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Sample records for opiate receptor heterogeneity

  1. Characterization of opiate receptor heterogeneity using affinity ligands and phospholipase A/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Reichman, M.

    1985-01-01

    The primary aim of the dissertation was to study the heterogeneity of opiate receptors by utilizing affinity ligands, and by modification of the receptor lipid-microenvironment with phospholipase A/sub 2/ (PLA/sub 2/). The affinity ligands, 14-bromacetamidomorphine (BAM) and 14-chloroacetylnaltrexone (CAN), selectively inactivated high affinity dihydromorphine binding sites in an apparently irreversible manner (the inhibition was resistant to extensive washes of treated neural membrane homogenates). The inhibitory effect of PLA/sub 2/ (10 ng/ml) on opiate receptor subtypes was determined using (/sup 3/H)-dihydromorphine (..mu..-type agonist), (/sup 3/H)-enkephalin (delta agonist) and (/sup 3/H)-naloxone (..mu.. antagonist). PLA/sub 2/ abolished the high affinity antagonist binding site, whereas it inhibited high and low affinity agonist binding sites similarly. The results suggest that high affinity antagonist binding sites are different from high affinity agonist binding sites. Indirect binding assays demonstrated that the selectivities of ..mu..- and delta receptors are not affected significantly by PLA/sub 2/ treatment.

  2. In vivo studies of opiate receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Duelfer, T.; Burns, H.D.; Ravert, H.T.; Langstroem, B.; Balasubramanian, V.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    To study opiate receptors noninvasively in vivo using positron emission tomography, techniques for preferentially labeling opiate receptors in vivo can be used. The rate at which receptor-bound ligand clears from the brain in vivo can be predicted by measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) at 37 degrees C in the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride and 100 microM guanyl-5'-imidodiphosphate, the drug distribution coefficient, and the molecular weight. A suitable ligand for labeling opiate receptors in vivo is diprenorphine, which binds to mu, delta, and kappa receptors with approximately equal affinity in vitro. However, in vivo diprenorphine may bind predominantly to one opiate receptor subtype, possibly the mu receptor. To predict the affinity for binding to the opiate receptor, a Hansch correlation was determined between the 50% inhibitory concentration for a series of halogen-substituted fentanyl analogs and electronic, lipophilic, and steric parameters. Radiochemical methods for the synthesis of carbon-11-labeled diprenorphine and lofentanil are presented.

  3. Imaging opiate receptors with positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Wong, D.F.; Links, J.M.; Burns, H.D.; Kuhar, M.J.; Snyder, S.H.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Opiate receptors exist in the mammalian brain and are thought to meditate the diverse pharmacological actions of the opiates, such as analgesia, euphoria, and sedation. The 4-carbomethoxyl derivatives of fentanyl, such as lofentanil and R31833 (4-carbomethoxyfentanyl) bind to the opiate receptor with high affinity. C-11 R31833 was synthesized by reacting C-11 methyl iodide with the appropriate carboxylate. Male ICR mice were injected intravenously with C-11 R31833 (5..mu..g/kg), killed 30 minutes later, and the brains rapidly dissected. The thalami, striata, and cerebral cortex are rich in opiate receptors, but the cerebellum contains a very low concentration of opiate receptors. The thalamus/cerebellum and striatum/cerebellum activity ratios, calculated per mg of wet tissue, were 4.1 and 5.2 respectively. Coinjection of 5mg/kg naloxone reduced the ratios to 1.1, which indicates that the preferential localization of C-11 R31833 in the thalami and striata is due to binding to opiate is due to binding to opiate receptors. A 22 kg anesthetized male baboon was imaged using the NeuroECAT after injection of 18.9 mCi of C-11 R13833 (0.50 ..mu..g/kg, specific activity 616 Ci/mmole at time of injection). From 15-70 minutes after injection preferential accumulation of activity could be seen in the thalami, caudate nuclei, and cerebral cortex and, conversely, low activity was demonstrated in the cerebellum. At one hour postinjection the maximum measured caudate/cerebellum activity ratio per pixel was 2.9. For the NeuroECAT the recovery coefficient for the baboon caudate is ca. 0.2-0.3, and therefore the actual caudate/cerebellum ratio is ca. 10-15.

  4. [Opiate receptors and endorphines (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Taube, H D

    1978-01-01

    Recent progress in narcotic drug research is briefly reviewed. Several investigators were able, independently to identify stereospecific opiate receptors, which mediate the specific effects of narcotic analgesics. A possible physiological importance of opiate receptors is likely, since endogenous ligands could be detected. Especially from brain and from pituitary glands of several species, quite a number of peptides with morphine-like effects could be isolated. The chemical structure of some of these endorphines could be analyzed. Endorphines are suggested to be involved in pain perception, electroanalgesia, acupuncture analgesia, psychiatric disorders, synthesis and release of pituitary hormones.

  5. Interaction of ethanol with opiate receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Yukhananov, R.Y.; Bujov, Y.V.; Maiskii, A.I.

    1986-04-01

    The authors study the action of ethanol on membrane-bound opiate receptors. Ethanol at 37/sup 0/C was shown to produce dose-dependent inhibition of binding of /sup 3/H-naloxone with opiate receptors. ID/sub 50/ under these conditions was 462 mM. Temperature-dependent inhibition of ligand-receptor binding suggests that ethanol does not compete for the stereospecific binding site of /sup 3/H-naloxone. Analysis of the inhibitory action of ethanol on /sup 3/H-naloxone binding in animals at different stages of experimental alcoholism revealed no differences between the control and experimental animals after 3.5 and 10 months of voluntary alcoholization.

  6. [Endorphines--the endogenous ligands of opiate receptors (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Teschemacher, H

    1978-01-01

    The demonstration of opiate receptors in the nervous tissue of vertebrates in 1973 was the starting point of an intensive search for the endogenous ligands of these receptors. During the following years, several of such "edogenous opiates", called "endorphines", were isolated from various tissues of the mammalian organism. These are peptides which are able to elicit the same effects as do opiates. Possibly, they play a role in the reaction of the organism to stress.

  7. Opiate receptor blockade on human granulosa cells inhibits VEGF release.

    PubMed

    Lunger, Fabian; Vehmas, Anni P; Fürnrohr, Barbara G; Sopper, Sieghart; Wildt, Ludwig; Seeber, Beata

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether the main opioid receptor (OPRM1) is present on human granulosa cells and if exogenous opiates and their antagonists can influence granulosa cell vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production via OPRM1. Granulosa cells were isolated from women undergoing oocyte retrieval for IVF. Complementary to the primary cells, experiments were conducted using COV434, a well-characterized human granulosa cell line. Identification and localization of opiate receptor subtypes was carried out using Western blot and flow cytometry. The effect of opiate antagonist on granulosa cell VEGF secretion was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. For the first time, the presence of OPRM1 on human granulosa cells is reported. Blocking of opiate signalling using naloxone, a specific OPRM1 antagonist, significantly reduced granulosa cell-derived VEGF levels in both COV434 and granulosa-luteal cells (P < 0.01). The presence of opiate receptors and opiate signalling in granulosa cells suggest a possible role in VEGF production. Targeting this signalling pathway could prove promising as a new clinical option in the prevention and treatment of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

  8. Photoaffinity labeling of opiate receptors using intrinsically photoactive /sup 3/H-opiates

    SciTech Connect

    Kooper, G.N.; Levinson, N.R.; Copeland, C.F.; Bowen, W.D.

    1988-03-01

    Opiate receptors in rat and cow brain membranes have been labeled irreversibly using the intrinsic photolability of 3H-opiates. Membranes were incubated with 3H-ligand and then irradiated with UV light of 254 nm. Nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of 10 microM unlabeled levallorphan. Irreversible binding was defined as binding which survived heat or acid denaturation of membranes. Specific incorporation of label into denatured samples was observed only when unbound or loosely bound 3H-ligand was washed free from the membranes prior to irradiation. There was a general correlation between photosensitivity of the 3H-ligand and its ability to photolabel receptors. Hence, photolabeling presumably results by covalent attachment of highly reactive species generated during photochemical decomposition of ligand. With 3H-etorphine, optimal irradiation time was 5 min. In addition to 3H-etorphine, receptors could be labeled irreversibly with 3H-oxymorphone, 3H-dihydromorphine, and 3H-ethylketocyclazocine. Of the specific binding present in irradiated, nondenatured samples, 45-60% remained attached to receptors upon denaturation. 3H-Ethylketocyclazocine exhibited an 86% yield of incorporation. Signal-to-noise levels of 50-80% could be achieved in denatured samples. Therefore, this method provides a means of covalently labeling opiate receptors in high yield and with high signal-to-noise ratios. The opioid peptides, 3H-D-Ala2,D-Leu5-enkephalin, 3H-D-Ser2,Leu5,Thr6-enkephalin, 3H-D-Ala2,Met5-enkephalin amide, and 3H-D-Ala2,N-MePhe4,Gly-ol5-enkephalin, as well as the benzomorphan, 3H-bremazocine, apparently lack the structural characteristics which allow photolabeling.

  9. A classification of opiate receptors that mediate antinociception in animals.

    PubMed Central

    Tyers, M. B.

    1980-01-01

    1 To investigate the opiate receptors that mediate antinociception, the activity profiles of opioid analgesic drugs have been determined against different nociceptive stimuli in the mouse and rat. 2 In tests that employ heat as the nociceptive stimulus, mu-opiate receptor agonists, such as morphine, pethidine and dextropropoxyphene, had steep and parallel dose-response curves and were capable of achieving maximum effects. In addition, the antinociceptive potency ratios of these drugs in heat tests were similar to those for analgesia in man. 3 The kappa-agonists, such as ethylketazocine, nalorphine, Mr2034 and pentazocine, were essentially inactive against heat nociception except at doses that caused sedation and motor incapacitation. 4 In the writhing and paw pressure tests both mu- and kappa-agonists produced steep and parallel dose-response curves. 5 It is concluded that both mu- and kappa-opiate receptors mediate antinociception in animals and that the interactions of analgesic drugs with these receptors may be classified in terms of their antinociceptive activities against qualitatively different nociceptive stimuli. PMID:6249436

  10. Opiate receptors and endorphins in the pathophysiology of hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Gurll, N J; Vargish, T; Reynolds, D G; Lechner, R B

    1981-03-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that endorphins released by stress act on opiate receptors to depress cardiovascular function during hemorrhagic shock. Anesthetized adult mongrel dogs were bled into a heparinized reservoir to achieve a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 45 mm Hg. The reservoir was adjusted to maintain MAP for 1 hour and then clamped for 1 hour, at the end of which time the shed blood was reinfused. While the reservoir was clamped we treated the animals with an intravenous bolus followed by 3-hour infusion of either 0.9% NaCl (as control) or the specific opiate receptor antagonist naloxone at three dose regimens (0.5, 1, or 2 mg/kg plus 0.5, 1, or 2 mg/kg . hr). Naloxone produced dose-dependent increases in MAP, cardiac output, stroke volume, and left ventricular contractility. Survival at 72 hours was related to the dose of naloxone used. None of six dogs treated at 0 mg/kg . hr survived, one of six survived at 0.5 mg/kg . hr, four of five at 1 mg/kg . hr, and five of five at 2 mg/kg . hr. Since naloxone has minimal effect on cardiovascular function in nonshocked dogs, these results implicate opiate receptors and perhaps endorphins in the cardiovascular pathophysiology of hemorrhagic shock.

  11. Pain and Opiate Receptors: Considerations for the Design of Positron Emission Tomography Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sadzot, B.; Frost, J. J.

    1990-01-01

    Opiate receptors in the brain are the target of endogenous opioids and of exogenous synthetic opiates. These receptors play a major role in the modulation of pain perception. Using the appropriate ligands, positron emission tomography now allows investigators to monitor neuroreceptors in vivo. We have used 11C-diprenorphine and the extremely potent mu opiate receptor agonist, 11C-carfentanil, to image the distribution of opiate receptors in the brain and to quantify their density, their affinity, and their occupancy. Several important aspects of the in vivo opiate receptor labeling with positron emission tomography in relation to the study of pain are considered in this paper. Monitoring receptor occupancy by opiate drugs as a function of pain relief has the potential to reveal better ways to treat pain. PMID:1964768

  12. Multiple opiate receptors in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Bhargava, H.N.

    1986-03-01

    The characteristics of ..mu.., delta and kappa -opiate receptors in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were determined using the receptor binding assays. The ligands used were /sup 3/H-naltrexone (..mu..), /sup 3/H-ethylketocyclazocine (EKC, kappa) and /sup 3/H-Tyr-D-Ser-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr (DSTLE, delta). Since EKC binds to ..mu.. and delta receptors in addition to kappa, the binding was done in the presence of 100 nM each of DAGO and DADLE to suppress ..mu.. and delta sites, respectively. All three ligands bound to brain membranes of WKY rats at a single high affinity site with the following B/sub max/ (fmol/mg protein) and K/sub d/ (nM) values: /sup 3/H-naltrexone (130.5; 0.43) /sup 3/H-EKC (19.8, 1.7) and /sup 3/H-DSTLE (139, 2.5). The binding of /sup 3/H-naltrexone and /sup 3/H-DSTLE in the brain of WKY and SH did not differ. A consistent increase (22%) in B/sub max/ of /sup 3/H-EKC was found in SHR compared to WKY rats. However, the K/sub d/ values did not differ. The increase in B/sub max/ was due to increases in hypothalamus and cortex. It is concluded that SH rats have higher density of kappa-opiate receptors, particularly in hypothalamus and cortex, compared to WKY rats, and that kappa-opiate receptors may be involved in the pathophysiology of hypertension.

  13. Study of gastrointestinal opiate receptors: the role of the mu receptor on gastric emptying: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Lamki, L.; Sullivan, S.

    1983-08-01

    Animal and in vitro experiments suggest that opiates exert their actions by interaction with possibly five different subtypes of opiate receptors, identified as mu, kappa, sigma, delta, and epsilon. As yet there is no conclusive evidence for their existence in man. Our experiments on morphine and the enkephalin analog DAMME have suggested at least two types of opiate receptors involved in gastric secretion. In this study we have used the very powerful and nonselective opiate agonist etorphine to stimulate as many of the different opiate receptors as possible. We have then attempted to block selectively the ..mu.. receptor by administering a small dose of naloxone. Etorphine delayed gastric emptying whereas naloxone alone had no effect. In combination, the inhibitory effect of etorphine on gastric emptying was incompletely prevented while the subjective effects of etorphoine were completely abolished. These results may indicate that ..mu.. receptors are important in the regulation of gastric emptying, but that other (non-..mu..) receptors are also involved. The radionuclide study of gastric emptying, as used here, is a potentially powerful tool in physiological research on the gastrointestinal tract.

  14. Endomorphins: novel endogenous mu-opiate receptor agonists in regions of high mu-opiate receptor density.

    PubMed

    Zadina, J E; Martin-Schild, S; Gerall, A A; Kastin, A J; Hackler, L; Ge, L J; Zhang, X

    1999-01-01

    Endomorphin-1 (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH2, EM-1) and endomorphin-2 (Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2, EM-2) are peptides recently isolated from brain that show the highest affinity and selectivity for the mu (morphine) opiate receptor of all the known endogenous opioids. The endomorphins have potent analgesic and gastrointestinal effects. At the cellular level, they activate G-proteins (35S-GTP gamma-S binding) and inhibit calcium currents. Support for their role as endogenous ligands for the mu-opiate receptor includes their localization by radioimmunoassay and immunocytochemistry in central nervous system regions of high mu receptor density. Intense EM-2 immunoreactivity is present in the terminal regions of primary afferent neurons in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and in the medulla near high densities of mu receptors. Chemical (capsaicin) and surgical (rhizotomy) disruption of nociceptive primary afferent neurons depletes the immunoreactivity, implicating the primary afferents as the source of EM-2. Thus, EM-2 is well-positioned to serve as an endogenous modulator of pain in its earliest stages of perception. In contrast to EM-2, which is more prevalent in the spinal cord and lower brainstem, EM-1 is more widely and densely distributed throughout the brain than EM-2. The distribution is consistent with a role for the peptides in the modulation of diverse functions, including autonomic, neuroendocrine, and reward functions as well as modulation of responses to pain and stress.

  15. Alteration of dopamine receptor sensitivity by opiates and the subsequent effect of this alteration on opiate tolerance and dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether there is an alteration of dopamine receptor sensitivity following opiate administration, and whether this alteration has any influence on the development of opiate tolerance and dependence. Behavioral hypersensitivity to direct-acting dopamine agonists was observed in mice following acute or chronic morphine administration. Acute levorphanol administration also resulted in potentiation of dopamine agonist-induced behaviors. An increase in density of dopamine receptors, as measured by (/sup 3/H)butyrophenone binding accompanied the development of behavioral hypersensitivity. This increase was localized to the striatum, an area important in the mediation of dopamine-agonist induced behaviors. Naloxone or LiCl coadministered with the opiates prevented the development of hypersensitivity and the increase in density of dopamine receptors. Coadministration of lithium enhanced the development of acute and chronic tolerance. Lithium enhanced the development of dependence as determined by naloxone-induced hypothermia in chronically morphine-treated mice. Apomorphine enhanced naloxone-induced withdrawal in acutely dependent mice. This enhancement was blocked by coadministration of lithium with the opiates. These results suggest that dopamine receptor supersensitivity influences the degree of tolerance and dependence.

  16. Studies on rat intestinal epithelial cell receptors for serotonin and opiates.

    PubMed Central

    Gaginella, T S; Rimele, T J; Wietecha, M

    1983-01-01

    We have employed the receptor-ligand binding technique in an attempt to determine if specific binding sites (receptors) for serotonin and opiates are present on rat intestinal epithelial cell membranes. A wide variety of ligands for serotonin and opiate receptors bound to specific receptor sites in rat brain. However, the same ligands failed to bind in a specific (receptor-related) manner to isolated membranes of rat ileal and colonic cells. Additional washing of the tissue pellet (to remove soluble peptidases), pretreatment with p-chlorophenylalanine (to deplete endogenous serotonin), alteration of sodium concentration (to antagonize the effects of putative endogenous inhibitors of opiate ligand binding), changes in incubation time, temperature, tissue protein and tritiated ligand concentration failed to yield meaningful results with the enterocyte membranes. We conclude that, as assessed under the present conditions, serotonergic and opiate receptors are not present or are not accessible on rat intestinal epithelial cell membranes. PMID:6308215

  17. Opiates modulate thermosensation by internalizing cold receptor TRPM8.

    PubMed

    Shapovalov, George; Gkika, Dimitra; Devilliers, Maily; Kondratskyi, Artem; Gordienko, Dmitri; Busserolles, Jerome; Bokhobza, Alexandre; Eschalier, Alain; Skryma, Roman; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2013-08-15

    Stimulation of μ-opioid receptors (OPRMs) brings powerful pain relief, but it also leads to the development of tolerance and addiction. Ensuing withdrawal in abstinent patients manifests itself with severe symptoms, including cold hyperalgesia, often preventing addicted patients from successfully completing the rehabilitation. Unsurprisingly, OPRMs have been a central point of many studies. Nonetheless, a satisfactory understanding of the pathways leading to distorted sensory responses during opiate administration and abstinence is far from complete. Here, we present a mechanism that leads to modulation by OPRMs of one of the sensory responses, thermosensation. Activation of OPRM1 leads to internalization of a cold-sensor TRPM8, which can be reversed by a follow-up treatment with the inverse OPRM agonist naloxone. Knockout of TRPM8 protein leads to a decrease in morphine-induced cold analgesia. The proposed pathway represents a universal mechanism that is probably shared by regulatory pathways modulating general pain sensation in response to opioid treatment.

  18. [Opiate receptors and endorphins at the central nervous system level].

    PubMed

    Simon, E J

    1978-01-01

    Four years ago, sterospecific sites for the bending of opiates were discovered within the brain of animals and the human being. All of the properties of these sites are in conformity with the proposition that they are pharmacological receptors which have long been postulated for these drugs. The binding of morphine or of one of its derivatives to these sites should result in chemical or physical reactions leading to well known pharmacological responses. These reactions following the binding of drugs to the receptors are not yet known, but there is some evidence that cyclical nucleotides play a role. The affinity of a whole series of morphine derivatives, agonists and atagonists, is well correlated with their pharmacological effectiveness. In the presence of sodium salts, antagonists become more strongly bound and agonists less strongly than in the absence of sodium. The evidence is presented. This is explained by an equilibrium between two formations of the receptor: one characteristic of the absence of sodium and one of its presence. Receptors are found in the nervous system of all vertebrates and their distribution has been studied in the human brain. The regions with the highest concentration of receptors are those of the limbic system. A high level exists also in the "substantia gelatinosa" of the spinal cord, which is involved in the passage of painful messages. Study of the function of morphine receptors has led to the isolation, in animal brain, of a number of peptides with morphine properties named endorphines. The first two endorphines isolated were pentapeptides named encephalins. The properties of endorphines from the subject of several lecture in this course.

  19. Ontogeny of opiate receptors in the rat medial preoptic area: Critical periods in regional development.

    PubMed

    Hammkr, R P

    1985-01-01

    Opiate receptor labeling was examined throughout the early postnatal period using autoradiography to localize and quantify [(3)H]naloxone binding to μ-type opiate receptors in the medial preoptic area (MPOA). This region begins to exhibit sexual dimorphism of volume and dendritic growth shortly after birth. A distinct concentration of opiate receptor labeling appears on postnatal day 3 in females: this labeling is directly associated with the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA). SDN-POA labeling becomes denser through postnatal day 10 in females and the densely labeled area increases in size to encompass and surround the SDN-POA. These changes in opiate receptor labeling occur only in females, since males show relatively uniform labeling across the region throughout the early postnatal period. The critical time of formation of dense MPOA opiate receptor labeling may be related to endogenous MPOA opioid function and to the critical period of dendritic growth of SDN-POA neurons. The timing of these critical periods and their focus in the SDN-POA are coincident. The possible role of MPOA opiate receptors in modulating growth of MPOA neurons is discussed.

  20. Functional changes after prenatal opiate exposure related to opiate receptors' regulated alterations in cholinergic innervation.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Joseph; Huleihel, Rabab; Izrael, Michal; Metsuyanim, Sally; Shahak, Halit; Vatury, Ori; Yaniv, Shiri P

    2003-09-01

    Opioid drugs act primarily on the opiate receptors; they also exert their effect on other innervations resulting in non-opioidergic behavioural deficits. Similarly, opioid neurobehavioural teratogenicity is attested in numerous behaviours and neural processes which hinder the research on the mechanisms involved. Therefore, in order to be able to ascertain the mechanism we have established an animal (mouse) model for the teratogenicity induced by opioid abuse, which focused on behaviours related to specific brain area and innervation. Diacetylmorphine (heroin) and not morphine was applied because heroin exerts a unique action, distinguished from that of morphine. Pregnant mice were exposed to heroin (10 mg/kg per day) and the offspring were tested for behavioural deficits and biochemical alterations related to the septohippocampal cholinergic innervation. Some studies employing the chick embryo were concomitantly added as a control for the confounding indirect variables. Prenatal exposure to heroin in mice induced global hyperactivation both pre- and post-synaptic along the septohippocampal cholinergic innervation, including basal protein kinase C (PKC) activity accompanied by a desensitization of PKC activity in response to cholinergic agonist. Functionally, the heroin-exposed offspring displayed deficits in hippocampus-related behaviours, suggesting deficits in the net output of the septohippocampal cholinergic innervation. Grafting of cholinergic cells to the impaired hippocampus reversed both pre- and post-synaptic hyperactivity, resensitized PKC activity, and restored the associated behaviours to normality. Consistently, correlation studies point to the relative importance of PKC to the behavioural deficits. The chick model, which dealt with imprinting related to a different brain region, confirmed that the effect of heroin is direct. Taken together with studies by others on the effect of prenatal exposure to opioids on the opioidergic innervation and with what

  1. Opiate receptors in rat pituitary are confined to the neural lobe and are exclusively kappa.

    PubMed

    Herkenham, M; Rice, K C; Jacobson, A E; Rothman, R B

    1986-09-24

    The distribution and density of opiate receptor subtypes in rat pituitary were examined by quantitative autoradiography of tritiated ligand-binding to slide-mounted sections under conditions optimized to label mu, delta, or kappa opiate receptors. Mu and delta receptor-binding was virtually undetectable in the pituitary. Kappa receptor-binding was confined to the neural lobe where it was densest in the external rim. Autoradiographic silver grains in emulsion-coated, Nissl-stained sections were preferentially located between cells, suggesting kappa receptor localization on nerve terminals and/or processes of pituicytes.

  2. Cerebrocortical and medullary blood flow changes after general opiate receptor blockade during hemorrhagic shock in cats.

    PubMed

    Komjáti, K; Sandor, P; Sandor, N; Szirmai, L; H-Velkei, M; Kovach, A G

    1997-04-01

    The effect of centrally induced opiate receptor blockade on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was studied in anesthetized, ventilated cats during the course of hemorrhagic shock. The blood flow of the medulla and the parietal cortex was measured with the H2-gas clearance technique. Hemorrhagic shock was produced by lowering the systemic mean arterial pressure to 60 mmHg for 120 min by blood withdrawal. Central opiate receptor blockade was induced by 10 micrograms/kg intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) injected naloxone at the 60th min of the bleeding period. Cortical blood flow showed no improvement after i.c.v. naloxone administration. Medullary blood flow, however, increased significantly and approached the pre-bleeding control flow values following central opiate receptor blockade. The results indicate involvement of endogenous opioid mechanisms in the regulation of rCBF during hemorrhage and may provide an explanation for the previously described beneficial effects of naloxone in hemorrhagic shock.

  3. A differential role for the adenosine A2A receptor in opiate reinforcement vs opiate-seeking behavior.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robyn Mary; Short, Jennifer Lynn; Cowen, Michael Scott; Ledent, Catherine; Lawrence, Andrew John

    2009-03-01

    The adenosine A(2A) receptor is specifically enriched in the medium spiny neurons that make up the 'indirect' output pathway from the ventral striatum, a structure known to have a crucial, integrative role in processes such as reward, motivation, and drug-seeking behavior. In the present study we investigated the impact of adenosine A(2A) receptor deletion on behavioral responses to morphine in a number of reward-related paradigms. The acute, rewarding effects of morphine were evaluated using the conditioned place preference paradigm. Operant self-administration of morphine on both fixed and progressive ratio schedules as well as cue-induced drug-seeking was assessed. In addition, the acute locomotor response to morphine as well as sensitization to morphine was evaluated. Decreased morphine self-administration and breakpoint in A(2A) knockout mice was observed. These data support a decrease in motivation to consume the drug, perhaps reflecting diminished rewarding effects of morphine in A(2A) knockout mice. In support of this finding, a place preference to morphine was not observed in A(2A) knockout mice but was present in wild-type mice. In contrast, robust cue-induced morphine-seeking behavior was exhibited by both A(2A) knockout and wild-type mice after a period of withdrawal. The acute locomotor response to morphine in the A(2A) knockout was similar to wild-type mice, yet A(2A) knockout mice did not display tolerance to chronic morphine under the present paradigm. Both genotypes display locomotor sensitization to morphine, implying a lack of a role for the A(2A) receptor in the drug-induced plasticity necessary for the development or expression of sensitization. Collectively, these data suggest a differential role for adenosine A(2A) receptors in opiate reinforcement compared to opiate-seeking.

  4. Dopamine D2 receptor availability in opiate addicts at baseline and during naloxone precipitated withdrawal

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.J.; Volkow, N.D.; Logan, J. ||

    1996-05-01

    To determine if changes in dopamine activity contribute to the clinical presentation of opiate withdrawal we assessed dopamine (DA) D2 receptor availability in opiate-dependent subjects at baseline and during naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. DA D2 receptor availability was evaluated in eleven male heroine and methadone users using positron emission tomography (PET) and [11-C]raclopride and compared to eleven age matched male control subjects. Nine of the opiate-dependent subjects and two of the control were tested twice after placebo and naloxone (0.02 mg/kg) iv injection 7-10 min. prior to [11-C]raclopride. DA D2 receptor availability was measured using the ratio of the distribution volume in the region of interest (caudate, putamen and ventral striatum) to that in the cerebellum which is a function of B{sub max}/K{sub d}. DA D2 receptor availability in putamen was significantly lower in opiate-dependent subjects (3.44 {plus_minus} 0.4) than that in controls (3.97 {plus_minus} 0.45, p {ge} 0.009). Naloxone induced a short lasting withdrawal in all of the opiate-dependent subjects (79 {plus_minus} 17% of maximum withdrawal), but not in controls, with significant increase in pulse (p {le} 0.006), blood pressure (p {le} 0.0001), lacrimation (p {le} 0.01), muscle twitches (p {le} 0.01), annoyance (p {le} 0.005), anxiety (p {le} 0.0006), restlessness (p {le} 0.0005) and unhappiness (p {le} 0.001). DA D2 receptor availability in basal ganglia after naloxone administration was not different from that of baseline. These results document abnormalities in DA D2 receptors in opiate-dependent subjects. However, DA D2 availability did not change with naloxone-precipitated withdrawal.

  5. Effect of thyrotrophin releasing hormone on opiate receptors of the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Balashov, A.M.; Shchurin, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    It has recently been shown that the hypothalamic thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) has the properties of a morphine antagonist, blocking its inhibitory action on respiration and, to a lesser degree, its analgesic action. This suggests that the antagonistic effects of TRH are mediated through its interaction with opiate receptors. The aim of this paper is to study this hypothesis experimentally. Tritium-labelled enkephalins in conjunction with scintillation spectroscopy were used to assess the receptor binding behavior. The results indicate the existence of interconnections between the opiate systems and TRH. Although it is too early to reach definite conclusions on the mechanisms of this mutual influence and its physiological significance it can be tentatively suggested that TRH abolishes the pharmacological effects of morphine by modulating the functional state of opiate reception.

  6. Conformationally restricted analogs of somatostatin with high mu-opiate receptor specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Pelton, J T; Gulya, K; Hruby, V J; Duckles, S P; Yamamura, H I

    1985-01-01

    A series of cyclic, conformationally restricted analogs of somatostatin have been prepared and tested for their ability to inhibit the binding of [3H]naloxone and [D-Ala2, D-Leu5] [3H]enkephalin to rat brain membranes. The most potent analog, D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Lys-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 where Pen is penicillamine in [D-Phe5, Cys6, Tyr7, D-Trp8, Pen11]somatostatin-(5-12)-octapeptide amide, exhibited high affinity for mu-opiate receptors (IC50 value of [3H]naloxone = 3.5 nM), being 7800 times more potent than somatostatin. The cyclic octapeptide also displayed high mu-opiate receptor selectivity with an IC50 [( D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin)/IC50 (naloxone) ratio of 271. The high affinity and selectivity of the somatostatin analog for mu-opiate receptors may be of use in examining the physiological role(s) of the mu-opiate receptor. PMID:2857488

  7. The effect of hyperthyroidism on opiate receptor binding and pain sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, E.A. ); Bonnet, K.A.; Friedhoff, A.J. )

    1990-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of thyroid hormone on opiate receptor ligand-binding and pain sensitivity. Specific opiate receptor-binding was performed on brain homogenates of Swiss-Webster mice. There was a significant increase in {sup 3}H-naloxone-binding in thyroxine-fed subjects (hyperthyroid). Scatchard analysis revealed that the number of opiate receptors was increased in hyperthyroid mice (Bmax = 0.238 nM for hyperthyroid samples vs. 0.174 nM for controls). Binding affinity was unaffected (Kd = 1.54 nM for hyperthyroid and 1.58 nM for control samples). When mice were subjected to hotplate stimulation, the hyperthyroid mice were noted to be more sensitive as judged by pain aversion response latencies which were half that of control animals. After morphine administration, the hyperthyroid animals demonstrated a shorter duration of analgesia. These findings demonstrate that thyroxine increases opiate receptor number and native pain sensitivity but decreases the duration of analgesia from morphine.

  8. Angiotensin II receptor heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Herblin, W.F.; Chiu, A.T.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L. )

    1991-04-01

    The possibility of receptor heterogeneity in the angiotensin II (AII) system has been suggested previously, based on differences in Kd values or sensitivity to thiol reagents. One of the authors earliest indications was the frequent observation of incomplete inhibition of the binding of AII to adrenal cortical membranes. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated that all of the labeling of the rat adrenal was blocked by unlabeled AII or saralasin, but not by DuP 753. The predominant receptor in the rat adrenal cortex (80%) is sensitive to dithiothreitol (DTT) and DuP 753, and is designated AII-1. The residual sites in the adrenal cortex and almost all of the sites in the rat adrenal medulla are insensitive to both DTT and DuP 753, but were blocked by EXP655. These sites have been confirmed by ligand binding studies and are designated AII-2. The rabbit adrenal cortex is unique in yielding a nonuniform distribution of AII-2 sites around the outer layer of glomerulosa cells. In the rabbit kidney, the sites on the glomeruli are AII-1, but the sites on the kidney capsule are AII-2. Angiotensin III appears to have a higher affinity for AII-2 sites since it inhibits the binding to the rabbit kidney capsule but not the glomeruli. Elucidation of the distribution and function of these diverse sites should permit the development of more selective and specific therapeutic strategies.

  9. The corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-2 mediates the motivational effect of opiate withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Rouibi, Khalil; Contarino, Angelo

    2013-10-01

    Altered motivational processes are key features of drug dependence and withdrawal, yet their neural mechanisms remain largely unknown. The present study shows that genetic disruption of the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-2 (CRF₂-/-) does not impair motivation for palatable food in drug-naïve mice. However, CRF₂ receptor-deficiency effectively reduces the increase in palatable food-driven motivation induced by opiate withdrawal. Indeed, both in male and female wild-type mice, withdrawal from escalating morphine doses (20-100 mg/kg) induces a dramatic and relatively long-lasting (6 days) increase in palatable food-driven operant behavior under a progressive ratio (PR) schedule of reinforcement. In contrast, either male or female morphine-withdrawn CRF₂-/- mice show smaller and shorter (2 days) increases in motivation than wild-type mice. Nevertheless, CRF₂ receptor-deficiency does not impair the ability to discriminate reinforced behavior prior to, during the partial opiate withdrawal periods occurring between morphine injections and following drug discontinuation, indicating preserved cognitive function. Moreover, CRF₂ receptor-deficiency does not affect the ambulatory or body weight effects of intermittent morphine injections and withdrawal. These results provide initial evidence of a gender-independent and specific role for the CRF₂ receptor in the motivational effects of opiate withdrawal.

  10. Exposure to Opiates in Female Adolescents Alters Mu Opiate Receptor Expression and Increases the Rewarding Effects of Morphine in Future Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Vassoler, Fair M.; Wright, Siobhan J.; Byrnes, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Prescription opiate use and abuse has increased dramatically over the past two decades, including increased use in adolescent populations. Recently, it has been proposed that use during this critical period may affect future offspring even when use is discontinued prior to conception. Here, we utilize a rodent model to examine the effects of adolescent morphine exposure on the reward functioning of the offspring. Female Sprague Dawley rats were administered morphine for 10 days during early adolescence (post-natal day 30–39) using an escalating dosing regimen. Animals then remained drug free until adulthood at which point they were mated with naïve males. Adult offspring (F1 animals) were tested for their response to morphine-induced (0, 1, 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg, s.c.) conditioned place preference (CPP) and context-independent morphine-induced sensitization. Naïve littermates were used to examine mu opiate receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area. Results indicate that F1 females whose mothers were exposed to morphine during adolescence (Mor-F1) demonstrate significantly enhanced CPP to the lowest doses of morphine compared with Sal-F1 females. There were no differences in context-independent sensitization between maternal treatment groups. Protein expression analysis showed significantly increased levels of accumbal mu opiate receptor in Mor-F1 offspring and decreased levels in the VTA. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a shift in the dose response curve with regard to the rewarding effects of morphine in Mor-F1 females which may in part be due to altered mu opiate receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens and VTA. PMID:26700246

  11. Exposure to opiates in female adolescents alters mu opiate receptor expression and increases the rewarding effects of morphine in future offspring.

    PubMed

    Vassoler, Fair M; Wright, Siobhan J; Byrnes, Elizabeth M

    2016-04-01

    Prescription opiate use and abuse has increased dramatically over the past two decades, including increased use in adolescent populations. Recently, it has been proposed that use during this critical period may affect future offspring even when use is discontinued prior to conception. Here, we utilize a rodent model to examine the effects of adolescent morphine exposure on the reward functioning of the offspring. Female Sprague Dawley rats were administered morphine for 10 days during early adolescence (post-natal day 30-39) using an escalating dosing regimen. Animals then remained drug free until adulthood at which point they were mated with naïve males. Adult offspring (F1 animals) were tested for their response to morphine-induced (0, 1, 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg, s.c.) conditioned place preference (CPP) and context-independent morphine-induced sensitization. Naïve littermates were used to examine mu opiate receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area. Results indicate that F1 females whose mothers were exposed to morphine during adolescence (Mor-F1) demonstrate significantly enhanced CPP to the lowest doses of morphine compared with Sal-F1 females. There were no differences in context-independent sensitization between maternal treatment groups. Protein expression analysis showed significantly increased levels of accumbal mu opiate receptor in Mor-F1 offspring and decreased levels in the VTA. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a shift in the dose response curve with regard to the rewarding effects of morphine in Mor-F1 females which may in part be due to altered mu opiate receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens and VTA.

  12. Modification of the development of acute opiate tolerance by increased dopamine receptor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Martin, J R; Takemori, A E

    1987-04-01

    Earlier studies have suggested that the acute administration of an opiate can result in the development of supersensitive dopamine receptors. The present study was undertaken to determine whether the supersensitive dopamine receptors can modify the development of opiate tolerance and dependence. Administration of morphine (100 mg/kg s.c.) 6 or 24 hr before apomorphine (i.p.) potentiated apomorphine-induced climbing behavior in mice. Administration of levorphanol (12 mg/kg s.c.) 3 or 6 hr, but not 24 hr, before apomorphine also potentiated apomorphine-induced climbing behavior. Coadministration of 5 mEq/kg of LiCl with morphine or levorphanol attenuated the increased sensitivity developed to apomorphine after either opiate. Acute tolerance and dependence was induced by administration of 100 mg/kg of morphine or 12 mg/kg of levorphanol. Lithium enhanced the development of acute tolerance when coadministered with morphine 3, 6 or 24 hr before test doses of morphine, or with levorphanol 3 hr before test doses of levorphanol. Administration of apomorphine 5 min before naloxone significantly decreased the naloxone ED50 for inducing withdrawal jumping in mice that had been pretreated with morphine or levorphanol. Although coadministration of lithium with morphine or levorphanol had no significant effect on naloxone-induced withdrawal jumping, it attenuated the ability of apomorphine to decrease naloxone ED50. Morphine (100 mg/kg s.c.) increased the number of whole brain [3H]spiroperidol binding sites 3 and 6 hr after administration of morphine. This increase was no longer present 24 hr after morphine administration. Levorphanol (12 mg/kg s.c.) also increased the number of binding sites 3 hr after administration. Coadministration of lithium with morphine attenuated the increase in [3H]spiroperidol binding sites.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Photoaffinity labeling of opiate receptors with /sup 3/H-etorphine: possible species differences in glycosylation

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, W.D.; Kooper, G.

    1986-01-01

    Opiate receptors from whole rat brain (minus cerebellum) and cow striatum were labeled irreversibly using the intrinsic photolability of /sup 3/H-etorphine. After incubation with 2 nM /sup 3/H-etorphine and centrifugal washing, membranes were irradiated with light of 254 nm. Non-specific binding was determined by carrying out incubations in presence and absence of 10 microM levallorphan. Specific binding in photolabeled membranes was 75-80%, with a photo-incorporation yield of approximately 50%. Photolabeled membranes were extracted with CHAPS/Lubrol and unbound /sup 3/H-etorphine was removed by dialysis and passage over Sephadex G-25. Solubilized proteins were then subjected to chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin, and retained proteins were eluted with N-acetyl D-glucosamine (NAG). Protein profiles from rat brain and cow striatum were identical, with 89% of the total protein flowing through unretained and 11% eluted by NAG. However, the profile of radioactivity was markedly different in the two species. With rat, the specific activity (cpm/A280) was the same for flow-through and NAG-eluate. With cow, the specific activity of the NAG-eluate was 17 times greater than the flow-through. These results indicate that cow striatum and rat whole brain contain populations of opiate receptors which are glycosylated differently.

  14. 1,3-Di(2-(5-/sup 3/H)tolyl)guanidine: a selective ligand that labels sigma-type receptors for psychotomimetic opiates and antipsychotic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, E.; Sonders, M.; Quarum, M.; McLean, S.; Pou, S.; Keana, J.F.

    1986-11-01

    Brain sigma-type receptors are thought to mediate hallucinogenic effects of certain benzomorphan opiates in humans. The biochemical characterization of sigma receptors has been difficult because of the lack of potent and selective ligands. We report here the synthesis and characterization of a tritiated, symmetrically substituted guanidine derivative, 1,3-di(2-(5-/sup 3/H)tolyl)guanidine ((/sup 3/H)Tol2Gdn), that binds with high affinity to a single population of binding sites in guinea pig brain membrane preparations. The (/sup 3/H)Tol2Gdn binding site displays stereoselectivity for dextrorotatory optical isomers of benzomorphan opiates known to have sigma-type behavioral effects. Furthermore, the (/sup 3/H)Tol2Gdn binding site has a high affinity for haloperidol and for phenothiazine antipsychotics, which have antihallucinatory properties in humans. The drug-selectivity profile of (/sup 3/H)Tol2Gdn binding closely correlates with the drug-selectivity profile of tritiated (+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP) binding to guinea pig brain membrane receptors. (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP has been proposed to be a selective sigma-receptor ligand (Largent, B. L., Gundlach, A. L. and Snyder, S. H. (1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82, 4983-4987). Receptor autoradiography using (/sup 3/H)Tol2Gdn on slide-mounted rat and guinea pig brain sections reveals a heterogeneous distribution pattern of enriched binding in limbic and sensorimotor structures of the brain. These results indicate that (/sup 3/H)Tol2Gdn is a selective ligand for the sigma-site. Availability of this sigma-receptor probe should greatly facilitate the physiological, biochemical, and pharmacological characterization of sigma receptors in brain.

  15. 1,3-Di(2-[5-3H]tolyl)guanidine: a selective ligand that labels sigma-type receptors for psychotomimetic opiates and antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, E; Sonders, M; Quarum, M; McLean, S; Pou, S; Keana, J F

    1986-01-01

    Brain sigma-type receptors are thought to mediate hallucinogenic effects of certain benzomorphan opiates in humans. The biochemical characterization of sigma receptors has been difficult because of the lack of potent and selective ligands. We report here the synthesis and characterization of a tritiated, symmetrically substituted guanidine derivative, 1,3-di(2-[5-3H]tolyl)guanidine ([3H]Tol2Gdn), that binds with high affinity to a single population of binding sites in guinea pig brain membrane preparations. The [3H]Tol2Gdn binding site displays stereoselectivity for dextrorotatory optical isomers of benzomorphan opiates known to have sigma-type behavioral effects. Furthermore, the [3H]Tol2Gdn binding site has a high affinity for haloperidol and for phenothiazine antipsychotics, which have antihallucinatory properties in humans. The drug-selectivity profile of [3H]Tol2Gdn binding closely correlates with the drug-selectivity profile of tritiated (+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine [+)-[3H]3-PPP) binding to guinea pig brain membrane receptors. (+)-[3H]3-PPP has been proposed to be a selective sigma-receptor ligand [Largent, B. L., Gundlach, A. L. & Snyder, S. H. (1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82, 4983-4987]. Receptor autoradiography using [3H]Tol2Gdn on slide-mounted rat and guinea pig brain sections reveals a heterogeneous distribution pattern of enriched binding in limbic and sensorimotor structures of the brain. These results indicate that [3H]Tol2Gdn is a selective ligand for the sigma-site. Availability of this sigma-receptor probe should greatly facilitate the physiological, biochemical, and pharmacological characterization of sigma receptors in brain. Images PMID:2877462

  16. Dopamine D1 Receptors Are Not Critical for Opiate Reward but Can Mediate Opiate Memory Retrieval in a State-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Perez, Hector; George, Susan R.; van der Kooy, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Although D1 receptor knockout mice demonstrate normal morphine place preferences, antagonism of basolateral amygdala (BLA) D1 receptors only during drug-naive rat conditioning has been reported to inhibit the expression of a morphine place preference. One possible explanation for this result is state-dependent learning. That is, the omission of the intra-BLA infusion cue during testing — which acts as a potent discriminative stimulus — may have prevented the recall of a morphine-environment association and therefore, the consequent expression of a morphine place preference. To examine this possibility, we tested whether intra-BLA infusion of the D1-receptor antagonist SCH23390 during both training and testing might reveal a morphine place preference. Our results suggest that in previously drug-naive animals, D1 receptor antagonism during testing restores the opiate conditioned place preference that is normally absent when D1 receptors are blocked only during training, suggesting that BLA D1 receptors can mediate state-dependent memory retrieval. PMID:23538064

  17. Presence in neuroblastoma cells of a mu 3 receptor with selectivity for opiate alkaloids but without affinity for opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Cruciani, R A; Dvorkin, B; Klinger, H P; Makman, M H

    1994-12-26

    Evidence is presented for the occurrence of a unique opiate alkaloid-selective, opioid peptide-insensitive binding site in N18TG2 mouse neuroblastoma cells and in late passage hybrid F-11 cells, derived from N18TG2 neuroblastoma cells and rat dorsal root ganglion cells. Those cells lacked classical opioid peptide-sensitive receptor subtypes, but contained [3H]morphine and [3H]diprenorphine binding sites with affinity for certain opiate alkaloids but not for any endogenously occurring opioid peptide or peptide analog tested, including D-ala2-D-leu5-enkephalin (DADLE), D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol (DAGO) and dynorphin A(1-17). The binding site differed from hitherto described mu, delta and kappa neuronal opioid receptors not only on the basis of peptide insensitivity, but also on the basis of selectivity and affinities of alkaloids. Saturation experiments with [3H]morphine indicated the presence of a single site with Kd = 49 nM and Bmax = 1510 fmol/mg protein. This novel binding site was not present in F-11 hybrid cells at early passage. Instead the hybrid cells contained conventional opioid receptors (predominantly delta and also mu) capable of binding DADLE and other peptides as well as opiate alkaloids. With additional passage (cell divisions) of the hybrid cells, during which a limited change occurred in mouse chromosome number, the peptide-insensitive binding appeared and the opioid peptide-binding (delta and mu) receptors were lost reciprocally. Thus, expression of the peptide-insensitive binding normally may be repressed when conventional opioid receptors are expressed. The peptide-insensitive opiate binding site described here appears to correspond to the mu 3 receptor subtype, recently identified pharmacologically and functionally in several cell types of the immune system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Psychotomimetic opiate receptors labeled and visualized with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1984-08-01

    3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine (3-PPP) has been proposed as a selective dopamine autoreceptor agonist in the central nervous system. This report describes the pharmacology and localization of specific high-affinity binding sites for (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP in brain. The drug specificity of (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP binding is identical to that of sigma receptors, which may mediate psychotomimetic effects of some opiates. Haloperidol and the opioid derivatives, pentazocine, cyclazocine, and SKF 10,047 are potent inhibitors of (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP binding. Stereoselectivity is exhibited for the (+) isomers of cyclazocine and SKF 10.047 at the sigma site, opposite to the stereoselectivity seen at ..mu.., sigma, and k opiate receptors. (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP does not label dopamine receptors, as potent dopamine agonists and antagonists are weak inhibitors of binding and the localization of specific (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP binding sites does not parallel that of dopamine neurons. Discrete localizations of (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP binding sites in many brain areas including limbic, midbrain, brainstem, and cerebellar regions may explain psychotomimetic actions of opiates and behavior effects of 3-PPP. 41 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  19. Persistence of evolutionary memory: primordial six-transmembrane helical domain mu opiate receptors selectively linked to endogenous morphine signaling.

    PubMed

    Kream, Richard M; Sheehan, Melinda; Cadet, Patrick; Mantione, Kirk J; Zhu, Wei; Casares, Federico; Stefano, George B

    2007-12-01

    Biochemical, molecular and pharmacological evidence for two unique six-transmembrane helical (TMH) domain opiate receptors expressed from the micro opioid receptor (MOR) gene have been shown. Designated micro3 and micro4 receptors, both protein species are Class A rhodopsin-like members of the superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors but are selectively tailored to mediate the cellular regulatory effects of endogenous morphine and related morphinan alkaloids via stimulation of nitric oxide (NO) production and release. Both micro3 and micro4 receptors lack an amino acid sequence of approximately 90 amino acids that constitute the extracellular N-terminal and TMH1 domains and part of the first intracellular loop of the micro1 receptor, but retain the empirically defined ligand binding pocket distributed across conserved TMH2, TMH3, and TMH7 domains of the micro1 sequence. Additionally, the receptor proteins are terminated by unique intracellular C-terminal amino acid sequences that serve as putative coupling or docking domains required for constitutive NO synthase activation. Because the recognition profile of micro3 and micro4 receptors is restricted to rigid benzylisoquinoline alkaloids typified by morphine and its extended family of chemical congeners, it is hypothesized that conformational stabilization provided by interaction of extended extracellular N-terminal protein domains and the extracellular loops is required for binding of endogenous opioid peptides as well as synthetic flexible opiate alkaloids.

  20. Change in the properties of the opiate receptors of the brain under conditions of habituation of rats to morphine

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitsev, S.V.; Sergeeva, M.G.; Chichenkov, O.N.; Petrov, V.E.; Varfolomeev, S.D.

    1987-02-20

    The influence of prolonged administration of morphine on the properties of the opiate receptors of the rat brain was investigated. For this purpose they conducted an analysis of the isotherms of binding of labeled ..mu..-, sigma-, and chi-ligands: morphine, D-Ala/sup 2/, D-Leu/sup 5/-enkephalin, and ethylketocyclazocin, with membrane preparations of the brains of rats tolerant to morphine, as well as the control animals. For a quantitative determination of the dissociation constants of the ligand-receptor complexes (K) and the concentration of the reagents ((Q)), they used differential method and the method of simulation modeling. It was shown that the values of K and (Q) for individual animals are subjected to substantial dispersion, whereas the ratios (Q)/K undergo minor individual fluctuations, both in the control group and in the group of rats tolerant to morphine. This permits the ratio (Q)/K to be singled out as one of the main parameters for comparing the properties of opiate receptors of various groups of animals. Using this criterion, as well as the method of simulated modeling, it was shown that the development of tolerance is accompanied by a change in the properties of the delta-receptors (the ratio (Q)/K decreases by a factor of more than two). In contrast to the delta-receptors, no significant influence of the tolerance on the properties of the ..mu..- and chi-receptors, as well as the ultrahigh-affinity ligand binding sites, was detected.

  1. Mu opioid receptors on primary afferent nav1.8 neurons contribute to opiate-induced analgesia: insight from conditional knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Weibel, Raphaël; Reiss, David; Karchewski, Laurie; Gardon, Olivier; Matifas, Audrey; Filliol, Dominique; Becker, Jérôme A J; Wood, John N; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Gaveriaux-Ruff, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Opiates are powerful drugs to treat severe pain, and act via mu opioid receptors distributed throughout the nervous system. Their clinical use is hampered by centrally-mediated adverse effects, including nausea or respiratory depression. Here we used a genetic approach to investigate the potential of peripheral mu opioid receptors as targets for pain treatment. We generated conditional knockout (cKO) mice in which mu opioid receptors are deleted specifically in primary afferent Nav1.8-positive neurons. Mutant animals were compared to controls for acute nociception, inflammatory pain, opiate-induced analgesia and constipation. There was a 76% decrease of mu receptor-positive neurons and a 60% reduction of mu-receptor mRNA in dorsal root ganglia of cKO mice. Mutant mice showed normal responses to heat, mechanical, visceral and chemical stimuli, as well as unchanged morphine antinociception and tolerance to antinociception in models of acute pain. Inflammatory pain developed similarly in cKO and controls mice after Complete Freund's Adjuvant. In the inflammation model, however, opiate-induced (morphine, fentanyl and loperamide) analgesia was reduced in mutant mice as compared to controls, and abolished at low doses. Morphine-induced constipation remained intact in cKO mice. We therefore genetically demonstrate for the first time that mu opioid receptors partly mediate opiate analgesia at the level of Nav1.8-positive sensory neurons. In our study, this mechanism operates under conditions of inflammatory pain, but not nociception. Previous pharmacology suggests that peripheral opiates may be clinically useful, and our data further demonstrate that Nav1.8 neuron-associated mu opioid receptors are feasible targets to alleviate some forms of persistent pain.

  2. Extinction of conditioned opiate withdrawal in rats is blocked by intracerebroventricular infusion of an NMDA receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Brian R; Carlezon, William A; Myers, Karyn M

    2013-04-29

    Maladaptive conditioned responses (CRs) contribute to psychiatric disorders including anxiety disorders and addiction. Methods of reducing these CRs have been considered as possible therapeutic approaches. One such method is extinction, which involves exposure to CR-eliciting cues in the absence of the event they once predicted. In animal models, extinction reduces both fear and addiction-related CRs, and in humans, extinction-based cue exposure therapy (CET) reduces fear CRs. However, CET is less effective in drug addicts, for reasons that are not clear. Increased understanding of the neurobiology of extinction of drug-related CRs as compared to fear CRs may help illuminate this issue. Here, we examine the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependence of extinction of conditioned opiate withdrawal in rats. Using a place conditioning paradigm, we trained morphine-dependent rats to associate an environment with naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. We then extinguished that association by returning the rats repeatedly to the environment in the absence of acute withdrawal. In some rats we administered the NMDA receptor antagonist d,l-2-amino-5-phosphovaleric acid (AP5) intracerebroventricularly immediately prior to extinction training. In a subsequent test session, these rats avoided the formerly naloxone-paired environment, similar to rats that had not undergone extinction training. By contrast, rats that received vehicle prior to extinction training did not avoid the formerly naloxone-paired environment. This finding indicates that extinction of a drug-related CR (conditioned opiate withdrawal) is dependent on NMDA receptors, similar to extinction of conditioned fear. The locus of the critical NMDA receptors is unclear but may include basolateral amygdala and/or medial prefrontal cortex.

  3. Molecular orbital calculations of proton transfer involving amines as models for the clastic binding of opiates with their receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, L.K.; Beamer, R.L.

    1986-08-01

    Semi-empirical (CNDO) molecular orbital calculations, based on a previously reported ammonia-amine model system, were performed on an extended series of methyl-, ethyl-, and propylamines as models for the analgesic receptor. Methyl-, dimethyl-, and trimethylamines were chosen to represent the opiate molecules. Interatomic distances were varied within normally expected biological values. The results for the larger systems are similar to more elaborate calculations previously reported using smaller molecules. At internuclear distances of greater than 0.275 nm, the potential energy curves had two minima. At 0.2731 nm, the optimized N-N distance, the depth of the minima in the potential energy curve were not as great. Energy differences as well as population differences suggest deviation from the currently stated clastic binding theories mechanism for the analgesic response of the tertiary amines. The dimethylamine energy profile and population data indicate that the hypothesis of N-demethylated opiate as the active molecule needs further consideration and investigation. Investigation of larger systems is also indicated to develop increasingly realistic models for the analgesic response.

  4. Imaging opiate receptors by positron tomography (PET): Evaluation by displacement of 3-Acetyl-6-Deoxy-6-Beta-/sup 18/F-flouronaltrexone with active and inactive naloxone

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, S.M.; Channing, M.A.; Rice, K.R.; Pert, C.B.; Eckelman, W.C.; Burke, T.R.; Bennett, J.M.; Carson, R.E.; Di Chiro, G.

    1985-05-01

    We recently reported the development of a new radiopharmaceutical for in vivo PET imaging of opiate receptors, 3-acetyl-6-deoxy-6-Beta-/sup 18/F-fluoronaltrexone: 3-acetylcyclofoxy, or /sup 18/F-ACF. These studies involved displacement of /sup 18/F-ACF from sites of uptake in the baboon sub-cortical gray matter, and provided strong proof of the opiate receptor specificity of the tracer. We now report on the anatomic localization of /sup 18/F-ACF in the sub-cortical grapy matter of baboon, and the kinetics of uptake and displacement of the tracer. /sup 18/F-ACF was prepared from the known 3-acetyl-6-alpha-naltrexol via the triflate, using /sup 18/F produced by neutron bombardment of /sup 6/Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. Anesthetized baboons were imaged after injection of /sup 18/F-ACF (sp.ac.=20Ci/mmol), using the NIH NEUROPET, a high resolution PET scanner. After bolus injection, the initial distribution to brain was rapid with peak uptake at 6 minutes post-injection. Clearance from opiate receptor rich regions of thalamus and basal ganglia was gradual, but after injection of active (but not after inactive), naloxone, clearance from these regions more than doubled. In non-opiate rich regions, (e.g. cerebellum), the predominant component of clearance was equally rapid with or without the active naloxone. Displacement studies of positron labelled ligands provide a powerful tool for non-invasive study of opiate receptor in living primates.

  5. Opiate agonist-induced re-distribution of Wntless, a mu-opioid receptor interacting protein, in rat striatal neurons.

    PubMed

    Reyes, B A S; Vakharia, K; Ferraro, T N; Levenson, R; Berrettini, W H; Van Bockstaele, E J

    2012-01-01

    Wntless (WLS), a mu-opioid receptor (MOR) interacting protein, mediates Wnt protein secretion that is critical for neuronal development. We investigated whether MOR agonists induce re-distribution of WLS within rat striatal neurons. Adult male rats received either saline, morphine or [d-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO) directly into the lateral ventricles. Following thirty minutes, brains were extracted and tissue sections were processed for immunogold silver detection of WLS. In saline-treated rats, WLS was distributed along the plasma membrane and within the cytoplasmic compartment of striatal dendrites as previously described. The ratio of cytoplasmic to total dendritic WLS labeling was 0.70±0.03 in saline-treated striatal tissue. Morphine treatment decreased this ratio to 0.48±0.03 indicating a shift of WLS from the intracellular compartment to the plasma membrane. However, following DAMGO treatment, the ratio was 0.85±0.05 indicating a greater distribution of WLS intracellularly. The difference in the re-distribution of the WLS following different agonist exposure may be related to DAMGO's well known ability to induce internalization of MOR in contrast to morphine, which is less effective in producing receptor internalization. Furthermore, these data are consistent with our hypothesis that MOR agonists promote dimerization of WLS and MOR, thereby preventing WLS from mediating Wnt secretion. In summary, our findings indicate differential agonist-induced trafficking of WLS in striatal neurons following distinct agonist exposure. Adaptations in WLS trafficking may represent a novel pharmacological target in the treatment of opiate addiction and/or pain.

  6. Endogenous opiates and behavior: 2014.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    This paper is the thirty-seventh consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system. It summarizes papers published during 2014 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (endogenous opioids and receptors), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (pain and analgesia); stress and social status (human studies); tolerance and dependence (opioid mediation of other analgesic responses); learning and memory (stress and social status); eating and drinking (stress-induced analgesia); alcohol and drugs of abuse (emotional responses in opioid-mediated behaviors); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (opioid involvement in stress response regulation); mental illness and mood (tolerance and dependence); seizures and neurologic disorders (learning and memory); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (opiates and conditioned place preferences (CPP)); general activity and locomotion (eating and drinking); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (alcohol and drugs of abuse); cardiovascular responses (opiates and ethanol); respiration and thermoregulation (opiates and THC); and immunological responses (opiates and stimulants). This paper is the thirty-seventh consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system. It summarizes papers published during 2014 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular

  7. Differences of binding characteristics of non-selective opiates towards and delta receptor types

    SciTech Connect

    Delay-Goyet, P.; Roques, B.P.; Zajac, J.M.

    1987-08-10

    (TH)ET (etorphine), which is considered either as an universal ligand or a agonist, interacts with identical affinities K/sub D/ = 0.33 - 0.38 nM to hybrid cells and rabbit cerebellum, pure delta and -enriched opioid receptor preparations, respectively. In rat brain tissue, (TH)ET binding is inhibited by DAGO (Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-(Me)-Phe-Gly-ol), a selective agonist, in a competitive manner without apparent modification of the maximal number of sites. Furthermore, even at a DAGO concentration (300 nM) which should be sufficient to block (TH)ET interaction with sites, no variation in the total capacity of the tritiated ligand is observed. In contrast, DTLET (Tyr-D-Thr-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr), a delta-preferential agonist, blocks (TH)ET binding in rat brain at a concentration able to saturate delta-sites. At higher concentrations, where DTLET cross reacts with -sites, this ligand exhibits similar properties to those of DAGO. These data are very different from those obtained with (TH)EKC (ethylketocyclazocine), another universal ligand, the binding properties of which are easily explained by the occurrence in rat brain tissue of independent sites exhibiting pharmacological profiles of , delta and kappa sites. The authors results underline the possible misinterpretation of binding data obtained by using (TH) etorphine as a non-selective ligand. 28 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  8. The neurobiology of opiate motivation.

    PubMed

    Ting-A-Kee, Ryan; van der Kooy, Derek

    2012-10-01

    Opiates are a highly addictive class of drugs that have been reported to possess both dopamine-dependent and dopamine-independent rewarding properties. The search for how, if at all, these distinct mechanisms of motivation are related is of great interest in drug addiction research. Recent electrophysiological, molecular, and behavioral work has greatly improved our understanding of this process. In particular, the signaling properties of GABA(A) receptors located on GABA neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) appear to be crucial to understanding the interplay between dopamine-dependent and dopamine-independent mechanisms of opiate motivation.

  9. The Neurobiology of Opiate Motivation

    PubMed Central

    Ting-A-Kee, Ryan; van der Kooy, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Opiates are a highly addictive class of drugs that have been reported to possess both dopamine-dependent and dopamine-independent rewarding properties. The search for how, if at all, these distinct mechanisms of motivation are related is of great interest in drug addiction research. Recent electrophysiological, molecular, and behavioral work has greatly improved our understanding of this process. In particular, the signaling properties of GABAA receptors located on GABA neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) appear to be crucial to understanding the interplay between dopamine-dependent and dopamine-independent mechanisms of opiate motivation. PMID:23028134

  10. Regulation of Pleiotrophin, Midkine, Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase β/ζ, and Their Intracellular Signaling Cascades in the Nucleus Accumbens During Opiate Administration

    PubMed Central

    Laorden, María Luisa; Milanés, María Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Background: Most classes of addictive substances alter the function and structural plasticity of the brain reward circuitry. Midkine (MK) and pleiotrophin (PTN) are growth/differentiation cytokines which, similarly to neurotrophins, play an important role in repair, neurite outgrowth, and cell differentiation. PTN or MK signaling through receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase β/ζ (RPTPβ/ζ), leads to the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases and thymoma viral proto-oncogene. This activation induces morphological changes and modulates addictive behaviors. Besides, there is increasing evidence that during the development of drug addiction, astrocytes contribute to the synaptic plasticity by synthesizing and releasing substances such as cytokines. Methods: In the present work we studied the effect of acute morphine administration, chronic morphine administration, and morphine withdrawal on PTN, MK, and RPTPβ/ζ expression and on their signaling pathways in the nucleus accumbens. Results: Present results indicated that PTN, MK, and RPTPβ/ζ levels increased after acute morphine injection, returned to basal levels during chronic opioid treatment, and were up-regulated again during morphine withdrawal. We also observed an activation of astrocytes after acute morphine injection and during opiate dependence and withdrawal. In addition, immunofluorescence analysis revealed that PTN, but not MK, was overexpressed in astrocytes and that dopaminoceptive neurons expressed RPTPβ/ζ. Conclusions: All these observations suggest that the neurotrophic and behavioral adaptations that occur during opiate addiction could be, at least partly, mediated by cytokines. PMID:26164717

  11. Phagocytosis in Tetrahymena thermophila: naloxone-reversible inhibition by opiates.

    PubMed

    De Jesus, S; Renaud, F L

    1989-01-01

    1. Nanomolar concentrations of opiates inhibit phagocytosis in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. 2. Naloxone and naltrexone counteract the effect of the opiate agonists tested. 3. The dose-response curves are U-shaped, with no detectable effect at low or high concentrations. 4. An increase in extracellular calcium and dopamine counteract the inhibition caused by metenkephalin. 5. The recognition mechanism for opiates in Tetrahymena cannot be classified as belonging to any of the mammalian opiate receptor subtypes and is perhaps a primitive receptor.

  12. Buprenorphine in the treatment of opiate dependence: its pharmacology and social context of use in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Wesson, Donald R

    2004-05-01

    Buprenorphine's physiological effects are produced when it attaches to specific opiate receptors that are designated mu, kappa, or delta. Buprenorphine, a partial agonist at the mu receptor and an antagonist at the kappa receptor, produces typical morphine-like effects at low doses. At higher doses, it produces opiate effects that are less than those of full opiate agonists. Knowledge of the physiological effects of opiate receptors and the way they interact with opiate agonists, partial opiate agonists, and opiate antagonists is fundamental to understanding the safety and efficacy of buprenorphine in treatment of pain and opiate addiction. Knowledge of the historical and social context of opiate agonist treatment of opiate dependence is fundamental to understanding how nonpharmacological factors may limit the clinical adoption and utility of a safe and effective medication in treatment of opiate dependence. This article reviews the pharmacology of sublingual buprenorphine and the historical context of opiate agonist therapy; delineates classes of opiate receptors and their interaction with opiate agonists, partial agonists, and antagonists; and describes the commercially available pharmaceutical formulations of buprenorphine. It focuses on sublingual buprenorphine tablets, Subutex and Suboxone, the FDA-approved formulations of buprenorphine for treatment of opiate dependence. Sublingual buprenorphine, and the combination of sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone, have unique pharmacological properties that make them a logical first-line intervention in the treatment of opioid dependence.

  13. Elevated mu-opioid receptor expression in the nucleus of the solitary tract accompanies attenuated withdrawal signs after chronic low dose naltrexone in opiate-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Van Bockstaele, E J; Rudoy, C; Mannelli, P; Oropeza, V; Qian, Y

    2006-02-15

    We previously described a decrease in withdrawal behaviors in opiate-dependent rats that were chronically treated with very low doses of naltrexone in their drinking water. Attenuated expression of withdrawal behaviors correlated with decreased c-Fos expression and intracellular signal transduction elements [protein kinase A regulatory subunit II (PKA) and phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (pCREB)] in brainstem noradrenergic nuclei. In this study, to determine whether similar cellular changes occurred in forebrain nuclei associated with drug reward, expressions of PKA and pCREB were analyzed in the ventral tegmental area, frontal cortex, striatum, and amygdala of opiate-treated rats that received low doses of naltrexone in their drinking water. No significant difference in PKA or pCREB was detected in these regions following drug treatment. To examine further the cellular mechanisms in noradrenergic nuclei that could underlie attenuated withdrawal behaviors following low dose naltrexone administration, the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and locus coeruleus (LC) were examined for opioid receptor (OR) protein expression. Results showed a significant increase in muOR expression in the NTS of morphine-dependent rats that received low doses of naltrexone in their drinking water, and increases in muOR expression were also found to be dose dependent. Protein expression of muOR in the LC and deltaOR in either brain region remained unchanged. In conclusion, our previously reported decreases in c-Fos and PKA expression in the NTS following pretreatment with low doses of naltrexone may be partially explained by a greater inhibition of NTS neurons resulting from increased muOR expression in this region.

  14. Gender-related differences in the pharmacokinetics of opiates.

    PubMed

    Djurendic-Brenesel, Maja; Mimica-Dukic, Neda; Pilija, Vladimir; Tasic, Milos

    2010-01-30

    Previous studies have documented gender-related differences in a number of aspects of the pharmacology of opiates, including their analgesic activity, stimulative properties and generation of physical dependence. The current experiments were carried out with the aim to examine whether male-female differences exist in the blood and brain levels of opiates attained after their intraperitoneal injection to male and female Wistar rats. The tests were performed 5, 15, 45 and 120 min after the animal treatment with seized heroin. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed to quantitatively determine opiate alkaloids in blood and brain regions (known for their high concentration of mu-opiate receptors): cortex, brainstem, amygdala and basal ganglia. Maximal contents of opiates in blood of animals of both genders were found in the second measurement time (15 min), the values measured in the males being significantly higher, which suggests a faster passage of the opiates from blood to brain tissue in female animals. The highest content of opiates in the brain tissue of female animals was measured 15 min and with male animals 45 min after the treatment, which also indicates faster distribution of opiates from blood to brain in the female compared to male rats. The highest proportion of opiates was found in the basal ganglia of the animals of both genders. The obtained results offer the possibility of selecting this part of the brain tissue of both males and females as a representative sample for identifying and assessing contents of opiates.

  15. Conformation-activity relationships of opiate analgesics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jennifer; Andrews, Peter

    1987-04-01

    Extensive conformational calculations were performed on the potent opiate analgesics etorphine, PET, R30490 and etonitazene to determine all of their many low-energy conformations. The results were used to characterize four possible models for binding of a simple pharmacophore, comprising two phenyl rings plus a protonated nitrogen, to opiate analgesic receptors. These four models may define the necessary three-dimensional features leading to particular opiate actions. The model favoured for μ receptor activity can accommodate a protonated nitrogen, an aromatic ring (which may be substituted with an electronegative group) and a second lipophilic group. These structural features must be presented in a precise three-dimensional arrangement. It appears likely that a hydrophilic substituent in a certain region of the analgesic pharmacophore may also interact with the receptor as a secondary binding group.

  16. Effects of opiates on synaptosomal calmodulin and calcium uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Hoss, W.; Formaniak, M.

    1983-02-01

    Acute opiate administration in vivo increases the level of cytoplasmic calmodulin in isolated rat brain synaptosomes. These synaptosomes do not, however, display decreased K/sup +/-stimulated /sup 45/Ca uptake in vitro. Opiates affect neither cytoplasmic calmodulin nor Ca uptake after incubation of synaptosomes with the drugs in vitro. In contrast to the interpretation of electrophysiological data, these results suggest that the observed inhibition by opiates of the release of several transmitters may not be mediated by presynaptic opiate receptors that inhibit Ca uptake.

  17. Opiate alkaloids in Ascaris suum.

    PubMed

    Pryor, S C; Putnam, Jennifer; Hoo, Nanyamka

    2004-01-01

    The parasitic worm Ascaris suum contains the opiate alkaloids morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide as determined by HPLC coupled to electrochemical detection and by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The level of morphine in muscle tissue of female and male is 252 +/- 32.68, 1168 +/- 278 and 180 +/- 23.47 (ng/g of wet tissue), respectively. The level of M6G in muscle tissue of female and male is 167 +/- 28.37 and 92 +/- 11.45 (ng/g of wet tissue), respectively. Furthermore, Ascaris maintained for 5 days contained a significant amount of morphine, as did their medium, demonstrating their ability to synthesize the opiate alkaloid. The anatomic distribution of morphine was examined by indirect immunofluorescent staining and HPLC of various tissues dissected from male and female adult worms. Immunofluorescence revealed morphine in the subcuticle layers, in the animals' nerve chords and in the female reproductive organs. Morphine was found to be most prevalent in the muscle tissue and there is significantly more morphine in females than males, probably due to the large amounts in the female uterus. Morphine (10(-9) M) and morphine-6-glucuronide (10(-9) M) stimulated the release of NO from Ascaris muscle tissue. Naloxone (10(-7) M), and L-NAME (10(-6) M) blocked (P < 0.005) morphine-stimulated NO release from A. suum muscle. CTOP (10(-7) M) did not block morphine's NO release. However, naloxone could not block M6G stimulated NO release by muscle tissue, whereas CTOP (10(-7) M) blocked its release. These findings were in seeming contradiction to our inability to isolate a mu opiate receptor messenger RNA by RT-PCR using a human mu primer. This suggests that a novel mu opiate receptor was present and selective toward M6G.

  18. Synthesis and evaluation of aryl-naloxamide opiate analgesics targeting truncated exon 11-associated μ opioid receptor (MOR-1) splice variants.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Susruta; Subrath, Joan; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Polikar, Lisa; Burgman, Maxim; Nagakura, Kuni; Ocampo, Julie; Haselton, Nathan; Pasternak, Anna R; Grinnell, Steven; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2012-07-26

    3-Iodobenzoylnaltrexamide 1 (IBNtxA) is a potent analgesic acting through a novel receptor target that lack many side-effects of traditional opiates composed, in part, of exon 11-associated truncated six transmembrane domain MOR-1 (6TM/E11) splice variants. To better understand the SAR of this drug target, a number of 4,5-epoxymorphinan analogues were synthesized. Results show the importance of a free 3-phenolic group, a phenyl ring at the 6 position, an iodine at the 3'or 4' position of the phenyl ring, and an N-allyl or c-propylmethyl group to maintain high 6TM/E11 affinity and activity. 3-Iodobenzoylnaloxamide 15 (IBNalA) with a N-allyl group displayed lower δ opioid receptor affinity than its naltrexamine analogue, was 10-fold more potent an analgesic than morphine, elicited no respiratory depression or physical dependence, and only limited inhibition of gastrointestinal transit. Thus, the aryl-naloxamide scaffold can generate a potent analgesic acting through the 6TM/E11 sites with advantageous side-effect profile and greater selectivity.

