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Sample records for opiate receptor heterogeneity

  1. Characterization of opiate receptor heterogeneity using affinity ligands and phospholipase A/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Reichman, M.

    1985-01-01

    The primary aim of the dissertation was to study the heterogeneity of opiate receptors by utilizing affinity ligands, and by modification of the receptor lipid-microenvironment with phospholipase A/sub 2/ (PLA/sub 2/). The affinity ligands, 14-bromacetamidomorphine (BAM) and 14-chloroacetylnaltrexone (CAN), selectively inactivated high affinity dihydromorphine binding sites in an apparently irreversible manner (the inhibition was resistant to extensive washes of treated neural membrane homogenates). The inhibitory effect of PLA/sub 2/ (10 ng/ml) on opiate receptor subtypes was determined using (/sup 3/H)-dihydromorphine (..mu..-type agonist), (/sup 3/H)-enkephalin (delta agonist) and (/sup 3/H)-naloxone (..mu.. antagonist). PLA/sub 2/ abolished the high affinity antagonist binding site, whereas it inhibited high and low affinity agonist binding sites similarly. The results suggest that high affinity antagonist binding sites are different from high affinity agonist binding sites. Indirect binding assays demonstrated that the selectivities of ..mu..- and delta receptors are not affected significantly by PLA/sub 2/ treatment.

  2. Opiate Receptor Binding Properties of Carfentanil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    CHEMICAL O [RE CORN r RESEARCHL co -DEVELOPMENT & ENGINEERING CENTER,CRDEC-TR-88029 OPIATE RECEPTOR BINDING PROPERTIES OF CARFENTANIL DTIC .4J...TITLE (Include Security Classification) Opiate Receptor Binding Properties of Carfentanil 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Thompson, Roy G., Menking, Darrel...FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Opiates DELTA receptor 07 03 Carfentanil KAPPA receptor 15 06 03 Mil rpcentnr 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and

  3. Coffee contains potent opiate receptor binding activity.

    PubMed

    Boublik, J H; Quinn, M J; Clements, J A; Herington, A C; Wynne, K N; Funder, J W

    1983-01-20

    Opiate receptor-active peptide fragments (exorphins) have been identified recently in casein and gluten hydrolysates, and morphine has been found in bovine and human milk. To determine whether similar peptides or alkaloids occur in other foodstuffs, we have screened potential sources using a rat brain homogenate assay to detect opiate receptor activity. We report here that instant coffee powders from a variety of manufacturers compete with tritiated naloxone for binding to opiate receptors in the rat brain membrane preparations, with no significant difference between normal and decaffeinated coffee. The receptor binding activity resembles that seen with opiate antagonists, in that there was no change in the half-maximal effective dose (ED50) in the presence of 100 mM Na+; on bioassay, the activity was similarly shown to be antagonistic and specific for opiate-induced inhibition of twitch. Preliminary characterization of the activity reveals that it has a molecular weight (MW) in the range 1,000-3,500, is heat-stable, ether-extractable, not modified by enzymatic digestion with papain, and clearly separable from caffeine and morphine on TLC. As its concentration in an average cup of coffee is five times the ED50, these data suggest that drinking coffee may be followed by effects mediated via opiate receptors, as well as effects of caffeine.

  4. In vivo studies of opiate receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Duelfer, T.; Burns, H.D.; Ravert, H.T.; Langstroem, B.; Balasubramanian, V.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    To study opiate receptors noninvasively in vivo using positron emission tomography, techniques for preferentially labeling opiate receptors in vivo can be used. The rate at which receptor-bound ligand clears from the brain in vivo can be predicted by measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) at 37 degrees C in the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride and 100 microM guanyl-5'-imidodiphosphate, the drug distribution coefficient, and the molecular weight. A suitable ligand for labeling opiate receptors in vivo is diprenorphine, which binds to mu, delta, and kappa receptors with approximately equal affinity in vitro. However, in vivo diprenorphine may bind predominantly to one opiate receptor subtype, possibly the mu receptor. To predict the affinity for binding to the opiate receptor, a Hansch correlation was determined between the 50% inhibitory concentration for a series of halogen-substituted fentanyl analogs and electronic, lipophilic, and steric parameters. Radiochemical methods for the synthesis of carbon-11-labeled diprenorphine and lofentanil are presented.

  5. Imaging opiate receptors with positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Wong, D.F.; Links, J.M.; Burns, H.D.; Kuhar, M.J.; Snyder, S.H.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Opiate receptors exist in the mammalian brain and are thought to meditate the diverse pharmacological actions of the opiates, such as analgesia, euphoria, and sedation. The 4-carbomethoxyl derivatives of fentanyl, such as lofentanil and R31833 (4-carbomethoxyfentanyl) bind to the opiate receptor with high affinity. C-11 R31833 was synthesized by reacting C-11 methyl iodide with the appropriate carboxylate. Male ICR mice were injected intravenously with C-11 R31833 (5..mu..g/kg), killed 30 minutes later, and the brains rapidly dissected. The thalami, striata, and cerebral cortex are rich in opiate receptors, but the cerebellum contains a very low concentration of opiate receptors. The thalamus/cerebellum and striatum/cerebellum activity ratios, calculated per mg of wet tissue, were 4.1 and 5.2 respectively. Coinjection of 5mg/kg naloxone reduced the ratios to 1.1, which indicates that the preferential localization of C-11 R31833 in the thalami and striata is due to binding to opiate is due to binding to opiate receptors. A 22 kg anesthetized male baboon was imaged using the NeuroECAT after injection of 18.9 mCi of C-11 R13833 (0.50 ..mu..g/kg, specific activity 616 Ci/mmole at time of injection). From 15-70 minutes after injection preferential accumulation of activity could be seen in the thalami, caudate nuclei, and cerebral cortex and, conversely, low activity was demonstrated in the cerebellum. At one hour postinjection the maximum measured caudate/cerebellum activity ratio per pixel was 2.9. For the NeuroECAT the recovery coefficient for the baboon caudate is ca. 0.2-0.3, and therefore the actual caudate/cerebellum ratio is ca. 10-15.

  6. [Opiate receptors and endorphines (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Taube, H D

    1978-01-01

    Recent progress in narcotic drug research is briefly reviewed. Several investigators were able, independently to identify stereospecific opiate receptors, which mediate the specific effects of narcotic analgesics. A possible physiological importance of opiate receptors is likely, since endogenous ligands could be detected. Especially from brain and from pituitary glands of several species, quite a number of peptides with morphine-like effects could be isolated. The chemical structure of some of these endorphines could be analyzed. Endorphines are suggested to be involved in pain perception, electroanalgesia, acupuncture analgesia, psychiatric disorders, synthesis and release of pituitary hormones.

  7. Interaction of ethanol with opiate receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Yukhananov, R.Y.; Bujov, Y.V.; Maiskii, A.I.

    1986-04-01

    The authors study the action of ethanol on membrane-bound opiate receptors. Ethanol at 37/sup 0/C was shown to produce dose-dependent inhibition of binding of /sup 3/H-naloxone with opiate receptors. ID/sub 50/ under these conditions was 462 mM. Temperature-dependent inhibition of ligand-receptor binding suggests that ethanol does not compete for the stereospecific binding site of /sup 3/H-naloxone. Analysis of the inhibitory action of ethanol on /sup 3/H-naloxone binding in animals at different stages of experimental alcoholism revealed no differences between the control and experimental animals after 3.5 and 10 months of voluntary alcoholization.

  8. [Endorphines--the endogenous ligands of opiate receptors (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Teschemacher, H

    1978-01-01

    The demonstration of opiate receptors in the nervous tissue of vertebrates in 1973 was the starting point of an intensive search for the endogenous ligands of these receptors. During the following years, several of such "edogenous opiates", called "endorphines", were isolated from various tissues of the mammalian organism. These are peptides which are able to elicit the same effects as do opiates. Possibly, they play a role in the reaction of the organism to stress.

  9. Production of antibodies which recognize opiate receptors on murine leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, D.J.J.; Bost, K.L.; Blalock, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    An antibody has been developed which recognizes opiate receptors on cells of the immune system. This antibody blocks specific binding of the radiolabeled opiate receptor ligand, /sup 3/H-dihydromorphine, to receptors on murine splenocytes. Additionally, the anti-receptor antibody competes with ..beta..-endorphin, meta-enkephalin, and naloxone for the same binding site on the leukocytes. Moreover, the anti-receptor antibody possesses agonist activity similar to ..beta..-endorphin in suppressing cAMP production by lymphocytes. These results suggest the development of an antibody which recognizes classical opiate receptors on cells of the immune system.

  10. Iodothyronines and iodotyrosines as hypothetical receptors for catecholamines and opiates.

    PubMed

    Clur, A

    1985-02-01

    The signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism are similar to those of phaeochromocytoma and adrenergic stimulation. These changes have been attributed to increased beta receptor numbers in hyperthyroidism, resulting in adrenergic supersensitivity. Beta blockers are used in treatment of hyperthyroidism and inoperable phaeochromocytomas. Beta receptor numbers increase in direct proportion to the dose of thyroid hormone given. Hypothyroidism decreases the number of alpha and beta receptors with greater reduction in beta receptor numbers. Beta responses predominate in hyperthyroidism and alpha responses in hypothyroidism. Hypothyroid patients show increased sensitivity to opiates while hyperthyroid patients are tolerant to opiates. In the present paper it is proposed that the various iodothyronine amino acids are incorporated into the various catecholamine and opiate receptors, providing the phenyl binding sites in the receptors. T3 and T4 are proposed as part of beta 1 chronotropic and inotropic receptors and those mediating vasodilation. T2 and rT3 are proposed as part of alpha 1 and alpha 2 receptors and dopamine and opiate receptors. T2 is probably incorporated into beta 2 receptors causing bronchodilation. The different structural features of the various amino acids would account in part for the selectivity of various drugs for various receptors.

  11. Opiate receptor blockade on human granulosa cells inhibits VEGF release.

    PubMed

    Lunger, Fabian; Vehmas, Anni P; Fürnrohr, Barbara G; Sopper, Sieghart; Wildt, Ludwig; Seeber, Beata

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether the main opioid receptor (OPRM1) is present on human granulosa cells and if exogenous opiates and their antagonists can influence granulosa cell vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production via OPRM1. Granulosa cells were isolated from women undergoing oocyte retrieval for IVF. Complementary to the primary cells, experiments were conducted using COV434, a well-characterized human granulosa cell line. Identification and localization of opiate receptor subtypes was carried out using Western blot and flow cytometry. The effect of opiate antagonist on granulosa cell VEGF secretion was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. For the first time, the presence of OPRM1 on human granulosa cells is reported. Blocking of opiate signalling using naloxone, a specific OPRM1 antagonist, significantly reduced granulosa cell-derived VEGF levels in both COV434 and granulosa-luteal cells (P < 0.01). The presence of opiate receptors and opiate signalling in granulosa cells suggest a possible role in VEGF production. Targeting this signalling pathway could prove promising as a new clinical option in the prevention and treatment of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome.

  12. Opiate physical dependence and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors.

    PubMed

    Noda, Yukihiro; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2004-10-01

    The present review focused the involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in morphine physical dependence. The increased levels of extracellular glutamate, NMDA receptor zeta subunit (NR1) mRNA, NMDA receptor epsilon 1 subunit (NR2A) protein, phosphorylated Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase II (p-CaMKII) protein, c-fos mRNA, c-Fos protein, are observed in the specific brain areas of mice and/or rats showing signs of naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. In preclinical and clinical studies, a variety of NMDA receptor antagonists and pretreatment with an antisense oligonucleotide of the NR1 have been reported to inhibit the development, expression and/or maintenance of opiate physical dependence. In contrast to data obtained in adult animals, NMDA receptor antagonists are neither effective in blocking the development of opiate dependence nor the expression of opiate withdrawal in neonatal rats. In the NMDA receptor-deficient mice, the NR2A knockout mice show the marked loss of typical withdrawal abstinence behaviors precipitated by naloxone. The rescue of NR2A protein by electroporation into the nucleus accumbens of NR2A knockout mice reverses the loss of abstinence behaviors. The activation of CaMKII and increased expression of c-Fos protein in the brain of animals with naloxone-precipitated withdrawal syndrome are prevented by NMDA receptor antagonists, whereas the increased levels of extracellular glutamate are not prevented by them. These findings indicate that glutamatergic neurotransmission at the NMDA receptor site contributes to the development, expression and maintenance of opiate dependence, and suggest that NMDA receptor antagonists may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of opiate dependence.

  13. Photoaffinity labeling of opiate receptors using intrinsically photoactive /sup 3/H-opiates

    SciTech Connect

    Kooper, G.N.; Levinson, N.R.; Copeland, C.F.; Bowen, W.D.

    1988-03-01

    Opiate receptors in rat and cow brain membranes have been labeled irreversibly using the intrinsic photolability of 3H-opiates. Membranes were incubated with 3H-ligand and then irradiated with UV light of 254 nm. Nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of 10 microM unlabeled levallorphan. Irreversible binding was defined as binding which survived heat or acid denaturation of membranes. Specific incorporation of label into denatured samples was observed only when unbound or loosely bound 3H-ligand was washed free from the membranes prior to irradiation. There was a general correlation between photosensitivity of the 3H-ligand and its ability to photolabel receptors. Hence, photolabeling presumably results by covalent attachment of highly reactive species generated during photochemical decomposition of ligand. With 3H-etorphine, optimal irradiation time was 5 min. In addition to 3H-etorphine, receptors could be labeled irreversibly with 3H-oxymorphone, 3H-dihydromorphine, and 3H-ethylketocyclazocine. Of the specific binding present in irradiated, nondenatured samples, 45-60% remained attached to receptors upon denaturation. 3H-Ethylketocyclazocine exhibited an 86% yield of incorporation. Signal-to-noise levels of 50-80% could be achieved in denatured samples. Therefore, this method provides a means of covalently labeling opiate receptors in high yield and with high signal-to-noise ratios. The opioid peptides, 3H-D-Ala2,D-Leu5-enkephalin, 3H-D-Ser2,Leu5,Thr6-enkephalin, 3H-D-Ala2,Met5-enkephalin amide, and 3H-D-Ala2,N-MePhe4,Gly-ol5-enkephalin, as well as the benzomorphan, 3H-bremazocine, apparently lack the structural characteristics which allow photolabeling.

  14. A classification of opiate receptors that mediate antinociception in animals.

    PubMed Central

    Tyers, M. B.

    1980-01-01

    1 To investigate the opiate receptors that mediate antinociception, the activity profiles of opioid analgesic drugs have been determined against different nociceptive stimuli in the mouse and rat. 2 In tests that employ heat as the nociceptive stimulus, mu-opiate receptor agonists, such as morphine, pethidine and dextropropoxyphene, had steep and parallel dose-response curves and were capable of achieving maximum effects. In addition, the antinociceptive potency ratios of these drugs in heat tests were similar to those for analgesia in man. 3 The kappa-agonists, such as ethylketazocine, nalorphine, Mr2034 and pentazocine, were essentially inactive against heat nociception except at doses that caused sedation and motor incapacitation. 4 In the writhing and paw pressure tests both mu- and kappa-agonists produced steep and parallel dose-response curves. 5 It is concluded that both mu- and kappa-opiate receptors mediate antinociception in animals and that the interactions of analgesic drugs with these receptors may be classified in terms of their antinociceptive activities against qualitatively different nociceptive stimuli. PMID:6249436

  15. Opiate receptors and endorphins in the pathophysiology of hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Gurll, N J; Vargish, T; Reynolds, D G; Lechner, R B

    1981-03-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that endorphins released by stress act on opiate receptors to depress cardiovascular function during hemorrhagic shock. Anesthetized adult mongrel dogs were bled into a heparinized reservoir to achieve a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 45 mm Hg. The reservoir was adjusted to maintain MAP for 1 hour and then clamped for 1 hour, at the end of which time the shed blood was reinfused. While the reservoir was clamped we treated the animals with an intravenous bolus followed by 3-hour infusion of either 0.9% NaCl (as control) or the specific opiate receptor antagonist naloxone at three dose regimens (0.5, 1, or 2 mg/kg plus 0.5, 1, or 2 mg/kg . hr). Naloxone produced dose-dependent increases in MAP, cardiac output, stroke volume, and left ventricular contractility. Survival at 72 hours was related to the dose of naloxone used. None of six dogs treated at 0 mg/kg . hr survived, one of six survived at 0.5 mg/kg . hr, four of five at 1 mg/kg . hr, and five of five at 2 mg/kg . hr. Since naloxone has minimal effect on cardiovascular function in nonshocked dogs, these results implicate opiate receptors and perhaps endorphins in the cardiovascular pathophysiology of hemorrhagic shock.

  16. Pain and Opiate Receptors: Considerations for the Design of Positron Emission Tomography Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sadzot, B.; Frost, J. J.

    1990-01-01

    Opiate receptors in the brain are the target of endogenous opioids and of exogenous synthetic opiates. These receptors play a major role in the modulation of pain perception. Using the appropriate ligands, positron emission tomography now allows investigators to monitor neuroreceptors in vivo. We have used 11C-diprenorphine and the extremely potent mu opiate receptor agonist, 11C-carfentanil, to image the distribution of opiate receptors in the brain and to quantify their density, their affinity, and their occupancy. Several important aspects of the in vivo opiate receptor labeling with positron emission tomography in relation to the study of pain are considered in this paper. Monitoring receptor occupancy by opiate drugs as a function of pain relief has the potential to reveal better ways to treat pain. PMID:1964768

  17. Multiple opiate receptors in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Bhargava, H.N.

    1986-03-01

    The characteristics of ..mu.., delta and kappa -opiate receptors in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were determined using the receptor binding assays. The ligands used were /sup 3/H-naltrexone (..mu..), /sup 3/H-ethylketocyclazocine (EKC, kappa) and /sup 3/H-Tyr-D-Ser-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr (DSTLE, delta). Since EKC binds to ..mu.. and delta receptors in addition to kappa, the binding was done in the presence of 100 nM each of DAGO and DADLE to suppress ..mu.. and delta sites, respectively. All three ligands bound to brain membranes of WKY rats at a single high affinity site with the following B/sub max/ (fmol/mg protein) and K/sub d/ (nM) values: /sup 3/H-naltrexone (130.5; 0.43) /sup 3/H-EKC (19.8, 1.7) and /sup 3/H-DSTLE (139, 2.5). The binding of /sup 3/H-naltrexone and /sup 3/H-DSTLE in the brain of WKY and SH did not differ. A consistent increase (22%) in B/sub max/ of /sup 3/H-EKC was found in SHR compared to WKY rats. However, the K/sub d/ values did not differ. The increase in B/sub max/ was due to increases in hypothalamus and cortex. It is concluded that SH rats have higher density of kappa-opiate receptors, particularly in hypothalamus and cortex, compared to WKY rats, and that kappa-opiate receptors may be involved in the pathophysiology of hypertension.

  18. Perinatal undernutrition: changes in brain opiate receptor density.

    PubMed

    Kademian, Silvia; Pérez, Mariela F; Keller, Elizabeth A

    2002-02-01

    The present work sought to study the binding properties of central mu-opiate receptors in whole brain and in different central areas in adult rats undernourished at perinatal age. Rats were undernourished with a hypoproteic diet containing 8% casein from day 14 of gestation until 50 days of age. The animals were thereafter fed a balanced commercial chow until 140 days of age. At this time point the experiments started. 3H-D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol-enkephalin (3H-DAMGO) was used to selectively label the mu-receptors. The results obtained demonstrated that perinatal undernutrition induced, in the adult animal, a decreased mu-receptors density (Bmax) both in whole brain as well as in midbrain, without significant changes in affinity. In addition, no changes were found in mu-specific binding in the cortex of these undernourished animals. Taking into account that recent evidences from our laboratory have demonstrated a lower stress-induced analgesia following exposure to different stressful situations in rats undernourished in early life, the present findings seem to suggest that this lower analgesic response could be due, at least in part, to a lower density of mu-opiate receptors in the brain.

  19. Study of gastrointestinal opiate receptors: the role of the mu receptor on gastric emptying: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Lamki, L.; Sullivan, S.

    1983-08-01

    Animal and in vitro experiments suggest that opiates exert their actions by interaction with possibly five different subtypes of opiate receptors, identified as mu, kappa, sigma, delta, and epsilon. As yet there is no conclusive evidence for their existence in man. Our experiments on morphine and the enkephalin analog DAMME have suggested at least two types of opiate receptors involved in gastric secretion. In this study we have used the very powerful and nonselective opiate agonist etorphine to stimulate as many of the different opiate receptors as possible. We have then attempted to block selectively the ..mu.. receptor by administering a small dose of naloxone. Etorphine delayed gastric emptying whereas naloxone alone had no effect. In combination, the inhibitory effect of etorphine on gastric emptying was incompletely prevented while the subjective effects of etorphoine were completely abolished. These results may indicate that ..mu.. receptors are important in the regulation of gastric emptying, but that other (non-..mu..) receptors are also involved. The radionuclide study of gastric emptying, as used here, is a potentially powerful tool in physiological research on the gastrointestinal tract.

  20. Endomorphins: novel endogenous mu-opiate receptor agonists in regions of high mu-opiate receptor density.

    PubMed

    Zadina, J E; Martin-Schild, S; Gerall, A A; Kastin, A J; Hackler, L; Ge, L J; Zhang, X

    1999-01-01

    Endomorphin-1 (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH2, EM-1) and endomorphin-2 (Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2, EM-2) are peptides recently isolated from brain that show the highest affinity and selectivity for the mu (morphine) opiate receptor of all the known endogenous opioids. The endomorphins have potent analgesic and gastrointestinal effects. At the cellular level, they activate G-proteins (35S-GTP gamma-S binding) and inhibit calcium currents. Support for their role as endogenous ligands for the mu-opiate receptor includes their localization by radioimmunoassay and immunocytochemistry in central nervous system regions of high mu receptor density. Intense EM-2 immunoreactivity is present in the terminal regions of primary afferent neurons in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and in the medulla near high densities of mu receptors. Chemical (capsaicin) and surgical (rhizotomy) disruption of nociceptive primary afferent neurons depletes the immunoreactivity, implicating the primary afferents as the source of EM-2. Thus, EM-2 is well-positioned to serve as an endogenous modulator of pain in its earliest stages of perception. In contrast to EM-2, which is more prevalent in the spinal cord and lower brainstem, EM-1 is more widely and densely distributed throughout the brain than EM-2. The distribution is consistent with a role for the peptides in the modulation of diverse functions, including autonomic, neuroendocrine, and reward functions as well as modulation of responses to pain and stress.

  1. Alteration of dopamine receptor sensitivity by opiates and the subsequent effect of this alteration on opiate tolerance and dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether there is an alteration of dopamine receptor sensitivity following opiate administration, and whether this alteration has any influence on the development of opiate tolerance and dependence. Behavioral hypersensitivity to direct-acting dopamine agonists was observed in mice following acute or chronic morphine administration. Acute levorphanol administration also resulted in potentiation of dopamine agonist-induced behaviors. An increase in density of dopamine receptors, as measured by (/sup 3/H)butyrophenone binding accompanied the development of behavioral hypersensitivity. This increase was localized to the striatum, an area important in the mediation of dopamine-agonist induced behaviors. Naloxone or LiCl coadministered with the opiates prevented the development of hypersensitivity and the increase in density of dopamine receptors. Coadministration of lithium enhanced the development of acute and chronic tolerance. Lithium enhanced the development of dependence as determined by naloxone-induced hypothermia in chronically morphine-treated mice. Apomorphine enhanced naloxone-induced withdrawal in acutely dependent mice. This enhancement was blocked by coadministration of lithium with the opiates. These results suggest that dopamine receptor supersensitivity influences the degree of tolerance and dependence.

  2. Studies on rat intestinal epithelial cell receptors for serotonin and opiates.

    PubMed Central

    Gaginella, T S; Rimele, T J; Wietecha, M

    1983-01-01

    We have employed the receptor-ligand binding technique in an attempt to determine if specific binding sites (receptors) for serotonin and opiates are present on rat intestinal epithelial cell membranes. A wide variety of ligands for serotonin and opiate receptors bound to specific receptor sites in rat brain. However, the same ligands failed to bind in a specific (receptor-related) manner to isolated membranes of rat ileal and colonic cells. Additional washing of the tissue pellet (to remove soluble peptidases), pretreatment with p-chlorophenylalanine (to deplete endogenous serotonin), alteration of sodium concentration (to antagonize the effects of putative endogenous inhibitors of opiate ligand binding), changes in incubation time, temperature, tissue protein and tritiated ligand concentration failed to yield meaningful results with the enterocyte membranes. We conclude that, as assessed under the present conditions, serotonergic and opiate receptors are not present or are not accessible on rat intestinal epithelial cell membranes. PMID:6308215

  3. Opiates modulate thermosensation by internalizing cold receptor TRPM8.

    PubMed

    Shapovalov, George; Gkika, Dimitra; Devilliers, Maily; Kondratskyi, Artem; Gordienko, Dmitri; Busserolles, Jerome; Bokhobza, Alexandre; Eschalier, Alain; Skryma, Roman; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2013-08-15

    Stimulation of μ-opioid receptors (OPRMs) brings powerful pain relief, but it also leads to the development of tolerance and addiction. Ensuing withdrawal in abstinent patients manifests itself with severe symptoms, including cold hyperalgesia, often preventing addicted patients from successfully completing the rehabilitation. Unsurprisingly, OPRMs have been a central point of many studies. Nonetheless, a satisfactory understanding of the pathways leading to distorted sensory responses during opiate administration and abstinence is far from complete. Here, we present a mechanism that leads to modulation by OPRMs of one of the sensory responses, thermosensation. Activation of OPRM1 leads to internalization of a cold-sensor TRPM8, which can be reversed by a follow-up treatment with the inverse OPRM agonist naloxone. Knockout of TRPM8 protein leads to a decrease in morphine-induced cold analgesia. The proposed pathway represents a universal mechanism that is probably shared by regulatory pathways modulating general pain sensation in response to opioid treatment.

  4. [Opiate receptors and endorphins at the central nervous system level].

    PubMed

    Simon, E J

    1978-01-01

    Four years ago, sterospecific sites for the bending of opiates were discovered within the brain of animals and the human being. All of the properties of these sites are in conformity with the proposition that they are pharmacological receptors which have long been postulated for these drugs. The binding of morphine or of one of its derivatives to these sites should result in chemical or physical reactions leading to well known pharmacological responses. These reactions following the binding of drugs to the receptors are not yet known, but there is some evidence that cyclical nucleotides play a role. The affinity of a whole series of morphine derivatives, agonists and atagonists, is well correlated with their pharmacological effectiveness. In the presence of sodium salts, antagonists become more strongly bound and agonists less strongly than in the absence of sodium. The evidence is presented. This is explained by an equilibrium between two formations of the receptor: one characteristic of the absence of sodium and one of its presence. Receptors are found in the nervous system of all vertebrates and their distribution has been studied in the human brain. The regions with the highest concentration of receptors are those of the limbic system. A high level exists also in the "substantia gelatinosa" of the spinal cord, which is involved in the passage of painful messages. Study of the function of morphine receptors has led to the isolation, in animal brain, of a number of peptides with morphine properties named endorphines. The first two endorphines isolated were pentapeptides named encephalins. The properties of endorphines from the subject of several lecture in this course.

  5. Functional changes after prenatal opiate exposure related to opiate receptors' regulated alterations in cholinergic innervation.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Joseph; Huleihel, Rabab; Izrael, Michal; Metsuyanim, Sally; Shahak, Halit; Vatury, Ori; Yaniv, Shiri P

    2003-09-01

    Opioid drugs act primarily on the opiate receptors; they also exert their effect on other innervations resulting in non-opioidergic behavioural deficits. Similarly, opioid neurobehavioural teratogenicity is attested in numerous behaviours and neural processes which hinder the research on the mechanisms involved. Therefore, in order to be able to ascertain the mechanism we have established an animal (mouse) model for the teratogenicity induced by opioid abuse, which focused on behaviours related to specific brain area and innervation. Diacetylmorphine (heroin) and not morphine was applied because heroin exerts a unique action, distinguished from that of morphine. Pregnant mice were exposed to heroin (10 mg/kg per day) and the offspring were tested for behavioural deficits and biochemical alterations related to the septohippocampal cholinergic innervation. Some studies employing the chick embryo were concomitantly added as a control for the confounding indirect variables. Prenatal exposure to heroin in mice induced global hyperactivation both pre- and post-synaptic along the septohippocampal cholinergic innervation, including basal protein kinase C (PKC) activity accompanied by a desensitization of PKC activity in response to cholinergic agonist. Functionally, the heroin-exposed offspring displayed deficits in hippocampus-related behaviours, suggesting deficits in the net output of the septohippocampal cholinergic innervation. Grafting of cholinergic cells to the impaired hippocampus reversed both pre- and post-synaptic hyperactivity, resensitized PKC activity, and restored the associated behaviours to normality. Consistently, correlation studies point to the relative importance of PKC to the behavioural deficits. The chick model, which dealt with imprinting related to a different brain region, confirmed that the effect of heroin is direct. Taken together with studies by others on the effect of prenatal exposure to opioids on the opioidergic innervation and with what

  6. Ontogeny of opiate receptors in the rat medial preoptic area: Critical periods in regional development.

    PubMed

    Hammkr, R P

    1985-01-01

    Opiate receptor labeling was examined throughout the early postnatal period using autoradiography to localize and quantify [(3)H]naloxone binding to μ-type opiate receptors in the medial preoptic area (MPOA). This region begins to exhibit sexual dimorphism of volume and dendritic growth shortly after birth. A distinct concentration of opiate receptor labeling appears on postnatal day 3 in females: this labeling is directly associated with the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA). SDN-POA labeling becomes denser through postnatal day 10 in females and the densely labeled area increases in size to encompass and surround the SDN-POA. These changes in opiate receptor labeling occur only in females, since males show relatively uniform labeling across the region throughout the early postnatal period. The critical time of formation of dense MPOA opiate receptor labeling may be related to endogenous MPOA opioid function and to the critical period of dendritic growth of SDN-POA neurons. The timing of these critical periods and their focus in the SDN-POA are coincident. The possible role of MPOA opiate receptors in modulating growth of MPOA neurons is discussed.

  7. Opiate receptors in rat pituitary are confined to the neural lobe and are exclusively kappa.

    PubMed

    Herkenham, M; Rice, K C; Jacobson, A E; Rothman, R B

    1986-09-24

    The distribution and density of opiate receptor subtypes in rat pituitary were examined by quantitative autoradiography of tritiated ligand-binding to slide-mounted sections under conditions optimized to label mu, delta, or kappa opiate receptors. Mu and delta receptor-binding was virtually undetectable in the pituitary. Kappa receptor-binding was confined to the neural lobe where it was densest in the external rim. Autoradiographic silver grains in emulsion-coated, Nissl-stained sections were preferentially located between cells, suggesting kappa receptor localization on nerve terminals and/or processes of pituicytes.

  8. Cerebrocortical and medullary blood flow changes after general opiate receptor blockade during hemorrhagic shock in cats.

    PubMed

    Komjáti, K; Sandor, P; Sandor, N; Szirmai, L; H-Velkei, M; Kovach, A G

    1997-04-01

    The effect of centrally induced opiate receptor blockade on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was studied in anesthetized, ventilated cats during the course of hemorrhagic shock. The blood flow of the medulla and the parietal cortex was measured with the H2-gas clearance technique. Hemorrhagic shock was produced by lowering the systemic mean arterial pressure to 60 mmHg for 120 min by blood withdrawal. Central opiate receptor blockade was induced by 10 micrograms/kg intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) injected naloxone at the 60th min of the bleeding period. Cortical blood flow showed no improvement after i.c.v. naloxone administration. Medullary blood flow, however, increased significantly and approached the pre-bleeding control flow values following central opiate receptor blockade. The results indicate involvement of endogenous opioid mechanisms in the regulation of rCBF during hemorrhage and may provide an explanation for the previously described beneficial effects of naloxone in hemorrhagic shock.

  9. A differential role for the adenosine A2A receptor in opiate reinforcement vs opiate-seeking behavior.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robyn Mary; Short, Jennifer Lynn; Cowen, Michael Scott; Ledent, Catherine; Lawrence, Andrew John

    2009-03-01

    The adenosine A(2A) receptor is specifically enriched in the medium spiny neurons that make up the 'indirect' output pathway from the ventral striatum, a structure known to have a crucial, integrative role in processes such as reward, motivation, and drug-seeking behavior. In the present study we investigated the impact of adenosine A(2A) receptor deletion on behavioral responses to morphine in a number of reward-related paradigms. The acute, rewarding effects of morphine were evaluated using the conditioned place preference paradigm. Operant self-administration of morphine on both fixed and progressive ratio schedules as well as cue-induced drug-seeking was assessed. In addition, the acute locomotor response to morphine as well as sensitization to morphine was evaluated. Decreased morphine self-administration and breakpoint in A(2A) knockout mice was observed. These data support a decrease in motivation to consume the drug, perhaps reflecting diminished rewarding effects of morphine in A(2A) knockout mice. In support of this finding, a place preference to morphine was not observed in A(2A) knockout mice but was present in wild-type mice. In contrast, robust cue-induced morphine-seeking behavior was exhibited by both A(2A) knockout and wild-type mice after a period of withdrawal. The acute locomotor response to morphine in the A(2A) knockout was similar to wild-type mice, yet A(2A) knockout mice did not display tolerance to chronic morphine under the present paradigm. Both genotypes display locomotor sensitization to morphine, implying a lack of a role for the A(2A) receptor in the drug-induced plasticity necessary for the development or expression of sensitization. Collectively, these data suggest a differential role for adenosine A(2A) receptors in opiate reinforcement compared to opiate-seeking.

  10. Dopamine D2 receptor availability in opiate addicts at baseline and during naloxone precipitated withdrawal

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.J.; Volkow, N.D.; Logan, J. ||

    1996-05-01

    To determine if changes in dopamine activity contribute to the clinical presentation of opiate withdrawal we assessed dopamine (DA) D2 receptor availability in opiate-dependent subjects at baseline and during naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. DA D2 receptor availability was evaluated in eleven male heroine and methadone users using positron emission tomography (PET) and [11-C]raclopride and compared to eleven age matched male control subjects. Nine of the opiate-dependent subjects and two of the control were tested twice after placebo and naloxone (0.02 mg/kg) iv injection 7-10 min. prior to [11-C]raclopride. DA D2 receptor availability was measured using the ratio of the distribution volume in the region of interest (caudate, putamen and ventral striatum) to that in the cerebellum which is a function of B{sub max}/K{sub d}. DA D2 receptor availability in putamen was significantly lower in opiate-dependent subjects (3.44 {plus_minus} 0.4) than that in controls (3.97 {plus_minus} 0.45, p {ge} 0.009). Naloxone induced a short lasting withdrawal in all of the opiate-dependent subjects (79 {plus_minus} 17% of maximum withdrawal), but not in controls, with significant increase in pulse (p {le} 0.006), blood pressure (p {le} 0.0001), lacrimation (p {le} 0.01), muscle twitches (p {le} 0.01), annoyance (p {le} 0.005), anxiety (p {le} 0.0006), restlessness (p {le} 0.0005) and unhappiness (p {le} 0.001). DA D2 receptor availability in basal ganglia after naloxone administration was not different from that of baseline. These results document abnormalities in DA D2 receptors in opiate-dependent subjects. However, DA D2 availability did not change with naloxone-precipitated withdrawal.

  11. Effect of thyrotrophin releasing hormone on opiate receptors of the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Balashov, A.M.; Shchurin, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    It has recently been shown that the hypothalamic thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) has the properties of a morphine antagonist, blocking its inhibitory action on respiration and, to a lesser degree, its analgesic action. This suggests that the antagonistic effects of TRH are mediated through its interaction with opiate receptors. The aim of this paper is to study this hypothesis experimentally. Tritium-labelled enkephalins in conjunction with scintillation spectroscopy were used to assess the receptor binding behavior. The results indicate the existence of interconnections between the opiate systems and TRH. Although it is too early to reach definite conclusions on the mechanisms of this mutual influence and its physiological significance it can be tentatively suggested that TRH abolishes the pharmacological effects of morphine by modulating the functional state of opiate reception.

  12. Involvement of brain opiate receptors in the immune-suppressive effect of morphine.

    PubMed Central

    Shavit, Y; Depaulis, A; Martin, F C; Terman, G W; Pechnick, R N; Zane, C J; Gale, R P; Liebeskind, J C

    1986-01-01

    We previously reported that a single systemic injection of a high dose of morphine (greater than or equal to 20 mg/kg) transiently suppresses splenic natural killer cell cytotoxicity in rats. The present study examined the possibility that the immune-suppressive effect of morphine is mediated by opiate receptors in the brain. Supporting this hypothesis, we found that morphine (20 or 40 micrograms) injected into the lateral ventricle suppressed natural killer cell activity to the same degree as a systemic dose higher by three orders of magnitude. This effect was blocked by an opiate antagonist, naltrexone. Natural killer cell activity was unaffected by systemic administration of N-methyl morphine, a morphine analogue that does not cross the blood-brain barrier. These data implicate opiate receptors in the brain in morphine-induced suppression of natural killer cell cytotoxicity. Images PMID:3018757

  13. Angiotensin II receptor heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Herblin, W.F.; Chiu, A.T.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L. )

    1991-04-01

    The possibility of receptor heterogeneity in the angiotensin II (AII) system has been suggested previously, based on differences in Kd values or sensitivity to thiol reagents. One of the authors earliest indications was the frequent observation of incomplete inhibition of the binding of AII to adrenal cortical membranes. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated that all of the labeling of the rat adrenal was blocked by unlabeled AII or saralasin, but not by DuP 753. The predominant receptor in the rat adrenal cortex (80%) is sensitive to dithiothreitol (DTT) and DuP 753, and is designated AII-1. The residual sites in the adrenal cortex and almost all of the sites in the rat adrenal medulla are insensitive to both DTT and DuP 753, but were blocked by EXP655. These sites have been confirmed by ligand binding studies and are designated AII-2. The rabbit adrenal cortex is unique in yielding a nonuniform distribution of AII-2 sites around the outer layer of glomerulosa cells. In the rabbit kidney, the sites on the glomeruli are AII-1, but the sites on the kidney capsule are AII-2. Angiotensin III appears to have a higher affinity for AII-2 sites since it inhibits the binding to the rabbit kidney capsule but not the glomeruli. Elucidation of the distribution and function of these diverse sites should permit the development of more selective and specific therapeutic strategies.

  14. The effect of hyperthyroidism on opiate receptor binding and pain sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, E.A. ); Bonnet, K.A.; Friedhoff, A.J. )

    1990-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of thyroid hormone on opiate receptor ligand-binding and pain sensitivity. Specific opiate receptor-binding was performed on brain homogenates of Swiss-Webster mice. There was a significant increase in {sup 3}H-naloxone-binding in thyroxine-fed subjects (hyperthyroid). Scatchard analysis revealed that the number of opiate receptors was increased in hyperthyroid mice (Bmax = 0.238 nM for hyperthyroid samples vs. 0.174 nM for controls). Binding affinity was unaffected (Kd = 1.54 nM for hyperthyroid and 1.58 nM for control samples). When mice were subjected to hotplate stimulation, the hyperthyroid mice were noted to be more sensitive as judged by pain aversion response latencies which were half that of control animals. After morphine administration, the hyperthyroid animals demonstrated a shorter duration of analgesia. These findings demonstrate that thyroxine increases opiate receptor number and native pain sensitivity but decreases the duration of analgesia from morphine.

  15. Conformationally restricted analogs of somatostatin with high mu-opiate receptor specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Pelton, J T; Gulya, K; Hruby, V J; Duckles, S P; Yamamura, H I

    1985-01-01

    A series of cyclic, conformationally restricted analogs of somatostatin have been prepared and tested for their ability to inhibit the binding of [3H]naloxone and [D-Ala2, D-Leu5] [3H]enkephalin to rat brain membranes. The most potent analog, D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Lys-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 where Pen is penicillamine in [D-Phe5, Cys6, Tyr7, D-Trp8, Pen11]somatostatin-(5-12)-octapeptide amide, exhibited high affinity for mu-opiate receptors (IC50 value of [3H]naloxone = 3.5 nM), being 7800 times more potent than somatostatin. The cyclic octapeptide also displayed high mu-opiate receptor selectivity with an IC50 [( D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin)/IC50 (naloxone) ratio of 271. The high affinity and selectivity of the somatostatin analog for mu-opiate receptors may be of use in examining the physiological role(s) of the mu-opiate receptor. PMID:2857488

  16. Involvement of neuropeptide FF receptors in neuroadaptive responses to acute and chronic opiate treatments

    PubMed Central

    Elhabazi, K; Trigo, JM; Mollereau, C; Moulédous, L; Zajac, J-M; Bihel, F; Schmitt, M; Bourguignon, JJ; Meziane, H; Petit-demoulière, B; Bockel, F; Maldonado, R; Simonin, F

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Opiates remain the most effective compounds for alleviating severe pain across a wide range of conditions. However, their use is associated with significant side effects. Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptors have been implicated in several opiate-induced neuroadaptive changes including the development of tolerance. In this study, we investigated the consequences of NPFF receptor blockade on acute and chronic stimulation of opioid receptors in mice by using RF9, a potent and selective antagonist of NPFF receptors that can be administered systemically. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of RF9 were investigated on opioid pharmacological responses including locomotor activity, antinociception, opioid-induced hyperalgesia, rewarding properties and physical dependence. KEY RESULTS RF9 had no effect on morphine-induced horizontal hyperlocomotion and slightly attenuated the decrease induced in vertical activity. Furthermore, RF9 dose-dependently blocked the long-lasting hyperalgesia produced by either acute fentanyl or chronic morphine administration. RF9 also potentiated opiate early analgesic effects and prevented the development of morphine tolerance. Finally, RF9 increased morphine-induced conditioned place preference without producing any rewarding effect by itself and decreased naltrexone-precipitated withdrawal syndrome following chronic morphine treatment. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS The NPFF system is involved in the development of two major undesirable effects: tolerance and dependence, which are clinically associated with prolonged exposure to opiates. Our findings suggest that NPFF receptors are interesting therapeutic targets to improve the analgesic efficacy of opiates by limiting the development of tolerance, and for the treatment of opioid dependence. PMID:21718302

  17. The corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-2 mediates the motivational effect of opiate withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Rouibi, Khalil; Contarino, Angelo

    2013-10-01

    Altered motivational processes are key features of drug dependence and withdrawal, yet their neural mechanisms remain largely unknown. The present study shows that genetic disruption of the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-2 (CRF₂-/-) does not impair motivation for palatable food in drug-naïve mice. However, CRF₂ receptor-deficiency effectively reduces the increase in palatable food-driven motivation induced by opiate withdrawal. Indeed, both in male and female wild-type mice, withdrawal from escalating morphine doses (20-100 mg/kg) induces a dramatic and relatively long-lasting (6 days) increase in palatable food-driven operant behavior under a progressive ratio (PR) schedule of reinforcement. In contrast, either male or female morphine-withdrawn CRF₂-/- mice show smaller and shorter (2 days) increases in motivation than wild-type mice. Nevertheless, CRF₂ receptor-deficiency does not impair the ability to discriminate reinforced behavior prior to, during the partial opiate withdrawal periods occurring between morphine injections and following drug discontinuation, indicating preserved cognitive function. Moreover, CRF₂ receptor-deficiency does not affect the ambulatory or body weight effects of intermittent morphine injections and withdrawal. These results provide initial evidence of a gender-independent and specific role for the CRF₂ receptor in the motivational effects of opiate withdrawal.

  18. Upregulation of IRAS/nischarin (I1-imidazoline receptor), a regulatory protein of μ-opioid receptor trafficking, in postmortem prefrontal cortex of long-term opiate and mixed opiate/cocaine abusers.

    PubMed

    Keller, Benjamin; La Harpe, Romano; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2017-09-01

    Imidazoline receptor antisera-selected (IRAS)/nischarin, a putative I1-imidazoline receptor, has recently been shown to regulate μ-opioid receptor (OR) trafficking and resensitisation. To study a possible involvement of this μ-OR regulator in opiate dependence, the present study assessed by Western blot analysis the contents of IRAS/nischarin and μ-OR in total homogenates and subcellular preparations of postmortem human prefrontal cortex (PFC/BA9) of long-term opiate and mixed opiate/cocaine abusers as well as of matched healthy control subjects. In the PFC/BA9 of long-term opiate/cocaine abusers (all subjects together) IRAS/nischarin content was increased (+67%, p < 0.01, n = 11) when compared with matched controls (n = 10). Similar increases were found for the subgroups of opiate (+72%, n = 6) and mixed opiate/cocaine (+61%, n = 5) abusers. IRAS/nischarin immunocontents were also found increased in subcellular membrane preparations (+61%, p < 0.05, n = 10) of PFC/BA9 from opiate addicts. In the same brain samples, the levels of μ-OR were not different to those in control subjects. Based on the increased contents in brains of opiate abusers and the reported function as μ-OR regulator, IRAS/nischarin could represent a new promising target for treatment of opiate use disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Light microscopic localization of brain opiate receptors: a general autoradiographic method which preserves tissue quality

    SciTech Connect

    Herkenham, M.; Pert, C.B.

    1982-08-01

    A general technique is described for using slide-mounted unfixed tissue sections to characterize and visualize drug and neurotransmitter receptors in brain or other tissues. The preparation of material, from fresh frozen, unfixed brain to dried sections securely attached to slides, is described in detail. The tissue can be kept intact during incubation at varying temperatures in solutions containing radiolabeled ligand, ions, buffers, and allosteric effectors. Strategies are described for determining optimal stereospecific binding with highest signal-to-noise ratios and for determining that a meaningful receptor is being studied. Dry formaldehyde fixation by vapors from heated paraformaldehyde preserves the tissue quality and traps the ligand near its site on the receptor, permitting subsequent histological processing through alcohols, solvents, and aqueous media, including liquid nuclear track emulsion. Visualization of (/sup 3/H)naloxone- or (/sup 3/H)enkephalin-labeled opiate receptor distributions in rat and human brains is achieved by tritium-sensitive film or by classical wet emulsion autoradiography. The advantages of the film include its ease of use and the ability to quantify receptor density by densitometry which can be computer-assisted. The advantage of the emulsion is the greater resolution and the concomitant appearance of morphology in cell-stained sections. Examples of correlations of opiate receptor distributions which underlying cytoarchitecture illustrate the potential for receptor localization studies.

  20. Hypertensive response following stimulation of opiate receptors in the caudal ventrolateral medulla.

    PubMed

    Willette, R N; Punnen, S; Krieger, A J; Sapru, H N

    1984-04-01

    In urethane-anesthetized rats, vasodepressor neuron pools were located bilaterally in and adjacent to the A1 area of the ventrolateral medulla by injecting the neuroexcitatory amino acid, L-glutamate. Ventrolateral vasodepressor areas included the caudalateral part of the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis, the rostrolateral part of the nucleus reticularis ventralis, and the dorsal nucleus reticularis lateralis. In the ventrolateral vasodepressor areas L-glutamate elicited a transient fall in blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). The opiate agonist (D-ala2-met5)-enkephalinamide (DAME) was used to stimulate opiate receptors in vasodepressor sites, identified with L-glutamate. In these sites, bilateral injections (0.1 microliter/site) of DAME caused a dose-related (2.5-500.0 ng) increase in blood pressure and heart rate, as well as exaggeration of the response to occlusion of the carotid. The effects of DAME on blood pressure were completely abolished by alpha-adrenergic blockade (phentolamine, 2 mg/kg, i.v.) and all effects of DAME were reversed by the administration of naloxone HCl (1 mg/kg, i.v.). Naloxone reversal was accompanied by an unexpected "rebound" hypertension. Saline had no significant effects when injected, or administered intravenously, in the absence or presence of DAME. It was concluded that stimulation of opiate receptors in the ventrolateral vasodepressor areas activated sympathetic outflow. An enkephalinergic system in this area of the brain stem may serve to modulate blood pressure, heart rate and cardiovascular reflexes.

  1. Phencyclidine (angel dust)/sigma "opiate" receptor: visualization by tritium-sensitive film.

    PubMed Central

    Quirion, R; Hammer, R P; Herkenham, M; Pert, C B

    1981-01-01

    [3H]Phencyclidine ([3H]PCP) binds specifically to an apparently single class of binding sites on slide-mounted sections of rat olfactory bulb (Kd = 46 nM; Bmax = 10.5 fmol per slice). Bound [3H]PCP can be displaced by nonradioactive PCP and a series of its analogs with relative potencies that correlate closely (P less than 0.001) with values determined in a rat discrimination test that utilized PCP as a cue. Although morphine, naloxone, and opiate peptides do not displace bound [3H]PCP, psychotomimetic benzomorphans, classed as "sigma opiates," are quite potent displacers in vitro and have PCP-like behavioral properties in vivo. These results suggest that phencyclidine and the sigma opiates act at the same sites. [3H]PCP binding sites were visualized by using tritium-sensitive LKB film analyzed by computerized densitometry and color coding. The [3H]PCP binds most densely to cortical areas, diffusely in neocortex, and somewhat heterogeneously in the laminae of the hippocampal formation and dentate gyrus. Most of the brainstem and spinal cord show low specific [3H]PCP binding, with gray matter generally showing more binding than white. Images PMID:6272322

  2. Exposure to Opiates in Female Adolescents Alters Mu Opiate Receptor Expression and Increases the Rewarding Effects of Morphine in Future Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Vassoler, Fair M.; Wright, Siobhan J.; Byrnes, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Prescription opiate use and abuse has increased dramatically over the past two decades, including increased use in adolescent populations. Recently, it has been proposed that use during this critical period may affect future offspring even when use is discontinued prior to conception. Here, we utilize a rodent model to examine the effects of adolescent morphine exposure on the reward functioning of the offspring. Female Sprague Dawley rats were administered morphine for 10 days during early adolescence (post-natal day 30–39) using an escalating dosing regimen. Animals then remained drug free until adulthood at which point they were mated with naïve males. Adult offspring (F1 animals) were tested for their response to morphine-induced (0, 1, 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg, s.c.) conditioned place preference (CPP) and context-independent morphine-induced sensitization. Naïve littermates were used to examine mu opiate receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area. Results indicate that F1 females whose mothers were exposed to morphine during adolescence (Mor-F1) demonstrate significantly enhanced CPP to the lowest doses of morphine compared with Sal-F1 females. There were no differences in context-independent sensitization between maternal treatment groups. Protein expression analysis showed significantly increased levels of accumbal mu opiate receptor in Mor-F1 offspring and decreased levels in the VTA. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a shift in the dose response curve with regard to the rewarding effects of morphine in Mor-F1 females which may in part be due to altered mu opiate receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens and VTA. PMID:26700246

  3. Exposure to opiates in female adolescents alters mu opiate receptor expression and increases the rewarding effects of morphine in future offspring.

    PubMed

    Vassoler, Fair M; Wright, Siobhan J; Byrnes, Elizabeth M

    2016-04-01

    Prescription opiate use and abuse has increased dramatically over the past two decades, including increased use in adolescent populations. Recently, it has been proposed that use during this critical period may affect future offspring even when use is discontinued prior to conception. Here, we utilize a rodent model to examine the effects of adolescent morphine exposure on the reward functioning of the offspring. Female Sprague Dawley rats were administered morphine for 10 days during early adolescence (post-natal day 30-39) using an escalating dosing regimen. Animals then remained drug free until adulthood at which point they were mated with naïve males. Adult offspring (F1 animals) were tested for their response to morphine-induced (0, 1, 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg, s.c.) conditioned place preference (CPP) and context-independent morphine-induced sensitization. Naïve littermates were used to examine mu opiate receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area. Results indicate that F1 females whose mothers were exposed to morphine during adolescence (Mor-F1) demonstrate significantly enhanced CPP to the lowest doses of morphine compared with Sal-F1 females. There were no differences in context-independent sensitization between maternal treatment groups. Protein expression analysis showed significantly increased levels of accumbal mu opiate receptor in Mor-F1 offspring and decreased levels in the VTA. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a shift in the dose response curve with regard to the rewarding effects of morphine in Mor-F1 females which may in part be due to altered mu opiate receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens and VTA.

  4. NMDA receptor hypofunction in the prelimbic cortex increases sensitivity to the rewarding properties of opiates via dopaminergic and amygdalar substrates.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Stephanie F; Lauzon, Nicole M; Bechard, Melanie; Gholizadeh, Shervin; Laviolette, Steven R

    2011-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays a significant role in associative learning and memory formation during the opiate addiction process. Various lines of evidence demonstrate that glutamatergic (GLUT) transmission through the N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor can modulate neuronal network activity within the mPFC and influence dopaminergic signaling within the mesocorticolimbic pathway. However, little is known about how modulation of NMDA receptor signaling within the mPFC may regulate associative opiate reward learning and memory formation. Using a conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure, we examined the effects of selective NMDA receptor blockade directly within the prelimbic cortex (PLC) during the acquisition of associative opiate reward learning. NMDA receptor blockade specifically within the PLC caused a strong potentiation in the rewarding effects of either systemic or intra-ventral tegmental area (intra-VTA) morphine administration. This reward potentiation was dose dependently blocked by coadministration of dopamine D1 or D2 receptor antagonists and by blockade of presynaptic GLUT release. In addition, pharmacological inactivation of the basolateral amygdala (BLA) also prevented intra-PLC NMDA receptor blockade-induced potentiation of opiate reward signals, demonstrating a functional interaction between inputs from the VTA and BLA within the PLC, during the encoding and modulation of associative opiate reward information.

  5. Targeted expression of μ-opioid receptors in a subset of striatal direct-pathway neurons restores opiate reward.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yijun; Ostlund, Sean B; James, Alex S; Park, Chang Sin; Ge, Weihong; Roberts, Kristofer W; Mittal, Nitish; Murphy, Niall P; Cepeda, Carlos; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Levine, Michael S; Jentsch, James David; Walwyn, Wendy M; Sun, Yi E; Evans, Christopher J; Maidment, Nigel T; Yang, X William

    2014-02-01

    μ-opioid receptors (MORs) are necessary for the analgesic and addictive effects of opioids such as morphine, but the MOR-expressing neuronal populations that mediate the distinct opiate effects remain elusive. Here we devised a new conditional bacterial artificial chromosome rescue strategy to show, in mice, that targeted MOR expression in a subpopulation of striatal direct-pathway neurons enriched in the striosome and nucleus accumbens, in an otherwise MOR-null background, restores opiate reward and opiate-induced striatal dopamine release and partially restores motivation to self administer an opiate. However, these mice lack opiate analgesia or withdrawal. We used Cre-mediated deletion of the rescued MOR transgene to establish that expression of the MOR transgene in the striatum, rather than in extrastriatal sites, is needed for the restoration of opiate reward. Our study demonstrates that a subpopulation of striatal direct-pathway neurons is sufficient to support opiate reward-driven behaviors and provides a new intersectional genetic approach to dissecting neurocircuit-specific gene function in vivo.

  6. Modification of the development of acute opiate tolerance by increased dopamine receptor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Martin, J R; Takemori, A E

    1987-04-01

    Earlier studies have suggested that the acute administration of an opiate can result in the development of supersensitive dopamine receptors. The present study was undertaken to determine whether the supersensitive dopamine receptors can modify the development of opiate tolerance and dependence. Administration of morphine (100 mg/kg s.c.) 6 or 24 hr before apomorphine (i.p.) potentiated apomorphine-induced climbing behavior in mice. Administration of levorphanol (12 mg/kg s.c.) 3 or 6 hr, but not 24 hr, before apomorphine also potentiated apomorphine-induced climbing behavior. Coadministration of 5 mEq/kg of LiCl with morphine or levorphanol attenuated the increased sensitivity developed to apomorphine after either opiate. Acute tolerance and dependence was induced by administration of 100 mg/kg of morphine or 12 mg/kg of levorphanol. Lithium enhanced the development of acute tolerance when coadministered with morphine 3, 6 or 24 hr before test doses of morphine, or with levorphanol 3 hr before test doses of levorphanol. Administration of apomorphine 5 min before naloxone significantly decreased the naloxone ED50 for inducing withdrawal jumping in mice that had been pretreated with morphine or levorphanol. Although coadministration of lithium with morphine or levorphanol had no significant effect on naloxone-induced withdrawal jumping, it attenuated the ability of apomorphine to decrease naloxone ED50. Morphine (100 mg/kg s.c.) increased the number of whole brain [3H]spiroperidol binding sites 3 and 6 hr after administration of morphine. This increase was no longer present 24 hr after morphine administration. Levorphanol (12 mg/kg s.c.) also increased the number of binding sites 3 hr after administration. Coadministration of lithium with morphine attenuated the increase in [3H]spiroperidol binding sites.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Morphine stimulates phagocytosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by human microglial cells: involvement of a G protein-coupled opiate receptor.

    PubMed

    Peterson, P K; Gekker, G; Hu, S; Sheng, W S; Molitor, T W; Chao, C C

    1995-01-01

    Opiate-induced immunosuppression has been implicated in the pathogenesis of infections caused by a variety of microorganisms, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Although effects of opiates on lymphocyte function have been studied more extensively, morphine also has been shown to inhibit several functional activities of mononuclear phagocytes (e.g. chemotaxis, respiratory burst activity and phagocytosis). Opiate addiction has been identified as a risk factor for clinical tuberculosis prior to the HIV epidemic, and macrophages are a key cell in the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Thus, the hypothesis was tested in the present study that morphine would suppress phagocytosis of M. tuberculosis by human microglial cells, the resident macrophages of the brain. Contrary to this hypothesis, treatment of human fetal microglial cell cultures with morphine (10(-8) M) was found to stimulate phagocytosis of nonopsonized M. tuberculosis H37Rv. The stimulatory effect of morphine was blocked by naloxone and the mu opiate receptor selective antagonist beta-funaltrexamine. Also, morphine-induced increase in phagocytic activity was markedly inhibited by pertussis toxin and was unaffected by cholera toxin, suggesting the mechanism of morphine's stimulatory effect on microglial cell phagocytosis involves a Gi protein-coupled mu opiate receptor. The results of this in vitro study support the concept that exogenous and endogenous opioids play an immunomodulatory role within the central nervous system through their interaction with G protein-coupled receptors on microglial cells.

  8. Photoaffinity labeling of opiate receptors with /sup 3/H-etorphine: possible species differences in glycosylation

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, W.D.; Kooper, G.

    1986-01-01

    Opiate receptors from whole rat brain (minus cerebellum) and cow striatum were labeled irreversibly using the intrinsic photolability of /sup 3/H-etorphine. After incubation with 2 nM /sup 3/H-etorphine and centrifugal washing, membranes were irradiated with light of 254 nm. Non-specific binding was determined by carrying out incubations in presence and absence of 10 microM levallorphan. Specific binding in photolabeled membranes was 75-80%, with a photo-incorporation yield of approximately 50%. Photolabeled membranes were extracted with CHAPS/Lubrol and unbound /sup 3/H-etorphine was removed by dialysis and passage over Sephadex G-25. Solubilized proteins were then subjected to chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin, and retained proteins were eluted with N-acetyl D-glucosamine (NAG). Protein profiles from rat brain and cow striatum were identical, with 89% of the total protein flowing through unretained and 11% eluted by NAG. However, the profile of radioactivity was markedly different in the two species. With rat, the specific activity (cpm/A280) was the same for flow-through and NAG-eluate. With cow, the specific activity of the NAG-eluate was 17 times greater than the flow-through. These results indicate that cow striatum and rat whole brain contain populations of opiate receptors which are glycosylated differently.

  9. Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of [3H]carfentanil binding to mu opiate receptors in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, L W; Teitler, M

    1993-06-01

    Fentanyl and its derivatives are considered among the most potent opiate analgesic/euphoriants. The pharmacological literature generally supports a mu opiate receptor site of action for the fentanyl derivatives, but some observations suggest that other sites of action may be involved in producing the extremely potent fentanyl effects. In order to investigate the mechanism of action of fentanyl-like drugs further, [3H]carfentanil was used as a radioligand to image high-affinity carfentanil binding sites in slidemounted sections of the rat brain (receptor autoradiography). In parallel studies the prototypical mu opiate agonist radioligand [3H]DAMGO ([D-Ala2-MePhe4-Gly-ol5]enkephalin) was also used. The working hypothesis was that if carfentanil was acting through another high-affinity site besides the mu opiate receptor, the distribution pattern of the autoradiographic image produced by [3H]carfentanil should be significantly different than the autoradiographic pattern displayed by the well-characterized and selective mu opiate [3H]DAMGO. Thirty-five brain regions were examined for specific [3H]carfentanil and [3H]DAMGO binding. The absolute and relative densities of the sites were essentially identical. The highest levels of binding were observed in the "patch" areas of the striatum (131 +/- 5 fmol/mg T.E. for [3H]carfentanil; 162 +/- 13 fmol/mg T.E. for [3H]DAMGO). The lowest levels were observed in the cerebellum where no specific binding of either radioligand was observed. The overall distribution pattern of the two radioligands produced a correlation coefficient of 0.95; the distribution pattern was prototypical for the mu opiate receptor as reported previously by other groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Potential probe for examining opiate-receptor interactions: model compound study of dynamic effects on /sup 15/N INEPT enhancements

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, K.H.; Mikita, M.A.