  19. Lack of functional evidence for the involvement of sigma opiate receptors in the actions of the 3-PPP enantiomers on central dopaminergic systems: discrepancies between in vitro and in vivo observations.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, S; Clark, D; Carlsson, A

    1985-08-19

    In vitro radioligand binding and autoradiographic distribution studies have suggested the possible involvement of central sigma-opiate sites in the effects of several purportedly dopaminergic agents. Specifically, Largent et al. (Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 81, 4983, 1984) proposed that "actions of 3-PPP at sigma receptors may account for the effect of the drug on behavior and dopaminergic nerve function". Using the sigma-opiate- and dopamine (DA)-preferring (-)- and (+)-enantiomer, respectively, of butaclamol, and the two enantiomers of 3-PPP, the present study was undertaken to address the in vivo functional significance of this proposal. To this end we investigated various biological responses considered to reflect drug interactions with DA cell body and terminal autoreceptors and with presumed non-synaptic and postsynaptic DA receptors in the rat CNS. (+)- but not (-)-butaclamol antagonized the 3-PPP (either enantiomer)-induced DA synthesis and prolactin decreases in GBL-treated rats, the (+)-3-PPP-induced inhibition of substantia nigra DA cell firing and the (+)-3-PPP-induced reversal of reserpine akinesia. Taken together with previous findings available data suggest that DA rather than sigma-opiate receptors mediate the neurochemical, electrophysiological, behavioral and other physiological (prolactin, body temperature) effects of 3-PPP and its enantiomers. The in vivo pharmacological relevance of the claimed non-dopaminergic, proposedly sigma-opiatergic, radioligand binding demonstrated in vitro (with e.g. (+)-3-PPP) thus remains to be established.

  20. A proposal for the molecular basis of μ and δ opiate receptor differentiation based on modeling of two types of cyclic enkephalins and a narcotic alkaloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, André; Villeneuve, Gérald; DiMaio, John

    1991-12-01

    The molecular basis underlying the divergent receptor selectivity of two cyclic opioid peptides Tyr-c[ N δ- d-Orn2-Gly-Phe-Leu-] (c-ORN) and [ d-Pen2, l-Cys5]-enkephalinamide (c-PEN) was investigated using a molecular modeling approach. Ring closure and conformational searching procedures were used to determine low-energy cyclic backbone conformers. Following reinsertion of amino acid side chains, the narcotic alkaloid 7α-[(1R)-1-methyl-1-hydroxy-3-phenylpropyl]-6,14-endoethenotetrahydro oripavine (PEO) was used as a flexible template for bimolecular superpositions with each of the determined peptide ring conformers using the coplanarity and cocentricity of the phenolic rings as the minimum constraint. A vector space of PEO, accounting for all possible orientations for the C21-aromatic ring of PEO served as a geometrical locus for the aromatic ring of the Phe4 residue in the opioid peptides. Although a vast number of polypeptide conformations satisfied the criteria of the opiate pharmacophore, they could be grouped into three classes differing in magnitude and sign of the torsional angle values of the tyrosyl side chain. Only class III conformers for both c-ORN and c-PEN, having tyramine dihedral angles χ1 =-150° ± 30° and χ2=-155° ± 20°, had significant structural and conformational properties that were mutually compatible while respecting the PEO vector space. Comparison of these properties in the context of the divergent receptor selectivity of the studied opioid peptides suggests that the increased distortion of the peptide backbone in the closure region of c-PEN together with the pendant β,β-dimethyl group, combine to generate a steric volume which is absent in c-ORN and that may be incompatible with a restrictive topography of the μ receptor. The nature and stereo-chemistry of substituents adjacent to the closure region of the peptides could also modulate receptor selection by interacting with a charged (δ) or neutral (μ) subsite.

  1. Opioid peptides and opiate alkaloids in immunoregulatory processes.

    PubMed

    Stefano, George B; Kream, Richard M

    2010-06-30

    Among the various non-neuronal cell types known to express and utilize neuropeptides, those of the immune system have received much attention in recent years. In particular, comparative studies in vertebrates and invertebrates have shown that endogenous opioid peptides are engaged in receptor mediated autoregulatory immune and neuroendocrine processes. The majority of these immune processes are stimulatory, as determined by their effects on conformational changes indicative of immunocyte activation, cellular motility, and phagocytosis. Endogenous opioid peptides form an effective network of messenger molecules in cooperation with cytokines, opiate alkaloids, and certain regulatory enzymes (neutral endopeptidase 24.11). Peptide-mediated immunostimulatory effects observed in this system are operationally counteracted by the inhibitory effects of morphine and related opiates. Opioid/opiate signaling processes are mediated by several types of receptors with different degrees of selectivity. Among them the recently identified, opioid insensitive µ(3) receptor deserves attention on account of its specificity for opiate alkaloids.

  2. The AXL Receptor is a Sensor of Ligand Spatial Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Aaron S.; Zweemer, Annelien J.M.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    The AXL receptor is a TAM (Tyro3, AXL, MerTK) receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) important in physiological inflammatory processes such as blood clotting, viral infection, and innate immune-mediated cell clearance. Overexpression of the receptor in a number of solid tumors is increasingly appreciated as a key drug resistance and tumor dissemination mechanism. Although the ligand-receptor (Gas6-AXL) complex structure is known, literature reports on ligand-mediated signaling have provided conflicting conclusions regarding the influence of other factors such as phosphatidylserine binding, and a detailed, mechanistic picture of AXL activation has not emerged. Integrating quantitative experiments with mathematical modeling, we show here that AXL operates to sense local spatial heterogeneity in ligand concentration, a feature consistent with its physiological role in inflammatory cell responses. This effect arises as a result of an intricate reaction-diffusion interaction. Our results demonstrate that AXL functions distinctly from other RTK families, a vital insight for envisioned design of AXL-targeted therapeutic intervention. PMID:26236777

  3. Modification of opiate agonist binding by pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Abood, M.E.; Lee, N.M.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-03-05

    Opiate agonist binding is decreased by GTP, suggesting the possible involvement of GTP binding proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding. This possibility was addressed by asking whether pertussis toxin treatment, which results in ADP-ribosylation and modification of G proteins, would alter opiate agonist binding. The striatum was chosen for the initial brain area to be studied, since regulation of opiate action in this area had been shown to be modified by pertussis toxin. Treatment of striatal membranes with pertussis toxin results in up to a 55% decrease in /sup 3/(H)-DADLE binding as compared with membranes treated identically without toxin. This corresponds to a near complete ADP-ribosylation of both G proteins in the striatal membrane. The decrease in agonist binding appears to be due to an altered affinity of the receptor for agonist as opposed to a decrease in the number of sites. This effect of pertussis toxin on opiate agonist binding demonstrates the actual involvement of G proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding.

  4. Distribution of opiate alkaloids in brain tissue of experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Djurendic-Brenesel, Maja; Pilija, Vladimir; Mimica-Dukic, Neda; Budakov, Branislav; Cvjeticanin, Stanko

    2012-12-01

    The present study examined regional distribution of opiate alkaloids from seized heroin in brain regions of experimental animals in order to select parts with the highest content of opiates. Their analysis should contribute to resolve causes of death due to heroin intake. The tests were performed at different time periods (5, 15, 45 and 120 min) after male and female Wistar rats were treated with seized heroin. Opiate alkaloids (codeine, morphine, acetylcodeine, 6-acetylmorphine and 3,6-diacetylmorphine) were quantitatively determined in brain regions known for their high concentration of µ-opiate receptors: cortex, brainstem, amygdala and basal ganglia, by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The highest content of opiate alkaloids in the brain tissue of female animals was found 15 min and in male animals 45 min after treatment. The highest content of opiates was determined in the basal ganglia of the animals of both genders, indicating that this part of brain tissue presents a reliable sample for identifying and assessing contents of opiates after heroin intake.

  5. Switching agonist/antagonist properties of opiate alkaloids at the delta opioid receptor using mutations based on the structure of the orphanin FQ receptor.

    PubMed

    Meng, F; Wei, Q; Hoversten, M T; Taylor, L P; Akil, H

    2000-07-21

    In an earlier study, we have demonstrated that by mutating five amino acid residues to those conserved in the opioid receptors, the OFQ receptor could be converted to a functional receptor that bound many opioid alkaloids with nanomolar affinities. Surprisingly, when the reciprocal mutations, Lys-214 --> Ala (TM5), Ile-277 --> Val/His-278 --> Gln/Ile-279 --> Val (TM6), and Ile-304 --> Thr (TM7), are introduced in the delta receptor, neither the individual mutations nor their various combinations significantly reduce the binding affinities of opioid alkaloids tested. However, these mutations cause profound alterations in the functional characteristics of the mutant receptors as measured in guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding assays. Some agonists become antagonists at some constructs as they lose their ability to activate them. Some alkaloid antagonists are transformed into agonists at other constructs, but their agonistic effects can still be blocked by the peptide antagonist TIPP. Even the delta inverse agonist 7-benzylidenenaltrexone becomes an agonist at the mutant containing both the Ile-277 --> Val/His-278 --> Gln/Ile-279 --> Val and Ile-304 --> Thr mutations. Thus, although the mutated residues are thought to be part of the binding pocket, they are critically involved in the control of the delta receptor activation process. These findings shed light on some of the structural bases of ligand efficacy. They are also compatible with the hypothesis that a ligand may achieve high affinity binding in several different ways, each having different effects on receptor activation.

  6. A thalamic input to the nucleus accumbens mediates opiate dependence

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yingjie; Wienecke, Carl F.R.; Nachtrab, Gregory; Chen, Xiaoke

    2016-01-01

    Chronic opiate use induces opiate dependence, which is characterized by extremely unpleasant physical and emotional feelings after drug use is terminated. Both rewarding effects of drug and the desire to avoid withdrawal symptoms motivate continued drug use1-3, and the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is important for orchestrating both processes4,5. While multiple inputs to the NAc regulate reward6-9, little is known about the NAc circuitry underlying withdrawal. Here we identify the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT) as a prominent input to the NAc mediating the expression of opiate withdrawal induced physical signs and aversive memory. Activity in the PVT to NAc pathway is necessary and sufficient to mediate behavioral aversion. Selectively silencing this pathway abolishes aversive symptoms in two different mouse models of opiate withdrawal. Chronic morphine exposure selectively potentiates excitatory transmission between the PVT and D2-receptor-expressing medium spiny neurons (D2-MSNs) via synaptic insertion of GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors. Notably, in vivo optogenetic depotentiation restores normal transmission at PVT→D2-MSNs synapses and robustly suppresses morphine withdrawal symptoms. These results link morphine-evoked pathway- and cell type-specific plasticity in the PVT→NAc circuit to opiate dependence, and suggest that reprogramming this circuit holds promise for treating opiate addiction. PMID:26840481

  7. Biomarkers of opiate use.

    PubMed

    Stefanidou, M; Athanaselis, S; Spiliopoulou, C; Dona, A; Maravelias, C

    2010-11-01

    The interpretation of toxicological findings is critical for the thorough investigation of the use and abuse of psychoactive substances. A positive analytical result for a sample taken could usually result in criminal proceedings and a punitive outcome for the defendant whose sample was analysed. The detection of markers of illicit opiate misuse is important both in the management of substance misuse and in the postmortem identification of illicit opiate use. The aim of this study was to emphasise the role of opiate biomarkers available at the laboratory and in the clinical environment. Urine remains the biological tool of choice for qualitative detection of illicit drug use in a clinical setting, while quantitative accuracy remains strictly the domain of blood. Accurate interpretation of the screening tests within a clinical setting alongside other relevant information remains the key to the usefulness of any test. Moreover, the finding of a morphine/codeine concentration ratio in blood exceeding unity is a strong evidence that the person had used heroin, as opposed to having taken a prescription analgesic drug containing codeine.

  8. Nuclear estrogen receptor molecular heterogeneity in the mouse uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Golding, T.S.; Korach, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    Holomeric estrogen receptor (ER) prepared from ovariectomized mouse uteri displays heterogeneous electrophoretic mobility when analyzed by NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE. ER derived from nuclei (ER/sub n/) appears as a closely spaced doublet having apparent molecular masses of 66.4 and 65 kDa, while ER from the cytosolic compartment (ER/sub c/) has a single band of 65 kDa. Both partially purified ER/sub c/ and the 8S form of unactivated ER/sub c/ show only the 65-kDa band. The appearance of the ER/sub n/ doublet is hormonally inducible, and the relative proportions of the two doublet bands are influenced by the type of hormone treatment, with weakly estrogenic compounds yielding the lower band as predominant while potent estrogens increase the proportion of the upper band. Steroid binding of the ER/sub n/ doublet was determined by (/sup 3/H)tamoxifen aziridine affinity labeling of both the 66.4- and the 65-kDa peptides; binding to the 65-kDa peptide was predominant. The ER/sub n/ doublet displays a time dependency after estrogen administration with maximal amounts occurring in a bimodal fashion at 1 and 8 hr.

  9. Histamine homologues discriminating between two functional H3 receptor assays. Evidence for H3 receptor heterogeneity?.

    PubMed

    Leurs, R; Kathmann, M; Vollinga, R C; Menge, W M; Schlicker, E; Timmerman, H

    1996-03-01

    We studied several histamine homologues as potential ligands for the histamine H3 receptor in two binding assays ([125l]iodophenpropit and N alpha-[3H]methylhistamine binding to rat brain cortex membranes) and two functional H3 receptor models (inhibition of the neurogenic contraction in the guinea pig jejunum and of [3H]noradrenaline release in mouse brain cortex slices). The histamine homologues acted all as competitive H3 antagonists at the guinea pig jejunum. The potency in this model and/or the affinity for N alpha-[3H]methylhistamine binding was higher for the butylene (pA2 = 7.7; pKi = 9.4) and pentylene homologue (impentamine, pA2 = 8.4; pKi = 9.1) than for the propylene, hexylene and octylene homologues (pA2 = 5.9-7.8; pKi = 6.1-7.6). In the mouse brain cortex the propylene, butylene and pentylene homologues acted as partial agonists (alpha = 0.3-0.6) and the hexylene and octylene homologues acted as antagonists. [125I]Iodophenpropit binding was displaced monophasically by the propylene, hexylene and octylene homologues and biphasically by the butylene and pentylene homologues. Biphasic displacement curves were converted to monophasic ones by 10 microM guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate. In conclusion, the homologue of histamine with five methylene groups is a more potent H3 receptor antagonist in the guinea pig jejunum than the other homologues tested. Furthermore, the propylene, butylene and pentylene homologues can discriminate between the two functional H3 receptor models in the guinea pig jejunum and mouse brain. These data are discussed in relation to the efficiency of receptor coupling and receptor heterogeneity.

  10. Photoaffinity labeling of opiate (enkephalin) receptor of rat brain plasma membranes with /sup 125/I(D-Ala/sup 2/, p-N/sub 3/-Phe/sup 4/-Met/sup 5/)-enkephalin

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, C.W.T.

    1986-05-01

    A photoreactive (D-Ala/sup 2/, p-N/sub 3/-Phe/sup 4/-Met/sup 5/)enkephalin derivative was prepared, iodinated with carrier free /sup 125/I and then purified by high performance liquid chromatography. The purified radioactive photoprobe was monoiodinated at the amino terminal tyrosine residue. This radioactive photoprobe was used to photoaffinity label plasma membranes prepared from rat brain, spinal cord and cerebellum. The photolabeled plasma membranes were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. A 46,000-daltons band was specifically photolabeled in the plasma membranes of brain and spinal cord but not in the plasma membranes from cerebellum. The photolabeling of this band was inhibited by peptides related to enkephalin by not but substance P or gastrin tetrapeptide. These data demonstrate that the labeled 46,000-daltons band is a protein of the opiate (enkephalin)receptor.

  11. A hormonal role for endogenous opiate alkaloids: vascular tissues.

    PubMed

    Stefano, George B; Zhu, Wei; Cadet, Patrick; Mantione, Kirk; Bilfinger, Thomas V; Bianchi, Enrica; Guarna, Massimo

    2002-02-01

    The distribution of morphine-containing cells in the central nervous system, adrenal gland, and its presence in blood may serve to demonstrate that this signal molecule can act as a hormone besides its role in cell-to-cell signaling within the brain. This speculative review is the result of a literature evaluation with an emphasis on studies from our laboratory. Opioid peptides and opiate alkaloids have been found to influence cardiac and vascular function. They have also been reported to promote ischemic preconditioning protection in the heart. Given the presence of morphine and the novel mu(3) opiate receptor on vascular endothelial cells, including cardiac and vascular endothelial cells in the median eminence, it would appear that endogenous opiate alkaloids are involved in modulating cardiac function, possible at the hormonal level. This peripheral target tissue, via nitric oxide coupling to mu opiate receptors, may serve to down regulate the excitability of this tissue given the heart's high performance state as compared to that of the saphenous vein, a passive resistance conduit. With this in mind, morphine and other endogenous opiate alkaloids may function as a hormone.

  12. Bioluminescence Microscopy as a Method to Measure Single Cell Androgen Receptor Activity Heterogeneous Responses to Antiandrogens

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Pallavi; Neveu, Bertrand; Velot, Lauriane; Wu, Lily; Fradet, Yves; Pouliot, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell heterogeneity is well-documented. Therefore, techniques to monitor single cell heterogeneous responses to treatment are needed. We developed a highly translational and quantitative bioluminescence microscopy method to measure single cell androgen receptor (AR) activity modulation by antiandrogens from fluid biopsies. We showed that this assay can detect heterogeneous cellular response to drug treatment and that the sum of single cell AR activity can mirror the response in the whole cell population. This method may thus be used to monitor heterogeneous dynamic treatment responses in cancer cells. PMID:27678181

  13. Glycine receptor heterogeneity in rat spinal cord during postnatal development.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, C M; Hoch, W; Betz, H

    1988-01-01

    Two different isoforms of the inhibitory glycine receptor were identified during postnatal development of rat spinal cord. A neonatal form characterized by low strychnine binding affinity, altered antigenicity, and a ligand binding subunit differing in mol. wt (49 kd) from that of the adult receptor (48 kd) predominates at birth (70% of the total receptor protein). Separation from the adult form could be achieved by either use of a selective antibody or glycine gradient elution of 2-aminostrychnine affinity columns. Both isoforms co-purify with the mol. wt 93 kd peripheral membrane protein of the postsynaptic glycine receptor complex. Images PMID:2850172

  14. GluN2B NMDA receptor and excitatory amino acid transporter 3 are upregulated in primary sensory neurons after seven days of morphine administration in rats: implication for opiate-induced hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Kerui; Bhargava, Aditi; Jasmin, Luc

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of the peripheral nervous system to opiate-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is not well understood. Here, we determined the changes in excitability of primary sensory neurons after sustained morphine administration for 7 days. Changes in expression of glutamate receptors and glutamate transporters after morphine administration were ascertained in dorsal root ganglions (DRGs). Patch clamp recordings from intact DRGs (ex-vivo preparation) of morphine-treated rats showed increased excitability of small diameter (≤ 30 μm) neurons with respect to rheobase and membrane threshold, whereas the excitability of large diameter (> 30 μm) neurons remained unchanged. Small diameter neurons also displayed increased responses to glutamate, which were mediated mainly by GluN2B containing NMDA receptors (NMDARs), and to a lesser degree by the neuronal excitatory amino acid transporter 3 /excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAT3/EAAC1). Co-administration in vivo of the GluN2B selective antagonist Ro 25-6981 with morphine for 7 days prevented the appearance of OIH and increased morphine-induced analgesia. Administration of morphine for 7 days led to an increased expression of GluN2B and EAAT3/EAAC1, but not of the AMPA, kainate or Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors, or of the vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2). These results suggest that peripheral glutamatergic neurotransmission contributes to OIH and that GluN2B subunit of NMDARs in the periphery may be a target for therapy. PMID:26335908

  15. Effects of opiates and HIV proteins on neurons: the role of ferritin heavy chain and a potential for synergism.

    PubMed

    Festa, Lindsay; Meucci, Olimpia

    2012-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and its associated proteins can have a profound impact on the central nervous system. Co-morbid abuse of opiates, such as morphine and heroin, is often associated with rapid disease progression and greater neurological dysfunction. The mechanisms by which HIV proteins and opiates cause neuronal damage on their own and together are unclear. The emergence of ferritin heavy chain (FHC) as a negative regulator of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, a co-receptor for HIV, may prove to be important in elucidating the interaction between HIV proteins and opiates. This review summarizes our current knowledge of central nervous system damage inflicted by HIV and opiates, as well as the regulation of CXCR4 by opiate-induced changes in FHC protein levels. We propose that HIV proteins and opiates exhibit an additive or synergistic effect on FHC/CXCR4, thereby decreasing neuronal signaling and function.

  16. Neuroscience of opiates for addiction medicine: From stress-responsive systems to behavior.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Leri, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Opiate addiction, similarly to addiction to other psychoactive drugs, is chronic relapsing brain disease caused by drug-induced short-term and long-term neuroadaptations at the molecular, cellular, and behavioral levels. Preclinical research in laboratory animals has found important interactions between opiate exposure and stress-responsive systems. In this review, we will discuss the dysregulation of several stress-responsive systems in opiate addiction: vasopressin and its receptor system, endogenous opioid systems (including proopiomelanocortin/mu opioid receptor and dynorphin/kappa opioid receptor), orexin and its receptor system, and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. A more complete understanding of how opiates alter these stress systems, through further laboratory-based studies, is required to identify novel and effective pharmacological targets for the long-term treatment of heroin addiction.

  17. Opiate exposure and withdrawal induces a molecular memory switch in the basolateral amygdala between ERK1/2 and CaMKIIα-dependent signaling substrates.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Danika; de Jaeger, Xavier; Rosen, Laura G; Ahmad, Tasha; Lauzon, Nicole M; Zunder, Jordan; Coolen, Lique M; Rushlow, Walter; Laviolette, Steven R

    2013-09-11

    Opiate reward memories are powerful triggers for compulsive opiate-seeking behaviors. The basolateral amygdala (BLA) is an important structure for the processing of opiate-related associative memories and is functionally linked to the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) pathway. Transmission through intra-BLA DA D1-like and D2-like receptors independently modulates the formation of opiate reward memories as a function of opiate-exposure state. Thus, in the opiate-naive state, intra-BLA D1 transmission is required for opiate-related memory formation. Once opiate dependence and withdrawal has developed, a functional switch to a DA D2-mediated memory mechanism takes place. However, the downstream molecular signaling events that control this functional switch between intra-BLA DA D1 versus D2 receptor transmission are not currently understood. Using an unbiased place conditioning procedure in rats combined with molecular analyses, we report that opiate reward memory acquisition requires intra-BLA ERK1/2 signaling only in the previously opiate-naive state. However, following chronic opiate exposure and withdrawal, intra-BLA reward memory processing switches to a CaMKIIα-dependent memory substrate. Furthermore, the ability of intra-BLA DA D1 or D2 receptor transmission to modulate the motivational salience of opiates similarly operates through a D1-mediated ERK-dependent mechanism in the opiate-naive state, but switches to a D2-mediated CaMKIIα-dependent mechanism in the dependent/withdrawn state. Protein analysis of BLA tissue revealed a downregulation of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and a dramatic reduction in both total and phosphorylated CaMKIIα signaling, specifically in the opiate-dependent/withdrawn state, demonstrating functional control of ERK1/2-dependent versus CaMKIIα-dependent memory mechanisms within the BLA, controlled by opiate-exposure state.

  18. Heterogeneity of muscarinic receptor subtypes in cerebral blood vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Villalon, A.L.; Krause, D.N.; Ehlert, F.J.; Duckles, S.P. )

    1991-07-01

    The identity and distribution of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes and associated signal transduction mechanisms was characterized for the cerebral circulation using correlated functional and biochemical investigations. Subtypes were distinguished by the relative affinities of a panel of muscarinic antagonists, pirenzepine, AF-DX 116 (11-2-((2-(diethylaminomethyl)- 1-piperidinyl)acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H- pyrido(2,3-b)(1,4)benzodiazepine-6-one), hexahydrosiladifenidol, methoctramine, 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methobromide, dicyclomine, para-fluoro-hexahydrosiladifenidol and atropine. Muscarinic receptors characterized by inhibition of (3H)quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in membranes of bovine pial arteries were of the M2 subtype. In contrast pharmacological analysis of (3H)-quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in bovine intracerebral microvessels suggests the presence of an M4 subtype. Receptors mediating endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rabbit pial arteries were of the M3 subtype, whereas muscarinic receptors stimulating endothelium-independent phosphoinositide hydrolysis in bovine pial arteries were of the M1 subtype. These findings suggest that characteristics of muscarinic receptors in cerebral blood vessels vary depending on the type of vessel, cellular location and function mediated.

  19. [Ultra-fast opiate detoxification under general anesthesia: preliminary results of the Liege protocol].

    PubMed

    Pinto, E; Reggers, J; Delhez, M; Fuchs, S; Venneman, I; Lamy, M; Ansseau, M

    2001-08-01

    Many studies support the hypothesis of a substantial benefit in inducing an Opiate Receptor Blockade through a Rapid Opiate Detoxification under general Anaesthesia (RODA) in opiate dependent patients. However, prospective studies and long term evaluation of the technique are lacking. In order to evaluate long-term abstinence rates after a RODA among a sample of opiate addicts, a study was started in March 1999 at the University of Liège. To date, 45 patients were evaluated (mean age: 29 +/- 5 years) with a mean opiate dependence duration of 8 +/- 4 years. Most of them were both heroin and methadone dependent; 42.2% of them were included while 31.1% did not complete the whole inclusion procedure and 26.7% were excluded. None experienced severe withdrawal symptoms. At six months, abstinence rate was 67% and 46% at one year. These preliminary results suggest the interest of the procedure in carefully selected patients.

  20. Effects of the immunostimulant, levamisole, on opiate withdrawal and levels of endogenous opiate alkaloids and monoamine neurotransmitters in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Spector, S; Munjal, I; Schmidt, D E

    1998-11-01

    This report present evidence that the immunostimulant drug levamisole, (-)-(S)-2,3,5,6-tetrahydro-6-phenylimidazo[2,1-b] thiazole monohydrochloride, produced a significant elevation of endogeneous morphine and codeine levels in brain regions and peripheral organs and attenuated the effects of naltrexone-induced withdrawal in morphine-addicted rats. Levamisole also significantly altered the metabolism of norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin in specific brain regions. These results suggest that levamisole's attenuation of opiate withdrawal may be related to its ability to increase endogeneous opiate alkaloid levels and/or to alter central monoaminergic function. Levamisole does not have significant affinity for opiate receptors. These results raise the intriguing possibility that agents such as levamisole, which elevate the levels of the endogenous opiate alkaloids, might be useful for treating narcotic withdrawal. The mechanism for the immunostimulatory properties of agents such as levamisole and muramyl dipeptide (MDP) have not been established. We suggest that the ability of MDP and levamisole to increase endogenous opiate alkaloids may be related to their immunostimulatory properties.

  1. Muscarinic receptor heterogeneity in follicle-enclosed Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Arellano, Rogelio O; Garay, Edith; Miledi, Ricardo

    1999-01-01

    Ionic current responses elicited by acetylcholine (ACh) in follicle-enclosed Xenopus oocytes (follicles) were studied using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. ACh generated a fast chloride current (Fin) and inhibited K+ currents gated by cAMP (IK,cAMP) following receptor activation by adenosine, follicle-stimulating hormone or noradrenaline. These previously described cholinergic responses were confirmed to be of the muscarinic type, and were independently generated among follicles from different frogs.Inhibition of IK,cAMP was about 100 times more sensitive to ACh than Fin activation; the half-maximal effective concentrations (EC50) were 6.6 ± 0.4 and 784 ± 4 nm, respectively.Both responses were blocked by several muscarinic receptor antagonists. Using the respective EC50 concentrations of ACh as standard, the antagonist 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide blocked the two effects with very different potencies. Fin was blocked with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2.4 ± 0.07 nm, whilst the IC50 for IK,cAMP inhibition was 5.9 ± 0.2 μm.Oxotremorine, a muscarinic agonist, preferentially stimulated IK,cAMP inhibition (EC50= 15.8 ± 1.4 μm), whilst Fin was only weakly activated. In contrast, oxotremorine inhibited Fin generated by ACh with an IC50 of 2.3 ± 0.7 μm.Fin elicited via purinergic receptor stimulation was not affected by oxotremorine, indicating that the inhibition produced was specific to the muscarinic receptor, and suggesting that muscarinic actions do not exert a strong effect on follicular cell-oocyte coupling.Using reverse transcription-PCR, transcripts of a previously cloned muscarinic receptor from Xenopus (XlmR) were amplified from the RNA of both the isolated follicular cells and the oocyte. The pharmacological and molecular characteristics suggest that XlmR is involved in IK,cAMP inhibition.In conclusion, follicular cells possess two different muscarinic receptors, one resembling the M2 (or M4) subtype

  2. Fcγ Receptor Heterogeneity in Leukocyte Functional Responses

    PubMed Central

    Rosales, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies participate in defense of the organism from all types of pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. IgG antibodies recognize their associated antigen via their two Fab portions and are in turn recognized though their Fc portion by specific Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) on the membrane of immune cells. Multiple types and polymorphic variants of FcγR exist. These receptors are expressed in many cells types and are also redundant in inducing cell responses. Crosslinking of FcγR on the surface of leukocytes activates several effector functions aimed toward the destruction of pathogens and the induction of an inflammatory response. In the past few years, new evidence on how the particular IgG subclass and the glycosylation pattern of the antibody modulate the IgG–FcγR interaction has been presented. Despite these advances, our knowledge of what particular effector function is activated in a certain cell and in response to a specific type of FcγR remains very limited today. On one hand, each immune cell could be programmed to perform a particular cell function after FcγR crosslinking. On the other, each FcγR could activate a particular signaling pathway leading to a unique cell response. In this review, I describe the main types of FcγRs and our current view of how particular FcγRs activate various signaling pathways to promote unique leukocyte functions. PMID:28373871

  3. Modulation of the estrogen receptor structure, evidence of a heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Toulas, C.; Guilbaud, N.; Delassus, F.; Bayard, F.; Faye, J.C. )

    1990-01-01

    In order to analyse the molecular weight polymorphism of the estrogen receptor (ER) in MCF-7 cells, we have developed a procedure which allowed in situ linkage of ER by (3H) tamoxifen aziridine and provided labelled proteins in conditions which minimized protease activities. After labelling, cell lysis was performed in SDS buffer containing various concentrations of mercaptoethanol. Proteins extracted with phenolic solution and precipitated by cold acetone were analysed by SDS PAGE. It appears that beside the form of 67 kDa already described, binding entities of tamoxifen aziridine were also present at a molecular mass of 110 kDa and 45 kDa. On the other hand, investigations on the effect of 12-0-Tetradecanoyl Phorbol 13-Acetate (TPA) showed that TPA induces a decrease of the 67 kDa entity.

  4. Molecular docking of opiates and opioid peptides, a tool for the design of selective agonists and antagonists, and for the investigation of atypical ligand-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Gentilucci, L; Tolomelli, A; De Marco, R; Artali, R

    2012-01-01

    In the last years, molecular docking emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the interactions between opioid ligands and their receptors, thus driving the design and development of new selective agonists or antagonists of therapeutic interest. This review especially covers the most representative and recent comparative molecular docking analyses of structurally related compounds, as well as of agonists and antagonists within the active and inactive states of the receptors. The comparative analyses gave important information on the structural determinants responsible for the affinity and selectivity of the ligands, and defined the features responsible for the activation of the receptors. A special section is dedicated to the analyses of recently discovered, unusual agonists lacking of the tyramine pharmacophore, such as Salvinorin A, and the cyclopeptides which comprise the D-Trp-Phe pharmacophoric motif. For the atypical structure of these compounds, the docking proved to be essential to disclose how they interact with and activate the receptors.

  5. Heterogeneity of human lymphocyte Fc receptors. I. Differential susceptibility to proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Gormus, B. J.; Woodson, Mildred; Kaplan, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    To study the possible heterogeneity of human lymphocyte Fc receptors, isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were enzymatically altered (`stripped') by exposure to pronase or papain. Pronase treatment markedly increased the percentages of PBL binding IgG-sensitized erythrocytes (EA), while simultaneously removing or inactivating their receptors for heat-aggregated IgG (aggG). Papain treatment markedly diminished the ability of PBL to bind both EA and aggG. Essentially identical results were obtained utilizing EA composed of either human Rh-positive type O erythrocytes sensitized with the human anti-Rh serum Ripley (HRBC-A Ripley) or with chicken erythrocytes sensitized with rabbit anti-CRBC IgG (CRBC-A). CRBC sensitized with Fab'2 fragments of rabbit anti-CRBC IgG were incapable of forming rosettes with normal or with pronase- or papain-stripped PBL. Pre-treatment of normal lymphocytes with aggG totally ablated their ability to rosette with EA. Incubation of pronase-stripped PBL for 18–20 hr in 5% CO2-air at 37°C resulted in diminution (to levels originally present) in the percentages of lymphocytes binding EA, but no regeneration of aggG receptors. Similar incubation of papain-stripped PBL resulted in significant reappearance of receptors binding EA, but no regeneration of aggG receptors. These results strongly suggest that: (1) lymphocyte receptors that bind EA complexes differ from those that bind aggG; (2) some lymphocytes possess cryptic receptors for EA that are expressed after proteolysis with pronase; (3) PBL having receptors for EA also have aggG receptors; and (4) there is no evidence that proteolytic stripping of PBL results in the generation of functionally different receptors for complexed IgG, since the Fc specificity of this receptor remains unchanged. PMID:737911

  6. Survival prediction in patients undergoing radionuclide therapy based on intratumoral somatostatin-receptor heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Ilhan, Harun; Higuchi, Takahiro; Buck, Andreas K.; Lehner, Sebastian; Bartenstein, Peter; Bengel, Frank; Schatka, Imke; Muegge, Dirk O.; Papp, László; Zsótér, Norbert; Große-Ophoff, Tobias; Essler, Markus; Bundschuh, Ralph A.

    2017-01-01

    The NETTER-1 trial demonstrated significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) in neuroendocrine tumors (NET) emphasizing the high demand for response prediction in appropriate candidates. In this multicenter study, we aimed to elucidate the prognostic value of tumor heterogeneity as assessed by somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-PET/CT. 141 patients with SSTR-expressing tumors were analyzed obtaining SSTR-PET/CT before PRRT (1-6 cycles, 177Lu somatostatin analog). Using the Interview Fusion Workstation (Mediso), a total of 872 metastases were manually segmented. Conventional PET parameters as well as textural features representing intratumoral heterogeneity were computed. The prognostic ability for PFS and overall survival (OS) were examined. After performing Cox regression, independent parameters were determined by ROC analysis to obtain cut-off values to be used for Kaplan-Meier analysis. Within follow-up (median, 43.1 months), 75 patients showed disease progression (median, 22.2 m) and 54 patients died (median, 27.6 m). Cox analysis identified 8 statistically independent heterogeneity parameters for time-to-progression and time-to-death. Among them, the textural feature Entropy predicted both PFS and OS. Conventional PET parameters failed in response prediction. Imaging-based heterogeneity assessment provides prognostic information in PRRT candidates and outperformed conventional PET parameters. Its implementation in clinical practice can pave the way for individualized patient management. PMID:27705948

  7. Interrogative suggestibility in opiate users.

    PubMed

    Murakami, A; Edelmann, R J; Davis, P E

    1996-09-01

    The present study investigated interrogative suggestibility in opiate users. A group of patients undergoing a methadone detoxification programme in an in-patient drug treatment unit (Detox group, n = 21), and a group of residents who had come off drugs and were no longer suffering from withdrawal syndrome (Rehab group, n = 19) were compared on interrogative suggestibility and various other psychological factors. Significant differences were found between the two groups, with the Detox group having more physical and psychological problems, and a higher total suggestibility score in comparison with the Rehab group. These findings are discussed in relation to the context of police interrogations and the reliability of confessions made by suspects and witnesses dependent on opiates.

  8. Heterogeneity of binding of muscarinic receptor antagonists in rat brain homogenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; el-Fakahany, E.E.

    1985-06-01

    The binding properties of (-)-(/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate and (/sup 3/H) N-methylscopolamine to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors have been investigated in rat brain homogenates. The binding of both antagonists demonstrated high affinity and saturability. Analysis of the binding data resulted in linear Scatchard plots. However, (-)-(/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate showed a significantly higher maximal binding capacity than that of (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine. Displacement of both ligands with several muscarinic receptor antagonists resulted in competition curves in accordance with the law of mass-action for quinuclidinyl benzilate, atropine and scopolamine. A similar profile was found for the quaternary ammonium analogs of atropine and scopolamine when (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine was used to label the receptors. However, when these hydrophilic antagonists were used to displace (-)-(/sup 3/H) quinuclidinyl benzilate binding, they showed interaction with high- and low-affinity binding sites. On the other hand, the nonclassical muscarinic receptor antagonist, pirenzepine, was able to displace both ligands from two binding sites. The present data are discussed in terms of the relationship of this anomalous heterogenity of binding of these hydrophilic muscarinic receptor antagonists and the proposed M1 and M2 receptor subtypes.

  9. Effect of Pharmacological Modulation of the Endocannabinoid System on Opiate Withdrawal: A Review of the Preclinical Animal Literature.

    PubMed

    Wills, Kiri L; Parker, Linda A

    2016-01-01

    Over the years, animal studies have revealed a role for the endocannabinoid system in the regulation of multiple aspects of opiate addiction. The current review provides an overview of this literature in regards to opiate withdrawal. The opiate withdrawal syndrome, hypothesized to act as a negative reinforcer in mediating continued drug use, can be characterized by the emergence of spontaneous or precipitated aversive somatic and affective states following the termination of drug use. The behaviors measured to quantify somatic opiate withdrawal and the paradigms employed to assess affective opiate withdrawal (e.g., conditioned place aversion) in both acutely and chronically dependent animals are discussed in relation to the ability of the endocannabinoid system to modulate these behaviors. Additionally, the brain regions mediating somatic and affective opiate withdrawal are elucidated with respect to their modulation by the endocannabinoid system. Ultimately, a review of these findings reveals dissociations between the brain regions mediating somatic and affective opiate withdrawal, and the ability of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor agonism/antagonism to interfere with opiate withdrawal within different brain sub regions.

  10. Effect of Pharmacological Modulation of the Endocannabinoid System on Opiate Withdrawal: A Review of the Preclinical Animal Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wills, Kiri L.; Parker, Linda A.

    2016-01-01

    Over the years, animal studies have revealed a role for the endocannabinoid system in the regulation of multiple aspects of opiate addiction. The current review provides an overview of this literature in regards to opiate withdrawal. The opiate withdrawal syndrome, hypothesized to act as a negative reinforcer in mediating continued drug use, can be characterized by the emergence of spontaneous or precipitated aversive somatic and affective states following the termination of drug use. The behaviors measured to quantify somatic opiate withdrawal and the paradigms employed to assess affective opiate withdrawal (e.g., conditioned place aversion) in both acutely and chronically dependent animals are discussed in relation to the ability of the endocannabinoid system to modulate these behaviors. Additionally, the brain regions mediating somatic and affective opiate withdrawal are elucidated with respect to their modulation by the endocannabinoid system. Ultimately, a review of these findings reveals dissociations between the brain regions mediating somatic and affective opiate withdrawal, and the ability of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor agonism/antagonism to interfere with opiate withdrawal within different brain sub regions. PMID:27445822

  11. Identification of the binding subunit of the sigma-type opiate receptor by photoaffinity labeling with 1-(4-azido-2-methyl(6-/sup 3/H)phenyl)-3-(2-methyl(4,6-/sup 3/H)phenyl)guanidine

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanaugh, M.P.; Tester, B.C.; Scherz, M.W.; Keana, J.F.W.; Weber, E.

    1988-04-01

    The sigma-type opiate receptor is a distinct binding site in the brain that may mediate some of the psychotomimetic effects caused by benzomorphan opiates and phencyclidine in humans. The authors have developed a synthetic, highly selective ligand for this receptor, 1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG). To identify the binding protein(s) of the sigma receptor, they have now synthesized a radiolabeled azide derivative of DTG, ((/sup 3/H)N/sub 3/DTG). In guinea pig brain membrane binding assays conducted in the dark, (/sup 3/H)N/sub 3/DTG bound reversibly, selectively, and with high affinity to sigma receptors. The drug specificity profile of reversible (/sup 3/H)-N/sub 3/DTG binding was identical to that of (/sup 3/H)DTG and /sup 3/H-labeled (+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine binding indicating that (/sup 3/H)N/sub 3/DTG is a selective sigma receptor ligand. Guinea pig brain membranes were photoaffinity-labeled with (/sup 3/H)N/sub 3/DTG. NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE of detergent-solubilized membrane extract identified a single 29-kDa radioactive band. Sepharose Cl-6B gel chromatography of photolabeled brain membranes solubilized with the nondenaturing detergent sodium cholate showed a radioactive complex with a Stoke's radius of 4.6 nm (M/sub r/, 150,000) that may represent the intact sigma receptor complex. NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE of this complex showed the radiolabeled material was a 29-kDa polypeptide that may be binding subunit of the sigma receptor.

  12. Intratumoral Heterogeneity for Expression of Tyrosine Kinase Growth Factor Receptors in Human Colon Cancer Surgical Specimens and Orthotopic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kuwai, Toshio; Nakamura, Toru; Kim, Sun-Jin; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Langley, Robert R.; Fan, Dominic; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Fidler, Isaiah J.

    2008-01-01

    The design of targeted therapy, particularly patient-specific targeted therapy, requires knowledge of the presence and intratumoral distribution of tyrosine kinase receptors. To determine whether the expression of such receptors is constant or varies between and within individual colon cancer neoplasms, we examined the pattern of expression of the ligands, epidermal growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor-B as well as their respective receptors in human colon cancer surgical specimens and orthotopic human colon cancers growing in the cecal wall of nude mice. The expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor and the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor on tumor cells and stromal cells, including tumor-associated endothelial cells, was heterogeneous in surgical specimens and orthotopic tumors. In some tumors, the receptor was expressed on both tumor cells and stromal cells, and in other tumors the receptor was expressed only on tumor cells or only on stromal cells. In contrast, the platelet-derived growth factor receptor was expressed only on stromal cells in both surgical specimens and orthotopic tumors. Examination of receptor expression in both individual surgical specimens and orthotopic tumors revealed that the platelet-derived growth factor receptor was expressed only on stromal cells and that the patterns of epidermal growth factor receptor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 expression differed between tumor cells. This heterogeneity in receptor expression among different tumor cells suggests that targeting a single tyrosine kinase may not yield eradication of the disease. PMID:18202197

  13. An opiate binding site in the rat brain is highly selective for 4,5-epoxymorphinans.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J; Sadée, W

    1983-09-16

    In vitro binding studies have demonstrated the existence of multiple opiate receptor types. An additional site in the rat brain (termed the lambda site) is distinct from the established types by its selectivity for 4,5-epoxymorphinans (such as naloxone and morphine). While the lambda site displays a high affinity for naloxone in vivo and in vitro in fresh brain membrane homogenates, these sites rapidly convert in vitro to a state of low affinity. The regional distribution of the lambda site in the brain is strikingly different from that of the classic opiate receptor types.

  14. Opiate and Cocaine Exposed Newborns: Growth Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butz, Arlene M.; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Royall, Richard; Kolodner, Ken; Pulsifer, Margaret B.; Lears, Mary Kathleen; Henderson, Robin; Belcher, Harolyn; Sellers, Sherri; Wilson, Modena

    1999-01-01

    Examines growth parameters at birth in 204 infants born to mothers who used cocaine and/or opiates during pregnancy. Outcome measures included birth weight, length, and head circumference. Study provides support that in utero cocaine exposure may confer more risk for somatic growth retardation at birth than opiate exposure. (Author/GCP)

  15. Opiates Modulate Noxious Chemical Nociception through a Complex Monoaminergic/Peptidergic Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Holly; Ortega, Amanda; Law, Wenjing; Hapiak, Vera; Summers, Philip; Clark, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The ability to detect noxious stimuli, process the nociceptive signal, and elicit an appropriate behavioral response is essential for survival. In Caenorhabditis elegans, opioid receptor agonists, such as morphine, mimic serotonin, and suppress the overall withdrawal from noxious stimuli through a pathway requiring the opioid-like receptor, NPR-17. This serotonin- or morphine-dependent modulation can be rescued in npr-17-null animals by the expression of npr-17 or a human κ opioid receptor in the two ASI sensory neurons, with ASI opioid signaling selectively inhibiting ASI neuropeptide release. Serotonergic modulation requires peptides encoded by both nlp-3 and nlp-24, and either nlp-3 or nlp-24 overexpression mimics morphine and suppresses withdrawal. Peptides encoded by nlp-3 act differentially, with only NLP-3.3 mimicking morphine, whereas other nlp-3 peptides antagonize NLP-3.3 modulation. Together, these results demonstrate that opiates modulate nociception in Caenorhabditis elegans through a complex monoaminergic/peptidergic cascade, and suggest that this model may be useful for dissecting opiate signaling in mammals. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Opiates are used extensively to treat chronic pain. In Caenorhabditis elegans, opioid receptor agonists suppress the overall withdrawal from noxious chemical stimuli through a pathway requiring an opioid-like receptor and two distinct neuropeptide-encoding genes, with individual peptides from the same gene functioning antagonistically to modulate nociception. Endogenous opioid signaling functions as part of a complex, monoaminergic/peptidergic signaling cascade and appears to selectively inhibit neuropeptide release, mediated by a α-adrenergic-like receptor, from two sensory neurons. Importantly, receptor null animals can be rescued by the expression of the human κ opioid receptor, and injection of human opioid receptor ligands mimics exogenous opiates, highlighting the utility of this model for dissecting opiate

  16. Heterogeneity of Drosophila nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: SAD, a novel developmentally regulated alpha-subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Sawruk, E; Schloss, P; Betz, H; Schmitt, B

    1990-01-01

    Two genes, ard and als, are known to encode subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in Drosophila. Here we describe the isolation of cDNA clones encoding a novel member (SAD, or alpha 2) of this receptor protein family. The deduced amino acid sequence displays high homology to the ALS protein and shares structural features with ligand binding nAChR alpha-subunits. Sad transcripts accumulate during major periods of neuronal differentiation and, in embryos, are localized in the central nervous system. Expression of SAD cRNA in Xenopus oocytes generates cation channels that are gated by nicotine. These data indicate heterogeneity of nAChRs in Drosophila. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1697262

  17. Structural Heterogeneity and Functional Domains of Murine Immunoglobulin G Fc Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravetch, Jeffrey V.; Luster, Andrew D.; Weinshank, Richard; Kochan, Jarema; Pavlovec, Amalia; Portnoy, Daniel A.; Hulmes, Jeffrey; Pan, Yu-Ching E.; Unkeless, Jay C.

    1986-11-01

    Binding of antibodies to effector cells by way of receptors to their constant regions (Fc receptors) is central to the pathway that leads to clearance of antigens by the immune system. The structure and function of this important class of receptors on immune cells is addressed through the molecular characterization of Fc receptors (FcR) specific for the murine immunoglobulin G isotype. Structural diversity is encoded by two genes that by alternative splicing result in expression of molecules with highly conserved extracellular domains and different transmembrane and intracytoplasmic domains. The proteins encoded by these genes are members of the immunoglobulin supergene family, most homologous to the major histocompatibility complex molecule Eβ. Functional reconstitution of ligand binding by transfection of individual FcR genes demonstrates that the requirements for ligand binding are encoded in a single gene. These studies demonstrate the molecular basis for the functional heterogeneity of FcR's, accounting for the possible transduction of different signals in response to a single ligand.

  18. The effect of isoquinoline alkaloids on opiate withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Capasso, A; Piacente, S; De Tommasi, N; Rastrelli, L; Pizza, C

    2006-01-01

    Our interest has been centered on isoquinoline alkaloids obtained from Argemone mexicana (Papaveraceae), Aristolochia constricta (Aristolochiaceae) and the opium alkaloid, papaverine. In this respect, the effect of these isoquinoline alkaloids was investigated on contractions induced by naloxone of isolated guinea pig ileum acutely exposed to morphine in vitro. The activity of these alkaloids was compared to the control compound, papaverine. Furthermore, the effect of these isoquinoline alkaloids was also determined on naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in isolated guinea pig ileum exposed to DAMGO (highly selective mu opioid receptor agonist) and U50-488H (highly selective kappa opioid receptor agonist) to test whether the possible interaction of isoquinoline alkaloids on opioid withdrawal involves mu- and/or kappa-opioid receptors. Isoquinoline alkaloids from A. mexicana (from 5 x 10(-6) to 1 x 10(-4) M), from A. constricta (1 x 10(-5) x 10(-5)-1 x 10(-4) M) as well as papaverine treatment (1 x 10(-7)-5 x 10(-6)-1 x 10(-6) M) before or after the opioid agonists were able of both preventing and reversing the naloxone-induced contraction after exposure to mu (morphine and DAMGO) or kappa (U50-488H) opiate receptor agonists in a concentration-dependent manner. Both acetylcholine response and electrical stimulation were also reduced by isoquinoline alkaloids and papaverine treatment as well as the final opiate withdrawal was still reduced. The results of the present study indicate that isoquinoline alkaloids as well as papaverine were able to produce significant influence on the opiate withdrawal in vitro and these compounds were able to exert their effects both at mu and kappa opioid agonists.

  19. Opiate modification of intracranial self-stimulation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Weibel, S L; Wolf, H H

    1979-01-01

    Studies were conducted to confirm the involvement of central opiate receptors in the expression of opiate modulation of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). Biphasic, dose-related changes in ICSS responding are described following IP administration of morphine sulfate (1-25 mg/kg) and levorphanol tartrate (LEV, 0.5-5 mg/kg). Similar patterns of response modification are reported following intraventricular (IVt) administration of LEV (0.01-0.2 muMoles) LEV's enantiomorph, dextrorphan, was not found to elicit comparable effects after either IP or IVt administration. Both the facilitatory and the depressant phases of LEV's action were antagonized by naltrexone (10 microgram, IVt), which had no apparent effect on ICSS by itself. Complete tolerance developed to the suppression of responding by 2.5 mg/kg LEV (IP) but not to the facilitatory effect of 0.5 mg/kg (IP), during a 5-day course of administration. The implications of these results for opiate reinforcement theory are discussed and possible mechanisms are advanced.

  20. Achalasia and chronic opiate use: innocent bystanders or associated conditions?

    PubMed

    Ravi, K; Murray, J A; Geno, D M; Katzka, D A

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution manometry identifies three subtypes of achalasia. However, type 3 differs from classic achalasia. Although opiates affect esophageal motility, opiate use and achalasia have not been studied. Patients with a new diagnosis of achalasia at Mayo Clinic Rochester between June 1, 2012 and January 3, 2014 were identified. Clinical records were reviewed to assess symptoms, opiate use, and therapy. Fifty-six patients with achalasia were identified, 14 (25%) were on opiates. Opiate prescription was unrelated to achalasia in all cases, with chronic back and joint pain constituting the majority. Of patients on opiates, five (36%) had type 3 achalasia compared with four (10%) not on opiates (P = 0.02). No patients on opiates had type 1 achalasia. Clinical presentation did not differ with opiates, although those on opiates were more likely to report chest pain (39 vs. 14%, P = 0.05) and less likely to have esophageal dilation (62 vs. 82%, P = 0.13), none with greater than 5-cm diameter. Contractile vigor was greater with opiate use, with distal contractile integral of 7149 versus 2615.5 mmHg/cm/second (P = 0.08). Treatment response was inferior on opiates, with persistent symptoms in 22% compared with 3% without opiates (P = 0.06). Opiate use is common in type 3 achalasia, with the majority of patients on opiates. No patients on opiates were diagnosed with type 1 achalasia. Manometric findings of type 3 achalasia mimic those induced by opiates, suggesting a physiologic mechanism for opiate induced type 3 achalasia. Treatment outcome is inferior with opiates, with opiate cessation perhaps preferable. Further studies assessing opiate use and achalasia are needed.

  1. 21 CFR 862.3650 - Opiate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Opiate test system. 862.3650 Section 862.3650 Food... Opiate test system. (a) Identification. An opiate test system is a device intended to measure any of the addictive narcotic pain-relieving opiate drugs in blood, serum, urine, gastric contents, and saliva....

  2. 21 CFR 862.3650 - Opiate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Opiate test system. 862.3650 Section 862.3650 Food... Opiate test system. (a) Identification. An opiate test system is a device intended to measure any of the addictive narcotic pain-relieving opiate drugs in blood, serum, urine, gastric contents, and saliva....

  3. 21 CFR 862.3650 - Opiate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Opiate test system. 862.3650 Section 862.3650 Food... Opiate test system. (a) Identification. An opiate test system is a device intended to measure any of the addictive narcotic pain-relieving opiate drugs in blood, serum, urine, gastric contents, and saliva....

  4. 21 CFR 862.3650 - Opiate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Opiate test system. 862.3650 Section 862.3650 Food... Opiate test system. (a) Identification. An opiate test system is a device intended to measure any of the addictive narcotic pain-relieving opiate drugs in blood, serum, urine, gastric contents, and saliva....

  5. 21 CFR 862.3650 - Opiate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Opiate test system. 862.3650 Section 862.3650 Food... Opiate test system. (a) Identification. An opiate test system is a device intended to measure any of the addictive narcotic pain-relieving opiate drugs in blood, serum, urine, gastric contents, and saliva....

  6. Heterogeneous estrogen receptor expression in circulating tumor cells suggests diverse mechanisms of fulvestrant resistance.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Costanza; Larios, Jose M; Muñiz, Maria C; Aung, Kimberly; Cannell, Emily M; Darga, Elizabeth P; Kidwell, Kelley M; Thomas, Dafydd G; Tokudome, Nahomi; Brown, Martha E; Connelly, Mark C; Chianese, David A; Schott, Anne F; Henry, N Lynn; Rae, James M; Hayes, Daniel F

    2016-08-01

    Fulvestrant is a dose dependent selective estrogen receptor (ER) down-regulator (SERD) used in ER-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Nearly all patients develop resistance. We performed molecular analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTC) to gain insight into fulvestrant resistance. Preclinical studies were performed with cultured breast cancer cells spiked into human blood and analyzed on the CellSearch(®) system. Clinical data are limited to a subset of patients with ER-positive MBC from a previously reported pilot trial whose disease was progressing on fulvestrant (N = 7) or aromatase inhibitors (AIs) (N = 10). CTCs were enumerated and phenotyped for ER and B-cell lymphoma (BCL2) using the CellSearch(®) CXC kit. In preclinical modeling, tamoxifen and AIs resulted in stabilized ER expression, whereas fulvestrant eliminated it. Five of seven patients progressing on fulvestrant had ≥5CTC/7.5 ml WB. Two of these five, treated with 500 mg/month fulvestrant, had no detectable CTC-expression of ER and BCL2 (an ER regulated gene). Three patients had heterogeneous CTC-ER and BCL2 expression indicating incomplete degradation of the ER target by fulvestrant. Two of these patients received 250 mg/month whereas the third patient received 500 mg/month fulvestrant. Her cancer harbored a mutation (Y537S) in the estrogen receptor alpha gene (ESR1). All seven ER positive patients progressing on AIs had heterogeneous CTC-ER expression. These results suggest heterogeneous mechanisms of resistance to fulvestrant, including insufficient dosage, ESR1 mutation, or conversion to dependence on non-ER pathways. CTC enumeration, phenotyping, and genotyping might identify patients who would benefit from fulvestrant dose escalation versus switching to alternative therapies.

  7. Contribution of opiates in sudden asthma deaths.

    PubMed

    Hlavaty, Leigh; Hansma, Patrick; Sung, LokMan

    2015-03-01

    Asthma is a common disease in the United States and is frequently encountered during medicolegal autopsies. Patients are often young and have a witnessed collapse or are found dead. Opiate abuse is also pervasive and is repeatedly seen in death investigations. All cases over a 7-year period involving asthma investigated at the Wayne County Medical Examiner's Office were reviewed for demographics, circumstances, autopsy toxicology findings, and cause and manner of death. Ninety-four cases met these criteria. Ten cases (10.5%) were positive for opiates, 8 listed drugs as the cause of death, and 2 listed asthma. Of cases with established asthma opiate positivity, 8 (80%) were found dead, and only one had a witnessed collapse. Compared with those without opiate abuse, asthmatic patients abusing opiates had a higher mean age, no reported respiratory symptoms immediately preceding death, and higher frequency of being found dead. A discernable difference exists between deaths in asthmatic patients in the presence of opiates and those without. These findings indicate that it may be possible to predict the presence of opiates given history investigation information, thereby focusing toxicology panels to promote cost-effective practices when ordering supportive tests.

  8. Heterogeneity of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) contractile and relaxing receptors in horse penile small arteries.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Dolores; Arcos, Luis Rivera de Los; Martínez, Pilar; Benedito, Sara; García-Sacristán, Albino; Hernández, Medardo

    2004-12-01

    -36) evoked potent slow relaxations in NA-precontracted arteries, under conditions of nitric oxide (NO) synthase blockade. Mechanical removal of the endothelium markedly enhanced contractions of NPY on NA-precontracted arteries, whereas blockade of the neuronal voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels did not alter NPY responses. These results demonstrate that NPY can elicit dual contractile/relaxing responses in penile small arteries through a heterogeneous population of postjunctional NPY receptors. Potentiation of the contractions evoked by NA involve both NPY Y(1) and NPY Y(2) receptors. An NO-independent relaxation probably mediated by an atypical endothelial NPY receptor is also shown and unmasked in the presence of selective antagonists of the NPY contractile receptors.

  9. [Antihypoxic properties of opiates and substance P].

    PubMed

    Vlasova, I G; Torshin, V I

    2001-01-01

    Using survival slices of the rat cerebellum, we studied the influence of opiates (alpha- and beta-endorphines, met-enkephalines) as well as substance P (SP) on the impulse activity (IA) of neurons. Low doses of the studied substances (10(-8)-10(-10) M) for the most part increased the IA of the neurons, while high doses (10(6)-10(-5) M) produced biphasic reaction (inhibition-excitation). It is supposed that opiates and SP act as transmitters in the cerebellum. Under increasing hypoxia, opiates and SP manifested antixypoxic properties both in low O22 concentration and under reoxygenation. Opiates and SP proved to be natural antihypoxants involved not only in nociception mechanisms but also in brain adaptation to oxygen deficiency.

  10. Dynamic heterogeneity and non-Gaussian statistics for acetylcholine receptors on live cell membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, W.; Song, H.; Su, Y.; Geng, L.; Ackerson, B. J.; Peng, H. B.; Tong, P.

    2016-05-01

    The Brownian motion of molecules at thermal equilibrium usually has a finite correlation time and will eventually be randomized after a long delay time, so that their displacement follows the Gaussian statistics. This is true even when the molecules have experienced a complex environment with a finite correlation time. Here, we report that the lateral motion of the acetylcholine receptors on live muscle cell membranes does not follow the Gaussian statistics for normal Brownian diffusion. From a careful analysis of a large volume of the protein trajectories obtained over a wide range of sampling rates and long durations, we find that the normalized histogram of the protein displacements shows an exponential tail, which is robust and universal for cells under different conditions. The experiment indicates that the observed non-Gaussian statistics and dynamic heterogeneity are inherently linked to the slow-active remodelling of the underlying cortical actin network.

  11. Receptor mechanisms underlying heterogenic reflexes among the triceps surae muscles of the cat.

    PubMed

    Nichols, T R

    1999-02-01

    The soleus (S), medial gastrocnemius (MG), and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscles of the cat are interlinked by rapid spinal reflex pathways. In the decerebrate state, these heterogenic reflexes are either excitatory and length dependent or inhibitory and force dependent. Mechanographic analysis was used to obtain additional evidence that the muscle spindle primary ending and the Golgi tendon organ provide the major contributions to these reflexes, respectively. The tendons of the triceps surae muscles were separated and connected to independent force transducers and servo-controlled torque motors in unanesthetized, decerebrate cats. The muscles were activated as a group using crossed-extension reflexes. Electrical stimulation of the caudal cutaneous sural nerve was used to provide a particularly strong activation of MG and decouple the forces of the triceps surae muscles. During either form of activation, the muscles were stretched either individually or in various combinations to determine the strength and characteristics of autogenic and heterogenic feedback. The corresponding force responses, including both active and passive components, were measured during the changing background tension. During activation of the entire group, the excitatory, heterogenic feedback linking the three muscles was found to be strongest onto LG and weakest onto MG, in agreement with previous results concerning the strengths of heteronymous Ia excitatory postsynaptic potentials among the triceps surae muscles. The inhibition, which is known to affect only the soleus muscle, was dependent on active contractile force and was detected essentially as rapidly as length dependent excitation. The inhibition outlasted the excitation and was blocked by intravenous strychnine. These results indicate that the excitatory and inhibitory effects are dominated by feedback from primary spindle receptors and Golgi tendon organs. The interactions between these two feedback pathways potentially can

  12. Resolution of Disulfide Heterogeneity in Nogo Receptor 1 Fusion Proteins by Molecular Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    P Weinreb; D Wen; F Qian; C Wildes; E Garber; L Walus; M Jung; J Wang; J Relton; et al.

    2011-12-31

    NgRI (Nogo-66 receptor) is part of a signalling complex that inhibits axon regeneration in the central nervous system. Truncated soluble versions of NgRI have been used successfully to promote axon regeneration in animal models of spinal-cord injury, raising interest in this protein as a potential therapeutic target. The LRR (leucine-rich repeat) regions in NgRI are flanked by N- and C-terminal disulfide-containing 'cap' domains (LRRNT and LRRCT respectively). In the present work we show that, although functionally active, the NgRI(310)-Fc fusion protein contains mislinked and heterogeneous disulfide patterns in the LRRCT domain, and we report the generation of a series of variant molecules specifically designed to prevent this heterogeneity. Using these variants we explored the effects of modifying the NgRI truncation site or the spacing between the NgRI and Fc domains, or replacing cysteines within the NgRI or IgG hinge regions. One variant, which incorporates replacements of Cys{sup 266} and Cys{sup 309} with alanine residues, completely eliminated disulfide scrambling while maintaining functional in vitro and in vivo efficacy. This modified NgRI-Fc molecule represents a significantly improved candidate for further pharmaceutical development, and may serve as a useful model for the optimization of other IgG fusion proteins made from LRR proteins.

  13. GBM heterogeneity as a function of variable epidermal growth factor receptor variant III activity

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Olle R.; McKinney, Andrew; Engler, Jane R.; Koshkakaryan, Gayane; Gong, Henry; Robinson, Aaron E.; Ewald, Andrew J.; Huillard, Emmanuelle; James, C. David; Molinaro, Annette M.; Shieh, Joseph T.; Phillips, Joanna J.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) due to a deletion of exons 2-7 of EGFR (EGFRvIII) is a common alteration in glioblastoma (GBM). While this alteration can drive gliomagenesis, tumors harboring EGFRvIII are heterogeneous. To investigate the role for EGFRvIII activation in tumor phenotype we used a neural progenitor cell-based murine model of GBM driven by EGFR signaling and generated tumor progenitor cells with high and low EGFRvIII activation, pEGFRHi and pEGFRLo. In vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro studies suggested a direct association between EGFRvIII activity and increased tumor cell proliferation, decreased tumor cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix, and altered progenitor cell phenotype. Time-lapse confocal imaging of tumor cells in brain slice cultures demonstrated blood vessel co-option by tumor cells and highlighted differences in invasive pattern. Inhibition of EGFR signaling in pEGFRHi promoted cell differentiation and increased cell-matrix adhesion. Conversely, increased EGFRvIII activation in pEGFRLo reduced cell-matrix adhesion. Our study using a murine model for GBM driven by a single genetic driver, suggests differences in EGFR activation contribute to tumor heterogeneity and aggressiveness. PMID:27738329

  14. Opiate Exposure State Controls a D2-CaMKIIα-Dependent Memory Switch in the Amygdala-Prefrontal Cortical Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Laura G; Zunder, Jordan; Renard, Justine; Fu, Jennifer; Rushlow, Walter; Laviolette, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian basolateral amygdala (BLA) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) comprise a functionally interconnected circuit that is critical for processing opiate-related associative memories. In the opiate-naïve state, reward memory formation in the BLA involves a functional link between dopamine (DA) D1 receptor (D1R) and extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling substrates, but switches to a DA D2 (D2R)/Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα)-dependent memory substrate following chronic opiate exposure and spontaneous withdrawal. Using conditioned place preference (CPP) in rats paired with molecular analyses, we examined the role of intra-mPFC CaMKII, ERK and DAergic activity during the formation of opiate associative memories, and how opiate exposure state may regulate the functions of these molecular memory pathways. We report that the role of CaMKIIα signaling is functionally reversed within the BLA-mPFC pathway depending on opiate exposure state. Thus, in the opiate-naïve state, intra-mPFC but not intra-BLA blockade of CaMKII signaling prevents formation of opiate reward memory. However, following chronic opiate exposure and spontaneous withdrawal, the role of CaMKII signaling in the BLA-mPFC is functionally reversed. This behavioral memory switch corresponds to a selective increase in the expression of D2R and CaMKIIα, but not other calcium/calmodulin-related molecules, nor D1R expression levels within the mPFC. PMID:26174594

  15. 'Lingering' opiate deaths? Concentration of opiates in medulla and femoral blood.

    PubMed

    Naso-Kaspar, Claire K; Herndon, Grant W; Wyman, John F; Felo, Joseph A; Lavins, Eric S; Gilson, Thomas P

    2013-10-01

    'Lingering death' cases occur when the circumstances of death indicate an opiate overdose, but measured opiate blood levels are only in the therapeutic range; death results from cardiac and respiratory depression. This study examined the relative concentration of opiates in femoral blood and in the medulla oblongata (sites for cardiac and respiratory control) from 41 cases to determine whether a difference in opiate concentration might explain lingering deaths. Opiates from blood and medulla were analyzed using GC-EI-MS in selective ion monitoring mode. Results were correlated with gross and microscopic findings of the lungs and with cause and manner of death. Opiate concentrations for morphine, codeine and 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM) were higher in the medulla than in blood. The brain: blood ratio for the analytes demonstrated an increasing ratio from morphine, to codeine, to 6-AM (1.42, 2.48 and 4.86), which corresponds to the relative lipophilicity of these analytes. The average right and left lung weights were 762 and 668 g, respectively. Histologic examination showed edema, and/or polarizable microemboli, acute bronchopneumonia and acute bronchitis. The preferential distribution of opiates to medulla suggests that lingering opiate deaths may be explained, at least in part, because of higher relative concentrations of drug in brain, compared with femoral blood.

  16. Inhibitory effect of opiates on LPS mediated release of TNF and IL-8.

    PubMed

    Bastami, Salumeh; Norling, Cecilia; Trinks, Cecilia; Holmlund, Birgitta; Walz, Thomas M; Ahlner, Johan; Uppugunduri, Srinivas

    2013-06-01

    Most patients with advanced cancer experience severe pain and are often treated with opiates. Cancer patients are especially susceptible to opportunistic infections due to treatment with immunosuppressive and cytostatic drugs. Since opiates have been demonstrated to have immunomodulatory effects, it is of clinical importance to evaluate potential differences between commonly used opiates with regard to their effect on the immune system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of morphine, tramadol, fentanyl and ketobemidone on the functioning of the immune system with special reference to TNF and IL-8 release. Method. U-937 cells were preincubated with different concentrations of opioids followed by stimulation with LPS 100 μg/ml for three hours. The effect of opioids on the levels of cytokine mRNA was studied using RT-PCR. Erk and Akt phosphorylation was also measured by Western blot. Results. All opioids with the exception of fentanyl were capable of inhibiting TNF release from U-937 cells. Morphine had no effect on IL-8 release but the effect of other opiates was almost the same as the effect on TNF. All opioids with the exception of fentanyl were capable of inhibiting production of mRNA for TNF and IL-8. The observed effects of opiates were not always reversible by naloxone, suggesting that the effects might be mediated by other receptors or through a non-receptor mediated direct effect. Although preliminary evidence suggests the involvement of Erk and Akt pathways, further studies are needed to unravel the intracellular pathways involved in mediating the effects of opiates. Our data suggests that the order of potency with regard to inhibition of cytokine release is as follows: tramadol > ketobemidone > morphine > fentanyl. Conclusion. Further studies are needed to understand the clinical implications of the observed immunosuppressive effects of tramadol and ketobemidone and to improve opioid treatment strategies in patients with cancer.

  17. Molecular characterization of opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this research was to purify and characterize active opioid receptors and elucidate molecular aspects of opioid receptor heterogeneity. Purification to apparent homogeneity of an opioid binding protein from bovine caudate was achieved by solubilization in the non-ionic detergent, digitonin, followed by sequential chromatography on the opiate affinity matrix, ..beta..-naltrexylethylenediamine-CH-Sepharose 4B, and on the lectine affinity matrix, wheat germ agglutinin-agarose. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS-PAGE) followed by autoradiography revealed that radioiodinated purified receptor gave a single band. Purified receptor preparations showed a specific activity of 12,000-15,000 fmol of opiate bound per mg of protein. Radioiodinated human beta-endorphin (/sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/) was used as a probe to investigate the ligand binding subunits of mu and delta opioid receptors. /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ was shown to bind to a variety of opioid receptor-containing tissues with high affinity and specificity with preference for mu and delta sites, and with little, if any, binding to kappa sites. Affinity crosslinking techniques were employed to covalently link /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ to opioid receptors, utilizing derivatives of bis-succinimidyl esters that are bifunctional crosslinkers with specificities for amino and sulfhydryl groups. This, and competition experiments with high type-selective ligands, permitted the assignment of two labeled peptides to their receptor types, namely a peptide of M/sub r/ = 65,000 for mu receptors and one of M/sub r/ = 53,000 for delta receptors.

  18. Analysis of photoaffinity-labeled aryl hydrocarbon receptor heterogeneity by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Perdew, G.H.; Hollenback, C.E. )

    1990-07-03

    The level of charge heterogeneity in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) was examined by high-resolution denaturing two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis. Hepa 1c1c7 cell cytosolic fraction was photoaffinity-labeled with 2-azido-3-({sup 125}I)-iodo-7,8-dibromodibenzo-p-dioxin and applied to isoelectric focusing (IEF) tube gels. After optimization of focusing conditions a broad peak of radioactivity was detected in the apparent pI range of 5.2-5.7. IEF tube gels were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by visualization of the radiolabeled AhR by autoradiography; three distinct isoforms were detected. The same 2D electrophoretic isoform pattern was obtained when the AhR from Hepa 1c1c7 was photoaffinity-labeled in cell culture. BP{sup r}Cl cells, a mutant line derived from Hepa 1c1c7 cells, contain an AhR that is unable to bind to DNA. Photoaffinity-labeled BP{sup r}Cl cytosolic fractions were subjected to 2D gel electrophoretic analysis resulting in essentially the same molecular weight and isoform pattern as seen in Hepa 1c1c7 cytosol. This result would suggest that if a mutation is present in the BP{sup r}Cl AhR it has not caused a significant change in its IEF pattern, although a small shift in the pI values was observed. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of photoaffinity-labeled cytosolic fractions from HeLa cells, the rat liver tumor cell line McA-RH777, and buffalo rat thymus revealed three isoforms, essentially the same isoform pattern as in Hepa 1c1c7 cells. This would indicate that despite the considerable molecular weight polymorphism between species the level of charge heterogeneity is high conserved.

  19. Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein K is a Novel Regulator of Androgen Receptor Translation

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Nishit K; Kim, Jayoung; Cinar, Bekir; Ramachandran, Aruna; Hager, Martin H; Di Vizio, Dolores; Adam, Rosalyn M; Rubin, Mark A; Raychaudhuri, Pradip; De Benedetti, Arrigo; Freeman, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of androgen receptor (AR) expression in prostate cancer (PCa) is still poorly understood. Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in PCa cells was previously shown to lower AR expression by a rapamycin-sensitive, post-transcriptional mechanism involving the AR mRNA 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR). In a search for an intermediate within the EGFR/PI3-kinase/Akt/mTOR pathway that regulates AR at this site, we identified the nucleic acid binding protein, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP-K), by mass spectrometric analysis of Akt immune complexes from lipid raft-enriched subcellular fractions. We show here that hnRNP-K is a novel inhibitor of AR mRNA translation that regulates androgen-responsive gene expression and PCa cell proliferation. A functional hnRNP-K binding site involved in down-regulating AR protein levels was identified in the AR mRNA 5′-UTR. Further analysis revealed that hnRNP-K is also able to inhibit AR translation in the absence of the 5′-UTR, consistent with the presence of additional predicted hnRNP-K binding sites within the AR open reading frame and in the 3′-UTR. Immunohistochemical analysis of a human PCa tissue microarray revealed an inverse correlation between hnRNP-K expression and AR protein levels in organ-confined PCa tumors and a substantial decline in cytoplasmic hnRNP-K in metastases, despite an overall increase in hnRNP-K levels in metastatic tumors. These data suggest that translational inhibition of AR by hnRNP-K may occur in organ-confined tumors but possibly at a reduced level in metastases. HnRNP-K is the first protein identified that directly interacts with and regulates the AR translational apparatus. PMID:19258514

  20. [Impact of opiates on dopaminergic neurons].