    1987-10-01

    Model systems were chosen in an attempt to mimic the proton exchange environment of an agonist nitrogen in an opiate-receptor interaction. The two model systems studied were an ammonium: 18-crown-6 ether complex and a quinuclidine-trifluoroacetic acid ion pair. Each system was examined for their effects on /sup 15/N NMR INEPT enhancements. Both models were found to retard proton exchange dynamics, as observed by increased enhancements relative to free ions in neutral aqueous solutions. These results suggest that the confinement of a protonated nitrogen, such as that expected in receptor binding, may alter exchange dynamics to favor INEPT enhancements, while unbound agonists would remain unenhanced. As a result, /sup 15/N NMR INEPT enhancements from a solution of receptor subtypes with an appropriate /sup 15/N-labeled agonist may present a means of exploring the dynamics of direct opiate-receptor interactions.

  11. Dopamine D1 Receptors Are Not Critical for Opiate Reward but Can Mediate Opiate Memory Retrieval in a State-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Perez, Hector; George, Susan R.; van der Kooy, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Although D1 receptor knockout mice demonstrate normal morphine place preferences, antagonism of basolateral amygdala (BLA) D1 receptors only during drug-naive rat conditioning has been reported to inhibit the expression of a morphine place preference. One possible explanation for this result is state-dependent learning. That is, the omission of the intra-BLA infusion cue during testing — which acts as a potent discriminative stimulus — may have prevented the recall of a morphine-environment association and therefore, the consequent expression of a morphine place preference. To examine this possibility, we tested whether intra-BLA infusion of the D1-receptor antagonist SCH23390 during both training and testing might reveal a morphine place preference. Our results suggest that in previously drug-naive animals, D1 receptor antagonism during testing restores the opiate conditioned place preference that is normally absent when D1 receptors are blocked only during training, suggesting that BLA D1 receptors can mediate state-dependent memory retrieval. PMID:23538064

  12. Comparison of [11C]diprenorphine and [11C]carfentanil in vivo binding to opiate receptors in man using a dual detector system.

    PubMed

    Villemagne, V L; Frost, J J; Dannals, R F; Lever, J R; Tanada, S; Natarajan, T K; Wilson, A A; Ravert, H T; Wagner, H N

    1994-05-12

    A simple dual detector coincidence system was used to measure the binding of [11C]carfentanil and [11C]diprenorphine to opiate receptors in normal volunteers before and after the administration of naloxone. Total radioactivity without naloxone and the ratio of total/non-specific radioactivity was 2 times greater for [11C]diprenorphine than [11C]carfentanil. The dose of naloxone required to maximally block specific [11C]diprenorphine binding was 10 times that for [11C]carfentanil, indicating that [11C]diprenorphine labels opiate receptor subtypes in addition to mu opiate receptors.

  13. 1,3-Di(2-[5-3H]tolyl)guanidine: a selective ligand that labels sigma-type receptors for psychotomimetic opiates and antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, E; Sonders, M; Quarum, M; McLean, S; Pou, S; Keana, J F

    1986-01-01

    Brain sigma-type receptors are thought to mediate hallucinogenic effects of certain benzomorphan opiates in humans. The biochemical characterization of sigma receptors has been difficult because of the lack of potent and selective ligands. We report here the synthesis and characterization of a tritiated, symmetrically substituted guanidine derivative, 1,3-di(2-[5-3H]tolyl)guanidine ([3H]Tol2Gdn), that binds with high affinity to a single population of binding sites in guinea pig brain membrane preparations. The [3H]Tol2Gdn binding site displays stereoselectivity for dextrorotatory optical isomers of benzomorphan opiates known to have sigma-type behavioral effects. Furthermore, the [3H]Tol2Gdn binding site has a high affinity for haloperidol and for phenothiazine antipsychotics, which have antihallucinatory properties in humans. The drug-selectivity profile of [3H]Tol2Gdn binding closely correlates with the drug-selectivity profile of tritiated (+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine [+)-[3H]3-PPP) binding to guinea pig brain membrane receptors. (+)-[3H]3-PPP has been proposed to be a selective sigma-receptor ligand [Largent, B. L., Gundlach, A. L. & Snyder, S. H. (1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82, 4983-4987]. Receptor autoradiography using [3H]Tol2Gdn on slide-mounted rat and guinea pig brain sections reveals a heterogeneous distribution pattern of enriched binding in limbic and sensorimotor structures of the brain. These results indicate that [3H]Tol2Gdn is a selective ligand for the sigma-site. Availability of this sigma-receptor probe should greatly facilitate the physiological, biochemical, and pharmacological characterization of sigma receptors in brain. Images PMID:2877462

  14. 1,3-Di(2-(5-/sup 3/H)tolyl)guanidine: a selective ligand that labels sigma-type receptors for psychotomimetic opiates and antipsychotic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, E.; Sonders, M.; Quarum, M.; McLean, S.; Pou, S.; Keana, J.F.

    1986-11-01

    Brain sigma-type receptors are thought to mediate hallucinogenic effects of certain benzomorphan opiates in humans. The biochemical characterization of sigma receptors has been difficult because of the lack of potent and selective ligands. We report here the synthesis and characterization of a tritiated, symmetrically substituted guanidine derivative, 1,3-di(2-(5-/sup 3/H)tolyl)guanidine ((/sup 3/H)Tol2Gdn), that binds with high affinity to a single population of binding sites in guinea pig brain membrane preparations. The (/sup 3/H)Tol2Gdn binding site displays stereoselectivity for dextrorotatory optical isomers of benzomorphan opiates known to have sigma-type behavioral effects. Furthermore, the (/sup 3/H)Tol2Gdn binding site has a high affinity for haloperidol and for phenothiazine antipsychotics, which have antihallucinatory properties in humans. The drug-selectivity profile of (/sup 3/H)Tol2Gdn binding closely correlates with the drug-selectivity profile of tritiated (+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP) binding to guinea pig brain membrane receptors. (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP has been proposed to be a selective sigma-receptor ligand (Largent, B. L., Gundlach, A. L. and Snyder, S. H. (1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82, 4983-4987). Receptor autoradiography using (/sup 3/H)Tol2Gdn on slide-mounted rat and guinea pig brain sections reveals a heterogeneous distribution pattern of enriched binding in limbic and sensorimotor structures of the brain. These results indicate that (/sup 3/H)Tol2Gdn is a selective ligand for the sigma-site. Availability of this sigma-receptor probe should greatly facilitate the physiological, biochemical, and pharmacological characterization of sigma receptors in brain.

  15. Human kappa opioid receptor gene (OPRK1) polymorphism is associated with opiate addiction.

    PubMed

    Gerra, G; Leonardi, C; Cortese, E; D'Amore, A; Lucchini, A; Strepparola, G; Serio, G; Farina, G; Magnelli, F; Zaimovic, A; Mancini, A; Turci, M; Manfredini, M; Donnini, C

    2007-09-05

    Variants of the opioid receptors are the obvious candidates underlying addiction. The kappa opioid receptor (KOR) system seems to play a role in stress responsivity, opiate withdrawal and responses to psycho-stimulants, inhibiting mesolimbic dopamine. KOR gene polymorphisms have been reported to contribute to predisposition to voluntary alcohol-drinking behavior in experimental animals. In humans, the 36G > T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on KOR gene, that was recently identified, has been found associate with substance dependence, with inconclusive findings. In the present study, 106 heroin addicts (West European, Caucasians) and 70 healthy control subjects matched for race and gender, with no history of substance use disorder, have been genotyped. The frequency of KOR 36G > T SNP was significantly higher among heroin-dependent individuals compared with control subjects (Fisher's exact = 0.044; Pearson chi(2) = 4.2734, P = 0.039; likelihood ratio chi(2) tests = 4.6156, P = 0.032). Although KOR silent polymorphisms may apparently have no consequences on mRNA transcription, post-transcriptional mechanisms, such as mRNA stability, translation efficiency, and regulability may impair the function of kappa receptors system, with increased risk for substance use disorders. In specific, the neurobiological changes induced by mu-kappa opioid imbalance could underlie vulnerable personality traits and risk behavior. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Presence in neuroblastoma cells of a mu 3 receptor with selectivity for opiate alkaloids but without affinity for opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Cruciani, R A; Dvorkin, B; Klinger, H P; Makman, M H

    1994-12-26

    Evidence is presented for the occurrence of a unique opiate alkaloid-selective, opioid peptide-insensitive binding site in N18TG2 mouse neuroblastoma cells and in late passage hybrid F-11 cells, derived from N18TG2 neuroblastoma cells and rat dorsal root ganglion cells. Those cells lacked classical opioid peptide-sensitive receptor subtypes, but contained [3H]morphine and [3H]diprenorphine binding sites with affinity for certain opiate alkaloids but not for any endogenously occurring opioid peptide or peptide analog tested, including D-ala2-D-leu5-enkephalin (DADLE), D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol (DAGO) and dynorphin A(1-17). The binding site differed from hitherto described mu, delta and kappa neuronal opioid receptors not only on the basis of peptide insensitivity, but also on the basis of selectivity and affinities of alkaloids. Saturation experiments with [3H]morphine indicated the presence of a single site with Kd = 49 nM and Bmax = 1510 fmol/mg protein. This novel binding site was not present in F-11 hybrid cells at early passage. Instead the hybrid cells contained conventional opioid receptors (predominantly delta and also mu) capable of binding DADLE and other peptides as well as opiate alkaloids. With additional passage (cell divisions) of the hybrid cells, during which a limited change occurred in mouse chromosome number, the peptide-insensitive binding appeared and the opioid peptide-binding (delta and mu) receptors were lost reciprocally. Thus, expression of the peptide-insensitive binding normally may be repressed when conventional opioid receptors are expressed. The peptide-insensitive opiate binding site described here appears to correspond to the mu 3 receptor subtype, recently identified pharmacologically and functionally in several cell types of the immune system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Alpha1b-adrenergic receptors control locomotor and rewarding effects of psychostimulants and opiates.

    PubMed

    Drouin, Candice; Darracq, Laurent; Trovero, Fabrice; Blanc, Gérard; Glowinski, Jacques; Cotecchia, Susanna; Tassin, Jean-Pol

    2002-04-01

    Drugs of abuse, such as psychostimulants and opiates, are generally considered as exerting their locomotor and rewarding effects through an increased dopaminergic transmission in the nucleus accumbens. Noradrenergic transmission may also be implicated because most psychostimulants increase norepinephrine (NE) release, and numerous studies have indicated interactions between noradrenergic and dopaminergic neurons through alpha1-adrenergic receptors. However, analysis of the effects of psychostimulants after either destruction of noradrenergic neurons or pharmacological blockade of alpha1-adrenergic receptors led to conflicting results. Here we show that the locomotor hyperactivities induced by d-amphetamine (1-3 mg/kg), cocaine (5-20 mg/kg), or morphine (5-10 mg/kg) in mice lacking the alpha1b subtype of adrenergic receptors were dramatically decreased when compared with wild-type littermates. Moreover, behavioral sensitizations induced by d-amphetamine (1-2 mg/kg), cocaine (5-15 mg/kg), or morphine (7.5 mg/kg) were also decreased in knock-out mice when compared with wild-type. Ruling out a neurological deficit in knock-out mice, both strains reacted similarly to novelty, to intraperitoneal saline, or to the administration of scopolamine (1 mg/kg), an anti-muscarinic agent. Finally, rewarding properties could not be observed in knock-out mice in an oral preference test (cocaine and morphine) and conditioned place preference (morphine) paradigm. Because catecholamine tissue levels, autoradiography of D1 and D2 dopaminergic receptors, and of dopamine reuptake sites and locomotor response to a D1 agonist showed that basal dopaminergic transmission was similar in knock-out and wild-type mice, our data indicate a critical role of alpha1b-adrenergic receptors and noradrenergic transmission in the vulnerability to addiction.

  18. CRF2 Receptor Deficiency Eliminates the Long-Lasting Vulnerability of Motivational States Induced by Opiate Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Morisot, Nadège; Rouibi, Khalil; Contarino, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Vulnerability to stressful life events is a hallmark of drug dependence that may persist long after cessation of drug intake and dramatically fuel key clinical features, such as deregulated up-shifted motivational states and craving. However, to date, no effective therapy is available for reducing vulnerability to stressful events in former drug users and drug-dependent patients, mostly because of poor knowledge of the mechanisms underlying it. In this study, we report that genetic inactivation of the stress-responsive corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-2 (CRF2−/−) completely eliminates the reemergence of increased nonrewarded nose-pokes, reflecting up-shifted motivational states, triggered by ethological environmental stressors long after cessation of morphine administration in mice. Accordingly, CRF2 receptor deficiency completely abolishes the increase in biomarkers of synthesis of major brain motivational substrates, such as ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) and amygdala γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) systems, associated with the stress-induced reemergence of up-shifted motivational states long after opiate withdrawal. Nevertheless, neither CRF2 receptor deficiency nor long-term opiate withdrawal affects amygdala CRF or hypothalamus CRF expression, indicating preserved brain stress-coping systems. Moreover, CRF2 receptor deficiency does not influence the locomotor or the anxiety-like effect of long-term opiate withdrawal. Thus, the present results reveal an essential and specific role for the CRF2 receptor in the stress-induced reemergence of up-shifted motivational states and related alterations in brain motivational systems long after opiate withdrawal. These findings suggest new strategies for the treatment of the severe and long-lasting vulnerability that inexorably follows drug withdrawal and hinder drug abstinence. PMID:25672976

  19. Cholecystokinin-8 suppressed /sup 3/H-etorphine binding to rat brain opiate receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.J.; Fan, S.G.; Ren, M.F.; Han, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    Radioreceptor assay (RRA) was adopted to analyze the influence of CCK-8 on /sup 3/H-etorphine binding to opiate receptors in rat brain synaptosomal membranes (P2). In the competition experiment CCK-8 suppressed the binding of /sup 3/H-etorphine. This effect was completely reversed by proglumide at 1/mu/M. Rosenthal analysis for saturation revealed two populations of /sup 3/H-etorphine binding sites. CCK-8 inhibited /sup 3/H-etorphine binding to the high affinity sites by an increase in Kd and decrease in Bmax without significant changes in the Kd and Bmax of the low affinity sites. This effect of CCK-8 was also completely reversed by proglumide at 1/mu/M. Unsulfated CCK-8 produced only a slight increase in Kd of the high affinity sites without affecting Bmax. The results suggest that CCK-8 might be capable of suppressing the high affinity opioid binding sites via the activation of CCK receptor.

  20. Persistence of evolutionary memory: primordial six-transmembrane helical domain mu opiate receptors selectively linked to endogenous morphine signaling.

    PubMed

    Kream, Richard M; Sheehan, Melinda; Cadet, Patrick; Mantione, Kirk J; Zhu, Wei; Casares, Federico; Stefano, George B

    2007-12-01

    Biochemical, molecular and pharmacological evidence for two unique six-transmembrane helical (TMH) domain opiate receptors expressed from the micro opioid receptor (MOR) gene have been shown. Designated micro3 and micro4 receptors, both protein species are Class A rhodopsin-like members of the superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors but are selectively tailored to mediate the cellular regulatory effects of endogenous morphine and related morphinan alkaloids via stimulation of nitric oxide (NO) production and release. Both micro3 and micro4 receptors lack an amino acid sequence of approximately 90 amino acids that constitute the extracellular N-terminal and TMH1 domains and part of the first intracellular loop of the micro1 receptor, but retain the empirically defined ligand binding pocket distributed across conserved TMH2, TMH3, and TMH7 domains of the micro1 sequence. Additionally, the receptor proteins are terminated by unique intracellular C-terminal amino acid sequences that serve as putative coupling or docking domains required for constitutive NO synthase activation. Because the recognition profile of micro3 and micro4 receptors is restricted to rigid benzylisoquinoline alkaloids typified by morphine and its extended family of chemical congeners, it is hypothesized that conformational stabilization provided by interaction of extended extracellular N-terminal protein domains and the extracellular loops is required for binding of endogenous opioid peptides as well as synthetic flexible opiate alkaloids.

  1. Psychotomimetic opiate receptors labeled and visualized with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1984-08-01

    3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine (3-PPP) has been proposed as a selective dopamine autoreceptor agonist in the central nervous system. This report describes the pharmacology and localization of specific high-affinity binding sites for (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP in brain. The drug specificity of (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP binding is identical to that of sigma receptors, which may mediate psychotomimetic effects of some opiates. Haloperidol and the opioid derivatives, pentazocine, cyclazocine, and SKF 10,047 are potent inhibitors of (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP binding. Stereoselectivity is exhibited for the (+) isomers of cyclazocine and SKF 10.047 at the sigma site, opposite to the stereoselectivity seen at ..mu.., sigma, and k opiate receptors. (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP does not label dopamine receptors, as potent dopamine agonists and antagonists are weak inhibitors of binding and the localization of specific (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP binding sites does not parallel that of dopamine neurons. Discrete localizations of (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP binding sites in many brain areas including limbic, midbrain, brainstem, and cerebellar regions may explain psychotomimetic actions of opiates and behavior effects of 3-PPP. 41 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  2. Change in the properties of the opiate receptors of the brain under conditions of habituation of rats to morphine

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitsev, S.V.; Sergeeva, M.G.; Chichenkov, O.N.; Petrov, V.E.; Varfolomeev, S.D.

    1987-02-20

    The influence of prolonged administration of morphine on the properties of the opiate receptors of the rat brain was investigated. For this purpose they conducted an analysis of the isotherms of binding of labeled ..mu..-, sigma-, and chi-ligands: morphine, D-Ala/sup 2/, D-Leu/sup 5/-enkephalin, and ethylketocyclazocin, with membrane preparations of the brains of rats tolerant to morphine, as well as the control animals. For a quantitative determination of the dissociation constants of the ligand-receptor complexes (K) and the concentration of the reagents ((Q)), they used differential method and the method of simulation modeling. It was shown that the values of K and (Q) for individual animals are subjected to substantial dispersion, whereas the ratios (Q)/K undergo minor individual fluctuations, both in the control group and in the group of rats tolerant to morphine. This permits the ratio (Q)/K to be singled out as one of the main parameters for comparing the properties of opiate receptors of various groups of animals. Using this criterion, as well as the method of simulated modeling, it was shown that the development of tolerance is accompanied by a change in the properties of the delta-receptors (the ratio (Q)/K decreases by a factor of more than two). In contrast to the delta-receptors, no significant influence of the tolerance on the properties of the ..mu..- and chi-receptors, as well as the ultrahigh-affinity ligand binding sites, was detected.

  3. Opiate Drug Use and the Pathophysiology of NeuroAIDS

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Kurt F; Fitting, Sylvia; Dever, Seth M; Podhaizer, Elizabeth M; Knapp, Pamela E

    2012-01-01

    Opiate abuse and HIV-1 have been described as interrelated epidemics, and even in the advent of combined anti-retroviral therapy, the additional abuse of opiates appears to result in greater neurologic and cognitive deficits. The central nervous system (CNS) is particularly vulnerable to interactive opiate-HIV-1 effects, in part because of the unique responses of microglia and astroglia. Although neurons are principally responsible for behavior and cognition, HIV-1 infection and replication in the brain is largely limited to microglia, while astroglia and perhaps glial progenitors can be latently infected. Thus, neuronal dysfunction and injury result from cellular and viral toxins originating from HIV-1 infected/exposed glia. Importantly, subsets of glial cells including oligodendrocytes, as well as neurons, express µ-opioid receptors and therefore can be direct targets for heroin and morphine (the major metabolite of heroin in the CNS), which preferentially activate µ-opioid receptors. This review highlights findings that neuroAIDS is a glially driven disease, and that opiate abuse may act at multiple glial-cell types to further compromise neuron function and survival. The ongoing, reactive cross-talk between opiate drug and HIV-1 co-exposed microglia and astroglia appears to exacerbate critical proinflammatory and excitotoxic events leading to neuron dysfunction, injury, and potentially death. Opiates enhance synaptodendritic damage and a loss of synaptic connectivity, which is viewed as the substrate of cognitive deficits. We especially emphasize that opioid signaling and interactions with HIV-1 are contextual, differing among cell types, and even within subsets of the same cell type. For example, astroglia even within a single brain region are heterogeneous in their expression of µ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors, as well as CXCR4 and CCR5, and Toll-like receptors. Thus, defining the distinct targets engaged by opiates in each cell type, and among brain

  4. Opiate drug use and the pathophysiology of neuroAIDS.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Kurt F; Fitting, Sylvia; Dever, Seth M; Podhaizer, Elizabeth M; Knapp, Pamela E

    2012-07-01

    Opiate abuse and HIV-1 have been described as interrelated epidemics, and even in the advent of combined anti-retroviral therapy, the additional abuse of opiates appears to result in greater neurologic and cognitive deficits. The central nervous system (CNS) is particularly vulnerable to interactive opiate-HIV-1 effects, in part because of the unique responses of microglia and astroglia. Although neurons are principally responsible for behavior and cognition, HIV-1 infection and replication in the brain is largely limited to microglia, while astroglia and perhaps glial progenitors can be latently infected. Thus, neuronal dysfunction and injury result from cellular and viral toxins originating from HIV-1 infected/exposed glia. Importantly, subsets of glial cells including oligodendrocytes, as well as neurons, express µ-opioid receptors and therefore can be direct targets for heroin and morphine (the major metabolite of heroin in the CNS), which preferentially activate µ-opioid receptors. This review highlights findings that neuroAIDS is a glially driven disease, and that opiate abuse may act at multiple glial-cell types to further compromise neuron function and survival. The ongoing, reactive cross-talk between opiate drug and HIV-1 co-exposed microglia and astroglia appears to exacerbate critical proinflammatory and excitotoxic events leading to neuron dysfunction, injury, and potentially death. Opiates enhance synaptodendritic damage and a loss of synaptic connectivity, which is viewed as the substrate of cognitive deficits. We especially emphasize that opioid signaling and interactions with HIV-1 are contextual, differing among cell types, and even within subsets of the same cell type. For example, astroglia even within a single brain region are heterogeneous in their expression of µ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors, as well as CXCR4 and CCR5, and Toll-like receptors. Thus, defining the distinct targets engaged by opiates in each cell type, and among brain

  5. Do presynaptic opiate receptors and alpha-adrenoceptors alter acetylcholine release from a sympathetic ganglion by a similar mechanism?

    PubMed

    Araujo, D M; Collier, B

    1987-07-09

    The present experiments tested the possible involvement of a calcium-sensitive mechanism in the alpha-adrenoceptor- and opiate receptor-mediated inhibition of acetylcholine release from the cat superior cervical ganglion. First, the calcium-dependence of evoked acetylcholine release was measured in the presence and absence of the alpha-adrenoceptor agonist noradrenaline or of the opiate receptor agonist [Met5]enkephalin-Arg6-Phe7. When ganglia were perfused with Krebs medium containing [Ca2+] = 2.4, 1.2, 0.6, 0.2 mM, evoked release of acetylcholine was depressed by both agonists and the inhibition increased with reduced levels of extracellular Ca2+; this was especially evident when calcium in the medium was reduced to 0.2 mM. Second, the effects of both noradrenaline and [Met5]enkephalin-Arg6-Phe7 on calcium influx into presynaptic nerve endings was determined by measuring the accumulation of 45Ca into ganglia in the presence and absence of either drug. Both agonists reduced the stimulation-induced increase in 45Ca accumulation. The effect of noradrenaline to reduce calcium influx was blocked by yohimbine or by phentolamine; the effect of [Met5]enkephalin-Arg6-Phe7 to decrease 45Ca accumulation by ganglia was blocked by naloxone. It is concluded that activation of presynaptic opiate receptors and alpha-adrenoceptors in the cat superior cervical ganglion can alter acetylcholine release by a similar mechanism, i.e. to reduce Ca2+ influx during preganglionic nerve stimulation.

  6. Comparison of [11C]diprenorphine and [11C]carfentanil binding to opiate receptors in humans by positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Frost, J J; Mayberg, H S; Sadzot, B; Dannals, R F; Lever, J R; Ravert, H T; Wilson, A A; Wagner, H N; Links, J M

    1990-07-01

    The kinetics and regional distribution of [11C]carfentanil, a mu-selective opiate receptor agonist, and [11C]diprenorphine, a nonselective opiate receptor antagonist, were compared using paired positron emission tomography studies in two normal volunteers. Kinetics of total radioactivity (counts/mCi/pixel) was greater for [11C]diprenorphine than [11C]carfentanil in all regions. [11C]Carfentanil binding (expressed as the total/nonspecific ratio) reached near equilibrium at approximately 40 min, whereas [11C]diprenorphine showed a linear increase until approximately 60 min. Kinetics of specific binding demonstrated significant dissociation of [11C]carfentanil from opiate receptors, whereas little dissociation of [11C]diprenorphine was observed during the 90-min scan session. Regional distributions of [11C]carfentanil and [11C]diprenorphine were qualitatively and quantitatively different: Relative to the thalamus (a region with known predominance of mu-receptors), [11C]diprenorphine displayed greater binding in the striatum and cingulate and frontal cortex compared to [11C]carfentanil, consistent with labeling of additional, non-mu sites by [11C]diprenorphine. We conclude from these studies that [11C]diprenorphine labels other opiate receptor subtypes in addition to the mu sites selectively labeled by [11C]carfentanil. The nonselective nature of diprenorphine potentially limits its usefulness in defining abnormalities of specific opiate receptor subtypes in various diseases. Development of selective tracers for the delta- and kappa-opiate receptor sites, or alternatively use of unlabeled inhibitors to differentially displace mu, delta, and kappa subtypes, will help offset these limitations.

  7. Opiate anti-nociception is attenuated following lesion of large dopamine neurons of the periaqueductal grey: critical role for D1 (not D2) dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Flores, Juan A; El Banoua, Fadwa; Galán-Rodríguez, Beatriz; Fernandez-Espejo, Emilio

    2004-07-01

    The periaqueductal grey (PAG) area is involved in pain modulation as well as in opiate-induced anti-nociceptive effects. The PAG possess dopamine neurons, and it is likely that this dopaminergic network participates in anti-nociception. The objective was to further study the morphology of the PAG dopaminergic network, along with its role in nociception and opiate-induced analgesia in rats, following either dopamine depletion with the toxin 6-hydroxydopamine or local injection of dopaminergic antagonists. Nociceptive responses were studied through the tail-immersion (spinal reflex) and the hot-plate tests (integrated supraspinal response), establishing a cut-off time to further minimize animal suffering. Heroin and morphine were employed as opiates. Histological data indicated that the dopaminergic network of the PAG is composed of two types of neurons: small rounded cells, and large multipolar neurons. Following dopamine depletion of the PAG, large neurons (not small ones) were selectively affected by the toxin (61.9% dopamine cell loss, 80.7% reduction of in vitro dopaminergic peak), and opiate-induced analgesia in the hot-plate test (not the tail-immersion test) was reliably attenuated in lesioned rats (P < 0.01). After infusions of dopaminergic ligands into the PAG, D(1) (not D(2)) receptor antagonism attenuated opiate-induced analgesia in a dose-dependent manner in the hot-plate test. The present study provides evidence that large neurons of the dopaminergic network of the PAG participate in supraspinal (not spinal) nociceptive responses after opiates through the involvement of D(1) dopamine receptors. This dopaminergic system should be included as another network within the PAG involved in opiate-induced anti-nociception.

  8. Adenosine A2a blockade prevents synergy between mu-opiate and cannabinoid CB1 receptors and eliminates heroin-seeking behavior in addicted rats.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lina; McFarland, Krista; Fan, Peidong; Jiang, Zhan; Ueda, Takashi; Diamond, Ivan

    2006-05-16

    Relapse is the most serious limitation of effective medical treatment of opiate addiction. Opiate-related behaviors appear to be modulated by cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1) through poorly understood cross-talk mechanisms. Opiate and CB1 receptors are coexpressed in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and dorsal striatum. These regions also have the highest density of adenosine A2a receptors (A2a) in the brain. We have been investigating the postsynaptic signaling mechanisms of mu-opiate receptors (MORs) and CB1 receptors in primary NAc/striatal neurons. In this article, we present evidence that MOR and CB1 act synergistically on cAMP/PKA signaling in NAc/striatal neurons. In addition, we find that synergy requires adenosine and A2a. Importantly, an A2a antagonist administered either directly into the NAc or indirectly by i.p. injection eliminates heroin-induced reinstatement in rats trained to self-administer heroin, a model of human craving and relapse. These findings suggest that A2a antagonists might be effective therapeutic agents in the management of abstinent heroin addicts.