    PubMed

    Kaufling, Jennifer; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José; Barrot, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Since the work of Johnson and North, it is known that opiates increase the activity of dopaminergic neurons by a GABA neuron-mediated desinhibition. This model should however be updated based on recent advances. Thus, the neuroanatomical location of the GABA neurons responsible for this desinhibition has been recently detailed: they belong to a brain structure in continuity with the posterior part of the ventral tegmental area and discovered this past decade. Other data also highlighted the critical role played by glutamatergic transmission in the opioid regulation of dopaminergic neuron activity. During protracted opiate withdrawal, the inhibitory/excitatory balance exerted on dopaminergic neurons is altered. These results are now leading to propose an original hypothesis for explaining the impact of protracted opiate withdrawal on mood.

  1. Opiate and cocaine addiction: from bench to clinic and back to the bench.

    PubMed

    Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Zhou, Yan; Butelman, Eduardo R; Levran, Orna

    2009-02-01

    This review primarily focuses on our recent findings in bidirectional translational research on opiate and cocaine addictions. First, we present neurobiological and molecular studies on endogenous opioid systems (e.g. proopiomelanocortin, mu opioid receptor, dynorphin, and kappa opioid receptor), brain stress-responsive systems (e.g. orexin, arginine vasopressin, V1b receptor, and corticotropin-releasing factor), hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and neurotransmitters (especially dopamine), in response to both chronic cocaine or opiate exposure and to drug withdrawal, using several newly developed animal models and molecular approaches. The second aspect is human molecular genetic association investigations including hypothesis-driven studies and genome-wide array studies, to define particular systems involved in vulnerability to develop specific addictions, and response to pharmacotherapy.

  2. Opiate antagonist binding sites in discrete brain regions of spontaneously hypertensive and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmani, N.H.; Gulati, A.; Bhargava, H.N. )

    1991-01-01

    The binding of {sup 3}H-naltrexone, an opiate receptor antagonist, to membranes of discrete brain regions and spinal cord of 10 week old spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats was determined. The brain regions examined were hypothalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, corpus striatum, pons and medulla, midbrain and cortex. {sup 3}H-Naltrexone bound to membranes of brain regions and spinal cord at a single high affinity site with an apparent dissociation constant value of 3 nM. The highest density of {sup 3}H-naltrexone binding sites were in hippocampus and lowest in the cerebral cortex. The receptor density (B{sub max}value) and apparent dissociation constant (K{sub d} value) values of {sup 3}H-naltrexone to bind to opiate receptors on the membranes of amygdala, hippocampus, corpus striatum, pons and medulla, midgrain, cortex and spinal cord of WKY and SHR rates did not differ. The B{sub max} value of {sup 3}H-naltrexone binding to membranes of hypothalamus of SHR rates was 518% higher than WKY rats but the K{sub d} values in the two strains did not differ. It is concluded that SHR rats have higher density of opiate receptors labeled with {sup 3}H-naltrexone in the hypothalamus only, in comparison with WKY rats, and that such a difference in the density of opiate receptors may be related to the elevated blood pressure in SHR rats.

  3. Carbonylation induces heterogeneity in cardiac ryanodine receptor function in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shao, Chun Hong; Tian, Chengju; Ouyang, Shouqiang; Moore, Caronda J; Alomar, Fadhel; Nemet, Ina; D'Souza, Alicia; Nagai, Ryoji; Kutty, Shelby; Rozanski, George J; Ramanadham, Sasanka; Singh, Jaipaul; Bidasee, Keshore R

    2012-09-01

    Heart failure and arrhythmias occur at 3 to 5 times higher rates among individuals with diabetes mellitus, compared with age-matched, healthy individuals. Studies attribute these defects in part to alterations in the function of cardiac type 2 ryanodine receptors (RyR2s), the principal Ca(2+)-release channels on the internal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). To date, mechanisms underlying RyR2 dysregulation in diabetes remain poorly defined. A rat model of type 1 diabetes, in combination with echocardiography, in vivo and ex vivo hemodynamic studies, confocal microscopy, Western blotting, mass spectrometry, site-directed mutagenesis, and [(3)H]ryanodine binding, lipid bilayer, and transfection assays, was used to determine whether post-translational modification by reactive carbonyl species (RCS) represented a contributing cause. After 8 weeks of diabetes, spontaneous Ca(2+) release in ventricular myocytes increased ~5-fold. Evoked Ca(2+) release from the SR was nonuniform (dyssynchronous). Total RyR2 protein levels remained unchanged, but the ability to bind the Ca(2+)-dependent ligand [(3)H]ryanodine was significantly reduced. Western blotting and mass spectrometry revealed RCS adducts on select basic residues. Mutation of residues to delineate the physiochemical impact of carbonylation yielded channels with enhanced or reduced cytoplasmic Ca(2+) responsiveness. The prototype RCS methylglyoxal increased and then decreased the RyR2 open probability. Methylglyoxal also increased spontaneous Ca(2+) release and induced Ca(2+) waves in healthy myocytes. Treatment of diabetic rats with RCS scavengers normalized spontaneous and evoked Ca(2+) release from the SR, reduced carbonylation of RyR2s, and increased binding of [(3)H]ryanodine to RyR2s. From these data, we conclude that post-translational modification by RCS contributes to the heterogeneity in RyR2 activity that is seen in experimental diabetes.

  4. Inhibition of melanocortin 1 receptor slows melanoma growth, reduces tumor heterogeneity and increases survival

    PubMed Central

    Kansal, Rita G.; McCravy, Matthew S.; Basham, Jacob H.; Earl, Joshua A.; McMurray, Stacy L.; Starner, Chelsey J.

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma risk is increased in patients with mutations of melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) yet the basis for the increased risk remains unknown. Here we report in vivo evidence supporting a critical role for MC1R in regulating melanoma tumor growth and determining overall survival time. Inhibition of MC1R by its physiologically relevant competitive inhibitor, agouti signaling protein (ASIP), reduced melanin synthesis and morphological heterogeneity in murine B16-F10 melanoma cells. In the lungs of syngeneic C57BL/6 mice, mCherry-marked, ASIP-secreting lung tumors inhibited MC1R on neighboring tumors lacking ASIP in a dose dependent manner as evidenced by a proportional loss of pigment in tumors from mice injected with 1:1, 3:1 and 4:1 mixtures of parental B16-F10 to ASIP-expressing tumor cells. ASIP-expressing B16-F10 cells formed poorly pigmented tumors in vivo that correlated with a 20% longer median survival than those bearing parental B16-F10 tumors (p=0.0005). Mice injected with 1:1 mixtures also showed survival benefit (p=0.0054), whereas injection of a 4:1 mixture showed no significant difference in survival. The longer survival time of mice bearing ASIP-expressing tumors correlated with a significantly slower growth rate than parental B16-F10 tumors as judged by quantification of numbers of tumors and total tumor load (p=0.0325), as well as a more homogeneous size and morphology of ASIP-expressing lung tumors. We conclude that MC1R plays an important role in regulating melanoma growth and morphology. Persistent inhibition of MC1R provided a significant survival advantage resulting in part from slower tumor growth, establishing MC1R as a compelling new molecular target for metastatic melanoma. PMID:27028866

  5. Attributions and Relapse in Opiate Addicts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Brendan P.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Investigated whether attributions of opiate addicts would predict abstinence and reactions to abstinence violations. Found that addicts who at admission attributed to themselves greater responsibility for negative outcomes and who attributed relapse episodes to more personally controllable factors were subsequently more likely either to be…

  6. Behavioral measures of anxiety during opiate withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Grasing, K; Wang, A; Schlussman, S

    1996-10-01

    Heightened anxiety is a major component of the withdrawal syndromes associated with ethanol and sedative hypnotic medications. Because of similarities between the opiate and sedative-hypnotic withdrawal syndromes as well as data implicating heightened noradrenergic tone with opiate withdrawal, we investigated changes in anxiety measures identified by plus-maze and social interaction testing during opiate withdrawal. Because Sprague Dawley rats had very low levels of entry into plus-maze open arms, further studies were conducted using the Long-Evans strain. Long-Evans rats received continuous infusions of morphine sulfate at 44 mg/kg per day delivered by osmotic pump over 7 days while control animals received inert implants. During the first 3 days of withdrawal, the number and time of entries into open and closed arms of a plus-maze was recorded. Both social and aggressive behaviors were scored durings pairings of groups of two socially naive animals. Body weight was significantly reduced in morphine-treated animals prior to and during withdrawal. Both the number of entries into open plus-maze arms and the time spent in open areas increased over the 3 days of testing. However, no difference in plus-maze activity was detected between morphine-treated and control subjects. On the third day of withdrawal, social interaction time was greater in pairs of withdrawn and control subjects compared to pairs of two control subjects. In conclusion, behavioral measures of anxiety are not increased during opiate withdrawal.

  7. Chronic opiate treatment enhances both cocaine-reinforced and cocaine-seeking behaviors following opiate withdrawal.

    PubMed

    He, Shaunteng; Grasing, Kenneth

    2004-08-16

    After chronic exposure to psychostimulants or opiates, self-administration or conditioned place preference with either class is increased (sensitized). Cross-sensitization of conditioned place preference, i.e., enhancement of psychostimulant-induced preferences after exposure to opiates, has also been described, but increases in cocaine self-administration after morphine pretreatment have not been reported. The present study evaluated effects of chronic morphine treatment on cocaine reinforcement. Opiate dependence was established in Wistar rats by administration of morphine as a constant infusion that was gradually increased to a dose of 50mg/kg per day over a 1-week period. Immediately after discontinuation of chronic morphine treatment, animals were allowed to acquire cocaine self-administration under a simple fixed-ratio schedule (FR-1), and were subsequently advanced to a progressive ratio schedule. Acquisition of cocaine self-administration under the FR-1 did not differ in saline- and morphine-pretreated animals. For cocaine self-administration under a progressive ratio schedule measured at 5 or more days after the onset of opiate withdrawal, chronic pretreatment with morphine increased the number of ratios completed, augmented final response requirements, and produced a more stable pattern of cocaine self-administration. Responding was also increased in morphine-pretreated animals during an initial extinction session. These results show that chronic opiate treatment can enhance both cocaine-reinforced and cocaine-seeking behaviors following opiate withdrawal. A similar effect may occur in human patients who discontinue methadone or other forms of replacement therapy for opiate abuse, and may contribute to relapse involving use of cocaine or other psychostimulants.

  8. Endogenous Opiates and Behavior: 2006

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the twenty-ninth consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system, now spanning thirty years of research. It summarizes papers published during 2006 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (Section 2), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (Section 3); stress and social status (Section 4); tolerance and dependence (Section 5); learning and memory (Section 6); eating and drinking (Section 7); alcohol and drugs of abuse (Section 8); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (Section 9); mental illness and mood (Section 10); seizures and neurological disorders (Section 11); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (Section 12); general activity and locomotion (Section 13); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (Section 14); cardiovascular responses (Section 15); respiration and thermoregulation (Section 16); and immunological responses (Section 17). PMID:17949854

  9. Discrimination of heterogenous mRNAs encoding strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in Xenopus oocytes by antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Akagi, H; Patton, D E; Miledi, R

    1989-01-01

    Three synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides complementary to different parts of an RNA encoding a glycine receptor subunit were used to discriminate heterogenous mRNAs coding for glycine receptors in adult and neonatal rat spinal cord. Injection of the three antisense oligonucleotides into Xenopus oocytes specifically inhibited the expression of glycine receptors by adult spinal cord mRNA. In contrast, the antisense oligonucleotides were much less potent in inhibiting the expression of glycine receptors encoded by neonatal spinal cord mRNA. Northern blot analysis revealed that the oligonucleotides hybridized mostly to an adult cord transcript of approximately 10 kilobases in size. This band was also present in neonatal spinal cord mRNA but its density was about one-fourth of the adult cord message. There was no intense band in the low molecular weight position (approximately 2 kilobases), the existence of which was expected from electrophysiological studies with size-fractionated mRNA of neonatal spinal cord. Our results suggest that in the rat spinal cord there are at least three different types of mRNAs encoding functional strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors. Images PMID:2479016

  10. Leg edema from intrathecal opiate infusions.

    PubMed

    Aldrete, J A; Couto da Silva JM

    2000-01-01

    Despite the increasing popularity of intrathecal infusions to treat patients with long-term non-cancer-related pain, this therapy is not without serious side-effects. Five out of 23 patients who had intrathecal infusions of opiates for longer than 24 months developed leg and feet edema. As predisposing factors, cardiovascular disease, deep venous thrombosis, peripheral vascular disease, and venous stasis of the lower extremities were considered. Every patient who developed pedal and leg edema after the implantation of an infusion pump was also found to have leg edema and venous stasis prior to the time when the pump was inserted. This complication was severe enough to limit their physical activity, and to produce lymphedema, ulcerations and hyperpigmentation of the skin. Reduction of the edema occurred when the dose of the opiate was decreased, and in two cases in which the infusion was discontinued, there was almost complete resolution of the syndrome. It appears that the pre-existence of pedal edema and of venous stasis is a relative contraindication to the long-term intrathecal infusion of opiates in patients with chronic non-cancer pain.

  11. Functional characterization of insulin receptor gene mutations contributing to Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome - phenotypic heterogeneity of insulin receptor gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Fang, Qichen; Zhang, Feng; Wan, Hui; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Congrong; Bao, Yuqian; Zhang, Lei; Ma, Xiaojing; Lu, Junxi; Gao, Fei; Xiang, Kunsan; Jia, Weiping

    2011-01-01

    Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome (RMS) is a rare disorder that presents as severe insulin resistance as a result of mutations present in the insulin receptor (INSR). A Chinese girl with RMS presented with profound diabetes, hyperinsulinemia, acanthosis nigricans, hirsutism, and abnormalities of teeth and nails. Direct sequencing of the patient's INSR detected heterozygote mutations at Arg83Gln (R83Q) and Ala1028Val (A1028V), with the former representing a novel mutation. Functional studies of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells transfected with wild-type (WT) and mutant forms of INSR were performed to evaluate the effects of these mutations on receptor expression and activation. Receptor expression, insulin binding activity, and phosphorylation of the R83Q variant were comparable to WT. In contrast, expression of the A1028V receptor was much lower than that of WT INSR, and impairment of insulin binding and autophosphorylation were nearly commensurate with the decrease in expression detected. Reductions in the phosphorylation of IRS-1, Akt, and Erk1/2 (60%, 40%, and 50% of WT, respectively) indicate that the A1028V receptor contributes to impaired signal transduction. In conclusion, INSR mutations associated with RMS were identified. Moreover, the A1028V mutation associated with a decrease in expression of INSR potentially accounts for loss of function of the INSR.

  12. Tianeptine prevents respiratory depression without affecting analgesic effect of opiates in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Cavalla, David; Chianelli, Fabio; Korsak, Alla; Hosford, Patrick S; Gourine, Alexander V; Marina, Nephtali

    2015-08-15

    Respiratory depression remains an important clinical problem that limits the use of opiate analgesia. Activation of AMPA glutamate receptors has been shown to reverse fentanyl-induced respiratory changes. Here, we explored whether tianeptine, a drug known for its ability to phosphorylate AMPA receptors, can be used to prevent opiate-induced respiratory depression. A model of respiratory depression in conscious rats was produced by administration of morphine (10mg/kg, i.p.). Rats were pre-treated with test compounds or control solutions 5min prior to administration of morphine. Respiratory activity was measured using whole-body plethysmography. In conscious animals, tianeptine (2 and 10mg/kg, ip) and DP-201 (2-(4-((3-chloro-6-methyl-5,5-dioxido-6,11-dihydrodibenzo[c,f][1,2] thiazepin-11-yl)amino)butoxy)acetic acid; tianeptine analogue; 2mg/kg, ip) triggered significant (~30%) increases in baseline respiratory activity and prevented morphine-induced respiratory depression. These effects were similar to those produced by an ampakine CX-546 (15mg/kg, ip). The antinociceptive effect of morphine (hot plate test) was unaffected by tianeptine pre-treatment. In conclusion, the results of the experiments conducted in conscious rats demonstrate that systemic administration of tianeptine increases respiratory output and prevents morphine-induced respiratory depression without interfering with the antinociceptive effect of opiates.

  13. Regulation of neuronal ferritin heavy chain, a new player in opiate-induced chemokine dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Anna Cook; Meucci, Olimpia

    2013-01-01

    The heavy chain subunit of ferritin (FHC), a ubiquitous protein best known for its iron-sequestering activity as part of the ferritin complex, has recently been described as a novel inhibitor of signaling through the chemokine receptor CXCR4. Levels of FHC as well as its effects on CXCR4 activation increase in cortical neurons exposed to mu-opioid receptor agonists such as morphine, an effect likely specific to neurons. Major actions of CXCR4 signaling in the mature brain include a promotion of neurogenesis, activation of pro-survival signals, and modulation of excitotoxic pathways; thus FHC up-regulation may contribute to the neuronal dysfunction often associated with opiate drug abuse. This review summarizes our knowledge of neuronal CXCR4 function, its regulation by opiates and the role of FHC in this process, and known mechanisms controlling FHC production. We speculate on the mechanism involved in FHC regulation by opiates, and offer FHC as a new target in opioid-induced neuropathology. PMID:21465240

  14. Opiate-induced Changes in Brain Adenosine Levels and Narcotic Drug Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Manhong; Sahbaie, Peyman; Zheng, Ming; Lobato, Robert; Boison, Detlev; Clark, J. David; Peltz, Gary

    2012-01-01

    We have very little information about the metabolomic changes that mediate neurobehavioral responses, including addiction. It was possible that opioid-induced metabolomic changes in brain could mediate some of the pharmacodynamic effects of opioids. To investigate this, opiate-induced brain metabolomic responses were profiled using a semi-targeted method in C57BL/6 and 129Sv1 mice, which exhibit extreme differences in their tendency to become opiate dependent. Escalating morphine doses (10–40 mg/kg) administered over a 4-day period selectively induced a two-fold decrease (p<0.00005) in adenosine abundance in the brainstem of C57BL/6 mice, which exhibited symptoms of narcotic drug dependence; but did not decrease adenosine abundance in 129Sv1 mice, which do not exhibit symptoms of dependence. Based on this finding, the effect of adenosine on dependence was investigated in genetically engineered mice with alterations in adenosine tone in the brain and in pharmacologic experiments. Morphine withdrawal behaviors were significantly diminished (P<0.0004) in genetically engineered mice with reduced adenosine tone in the brainstem, and by treatment with an adenosine receptor1 (A1) agonist (2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine, 0.5 mg/kg) or an A2a receptor (A2a) antagonist (SCH 58261 1 mg/kg). These results indicate that adenosine homeostasis plays a crucial role in narcotic drug responses. Opiate-induced changes in brain adenosine levels may explain many important neurobehavioral features associated with opiate addiction and withdrawal. PMID:23098802

  15. Characterization and Utilization of Opiate-Like Hibernation Factors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-08

    aforementioned effects are reversed or retarded by the infusion of the opiate antagonists, naloxone and naltrexone . Such evidence enforces our hypothesis...inhibits protein synthesis in continuously growing TRMP cells ................................... 20 10. Low concentrations of plasma form both...infusion of the opiate antagonists naloxone or naltrexone ,(1, 2) and Bruce, et al.,(3) have shown that continuous naloxone infusion will effectively

  16. Burden and nutritional deficiencies in opiate addiction- systematic review article.

    PubMed

    Nabipour, Sepideh; Ayu Said, Mas; Hussain Habil, Mohd

    2014-08-01

    Addiction to the illicit and prescribed use of opiate is an alarming public health issue. Studies on addictive disorders have demonstrated severe nutritional deficiencies in opiate abusers with behavioral, physiological and cognitive symptoms. Opiate addiction is also link with a significant number of diseases including Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and other blood borne diseases generally stem from the use of needles to inject heroin. The use of medication assisted treatment for opioid addicts in combination with behavioural therapies has been considered as a highly effective treatment. Methadone is a long-lasting μ-opioid agonist and a pharmacological tool which attenuates withdrawal symptoms effectively replacement therapies. This review article aims to explain opiate addiction mechanisms, epidemiology and disease burden with emphasis on dietary and nutritional status of opiate dependent patients in methadone maintenance therapy.

  17. Burden and Nutritional Deficiencies in Opiate Addiction- Systematic Review Article

    PubMed Central

    NABIPOUR, Sepideh; AYU SAID, Mas; HUSSAIN HABIL, Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Addiction to the illicit and prescribed use of opiate is an alarming public health issue. Studies on addictive disorders have demonstrated severe nutritional deficiencies in opiate abusers with behavioral, physiological and cognitive symptoms. Opiate addiction is also link with a significant number of diseases including Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and other blood borne diseases generally stem from the use of needles to inject heroin. The use of medication assisted treatment for opioid addicts in combination with behavioural therapies has been considered as a highly effective treatment. Methadone is a long-lasting μ-opioid agonist and a pharmacological tool which attenuates withdrawal symptoms effectively replacement therapies. This review article aims to explain opiate addiction mechanisms, epidemiology and disease burden with emphasis on dietary and nutritional status of opiate dependent patients in methadone maintenance therapy. PMID:25927032

  18. Potencies of antagonists chemically related to iodoproxyfan at histamine H3 receptors in mouse brain cortex and guinea-pig ileum: evidence for H3 receptor heterogeneity?

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Kathmann, M; Bitschnau, H; Marr, I; Reidemeister, S; Stark, H; Schunack, W

    1996-04-01

    .001). In each of the three experimental models, iodoproxyfan was the most potent compound; its deiodo analogue was less potent by more than 1.1 log units. The present results show that the compounds under study possess moderate to high affinity and/or (partial) H3 receptor antagonist potency. The two functional H3 receptors in the mouse brain cortex and the guinea-pig ileum may be slightly different; further studies are necessary to clarify whether this difference is due to H3 receptor heterogeneity, species variants or differences in the efficiency of receptor coupling. The marked difference in the affinity/potency between iodoproxyfan and its deiodo analogue may suggest that a highly lipophilic residue in that part of the molecule favours a high affinity/antagonistic potency at H3 receptors.

  19. Heterogeneity of histamine H3 receptor genomic expression in the cerebral cortex of spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Shaw, J B; Cai, Q; Mtshali, C; Myles, E L; Washington, B

    2007-05-15

    Specific binding of [3H]-N-alpha-methylhistamine to homogenates from cerebral cortex tissue was analyzed in aged Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and Spontaneously Hypertensive rats (SHR). Scatchard plot analysis of [3H]-N-alpha-methylhistamine binding of the H3 receptor in the cerebral cortex from aged (6, 9, 12, and 16 week) SHR animals indicated that Bmax increased, respectively, 38.05 +/- 1.58, 59.63 +/- 2.48, 79.17 +/- 5.02, and 84.41 +/- 3.72 fmol/mg of protein. Binding studies using tissue from WKY rats indicated that maximal binding (Bmax) of the ligand to the receptor was not significantly altered. The analyses also yielded Kd values of 5, 7.2, 6.3 and 3.8 nM in SHR tissue respectively. Primers based on the sequence of the third intracellular loop of the H3 receptor were amplified at 35 cycles yielding several amplicons. These amplicons expressed sizes 875, 485, and 280 bp in 6 and 9 week cortical tissue from WKY animals where as in cortical tissue from 6 and 9 week SHR animals only two amplicons were expressed, 485 and 280 bp, respectively. Differences in gene expression for 12 and 16 week WKY and SHR rats were also compared using identical primers. Five amplicons were expressed in cortical tissue from 12 and 16 week WKY rats with 1000, 900, 821, 485, and 430 bp where as in 12 and 16 week SHR animals only one amplicon was expressed at 485 bp. The present results imply (1) that H3 receptor density in cortical tissue of SHR animals increases with age where as the number of the expressed amplicons of the detected H3 receptor decreases; and (2) even though a decrease in number of expressed amplicons of the H3 receptor were observed, an increase in expression of the larger amplicon (~500 bp) is evident.

  20. Heterogeneity of clinical features and corresponding antibodies in seven patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Sühs, Kurt-Wolfram; Wegner, Florian; Skripuletz, Thomas; Trebst, Corinna; Tayeb, Said Ben; Raab, Peter; Stangel, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Anti-N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is the most common type of encephalitis in the spectrum of autoimmune encephalitis defined by antibodies targeting neuronal surface antigens. In the present study, the clinical spectrum of this disease is presented using instructive cases in correlation with the anti-NMDA receptor antibody titers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum. A total of 7 female patients admitted to the hospital of Hannover Medical School (Hannover, Germany) between 2008 and 2014 were diagnosed with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. Among these patients, 3 cases were selected to illustrate the range of similar and distinct clinical features across the spectrum of the disease and to compare anti-NMDA antibody levels throughout the disease course. All patients received immunosuppressive treatment with methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin and/or plasmapheresis, followed in the majority of patients by second-line therapy with rituximab and cyclophosphamide. The disease course correlated with NMDA receptor antibody titers, and to a greater extent with the ratio between antibody titer and protein concentration. A favorable clinical outcome with a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of ≤1 was achieved in 4 patients, 1 patient had an mRS score of 2 after 3 months of observation only, whereas 2 patients remained severely impaired (mRS score 4). Early and aggressive immunosuppressive treatment appears to support a good clinical outcome; however, the clinical signs and symptoms differ distinctively and treatment decisions have to be made on an individual basis.

  1. Impaired periamygdaloid-cortex prodynorphin is characteristic of opiate addiction and depression.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sarah Ann R; Michaelides, Michael; Zarnegar, Parisa; Ren, Yanhua; Fagergren, Pernilla; Thanos, Panayotis K; Wang, Gene-Jack; Bannon, Michael; Neumaier, John F; Keller, Eva; Volkow, Nora D; Hurd, Yasmin L

    2013-12-01

    Negative affect is critical for conferring vulnerability to opiate addiction as reflected by the high comorbidity of opiate abuse with major depressive disorder (MDD). Rodent models implicate amygdala prodynorphin (Pdyn) as a mediator of negative affect; however, evidence of PDYN involvement in human negative affect is limited. Here, we found reduced PDYN mRNA expression in the postmortem human amygdala nucleus of the periamygdaloid cortex (PAC) in both heroin abusers and MDD subjects. Similar to humans, rats that chronically self-administered heroin had reduced Pdyn mRNA expression in the PAC at a time point associated with a negative affective state. Using the in vivo functional imaging technology DREAMM (DREADD-assisted metabolic mapping, where DREADD indicates designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs), we found that selective inhibition of Pdyn-expressing neurons in the rat PAC increased metabolic activity in the extended amygdala, which is a key substrate of the extrahypothalamic brain stress system. In parallel, PAC-specific Pdyn inhibition provoked negative affect-related physiological and behavioral changes. Altogether, our translational study supports a functional role for impaired Pdyn in the PAC in opiate abuse through activation of the stress and negative affect neurocircuitry implicated in addiction vulnerability.

  2. Heterogeneous function of ryanodine receptors, but not IP3 receptors, in hamster cremaster muscle feed arteries and arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Westcott, Erika B.

    2011-01-01

    The roles played by ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) in vascular smooth muscle in the microcirculation remain unclear. Therefore, the function of both RyRs and IP3Rs in Ca2+ signals and myogenic tone in hamster cremaster muscle feed arteries and downstream arterioles were assessed using confocal imaging and pressure myography. Feed artery vascular smooth muscle displayed Ca2+ sparks and Ca2+ waves, which were inhibited by the RyR antagonists ryanodine (10 μM) or tetracaine (100 μM). Despite the inhibition of sparks and waves, ryanodine or tetracaine increased global intracellular Ca2+ and constricted the arteries. The blockade of IP3Rs with xestospongin D (5 μM) or 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (100 μM) or the inhibition of phospholipase C using U-73122 (10 μM) also attenuated Ca2+ waves without affecting Ca2+ sparks. Importantly, the IP3Rs and phospholipase C antagonists decreased global intracellular Ca2+ and dilated the arteries. In contrast, cremaster arterioles displayed only Ca2+ waves: Ca2+ sparks were not observed, and neither ryanodine (10–50 μM) nor tetracaine (100 μM) affected either Ca2+ signals or arteriolar tone despite the presence of functional RyRs as assessed by responses to the RyR agonist caffeine (10 mM). As in feed arteries, arteriolar Ca2+ waves were attenuated by xestospongin D (5 μM), 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (100 μM), and U-73122 (10 μM), accompanied by decreased global intracellular Ca2+ and vasodilation. These findings highlight the contrasting roles played by RyRs and IP3Rs in Ca2+ signals and myogenic tone in feed arteries and demonstrate important differences in the function of RyRs between feed arteries and downstream arterioles. PMID:21357503

  3. Heterogeneity of human lymphocyte Fc receptors. II. Relationship to antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gormus, B. J.; Woodson, Mildred; Kaplan, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were incubated (stripped) with pronase or papain and compared with unstripped lymphocytes for their ability to mediate antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Despite marked removal or inactivation of receptors for heat-aggregated IgG (aggG) by proteolytic digestion, and pronounced changes in the percentages of cells rosetting with IgG-sensitized erythrocytes (EA) (decreased by papain, increased by pronase), stripped PBL functioned normally in ADCC. Stripped and unstripped lymphocytes were pre-treated with aggG to determine the role of aggG receptors in ADCC. AggG almost totally abolished ADCC by unstripped PBL, but inhibited ADCC by enzyme-stripped lymphocytes relatively poorly. Neither untreated nor stripped PBL were able to induce cytotoxicity of chicken erythrocyte (CRBC) target cells sensitized with the Fab'2 fragment of anti-CRBC IgG antibody (CRBC-A). Exposure of PBL to EA monolayers composed of CRBC-A or of sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) sensitized with rabbit anti-SRBC IgG antibody (SRBC-A) depleted PBL of cells that rosetted with CRBC-A and with human Rh-positive, type O erythrocytes sensitized with the human anti-Rh serum Ripley (HRBC-A Ripley). Non-adherent cells were incapable of binding aggG and had markedly diminished cytotoxicity in ADCC. Similarly, exposure of PBL to HRBC-A Ripley monolayers resulted in non-adherent cells that were incapable of rosette formation with HRBC-A or CRBC-A, failed to bind aggG, and exhibited significantly diminished ADCC activity. These studies indicated that: (1) cytotoxic effector PBL active in ADCC (K cells) have receptors for aggG and for EA; (2) PBL deficient in functional aggG receptors (enzymatically inactivated or removed) are capable of inducing normal levels of ADCC; (3) aggG and EA receptors appear to be closely associated on native K-cell membranes; (4) there is no clear-cut relationship in a given lymphocyte population between the presence of either aggG or

  4. Detection of opiate use in a methadone maintenance treatment population with the CEDIA 6-acetylmorphine and CEDIA DAU opiate assays.

    PubMed

    Spanbauer, A C; Casseday, S; Davoudzadeh, D; Preston, K L; Huestis, M A

    2001-10-01

    Heroin, with a plasma half-life of approximately 5 min, is rapidly metabolized to 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM). 6-AM, a specific marker for heroin use, which also has a short half-life of only 0.6 h, is detected in urine for only a few hours after heroin exposure. Ingestion of poppy seeds and/or licit opiate analgesics can produce positive urine opiate tests. This has complicated the interpretation of positive opiate results and contributed to the decision to raise opiate cutoff concentrations and to require 6-AM confirmation in federally mandated workplace drug-testing programs. Microgenics Corp. has developed the CEDIA 6-AM assay, a homogeneous enzyme immunoassay for semiquantitative determination of 6-AM in human urine, in addition to its CEDIA DAU opiate assay. Urine specimens were collected 3 times per week from 27 participants enrolled in a clinical research trial evaluating a contingency management treatment program for heroin and cocaine abuse. Of the 1377 urine specimens screened, 261 (18.9%) were positive for opiates at > or = 300 ng/mL, 153 (11.1%) were positive for opiates at > or = 2000 ng/mL, and 55 (4.0%) were positive for 6-AM at > or = 10 ng/mL. For opiate-positive screens > or = 300 and > or = 2000 ng/mL, 91.3% and 80.8% confirmed positive for morphine or codeine at the respective gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) cutoffs. All specimens screening positive for 6-AM also confirmed positive by GC-MS at > or = 10 ng/mL. Increasing the opiate screening and confirmation cutoffs for the federal workplace drug-testing program resulted in 8% fewer opiate-positive tests; however, recent heroin use was not affected by this change.

  5. Heterogeneity of clinical features and corresponding antibodies in seven patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    SÜHS, KURT-WOLFRAM; WEGNER, FLORIAN; SKRIPULETZ, THOMAS; TREBST, CORINNA; TAYEB, SAID BEN; RAAB, PETER; STANGEL, MARTIN

    2015-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is the most common type of encephalitis in the spectrum of autoimmune encephalitis defined by antibodies targeting neuronal surface antigens. In the present study, the clinical spectrum of this disease is presented using instructive cases in correlation with the anti-NMDA receptor antibody titers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum. A total of 7 female patients admitted to the hospital of Hannover Medical School (Hannover, Germany) between 2008 and 2014 were diagnosed with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. Among these patients, 3 cases were selected to illustrate the range of similar and distinct clinical features across the spectrum of the disease and to compare anti-NMDA antibody levels throughout the disease course. All patients received immunosuppressive treatment with methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin and/or plasmapheresis, followed in the majority of patients by second-line therapy with rituximab and cyclophosphamide. The disease course correlated with NMDA receptor antibody titers, and to a greater extent with the ratio between antibody titer and protein concentration. A favorable clinical outcome with a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of ≤1 was achieved in 4 patients, 1 patient had an mRS score of 2 after 3 months of observation only, whereas 2 patients remained severely impaired (mRS score 4). Early and aggressive immunosuppressive treatment appears to support a good clinical outcome; however, the clinical signs and symptoms differ distinctively and treatment decisions have to be made on an individual basis. PMID:26622479

  6. Charge heterogeneity: Basic antibody charge variants with increased binding to Fc receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hintersteiner, Beate; Lingg, Nico; Zhang, Peiqing; Woen, Susanto; Hoi, Kong Meng; Stranner, Stefan; Wiederkum, Susanne; Mutschlechner, Oliver; Schuster, Manfred; Loibner, Hans; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We identified active isoforms of the chimeric anti-GD2 antibody, ch14.18, a recombinant antibody produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells, which is already used in clinical trials.1,2,3 We separated the antibody by high resolution ion-exchange chromatography with linear pH gradient elution into acidic, main and basic charge variants on a preparative scale yielding enough material for an in-depth study of the sources and the effects of microheterogeneity. The binding affinity of the charge variants toward the antigen and various cell surface receptors was studied by Biacore. Effector functions were evaluated using cellular assays for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Basic charge variants showed increased binding to cell surface receptor FcγRIIIa, which plays a major role in regulating effector functions. Furthermore, increased binding of the basic fractions to the neonatal receptor was observed. As this receptor mediates the prolonged half-life of IgG in human serum, this data may well hint at an increased serum half-life of these basic variants compared to their more acidic counterparts. Different glycoform patterns, C-terminal lysine clipping and N-terminal pyroglutamate formation were identified as the main structural sources for the observed isoform pattern. Potential differences in structural stability between individual charge variant fractions by nano differential scanning calorimetry could not been detected. Our in-vitro data suggests that the connection between microheterogeneity and the biological activity of recombinant antibody therapeutics deserves more attention than commonly accepted. PMID:27559765

  7. Increasing opiate abstinence through voucher-based reinforcement therapy.

    PubMed

    Silverman, K; Wong, C J; Higgins, S T; Brooner, R K; Montoya, I D; Contoreggi, C; Umbricht-Schneiter, A; Schuster, C R; Preston, K L

    1996-06-01

    Heroin dependence remains a serious and costly public health problem, even in patients receiving methadone maintenance treatment. This study used a within-subject reversal design to assess the effectiveness of voucher-based abstinence reinforcement in reducing opiate use in patients receiving methadone maintenance treatment in an inner-city program. Throughout the study subjects received standard methadone maintenance treatment involving methadone, counseling, and urine monitoring (three times per week). Thirteen patients who continued to use opiates regularly during a 5-week baseline period were exposed to a 12-week program in which they received a voucher for each opiate-free urine sample provided: the vouchers had monetary values that increased as the number of consecutive opiate-free urines increased. Subjects continued receiving standard methadone maintenance for 8 weeks after discontinuation of the voucher program (return-to-baseline). Tukey's posthoc contrasts showed that the percentage of urine specimens that were positive for opiates decreased significantly when the voucher program was instituted. (P < or = 0.01) and then increased significantly when the voucher program was discontinued during the return-to-baseline condition (P < or = 0.01). Rates of opiate positive urines in the return-to-baseline condition remained significantly below the rates observed in the initial baseline period (P < or = 0.01). Overall, the study shows that voucher-based reinforcement contingencies can decrease opiate use in heroin dependent patients receiving methadone maintenance treatment.

  8. [NON-ONCOLOGIC CHRONIC PAIN TREATMENT WITH OPIATES].

    PubMed

    Molas Ferrer, Glòria; Castellà Kastner, Montse; Lombraña Mencia, María

    2014-09-01

    Non-oncologic chronic pain is a very common symptom. It causes great impact on daily activities of people who suffer it. The incidence of this type of pain is rising due to the increase in life expectancy. The most affected population is geriatric population. Back pain, osteoarthritic pain and neuropathic pain are the most prevalent types of non-oncologic chronic pain. Opiates, among other analgesic drugs, are used to alleviate this type of pain. Opiates are divided into minor opiates (tramadol, codeine) and major opiates (morphine, fentanyl, oxycodone, methadone). Opiates are very effective to treat pain, but they also have important adverse effects that we must know and try to prevent. One of these adverse effects is the opiates ability to cause dependence, tolerance, addiction and other aberrant behaviors. Terminology of these concepts is sometimes confusing. It is necessary to be careful and control the patient periodically in order to avoid these aberrant behaviors. However, if health professionals take precautions to prevent these behaviors, the risk is considerably reduced. Controlling patients on opiate treatment is essential to achieve a correct use if these drugs.

  9. Further evidence for the heterogeneity of functional muscarinic receptors in guinea pig gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Akici, A; Karaalp, A; Iskender, E; Christopoulos, A; El-Fakahany, E E; Oktay, S

    2000-01-24

    Previous studies have suggested the presence of multiple muscarinic receptor subtypes in guinea pig gallbladder smooth muscle, although the relative abundance and functional role of these subtypes remains an area of significant research efforts. The present study utilized both radioligand kinetic and functional experiments to further probe the nature of the muscarinic receptors in gallbladder smooth muscle and their mode of coupling to intra- and extra-cellular Ca(2+) sources. Dissociation kinetic studies using [3H]N-methylscopolamine ([3H]NMS) indicated that the binding profile in guinea pig gallbladder smooth muscle could not be reconciled with that expected for a single muscarinic receptor subtype, the latter determined in parallel experiments conducted on the cloned muscarinic M(1)-M(5) subtypes in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Furthermore, comparison of the gallbladder data with the dissociation characteristics of [3H]NMS in guinea pig urinary bladder revealed a significantly different kinetic profile, with the urinary bladder, but not the gallbladder, demonstrating biphasic radioligand dissociation kinetics. In functional experiments, carbachol caused a concentration-dependent contraction of guinea pig gallbladder smooth muscle strips in Ca(2+)-free or 5 mM Sr(2+)-substituted physiological salt solutions (PSS) with amplitudes of the maximal contractions corresponding to 45.8+/-8.0% and 33.2+/-6.6% of control responses in normal PSS, respectively. Furthermore, the stimulus-response characteristics of carbachol-mediated contraction appeared significantly altered in Ca(2+)-free PSS relative to normal or Sr(2+)-substituted PSS. The antagonist, methoctramine (1x10(-7)-3x10(-5) M), exerted only a slight inhibition of carbachol (10(-5) M)-induced contractions in 5 mM Sr(2+)-substituted medium, whereas it was significantly more potent in antagonizing gallbladder contractions in response to 10(-5) M carbachol in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). Both atropine

  10. Variable angle of strabismus related to timing of opiate ingestion.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jonathan J; Brown, Valerie; Fern, Alasdair I

    2009-04-01

    Heroin (diamorphine) is a highly addictive opiate with potential for misuse. A small number of reports have linked the commencement of heroin misuse to acute exotropia with diplopia and subsequent withdrawal to esotropia in individuals without previous symptoms.(1-5) We describe a young adult who sought strabismus surgery to correct a large-angle exotropia. Detailed patient history and orthoptic measurements at different times of the day revealed a fluctuating angle of divergence relating to the timing of opiate ingestion, rendering surgery inappropriate. We suggest that opiate misuse, which may not willingly be disclosed by patients, should be specifically asked about before acquired-strabismus surgery is undertaken in adults.

  11. Atrial natriuretic peptide receptor heterogeneity and effects on cyclic GMP accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Leitman, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) on guanylate cyclase activity and cyclic GMP accumulation were examined, since these hormones appear to be intimately associated with blood pressure and intravascular volume homeostasis. ANP was found to increase cyclic GMP accumulation in ten cell culture systems, which were derived from blood vessels, adrenal cortex, kidney, lung, testes and mammary gland. ANP receptors were characterized in intact cultured cells using {sup 125}I-ANP{sub 8-33}. Specific {sup 125}I-ANP binding was saturable and of high affinity. Scratchard analysis of the binding data for all cell types exhibited a straight line, indicating that these cells possessed a single class of binding sites. Despite the presence of linear Scatchard plots, these studies demonstrated that cultured cells possess two functionally and physically distinct ANP-binding sites. Most of the ANP-binding sites in cultured cells have a molecular size of 66,000 daltons under reducing conditions. The identification of cultured cell types in which hormones (ANP and oxytocin) regulate guanylate cyclase activity and increase cyclic GMP synthesis will provide valuable systems to determine the mechanisms of hormone-receptor coupling to guanylate cyclase and the cellular processes regulated by cyclic GMP.

  12. Structural heterogeneity of the μ-opioid receptor's conformational ensemble in the apo state.

    PubMed

    Sena, Diniz M; Cong, Xiaojing; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Kless, Achim; Carloni, Paolo

    2017-04-03

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest and most pharmaceutically relevant family of membrane proteins. Here, fully unbiased, enhanced sampling simulations of a constitutively active mutant (CAM) of a class A GPCR, the μ-opioid receptor (μOR), demonstrates repeated transitions between the inactive (IS) and active-like (AS-L) states. The interconversion features typical activation/inactivation patterns involving established conformational rearrangements of conserved residues. By contrast, wild-type μOR remains in IS during the same course of simulation, consistent with the low basal activity of the protein. The simulations point to an important role of residue W293(6.48) at the "toggle switch" in the mutation-induced constitutive activation. Such role has been already observed for other CAMs of class A GPCRs. We also find a significantly populated intermediate state, rather similar to IS. Based on the remarkable accord between simulations and experiments, we suggest here that this state, which has escaped so far experimental characterization, might constitute an early step in the activation process of the apo μOR CAM.

  13. The opiate-like action of tilidine is mediated by metabolites.

    PubMed

    Schulz, R; Bläsig, J; Wüster, M; Herz, A

    1978-09-01

    The analgesic effect of tilidine in rats is completely antagonized by the narcotic antagonist naloxone. Radioreceptor assays revealed, however, that the main metabolites of tilidine, nortilidine and bisnortilidine, rather than tilidine exhibit affinity to opiate receptors. These findings were confirmed in studies using the electrically stimulated guinea pig ileum and the mouse vas deferens. Chronic tilidine administration to rats caused a considerable degree of physical dependence, which was expected from the ability of the intact animal to metabolize tilidine. In the isolated ileum from chronically morphinized guinea pigs, both nortilidine and bisnortilidine fully substituted for morphine in preventing induction of withdrawal, indicating dependence liability of these metabolites.

  14. HIV, opiates, and enteric neuron dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Galligan, J J

    2015-04-01

    Human immune deficient virus (HIV) is an immunosuppressive virus that targets CD4(+) T-lymphocytes. HIV infections cause increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and cancer. HIV infection can also alter central nervous system (CNS) function causing cognitive impairment. HIV does not infect neurons but it does infect astrocytes and microglia in the CNS. HIV can also infect enteric glia initiating an intestinal inflammatory response which causes enteric neural injury and gut dysfunction. Part of the inflammatory response is HIV induced production of proteins including, Transactivator of transcription (Tat) which contribute to neuronal injury after release from HIV infected glial cells. A risk factor for HIV infection is intravenous drug use with contaminated needles and chronic opiate use can exacerbate neural injury in the nervous system. While most research focuses on the actions of Tat and other HIV related proteins and opiates on the brain, recent data indicate that Tat can cause intestinal inflammation and disruption of enteric neuron function, including alteration of Na(+) channel activity and action potential generation. A paper published in this issue of Neurogastroenterology and Motility extends these findings by identifying an interaction between Tat and morphine on enteric neuron Na(+) channels and on intestinal motility in vivo using a Tat expressing transgenic mouse model. These new data show that Tat protein can enhance the inhibitory actions of morphine on action potential generation and propulsive motility. These findings are important to our understanding of how HIV causes diarrhea in infected patients and for the use of opioid drugs to treat HIV-induced diarrhea.

  15. The heterogeneous allelic repertoire of human toll-like receptor (TLR) genes.

    PubMed

    Georgel, Philippe; Macquin, Cécile; Bahram, Seiamak

    2009-11-17

    Toll-Like Receptors (TLR) are critical elements of the innate arm of the vertebrate immune system. They constitute a multigenic family of receptors which collectively bind a diverse array of--exogeneous as well as endogeneous--ligands. An exponential burst of knowledge has defined their biological role in fight against infections and generation/modulation of auto-immune disorders. Hence, they could at least be conceptually recognized--despite being structurally unrelated - as innate counterparts to Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) molecules--equally recognizing antigenic ligands (albeit structurally more homogeneous i.e., peptides), again derived from self and/or non-self sources--preeminent this time in adaptive immunity. Our great disparities in face of infections and/or susceptibility to auto-immune diseases have provoked an intense search for genetic explanations, in part satisfied by the extraordinary MHC allelic repertoire. An equally in-depth and systematic analysis of TLR diversity is lacking despite numerous independent reports of a growing number of SNPs within these loci. The work described here aims at providing a preliminary picture of the allelic repertoire--and not purely SNPs--of all 10 human TLR coding sequences (with exception of TLR3) within a single cohort of up to 100 individuals. It appears from our work that TLR are unequally polymorphic: TLR2 (DNA alleles: 7/protein alleles: 3), 4 (4/3), 7 (6/3), 8 (9/2) and 9 (8/3) being comparatively least diverse whereas TLR1 (11/10), 5 (14/12), 6 (10/8) and 10 (15/10) show a substantial number of alleles. In addition to allelic assignment of a large number of SNPs, 10 new polymorphic positions were hereby identified. Hence this work depicts a first overview of the diversity of almost all human TLR genes, a prelude for large-scale population genetics as well as genetic association studies.

  16. A new, highly selective CCK-B receptor radioligand (( sup 3 H)(N-methyl-Nle28,31)CCK26-33): Evidence for CCK-B receptor heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.J.; Vaughn, L.K.; Fang, S.N.; Bogert, C.L.; Yamamura, M.S.; Hruby, V.J.; Yamamura, H.I. )

    1990-12-01

    (N-methyl-Nle28,31)CCK26-33 (SNF 8702) is a nonsulfated cholecystokinin octapeptide analog that is highly selective for cholecystokinin-B (CCK-B) receptors. Inhibition studies using (125I) Bolton-Hunter-labeled CCK-8 show that SNF 8702 has over 4,000-fold greater affinity for CCK receptors in guinea pig cortex relative to those in guinea pig pancreas. SNF 8702 was tritium-labeled to a specific activity of 23.7 Ci/mmol and its binding properties characterized for guinea pig brain membrane preparations. (3H)SNF 8702 binds to a single site with high affinity (Kd = 0.69-0.90 nM) in guinea pig cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus and pons-medulla. Of these four tissues, the highest receptor density was measured in the cortex (86 fmol/mg of protein) and the lowest in the pons-medulla (22 fmol/mg of protein). In contrast to findings of single-site binding in some brain regions, evidence for CCK-B receptor heterogeneity is observed under other conditions. (3H)SNF 8702 binding to membranes prepared from whole guinea pig brain shows biphasic association kinetics at a concentration of 2.0 nM consistent with the presence of binding site heterogeneity. Binding site heterogeneity is consistently observed for (3H)SNF 8702 binding to guinea pig whole brain membranes in saturation studies where a high-affinity site (Kd = 0.31 nM) is distinguished from a low-affinity site (Kd = 3.3 nM). Binding site heterogeneity is also observed for the midbrain-thalamic region. CCK-B receptor heterogeneity is suggested by the effect of the guanyl nucleotide analogue, guanylyl-imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p), on (3H)SNF 8702 binding to CCK-B receptors in the cerebellum.

  17. Illicit Use of Prescription Opiates among Graduate Students.

    PubMed

    Varga, Matthew D; Parrish, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Through this study the authors assessed the prevalence rate, reasons for use, and poly-substance use of prescription opiates among graduate students. The authors employed a cross-sectional survey research design using an online, self-administered questionnaire to assess the prevalence rates of prescription opiate use among graduate students (N = 1,033), reasons for use, and their likelihood for poly-substance use. The survey was e-mailed to 5,000 graduate students. Graduate students (19.7%) reported illicit use of prescription opiates in their lifetime and 6.6% reported past-year illicit use. Those who indicated illicitly using prescription opiates did so for self-medication reasons; a few respondents indicated recreational use. Students using prescription opiates were 75% less likely to use marijuana; 79% less likely to use cocaine; and 75% less likely to use ecstasy. Graduate students are illicitly using prescription opiates, but primarily for self-medication, and, while doing so, are less likely to use other substances.

  18. Heterogeneity of postsynaptic receptor occupancy fluctuations among glycinergic inhibitory synapses in the zebrafish hindbrain

    PubMed Central

    Rigo, Jean-Michel; Badiu, Carmen Ionela; Legendre, Pascal

    2003-01-01

    The amplitude of glycinergic miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) varies considerably in neurons recorded in the isolated hindbrain of 50-h-old zebrafish larvae. At this age, glycinergic synapses are functionally mature. In order to measure the occupancy level of postsynaptic glycine receptors (GlyRs) and to determine the pre- and/or postsynaptic origin of its variability, we analysed mIPSCs within bursts evoked by α-latrotoxin (0.1–1 nm). Two types of burst were observed according to their mIPSC frequencies: ‘slow’ bursts with clearly spaced mIPSCs and ‘fast’ bursts characterised by superimposed events. Non-stationary noise analysis of mIPSCs in some ‘slow’ bursts recorded in the presence or in the absence of Ca2+ denoted that mIPSC amplitude variance did not depend on the quantity of neurotransmitters released (presynaptic origin), but rather on intrinsic stochastic behaviour of the same group of GlyRs (postsynaptic origin). In these bursts, the open probability measured at the peak of the mIPSCs was close to 0.5 while the maximum open probability is close to 0.9 for the synaptic isoform of GlyRs (heteromeric α1/β GlyRs). In ‘fast’ bursts with superimposed events, a correlation was found between the amplitude of mIPSCs and the basal current level measured at their onset, which could suggest that the same group of GlyRs is activated during such bursts. Altogether, our results indicate that glycine synapses can display different release modes in the presence of α-latrotoxin. They also indicate that, in our model, postsynaptic GlyRs cannot be saturated by the release of a single vesicle. PMID:14500774

  19. Poppy Seed Consumption or Opiate Use: The Determination of Thebaine and Opiates of Abuse in Postmortem Fluids and Tissues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    codeine , following the consumption of poppy seeds .4-8 Scientific literature has clearly demonstrated the distinct possibil- ity of a morphine and/or... codeine positive due to poppy seed consumption.4-8 The potential legal consequences of an opiate positive necessitates that laboratories, both...drug testing and forensic, differentiate between an opiate positive due to morphine or codeine use and an opi- ate positive due to poppy seed

  20. Opiate alkaloids and nitric oxide production in the nematode Ascaris suum.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Pryor, Stephen C; Putnam, Jennifer; Cadet, Patrick; Stefano, George B

    2004-02-01

    The tissue distribution, course of secretion, and sex differences of morphine were delineated in Ascaris suum. Nitric oxide (NO) release in various tissues in response to morphine and its metabolite morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) were also examined. Ascaris suum of both sexes along with their incubation fluid were analyzed for morphine concentrations by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) over a 5-day period. Various tissues were also dissected for HPLC and NO analysis. Morphine was found to be most prevalent in the muscle tissue, and there is significantly more morphine in females than males, probably because of the large amounts present in the female uterus. Morphine (10(-9) M) and M6G (10(-9) M) stimulated the release of NO from muscles. Naloxone (10(-7) M) and N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10(-6) M) blocked (P < 0.005) morphine-stimulated NO release from A. suum muscle tissue. D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Om-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP) (10(-7) M) did not block morphine's NO release. However, naloxone could not block M6G-stimulated NO release by muscles, whereas CTOP (10(-7) M) blocked its release. These findings were in seeming contradiction to our earlier inability to isolate a mu opiate receptor messenger RNA by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction using a human mu primer. This suggests that a novel mu opiate receptor was possibly present and selective toward M6G.

  1. Opiate sensitivity test in patients with stereotypic movement disorder and trichotillomania.

    PubMed

    Frecska, Ede; Arato, Mihaly

    2002-06-01

    Preliminary data about the therapeutic effect of opiate receptor manipulation in self-injurious behavior (SIB) suggest that endogenous opioid mechanisms may have a pathophysiological role in that condition and their involvement may be dependent on the severity of the SIB. The aim of this study was to use fentanyl-induced prolactin response as an opiate receptor sensitivity test in patients with stereotypic movement disorder (SMD) manifesting SIB (skin picking). Healthy volunteers and trichotillomanic patients were enrolled as comparison subjects. Individuals with trichotillomania (TTM) manifest repetitive, less serious self-mutilation (hair pulling) and are classified under different DSM-IV category than SMD. Therefore, they were considered as patient controls. Ten healthy subjects received 0.05 mg/70 kg and another 10 were given 0.1 mg/70 kg dose of fentanyl intravenously in the AM hours. Five of them had placebo trials. A dose of 0.05 mg/70 kg fentanyl was administered to patients with SMD (n = 10) and TTM (n = 12). Serial blood sampling was performed for prolactin measurements. Fentanyl elevated plasma prolactin in a dose-dependent manner. Patients with skin picking, but not with hair pulling, showed significantly increased responses. This finding supports the involvement of endogenous opioids in the pathomechanism of serious SIB.

  2. Enhanced bioavailability of opiates after intratracheal administration

    SciTech Connect

    Findlay, J.W.A.; Jones, E.C.; McNulty, M.J.

    1986-03-01

    Several opiate analgesics have low oral bioavailabilities in the dog because of presystemic metabolism. Intratracheal administration may circumvent this first-pass effect. Three anesthetized beagles received 5-mg/kg doses of codeine phosphate intratracheally (i.t.), orally (p.o.) and intravenously (i.v.) in a crossover study. The following drugs were also studied in similar experiments: ethylmorphine hydrochloride (5 mg/kg), pholcodine bitartrate (10 mg/kg, hydrocodone bitartrate (4 mg/kg) and morphine sulfate (2.5 mg/kg). Plasma drug concentrations over the 24- to 48-hr periods after drug administrations were determined by radioimmunoassays. I.t. bioavailabilities (codeine (84%), ethylmorphine (100%), and morphine (87%)) of drugs with poor oral availabilities were all markedly higher than the corresponding oral values (14, 26, and 23%, respectively). I.t. bioavailabilities of pholcodine (93%) and hydrocodone (92%), which have good oral availabilities (74 and 79%, respectively), were also enhanced. In all cases, peak plasma concentrations occurred more rapidly after i.t. (0.08-0.17 hr) than after oral (0.5-2 hr) dosing and i.t. disposition often resembled i.v. kinetics. I.t. administration may be a valuable alternative dosing route, providing rapid onset of pharmacological activity for potent drugs with poor oral bioavailability.

  3. Heterogeneity of the M1 muscarinic receptor subtype between peripheral lung and cerebral cortex demonstrated by the selective antagonist AF-DX 116

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, J.W.; Halonen, M.; Seaver, N.A.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1987-07-27

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the majority of muscarinic receptors in rabbit peripheral lung homogenates bind pirenzepine with high affinity (putative M1 subtype). In experiments of AF-DX 116 inhibiting (TH)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate or (TH)pirenzepine, the authors found similar inhibitory constants for AF-DX 116 binding in rat heart and rabbit peripheral lung that were 4-fold smaller (i.e. of higher affinity) than the inhibitory constant for rat cerebral cortex. This results demonstrates heterogeneity of the M1 muscarinic receptor subtype between peripheral lung and cerebral cortex. 20 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  4. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutation heterogeneity analysis of pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinoma successfully treated with erlotinib: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZOU, FANGWEN; XIE, GUIYUAN; MA, JIN-AN; ZHOU, DONG-AI; JIANG, YI; ZHENG, JIAO-YUN

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinoma (PSC) is a rare histological subtype of non-small cell lung cancer, and the available studies on the response to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) is limited. In the present study, a 73-year-old female presented with a large mass in the lower right lung, which was diagnosed as a PSC on biopsy. An amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) test revealed that the patient possessed the wild-type EGFR gene, and the patient subsequently underwent radiotherapy (60 Gy) and four 21-day cycles of chemoradiotherapy (1,600 mg gemcitabine, days 1 and 8; 30 mg, cisplatin, days 1–3). Following radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment, a CT scan revealed complete remission of the mass in the lower right lung, however, metastases were identified in the paraaortic lymph node, bilateral iliac fossa and the right gluteal region. Notably, an EGFR exon 21 L858R gene mutation was identified in the mass of the right gluteal metastasis. Therefore, treatment with erlotinib was initiated. The patient continued to experience progression-free survival for six months following the initiation of erlotinib therapy. However, multiple metastases were then identified, and all lesions possessed the wild-type EGFR gene, as identified by the ARMS test. The findings suggest that erlotinib is a viable therapeutic option for the treatment of PSC patients that possess an EGFR mutation. The spatio-temporal evolution of EGFR mutational heterogeneity in PSC may result in drug-resistance, which challenges EGFR-TKI therapy and EGFR gene mutation diagnosis. PMID:26137049

  5. Adolescent cannabis exposure alters opiate intake and opioid limbic neuronal populations in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ellgren, Maria; Spano, Sabrina M; Hurd, Yasmin L

    2007-03-01

    Cannabis use is a hypothesized gateway to subsequent abuse of other drugs such as heroin. We currently assessed whether Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) exposure during adolescence modulates opiate reinforcement and opioid neural systems in adulthood. Long-Evan male rats received THC (1.5 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.)) or vehicle every third day during postnatal days (PNDs) 28-49. Heroin self-administration behavior (fixed ratio-1; 3-h sessions) was studied from young adulthood (PND 57) into full adults (PND 102). THC-pretreated rats showed an upward shift throughout the heroin self-administration acquisition (30 microg/kg/infusion) phase, whereas control animals maintained the same pattern once stable intake was obtained. Heightened opiate sensitivity in THC animals was also evidenced by higher heroin consumption during the maintenance phase (30 and 60 microg/kg/infusion) and greater responding for moderate-low heroin doses (dose-response curve: 7.5, 15, 30, 60, and 100 microg/kg/injection). Specific disturbance of the endogenous opioid system was also apparent in the brain of adults with adolescent THC exposure. Striatal preproenkephalin mRNA expression was exclusively increased in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell; the relative elevation of preproenkephalin mRNA in the THC rats was maintained even after heroin self-administration. Moreover, mu opioid receptor (muOR) GTP-coupling was potentiated in mesolimbic and nigrostriatal brainstem regions in THC-pretreated animals. muOR function in the NAc shell was specifically correlated to heroin intake. The current findings support the gateway hypothesis demonstrating that adolescence cannabis exposure has an enduring impact on hedonic processing resulting in enhanced opiate intake, possibly as a consequence of alterations in limbic opioid neuronal populations.

  6. Reduction of opiate withdrawal symptoms with use of clonidine in a county jail.

    PubMed

    Fresquez-Chavez, Kathy R; Fogger, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, addicted inmates admitted to jail in New Mexico are in the process of opiate withdrawal. While the standard for opiate detoxification is a narcotic taper, correctional policy restricts opiate use for safety reasons. An alternative for withdrawal is a supportive intervention with clonidine, a non-opiate. Could clonidine be beneficial for acute opiate withdrawal symptoms in this population? Fifty-five inmates (37 male and 18 female) volunteered to participate in assessing clonidine for the reduction of withdrawal symptoms. Symptoms were assessed with the Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale and treated with a standard clonidine protocol. Clonidine significantly decreased the mean scores at 1 and 4 hours after medication use. Clonidine for opiate withdrawal reduces symptoms when opiate-assisted detoxification is not available.

  7. Add-on gabapentin in the treatment of opiate withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Raga, José; Sabater, Ana; Perez-Galvez, Bartolome; Castellano, Miguel; Cervera, Gaspar

    2004-05-01

    Gabapentin is an antiepileptic drug shown to be effective in the treatment of pain disorders and appears to be useful as well for several psychiatric disorders, including bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders, alcohol withdrawal and cocaine dependence. Gabapentin, at a dose of 600 mg three times a day, was evaluated as an add-on medication to a standard detoxification regime in seven heroin dependent individuals undergoing outpatient opiate withdrawal treatment. All seven patients successfully completed opiate detoxification and commenced opiate antagonist treatment with naltrexone on day five of withdrawal treatment, as scheduled. No adverse event was noted. Gabapentin appeared to lead a reduction in symptomatic medication and an overall beneficial effect on symptoms of heroin withdrawal.

  8. HIV-1 Tat and opiate-induced changes in astrocytes promote chemotaxis of microglia through the expression of MCP-1 and alternative chemokines.

    PubMed

    El-Hage, Nazira; Wu, Guanghan; Wang, Juan; Ambati, Jayakrishna; Knapp, Pamela E; Reed, Janelle L; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Hauser, Kurt F

    2006-01-15

    Opiates exacerbate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat(1-72)-induced release of key proinflammatory cytokines by astrocytes, which may accelerate HIV neuropathogenesis in opiate abusers. The release of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, also known as CCL2), in particular, is potentiated by opiate-HIV Tat interactions in vitro. Although MCP-1 draws monocytes/macrophages to sites of CNS infection, and activated monocytes/microglia release factors that can damage bystander neurons, the role of MCP-1 in neuro-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (neuroAIDS) progression in opiate abusers, or nonabusers, is uncertain. Using a chemotaxis assay, N9 microglial cell migration was found to be significantly greater in conditioned medium from mouse striatal astrocytes exposed to morphine and/or Tat(1-72) than in vehicle-, mu-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonist-, or inactive, mutant Tat(delta31-61)-treated controls. Conditioned medium from astrocytes treated with morphine and Tat caused the greatest increase in motility. The response was attenuated using conditioned medium immunoneutralized with MCP-1 antibodies, or medium from MCP-1(-/-) astrocytes. In the presence of morphine (time-release, subcutaneous implant), intrastriatal Tat increased the proportion of neural cells that were astroglia and F4/80+ macrophages at 7 days post-injection. This was not seen after treatment with Tat alone, or with morphine plus inactive Tat(delta31-61) or naltrexone. Glia displayed increased MOR and MCP-1 immunoreactivity after morphine and/or Tat exposure. The findings indicate that MCP-1 underlies most of the response of microglia, suggesting that one way in which opiates exacerbate neuroAIDS is by increasing astroglial-derived proinflammatory chemokines at focal sites of CNS infection and promoting macrophage entry and local microglial activation. Importantly, increased glial expression of MOR can trigger an opiate-driven amplification/positive feedback of MCP-1 production and

  9. Maintenance Medication for Opiate Addiction: The Foundation of Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Bart, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    Illicit use of opiates is the fastest growing substance use problem in the United States and the main reason for seeking addiction treatment services for illicit drug use throughout the world. It is associated with significant morbidity and mortality related to HIV, hepatitis C, and overdose. Treatment for opiate addiction requires long-term management. Behavioral interventions alone have extremely poor outcomes, with more than 80% of patients returning to drug use. Similarly poor results are seen with medication assisted detoxification. This article provides a topical review of the three medications approved by the FDA for long-term treatment of opiate dependence: the opioid agonist methadone, the opioid partial agonist buprenorphine, and the opioid antagonist naltrexone. Basic mechanisms of action and treatment outcomes are described for each medication. Results indicate that maintenance medication provides the best opportunity for patients to achieve recovery from opiate addiction. Extensive literature and systematic reviews show that maintenance treatment with either methadone or buprenorphine is associated with retention in treatment, reduction in illicit opiate use, decreased craving, and improved social function. Oral naltrexone is ineffective in treating opiate addiction but recent studies using extended release naltrexone injections have shown promise. While no direct comparisons between extended release naltrexone injections and either methadone or buprenorphine exist, indirect comparison of retention shows inferior outcome compared to methadone and buprenorphine. Further work is needed to compare directly each medication and determine individual factors that can assist in medication selection. Until such time, selection of medication should be based on informed choice following a discussion of outcomes, risks, and benefits of each medication. PMID:22873183

  10. One-pot heterogeneous synthesis of Δ(3)-tetrahydrocannabinol analogues and xanthenes showing differential binding to CB(1) and CB(2) receptors.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Ornelio; Messina, Federica; Pelosi, Azzurra; Curini, Massimo; Petrucci, Vanessa; Gertsch, Jürg; Chicca, Andrea

    2014-10-06

    Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) is the major psychoactive cannabinoid in hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) and responsible for many of the pharmacological effects mediated via cannabinoid receptors. Despite being the major cannabinoid scaffold in nature, Δ(9)-THC double bond isomers remain poorly studied. The chemical scaffold of tetrahydrocannabinol can be assembled from the condensation of distinctly substituted phenols and monoterpenes. Here we explored a microwave-assisted one pot heterogeneous synthesis of Δ(3)-THC from orcinol (1a) and pulegone (2). Four Δ(3)-THC analogues and corresponding Δ(4a)-tetrahydroxanthenes (Δ(4a)-THXs) were synthesized regioselectively and showed differential binding affinities for CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors. Here we report for the first time the CB1 receptor binding of Δ(3)-THC, revealing a more potent receptor binding affinity for the (S)-(-) isomer (hCB1Ki = 5 nM) compared to the (R)-(+) isomer (hCB1Ki = 29 nM). Like Δ(9)-THC, also Δ(3)-THC analogues are partial agonists at CB receptors as indicated by [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays. Interestingly, the THC structural isomers Δ(4a)-THXs showed selective binding and partial agonism at CB2 receptors, revealing a simple non-natural natural product-derived scaffold for novel CB2 ligands.

  11. Dracunculus medinensis and Schistosoma mansoni contain opiate alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Baggerman, G; Secor, W Evan; Casares, F; Pryor, S C; Fricchione, G L; Ruiz-Tiben, E; Eberhard, M L; Bimi, L; Stefano, G B

    2002-04-01

    The results of analysis, by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrochemical detection and by nano-electrospray-ionization, double quadrupole/orthogonal-acceleration, time-of-flight mass spectrometry, indicate that adult Dracunculus medinensis and Schistosoma mansoni both contain the opiate alkaloid morphine and that D. medinesis also contains the active metabolite of morphine, morphine 6-glucuronide. From these and previous observations, it would appear that many helminths are probably using opiate alkaloids as potent immunosuppressive and antinociceptive signal molecules, to down-regulate immunosurveillance responsiveness and pain signalling in their hosts.

  12. New methodology for the N-demethylation of opiate alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zemin; Scammells, Peter J

    2007-12-21

    N-Demethylation is a key step in the preparation of a number of semisynthetic opiate pharmaceuticals. Herein we report a high-yielding, catalytic procedure for the N-demethylation of opiates which has a number of advantages over existing methods. For example, tetrasodium 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-sulfophenyl)porphyrinatoiron(II) (0.3 molar equiv) effected the transformation of codeine methyl ether to the corresponding N-nor analogue in 91% yield. The catalyst was readily removed and recycled.

  13. Pholcodine interference in the immunoassay for opiates in urine.

    PubMed

    Svenneby, G; Wedege, E; Karlsen, R L

    1983-01-01

    The excretion in urine after single oral therapeutic doses of morphine derivatives was analysed with radioimmunoassay (RIA) and homogeneous enzyme immunoassay (EMIT) for opiates. In contrast to the rapid excretion of ethylmorphine and codeine, pholcodine showed positive results for opiates 2-6 weeks after intake when the urines were analysed with the RIA-method. When analysed with the EMIT-method, positive results were obtained for pholcodine for approximately 10 days. As pholcodine is a common component in cough mixtures, its prolonged excretion could represent a hazard in interpreting the results from drug analyses of urines.

  14. Activation of reward circuitry in human opiate addicts.

    PubMed

    Sell, L A; Morris, J; Bearn, J; Frackowiak, R S; Friston, K J; Dolan, R J

    1999-03-01

    The neurobiological mechanisms of opiate addictive behaviour in humans are unknown. A proposed model of addiction implicates ascending brainstem neuromodulatory systems, particularly dopamine. Using functional neuroimaging, we assessed the neural response to heroin and heroin-related cues in established opiate addicts. We show that the effect of both heroin and heroin-related visual cues are maximally expressed in the sites of origin of ascending midbrain neuromodulatory systems. These context-specific midbrain activations predict responses to salient visual cues in cortical and subcortical regions implicated in reward-related behaviour. These findings implicate common neurobiological processes underlying drug and drug-cue-related effects.

  15. Evidence from opiate binding studies that heroin acts through its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Inturrisi, C E; Schultz, M; Shin, S; Umans, J G; Angel, L; Simon, E J

    1983-01-01

    The relative affinity to opiate receptors of heroin, 6-acetylmorphine and morphine was estimated by determining their ability to displace specifically bound 3H-naltrexone from rat brain opiate binding sites. In vitro hydrolysis of heroin to 6-acetylmorphine was monitored in the binding assay filtrate by use of a quantitative HPLC procedure. The rate of heroin hydrolysis was significantly slower at 0 degrees C than at 37 degrees C. The displacement of 1 nM 3H-naltrexone by unlabeled ligand at concentrations ranging from 7 to 500 nM was measured at 0 degrees C for 120 minutes, yielding IC50 values of heroin = 483 nM, 6-acetylmorphine = 73 nM and morphine = 53 nM. When the binding data for heroin were recalculated to include the displacement that could be attributed to the 6-acetylmorphine derived from heroin degradation during the incubation, all of the apparent heroin binding was accounted for by the 6-acetylmorphine. These results are consistent with previous reports of the low binding affinity of morphine congeners (e.g., codeine) that lack a free phenolic 3-hydroxyl group and support the view that heroin is a prodrug which serves to determine the distribution of its intrinsically active metabolites, 6-acetylmorphine and morphine.

  16. Photoperiodic changes in opiate binding and their functional implications in golden hamsters.

    PubMed

    Tubbiola, M L; Nock, B; Bittman, E L

    1989-11-27

    Daylength modulates gonadotropin secretion, gonadal steroid hormone feedback, sexual behavior and body weight in male golden hamsters. Endogenous opiates regulate each of these phenomena, and the ability of opiate receptor blockade to elevate serum LH secretion is photoperiod-dependent. We used in vitro autoradiography to localize and quantify effects of daylength in golden hamsters. Hamsters were exposed to stimulatory (14 h light: 10 h dark) or inhibitory (10 h light: 14 h dark) photoperiods for 10 weeks before specific [3H]naloxone binding was assessed. Short days significantly decreased binding in medial amygdala and the intercalated amygdaloid nucleus. This effect was reversed by superior cervical ganglionectomy. No significant effects of daylength were observed in other amygdaloid, hypothalamic or preoptic areas. Lesions of the medial amygdala decreased copulatory behavior, short day-induced weight loss, and anogenital chemoinvestigation but did not affect gonadal regression or other forms of chemoinvestigation. These lesions facilitated testosterone's negative feedback on luteinizing hormone in long days but did not interfere with the potentiation of negative feedback by short days.

  17. Neurotransmitter Receptor Binding in Bovine Cerebral Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Reinhard, John F.; Synder, Solomon H.

    1980-05-01

    Purified preparations of microvessels from bovine cerebral cortex contain substantial levels of alpha-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, and histamine 1 receptor binding sites but only negligible serotonin, muscarinic cholinergic, opiate, and benzodiazepine receptor binding. Norepinephrine and histamine may be endogenous regulators of the cerebral microcirculation at the observed receptors.

  18. Opiate Pharmacology and Relief of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2014-01-01

    Opioids remain the mainstay of severe pain management in patients with cancer. The hallmark of pain management is individualization of therapy. Although almost all clinically used drugs act through mu opioid receptors, they display subtle but important differences pharmacologically. Furthermore, not all patients respond equally well to all drugs. Evidence suggests that these variable responses among patients have a biologic basis and are likely to involve both biased agonism and the many mu opioid receptor subtypes that have been cloned. PMID:24799496

  19. Contingent methadone delivery: effects on illicit-opiate use.

    PubMed

    Higgins, S T; Stitzer, M L; Bigelow, G E; Liebson, I A

    1986-07-01

    This study examined the effects of contingent vs. non-contingent delivery of a methadone dose supplement on relapse to illicit opiate use in the context of a methadone outpatient detoxification program. Following a 3-week methadone stabilization period on 30 mg, patients (N = 39) were randomly assigned to a contingent, a non-contingent, or a control treatment group. All patients received identical gradual reductions in their assigned methadone dose. During the dose reduction period (weeks 4-11), members of the contingent (N = 13) and non-contingent groups (N = 13) could obtain daily methadone-dose supplements up to 20 mg, but contingent group members could obtain supplements only if their most recent urinalysis results were opiate negative. Control subjects (N = 13) did not have dose increases available. The contingent group presented significantly lower opiate-positive urines during weeks 8-11 (14% positive) of the detox than the non-contingent (38% positive) or control (50% positive) groups. Additionally, the availability of extra methadone improved treatment retention and increased clinic attendance above levels observed in the control group. The potential for further use of methadone's reinforcing properties in the treatment of opiate dependence is discussed.

  20. Reinforcement processes in opiate addiction: a homeostatic model.

    PubMed

    Schulteis, G; Koob, G F

    1996-11-01

    The development of tolerance and dependence has traditionally been considered an integral aspect of the drug addiction process, and opiate dependence has been studied extensively as a model system in this regard. However, recent emphasis on the positive reinforcing properties of drugs has led to the suggestion that tolerance, dependence, and withdrawal may be of secondary or even negligible importance in motivating compulsive drug use. The current article argues for an integrated view of addiction in the form of a homeostatic neuroadaptation model which emphasizes the motivational significance of both the positive affective state produced by opiates and the negative affective state characteristic of drug withdrawal. The model is supported by evidence at both the behavioral and neural systems levels of analysis. Understanding the important distinction between somatic and affective components of opiate withdrawal is key to recognizing the factors which contribute to the motivational significance of opiate dependence and withdrawal. In addition, the critical role of conditioning processes in the maintenance of compulsive drug use and relapse after periods of abstention is discussed. Finally, it is argued that both the positive reinforcement produced by acute administration of a drug and the negative affective state produced by withdrawal are common to multiple classes of abused drugs, suggesting that an understanding of homeostatic neuroadaptation within motivational systems provides a key to the etiology, treatment and prevention of drug addiction.

  1. Role of endogenous opiates in the expression of negative feedback actions of androgen and estrogen on pulsatile properties of luteinizing hormone secretion in man.

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, J D; Rogol, A D; Samojlik, E; Ertel, N H

    1984-01-01

    We have tested the participation of endogenous opiate pathways in the negative feedback actions of gonadal steroids on pulsatile properties of luteinizing (LH) hormone release in normal men. To this end, sex steroid hormones were infused intravenously at dosages that under steady state conditions selectively suppressed either the frequency or the amplitude of the pulsatile LH signal. The properties of pulsatile LH secretion were assessed quantitatively by computerized analysis of LH series derived from serial blood sampling over 12 h of observation. When the pure (nonaromatizable) androgen, 5-alpha-dihydrotestosterone, was infused continuously for 108 h at the blood production rate of testosterone, we were able to achieve selective inhibition of LH pulse frequency akin to that observed in experimental animals after low-dosage androgen replacement. Under these conditions, serum concentrations of testosterone and estradiol-17 beta did not change significantly, but serum 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone concentrations increased approximately two- to threefold, with a corresponding increase in levels of its major metabolite, 5 alpha-androstan-3 alpha, 17 beta-diol. In separate experiments, the infusion of estradiol-17 beta at its blood production rate over a 4.5-d interval selectively suppressed LH pulse amplitude without influencing LH pulse frequency. Estrogen infusion increased serum estradiol-17 beta levels approximately twofold without significantly altering blood androgen concentrations. We then used these schedules of selective androgen or estrogen infusion to investigate the participation of endogenous opiates in the individual inhibitory feedback actions of pure androgen or estrogen on pulsatile LH release by administering a potent and specific opiate-receptor antagonist, naltrexone, during the infusions. Our observations indicate that, despite the continuous infusion of a dosage of 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone that significantly suppresses LH pulse frequency, co

  2. Pharmacogenetics of opiates in clinical practice: the visible tip of the iceberg.

    PubMed

    Hajj, Aline; Khabbaz, Lydia; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Peoc'h, Katell

    2013-04-01

    Opioids are the cornerstone of analgesic therapy and are used as a substitution therapy for opiate addiction. Interindividual variability in response to opioids is a significant challenge in the management of pain and substitution. Therefore, treatment with opioids requires a careful individualization of dosage to achieve an appropriate balance of efficacy and adverse effects and, consequently, avoid toxicity, particularly respiratory depression, sedation and for some, cardiac ventricular fibrillations. Many studies have investigated the association between genetic factors and the variability of response to opioids. Variants in genes encoding proteins implied in opioid pharmacokinetics (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity), together with those implied in opioids direct and indirect pharmacodynamics (genes of opioid receptors and monoaminergic systems), are the most studied. Many association studies have not been replicated. The purpose of this article is to summarize pharmacogenetic data associated with some opioids frequently encountered in managed care settings.

  3. Adolescent exposure to chronic delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol blocks opiate dependence in maternally deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Morel, Lydie J; Giros, Bruno; Daugé, Valérie

    2009-10-01

    Maternal deprivation in rats specifically leads to a vulnerability to opiate dependence. However, the impact of cannabis exposure during adolescence on this opiate vulnerability has not been investigated. Chronic dronabinol (natural delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol, THC) exposure during postnatal days 35-49 was made in maternal deprived (D) or non-deprived (animal facility rearing, AFR) rats. The effects of dronabinol exposure were studied after 2 weeks of washout on the rewarding effects of morphine measured in the place preference and oral self-administration tests. The preproenkephalin (PPE) mRNA levels and the relative density and functionality of CB1, and mu-opioid receptors were quantified in the striatum and the mesencephalon. Chronic dronabinol exposure in AFR rats induced an increase in sensitivity to morphine conditioning in the place preference paradigm together with a decrease of PPE mRNA levels in the nucleus accumbens and the caudate-putamen nucleus, without any modification for preference to oral morphine consumption. In contrast, dronabinol treatment on D-rats normalized PPE decrease in the striatum, morphine consumption, and suppressed sensitivity to morphine conditioning. CB1 and mu-opioid receptor density and functionality were not changed in the striatum and mesencephalon of all groups of rats. These results indicate THC potency to act as a homeostatic modifier that would worsen the reward effects of morphine on naive animals, but ameliorate the deficits in maternally D-rats. These findings point to the self-medication use of cannabis in subgroups of individuals subjected to adverse postnatal environment.

  4. OPIATE EXPOSURE AND WITHDRAWAL DYNAMICALLY REGULATE mRNA EXPRESSION IN THE SEROTONERGIC DORSAL RAPHE NUCLEUS

    PubMed Central

    Lunden, Jason; Kirby, Lynn G.

    2013-01-01

    Previous results from our lab suggest that hypofunctioning of the serotonergic (5-HT) dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is involved in stress-induced opiate reinstatement. To further investigate the effects of morphine dependence and withdrawal on the 5-HT DRN system, we measured gene expression at the level of mRNA in the DRN during a model of morphine dependence, withdrawal and post withdrawal stress exposure in rats. Morphine pellets were implanted for 72h and then either removed or animals were injected with naloxone to produce spontaneous or precipitated withdrawal, respectively. Animals exposed to these conditions exhibited withdrawal symptoms including weight loss, wet dog shakes and jumping behavior. Gene expression for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB, corticotrophin releasing-factor (CRF)-R1, CRF-R2, GABAA-α1, μ-opioid receptor (MOR), 5-HT1A, tryptophan hydroxylase2 and the 5-HT transporter was then measured using quantitative real-time PCR at multiple time-points across the model of morphine exposure, withdrawal and post withdrawal stress. Expression levels of BDNF, TrkB and CRF-R1 mRNA were decreased during both morphine exposure and following seven days of withdrawal. CRF-R2 mRNA expression was elevated after seven days of withdrawal. 5-HT1A receptor mRNA expression was decreased following 3 hours of morphine exposure, while TPH2 mRNA expression was decreased after seven days of withdrawal with swim stress. There were no changes in the expression of GABAA-α1, MOR or 5-HT transporter mRNA. Collectively these results suggest that alterations in neurotrophin support, CRF-dependent stress signaling, 5-HT synthesis and release may underlie 5-HT DRN hypofunction that can potentially lead to stress-induced opiate relapse. PMID:24055683

  5. Biphasic competition between opiates and enkephalins: does it indicate the existence of a common high affinity (mu-1) binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Sarne, Y.; Kenner, A.

    1987-08-03

    Displacement from brain membranes of labeled opiates by low concentrations of enkephalins and of labeled enkephalins by low concentrations of opiates has been previously explained by the existance of a common high affinity site termed mu-1. An alternative interpretation of the same results is that the trough seen in the low concentration zone of the displacement curves represents cross binding of mu and delta opioid ligands to delta and mu receptors, respectively. In three sets of experiments with brain membranes, the size of the trough is shown to be dependent on the labeled ligand used: The ratio between the size of troughs seen with (TH)D-Ala, D-Leu enkephalin and with (TH)morphine varies with experimental conditions (storage of membranes at 4C for 72h), with ratio of mu:delta receptors (e.g. in thalamus and cortex which are enriched in mu and delta sites, respectively) and with pretreatment of membranes with naloxonazine. These results cannot be explained by a common high affinity site, but rather by binding of (TH)D-Ala, D-Leu enkephalin to mu and of (TH)morphine to delta opioid receptors. 17 references, 3 figures.

  6. Analysis of the clinical indications for opiate use in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sundas; Akerman, Meredith; Sultan, Keith

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Opiate use for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), particularly high-dose (HD) use, is associated with increased mortality. It's assumed that opiate use is directly related to IBD-related complaints, although this hasn't been well defined. Our goal was to determine the indications for opiate use as a first step in developing strategies to prevent or decrease opiate use. Methods A retrospective cohort was formed of adults who were diagnosed with IBD and for whom outpatient evaluations from 2009 to 2014 were documented. Opiate use was defined if opiates were prescribed for a minimum of 30 days over a 365-day period. Individual chart notes were then reviewed to determine the clinical indication(s) for low-dose (LD) and HD opiate use. Results After a search of the electronic records of 1,109,277 patients, 3,226 patients with IBD were found. One hundred four patients were identified as opiate users, including 65 patients with Crohn's and 39 with ulcerative colitis; a total of 134 indications were available for these patients. IBD-related complaints accounted for 49.25% of the opiate indications, with abdominal pain (23.13%) being the most common. Overall, opiate use for IBD-related complaints (81.40% vs. 50.82%; P=0.0014) and abdominal pain (44.19% vs. 19.67%; P=0.0071) was more common among HD than among LD. Conclusions Our findings show that most IBD patients using opiates, particularly HD users, used opiates for IBD-related complaints. Future research will need to determine the degree to which these complaints are related to disease activity and to formulate non-opiate pain management strategies for patients with both active and inactive IBD. PMID:28239317

  7. sigma opiates and certain antipsychotic drugs mutually inhibit (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 and (/sup 3/H)haloperidol binding in guinea pig brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, S.W.; Cook, L.

    1984-09-01

    The relationship between binding of antipsychotic drugs and sigma psychotomimetic opiates to binding sites for the sigma agonist (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 (N-allylnormetazocine) and to dopamine D/sub 2/ sites was investigated. In guinea pig brain membranes, (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 bound to single class of sites with a K/sub d/ of 4 x 10/sup -8/ M and a B/sub max/ of 333 fmol/mg of protein. This binding was different from ..mu.., kappa, or delta opiate receptor binding. It was inhibited by opiates that produce psychotomimetic activities but not by opiates that lack such activities. Some antipsychotic drugs inhibited (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding with high to moderate affinities in the following order of potency: haloperidol > perphenazine > fluphenazine > acetophenazine > trifluoperazine > molindone greater than or equal to pimozide greater than or equal to thioridazine greater than or equal to chlorpromazine greater than or equal to triflupromazine. However, there were other antipsychotic drugs such as spiperone and clozapine that showed low affinity for the (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding sites. Affinities of antipsychotic drugs for (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding sites did not correlate with those for (/sup 3/H)spiperone (dopamine D/sub 2/) sites. (/sup 3/H)-Haloperidol binding in whole brain membranes was also inhibited by the sigma opiates pentazocine, cyclazocine, and (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047. In the striatum, about half of the saturable (/sup 3/H)haloperidol binding was to (/sup 3/H)spiperone (D/sub 2/) sites and the other half was to sites similar to (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding sites. 15 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  8. Amenability to counseling of opiate addicts on probation or parole.

    PubMed

    Goodkin, K; Wilson, K E

    1982-08-01

    Fifty-two opiate addicts were classified as abstainers or continued abusers by their probation or parole officer. Eighteen variables--nine demographic and nine psychological--were evaluated for all subjects. Following factor analysis, 13 remaining variables were entered into a stepwise discriminant function analysis which significantly differentiated the abstaining and abusing groups. Abstainers were characterized by less dogmatism, higher education and personality integration, fewer aggressive incidents and previous drug arrests, and older age. The discriminant function classified 78.8% of the observations correctly and accounted for 27% of the variance. Rokeach's Dogmatism Scale, the Personality Integration Subscale of the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale, and the effective demographic discriminators have been included in a screening battery for counseling amenability by which incoming opiate addicts scoring like abstainers are granted priority in treatment assignment.

  9. Opiate versus psychostimulant addiction: the differences do matter.

    PubMed

    Badiani, Aldo; Belin, David; Epstein, David; Calu, Donna; Shaham, Yavin

    2011-10-05

    The publication of the psychomotor stimulant theory of addiction in 1987 and the finding that addictive drugs increase dopamine concentrations in the rat mesolimbic system in 1988 have led to a predominance of psychobiological theories that consider addiction to opiates and addiction to psychostimulants as essentially identical phenomena. Indeed, current theories of addiction - hedonic allostasis, incentive sensitization, aberrant learning and frontostriatal dysfunction - all argue for a unitary account of drug addiction. This view is challenged by behavioural, cognitive and neurobiological findings in laboratory animals and humans. Here, we argue that opiate addiction and psychostimulant addiction are behaviourally and neurobiologically distinct and that the differences have important implications for addiction treatment, addiction theories and future research.

  10. Uzbekistan: government discontinues pilot opiate substitution therapy program.

    PubMed

    Khachatrian, Avet

    2009-12-01

    In this decade, with support from the international community, most countries of the former Soviet Union introduced opiate substitution therapy (OST) programs, using methadone or buprenorphine, in order to curb the spread of HIV and to introduce more efficient drug dependence treatment options. However, the development is uneven:While some countries have expanded their pilot projects, others have not gone beyond the pilot stage. One Central Asian country--Uzbekistan--has recently closed its pilot OST project.

  11. Increased vulnerability to stress following opiate exposures: behavioral and autonomic correlates.

    PubMed

    Blatchford, Kate E; Diamond, Keri; Westbrook, R Frederick; McNally, Gavan P

    2005-08-01

    The authors used rats to study the impact of a history of opiate exposures on behavioral and autonomic responses to restraint stress. Brief restraint (30 min) provoked tachycardia and a pressor response, anxiety (as indexed by social interaction), grooming, and reduced exploration. The pressor response was reduced at 1 day, but not 7 days, after last opiate exposure; tachycardia was unaffected (Experiment 1). Stress-induced anxiety was potentiated 1 and 7 days after last opiate exposure (Experiment 2), and this potentiation was a function of dose (Experiment 3) and duration (Experiment 4) of opiate exposure. The results show that a history of opiate exposures alters vulnerability to stress and has implications for understanding coping, anxiety, and emotionality in former opiate users.

  12. Total biosynthesis of opiates by stepwise fermentation using engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Akira; Matsumura, Eitaro; Koyanagi, Takashi; Katayama, Takane; Kawano, Noriaki; Yoshimatsu, Kayo; Yamamoto, Kenji; Kumagai, Hidehiko; Sato, Fumihiko; Minami, Hiromichi

    2016-02-05

    Opiates such as morphine and codeine are mainly obtained by extraction from opium poppies. Fermentative opiate production in microbes has also been investigated, and complete biosynthesis of opiates from a simple carbon source has recently been accomplished in yeast. Here we demonstrate that Escherichia coli serves as an efficient, robust and flexible platform for total opiate synthesis. Thebaine, the most important raw material in opioid preparations, is produced by stepwise culture of four engineered strains at yields of 2.1 mg l(-1) from glycerol, corresponding to a 300-fold increase from recently developed yeast systems. This improvement is presumably due to strong activity of enzymes related to thebaine synthesis from (R)-reticuline in E. coli. Furthermore, by adding two genes to the thebaine production system, we demonstrate the biosynthesis of hydrocodone, a clinically important opioid. Improvements in opiate production in this E. coli system represent a major step towards the development of alternative opiate production systems.

  13. Total biosynthesis of opiates by stepwise fermentation using engineered Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Akira; Matsumura, Eitaro; Koyanagi, Takashi; Katayama, Takane; Kawano, Noriaki; Yoshimatsu, Kayo; Yamamoto, Kenji; Kumagai, Hidehiko; Sato, Fumihiko; Minami, Hiromichi

    2016-01-01

    Opiates such as morphine and codeine are mainly obtained by extraction from opium poppies. Fermentative opiate production in microbes has also been investigated, and complete biosynthesis of opiates from a simple carbon source has recently been accomplished in yeast. Here we demonstrate that Escherichia coli serves as an efficient, robust and flexible platform for total opiate synthesis. Thebaine, the most important raw material in opioid preparations, is produced by stepwise culture of four engineered strains at yields of 2.1 mg l−1 from glycerol, corresponding to a 300-fold increase from recently developed yeast systems. This improvement is presumably due to strong activity of enzymes related to thebaine synthesis from (R)-reticuline in E. coli. Furthermore, by adding two genes to the thebaine production system, we demonstrate the biosynthesis of hydrocodone, a clinically important opioid. Improvements in opiate production in this E. coli system represent a major step towards the development of alternative opiate production systems. PMID:26847395

  14. Heterogeneity of alpha1 receptors associated with vascular smooth muscle: evidence from functional and ligand binding studies

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, M.; Pedigo, N.W.; Butler, B.T.; Piascik, M.T.

    1987-08-10

    The nature of the alpha1 receptor associated with rabbit aorta has been examined in functional and receptor binding studies. In isolated aortic rings the dose-response curve for (-)metaraminol was not parallel to that of (-)epinephrine, (-)norepinephrine or (-)phenylephrine. Following inactivation of a portion of the alpha receptors with phenoxybenzamine, the occupancy versus response relationship for metaraminol, in contrast to the other test agonists, was biphasic. In microsomes prepared from aorta, metaraminol bound to two classes of sites labelled by the selective alpha1 antagonist (TH) prazosin. Norepinephrine also bound to two sites on the alpha receptor in all three preparations tested. The Scatchard plot of (TH)prazosin binding to microsomes prepared from frozen aorta was curvilinear. Estimates of the affinities and site densities were 49.6 +/- 15.3 pM and 44.8 +/- 11.8 pmol/gm protein and 1.0 +/- 0.2 nM and 43.8 +/- 17.4 pmol/gm for the high and low affinity sites, respectively. These data are consistent with the idea that there are subtypes of the alpha1 receptor. 33 references, 5 figures.

  15. Heterogeneity of nonimmune immunoglobulin Fc reactivity among gram-positive cocci: description of three major types of receptors for human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Myhre, E B; Kronvall, G

    1977-09-01

    Two hundred and thirty strains of various gram-positive cocci were tested for quantitative, nonimmune binding of radiolabeled human polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG). The majority of coagulase-positive staphylococci and streptococci belonging to serogroups C and G showed a high uptake of IgG. The binding of immunoglobulin to group A streptococci was considerably less, with a number of strains completely negative. None of the pneumococcal or the group B or D streptococcal strains displayed any binding capacity. Heterogeneity of the IgG reactivity of various reactive strains was studied in an inhibition assay using 10 different animal serum pools. Three different inhibition patterns were seen, each of them revealing a striking degree of homogeneity within single bacterial species. Staphylococcus aureus and group A streptococci, respectively, constituted two homogeneous groups which differed markedly from each other and from C and G streptococci. No differences were observed between group C and G streptococci. Based on the profound differences between these homogeneous groups, three major types of Fc receptors could be defined. Type I and II Fc receptors were found on S. aureus and on group A streptococci, respectively. Fc receptor type III represented the immunoglobulin-binding structure of both group C and G streptococci.

  16. Individual variation of human S1P₁ coding sequence leads to heterogeneity in receptor function and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Obinata, Hideru; Gutkind, Sarah; Stitham, Jeremiah; Okuno, Toshiaki; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Hwa, John; Hla, Timothy

    2014-12-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P₁), an abundantly-expressed G protein-coupled receptor which regulates key vascular and immune responses, is a therapeutic target in autoimmune diseases. Fingolimod/Gilenya (FTY720), an oral medication for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, targets S1P₁ receptors on immune and neural cells to suppress neuroinflammation. However, suppression of endothelial S1P₁ receptors is associated with cardiac and vascular adverse effects. Here we report the genetic variations of the S1P₁ coding region from exon sequencing of >12,000 individuals and their functional consequences. We conducted functional analyses of 14 nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the S1PR1 gene. One SNP mutant (Arg¹²⁰ to Pro) failed to transmit sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)-induced intracellular signals such as calcium increase and activation of p44/42 MAPK and Akt. Two other mutants (Ile⁴⁵ to Thr and Gly³⁰⁵ to Cys) showed normal intracellular signals but impaired S1P-induced endocytosis, which made the receptor resistant to FTY720-induced degradation. Another SNP mutant (Arg¹³ to Gly) demonstrated protection from coronary artery disease in a high cardiovascular risk population. Individuals with this mutation showed a significantly lower percentage of multi-vessel coronary obstruction in a risk factor-matched case-control study. This study suggests that individual genetic variations of S1P₁ can influence receptor function and, therefore, infer differential disease risks and interaction with S1P₁-targeted therapeutics.

  17. Radiosynthesis of F-18-3-acetylcyclofoxy: A high affinity opiate antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Channing, M.A.; Eckelman, W.C.; Bennett, J.M.; Burke, T.R. Jr.; Rice, K.C.; Larson, S.M.

    1985-05-01

    A convenient method for the preparation of F-18-3-acetylcyclofoxy (3-acetyl-6-deoxy-6-beta-F-18-fluoronaltrexone was developed. The method uses reactor-produced F-18-fluoride as its tetraethylammonium salt. F-18 fluoride is produced at the National Bureau of Standards nuclear reactor by the Li-6(n,..cap alpha..)H-3, 0-16(H-3,n) F-18 nuclear reaction. A sealed quartz tube containing enriched lithium carbonate (0.4 g) was irradiated in a neutron flux of 1.1 x 10/sup 14/ n/cm/sup 2//s for 2h to produce 80 mCi. The lithium is removed by cation exchange resin. The fluoride is then adsorbed on a strong anion exchange column which is rinsed to remove H-3 and any remaining cations. The F-18 is then eluted with tetraethylammonium hydroxide to produce tetraethylammonium fluoride (TEAF). The triflate of 3-acetyl-6-alpha-naltrexol, synthesized by reaction of the alcohol with trifluoromethanesulfonic anhydride was added in anhydrous acetonitrile to the dry F-18 TEAF containing 0.2 ..mu..mol F-19 TEAF. The mixture was refluxed for 15 minutes after which the product was purified by reversed phase chromatography. F-18-acetylcyclofoxy was prepared in 35% radiochemical yield. About 55% of the F-18 was lost by decay (36%) and by incomplete transfer (19%). The specific activity of the final product was approximately 50 Ci/mmol but the effective specific activity was approximately 25 Ci/mmol. Visualization of the basal ganglia in baboons was possible using PET. F-18 3-acetylcyclofoxy is the first positron-emitting opiate for which the active and inactive forms of naloxone were used to unequivocially demonstrate stereospecific displacement from opiate receptor-rich regions.

  18. R7BP modulates opiate analgesia and tolerance but not withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Dimitra; Cao, Yan; Agrimaki, Ioanna; Martemyanov, Kirill A; Zachariou, Venetia

    2012-03-01

    The adaptor protein R7 family binding protein (R7BP) modulates G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling and desensitization by controlling the function of regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins. R7BP is expressed throughout the brain and appears to modulate the membrane localization and stability of three proteins that belong to R7 RGS family: RGS6, RGS7, and RGS9-2. RGS9-2 is a potent negative modulator of opiate and psychostimulant addiction and promotes the development of analgesic tolerance to morphine, whereas the role of RGS6 and RGS7 in addiction remains unknown. Recent studies revealed that functional deletion of R7BP reduces R7 protein activity by preventing their anchoring to the cell membrane and enhances GPCR responsiveness in the basal ganglia. Here, we take advantage of R7BP knockout mice in order to examine the way interventions in R7 proteins function throughout the brain affect opiate actions. Our results suggest that R7BP is a negative modulator of the analgesic and locomotor activating actions of morphine. We also report that R7BP contributes to the development of morphine tolerance. Finally, our data suggest that although prevention of R7BP actions enhances the analgesic responses to morphine, it does not affect the severity of somatic withdrawal signs. Our data suggest that interventions in R7BP actions enhance the analgesic effect of morphine and prevent tolerance, without affecting withdrawal, pointing to R7BP complexes as potential new targets for analgesic drugs.

  19. Pharmacological modulation of protein kinases as a new approach to treat addiction to cocaine and opiates.

    PubMed

    García-Pardo, María Pilar; Roger-Sanchez, Concepción; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta; Miñarro, Jose; Aguilar, María Asunción

    2016-06-15

    Drug addiction shares brain mechanisms and molecular substrates with learning and memory processes, such as the stimulation of glutamate receptors and their downstream signalling pathways. In the present work we provide an up-to-date review of studies that have demonstrated the implication of the main memory-related calcium-dependent protein kinases in opiate and cocaine addiction. The effects of these drugs of abuse in different animal models of drug reward, dependence and addiction are altered by manipulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, particularly extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), the protein kinase C (PKC) family (including PKMζ), cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), cGMP-dependent protein kinase G (PKG), the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and its downstream target mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR), cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), heat-shock proteins (Hsp) and other enzymes and proteins. Research suggests that drugs of abuse induce dependence and addiction by modifying the signalling pathways that involve these memory-related protein kinases, and supports the idea that drug addiction is an excessive aberrant learning disorder in which the maladaptive memory of drug-associated cues maintains compulsive drug use and contributes to relapse. Moreover, the studies we review offer new pharmacological strategies to treat opiate and cocaine dependence based on the manipulation of these protein kinases. In particular, disruption of reconsolidation of drug-related memories may have a high therapeutic value in the treatment of drug addiction.

  20. Molecular analysis of the sea anemone toxin Av3 reveals selectivity to insects and demonstrates the heterogeneity of receptor site-3 on voltage-gated Na+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Yehu; Kahn, Roy; Cohen, Lior; Gur, Maya; Karbat, Izhar; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Av3 is a short peptide toxin from the sea anemone Anemonia viridis shown to be active on crustaceans and inactive on mammals. It inhibits inactivation of Navs (voltage-gated Na+ channels) like the structurally dissimilar scorpion α-toxins and type I sea anemone toxins that bind to receptor site-3. To examine the potency and mode of interaction of Av3 with insect Navs, we established a system for its expression, mutagenized it throughout, and analysed it in toxicity, binding and electrophysiological assays. The recombinant Av3 was found to be highly toxic to blowfly larvae (ED50=2.65±0.46 pmol/100 mg), to compete well with the site-3 toxin LqhαIT (from the scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus) on binding to cockroach neuronal membranes (Ki=21.4±7.1 nM), and to inhibit the inactivation of Drosophila melanogaster channel, DmNav1, but not that of mammalian Navs expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Moreover, like other site-3 toxins, the activity of Av3 was synergically enhanced by ligands of receptor site-4 (e.g. scorpion β-toxins). The bioactive surface of Av3 was found to consist mainly of aromatic residues and did not resemble any of the bioactive surfaces of other site-3 toxins. These analyses have portrayed a toxin that might interact with receptor site-3 in a different fashion compared with other ligands of this site. This assumption was corroborated by a D1701R mutation in DmNav1, which has been shown to abolish the activity of all other site-3 ligands, except Av3. All in all, the present study provides further evidence for the heterogeneity of receptor site-3, and raises Av3 as a unique model for design of selective anti-insect compounds. PMID:17492942

  1. Pain reporting, opiate dosing, and the adverse effects of opiates after hip or knee replacement in patients 60 years old or older.

    PubMed

    Petre, Benjamin M; Roxbury, Christopher R; McCallum, Jeremy R; Defontes, Kenneth W; Belkoff, Stephen M; Mears, Simon C

    2012-03-01

    Our goal was to determine whether there were age-related differences in pain, opiate use, and opiate side effects after total hip or knee arthroplasty in patients 60 years old or older. We hypothesized that there would be no significant differences between age groups in (1) mean pain score, (2) opiate use after adjusting for pain, or (3) opiate side effects after adjusting for opiate use and pain score. We retrospectively reviewed the electronic and paper charts of all patients undergoing total joint replacements at our institution over 3 years who met the following criteria: (1) 60 years old or older, (2) primary single total knee or total hip replacement, and (3) no preoperative dementia. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative course data were collected using a customized data entry process and database. We divided the patients into 2 age groups, those 60 to 79 years old and those 80 years old or older. Using a marginal model with the panel variable of postoperative day, we investigated the associations between age group and pain, age group and pain adjusting for opiate use, and age group and complications (respiratory depression, naloxone usage as a measure of respiratory arrest, delirium, constipation, and urinary retention) adjusting for opiate use (Xtgee, Stata10, Stata Corp. LP, College Station, Texas). Significance was set at P < .05. We found no significant difference in pain scores between groups, but the older group had significantly fewer opiates prescribed yet significantly more side effects, including delirium (odds ratio 4.2), than did the younger group, even after adjusting for opiate dose and pain score.

  2. Ultra-deep T cell receptor sequencing reveals the complexity and intratumour heterogeneity of T cell clones in renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Gerlinger, Marco; Quezada, Sergio A; Peggs, Karl S; Furness, Andrew J S; Fisher, Rosalie; Marafioti, Teresa; Shende, Vishvesh H; McGranahan, Nicholas; Rowan, Andrew J; Hazell, Steven; Hamm, David; Robins, Harlan S; Pickering, Lisa; Gore, Martin; Nicol, David L; Larkin, James; Swanton, Charles

    2013-12-01

    The recognition of cancer cells by T cells can impact upon prognosis and be exploited for immunotherapeutic approaches. This recognition depends on the specific interaction between antigens displayed on the surface of cancer cells and the T cell receptor (TCR), which is generated by somatic rearrangements of TCR α- and β-chains (TCRb). Our aim was to assess whether ultra-deep sequencing of the rearranged TCRb in DNA extracted from unfractionated clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) samples can provide insights into the clonality and heterogeneity of intratumoural T cells in ccRCCs, a tumour type that can display extensive genetic intratumour heterogeneity (ITH). For this purpose, DNA was extracted from two to four tumour regions from each of four primary ccRCCs and was analysed by ultra-deep TCR sequencing. In parallel, tumour infiltration by CD4, CD8 and Foxp3 regulatory T cells was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and correlated with TCR-sequencing data. A polyclonal T cell repertoire with 367-16 289 (median 2394) unique TCRb sequences was identified per tumour region. The frequencies of the 100 most abundant T cell clones/tumour were poorly correlated between most regions (Pearson correlation coefficient, -0.218 to 0.465). 3-93% of these T cell clones were not detectable across all regions. Thus, the clonal composition of T cell populations can be heterogeneous across different regions of the same ccRCC. T cell ITH was higher in tumours pretreated with an mTOR inhibitor, which could suggest that therapy can influence adaptive tumour immunity. These data show that ultra-deep TCR-sequencing technology can be applied directly to DNA extracted from unfractionated tumour samples, allowing novel insights into the clonality of T cell populations in cancers. These were polyclonal and displayed ITH in ccRCC. TCRb sequencing may shed light on mechanisms of cancer immunity and the efficacy of immunotherapy approaches.

  3. Effects of specific mu and kappa opiate tolerance and abstinence on hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis secretion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ignar, D M; Kuhn, C M

    1990-12-01

    Chronic administration of opiates to rats results in HPA axis tolerance and abstinence-induced hypersecretion. The effects of specific mu and kappa tolerance and withdrawal on the functional secretion of the HPA axis were evaluated in this study. Adult male rats were injected s.c. twice daily with saline, morphine or U50,488 for 5 days. Serum adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) or corticosterone (CS) were determined by radioimmunoassay as measures of HPA axis function. Tolerance to morphine (10 mg/kg) and U50,488 (1 mg/kg), but no cross-tolerance, was observed suggesting the development of mu- or kappa-specific tolerance, respectively. Tolerance does not occur at the pituitary or adrenal levels after these paradigms because ACTH and CS responses to exogenous corticotropin-releasing factor and ACTH, respectively, were not attenuated. CS secretion in response to novelty stress was not affected by either chronic opiate treatment, but the circadian variation of CS levels was slightly blunted after chronic morphine. In contrast, the elevation of CS secretion by quipazine (0.5 mg/kg) and physostigmine (0.1 mg/kg) was attenuated after chronic U50,488, but not morphine administration. Both spontaneous and antagonist-precipitated withdrawal from morphine, but not U50,488, resulted in elevation of CS levels. Low doses of morphine suppressed morphine abstinence-induced CS hypersecretion, whereas, U50,488 and clonidine had no effect. In conclusion, alterations of HPA axis function occur during chronic mu or kappa opiate administration that are receptor-specific and involve multiple neural controls of the HPA axis.

  4. Knowledge of Medical Students, Residents, and Attending Physicians About Opiate Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shine, Daniel, Demas, Penelope

    1984-01-01

    A questionnaire concerning knowledge of opiate abuse and attitudes about abusers was administered to 94 randomly selected physicians and medical students at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. The results indicated that physicians might benefit from improved teaching in the area of opiate abuse. (Author/MLW)

  5. Identification of the convulsant opiate thebaine in mammalian brain.

    PubMed Central

    Kodaira, H; Lisek, C A; Jardine, I; Arimura, A; Spector, S

    1989-01-01

    The convulsant opiate thebaine, an intermediate of morphine biosynthesis, was purified from bovine brain to homogeneity by gel filtration and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) monitored by a radioimmunoassay. The immunoreactive material behaved identically to standard thebaine in two HPLC systems and was confirmed to be thebaine by combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. To our knowledge, the presence of thebaine in mammalian tissue has not been demonstrated previously. Codeine and morphine were also found to exist in ovine brain. The presence of thebaine in ovine brain provides strong evidence that morphine and codeine, in various mammalian tissues, are of endogenous origin and actually biosynthesized from a precursor. Images PMID:2911601

  6. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  7. Binding of kappa- and sigma-opiates in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Wolozin, B.L.; Nishimura, S.; Pasternak, G.W.

    1982-06-01

    Detailed displacements of (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine by ketocyclazocine and SKF 10,047, (/sup 3/H)ethylketocyclazocine by SKF 10,047, and (/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 by ketocyclazocine are all multiphasic, suggesting multiple binding sites. After treating brain tissue in vitro with naloxazone, all displacements lose the initial inhibition of /sup 3/H-ligand binding by low concentrations of unlabeled drugs. Together with Scatchard analysis of saturation experiments, these studies suggest a common site which binds mu-, kappa, and sigma-opiates and enkephalins equally well and with highest affinity (KD less than 1 nM). The ability of unlabeled drugs to displace the low affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine (KD . 3 nM), (/sup 3/H)ethylketocyclazocine (KD . 4 nM), (/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 (KD . 6 nM), and D-Ala2-D-Leu5-(/sup 3/H)enkephalin (KD . 5 nM) remaining after treating tissue with naloxazone demonstrates unique pharmacological profiles for each. These results suggest the existence of distinct binding sites for kappa- and sigma-opiates which differ from those sites which selectively bind morphine (mu) and enkephalin (delta).

  8. Ultra-deep T cell receptor sequencing reveals the complexity and intratumour heterogeneity of T cell clones in renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Gerlinger, Marco; Quezada, Sergio A; Peggs, Karl S; Furness, Andrew JS; Fisher, Rosalie; Marafioti, Teresa; Shende, Vishvesh H; McGranahan, Nicholas; Rowan, Andrew J; Hazell, Steven; Hamm, David; Robins, Harlan S; Pickering, Lisa; Gore, Martin; Nicol, David L; Larkin, James; Swanton, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The recognition of cancer cells by T cells can impact upon prognosis and be exploited for immunotherapeutic approaches. This recognition depends on the specific interaction between antigens displayed on the surface of cancer cells and the T cell receptor (TCR), which is generated by somatic rearrangements of TCR α- and β-chains (TCRb). Our aim was to assess whether ultra-deep sequencing of the rearranged TCRb in DNA extracted from unfractionated clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) samples can provide insights into the clonality and heterogeneity of intratumoural T cells in ccRCCs, a tumour type that can display extensive genetic intratumour heterogeneity (ITH). For this purpose, DNA was extracted from two to four tumour regions from each of four primary ccRCCs and was analysed by ultra-deep TCR sequencing. In parallel, tumour infiltration by CD4, CD8 and Foxp3 regulatory T cells was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and correlated with TCR-sequencing data. A polyclonal T cell repertoire with 367–16 289 (median 2394) unique TCRb sequences was identified per tumour region. The frequencies of the 100 most abundant T cell clones/tumour were poorly correlated between most regions (Pearson correlation coefficient, –0.218 to 0.465). 3–93% of these T cell clones were not detectable across all regions. Thus, the clonal composition of T cell populations can be heterogeneous across different regions of the same ccRCC. T cell ITH was higher in tumours pretreated with an mTOR inhibitor, which could suggest that therapy can influence adaptive tumour immunity. These data show that ultra-deep TCR-sequencing technology can be applied directly to DNA extracted from unfractionated tumour samples, allowing novel insights into the clonality of T cell populations in cancers. These were polyclonal and displayed ITH in ccRCC. TCRb sequencing may shed light on mechanisms of cancer immunity and the efficacy of immunotherapy approaches. Copyright © 2013 Pathological Society of

  9. Cannabis as an adjunct to or substitute for opiates in the treatment of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence to support the use of medical cannabis as an adjunct to or substitute for prescription opiates in the treatment of chronic pain. When used in conjunction with opiates, cannabinoids lead to a greater cumulative relief of pain, resulting in a reduction in the use of opiates (and associated side-effects) by patients in a clinical setting. Additionally, cannabinoids can prevent the development of tolerance to and withdrawal from opiates, and can even rekindle opiate analgesia after a prior dosage has become ineffective. Novel research suggests that cannabis may be useful in the treatment of problematic substance use. These findings suggest that increasing safe access to medical cannabis may reduce the personal and social harms associated with addiction, particularly in relation to the growing problematic use of pharmaceutical opiates. Despite a lack of regulatory oversight by federal governments in North America, community-based medical cannabis dispensaries have proven successful at supplying patients with a safe source of cannabis within an environment conducive to healing, and may be reducing the problematic use of pharmaceutical opiates and other potentially harmful substances in their communities.

  10. Forensic drug testing for opiates. VI. Urine testing for hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone with commercial opiate immunoassays and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smith, M L; Hughes, R O; Levine, B; Dickerson, S; Darwin, W D; Cone, E J

    1995-01-01

    Opiate testing for morphine and codeine is performed routinely in forensic urine drug-testing laboratories in an effort to identify illicit opiate abusers. In addition to heroin, the 6-keto-opioids, including hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone, have high abuse liability and are self-administered by opiate abusers, but only limited information is available on detection of these compounds by current immunoassay and gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) methods. In this study, single doses of hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone were administered to human subjects, and urine samples were collected before and periodically after dosing. Opiate levels were determined in a quantitative mode with four commercial immunoassays, TDx opiates (TDx), Abuscreen radioimmunoassay (ABUS), Coat-A-Count morphine in urine (CAC), and EMIT d.a.u. opiate assay (EMIT), and by GC-MS. GC-MS assay results indicated that hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone administration resulted in rapid excretion of parent drug and O-demethylated metabolites in urine. Peak concentrations occurred within 8 h after drug administration and declined below 300 ng/mL within 24-48 h. Immunoassay testing indicated that hydromorphone, hydrocodone, and oxycodone, but not oxymorphone, were detectable in urine by TDx and EMIT (300-ng/mL cutoff) for 6-24 h. ABUS detected only hydrocodone, and CAC failed to detect any of the four 6-keto-opioid analgesics. Generally, immunoassays for opiates in urine displayed substantially lower sensitivities for 6-keto-opioids compared with GC-MS. Consequently, urine samples containing low to moderate concentrations of hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone will likely go undetected when tested by conventional immunoassays.

  11. Reduction in arterial stiffness and vascular age by naltrexone-induced interruption of opiate agonism: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Reece, Albert Stuart; Hulse, Gary Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Objective To prospectively assess if opiate antagonist treatment or the opiate-free status could reverse opiate-related vasculopathy. Design Longitudinal Open Observational, Serial ‘N of One’, over 6.5 years under various treatment conditions: opiate dependence, naltrexone and opiate-free. Setting Primary care, Australia. Participants 20 opiate-dependent patients (16 males: 16 cases of buprenorphine 4.11±1.17 mg, two of methadone 57.5±12.5 mg and two of heroin 0.75±0.25 g). Intervention Studies of central arterial stiffness and vascular reference age (RA) were performed longitudinally by SphygmoCor Pulse Wave Analysis (AtCor, Sydney). Primary outcomes Primary outcome was vascular age and arterial stiffness accrual under different treatment conditions. Results The mean chronological age (CA) was 33.62±2.03 years. The opiate-free condition was associated with a lower apparent vascular age both in itself (males: p=0.0402 and females: p=0.0360) and in interaction with time (males: p=0.0001 and females: p=0.0004), and confirmed with other measures of arterial stiffness. The mean modelled RA was 38.82, 37.73 and 35.05 years in the opiate, naltrexone and opiate-free conditions, respectively. The opiate-free condition was superior to opiate agonism after full multivariate adjustment (p=0.0131), with modelled RA/CA of 1.0173, 0.9563 and 0.8985 (reductions of 6.1% and 11.9%, respectively). Conclusions Data demonstrate that opiate-free status improves vascular age and arterial stiffness in previous chronic opiate users. The role of opiate antagonist treatment in achieving these outcomes requires future clarification and offers hope of novel therapeutic remediation. PMID:23524044

  12. Temporal Heterogeneity of Estrogen Receptor Expression in Bone-Dominant Breast Cancer: 18F-Fluoroestradiol PET Imaging Shows Return of ER Expression

    PubMed Central

    Currin, Erin; Peterson, Lanell M.; Schubert, Erin K.; Link, Jeanne M.; Krohn, Kenneth A.; Livingston, Robert B.; Mankoff, David A.; Linden, Hannah M.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in estrogen receptor (ER) expression over the course of therapy may affect response to endocrine therapy. However, measuring temporal changes in ER expression requires serial biopsies, which are impractical and poorly tolerated by most patients. Functional ER imaging using 18F-fluoroestradiol (FES)-PET provides a noninvasive measure of regional ER expression and is ideally suited to serial studies. Additionally, lack of measurable FES uptake in metastatic sites of disease predict tumor progression in patients with ER-positive primary tumors treated with endocrine therapy. This report presents a case of restored sensitivity to endocrine therapy in a patient with bone-dominant breast cancer who underwent serial observational FES-PET imaging over the course of several treatments at our center, demonstrating the temporal heterogeneity of regional ER expression. Although loss and restoration of endocrine sensitivity in patients who have undergone prior hormonal and cytotoxic treatments has been reported, this is, to our knowledge, the first time the accompanying changes in ER expression have been documented by molecular imaging. PMID:26850484

  13. Nonmedical use of sedative-hypnotics and opiates among rural and urban women with protective orders.

    PubMed

    Cole, Jennifer; Logan, T K

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence and risk factors for lifetime nonmedical use of sedative-hypnotics and opiates among a sample of rural and urban women with recent partner violence victimization (n=756). Nearly one third of the sample (32.8%) reported ever using illicit sedative-hypnotics or opiates. Nonmedical use of sedative-hypnotics and opiates was significantly associated with lifetime cumulative exposure to interpersonal victimization, rural Appalachian residency, past-year use of other substances and other substance-related problems, and lifetime unmet health care needs. Findings have implications for substance abuse prevention and treatment and victim advocacy programs.

  14. Determination of opiate alkaloids in process liquors using capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Hindson, Benjamin J; Francis, Paul S; Purcell, Stuart D; Barnett, Neil W

    2007-02-19

    This paper describes the determination of opiate alkaloids (morphine, codeine, oripavine and thebaine) in industrial process liquors using capillary zone electrophoresis with UV-absorption detection at 214 nm. A study of cyclodextrin type and concentration revealed that the addition of 30 mM hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin to the electrolyte solution (100mM Tris adjusted to pH 2.8) was suitable to resolve the four analytes of interest. Typical analysis time was 12 min and the limit of detection for each alkaloid was 2.5 x 10(-6) M. The results for the proposed methodology were in good agreement with those of a conventional HPLC procedure. Under the same conditions, short-end injection was used to reduce the effective separation length from 41.5 to 8.5 cm, which allowed the determination of morphine and thebaine in process liquors within 2.5 min.

  15. Opiate addiction and cocaine addiction: underlying molecular neurobiology and genetics.

    PubMed

    Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Levran, Orna; Reed, Brian; Schlussman, Stefan D; Zhou, Yan; Butelman, Eduardo R

    2012-10-01

    Addictive diseases, including addiction to heroin, prescription opioids, or cocaine, pose massive personal and public health costs. Addictions are chronic relapsing diseases of the brain caused by drug-induced direct effects and persisting neuroadaptations at the epigenetic, mRNA, neuropeptide, neurotransmitter, or protein levels. These neuroadaptations, which can be specific to drug type, and their resultant behaviors are modified by various internal and external environmental factors, including stress responsivity, addict mindset, and social setting. Specific gene variants, including variants encoding pharmacological target proteins or genes mediating neuroadaptations, also modify vulnerability at particular stages of addiction. Greater understanding of these interacting factors through laboratory-based and translational studies have the potential to optimize early interventions for the therapy of chronic addictive diseases and to reduce the burden of relapse. Here, we review the molecular neurobiology and genetics of opiate addiction, including heroin and prescription opioids, and cocaine addiction.

  16. Simultaneous quantification of opiates, cocaine and cannabinoids in hair.

    PubMed

    Jurado, C; Giménez, M P; Menéndez, M; Repetto, M

    1995-01-05

    The present paper describes a sensitive method developed in our laboratory for the simultaneous analysis of opiates (morphine, codeine and monoacetylmorphine), cocainis (cocaine and benzoylecgonine) and cannabinoids (delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid) in hair samples. After decontaminating the sample with dichloromethane, two consecutive hydrolyses were performed in order to achieve the best conditions for extracting the three kinds of drugs from the protein matrix. First the opiate and cocainic compounds were extracted by means of a soft acidic hydrolysis with 0.1 N HCl at 50 degrees C overnight and organic solvent extraction at pH 9.2. The cannabinoids need a stronger basic hydrolysis with 11.8 N KOH for 10 min at laboratory temperature. After adding maleic acid, the cannabinoids were extracted with an organic solvent. The derivatization was carried out with heptafluorobutyric anhydride and hexafluoropropanol. Calibration curves were linear between 0.5-100 ng/mg of hair. Recovery and reproducibility were assured. The quantification limits ranged between 0.04-0.26 ng/mg of hair. Seventy hair samples from known drug abusers were cut into 1-cm segments and analyzed by this method. The ranges of measured concentrations (ng/mg) were 0.31-89 for cocaine, 0.1-5.76 for benzoylecgonine, 0.34-45.79 for morphine, 0.45-39.59 for codeine, 0.09-48.18 for monoacetylmorphine, 0.06-7.63 for THC and 0.06-3.87 for THC-COOH. The results of sectional analyses agreed with the self reported drug histories. The usefulness of this method is in assessing earlier drug consumption, and also at the same time obtaining a chronological profile of the consumption of these three types of drugs.

  17. Determination of opiates in human fingernail--comparison to hair.

    PubMed

    Shen, Min; Chen, Hang; Xiang, Ping

    2014-09-15

    6-Monoacetylmorphine in keratinized matrices can be used to discriminate between heroin users and individuals exposed to other sources of morphine alkaloids. Frozen pulverization is effective in preventing 6-monoacetylmorphine hydrolysis. The main aim of this study was to develop an LC-MS/MS method for the determination of five opiates in human fingernails using a frozen pulverization preparation method and to investigate the correlation between the concentration of opiates in nail and hair samples from subjects whose urine specimens were positive for morphine. Borate buffer (500 μL; pH 9.2) was added to 20mg of pulverized fingernail, followed by ultrasonication and liquid-liquid extraction. Analytes were analyzed on an Allure PFP propyl column by gradient elution. The mass spectrometer was operated in the positive electrospray ionization mode and multiple reactions monitoring mode. A total of 12 of 18 fingernail samples contained detectable 6-monoacetylmorphine (mean=0.43 ng/mg, range=0.10-1.37 ng/mg), morphine (mean=1.74 ng/mg, range=0.58-3.16 ng/mg) and codeine (range from

  18. Poppy seed ingestion and opiates urinalysis: a closer look.

    PubMed

    elSohly, H N; elSohly, M A; Stanford, D F

    1990-01-01

    Review of scientific literature shows that ingestion of poppy seed containing products can result in a positive urinalysis test for opiates. In many cases the amount of seeds ingested is unrealistically high or is not specified. This study is designed to correlate the amount of seeds ingested with the urinary concentration of total morphine as a function of time. Two males and two females were involved in all four protocols, which were separated by at least one week. Subjects ingested one, two, or three poppy seed rolls, each containing 2 g of Australian seeds (108 micrograms morphine/g seed) in three protocols. In the fourth protocol subjects ingested two rolls per day for four consecutive days. Urine specimens were collected for 48 h after ingestion, analyzed by RIA, EMIT, and TDx, and selected samples were confirmed by GC/MS. The data show that the highest concentrations of total morphine in urine were found 3-8 h after ingestion or in the first-void samples. Of the 264 samples collected, there were only 16 specimens that exceeded 300 ng/mL by any of the methods used for analysis with only three samples exceeding 400 ng/mL by GC/MS (406, 611, and 954 ng/mL). In all cases, the total opiates level was less than 150 ng/mL 24 h after ingestion. Following these studies, one of the subjects ingested a poppy seed cake containing 15 g seed obtained from a bakery which analyzed for 169 micrograms morphine/g seed. Urine specimens were collected over 48 h, and all specimens were analyzed by GC/MS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. [Functional selectivity of opioid receptors ligands].

    PubMed

    Audet, Nicolas; Archer-Lahlou, Elodie; Richard-Lalonde, Mélissa; Piñeyro-Filpo, Graciela

    2010-01-01

    Opiates are the most effective analgesics available for the treatment of severe pain. However, their clinical use is restricted by unwanted side effects such as tolerance, physical dependence and respiratory depression. The strategy to develop new opiates with reduced side effects has mainly focused on the study and production of ligands that specifically bind to different opiate receptors subtypes. However, this strategy has not allowed the production of novel therapeutic ligands with a better side effects profile. Thus, other research strategies need to be explored. One which is receiving increasing attention is the possibility of exploiting ligand ability to stabilize different receptor conformations with distinct signalling profiles. This newly described property, termed functional selectivity, provides a potential means of directing the stimulus generated by an activated receptor towards a specific cellular response. Here we summarize evidence supporting the existence of ligand-specific active conformations for two opioid receptors subtypes (delta and mu), and analyze how functional selectivity may contribute in the production of longer lasting, better tolerated opiate analgesics. double dagger.

  20. Recent developments in the study of opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Cox, Brian M

    2013-04-01

    It is now about 40 years since Avram Goldstein proposed the use of the stereoselectivity of opioid receptors to identify these receptors in neural membranes. In 2012, the crystal structures of the four members of the opioid receptor family were reported, providing a structural basis for understanding of critical features affecting the actions of opiate drugs. This minireview summarizes these recent developments in our understanding of opiate receptors. Receptor function is also influenced by amino acid substitutions in the protein sequence. Among opioid receptor genes, one polymorphism is much more frequent in human populations than the many others that have been found, but the functional significance of this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) has been unclear. Recent studies have shed new light on how this SNP might influence opioid receptor function. In this minireview, the functional significance of the most prevalent genetic polymorphism among the opioid receptor genes is also considered.

  1. Tumor Heterogeneity in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2)-Positive Advanced Gastric Cancer Assessed by CT Texture Analysis: Association with Survival after Trastuzumab Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sung Hyun; Lee, Yoon Jin; Park, Jihoon; Kim, Jin Won; Lee, Hye Seung; Kim, Bohyoung

    2016-01-01

    Background Image texture analysis is a noninvasive technique for quantifying intratumoral heterogeneity, with derived texture features reported to be closely related to the treatment outcome of tumors. Gastric cancer is one of the most common tumors and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Although trastuzumab is associated with a survival gain among patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive advanced gastric cancer, optimal patient selection is challenging. The purpose of this study was to determine whether CT texture features of HER2-positive gastric cancer were related to the survival rate after trastuzumab treatment. Methods and Findings Patients diagnosed with HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer from February 2007 to August 2014 were retrospectively selected. Using in-house built software, histogram features (kurtosis and skewness) and gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) features (angular second moment [ASM], contrast, entropy, variance, and correlation) were derived from the CT images of HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer in 26 patients. All the patients were followed up for more than 6 months, with no confirmed deaths. The patients were dichotomized into a good and poor survival group based on cutoff points of overall survival of 12 months. A receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was performed to test the ability of each texture parameter to identify the good survival group. Kaplan–Meier curves for patients above and below each threshold were constructed. Using a threshold of >265.8480 for contrast, >488.3150 for variance, and ≤0.1319×10−3. for correlation, all of the area under the ROC curves showed fair accuracy (>0.7). Kaplan–Meier analysis showed statistically significant survival difference between two groups according to optimal cutoff values of contrast, variance, correlation and ASM. However, as this study had a small number of patients, a further study with a larger

  2. Opiate Addicted and Non-Addicted Siblings in a Slum Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Daniel; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Compares addicted and non-addicted siblings of families residing in and around a slum block in New York. Data supporting an ideographic relative deprivation-differential anticipation" explanation for current opiate addiction in the U. S. was produced. (JM)

  3. Opiate addiction and the entanglements of imperialism and patriarchy in Manchukuo, 1932-45.

    PubMed

    Smith, Norman

    2005-01-01

    In the Japanese colonial state of Manchukuo, opiate addiction was condemned by officials and critics alike. But the state-sponsored creation of a monopoly, opium laws, and rehabilitation programs failed to reduce rates of addiction. Further, official media condemnation of opiate addiction melded with local Chinese-language literature to stigmatise addiction, casing a negative light over the state's failure to realise its own anti-opiate agenda. Chinese writers were thus transfixed in a complex colonial environment in which they applauded measures to reduce harm to the local population while levelling critiques of Japanese colonial rule. This paper demonstrates how the Chinese-language literature of Manchukuo did not simply parrot official politics. It also delegitimised Japanese rule through opiate narratives that are gendered, consistently negative, and more critical of the state than might be expected in a colonial literature.

  4. Inhibition of Morphine Tolerance and Dependence by the NMDA Receptor Antagonist MK-801

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Keith A.; Akil, Huda

    1991-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of the glutamate receptor is an important mediator of several forms of neural and behavioral plasticity. The present studies examined whether NMDA receptors might be involved in the development of opiate tolerance and dependence, two examples of behavioral plasticity. The noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 attenuated the development of tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine without affecting acute morphine analgesia. In addition, MK-801 attenuated the development of morphine dependence as assessed by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. These results suggest that NMDA receptors may be important in the development of opiate tolerance and dependence.

  5. Role of Temperament, Personality Traits and Onset Age of Smoking in Predicting Opiate Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Amirabadi, Bahareh; Nikbakht, Mohammad; Nokani, Mostafa; Alibeygi, Neda; Safari, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: According to drug gateway theory, smoking cigarettes, especially, low onset age of smoking, is one of the risk factors for future use. Objectives: The present study aimed to compare nicotine and opiate addicts to identify the differences in personality traits and onset age of smoking in the two groups that cause some individuals to appeal to other substances after starting to use cigarettes. Patients and Methods: Two groups of opiate and nicotine addicts were randomly selected. Revised version of the Cloninger temperament inventory questionnaire, the Fagrastrom nicotine dependence and the Maudsley addiction profile were used. ANOVA and logistic regression were applied for data analysis. Results: Opiate addicts had higher scores in novelty seeking dimension and lower scores in cooperativeness compared to nicotine addicts. The onset age of smoking cigarette in opiate addicts was lower than nicotine addicts. Conclusions: Low onset age of smoking cigarettes, high novelty seeking and low cooperativeness in opiate dependents are among the important personality traits in future use of drugs that can predict the subsequent onset of using opiate drugs. PMID:26870712

  6. The contribution of opiate analgesics to the development of infectious complications in trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Oppeltz, Richard F; Holloway, Travis L; Covington, Cody J; Schwacha, Martin G

    2015-01-01

    Trauma-related pain is a natural consequence of injury and its surgical management; however, the relationship between opiates and complications in trauma patients is unknown. To study this a retrospective chart review of selected subjects following traumatic injury with admission to the SICU for > 3 days was performed, and opiate administration data was collected for the first 3 days of admission. Associated data from each subject’s chart was also collected. Analysis of the data revealed that increased opiate intake after admission to the SICU was associated with significantly increased SICU and hospital LOS independent of injury severity. This increase in LOS was independent of mechanical ventilation in the moderate ISS group. Infectious complications were also more prevalent in the moderate ISS group with higher opiate use. These findings suggest that increased doses of opiate analgesics in trauma patients may contribute to an increased overall LOS and associated infectious complications. Analgesic regimes that minimize opiate intake, while still providing adequate pain relief, may be advantageous in reducing LOS, complications and reduce hospitalization costs. PMID:26309777

  7. The Role of Family Atmosphere in the Relapse Behavior of Iranian Opiate Users: a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Peyrovi, Hamid; Seyedfatemi, Naiemeh; Jalali, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Many Iranian opiate users live with family members and family atmosphere can be influential on reducing such social behaviors of opiate users as substance use and relapses. This paper reports the impact of family atmosphere on relapse behavior as a part of the findings of a larger study that explored the relapse process among Iranian opiate users. Methods: In this qualitative research, we selected 17 participants (5 women and 12 men). The questions were been asked through semi-structured interviews. The researchers analyzed the verbatim transcripts using content analysis method. Results: "Family atmosphere" with three sub-themes (family and tribes' interaction, family challenges and family structure) was been found as determinants of relapse behavior. The quality of the family atmosphere could be in harmony with or against the willingness or motivation of the opiate user towards the relapse. Conclusion Health care providers should reinforce involvement of the family members in the treatment and rehabilitation of opiate users. The opiate user's family and even relatives may benefit from learning how to manage their own feelings and attitude towards the client and being supportive during interactions. PMID:26464835

  8. Effect of moderate alcohol consumption on plasma opiate levels in premenopausal women

    SciTech Connect

    Bhathena, S.J.; Kim, Y.C.; Law, J.S.; Berlin, E.; Judd. J.T.; Reichman, M.E.; Taylor, P.R.; Schatzkin, A. NCI, Bethesda, MD )

    1991-03-15

    Opiate changes have been reported in response to excessive alcohol consumption. Different phases of the menstrual cycle also affect the opiate tone. The authors studied the effect of moderate alcohol consumption and the menstrual cycle per se on plasma opiates. Forty premenopausal women were given alcohol or a soft drink of equal caloric value for 3 menstrual cycles in a cross over study. The subjects were fed a controlled diet containing 35% of energy from fat. Blood was collected in the third menstrual cycle of each period during follicular (F), ovulatory (O) and luteal (L) phases. {beta}-endorphin, met-enkephalin and lwu-enkephalin (LE) were measured by radioimmunoassay. None of the opiates showed significant change after alcohol consumption though LE was consistently higher after alcohol consumption during all three phases of the menstrual cycle. There was a significant decrease in BEN during L phase compared to F phase while both enkephalins were higher during L phase than during F phase. Opiate levels during O phase were intermediate between F and L. Thus, in contrast to previously observed opiate changes following excessive alcohol consumption, they did not observe changes with moderate consumption.

  9. Evaluation of the usefulness of an oxycodone immunoassay in combination with a traditional opiate immunoassay for the screening of opiates in urine.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Marie; Laberge, Marie-Hélène; Lefebvre, Michel

    2010-03-01

    Oxycodone is a semisynthetic opioid analgesic largely prescribed for post-operative and chronic pain management. The introduction of a slow release formulation of oxycodone has led to its frequent abuse and to an increase in emergency cases related to oxycodone overdose. Until recently, oxycodone testing has been confined to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis because the widely used automated opiate immunoassays poorly react to this compound. We investigated the utility of a new oxycodone immunoassay as a screening procedure to eliminate inappropriate GC-MS testing of negative urine specimens. We analyzed 96 urine specimens using GC-MS and two immunoassays, CEDIA((R)) opiates and DRI((R)) oxycodone assays from Microgenics, on a Hitachi 917 analyzer. The GC-MS allowed us to detect codeine, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, morphine, oxycodone, and oxymorphone following enzymatic hydrolysis and derivation by acetylation. The combination of the two immunoassays gave the best performance (98% sensitivity and specificity) when considering a positive result from GC-MS for any of the opiates. Considering positive GC-MS results for oxycodone or oxymorphone only, the oxycodone immunoassay resulted in two false-positives and one false-negative (50 ng/mL cutoff). Using these immunoassays for screening before GC-MS analysis provides a reduced opiate GC-MS workload without compromising quality.

  10. Fiscal strain and access to opiate substitution therapy at Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.

    PubMed

    Rosenheck, Robert; Leslie, Douglas; Woody, George

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between institutional fiscal strain and the availability of opiate substitution therapy (eg, methadone maintenance), an effective but relatively expensive treatment for heroin addiction. An observational design was used to examine the association of changes in funding and changes in provision for treating opiate addiction at 29 VA Medical Centers (VAMCs). We hypothesized that VAMCs experiencing greater fiscal strain would show reduced availability of opiate substitution treatment. Administrative records from each of 29 VAMCs that provided opiate substitution therapy in both Fiscal Year (FY) 1995 and FY 1999 were used to measure changes in the availability of this service, ie, the percent change in total patients treated, annual visits per patient, and total services delivered. Institutional fiscal strain was measured by the percent decline in per capita funding at four levels at each VAMC: the entire medical center, all mental health programs, all substance abuse programs (inpatient and outpatient), and outpatient substance abuse programs alone. The total number of patients receiving opiate substitution increased from 5,549 in FY 1995 to 6,884 in FY 1999 (24%), annual visits per patient decreased by 16%, and the total number of units of services increased by 4%. There were no significant relationships between changes in the delivery of opiate substitution services and changes in per capita funding at any of the four institutional levels. No new programs were started during these years. Although no new programs were started, the availability of opiate substitution therapy at VA facilities with existing programs was maintained over a five-year period regardless of local funding changes, although at somewhat reduced intensity.

  11. Migrating opiate pump: atypical [corrected] cause of meralgia paresthetica.

    PubMed

    Windsor, Robert E; Thampi, Samuel

    2003-10-01

    This is a case report of a 60 year-old female who presented with pain on the anterolateral aspect of her right thigh. The patient had a history of placement of a Drug Administration System (DAS, Opiate pump) in August, 1998 for chronic lumbar radiculopathy and a multiply operated on spine which she had suffered with since October, 1991. She presented with the subacute onset of focal pain on the anterior aspect of her right superior iliac crest region and dysesthesias on the anterolateral aspect of her right thigh. There was no history of recent trauma, worsening low back pain, or any other sensori-motor change. There was no history of anterior iliac crest bone graft for her spinal fusion and she had no anterolateral thigh symptoms related to her lumbar radiculopathy. Her neurological examination was significant only for decreased sensation on the anterolateral aspect of her right thigh. On abdominal examination the DAS pump was found at a low-lying location and was closely abutting the anterior and medial aspect of her superior iliac spine. She underwent revision of the DAS pump site with obliteration of the inferior and lateral aspect of the pump pocket. Her symptoms improved by 30% immediately and completely dissipated within two month following the procedure. This is the first reported case of lateral femoral cutaneous nerve neuropathy with DAS use. Recognition of focal compressive neuropathy by distal migration of a DAS is important, as they are potentially treatable with recognition.

  12. Characteristics of opiate users leaving detoxification treatment against medical advice.

    PubMed

    Kenne, Deric R; Boros, Alec P; Fischbein, Rebecca L

    2010-07-01

    Substance-dependent patients leaving against medical advice (AMA) pose a unique challenge to detoxification programs. Most notably, AMA patients fail to access residential or outpatient treatment needed after detoxification and often return to detoxification treatment multiple times which has deleterious results for the patient and is taxing to the healthcare system. Using retrospective data from 89 daily opiate-using detoxification patients completing detoxification and 95 patients leaving AMA, we sought to identify patient characteristics useful in predicting AMA discharges from detoxification. Bivariate analyses indicated that AMA patients reported drug use did not impair their health, were injection drug users, younger and had fewer previous treatment admissions. Binomial logistic regression indicated that AMA patients were more likely to be unemployed and report that drug use did not impair their health. Patients completing detoxification were less likely to be injection drug users and less likely to be self-referred to treatment. Identifying patients at risk of leaving AMA provides an opportunity for clinicians to intervene in an effort to increase treatment engagement for these patients.

  13. Opioid receptor desensitization: mechanisms and its link to tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Allouche, Stéphane; Noble, Florence; Marie, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors (OR) are part of the class A of G-protein coupled receptors and the target of the opiates, the most powerful analgesic molecules used in clinic. During a protracted use, a tolerance to analgesic effect develops resulting in a reduction of the effectiveness. So understanding mechanisms of tolerance is a great challenge and may help to find new strategies to tackle this side effect. This review will summarize receptor-related mechanisms that could underlie tolerance especially receptor desensitization. We will focus on the latest data obtained on molecular mechanisms involved in opioid receptor desensitization: phosphorylation, receptor uncoupling, internalization, and post-endocytic fate of the receptor. PMID:25566076

  14. Decision-making ability in current and past users of opiates: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Biernacki, Kathryn; McLennan, Skye N; Terrett, Gill; Labuschagne, Izelle; Rendell, Peter G

    2016-12-01

    Opiate use is associated with deficits in decision-making. However, the impact of abstinence and co-morbid factors, like head injury and poly-substance abuse, on this ability, is currently unclear. This meta-analysis aimed to assess 1) the magnitude of decision-making deficits in opiate users; 2) whether co-morbid factors moderate the severity of these deficits; 3) whether ex-opiate users demonstrate smaller decision-making deficits than current users; and 4) whether the length of abstinence is related to the magnitude of decision-making deficits. We analysed 22 studies that compared the performance of current and ex-opiate users to healthy controls on decision-making measures such as the Iowa Gambling Task. Current users demonstrated a moderately strong impairment in decision-making relative to controls, which was not significantly moderated by co-morbid factors. The magnitude of the impairment did not significantly differ between studies assessing current or ex-users, and this impairment was not related to length of abstinence. Thus, it appears that opiate users have relatively severe decision-making deficits that persist at least 1.5 years after cessation of use.

  15. Simultaneous quantification of opiates and effect of pigmentation on its deposition in hair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sooyeun; Han, Eunyoung; Kim, Eunmi; Choi, Hwakyung; Chung, Heesun; Oh, Seung Min; Yun, Young Mi; Jwa, Seok Hun; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2010-11-01

    In forensic toxicology, the abuse of various opiate preparations, such as raw opium and heroin, is of interest since the metabolic pathways of these opiates overlap. Although the pharmaco(toxico)kinetics in hair is not clearly understood, melanin is thought to play a key part in the incorporation and distribution of drugs and metabolites in hair. Therefore, in the present study, a simultaneous quantification method for the determination of codeine, morphine, norcodeine, normorphine and 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM) in hair was developed in order to analytically diagnose chronic users of opiates including morphine and codeine preparations, raw opium and heroin. Furthermore, the effect of hair pigmentation on the distribution of opiates in hair was investigated using lean Zucker rats with both dark grey and white hair on the same body. Opiates were extracted using 0.1 M hydrochloric acid followed by solid phase extraction. The extracts were derivatized with N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The method was fully validated and applied to the animal study. In conclusion, the current study demonstrates that codeine, morphine and their metabolites were successfully determined in both pigmented and non-pigmented hair. However, the melanin content plays an important role in the degree of incorporation of morphine, codeine and their metabolites into hair.

  16. Heroin-assisted treatment as a response to the public health problem of opiate dependence.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Benedikt; Rehm, Jürgen; Kirst, Maritt; Casas, Miguel; Hall, Wayne; Krausz, Michael; Metrebian, Nicky; Reggers, Jean; Uchtenhagen, Ambros; van den Brink, Wim; van Ree, Jan M

    2002-09-01

    Injection drug use (involving the injection of illicit opiates) poses serious public health problems in many countries. Research has indicated that injection drug users are at higher risk for morbidity in the form of HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis B and C, and drug-related mortality, as well as increased criminal activity. Methadone maintenance treatment is the most prominent form of pharmacotherapy treatment for illicit opiate dependence in several countries, and its application varies internationally with respect to treatment regulations and delivery modes. In order to effectively treat those patients who have previously been resistant to methadone maintenance treatment, several countries have been studying and/or considering heroin-assisted treatment as a complementary form of opiate pharmacotherapy treatment. This paper provides an overview of the prevalence of injection drug use and the opiate dependence problem internationally, the current opiate dependence treatment landscape in several countries, and the status of ongoing or planned heroin-assisted treatment trials in Australia, Canada and certain European countries.

  17. Effect of poppy seed consummation on the positive results of opiates screening in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Jankovicová, Katarína; Ulbrich, Pavol; Fuknová, Mária

    2009-04-01

    Poppy seed is a popular substance of many traditional Slovak cakes. We can eat quite great amount of it, sometimes more than 50 g. Existing problem in interpreting the results of opiate urine analysis in case of drug abuse arises from the natural occurrence of opiate alkaloids in poppy seed. Interpretation of morphine presence in urine sample is in some cases a problem because morphine present in the urine sample may come from different "sources". The presence of additional, respectively, other opiate in urine sample is significant help when interpreting the presence of morphine. We used poppy seed bought in supermarket for our experiment. Presence of morphine and codeine was determined in poppy seed extracts, whereas the concentration of majority opiate-morphine was 0.9 mg/100 g (9 ppm). This poppy seed was used for two series of experiment-poppy seed consummation, where four persons consumed 100g of poppy seed in the first series and 50 g in the second series. Urine samples were taken in regular 1h intervals where first urine sample was given for testing 3 h after consummation. Concentrations of total opiates were determined in each urine sample by screening examination. Morphine concentrations were determined in selected urine samples using GC/MS with internal standard.

  18. Laboratory analysis of remotely collected oral fluid specimens for opiates by immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Niedbala, R S; Kardos, K; Waga, J; Fritch, D; Yeager, L; Doddamane, S; Schoener, E

    2001-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a method for detecting opiates (morphine, codeine, heroin, and 6-acetylmorphine [6-AM]) in oral fluid specimens were examined and compared with methods for urine specimens. The oral fluid was easily obtained using a simple device that collects between 1 and 1.5 mL of fluid for laboratory analysis. Simultaneously collected specimens from 60 known opiate abusers from a drug-treatment center were first tested using an immunoassay cutoff of 10 ng/mL in oral fluids and 2,000 ng/mL in urine. Using a second aliquot, opiate confirmation in urine was performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and in oral fluids by GC-MS-MS. The combined immunoassay and GC-MS-MS procedures were completed with less than 250 pL of oral fluid. Opiates identified in oral fluid specimens from heroin users included morphine, codeine, heroin, and 6-AM. The immunoassay was tested for precision, stability, and the effects of potential cross-reactants. The results yielded 93.6% agreement between oral fluid and urine, suggesting that oral fluid may be a reliable matrix for opiate detection.