  9. Adenosine A2a blockade prevents synergy between μ-opiate and cannabinoid CB1 receptors and eliminates heroin-seeking behavior in addicted rats

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lina; McFarland, Krista; Fan, Peidong; Jiang, Zhan; Ueda, Takashi; Diamond, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    Relapse is the most serious limitation of effective medical treatment of opiate addiction. Opiate-related behaviors appear to be modulated by cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1) through poorly understood cross-talk mechanisms. Opiate and CB1 receptors are coexpressed in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and dorsal striatum. These regions also have the highest density of adenosine A2a receptors (A2a) in the brain. We have been investigating the postsynaptic signaling mechanisms of μ-opiate receptors (MORs) and CB1 receptors in primary NAc/striatal neurons. In this article, we present evidence that MOR and CB1 act synergistically on cAMP/PKA signaling in NAc/striatal neurons. In addition, we find that synergy requires adenosine and A2a. Importantly, an A2a antagonist administered either directly into the NAc or indirectly by i.p. injection eliminates heroin-induced reinstatement in rats trained to self-administer heroin, a model of human craving and relapse. These findings suggest that A2a antagonists might be effective therapeutic agents in the management of abstinent heroin addicts. PMID:16684876

  10. Extinction of conditioned opiate withdrawal in rats is blocked by intracerebroventricular infusion of an NMDA receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Brian R; Carlezon, William A; Myers, Karyn M

    2013-04-29

    Maladaptive conditioned responses (CRs) contribute to psychiatric disorders including anxiety disorders and addiction. Methods of reducing these CRs have been considered as possible therapeutic approaches. One such method is extinction, which involves exposure to CR-eliciting cues in the absence of the event they once predicted. In animal models, extinction reduces both fear and addiction-related CRs, and in humans, extinction-based cue exposure therapy (CET) reduces fear CRs. However, CET is less effective in drug addicts, for reasons that are not clear. Increased understanding of the neurobiology of extinction of drug-related CRs as compared to fear CRs may help illuminate this issue. Here, we examine the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependence of extinction of conditioned opiate withdrawal in rats. Using a place conditioning paradigm, we trained morphine-dependent rats to associate an environment with naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. We then extinguished that association by returning the rats repeatedly to the environment in the absence of acute withdrawal. In some rats we administered the NMDA receptor antagonist d,l-2-amino-5-phosphovaleric acid (AP5) intracerebroventricularly immediately prior to extinction training. In a subsequent test session, these rats avoided the formerly naloxone-paired environment, similar to rats that had not undergone extinction training. By contrast, rats that received vehicle prior to extinction training did not avoid the formerly naloxone-paired environment. This finding indicates that extinction of a drug-related CR (conditioned opiate withdrawal) is dependent on NMDA receptors, similar to extinction of conditioned fear. The locus of the critical NMDA receptors is unclear but may include basolateral amygdala and/or medial prefrontal cortex.

  11. Extinction of conditioned opiate withdrawal in rats is blocked by intracerebroventricular infusion of an NMDA receptor antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Brian R.; Carlezon, William A.; Myers, Karyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Maladaptive conditioned responses (CRs) contribute to psychiatric disorders including anxiety disorders and addiction. Methods of reducing these CRs have been considered as possible therapeutic approaches. One such method is extinction, which involves exposure to CR-eliciting cues in the absence of the event they once predicted. In animal models, extinction reduces both fear and addiction-related CRs, and in humans, extinction-based cue exposure therapy (CET) reduces fear CRs. However, CET is less effective in drug addicts, for reasons that are not clear. Increased understanding of the neurobiology of extinction of drug-related CRs as compared to fear CRs may help illuminate this issue. Here, we examine the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependence of extinction of conditioned opiate withdrawal in rats. Using a place conditioning paradigm, we trained morphine-dependent rats to associate an environment with naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. We then extinguished that association by returning the rats repeatedly to the environment in the absence of acute withdrawal. In some rats we administered the NMDA receptor antagonist D,L-2-amino-5-phosphovaleric acid (AP5) intracerebroventricularly immediately prior to extinction training. In a subsequent test session, these rats avoided the formerly naloxone-paired environment, similar to rats that had not undergone extinction training. By contrast, rats that received vehicle prior to extinction training did not avoid the formerly naloxone-paired environment. This finding indicates that extinction of a drug-related CR (conditioned opiate withdrawal) is dependent on NMDA receptors, similar to extinction of conditioned fear. The locus of the critical NMDA receptors is unclear but may include basolateral amygdala and/or medial prefrontal cortex. PMID:23416323

  12. Mu Opioid Receptors on Primary Afferent Nav1.8 Neurons Contribute to Opiate-Induced Analgesia: Insight from Conditional Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Karchewski, Laurie; Gardon, Olivier; Matifas, Audrey; Filliol, Dominique; Becker, Jérôme A. J.; Wood, John N.; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Gaveriaux-Ruff, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Opiates are powerful drugs to treat severe pain, and act via mu opioid receptors distributed throughout the nervous system. Their clinical use is hampered by centrally-mediated adverse effects, including nausea or respiratory depression. Here we used a genetic approach to investigate the potential of peripheral mu opioid receptors as targets for pain treatment. We generated conditional knockout (cKO) mice in which mu opioid receptors are deleted specifically in primary afferent Nav1.8-positive neurons. Mutant animals were compared to controls for acute nociception, inflammatory pain, opiate-induced analgesia and constipation. There was a 76% decrease of mu receptor-positive neurons and a 60% reduction of mu-receptor mRNA in dorsal root ganglia of cKO mice. Mutant mice showed normal responses to heat, mechanical, visceral and chemical stimuli, as well as unchanged morphine antinociception and tolerance to antinociception in models of acute pain. Inflammatory pain developed similarly in cKO and controls mice after Complete Freund’s Adjuvant. In the inflammation model, however, opiate-induced (morphine, fentanyl and loperamide) analgesia was reduced in mutant mice as compared to controls, and abolished at low doses. Morphine-induced constipation remained intact in cKO mice. We therefore genetically demonstrate for the first time that mu opioid receptors partly mediate opiate analgesia at the level of Nav1.8-positive sensory neurons. In our study, this mechanism operates under conditions of inflammatory pain, but not nociception. Previous pharmacology suggests that peripheral opiates may be clinically useful, and our data further demonstrate that Nav1.8 neuron-associated mu opioid receptors are feasible targets to alleviate some forms of persistent pain. PMID:24069332

  13. Mu opioid receptors on primary afferent nav1.8 neurons contribute to opiate-induced analgesia: insight from conditional knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Weibel, Raphaël; Reiss, David; Karchewski, Laurie; Gardon, Olivier; Matifas, Audrey; Filliol, Dominique; Becker, Jérôme A J; Wood, John N; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Gaveriaux-Ruff, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Opiates are powerful drugs to treat severe pain, and act via mu opioid receptors distributed throughout the nervous system. Their clinical use is hampered by centrally-mediated adverse effects, including nausea or respiratory depression. Here we used a genetic approach to investigate the potential of peripheral mu opioid receptors as targets for pain treatment. We generated conditional knockout (cKO) mice in which mu opioid receptors are deleted specifically in primary afferent Nav1.8-positive neurons. Mutant animals were compared to controls for acute nociception, inflammatory pain, opiate-induced analgesia and constipation. There was a 76% decrease of mu receptor-positive neurons and a 60% reduction of mu-receptor mRNA in dorsal root ganglia of cKO mice. Mutant mice showed normal responses to heat, mechanical, visceral and chemical stimuli, as well as unchanged morphine antinociception and tolerance to antinociception in models of acute pain. Inflammatory pain developed similarly in cKO and controls mice after Complete Freund's Adjuvant. In the inflammation model, however, opiate-induced (morphine, fentanyl and loperamide) analgesia was reduced in mutant mice as compared to controls, and abolished at low doses. Morphine-induced constipation remained intact in cKO mice. We therefore genetically demonstrate for the first time that mu opioid receptors partly mediate opiate analgesia at the level of Nav1.8-positive sensory neurons. In our study, this mechanism operates under conditions of inflammatory pain, but not nociception. Previous pharmacology suggests that peripheral opiates may be clinically useful, and our data further demonstrate that Nav1.8 neuron-associated mu opioid receptors are feasible targets to alleviate some forms of persistent pain.

  14. Molecular orbital calculations of proton transfer involving amines as models for the clastic binding of opiates with their receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, L.K.; Beamer, R.L.

    1986-08-01

    Semi-empirical (CNDO) molecular orbital calculations, based on a previously reported ammonia-amine model system, were performed on an extended series of methyl-, ethyl-, and propylamines as models for the analgesic receptor. Methyl-, dimethyl-, and trimethylamines were chosen to represent the opiate molecules. Interatomic distances were varied within normally expected biological values. The results for the larger systems are similar to more elaborate calculations previously reported using smaller molecules. At internuclear distances of greater than 0.275 nm, the potential energy curves had two minima. At 0.2731 nm, the optimized N-N distance, the depth of the minima in the potential energy curve were not as great. Energy differences as well as population differences suggest deviation from the currently stated clastic binding theories mechanism for the analgesic response of the tertiary amines. The dimethylamine energy profile and population data indicate that the hypothesis of N-demethylated opiate as the active molecule needs further consideration and investigation. Investigation of larger systems is also indicated to develop increasingly realistic models for the analgesic response.

  15. Distribution of opiate receptor subtypes and enkephalin and dynorphin immunoreactivity in the hippocampus of squirrel, guinea pig, rat, and hamster.

    PubMed

    McLean, S; Rothman, R B; Jacobson, A E; Rice, K C; Herkenham, M

    1987-01-22

    The distribution of enkephalin and dynorphin immunoreactivity in the hippocampus of four rodent species (gray squirrel, guinea pig, rat, and hamster) is compared with the pattern of opiate receptor subtypes (mu, delta, and kappa). The distribution of opioid peptides is fairly consistent in the anterior hippocampus of these four species. Intense immunoreactivity for dynorphin and enkephalin is found in the hilus of the dentate gyrus and in the mossy fiber system. Occasional immunoreactive processes are seen in the dentate molecular layer and scattered throughout the CA1 and CA3 fields. In the rat and hamster, an additional plexus of enkephalinergic fibers straddles both sides of the hippocampal fissure. Cells immunoreactive for both opioid peptides are located in and just superficial to the dentate granule cell layer. Opiate receptors are variably distributed in these rodent species. In the squirrel, guinea pig, and hamster, mu and kappa binding is dense in the stratum lucidum of CA3 and the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. In the rat, dense mu and kappa binding is localized within and adjacent to the pyramidal and granule cell layers. Delta receptor patterns show additional species differences. In the rat, the delta distribution is similar to the mu and kappa patterns. In the other species, the delta binding pattern is generally the inverse of the mu/kappa pattern: most areas of the hippocampus are enriched in delta sites, whereas the stratum lucidum and the pyramidal cell layer are receptor-sparse. Thus, the stratum lucidum--site of dense terminations of mossy fibers containing opioid peptides--is characterized by selectively sparse delta receptors in four species and by selectively dense kappa receptors in three species. The three receptor subtypes, taken either individually or together and compared to the peptides, are more variably and more widely distributed throughout the hippocampus and fail to show a correspondence with opioid

  16. Opiate receptor antagonism in right-sided congestive heart failure. Naloxone exerts salutary hemodynamic effects through its action on the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, S; Stone, C K; Woolf, P D; Liang, C S

    1989-07-01

    Opiate receptor inhibition causes adrenergic receptor-mediated increases in aortic pressure, cardiac output, and left ventricular contractile function in right heart failure. To study whether the effects of opiate receptor inhibition are mediated by means of an action on the central opiate system, we administered equimolar doses of naloxone hydrochloride and naloxone methobromide (MeBr) and normal saline to heart failure dogs. Chronic stable right heart failure was produced by progressive pulmonary artery constriction and tricuspid valve avulsion. Naloxone hydrochloride caused an increase in mean aortic pressure, cardiac output, left ventricular dP/dt and dP/dt/P, plasma catecholamines, and regional blood flows to the myocardium, quadriceps muscle, kidneys, and splanchnic beds. Plasma beta-endorphin and adrenocorticotropin also increased. In contrast, neither normal saline nor naloxone MeBr (which does not cross the blood-brain barrier) affected the systemic or regional hemodynamics or neurohormones. Naloxone hydrochloride was also administered to anesthetized heart failure dogs. Pentobarbital anesthesia removed cortical perception of nociceptive stimulation, reduced the increase in plasma epinephrine, and abolished vasodilation in skeletal muscle that occurred in conscious dogs after naloxone hydrochloride administration but had no major effects on responses of plasma norepinephrine, systemic hemodynamics, or other regional blood flows to opiate receptor inhibition. Naloxone hydrochloride had no effect in sham-operated dogs. The results indicate that the hemodynamic effects of naloxone are mediated by an action within the central nervous system. Furthermore, since pentobarbital anesthesia did not markedly alter the hemodynamic responses to naloxone hydrochloride, the acute salutary effects of opiate receptor inhibition probably are not caused by removal of the antinociceptive effect of endogenous opioids in heart failure.

  17. Imaging opiate receptors by positron tomography (PET): Evaluation by displacement of 3-Acetyl-6-Deoxy-6-Beta-/sup 18/F-flouronaltrexone with active and inactive naloxone

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, S.M.; Channing, M.A.; Rice, K.R.; Pert, C.B.; Eckelman, W.C.; Burke, T.R.; Bennett, J.M.; Carson, R.E.; Di Chiro, G.

    1985-05-01

    We recently reported the development of a new radiopharmaceutical for in vivo PET imaging of opiate receptors, 3-acetyl-6-deoxy-6-Beta-/sup 18/F-fluoronaltrexone: 3-acetylcyclofoxy, or /sup 18/F-ACF. These studies involved displacement of /sup 18/F-ACF from sites of uptake in the baboon sub-cortical gray matter, and provided strong proof of the opiate receptor specificity of the tracer. We now report on the anatomic localization of /sup 18/F-ACF in the sub-cortical grapy matter of baboon, and the kinetics of uptake and displacement of the tracer. /sup 18/F-ACF was prepared from the known 3-acetyl-6-alpha-naltrexol via the triflate, using /sup 18/F produced by neutron bombardment of /sup 6/Li/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. Anesthetized baboons were imaged after injection of /sup 18/F-ACF (sp.ac.=20Ci/mmol), using the NIH NEUROPET, a high resolution PET scanner. After bolus injection, the initial distribution to brain was rapid with peak uptake at 6 minutes post-injection. Clearance from opiate receptor rich regions of thalamus and basal ganglia was gradual, but after injection of active (but not after inactive), naloxone, clearance from these regions more than doubled. In non-opiate rich regions, (e.g. cerebellum), the predominant component of clearance was equally rapid with or without the active naloxone. Displacement studies of positron labelled ligands provide a powerful tool for non-invasive study of opiate receptor in living primates.

  18. GABA(B) receptor activation in the ventral tegmental area inhibits the acquisition and expression of opiate-induced motor sensitization.

    PubMed

    Leite-Morris, Kimberly A; Fukudome, Eugene Y; Shoeb, Marwa H; Kaplan, Gary B

    2004-02-01

    Opiate-induced motor sensitization refers to the progressive and enduring motor response that develops after intermittent drug administration, and results from neuroadaptive changes in ventral tegmental area (VTA) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) neurons. Repeated activation of mu-opioid receptors localized on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons in the VTA enhances dopaminergic cell activity and stimulates dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. We hypothesize that GABA(B) receptor agonist treatment in the VTA blocks morphine-induced motor stimulation, motor sensitization, and accumbal Fos immunoreactivity by inhibiting the activation of dopaminergic neurons. First, C57BL/6 mice were coadministered a single subcutaneous injection of morphine with intra-VTA baclofen, a GABA(B) receptor agonist. Baclofen produced a dose-dependent inhibition of opiate-induced motor stimulation that was attenuated by 2-hydroxysaclofen, a GABA(B) receptor antagonist. Next, morphine was administered on days 1, 3, 5, and 9 and mice demonstrated sensitization to its motor stimulant effects and concomitant induction of Fos immunoreactivity in the NAc shell (NAcS) but not NAc core. Intra-VTA baclofen administered during morphine pretreatment blocked the acquisition of morphine-induced motor sensitization and Fos activation in the NAcS. Intra-VTA baclofen administered only on day 9 blocked the expression of morphine-induced motor sensitization and Fos activation in the NAcS. A linear relationship was found between morphine-induced motor activity and accumbal Fos in single- and repeated-dose treatment groups. In conclusion, GABA(B) receptor stimulation in the VTA blocked opiate-induced motor stimulation and motor sensitization by inhibiting the activation of NAcS neurons. GABA(B) receptor agonists may be useful pharmacological treatments in altering the behavioral effects of opiates.

  19. Multicompartmental analysis of (/sup 11/C)-carfentanil binding to opiate receptors in humans measured by positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.J.; Douglass, K.H.; Mayberg, H.S.; Dannals, R.F.; Links, J.M.; Wilson, A.A.; Ravert, H.T.; Crozier, W.C.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1989-06-01

    (11C)-Carfentanil is a high affinity opiate agonist that can be used to localize mu opiate receptors in humans by positron emission tomography (PET). A four-compartment model was used to obtain quantitative estimates of rate constants for receptor association and dissociation. PET studies were performed in five normal subjects in the absence and presence of 1 mg/kg naloxone. Arterial plasma concentration of (11C)-carfentanil and its labeled metabolites were determined during each PET study. The value of k3/k4 = Bmax/kD was determined for each subject in the presence and absence of naloxone. There was a significant reduction in the value of k3/k4 from 3.4 +/- 0.92 to 0.26 +/- 0.13 in the thalamus (p less than 0.01) and from 1.8 +/- 0.33 to 0.16 +/- 0.065 in the frontal cortex (p less than 0.001). Mean values of frontal cortex/occipital cortex and thalamus/occipital cortex ratios were determined for the interval 35-70 min after injection when receptor binding is high relative to nonspecific binding. The relationship between the measured region/occipital cortex values and the corresponding values of k3/k4 in the presence and absence of naloxone was: regions/occipital cortex = 0.95 + 0.74 (k3/k4) with r = 0.98 (n = 20). Simulation studies also demonstrated a linear relationship between the thalamus/occipital cortex or frontal cortex/occipital cortex ratio and k3/k4 for less than twofold increases or decreases in k3/k4. Simulation studies in which thalamic blood flow was varied demonstrated no significant effect on the region/occipital cortex ratio at 35-70 min for a twofold increase or fourfold decrease in blood flow. Therefore, the region/occipital cortex ratio can be used to quantitate changes in k3/k4 when tracer kinetic modeling is not feasible.

  20. Multicompartmental analysis of [11C]-carfentanil binding to opiate receptors in humans measured by positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Frost, J J; Douglass, K H; Mayberg, H S; Dannals, R F; Links, J M; Wilson, A A; Ravert, H T; Crozier, W C; Wagner, H N

    1989-06-01

    [11C]-Carfentanil is a high affinity opiate agonist that can be used to localize mu opiate receptors in humans by positron emission tomography (PET). A four-compartment model was used to obtain quantitative estimates of rate constants for receptor association and dissociation. PET studies were performed in five normal subjects in the absence and presence of 1 mg/kg naloxone. Arterial plasma concentration of [11C]-carfentanil and its labeled metabolites were determined during each PET study. The value of k3/k4 = Bmax/kD was determined for each subject in the presence and absence of naloxone. There was a significant reduction in the value of k3/k4 from 3.4 +/- 0.92 to 0.26 +/- 0.13 in the thalamus (p less than 0.01) and from 1.8 +/- 0.33 to 0.16 +/- 0.065 in the frontal cortex (p less than 0.001). Mean values of frontal cortex/occipital cortex and thalamus/occipital cortex ratios were determined for the interval 35-70 min after injection when receptor binding is high relative to nonspecific binding. The relationship between the measured region/occipital cortex values and the corresponding values of k3/k4 in the presence and absence of naloxone was: regions/occipital cortex = 0.95 + 0.74 (k3/k4) with r = 0.98 (n = 20). Simulation studies also demonstrated a linear relationship between the thalamus/occipital cortex or frontal cortex/occipital cortex ratio and k3/k4 for less than twofold increases or decreases in k3/k4. Simulation studies in which thalamic blood flow was varied demonstrated no significant effect on the region/occipital cortex ratio at 35-70 min for a twofold increase or fourfold decrease in blood flow. Therefore, the region/occipital cortex ratio can be used to quantitate changes in k3/k4 when tracer kinetic modeling is not feasible.

  1. Blockade of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, but not blockade of gamma-aminobutyric acidA, serotonin, or opiate receptors, augments responsiveness of locus coeruleus neurons to excitatory stimulation.

    PubMed

    Simson, P E; Weiss, J M

    1989-07-01

    Previous studies in this laboratory indicated that alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in the locus coeruleus play a major role in regulating the responsiveness of neurons in the locus coeruleus to excitatory influences. The present study points to the possibility that alpha 2-receptors are unique among inhibitory receptors in the locus coeruleus in regulating responsiveness of these neurons independently of the spontaneous firing rate. In the first part of the study, blockade of alpha 2-receptors was shown to markedly augment responsiveness of neurons in the locus coeruleus to the excitatory stimulus of compression of the contralateral hind paw at doses of an alpha 2-blocker both above and well below those necessary to increase spontaneous activity of neurons in the locus coeruleus. In contrast, blockade of gamma-aminobutyric acid and serotonin receptors augmented spontaneous firing rates of neurons in the locus coeruleus but failed to augment responsiveness of these neurons to compression of the hindpaw. Blockade of opiate receptors failed to increase either spontaneous firing rates or the responsiveness of neurons of the locus coeruleus to paw compression; moreover, in animals given an opiate agonist over a number of days to produce tonic stimulation of opiate receptors, blockade of opiate receptors augmented spontaneous firing rates of neurons in the locus coeruleus but had no effect on responsiveness to paw compression. In that blockade of each type of inhibitory receptor tested increased the spontaneous firing rates of neurons in the locus coeruleus but only blockade of alpha 2-receptors increased the responsiveness of neurons in the locus coeruleus to stimulation, without affecting the spontaneous firing rate, alpha 2-receptors may be unique among inhibitory receptors in independently regulating the responsiveness of neurons in the locus coeruleus. One possibility discussed for why alpha 2-receptors regulate the responsiveness, independently of the spontaneous

  2. Effects of the NOP receptor agonist Ro65-6570 on the acquisition of opiate- and psychostimulant-induced conditioned place preference in rats.

    PubMed

    Rutten, Kris; De Vry, Jean; Bruckmann, Walter; Tzschentke, Thomas M

    2010-10-25

    Activation of the Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ (NOP) receptor may have anti-abuse effects. The present study examined the consequence of NOP receptor activation on the rewarding effect of opiates and psychostimulants in the conditioned place preference task in rats. First, the motivational effect of the NOP receptor agonists Ro64-6198 (0.316-3.16 mg/kg i.p.) and Ro65-6570 (1-10mg/kg i.p.) when administered alone, was assessed. Ro65-6570 was selected for further drug combination studies since, unlike Ro64-6198, it was devoid of an intrinsic motivational effect. Next, the minimal effective dose to induce reward for the opiates heroin (0.1-3.16 mg/kg i.p.), morphine (1-10mg/kg i.p.), hydrocodone (0.316-10mg/kg i.p.), tilidine (1-31.6 mg/kg i.p.), hydromorphone (0.1-10mg/kg i.p.), and oxycodone (0.0316-10mg/kg i.p.), as well as for the psychostimulants cocaine (3.16-31.6 mg/kg i.p.) and dexamphetamine (0.316-3.16 mg/kg i.p.) in combination with Ro 65-6570 (0 or 3.16 mg/kg i.p.) was determined. All drugs produced conditioned place preference, and for opiates and cocaine, but not for dexamphetamine, the minimal effective dose was higher when combined with Ro65-6570 (3.16 mg/kg i.p.). Attenuation of the rewarding effect of tilidine (3.16 mg/kg i.p.) and oxycodone (1mg/kg i.p.) by Ro65-6570 (3.16 mg/kg i.p.) could be reversed by pre-treatment with the NOP receptor antagonist J-113397 (4.64 mg/kg i.p.), suggesting that the attenuating effect of Ro65-6570 on opiates is due to activation of the NOP receptor. Taken together, the present study suggests that activation of NOP receptors effectively attenuates the rewarding effect of opiates, but may be less effective in reducing psychostimulant-induced reward. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Opiate agonist-induced re-distribution of Wntless, a mu-opioid receptor interacting protein, in rat striatal neurons.

    PubMed

    Reyes, B A S; Vakharia, K; Ferraro, T N; Levenson, R; Berrettini, W H; Van Bockstaele, E J

    2012-01-01

    Wntless (WLS), a mu-opioid receptor (MOR) interacting protein, mediates Wnt protein secretion that is critical for neuronal development. We investigated whether MOR agonists induce re-distribution of WLS within rat striatal neurons. Adult male rats received either saline, morphine or [d-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO) directly into the lateral ventricles. Following thirty minutes, brains were extracted and tissue sections were processed for immunogold silver detection of WLS. In saline-treated rats, WLS was distributed along the plasma membrane and within the cytoplasmic compartment of striatal dendrites as previously described. The ratio of cytoplasmic to total dendritic WLS labeling was 0.70±0.03 in saline-treated striatal tissue. Morphine treatment decreased this ratio to 0.48±0.03 indicating a shift of WLS from the intracellular compartment to the plasma membrane. However, following DAMGO treatment, the ratio was 0.85±0.05 indicating a greater distribution of WLS intracellularly. The difference in the re-distribution of the WLS following different agonist exposure may be related to DAMGO's well known ability to induce internalization of MOR in contrast to morphine, which is less effective in producing receptor internalization. Furthermore, these data are consistent with our hypothesis that MOR agonists promote dimerization of WLS and MOR, thereby preventing WLS from mediating Wnt secretion. In summary, our findings indicate differential agonist-induced trafficking of WLS in striatal neurons following distinct agonist exposure. Adaptations in WLS trafficking may represent a novel pharmacological target in the treatment of opiate addiction and/or pain.

  4. Endogenous opiates and behavior: 2014.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    This paper is the thirty-seventh consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system. It summarizes papers published during 2014 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (endogenous opioids and receptors), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (pain and analgesia); stress and social status (human studies); tolerance and dependence (opioid mediation of other analgesic responses); learning and memory (stress and social status); eating and drinking (stress-induced analgesia); alcohol and drugs of abuse (emotional responses in opioid-mediated behaviors); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (opioid involvement in stress response regulation); mental illness and mood (tolerance and dependence); seizures and neurologic disorders (learning and memory); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (opiates and conditioned place preferences (CPP)); general activity and locomotion (eating and drinking); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (alcohol and drugs of abuse); cardiovascular responses (opiates and ethanol); respiration and thermoregulation (opiates and THC); and immunological responses (opiates and stimulants). This paper is the thirty-seventh consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system. It summarizes papers published during 2014 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular

  5. Mu opiate receptors are selectively labelled by [3H]carfentanil in human and rat brain.

    PubMed

    Titeler, M; Lyon, R A; Kuhar, M J; Frost, J F; Dannals, R F; Leonhardt, S; Bullock, A; Rydelek, L T; Price, D L; Struble, R G

    1989-08-22

    [11C]Carfentanil is a potent opioid agonist currently in use as a specific PET (position emission tomography) scan radioligand for brain mu opioid receptors. In order to investigate the receptor interactions of carfentanil in detail [3H]carfentanil was used as a radioligand for labelling receptors in rat and human brain tissue homogenates. [3H]Carfentanil was found to bind saturably and with high affinity (KD = 0.08 +/- 0.01 nM) to membranes prepared from human cortical (Bmax = 42 +/- 3 fmol/mg) and thalamic (Bmax = 84 +/- 3 fmol/mg) tissues and rat cortex (Bmax = 82 +/- 4 fmol/mg) and diencephalon (Bmax = 105 +/- 5 fmol/mg). Association (1.23 +/- 0.19 X 10(10) Mol-1 X min-1 and dissociation rate (0.19 +/- 0.03 min-1) constants were determined in human cortical tissues; results from studies in rat cortical, and rat diencephalon tissue homogenates produced similar kinetic rate constants. Competition studies with a variety of drugs indicated that [3H]carfentanil interacts primarily with mu opioid receptors in the four tissues studied; the affinities of a series of non-radioactive opioid ligands were essentially identical in the four tissues (correlation coefficients = 0.88-0.93). Naloxone, morphine, DAGO [( D-Ala2-MePhe4-Gly-ol5]enkephalin), DADL [( D-Ala2-D-Leu5]enkephalin) and EKC (ehtylketazocine) potently displaced specific [3H]carfentanil binding with nM potency while the kappa agonist U-69593, the sigma agonists (+)-SKF 10047, (+)-3-PPP [3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine) and haloperidol and PCP (phencyclidine) were less potent displacing agents. The higher affinities of DAGO and morphine versus DADL for the [3H]carfentanil binding sites indicates that delta opioid receptors are not being labelled.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Glucocorticoid receptors participate in the opiate withdrawal-induced stimulation of rats NTS noradrenergic activity and in the somatic signs of morphine withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Zaragoza, Javier; Hidalgo, Juana M; Laorden, M Luisa; Milanés, M Victoria

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Recent evidence suggests that glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a major molecular substrate of addictive properties of drugs of abuse. Hence, we performed a series of experiments to further characterize the role of GR signalling in opiate withdrawal-induced physical signs of dependence, enhanced noradrenaline (NA) turnover in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) phosphorylation (activation) as well as GR expression in the nucleus of the solitary tract noradrenergic cell group (NTS-A2). EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The role of GR signalling was assessed by i.p. pretreatment of the selective GR antagonist, mifepristone. Rats were implanted with two morphine (or placebo) pellets. Six days later, rats were pretreated with mifepristone or vehicle 30 min before naloxone and physical signs of abstinence, NA turnover, TH activation, GR expression and the hypothalamus–pituitary–adrenocortical axis activity were measured using HPLC, immunoblotting and RIA. KEY RESULTS Mifepristone alleviated the somatic signs of naloxone-induced opiate withdrawal. Mifepristone attenuated the increase in the NA metabolite, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethylen glycol (MHPG), in the PVN, and the enhanced NA turnover observed in morphine-withdrawn rats. Mifepristone antagonized the TH phosphorylation at Ser31 and the expression of c-Fos expression induced by morphine withdrawal. Finally, naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal induced up-regulation of GR in the NTS. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results suggest that the physical signs of opiate withdrawal, TH activation and stimulation of noradrenergic pathways innervating the PVN are modulated by GR signalling. Overall, the present data suggest that drugs targeting the GR may ameliorate stress and aversive effects associated with opiate withdrawal. PMID:22364199

  7. In vivo evaluation of new carfentanil-based radioligands for the mu opiate receptor.

    PubMed

    Jewett, Douglas M; Kilbourn, Michael R

    2004-04-01

    Eight derivatives of [(11)C]carfentanil were evaluated as alternative mu opioid receptor radioligands with the potential for lower pharmacological activity, faster pharmacokinetics, and/or lower non-specific binding. Derivatives with aryl ring substituents or alkyl group substitutions were prepared in carbon-11 labeled form and examined for initial brain uptake and regional brain tissue pharmacokinetics in mouse brain. Promising derivatives with chloro, methoxy and methyl substituents on one aryl ring were then evaluated for specific binding in an equilibrium infusion rat model of regional brain distributions. Although no derivatives were identified with improved pharmacokinetics or lower non-specific binding, several derivatives show acceptable in vivo specific binding properties and may deserve further evaluation as less potent and thus safer compounds for in vivo imaging studies.