  19. [Spinal opiates in obstetrics. Theoretical aspects and criteria for practical use].

    PubMed

    Miranda, A

    1995-11-01

    Spinal opiates were introduced for use in obstetrics during the 1980's. The possibility of achieving analgesic effects with small doses, without motor and/or vegetative involvement, initially aroused a great deal of enthusiasm. After extensive experience using these drugs, however, it seems they only partially live up to these great expectations. Savings on dose seem to be attained only with morphine and the efficacy of spinal opiates used as the only agents against pain during childbirth is limited. Intradural administration is often accompanied by vegetative involvement, and the reduction in motor blockade generally does not have substantial effect on the progression of labor. On the other hand, it is important to underline the advantages of combining opiates with local anesthesia: both doses are reduced, quality of analgesia is greater, as is maternal satisfaction, and fetal/neonatal repercussions are scarce. Finally, in certain cases, opiates may constitute a valid alternative for local anesthesia, especially if delivery is intradural. The use of spinal opiates is certainly an important qualitative advance, though not a definitive one, in obstetrics.

  20. Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, R.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a heterogeneous catalysis course which has elements of materials processing embedded in the classical format of catalytic mechanisms and surface chemistry. A course outline and list of examples of recent review papers written by students are provided. (MVL)

  1. Heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Schlögl, Robert

    2015-03-09

    A heterogeneous catalyst is a functional material that continually creates active sites with its reactants under reaction conditions. These sites change the rates of chemical reactions of the reactants localized on them without changing the thermodynamic equilibrium between the materials.

  2. Opiate refractory pain from an intestinal obstruction responsive to an intravenous lidocaine infusion.

    PubMed

    Bafuma, Patrick J; Nandi, Arun; Weisberg, Michael

    2015-10-01

    A 24-year-old female patient presented to our community emergency department (ED) for abdominal pain that had progressively worsened over the last 28 hours. Of note, 1 month prior to her presentation, the patient had a colostomy due to a rectal abscess and required stoma revision 5 days prior to her visit to our ED. The patient's pain was refractory to opiate analgesia in our ED, but experienced significant relief after an intravenous lidocaine infusion. Computer tomography of the abdomen and pelvis ultimately revealed a large bowel obstruction just proximal to the colostomy site. Historically, options for ED management of severe pain have been limited beyond narcotic analgesia. For patients whom are refractory to opiates in the ED, or for whom opiates are contraindicated, lidocaine infusions have shown promise for a variety of both acute and chronic painful conditions.

  3. Treatment of experimental stroke with opiate antagonists. Effects on neurological function, infarct size, and survival.

    PubMed

    Baskin, D S; Hosobuchi, Y; Grevel, J C

    1986-01-01

    The effects are reported of acute and long-term continuous administration of three opiate antagonists--naloxone, naltrexone, and diprenorphine--on neurological function, survival, and infarct size in a feline model of acute focal cerebral ischemia. All three drugs produced statistically significant improvement in motor function following acute administration without concomitant changes in level of consciousness; saline had no effect. Naloxone and naltrexone significantly prolonged survival (p less than 0.01); diprenorphine did not. Infarct size was not altered by any treatment administered. These findings confirm previous work suggesting that, with the appropriate methodology, treatment with opiate antagonists partially reverses neurological deficits. They also show that opiate antagonists prolong survival in certain conditions of acute and subacute focal cerebral ischemia without altering the area of infarcted tissue.

  4. The effect of opiates on the activity of human placental aromatase/CYP19.

    PubMed

    Zharikova, Olga L; Deshmukh, Sujal V; Kumar, Meena; Vargas, Ricardo; Nanovskaya, Tatiana N; Hankins, Gary D V; Ahmed, Mahmoud S

    2007-01-15

    Aromatase, cytochrome P450 19, is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of estrogens by the human placenta. It is also the major placental enzyme that metabolizes the opiates L-acetylmethadol (LAAM), methadone, and buprenorphine (BUP). Methadone and BUP are used in treatment of the opiate addict and are competitive inhibitors of testosterone conversion to estradiol (E(2)) and 16alpha-hydroxytestosterone (16-OHT) to estriol (E(3)) by aromatase. The aim of this investigation is to determine the effect of 20 opiates, which can be administered to pregnant patients for therapeutic indications or abused, on E(2) and E(3) formation by placental aromatase. Data obtained indicated that the opiates increased, inhibited, or had no effect on aromatase activity. Their effect on E(3) formation was more pronounced than that on E(2) due to the lower affinity of 16-OHT than testosterone to aromatase. The K(i) values for the opiates that inhibited E(3) formation were sufentanil, 7 +/- 1 microM; LAAM, 13 +/- 8 microM; fentanyl, 25 +/- 5 microM; oxycodone, 92 +/- 22 microM; codeine, 218 +/- 69 microM; (+)-pentazocine, 225 +/- 73 microM. The agonists morphine, heroin, hydromorphone, oxymorphone, hydrocodone, propoxyphene, meperidine, levorphanol, dextrorphan, and (-)-pentazocine and the antagonists naloxone and naltrexone caused an increase in E(3) formation by 124-160% of control but had no effect on E(2) formation. Moreover, oxycodone and codeine did not inhibit E(2) formation and the IC(50) values for fentanyl, sufentanil, and (+)-pentazocine were >1000 microM. It is unlikely that the acute administration of the opiates that inhibit estrogen formation would affect maternal and/or neonatal outcome. However, the effects of abusing any of them during the entire pregnancy are unclear at this time.

  5. Comparison of methadone and buprenorphine for opiate detoxification (LEEDS trial): a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Nat MJ; Sheard, Laura; Adams, Clive E; Rushforth, Bruno J; Harrison, Wendy; Bound, Nicole; Hart, Roger; Tompkins, Charlotte NE

    2011-01-01

    Background Many opiate users require prescribed medication to help them achieve abstinence, commonly taking the form of a detoxification regime. In UK prisons, drug users are nearly universally treated for their opiate use by primary care clinicians, and once released access GP services where 40% of practices now treat drug users. There is a paucity of evidence evaluating methadone and buprenorphine (the two most commonly prescribed agents in the UK) for opiate detoxification. Aim To evaluate whether buprenorphine or methadone help to achieve drug abstinence at completion of a reducing regimen for heroin users presenting to UK prison health care for detoxification. Design Open-label, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial in three prison primary healthcare departments in the north of England. Method Prisoners (n = 306) using illicit opiates were recruited and given daily sublingual buprenorphine or oral methadone, in the context of routine care, over a standard reduced regimen of not more than 20 days. The primary outcome measure was abstinence from illicit opiates at 8 days post detoxification, as indicated by urine test (self-report/clinical notes where urine sample was not feasible). Secondary outcomes were also recorded. Results Abstinence was ascertained for 73.7% at 8 days post detoxification (urine sample = 52.6%, self report = 15.2%, clinical notes = 5.9%). There was no statistically significant difference in the odds of achieving abstinence between methadone and buprenorphine (odds ratio [OR] = 1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.81 to 3.51; P = 0.163). Abstinence was associated solely with whether or not the participant was still in prison at that time (15.22 times the odds; 95% CI = 4.19 to 55.28). The strongest association for lasting abstinence was abstinence at an earlier time point. Conclusion There is equal clinical effectiveness between methadone and buprenorphine in achieving abstinence from opiates at 8 days post detoxification within prison

  6. Experience with a urine opiate screening and confirmation cutoff of 2000 ng/mL.

    PubMed

    Fraser, A D; Worth, D

    1999-10-01

    Until recently, most laboratories used an opiate immunoassay screening and confirmation cutoff value of 300 ng/mL for codeine and morphine detection by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The cutoff value for opiates was increased to 2000 ng/mL or higher in various laboratories because of concerns that small doses of codeine and foods containing poppy seeds would give a positive opiate-screening result. Workplace drug-testing programs in the U.S. raised the opiate cutoff value to 2000 ng/mL on 30 November 1998. The objective of this study is to describe the results of opiate testing of 8600 urine specimens collected over 24 months with a 2000-ng/mL screening and confirmation (codeine and morphine) cutoff value. Specimens were screened by the EMITdau opiate assay using an in-house 2000-ng/mL morphine calibrator. Presumptive positive findings (N = 621) were analyzed quantitatively by GC-MS for codeine and morphine. One hundred and eighty six urine specimens were positive for codeine and morphine (> 2000 ng/mL), 298 specimens were positive for codeine only (> 2000 ng/mL) and 26 specimens were positive for morphine only (> 2000 ng/mL). All remaining specimens had codeine and morphine values < 2000 ng/mL. The codeine and morphine confirmation rate in this program reduced from 7.1% in 1994-1996 (300-ng/mL cutoff) to 2.1% in 1997-1998 with a 2000-ng/mL cutoff value. The codeine-only confirmation rate lowered from 6.6% (300-ng/mL cutoff) to 3.4% (2000-ng/mL cutoff). It was concluded that increasing opiate screening and codeine and morphine confirmation cutoff values led to > 300% reduction in the confirmed-positive rate for codeine and morphine and a 47% reduction in codeine-only confirmations in a urine drug-testing program where codeine was the major opiate used.

  7. Lifetime opiate exposure as an independent and interactive cardiovascular risk factor in males: a cross-sectional clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Reece, Albert S; Hulse, Gary K

    2013-01-01

    Introduction While several studies have identified an increased incidence of cardiovascular disorders in opiate dependence, neither opiates as a cardiovascular risk factor nor their effect on central arterial function has been considered. Methods Pulse wave analysis (SphygmoCor, AtCorMedical Pty Limited, Sydney, NSW, Australia) was undertaken on a cohort of controls and opiate dependent patients and the results compared to their lifetime opiate exposure. Results Controls (N = 401) were compared with 465 opiate dependent men. The mean (log) ages were different and were found to be 28.80 ± 0.49 years versus 35.02 ± 0.39 years (P < 0.0001), respectively. Of the opiate dependent group, 87.7% were treated with buprenorphine, 8.8% with methadone, and 3.4% with naltrexone. Multiple regression analysis was used to adjust for chronologic age (CA). At CA of 60 years, the modeled age in the controls was 66.40 years, and that in the addicted group was 73.11 years, an advancement of 6.71 years, or 10.10%. Exacerbations of age dependent changes in central arterial stiffness, central pressures, pulse rate, ejection duration, diastolic duration, and subendocardial perfusion ratio by opiate dependence were all noted (P < 0.05). Current heroin dose, heroin duration, and the dose duration interaction were all significantly related to the vascular (or “reference”) age (RA)/CA ratio (all P < 0.006). After multivariate adjustment, the opiate dose duration was independently predictive of RA (P < 0.02). Opiate dose and/or duration were included in a further 25 terms. Conclusion These data show that opiate use is not benign for the male cardiovascular system, but has a dose response relationship to central arterial stiffness and thus cardiovascular aging, acting independently and interactively with established cardiovascular risk factors. These findings imply accelerated organismal aging. PMID:24124373

  8. Bystander killing effect of DS-8201a, a novel anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 antibody-drug conjugate, in tumors with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Ogitani, Yusuke; Hagihara, Katsunobu; Oitate, Masataka; Naito, Hiroyuki; Agatsuma, Toshinori

    2016-07-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates deliver anticancer agents selectively and efficiently to tumor tissue and have significant antitumor efficacy with a wide therapeutic window. DS-8201a is a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeting antibody-drug conjugate prepared using a novel linker-payload system with a potent topoisomerase I inhibitor, exatecan derivative (DX-8951 derivative, DXd). It was effective against trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1)-insensitive patient-derived xenograft models with both high and low HER2 expression. In this study, the bystander killing effect of DS-8201a was evaluated and compared with that of T-DM1. We confirmed that the payload of DS-8201a, DXd (1), was highly membrane-permeable whereas that of T-DM1, Lys-SMCC-DM1, had a low level of permeability. Under a coculture condition of HER2-positive KPL-4 cells and negative MDA-MB-468 cells in vitro, DS-8201a killed both cells, whereas T-DM1 and an antibody-drug conjugate with a low permeable payload, anti-HER2-DXd (2), did not. In vivo evaluation was carried out using mice inoculated with a mixture of HER2-positive NCI-N87 cells and HER2-negative MDA-MB-468-Luc cells by using an in vivo imaging system. In vivo, DS-8201a reduced the luciferase signal of the mice, indicating suppression of the MDA-MB-468-Luc population; however, T-DM1 and anti-HER2-DXd (2) did not. Furthermore, it was confirmed that DS-8201a was not effective against MDA-MB-468-Luc tumors inoculated at the opposite side of the NCI-N87 tumor, suggesting that the bystander killing effect of DS-8201a is observed only in cells neighboring HER2-positive cells, indicating low concern in terms of systemic toxicity. These results indicated that DS-8201a has a potent bystander effect due to a highly membrane-permeable payload and is beneficial in treating tumors with HER2 heterogeneity that are unresponsive to T-DM1.

  9. Predicting Sobriety from the Employment Status of Dually Diagnosed Clients Who Are Opiate Dependent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scorzelli, James F.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (E. S. Neukrug & R. C. Fawcett, 2006) profiles and employment status for clients who are opiate dependent. A discriminant function analysis indicated that employment was a predictor in maintaining sobriety after 6 months. (Contains…

  10. Automated multiple development thin-layer chromatography for separation of opiate alkaloids and derivatives.

    PubMed

    Pothier, Jacques; Galand, Nicole

    2005-07-08

    There are three types of opiate alkaloids. First, the poppy alkaloids: morphine, codeine, thebaine, noscapine and papaverine; then, the semi-synthetic and synthetic derivatives used in therapy as antitussives and analgesics, such as pholcodine, ethylmorphine and dextromethorphan; at last narcotic compounds, diacetylmorphine (heroin) and opiates employed as substitutes in treatment of addiction: buprenorphine and methadone. For classical thin-layer chromatography (TLC) of opium alkaloids, it is necessary to use complex eluents with strong alkaline substances to obtain a clean separation between morphinan and isoquinoline compounds. This study purposes the planar chromatographic analysis of these substances by the automated multiple development (AMD) compared with results obtained by classical TLC method. The aim of this work was to achieve the best separation of these opiate alkaloids and derivatives by this modern technique of planar chromatography. The AMD system provided a clean separation for each of three opiates groups studied and the best results have been obtained with universal gradient: methanol 100, methanol-dichloromethane 50/50, dichloromethane 100, dichloromethane 100, hexane 100 for opium alkaloids and with gradient A: 5% of 28% ammonia in methanol 100, acetone 100, acetone 100, ethyl acetate-dichloromethane 50/50, dichloromethane 100 for antitussives and substitutes. Two reagents were used for the detection of alkaloids by spraying: Dragendorff and iodoplatinate reagents. The detection limits with these two reagents were 1 microg for ethylmorphine, thebaine, papaverine, codeine, and 2 microg for morphine and noscapine and other alkaloids.

  11. Differentiating Violent and Nonviolent Opiate-Addicted Reformatory Inmates with the MMPI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chick, Garry E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Discriminated among four groups of male opiate-addicted reformatory inmates (N=193) according to degree of criminal violence using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). Results showed that discriminant analysis was moderately successful for classifying Bodily Violent and Nonbodily Violent groups on the basis of their MMPI scores.…

  12. Drugs and Personality: Personality Correlates and Predictors of Non-Opiate Drug Use. Research Issues 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Gregory A., Ed.; And Others

    This collection of abstracts from current research and theoretical studies explores various aspects of the relationship between non-opiate drug use and personality. The literature covers a period from 1968 through 1975 and focuses on tests that were conducted on adolescents and college students from the United States, Canada and Sydney, Australia.…

  13. Review article: lack of effect of opiates in the treatment of acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema.

    PubMed

    Sosnowski, Marcin A

    2008-10-01

    Opiates have traditionally been used as one of the main treatments of acute heart failure and are still recognized as such. Most current textbooks and official guidelines advise the use of morphine as one of the first-line treatments for patients in acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema and a majority of physicians accept it to be the case. The author performed an extensive literature search in order to validate the evidence for the use of opiates in this condition. A total of seven papers, six in English and one in Polish, were found that directly investigated or reported the clinically important outcomes of treatment of acute pulmonary oedema. Only five of these dealt specifically with the effects of administration of opiates in acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema. None of the above publications suggested a clinically significant improvement in outcomes of patients treated with morphine, although early research did suggest reduced anxiety, blood pressure and pulse rate as well as a reduction in arterial oxygen contents. The more recent studies suggest a strong association between increased mortality and morbidity (e.g. intensive care unit admissions or intubation rates), although causality is difficult to establish because of research methodologies. The current evidence does not support the routine use of opiates in the treatment of acute pulmonary oedema.

  14. Poppy seed ingestion as a contributing factor to opiate-positive urinalysis results: the Pacific perspective.

    PubMed

    Selavka, C M

    1991-05-01

    The possible contribution of poppy seed foods to positive opiate urinalysis results, especially from foods available in the Pacific Rim area, has recently become an issue for the U.S. Army Forensic Toxicology Drug Testing Laboratory in Hawaii. To assess the likelihood of this possible contribution, seven different poppy seed food products were consumed by male and female volunteers, and urine specimens were collected at time increments up to either 24 or 72 h. Specimens were evaluated for opiates using Roche Abuscreen radioimmunoassay (RIA), and all RIA positive specimens were analyzed for morphine and codeine using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Poppy seed cake, bagels, muffins, and rolls did not contain sufficient quantities of poppy seeds to give rise to opiate positive specimens by U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) GC-MS cutoff levels (morphine = 4000 ng/mL, codeine = 2000 ng/mL), although a number of specimens were positive by National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) cutoff levels (morphine and codeine = 300 ng/mL). However, ingestion of poppy seed streusel or Danish pastry led to confirmed morphine and codeine positive specimens, irrespective of the use of DOD or NIDA confirmation cutoff values. In addition, significant amounts of codeine were observed in a number of these specimens. These findings argue against the unqualified application of previously published quantitative guidelines for eliminating poppy seed ingestion as a possible cause for a positive opiate urinalysis result.

  15. Psychometric Evaluation of the Life Orientation Test-Revised in Treated Opiate Dependent Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Jameson K.; Britton, Peter C.; Conner, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    We examined internal consistency and test-retest reliability of a measure of dispositional optimism, the Life Orientation Test-Revised, in 121 opiate-dependent patients seeking methadone treatment. Internal consistency was adequate at baseline (alpha = 0.69) and follow-up (alpha = 0.72). Low socioeconomic status and being on disability were…

  16. A meta-analysis of marijuana, cocaine and opiate toxicology study findings among homicide victims.

    PubMed

    Kuhns, Joseph B; Wilson, David B; Maguire, Edward R; Ainsworth, Stephanie A; Clodfelter, Tammatha A

    2009-07-01

    ABSTRACT Aim To synthesize the results of marijuana, cocaine and opiate drug toxicology studies of homicide victims and examine variation in results across person and setting characteristics. Methods A meta-analysis of 18 independent studies identified from an extensive review of 239 published articles that met the inclusion criteria of reporting marijuana, cocaine and/or opiate toxicology test results for homicide victims. A total of 28 868 toxicology test results derived from 30 482 homicide victims across five countries were examined. Results On average, 6% of homicide victims tested positive for marijuana, 11% tested positive for cocaine, and 5% tested positive for opiates. The proportion of homicide victims testing positive for illicit drugs has increased over time. Age had a strong curvilinear relationship with toxicology test results, but gender differences were not apparent. Hispanic and African American homicide victims were more likely to test positive for cocaine; Caucasians were most likely to test positive for opiates. Cocaine use appeared to be related to increased risk of death from a firearm and was a greater risk factor for violent victimization in the United States than in Newfoundland and Scandinavia. Conclusion There are relatively few studies of illicit drug toxicology reports from homicide victims that allow for cross-cultural comparisons. This study provides a basis for comparing future local toxicology test results to estimates from existing research.

  17. Dissociation of POMC Peptides after Self-Injury Predicts Responses To Centrally Acting Opiate Blockers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandman, Curt A.; Hetrick, William; Taylor, Derek V.; Chicz-DeMet, Aleksandra

    1997-01-01

    This study investigated whether blood plasma levels of pro-opiomelanocortin-derived (POMC) peptides, beta-endorphin-like activity, adrenocorticotrophic hormone, and adrenal cortisol immediately after self injurious behavior (SIB) episodes predicted subsequent response to an opiate blocker in 10 patients with mental retardation. Results suggest…

  18. Opiate Dependence as an Independent and Interactive Risk Factor for Arterial Stiffness and Cardiovascular Ageing - A Longitudinal Study in Females

    PubMed Central

    Reece, Albert Stuart; Hulse, Gary Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite intriguing observational cross-sectional data there are no longitudinal studies of opiate related arterial disease. As opiates act via P16INK4A/CDKN2A, and vascular ageing has been thought to be a surrogate for organismal ageing, the subject has far-reaching implications. Methods Pulse Wave Analysis (PWA) by radial arterial tonometry (SphygmoCor) was performed on control and opiate dependent patients. Results A total of 37 controls were compared with 93 opiate dependents. They were studied on 117 and 275 occasions respectively up to 1,797 days. The mean (± S.E.M.) ages were 38.72 ± 2.64 and 33.78 ± 0.90 years (P = 0.0260), 91.4% and 10.8% smoked (P < 0.0001). Body mass index rose more in controls (P = 0.0185) and in interaction with time (P = 0.0025). When controlled for time and BMI, opiate dependency status was shown to be associated with vascular age and central arterial stiffness and pressure indices (all P < 0.05). When repeated measures multiple regression was performed on all traditional cardiovascular risk factors, the opiate dose-duration interaction was significant and appeared in 12 terms in the final model. It was also independently significant (P = 0.0153). Opiate dose or duration appeared in a further 15 terms. The model was shown to be significantly improved by the inclusion of terms for opiate dependency (A.I.C. 71.10 v 54.31, P < 0.0001). Conclusion These data confirm increased vascular stiffness and ageing in a longitudinal study, and thereby imply advanced organismal ageing. These multivariate studies are consistent with opiate dependency as an interactive and multivariate cardiovascular risk factor and emphasize the role of treatment duration. PMID:23976908

  19. Opiate Analgesia Treatment Reduced Early Inflammatory Response After Severe Chest Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Krdzalic, Goran; Musanovic, Nermin; Krdzalic, Alisa; Mehmedagic, Indira; Kesetovic, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The frequency of severe chest injuries are increased. Their high morbidity is followed by systemic inflammatory response. The efficacy of pharmacological blockade of the response could prevent complications after chest injures. Aim: The aim of the study was to show an inflammatory response level, its prognostic significant and length of hospital stay after chest injures opiate analgesia treatment. Methods: Sixty patients from Department of Thoracic Surgery with severe chest injures were included in the prospective study. With respect of non opiate or opiate analgesia treatment, the patients were divided in two groups consisted of 30 patients. As a inflammatory markers, serum values of leukocytes, neutrophils, C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen in three measurements: at the time of admission, 24hours and 48 hours after admission, were followed. Results: Statistically significant differences were found between the examined groups in mean serum values of neutrophils (p=0.026 and p=0.03) in the second and the third measurement, CRP (p=0.05 and 0.25) in the second and the third measurement and leukocytes in the third measurement (p=0.016). 6 patients in group I and 3 in group II had initial stage of pneumonia, 13 patients in group I and 6 in group II had atelectasis and 7 patients from group I and 4 from group II had pleural effusion. The rate of complications was lower in group of patient who were under opiate analgesia treatment but without significant difference. The length of hospital stay for the patients in group I was 7.3±1.15 days and for the patients in group II it was 6.1±0.87 days with statistically significant difference p=0.017. Conclusion: The opiate analgesia in patients with severe chest injures reduced level of early inflammatory response, rate of intra hospital complications and length of hospital stay. PMID:28210021

  20. Behavioral expression of opiate withdrawal is altered after prefrontocortical dopamine depletion in rats: monoaminergic correlates.

    PubMed

    Espejo, E F; Serrano, M I; Caillé, S; Stinus, L

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the effects of prefrontocortical dopamine depletion on opiate withdrawal and prefrontocortical neurochemical changes elicited by morphine dependence and withdrawal. The dopaminergic content was also measured in the nucleus accumbens during withdrawal, in order to detect reactive changes induced by prefrontocortical lesion. Withdrawal was induced by naloxone in morphine-dependent rats. Monoamine levels were analyzed post-mortem by high performance liquid cromatography. The results showed that chronic morphine dependence did not modify basal levels of monoamines in sham rats, revealing neuroadaptation of prefrontocortical dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin systems to chronic morphine. The neuroadaptive phenomenon remained after prefrontocortical lesion (> 79% dopamine depletion). On the other hand, a strong increase of dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin contents in the medial prefrontal cortex of sham rats was detected during opiate withdrawal. However, in lesioned rats, the increase of prefrontocortical dopamine and serotonin content, but not that of noradrenaline, was much lower. In the nucleus accumbens, prefrontocortical lesion reactively enhanced the dopaminergic tone and, although opiate withdrawal reduced dopaminergic activity in both sham and lesioned rats, this reduction was less intense in the latter group. At a behavioral level, some symptoms of physical opiate withdrawal were exacerbated in lesioned rats (writhing, mastication, teeth-chattering, global score) and exploration was reduced. The findings hence indicate that: (i) prefrontocortical monoaminergic changes play a role in the behavioral expression of opiate withdrawal; (ii) the severity of some withdrawal signs are related to the dopaminergic and serotonergic tone of the medial prefrontal cortex rather than to the noradrenergic one, and (iii) an inverse relationship between mesocortical and mesolimbic dopaminergic systems exists.

  1. Direct analysis of opiates in urine by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Edinboro, Leslie E; Backer, Ronald C; Poklis, Alphonse

    2005-10-01

    A method for the direct analysis of 10 opiate compounds in urine was developed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) with electrospray ionization interface (ESI). Opiates included were morphine-3-P-glucuronide, morphine-6--glucuronide, morphine, oxymorphone, hydromorphone, norcodeine, codeine, oxycodone, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6MAM), and hydrocodone. Urine samples were prepared by centrifugation to remove large particles and direct injection into the LC-MS-MS. Separation and detection of all compounds was accomplished within 6 min. Linearity was established for all opiates except 6MAM from 50 ng/mL to 10,000 ng/mL; 6MAM from 0.25 ng/mL to 50 ng/mL with all correlation coefficients (r) > 0.99. Interrun precision (%CV) ranged from 1.1% to 16.7%, and intrarun precision ranged from 1.3% to 16.3%. Accuracy (% bias) ranged from -7.3% to 13.6% and -8.5% to 11.8 for inter- and intrarun, respectively. Eighty-nine urine samples previously analyzed by gas chromatography-MS were re-analyzed by the LC-MS-MS method. The qualitative results found an 88% agreement for negative samples between the two methods and 94% for positive samples. The LC-MS-MS method identified 19 samples with additional opiates in the positive samples. Overall, the direct injection LC-MS-MS method performed well and permitted the rapid analysis of urine samples for several opiates simultaneously without extensive sample preparation.

  2. Major disruptions of sleep during treatment of the opiate withdrawal syndrome: differences between methadone and lofexidine detoxification treatments.

    PubMed

    Beswick, Tracy; Best, David; Rees, Sian; Bearn, Jenny; Gossop, Michael; Strang, John

    2003-03-01

    Sleep disturbance experienced during methadone or lofexidine opiate detoxification was investigated in 118 opiate-dependent patients receiving inpatient detoxification treatment. Sleep was assessed at four time-points during opiate detoxification using a self-report questionnaire. Maximum sleep disruption occurred at completion of detoxification and during the protracted withdrawal period, with patients in the methadone group reporting higher levels of withdrawal symptoms, lower overall sleep, longer sleep latencies and significantly longer periods of time awake than lofexidine patients. Regression analyses demonstrated a significant relationship between sleep disturbance, protracted withdrawal and retention in treatment, in addition to the major treatment benefit of reduced sleep disturbance conferred by lofexidine treatment.

  3. Sigma-1 receptors modulate functional activity of rat splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Whitlock, B B; Pultz, J A; Wolfe, S A

    1995-06-01

    Neuroleptics, opiates, and cocaine are commonly prescribed for or abused by humans. Although primarily used for their actions at other receptors in brain, these compounds also act at sigma receptors. We have previously identified sigma-1 receptors on human peripheral blood leukocytes and rat spleen, and in the present study we demonstrate a correlation between the pharmacology of these receptors and the ability of drugs to suppress concanavalin A-induced splenocyte proliferation. These results support the hypothesis that sigma-1 receptors regulate functional activities of immune cells, and suggest that sigma agonists may cause changes in immune competence in vivo.

  4. Opioid receptor trafficking and interaction in nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X; Bao, L; Li, S

    2015-01-01

    Opiate analgesics such as morphine are often used for pain therapy. However, antinociceptive tolerance and dependence may develop with long-term use of these drugs. It was found that μ-opioid receptors can interact with δ-opioid receptors, and morphine antinociceptive tolerance can be reduced by blocking δ-opioid receptors. Recent studies have shown that μ- and δ-opioid receptors are co-expressed in a considerable number of small neurons in the dorsal root ganglion. The interaction of μ-opioid receptors with δ-opioid receptors in the nociceptive afferents is facilitated by the stimulus-induced cell-surface expression of δ-opioid receptors, and contributes to morphine tolerance. Further analysis of the molecular, cellular and neural circuit mechanisms that regulate the trafficking and interaction of opioid receptors and related signalling molecules in the pain pathway would help to elucidate the mechanism of opiate analgesia and improve pain therapy. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24611685

  5. Opiate concentrations following the ingestion of poppy seed products--evidence for 'the poppy seed defence'.

    PubMed

    Meadway, C; George, S; Braithwaite, R

    1998-08-31

    The universally accepted 300 ng/ml cut-off limit for opiate assays stated to be mandatory for all drug screening laboratories by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, has been questioned recently due to positive results being obtained following the ingestion of poppy seed containing food products. To establish the plausibility of the 'the poppy seed defence' the concentrations of codeine, norcodeine, morphine, normorphine and thebaine (a potential marker for seed ingestion) in several varieties of poppy seeds from different countries were quantified by GC-MS. The country of origin of the seed specimen analysed and the preparation of the seeds prior to their culinary use was found to influence the alkaloid concentration determined. The maximum morphine and codeine concentrations determined in the seeds were found to be 33.2 and 13.7 micrograms/g seed respectively. In addition, thebaine concentrations were found to vary with each seed sample analysed. Following the consumption of bread rolls (mean 0.76 g seed covering per roll) by four subjects, all urine specimens analysed produced negative results (using the Dade Bebring EMIT II opiate screening assay) with the exception of one subject (body weight 63.0 kg) who consumed two poppy seed rolls. In this subject opiate positive screening results were obtained for up to 6 h post ingestion with maximum urinary morphine and codeine concentrations of 832.0 ng/ml (@ 2-4 h post ingestion) and 47.9 ng/ml (@ 0-2 h post ingestion) respectively being achieved. Following the ingestion of poppy seed cake containing an average of 4.69 g of seed per slice by four individuals, opiate positive screening results were obtained for up to 24 h. In one subject (dose equivalent to 0.07 g poppy seed/kg body weight) maximum urinary morphine and codeine concentrations of 302.1 ng/ml (@ 0-2 h) and 83.8 ng/ml (@ 2-4 h) respectively were recorded. The elimination of thebaine was found to vary widely between individuals

  6. Morphine and codeine concentrations in human urine following controlled poppy seeds administration of known opiate content.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael L; Nichols, Daniel C; Underwood, Paula; Fuller, Zachary; Moser, Matthew A; LoDico, Charles; Gorelick, David A; Newmeyer, Matthew N; Concheiro, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-08-01

    Opiates are an important component for drug testing due to their high abuse potential. Proper urine opiate interpretation includes ruling out poppy seed ingestion; however, detailed elimination studies after controlled poppy seed administration with known morphine and codeine doses are not available. Therefore, we investigated urine opiate pharmacokinetics after controlled oral administration of uncooked poppy seeds with known morphine and codeine content. Participants were administered two 45 g oral poppy seed doses 8 h apart, each containing 15.7 mg morphine and 3mg codeine. Urine was collected ad libitum up to 32 h after the first dose. Specimens were analyzed with the Roche Opiates II immunoassay at 2000 and 300 μg/L cutoffs, and the ThermoFisher CEDIA(®) heroin metabolite (6-acetylmorphine, 6-AM) and Lin-Zhi 6-AM immunoassays with 10 μg/L cutoffs to determine if poppy seed ingestion could produce positive results in these heroin marker assays. In addition, all specimens were quantified for morphine and codeine by GC/MS. Participants (N=22) provided 391 urine specimens over 32 h following dosing; 26.6% and 83.4% were positive for morphine at 2000 and 300 μg/L GC/MS cutoffs, respectively. For the 19 subjects who completed the study, morphine concentrations ranged from <300 to 7522 μg/L with a median peak concentration of 5239 μg/L. The median first morphine-positive urine sample at 2000 μg/L cutoff concentration occurred at 6.6 h (1.2-12.1), with the last positive from 2.6 to 18 h after the second dose. No specimens were positive for codeine at a cutoff concentration of 2000 μg/L, but 20.2% exceeded 300 μg/L, with peak concentrations of 658 μg/L (284-1540). The Roche Opiates II immunoassay had efficiencies greater than 96% for the 2000 and 300 μg/L cutoffs. The CEDIA 6-AM immunoassay had a specificity of 91%, while the Lin-Zhi assay had no false positive results. These data provide valuable information for interpreting urine opiate results.

  7. Morphine and Codeine Concentrations in Human Urine following Controlled Poppy Seeds Administration of Known Opiate Content

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael L.; Nichols, Daniel C.; Underwood, Paula; Fuller, Zachary; Moser, Matthew A.; LoDico, Charles; Gorelick, David A.; Newmeyer, Matthew N.; Concheiro, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Opiates are an important component for drug testing due to their high abuse potential. Proper urine opiate interpretation includes ruling out poppy seed ingestion; however, detailed elimination studies after controlled poppy seed administration with known morphine and codeine doses are not available. Therefore, we investigated urine opiate pharmacokinetics after controlled oral administration of uncooked poppy seeds with known morphine and codeine content. Participants were administered two 45g oral poppy seed doses 8h apart, each containing 15.7mg morphine and 3mg codeine. Urine was collected ad libitum up to 32h after the first dose. Specimens were analyzed with the Roche Opiates II immunoassay at 2,000 and 300μg/L cutoffs, and the ThermoFisher CEDIA® Heroin Metabolite (6-acetylmorphine, 6AM) and Lin-Zhi 6AM immunoassays with 10μg/L cutoffs to determine if poppy seed ingestion could produce positive results in these heroin marker assays. In addition, all specimens were quantified for morphine and codeine by GC/MS. Participants (N=22) provided 391 urine specimens over 32h following dosing; 26.6% and 83.4% were positive for morphine at 2,000 and 300μg/L GC/MS cutoffs, respectively. For the 19 subjects who completed the study, morphine concentrations ranged from <300 to 7,522μg/L with a median peak concentration of 5,239μg/L. The median first morphine-positive urine sample at 2,000μg/L cutoff concentration occurred at 6.6h (1.2-12.1), with the last positive from 2.6 to 18h after the second dose. No specimens were positive for codeine at a cutoff concentration of 2,000μg/L, but 20.2% exceeded 300μg/L, with peak concentrations of 658 μg/L (284-1540). The Roche Opiates II immunoassay had efficiencies greater than 96% for the 2000 and 300μg/L cutoffs. The CEDIA 6AM immunoassay had a specificity of 91%, while the Lin-Zhi assay had no false positive results. These data provide valuable information for interpreting urine opiate results. PMID:24887324

  8. Aberrant mesolimbic dopamine-opiate interaction in obesity.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, Lauri; Tuulari, Jetro; Karlsson, Henry; Hirvonen, Jussi; Helin, Semi; Salminen, Paulina; Parkkola, Riitta; Hietala, Jarmo; Nuutila, Pirjo; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2015-11-15

    Dopamine and opioid neurotransmitter systems share many functions such as regulation of reward and pleasure. μ-Opioid receptors (MOR) modulate the mesolimbic dopamine system in ventral tegmental area and striatum, key areas implicated in reward. We hypothesized that dopamine and opioid receptor availabilities correlate in vivo and that this correlation is altered in obesity, a disease with altered reward processing. Twenty lean females (mean BMI 22) and 25 non-binge eating morbidly obese females (mean BMI 41) underwent two positron emission tomography scans with [(11)C]carfentanil and [(11)C]raclopride to measure the MOR and dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) availability, respectively. In lean subjects, the MOR and DRD2 availabilities were positively associated in the ventral striatum (r=0.62, p=0.003) and dorsal caudate nucleus (r=0.62, p=0.004). Moreover, DRD2 availability in the ventral striatum was associated with MOR availability in other regions of the reward circuitry, particularly in the ventral tegmental area. In morbidly obese subjects, this receptor interaction was significantly weaker in ventral striatum but unaltered in the caudate nucleus. Finally, the association between DRD2 availability in the ventral striatum and MOR availability in the ventral tegmental area was abolished in the morbidly obese. The study demonstrates a link between DRD2 and MOR availabilities in living human brain. This interaction is selectively disrupted in mesolimbic dopamine system in morbid obesity. We propose that interaction between the dopamine and opioid systems is a prerequisite for normal reward processing and that disrupted cross-talk may underlie altered reward processing in obesity.

  9. LC-MS-MS Method for Analysis of Opiates in Wastewater During Football Games II.

    PubMed

    Gul, Waseem; Stamper, Brandon; Godfrey, Murrell; Gul, Shahbaz W; ElSohly, Mahmoud A

    2016-06-01

    Continuing our previous studies analyzing drugs of abuse in municipal wastewater, a method was developed for the analysis of opiates in wastewater samples using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Eight opiate drugs and metabolites were analyzed including codeine, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM, the primary urinary metabolite of heroin), morphine, norhydrocodone (the primary urinary metabolite of hydrocodone), oxycodone and oxymorphone. These drugs were chosen because of their widespread abuse. Wastewater samples were collected at both the Oxford Waste Water Treatment Plant in Oxford, Mississippi (MS) and the University Wastewater Treatment Plant in University, MS. These wastewater samples were collected on weekends in which the Ole Miss Rebel football team held home games (Vaught-Hemingway Stadium, University, MS 38677). The collected samples were analyzed using a validated method and found to contain codeine, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, morphine, norhydrocodone, oxycodone and oxymorphone. None of the samples contained 6-MAM.

  10. The Growing Burden of Neonatal Opiate Exposure on Children and Family Services in Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    França, Urbano L; Mustafa, Shaheer; McManus, Michael L

    2016-02-01

    Increasing opiate use among women of reproductive age has led to a rise in adverse pregnancy outcomes, including neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Recent studies have documented the increased incidence of NAS, but subsequent impact on the chain of organizations within the social service system remains unexplored. In this article, we begin to estimate the reach of this issue by assessing the labor costs of caring for NAS infants within the Massachusetts Department of Children and Families (MA DCF). Based on a process map of services, we modeled social service hours using encounter-level hospital data as inputs. In this manner, we estimate that MA DCF professionals now devote more than 10,000 hours per month to this single problem. As opiate addiction increases across America, substantial additional investment in social service providers, foster care, Early Intervention Programs, and other family services will be required.

  11. Parenting beliefs and practices of opiate-addicted parents: concealment and taboo.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Diane M

    2003-07-01

    The lifestyle associated with opiate dependence, including drug taking, the buying and selling of drugs, and contact with other drug users, carries potential risks for the safety and well-being of children of drug-using parents. Based on a qualitative interview study conducted with 50 opiate-dependent parents in Dublin, Ireland, the parenting beliefs and practices in relation to children's exposure to drugs and the associated lifestyle are described. Parents saw their lifestyle as potentially risky for their children and their families. The most common strategy adopted by parents was to conceal their drug-related activities and maintain a strict family taboo about these activities. Intervention programmes should be offered to support effective family communication about parental drug dependence.

  12. Efficient N-demethylation of opiate alkaloids using a modified nonclassical Polonovski reaction.

    PubMed

    McCamley, Kristy; Ripper, Justin A; Singer, Robert D; Scammells, Peter J

    2003-12-12

    A modified Polonovski reaction has been employed to N-demethylate several opiate alkaloids in moderate to high yield. This method provides an alternative to traditional N-demethylation procedures which utilize toxic reagents such as cyanogen bromide or expensive reagents such as vinyl chloroformate. The current synthesis involves N-oxide formation, isolation of the corresponding N-oxide hydrochloride, and an FeSO(4).7H(2)O mediated Polonovski reaction to afford the desired secondary amine.

  13. Buprenorphine versus dihydrocodeine for opiate detoxification in primary care: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Nat MJ; Sheard, Laura; Tompkins, Charlotte NE; Adams, Clive E; Allgar, Victoria L; Oldham, Nicola S

    2007-01-01

    Background Many drug users present to primary care requesting detoxification from illicit opiates. There are a number of detoxification agents but no recommended drug of choice. The purpose of this study is to compare buprenorphine with dihydrocodeine for detoxification from illicit opiates in primary care. Methods Open label randomised controlled trial in NHS Primary Care (General Practices), Leeds, UK. Sixty consenting adults using illicit opiates received either daily sublingual buprenorphine or daily oral dihydrocodeine. Reducing regimens for both interventions were at the discretion of prescribing doctor within a standard regimen of not more than 15 days. Primary outcome was abstinence from illicit opiates at final prescription as indicated by a urine sample. Secondary outcomes during detoxification period and at three and six months post detoxification were recorded. Results Only 23% completed the prescribed course of detoxification medication and gave a urine sample on collection of their final prescription. Risk of non-completion of detoxification was reduced if allocated buprenorphine (68% vs 88%, RR 0.58 CI 0.35–0.96, p = 0.065). A higher proportion of people allocated to buprenorphine provided a clean urine sample compared with those who received dihydrocodeine (21% vs 3%, RR 2.06 CI 1.33–3.21, p = 0.028). People allocated to buprenorphine had fewer visits to professional carers during detoxification and more were abstinent at three months (10 vs 4, RR 1.55 CI 0.96–2.52) and six months post detoxification (7 vs 3, RR 1.45 CI 0.84–2.49). Conclusion Informative randomised trials evaluating routine care within the primary care setting are possible amongst drug using populations. This small study generates unique data on commonly used treatment regimens. PMID:17210079

  14. The Role of Endorphins in the Pathophysiology of Shock and the Therapeutic Benefit of Opiate Antagonists,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    in rats, cats , and dogs demonstrate these therapeutic effects of naloxone across a variety of species. Additionally, naloxone treatment significantly...in rats (14,15,16) and dogs (17), and following spinal shock in rats (9,10) and cats (11,12). Since naloxone has been described as a pure opiate...rats, cats , and dogs . In addition, naloxone was shown to signifi- cantly decrease the paralysis resulting from spinal-cord injury in the cat

  15. Preclinical Assessment of a Strategy to Minimize the Abuse Liability of Opiate Medications for Pain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    dependence and abuse in both civilian and military populations (1, 2). Prescription drug use has risen especially rapidly in the military population (2). This...plans (3). In fact, Bray and colleagues found that pain medication is the most highly abused of all prescribed drugs in the military (4...1 Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0305 TITLE: Preclinical Assessment of a Strategy to Minimize the Abuse Liability of Opiate Medications for Pain

  16. Neurofeedback training for opiate addiction: improvement of mental health and craving.

    PubMed

    Dehghani-Arani, Fateme; Rostami, Reza; Nadali, Hosein

    2013-06-01

    Psychological improvements in patients with substance use disorders have been reported after neurofeedback treatment. However, neurofeedback has not been commonly accepted as a treatment for substance dependence. This study was carried out to examine the effectiveness of this therapeutic method for opiate dependence disorder. The specific aim was to investigate whether treatment leads to any changes in mental health and substance craving. In this experimental study with a pre-post test design, 20 opiate dependent patients undergoing Methadone or Buprenorphine maintenance treatment were examined and matched and randomized into two groups. While both experimental and control groups received their usual maintenance treatment, the experimental group received 30 sessions of neurofeedback treatment in addition. The neurofeedback treatment consisted of sensory motor rhythm training on Cz, followed by an alpha-theta protocol on Pz. Data from the general health questionnaire and a heroin craving questionnaire were collected before and after treatment. Multivariate analysis of covariance showed that the experimental group achieved improvement in somatic symptoms, depression, and total score in general mental health; and in anticipation of positive outcome, desire to use opioid, and relief from withdrawal of craving in comparison with the control group. The study supports the effectiveness of neurofeedback training as a therapeutic method in opiate dependence disorder, in supplement to pharmacotherapy.

  17. Poppy seed foods and opiate drug testing--where are we today?

    PubMed

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Sproll, Constanze; Musshoff, Frank

    2010-02-01

    Seeds of the opium poppy plant are legally sold and widely consumed as food. Due to contamination during harvesting, the seeds can contain morphine and other opiate alkaloids. The objective of this study is to review the toxicology of poppy seed foods regarding influence on opiate drug tests. Computer-assisted literature review resulted in 95 identified references. Normal poppy seed consumption is generally regarded as safe. During food processing, the morphine content is considerably reduced (up to 90%). The possibility of false-positive opiate drug tests after poppy food ingestion exists. There are no unambiguous markers available to differentiate poppy food ingestion from heroin or pharmaceutical morphine use. This is also a problem in heroin-assisted maintenance programs. A basic requirement in such substitution programs is the patients' abstinence from any other drugs, including additional illicit heroin. Also a lack of forensic ingestion trials was detected that consider all factors influencing the morphine content in biologic matrices after consumption. Most studies did not control for the losses during food processing, so that the initial morphine dosage was overestimated. The large reduction of the morphine content during past years raises questions about the validity of the "poppy seed defence." However, a threshold of food use that would not lead to positive drug tests with certainty is currently unavailable. Research is needed to prove if the morphine contents in today's foods still pose the possibility of influencing drug tests. Future trials should consider processing-related morphine losses.

  18. Therapeutic manipulation of peroxynitrite attenuates the development of opiate-induced antinociceptive tolerance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Muscoli, Carolina; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Ndengele, Michael M.; Mollace, Vincenzo; Porreca, Frank; Fabrizi, Francesca; Esposito, Emanuela; Masini, Emanuela; Matuschak, George M.; Salvemini, Daniela

    2007-01-01

    Severe pain syndromes reduce quality of life in patients with inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, often because chronic opiate therapy results in reduced analgesic effectiveness, or tolerance, leading to escalating doses and distressing side effects. The mechanisms leading to tolerance are poorly understood. Our studies revealed that development of antinociceptive tolerance to repeated doses of morphine in mice was consistently associated with the appearance of several tyrosine-nitrated proteins in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, including the mitochondrial isoform of superoxide (O2–) dismutase, the glutamate transporter GLT-1, and the enzyme glutamine synthase. Furthermore, antinociceptive tolerance was associated with increased formation of several proinflammatory cytokines, oxidative DNA damage, and activation of the nuclear factor poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Inhibition of NO synthesis or removal of O2– blocked these biochemical changes and inhibited the development of tolerance, pointing to peroxynitrite (ONOO–), the product of the interaction between O2– and NO, as a signaling mediator in this setting. Indeed, coadministration of morphine with the ONOO– decomposition catalyst, Fe(III) 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(N-methylpyridinium-4-yl)porphyrin, blocked protein nitration, attenuated the observed biochemical changes, and prevented the development of tolerance in a dose-dependent manner. Collectively, these data suggest a causal role for ONOO– in pathways culminating in antinociceptive tolerance to opiates. Peroxynitrite (ONOO–) decomposition catalysts may have therapeutic potential as adjuncts to opiates in relieving suffering from chronic pain. PMID:17975673

  19. NCK2 is significantly associated with opiates addiction in African-origin men.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhifa; Guo, Xiaobo; Jiang, Yuan; Zhang, Heping

    2013-01-01

    Substance dependence is a complex environmental and genetic disorder with significant social and medical concerns. Understanding the etiology of substance dependence is imperative to the development of effective treatment and prevention strategies. To this end, substantial effort has been made to identify genes underlying substance dependence, and in recent years, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have led to discoveries of numerous genetic variants for complex diseases including substance dependence. Most of the GWAS discoveries were only based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and a single dichotomized outcome. By employing both SNP- and gene-based methods of analysis, we identified a strong (odds ratio = 13.87) and significant (P value = 1.33E - 11) association of an SNP in the NCK2 gene on chromosome 2 with opiates addiction in African-origin men. Codependence analysis also identified a genome-wide significant association between NCK2 and comorbidity of substance dependence (P value = 3.65E - 08) in African-origin men. Furthermore, we observed that the association between the NCK2 gene (P value = 3.12E - 10) and opiates addiction reached the gene-based genome-wide significant level. In summary, our findings provided the first evidence for the involvement of NCK2 in the susceptibility to opiates addiction and further revealed the racial and gender specificities of its impact.

  20. Opiates do not violate the viability and proliferative activity of human articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Chechik, Ofir; Arbel, Ron; Salai, Moshe; Gigi, Roy; Beilin, Mark; Flaishon, Ron; Sever, Ronen; Khashan, Morsi; Ben-Tov, Tomer; Gal-Levy, Ronit; Yayon, Avner; Blumenstein, Sara

    2014-09-01

    Articular cartilage injuries present a challenge for the clinician. Autologous chondrocyte implantation embedded in scaffolds are used to treat cartilage defects with favorable outcomes. Autologous serum is often used as a medium for chondrocyte cell culture during the proliferation phase of the process of such products. A previous report showed that opiate analgesics (fentanyl, alfentanil and diamorphine) in the sera have a significant inhibitory effect on chondrocyte proliferation. In order to determine if opiates in serum inhibit chondrocyte proliferation, twenty two patients who underwent knee arthroscopy and were anesthetized with either fentanyl or remifentanil were studied. Blood was drawn before and during opiate administration and up to 2 h after its discontinuation. The sera were used as medium for in vitro proliferation of both cryopreserved and freshly isolated chondrocytes, and the number and viability of cells were measured. There was no difference in the yield or cell viability between the serum samples of patients anesthetized with fentanyl when either fresh or cryopreserved human articular chondrocytes (hACs) were used. Some non-significant reduction in the yield of cells was observed in the serum samples of patients anesthetized with remifentanil when fresh hAC were used. We conclude that Fentanyl in human autologous serum does not inhibit in vitro hAC proliferation. Remifentanil may show minimal inhibitory effect on in vitro fresh hAC proliferation.

  1. ACTH-like peptides increase pain sensitivity and antagonize opiate analgesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heybach, J. P.; Vernikos, J.

    1981-01-01

    The role of the pituitary and of ACTH in pain sensitivity was investigated in the rat. Pain sensitivity was assessed by measuring paw-lick and jump latencies in response to being placed on a grid at 55 C. Hypophysectomy reduced pain sensitivity, and this effect was reversed by the intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of the opiate antagonist naloxone. Similarly, the analgesia produced by a dose of morphine was antagonized by the administration of ACTH or alpha-MSH. The peripheral injection of ACTH or alpha-MSH in normal rats did not increase pain sensitivity. However, ACTH administered ICV increased pain sensivity within 10 min. The results indicate that the pituitary is the source of an endogenous opiate antagonist and hyperalgesic factor and that this factor is ACTH or an ACTH-like peptide. This activity resides in the N-terminal portion of the ACTH molecule since ACTH sub 4-10 is not active in this respect, nor does this activity require a free N-terminal serine since alpha-MSH appears to be almost as potent as the ACTH sub 1-24 peptide. It is concluded that ACTH-like peptides of pituitary origin act as endogenous hyperalgesic and opiate antagonistic factors.

  2. Performance of immunoassays in screening for opiates, cannabinoids and amphetamines in post-mortem blood.

    PubMed

    Hino, Yukiko; Ojanperä, Ilkka; Rasanen, Ilpo; Vuori, Erkki

    2003-01-28

    Several immunoassay methods for screening of abused drugs in whole blood were evaluated in post-mortem forensic toxicology. Blood samples known to be positive or negative for opiates, cannabinoids or amphetamines by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were analysed by EMIT II Plus and EMIT d.a.u., Syva RapidTest and Triage 8 after acetone precipitation. In these experiments, the EMIT immunoassay method was modified by using the Dade Behring VIVA analyser to detect substances more sensitively. Low concentrations of abused drugs were detected in blood samples. The sensitivities of the modified EMIT method for opiates, cannabinoids and amphetamines were 100, 86 and 98%, respectively, whereas the values were below 86% with the other methods. The specificities of all immunoassay methods for opiates and cannabinoids were 83% or above but 51-85% for amphetamines. Sample rejection occurred in a few cases with the EMIT amphetamine assays. The modified EMIT immunoassay system presented here seems to be useful for screening of drugs of abuse in post-mortem blood samples, especially when urine is not available.

  3. [Opiate dependence type II or antisocial: Cloninger's Psychobiological Model and its usefullness in addictions].

    PubMed

    Benito, Ana; Haro, Gonzalo; Orengo, Teresa; González, Marisa; Fornés, Teresa; Mateu, César

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to analyze the relationship between Cloninger's dimensions and Personality Disorders (PD) (with DSM-IV criteria) in opiate dependents. The study was Cross-sectional. The sampling of 196 patients with opiate dependence was consecutive. All were receiving treatment in an inpatient detoxification unit. Cloninger's Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI), International Personality Disorders Examination (IPDE) and a Substance Use Questionnaire were used. Character's dimensions as Self-directness and Cooperation were related with PD when scored low. Opposite to Cloninger descriptions, high scores of Self-transcendence were related with presence of PD. Related to temperamental dimensions, cluster A was related with low scores of Reward Dependence (RD) and cluster C with high scores of Harm Avoidance (HA). Otherwise, in cluster B, while Borderline PD had high scores of Novelty Seeking (as high HA), the Antisocial PD only were related to low scores of RD. RD dimension seems useful to differ from presence or absence of Antisocial PD, also when alcohol consumption is considered. Cloninger's Model of Personality is useful in drug dependents for the definition of the different PD, as well as for probable PD's aggregation. This model also helps to create subtypes in opiate dependents as the antisocial or type II.

  4. 2D-ELDOR study of heterogeneity and domain structure changes in plasma membrane vesicles upon cross-linking of receptors.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yun-Wei; Costa-Filho, Antonio J; Baird, Barbara; Freed, Jack H

    2011-09-08

    2D electron-electron double resonance (2D-ELDOR) with the "full Sc-" method of analysis is applied to the study of plasma membrane vesicles. Membrane structural changes upon antigen cross-linking of IgE receptors (IgE-FcεRI) in plasma membrane vesicles (PMVs) isolated from RBL-2H3 mast cells are investigated, for the first time, by means of these 2D-ELDOR techniques. Spectra of 1-palmitoyl-2-(16-doxyl stearoyl) phosphatidylcholine (16-PC) from PMVs before and after this stimulation at several temperatures are reported. The results demonstrate a coexistence of liquid-ordered (L(o)) and liquid-disordered (L(d)) components. We find that upon cross-linking, the membrane environment is remodeled to become more disordered, as shown by a moderate increase in the population of the L(d) component. This change in the relative amount of the L(o) versus L(d) components upon cross-linking is consistent with a model wherein the IgE receptors, which when clustered by antigen to cause cell stimulation, lead to more disordered lipids, and their dynamic and structural properties are slightly altered. This study demonstrates that 2D-ELDOR, analyzed by the full Sc- method, is a powerful approach for capturing the molecular dynamics in biological membranes. This is a particular case showing how 2D-ELDOR can be applied to study physical processes in complex systems that yield subtle changes.

  5. Multigenerational Effects of Adolescent Morphine Exposure on Dopamine D2 Receptor Function

    PubMed Central

    Byrnes, John J.; Johnson, Nicole L.; Carini, Lindsay M.; Byrnes, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale The use and misuse of prescription opiates in adolescent populations, and in particular, adolescent female populations, has increased dramatically in the past two decades. Given the significant role that opioids play in neuroendocrine function, exposure to opiates during this critical developmental period could have significant consequences for the female, as well as her offspring. Objectives In the current set of studies, we utilized the female rat to model the transgenerational impact of adolescent opiate exposure. Methods We examined locomotor sensitization in response to the dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist quinpirole in the adult male progeny (F1 and F2 generation) of females exposed to morphine during adolescence. All females were drug-free for at least 3 weeks prior to conception, eliminating the possibility of direct fetal exposure to morphine. Results Both F1 and F2 progeny of morphine-exposed females demonstrated attenuated locomotor sensitization following repeated quinpirole administration. These behavioral effects were coupled with increased quinpirole-induced corticosterone secretion, and up-regulated kappa opioid receptor (KOR) and dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) gene expression within the NAc. Conclusions These results suggest significant modifications in response to repeated D2R activation in the progeny of females exposed to opiates during adolescence. Given the significant role that the D2R plays in psychopathology, adolescent opiate exposure could shift the vulnerability of future offspring to psychological disorders, including addiction. Moreover, that effects are also observed in the F2 generation suggests that adolescent opiate exposure can trigger transgenerational epigenetic modifications impacting systems critical for motivated behavior. PMID:23314440

  6. Analysis of the hormone receptor status of circulating tumor cell subpopulations based on epithelial-mesenchymal transition: a proof-of-principle study on the heterogeneity of circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xiuwen; Ma, Fei; Liu, Suyan; Wu, Shiyang; Xiao, Rong; Yuan, Lifang; Sun, Xiaoying; Yi, Zongbi; Yang, Huiyi; Xu, Binghe

    2016-01-01

    Although the enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been demonstrated to be a prognostic indicator in metastatic breast cancer, the heterogeneous characteristics of CTCs, such as variations in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), may limit its broad clinical application. To investigate an uncomplicated and practicable detection approach based on the potential utility of the heterogeneity of CTCs from the standpoint of the EMT phenotype and ER/PR status of CTCs, an analysis was conducted using peripheral blood samples obtained from 28 metastatic breast cancer patients. The CanPatrol CTC enrichment technique was used to identify different CTC subpopulations, including epithelial-dominated CTCs, biophenotypic epithelial/mesenchymal CTCs, and mesenchymal-dominated CTCs, according to epithelial and mesenchymal markers. Furthermore, the hormone receptor (HR) status of each CTC was determined based on the expression levels of three reference genes and was characterized by four levels, which ranged from high-level expression to non-expression. We subsequently concluded that based on EMT phenotypes, the order of different CTC subgroups differed according to the HR expression status of the primary tumor. With respect to the HR status between tissues and CTCs, the variation tendency from high-level expression to non-expression of HR in CTCs was significantly correlated with the HR status of the primary tumor. The findings could provide evidence for the potential application of this uncomplicated and practicable detection approach for prognostic analysis and individualized endocrine therapeutic direction in a real-time manner via confirmation in further large-scale trials. PMID:27602758

  7. EMPLOYMENT-BASED ABSTINENCE REINFORCEMENT PROMOTES OPIATE AND COCAINE ABSTINENCE IN OUT-OF-TREATMENT INJECTION DRUG USERS

    PubMed Central

    Holtyn, August F.; Koffarnus, Mikhail N.; DeFulio, Anthony; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur O.; Strain, Eric C.; Schwartz, Robert P.; Silverman, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    We examined the use of employment-based abstinence reinforcement in out-of-treatment injection drug users, in this secondary analysis of a previously reported trial. Participants (N = 33) could work in the therapeutic workplace, a model employment-based program for drug addiction, for 30 weeks and could earn approximately $10 per hr. During a 4-week induction, participants only had to work to earn pay. After induction, access to the workplace was contingent on enrollment in methadone treatment. After participants met the methadone contingency for 3 weeks, they had to provide opiate-negative urine samples to maintain maximum pay. After participants met those contingencies for 3 weeks, they had to provide opiate- and cocaine-negative urine samples to maintain maximum pay. The percentage of drug-negative urine samples remained stable until the abstinence reinforcement contingency for each drug was applied. The percentage of opiate- and cocaine-negative urine samples increased abruptly and significantly after the opiate- and cocaine-abstinence contingencies, respectively, were applied. These results demonstrate that the sequential administration of employment-based abstinence reinforcement can increase opiate and cocaine abstinence among out-of-treatment injection drug users. PMID:25292399

  8. Employment-based abstinence reinforcement promotes opiate and cocaine abstinence in out-of-treatment injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Holtyn, August F; Koffarnus, Mikhail N; DeFulio, Anthony; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur O; Strain, Eric C; Schwartz, Robert P; Silverman, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    We examined the use of employment-based abstinence reinforcement in out-of-treatment injection drug users, in this secondary analysis of a previously reported trial. Participants (N = 33) could work in the therapeutic workplace, a model employment-based program for drug addiction, for 30 weeks and could earn approximately $10 per hr. During a 4-week induction, participants only had to work to earn pay. After induction, access to the workplace was contingent on enrollment in methadone treatment. After participants met the methadone contingency for 3 weeks, they had to provide opiate-negative urine samples to maintain maximum pay. After participants met those contingencies for 3 weeks, they had to provide opiate- and cocaine-negative urine samples to maintain maximum pay. The percentage of drug-negative urine samples remained stable until the abstinence reinforcement contingency for each drug was applied. The percentage of opiate- and cocaine-negative urine samples increased abruptly and significantly after the opiate- and cocaine-abstinence contingencies, respectively, were applied. These results demonstrate that the sequential administration of employment-based abstinence reinforcement can increase opiate and cocaine abstinence among out-of-treatment injection drug users.

  9. Anatomically heterogeneous populations of CB1 cannabinoid receptor-expressing interneurons in the CA3 region of the hippocampus show homogeneous input-output characteristics.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Gergely G; Papp, Orsolya I; Máté, Zoltán; Szabó, Gábor; Hájos, Norbert

    2014-12-01

    A subpopulation of GABAergic cells in cortical structures expresses CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1 ) on their axon terminals. To understand the function of these interneurons in information processing, it is necessary to uncover how they are embedded into neuronal circuits. Therefore, the proportion of GABAergic terminals expressing CB1 and the morphological and electrophysiological properties of CB1 -immunoreactive interneurons should be revealed. We investigated the ratio and the origin of CB1 -expressing inhibitory boutons in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Using immunocytochemical techniques, we estimated that ∼40% of GABAergic axon terminals in different layers of CA3 also expressed CB1 . To identify the inhibitory cell types expressing CB1 in this region, we recorded and intracellularly labeled interneurons in hippocampal slices. CB1 -expressing interneurons showed distinct axonal arborization, and were classified as basket cells, mossy-fiber-associated cells, dendritic-layer-innervating cells or perforant-path-associated cells. In each morphological category, a substantial variability in axonal projection was observed. In contrast to the diverse morphology, the active and passive membrane properties were found to be rather similar. Using paired recordings, we found that pyramidal cells displayed large and fast unitary postsynaptic currents in response to activating basket and mossy-fiber-associated cells, while they showed slower and smaller synaptic events in pairs originating from interneurons that innervate the dendritic layer, which may be due to dendritic filtering. In addition, CB1 activation significantly reduced the amplitude of the postsynaptic currents in each cell pair tested. Our data suggest that CB1 -expressing interneurons with different axonal projections have comparable physiological characteristics, contributing to a similar proportion of GABAergic inputs along the somato-dendritic axis of CA3 pyramidal cells.

  10. Challenging small human hepatocytes with opiates: further characterization of a novel prototype bioartificial liver.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Martin; Woess, Claudia; Libiseller, Kathrin; Beer, Beate; Pavlic, Marion

    2010-03-01

    Bioartificial liver (BAL) systems can take over liver functions in patients undergoing liver failure until transplantation. Recently, a novel prototype rotary BAL has been developed using small human hepatocytes (SH). This study investigated the metabolism of opiates morphine and methadone in the BAL and their influence on the basic cell culture parameters, viability, and growth of SH. Opiates may be present in patients due to pain therapy, anticancer treatment, or drug abuse. Cells were cultivated in the BAL for a total of 12 days and exposed twice to 100 microg/L of morphine or methadone. Morphine and methadone concentrations were analyzed using gas chromatography with a mass spectrometry detector. Further, the production of albumin, lactate dehydrogenase release, lactate release, urea production, and glucose consumption were measured. Cell viability and growth were determined by confocal microscopy. Cytochrome P 3A4 and uridindiphosphat (UDP) glucuronosyl transferase 2B7 in SH were analyzed by western blot. The mean cell density during treatment was 5.5 +/- 0.7 x 10(6) cells/mL (n = 6) and was not altered significantly by the opiates. Cell viability stayed above 90%. Morphine was not reduced by SH and was a stress factor as determined by decreased metabolic activity. On the other hand, SH metabolized methadone showing first-order kinetics: the first-order rate constant k = 0,019, half-life t(1/2) = 36 h. Methadone metabolism led to decreased urea and albumin production. The expression of cytochrome P 3A4, mainly responsible for methadone metabolism, was proved in SH. The prototype BAL is basically suited to support liver functions, provided patients receive therapy with methadone.

  11. Frontal Metabolite Concentration Deficits in Opiate Dependence Relate to Substance Use, Cognition, and Self-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Donna E; Durazzo, Timothy C; Schmidt, Thomas P; Abé, Christoph; Guydish, Joseph; Meyerhoff, Dieter J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) in opiate dependence showed abnormalities in neuronal viability and glutamate concentration in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Metabolite levels in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) or orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and their neuropsychological correlates have not been investigated in opiate dependence. Methods Single-volume proton MRS at 4 Tesla and neuropsychological testing were conducted in 21 opiate-dependent individuals (OD) on buprenorphine maintenance therapy. Results were compared to 28 controls (CON) and 35 alcohol-dependent individuals (ALC), commonly investigated treatment-seekers providing context for OD evaluation. Metabolite concentrations were measured from ACC, DLPFC, OFC and parieto-occipital cortical (POC) regions. Results Compared to CON, OD had lower concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), glutamate (Glu), creatine +phosphocreatine (Cr) and myo-Inositol (mI) in the DLPFC and lower NAA, Cr, and mI in the ACC. OD, ALC, and CON were equivalent on metabolite levels in the POC and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) concentration did not differ between groups in any region. In OD, prefrontal metabolite deficits in ACC Glu as well as DLPFC NAA and choline containing metabolites (Cho) correlated with poorer working memory, executive and visuospatial functioning; metabolite deficits in DLPFC Glu and ACC GABA and Cr correlated with substance use measures. In the OFC of OD, Glu and choline-containing metabolites were elevated and lower Cr concentration related to higher nonplanning impulsivity. Compared to 3 week abstinent ALC, OD had significant DLPFC metabolite deficits. Conclusion The anterior frontal metabolite profile of OD differed significantly from that of CON and ALC. The frontal lobe metabolite abnormalities in OD and their neuropsychological correlates may play a role in treatment outcome and could be explored as specific targets for improved OD treatment. PMID:27695638

  12. Opiate System Mediate the Antinociceptive Effects of Coriandrum sativum in Mice.

    PubMed

    Taherian, Abbas Ali; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Ameri, Javad

    2012-01-01

    Our previous study showed that Coriandrum sativum (CS) has antinociceptive effects, but the mechanisms that mediate this effect are not clear. The present study was designed to test the role of opiate system in the antinociceptive effects of CS on acute and chronic pain in mice using Hot Plate (HP), Tail Flick (TF) and Formalin (FT) tests and also to compare its effect with dexamethasone (DEX) and stress (ST). Young adult male albino mice (25-30 g) in 33 groups (n = 8 in each group) were used in this study. CS (125 250, 500 and 1000 mg/Kg IP), DEX (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/Kg IP), vehicle (VEH) or swim stress were used 30 min before the pain evaluation tests. Acute and chronic pain was assessed by HP, TF and FT models. In addition, Naloxone (NAL, 2 mg/Kg, IP) was injected 15 min before the CS extract administration in order to assess the role of opiate system in the antinociception of CS. Results indicated that CS, DEX and ST have analgesic effects (p < 0.01) in comparison with the control group and higher dose of CS was more effective (p < 0.001). Besides, pretreatment of NAL modulates the antinociceptive effects of CS in all models (p < 0.001). The above findings showed that CS, DEX and ST have modulator effects on pain. These findings further indicate that the CS extract has more analgesic effects than DEX and ST and also provides the evidence for the existence of an interaction between antinociceptive effects of CS and opiate system.

  13. Label-free porous silicon immunosensor for broad detection of opiates in a blind clinical study and results comparison to commercial analytical chemistry techniques.

    PubMed

    Bonanno, Lisa M; Kwong, Tai C; DeLouise, Lisa A

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we evaluate for the first time the performance of a label-free porous silicon (PSi) immunosensor assay in a blind clinical study designed to screen authentic patient urine specimens for a broad range of opiates. The PSi opiate immunosensor achieved 96% concordance with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) results on samples that underwent standard opiate testing (n = 50). In addition, successful detection of a commonly abused opiate, oxycodone, resulted in 100% qualitative agreement between the PSi opiate sensor and LC-MS/MS. In contrast, a commercial broad opiate immunoassay technique (CEDIA) achieved 65% qualitative concordance with LC-MS/MS. Evaluation of important performance attributes including precision, accuracy, and recovery was completed on blank urine specimens spiked with test analytes. Variability of morphine detection as a model opiate target was <9% both within-run and between-day at and above the cutoff limit of 300 ng mL(-1). This study validates the analytical screening capability of label-free PSi opiate immunosensors in authentic patient samples and is the first semiquantitative demonstration of the technology's successful clinical use. These results motivate future development of label-free PSi technology to reduce complexity and cost of diagnostic testing particularly in a point-of-care setting.

  14. A Label-Free Porous Silicon Immunosensor for Broad Detection of Opiates in a Blind Clinical Study and Result Comparison to Commercial Analytical Chemistry Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Bonanno, Lisa M.; Kwong, Tai C.; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we evaluate for the first time the performance of a label-free porous silicon (PSi) immunosensor assay in a blind clinical study designed to screen authentic patient urine specimens for a broad range of opiates. The PSi opiate immunosensor achieved 96% concordance with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) results on samples that underwent standard opiate testing (n=50). In addition, successful detection of a commonly abused opiate, oxycodone, resulted in 100% qualitative agreement between the PSi opiate sensor and LC-MS/MS. In contrast, a commercial broad opiate immunoassay technique (CEDIA®) achieved 65% qualitative concordance with LC-MS/MS. Evaluation of important performance attributes including precision, accuracy, and recovery was completed on blank urine specimens spiked with test analytes. Variability of morphine detection as a model opiate target was < 9% both within-run and between-day at and above the cutoff limit of 300 ng ml−1. This study validates the analytical screening capability of label-free PSi opiate immunosensors in authentic patient samples and is the first semi-quantitative demonstration of the technology’s successful clinical use. These results motivate future development of PSi technology to reduce complexity and cost of diagnostic testing particularly in a point-of-care setting. PMID:21062030

  15. [Analytical validation of a chromatographic method dedicated to search and identify natural and semi-synthetic opiates].

    PubMed

    Dubois, Nathalie; Counerotte, Stéphane; Goffin, Eric; Pirotte, Bernard; Charlier, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    The identification of a product absorbed by an opiate consumer is sometimes problematic since there is no specific biomarker for all molecules. We developed an ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry technique which allows the identification and the quantification of 25 opiates in plasma. The sample preparation consists in a solid-phase extraction on Oasis MCX cartridges (Waters). The method has been validated according to FDA criteria completely for 21 substances and with some reservations for the remaining 4 analytes. This method has been applied to 80 patients treated at the University Hospital of Liege for whom the screening of opiates was positive. The identification of the product consumed was effective in 86% of cases.

  16. Vaccines against morphine/heroin and its use as effective medication for preventing relapse to opiate addictive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Anton, Benito; Salazar, Alberto; Flores, Anabel; Matus, Maura; Marin, Rodrigo; Hernandez, Jorge-Alberto; Leff, Philippe

    2009-04-01

    Current pharmacotherapies for treating morphine/heroin dependence are designed to substitute or block addiction by targeting the drug itself rather than the brain. The heroin addict is still being exposed to addictive opiates, and consequently may develop tolerance to and experience withdrawal and drug's toxic effects from the treatment with high incidence of relapse to addictive drug consumption. As for other drugs of abuse, an alternative approach for morphine/heroin addiction is an antibody-based antagonism of heroin's brain entry. This review summarizes the literature examining important aspects of neurobiological and pharmacological processes involved in opiate dependence. Thereafter, classical pharmacological interventions for opiate dependence treatment and its major clinical limitations are reviewed. Finally, relevant preclinical studies are examined for comparisons in the design, use, immunogenic profile and efficacy of several models of morphine/heroin vaccine as immunologic interventions on the pharmacokinetics and behavioral of morphine/heroin in the rat as animal model.

  17. Opiate-addicted parents in methadone treatment: long-term recovery, health, and family relationships.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Martie L; Haggerty, Kevin P; Fleming, Charles B; Catalano, Richard F; Gainey, Randy R

    2011-01-01

    Few studies follow the lives of opiate-addicted parents. The authors examined a 12-year follow-up of 144 parents in methadone treatment and their 3- to 14-year-old children. Parent mortality was high. Among survivors, drug use and treatment, incarceration, residential and family disruptions, and health problems were common. Moderate and long-term recovery were associated with consistent methadone treatment, further education, employment, and fewer relationship disruptions. Earlier depression, deviant friends, and poor coping skills predicted continued drug problems. Thus, interventions should include treatment for depression and build skills for avoiding and refusing drugs, coping with stress, and maintaining recovery-supportive friendships.

  18. Opiates and Pain Pathways: Demonstration of Enkephalin Synapses on Dorsal Horn Projection Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruda, M. A.

    1982-03-01

    The participation of the opiate peptide enkephalin in the neural circuitry of the dorsal horn was examined at the light and ultrastructural level through the use of the combined techniques of immunocytochemistry and retrograde transport of horseradish peroxidase. Enkephalin immunoreactive axonal endings made direct synaptic contact with the soma and proximal dendrites of dorsal horn thalamic projection neurons. This observation demonstrates that one major synaptic site of enkephalin modulation of the transfer of nociceptive information in the dorsal horn is on the projection neurons themselves.

  19. Opiate-addicted Parents in Methadone Treatment: Long-term Recovery, Health and Family Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Martie L.; Haggerty, Kevin P.; Fleming, Charles B.; Catalano, Richard F.; Gainey, Randy R.

    2011-01-01

    Few studies follow the lives of opiate-addicted parents. We examine a 12-year follow-up of 144 parents in methadone treatment and their 3- to 14-year-old children. Parent mortality was high. Among survivors, drug use and treatment, incarceration, residential and family disruptions, and health problems were common. Moderate and long-term recovery were associated with consistent methadone treatment, further education, employment, and fewer relationship disruptions. Earlier depression, deviant friends, and poor coping skills predicted continued drug problems. Thus, interventions should include treatment for depression and build skills for avoiding and refusing drugs, coping with stress, and maintaining recovery-supportive friendships. PMID:21218307

  20. Opiates in poppy seed: effect on urinalysis results after consumption of poppy seed cake-filling.

    PubMed

    Pettitt, B C; Dyszel, S M; Hood, L V

    1987-07-01

    We report the analysis of poppy seed filling for morphine and codeine content. Concentrations in the range 17.4 to 18.6 micrograms/g (morphine) and 2.3 to 2.5 micrograms/g (codeine) were found in different lots of the filling, which is widely used in baking. The effect of consumption of poppy seed filling on opiate urinalysis results is discussed. Morphine concentrations as high as 4.5 mg/L are reported, with persistence of concentrations greater than 0.3 mg/L as long as 35 h after consumption.

  1. In control?: Ukrainian opiate substitution treatment patients strive for a voice in their treatment.

    PubMed

    Golovanevskaya, Maria; Vlasenko, Leonid; Saucier, Roxanne

    2012-04-01

    This article explores the burgeoning advocacy movement for methadone and buprenorphine treatment by patients, parents, and doctors in Ukraine, and their efforts to remake a system that infantilizes and controls patients into one where patients have a voice in their treatment. Through a review of gray literature and in-depth interviews with 28 patient-advocates and doctors in five Ukrainian cities between October 2009 and July 2010, this piece chronicles the emergence of opiate substitution treatment in Ukraine, describes successes toward patient-friendly treatment, and explores the institutionalized barriers that have pushed the patients to become advocates for their own treatment.

  2. Molecular Heterogeneity and Response to Neoadjuvant Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Targeting in CALGB 40601, a Randomized Phase III Trial of Paclitaxel Plus Trastuzumab With or Without Lapatinib

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Donald A.; Cirrincione, Constance T.; Barry, William T.; Pitcher, Brandelyn N.; Harris, Lyndsay N.; Ollila, David W.; Krop, Ian E.; Henry, Norah Lynn; Weckstein, Douglas J.; Anders, Carey K.; Singh, Baljit; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Iglesia, Michael; Cheang, Maggie Chon U.; Perou, Charles M.; Winer, Eric P.; Hudis, Clifford A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Dual human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) targeting can increase pathologic complete response rates (pCRs) to neoadjuvant therapy and improve progression-free survival in metastatic disease. CALGB 40601 examined the impact of dual HER2 blockade consisting of trastuzumab and lapatinib added to paclitaxel, considering tumor and microenvironment molecular features. Patients and Methods Patients with stage II to III HER2-positive breast cancer underwent tumor biopsy followed by random assignment to paclitaxel plus trastuzumab alone (TH) or with the addition of lapatinib (THL) for 16 weeks before surgery. An investigational arm of paclitaxel plus lapatinib (TL) was closed early. The primary end point was pCR in the breast; correlative end points focused on molecular features identified by gene expression–based assays. Results Among 305 randomly assigned patients (THL, n = 118; TH, n = 120; TL, n = 67), the pCR rate was 56% (95% CI, 47% to 65%) with THL and 46% (95% CI, 37% to 55%) with TH (P = .13), with no effect of dual therapy in the hormone receptor–positive subset but a significant increase in pCR with dual therapy in those with hormone receptor–negative disease (P = .01). The tumors were molecularly heterogeneous by gene expression analysis using mRNA sequencing (mRNAseq). pCR rates significantly differed by intrinsic subtype (HER2 enriched, 70%; luminal A, 34%; luminal B, 36%; P < .001). In multivariable analysis treatment arm, intrinsic subtype, HER2 amplicon gene expression, p53 mutation signature, and immune cell signatures were independently associated with pCR. Post-treatment residual disease was largely luminal A (69%). Conclusion pCR to dual HER2-targeted therapy was not significantly higher than single HER2 targeting. Tissue analysis demonstrated a high degree of intertumoral heterogeneity with respect to both tumor genomics and tumor microenvironment that significantly affected pCR rates. These factors should be considered when

  3. Global genetic variation of select opiate metabolism genes in self-reported healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Wendt, F R; Pathak, G; Sajantila, A; Chakraborty, R; Budowle, B

    2017-04-11

    CYP2D6 is a key pharmacogene encoding an enzyme impacting poor, intermediate, extensive and ultrarapid phase I metabolism of many marketed drugs. The pharmacogenetics of opiate drug metabolism is particularly interesting due to the relatively high incidence of addiction and overdose. Recently, trans-acting opiate metabolism and analgesic response enzymes (UGT2B7, ABCB1, OPRM1 and COMT) have been incorporated into pharmacogenetic studies to generate more comprehensive metabolic profiles of patients. With use of massively parallel sequencing, it is possible to identify additional polymorphisms that fine tune, or redefine, previous pharmacogenetic findings, which typically rely on targeted approaches. The 1000 Genomes Project data were analyzed to describe population genetic variation and statistics for these five genes in self-reported healthy individuals in five global super- and 26 sub-populations. Findings on the variation of these genes in various populations expand baseline understanding of pharmacogenetically relevant polymorphisms for future studies of affected cohorts.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 11 April 2017; doi:10.1038/tpj.2017.13.

  4. Roche DAT immunoassay: sensitivity and specificity testing for amphetamines, cocaine, and opiates in oral fluid.

    PubMed

    Crooks, C Richard; Brown, Sue

    2010-03-01

    Laboratory testing of oral fluid for drugs of abuse continues to expand in the workplace, legal, treatment, and health settings. In this study, we assessed recently developed homogeneous Roche DAT screening assays for amphetamines, cocaine metabolite [benzoylecgonine (BZE)], methamphetamines, and opiates in oral fluid. Precision and accuracy were assessed using control samples at +/-25% of cutoff. Sensitivity, specificity, and agreement compared to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) was assessed by analysis of oral fluid specimens collected from 994 subjects enrolled in a drug treatment or probation and parole drug-testing program. An additional 180 research specimens from Kroll Laboratories were analyzed for amphetamine and methamphetamine. Screening cutoff concentrations (ng/mL) were as follows: amphetamines, 40; cocaine metabolite, 3; methamphetamines, 40; and opiates, 10. LC-MS-MS analyses were performed with the following cutoff concentrations (ng/mL): amphetamine, 40; BZE, 2.0; methamphetamine, 40; and codeine or morphine, 10. The percent coefficient of variation ranged from 3.4% to 7.3%. Sensitivity and specificity of the Roche DAT assays compared to LC-MS-MS were > 94%, and agreement was > 96% for the four assays. The performance of the Roche DAT assays suggests these new homogeneous screening assays will be an attractive alternative to existing more labor-intensive enzyme immunoassays.

  5. For lack of wanting: Discourses of desire in Ukrainian opiate substitution therapy programs.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Jennifer J

    2016-04-01

    Available treatments for addiction and substance abuse in Ukraine have been shaped by the economic, political, and social shifts that have followed the country's independence. The introduction of methadone-based opiate substitution therapy (OST) for opiate addicts is especially representative of this. Biomedical paradigms of addiction, its etiology, and its treatment, promoted and paid for by international donors and elite global health entities, are being met by Ukrainian notions of personhood and psychology in both public discourse and clinical settings. Ukrainian physicians who work in OST programs frequently reference desire (желание) as the most significant factor in determining the success or failure of treatment. They refer to a desire to be treated, desire to get better, desire to live. The moralized imperative to possess this desire to get better is, in many ways, a reflection of how addiction and the addicted psyche is constructed and understood in the Ukrainian context. By exploring discourses of desire in narratives of addiction and treatment, I examine how notions of psychology, will, and self-control intersect, shaping the subjectivity, agency, and daily experiences of this vulnerable population.

  6. Involvement of endogenous opiates in regulation of gastric emptying of fat test meals in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fioramonti, J.; Fargeas, M.J.; Bueno, L.

    1988-08-01

    The role of endogenous opioids and cholecystokinin (CCK) in gastric emptying was investigated in mice killed 30 min after gavage with /sup 51/Cr-radiolabeled liquid meals. The meals consisted of 0.5 ml of milk or one of five synthetic meals containing arabic gum, glucose and/or arachis oil and/or casein. Naloxone (0.1 mg/kg sc) significantly (P less than 0.01) accelerated gastric emptying of milk and meals containing fat but did not modify gastric emptying of nonfat meals. The CCK antagonist asperlicin (0.1 mg/kg ip) increased by 25% gastric emptying of milk. The gastric emptying of meals containing glucose and casein but not fat was reduced after administration of the COOH-terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin (CCK-8, 4 micrograms/kg ip). This decrease was antagonized by both asperlicin (10 mg/kg ip) and naloxone (0.1 mg/kg sc). Intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of an opiate antagonist that poorly crosses the blood-brain barrier, methyl levallorphan (10 micrograms/kg), did not modify gastric emptying of milk but accelerated it when peripherally administered (0.1 mg/kg sc). Similarly, asperlicin (icv) administered at a dose of 1 mg/kg did not affect milk emptying. These results indicate that endogenous opiates are involved at peripheral levels in the regulation of gastric emptying of fat meals only and that such regulation involves release of CCK.

  7. Involvement of protein degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome system in opiate addictive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Massaly, Nicolas; Dahan, Lionel; Baudonnat, Mathieu; Hovnanian, Caroline; Rekik, Khaoula; Solinas, Marcello; David, Vincent; Pech, Stéphane; Zajac, Jean-Marie; Roullet, Pascal; Mouledous, Lionel; Frances, Bernard

    2013-03-01

    Plastic changes in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), a structure occupying a key position in the neural circuitry related to motivation, are among the critical cellular processes responsible for drug addiction. During the last decade, it has been shown that memory formation and related neuronal plasticity may rely not only on protein synthesis but also on protein degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). In this study, we assess the role of protein degradation in the NAcc in opiate-related behaviors. For this purpose, we coupled behavioral experiments to intra-accumbens injections of lactacystin, an inhibitor of the UPS. We show that protein degradation in the NAcc is mandatory for a full range of animal models of opiate addiction including morphine locomotor sensitization, morphine conditioned place preference, intra-ventral tegmental area morphine self-administration and intra-venous heroin self-administration but not for discrimination learning rewarded by highly palatable food. This study provides the first evidence of a specific role of protein degradation by the UPS in addiction.

  8. Black Religion as BOTH Opiate and Inspiration of Civil Rights Militancy: Putting Marx's Data to the Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Larry L.; Hunt, Janet G.

    1977-01-01

    Concludes that Harry Marx's (1964) inference of a general opiate quality in black religion is incomplete and misleading. Examines data concerning religion and civil rights militancy. Finds that secular social factors (e.g., social class, region, and nonurban origins) are better indicators of militance than is religiosity. (Author/GC)

  9. Psychological mood state of opiate addicted women during pregnancy and postpartum in comparison to non-addicted healthy women.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Maki; Sieber, Sandra; Rechsteiner, Chantal; Lauper, Urs; Zimmermann, Roland; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2009-09-01

    Opiate addiction has been widely documented to have negative impact on pregnancy course and outcome. Unfavorable psychosocial situation of addicted women predispose for poor processing of the physiological and psychological demands of pregnancy. Thus aim of our study was to investigate the psychological mood state of opiate addicts during pregnancy and postpartum in comparison to healthy women. In a case-controlled, prospective, longitudinal study nine pregnant opiate addicts and nine healthy pregnant women matched by age, level of education and gestational age at birth were interviewed in the third trimester of pregnancy and postpartum. Standardized questionnaires and inventories for assessment of the general psychopathology and emotional state, the perceived self-efficacy expectancy, the psychosocial adaptation to pregnancy and the fear of delivery, respectively were applied. Addicted women achieved significantly higher scores in the test assessing general psychopathology and emotional state before delivery compared to abstinent women. Interestingly this difference was unverifiable postpartum. This study reaffirms the presumption of a disadvantageous psychological condition in pregnant opiate addicts in comparison to healthy pregnant women for the first time in a prospective case-control study design.

  10. Psychological mood state of opiate addicted women during pregnancy and postpartum in comparison to non-addicted healthy women.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Maki; Sieber, Sandra; Rechsteiner, Chantal; Lauper, Urs; Zimmermann, Roland; Ehlert, Ulrike

    2007-03-01

    Opiate addiction has been widely documented to have a negative impact on pregnancy course and outcome. The unfavorable psychosocial situation of addicted women predispose for poor processing of the physiological and psychological demands of pregnancy. Thus the aim of our study was to investigate the psychological mood state of opiate addicts during pregnancy and postpartum in comparison to healthy women. In a case-controlled, prospective, longitudinal study, nine pregnant opiate addicts and nine healthy pregnant women matched by age, level of education and gestational age at birth were interviewed in the third trimester of pregnancy and postpartum. Standardized questionnaires and inventories for assessment of the general psychopathology and emotional state, the perceived self-efficacy expectancy, the psychosocial adaptation to pregnancy and the fear of delivery, respectively were applied. Addicted women achieved significantly higher scores in the test assessing general psychopathology and emotional state before delivery compared to abstinent women. Interestingly this difference was unverifiable postpartum. This study reaffirms the presumption of a disadvantageous psychological condition in pregnant opiate addicts in comparison to healthy pregnant women for the first time in a prospective case-control study design.

  11. Randomized Trial Comparing Two Treatment Strategies Using Prize-Based Reinforcement of Abstinence in Cocaine and Opiate Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Kenzie L.; Ghitza, Udi E.; Schmittner, John P.; Schroeder, Jennifer R.; Epstein, David H.

    2008-01-01

    We compared two strategies of prize-based contingency management (CM) in methadone-maintained outpatients. Urine was tested thrice weekly for 5 weeks pre-CM, 12 weeks CM, and 8 weeks post-CM. Participants were randomly assigned to a cocaine contingency (four prize draws for each cocaine-negative urine, N = 29) or an opiate-cocaine contingency (one…

  12. Recent developments in naltrexone implants and depot injections for opiate abuse: the new kid on the block is approaching adulthood.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Colin; Streel, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Implants and depot injections (DI) of naltrexone (NTX) have undergone considerable development since the first commercially available implants appeared in the mid-1990s. In particular, long-acting implants that can deliver relapse-preventing serum NTX levels for around six months have now been subjected to classic randomised controlled trials that have given positive and generally significant results when compared with oral NTX and placebo implants, or with standard post-detoxification care. They also provide lower serum levels that can prevent opiate overdose for several additional months and 3-year mortality rates are similar to those of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). At least 18 months of antagonist-assisted abstinence may be desirable to normalise new, opiatefree cognitive-behavioural habits and extinguish old, maladaptive ones. We discuss ideological antagonisms between protagonists of MMT and of NTX implants, notably in Australia, but we argue that both treatments can and should co-exist. The main obstacle to the expansion of longacting implant treatment is not the lack of an evidential or theoretical base but the lack of a licensed product. NTX appears to block all opiates if serum levels are adequate and we stress its apparent lack of clinically significant hepatotoxicity. Some patients may need above-average serum levels and occasionally, habitual injectors continue to inject opiates despite experiencing no opiate effects.

  13. Early versus Late-Phase Consolidation of Opiate Reward Memories Requires Distinct Molecular and Temporal Mechanisms in the Amygdala-Prefrontal Cortical Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gholizadeh, Shervin; Sun, Ninglei; De Jaeger, Xavier; Bechard, Melanie; Coolen, Lique; Laviolette, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    The consolidation of newly acquired memories involves the temporal transition from a recent, less stable trace to a more permanent consolidated form. Opiates possess potent rewarding effects and produce powerful associative memories. The activation of these memories is associated with opiate abuse relapse phenomena and the persistence of compulsive opiate dependence. However, the neuronal, molecular and temporal mechanisms by which associative opiate reward memories are consolidated are not currently understood. We report that the consolidation of associative opiate reward memories involves a temporal and molecular switch between the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) (early consolidation phase) to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) (late consolidation phase). We demonstrate at the molecular, behavioral and neuronal levels that the consolidation of a recently acquired opiate reward memory involves an extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK)-dependent phosphorylation process within the BLA. In contrast, later-stage consolidation of a newly acquired memory is dependent upon a calcium-calmodulin-dependent (CaMKII), ERK-independent, mechanism in the mPFC, over a 12 hr temporal gradient. In addition, using in vivo multi-unit neuronal recordings in the mPFC, we report that protein synthesis within the BLA modulates the consolidation of opiate-reward memory in neuronal mPFC sub-populations, via the same temporal dynamic. PMID:23696837

  14. Naloxone potentiates the inotropic effects of isoproterenol in vitro by a nonopiate receptor mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lechner, R B

    1992-11-01

    Naloxone potentiates the effects of adrenergic agonists when administered to hypovolemic dogs, and it has been assumed that this effect is due to naloxone's action at opiate receptors. To help determine the site and mechanism of this interaction, we administered naloxone and its "d" stereo-isomer (which does not bind to opiate receptors) to guinea pig papillary muscles in the presence and absence of pharmacologic (isoproterenol) and physiologic (treppe) inotropic stimulation. In control muscles and in rapidly paced muscles, naloxone was without significant inotropic effect. In the presence of isoproterenol, d- and l-naloxone exerted significant positive inotropic effects that were dose dependent. We conclude that, since both d- and l-naloxone potentiated the inotropic effects of isoproterenol and this was seen in the absence of opioids, naloxone may increase contractility by a nonopiate receptor-mediated mechanism.

  15. Reducing parental risk factors for children's substance misuse: preliminary outcomes with opiate-addicted parents.

    PubMed

    Catalano, R F; Haggerty, K P; Gainey, R R; Hoppe, M J

    1997-05-01

    Parents in methadone treatment were offered an experimental intervention, Focus on Families, designed to reduce their risk of relapse and their children's risk of substance use. Experimentally assigned volunteers participated in systematic group training in relapse prevention and parenting skills, and received home-based case management services. Immediate posttreatment outcome results reported here include analyses of covariance controlling for baseline measures. Analyses show experimental parents held more family meetings to discuss family fun, displayed stronger refusal/relapse coping skills, demonstrated stronger sense of self-efficacy in role-play situations, and had lower levels of opiate use than control subjects. No significant differences in family bonding, family conflict, or other measures of drug use were found. The utility of intervening with drug-addicted parents in methadone treatment is discussed in light of these findings.

  16. Verbal deficits and disruptive behavior disorders among children of opiate-dependent parents.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jeffrey J; Nuñes, Edward V; Greenwald, Steven; Weissman, Myrna

    2004-01-01

    In order to explore the association between verbal deficits and disruptive behavior disorders among children of addicted parents, 283 6-17-year-old children and their opiate-dependent parents completed diagnostic interviews and standardized measures of vocabulary. Unexpectedly, racial differences in the scores confounded the exploration of the relationship between cognitive scores and disruptive behavior disorders. An interaction between disruptive behavior disorder and race is explored; among Caucasian youths, low verbal scores are associated with disruptive behavior disorders, but this association was not found among African- and Hispanic-American youths. Further analysis and research are needed to understand the clinical significance of relationships between verbal deficits and disruptive behavior disorders within racially diverse groups.

  17. Prenatal Tobacco, Marijuana, Stimulant, and Opiate Exposure: Outcomes and Practice Implications

    PubMed Central

    Minnes, Sonia; Lang, Adelaide; Singer, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Abuse of drugs by pregnant women both in the United States and worldwide has raised many questions regarding the effects of prenatal drug exposure on the developing fetus and subsequent child outcomes. Studies using the neurobehavioral teratology model have been undertaken to determine specific prenatal drug effects on cognitive and behavioral development. Here we summarize the findings of studies that have investigated the developmental effects of prenatal exposure to tobacco, marijuana, stimulants, and opiates. These studies consider the timing and amount of prenatal exposure; other drug exposures; maternal characteristics; and other health, nutritional, and environmental factors. We review treatment options for pregnant, substance-dependent women and therapeutic interventions for exposed children. PMID:22003423

  18. Cocaine and opiates use in pregnancy: detection of drugs in neonatal meconium and urine.

    PubMed

    López, P; Bermejo, A M; Tabernero, M J; Cabarcos, P; Alvarez, I; Fernández, P

    2009-09-01

    In this study, the case of a newborn with symptoms of hyperexcitability was analyzed. After it was confirmed in the hospital that the mother had consumed drugs during pregnancy using an enzyme multiplied immunoassay technique, samples of the newborn's urine and meconium were sent to our laboratory to observe the evolution in the distribution of cocaine and opiates during the days following birth. For urine analysis, screening was done with an immunoassay technique, and the confirmation was done by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) according to a published method. A GC-MS method for simultaneous analysis of cocaine, benzoylecgonine, codeine, morphine, and 6-acetylmorphine in meconium is described. GC-MS confirmation of urine and meconium results showed consumption of cocaine and codeine during pregnancy and also showed the levels of drugs gradually declined, totally disappearing by the third day.

  19. An examination of sex differences in the effects of early-life opiate and alcohol exposure.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Laurne S; Gomez, Julie; Schwarz, Jaclyn M

    2016-02-19

    Early-life exposure to drugs and alcohol is one of the most preventable causes of developmental, behavioural and learning disorders in children. Thus a significant amount of basic, animal and human research has focused on understanding the behavioural consequences and the associated neural effects of exposure to drugs and alcohol during early brain development. Despite this, much of the previous research that has been done on this topic has used predominantly male subjects or rodents. While many of the findings from these male-specific studies may ultimately apply to females, the purpose of this review is to highlight the research that has also examined sex as a factor and found striking differences between the sexes in their response to early-life opiate and alcohol exposure. Finally, we will also provide a framework for scientists interested in examining sex as a factor in future experiments that specifically examine the consequences of early-life drug and alcohol exposure.

  20. An examination of sex differences in the effects of early-life opiate and alcohol exposure

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, Laurne S.; Gomez, Julie; Schwarz, Jaclyn M.

    2016-01-01

    Early-life exposure to drugs and alcohol is one of the most preventable causes of developmental, behavioural and learning disorders in children. Thus a significant amount of basic, animal and human research has focused on understanding the behavioural consequences and the associated neural effects of exposure to drugs and alcohol during early brain development. Despite this, much of the previous research that has been done on this topic has used predominantly male subjects or rodents. While many of the findings from these male-specific studies may ultimately apply to females, the purpose of this review is to highlight the research that has also examined sex as a factor and found striking differences between the sexes in their response to early-life opiate and alcohol exposure. Finally, we will also provide a framework for scientists interested in examining sex as a factor in future experiments that specifically examine the consequences of early-life drug and alcohol exposure. PMID:26833841

  1. Simultaneous quantification of cocaine, amphetamines, opiates and cannabinoids in vitreous humor.

    PubMed

    Peres, Mariana Dadalto; Pelição, Fabrício Souza; Caleffi, Bruno; De Martinis, Bruno Spinosa

    2014-01-01

    A GC-MS method for simultaneous analysis of cocaine (COC), amphetamines (AMPs), opiates, cannabinoids and their metabolites in vitreous humor (VH) was developed and fully validated. VH samples were extracted using solid phase extraction and injected into the GC-MS, using a selected ion monitoring mode. Linearity ranged from 10 to 1000 ng/mL; the exception was anhydroecgonine methyl ester (AEME), for which linearity ranged from 10 to 750 ng/mL. Inter-assay imprecision lay from 1.2 to 10.0%, intra-assay imprecision was <10.4% for all the analytes and accuracy ranged from 95.6 to 104.0%. An limit of quantitation for all drugs was 10 ng/mL and recoveries ranged from 70.4 to 100.1% for basic and neutral compounds; the acid compounds had poor recovery--<40%. The validated method was applied to 10 VH samples taken from individuals whose blood had screened positive for drugs of abuse. All the individuals screened positive for COC in the blood (seven samples) also had positive results in VH; COC concentration ranged from 30.81 to 283.97 ng/mL (mean 186.98 ng/mL) and benzoylecgonine concentration ranged from 11.47 to 460.98 ng/mL (mean 133.91 ng/mL). It was also noticed that, in five cases, cocaethylene was detected. AEME was also quantified in one case. The use of AMP detected by blood analysis was confirmed in the VH of one individual (24.31 ng/mL). However, samples taken from three individuals whose blood tested positive for carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol presented negative results. The results demonstrated that VH is a suitable alternative biological sample to determine COC, AMPs, opiates and their metabolites.

  2. Disappearance of 6-acetylmorphine, morphine and codeine from human scalp hair after discontinuation of opiate abuse.

    PubMed

    Shen, Min; Xiang, Ping; Sun, Yingying; Shen, Baohua

    2013-04-10

    Opiates continue to be used at high rates in East and Southeast Asia. Hair analysis for drugs of abuse has been developed into a powerful and widely used tool in forensic and clinical toxicology. Specifically, testing the proximal segment of scalp hair to confirm morphine (MOR) positive urine samples could solve the poppy seed problem. Human scalp hair grows approximately 1cm per month and can therefore reflect a retrospective timeline of drug exposure. This study is the first to investigate the disappearance of 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM), MOR and codeine (COD) from human scalp hair after the discontinuation of drug use. Thirty-two healthy women (ages 21-51 years) with a known history of heroin abuse, who went to a rehabilitation centre and ceased consuming heroin (for 4-5 months), were recruited into the study. A pharmacokinetic analysis in seven individual hair segments was performed using a first-order kinetic. Assuming a rate of hair growth of 1cm/month, the mean hair elimination half-lives of 6-AM, MOR and COD were 0.88 months (95% CI, 0.74-1.03), 0.73 months (95% CI, 0.64-0.81), and 0.61 months (95% CI, 0.54-0.69), respectively. Our results suggest that to evaluate the discontinuation of opiate abuse after a 6-month period of abstinence, the results from a 3-cm proximal hair segment should be free of 6-AM at the proposed 0.2 ng/mg cutoff level. This finding should become the basis for the interpretation of results from segmental hair analyses in the evaluation of drug abstinence.

  3. Multimodal analgesia versus traditional opiate based analgesia after cardiac surgery, a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate if an opiate sparing multimodal regimen of dexamethasone, gabapentin, ibuprofen and paracetamol had better analgesic effect, less side effects and was safe compared to a traditional morphine and paracetamol regimen after cardiac surgery. Methods Open-label, prospective randomized controlled trial. 180 patients undergoing cardiac procedures through median sternotomy, were included in the period march 2007- August 2009. 151 patients were available for analysis. Pain was assessed with the 11-numeric rating scale (11-NRS). Results Patients in the multimodal group demonstrated significantly lower average pain scores from the day of surgery throughout the third postoperative day. Extensive nausea and vomiting, was found in no patient in the multimodal group but in 13 patients in the morphine group, p < 0.001. Postoperative rise in individual creatinine levels demonstrated a non-significant rise in the multimodal group, 33.0±53.4 vs. 19.9±48.5, p = 0.133. Patients in the multimodal group suffered less major in-hospital events in crude numbers: myocardial infarction (MI) (1 vs. 2, p = 0.54), stroke (0 vs. 3, p = 0.075), dialysis (1 vs. 2, p = 0.54), and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding (0 vs. 1, p = 0.31). 30-day mortality was 1 vs. 2, p = 0.54. Conclusions In patients undergoing cardiac surgery, a multimodal regimen offered significantly better analgesia than a traditional opiate regimen. Nausea and vomiting complaints were significantly reduced. No safety issues were observed with the multimodal regimen. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01966172 PMID:24650125

  4. Mechanisms of Bacterial Spore Germination and Its Heterogeneity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-10

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Great progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms of Bacillus and Clostridium spore germination and its...12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Bacillus , Clostridium, spores, spore germination, germinant receptors, germination heterogeneity REPORT...made in understanding the mechanisms of Bacillus and Clostridium spore germination and its heterogeneity in the 5+ years of the MURI award. The

  5. Simultaneous analysis of thebaine, 6-MAM and six abused opiates in postmortem fluids and tissues using Zymark automated solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R J; Johnson, R D; Hattrup, R A

    2005-08-05

    Opiates are some of the most widely prescribed drugs in America and are often abused. Demonstrating the presence or absence of opiate compounds in postmortem fluids and/or tissues derived from fatal civil aviation accidents can have serious legal consequences and may help determine the cause of impairment and/or death. However, the consumption of poppy seed products can result in a positive opiate drug test. We have developed a simple method for the simultaneous determination of eight opiate compounds from one extraction. These compounds are hydrocodone, dihydrocodeine, codeine, oxycodone, hydromorphone, 6-monoacetylmorphine, morphine, and thebaine. The inclusion of thebaine is notable as it is an indicator of poppy seed consumption and may help explain morphine/codeine positives in cases where no opiate use was indicated. This method incorporates a Zymark RapidTracetrade mark automated solid-phase extraction system, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and trimethyl silane (TMS) and oxime-TMS derivatives. The limits of detection ranged from 0.78 to 12.5 ng/mL. The linear dynamic range for most analytes was 6.25-1600 ng/mL. The extraction efficiencies ranged from 70 to 103%. We applied this method to eight separate aviation fatalities where opiate compounds had previously been detected.

  6. Economical synthesis of 13C-labeled opiates, cocaine derivatives and selected urinary metabolites by derivatization of the natural products.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Morten; Liu, Huiling; Johansen, Jon Eigill; Hoff, Bård Helge

    2015-03-25

    The illegal use of opiates and cocaine is a challenge world-wide, but some derivatives are also valuable pharmaceuticals. Reference samples of the active ingredients and their metabolites are needed both for controlling administration in the clinic and to detect drugs of abuse. Especially, (13)C-labeled compounds are useful for identification and quantification purposes by mass spectroscopic techniques, potentially increasing accuracy by minimizing ion alteration/suppression effects. Thus, the synthesis of [acetyl-(13)C4]heroin, [acetyl-(13)C4-methyl-(13)C]heroin, [acetyl-(13)C2-methyl-(13)C]6-acetylmorphine, [N-methyl-(13)C-O-metyl-(13)C]codeine and phenyl-(13)C6-labeled derivatives of cocaine, benzoylecgonine, norcocaine and cocaethylene was undertaken to provide such reference materials. The synthetic work has focused on identifying (13)C atom-efficient routes towards these derivatives. Therefore, the (13)C-labeled opiates and cocaine derivatives were made from the corresponding natural products.

  7. Nociceptive Flexion Reflex and Pain Rating Responses During Endogenous Opiate Blockade with Naltrexone in Healthy Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    France, Christopher R.; al'Absi, Mustafa; Ring, Christopher; France, Janis L.; Harju, Angie; Wittmers, Lorentz E.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of opioid blockade on nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR) activity and subjective pain ratings was examined in 151 healthy young men and women. Using a within-subjects design, NFR threshold was assessed on two days after administration of either placebo or a 50 mg dose of naltrexone. Electrocutaneous pain threshold and tolerance levels were measured after NFR threshold assessment on each day. Results indicated that administration of naltrexone was consistently associated with hypoalgesic responding. Specifically, participants exhibited lower levels of NFR activity and reported lower pain ratings for electrocutaneous stimulation delivered at pain threshold and tolerance levels following administration of naltrexone as compared to placebo. These findings indicate that opiate blockade using the current standard dose may elicit hypoalgesia. A potential moderating effect of dose of opiate blockade medication and level of endogenous opioid activation should be carefully examined in future research. PMID:17244518

  8. Separation of Opiate Isomers Using Electrospray Ionization and Paper Spray Coupled to High-Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manicke, Nicholas E.; Belford, Michael

    2015-05-01

    One limitation in the growing field of ambient or direct analysis methods is reduced selectivity caused by the elimination of chromatographic separations prior to mass spectrometric analysis. We explored the use of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), an ambient pressure ion mobility technique, to separate the closely related opiate isomers of morphine, hydromorphone, and norcodeine. These isomers cannot be distinguished by tandem mass spectrometry. Separation prior to MS analysis is, therefore, required to distinguish these compounds, which are important in clinical chemistry and toxicology. FAIMS was coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, and ionization was performed using either a pneumatically assisted heated electrospray ionization source (H-ESI) or paper spray, a direct analysis method that has been applied to the direct analysis of dried blood spots and other complex samples. We found that FAIMS was capable of separating the three opiate structural isomers using both H-ESI and paper spray as the ionization source.

  9. A Pilot Study of a Distress Tolerance Treatment for Opiate Dependent Patients Initiating Buprenorphine: Rationale, Methodology, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Richard A.; Bloom, Erika Litvin; Hecht, Jacki; Moitra, Ethan; Herman, Debra S.; Stein, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Buprenorphine, an opioid that is a long-acting partial opiate agonist, is an efficacious treatment for opiate dependence that is growing in popularity. Nevertheless, evidence suggests that many patients will lapse within the first week of treatment, and that lapses are often associated with withdrawal-related or emotional distress. Recent research suggests that individuals’ reactions to this distress may represent an important treatment target. In the current study, we describe the development and outcomes from a preliminary pilot evaluation (N = 5) of a novel distress tolerance treatment for individuals initiating buprenorphine. This treatment incorporates exposure-based and acceptance-based treatment approaches that we have previously applied to the treatment of tobacco dependence. Results from this pilot study establish the feasibility and acceptability of this approach. We are now conducting a randomized controlled trial of this treatment that we hope will yield clinically significant findings and offer clinicians an efficacious behavioral treatment to complement the effects of buprenorphine. PMID:24973401

  10. Temperament and character dimensions in opiate addicts: comparing subjects who completed inpatient treatment in therapeutic communities vs. incompleters.

    PubMed

    Zoccali, R; Muscatello, M R A; Bruno, A; Bilardi, F; De Stefano, C; Felletti, E; Isgrò, S; Micalizzi, V; Micò, U; Romeo, A; Meduri, M

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare temperamental profiles of patients who completed inpatient treatment of drug dependence with those who failed to complete the program. One hundred forty four opiate addicts, all resident in therapeutic communities and screened to exclude Axis I disorders, were assessed using the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). After one year, the TCI scores were compared between those who were still resident and those who had dropped out. Significant differences between groups were found in Reward Dependence, Persistence, Cooperativeness, Self-Transcendence. Temperament and character features may have an influence on motivation and on the adherence to treatment and community rules, as they modulate the maintenance of ongoing behaviors and the sensitivity to social rewards. The findings suggest that personality assessment with TCI in opiate addicts may be helpful in screening procedures to increase the efficiency of treatment and rehabilitative strategies.

  11. Separation of opiate alkaloids by electrokinetic chromatography with sulfated-cyclodextrin as a pseudo-stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Philip; Macka, Miroslav; Haddad, Paul R

    2003-01-24

    The separation of six related opiate alkaloids (morphine, thebaine, 10-hydroxythebaine, codeine, oripavine and laudanine) was studied using sulfated-cyclodextrin (s-CD) as a cation-exchange pseudo-stationary phase. Cation-exchange interactions between the cationic analytes and the anionic s-CD (7-11 mol of sulfate groups per mole CD) were found to bethe predominant mechanism, allowing the separations to be performed at low pH where the opiates are protonated and exhibit very similar mobilities. The concentrations of the s-CD and the competing ion (Na+ or Mg2+) in the electrolyte were used to govern the extent of the ion-exchange interactions. Interactions with the sulfated-cyclodextrin differed for each analyte, with oripavine exhibiting the strongest interaction and 10-thebaine and laudanine showing the weakest interactions. Despite the very similar structures of the analytes, these differences resulted in significant changes in separation selectivity. The separation was modelled using a migration equation derived from first principles and based on ion-exchange interactions between the s-CD and the opiates. Constants within the model were obtained by non-linear regression using a small subset of experimentally determined migration times. These constants related to the ion-exchange affinities of the s-CD for the various opiates. When the model was used to predict migration times under other experimental conditions, a very good correlation was obtained between observed and predicted mobilities (r2=0.996). Optimisation of the system was performed using the normalised resolution product and minimum resolution criteria and this process provided two optimised separations, each exhibiting a different separation selectivity.

  12. Adolescent Opiate Exposure in the Female Rat Induces Subtle Alterations in Maternal Care and Transgenerational Effects on Play Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nicole L.; Carini, Lindsay; Schenk, Marian E.; Stewart, Michelle; Byrnes, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    The non-medical use of prescription opiates, such as Vicodin® and MSContin®, has increased dramatically over the past decade. Of particular concern is the rising popularity of these drugs in adolescent female populations. Use during this critical developmental period could have significant long-term consequences for both the female user as well as potential effects on her future offspring. To address this issue, we have begun modeling adolescent opiate exposure in female rats and have observed significant transgenerational effects despite the fact that all drugs are withdrawn several weeks prior to pregnancy. The purpose of the current set of studies was to determine whether adolescent morphine exposure modifies postpartum care. In addition, we also examined juvenile play behavior in both male and female offspring. The choice of the social play paradigm was based on previous findings demonstrating effects of both postpartum care and opioid activity on play behavior. The findings revealed subtle modifications in the maternal behavior of adolescent morphine-exposed females, primarily related to the amount of time females’ spend nursing and in non-nursing contact with their young. In addition, male offspring of adolescent morphine-exposed mothers (MOR-F1) demonstrate decreased rough and tumble play behaviors, with no significant differences in general social behaviors (i.e., social grooming and social exploration). Moreover, there was a tendency toward increased rough and tumble play in MOR-F1 females, demonstrating the sex-specific nature of these effects. Given the importance of the postpartum environment on neurodevelopment, it is possible that modifications in maternal–offspring interactions, related to a history of adolescent opiate exposure, plays a role in the observed transgenerational effects. Overall, these studies indicate that the long-term consequences of adolescent opiate exposure can impact both the female and her future offspring. PMID:21713113

  13. Morphofunctional alterations in ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons in acute and prolonged opiates withdrawal. A computational perspective.

    PubMed

    Enrico, P; Migliore, M; Spiga, S; Mulas, G; Caboni, F; Diana, M

    2016-05-13

    Dopamine (DA) neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) play a key role in the neurobiological basis of goal-directed behaviors and addiction. Morphine (MOR) withdrawal induces acute and long-term changes in the morphology and physiology of VTA DA cells, but the mechanisms underlying these modifications are poorly understood. Because of their predictive value, computational models are a powerful tool in neurobiological research, and are often used to gain further insights and deeper understanding on the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying the development of various psychiatric disorders. Here we present a biophysical model of a DA VTA neuron based on 3D morphological reconstruction and electrophysiological data, showing how opiates withdrawal-driven morphological and electrophysiological changes could affect the firing rate and discharge pattern. The model findings suggest how and to what extent a change in the balance of GABA/GLU inputs can take into account the experimentally observed hypofunction of VTA DA neurons during acute and prolonged withdrawal, whereas morphological changes may play a role in the increased excitability of VTA DA cell to opiate administration observed during opiate withdrawal.

  14. Simultaneous quantification of amphetamine, opiates, ketamine and relative metabolites in urine for confirmatory analysis by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huei-Ru; Choi, Ka-Ian; Lin, Tzu-Chieh; Hu, Anren

    2013-06-15

    The rise in amphetamine, ketamine and opiates abuse in Taiwan has created a need for a reliable confirmatory assay. A method that combines superficially porous liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with solid-phase extraction (SPE) was developed for the simultaneous quantification of amphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), ketamine, opiates, and their corresponding metabolites in urine. The total run time of the method was 6.7min including equilibration time. The method was validated in accordance with the European Commission (EC) Decision 2002/642/EC. The within- and between-day precision was below 13.6% and the accuracy ranged from -17.1% to +9.9% for all analytes. Ion suppression was observed but compensated by using deuterated internal standards. No carryover was detected and the analytes were stable at room temperature for 16h, and for 72h at 4°C, and three-thaw cycles. The method was further validated by comparison with a reference gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method, using 52 authentic urine samples. The results indicated that for the target analytes studied, the LC-MS/MS analysis was as precise, accurate, and specific as the GC-MS method. In conclusion, the present LC-MS/MS method is robust and reliable, and suitable for use as a confirmation assay in the simultaneous urine drug testing and quantification of amphetamines, ketamines, and opiates.

  15. Older adults prescribed methadone: a review of the literature across the life span from opiate initiation to methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Doukas, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Professionals currently working with methadone patients are facing challenges with the rise of polydrug use, HIV and Hepatitis epidemics, and treating a large volume of individuals who are older than ever before, presenting for the first time in their 50's, 60's and 70's. There have been two literature reviews conducted on this older population, but they can only provide a snap-shot view on the later stage of life of this unique group. A longitudinal literature review of the long-term opiate abuser who has transitioned into opiate replacement therapy will provide depth and illustrate the complexity of interrelated factors that have been affected throughout their life span. This paper reviews the literature conducted on opiate addicts from their earlier stages of substance use to older adulthood where many have chosen to enter into a methadone maintenance program. The paper will also take a biopsychosocial approach when reviewing the literature because of how these three domains are deeply affected and interrelated with this population.

  16. Exploration of Bivalent Ligands Targeting Putative Mu Opioid Receptor and Chemokine Receptor CCR5 Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Arnatt, Christopher K.; Falls, Bethany A.; Yuan, Yunyun; Raborg, Thomas J.; Masvekar, Ruturaj R.; El-Hage, Nazira; Selley, Dana E.; Nicola, Anthony V.; Knapp, Pamela E.; Hauser, Kurt F.; Zhang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Modern antiretroviral therapies have provided HIV-1 infected patients longer lifespans and better quality of life. However, several neurological complications are now being seen in these patients due to HIV-1 associated injury of neurons by infected microglia and astrocytes. In addition, these effects can be further exacerbated with opiate use and abuse. One possible mechanism for such potentiation effects of opiates is the interaction of the mu opioid receptor (MOR) with the chemokine receptor CCR5 (CCR5), a known HIV-1 co-receptor, to form MOR-CCR5 heterodimer. In an attempt to understand this putative interaction and its relevance to neuroAIDS, we designed and synthesized a series of bivalent ligands targeting the putative CCR5-MOR heterodimer. To understand how these bivalent ligands may interact with the heterodimer, biological studies including calcium mobilization inhibition, binding affinity, HIV-1 invasion, and cell fusion assays were applied. In particular, HIV-1 infection assays using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, macrophages, and astrocytes revealed a notable synergy in activity for one particular bivalent ligand. Further, a molecular model of the putative CCR5-MOR heterodimer was constructed, docked with the bivalent ligand, and molecular dynamics simulations of the complex was performed in a membrane-water system to help understand the biological observation. PMID:27720326

  17. Comparative Study of the Activity of Brain Behavioral Systems in Methamphetamine and Opiate Dependents

    PubMed Central

    Alemikhah, Marjan; Faridhosseini, Farhad; Kordi, Hassan; Rasouli-Azad, Morad; Shahini, Najmeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Substance dependency is a major problem for the general health of a society. Different approaches have investigated the substance dependency in order to explain it. Gray’s reinforcement sensitivity theory (RST) is an advanced and important neuropsychological theory in this area. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare three systems of the revised reinforcement sensitivity theory the behavioral activation system (r-BAS), the revised behavioral inhibition system (r-BIS), and the revised fight/flight/freezing system (r-FFFS) between patients dependent on methamphetamine and opiates, and a group of controls. Patients and Methods: This research was a causal-comparative study that was conducted in the first six months of 2012. The population of the study was males of Mashhad city, who were dependent on methamphetamine or opiates, and ruling out psychotic disorders and prominent Axis II. Twenty-five people were selected by the convenient sampling method. Also, 25 non-dependent people from the patients’ relatives were selected and matched for the variables of age, gender, and education to participate in this study. Participants were evaluated using a structured clinical interview (SCID) for DSM-IV, demographic questionnaire information, and a Jackson-5 questionnaire (2009). Data were analyzed by Chi-square, K-S, and independent t-test. Results: The methamphetamine dependent group had a higher sensitivity in the r-BAS, r-BIS, and the r-Fight and r-Freezing systems compared to the control group (P < 0.05). However, there was no significant difference in r-Flight between the two groups (P > 0.05). “The scores of r-BIS were also significantly higher in the methamphetamine-dependent group than the opioid-dependent and control groups. For the r-Fight variable, the methamphetamine-dependent group was higher than the opioid-dependent group”. Conclusions: The personality patterns of patients dependent on methamphetamines were different from the controls

  18. Simultaneous determination of cocaine and opiates in dried blood spots by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Antelo-Domínguez, Ángel; Cocho, José Ángel; Tabernero, María Jesús; Bermejo, Ana María; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio

    2013-12-15

    A sample pre-treatment method based on blood spot collection filter cards was optimized as a means of using small volume samples for the screening and confirmation of cocaine and opiates abuse. Dried blood spots (DBSs) were prepared by dispersing 20 µL of whole blood specimens previously mixed with the internal standards (deuterated analogs of each target), and subjecting the whole DBS to extraction with 5 mL of methanol under orbital-horizontal shaking (180 rpm) for 10 min. Determinations were based on direct electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) by injecting the re-dissolved methanol extract with the delivery solution (acetonitrile-water-formic acid, 80:19.875:0.125) at a flow rate of 60 µL min(-1), and using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode with the m/z (precursor ion)→m/z (product ion) transitions for acquisition. Matrix effect has been found to be statistically significant (Multiple Range Test) when assessing cocaine, BZE, codeine and morphine, and the use of the standard addition method (dispersion of whole blood previously mixed with standards onto the filter papers) was needed for accurate determinations. The developed DBS-ESI-MS/MS procedure offered good intra-day and inter-day precisions (lower than 10% and 12%, respectively), as well as good intra-day and inter-day accuracies (inter-day absolute recoveries, expressed as the mean analytical recovery over three target concentration levels, of 103%, 100%, 101%, 98% and 100% for cocaine, BZE, codeine, morphine and 6-MAM, respectively). The high sensitivity inherent to MS/MS determinations combined with the minimal dilution of sample allowed low limits of quantification for all targets, and the developed method results therefore adequate for cocaine and opiates screening and confirmation purposes. The procedure was finally applied to DBSs prepared from whole blood from polydrug abusers, and results were compared with those obtained after a conventional sample pretreatment

  19. Phenotypically heterogeneous populations in spatially heterogeneous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Pintu; Klumpp, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    The spatial expansion of a population in a nonuniform environment may benefit from phenotypic heterogeneity with interconverting subpopulations using different survival strategies. We analyze the crossing of an antibiotic-containing environment by a bacterial population consisting of rapidly growing normal cells and slow-growing, but antibiotic-tolerant persister cells. The dynamics of crossing is characterized by mean first arrival times and is found to be surprisingly complex. It displays three distinct regimes with different scaling behavior that can be understood based on an analytical approximation. Our results suggest that a phenotypically heterogeneous population has a fitness advantage in nonuniform environments and can spread more rapidly than a homogeneous population.

  20. Patterns of Emphysema Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Valipour, Arschang; Shah, Pallav L.; Gesierich, Wolfgang; Eberhardt, Ralf; Snell, Greg; Strange, Charlie; Barry, Robert; Gupta, Avina; Henne, Erik; Bandyopadhyay, Sourish; Raffy, Philippe; Yin, Youbing; Tschirren, Juerg; Herth, Felix J.F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although lobar patterns of emphysema heterogeneity are indicative of optimal target sites for lung volume reduction (LVR) strategies, the presence of segmental, or sublobar, heterogeneity is often underappreciated. Objective The aim of this study was to understand lobar and segmental patterns of emphysema heterogeneity, which may more precisely indicate optimal target sites for LVR procedures. Methods Patterns of emphysema heterogeneity were evaluated in a representative cohort of 150 severe (GOLD stage III/IV) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients from the COPDGene study. High-resolution computerized tomography analysis software was used to measure tissue destruction throughout the lungs to compute heterogeneity (≥ 15% difference in tissue destruction) between (inter-) and within (intra-) lobes for each patient. Emphysema tissue destruction was characterized segmentally to define patterns of heterogeneity. Results Segmental tissue destruction revealed interlobar heterogeneity in the left lung (57%) and right lung (52%). Intralobar heterogeneity was observed in at least one lobe of all patients. No patient presented true homogeneity at a segmental level. There was true homogeneity across both lungs in 3% of the cohort when defining heterogeneity as ≥ 30% difference in tissue destruction. Conclusion Many LVR technologies for treatment of emphysema have focused on interlobar heterogeneity and target an entire lobe per procedure. Our observations suggest that a high proportion of patients with emphysema are affected by interlobar as well as intralobar heterogeneity. These findings prompt the need for a segmental approach to LVR in the majority of patients to treat only the most diseased segments and preserve healthier ones. PMID:26430783

  1. Assessment of exposure to opiates and cocaine during pregnancy in a Mediterranean city: preliminary results of the "Meconium Project".

    PubMed

    Pichini, Simona; Puig, Carme; Zuccaro, Piergiorgio; Marchei, Emilia; Pellegrini, Manuela; Murillo, Janeth; Vall, Oriol; Pacifici, Roberta; García-Algar, Oscar

    2005-10-04

    For the first time in Europe, the "Meconium Project" aimed to estimate the prevalence of drug use by pregnant women and the effects of exposure to illicit drugs during pregnancy on the fetus and infant. Between October 2002 and February 2004, 1151 (79%) dyads among the 1439 mother-infant dyads from the Hospital del Mar, Barcelona, Spain, met eligibility criteria and agreed to participate in the study. We present preliminary results on the first 830 meconium samples and 549 mother-infant dyads, for which statistical analysis of socio-economic and demographic characteristics and newborn somatometry was completed. The meconium analysis showed an overall 7.9% positivity for drugs of abuse, with 6-monoacetylmorphine and cocaine being the analytes, most frequently found in samples positive for opiates and cocaine. Structured interview disclosed 1.3, 1.8 and 1.3% of mothers exposed to opiates, cocaine and both drugs, while only one mother declared ecstasy consumption. Meconium analysis showed that prevalence of opiates, cocaine and combined drugs exposure was 8.7, 4.4 and 2.2%, respectively, and confirmed the case of ecstasy use. Arecoline, the main areca nut alkaloid, was found in meconium specimens from four Asiatic newborns, whose mothers declared beetle nut consumption during pregnancy. Parental ethnicity was not associated with drug use, nor was the social class, although a higher tendency toward drug consumption was observed in professional and partly skilled mothers. Drug consuming mothers showed a higher number of previous pregnancies and abortions (p<0.05) when compared to non-consumer mothers (meconium negative test), probably due to a lack of family planning. Consumption of opiates and cocaine during pregnancy was associated with active tobacco smoking, a higher number of smoked cigarettes and cannabis use. Exposure status and smoking behavior correlated with significantly lower birth weight in newborns from mothers exposed only to cocaine and to opiates and

  2. Pain management in total knee arthroplasty: efficacy of a multimodal opiate-free protocol

    PubMed Central

    CANATA, GIAN LUIGI; CASALE, VALENTINA; CHIEY, ALFREDO

    2016-01-01

    Purpose this study was conducted to identify the most effective method of postoperative pain management, comparing the intravenous opiate infusion protocol with the use of a single periarticular local anesthetic infiltration (LAI) in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery. Methods 50 patients submitted to TKA surgery between 2013 and 2015 were divided into two groups. Buprenorphine was administered intravenously to the patients in Group A, while the Group B patients received a single periarticular LAI (ropivacaine and ketorolac) during surgery. Pain was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) and the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score. Hemoglobin and hematocrit were measured in the early postoperative period and at 40 days post-surgery. Range of motion and inflammatory markers were also assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using Student’s t-test. Results student’s t-test showed no significant difference between the groups in functional outcomes or blood values, but a difference in VAS score on the day of surgery was found (p < 0.0001), in favor of Group B. Conclusions LAI considerably reduces postoperative pain, allowing rapid mobilization and accelerating functional recovery. Level of evidence Level I, prospective single-blind randomized trial. PMID:28217658

  3. Historical review: Molecular and cellular mechanisms of opiate and cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Nestler, Eric J

    2004-04-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse was founded in 1974, and since that time there have been significant advances in understanding the processes by which drugs of abuse cause addiction. The initial protein targets for almost all drugs of abuse are now known. Animal models that replicate key features of addiction are available, and these models have made it possible to characterize the brain regions that are important for addiction and other drug effects, such as physical dependence. A large number of drug-induced changes at the molecular and cellular levels have been identified in these brain areas and rapid progress is being made in relating individual changes to specific behavioral abnormalities in animal models of addiction. The current challenges are to translate this increasingly impressive knowledge of the basic neurobiology of addiction to human addicts, and to identify the specific genes that make some individuals either particularly vulnerable or resistant to addiction. In this article, I present a historical review of basic research on opiate and cocaine addiction.

  4. Blunted Opiate Modulation of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenocortical Activity in Men and Women Who Smoke

    PubMed Central

    al’Absi, Mustafa; Wittmers, Lorentz E.; Hatsukami, Dorothy; Westra, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the extent to which nicotine dependence alters endogenous opioid regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis functions. Endogenous opiates play an important role in regulating mood, pain, and drug reward. They also regulate the HPA functions. Previous work has demonstrated an abnormal HPA response to psychological stress among dependent smokers. Methods Smokers and nonsmokers (total n = 48 participants) completed two sessions during which a placebo or 50 mg of naltrexone was administered, using a double-blind design. Blood and saliva samples, cardiovascular and mood measures were obtained during a resting absorption period, after exposure to two noxious stimuli, and during an extended recovery period. Thermal pain threshold and tolerance were assessed in both sessions. Participants also rated pain during a 90-second cold pressor test. Results Opioid blockade increased adrenocorticotropin, plasma cortisol, and salivary cortisol levels; these increases were enhanced by exposure to the noxious stimuli. These responses were blunted in smokers relative to nonsmokers. Smokers tended to report less pain than nonsmokers, and women reported more pain during both pain procedures, although sex differences in pain were significant only among nonsmokers. Conclusions We conclude that nicotine dependence is associated with attenuated opioid modulation of the HPA. This dysregulation may play a role in the previously observed blunted responses to stress among dependent smokers. PMID:18799426

  5. Degradation of Opioids and Opiates During Acid Hydrolysis Leads to Reduced Recovery Compared to Enzymatic Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Sitasuwan, Pongkwan; Melendez, Cathleen; Marinova, Margarita; Mastrianni, Kaylee R; Darragh, Alicia; Ryan, Emily; Lee, L Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Drug monitoring laboratories utilize a hydrolysis process to liberate the opiates from their glucuronide conjugates to facilitate their detection by tandem mass spectrometry (MS). Both acid and enzyme hydrolysis have been reported as viable methods, with the former as a more effective process for recovering codeine-6-glucuronide and morphine-6-glucuronide. Here, we report concerns with acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of opioids, including a significant loss of analytes and conversions of oxycodone to oxymorphone, hydrocodone to hydromorphone and codeine to morphine. The acid-catalyzed reaction was monitored in neat water and patient urine samples by liquid chromatography-time-of-flight and tandem MS. These side reactions with acid hydrolysis may limit accurate quantitation due to loss of analytes, possibly lead to false positives, and poorly correlate with pharmacogenetic profiles, as cytochrome P450 enzyme (CYP2D6) is often involved with oxycodone to oxymorphone, hydrocodone to hydromorphone and codeine to morphine conversions. Enzymatic hydrolysis process using the purified, genetically engineered β-glucuronidase (IMCSzyme(®)) addresses many of these concerns and demonstrates accurate quantitation and high recoveries for oxycodone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone and hydromorphone.

  6. Critical comparison of extraction procedures for the capillary electrophoretic analysis of opiates in hair.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Elizabete C; da Silva, Clóvis L; Gauchée, Magnólia L N; Tavares, Marina F M

    2003-01-01

    This work presents a comparative evaluation of extraction procedures for the capillary analysis of seven opiates (meperidine, morphine, naloxone, tramadol, fentanyl, sufentanyl, and alfentanyl) in human hair. Pieces of hair (50-150 mg) were subjected to acidic hydrolysis (0.25 mmol L(-1) HCl at 45 degrees C, overnight) followed by pH adjustment and either liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) in hexane, petroleum ether, dichloromethane, and ethyl acetate solvents, or solid-phase extraction (SPE) in octadecyl, cyanopropyl, and aminopropyl bonded silica and cation exchange polymeric phases. Excellent recoveries of approximately 70% (naloxone and fentanyl and its analogues), 88% (meperidine), and ca. 100% (morphine and tramadol) were obtained using SPE in a M-fixed-mode cation exchange reversed-phase cartridge (Oasis MCX LP, Waters Corp., Milford, MA, U.S.A.), making this type of procedure eligible for novel clinical and forensic methodologies for hair analysis. The utility of the proposed extraction technique was demonstrated by the analysis of hair extracts from patients using morphine as part of their pain management protocol.

  7. Skin Conductance at Baseline and Post-Heel Lance Reflects Sympathetic Activation in Neonatal Opiate Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Oji-Mmuo, Christiana N.; Michael, Eric J.; McLatchy, Jacqueline; Lewis, Mary M.; Becker, Julie E.; Doheny, Kim Kopenhaver

    2015-01-01

    Aim Skin conductance (SC) provides an objective measure of autonomic system regulation through sympathetic-mediated filling of sweat glands. This study aimed to test the utility of SC to detect sympathetic activation in neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Methods 14 term (mean, SE: 38.8 ± 0.35 weeks gestational age) neonates with chronic prenatal opiate exposure were enrolled. SC (peaks/sec and mean of peaks) were measured at baseline, during heel lance/squeeze (HLS) and recovery from HLS at 24-48 (mean 38) hours of life prior to treatment for NAS. Blinded coders with established reliability assessed neonates using the Modified Finnegan Neonatal Scoring System (MFNSS). Non-parametric tests were used to determine group differences, phase differences from baseline to HLS and HLS to recovery, and associations between MFNSS and SC measures. Results Neonates that would later require morphine treatment for NAS (n = 6) had higher baseline SC mean of peaks than those that did not require treatment (n = 8) (P<0.05). Moreover, there were unique phase differences between groups and SC positively correlated with MFNSS (P< 0.05). Conclusion SC provides early identification of NAS severity. However, a larger sample is needed to determine sensitivity and specificity of SC for early identification of NAS and treatment effectiveness. PMID:26613197

  8. Blind trials of an onsite saliva drug test for marijuana and opiates.

    PubMed

    Jehanli, A; Brannan, S; Moore, L; Spiehler, V R

    2001-09-01

    The objective of these clinical trials was to calculate the performance, limit of detection, specificity and sensitivity of a novel, semi-quantitative immunoassay for drugs of abuse in saliva and to determine operator bias when measured blind by four different operators. The test is based on lateral flow gold particle technology coupled with digital photography to provide a semi-quantitative end point. The performance of the test was compared with that of enzyme immunoassays and GC/MS methods. Volunteers consumed marijuana or codeine and their saliva was collected 0.25 to 24 h later with the Cozart RapiScan collection device. The sensitivity and specificity of the opiate test were both 100%+/-10.4% for codeine for 9 h after dosing. The cutoff of the marijuana test at 10 ng/mL THCA was too high to detect marijuana use for more than a few hours after smoking. There was no operator bias because the results were presented in written form either as "positive" or "negative" for each of the five drug classes on the screen of the hand-held reader.

  9. Resting EEG and ERPs findings in methadone-substituted opiate users: a review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Grace Y; Kydd, Robert; Russell, Bruce R

    2015-12-01

    Methadone has been used to treat opiate dependence since the mid-1960s. Despite its clinical effectiveness there is evidence from neuropsychological studies demonstrating that its long-term use might have negative effects on cognition. Nevertheless, it remains uncertain whether the observed cognitive impairments in patients undertaking methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) are solely attributable to the pharmacological effects of methadone, as suggested by some researchers. Determining the effects of MMT on neuropsychological function using electroencephalography (EEG) combined with event-related potentials (ERP) has been used infrequently. However EEG and ERP provide a means of closely examining information processing to determine whether MMT induces any deficits. The purpose of this review was to investigate whether psychophysiological evidence supports cognitive impairment in association with MMT by focusing on research using EEG and ERPs. The findings of EEG studies to date appear not support the notion that cognitive impairments are attributable to the specific pharmacological effects of methadone suggested by some neuropsychological studies. However, due to the methodological deficits and limited number of the studies, any conclusion based on the findings of the existing EEG studies should be avoided.

  10. Retention in medication-assisted treatment for opiate dependence: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Timko, Christine; Schultz, Nicole R; Cucciare, Michael A; Vittorio, Lisa; Garrison-Diehn, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Retention in medication-assisted treatment among opiate-dependent patients is associated with better outcomes. This systematic review (55 articles, 2010-2014) found wide variability in retention rates (i.e., 19%-94% at 3-month, 46%-92% at 4-month, 3%-88% at 6-month, and 37%-91% at 12-month follow-ups in randomized controlled trials), and identified medication and behavioral therapy factors associated with retention. As expected, patients who received naltrexone or buprenorphine had better retention rates than patients who received a placebo or no medication. Consistent with prior research, methadone was associated with better retention than buprenorphine/naloxone. And, heroin-assisted treatment was associated with better retention than methadone among treatment-refractory patients. Only a single study examined retention in medication-assisted treatment for longer than 1 year, and studies of behavioral therapies may have lacked statistical power; thus, studies with longer-term follow-ups and larger samples are needed. Contingency management showed promise to increase retention, but other behavioral therapies to increase retention, such as supervision of medication consumption, or additional counseling, education, or support, failed to find differences between intervention and control conditions. Promising behavioral therapies to increase retention have yet to be identified.

  11. [Heroin-assisted treatment of opiate addicts--former and current research emphasis].

    PubMed

    Steffen, T; Kaufmann, B; Blättler, R; Dobler-Mikola, A; Gutzwiller, F; Uchtenhagen, A

    1999-01-01

    Heroin-assisted treatment has been examined broadly in Switzerland since 1994 within the context of scientific studies. The goal was to clarify the suitability of this treatment for opiate addicts whom previous therapy had failed to reach. Results of the initial research phase show that the target group could be reached for treatment extending 18 months with a satisfactory retention rate of 69%. The patients could improve their health and social situation during treatment and reduce illegal consumption of narcotics. Studies during the initial years primarily examined the viability of heroin-assisted treatment and its effects on the patients' psychosocial and somatic development. A second study phase ongoing since 1998 pursues the specific importance of medical and psychosocial treatment for patients' health and social development in heroin-assisted treatment. The focal point is the effort to optimise treatment of patients with comorbidity of psychiatric disorders and severe somatic diseases, particularly AIDS. Investigations carried out in Switzerland have been discussed broadly at an international level. Studies on heroin-assisted treatment are also being conducted at present in various countries. In future, co-operation should be further intensified with researchers on an international scale.

  12. Tumour Cell Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Laura; Baker, Ann-Marie; Graham, Trevor A.

    2016-01-01

    The population of cells that make up a cancer are manifestly heterogeneous at the genetic, epigenetic, and phenotypic levels. In this mini-review, we summarise the extent of intra-tumour heterogeneity (ITH) across human malignancies, review the mechanisms that are responsible for generating and maintaining ITH, and discuss the ramifications and opportunities that ITH presents for cancer prognostication and treatment. PMID:26973786

  13. An Opioid Agonist that Does Not Induce μ-Opioid Receptor—Arrestin Interactions or Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Groer, C. E.; Tidgewell, K.; Moyer, R. A.; Harding, W. W.; Rothman, R. B.; Prisinzano, T. E.; Bohn, L. M.

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor desensitization and trafficking are important regulators of opioid receptor signaling that can dictate overall drug responsiveness in vivo. Furthermore, different μ-opioid receptor (μOR) ligands can lead to varying degrees of receptor regulation, presumably because of distinct structural conformations conferred by agonist binding. For example, morphine binding produces a μOR with low affinity for β-arrestin proteins and limited receptor internalization, whereas enkephalin analogs promote robust trafficking of both β-arrestins and the receptors. Here, we evaluate μOR trafficking in response to activation by a novel μ-selective agonist derived from the naturally occurring plant product, salvinorin A. It is interesting that this compound, termed herkinorin, does not promote the recruitment of β-arrestin-2 to the μOR and does not lead to receptor internalization. Moreover, whereas G protein-coupled receptor kinase overexpression can promote morphine-induced β-arrestin interactions and μOR internalization, such manipulations do not promote herkinorin-induced trafficking. Studies in mice have shown that β-arrestin-2 plays an important role in the development of morphine-induced tolerance, constipation, and respiratory depression. Therefore, drugs that can activate the receptor without recruiting the arrestins may be a promising step in the development of opiate analgesics that distinguish between agonist activity and receptor regulation and may ultimately lead to therapeutics designed to provide pain relief without the adverse side effects normally associated with the opiate narcotics. PMID:17090705

  14. DSM IV axis II traits can influence compliance to treatment with oral naltrexone: a preliminary study on 30 opiate dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Streel, Emmanuel; Chenut, Christie; Papageorgiou, Constentin; Verbanck, Paul

    2014-01-01

    For many decades, health specialists have successfully used their clinical ingenuity to increase the efficiency of opiate detoxification protocols. However, even if drop-out rate has decreased significantly in today's protocols, relapse after opiate detoxification remains a major problem. Therefore, naltrexone hydrochloride, an opiate antagonist, has been considered by many as a potential tool to support abstinence in what has been called "antagonist-assisted abstinence" (AAA). Nevertheless, while naltrexone implants are becoming more accessible, a large majority of centers still use oral naltrexone and adherence to treatment remains a major obstacle to AAA's efficiency. As the personality profile could give an insight into compliance, we investigated the relationship between personality profiles and naltrexone adherence in a cohort of 30 patients. The results indicate that the Axis II profile influences the likely pattern of oral naltrexone compliance. As clinicians need to identify opiate dependent patients who are most likely to benefit from oral naltrexone treatment, it therefore carries important implications and could lead to a better adjustment of therapeutic strategies for opiate dependent patients.

  15. Escalating morphine exposures followed by withdrawal in feline immunodeficiency virus-infected cats: a model for HIV infection in chronic opiate abusers.

    PubMed

    Barr, Margaret C; Huitron-Resendiz, Salvador; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Henriksen, Steven J; Phillips, Tom R

    2003-11-24

    Opiate abuse is a risk factor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Because the direct effects of opiates on HIV infection are difficult to determine epidemiologically, animal models of lentivirus infection are relied upon to study the effects of opiates in the absence of confounding factors. Morphine, the predominant metabolite of heroin, is used in most experimental systems examining heroin abuse. In this study, morphine treatment of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats modeled a typical pattern of escalating drug use interspersed with withdrawals. Plasma cortisol levels were measured for evidence of stress associated with morphine withdrawal. In the morphine-treated cats, cortisol levels peaked at time points corresponding to morphine withdrawal and returned to baseline levels during treatment and several weeks after the final withdrawal. Morphine-treated cats displayed clear behavioral and physical signs of opiate exposure and evidence of withdrawal when the drug was stopped. Morphine-exposed cats did not experience enhanced severity of FIV-related disease; in fact, morphine demonstrated a protective effect on FIV-associated changes in brainstem auditory evoked potentials. Our research suggests that opiate exposure is unlikely to adversely affect the progression of acute lentivirus infection and might be beneficial in controlling associated neurological disease.

  16. Comparing the Effectiveness of Behavioral Recognition and Group Stress Surmounting Techniques Instructions on Changing University Students' Positive Attitudes towards Opiate Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Bahman

    2011-01-01

    Background One of the most important strategies in preventing addiction is changing positive attitudes and stabilizing negative attitudes towards opiate abuse. Current research has been comparing the effectiveness of behavioral recognition and stress surmounting techniques instructions on changing students' positive attitudes towards opiate abuse. Methods To determine the effectiveness of behavioral-recognition and group stress surmounting instructions on changing student’s positive attitudes towards opiate abuse, 90 students (45 boys and 45 girls) who had got good grades in attitude measuring questionnaire were chosen and were randomly assigned in 3 groups (two test groups and the control group) and then, were randomly replaced in 15 person groups with sex distinction. The research data were analyzed using multivariate statistical analysis method. Findings The results of pot-test analyses showed significant improvement compared with pretest analysis in both training methods and in both genders (P < 0.05). Then, the surmounting methods group training and recognition-behavioral group training both significantly improved positive attitudes towards opiate abuse in male and female students. Conclusion Behavioral-recognition and stress surmounting techniques instructions brought about changes in students attitudes towards opiate abuse and these changes were more prominent in female students than in males. PMID:24494119

  17. Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schryer, David R.

    In the past few years it has become increasingly clear that heterogeneous, or multiphase, processes play an important role in the atmosphere. Unfortunately the literature on the subject, although now fairly extensive, is still rather dispersed. Furthermore, much of the expertise regarding heterogeneous processes lies in fields not directly related to atmospheric science. Therefore, it seemed desirable to bring together for an exchange of ideas, information, and methodologies the various atmospheric scientists who are actively studying heterogeneous processes as well as other researchers studying similar processes in the context of other fields.

  18. Visualization of. mu. /sub 1/ opiate receptors in rat brain by using a computerized autoradiographic subtraction technique

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, R.R.; Pasternak, G.W.

    1985-10-01

    The authors have developed a quantitative computerized subtraction technique to demonstrate in rat brain the regional distribution of ..mu../sub 1/ sites, a common very-high-affinity binding site for both morphine and the enkephalins. Low concentrations of (D-Ala/sup 2/, D-Leu/sup 5/)enkephalin selectively inhibit the ..mu../sub 1/ binding of (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine, leaving ..mu../sub 2/-sites, while low morphine concentrations eliminate the ..mu../sub 1/ binding of (/sup 3/H)(D-Ala/sup 2/, D-Leu/sub 5/)enkephalin, leaving sigma sites. Thus, quantitative differences between images of sections incubated in the presence and absence of these low concentrations of unlabeled opioid represent ..mu../sub 1/ binding sites. The regional distributions of ..mu../sub 1/ sites labeled with (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine were quite similar to those determined by using (/sup 3/H)(D-Ala/sup 2/, D-Leu/sup 5/)enkephalin. High levels of ..mu../sub 1/ binding were observed in the periaqueductal gray, medial thalamus, and median raphe, consistent with the previously described role of ..mu../sub 1/ sites in analgesia. Other regions with high levels of ..mu../sub 1/ binding include the nucleus accumbens, the clusters and subcallosal streak of the striatum, hypothalamus, medial habenula, and the medial septum/diagonal band region. The proportion of total specific binding corresponding to ..mu../sub 1/ sites varied among the regions, ranging from 14% to 75% for (/sup 3/H)(D-Ala/sup 2/, D-Leu/sup 5/)enkephalin and 20% to 52% for (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine.