  8. Quantification of human opiate receptor concentration and affinity using high and low specific activity ( sup 11 C)diprenorphine and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Sadzot, B.; Price, J.C.; Mayberg, H.S.; Douglass, K.H.; Dannals, R.F.; Lever, J.R.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Feldman, M.A. )

    1991-03-01

    (11C)Diprenorphine, a weak partial opiate agonist, and positron emission tomography were used to obtain noninvasive regional estimates of opiate receptor concentration (Bmax) and affinity (Kd) in human brain. Different compartmental models and fitting strategies were compared statistically to establish the most reliable method of parameter estimation. Paired studies were performed in six normal subjects using high (769-5,920 Ci/mmol) and low (27-80 Ci/mmol) specific activity (SA) (11C)diprenorphine. Two subjects were studied a third time using high SA (11C)diprenorphine after a pretreatment with 1-1.5 mg/kg of the opiate antagonist naloxone. After the plasma radioactivity was corrected for metabolites, the brain data were analyzed using a three-compartment model and nonlinear least-squares curve fitting. Linear differential equations were used to describe the high SA (low receptor occupancy) kinetics. The k3/k4 ratio varied from 1.0 +/- 0.2 (occipital cortex) to 8.6 +/- 1.6 (thalamus). Nonlinear differential equations were used to describe the low SA (high receptor occupancy) kinetics and the curve fits provided the konf2 product. The measured free fraction of (11C)diprenorphine in plasma (f1) was 0.30 +/- 0.03, the average K1/k2 ratio from the two naloxone studies was 1.1 +/- 0.2, and the calculated free fraction of (11C)diprenorphine in the brain (f2) was 0.3. Using the paired SA studies, the estimated kinetic parameters, and f2, separate estimates of Bmax and Kd were obtained. Bmax varied from 2.3 +/- 0.5 (occipital cortex) to 20.6 +/- 7.3 (cingulate cortex) nM. The average Kd (eight brain regions) was 0.85 +/- 0.17 nM.

  9. Differences of binding characteristics of non-selective opiates towards and delta receptor types

    SciTech Connect

    Delay-Goyet, P.; Roques, B.P.; Zajac, J.M.

    1987-08-10

    (TH)ET (etorphine), which is considered either as an universal ligand or a agonist, interacts with identical affinities K/sub D/ = 0.33 - 0.38 nM to hybrid cells and rabbit cerebellum, pure delta and -enriched opioid receptor preparations, respectively. In rat brain tissue, (TH)ET binding is inhibited by DAGO (Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-(Me)-Phe-Gly-ol), a selective agonist, in a competitive manner without apparent modification of the maximal number of sites. Furthermore, even at a DAGO concentration (300 nM) which should be sufficient to block (TH)ET interaction with sites, no variation in the total capacity of the tritiated ligand is observed. In contrast, DTLET (Tyr-D-Thr-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr), a delta-preferential agonist, blocks (TH)ET binding in rat brain at a concentration able to saturate delta-sites. At higher concentrations, where DTLET cross reacts with -sites, this ligand exhibits similar properties to those of DAGO. These data are very different from those obtained with (TH)EKC (ethylketocyclazocine), another universal ligand, the binding properties of which are easily explained by the occurrence in rat brain tissue of independent sites exhibiting pharmacological profiles of , delta and kappa sites. The authors results underline the possible misinterpretation of binding data obtained by using (TH) etorphine as a non-selective ligand. 28 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  10. The Neurobiology of Opiate Motivation

    PubMed Central

    Ting-A-Kee, Ryan; van der Kooy, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Opiates are a highly addictive class of drugs that have been reported to possess both dopamine-dependent and dopamine-independent rewarding properties. The search for how, if at all, these distinct mechanisms of motivation are related is of great interest in drug addiction research. Recent electrophysiological, molecular, and behavioral work has greatly improved our understanding of this process. In particular, the signaling properties of GABAA receptors located on GABA neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) appear to be crucial to understanding the interplay between dopamine-dependent and dopamine-independent mechanisms of opiate motivation. PMID:23028134

  11. The neurobiology of opiate motivation.

    PubMed

    Ting-A-Kee, Ryan; van der Kooy, Derek

    2012-10-01

    Opiates are a highly addictive class of drugs that have been reported to possess both dopamine-dependent and dopamine-independent rewarding properties. The search for how, if at all, these distinct mechanisms of motivation are related is of great interest in drug addiction research. Recent electrophysiological, molecular, and behavioral work has greatly improved our understanding of this process. In particular, the signaling properties of GABA(A) receptors located on GABA neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) appear to be crucial to understanding the interplay between dopamine-dependent and dopamine-independent mechanisms of opiate motivation.

  12. Black cohosh (Actaea racemosa, Cimicifuga racemosa) behaves as a mixed competitive ligand and partial agonist at the human mu opiate receptor

    PubMed Central

    Rhyu, Mee-Ra; Lu, Jian; Webster, Donna E.; Fabricant, Daniel S.; Farnsworth, Norman R.; Wang, Z. Jim

    2008-01-01

    Black cohosh is a commonly used botanical dietary supplement for the treatment of climacteric complaints. Since the opiate system in the brain is intimately associated with mood, temperature and sex hormonal levels, we investigated the activity of black cohosh extracts at the human μ opiate receptor (hMOR) expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The 100% methanol-, 75% ethanol- and 40% 2-propanol- extracts of black cohosh effectively displaced the specific binding of [3H]DAMGO to hMOR. Further studies of the clinically used ethanol extract indicated that black cohosh acted as a mixed competitive ligand, displacing 77 ± 4% [3H]DAMGO to hMOR (Ki = 62.9 μg/ml). Using the [35S]GTPγS assay, the action of black cohosh was found to be consistent with an agonist, with an EC50 of 68.8 ± 7.7 μg/ml. These results demonstrate for the first time that black cohosh contains active principle(s) that activate hMOR, supporting its beneficial role in alleviating menopausal symptoms. PMID:17177511

  13. Black cohosh (Actaea racemosa, Cimicifuga racemosa) behaves as a mixed competitive ligand and partial agonist at the human mu opiate receptor.

    PubMed

    Rhyu, Mee-Ra; Lu, Jian; Webster, Donna E; Fabricant, Daniel S; Farnsworth, Norman R; Wang, Z Jim

    2006-12-27

    Black cohosh is a commonly used botanical dietary supplement for the treatment of climacteric complaints. Because the opiate system in the brain is intimately associated with mood, temperature, and sex hormonal levels, the activity of black cohosh extracts at the human mu opiate receptor (hMOR) expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells was investigated. The 100% methanol, 75% ethanol, and 40% 2-propanol extracts of black cohosh effectively displaced the specific binding of [3H]DAMGO to hMOR. Further studies of the clinically used ethanol extract indicated that black cohosh acted as a mixed competitive ligand, displacing 77 +/- 4% [3H]DAMGO to hMOR (Ki = 62.9 microg/mL). Using the [35S]GTPgammaS assay, the action of black cohosh was found to be consistent with an agonist, with an EC50 of 68.8 +/- 7.7 microg/mL. These results demonstrate for the first time that black cohosh contains active principle(s) that activate hMOR, supporting its beneficial role in alleviating menopausal symptoms.

  14. Regulation of Pleiotrophin, Midkine, Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase β/ζ, and Their Intracellular Signaling Cascades in the Nucleus Accumbens During Opiate Administration.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Daniel; Laorden, María Luisa; Milanés, María Victoria

    2015-07-11

    Most classes of addictive substances alter the function and structural plasticity of the brain reward circuitry. Midkine (MK) and pleiotrophin (PTN) are growth/differentiation cytokines which, similarly to neurotrophins, play an important role in repair, neurite outgrowth, and cell differentiation. PTN or MK signaling through receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase β/ζ (RPTPβ/ζ), leads to the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases and thymoma viral proto-oncogene. This activation induces morphological changes and modulates addictive behaviors. Besides, there is increasing evidence that during the development of drug addiction, astrocytes contribute to the synaptic plasticity by synthesizing and releasing substances such as cytokines. In the present work we studied the effect of acute morphine administration, chronic morphine administration, and morphine withdrawal on PTN, MK, and RPTPβ/ζ expression and on their signaling pathways in the nucleus accumbens. Present results indicated that PTN, MK, and RPTPβ/ζ levels increased after acute morphine injection, returned to basal levels during chronic opioid treatment, and were up-regulated again during morphine withdrawal. We also observed an activation of astrocytes after acute morphine injection and during opiate dependence and withdrawal. In addition, immunofluorescence analysis revealed that PTN, but not MK, was overexpressed in astrocytes and that dopaminoceptive neurons expressed RPTPβ/ζ. All these observations suggest that the neurotrophic and behavioral adaptations that occur during opiate addiction could be, at least partly, mediated by cytokines. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  15. Regulation of Pleiotrophin, Midkine, Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase β/ζ, and Their Intracellular Signaling Cascades in the Nucleus Accumbens During Opiate Administration

    PubMed Central

    Laorden, María Luisa; Milanés, María Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Background: Most classes of addictive substances alter the function and structural plasticity of the brain reward circuitry. Midkine (MK) and pleiotrophin (PTN) are growth/differentiation cytokines which, similarly to neurotrophins, play an important role in repair, neurite outgrowth, and cell differentiation. PTN or MK signaling through receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase β/ζ (RPTPβ/ζ), leads to the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases and thymoma viral proto-oncogene. This activation induces morphological changes and modulates addictive behaviors. Besides, there is increasing evidence that during the development of drug addiction, astrocytes contribute to the synaptic plasticity by synthesizing and releasing substances such as cytokines. Methods: In the present work we studied the effect of acute morphine administration, chronic morphine administration, and morphine withdrawal on PTN, MK, and RPTPβ/ζ expression and on their signaling pathways in the nucleus accumbens. Results: Present results indicated that PTN, MK, and RPTPβ/ζ levels increased after acute morphine injection, returned to basal levels during chronic opioid treatment, and were up-regulated again during morphine withdrawal. We also observed an activation of astrocytes after acute morphine injection and during opiate dependence and withdrawal. In addition, immunofluorescence analysis revealed that PTN, but not MK, was overexpressed in astrocytes and that dopaminoceptive neurons expressed RPTPβ/ζ. Conclusions: All these observations suggest that the neurotrophic and behavioral adaptations that occur during opiate addiction could be, at least partly, mediated by cytokines. PMID:26164717

  16. Phagocytosis in Tetrahymena thermophila: naloxone-reversible inhibition by opiates.

    PubMed

    De Jesus, S; Renaud, F L

    1989-01-01

    1. Nanomolar concentrations of opiates inhibit phagocytosis in the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. 2. Naloxone and naltrexone counteract the effect of the opiate agonists tested. 3. The dose-response curves are U-shaped, with no detectable effect at low or high concentrations. 4. An increase in extracellular calcium and dopamine counteract the inhibition caused by metenkephalin. 5. The recognition mechanism for opiates in Tetrahymena cannot be classified as belonging to any of the mammalian opiate receptor subtypes and is perhaps a primitive receptor.

  17. Radiosynthesis of an opiate receptor-binding radiotracer for positron emission tomography: (C-11 methyl)-methyl-4-(N-(1-oxopropyl)-N-phenylamino)-4-piperidine carboxylate (C-11 4-carbomethoxyfentanyl)

    SciTech Connect

    Dannals, R.F.; Ravert, H.T.; Frost, J.J.; Wilson, A.A.; Burns, H.D.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The development of high affinity, high specific activity tritium-labeled neurotransmitter receptor ligands has made it possible to determine the spatial distribution and relative regional concentration of several neuroreceptors by means of in vivo receptor labeling techniques in animals. This development made possible the biochemical identification of opiate receptors by autoradiographic visualization in experimental animals. The quantitation and localization of opiate receptors in man using non-invasive methods, such as positron emission tomography, could provide a means of obtaining information about a variety of receptor-linked neuropsychiatric diseases as well as normal brain mechanisms regulating pain and emotions. As part of a continuing program to identify and radiolabel high affinity, highly specific ligands for the opiate receptor, the authors have selected two derivatives of fentanyl, a well-known analgesic, as candidates for radiolabeling: R-31,833 (4-carbomethoxy-fentanyl) and R-34,995 (lofentanil). Carbon-11 labeled R-31,833 was synthesized by the methylation of the appropriate carboxylate with C-11 methyl iodide in dimethylformamide at room temperature and purified by high performance liquid chromatography. The average synthesis time from end-of-bombardment (E.O.B.) was 30 minutes. The average specific activity was determined by ultraviolet spectroscopy to be 890 mCi/..mu..mole end-of-synthesis (approx. 2500 mCi/..mu..mole E.O.B.).

  18. Buprenorphine in the treatment of opiate dependence: its pharmacology and social context of use in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Wesson, Donald R

    2004-05-01

    Buprenorphine's physiological effects are produced when it attaches to specific opiate receptors that are designated mu, kappa, or delta. Buprenorphine, a partial agonist at the mu receptor and an antagonist at the kappa receptor, produces typical morphine-like effects at low doses. At higher doses, it produces opiate effects that are less than those of full opiate agonists. Knowledge of the physiological effects of opiate receptors and the way they interact with opiate agonists, partial opiate agonists, and opiate antagonists is fundamental to understanding the safety and efficacy of buprenorphine in treatment of pain and opiate addiction. Knowledge of the historical and social context of opiate agonist treatment of opiate dependence is fundamental to understanding how nonpharmacological factors may limit the clinical adoption and utility of a safe and effective medication in treatment of opiate dependence. This article reviews the pharmacology of sublingual buprenorphine and the historical context of opiate agonist therapy; delineates classes of opiate receptors and their interaction with opiate agonists, partial agonists, and antagonists; and describes the commercially available pharmaceutical formulations of buprenorphine. It focuses on sublingual buprenorphine tablets, Subutex and Suboxone, the FDA-approved formulations of buprenorphine for treatment of opiate dependence. Sublingual buprenorphine, and the combination of sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone, have unique pharmacological properties that make them a logical first-line intervention in the treatment of opioid dependence.

  19. Elevated mu-opioid receptor expression in the nucleus of the solitary tract accompanies attenuated withdrawal signs after chronic low dose naltrexone in opiate-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Van Bockstaele, E J; Rudoy, C; Mannelli, P; Oropeza, V; Qian, Y

    2006-02-15

    We previously described a decrease in withdrawal behaviors in opiate-dependent rats that were chronically treated with very low doses of naltrexone in their drinking water. Attenuated expression of withdrawal behaviors correlated with decreased c-Fos expression and intracellular signal transduction elements [protein kinase A regulatory subunit II (PKA) and phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (pCREB)] in brainstem noradrenergic nuclei. In this study, to determine whether similar cellular changes occurred in forebrain nuclei associated with drug reward, expressions of PKA and pCREB were analyzed in the ventral tegmental area, frontal cortex, striatum, and amygdala of opiate-treated rats that received low doses of naltrexone in their drinking water. No significant difference in PKA or pCREB was detected in these regions following drug treatment. To examine further the cellular mechanisms in noradrenergic nuclei that could underlie attenuated withdrawal behaviors following low dose naltrexone administration, the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and locus coeruleus (LC) were examined for opioid receptor (OR) protein expression. Results showed a significant increase in muOR expression in the NTS of morphine-dependent rats that received low doses of naltrexone in their drinking water, and increases in muOR expression were also found to be dose dependent. Protein expression of muOR in the LC and deltaOR in either brain region remained unchanged. In conclusion, our previously reported decreases in c-Fos and PKA expression in the NTS following pretreatment with low doses of naltrexone may be partially explained by a greater inhibition of NTS neurons resulting from increased muOR expression in this region.

  20. Conformation-activity relationships of opiate analgesics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jennifer; Andrews, Peter

    1987-04-01

    Extensive conformational calculations were performed on the potent opiate analgesics etorphine, PET, R30490 and etonitazene to determine all of their many low-energy conformations. The results were used to characterize four possible models for binding of a simple pharmacophore, comprising two phenyl rings plus a protonated nitrogen, to opiate analgesic receptors. These four models may define the necessary three-dimensional features leading to particular opiate actions. The model favoured for μ receptor activity can accommodate a protonated nitrogen, an aromatic ring (which may be substituted with an electronegative group) and a second lipophilic group. These structural features must be presented in a precise three-dimensional arrangement. It appears likely that a hydrophilic substituent in a certain region of the analgesic pharmacophore may also interact with the receptor as a secondary binding group.

  1. Gender-related differences in the pharmacokinetics of opiates.

    PubMed

    Djurendic-Brenesel, Maja; Mimica-Dukic, Neda; Pilija, Vladimir; Tasic, Milos

    2010-01-30

    Previous studies have documented gender-related differences in a number of aspects of the pharmacology of opiates, including their analgesic activity, stimulative properties and generation of physical dependence. The current experiments were carried out with the aim to examine whether male-female differences exist in the blood and brain levels of opiates attained after their intraperitoneal injection to male and female Wistar rats. The tests were performed 5, 15, 45 and 120 min after the animal treatment with seized heroin. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed to quantitatively determine opiate alkaloids in blood and brain regions (known for their high concentration of mu-opiate receptors): cortex, brainstem, amygdala and basal ganglia. Maximal contents of opiates in blood of animals of both genders were found in the second measurement time (15 min), the values measured in the males being significantly higher, which suggests a faster passage of the opiates from blood to brain tissue in female animals. The highest content of opiates in the brain tissue of female animals was measured 15 min and with male animals 45 min after the treatment, which also indicates faster distribution of opiates from blood to brain in the female compared to male rats. The highest proportion of opiates was found in the basal ganglia of the animals of both genders. The obtained results offer the possibility of selecting this part of the brain tissue of both males and females as a representative sample for identifying and assessing contents of opiates.

  2. Opiate alkaloids in Ascaris suum.

    PubMed

    Pryor, S C; Putnam, Jennifer; Hoo, Nanyamka

    2004-01-01

    The parasitic worm Ascaris suum contains the opiate alkaloids morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide as determined by HPLC coupled to electrochemical detection and by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The level of morphine in muscle tissue of female and male is 252 +/- 32.68, 1168 +/- 278 and 180 +/- 23.47 (ng/g of wet tissue), respectively. The level of M6G in muscle tissue of female and male is 167 +/- 28.37 and 92 +/- 11.45 (ng/g of wet tissue), respectively. Furthermore, Ascaris maintained for 5 days contained a significant amount of morphine, as did their medium, demonstrating their ability to synthesize the opiate alkaloid. The anatomic distribution of morphine was examined by indirect immunofluorescent staining and HPLC of various tissues dissected from male and female adult worms. Immunofluorescence revealed morphine in the subcuticle layers, in the animals' nerve chords and in the female reproductive organs. Morphine was found to be most prevalent in the muscle tissue and there is significantly more morphine in females than males, probably due to the large amounts in the female uterus. Morphine (10(-9) M) and morphine-6-glucuronide (10(-9) M) stimulated the release of NO from Ascaris muscle tissue. Naloxone (10(-7) M), and L-NAME (10(-6) M) blocked (P < 0.005) morphine-stimulated NO release from A. suum muscle. CTOP (10(-7) M) did not block morphine's NO release. However, naloxone could not block M6G stimulated NO release by muscle tissue, whereas CTOP (10(-7) M) blocked its release. These findings were in seeming contradiction to our inability to isolate a mu opiate receptor messenger RNA by RT-PCR using a human mu primer. This suggests that a novel mu opiate receptor was present and selective toward M6G.

  3. Effects of opiates on synaptosomal calmodulin and calcium uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Hoss, W.; Formaniak, M.

    1983-02-01

    Acute opiate administration in vivo increases the level of cytoplasmic calmodulin in isolated rat brain synaptosomes. These synaptosomes do not, however, display decreased K/sup +/-stimulated /sup 45/Ca uptake in vitro. Opiates affect neither cytoplasmic calmodulin nor Ca uptake after incubation of synaptosomes with the drugs in vitro. In contrast to the interpretation of electrophysiological data, these results suggest that the observed inhibition by opiates of the release of several transmitters may not be mediated by presynaptic opiate receptors that inhibit Ca uptake.

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of aryl-naloxamide opiate analgesics targeting truncated exon 11-associated μ opioid receptor (MOR-1) splice variants.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Susruta; Subrath, Joan; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Polikar, Lisa; Burgman, Maxim; Nagakura, Kuni; Ocampo, Julie; Haselton, Nathan; Pasternak, Anna R; Grinnell, Steven; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2012-07-26

    3-Iodobenzoylnaltrexamide 1 (IBNtxA) is a potent analgesic acting through a novel receptor target that lack many side-effects of traditional opiates composed, in part, of exon 11-associated truncated six transmembrane domain MOR-1 (6TM/E11) splice variants. To better understand the SAR of this drug target, a number of 4,5-epoxymorphinan analogues were synthesized. Results show the importance of a free 3-phenolic group, a phenyl ring at the 6 position, an iodine at the 3'or 4' position of the phenyl ring, and an N-allyl or c-propylmethyl group to maintain high 6TM/E11 affinity and activity. 3-Iodobenzoylnaloxamide 15 (IBNalA) with a N-allyl group displayed lower δ opioid receptor affinity than its naltrexamine analogue, was 10-fold more potent an analgesic than morphine, elicited no respiratory depression or physical dependence, and only limited inhibition of gastrointestinal transit. Thus, the aryl-naloxamide scaffold can generate a potent analgesic acting through the 6TM/E11 sites with advantageous side-effect profile and greater selectivity.

  5. Inflated Reward Value in Early Opiate Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Wassum, Kate M.; Greenfield, Venuz Y.; Linker, Kay E.; Maidment, Nigel T.; Ostlund, Sean B.

    2014-01-01

    Through incentive learning the emotional experience of a reward in a relevant need state (e.g., hunger for food) sets the incentive value that guides the performance actions that earn that reward when the need state is encountered again. Opiate withdrawal has been proposed as a need state in which, through experience, opiate value can be increased resulting in escalated opiate self-administration. Endogenous opioid transmission plays anatomically dissociable roles in the positive emotional experience of reward consumption and incentive learning. We, therefore, sought to determine if chronic opiate exposure and withdrawal produces a disruption in the fundamental incentive learning process such that reward seeking, even for non-opiate rewards, can become maladaptive, inconsistent with the emotional experience of reward consumption and irrespective of need. Rats trained to earn sucrose or water on a reward-seeking chain were treated with morphine (10-30 mg/k.g., s.c.) daily for 11 d prior to testing in withdrawal. Opiate withdrawn rats showed elevated reward-seeking actions, but only after they experienced the reward in withdrawal, an effect that was strongest in early (1-3 d), as opposed to late (14-16 d) withdrawal. This was sufficient to overcome a negative reward value change induced by sucrose experience in satiety and, in certain circumstances, was inconsistent with the emotional experience of reward consumption. Lastly, we found that early opiate withdrawal-induced inflation of reward value was blocked by inactivation of basolateral amygdala mu opioid receptors. These data suggest that in early opiate withdrawal the incentive learning process is disrupted resulting in maladaptive reward seeking. PMID:25081350

  6. (/sup 3/H)U-69593 labels a subtype of kappa opiate receptor with characteristics different from that labeled by (/sup 3/H)ethylketocyclazocine

    SciTech Connect

    Nock, B.; Rajpara, A.; O'Connor, L.H.; Cicero, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    (/sup 3/H)U-69593 is an opiate agonist that has been reported to bind in vitro with high affinity and selectivity to the kappa receptor subtype. The studies reported here were designed to determine the optimal conditions for labeling kappa receptors with (/sup 3/H)U-69593 and to further characterize the binding site. The effects of temperature and NaCl on (/sup 3/H)U-69593 binding were of particular interest because previous studies reported that (/sup 3/H)ethylketocyclazocine ((/sup 3/H)EKC) and (/sup 3/H)bremazocine binding to kappa receptors was optimal at 4/sup 0/C in the presence of NaCl. Those conditions were not found to be optimal for (/sup 3/H)U-69593 binding. Although the pharmacological specificity and Bmax of (/sup 3/H)U-69593 binding was similar at room temperature and at 4/sup 0/C, the binding affinity was approximately three times lower at 4/sup 0/C than at room temperature. In addition, NaCl had an effect on (/sup 3/H)U-69593 binding that was opposite that on (/sup 3/H)EKC binding at 4/sup 0/C. These differences between (/sup 3/H)U-69593 and (/sup 3/H)EKC binding at 4/sup 0/C were accentuated by a vast difference in the density of the binding sites and suggested that (/sup 3/H)U-69593 might bind selectively to a kappa receptor subtype.

  7. Lack of functional evidence for the involvement of sigma opiate receptors in the actions of the 3-PPP enantiomers on central dopaminergic systems: discrepancies between in vitro and in vivo observations.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, S; Clark, D; Carlsson, A

    1985-08-19

    In vitro radioligand binding and autoradiographic distribution studies have suggested the possible involvement of central sigma-opiate sites in the effects of several purportedly dopaminergic agents. Specifically, Largent et al. (Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 81, 4983, 1984) proposed that "actions of 3-PPP at sigma receptors may account for the effect of the drug on behavior and dopaminergic nerve function". Using the sigma-opiate- and dopamine (DA)-preferring (-)- and (+)-enantiomer, respectively, of butaclamol, and the two enantiomers of 3-PPP, the present study was undertaken to address the in vivo functional significance of this proposal. To this end we investigated various biological responses considered to reflect drug interactions with DA cell body and terminal autoreceptors and with presumed non-synaptic and postsynaptic DA receptors in the rat CNS. (+)- but not (-)-butaclamol antagonized the 3-PPP (either enantiomer)-induced DA synthesis and prolactin decreases in GBL-treated rats, the (+)-3-PPP-induced inhibition of substantia nigra DA cell firing and the (+)-3-PPP-induced reversal of reserpine akinesia. Taken together with previous findings available data suggest that DA rather than sigma-opiate receptors mediate the neurochemical, electrophysiological, behavioral and other physiological (prolactin, body temperature) effects of 3-PPP and its enantiomers. The in vivo pharmacological relevance of the claimed non-dopaminergic, proposedly sigma-opiatergic, radioligand binding demonstrated in vitro (with e.g. (+)-3-PPP) thus remains to be established.

  8. Role of central and peripheral opiate receptors in the effects of fentanyl on analgesia, ventilation and arterial blood-gas chemistry in conscious rats

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Fraser; May, Walter J.; Gruber, Ryan B.; Discala, Joseph F.; Puscovic, Veljko; Young, Alex P.; Baby, Santhosh M.; Lewis, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    This study determined the effects of the peripherally restricted µ-opiate receptor (µ-OR) antagonist, naloxone methiodide (NLXmi) on fentanyl (25 µg/kg, i.v.)-induced changes in (1) analgesia, (2) arterial blood gas chemistry (ABG) and alveolar-arterial gradient (A-a gradient), and (3) ventilatory parameters, in conscious rats. The fentanyl-induced increase in analgesia was minimally affected by a 1.5 mg/kg of NLXmi but was attenuated by a 5.0 mg/kg dose. Fentanyl decreased arterial blood pH, pO2 and sO2 and increased pCO2 and A-a gradient. These responses were markedly diminished in NLXmi (1.5 mg/kg)-pretreated rats. Fentanyl caused ventilatory depression (e.g., decreases in tidal volume and peak inspiratory flow). Pretreatment with NLXmi (1.5 mg/kg, i.v.) antagonized the fentanyl decrease in tidal volume but minimally affected the other responses. These findings suggest that (1) the analgesia and ventilatory depression caused by fentanyl involve peripheral µ-ORs and (2) NLXmi prevents the fentanyl effects on ABG by blocking the negative actions of the opioid on tidal volume and A-a gradient. PMID:24284037

  9. Preoperative ultra-rapid opiate detoxification for the treatment of post-operative surgical pain.

    PubMed

    Blum, James M; Biel, Sarang S; Hilliard, Paul E; Jutkiewicz, Emily M

    2015-06-01

    Over the past two decades, the prescription of high dose opiate therapy has continued to accelerate in an attempt to treat patients with chronic pain. This presents a substantial challenge when patients on high dose opiate therapy require surgery, as opiate pain relief is a cornerstone of postoperative pain management. These patients have exceptionally challenging pain to control. This is likely due to downregulation of existing opiate receptors and the reluctance of clinicians to increase doses of opiates to exceptionally high levels to facilitate pain relief. We hypothesize that using the method of ultra-rapid opiate detoxification (UROD), it would be possible to rapidly increase the number of opiate receptors and return patients to a more naive state, which would be susceptible to exogenous opiate administration. Validation of this hypothesis is supported by two mechanisms, the first of which are reports of patients that underwent UROD for opiate addition that subsequently suffer respiratory arrests when beginning to rapidly abuse opiates shortly after treatment. Additionally there are data demonstrating the tapering of opiate therapy prior to elective surgery results in better pain control. In conclusion, we hypothesize that patients on chronic high dose opiates could obtain substantially better pain relief if they underwent UROD prior to surgery. This technique could be administered shortly before surgery and may dramatically improve the patients' recoveries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The AXL Receptor is a Sensor of Ligand Spatial Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Aaron S.; Zweemer, Annelien J.M.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    The AXL receptor is a TAM (Tyro3, AXL, MerTK) receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) important in physiological inflammatory processes such as blood clotting, viral infection, and innate immune-mediated cell clearance. Overexpression of the receptor in a number of solid tumors is increasingly appreciated as a key drug resistance and tumor dissemination mechanism. Although the ligand-receptor (Gas6-AXL) complex structure is known, literature reports on ligand-mediated signaling have provided conflicting conclusions regarding the influence of other factors such as phosphatidylserine binding, and a detailed, mechanistic picture of AXL activation has not emerged. Integrating quantitative experiments with mathematical modeling, we show here that AXL operates to sense local spatial heterogeneity in ligand concentration, a feature consistent with its physiological role in inflammatory cell responses. This effect arises as a result of an intricate reaction-diffusion interaction. Our results demonstrate that AXL functions distinctly from other RTK families, a vital insight for envisioned design of AXL-targeted therapeutic intervention. PMID:26236777

  11. A proposal for the molecular basis of μ and δ opiate receptor differentiation based on modeling of two types of cyclic enkephalins and a narcotic alkaloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, André; Villeneuve, Gérald; DiMaio, John

    1991-12-01

    The molecular basis underlying the divergent receptor selectivity of two cyclic opioid peptides Tyr-c[ N δ- d-Orn2-Gly-Phe-Leu-] (c-ORN) and [ d-Pen2, l-Cys5]-enkephalinamide (c-PEN) was investigated using a molecular modeling approach. Ring closure and conformational searching procedures were used to determine low-energy cyclic backbone conformers. Following reinsertion of amino acid side chains, the narcotic alkaloid 7α-[(1R)-1-methyl-1-hydroxy-3-phenylpropyl]-6,14-endoethenotetrahydro oripavine (PEO) was used as a flexible template for bimolecular superpositions with each of the determined peptide ring conformers using the coplanarity and cocentricity of the phenolic rings as the minimum constraint. A vector space of PEO, accounting for all possible orientations for the C21-aromatic ring of PEO served as a geometrical locus for the aromatic ring of the Phe4 residue in the opioid peptides. Although a vast number of polypeptide conformations satisfied the criteria of the opiate pharmacophore, they could be grouped into three classes differing in magnitude and sign of the torsional angle values of the tyrosyl side chain. Only class III conformers for both c-ORN and c-PEN, having tyramine dihedral angles χ1 =-150° ± 30° and χ2=-155° ± 20°, had significant structural and conformational properties that were mutually compatible while respecting the PEO vector space. Comparison of these properties in the context of the divergent receptor selectivity of the studied opioid peptides suggests that the increased distortion of the peptide backbone in the closure region of c-PEN together with the pendant β,β-dimethyl group, combine to generate a steric volume which is absent in c-ORN and that may be incompatible with a restrictive topography of the μ receptor. The nature and stereo-chemistry of substituents adjacent to the closure region of the peptides could also modulate receptor selection by interacting with a charged (δ) or neutral (μ) subsite.

  12. Autoradiographic mapping of mu-opioid receptors during opiate tolerance and supersensitivity in the rat central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Díaz, A; Pazos, A; Flórez, J; Hurlé, M A

    2000-08-01

    In this autoradiographic study we have analysed the regional changes in the density of mu-opioid receptors produced by the chronic administration of sufentanil alone and after concurrent administration with nimodipine. mu-Opioid receptors in the central nervous system (CNS) of rats were labelled using 5 nM [3H]DAMGO. Sufentanil, a high-efficacy agonist, was administered for 7 days by chronic infusion (2 microg/h). Another group of animals received a simultaneous infusion of sufentanil (2 microg/h) and nimodipine (1 microg/h) for 7 days. These two drug regimes have been previously shown to induce tolerance and supersensitivity to the analgesic effect of the opioid, respectively. Our results clearly demonstrate that opioid tolerance is associated with a generalised down-regulation of mu-opioid binding sites throughout the brain and the spinal cord. Compared with the findings in tolerant animals, the CNS of animals supersensitive to sufentanil showed less down-regulation of mu-opioid receptors, to the extent that, particularly in brain areas related to nociception, such as the somatosensory cortex, central grey, raphe magnus nucleus and dorsal horn of the spinal cord, no down-regulation occurred. These neurochemical findings may contribute to the functional interaction between nimodipine and sufentanil that we have previously observed in analgesic studies.

  13. Opiate treatment for opiate withdrawal in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Osborn, David A; Jeffery, Heather E; Cole, Michael J

    2010-10-06

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) due to opiate withdrawal may result in disruption of the mother-infant relationship, sleep-wake abnormalities, feeding difficulties, weight loss and seizures. To assess the effectiveness and safety of using an opiate compared to a sedative or non-pharmacological treatment for treatment of NAS due to withdrawal from opiates. The review was updated in 2010 with additional searches CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE supplemented by searches of conference abstracts and citation lists of published articles. Randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials of opiate treatment in infants with NAS born to mothers with opiate dependence. Each author assessed study quality and extracted data independently. Nine studies enrolling 645 infants met inclusion criteria. There were substantial methodological concerns in all studies comparing an opiate with a sedative. Two small studies comparing different opiates were of good methodology.Opiate (morphine) versus supportive care (one study): A reduction in time to regain birth weight and duration of supportive care and a significant increase in hospital stay was noted.Opiate versus phenobarbitone (four studies): Meta-analysis found no significant difference in treatment failure. One study reported opiate treatment resulted in a significant reduction in treatment failure in infants of mothers using only opiates. One study reported a significant reduction in days treatment and admission to the nursery for infants receiving morphine. One study reported a reduction in seizures, of borderline statistical significance, with the use of opiate.Opiate versus diazepam (two studies): Meta-analysis found a significant reduction in treatment failure with the use of opiate.Different opiates (six studies): there is insufficient data to determine safety or efficacy of any specific opiate compared to another opiate. Opiates compared to supportive care may reduce time to regain birth weight and duration of supportive care

  14. Characterization and autoradiographic visualization of (+)-(3H)SKF10,047 binding in rat and mouse brain: further evidence for phencyclidine/sigma opiate receptor commonality

    SciTech Connect

    Sircar, R.; Nichtenhauser, R.; Ieni, J.R.; Zukin, S.R.

    1986-05-01

    The binding specificity of (+)-(/sup 3/H)N-allylnormetazocine, the dextrorotatory isomer of the prototypical sigma opiate SKF10,047, was determined in rat and mouse brain and the neuroanatomical distribution of its binding sites elucidated by quantitative autoradiography in sections of rat brain. Computer-assisted Scatchard analysis revealed an apparent two-site fit of the binding data in both species and in all rat brain regions examined. In whole rat brain, the Kd values were 3.6 and 153 nM and the maximum binding values were 40 fmol and 1.6 pmol/mg of protein for the apparent high- and low-affinity binding sites, respectively. (+)-SKF10,047, haloperidol and pentazocine were among the most potent inhibitors of 7 nM (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF10,047 binding to the higher affinity sites; rank orders of ligand potencies at these sites differ sharply from those that have been reported for the (/sup 3/H)phencyclidine (PCP) site, or for eliciting PCP-like or SKF10,047-like behaviors. By contrast, rank orders of potency of sigma opiods, PCP derivatives and dioxolanes for displacement of 100 nM (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF10,047 from the more numerous lower affinity sites in the presence of 100 nM haloperidol agreed closely with their potencies in the (/sup 3/H)PCP binding assay as well as their potencies in exerting PCP- or SKF10,047-like behavioral effects. In order to compare directly the anatomical localizations of PCP and (+)-SKF10,047 binding sites, quantitative light microscopy autoradiography utilizing tritium-labeled PCP and (+)-SKF10,047 was carried out in rat brain sections. (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF10,047 binding was observed to follow the regional pattern of (3H)PCP binding but also to bind in other regions not associated with PCP receptors.

  15. Opioid peptides and opiate alkaloids in immunoregulatory processes.

    PubMed

    Stefano, George B; Kream, Richard M

    2010-06-30

    Among the various non-neuronal cell types known to express and utilize neuropeptides, those of the immune system have received much attention in recent years. In particular, comparative studies in vertebrates and invertebrates have shown that endogenous opioid peptides are engaged in receptor mediated autoregulatory immune and neuroendocrine processes. The majority of these immune processes are stimulatory, as determined by their effects on conformational changes indicative of immunocyte activation, cellular motility, and phagocytosis. Endogenous opioid peptides form an effective network of messenger molecules in cooperation with cytokines, opiate alkaloids, and certain regulatory enzymes (neutral endopeptidase 24.11). Peptide-mediated immunostimulatory effects observed in this system are operationally counteracted by the inhibitory effects of morphine and related opiates. Opioid/opiate signaling processes are mediated by several types of receptors with different degrees of selectivity. Among them the recently identified, opioid insensitive µ(3) receptor deserves attention on account of its specificity for opiate alkaloids.

  16. Modification of opiate agonist binding by pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Abood, M.E.; Lee, N.M.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-03-05

    Opiate agonist binding is decreased by GTP, suggesting the possible involvement of GTP binding proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding. This possibility was addressed by asking whether pertussis toxin treatment, which results in ADP-ribosylation and modification of G proteins, would alter opiate agonist binding. The striatum was chosen for the initial brain area to be studied, since regulation of opiate action in this area had been shown to be modified by pertussis toxin. Treatment of striatal membranes with pertussis toxin results in up to a 55% decrease in /sup 3/(H)-DADLE binding as compared with membranes treated identically without toxin. This corresponds to a near complete ADP-ribosylation of both G proteins in the striatal membrane. The decrease in agonist binding appears to be due to an altered affinity of the receptor for agonist as opposed to a decrease in the number of sites. This effect of pertussis toxin on opiate agonist binding demonstrates the actual involvement of G proteins in regulation of opiate receptor binding.

  17. Switching agonist/antagonist properties of opiate alkaloids at the delta opioid receptor using mutations based on the structure of the orphanin FQ receptor.

    PubMed

    Meng, F; Wei, Q; Hoversten, M T; Taylor, L P; Akil, H

    2000-07-21

    In an earlier study, we have demonstrated that by mutating five amino acid residues to those conserved in the opioid receptors, the OFQ receptor could be converted to a functional receptor that bound many opioid alkaloids with nanomolar affinities. Surprisingly, when the reciprocal mutations, Lys-214 --> Ala (TM5), Ile-277 --> Val/His-278 --> Gln/Ile-279 --> Val (TM6), and Ile-304 --> Thr (TM7), are introduced in the delta receptor, neither the individual mutations nor their various combinations significantly reduce the binding affinities of opioid alkaloids tested. However, these mutations cause profound alterations in the functional characteristics of the mutant receptors as measured in guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding assays. Some agonists become antagonists at some constructs as they lose their ability to activate them. Some alkaloid antagonists are transformed into agonists at other constructs, but their agonistic effects can still be blocked by the peptide antagonist TIPP. Even the delta inverse agonist 7-benzylidenenaltrexone becomes an agonist at the mutant containing both the Ile-277 --> Val/His-278 --> Gln/Ile-279 --> Val and Ile-304 --> Thr mutations. Thus, although the mutated residues are thought to be part of the binding pocket, they are critically involved in the control of the delta receptor activation process. These findings shed light on some of the structural bases of ligand efficacy. They are also compatible with the hypothesis that a ligand may achieve high affinity binding in several different ways, each having different effects on receptor activation.

  18. Distribution of opiate alkaloids in brain tissue of experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Djurendic-Brenesel, Maja; Pilija, Vladimir; Mimica-Dukic, Neda; Budakov, Branislav; Cvjeticanin, Stanko

    2012-12-01

    The present study examined regional distribution of opiate alkaloids from seized heroin in brain regions of experimental animals in order to select parts with the highest content of opiates. Their analysis should contribute to resolve causes of death due to heroin intake. The tests were performed at different time periods (5, 15, 45 and 120 min) after male and female Wistar rats were treated with seized heroin. Opiate alkaloids (codeine, morphine, acetylcodeine, 6-acetylmorphine and 3,6-diacetylmorphine) were quantitatively determined in brain regions known for their high concentration of µ-opiate receptors: cortex, brainstem, amygdala and basal ganglia, by using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The highest content of opiate alkaloids in the brain tissue of female animals was found 15 min and in male animals 45 min after treatment. The highest content of opiates was determined in the basal ganglia of the animals of both genders, indicating that this part of brain tissue presents a reliable sample for identifying and assessing contents of opiates after heroin intake.

  19. Nuclear estrogen receptor molecular heterogeneity in the mouse uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Golding, T.S.; Korach, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    Holomeric estrogen receptor (ER) prepared from ovariectomized mouse uteri displays heterogeneous electrophoretic mobility when analyzed by NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE. ER derived from nuclei (ER/sub n/) appears as a closely spaced doublet having apparent molecular masses of 66.4 and 65 kDa, while ER from the cytosolic compartment (ER/sub c/) has a single band of 65 kDa. Both partially purified ER/sub c/ and the 8S form of unactivated ER/sub c/ show only the 65-kDa band. The appearance of the ER/sub n/ doublet is hormonally inducible, and the relative proportions of the two doublet bands are influenced by the type of hormone treatment, with weakly estrogenic compounds yielding the lower band as predominant while potent estrogens increase the proportion of the upper band. Steroid binding of the ER/sub n/ doublet was determined by (/sup 3/H)tamoxifen aziridine affinity labeling of both the 66.4- and the 65-kDa peptides; binding to the 65-kDa peptide was predominant. The ER/sub n/ doublet displays a time dependency after estrogen administration with maximal amounts occurring in a bimodal fashion at 1 and 8 hr.

  20. Molecular Targets of Opiate Drug Abuse in NeuroAIDS

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Kurt F.; El-Hage, Nazira; Buch, Shreya; Berger, Joseph R.; Tyor, William R.; Nath, Avindra; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J.; Knapp, Pamela E.

    2015-01-01

    Opiate drug abuse, through selective actions at μ opioid receptors (MOR), exacerbates the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) in the CNS by disrupting glial homeostasis, increasing inflammation, and decreasing the threshold for pro-apoptotic events in neurons. Neurons are affected directly and indirectly by opiate-HIV interactions. Although most opiate drugs have some affinity for κ (KOR) and/or δ (DOR) opioid receptors, their neurotoxic effects are largely mediated through MOR. Besides direct actions on the neurons themselves, opiates directly affect MOR-expressing astrocytes and microglia. Because of their broad-reaching actions in glia, opiate abuse causes widespread metabolic derangement, inflammation, and the disruption of neuron-glial relationships, which likely contribute to neuronal dysfunction, death, and HIV encephalitis. In addition to direct actions on neural cells, opioids modulate inflammation and disrupt normal intercellular interactions among immunocytes (macrophages and lymphocytes), which on balance further promote neuronal dysfunction and death. The neural pathways involved in opiate enhancement of HIV-induced inflammation and cell death, appear to involve MOR activation with downstream effects through PI3-kinase/Akt and/or MAPK signaling, which suggests possible targets for therapeutic intervention in neuroAIDS. PMID:16260386

  1. A thalamic input to the nucleus accumbens mediates opiate dependence

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yingjie; Wienecke, Carl F.R.; Nachtrab, Gregory; Chen, Xiaoke

    2016-01-01

    Chronic opiate use induces opiate dependence, which is characterized by extremely unpleasant physical and emotional feelings after drug use is terminated. Both rewarding effects of drug and the desire to avoid withdrawal symptoms motivate continued drug use1-3, and the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is important for orchestrating both processes4,5. While multiple inputs to the NAc regulate reward6-9, little is known about the NAc circuitry underlying withdrawal. Here we identify the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT) as a prominent input to the NAc mediating the expression of opiate withdrawal induced physical signs and aversive memory. Activity in the PVT to NAc pathway is necessary and sufficient to mediate behavioral aversion. Selectively silencing this pathway abolishes aversive symptoms in two different mouse models of opiate withdrawal. Chronic morphine exposure selectively potentiates excitatory transmission between the PVT and D2-receptor-expressing medium spiny neurons (D2-MSNs) via synaptic insertion of GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors. Notably, in vivo optogenetic depotentiation restores normal transmission at PVT→D2-MSNs synapses and robustly suppresses morphine withdrawal symptoms. These results link morphine-evoked pathway- and cell type-specific plasticity in the PVT→NAc circuit to opiate dependence, and suggest that reprogramming this circuit holds promise for treating opiate addiction. PMID:26840481

  2. Biomarkers of opiate use.

    PubMed

    Stefanidou, M; Athanaselis, S; Spiliopoulou, C; Dona, A; Maravelias, C

    2010-11-01

    The interpretation of toxicological findings is critical for the thorough investigation of the use and abuse of psychoactive substances. A positive analytical result for a sample taken could usually result in criminal proceedings and a punitive outcome for the defendant whose sample was analysed. The detection of markers of illicit opiate misuse is important both in the management of substance misuse and in the postmortem identification of illicit opiate use. The aim of this study was to emphasise the role of opiate biomarkers available at the laboratory and in the clinical environment. Urine remains the biological tool of choice for qualitative detection of illicit drug use in a clinical setting, while quantitative accuracy remains strictly the domain of blood. Accurate interpretation of the screening tests within a clinical setting alongside other relevant information remains the key to the usefulness of any test. Moreover, the finding of a morphine/codeine concentration ratio in blood exceeding unity is a strong evidence that the person had used heroin, as opposed to having taken a prescription analgesic drug containing codeine. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Histamine homologues discriminating between two functional H3 receptor assays. Evidence for H3 receptor heterogeneity?.

    PubMed

    Leurs, R; Kathmann, M; Vollinga, R C; Menge, W M; Schlicker, E; Timmerman, H

    1996-03-01

    We studied several histamine homologues as potential ligands for the histamine H3 receptor in two binding assays ([125l]iodophenpropit and N alpha-[3H]methylhistamine binding to rat brain cortex membranes) and two functional H3 receptor models (inhibition of the neurogenic contraction in the guinea pig jejunum and of [3H]noradrenaline release in mouse brain cortex slices). The histamine homologues acted all as competitive H3 antagonists at the guinea pig jejunum. The potency in this model and/or the affinity for N alpha-[3H]methylhistamine binding was higher for the butylene (pA2 = 7.7; pKi = 9.4) and pentylene homologue (impentamine, pA2 = 8.4; pKi = 9.1) than for the propylene, hexylene and octylene homologues (pA2 = 5.9-7.8; pKi = 6.1-7.6). In the mouse brain cortex the propylene, butylene and pentylene homologues acted as partial agonists (alpha = 0.3-0.6) and the hexylene and octylene homologues acted as antagonists. [125I]Iodophenpropit binding was displaced monophasically by the propylene, hexylene and octylene homologues and biphasically by the butylene and pentylene homologues. Biphasic displacement curves were converted to monophasic ones by 10 microM guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate. In conclusion, the homologue of histamine with five methylene groups is a more potent H3 receptor antagonist in the guinea pig jejunum than the other homologues tested. Furthermore, the propylene, butylene and pentylene homologues can discriminate between the two functional H3 receptor models in the guinea pig jejunum and mouse brain. These data are discussed in relation to the efficiency of receptor coupling and receptor heterogeneity.

  4. Pathways through opiate use and offending: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hayhurst, Karen P; Pierce, Matthias; Hickman, Matthew; Seddon, Toby; Dunn, Graham; Keane, John; Millar, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Although evidence points to a strong link between illicit drug use and crime, robust evidence for temporal order in the relationship is scant. We carried out a systematic review to assess the evidence for pathways through opiate/crack cocaine use and offending to determine temporal order. A systematic review sourced five databases, three online sources, bibliographies and citation mapping. Inclusion criteria were: focus on opiate/crack use, and offending; pre-drug use information; longitudinal design; corroborative official crime records. Rate ratios (RR) of post-drug use initiation to pre-drug use initiation were pooled using random effects meta-analysis. 20 studies were included; UK (9) and US (11). All were of opiate use. Mean age at (recorded) offending onset (16.7yrs) preceded mean age at opiate-use onset (19.6yrs). Substantial heterogeneity (over 80%: unexplained by meta-regression) meant that RRs were not pooled. The RR for total (recorded) offending ranged from 0.71 to 25.7 (10 studies; 22 subsamples: positive association, 4: equivocal, 1: negative association). Positive associations were observed in 14/15 independent samples; unlikely to be a chance finding (sign test p=0.001). Individual offence types were examined: theft (RR 0.63-8.3, 13 subsamples: positive, 9: equivocal, 1 negative); burglary (RR 0.74-50.0, 9 subsamples: positive, 13: equivocal); violence (RR 0.39-16.0, 6 subsamples: positive, 15: equivocal); and robbery (RR 0.50-5.0, 5 subsamples: positive, 15: equivocal). Available evidence suggests that onset-opiate use accelerates already-existing offending, particularly for theft. However, evidence is out of date, with studies characterised by heterogeneity and failure to use a matched non-opiate-user comparison group to better-establish whether onset-opiate use is associated with additional crime. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetics of opiate addiction.

    PubMed

    Reed, Brian; Butelman, Eduardo R; Yuferov, Vadim; Randesi, Matthew; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2014-11-01

    Addiction to MOP-r agonists such as heroin (and also addiction to prescription opioids) has reemerged as an epidemic in the twenty first century, causing massive morbidity. Understanding the genetics contributing to susceptibility to this disease is crucial for the identification of novel therapeutic targets, and also for discovery of genetic markers which would indicate relative protection or vulnerability from addiction, and relative responsiveness to pharmacotherapy. This information could thus eventually inform clinical practice. In this review, we focus primarily on association studies of heroin and opiate addiction, and further describe the studies which have been replicated in this field, and are thus more likely to be useful for translational efforts.

  6. Photoaffinity labeling of opiate (enkephalin) receptor of rat brain plasma membranes with /sup 125/I(D-Ala/sup 2/, p-N/sub 3/-Phe/sup 4/-Met/sup 5/)-enkephalin

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, C.W.T.

    1986-05-01

    A photoreactive (D-Ala/sup 2/, p-N/sub 3/-Phe/sup 4/-Met/sup 5/)enkephalin derivative was prepared, iodinated with carrier free /sup 125/I and then purified by high performance liquid chromatography. The purified radioactive photoprobe was monoiodinated at the amino terminal tyrosine residue. This radioactive photoprobe was used to photoaffinity label plasma membranes prepared from rat brain, spinal cord and cerebellum. The photolabeled plasma membranes were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. A 46,000-daltons band was specifically photolabeled in the plasma membranes of brain and spinal cord but not in the plasma membranes from cerebellum. The photolabeling of this band was inhibited by peptides related to enkephalin by not but substance P or gastrin tetrapeptide. These data demonstrate that the labeled 46,000-daltons band is a protein of the opiate (enkephalin)receptor.

  7. Glycine receptor heterogeneity in rat spinal cord during postnatal development.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, C M; Hoch, W; Betz, H

    1988-01-01

    Two different isoforms of the inhibitory glycine receptor were identified during postnatal development of rat spinal cord. A neonatal form characterized by low strychnine binding affinity, altered antigenicity, and a ligand binding subunit differing in mol. wt (49 kd) from that of the adult receptor (48 kd) predominates at birth (70% of the total receptor protein). Separation from the adult form could be achieved by either use of a selective antibody or glycine gradient elution of 2-aminostrychnine affinity columns. Both isoforms co-purify with the mol. wt 93 kd peripheral membrane protein of the postsynaptic glycine receptor complex. Images PMID:2850172

  8. Bioluminescence Microscopy as a Method to Measure Single Cell Androgen Receptor Activity Heterogeneous Responses to Antiandrogens

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Pallavi; Neveu, Bertrand; Velot, Lauriane; Wu, Lily; Fradet, Yves; Pouliot, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell heterogeneity is well-documented. Therefore, techniques to monitor single cell heterogeneous responses to treatment are needed. We developed a highly translational and quantitative bioluminescence microscopy method to measure single cell androgen receptor (AR) activity modulation by antiandrogens from fluid biopsies. We showed that this assay can detect heterogeneous cellular response to drug treatment and that the sum of single cell AR activity can mirror the response in the whole cell population. This method may thus be used to monitor heterogeneous dynamic treatment responses in cancer cells. PMID:27678181

  9. A hormonal role for endogenous opiate alkaloids: vascular tissues.

    PubMed

    Stefano, George B; Zhu, Wei; Cadet, Patrick; Mantione, Kirk; Bilfinger, Thomas V; Bianchi, Enrica; Guarna, Massimo

    2002-02-01

    The distribution of morphine-containing cells in the central nervous system, adrenal gland, and its presence in blood may serve to demonstrate that this signal molecule can act as a hormone besides its role in cell-to-cell signaling within the brain. This speculative review is the result of a literature evaluation with an emphasis on studies from our laboratory. Opioid peptides and opiate alkaloids have been found to influence cardiac and vascular function. They have also been reported to promote ischemic preconditioning protection in the heart. Given the presence of morphine and the novel mu(3) opiate receptor on vascular endothelial cells, including cardiac and vascular endothelial cells in the median eminence, it would appear that endogenous opiate alkaloids are involved in modulating cardiac function, possible at the hormonal level. This peripheral target tissue, via nitric oxide coupling to mu opiate receptors, may serve to down regulate the excitability of this tissue given the heart's high performance state as compared to that of the saphenous vein, a passive resistance conduit. With this in mind, morphine and other endogenous opiate alkaloids may function as a hormone.

  10. GluN2B NMDA receptor and excitatory amino acid transporter 3 are upregulated in primary sensory neurons after seven days of morphine administration in rats: implication for opiate-induced hyperalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Kerui; Bhargava, Aditi; Jasmin, Luc

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of the peripheral nervous system to opiate-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) is not well understood. Here, we determined the changes in excitability of primary sensory neurons after sustained morphine administration for 7 days. Changes in expression of glutamate receptors and glutamate transporters after morphine administration were ascertained in dorsal root ganglions (DRGs). Patch clamp recordings from intact DRGs (ex-vivo preparation) of morphine-treated rats showed increased excitability of small diameter (≤ 30 μm) neurons with respect to rheobase and membrane threshold, whereas the excitability of large diameter (> 30 μm) neurons remained unchanged. Small diameter neurons also displayed increased responses to glutamate, which were mediated mainly by GluN2B containing NMDA receptors (NMDARs), and to a lesser degree by the neuronal excitatory amino acid transporter 3 /excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAT3/EAAC1). Co-administration in vivo of the GluN2B selective antagonist Ro 25-6981 with morphine for 7 days prevented the appearance of OIH and increased morphine-induced analgesia. Administration of morphine for 7 days led to an increased expression of GluN2B and EAAT3/EAAC1, but not of the AMPA, kainate or Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors, or of the vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2). These results suggest that peripheral glutamatergic neurotransmission contributes to OIH and that GluN2B subunit of NMDARs in the periphery may be a target for therapy. PMID:26335908

  11. Effects of opiates and HIV proteins on neurons: the role of ferritin heavy chain and a potential for synergism.

    PubMed

    Festa, Lindsay; Meucci, Olimpia

    2012-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and its associated proteins can have a profound impact on the central nervous system. Co-morbid abuse of opiates, such as morphine and heroin, is often associated with rapid disease progression and greater neurological dysfunction. The mechanisms by which HIV proteins and opiates cause neuronal damage on their own and together are unclear. The emergence of ferritin heavy chain (FHC) as a negative regulator of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, a co-receptor for HIV, may prove to be important in elucidating the interaction between HIV proteins and opiates. This review summarizes our current knowledge of central nervous system damage inflicted by HIV and opiates, as well as the regulation of CXCR4 by opiate-induced changes in FHC protein levels. We propose that HIV proteins and opiates exhibit an additive or synergistic effect on FHC/CXCR4, thereby decreasing neuronal signaling and function.

  12. Heterogeneity of muscarinic receptor subtypes in cerebral blood vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Villalon, A.L.; Krause, D.N.; Ehlert, F.J.; Duckles, S.P. )

    1991-07-01

    The identity and distribution of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes and associated signal transduction mechanisms was characterized for the cerebral circulation using correlated functional and biochemical investigations. Subtypes were distinguished by the relative affinities of a panel of muscarinic antagonists, pirenzepine, AF-DX 116 (11-2-((2-(diethylaminomethyl)- 1-piperidinyl)acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H- pyrido(2,3-b)(1,4)benzodiazepine-6-one), hexahydrosiladifenidol, methoctramine, 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methobromide, dicyclomine, para-fluoro-hexahydrosiladifenidol and atropine. Muscarinic receptors characterized by inhibition of (3H)quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in membranes of bovine pial arteries were of the M2 subtype. In contrast pharmacological analysis of (3H)-quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in bovine intracerebral microvessels suggests the presence of an M4 subtype. Receptors mediating endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rabbit pial arteries were of the M3 subtype, whereas muscarinic receptors stimulating endothelium-independent phosphoinositide hydrolysis in bovine pial arteries were of the M1 subtype. These findings suggest that characteristics of muscarinic receptors in cerebral blood vessels vary depending on the type of vessel, cellular location and function mediated.

  13. Neuroscience of opiates for addiction medicine: From stress-responsive systems to behavior.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Leri, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Opiate addiction, similarly to addiction to other psychoactive drugs, is chronic relapsing brain disease caused by drug-induced short-term and long-term neuroadaptations at the molecular, cellular, and behavioral levels. Preclinical research in laboratory animals has found important interactions between opiate exposure and stress-responsive systems. In this review, we will discuss the dysregulation of several stress-responsive systems in opiate addiction: vasopressin and its receptor system, endogenous opioid systems (including proopiomelanocortin/mu opioid receptor and dynorphin/kappa opioid receptor), orexin and its receptor system, and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. A more complete understanding of how opiates alter these stress systems, through further laboratory-based studies, is required to identify novel and effective pharmacological targets for the long-term treatment of heroin addiction. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Muscarinic receptor heterogeneity in follicle-enclosed Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Arellano, Rogelio O; Garay, Edith; Miledi, Ricardo

    1999-01-01

    Ionic current responses elicited by acetylcholine (ACh) in follicle-enclosed Xenopus oocytes (follicles) were studied using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. ACh generated a fast chloride current (Fin) and inhibited K+ currents gated by cAMP (IK,cAMP) following receptor activation by adenosine, follicle-stimulating hormone or noradrenaline. These previously described cholinergic responses were confirmed to be of the muscarinic type, and were independently generated among follicles from different frogs.Inhibition of IK,cAMP was about 100 times more sensitive to ACh than Fin activation; the half-maximal effective concentrations (EC50) were 6.6 ± 0.4 and 784 ± 4 nm, respectively.Both responses were blocked by several muscarinic receptor antagonists. Using the respective EC50 concentrations of ACh as standard, the antagonist 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide blocked the two effects with very different potencies. Fin was blocked with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 2.4 ± 0.07 nm, whilst the IC50 for IK,cAMP inhibition was 5.9 ± 0.2 μm.Oxotremorine, a muscarinic agonist, preferentially stimulated IK,cAMP inhibition (EC50= 15.8 ± 1.4 μm), whilst Fin was only weakly activated. In contrast, oxotremorine inhibited Fin generated by ACh with an IC50 of 2.3 ± 0.7 μm.Fin elicited via purinergic receptor stimulation was not affected by oxotremorine, indicating that the inhibition produced was specific to the muscarinic receptor, and suggesting that muscarinic actions do not exert a strong effect on follicular cell-oocyte coupling.Using reverse transcription-PCR, transcripts of a previously cloned muscarinic receptor from Xenopus (XlmR) were amplified from the RNA of both the isolated follicular cells and the oocyte. The pharmacological and molecular characteristics suggest that XlmR is involved in IK,cAMP inhibition.In conclusion, follicular cells possess two different muscarinic receptors, one resembling the M2 (or M4) subtype

  15. Opiate exposure and withdrawal induces a molecular memory switch in the basolateral amygdala between ERK1/2 and CaMKIIα-dependent signaling substrates.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Danika; de Jaeger, Xavier; Rosen, Laura G; Ahmad, Tasha; Lauzon, Nicole M; Zunder, Jordan; Coolen, Lique M; Rushlow, Walter; Laviolette, Steven R

    2013-09-11

    Opiate reward memories are powerful triggers for compulsive opiate-seeking behaviors. The basolateral amygdala (BLA) is an important structure for the processing of opiate-related associative memories and is functionally linked to the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) pathway. Transmission through intra-BLA DA D1-like and D2-like receptors independently modulates the formation of opiate reward memories as a function of opiate-exposure state. Thus, in the opiate-naive state, intra-BLA D1 transmission is required for opiate-related memory formation. Once opiate dependence and withdrawal has developed, a functional switch to a DA D2-mediated memory mechanism takes place. However, the downstream molecular signaling events that control this functional switch between intra-BLA DA D1 versus D2 receptor transmission are not currently understood. Using an unbiased place conditioning procedure in rats combined with molecular analyses, we report that opiate reward memory acquisition requires intra-BLA ERK1/2 signaling only in the previously opiate-naive state. However, following chronic opiate exposure and withdrawal, intra-BLA reward memory processing switches to a CaMKIIα-dependent memory substrate. Furthermore, the ability of intra-BLA DA D1 or D2 receptor transmission to modulate the motivational salience of opiates similarly operates through a D1-mediated ERK-dependent mechanism in the opiate-naive state, but switches to a D2-mediated CaMKIIα-dependent mechanism in the dependent/withdrawn state. Protein analysis of BLA tissue revealed a downregulation of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and a dramatic reduction in both total and phosphorylated CaMKIIα signaling, specifically in the opiate-dependent/withdrawn state, demonstrating functional control of ERK1/2-dependent versus CaMKIIα-dependent memory mechanisms within the BLA, controlled by opiate-exposure state.