  19. Physicians' knowledge of and willingness to prescribe naloxone to reverse accidental opiate overdose: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Beletsky, Leo; Ruthazer, Robin; Macalino, Grace E; Rich, Josiah D; Tan, Litjen; Burris, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Naloxone, the standard treatment for heroin overdose, is a safe and effective prescription drug commonly administered by emergency room physicians or first responders acting under standing orders of physicians. High rates of overdose deaths and widely accepted evidence that witnesses of heroin overdose are often unwilling or unable to call 9-1-1 has led to interventions in several US cities and abroad in which drug users are instructed in overdose rescue techniques and provided a "take-home" dose of naloxone. Under current Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations, such interventions require physician involvement. As part of a larger study to evaluate the knowledge and attitudes of doctors towards providing drug treatment and harm reduction services to injection drug users (IDUs), we investigated physician knowledge and willingness to prescribe naloxone. Less than one in four of the respondents in our sample reported having heard of naloxone prescription as an intervention to prevent opiate overdose, and the majority reported that they would never consider prescribing the agent and explaining its application to a patient. Factors predicting a favorable attitude towards prescribing naloxone included fewer negative perceptions of IDUs, assigning less importance to peer and community pressure not to treat IDUs, and increased confidence in ability to provide meaningful treatment to IDUs. Our data suggest that steps to promote naloxone distribution programs should include physician education about evidence-based harm minimization schemes, broader support for such initiatives by professional organizations, and policy reform to alleviate medicolegal concerns associated with naloxone prescription. FDA re-classification of naloxone for over-the-counter sales and promotion of nasal-delivery mechanism for this agent should be explored.

  20. Therapeutical Neurotargeting via Magnetic Nanocarrier: Implications to Opiate-Induced Neuropathogenesis and NeuroAIDS.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Vidya; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Atluri, Venkata S R; Ding, Hong; Arias, Adriana Y; Jayant, Rahul D; Kaushik, Ajeet; Nair, Madhavan

    2015-10-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is the most commonly and extensively explored magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for drug-targeting and imaging in the field of biomedicine. Nevertheless, its potential application as safe and effective drug-carrier for CNS (Central Nervous System) anomalies is very limited. Previous studies have shown an entangled epidemic of opioid use and HIV infection and increased neuropathogenesis. Opiate such as morphine, heroine, etc. are used frequently as recreational drugs. Existing treatments to alleviate the action of opioid are less effective at CNS level due to impermeability of therapeutic molecules across brain barriers. Thus, development of an advanced nanomedicine based approach may pave the way for better treatment strategies. We herein report magnetic nanoformulation of a highly selective and potent morphine antagonist, CTOP (D-Pen-Cys-Tyr-DTrp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2), which is impenetrable to the brain. MNPs, synthesized in size range from 25 to 40 nm, were characterized by Transmission electron microscopy and assembly of MNPs-CTOP nanoformulations were confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy and fluorescent detection. Flow-cytometry analysis showed that biological efficacy of this nanoformulation in prevention of morphine induced apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells remains equivalent to that of free CTOP. Similarly, confocal microscopy reveals comparable efficacy of free and MNPs bound CTOP in protecting modulation of neuronal dendrite and spine morphology during morphine exposure and morphine-treated HIV infection. Further, typical transmigration assay showed increased translocation of MNPs across in vitro blood-brain barrier upon exposure of external magnetic force where barrier integrity remains unaltered. Thus, the developed nanoformulation could be effective in targeting brain by application of external magnetic force to treat morphine addiction in HIV patients.

  1. Machine-learning identifies substance-specific behavioral markers for opiate and stimulant dependence

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Woo-Young; Vassileva, Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent animal and human studies reveal distinct cognitive and neurobiological differences between opiate and stimulant addictions; however, our understanding of the common and specific effects of these two classes of drugs remains limited due to the high rates of polysubstance-dependence among drug users. Methods The goal of the current study was to identify multivariate substance-specific markers classifying heroin dependence (HD) and amphetamine dependence (AD), by using machine-learning approaches. Participants included 39 amphetamine mono-dependent, 44 heroin mono-dependent, 58 polysubstance dependent, and 81 non-substance dependent individuals. The majority of substance dependent participants were in protracted abstinence. We used demographic, personality (trait impulsivity, trait psychopathy, aggression, sensation seeking), psychiatric (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, antisocial personality disorder, psychopathy, anxiety, depression), and neurocognitive impulsivity measures (Delay Discounting, Go/No-Go, Stop Signal, Immediate Memory, Balloon Analogue Risk, Cambridge Gambling, and Iowa Gambling tasks) as predictors in a machine-learning algorithm. Results The machine-learning approach revealed substance-specific multivariate profiles that classified HD and AD in new samples with high degree of accuracy. Out of 54 predictors, psychopathy was the only classifier common to both types of addiction. Important dissociations emerged between factors classifying HD and AD, which often showed opposite patterns among individuals with HD and AD. Conclusions These results suggest that different mechanisms may underlie HD and AD, challenging the unitary account of drug addiction. This line of work may shed light on the development of standardized and cost-efficient clinical diagnostic tests and facilitate the development of individualized prevention and intervention programs for HD and AD. PMID:26905209

  2. Distribution of opiates in femoral blood and vitreous humour in heroin/morphine-related deaths.

    PubMed

    Rees, Kelly A; Pounder, Derrick J; Osselton, M David

    2013-03-10

    The distribution of free morphine (FM), codeine and 6-acetylmorphine (6AM) in vitreous humour (VH) and femoral blood (FB) was measured in 70 cases involving heroin/morphine. The relationship between tissue drug concentrations was assessed with respect to case circumstances. Total morphine (TM) concentrations in FB are also reported. The relative concentrations of FM in VH and FB were influenced by survival time. In rapid deaths (<3h after drug intake; n=34) the median FM concentration in VH (0.13 mg/L) was significantly lower than the corresponding result for FB (0.25mg/L; p<.01). In delayed deaths (>3h; n=12) the VH concentration (median 0.15 mg/L) was higher than in FB (0.092 mg/L; p>.05). Free morphine VH/FB ratios were significantly higher in delayed (median 1.3) compared to rapid deaths (0.64). Although these findings indicate a lag in the distribution of morphine into the VH, overlaps were observed in the VH/FB ratio in rapid and delayed death groups which limits the interpretive use of VH/FB ratios. Codeine and 6AM appeared to distribute more rapidly into the VH. Despite the observation that all opiate analytes were correlated between FB and VH (r ≥ 61; p<.01), our results indicate that in the absence of a blood sample, blood concentrations cannot be reliably inferred from that measured in the VH. In the absence of additional toxicological evidence, the use of FM to TM ratios in blood as an indicator of survival time is not advised.

  3. Physicians’ Knowledge of and Willingness to Prescribe Naloxone to Reverse Accidental Opiate Overdose: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Ruthazer, Robin; Macalino, Grace E.; Rich, Josiah D.; Tan, Litjen; Burris, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Naloxone, the standard treatment for heroin overdose, is a safe and effective prescription drug commonly administered by emergency room physicians or first responders acting under standing orders of physicians. High rates of overdose deaths and widely accepted evidence that witnesses of heroin overdose are often unwilling or unable to call 9-1-1 has led to interventions in several US cities and abroad in which drug users are instructed in overdose rescue techniques and provided a “take-home” dose of naloxone. Under current Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations, such interventions require physician involvement. As part of a larger study to evaluate the knowledge and attitudes of doctors towards providing drug treatment and harm reduction services to injection drug users (IDUs), we investigated physician knowledge and willingness to prescribe naloxone. Less than one in four of the respondents in our sample reported having heard of naloxone prescription as an intervention to prevent opiate overdose, and the majority reported that they would never consider prescribing the agent and explaining its application to a patient. Factors predicting a favorable attitude towards prescribing naloxone included fewer negative perceptions of IDUs, assigning less importance to peer and community pressure not to treat IDUs, and increased confidence in ability to provide meaningful treatment to IDUs. Our data suggest that steps to promote naloxone distribution programs should include physician education about evidence-based harm minimization schemes, broader support for such initiatives by professional organizations, and policy reform to alleviate medicolegal concerns associated with naloxone prescription. FDA re-classification of naloxone for over-the-counter sales and promotion of nasal-delivery mechanism for this agent should be explored. PMID:17146712

  4. Towards heterogeneous distributed debugging

    SciTech Connect

    Damodaran-Kamal, S.K.

    1995-04-01

    Several years of research and development in parallel debugger design have given up several techniques, though implemented in a wide range of tools for an equally wide range of systems. This paper is an evaluation of these myriad techniques as applied to the design of a heterogeneous distributed debugger. The evaluation is based on what features users perceive as useful, as well as the ease of implementation of the features using the available technology. A preliminary architecture for such a heterogeneous tool is proposed. Our effort in this paper is significantly different from the other efforts at creating portable and heterogeneous distributed debuggers in that we concentrate on support for all the important issues in parallel debugging, instead of simply concentrating on portability and heterogeneity.

  5. Heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The present conference on heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry considers such topics concerning clusters, particles and microparticles as common problems in nucleation and growth, chemical kinetics, and catalysis, chemical reactions with aerosols, electron beam studies of natural and anthropogenic microparticles, and structural studies employing molecular beam techniques, as well as such gas-solid interaction topics as photoassisted reactions, catalyzed photolysis, and heterogeneous catalysis. Also discussed are sulfur dioxide absorption, oxidation, and oxidation inhibition in falling drops, sulfur dioxide/water equilibria, the evidence for heterogeneous catalysis in the atmosphere, the importance of heterogeneous processes to tropospheric chemistry, soot-catalyzed atmospheric reactions, and the concentrations and mechanisms of formation of sulfate in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  6. Heterogeneous basic catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Hideshi

    1995-05-01

    Heterogeneous acid catalysis attracted much attention primarily because heterogeneous acidic catalysts act as catalysts in petroleum refinery and are known as a main catalyst in the cracking process which is the largest process among the industrial chemical processes. In contrast to these extensive studies of heterogeneous acidic catalysts, fewer efforts have been given to the study of heterogeneous basic catalysts. The types of heterogeneous basic catalysts are listed in Table 1. Except for non-oxide catalysts, the basic sites are believed to be surface O atoms. The studies of heterogeneous catalysis have been continuous and progressed steadily. They have never been reviewed in the chemical Reviews before. It is more useful and informative to describe the studies of heterogeneous basic catalysis performed for a long period. In the present article, therefore, the cited papers are not restricted to those published recently, but include those published for the last 25 years. The paper first describes the generation of basic sites before describing methods used in the characterization of basic surfaces. These are indicator methods, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of CO{sub 2}, UV absorption and luminescence spectroscopies, TPD of H{sub 2}, XPS, IR of CO{sub 2}, IR of pyrrole, and oxygen exchange between CO{sub 2} and the surface. The paper then discusses studies on the catalysis by heterogeneous basic catalysts. Some of these reactions are dehydration, dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, amination, alkylation, ring transformation, and reactions of organosilanes. Catalysts discussed are single component metal oxides, zeolites, non-oxide types, and superbasic catalysts. 141 refs.

  7. HIV-1 alters neural and glial progenitor cell dynamics in the central nervous system: coordinated response to opiates during maturation.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Yun Kyung; Podhaizer, Elizabeth M; Hauser, Kurt F; Knapp, Pamela E

    2012-12-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HANDs) are common sequelae of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, even when viral titers are well controlled by antiretroviral therapy. Evidence in patients and animal models suggests that neurologic deficits are increased during chronic opiate exposure. We have hypothesized that central nervous system (CNS) progenitor cells in both adult and developing CNS are affected by HIV infection and that opiates exacerbate these effects. To examine this question, neural progenitors were exposed to HIV-1 Tat(1-86) in the developing brain of inducible transgenic mice and in vitro. We examined whether Tat affected the proliferation or balance of progenitor populations expressing nestin, Sox2, and Olig2. Disease relevance was further tested by exposing human-derived progenitors to supernatant from HIV-1 infected monocytes. Studies concentrated on striatum, a region preferentially targeted by HIV and opiates. Results were similar among experimental paradigms. Tat or HIV exposure reduced the proliferation of undifferentiated (Sox2(+)) progenitors and oligodendroglial (Olig2(+)) progenitors. Coexposure to morphine exacerbated the effects of Tat or HIV-1(SF162) supernatant, but partially reversed HIV-1(IIIB) supernatant effects. Populations of Sox2(+) and Olig2(+) cells were also reduced by Tat exposure, although progenitor survival was unaffected. In rare instances, p24 immunolabeling was detected in viable human progenitors by confocal imaging. The vulnerability of progenitors is likely to distort the dynamic balance among neuron/glial populations as the brain matures, perhaps contributing to reports that neurologic disease is especially prevalent in pediatric HIV patients. Pediatric disease is atypical in developed regions but remains a serious concern in resource-limited areas where infection occurs commonly at birth and through breast feeding.

  8. Do Consumers Substitute Opium for Hashish? An Economic Analysis of Simultaneous Cannabinoid and Opiate Consumption in a Legal Regime

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Madhur

    2015-01-01

    Aim To analyze interrelationships in the consumption of opiates and cannabinoids in a legal regime and, specifically, whether consumers of opiates and cannabinoids treat them as substitutes for each other. Method Econometric dynamic panel data models for opium consumption are estimated using the generalized method of moments (GMM). A unique dataset containing information about opiate (opium) consumption from the Punjab province of British India for the years 1907–1918 is analyzed (n=272) as a function of its own price, the prices of two forms of cannabis (the leaf (bhang), and the resin (charas, or hashish)), and wage income. Cross-price elasticities are examined to reveal substitution or complementarity between opium and cannabis. Results Opium is a substitute for charas (or hashish), with a cross price elasticity (β3) of 0.14 (p < 0.05), but not for bhang (cannabis leaves; cross price elasticity = 0.00, p > 0.10). Opium consumption (β1 = 0.47 to 0.49, p < 0.01) shows properties of habit persistence consistent with addiction. The consumption of opium is slightly responsive (inelastic) to changes in its own price (β2 = −0.34 to −0.35, p < 0.05 to 0.01) and consumer wages (β4 = 0.15, p < 0.05). Conclusion Opium and hashish, a form of cannabis, are substitutes. In addition, opium consumption displays properties of habit persistence and slight price and wage income responsiveness (inelasticity) consistent with an addictive substance. PMID:26455552

  9. Validation of analysis of amphetamines, opiates, phencyclidine, cocaine, and benzoylecgonine in oral fluids by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kala, Subbarao V; Harris, Steve E; Freijo, Tom D; Gerlich, Stan

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop and validate a method for the detection and quantitation of drugs of abuse in oral fluids. Fortified oral fluid samples (made in-house) and samples from donors collected with Quantasil oral fluid collection kits from Immunalysis were screened on an Olympus 5400 using reagents purchased from Immunalysis. Amphetamines (AMPs), opiates, phencyclidine (PCP), and cocaine and its metabolite benzoylecgonine (BE) in oral fluids were quantitated by an Applied Biosystems 3200 QTRAP liquid chromatograph-tandem mass spectrometer (LC-MS-MS). AMPs, opiates, PCP, cocaine, and BE were extracted from samples using liquid-liquid or solid-phase extractions and the extracts were separated on a Shimadzu high-performance liquid chromatograph prior to the MS-MS analysis. For each drug, two multiple reaction mode transitions were monitored using positive electrospray ionization coupled to an MS-MS detector. Corresponding d3, d5, d6, and d11 internal standards were used to quantitate the results. The limit of detection/quantitation for AMPs, opiates, PCP, cocaine, and its metabolite BE were 10, 10, 2, 2, and 2 ng/mL of oral fluid, respectively, on a signal-to-noise ratio > 4. This corresponded to 25, 25, 5, 5, and 5 pg on column. The method was verified by participating in the North America Oral Fluid Proficiency Testing administered by Research Triangle Institute and by analyzing real samples from donors. In conclusion, LC-MS-MS provided a simple way to analyze and quantitate drugs of abuse in oral fluids.

  10. [Opiates do not guarantee an adequate analgesia after large-volume open operations on the abdominal cavity organs].

    PubMed

    Potapov, A L; Kobeliatskiĭ, Iu Iu

    2011-08-01

    Efficacy of systemic application of opiates (promedol) for the pain relief after big open abdominal operations, using visual-analogue scale (VAS), was estimated in 50 patients. During 36-48 h postoperatively analgesia was inadequate (VAS in a rest state more than 3 points and while movement--more than 4 points). Intensive pain (VAS 6 points and more) was noted in 58% of patients, while they are moving, and in 26%--in a rest state. Inadequate anesthesia may constitute one of causes of excessive systemic inflammatory reaction development in patients postoperatively.

  11. The Opiate Pain Reliever Epidemic among U.S. Arrestees 2000–2010: Regional and Demographic Variations

    PubMed Central

    GOLUB, ANDREW; ELLIOTT, LUTHER; BROWNSTEIN, HENRY H.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing rate of opiate pain reliever (OPR) use is a pressing concern in the United States. This article uses a drug epidemics framework to examine OPR use among arrestees surveyed by the Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring program. Results demonstrate regional and demographic variation in use across nine focal cities. High rates of OPR use on the West Coast illustrate the expansion of use from its initial epicenter. By 2010, OPR use had plateaued in all focal cities. Findings suggest directions for ongoing research into pathways to use and vectors of diffusion and for regionally specific interventions sensitive to age and ethnic diversity. PMID:23480209

  12. Characterization of Paper Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Considine, John M.

    Paper and paperboard are the most widely-used green materials in the world because they are renewable, recyclable, reusable, and compostable. Continued and expanded use of these materials and their potential use in new products requires a comprehensive understanding of the variability of their mechanical properties. This work develops new methods to characterize the mechanical properties of heterogeneous materials through a combination of techniques in experimental mechanics, materials science and numerical analysis. Current methods to analyze heterogeneous materials focus on crystalline materials or polymer-crystalline composites, where material boundaries are usually distinct. This work creates a methodology to analyze small, continuously-varying stiffness gradients in 100% polymer systems and is especially relevant to paper materials where factors influencing heterogeneity include local mass, fiber orientation, individual pulp fiber properties, local density, and drying restraint. A unique approach was used to understand the effect of heterogeneity on paper tensile strength. Additional variation was intentionally introduced, in the form of different size holes, and their effect on strength was measured. By modifying two strength criteria, an estimate of strength in the absence of heterogeneity was determined. In order to characterize stiffness heterogeneity, a novel load fixture was developed to excite full-field normal and shear strains for anisotropic stiffness determination. Surface strains were measured with digital image correlation and were analyzed with the VFM (Virtual Fields Method). This approach led to VFM-identified stiffnesses that were similar to values determined by conventional tests. The load fixture and VFM analyses were used to measure local stiffness and local stiffness variation on heterogeneous anisotropic materials. The approach was validated on simulated heterogeneous materials and was applied experimentally to three different paperboards

  13. The clinical heterogeneity of drug-induced myoclonus: an illustrated review.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Sabine; Bloem, Bastiaan R; van de Warrenburg, Bart P

    2016-12-16

    A wide variety of drugs can cause myoclonus. To illustrate this, we first discuss two personally observed cases, one presenting with generalized, but facial-predominant, myoclonus that was induced by amantadine; and the other presenting with propriospinal myoclonus triggered by an antibiotic. We then review the literature on drugs that may cause myoclonus, extracting the corresponding clinical phenotype and suggested underlying pathophysiology. The most frequently reported classes of drugs causing myoclonus include opiates, antidepressants, antipsychotics, and antibiotics. The distribution of myoclonus ranges from focal to generalized, even amongst patients using the same drug, which suggests various neuro-anatomical generators. Possible underlying pathophysiological alterations involve serotonin, dopamine, GABA, and glutamate-related processes at various levels of the neuraxis. The high number of cases of drug-induced myoclonus, together with their reported heterogeneous clinical characteristics, underscores the importance of considering drugs as a possible cause of myoclonus, regardless of its clinical characteristics.

  14. Comparison of the Microgenics CEDIA heroin metabolite (6-AM) and the Roche Abuscreen ONLINE opiate immunoassays for the detection of heroin use in forensic urine samples.

    PubMed

    Holler, Justin M; Bosy, Thomas Z; Klette, Kevin L; Wiegand, Russel; Jemionek, John; Jacobs, Aaron

    2004-09-01

    Current Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) procedures for the detection of heroin abuse by testing urine utilize an initial opiate (codeine/morphine) immunoassay (IA) screen followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) confirmation of 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM), if the morphine concentration is above established cutoff. An alternative to the current opiates screen for heroin abuse is the direct IA for the metabolite of heroin, 6-acetylmorphine. In this regard, the performance of the Microgenics CEDIA heroin metabolite (6-AM) screening reagent was assessed. This evaluation was conducted on the P module of a Hitachi Modular automated IA analyzer calibrated using 6-AM at 10 ng/mL. Reproducibility, linearity, accuracy, sensitivity, and interferences associated with use of the 6-AM IA reagent were evaluated. The IA reagent precision (percent coefficient of variation (%CV)) around each of seven standards was less than 0.63%, with a linearity (r(2)) value of 0.9951. A total of 37,713 active duty service members' urine samples were analyzed simultaneously using the CEDIA heroin metabolite (6-AM) reagent and the Roche Abuscreen ONLINE opiate reagent to evaluate both the prevalence rate of 6-AM in the demographic group and the sensitivity and specificity of the reagents for the detection of heroin use. Of the 37,713 samples tested using the CEDIA heroin metabolite (6-AM) reagent, three samples screened positive at the DoD and HHS cutoff of 10 ng/mL. One of the three samples confirmed positive for 6-AM by GC-MS above the cutoff of 10 ng/mL, the two remaining samples confirmed negative for 6-AM at a GC-MS limit of detection (LOD) of 2.1 ng/mL. In contrast, the Roche Abuscreen ONLINE opiate IA produced 74 opiate-positive results for codeine/morphine, with 6 of the 74 specimens confirming positive for morphine above the DoD cutoff concentration of 4000 ng/mL (8% DoD morphine confirmation rate), only one of the 74 opiate

  15. Search for Genetic Markers and Functional Variants Involved in the Development of Opiate and Cocaine Addiction, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yuferov, Vadim; Levran, Orna; Proudnikov, Dmitri; Nielsen, David A.; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    Addiction to opiates and illicit use of psychostimulants is a chronic, relapsing brain disease that, if left untreated, can cause major medical, social and economic problems. This article reviews recent progress in studies of association of gene variants with vulnerability to develop opiate and cocaine addictions, focusing primarily on genes of the opioid and monoaminergic systems. In addition, we provide the first evidence of a cis-acting polymorphism and a functional haplotype in the PDYN gene, of significantly higher DNA methylation rate of the OPRM1 gene in the lymphocytes of heroin addicts, and significant differences in genotype frequencies of three single nucleotide polymorphisms of the P-glycoprotein gene (ABCB1) between “higher” and “lower” methadone doses in methadone-maintained patients. In genome-wide and multi-gene association studies, we have found association of a number of new genes and new variants of known genes with heroin addiction. Finally, we have described the development and application of a novel technique: molecular haplotyping for studies in genetics of drug addiction. PMID:20201854

  16. Sequential pattern of non-medical drug use in the drug career of opiate dependents in Nagpur, India.

    PubMed

    Wairagkar, N S; Wahab, S N; Kulkarni, H R

    1996-12-01

    A study was carried out in a group of opiate addicts who reported to various centers in Nagpur city, India, to know the sequential pattern of nonmedical drug use in the drug career of opiate dependents in Nagpur. The mean age of the study group was 28.2 years, the majority were males, educated up to 10th standard, employed in various occupations like petty business, vehicle driving, etc, with an average monthly income of Rs. 316. The average number of drugs ever used per person was 3.7 +/- 1.2, those recently used was 2.6 +/- 0.9 and currently used was 2.2 +/- 0.6. The study group experienced 13 drug types in their addict careers. Beedi¿cigarette was the first drug abused by the majority. Drug careers starting with beedi¿cigarette, progressing to alcohol and then to canabis and finally to heroin were observed in a majority of subjects. There appeared to be a shift from multidrug use to the singular combination of heroin and beedi¿cigarette currently. Use of all other drugs declined in favor of heroin as the career progressed. The study indicates that preventive programs should be directed at reducing the use of initial drugs like beedi¿cigarette and alcohol and also reducing the social acceptability of these drugs as measure for preventing progression to hard drugs like heroin.

  17. Spatial heterogeneity in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Morrissy, A Sorana; Cavalli, Florence M G; Remke, Marc; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Shih, David J H; Holgado, Borja L; Farooq, Hamza; Donovan, Laura K; Garzia, Livia; Agnihotri, Sameer; Kiehna, Erin N; Mercier, Eloi; Mayoh, Chelsea; Papillon-Cavanagh, Simon; Nikbakht, Hamid; Gayden, Tenzin; Torchia, Jonathon; Picard, Daniel; Merino, Diana M; Vladoiu, Maria; Luu, Betty; Wu, Xiaochong; Daniels, Craig; Horswell, Stuart; Thompson, Yuan Yao; Hovestadt, Volker; Northcott, Paul A; Jones, David T W; Peacock, John; Wang, Xin; Mack, Stephen C; Reimand, Jüri; Albrecht, Steffen; Fontebasso, Adam M; Thiessen, Nina; Li, Yisu; Schein, Jacqueline E; Lee, Darlene; Carlsen, Rebecca; Mayo, Michael; Tse, Kane; Tam, Angela; Dhalla, Noreen; Ally, Adrian; Chuah, Eric; Cheng, Young; Plettner, Patrick; Li, Haiyan I; Corbett, Richard D; Wong, Tina; Long, William; Loukides, James; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Hawkins, Cynthia E; Tabori, Uri; Rood, Brian R; Myseros, John S; Packer, Roger J; Korshunov, Andrey; Lichter, Peter; Kool, Marcel; Pfister, Stefan M; Schüller, Ulrich; Dirks, Peter; Huang, Annie; Bouffet, Eric; Rutka, James T; Bader, Gary D; Swanton, Charles; Ma, Yusanne; Moore, Richard A; Mungall, Andrew J; Majewski, Jacek; Jones, Steven J M; Das, Sunit; Malkin, David; Jabado, Nada; Marra, Marco A; Taylor, Michael D

    2017-04-10

    Spatial heterogeneity of transcriptional and genetic markers between physically isolated biopsies of a single tumor poses major barriers to the identification of biomarkers and the development of targeted therapies that will be effective against the entire tumor. We analyzed the spatial heterogeneity of multiregional biopsies from 35 patients, using a combination of transcriptomic and genomic profiles. Medulloblastomas (MBs), but not high-grade gliomas (HGGs), demonstrated spatially homogeneous transcriptomes, which allowed for accurate subgrouping of tumors from a single biopsy. Conversely, somatic mutations that affect genes suitable for targeted therapeutics demonstrated high levels of spatial heterogeneity in MB, malignant glioma, and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Actionable targets found in a single MB biopsy were seldom clonal across the entire tumor, which brings the efficacy of monotherapies against a single target into question. Clinical trials of targeted therapies for MB should first ensure the spatially ubiquitous nature of the target mutation.

  18. A Common Molecular Motif Characterizes Extracellular Allosteric Enhancers of GPCR Aminergic Receptors and Suggests Enhancer Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Robert Root; Dillon, Patrick F

    2014-01-01

    Several classes of compounds that have no intrinsic activity on aminergic systems nonetheless enhance the potency of aminergic receptor ligands three-fold or more while significantly increasing their duration of activity, preventing tachyphylaxis and reversing fade. Enhancer compounds include ascorbic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, cortico-steroids, opioid peptides, opiates and opiate antagonists. This paper provides the first review of aminergic enhancement, demonstrating that all enhancers have a common, inobvious molecular motif and work through a common mechanism that is manifested by three common characteristics. First, aminergic enhancers bind directly to the amines they enhance, suggesting that the common structural motif is reflected in common binding targets. Second, one common target is the first extracellular loop of aminergic receptors. Third, at least some enhancers are antiphosphodiesterases. These observations suggest that aminergic enhancers act on the extracellular surface of aminergic receptors to keep the receptor in its high affinity state, trapping the ligand inside the receptor. Enhancer binding produces allosteric modifications of the receptor structure that interfere with phosphorylation of the receptor, thereby inhibiting down-regulation of the receptor. The mechanism explains how enhancers potentiate aminergic activity and increase duration of activity and makes testable predictions about additional compounds that should act as aminergic enhancers. PMID:25174918

  19. Cancer heterogeneity and imaging.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, James P B

    2016-10-04

    There is interest in identifying and quantifying tumor heterogeneity at the genomic, tissue pathology and clinical imaging scales, as this may help better understand tumor biology and may yield useful biomarkers for guiding therapy-based decision making. This review focuses on the role and value of using x-ray, CT, MRI and PET based imaging methods that identify, measure and map tumor heterogeneity. In particular we highlight the potential value of these techniques and the key challenges required to validate and qualify these biomarkers for clinical use.

  20. Structural basis for bifunctional peptide recognition at human δ-opioid receptor

    DOE PAGES

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Betti, Cecilia; ...

    2015-02-16

    Bi-functional μ- and δ- opioid receptor (OR) ligands are potential therapeutic alternatives to alkaloid opiate analgesics with diminished side effects. We solved the structure of human δ-OR bound to the bi-functional δ-OR antagonist and μ-OR agonist tetrapeptide H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Phe-NH2 (DIPP-NH2) by serial femtosecond crystallography, revealing a cis-peptide bond between H-Dmt and Tic. In summary, the observed receptor-peptide interactions are critical to understand the pharmacological profiles of opioid peptides, and to develop improved analgesics.

  1. Structural basis for bifunctional peptide recognition at human δ-opioid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Betti, Cecilia; Giguere, Patrick; Han, Gye Won; Ishchenko, Andrii; Liu, Wei; Guillemyn, Karel; Zhang, Haitao; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John C. H.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J.; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr M.; White, Thomas A.; Oberthuer, Dominik; Metz, Markus; Yoon, Chun Hong; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N.; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Fromme, Raimund; Fromme, Petra; Tourwé, Dirk; Schiller, Peter W.; Roth, Bryan L.; Ballet, Steven; Katritch, Vsevolod; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim

    2015-02-16

    Bi-functional μ- and δ- opioid receptor (OR) ligands are potential therapeutic alternatives to alkaloid opiate analgesics with diminished side effects. We solved the structure of human δ-OR bound to the bi-functional δ-OR antagonist and μ-OR agonist tetrapeptide H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Phe-NH2 (DIPP-NH2) by serial femtosecond crystallography, revealing a cis-peptide bond between H-Dmt and Tic. In summary, the observed receptor-peptide interactions are critical to understand the pharmacological profiles of opioid peptides, and to develop improved analgesics.

  2. Structural basis for bifunctional peptide recognition at human δ-Opioid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Betti, Cecilia; Giguere, Patrick; Han, Gye Won; Ishchenko, Andrii; Liu, Wei; Guillemyn, Karel; Zhang, Haitao; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John C.H.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J.; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr M.; White, Thomas A.; Oberthuer, Dominik; Metz, Markus; Yoon, Chun Hong; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N.; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Fromme, Raimund; Fromme, Petra; Tourwé, Dirk; Schiller, Peter W.; Roth, Bryan L.; Ballet, Steven; Katritch, Vsevolod; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Bi-functional μ- and δ- opioid receptor (OR) ligands are potential therapeutic alternatives to alkaloid opiate analgesics with diminished side effects. We solved the structure of human δ-OR bound to the bi-functional δ-OR antagonist and μ-OR agonist tetrapeptide H-Dmt(1)-Tic(2)-Phe(3)-Phe(4)-NH2 (DIPP-NH2) by serial femtosecond crystallography, revealing a cis-peptide bond between H-Dmt(1) and Tic(2). The observed receptor-peptide interactions are critical to understand the pharmacological profiles of opioid peptides, and to develop improved analgesics. PMID:25686086

  3. Accumulation of "small dense" low density lipoproteins (LDL) in a homozygous patients with familial defective apolipoprotein B-100 results from heterogenous interaction of LDL subfractions with the LDL receptor.

    PubMed Central

    März, W; Baumstark, M W; Scharnagl, H; Ruzicka, V; Buxbaum, S; Herwig, J; Pohl, T; Russ, A; Schaaf, L; Berg, A

    1993-01-01

    The interaction of LDL and LDL subfractions from a patient homozygous for familial defective apoB-100 (FDB) has been studied. His LDL cholesterol ranged from 2.65 to 3.34 g/liter. In cultured fibroblasts, binding, internalization, and degradation of the patient's LDL was diminished, but not completely abolished. The patient's apolipoprotein E concentration was low, and the amount of apolipoprotein E associated with LDL was not elevated over normal. LDL were separated into six subfractions: LDL-1 (1.019-1.031 kg/liter), LDL-2 (1.031-1.034 kg/liter), LDL-3 (1.034-1.037 kg/liter), LDL-4 (1.037-1.040 kg/liter), LDL-5 (1.040-1.044 kg/liter), and LDL-6 (> 1.044 kg/liter). LDL-5 and LDL-6 selectively accumulated in the patient's plasma. Concentrations of LDL-1 to 3 were normal. The LDL receptor-mediated uptake of LDL-1 and LDL-2 could not be distinguished from normal LDL. LDL-3 and LDL-4 displayed reduced uptake; LDL-5 and LDL-6 were completely defective in binding. When apolipoprotein E-containing particles were removed by immunoabsorption before preparing subfractions, LDL-3 and LDL-4, but not LDL-1 and LDL-2, retained some receptor binding activity. We conclude that in FDB, LDL-1 and LDL-2 contain sufficient apolipoprotein E to warrant normal cellular uptake. In LDL-3 and LDL-4, the defective apoB-100 itself displays some receptor binding; LDL-5 and LDL-6 are inable to interact with LDL receptors and accumulate in plasma. Images PMID:8254047

  4. Imaging receptors and their interactions: Implications for psychiatry

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, J.D.; Wolkin, A.; Barouche, F.; Rotrosen, J.; Angrist, B. . Dept. of Psychiatry); Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.; Dewey, S.L.; Volkow, N.D.; MacGregor, R.; Schlyer, D.J.; Bendriem, B. )

    1989-01-01

    In the past ten years various receptor ligands for dopaminergic systems have been labeled and their regional distribution and time course imaged using positron emission tomography (PET). Labeled compounds have been developed to probe the opiate, benzodiazepine and serotonin receptors among others. The interest in evaluating dopamine receptors in the human brain has clearly been related to the known anti-psychotic effect of dopamine antagonists. In the present report, we shall summarize some of our recent findings on the dopamine (DA) system which bear on the psychiatric issues of the objective determination and monitoring of adequate neuroleptic dose; whether neuroleptic non-response is due to a failure of drug delivery; and preliminary data on the cholinergic system and its putative interaction with the DA system. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Heterogeneous Uncertainty Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-08

    probabilistic ( HTP ) agents, the concept of probabilistic version of XML and RDF, and probabilistic methods to reason about collections of moving objects. S...heterogeneous temporal probabilistic ( HTP ) agents, the concept of probabilistic version of XML and RDF, and probabilistic methods to reason about...temporal probabilistic ( HTP ) agent. HTP agents can build temporal probabilistic reasoning capabilities on top of multiple databases and software

  6. Heterogeneous waste processing

    DOEpatents

    Vanderberg, Laura A.; Sauer, Nancy N.; Brainard, James R.; Foreman, Trudi M.; Hanners, John L.

    2000-01-01

    A combination of treatment methods are provided for treatment of heterogeneous waste including: (1) treatment for any organic compounds present; (2) removal of metals from the waste; and, (3) bulk volume reduction, with at least two of the three treatment methods employed and all three treatment methods emplyed where suitable.

  7. Scales of mantle heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. C.; Akber-Knutson, S.; Konter, J.; Kellogg, J.; Hart, S.; Kellogg, L. H.; Romanowicz, B.

    2004-12-01

    A long-standing question in mantle dynamics concerns the scale of heterogeneity in the mantle. Mantle convection tends to both destroy (through stirring) and create (through melt extraction and subduction) heterogeneity in bulk and trace element composition. Over time, these competing processes create variations in geochemical composition along mid-oceanic ridges and among oceanic islands, spanning a range of scales from extremely long wavelength (for example, the DUPAL anomaly) to very small scale (for example, variations amongst melt inclusions). While geochemical data and seismic observations can be used to constrain the length scales of mantle heterogeneity, dynamical mixing calculations can illustrate the processes and timescales involved in stirring and mixing. At the Summer 2004 CIDER workshop on Relating Geochemical and Seismological Heterogeneity in the Earth's Mantle, an interdisciplinary group evaluated scales of heterogeneity in the Earth's mantle using a combined analysis of geochemical data, seismological data and results of numerical models of mixing. We mined the PetDB database for isotopic data from glass and whole rock analyses for the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) and the East Pacific Rise (EPR), projecting them along the ridge length. We examined Sr isotope variability along the East Pacific rise by looking at the difference in Sr ratio between adjacent samples as a function of distance between the samples. The East Pacific Rise exhibits an overall bowl shape of normal MORB characteristics, with higher values in the higher latitudes (there is, however, an unfortunate gap in sampling, roughly 2000 km long). These background characteristics are punctuated with spikes in values at various locations, some, but not all of which are associated with off-axis volcanism. A Lomb-Scargle periodogram for unevenly spaced data was utilized to construct a power spectrum of the scale lengths of heterogeneity along both ridges. Using the same isotopic systems (Sr, Nd

  8. [Postpartum risk factors in the development of children born to opiate-addicted mothers; comparison between mothers with and without methadone substitution].

    PubMed

    Ziegler, M; Poustka, F; von Loewenich, V; Englert, E

    2000-09-01

    In a retrospective case control study at the University of Frankfurt, Germany, 101 babies born to opiate-addicted mothers were identified from birth charts from 1988 to 1995. After birth, they developed a withdrawal syndrome (neonatal abstinence syndrome). Fifty control infants and their mothers were selected from neonatal wards. The group of opiate-exposed babies was subdivided into a group born to mothers without methadone treatment (n = 48) and a group born to mothers who were enrolled in a methadone program (n = 51). The methadone infants had a significantly higher mean birth weight (2822 g) than children in the group without methadone (2471 g). The abstinence syndrome was much more intense in the methadone group (convulsions 47.1%) than in heroin-exposed babies without methadone treatment (convulsions 27.1%). Women in methadone maintenance programs lived in more stable socioeconomic conditions than opiate-addicted women without methadone substitution. Moreover, they cared significantly better for their babies: 81.3% of the methadone mothers visited their children on a regular basis and 90.9% cared adequately. The data emphasize the need in future research to look more closely at the role of methadone treatment programs in the development of opiate-exposed babies.

  9. The Impact of Take-Home Naloxone Distribution and Training on Opiate Overdose Knowledge and Response: An Evaluation of the THN Project in Wales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Trevor; Holloway, Katy

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To determine the impact of naloxone training on knowledge of opiate overdose and confidence and willingness to take appropriate action and to examine the use of naloxone and other harm-reduction actions at the time of overdose events. Methods: The evaluation was based on a repeated-measure design, whereby clients were tested before and after…

  10. Molecular modeling of interactions of the non-peptide antagonist YM087 with the human vasopressin V1a, V2 receptors and with oxytocin receptors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giełdoń, Artur; Kaźmierkiewicz, Rajmund; Ślusarz, Rafał; Ciarkowski, Jerzy

    2001-12-01

    The nonapeptide hormones arginine vasopressin (CYFQNCPRG-NH2, AVP) and oxytocin (CYIQNCPLG-NH2, OT), control many essential functions in mammals. Their main activities include the urine concentration (via stimulation of AVP V2 receptors, V2R, in the kidneys), blood pressure regulation (via stimulation of vascular V1a AVP receptors, V1aR), ACTH control (via stimulation of V1b receptors, V1bR, in the pituitary) and labor and lactation control (via stimulation of OT receptors, OTR, in the uterus and nipples, respectively). All four receptor subtypes belong to the GTP-binding (G) protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. This work consists of docking of YM087, a potent non-peptide V1aR and V2R - but not OTR - antagonist, into the receptor models based on relatively new theoretical templates of rhodopsin (RD) and opiate receptors, proposed by Mosberg et al. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA). It is simultaneously demonstrated that this RD template satisfactorily compares with the first historical GPCR structure of bovine rhodopsin (Palczewski et al., 2000) and that homology-modeling of V2R, V1aR and OTR using opiate receptors as templates is rational, based on relatively high (20-60%) sequence homology among the set of 4 neurophyseal and 4 opiate receptors. YM087 was computer-docked to V1aR, V2R and OTR using the AutoDock (Olson et al., Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, USA) and subsequently relaxed using restrained simulated annealing and molecular dynamics, as implemented in AMBER program (Kollman et al., University of California, San Francisco, USA). From about 80 diverse configurations, sampled for each of the three ligand/receptor systems, 3 best energy-relaxed complexes were selected for mutual comparisons. Similar docking modes were found for the YM087/V1aR and YM087/V2R complexes, diverse from those of the YM087/OTR complexes, in agreement with the molecular affinity data.

  11. Comparison of the various opiate alkaloid contaminants and their metabolites found in illicit heroin with 6-monoacetyl morphine as indicators of heroin ingestion.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Sue; Cordero, Rosa

    2006-05-01

    In this study the use of the various opiate alkaloid contaminants as potential markers for illicit heroin ingestion were investigated. Urine samples (n = 227) taken from prisoners for routine drug screen, which were positive for opiates by immunoassay screening, were analyzed for contaminants in illicit heroin. A previously described method was used for the analysis; urines were extracted using mixed-mode solid-phase extraction; the extracts were derivatized using N-methyl-bistrifluoroacetamide and N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyltrifluoroactamide/trimethylchlorosilane. The derivatized extracts were subjected to electron impact gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The extracts were injected in full scan mode followed by selected ion monitoring mode for target opiate alkaloids found as contaminants in illicit heroin. The opiate alkaloids and their metabolites specifically targeted included meconine, desmethylmeconine, hydrocotarnine, acetylcodeine, codeine, morphine, 6-monacetylmorphine (6-mam), papaverine, hydroxypapaverine, and dihydroxypapaverine. Of the 227 samples positive for opiates by immunoassay, using a cut-off of 300 ng/mL, 199 were confirmed positive for morphine and using a cut-off of 10 ng/mL, 28 were confirmed positive for 6-mam. Using the screening method described in the study, the following numbers of positives were found: 199 for morphine, 103 for codeine, 5 for meconine, 46 for desmethylmeconine, 18 for 6-mam, 136 for hydroxypapaverine, and 139 for dihydroxypapaverine. Acetylcodeine, hydrocotarnine, and papaverine were not detected in any of the samples. The results of this study show that analysis for papaverine metabolites is more sensitive than 6-mam as a way of demonstrating illicit heroin use.

  12. Opiates or cocaine: mortality from acute reactions in six major Spanish cities. State Information System on Drug Abuse (SEIT) Working Group.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, J; Rodríguez, B; de la Fuente, L; Barrio, G; Vicente, J; Roca, J; Royuela, L

    1995-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--To describe temporal and geographical variations in mortality from acute reactions to opiates or cocaine and the demographic and toxicological characteristics of persons who died from these in major Spanish cities between 1983 and 1991. DESIGN--Descriptive study. Data were obtained retrospectively from pathologists' reports. SETTING--Cities of Madrid, Barcelona, Valencia, Seville, Zaragoza, and Bilbao. SUBJECTS--Deaths from acute reactions to opiates or cocaine were defined as those in which pathologists' reports did not indicate any other cause of death and in which evidence was found of recent consumption of these drugs. MAIN RESULTS--The mortality rate from acute reactions to opiate/cocaine per 100,000 population in the six cities as a whole rose from 1.2 in 1983 to 8.2 in 1991. Average annual rates for the whole period ranged from 1.7 in Seville to 4.9 in Barcelona. The male/female rates ratio was 5.9:1. The mean age of persons who died rose from 25.1 years in 1983 to 28 years in 1991. In more than 90% of the cases in whom toxicological tests were undertaken opiates were detected, and the proportion in which benzodiazepines or cocaine were detected increased during the period studied. CONCLUSIONS--Between 1983 and 1991 mortality from acute reactions to opiates/cocaine rose dramatically in major Spanish cities and significant differences in mortality between cities were found. Deaths were concentrated among men and young people. Acute drug reactions became one of the leading causes of death in persons 15-39 years of age, representing 11.1% of mortality from all causes in 1988 for this age group. Future studies should examine the relationship between the temporal and geographical variations in this type of mortality and various personal, environmental and social factors. PMID:7707007

  13. Concepts in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-06-01

    OxIdlaing Species In Heterogeneous Catalytic Oxidation. In the history of the study of heterogeneioum oxidation catalysis, reaction mechanisms have’ been...for sonti timie but recent workŔ’ onl the lplatitnum-rtothe~idina alloy systemn semi- s quite promising 10) lvad ito at bettr understanding. 1t wait...chemical nature of the catalyst, its previous history , and on the courac of the catalytic reaction itself. The energy spectrum of the active surface

  14. Galanin-induced decreases in nucleus accumbens/striatum excitatory postsynaptic potentials and morphine conditioned place preference require both galanin receptor 1 and galanin receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Emily B; Asaka, Yukiko; Yeckel, Mark F; Higley, Michael J; Picciotto, Marina R

    2013-05-01

    The neuropeptide galanin has been shown to alter the rewarding properties of morphine. To identify potential cellular mechanisms that might be involved in the ability of galanin to modulate opiate reward, we measured excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), using both field and whole-cell recordings from striatal brain slices extracted from wild-type mice and mice lacking specific galanin receptor (GalR) subtypes. We found that galanin decreased the amplitude of EPSPs in both the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens. We then performed recordings in slices from knockout mice lacking either the GalR1 or GalR2 gene, and found that the ability of galanin to decrease EPSP amplitude was absent from both mouse lines, suggesting that both receptor subtypes are required for this effect. In order to determine whether behavioral responses to opiates were dependent on the same receptor subtypes, we tested GalR1 and GalR2 knockout mice for morphine conditioned place preference (CPP). Morphine CPP was significantly attenuated in both GalR1 and GalR2 knockout mice. These data suggest that mesolimbic excitatory signaling is significantly modulated by galanin in a GalR1-dependent and GalR2-dependent manner, and that morphine CPP is dependent on the same receptor subtypes.

  15. Heterogeneities in granular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, A.; Barker, G. C.; Luck, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    The absence of Brownian motion in granular media is a source of much complexity, including the prevalence of heterogeneity, whether static or dynamic, within a given system. Such strong heterogeneities can exist as a function of depth in a box of grains; this is the system we study here. First, we present results from three-dimensional, cooperative and stochastic Monte Carlo shaking simulations of spheres on heterogeneous density fluctuations. Next, we juxtapose these with results obtained from a theoretical model of a column of grains under gravity; frustration via competing local fields is included in our model, whereas the effect of gravity is to slow down the dynamics of successively deeper layers. The combined conclusions suggest that the dynamics of a real granular column can be divided into different phases—ballistic, logarithmic, activated, and glassy—as a function of depth. The nature of the ground states and their retrieval (under zero-temperature dynamics) is analyzed; the glassy phase shows clear evidence of its intrinsic (“crystalline”) states, which lie below a band of approximately degenerate ground states. In the other three phases, by contrast, the system jams into a state chosen randomly from this upper band of metastable states. PMID:18541918

  16. Performance characteristics of DRI, CEDIA, and REMEDi systems for preliminary tests of amphetamines and opiates in human urine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min-Kun; Dai, Yu-Shan; Lee, Choung-Huei; Liu, Chiareiy; Tsay, Wen-Ing; Li, Jih-Heng

    2006-01-01

    Arrestee urine specimens (930) were tested with DRI, CEDIA, and REMEDi; those that tested positive for amphetamines and opiates (616 and 414, respectively) were then confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The performance characteristics of these three preliminary systems were evaluated using the following commonly used parameters: true positive, true negative, false positive, and false negative. The sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of these methods were also calculated. Data derived from this study indicated DRI and CEDIA adapted by this study generated acceptable preliminary test results for amphetamine/methamphetamine and morphine/codeine, but not for MDA/MDMA and REMEDi has lower sensitivity than DRI and CEDIA, but with better specificity and efficiency, supporting its use under emergency room settings where drug concentrations in overdose cases are expectedly at high levels.

  17. Rapid simultaneous determination of ephedrines, amphetamines, cocaine, cocaine metabolites, and opiates in human urine by GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takeshi; Mase, Hiroyasu; Takeichi, Sanae; Inokuchi, Sadaki

    2007-01-04

    This paper presents a simple and sensitive chromatographic procedure for the simultaneous determination and quantification of ephedrines, amphetamines, cocaine, cocaine metabolites, and opiates in human urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This method involves enzyme hydrolysis in the presence of a deuterated internal standard, liquid-liquid extraction, and derivatization with pentafluoropropionic anhydride and pentafluoropropanol. The recovery of each compound averaged at 65.8% or more. The limits of detection determined for each compound by using a 2-mL sample volume ranged from 5 to 50 ng/mL. The calibration curves were linear to 100 ng/mL for all compounds when determined using methamphetamine-d4 and MDMA-d5 as internal standards. This method was successfully applied for the analysis of urine samples suspected to contain intoxicants such as methamphetamine and heroin.

  18. The imidazoline receptors and ligands in pain modulation

    PubMed Central

    Bektas, Nurcan; Nemutlu, Dilara; Arslan, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Pain is an unpleasant experience and effects daily routine negatively. Although there are various drugs, many of them are not entirely successful in relieving pain, since pain modulation is a complex process involving numerous mediators and receptors. Therefore, it is a rational approach to identify the factors involved in the complex process and develop new agents that act on these pain producing mechanisms. In this respect, the involvement of the imidazoline receptors in pain modulation has drawn attention in recent years. In this review, it is aimed to focus on the imidazoline receptors and their ligands which contribute to the pain modulation. It is demonstrated that imidazoline-2 (I2) receptors are steady new drug targets for analgesics. Even if the mechanism of I2 receptor is not well known in the modulation of pain, it is known that it plays a role in tonic and chronic pain but not in acute phasic pain. Moreover, the I2 receptor ligands increase the analgesic effects of opioids in both acute and chronic pain and prevent the development of opioid tolerance. So, they are valuable for the chronic pain treatment and also therapeutic coadjuvants in the management of chronic pain with opiate drugs due to the attenuation of opioid tolerance and addiction. Thus, the use of the ligands which bind to the imidazoline receptors is an effective strategy for relieving pain. This educational forum exhibits the role of imidazoline receptors and ligands in pain process by utilizing experimental studies. PMID:26600633

  19. Simultaneous determination of opiates, methadone, buprenorphine and metabolites in human urine by superficially porous liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huei-Ru; Chen, Chin-Lun; Huang, Chieh-Liang; Chen, Shao-Tsu; Lua, Ahai-Chuang

    2013-04-15

    For monitoring compliance of methadone or buprenorphine maintenance patient, a method for the simultaneous determination of methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, opiates (morphine, codeine, 6-monoacetylmorphine) in urine by superficially porous liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry was developed and validated. After enzyme digestion and liquid-liquid extraction, reverse-phase separation was achieved in 5.2 min and quantification was performed by multiple reaction monitoring. Chromatographic separation was performed at 40 °C on a reversed phase Poroshell column with gradient elution. The mobile phase consisted of water and methanol, each containing 0.1% formic acid, at a flow rate of 0.32 mL/min. Intra-day and inter-day precision were less than 12.1% and accuracy was between -9.8% and 13.7%. Extraction efficiencies were more than 68%. Although ion suppression was detected, deuterated internal standards compensated for these effects. Carryover was minimal, less than 0.20%. All analytes were stable at room temperature for 16 h, 4 °C for 72 h, and after three freeze-thaw cycles. The assay also fulfilled compound identification criteria in accordance with the European Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. We analyzed 62 urine samples from patients received maintenance therapy and found that 54.8% of the patient samples tested were detected for morphine, codeine, or 6-monoacetylmorphine. This method provides a reliable and simultaneous quantification of opiates, maintenance drugs, and their metabolites in urine samples. It facilitates the routine monitoring in individuals prescribed the drug to ensure compliance and help therapeutic process.

  20. Psychosocial and treatment correlates of opiate free success in a clinical review of a naltrexone implant program

    PubMed Central

    Reece, AS

    2007-01-01

    Background There is on-going controversy in relation to the efficacy of naltrexone used for the treatment of heroin addiction, and the important covariates of that success. We were also interested to review our experience with two depot forms of implantable naltrexone. Methods A retrospective review of patients' charts was undertaken, patients were recalled by telephone and by letter, and urine drug screen samples were collected. Opiate free success (OFS) was the parameter of interest. Three groups were defined. The first two were treated in the previous 12 months and comprised "implant" and "tablet" patients. A third group was "historical" comprising those treated orally in the preceding 12 months. Results There were 102, 113 and 161 patients in each group respectively. Groups were matched for age, sex, and dose of heroin used, but not financial status or social support. The overall follow-up rate was 82%. The Kaplan Meier 12 month OFS were 82%, 58% and 52% respectively. 12 post-treatment variables were independently associated with treatment retention. In a Cox proportional hazard multivariate model social support, the number of detoxification episodes, post-treatment employment, the use of multiple implant episodes and spiritual belief were significantly related to OFS. Conclusion Consistent with the voluminous international literature clinically useful retention rates can be achieved with naltrexone, which may be improved by implants and particularly serial implants, repeat detoxification, meticulous clinical follow-up, and social support. As depot formulations of naltrexone become increasingly available such results can guide their clinical deployment, improve treatment outcomes, and enlarge the policy options for an exciting non-addictive pharmacotherapy for opiate addiction. PMID:18036213

  1. The North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI): profile of participants in North America's first trial of heroin-assisted treatment.

    PubMed

    Oviedo-Joekes, Eugenia; Nosyk, Bohdan; Brissette, Suzanne; Chettiar, Jill; Schneeberger, Pascal; Marsh, David C; Krausz, Michael; Anis, Aslam; Schechter, Martin T

    2008-11-01

    The North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI) is a randomized controlled trial evaluating the feasibility and effectiveness of heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) in the Canadian context. Our objective is to analyze the profile of the NAOMI participant cohort in the context of illicit opioid use in Canada and to evaluate its comparability with patient profiles of European HAT studies. Recruitment began in February 2005 and ended in March 2007. Inclusion criteria included opioid dependence, 5 or more years of opioid use, regular opioid injection, and at least two previous opiate addiction treatment attempts. Standardized assessment instruments such as the European Addiction Severity Index and the Maudsley Addiction Profile were employed. A total of 251 individuals were randomized from Vancouver, BC (192, 76.5%), and Montreal, Quebec (59, 23.5%); 38.5% were female, the mean age was 39.7 years (SD:8.6), and participants had injected drugs for 16.5 years (SD:9.9), on average. In the prior month, heroin was used a mean of 26.5 days (SD:7.4) and cocaine 16 days (SD;12.6). Vancouver had significantly more patients residing in unstable housing (88.5 vs. 22%; p < 0.001) and higher use of smoked crack cocaine (16.9 days vs. 2.3 days in the prior month; p < 0.001), while a significantly higher proportion of Montreal participants reported needle sharing in the prior 6 months (25% vs. 3.7%; p < 0.001). In many respects, the patient cohort was similar to the European trials; however, NAOMI had a higher proportion of female participants and participants residing in unstable housing. This study suggests that the NAOMI study successfully recruited participants with a profile indicated for HAT. It also raises concern about the high levels of crack cocaine use and social marginalization.

  2. Different mechanisms for dopaminergic excitation induced by opiates and cannabinoids in the rat midbrain.

    PubMed

    Melis, M; Gessa, G L; Diana, M

    2000-08-01

    1. The mechanism underlying morphine and cannabinoid-induced excitation of meso-accumbens and nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons was investigated by extracellular single unit recording techniques coupled with antidromic activation from the nucleus accumbens and striatum respectively, in unanesthetized rats. 2. The intravenous administration of cumulative doses (1-4 mg/kg) of morphine, dose-dependently increased the firing rate of dopaminergic neurons projecting to the nucleus accumbens and neostriatum, while the same doses inhibited the activity of pars reticulata neurons of the substantia nigra. Both effects were antagonized by naloxone (0.1 mg/kg i.v.) but not by the selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR 141716A (1 mg/kg i.v.). 3. The intravenous administration of cumulative doses (0.125-0.5 mg/kg) of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) also increased the firing rate of meso-accumbens and nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons; this effect was antagonized by SR 141716A (1 mg/kg i.v.), but not by naloxone. 4. Furthermore, nor delta9-THC up to a dose of 1 mg/kg, maximally effective in stimulating dopamine neurons, neither SR 141716A (1 mg/kg i.v.) at a dose able to reverse the stimulatory effect of delta9, THC on dopamine cells, did alter the activity of SNr neurons. 5. The results indicate that morphine and delta9-THC activate dopaminergic neurons through distinct receptor-mediated mechanisms; morphine may act by removing the inhibitory input from substantia nigra pars reticulata neurons (an effect mediated by mu-opioid receptors). Alternatively, the delta9-THC-induced excitation of dopaminergic neurons seems to be mediated by CB1 cannabinoid receptors, while neither mu-opioid receptors nor substantia nigra pars reticulata neurons are involved.

  3. Endogenous Opiates in the Nucleus Tractus Solitarius Mediate Electroacupuncture-Induced Sleep Activities in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chiung-Hsiang; Yi, Pei-Lu; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chang, Fang-Chia

    2011-01-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) possesses various therapeutic effects, including alleviation of pain, reduction of inflammation and improvement of sleep disturbance. The mechanisms of EA on sleep improvement, however, remain to be determined. It has been stated in ancient Chinese literature that the Anmian (EX17) acupoint is one of the trigger points that alleviates insomnia. We previously demonstrated that EA stimulation of Anmian acupoints in rats during the dark period enhances non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, which involves the induction of cholinergic activity in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). In addition to cholinergic activation of the NTS, activation of the endogenous opioidergic system may also be a mechanism by which acupuncture affects sleep. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the involvement of the NTS opioidergic system in EA-induced alterations in sleep. Our present results indicate that EA of Anmian acupoints increased NREM sleep, but not rapid eye movement sleep, during the dark period in rats. This enhancement in NREM sleep was dose-dependently blocked by microinjection of opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone, and the μ-opioid receptor antagonist, naloxonazine, into the NTS; administrations of δ-receptor antagonist, natrindole, and the κ-receptor antagonist, nor-binaltrophimine, however, did not affect EA-induced alterations in sleep. Furthermore, β-endorphin was significantly increased in both the brainstem and hippocampus after the EA stimuli, an effect blocked by administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine into the NTS. Our findings suggest that mechanisms of EA-induced NREM sleep enhancement may be mediated, in part, by cholinergic activation, stimulation of the opiodergic neurons to increase the concentrations of β-endorphin and the involvement of the μ-opioid receptors. PMID:19729491

  4. Endogenous opiates in the nucleus tractus solitarius mediate electroacupuncture-induced sleep activities in rats.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chiung-Hsiang; Yi, Pei-Lu; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chang, Fang-Chia

    2011-01-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) possesses various therapeutic effects, including alleviation of pain, reduction of inflammation and improvement of sleep disturbance. The mechanisms of EA on sleep improvement, however, remain to be determined. It has been stated in ancient Chinese literature that the Anmian (EX17) acupoint is one of the trigger points that alleviates insomnia. We previously demonstrated that EA stimulation of Anmian acupoints in rats during the dark period enhances non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, which involves the induction of cholinergic activity in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). In addition to cholinergic activation of the NTS, activation of the endogenous opioidergic system may also be a mechanism by which acupuncture affects sleep. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the involvement of the NTS opioidergic system in EA-induced alterations in sleep. Our present results indicate that EA of Anmian acupoints increased NREM sleep, but not rapid eye movement sleep, during the dark period in rats. This enhancement in NREM sleep was dose-dependently blocked by microinjection of opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone, and the μ-opioid receptor antagonist, naloxonazine, into the NTS; administrations of δ-receptor antagonist, natrindole, and the κ-receptor antagonist, nor-binaltrophimine, however, did not affect EA-induced alterations in sleep. Furthermore, β-endorphin was significantly increased in both the brainstem and hippocampus after the EA stimuli, an effect blocked by administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine into the NTS. Our findings suggest that mechanisms of EA-induced NREM sleep enhancement may be mediated, in part, by cholinergic activation, stimulation of the opiodergic neurons to increase the concentrations of β-endorphin and the involvement of the μ-opioid receptors.

  5. Cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous agonist, anandamide.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, J; Felder, C C

    1998-05-01

    Cannabinoids are a class of compound found in marijuana which have been known for their therapeutic and psychoactive properties for at least 4000 years. Isolation of the active principle in marijuana, delta9-THC, provided the lead structure in the development of highly potent congeners which were used to probe for the mechanism of marijuana action. Cannabinoids were shown to bind to selective binding sites in brain tissue thereby regulating second messenger formation. Such studies led to the cloning of three cannabinoid receptor subtypes, CB1, CB2, and CB1A all of which belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled plasma membrane receptors. Analogous to the discovery of endogenous opiates, isolation of cannabinoid receptors provided the appropriate tool to isolate an endogenous cannabimimetic eicosanoid, anandamide, from porcine brain. Recent studies indicate that anandamide is a member of a family of fatty acid ethanolamides that may represent a novel class of lipid neurotransmitters. This review discusses recent progress in cannabinoid research with a focus on the receptors for delta9-THC, their coupling to second messenger responses, and the endogenous lipid cannabimimetic, anandamide.

  6. A comparison of locomotor responses to some psychotropic drugs and cerebral receptors in the Acomys cahirinus and the laboratory mouse.

    PubMed

    Marona-Lewicka, D; Michaluk, J; Antkiewicz-Michaluk, L; Vetulani, J

    1987-01-01

    Comparative studies of the laboratory mouse and Acomys cahirinus have shown differences in their motor activity patterns and motor responses to morphine, apomorphine and clonidine. The two species also differed in respect of the density of cerebral alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, but no significant differences between other types of receptors (alpha 1-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, opiate mu and delta, and spiroperidol binding sites) were found. It is suggested that the high excitability of the Acomys may be related to a deficit in the inhibitory noradrenergic transmission in the central nervous system.

  7. Specific binding of a ligand of sigma-opioid receptors - N-allylnormetazocine (SKF 10047) - with liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Samovilova, N.N.; Yarygin, K.N.; Vinogradov, V.A.

    1986-08-01

    A ligand of the sigma-opioid receptors - N-allylnormetazocine (SKF 10047) -binds specifically and reversible with rat liver membranes. In relation to a number of properties, the sites binding SKF 10047 in the liver are similar to the sigma-opioid receptors of the central nervous system. They do not interact with classical opiates (morphine, naloxone) and with opioid peptides, but bind well benzomorphans (bremazocine, SKF 10047) and a number of compounds of different chemical structures with a pronounced psychtropic action (haloperidol, imipramine, phencyclidine, etc.).

  8. Unravelling mononuclear phagocyte heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Geissmann, Frédéric; Gordon, Siamon; Hume, David A.; Mowat, Allan M.; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.

    2011-01-01

    When Ralph Steinman and Zanvil Cohn first described dendritic cells (DCs) in 1973 it took many years to convince the immunology community that these cells were truly distinct from macrophages. Almost four decades later, the DC is regarded as the key initiator of adaptive immune responses; however, distinguishing DCs from macrophages still leads to confusion and debate in the field. Here, Nature Reviews Immunology asks five experts to discuss the issue of heterogeneity in the mononuclear phagocyte system and to give their opinion on the importance of defining these cells for future research. PMID:20467425

  9. Impairment of opiate-mediated behaviors by the selective TRPV1 antagonist SB366791.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shi-Xun; Kwon, Seung-Hwan; Seo, Jee-Yeon; Hwang, Ji-Young; Hong, Sa-Ik; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Lee, Seok-Yong; Jang, Choon-Gon

    2016-10-11

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), the archetypal member of the vanilloid TRP family, was initially identified as the receptor for capsaicin, the pungent ingredient in hot chili peppers. We previously demonstrated that TRPV1 in the dorsal striatum significantly contributes to morphine reward by using the conditioned place preference paradigm in mice; however, it is unknown whether TRPV1 has the same effect in other reward models. In this study, we investigated the role of TRPV1 in morphine reward by using a self-administration paradigm in rats. We found that treatment with a selective TRPV1 antagonist, SB366791, significantly decreased morphine self-administration on a fixed-ratio 1 schedule or a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement. In addition, treatment with another selective TRPV1 antagonist, AMG9810, not only significantly prevented morphine self-administration but also prevented morphine-induced c-fos expression in the nucleus accumbens. Furthermore, administration of SB366791 decreased an anxiolytic-like effect during the morphine abstinence period. Moreover, treatment with SB366791 significantly decreased morphine-priming reinstatement. Taken together, our findings suggest that blockade of TRPV1 receptors could provide an approach to limiting morphine addiction.

  10. Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA) in Israeli-Bedouins: genetic heterogeneity, novel mutations in the TRKA/NGF receptor gene, clinical findings, and results of nerve conduction studies.

    PubMed

    Shatzky, S; Moses, S; Levy, J; Pinsk, V; Hershkovitz, E; Herzog, L; Shorer, Z; Luder, A; Parvari, R

    2000-06-19

    Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA), a rare and severe disorder, comprises absence of sensation to noxious stimuli, inability to sweat, and recurrent episodes of hyperthermia. It has a relatively high prevalence in the consanguineous Israeli-Bedouins. Clinical studies of 28 patients are reported here. Using the linkage analysis approach, we linked the disease in 9 of 10 unrelated Israeli-Bedouin families with CIPA to the TrkA gene, which encodes the receptor for nerve growth factor. In one family, linkage was excluded, implying that another gene, yet unidentified, is involved. Two new mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of the TrkA gene were identified in our CIPA patients: a 1926-ins-T in most of the southern Israeli-Negev CIPA patients, and a Pro- 689-Leu mutation in a different isolate of Bedouins in northern Israel. Eight prenatal diagnoses were made in the southern Israeli-Negev Bedouins, two by linkage analysis and six by checking directly for the 1926-ins-T mutation. Three polymorphisms in the TrkA protein kinase encoding domain were also observed.

  11. The role of δ-opioid receptors in learning and memory underlying the development of addiction

    PubMed Central

    Klenowski, Paul; Morgan, Michael; Bartlett, Selena E

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are important endogenous ligands that exist in both invertebrates and vertebrates and signal by activation of opioid receptors to produce analgesia and reward or pleasure. The μ-opioid receptor is the best known of the opioid receptors and mediates the acute analgesic effects of opiates, while the δ-opioid receptor (DOR) has been less well studied and has been linked to effects that follow from chronic use of opiates such as stress, inflammation and anxiety. Recently, DORs have been shown to play an essential role in emotions and increasing evidence points to a role in learning actions and outcomes. The process of learning and memory in addiction has been proposed to involve strengthening of specific brain circuits when a drug is paired with a context or environment. The DOR is highly expressed in the hippocampus, amygdala, striatum and other basal ganglia structures known to participate in learning and memory. In this review, we will focus on the role of the DOR and its potential role in learning and memory underlying the development of addiction. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24641428

  12. Purification and characterization of mu-specific opioid receptor from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, J.; Cho, T.M.; Ge, B.L.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-03-05

    A mu-specific opioid receptor was purified to apparent homogeneity from rat brain membranes by 6-succinylmorphine affinity chromatography, Ultrogel filtration, wheat germ agglutinin affinity chromatography, and isoelectric focusing. The purified receptor had a molecular weight of 58,000 as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and was judged to be homogeneous by the following criteria: (1) a single band on the SDS gel; and (2) a specific opioid binding activity of 17,720 pmole/mg protein, close to the theoretical value. In addition, the 58,000 molecular weight value agrees closely with that determined by covalently labelling purified receptor with bromoacetyl-/sup 3/H-dihydromorphine or with /sup 125/I-beta-endorphin and dimethyl suberimidate. To their knowledge, this is the first complete purification of an opioid receptor that retains its ability to bind opiates.

  13. Disordered hyperuniform heterogeneous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torquato, Salvatore

    2016-10-01

    Disordered hyperuniform many-body systems are distinguishable states of matter that lie between a crystal and liquid: they are like perfect crystals in the way they suppress large-scale density fluctuations and yet are like liquids or glasses in that they are statistically isotropic with no Bragg peaks. These systems play a vital role in a number of fundamental and applied problems: glass formation, jamming, rigidity, photonic and electronic band structure, localization of waves and excitations, self-organization, fluid dynamics, quantum systems, and pure mathematics. Much of what we know theoretically about disordered hyperuniform states of matter involves many-particle systems. In this paper, we derive new rigorous criteria that disordered hyperuniform two-phase heterogeneous materials must obey and explore their consequences. Two-phase heterogeneous media are ubiquitous; examples include composites and porous media, biological media, foams, polymer blends, granular media, cellular solids, and colloids. We begin by obtaining some results that apply to hyperuniform two-phase media in which one phase is a sphere packing in d-dimensional Euclidean space {{{R}}d} . Among other results, we rigorously establish the requirements for packings of spheres of different sizes to be ‘multihyperuniform’. We then consider hyperuniformity for general two-phase media in {{{R}}d} . Here we apply realizability conditions for an autocovariance function and its associated spectral density of a two-phase medium, and then incorporate hyperuniformity as a constraint in order to derive new conditions. We show that some functional forms can immediately be eliminated from consideration and identify other forms that are allowable. Specific examples and counterexamples are described. Contact is made with well-known microstructural models (e.g. overlapping spheres and checkerboards) as well as irregular phase-separation and Turing-type patterns. We also ascertain a family of

  14. Disordered hyperuniform heterogeneous materials.

    PubMed

    Torquato, Salvatore

    2016-10-19

    Disordered hyperuniform many-body systems are distinguishable states of matter that lie between a crystal and liquid: they are like perfect crystals in the way they suppress large-scale density fluctuations and yet are like liquids or glasses in that they are statistically isotropic with no Bragg peaks. These systems play a vital role in a number of fundamental and applied problems: glass formation, jamming, rigidity, photonic and electronic band structure, localization of waves and excitations, self-organization, fluid dynamics, quantum systems, and pure mathematics. Much of what we know theoretically about disordered hyperuniform states of matter involves many-particle systems. In this paper, we derive new rigorous criteria that disordered hyperuniform two-phase heterogeneous materials must obey and explore their consequences. Two-phase heterogeneous media are ubiquitous; examples include composites and porous media, biological media, foams, polymer blends, granular media, cellular solids, and colloids. We begin by obtaining some results that apply to hyperuniform two-phase media in which one phase is a sphere packing in d-dimensional Euclidean space [Formula: see text]. Among other results, we rigorously establish the requirements for packings of spheres of different sizes to be 'multihyperuniform'. We then consider hyperuniformity for general two-phase media in [Formula: see text]. Here we apply realizability conditions for an autocovariance function and its associated spectral density of a two-phase medium, and then incorporate hyperuniformity as a constraint in order to derive new conditions. We show that some functional forms can immediately be eliminated from consideration and identify other forms that are allowable. Specific examples and counterexamples are described. Contact is made with well-known microstructural models (e.g. overlapping spheres and checkerboards) as well as irregular phase-separation and Turing-type patterns. We also ascertain a family

  15. Heterogeneity in Waardenburg syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Hageman, M J; Delleman, J W

    1977-01-01

    Heterogeneity of Waardenburg syndrome is demonstrated in a review of 1,285 patients from the literature and 34 previously unreported patients in five families in the Netherlands. The syndrome seems to consist of two genetically distinct entities that can be differentiated clinically: type I, Waardenburg syndrome with dystopia canthorum; and type II, Waardenburg syndrome without dystopia canthorum. Both types have an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. The incidence of bilateral deafness in the two types of the syndrome was found in one-fourth with type I and about half of the patients with type II. This difference has important consequences for genetic counseling. Images Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:331943

  16. Interconnecting heterogeneous database management systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gligor, V. D.; Luckenbaugh, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that there is still a great need for the development of improved communication between remote, heterogeneous database management systems (DBMS). Problems regarding the effective communication between distributed DBMSs are primarily related to significant differences between local data managers, local data models and representations, and local transaction managers. A system of interconnected DBMSs which exhibit such differences is called a network of distributed, heterogeneous DBMSs. In order to achieve effective interconnection of remote, heterogeneous DBMSs, the users must have uniform, integrated access to the different DBMs. The present investigation is mainly concerned with an analysis of the existing approaches to interconnecting heterogeneous DBMSs, taking into account four experimental DBMS projects.