  16. [Ultra-fast opiate detoxification under general anesthesia: preliminary results of the Liege protocol].

    PubMed

    Pinto, E; Reggers, J; Delhez, M; Fuchs, S; Venneman, I; Lamy, M; Ansseau, M

    2001-08-01

    Many studies support the hypothesis of a substantial benefit in inducing an Opiate Receptor Blockade through a Rapid Opiate Detoxification under general Anaesthesia (RODA) in opiate dependent patients. However, prospective studies and long term evaluation of the technique are lacking. In order to evaluate long-term abstinence rates after a RODA among a sample of opiate addicts, a study was started in March 1999 at the University of Liège. To date, 45 patients were evaluated (mean age: 29 +/- 5 years) with a mean opiate dependence duration of 8 +/- 4 years. Most of them were both heroin and methadone dependent; 42.2% of them were included while 31.1% did not complete the whole inclusion procedure and 26.7% were excluded. None experienced severe withdrawal symptoms. At six months, abstinence rate was 67% and 46% at one year. These preliminary results suggest the interest of the procedure in carefully selected patients.

  17. Effects of the immunostimulant, levamisole, on opiate withdrawal and levels of endogenous opiate alkaloids and monoamine neurotransmitters in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Spector, S; Munjal, I; Schmidt, D E

    1998-11-01

    This report present evidence that the immunostimulant drug levamisole, (-)-(S)-2,3,5,6-tetrahydro-6-phenylimidazo[2,1-b] thiazole monohydrochloride, produced a significant elevation of endogeneous morphine and codeine levels in brain regions and peripheral organs and attenuated the effects of naltrexone-induced withdrawal in morphine-addicted rats. Levamisole also significantly altered the metabolism of norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin in specific brain regions. These results suggest that levamisole's attenuation of opiate withdrawal may be related to its ability to increase endogeneous opiate alkaloid levels and/or to alter central monoaminergic function. Levamisole does not have significant affinity for opiate receptors. These results raise the intriguing possibility that agents such as levamisole, which elevate the levels of the endogenous opiate alkaloids, might be useful for treating narcotic withdrawal. The mechanism for the immunostimulatory properties of agents such as levamisole and muramyl dipeptide (MDP) have not been established. We suggest that the ability of MDP and levamisole to increase endogenous opiate alkaloids may be related to their immunostimulatory properties.

  18. [Social cognition in opiate addicts].

    PubMed

    Martin-Contero, M C; Secades-Villa, R; Tirapu-Ustarroz, J

    2012-12-16

    INTRODUCTION. Research on the emotional and social disorders associated with drug addiction has been very limited. AIM. To assess different components of social cognition: perception of emotional expressions, emotional-social intelligence, and empathy, in a sample of opiate addicts in a methadone maintenance program (MMP). SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Eighteen opiate addicts MMP and eighteen healthy controls participated. The test of emotional facial expression recognition, the TMMS-24, the EQ-i Bar-On, and Greene moral dilemmas were applied to each subject. RESULTS. The utilitarian response rate in impersonal moral dilemmas was significantly higher in the group of opiate dependents than in the control group. In the general and factorial social-emotional intelligence, opiate dependent group had significantly lower scores than the control group. However, they had worse facial expression recognition, nor worse scores on all three dimensions of emotional intelligence as measured by the TMMS-24. CONCLUSIONS. The opiate addicts not show a generalized deficit of social cognition, however obtain lower emotional-social intelligence quotient, and differ in empathy measured by moral judgments.

  19. Fcγ Receptor Heterogeneity in Leukocyte Functional Responses

    PubMed Central

    Rosales, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies participate in defense of the organism from all types of pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. IgG antibodies recognize their associated antigen via their two Fab portions and are in turn recognized though their Fc portion by specific Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) on the membrane of immune cells. Multiple types and polymorphic variants of FcγR exist. These receptors are expressed in many cells types and are also redundant in inducing cell responses. Crosslinking of FcγR on the surface of leukocytes activates several effector functions aimed toward the destruction of pathogens and the induction of an inflammatory response. In the past few years, new evidence on how the particular IgG subclass and the glycosylation pattern of the antibody modulate the IgG–FcγR interaction has been presented. Despite these advances, our knowledge of what particular effector function is activated in a certain cell and in response to a specific type of FcγR remains very limited today. On one hand, each immune cell could be programmed to perform a particular cell function after FcγR crosslinking. On the other, each FcγR could activate a particular signaling pathway leading to a unique cell response. In this review, I describe the main types of FcγRs and our current view of how particular FcγRs activate various signaling pathways to promote unique leukocyte functions. PMID:28373871

  20. Heterogeneous expression of Drosophila gustatory receptors in enteroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong-Ho; Kwon, Jae Young

    2011-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is emerging as a major site of chemosensation in mammalian studies. Enteroendocrine cells are chemosensory cells in the gut which produce regulatory peptides in response to luminal contents to regulate gut physiology, food intake, and glucose homeostasis, among other possible functions. Increasing evidence shows that mammalian taste receptors and taste signaling molecules are expressed in enteroendocrine cells in the gut. Invertebrate models such as Drosophila can provide a simple and genetically tractable system to study the chemosensory functions of enteroendocrine cells in vivo. To establish Drosophila enteroendocrine cells as a model for studying gut chemosensation, we used the GAL4/UAS system to examine the expression of all 68 Gustatory receptors (Grs) in the intestine. We find that 12 Gr-GAL4 drivers label subsets of enteroendocrine cells in the midgut, and examine colocalization of these drivers with the regulatory peptides neuropeptide F (NPF), locustatachykinin (LTK), and diuretic hormone 31 (DH31). RT-PCR analysis provides additional evidence for the presence of Gr transcripts in the gut. Our results suggest that the Drosophila Grs have chemosensory roles in the intestine to regulate physiological functions such as food uptake, nutrient absorption, or sugar homeostasis.

  1. Modulation of the estrogen receptor structure, evidence of a heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Toulas, C.; Guilbaud, N.; Delassus, F.; Bayard, F.; Faye, J.C. )

    1990-01-01

    In order to analyse the molecular weight polymorphism of the estrogen receptor (ER) in MCF-7 cells, we have developed a procedure which allowed in situ linkage of ER by (3H) tamoxifen aziridine and provided labelled proteins in conditions which minimized protease activities. After labelling, cell lysis was performed in SDS buffer containing various concentrations of mercaptoethanol. Proteins extracted with phenolic solution and precipitated by cold acetone were analysed by SDS PAGE. It appears that beside the form of 67 kDa already described, binding entities of tamoxifen aziridine were also present at a molecular mass of 110 kDa and 45 kDa. On the other hand, investigations on the effect of 12-0-Tetradecanoyl Phorbol 13-Acetate (TPA) showed that TPA induces a decrease of the 67 kDa entity.

  2. Pharmacological evidence for putative CCK1 receptor heterogeneity in human colon smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Morton, M F; Harper, E A; Tavares, I A; Shankley, N P

    2002-01-01

    The pharmacology of the cholecystokinin CCK1 receptors endogenously expressed in human gallbladder and human ascending colon smooth muscle tissue was compared using radioligand binding assays. Saturation analysis of the interaction between the radiolabelled, selective CCK1-receptor antagonist, [3H]-L-364,718, and enriched gastrointestinal tissue membranes suggested the presence of multiple binding sites in human colon but not human gallbladder. Competition studies, using a range of structurally diverse, CCK-receptor selective ligands provided further evidence for CCK1 receptor heterogeneity in human colon tissue (nH values significantly less than unity for SR27897=0.77±0.07, 2-NAP=0.73±0.03, YM220=0.70±0.09 and PD-134,308=0.83±0.01). Moreover, the competition data for SR27897, 2-NAP and YM220 were consistent with the interaction of these compounds at two binding sites. In contrast, in the human gallbladder assay, a single binding site model provided a good fit of the competition curve data obtained with all the CCK receptor selective compounds. The data obtained are consistent with the presence of a single CCK1 receptor binding site in the gallbladder but not in the colon. A two-site analysis of the colon data, indicated that one of the two sites was indistinguishable from that characterized in the gallbladder. The molecular basis of the apparent receptor heterogeneity in the colon remains to be established. PMID:12110612

  3. [Behavior therapy of opiate dependence].

    PubMed

    Vollmer, H

    1985-05-01

    Ten years ago an extensive behaviour therapy programme for the treatment of young opiate addicts was developed and tested, and shown through follow-ups extending over a period of two years to be successful. Some of the most important behaviour therapy procedures are introduced. A distinction is made between traditional methods which have been used since the beginning of the therapy programme and newer approaches in behaviour therapy, which in recent years have led to a broadening of the spectrum of therapy. In conclusion important areas for the treatment of opiate addicts in the future are dealt with, which make further improvements in the efficiency of therapy possible.

  4. Molecular docking of opiates and opioid peptides, a tool for the design of selective agonists and antagonists, and for the investigation of atypical ligand-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Gentilucci, L; Tolomelli, A; De Marco, R; Artali, R

    2012-01-01

    In the last years, molecular docking emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the interactions between opioid ligands and their receptors, thus driving the design and development of new selective agonists or antagonists of therapeutic interest. This review especially covers the most representative and recent comparative molecular docking analyses of structurally related compounds, as well as of agonists and antagonists within the active and inactive states of the receptors. The comparative analyses gave important information on the structural determinants responsible for the affinity and selectivity of the ligands, and defined the features responsible for the activation of the receptors. A special section is dedicated to the analyses of recently discovered, unusual agonists lacking of the tyramine pharmacophore, such as Salvinorin A, and the cyclopeptides which comprise the D-Trp-Phe pharmacophoric motif. For the atypical structure of these compounds, the docking proved to be essential to disclose how they interact with and activate the receptors.

  5. Rapid analysis of estrogen receptor heterogeneity by chromatofocusing with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hutchens, T W; Wiehle, R D; Shahabi, N A; Wittliff, J L

    1983-08-26

    Chromatofocusing principles have been utilized to develop a high-performance liquid chromatographic technique for the rapid and routine analysis of steroid receptor heterogeneity. Two anion-exchange columns (SynChropak AX-300 and AX-500) were compared for analytical and preparative chromatofocusing of estrogen receptor components. As many as ten different [125I]iodoestradiol-labeled binding proteins were identified in cytosols prepared from mammary gland and uterus. Estrogen receptors were well separated from other cytosolic proteins and recovery of activity routinely exceeded 90%. Parallel analyses of these cytosols to determine receptor size and shape indicated that HPLC chromatofocusing can be used effectively to study receptor isoforms with Stokes radii ranging from 30 A to greater than 70 A. In contrast to isoelectric focusing, this technique is compatible with the inclusion of a commonly used receptor-stabilizing agent, sodium molybdate. Inclusion of molybdate during chromatofocusing of molybdate-stabilized receptor allowed the identification of two acidic receptor species not previously reported.

  6. Heterogeneity of human lymphocyte Fc receptors. I. Differential susceptibility to proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Gormus, B. J.; Woodson, Mildred; Kaplan, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    To study the possible heterogeneity of human lymphocyte Fc receptors, isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were enzymatically altered (`stripped') by exposure to pronase or papain. Pronase treatment markedly increased the percentages of PBL binding IgG-sensitized erythrocytes (EA), while simultaneously removing or inactivating their receptors for heat-aggregated IgG (aggG). Papain treatment markedly diminished the ability of PBL to bind both EA and aggG. Essentially identical results were obtained utilizing EA composed of either human Rh-positive type O erythrocytes sensitized with the human anti-Rh serum Ripley (HRBC-A Ripley) or with chicken erythrocytes sensitized with rabbit anti-CRBC IgG (CRBC-A). CRBC sensitized with Fab'2 fragments of rabbit anti-CRBC IgG were incapable of forming rosettes with normal or with pronase- or papain-stripped PBL. Pre-treatment of normal lymphocytes with aggG totally ablated their ability to rosette with EA. Incubation of pronase-stripped PBL for 18–20 hr in 5% CO2-air at 37°C resulted in diminution (to levels originally present) in the percentages of lymphocytes binding EA, but no regeneration of aggG receptors. Similar incubation of papain-stripped PBL resulted in significant reappearance of receptors binding EA, but no regeneration of aggG receptors. These results strongly suggest that: (1) lymphocyte receptors that bind EA complexes differ from those that bind aggG; (2) some lymphocytes possess cryptic receptors for EA that are expressed after proteolysis with pronase; (3) PBL having receptors for EA also have aggG receptors; and (4) there is no evidence that proteolytic stripping of PBL results in the generation of functionally different receptors for complexed IgG, since the Fc specificity of this receptor remains unchanged. PMID:737911

  7. Survival prediction in patients undergoing radionuclide therapy based on intratumoral somatostatin-receptor heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Ilhan, Harun; Higuchi, Takahiro; Buck, Andreas K.; Lehner, Sebastian; Bartenstein, Peter; Bengel, Frank; Schatka, Imke; Muegge, Dirk O.; Papp, László; Zsótér, Norbert; Große-Ophoff, Tobias; Essler, Markus; Bundschuh, Ralph A.

    2017-01-01

    The NETTER-1 trial demonstrated significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) in neuroendocrine tumors (NET) emphasizing the high demand for response prediction in appropriate candidates. In this multicenter study, we aimed to elucidate the prognostic value of tumor heterogeneity as assessed by somatostatin receptor (SSTR)-PET/CT. 141 patients with SSTR-expressing tumors were analyzed obtaining SSTR-PET/CT before PRRT (1-6 cycles, 177Lu somatostatin analog). Using the Interview Fusion Workstation (Mediso), a total of 872 metastases were manually segmented. Conventional PET parameters as well as textural features representing intratumoral heterogeneity were computed. The prognostic ability for PFS and overall survival (OS) were examined. After performing Cox regression, independent parameters were determined by ROC analysis to obtain cut-off values to be used for Kaplan-Meier analysis. Within follow-up (median, 43.1 months), 75 patients showed disease progression (median, 22.2 m) and 54 patients died (median, 27.6 m). Cox analysis identified 8 statistically independent heterogeneity parameters for time-to-progression and time-to-death. Among them, the textural feature Entropy predicted both PFS and OS. Conventional PET parameters failed in response prediction. Imaging-based heterogeneity assessment provides prognostic information in PRRT candidates and outperformed conventional PET parameters. Its implementation in clinical practice can pave the way for individualized patient management. PMID:27705948

  8. Pharmacological evidence for putative CCK(1) receptor heterogeneity in human colon smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Morton, M F; Harper, E A; Tavares, I A; Shankley, N P

    2002-07-01

    1. The pharmacology of the cholecystokinin CCK(1) receptors endogenously expressed in human gallbladder and human ascending colon smooth muscle tissue was compared using radioligand binding assays. 2. Saturation analysis of the interaction between the radiolabelled, selective CCK(1)-receptor antagonist, [(3)H]-L-364,718, and enriched gastrointestinal tissue membranes suggested the presence of multiple binding sites in human colon but not human gallbladder. 3. Competition studies, using a range of structurally diverse, CCK-receptor selective ligands provided further evidence for CCK(1) receptor heterogeneity in human colon tissue (n(H) values significantly less than unity for SR27897=0.77+/-0.07, 2-NAP=0.73+/-0.03, YM220=0.70+/-0.09 and PD-134,308=0.83+/-0.01). Moreover, the competition data for SR27897, 2-NAP and YM220 were consistent with the interaction of these compounds at two binding sites. In contrast, in the human gallbladder assay, a single binding site model provided a good fit of the competition curve data obtained with all the CCK receptor selective compounds. 4. The data obtained are consistent with the presence of a single CCK(1) receptor binding site in the gallbladder but not in the colon. A two-site analysis of the colon data, indicated that one of the two sites was indistinguishable from that characterized in the gallbladder. The molecular basis of the apparent receptor heterogeneity in the colon remains to be established. British Journal of Pharmacology (2002) 136, 873-882

  9. Interrogative suggestibility in opiate users.

    PubMed

    Murakami, A; Edelmann, R J; Davis, P E

    1996-09-01

    The present study investigated interrogative suggestibility in opiate users. A group of patients undergoing a methadone detoxification programme in an in-patient drug treatment unit (Detox group, n = 21), and a group of residents who had come off drugs and were no longer suffering from withdrawal syndrome (Rehab group, n = 19) were compared on interrogative suggestibility and various other psychological factors. Significant differences were found between the two groups, with the Detox group having more physical and psychological problems, and a higher total suggestibility score in comparison with the Rehab group. These findings are discussed in relation to the context of police interrogations and the reliability of confessions made by suspects and witnesses dependent on opiates.

  10. Heterogeneity of binding of muscarinic receptor antagonists in rat brain homogenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.H.; el-Fakahany, E.E.

    1985-06-01

    The binding properties of (-)-(/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate and (/sup 3/H) N-methylscopolamine to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors have been investigated in rat brain homogenates. The binding of both antagonists demonstrated high affinity and saturability. Analysis of the binding data resulted in linear Scatchard plots. However, (-)-(/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate showed a significantly higher maximal binding capacity than that of (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine. Displacement of both ligands with several muscarinic receptor antagonists resulted in competition curves in accordance with the law of mass-action for quinuclidinyl benzilate, atropine and scopolamine. A similar profile was found for the quaternary ammonium analogs of atropine and scopolamine when (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine was used to label the receptors. However, when these hydrophilic antagonists were used to displace (-)-(/sup 3/H) quinuclidinyl benzilate binding, they showed interaction with high- and low-affinity binding sites. On the other hand, the nonclassical muscarinic receptor antagonist, pirenzepine, was able to displace both ligands from two binding sites. The present data are discussed in terms of the relationship of this anomalous heterogenity of binding of these hydrophilic muscarinic receptor antagonists and the proposed M1 and M2 receptor subtypes.

  11. Intratumoral Heterogeneity for Expression of Tyrosine Kinase Growth Factor Receptors in Human Colon Cancer Surgical Specimens and Orthotopic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kuwai, Toshio; Nakamura, Toru; Kim, Sun-Jin; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Langley, Robert R.; Fan, Dominic; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Fidler, Isaiah J.

    2008-01-01

    The design of targeted therapy, particularly patient-specific targeted therapy, requires knowledge of the presence and intratumoral distribution of tyrosine kinase receptors. To determine whether the expression of such receptors is constant or varies between and within individual colon cancer neoplasms, we examined the pattern of expression of the ligands, epidermal growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor-B as well as their respective receptors in human colon cancer surgical specimens and orthotopic human colon cancers growing in the cecal wall of nude mice. The expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor and the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor on tumor cells and stromal cells, including tumor-associated endothelial cells, was heterogeneous in surgical specimens and orthotopic tumors. In some tumors, the receptor was expressed on both tumor cells and stromal cells, and in other tumors the receptor was expressed only on tumor cells or only on stromal cells. In contrast, the platelet-derived growth factor receptor was expressed only on stromal cells in both surgical specimens and orthotopic tumors. Examination of receptor expression in both individual surgical specimens and orthotopic tumors revealed that the platelet-derived growth factor receptor was expressed only on stromal cells and that the patterns of epidermal growth factor receptor and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 expression differed between tumor cells. This heterogeneity in receptor expression among different tumor cells suggests that targeting a single tyrosine kinase may not yield eradication of the disease. PMID:18202197

  12. Identification of the binding subunit of the sigma-type opiate receptor by photoaffinity labeling with 1-(4-azido-2-methyl(6-/sup 3/H)phenyl)-3-(2-methyl(4,6-/sup 3/H)phenyl)guanidine

    SciTech Connect

    Kavanaugh, M.P.; Tester, B.C.; Scherz, M.W.; Keana, J.F.W.; Weber, E.

    1988-04-01

    The sigma-type opiate receptor is a distinct binding site in the brain that may mediate some of the psychotomimetic effects caused by benzomorphan opiates and phencyclidine in humans. The authors have developed a synthetic, highly selective ligand for this receptor, 1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG). To identify the binding protein(s) of the sigma receptor, they have now synthesized a radiolabeled azide derivative of DTG, ((/sup 3/H)N/sub 3/DTG). In guinea pig brain membrane binding assays conducted in the dark, (/sup 3/H)N/sub 3/DTG bound reversibly, selectively, and with high affinity to sigma receptors. The drug specificity profile of reversible (/sup 3/H)-N/sub 3/DTG binding was identical to that of (/sup 3/H)DTG and /sup 3/H-labeled (+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine binding indicating that (/sup 3/H)N/sub 3/DTG is a selective sigma receptor ligand. Guinea pig brain membranes were photoaffinity-labeled with (/sup 3/H)N/sub 3/DTG. NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE of detergent-solubilized membrane extract identified a single 29-kDa radioactive band. Sepharose Cl-6B gel chromatography of photolabeled brain membranes solubilized with the nondenaturing detergent sodium cholate showed a radioactive complex with a Stoke's radius of 4.6 nm (M/sub r/, 150,000) that may represent the intact sigma receptor complex. NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE of this complex showed the radiolabeled material was a 29-kDa polypeptide that may be binding subunit of the sigma receptor.

  13. Effect of Pharmacological Modulation of the Endocannabinoid System on Opiate Withdrawal: A Review of the Preclinical Animal Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wills, Kiri L.; Parker, Linda A.

    2016-01-01

    Over the years, animal studies have revealed a role for the endocannabinoid system in the regulation of multiple aspects of opiate addiction. The current review provides an overview of this literature in regards to opiate withdrawal. The opiate withdrawal syndrome, hypothesized to act as a negative reinforcer in mediating continued drug use, can be characterized by the emergence of spontaneous or precipitated aversive somatic and affective states following the termination of drug use. The behaviors measured to quantify somatic opiate withdrawal and the paradigms employed to assess affective opiate withdrawal (e.g., conditioned place aversion) in both acutely and chronically dependent animals are discussed in relation to the ability of the endocannabinoid system to modulate these behaviors. Additionally, the brain regions mediating somatic and affective opiate withdrawal are elucidated with respect to their modulation by the endocannabinoid system. Ultimately, a review of these findings reveals dissociations between the brain regions mediating somatic and affective opiate withdrawal, and the ability of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor agonism/antagonism to interfere with opiate withdrawal within different brain sub regions. PMID:27445822

  14. Effect of Pharmacological Modulation of the Endocannabinoid System on Opiate Withdrawal: A Review of the Preclinical Animal Literature.

    PubMed

    Wills, Kiri L; Parker, Linda A

    2016-01-01

    Over the years, animal studies have revealed a role for the endocannabinoid system in the regulation of multiple aspects of opiate addiction. The current review provides an overview of this literature in regards to opiate withdrawal. The opiate withdrawal syndrome, hypothesized to act as a negative reinforcer in mediating continued drug use, can be characterized by the emergence of spontaneous or precipitated aversive somatic and affective states following the termination of drug use. The behaviors measured to quantify somatic opiate withdrawal and the paradigms employed to assess affective opiate withdrawal (e.g., conditioned place aversion) in both acutely and chronically dependent animals are discussed in relation to the ability of the endocannabinoid system to modulate these behaviors. Additionally, the brain regions mediating somatic and affective opiate withdrawal are elucidated with respect to their modulation by the endocannabinoid system. Ultimately, a review of these findings reveals dissociations between the brain regions mediating somatic and affective opiate withdrawal, and the ability of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor agonism/antagonism to interfere with opiate withdrawal within different brain sub regions.

  15. 21 CFR 862.3650 - Opiate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... opiate is any natural or synthetic drug that has morphine-like pharmocological actions. The opiates include drugs such as morphine, morphine glucoronide, heroin, codeine, nalorphine, and meperedine...

  16. 21 CFR 862.3650 - Opiate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... opiate is any natural or synthetic drug that has morphine-like pharmocological actions. The opiates include drugs such as morphine, morphine glucoronide, heroin, codeine, nalorphine, and meperedine...

  17. 21 CFR 862.3650 - Opiate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... opiate is any natural or synthetic drug that has morphine-like pharmocological actions. The opiates include drugs such as morphine, morphine glucoronide, heroin, codeine, nalorphine, and meperedine...

  18. 21 CFR 862.3650 - Opiate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... opiate is any natural or synthetic drug that has morphine-like pharmocological actions. The opiates include drugs such as morphine, morphine glucoronide, heroin, codeine, nalorphine, and meperedine...

  19. 21 CFR 862.3650 - Opiate test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... opiate is any natural or synthetic drug that has morphine-like pharmocological actions. The opiates include drugs such as morphine, morphine glucoronide, heroin, codeine, nalorphine, and meperedine...

  20. Heterogeneity of Drosophila nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: SAD, a novel developmentally regulated alpha-subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Sawruk, E; Schloss, P; Betz, H; Schmitt, B

    1990-01-01

    Two genes, ard and als, are known to encode subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in Drosophila. Here we describe the isolation of cDNA clones encoding a novel member (SAD, or alpha 2) of this receptor protein family. The deduced amino acid sequence displays high homology to the ALS protein and shares structural features with ligand binding nAChR alpha-subunits. Sad transcripts accumulate during major periods of neuronal differentiation and, in embryos, are localized in the central nervous system. Expression of SAD cRNA in Xenopus oocytes generates cation channels that are gated by nicotine. These data indicate heterogeneity of nAChRs in Drosophila. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1697262

  1. Neonatal animal models of opiate withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Kimberlei A; Yohay, Anne-Lise J; Gauda, Estelle B; McLemore, Gabrielle L

    2006-01-01

    The symptoms of opiate withdrawal in infants are defined as neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). NAS is a significant cause of morbidity in term and preterm infants. Factors, such as polysubstance abuse, inadequate prenatal care, nutritional deprivation, and the biology of the developing central nervous system contribute to the challenge of evaluating and treating opiate-induced alterations in the newborn. Although research on the effects of opiates in neonatal animal models is limited, the data from adult animal models have greatly contributed to understanding and treating opiate tolerance, addiction, and withdrawal in adult humans. Yet the limited neonatal data that are available indicate that the mechanisms involved in these processes in the newborn differ from those in adult animals, and that neonatal models of opiate withdrawal are needed to understand and develop effective treatment regimens for NAS. In this review, the behavioral and neurochemical evidence from the literature is presented and suggests that mechanisms responsible for opiate tolerance, dependence, and withdrawal differ between adult and neonatal models. Also reviewed are studies that have used neonatal rodent models, the authors' preliminary data based on the use of neonatal rat and mouse models of opiate withdrawal, and other neonatal models that have been proposed for the study of neonatal opiate withdrawal.

  2. How should opiate withdrawal be measured?

    PubMed

    Turkington, D; Drummond, D C

    1989-10-01

    Comparison is made between subjective and objective measurements of opiate withdrawal severity in a group of 24 regular opiate takers undergoing inpatient detoxification. A lack of correlation is found between patients' subjective ratings, objective nurse ratings and physiological parameters of withdrawal severity. This indicates that in future research the subjective and objective dimensions of withdrawal should be considered and measured separately.

  3. Opiate and Cocaine Exposed Newborns: Growth Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butz, Arlene M.; Kaufmann, Walter E.; Royall, Richard; Kolodner, Ken; Pulsifer, Margaret B.; Lears, Mary Kathleen; Henderson, Robin; Belcher, Harolyn; Sellers, Sherri; Wilson, Modena

    1999-01-01

    Examines growth parameters at birth in 204 infants born to mothers who used cocaine and/or opiates during pregnancy. Outcome measures included birth weight, length, and head circumference. Study provides support that in utero cocaine exposure may confer more risk for somatic growth retardation at birth than opiate exposure. (Author/GCP)

  4. Structural Heterogeneity and Functional Domains of Murine Immunoglobulin G Fc Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravetch, Jeffrey V.; Luster, Andrew D.; Weinshank, Richard; Kochan, Jarema; Pavlovec, Amalia; Portnoy, Daniel A.; Hulmes, Jeffrey; Pan, Yu-Ching E.; Unkeless, Jay C.