  17. Etiologic heterogeneity in alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Gilligan, S B; Reich, T; Cloninger, C R

    1987-01-01

    Etiologic heterogeneity in alcohol abuse was evaluated in 195 extended pedigrees, comprising 288 nuclear families of 140 male and 55 female Caucasian American hospitalized alcoholics. Previous adoption studies in Sweden demonstrated differential heritability of two patterns of alcohol abuse in men: type-2 alcoholism exhibited early onset of abuse associated with criminal behavior, while type-1 abuse began at a later age, uncomplicated by antisocial traits. Alcohol abuse in female Swedish adoptees was relatively homogeneous and similar to the late-onset, type-1 abuse. The notion of etiologic heterogeneity, as suggested by the Stockholm Adoption Studies, was examined in the American pedigrees by contrasting the models of familial transmission of susceptibility to alcoholism obtained via segregation analyses of families of male versus female probands. Families of male probands demonstrated significant familial resemblance, accounted for by a multifactorial-polygenic background in addition to a major (gene) effect. In contrast, familial resemblance in the pedigrees of female probands was attributed solely to a multifactorial-polygenic effect. We considered whether some families of male alcoholics were similar to families of female probands, who expressed type-1 abuse predominantly. Pedigrees of male probands were separated in two groups: (1) "female-like" families had a better likelihood for the model obtained for families of female probands than the one for families of all male probands, (2) "male-like" families had a better likelihood for the model of familial transmission describing families of all male probands. A statistically significant difference in the pattern of familial transmission was observed between the "male-like" and "female-like" groups. Discriminant function analysis of alcohol-related symptoms showed that the familial subtypes differed in clinical features as well. Alcohol abuse by male relatives in "male-like" families was characterized by the

  18. Truncated G protein-coupled mu opioid receptor MOR-1 splice variants are targets for highly potent opioid analgesics lacking side effects.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Susruta; Grinnell, Steven; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Burgman, Maxim; Polikar, Lisa; Ansonoff, Michael; Pintar, John; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2011-12-06

    Pain remains a pervasive problem throughout medicine, transcending all specialty boundaries. Despite the extraordinary insights into pain and its mechanisms over the past few decades, few advances have been made with analgesics. Most pain remains treated by opiates, which have significant side effects that limit their utility. We now describe a potent opiate analgesic lacking the traditional side effects associated with classical opiates, including respiratory depression, significant constipation, physical dependence, and, perhaps most important, reinforcing behavior, demonstrating that it is possible to dissociate side effects from analgesia. Evidence indicates that this agent acts through a truncated, six-transmembrane variant of the G protein-coupled mu opioid receptor MOR-1. Although truncated splice variants have been reported for a number of G protein-coupled receptors, their functional relevance has been unclear. Our evidence now suggests that truncated variants can be physiologically important through heterodimerization, even when inactive alone, and can comprise new therapeutic targets, as illustrated by our unique opioid analgesics with a vastly improved pharmacological profile.

  19. Data manipulation in heterogeneous databases

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, A.; Segev, A.

    1991-10-01

    Many important information systems applications require access to data stored in multiple heterogeneous databases. This paper examines a problem in inter-database data manipulation within a heterogeneous environment, where conventional techniques are no longer useful. To solve the problem, a broader definition for join operator is proposed. Also, a method to probabilistically estimate the accuracy of the join is discussed.

  20. Interference Management in Heterogeneous Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    INTERFERENCE MANAGEMENT IN HETEROGENEOUS NETWORKS UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND JUNE 2013 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED...3. DATES COVERED (From - To) AUG 2011 – FEB 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE INTERFERENCE MANAGEMENT IN HETEROGENEOUS NETWORKS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...However, such deployments require efficient frequency allocation schemes for managing interference from the pico- and macro base stations that are

  1. Soluble manganese(IV) as a chemiluminescence reagent for the determination of opiate alkaloids, indoles and analytes of forensic interest.

    PubMed

    Brown, Allyson J; Lenehan, Claire E; Francis, Paul S; Dunstan, David E; Barnett, Neil W

    2007-03-30

    We present the results of our investigations into the use of soluble manganese(IV) as a chemiluminescence reagent, which include a significantly faster method of preparation and a study on the effect of formaldehyde and orthophosphoric acid concentration on signal intensity. Chemiluminescence detection was applied to the determination of 16 analytes, including opiate alkaloids, indoles and analytes of forensic interest, using flow injection analysis methodology. The soluble manganese(IV) reagent was less selective than either acidic potassium permanganate or tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(III) and therefore provided a more universal chemiluminescence detection system for HPLC. A broad spectral distribution with a maximum at 730+/-5nm was observed for the reaction between the soluble manganese(IV) and a range of analytes, as well as the background emission from the reaction with the formaldehyde enhancer. This spectral distribution matches that reported for chemiluminescence reactions with acidic potassium permanganate, where a manganese(II) emitting species was elucidated. This provides further evidence that the emission evoked in reactions with soluble manganese(IV) also emanates from a manganese(II) species, and not bimolecular singlet oxygen as suggested by previous authors.

  2. Comparison of personality traits in pedophiles, abstinent opiate addicts, and healthy controls: considering pedophilia as an addictive behavior.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Lisa J; Grebchenko, Yuli F; Steinfeld, Matthew; Frenda, Steven J; Galynker, Igor I

    2008-11-01

    To investigate the model of pedophilia as a disorder of addictive behavior, pedophiles and chemically addicted individuals were compared on personality traits potentially associated with impaired behavioral inhibition. Twenty-nine pedophiles, 25 opiate addicts (OA's), and 27 healthy controls were administered the Barratt Impulsivity Scale, Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R), and Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-V for Axis-II. OA's scored higher than either pedophiles or controls on the Barratt. Pedophiles and OA's scored higher than controls on all 3 Psychopathy Checklist-Revised scores but OA's scored marginally higher than pedophiles on factor 2 (behavioral) and total scores. On Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-V for Axis-II, pedophiles scored higher than controls on paranoid and schizoid scores whereas OA's did so on paranoid scores. Thus, both pedophiles and OA's may have elevated psychopathic traits and propensity toward cognitive distortions, as reflected in cluster A traits. Such similarities support the conceptualization of pedophilia as a behavioral addiction. Pedophiles may be less impulsive than OA's, however, and more prone toward cognitive distortions.

  3. Multiple aspects of hair analysis for opiates: methodology, clinical and workplace populations, codeine, and poppy seed ingestion.

    PubMed

    Hill, Virginia; Cairns, Thomas; Cheng, Chen-Chih; Schaffer, Michael

    2005-10-01

    Levels of morphine, 6-monoacetylmorphine (MAM) and codeine in hair in both clinical and workplace subjects are presented. Aggressive wash procedures, consisting of 1 isopropanol wash, three 30-min, and two 1-h buffer washes, followed by digestion, extraction and confirmation of digested samples, resulted in values from the cutoff of 2 ng morphine/10 mg hair to greater than 200 ng/10 mg hair. Both morphine and MAM were present above the cutoff in all hair samples from 69 clinical subjects. Only 39 of the 69 heroin-using subjects had urine tests positive for 6-MAM. In a study of morphine in hair following poppy seed consumption, ten subjects ingested 150 g of poppy seed over 3 weeks. Urine samples were collected on the days of poppy seed ingestion and hair samples were taken in the 5th week of the study. The range among the 10 subjects of the highest urine value for each subject was 2929 to 13,827 ng morphine/mL. Hair morphine levels were 0.05-0.48 ng/10 mg hair (average 0.17 ng/10 mg hair). Hair opiate levels of workplace subjects ranged somewhat lower than those of clinical subjects. While all clinical hair samples contained MAM, many workplace samples did not. From workplace samples, a maximum amount of morphine likely to be present from codeine use was 0-3.7% of the codeine in the hair.

  4. Opiate-prostaglandin interactions in the regulation of insulin secretion from rat islets of Langerhans in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Green, I.C.; Tadayyon, M.

    1988-01-01

    The inadequate insulin secretory response to glucose stimulation in non-insulin dependent diabetes has been attributed to many factors including high PGE/sub 2/ levels blunting the secretory response, and to the existence of inhibitory opiate activity in vivo. The purpose of the present work was to see if there was a connection between these two independent theories. Radioimmunoassayable PGE/sub 2/ in islets of Langerhans was found to be proportional to islet number and protein content and was typically 4 to 5pg/..mu..g islet protein. Indomethacin sodium salicylate and chlorpropamide all lowered islet PGE/sub 2/ levels and stimulated insulin release in vitro. Dynorphin stimulated insulin release at a concentration of 6 x 10/sup -9/M, while lowering islet PGE/sub 2/. Conversely, at a higher concentration, dynorphin had no stimulatory effect on insulin secretion and did not lower PGE/sub 2/ levels in islets or in the incubation media. The stimulatory effects of dynorphin and sodium salicylate on insulin secretion were blocked by exogenous PGE/sub 2/. PGE/sub 2/ at a lower concentration did not exert any inhibitory effect on dynorphin- or sodium salicylate-induced insulin release. This concentration of exogenous PGE/sub 2/ stimulated insulin release in the presence of 6mM glucose.

  5. A perspective on the new mechanism of antidepressants: neuritogenesis through sigma-1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Takebayashi, M; Hayashi, T; Su, T-P

    2004-11-01

    Sigma receptors were first described as one of the opiate receptor subtypes. Now it is well established that sigma receptors, existing as subtypes sigma-1 and sigma-2, are unique non-opioid receptors which are implicated in higher-ordered brain functions. Sigma-1 receptors have high to moderate affinities for (+)benzomorphans and also many psychotrophic drugs and neurosteroids. Sigma-1 receptor agonists and certain neurosteroids such as dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) have antidepressant-like effects in animal behavioral models of depression. The antidepressant-like effect induced by sigma-1 receptor agonists may involve intracellular Ca (2+) mobilization such that sigma-1 receptor agonists modulate Ca (2+) release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in a cytoskeletal protein-dependent manner. In addition, growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth is mediated through sigma-1 receptors, suggesting a role of antidepressants in neuroplasticity. Igmesine (JO1783), OPC-14 523 and SA4503, have recently been developed as sigma-1 agonists and are found to have antidepressant-like activity perhaps with fewer side effects. This article reviews the new potential use of sigma-1 receptor ligands in the treatment of mood disorder.

  6. GABA(B) receptors and opioid mechanisms involved in homotaurine-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Serrano, M I; Serrano, J S; Fernández, A; Asadi, I; Serrano-Martino, M C

    1998-03-01

    1. The involvement of GABA(B) receptors and opioid mechanisms in homotaurine-induced analgesia has been investigated in current models of nociception by using a GABA(B) receptor antagonist, morphine, and naloxone. CGP 35348 (50-200 mg/kg IP), a highly selective GABA(B) antagonist, was administered prior to carrying out a dose-response curve of homotaurine (22.6-445 mg/kg IP) antinociceptive effect in the abdominal constriction (mice) and tail flick (rats) tests. 2. The tail flick test was performed in animals pretreated with morphine (0.5 mg/kg SC) and naloxone (1 mg/kg), 15 min before amino acid. Animals treated with saline 10 ml/kg (mice) or 1.25 ml/kg (rats) were included as control for the vehicle used. 3. CGP 35348 antagonized the antinociceptive effect of homotaurine in both tests. The range of doses affected by the interaction depended on the test assayed, but it was coincident for the main part of the dose-response curve. 4. A subanalgesic dose of morphine potentiated the antinociceptive effect of lower doses of homotaurine in the tail flick test. Naloxone pretreatment inhibited the antinociceptive effect of homotaurine. 5. These data imply that GABA(B) receptor subpopulations and opiate mechanisms are involved in the antinociceptive effect of homotaurine. Because functional relationships have been found between GABAergic and opiate systems in analgesic effects, an interaction of the two mechanisms may be operating in the effects described for homotaurine.

  7. Theory of heterogeneous viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmacher, Walter; Ruocco, Giancarlo; Mazzone, Valerio

    2016-03-01

    We review a new theory of viscoelasticity of a glass-forming viscous liquid near and below the glass transition. In our model, we assume that each point in the material has a specific viscosity, which varies randomly in space according to a fluctuating activation free energy. We include a Maxwellian elastic term, and assume that the corresponding shear modulus fluctuates as well with the same distribution as that of the activation barriers. The model is solved in coherent potential approximation, for which a derivation is given. The theory predicts an Arrhenius-type temperature dependence of the viscosity in the vanishing frequency limit, independent of the distribution of the activation barriers. The theory implies that this activation energy is generally different from that of a diffusing particle with the same barrier height distribution. If the distribution of activation barriers is assumed to have the Gaussian form, the finite-frequency version of the theory describes well the typical low-temperature alpha relaxation peak of glasses. Beta relaxation can be included by adding another Gaussian with centre at much lower energies than that is responsible for the alpha relaxation. At high frequencies, our theory reduces to the description of an elastic medium with spatially fluctuating elastic moduli (heterogeneous elasticity theory), which explains the occurrence of the boson peak-related vibrational anomalies of glasses.

  8. Heterogeneous recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanov, Vitaly I.

    1991-02-01

    The paper summarizes the results of investigations performed to obtain deep 3-D holograms with 102 i0 mkm physical thickness allowing the postexposure amplification and the a posteriori changing of the grating parameters. This aim has been achieved by developing heterogeneous systems on the basis of porous glass with light-sensitive compositions introduced into it. 1. INTRODUCTION. LIGHT-SENSITIVE MEDIA FOR 3-D HOLOGRAMS RECORDING. The 3-D holograms have many useful properties: very high diffraction efficiency angular and spectral selectivity but low level of noise. It shoud be noted that in this case deep 3-D holograms are dealt with whose physical thickness is as high as 102 -i mkm. Such hologram recording is usually done using homogeneous light-sensitive media for example dyed acid-halide and electrooptical crystals photochrome glass photostructurized polimer compositions and so on. The nature of photophisical and photochemical processes responsible for the light sensitivity of these materials exclude the possibility of post-exposure treatment. This does not allow to enhance the recorded holograms and considerably hampers their fixing or makes it practically impossible. The object of our work is to create the media which are quite suitable for two-stage processes of the deep hologram formation with post-exposure processing. Such material must satisfy the following requirements: a)they must have high permeability for the developing substances in order to make the development duration suitable for practical applications b)they must be shrinkproof to prevent deformation of the

  9. Reference Point Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Terzi, Ayse; Koedijk, Kees; Noussair, Charles N.; Pownall, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that, when confronted with a decision to be taken under risk, individuals use reference payoff levels as important inputs. The purpose of this paper is to study which reference points characterize decisions in a setting in which there are several plausible reference levels of payoff. We report an experiment, in which we investigate which of four potential reference points: (1) a population average payoff level, (2) the announced expected payoff of peers in a similar decision situation, (3) a historical average level of earnings that others have received in the same task, and (4) an announced anticipated individual payoff level, best describes decisions in a decontextualized risky decision making task. We find heterogeneity among individuals in the reference points they employ. The population average payoff level is the modal reference point, followed by experimenter's stated expectation of a participant's individual earnings, followed in turn by the average earnings of other participants in previous sessions of the same experiment. A sizeable share of individuals show multiple reference points simultaneously. The reference point that best fits the choices of the individual is not affected by a shock to her income. PMID:27672374

  10. Reference Point Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Ayse; Koedijk, Kees; Noussair, Charles N; Pownall, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that, when confronted with a decision to be taken under risk, individuals use reference payoff levels as important inputs. The purpose of this paper is to study which reference points characterize decisions in a setting in which there are several plausible reference levels of payoff. We report an experiment, in which we investigate which of four potential reference points: (1) a population average payoff level, (2) the announced expected payoff of peers in a similar decision situation, (3) a historical average level of earnings that others have received in the same task, and (4) an announced anticipated individual payoff level, best describes decisions in a decontextualized risky decision making task. We find heterogeneity among individuals in the reference points they employ. The population average payoff level is the modal reference point, followed by experimenter's stated expectation of a participant's individual earnings, followed in turn by the average earnings of other participants in previous sessions of the same experiment. A sizeable share of individuals show multiple reference points simultaneously. The reference point that best fits the choices of the individual is not affected by a shock to her income.

  11. A structural feature of the non-peptide ligand interactions with mice mu-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Noori, Hamid R; Mucksch, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2014-01-01

    By binding to and activating the G-protein coupled μ-, κ- and δ-opioid receptors in the central nervous system, opiates are known to induce analgesic and sedative effects. In particular, non-peptide opioid ligands are often used in clinical applications to induce these therapeutically beneficial effects, due to their superior pharmacokinetics and bioavailability in comparison to endogenous neuropeptides. However, since opioid alkaloids are highly addictive substances, it is necessary to understand the exact mechanisms of their actions, specifically the ligand-binding properties of the target receptors, in order to safely apply opiates for therapeutic purposes. Using an in silico molecular docking approach (AutoDock Vina) combined with two-step cluster analysis, we have computationally obtained the docking scores and the ligand-binding pockets of twelve representative non-peptide nonendogenous agonists and antagonists at the crystallographically identified μ-opioid receptor. Our study predicts the existence of two main binding sites that are congruently present in all opioid receptor types. Interestingly, in terms of the agonist or antagonist properties of the substances on the receptors, the clustering analysis suggests a relationship with the position of the ligand-binding pockets, particularly its depth within the receptor structure. Furthermore, the binding affinity of the substances is directly correlated to the proximity of the binding pockets to the extracellular space. In conclusion, the results provide further insights into the structural features of the functional pharmacology of opioid receptors, suggesting the importance of the binding position of non-peptide agonists and antagonists- specifically the distance and the level of exposure to the extracellular space- to their dissociation kinetics and subsequent potency.

  12. Mu Opioids and Their Receptors: Evolution of a Concept

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ying-Xian

    2013-01-01

    Opiates are among the oldest medications available to manage a number of medical problems. Although pain is the current focus, early use initially focused upon the treatment of dysentery. Opium contains high concentrations of both morphine and codeine, along with thebaine, which is used in the synthesis of a number of semisynthetic opioid analgesics. Thus, it is not surprising that new agents were initially based upon the morphine scaffold. The concept of multiple opioid receptors was first suggested almost 50 years ago (Martin, 1967), opening the possibility of new classes of drugs, but the morphine-like agents have remained the mainstay in the medical management of pain. Termed mu, our understanding of these morphine-like agents and their receptors has undergone an evolution in thinking over the past 35 years. Early pharmacological studies identified three major classes of receptors, helped by the discovery of endogenous opioid peptides and receptor subtypes—primarily through the synthesis of novel agents. These chemical biologic approaches were then eclipsed by the molecular biology revolution, which now reveals a complexity of the morphine-like agents and their receptors that had not been previously appreciated. PMID:24076545

  13. Cannabinoid CB1 receptors control conditioned drug seeking.

    PubMed

    De Vries, Taco J; Schoffelmeer, Anton N M

    2005-08-01

    Recent developments have implicated cannabinoid CB1 receptors as a novel target for a new class of therapeutic agents used to treat drug addiction. CB1 receptors are expressed in the motivational circuitry of the brain and modulate drug seeking. Blockade of the CB1 receptor is particularly effective in reducing cue-induced reinstatement of drug seeking, an animal analogue of cue-induced relapse in human addicts. These relapse-preventing properties are observed with different classes of abused drug (i.e. psychostimulants, opiates, nicotine and alcohol). In addition, recent evidence indicates a more general role of CB1 receptors in reward-related memories, which is consistent with the proposed role of endocannabinoids in memory-related plasticity. Relapse-preventing actions and inhibitory effects on weight gain were confirmed recently in clinical trials with the CB1 antagonist rimonabant. Collectively, these clinical and preclinical studies suggest that antagonists of CB1 receptors offer a novel approach in the treatment of addictive behaviours.

  14. Characterization of the complex morphinan derivative BU72 as a high efficacy, long-lasting mu-opioid receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Neilan, Claire L; Husbands, Stephen M; Breeden, Simon; Ko, M C Holden; Aceto, Mario D; Lewis, John W; Woods, James H; Traynor, John R

    2004-09-19

    The development of buprenorphine as a treatment for opiate abuse and dependence has drawn attention to opioid ligands that have agonist actions followed by long-lasting antagonist actions. In a search for alternatives to buprenorphine, we discovered a bridged pyrrolidinomorphinan (BU72). In vitro, BU72 displayed high affinity and efficacy for mu-opioid receptors, but was also a partial delta-opioid receptor agonist and a full kappa-opioid receptor agonist. BU72 was a highly potent and long-lasting antinociceptive agent against both thermal and chemical nociception in the mouse and against thermal nociception in the monkey. These effects were prevented by mu-, but not kappa- or delta-, opioid receptor antagonists. Once the agonist effects of BU72 had subsided, the compound acted to attenuate the antinociceptive action of morphine. BU72 is too efficacious for human use but manipulation to reduce efficacy could provide a lead to the development of a treatment for opioid dependence.

  15. Antagonism of κ opioid receptor in the nucleus accumbens prevents the depressive-like behaviors following prolonged morphine abstinence.

    PubMed

    Zan, Gui-Ying; Wang, Qian; Wang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Yao; Hang, Ai; Shu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Jing-Gen

    2015-09-15

    The association between morphine withdrawal and depressive-like symptoms is well documented, however, the role of dynorphin/κ opioid receptor system and the underlying neural substrates have not been fully understood. In the present study, we found that four weeks morphine abstinence after a chronic escalating morphine regimen significantly induced depressive-like behaviors in mice. Prodynorphin mRNA and protein levels were increased in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) after four weeks of morphine withdrawal. Local injection of κ opioid receptor antagonist nor-Binaltorphimine (norBNI) in the NAc significantly blocked the expression of depressive-like behaviors without influencing general locomotor activity. Thus, the present study extends previous findings by showing that prolonged morphine withdrawal-induced depressive-like behaviors are regulated by dynorphin/κ opioid receptor system, and shed light on the κ opioid receptor antagonists as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of depressive-like behaviors induced by opiate withdrawal.

  16. Homogeneous, Heterogeneous, and Enzymatic Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyama, S. Ted; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses three areas of catalysis: homegeneous, heterogeneous, and enzymatic. Explains fundamentals and economic impact of catalysis. Lists and discusses common industrial catalysts. Provides a list of 107 references. (MVL)

  17. Decision-making in stimulant and opiate addicts in protracted abstinence: evidence from computational modeling with pure users

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Woo-Young; Vasilev, Georgi; Lee, Sung-Ha; Busemeyer, Jerome R.; Kruschke, John K.; Bechara, Antoine; Vassileva, Jasmin

    2014-01-01

    Substance dependent individuals (SDI) often exhibit decision-making deficits; however, it remains unclear whether the nature of the underlying decision-making processes is the same in users of different classes of drugs and whether these deficits persist after discontinuation of drug use. We used computational modeling to address these questions in a unique sample of relatively “pure” amphetamine-dependent (N = 38) and heroin-dependent individuals (N = 43) who were currently in protracted abstinence, and in 48 healthy controls (HC). A Bayesian model comparison technique, a simulation method, and parameter recovery tests were used to compare three cognitive models: (1) Prospect Valence Learning with decay reinforcement learning rule (PVL-DecayRI), (2) PVL with delta learning rule (PVL-Delta), and (3) Value-Plus-Perseverance (VPP) model based on Win-Stay-Lose-Switch (WSLS) strategy. The model comparison results indicated that the VPP model, a hybrid model of reinforcement learning (RL) and a heuristic strategy of perseverance had the best post-hoc model fit, but the two PVL models showed better simulation and parameter recovery performance. Computational modeling results suggested that overall all three groups relied more on RL than on a WSLS strategy. Heroin users displayed reduced loss aversion relative to HC across all three models, which suggests that their decision-making deficits are longstanding (or pre-existing) and may be driven by reduced sensitivity to loss. In contrast, amphetamine users showed comparable cognitive functions to HC with the VPP model, whereas the second best-fitting model with relatively good simulation performance (PVL-DecayRI) revealed increased reward sensitivity relative to HC. These results suggest that some decision-making deficits persist in protracted abstinence and may be mediated by different mechanisms in opiate and stimulant users. PMID:25161631

  18. Unambiguous characterization of analytical markers in complex, seized opiate samples using an enhanced ion mobility trace detector-mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Liuni, Peter; Romanov, Vladimir; Binette, Marie-Josée; Zaknoun, Hafid; Tam, Maggie; Pilon, Pierre; Hendrikse, Jan; Wilson, Derek J

    2014-11-04

    Ion mobility spectroscopy (IMS)-based trace-compound detectors (TCDs) are powerful and widely implemented tools for the detection of illicit substances. They combine high sensitivity, reproducibility, rapid analysis time, and resistance to dirt with an acceptable false alarm rate. The analytical specificity of TCD-IMS instruments for a given analyte depends strongly on a detailed knowledge of the ion chemistry involved, as well as the ability to translate this knowledge into field-robust analytical methods. In this work, we introduce an enhanced hybrid TCD-IMS/mass spectrometer (TCD-IMS/MS) that combines the strengths of ion-mobility-based target compound detection with unambiguous identification by tandem MS. Building on earlier efforts along these lines (Kozole et al., Anal. Chem. 2011, 83, 8596-8603), the current instrument is capable of positive and negative-mode analyses with tightly controlled gating between the IMS and MS modules and direct measurement of ion mobility profiles. We demonstrate the unique capabilities of this instrument using four samples of opium seized by the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), consisting of a mixture of opioid alkaloids and other naturally occurring compounds typically found in these samples. Although many analytical methods have been developed for analyzing naturally occurring opiates, this is the first detailed ion mobility study on seized opium samples. This work demonstrates all available analytical modes for the new IMS-MS system including "single-gate", "dual-gate", MS/MS, and precursor ion scan methods. Using a combination of these modes, we unambiguously identify all signals in the IMS spectra, including previously uncharacterized minor peaks arising from compounds that are common in raw opium.

  19. On-line liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry simultaneous determination of opiates, cocainics and amphetamines in dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Saussereau, E; Lacroix, C; Gaulier, J M; Goulle, J P

    2012-02-15

    A novel approach has been developed for the illicit drugs quantitative determination using dried blood spots (DBS) on filter paper. The illicit drugs tested were opiates (morphine and its 3- and 6-glucuronide metabolites, codeine, 6-monoacetylmorphine), cocainics (ecgonine methylester, benzoylecgonine, cocaine, cocaethylene) and amphetamines (amphetamine, methamphetamine, MDA, MDMA, MDEA). The described method, requiring a small blood volume, is based on high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry using on-line extraction. A Whatman card 903 was spotted with 30μL of whole blood and left overnight to dry at room temperature. A 3-mm diameter disk was removed using a manual punch, suspended in 150μL of water for 10min with ultrasonication, and then 100μL was injected in the on-line LC-MS/MS system. An Oasis HLB was used as an extraction column and a C18 Atlantis as an analytical column. The chromatographic cycle was performed with 20mM ammonium formate buffer (pH 2.8) (solvent A) and acetonitrile/solvent A (90:10, v/v) gradient in 16min. Detection was performed in positive electrospray ionization mode (ESI+) with a Quattro Micro (Waters). Recoveries of all analytes were up to 80%. DBS were stored in duplicate at 4°C and -20°C for up to 6 months. Illicit drugs seemed to be much more stabled at -20°C. Furthermore, it was tested whether analysis of DBS may be as reliable as that of whole blood investigating authentic samples; significant correlations were obtained. This DBS assay has potential as rapid, sensitive and inexpensive option for the illicit drugs determination in small blood volumes, which seems of great interest in suspected cases of driving under the influence of drugs.

  20. The politics of place(ment): problematising the provision of hepatitis C treatment within opiate substitution clinics.

    PubMed

    Rance, Jake; Newland, Jamee; Hopwood, Max; Treloar, Carla

    2012-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) epidemic is a significant public health challenge in Australia. Current initiatives to expand access to HCV treatment focus on opiate substitution therapy (OST) settings where the prevalence of hepatitis C among clients is high. In Australia, the provision of OST for many clients is via large clinics, with an estimated median of 150 clients per service. Conceptually informed by the work of Michel Foucault, our analysis of the proposed integrated treatment model focuses on the critical but overlooked question of organisational culture and power operating within OST. We argue that the specific context of OST not merely reflects but actively participates in the political economy of social exclusion via which the socio-spatial segregation and stigmatisation of the service user as 'drug user' is enacted. This paper analyses data collected from two samples during 2008/9: OST clients living in New South Wales, Australia and a range of OST health professionals working in Australian settings. In total, 27 interviews were conducted with current OST clients; 19 by phone and 8 face-to-face. One focus group and 16 telephone interviews were conducted with OST health professionals. Our analysis of key themes emerging from the interview data suggests that the successful introduction of HCV treatment within the OST clinic is not a given. We are concerned that particular areas of tension, if not explicit contradiction, have been overlooked in current research and debates informing the proposed combination treatment model. We question the appropriateness of co-locating a notoriously arduous, exacting treatment (HCV) within the highly surveillant and regulatory environment of OST. While applauding the intention to improve access to HCV care and treatment for people who inject drugs we caution against a treatment model that risks further entrenching (socio-spatial) stigmatisation amongst those already experiencing significant marginalisation.

  1. Simultaneous analysis of buprenorphine, methadone, cocaine, opiates and nicotine metabolites in sweat by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Concheiro, Marta; Shakleya, Diaa M.

    2013-01-01

    A liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for buprenorphine (BUP), norbuprenorphine (NBUP), methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), cocaine, benzoylecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester (EME), morphine, codeine, 6-acetylmorphine, heroin, 6-acetylcodeine, cotinine, and trans-3′-hydroxycotinine quantification in sweat was developed and comprehensively validated. Sweat patches were mixed with 6 mL acetate buffer at pH 4.5, and supernatant extracted with Strata-XC-cartridges. Reverse-phase separation was achieved with a gradient mobile phase of 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile in 15 min. Quantification was achieved by multiple reaction monitoring of two transitions per compound. The assay was a linear 1–1,000 ng/patch, except EME 5–1,000 ng/patch. Intra-, inter-day and total imprecision were <10.1%CV, analytical recovery 87.2–107.7%, extraction efficiency 35.3– 160.9%, and process efficiency 25.5–91.7%. Ion suppression was detected for EME (−63.3%) and EDDP (−60.4%), and enhancement for NBUP (42.6%). Deuterated internal standards compensated for these effects. No carryover was detected, and all analytes were stable for 24 h at 22 °C, 72 h at 4 °C, and after three freeze/thaw cycles. The method was applied to weekly sweat patches from an opioid-dependent BUP-maintained pregnant woman; 75.0% of sweat patches were positive for BUP, 93.8% for cocaine, 37.5% for opiates, 6.3% for methadone and all for tobacco biomarkers. This method permits a fast and simultaneous quantification of 14 drugs and metabolites in sweat patches, with good selectivity and sensitivity. PMID:21125263

  2. Development, optimization, and validation of a novel extraction procedure for the removal of opiates from human hair's surface.

    PubMed

    Restolho, José; Barroso, Mário; Saramago, Benilde; Dias, Mário; Afonso, Carlos A M

    2015-05-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) have proved to be efficient extraction media for several systems, and their ability to capture volatile compounds from the atmosphere is well established. We report herein a contactless extraction procedure for the removal of opiate drugs from the surface of human hair. The compounds were chosen as a model drug, particularly due to their low volatility. Equal amounts of IL and hair (about 100 mg) were introduced in a customized Y-shaped vial, and the process occurred simply by heating. After testing several ILs, some of them (e.g. 1-methyl-3-ethanol-imidazolium tetrafluoroborate, phenyl-trimethyl-ammonium triflate or bis(dimethyl) diheptylguanidinium iodide) showed extraction efficiencies higher than 80% for the two studied compounds, morphine and 6-monoacetylmorphine. Using the design of experiments (DOE) approach as an optimization tool, and bearing in mind the hygroscopic properties of the ILs (in particular, 1-methyl-3-ethanol-imidazolium tetrafluoroborate), the process was optimized concerning the following variables: temperature (50-120 ºC), extraction time (8-24 h), IL amount (50-200 mg) and water content of the IL (0.01-60%). This study not only provided the optimum conditions for the process (120 ºC, 16 h, 100 mg of IL containing 40% of water), but has also showed that the water content of the IL represents the variable with the most significant effect on the extraction efficiency. Finally, we validated our method through the comparison of the results obtained by treating hair samples with the described procedure to those obtained using a standard washing method and criteria for positivity.

  3. Heterogeneity in motor driven transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabei, Ali

    2015-03-01

    I will discuss quantitative analysis of particle tracking data for motor driven vesicles inside an insulin secreting cell. We use this method to study the dynamical and structural heterogeneity inside the cell. I will discuss our effort to explain the origin of observed heterogeneity in intracellular transport. Finally, I will explain how analyzing directional correlations in transport trajectories reveals self-similarity in the diffusion media.

  4. Direct and efficient liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric method for opiates in urine drug testing - importance of 6-acetylmorphine and reduction of analytes.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Maria; Stephanson, Nikolai; Ohman, Inger; Terzuoli, Tommy; Lindh, Jonatan D; Beck, Olof

    2014-04-01

    Opiates comprise a class of abused drugs that is of primary interest in clinical and forensic urine drug testing. Determination of heroin, codeine, or a multi-drug ingestion is complicated since both heroin and codeine can lead to urinary excretion of free and conjugated morphine. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) offers advantage over gas chromatography-mass spectrometry by simplifying sample preparation but increases the number of analytes. A method based on direct injection of five-fold diluted urine for confirmation of morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide, morphine-6-glucuronide, codeine, codeine-6-glucuronide and 6-acetylmorphine was validated using LC-MS/MS in positive electrospray mode monitoring two transitions using selected reaction monitoring. The method was applied for the analysis of 3155 unknown urine samples which were positive for opiates in immunochemical screening. A linear response was observed for all compounds in the calibration curves covering more than three orders of magnitude. Cut off was set to 2 ng/ml for 6-acetylmorphine and 150 ng/ml for the other analytes. 6-Acetylmorphine was found to be effective (sensitivity 82%) in detecting samples as heroin intake. Morphine-3-glucuronide and codeine-6-glucuronide was the predominant components of total morphine and codeine, 84% and 93%, respectively. The authors have validated a robust LC-MS/MS method for rapid qualitative and quantitative analysis of opiates in urine. 6-Acetylmorphine has been demonstrated as a sensitive and important parameter for a heroin intake. A possible interpretation strategy to conclude the source of detected analytes was proposed. The method might be further developed by reducing the number of analytes to morphine-3-glucuronide, codeine-6-glucuronide and 6-acetylmorphine without compromising test performance.

  5. Productive infection of human neural progenitor cells by R5 tropic HIV-1: opiate co-exposure heightens infectivity and functional vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Balinang, Joyce M.; Masvekar, Ruturaj R.; Hauser, Kurt F.; Knapp, Pamela E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective HIV type-1 (HIV-1) causes a spectrum of central nervous system (CNS) complications; many are worsened by opiate co-exposure. Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) give rise to all CNS neurons and macroglia. We tested the hypothesis that hNPC maturation and fate are altered by HIV and opiates, contributing to HIV-1-related neuropathology. Reports of hNPC infection remain controversial. We rigorously examined this question, testing whether hNPC propagated infection and whether HIV affected hNPCs absent their infection. Design and methods Primary hNPCs were characterized over multiple passages. Following R5 HIV-1BaL exposure, p24, Nef, and tat assays monitored infection; a serial dilution approach tested infection transfer to naive hNPCs. Bromodeoxyuridine uptake, population doubling time, and immunostaining assessed proliferation and differentiation. Morphine co-exposure assessed opiate interactions. Supernatant from HIV-1BaL-infected PBMCs (HIVsup), HIV-1BaL, and ultraviolet light-inactivated HIVsup were compared to test effects of inflammatory milieu versus virus or infection per se. Results The hNPCs (CD4_/CD8_/Iba_/CXC3CL1_/CD11b_) were infectable and could transfer infection to naive hNPCs. Infection was partly blocked by maraviroc, implicating CCR5. HIVsup reduced hNPC proliferation and caused premature differentiation into neurons/astroglia. Effects on proliferation were due to soluble factors/viral proteins, not infection per se. Morphine co-exposure exacerbated certain functional consequences of HIVsup, and sustained the infection of hNPCs. Conclusion hNPCs can be infected and propagate virus in vitro. hNPCs or their progeny may represent an underappreciated viral reservoir. Factors from infected cells alter hNPC proliferation and neural cell maturation which likely compromises CNS structure and function. Morphine–HIV interactions may worsen dysfunction and sustain infection. PMID:28099189

  6. Decreased mitochondrial DNA copy number in the hippocampus and peripheral blood during opiate addiction is mediated by autophagy and can be salvaged by melatonin.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yue-Mei; Jia, Yun-Fang; Su, Ling-Yan; Wang, Dong; Lv, Li; Xu, Lin; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2013-09-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic brain disease that is a serious social problem and causes enormous financial burden. Because mitochondrial abnormalities have been associated with opiate addiction, we examined the effect of morphine on mtDNA levels in rat and mouse models of addiction and in cultured cells. We found that mtDNA copy number was significantly reduced in the hippocampus and peripheral blood of morphine-addicted rats and mice compared with control animals. Concordantly, decreased mtDNA copy number and elevated mtDNA damage were observed in the peripheral blood from opiate-addicted patients, indicating detrimental effects of drug abuse and stress. In cultured rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells and mouse neurons, morphine treatment caused many mitochondrial defects, including a reduction in mtDNA copy number that was mediated by autophagy. Knockdown of the Atg7 gene was able to counteract the loss of mtDNA copy number induced by morphine. The mitochondria-targeted antioxidant melatonin restored mtDNA content and neuronal outgrowth and prevented the increase in autophagy upon morphine treatment. In mice, coadministration of melatonin with morphine ameliorated morphine-induced behavioral sensitization, analgesic tolerance and mtDNA content reduction. During drug withdrawal in opiate-addicted patients and improvement of protracted abstinence syndrome, we observed an increase of serum melatonin level. Taken together, our study indicates that opioid addiction is associated with mtDNA copy number reduction and neurostructural remodeling. These effects appear to be mediated by autophagy and can be salvaged by melatonin.

  7. Spontaneous remission from the problematic use of substances: an inductive model derived from a comparative analysis of the alcohol, opiate, tobacco, and food/obesity literatures.

    PubMed

    Stall, R; Biernacki, P

    1986-01-01

    Despite obvious theoretical and treatment implications, the study of how individuals end the "compulsive" use of substances without formal treatment ("spontaneous remission") remains a relatively neglected topic. This paper reviews the literature germane to spontaneous remission from four substances (opiates, alcohol, food/obesity, and tobacco) selected for their widely variant meanings within the mainstream North American culture. Common processes important to spontaneous remission from these four substances are identified and form the basis of an inductively derived model of spontaneous remission behavior. This model, relevant to interactionist theory, is offered for further, empirical testing.

  8. Evidence of morphine like substance and μ-opioid receptor expression in Toxacara canis (Nematoda: Ascaridae)

    PubMed Central

    Golabi, Mostafa; Naem, Soraya; Imani, Mehdi; Dalirezh, Nowruz

    2016-01-01

    Toxocara canis (Nematoda: Ascaridae) is an intestinal nematode parasite of dogs, which can also cause disease in humans. Transmission to humans usually occurs because of direct contact with T. canis eggs present in soil contaminated with the feces of infected dogs. This nematode has extraordinary abilities to survive for many years in different tissues of vertebrates, and develop to maturity in the intestinal tract of its definitive host. Survival of parasitic nematodes within a host requires immune evasion using complicated pathways. Morphine-like substance, as well as opioids, which are known as down regulating agents, can modulate both innate and acquired immune responses, and let the parasite survives in their hosts. In the present study, we aimed to find evidences of morphine-like substance and µ-opiate receptor expression in T. canis, using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results indicated that T. canis produced morphine-like substances at the level of 2.31± 0.26 ng g-1 wet weight, and expressed µ-opiate receptor as in expected size of 441 bp. According to our findings, it was concluded that T. canis, benefits using morphine-like substance to modulate host immunity. PMID:28144426

  9. Dealing with spatial heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsily, Gh.; Delay, F.; Gonçalvès, J.; Renard, Ph.; Teles, V.; Violette, S.

    2005-03-01

    Heterogeneity can be dealt with by defining homogeneous equivalent properties, known as averaging, or by trying to describe the spatial variability of the rock properties from geologic observations and local measurements. The techniques available for these descriptions are mostly continuous Geostatistical models, or discontinuous facies models such as the Boolean, Indicator or Gaussian-Threshold models and the Markov chain model. These facies models are better suited to treating issues of rock strata connectivity, e.g. buried high permeability channels or low permeability barriers, which greatly affect flow and, above all, transport in aquifers. Genetic models provide new ways to incorporate more geology into the facies description, an approach that has been well developed in the oil industry, but not enough in hydrogeology. The conclusion is that future work should be focused on improving the facies models, comparing them, and designing new in situ testing procedures (including geophysics) that would help identify the facies geometry and properties. A world-wide catalog of aquifer facies geometry and properties, which could combine site genesis and description with methods used to assess the system, would be of great value for practical applications. On peut aborder le problème de l'hétérogénéité en s'efforçant de définir une perméabilité équivalente homogène, par prise de moyenne, ou au contraire en décrivant la variation dans l'espace des propriétés des roches à partir des observations géologiques et des mesures locales. Les techniques disponibles pour une telle description sont soit continues, comme l'approche Géostatistique, soit discontinues, comme les modèles de faciès, Booléens, ou bien par Indicatrices ou Gaussiennes Seuillées, ou enfin Markoviens. Ces modèles de faciès sont mieux capables de prendre en compte la connectivité des strates géologiques, telles que les chenaux enfouis à forte perméabilité, ou au contraire les faci

  10. Heterogeneity of vertebrate brain tubulins.

    PubMed Central

    Field, D J; Collins, R A; Lee, J C

    1984-01-01

    We have examined the extent of brain tubulin heterogeneity in six vertebrate species commonly used in tubulin research (rat, calf, pig, chicken, human, and lamb) using isoelectric focusing, two-dimensional electrophoresis, and peptide mapping procedures that provide higher resolution than previously available. The extent of heterogeneity is extremely similar in all of these organisms, as judged by number, range of isoelectric points, and distribution of the isotubulins. A minimum of 6 alpha and 12 beta tubulins was resolved from all sources. Even the pattern of spots on two-dimensional peptide maps is remarkably similar. These similarities suggest that the populations of tubulin in all of these brains should have similar overall physical properties. It is particularly interesting that chicken, which has only four or five beta-tubulin genes, contains approximately 12 beta tubulins. Thus, post-translational modification must generate at least some of the tubulin heterogeneity. Mammalian species, which contain 15-20 tubulin DNA sequences, do not show any more tubulin protein heterogeneity than does chicken. This suggests that expression of only a small number of the mammalian genes may be required to generate the observed tubulin heterogeneity. Images PMID:6588378

  11. Reaction Selectivity in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2009-02-02

    The understanding of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis is of paramount importance to our society today. In this review we outline the current state of the art in research on selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis. Current in-situ surface science techniques have revealed several important features of catalytic selectivity. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy has shown us the importance of understanding the reaction intermediates and mechanism of a heterogeneous reaction, and can readily yield information as to the effect of temperature, pressure, catalyst geometry, surface promoters, and catalyst composition on the reaction mechanism. DFT calculations are quickly approaching the ability to assist in the interpretation of observed surface spectra, thereby making surface spectroscopy an even more powerful tool. HP-STM has revealed three vitally important parameters in heterogeneous selectivity: adsorbate mobility, catalyst mobility, and selective site-blocking. The development of size controlled nanoparticles from 0.8 to 10 nm, of controlled shape, and of controlled bimetallic composition has revealed several important variables for catalytic selectivity. Lastly, DFT calculations may be paving the way to guiding the composition choice for multi-metallic heterogeneous catalysis for the intelligent design of catalysts incorporating the many factors of selectivity we have learned.

  12. Simulator for heterogeneous dataflow architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    1993-01-01

    A new simulator is developed to simulate the execution of an algorithm graph in accordance with the Algorithm to Architecture Mapping Model (ATAMM) rules. ATAMM is a Petri Net model which describes the periodic execution of large-grained, data-independent dataflow graphs and which provides predictable steady state time-optimized performance. This simulator extends the ATAMM simulation capability from a heterogenous set of resources, or functional units, to a more general heterogenous architecture. Simulation test cases show that the simulator accurately executes the ATAMM rules for both a heterogenous architecture and a homogenous architecture, which is the special case for only one processor type. The simulator forms one tool in an ATAMM Integrated Environment which contains other tools for graph entry, graph modification for performance optimization, and playback of simulations for analysis.

  13. Simulator for heterogeneous dataflow architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    1993-09-01

    A new simulator is developed to simulate the execution of an algorithm graph in accordance with the Algorithm to Architecture Mapping Model (ATAMM) rules. ATAMM is a Petri Net model which describes the periodic execution of large-grained, data-independent dataflow graphs and which provides predictable steady state time-optimized performance. This simulator extends the ATAMM simulation capability from a heterogenous set of resources, or functional units, to a more general heterogenous architecture. Simulation test cases show that the simulator accurately executes the ATAMM rules for both a heterogenous architecture and a homogenous architecture, which is the special case for only one processor type. The simulator forms one tool in an ATAMM Integrated Environment which contains other tools for graph entry, graph modification for performance optimization, and playback of simulations for analysis.

  14. Static heterogeneities in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, H. Eugene; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2004-10-01

    The thermodynamic behavior of water seems to be closely related to static heterogeneities. These static heterogeneities are related to the local structure of water molecules, and when properly characterized, may offer an economical explanation of thermodynamic data. The key feature of liquid water is not so much that the existence of hydrogen bonds, first pointed out by Linus Pauling, but rather the local geometry of the liquid molecules is not spherical or oblong but tetrahedral. In the consideration of static heterogeneities, this local geometry is critical. Recent experiments suggested more than one phase of amorphous solid water, while simulations suggest that one of these phases is metastable with respect to another, so that in fact there are only two stable phases.

  15. Determination of opiates in whole blood and vitreous humor: a study of the matrix effect and an experimental design to optimize conditions for the enzymatic hydrolysis of glucuronides.

    PubMed

    Sanches, Livia Rentas; Seulin, Saskia Carolina; Leyton, Vilma; Paranhos, Beatriz Aparecida Passos Bismara; Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto; Muñoz, Daniel Romero; Osselton, Michael David; Yonamine, Mauricio

    2012-04-01

    Undoubtedly, whole blood and vitreous humor have been biological samples of great importance in forensic toxicology. The determination of opiates and their metabolites has been essential for better interpretation of toxicological findings. This report describes the application of experimental design and response surface methodology to optimize conditions for enzymatic hydrolysis of morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine-6-glucuronide. The analytes (free morphine, 6-acetylmorphine and codeine) were extracted from the samples using solid-phase extraction on mixed-mode cartridges, followed by derivatization to their trimethylsilyl derivatives. The extracts were analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with electron ionization and full scan mode. The method was validated for both specimens (whole blood and vitreous humor). A significant matrix effect was found by applying the F-test. Different recovery values were also found (82% on average for whole blood and 100% on average for vitreous humor). The calibration curves were linear for all analytes in the concentration range of 10-1,500 ng/mL. The limits of detection ranged from 2.0 to 5.0 ng/mL. The method was applied to a case in which a victim presented with a previous history of opiate use.

  16. Development and validation of a single LC-MS/MS assay following SPE for simultaneous hair analysis of amphetamines, opiates, cocaine and metabolites.

    PubMed

    Imbert, L; Dulaurent, S; Mercerolle, M; Morichon, J; Lachâtre, G; Gaulier, J-M

    2014-01-01

    The two major challenges in hair analysis are the limited amount of samples usually available and the low targeted concentrations. To overcome these limitations, a liquid chromatography-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry method (LC-ESI-MS/MS) allowing the simultaneous analysis of 17 amphetamines (amphetamine, BDB, m-CPP, dexfenfluramine, DOB, DOM, ephedrine, MBDB, MDA, MDEA, MDMA, methamphetamine, methylphenidate, 4-MTA, norephedrine, norfenfluramine and PMA), 5 opiates (morphine, codeine, heroin, ethylmorphine, and 6AM), cocaine and 5 metabolites [ecgonine methyl ester (EME), benzoylecgonine (BZE), anhydroecgonine methyl ester (AME), cocaethylene, and norcocaine] has been developed. The validation procedure included linearity, intra-day and inter-day variability and accuracy for 5 days (5 replicates at 3 concentration levels). Proficiency studies were used to check the accuracy of the method. As a result, all amphetamines, opiates and cocaine derivatives were satisfactory identified by 2 MRM transitions in 15 min. Calibration curves were performed by a quadratic 1/X weighted regression. The calibration model fits from 0.05 to 10 ng/mg. The limits of detection (LODs) range between 0.005 and 0.030 ng/mg. Precision has been checked by intra-day and inter-day RSD, and associated relative bias, which were lower than 25% for the limits of quantifications (LOQs) and lower than 20% for the other levels tested. This method was routinely applied to hair samples: two positive results of adult drug addicts are presented.

  17. Dynamic fracture of heterogeneous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, M.G.; Liu, C.; Addessio, F.L.; Williams, T.O.; Bennett, J.G.; Haberman, K.S.; Asay, B.W.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to investigate the fundamental aspects of the process of dynamic fracture propagation in heterogeneous materials. The work focused on three important, but poorly understood, aspects of dynamic fracture for materials with a heterogeneous microstructure. These were: the appropriateness of using a single-parameter asymptotic analysis to describe dynamic crack-tip deformation fields, the temperature rises at the tip and on the flanks of a running crack, and the constitutive modeling of damage initiation and accumulation.

  18. Lobeline, a potential pharmacotherapy for drug addiction, binds to mu opioid receptors and diminishes the effects of opioid receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Miller, Dennis K; Lever, John R; Rodvelt, Kelli R; Baskett, James A; Will, Matthew J; Kracke, George R

    2007-07-10

    Lobeline diminishes the behavioral and neurochemical effects of nicotine and amphetamines, and is considered a potential pharmacotherapy for drug abuse and addiction. Lobeline has high affinity for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and inhibits the function of vesicular monoamine and dopamine transporters. The present study investigated the less-explored interaction of lobeline and the endogenous opioid system. In guinea pig brain homogenates, lobeline displaced (K(i)=0.74 microM) the binding of [(3)H]DAMGO [(D-Ala(2), N-ME-Phe(4), Gly(5)-ol)-enkephalin]. In a functional assay system comprised of MOR-1 mu opioid receptors and GIRK2 potassium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes, lobeline had no effect on the resting current, but maximally inhibited (IC(50)=1.1 microM) morphine- and DAMGO-activated potassium current in a concentration-dependent manner. In a second functional assay, lobeline-evoked [(3)H]overflow from rat striatal slices preloaded with [(3)H]dopamine was not blocked by naltrexone. Importantly, concentrations of lobeline (0.1-0.3 microM) that did not have intrinsic activity attenuated ( approximately 50%) morphine-evoked [(3)H]overflow. Overall, the results suggest that lobeline functions as a mu opioid receptor antagonist. The ability of lobeline to block psychostimulant effects may be mediated by opioid receptor antagonism, and lobeline could be investigated as a treatment for opiate addiction.

  19. Morphine-induced trafficking of a mu-opioid receptor interacting protein in rat locus coeruleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Jaremko, Kellie M; Thompson, Nicholas L; Reyes, Beverly A S; Jin, Jay; Ebersole, Brittany; Jenney, Christopher B; Grigson, Patricia S; Levenson, Robert; Berrettini, Wade H; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J

    2014-04-03

    Opiate addiction is a devastating health problem, with approximately 2million people currently addicted to heroin or non-medical prescription opiates in the United States alone. In neurons, adaptations in cell signaling cascades develop following opioid actions at the mu opioid receptor (MOR). A novel putative target for intervention involves interacting proteins that may regulate trafficking of MOR. Morphine has been shown to induce a re-distribution of a MOR-interacting protein Wntless (WLS, a transport molecule necessary for secretion of neurotrophic Wnt proteins), from cytoplasmic to membrane compartments in rat striatal neurons. Given its opiate-sensitivity and its well-characterized molecular and cellular adaptations to morphine exposure, we investigated the anatomical distribution of WLS and MOR in the rat locus coeruleus (LC)-norepinephrine (NE) system. Dual immunofluorescence microscopy was used to test the hypothesis that WLS is localized to noradrenergic neurons of the LC and that WLS and MOR co-exist in common LC somatodendritic processes, providing an anatomical substrate for their putative interactions. We also hypothesized that morphine would influence WLS distribution in the LC. Rats received saline, morphine or the opiate agonist [d-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO), and tissue sections through the LC were processed for immunogold-silver detection of WLS and MOR. Statistical analysis showed a significant re-distribution of WLS to the plasma membrane following morphine treatment in addition to an increase in the proximity of gold-silver labels for MOR and WLS. Following DAMGO treatment, MOR and WLS were predominantly localized within the cytoplasmic compartment when compared to morphine and control. In a separate cohort of rats, brains were obtained from saline-treated or heroin self-administering male rats for pulldown co-immunoprecipitation studies. Results showed an increased association of WLS and MOR following heroin exposure. As the

  20. Morphine-induced trafficking of a mu-opioid receptor interacting protein in rat locus coeruleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jaremko, Kellie M.; Thompson, Nicholas L.; Reyes, Beverly A. S.; Jin, Jay; Ebersole, Brittany; Jenney, Christopher B.; Grigson, Patricia S.; Levenson, Robert; Berrettini, Wade H.; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    Opiate addiction is a devastating health problem, with approximately 2 million people currently addicted to heroin or non-medical prescription opiates in the United States alone. In neurons, adaptations in cell signaling cascades develop following opioid actions at the mu opioid receptor (MOR). A novel putative target for intervention involves interacting proteins that may regulate trafficking of MOR. Morphine has been shown to induce a re-distribution of a MOR-interacting protein Wntless (WLS, a transport molecule necessary for secretion of neurotrophic Wnt proteins), from cytoplasmic to membrane compartments in rat striatal neurons. Given its opiate-sensitivity and its well-characterized molecular and cellular adaptations to morphine exposure, we investigated the anatomical distribution of WLS and MOR in the rat locus coeruleus (LC)-norepinephrine (NE) system. Dual immunofluorescence microscopy was used to test the hypothesis that WLS is localized to noradrenergic neurons of the LC and that WLS and MOR co-exist in common LC somatodendritic processes, providing an anatomical substrate for their putative interactions. We also hypothesized that morphine would influence WLS distribution in the LC. Rats received saline, morphine or the opiate agonist [D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO), and tissue sections through the LC were processed for immunogold-silver detection of WLS and MOR. Statistical analysis showed a significant re-distribution of WLS to the plasma membrane following morphine treatment in addition to an increase in the proximity of gold-silver labels for MOR and WLS. Following DAMGO treatment, MOR and WLS were predominantly localized within the cytoplasmic compartment when compared to morphine and control. In a separate cohort of rats, brains were obtained from saline-treated or heroin self-administering male rats for pulldown co-immunoprecipitation studies. Results showed an increased association of WLS and MOR following heroin exposure. As

  1. Cellular heterogeneity profiling by hyaluronan probes reveals an invasive but slow-growing breast tumor subset

    PubMed Central

    Veiseh, Mandana; Kwon, Daniel H.; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Tolg, Cornelia; Leong, Hon S.; Lewis, John D.; Turley, Eva A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity confounds cancer diagnosis and the outcome of therapy, necessitating analysis of tumor cell subsets within the tumor mass. Elevated expression of hyaluronan (HA) and HA receptors, receptor for HA-mediated motility (RHAMM)/HA-mediated motility receptor and cluster designation 44 (CD44), in breast tumors correlates with poor outcome. We hypothesized that a probe for detecting HA–HA receptor interactions may reveal breast cancer (BCa) cell heterogeneity relevant to tumor progression. A fluorescent HA (F-HA) probe containing a mixture of polymer sizes typical of tumor microenvironments (10–480 kDa), multiplexed profiling, and flow cytometry were used to monitor HA binding to BCa cell lines of different molecular subtypes. Formulae were developed to quantify binding heterogeneity and to measure invasion in vivo. Two subsets exhibiting differential binding (HA−/low vs. HAhigh) were isolated and characterized for morphology, growth, and invasion in culture and as xenografts in vivo. F-HA–binding amounts and degree of heterogeneity varied with BCa subtype, were highest in the malignant basal-like cell lines, and decreased upon reversion to a nonmalignant phenotype. Binding amounts correlated with CD44 and RHAMM displayed but binding heterogeneity appeared to arise from a differential ability of HA receptor-positive subpopulations to interact with F-HA. HAhigh subpopulations exhibited significantly higher local invasion and lung micrometastases but, unexpectedly, lower proliferation than either unsorted parental cells or the HA−/low subpopulation. Querying F-HA binding to aggressive tumor cells reveals a previously undetected form of heterogeneity that predicts invasive/metastatic behavior and that may aid both early identification of cancer patients susceptible to metastasis, and detection/therapy of invasive BCa subpopulations. PMID:24733940

  2. Molecular ingredients of heterogeneous catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, G.A.

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a review and status report to those in theoretical chemistry of the rapidly developing surface science of heterogeneous catalysis. The art of catalysis is developing into science. This profound change provides one with opportunities not only to understand the molecular ingredients of important catalytic systems but also to develop new and improved catalyst. The participation of theorists to find answers to important questions is sorely needed for the sound development of the field. It is the authors hope that some of the outstanding problems of heterogeneous catalysis that are identified in this paper will be investigated. For this purpose the paper is divided into several sections. The brief Introduction to the methodology and recent results of the surface science of heterogeneous catalysis is followed by a review of the concepts of heterogeneous catalysis. Then, the experimental results that identified the three molecular ingredients of catalysis, structure, carbonaceous deposit and the oxidation state of surface atoms are described. Each section is closed with a summary and a list of problems that require theoretical and experimental scrutiny. Finally attempts to build new catalyst systems and the theoretical and experimental problems that appeared in the course of this research are described.

  3. Teaching about Heterogeneous Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals vary in their responses to incentives and opportunities. For example, additional education will affect one person differently than another. In recent years, econometricians have given increased attention to such heterogeneous responses and to the consequences of such responses for interpreting regression estimates, especially…

  4. Floodplain heterogeneity and meander migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The impact of horizontal heterogeneity of floodplain soils on rates and patterns of meander migration is analyzed with a Ikeda et al. (1981)-type model for hydrodynamics and bed morphodynamics, coupled with a physically-based bank erosion model according to the approach developed by Motta et al. (20...

  5. Heterogeneous porous media in hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababou, Rachid

    In natural geologic formations, flow and transport-related processes are perturbed by multidimensional and anisotropic material heterogeneities of diverse sizes, shapes, and origins (bedding, layering, inclusions, fractures, grains, for example). Heterogeneity tends to disperse and mix transported quantities and may initiate new transfer mechanisms not seen in ideally homogeneous porous media. Effective properties such as conductivity and dispersivity may not be simple averages of locally measured quantities.The special session, “Effective Constitutive Laws for Heterogeneous Porous Media,” convened at AGU's 1992 Fall Meeting in San Francisco, addressed these issue. Over forty-five contributions, both oral and poster, covering a broad range of physical phenomena were presented. The common theme was the macroscale characterization and modeling of flow and flow-related processes in geologic media that are heterogeneous at various scales (from grain size or fracture aperture, up to regional scales). The processes analyzed in the session included coupled hydro-mechanical processes; Darcy-type flow in the saturated, unsaturated, or two-phase regimes; tracer transport, dilution, and dispersion. These processes were studied for either continuous (porous) or discontinuous (fractured) media.

  6. Social Capital and Community Heterogeneity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffe, Hilde

    2009-01-01

    Recent findings indicate that more pronounced community heterogeneity is associated with lower levels of social capital. These studies, however, concentrate on specific aspects in which people differ (such as income inequality or ethnic diversity). In the present paper, we introduce the number of parties in the local party system as a more…

  7. Surface science of heterogeneous reactions.

    PubMed

    White, J M

    1982-10-29

    Some of the present and future directions for surface science as a growing and naturally interdisciplinary subject are reviewed. Particular attention is given to surface reaction chemistry as it is related to heterogenous catalysis, a subject area where there are abundant opportunities for detailed measurements of structure and dynamics at the molecular level.

  8. Flammability of Heterogeneously Combusting Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Peter D.

    1998-01-01

    Most engineering materials, including some metals, most notably aluminum, burn in homogeneous combustion. 'Homogeneous' refers to both the fuel and the oxidizer being in the same phase, which is usually gaseous. The fuel and oxidizer are well mixed in the combustion reaction zone, and heat is released according to some relation like q(sub c) = delta H(sub c)c[((rho/rho(sub 0))]exp a)(exp -E(sub c)/RT), Eq. (1) where the pressure exponent a is usually close to unity. As long as there is enough heat released, combustion is sustained. It is useful to conceive of a threshold pressure beyond which there is sufficient heat to keep the temperature high enough to sustain combustion, and beneath which the heat is so low that temperature drains away and the combustion is extinguished. Some materials burn in heterogeneous combustion, in which the fuel and oxidizer are in different phases. These include iron and nickel based alloys, which burn in the liquid phase with gaseous oxygen. Heterogeneous combustion takes place on the surface of the material (fuel). Products of combustion may appear as a solid slag (oxide) which progressively covers the fuel. Propagation of the combustion melts and exposes fresh fuel. Heterogeneous combustion heat release also follows the general form of Eq.(1), except that the pressure exponent a tends to be much less than 1. Therefore, the increase in heat release with increasing pressure is not as dramatic as it is in homogeneous combustion. Although the concept of a threshold pressure still holds in heterogeneous combustion, the threshold is more difficult to identify experimentally, and pressure itself becomes less important relative to the heat transfer paths extant in any specific application. However, the constants C, a, and E(sub c) may still be identified by suitable data reduction from heterogeneous combustion experiments, and may be applied in a heat transfer model to judge the flammability of a material in any particular actual

  9. Surface heterogeneity of small asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Sho

    A rubble pile model of asteroid origin would predict averaged rather homogeneous surface of an asteroid. Previous spacecraft observations (mostly S-type asteroids) did not show large color/albedo variation on the surface. Vesta would be exceptional since HST observation suggested that its surface should be heterogeneous due to the impact excavation of the interior. As for a young asteroid (832) Karin (age being 5Ma), Sasaki et al. (2004) detected variation of infrared spectra which could be explained by the difference of the space weathering degree. They discussed the possibility of the survival of the old surface. However, the variation was not confirmed by later observation (Chapman et al., 2007; Vernazza et al., 2007). Recent observation of a small (550m) asteroid Itokawa by Hayabusa spacecraft revealed that Itokawa is heterogeneous in color and albedo although the overall rocky structure is considered as a rubble pile (Saito et al., 2006). The color difference can be explained by the difference of weathering degree (Ishiguro et al., 2008). The heterogeneity could be explained by mass movement caused by rapid rotation from YORP effect (Scheeres et al., 2007) or seismic shaking (Sasaki, 2006). Probably small silicate asteroids without significant regolith could have heterogeneous in color and albedo. On large asteroids (˜ a few 10km), regolith reaccumulation should have covered the underlying heterogeneity. References: Chapman, C. R. et al (2007) Icarus, 191, 323-329 Ishiguro, M. et al. (2008) MAPS, in press. Saito, J. et al. (2006) Science, 312, 1341-1344 Sasaki, S. (2006) in Spacecraft Reconnaissance of Asteroid and Comet Interiors Sasaki, T. et al (2004) Astrophys. J. 615, L161-L164 Scheeres, D. J. (2007) Icarus 188, 425-429 Vernazza, P. et al. (2007) Icarus 191, 330-336.

  10. Heterogeneous differentiation patterns of individual CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Carmen; Rohr, Jan C; Perié, Leïla; van Rooij, Nienke; van Heijst, Jeroen W J; Velds, Arno; Urbanus, Jos; Naik, Shalin H; Jacobs, Heinz; Beltman, Joost B; de Boer, Rob J; Schumacher, Ton N M

    2013-05-03

    Upon infection, antigen-specific CD8(+) T lymphocyte responses display a highly reproducible pattern of expansion and contraction that is thought to reflect a uniform behavior of individual cells. We tracked the progeny of individual mouse CD8(+) T cells by in vivo lineage tracing and demonstrated that, even for T cells bearing identical T cell receptors, both clonal expansion and differentiation patterns are heterogeneous. As a consequence, individual naïve T lymphocytes contributed differentially to short- and long-term protection, as revealed by participation of their progeny during primary versus recall infections. The discordance in fate of individual naïve T cells argues against asymmetric division as a singular driver of CD8(+) T cell heterogeneity and demonstrates that reproducibility of CD8(+) T cell responses is achieved through population averaging.

  11. Subgroups Among Opiate Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berzins, Juris I.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    The principal objective of the present investigation was to delineate homogeneous MMPI profile subgroups (types) through multivariate clustering procedures and to compare the derived (replicable) types on measures of the components of "sociopathy" as well as on other psychometric devices. (Author)

  12. Opiate and opioid withdrawal

    MedlinePlus

    ... Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality. (2015). Behavioral health trends in the United States: Results from the 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (HHS Publication No. SMA 15-4927, NSDUH Series H-50). www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/ ...

  13. Dopamine receptor oligomerization visualized in living cells.

    PubMed

    O'Dowd, Brian F; Ji, Xiaodong; Alijaniaram, Mohammad; Rajaram, Ryan D; Kong, Michael M C; Rashid, Asim; Nguyen, Tuan; George, Susan R

    2005-11-04

    G protein-coupled receptors occur as dimers within arrays of oligomers. We visualized ensembles of dopamine receptor oligomers in living cells and evaluated the contributions of receptor conformation to the dynamics of oligomer association and dissociation, using a strategy of trafficking a receptor to another cellular compartment. We incorporated a nuclear localization sequence into the D1 dopamine receptor, which translocated from the cell surface to the nucleus. Receptor inverse agonists blocked this translocation, retaining the modified receptor, D1-nuclear localization signal (NLS), at the cell surface. D1 co-translocated with D1-NLS to the nucleus, indicating formation of homooligomers. (+)-Butaclamol retained both receptors at the cell surface, and removal of the drug allowed translocation of both receptors to the nucleus. Agonist-nonbinding D1(S198A/S199A)-NLS, containing two substituted serine residues in transmembrane 5 also oligomerized with D1, and both were retained on the cell surface by (+)-butaclamol. Drug removal disrupted these oligomerized receptors so that D1 remained at the cell surface while D1(S198A/S199A)-NLS trafficked to the nucleus. Thus, receptor conformational differences permitted oligomer disruption and showed that ligand-binding pocket occupancy by the inverse agonist induced a conformational change. We demonstrated robust heterooligomerization between the D2 dopamine receptor and the D1 receptor. The heterooligomers could not be disrupted by inverse agonists targeting either one of the receptor constituents. However, D2 did not heterooligomerize with the structurally modified D1(S198A/S199A), indicating an impaired interface for their interaction. Thus, we describe a novel method showing that a homogeneous receptor conformation maintains the structural integrity of oligomers, whereas conformational heterogeneity disrupts it.

  14. Sequence, Structure and Ligand Binding Evolution of Rhodopsin-Like G Protein-Coupled Receptors: A Crystal Structure-Based Phylogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Steffen; Grünewald, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) form the largest family of membrane receptors in the human genome. Advances in membrane protein crystallization so far resulted in the determination of 24 receptors available as high-resolution atomic structures. We performed the first phylogenetic analysis of GPCRs based on the available set of GPCR structures. We present a new phylogenetic tree of known human rhodopsin-like GPCR sequences based on this structure set. We can distinguish the three separate classes of small-ligand binding GPCRs, peptide binding GPCRs, and olfactory receptors. Analyzing different structural subdomains, we found that small molecule binding receptors most likely have evolved from peptide receptor precursors, with a rhodopsin/S1PR1 ancestor, most likely an ancestral opsin, forming the link between both classes. A light-activated receptor therefore seems to be the origin of the small molecule hormone receptors of the central nervous system. We find hints for a common evolutionary path of both ligand binding site and central sodium/water binding site. Surprisingly, opioid receptors exhibit both a binding cavity and a central sodium/water binding site similar to the one of biogenic amine receptors instead of peptide receptors, making them seemingly prone to bind small molecule ligands, e.g. opiates. Our results give new insights into the relationship and the pharmacological properties of rhodopsin-like GPCRs. PMID:25881057

  15. Rats that binge eat fat-rich food do not show somatic signs or anxiety associated with opiate-like withdrawal: implications for nutrient-specific food addiction behaviors.

    PubMed

    Bocarsly, Miriam E; Berner, Laura A; Hoebel, Bartley G; Avena, Nicole M

    2011-10-24

    Previous studies suggest that binge eating sugar leads to behavioral and neurochemical changes similar to those seen with drug addiction, including signs of opiate-like withdrawal. Studies are emerging that show multiple neurochemical and behavioral indices of addiction when animals overeat a fat-rich diet. The goal of the present study was to utilize liquid and solid diets high in sugar and fat content to determine whether opiate-like withdrawal is seen after binge consumption of these diets in Sprague-Dawley rats. Control groups were given ad libitum access to the sweet-fat food or standard chow. All rats were then given a battery of tests to measure signs of opiate-like withdrawal, which included somatic signs of distress, elevated plus-maze anxiety, and locomotor hypoactivity. Neither naloxone-precipitated (3 mg/kg) nor deprivation-induced withdrawal was observed in rats that were maintained on a nutritionally complete pelleted sweet-fat diet or a sweet, high-fat diet supplemented with standard rodent chow. Naloxone-precipitated withdrawal was also not seen in rats fed a liquid sweet-fat food. Further, body weight reduction to 85%, which is known to potentiate the reinforcing effects of substances of abuse, did not affect naloxone-precipitated signs of opiate-like withdrawal. Thus, unlike previous findings reported regarding rats with binge access to a sucrose solution, rats that binge eat sweet-fat combinations do not show signs of opiate-like withdrawal under the conditions tested. These data support the idea that excessive consumption of different nutrients can induce behaviors associated with addiction in different ways, and that the behaviors that could characterize "food addiction" may be subtyped based on the nutritional composition of the food consumed.

  16. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis inhibition: evidence for heterogeneity in IgE mast cell interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Lehrer, S B; McCants, M L; Farris, P N; Bazin, H

    1981-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that IgE molecules are heterogeneous with respect to ability to compete with IgE myeloma for sensitization of histamine release from chopped human lung and ability to passively sensitize human basophils for antigen-induced histamine release. These observations prompted further investigation of the possibility that there exists a functional heterogeneity in the IgE molecules with respect to mast-cell binding properties. Using eight different purified rat IgE myeloma proteins, we found that they differ in their ability to inhibit the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) reaction of mouse reaginic antisera. This suggests that IgE molecules differ in their ability to bind to mast cell receptors. Since maximal inhibition of different mouse reaginic antisera and mouse IgE hybridomas is achieved with different IgE myelomas, there may exist a functional heterogeneity in mast-cell binding receptors as well. PMID:7319556

  17. Biodiesel production using heterogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Semwal, Surbhi; Arora, Ajay K; Badoni, Rajendra P; Tuli, Deepak K

    2011-02-01

    The production and use of biodiesel has seen a quantum jump in the recent past due to benefits associated with its ability to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG). There are large number of commercial plants producing biodiesel by transesterification of vegetable oils and fats based on base catalyzed (caustic) homogeneous transesterification of oils. However, homogeneous process needs steps of glycerol separation, washings, very stringent and extremely low limits of Na, K, glycerides and moisture limits in biodiesel. Heterogeneous catalyzed production of biodiesel has emerged as a preferred route as it is environmentally benign needs no water washing and product separation is much easier. The present report is review of the progress made in development of heterogeneous catalysts suitable for biodiesel production. This review shall help in selection of suitable catalysts and the optimum conditions for biodiesel production.

  18. NASA GSFC Perspective on Heterogeneous Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Wesley A.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of NASA GSFC, our onboard processing applications, the applicability heterogeneous processing to these applications, and necessary developments to enable heterogeneous processing to be infused into our missions.

  19. The Role of GABAB Receptors in Morphine Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Ramshini, Effat; Alaei, Hojjatallah; Reisi, Parham; Alaei, Samaneh; Shahidani, Somaye

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is only little information about the effects of GABA receptors agonist and antagonist on morphine self-administration. Present study was designed to assess role of GABAB receptors in the regulation of morphine-reinforced self-administration. Methods: This study was performed in four groups of rats: (1) Saline group, which received saline in the self-administration session. (2) Morphine group, which received morphine in saline solution in the self-administration session. (3) Baclofen + Morphine group, which received both baclofen 20 min before self- administration test and morphine in the self-administration session. (4) Phaclofen + Morphine group, which received both phaclofen 20 min before self- administration test and morphine in the self-administration session. The number of lever pressing and self-infusion were recorded. Results: Morphine significantly increased the number of active lever pressing dose dependently in self-administration session in comparative with saline group. Administration of baclofen, 20 min before morphine self-administration produced significant decrease in the initiation of morphine self-administration during all session. Conversely, pre-treatment of phaclofen increased the number of active lever pressing and self-infusion in this test. Conclusion: Our results indicated a short-term treatment by baclofen, reduced morphine-maintenance response in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that GABAB receptor agonists could be useful for reversing the neuroadaptations related to opiates. PMID:23542877

  20. Temperature chaos and quenched heterogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barucca, Paolo; Parisi, Giorgio; Rizzo, Tommaso

    2014-03-01

    We present a treatable generalization of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) model which introduces correlations in the elements of the coupling matrix through multiplicative disorder on the single variables and investigate the consequences on the phase diagram. We define a generalized qEA parameter and test the structural stability of the SK results in this correlated case evaluating the de Almeida-Thouless line of the model. As a main result we demonstrate the increase of temperature chaos effects due to heterogeneities.