    1986-11-01

    Binding of antibodies to effector cells by way of receptors to their constant regions (Fc receptors) is central to the pathway that leads to clearance of antigens by the immune system. The structure and function of this important class of receptors on immune cells is addressed through the molecular characterization of Fc receptors (FcR) specific for the murine immunoglobulin G isotype. Structural diversity is encoded by two genes that by alternative splicing result in expression of molecules with highly conserved extracellular domains and different transmembrane and intracytoplasmic domains. The proteins encoded by these genes are members of the immunoglobulin supergene family, most homologous to the major histocompatibility complex molecule Eβ. Functional reconstitution of ligand binding by transfection of individual FcR genes demonstrates that the requirements for ligand binding are encoded in a single gene. These studies demonstrate the molecular basis for the functional heterogeneity of FcR's, accounting for the possible transduction of different signals in response to a single ligand.

  5. An opiate binding site in the rat brain is highly selective for 4,5-epoxymorphinans.

    PubMed

    Grevel, J; Sadée, W

    1983-09-16

    In vitro binding studies have demonstrated the existence of multiple opiate receptor types. An additional site in the rat brain (termed the lambda site) is distinct from the established types by its selectivity for 4,5-epoxymorphinans (such as naloxone and morphine). While the lambda site displays a high affinity for naloxone in vivo and in vitro in fresh brain membrane homogenates, these sites rapidly convert in vitro to a state of low affinity. The regional distribution of the lambda site in the brain is strikingly different from that of the classic opiate receptor types.

  6. Opiates Modulate Noxious Chemical Nociception through a Complex Monoaminergic/Peptidergic Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Holly; Ortega, Amanda; Law, Wenjing; Hapiak, Vera; Summers, Philip; Clark, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The ability to detect noxious stimuli, process the nociceptive signal, and elicit an appropriate behavioral response is essential for survival. In Caenorhabditis elegans, opioid receptor agonists, such as morphine, mimic serotonin, and suppress the overall withdrawal from noxious stimuli through a pathway requiring the opioid-like receptor, NPR-17. This serotonin- or morphine-dependent modulation can be rescued in npr-17-null animals by the expression of npr-17 or a human κ opioid receptor in the two ASI sensory neurons, with ASI opioid signaling selectively inhibiting ASI neuropeptide release. Serotonergic modulation requires peptides encoded by both nlp-3 and nlp-24, and either nlp-3 or nlp-24 overexpression mimics morphine and suppresses withdrawal. Peptides encoded by nlp-3 act differentially, with only NLP-3.3 mimicking morphine, whereas other nlp-3 peptides antagonize NLP-3.3 modulation. Together, these results demonstrate that opiates modulate nociception in Caenorhabditis elegans through a complex monoaminergic/peptidergic cascade, and suggest that this model may be useful for dissecting opiate signaling in mammals. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Opiates are used extensively to treat chronic pain. In Caenorhabditis elegans, opioid receptor agonists suppress the overall withdrawal from noxious chemical stimuli through a pathway requiring an opioid-like receptor and two distinct neuropeptide-encoding genes, with individual peptides from the same gene functioning antagonistically to modulate nociception. Endogenous opioid signaling functions as part of a complex, monoaminergic/peptidergic signaling cascade and appears to selectively inhibit neuropeptide release, mediated by a α-adrenergic-like receptor, from two sensory neurons. Importantly, receptor null animals can be rescued by the expression of the human κ opioid receptor, and injection of human opioid receptor ligands mimics exogenous opiates, highlighting the utility of this model for dissecting opiate

  7. Heterogeneous estrogen receptor expression in circulating tumor cells suggests diverse mechanisms of fulvestrant resistance.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Costanza; Larios, Jose M; Muñiz, Maria C; Aung, Kimberly; Cannell, Emily M; Darga, Elizabeth P; Kidwell, Kelley M; Thomas, Dafydd G; Tokudome, Nahomi; Brown, Martha E; Connelly, Mark C; Chianese, David A; Schott, Anne F; Henry, N Lynn; Rae, James M; Hayes, Daniel F

    2016-08-01

    Fulvestrant is a dose dependent selective estrogen receptor (ER) down-regulator (SERD) used in ER-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Nearly all patients develop resistance. We performed molecular analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTC) to gain insight into fulvestrant resistance. Preclinical studies were performed with cultured breast cancer cells spiked into human blood and analyzed on the CellSearch(®) system. Clinical data are limited to a subset of patients with ER-positive MBC from a previously reported pilot trial whose disease was progressing on fulvestrant (N = 7) or aromatase inhibitors (AIs) (N = 10). CTCs were enumerated and phenotyped for ER and B-cell lymphoma (BCL2) using the CellSearch(®) CXC kit. In preclinical modeling, tamoxifen and AIs resulted in stabilized ER expression, whereas fulvestrant eliminated it. Five of seven patients progressing on fulvestrant had ≥5CTC/7.5 ml WB. Two of these five, treated with 500 mg/month fulvestrant, had no detectable CTC-expression of ER and BCL2 (an ER regulated gene). Three patients had heterogeneous CTC-ER and BCL2 expression indicating incomplete degradation of the ER target by fulvestrant. Two of these patients received 250 mg/month whereas the third patient received 500 mg/month fulvestrant. Her cancer harbored a mutation (Y537S) in the estrogen receptor alpha gene (ESR1). All seven ER positive patients progressing on AIs had heterogeneous CTC-ER expression. These results suggest heterogeneous mechanisms of resistance to fulvestrant, including insufficient dosage, ESR1 mutation, or conversion to dependence on non-ER pathways. CTC enumeration, phenotyping, and genotyping might identify patients who would benefit from fulvestrant dose escalation versus switching to alternative therapies.

  8. The effect of isoquinoline alkaloids on opiate withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Capasso, A; Piacente, S; De Tommasi, N; Rastrelli, L; Pizza, C

    2006-01-01

    Our interest has been centered on isoquinoline alkaloids obtained from Argemone mexicana (Papaveraceae), Aristolochia constricta (Aristolochiaceae) and the opium alkaloid, papaverine. In this respect, the effect of these isoquinoline alkaloids was investigated on contractions induced by naloxone of isolated guinea pig ileum acutely exposed to morphine in vitro. The activity of these alkaloids was compared to the control compound, papaverine. Furthermore, the effect of these isoquinoline alkaloids was also determined on naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in isolated guinea pig ileum exposed to DAMGO (highly selective mu opioid receptor agonist) and U50-488H (highly selective kappa opioid receptor agonist) to test whether the possible interaction of isoquinoline alkaloids on opioid withdrawal involves mu- and/or kappa-opioid receptors. Isoquinoline alkaloids from A. mexicana (from 5 x 10(-6) to 1 x 10(-4) M), from A. constricta (1 x 10(-5) x 10(-5)-1 x 10(-4) M) as well as papaverine treatment (1 x 10(-7)-5 x 10(-6)-1 x 10(-6) M) before or after the opioid agonists were able of both preventing and reversing the naloxone-induced contraction after exposure to mu (morphine and DAMGO) or kappa (U50-488H) opiate receptor agonists in a concentration-dependent manner. Both acetylcholine response and electrical stimulation were also reduced by isoquinoline alkaloids and papaverine treatment as well as the final opiate withdrawal was still reduced. The results of the present study indicate that isoquinoline alkaloids as well as papaverine were able to produce significant influence on the opiate withdrawal in vitro and these compounds were able to exert their effects both at mu and kappa opioid agonists.

  9. Rapid opiate detoxication in outpatient treatment: relationship with naltrexone compliance.

    PubMed

    Gerra, G; Zaimovic, A; Rustichelli, P; Fontanesi, B; Zambelli, U; Timpano, M; Bocchi, C; Delsignore, R

    2000-03-01

    A variety of detoxification methods have been utilized for the treatment of heroin withdrawal before individuals begin long-term opiate-free and naltrexone programs. While methadone in decreasing doses is still widely used for detoxication procedures, rapid and ultrarapid protocols including clonidine and opiate receptors antagonists have been proposed. This study compares the efficacy of different detoxification methods and investigates possible changes in naltrexone compliance. Ninety-eight heroin-addicted individuals were studied to evaluate withdrawal symptoms, craving, mood, urine toxicologic screens, and drop-out rate during therapy with: Group A: clonidine only (5 days); Group B: clonidine, oxazepam, baclofen, and ketoprofene with naloxone and naltrexone (2 days); and Group C: methadone in decreasing doses (10 days). Naltrexone compliance and relapse rates were evaluated during a 6-month follow-up period. Rapid detoxification with opiate antagonists (Group B) induced slight and transient withdrawal symptoms, and resulted in a significantly lower percentage of heroin catabolites in urine controls during the detoxification procedure, lower negative and positive craving, less mood problems, and higher compliance in extended naltrexone treatment. In comparison with clonidine only (Group A) and methadone (Group C), the early use of naltrexone during detoxification in combination with benzodiazepines and clonidine facilitated extended naltrexone acceptance and improved the recovery outcome in outpatients.

  10. Opiate modification of intracranial self-stimulation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Weibel, S L; Wolf, H H

    1979-01-01

    Studies were conducted to confirm the involvement of central opiate receptors in the expression of opiate modulation of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). Biphasic, dose-related changes in ICSS responding are described following IP administration of morphine sulfate (1-25 mg/kg) and levorphanol tartrate (LEV, 0.5-5 mg/kg). Similar patterns of response modification are reported following intraventricular (IVt) administration of LEV (0.01-0.2 muMoles) LEV's enantiomorph, dextrorphan, was not found to elicit comparable effects after either IP or IVt administration. Both the facilitatory and the depressant phases of LEV's action were antagonized by naltrexone (10 microgram, IVt), which had no apparent effect on ICSS by itself. Complete tolerance developed to the suppression of responding by 2.5 mg/kg LEV (IP) but not to the facilitatory effect of 0.5 mg/kg (IP), during a 5-day course of administration. The implications of these results for opiate reinforcement theory are discussed and possible mechanisms are advanced.

  11. Achalasia and chronic opiate use: innocent bystanders or associated conditions?

    PubMed

    Ravi, K; Murray, J A; Geno, D M; Katzka, D A

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution manometry identifies three subtypes of achalasia. However, type 3 differs from classic achalasia. Although opiates affect esophageal motility, opiate use and achalasia have not been studied. Patients with a new diagnosis of achalasia at Mayo Clinic Rochester between June 1, 2012 and January 3, 2014 were identified. Clinical records were reviewed to assess symptoms, opiate use, and therapy. Fifty-six patients with achalasia were identified, 14 (25%) were on opiates. Opiate prescription was unrelated to achalasia in all cases, with chronic back and joint pain constituting the majority. Of patients on opiates, five (36%) had type 3 achalasia compared with four (10%) not on opiates (P = 0.02). No patients on opiates had type 1 achalasia. Clinical presentation did not differ with opiates, although those on opiates were more likely to report chest pain (39 vs. 14%, P = 0.05) and less likely to have esophageal dilation (62 vs. 82%, P = 0.13), none with greater than 5-cm diameter. Contractile vigor was greater with opiate use, with distal contractile integral of 7149 versus 2615.5 mmHg/cm/second (P = 0.08). Treatment response was inferior on opiates, with persistent symptoms in 22% compared with 3% without opiates (P = 0.06). Opiate use is common in type 3 achalasia, with the majority of patients on opiates. No patients on opiates were diagnosed with type 1 achalasia. Manometric findings of type 3 achalasia mimic those induced by opiates, suggesting a physiologic mechanism for opiate induced type 3 achalasia. Treatment outcome is inferior with opiates, with opiate cessation perhaps preferable. Further studies assessing opiate use and achalasia are needed.

  12. Contribution of opiates in sudden asthma deaths.

    PubMed

    Hlavaty, Leigh; Hansma, Patrick; Sung, LokMan

    2015-03-01

    Asthma is a common disease in the United States and is frequently encountered during medicolegal autopsies. Patients are often young and have a witnessed collapse or are found dead. Opiate abuse is also pervasive and is repeatedly seen in death investigations. All cases over a 7-year period involving asthma investigated at the Wayne County Medical Examiner's Office were reviewed for demographics, circumstances, autopsy toxicology findings, and cause and manner of death. Ninety-four cases met these criteria. Ten cases (10.5%) were positive for opiates, 8 listed drugs as the cause of death, and 2 listed asthma. Of cases with established asthma opiate positivity, 8 (80%) were found dead, and only one had a witnessed collapse. Compared with those without opiate abuse, asthmatic patients abusing opiates had a higher mean age, no reported respiratory symptoms immediately preceding death, and higher frequency of being found dead. A discernable difference exists between deaths in asthmatic patients in the presence of opiates and those without. These findings indicate that it may be possible to predict the presence of opiates given history investigation information, thereby focusing toxicology panels to promote cost-effective practices when ordering supportive tests.

  13. Heterogeneity of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) contractile and relaxing receptors in horse penile small arteries.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Dolores; Arcos, Luis Rivera de Los; Martínez, Pilar; Benedito, Sara; García-Sacristán, Albino; Hernández, Medardo

    2004-12-01

    -36) evoked potent slow relaxations in NA-precontracted arteries, under conditions of nitric oxide (NO) synthase blockade. Mechanical removal of the endothelium markedly enhanced contractions of NPY on NA-precontracted arteries, whereas blockade of the neuronal voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels did not alter NPY responses. These results demonstrate that NPY can elicit dual contractile/relaxing responses in penile small arteries through a heterogeneous population of postjunctional NPY receptors. Potentiation of the contractions evoked by NA involve both NPY Y(1) and NPY Y(2) receptors. An NO-independent relaxation probably mediated by an atypical endothelial NPY receptor is also shown and unmasked in the presence of selective antagonists of the NPY contractile receptors.

  14. Dynamic heterogeneity and non-Gaussian statistics for acetylcholine receptors on live cell membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, W.; Song, H.; Su, Y.; Geng, L.; Ackerson, B. J.; Peng, H. B.; Tong, P.

    2016-05-01

    The Brownian motion of molecules at thermal equilibrium usually has a finite correlation time and will eventually be randomized after a long delay time, so that their displacement follows the Gaussian statistics. This is true even when the molecules have experienced a complex environment with a finite correlation time. Here, we report that the lateral motion of the acetylcholine receptors on live muscle cell membranes does not follow the Gaussian statistics for normal Brownian diffusion. From a careful analysis of a large volume of the protein trajectories obtained over a wide range of sampling rates and long durations, we find that the normalized histogram of the protein displacements shows an exponential tail, which is robust and universal for cells under different conditions. The experiment indicates that the observed non-Gaussian statistics and dynamic heterogeneity are inherently linked to the slow-active remodelling of the underlying cortical actin network.

  15. Receptor mechanisms underlying heterogenic reflexes among the triceps surae muscles of the cat.

    PubMed

    Nichols, T R

    1999-02-01

    The soleus (S), medial gastrocnemius (MG), and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscles of the cat are interlinked by rapid spinal reflex pathways. In the decerebrate state, these heterogenic reflexes are either excitatory and length dependent or inhibitory and force dependent. Mechanographic analysis was used to obtain additional evidence that the muscle spindle primary ending and the Golgi tendon organ provide the major contributions to these reflexes, respectively. The tendons of the triceps surae muscles were separated and connected to independent force transducers and servo-controlled torque motors in unanesthetized, decerebrate cats. The muscles were activated as a group using crossed-extension reflexes. Electrical stimulation of the caudal cutaneous sural nerve was used to provide a particularly strong activation of MG and decouple the forces of the triceps surae muscles. During either form of activation, the muscles were stretched either individually or in various combinations to determine the strength and characteristics of autogenic and heterogenic feedback. The corresponding force responses, including both active and passive components, were measured during the changing background tension. During activation of the entire group, the excitatory, heterogenic feedback linking the three muscles was found to be strongest onto LG and weakest onto MG, in agreement with previous results concerning the strengths of heteronymous Ia excitatory postsynaptic potentials among the triceps surae muscles. The inhibition, which is known to affect only the soleus muscle, was dependent on active contractile force and was detected essentially as rapidly as length dependent excitation. The inhibition outlasted the excitation and was blocked by intravenous strychnine. These results indicate that the excitatory and inhibitory effects are dominated by feedback from primary spindle receptors and Golgi tendon organs. The interactions between these two feedback pathways potentially can

  16. Resolution of Disulfide Heterogeneity in Nogo Receptor 1 Fusion Proteins by Molecular Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    P Weinreb; D Wen; F Qian; C Wildes; E Garber; L Walus; M Jung; J Wang; J Relton; et al.

    2011-12-31

    NgRI (Nogo-66 receptor) is part of a signalling complex that inhibits axon regeneration in the central nervous system. Truncated soluble versions of NgRI have been used successfully to promote axon regeneration in animal models of spinal-cord injury, raising interest in this protein as a potential therapeutic target. The LRR (leucine-rich repeat) regions in NgRI are flanked by N- and C-terminal disulfide-containing 'cap' domains (LRRNT and LRRCT respectively). In the present work we show that, although functionally active, the NgRI(310)-Fc fusion protein contains mislinked and heterogeneous disulfide patterns in the LRRCT domain, and we report the generation of a series of variant molecules specifically designed to prevent this heterogeneity. Using these variants we explored the effects of modifying the NgRI truncation site or the spacing between the NgRI and Fc domains, or replacing cysteines within the NgRI or IgG hinge regions. One variant, which incorporates replacements of Cys{sup 266} and Cys{sup 309} with alanine residues, completely eliminated disulfide scrambling while maintaining functional in vitro and in vivo efficacy. This modified NgRI-Fc molecule represents a significantly improved candidate for further pharmaceutical development, and may serve as a useful model for the optimization of other IgG fusion proteins made from LRR proteins.

  17. GBM heterogeneity as a function of variable epidermal growth factor receptor variant III activity

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Olle R.; McKinney, Andrew; Engler, Jane R.; Koshkakaryan, Gayane; Gong, Henry; Robinson, Aaron E.; Ewald, Andrew J.; Huillard, Emmanuelle; James, C. David; Molinaro, Annette M.; Shieh, Joseph T.; Phillips, Joanna J.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) due to a deletion of exons 2-7 of EGFR (EGFRvIII) is a common alteration in glioblastoma (GBM). While this alteration can drive gliomagenesis, tumors harboring EGFRvIII are heterogeneous. To investigate the role for EGFRvIII activation in tumor phenotype we used a neural progenitor cell-based murine model of GBM driven by EGFR signaling and generated tumor progenitor cells with high and low EGFRvIII activation, pEGFRHi and pEGFRLo. In vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro studies suggested a direct association between EGFRvIII activity and increased tumor cell proliferation, decreased tumor cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix, and altered progenitor cell phenotype. Time-lapse confocal imaging of tumor cells in brain slice cultures demonstrated blood vessel co-option by tumor cells and highlighted differences in invasive pattern. Inhibition of EGFR signaling in pEGFRHi promoted cell differentiation and increased cell-matrix adhesion. Conversely, increased EGFRvIII activation in pEGFRLo reduced cell-matrix adhesion. Our study using a murine model for GBM driven by a single genetic driver, suggests differences in EGFR activation contribute to tumor heterogeneity and aggressiveness. PMID:27738329

  18. [Antihypoxic properties of opiates and substance P].

    PubMed

    Vlasova, I G; Torshin, V I

    2001-01-01

    Using survival slices of the rat cerebellum, we studied the influence of opiates (alpha- and beta-endorphines, met-enkephalines) as well as substance P (SP) on the impulse activity (IA) of neurons. Low doses of the studied substances (10(-8)-10(-10) M) for the most part increased the IA of the neurons, while high doses (10(6)-10(-5) M) produced biphasic reaction (inhibition-excitation). It is supposed that opiates and SP act as transmitters in the cerebellum. Under increasing hypoxia, opiates and SP manifested antixypoxic properties both in low O22 concentration and under reoxygenation. Opiates and SP proved to be natural antihypoxants involved not only in nociception mechanisms but also in brain adaptation to oxygen deficiency.

  19. Heterogeneous distribution of acetylcholine receptors in chick myocytes induced by cholesterol enrichment.

    PubMed

    Lasalde, J A; Colom, A; Resto, E; Zuazaga, C

    1995-05-04

    The cholesterol concentration at the cell surface of cultured chick myocytes was increased in order to determine the effects of high levels of cholesterol on the ion channel properties of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Single channel recordings and fluorescence polarization studies using 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) were performed under equivalent conditions for normal and cholesterol enriched myocytes. In cell attached patches from myocytes with a cholesterol to phospholipid molar ratio (c/p) of 0.24 and a microviscosity of 1.35 poise a single conductance of 51 pS was detected. The cholesterol enriched myocytes with a c/p of 0.52 and a microviscosity of 2.05 poise showed two conductances, a 54 pS and a 39 pS channel: both were blocked by alpha-bungarotoxin. The 39 pS channel was detected with the simultaneous appearance of a slow component of tau m (modulation time) for DPH fluorescence measured by phase demodulation. The 80% reduction in the open time constant (tau 2) of the 39 pS channel suggest an inhibition of the normal conformational state. The combined results suggest that cholesterol enrichment may induced a more heterogeneous lipid environment and that the two types of channel properties could result from the distribution of the receptors in different domains.

  20. Buprenorphine in the treatment of opiate dependence.

    PubMed

    Wesson, Donald R; Smith, David E

    2010-06-01

    Compelling clinical evidence establishes that buprenorphine is similar to methadone in efficacy for opiate detoxification and maintenance but safer than methadone in an overdose situation. The Drug Abuse Treatment Act of 2000 (DATA 2000) enabled US physicians with additional training to prescribe buprenorphine to a limited number of opiate-dependent patients. The sublingual tablets Subutex (buprenorphine alone) and Suboxone (a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone) meet the specifications of DATA 2000. Suboxone is intended to discourage intravenously administration and has less abuse potential than buprenorphine alone. Suboxone is generally recommended for maintenance treatment except for women who are pregnant. Subutex is recommended in treatment of pregnant women. A buprenorphine opiate withdrawal syndrome can occur in newborns. Although intravenous buprenorphine abuse is a significant public health problem in some countries, buprenorphine alone or in combination with naloxone has less potential for abuse than heroin and some prescription opiates, such as oxycodone. Pharmacotherapy from physicians' offices makes buprenorphine treatment acceptable to some opiate-dependent patients who would not accept treatment in traditional opiate-maintenance clinics. For reasons not adequately understood, some patients find discontinuation of buprenorphine following long-term use difficult. This article reviews the pharmacology of buprenorphine, summarizes evidence supporting the safety and efficacy of buprenorphine and provides clinical guidelines for treatment.

  1. Opiate Exposure State Controls a D2-CaMKIIα-Dependent Memory Switch in the Amygdala-Prefrontal Cortical Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Laura G; Zunder, Jordan; Renard, Justine; Fu, Jennifer; Rushlow, Walter; Laviolette, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian basolateral amygdala (BLA) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) comprise a functionally interconnected circuit that is critical for processing opiate-related associative memories. In the opiate-naïve state, reward memory formation in the BLA involves a functional link between dopamine (DA) D1 receptor (D1R) and extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling substrates, but switches to a DA D2 (D2R)/Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα)-dependent memory substrate following chronic opiate exposure and spontaneous withdrawal. Using conditioned place preference (CPP) in rats paired with molecular analyses, we examined the role of intra-mPFC CaMKII, ERK and DAergic activity during the formation of opiate associative memories, and how opiate exposure state may regulate the functions of these molecular memory pathways. We report that the role of CaMKIIα signaling is functionally reversed within the BLA-mPFC pathway depending on opiate exposure state. Thus, in the opiate-naïve state, intra-mPFC but not intra-BLA blockade of CaMKII signaling prevents formation of opiate reward memory. However, following chronic opiate exposure and spontaneous withdrawal, the role of CaMKII signaling in the BLA-mPFC is functionally reversed. This behavioral memory switch corresponds to a selective increase in the expression of D2R and CaMKIIα, but not other calcium/calmodulin-related molecules, nor D1R expression levels within the mPFC. PMID:26174594

  2. 'Lingering' opiate deaths? Concentration of opiates in medulla and femoral blood.

    PubMed

    Naso-Kaspar, Claire K; Herndon, Grant W; Wyman, John F; Felo, Joseph A; Lavins, Eric S; Gilson, Thomas P

    2013-10-01

    'Lingering death' cases occur when the circumstances of death indicate an opiate overdose, but measured opiate blood levels are only in the therapeutic range; death results from cardiac and respiratory depression. This study examined the relative concentration of opiates in femoral blood and in the medulla oblongata (sites for cardiac and respiratory control) from 41 cases to determine whether a difference in opiate concentration might explain lingering deaths. Opiates from blood and medulla were analyzed using GC-EI-MS in selective ion monitoring mode. Results were correlated with gross and microscopic findings of the lungs and with cause and manner of death. Opiate concentrations for morphine, codeine and 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM) were higher in the medulla than in blood. The brain: blood ratio for the analytes demonstrated an increasing ratio from morphine, to codeine, to 6-AM (1.42, 2.48 and 4.86), which corresponds to the relative lipophilicity of these analytes. The average right and left lung weights were 762 and 668 g, respectively. Histologic examination showed edema, and/or polarizable microemboli, acute bronchopneumonia and acute bronchitis. The preferential distribution of opiates to medulla suggests that lingering opiate deaths may be explained, at least in part, because of higher relative concentrations of drug in brain, compared with femoral blood.

  3. Analysis of photoaffinity-labeled aryl hydrocarbon receptor heterogeneity by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Perdew, G.H.; Hollenback, C.E. )

    1990-07-03

    The level of charge heterogeneity in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) was examined by high-resolution denaturing two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis. Hepa 1c1c7 cell cytosolic fraction was photoaffinity-labeled with 2-azido-3-({sup 125}I)-iodo-7,8-dibromodibenzo-p-dioxin and applied to isoelectric focusing (IEF) tube gels. After optimization of focusing conditions a broad peak of radioactivity was detected in the apparent pI range of 5.2-5.7. IEF tube gels were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by visualization of the radiolabeled AhR by autoradiography; three distinct isoforms were detected. The same 2D electrophoretic isoform pattern was obtained when the AhR from Hepa 1c1c7 was photoaffinity-labeled in cell culture. BP{sup r}Cl cells, a mutant line derived from Hepa 1c1c7 cells, contain an AhR that is unable to bind to DNA. Photoaffinity-labeled BP{sup r}Cl cytosolic fractions were subjected to 2D gel electrophoretic analysis resulting in essentially the same molecular weight and isoform pattern as seen in Hepa 1c1c7 cytosol. This result would suggest that if a mutation is present in the BP{sup r}Cl AhR it has not caused a significant change in its IEF pattern, although a small shift in the pI values was observed. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of photoaffinity-labeled cytosolic fractions from HeLa cells, the rat liver tumor cell line McA-RH777, and buffalo rat thymus revealed three isoforms, essentially the same isoform pattern as in Hepa 1c1c7 cells. This would indicate that despite the considerable molecular weight polymorphism between species the level of charge heterogeneity is high conserved.

  4. Inhibitory effect of opiates on LPS mediated release of TNF and IL-8.

    PubMed

    Bastami, Salumeh; Norling, Cecilia; Trinks, Cecilia; Holmlund, Birgitta; Walz, Thomas M; Ahlner, Johan; Uppugunduri, Srinivas

    2013-06-01

    Most patients with advanced cancer experience severe pain and are often treated with opiates. Cancer patients are especially susceptible to opportunistic infections due to treatment with immunosuppressive and cytostatic drugs. Since opiates have been demonstrated to have immunomodulatory effects, it is of clinical importance to evaluate potential differences between commonly used opiates with regard to their effect on the immune system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of morphine, tramadol, fentanyl and ketobemidone on the functioning of the immune system with special reference to TNF and IL-8 release. Method. U-937 cells were preincubated with different concentrations of opioids followed by stimulation with LPS 100 μg/ml for three hours. The effect of opioids on the levels of cytokine mRNA was studied using RT-PCR. Erk and Akt phosphorylation was also measured by Western blot. Results. All opioids with the exception of fentanyl were capable of inhibiting TNF release from U-937 cells. Morphine had no effect on IL-8 release but the effect of other opiates was almost the same as the effect on TNF. All opioids with the exception of fentanyl were capable of inhibiting production of mRNA for TNF and IL-8. The observed effects of opiates were not always reversible by naloxone, suggesting that the effects might be mediated by other receptors or through a non-receptor mediated direct effect. Although preliminary evidence suggests the involvement of Erk and Akt pathways, further studies are needed to unravel the intracellular pathways involved in mediating the effects of opiates. Our data suggests that the order of potency with regard to inhibition of cytokine release is as follows: tramadol > ketobemidone > morphine > fentanyl. Conclusion. Further studies are needed to understand the clinical implications of the observed immunosuppressive effects of tramadol and ketobemidone and to improve opioid treatment strategies in patients with cancer.

  5. Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein K is a Novel Regulator of Androgen Receptor Translation

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Nishit K; Kim, Jayoung; Cinar, Bekir; Ramachandran, Aruna; Hager, Martin H; Di Vizio, Dolores; Adam, Rosalyn M; Rubin, Mark A; Raychaudhuri, Pradip; De Benedetti, Arrigo; Freeman, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of androgen receptor (AR) expression in prostate cancer (PCa) is still poorly understood. Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in PCa cells was previously shown to lower AR expression by a rapamycin-sensitive, post-transcriptional mechanism involving the AR mRNA 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR). In a search for an intermediate within the EGFR/PI3-kinase/Akt/mTOR pathway that regulates AR at this site, we identified the nucleic acid binding protein, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP-K), by mass spectrometric analysis of Akt immune complexes from lipid raft-enriched subcellular fractions. We show here that hnRNP-K is a novel inhibitor of AR mRNA translation that regulates androgen-responsive gene expression and PCa cell proliferation. A functional hnRNP-K binding site involved in down-regulating AR protein levels was identified in the AR mRNA 5′-UTR. Further analysis revealed that hnRNP-K is also able to inhibit AR translation in the absence of the 5′-UTR, consistent with the presence of additional predicted hnRNP-K binding sites within the AR open reading frame and in the 3′-UTR. Immunohistochemical analysis of a human PCa tissue microarray revealed an inverse correlation between hnRNP-K expression and AR protein levels in organ-confined PCa tumors and a substantial decline in cytoplasmic hnRNP-K in metastases, despite an overall increase in hnRNP-K levels in metastatic tumors. These data suggest that translational inhibition of AR by hnRNP-K may occur in organ-confined tumors but possibly at a reduced level in metastases. HnRNP-K is the first protein identified that directly interacts with and regulates the AR translational apparatus. PMID:19258514

  6. Opiate substitution treatment and HIV transmission in people who inject drugs: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Minozzi, Silvia; Martin, Natasha; Vickerman, Peter; Deren, Sherry; Bruneau, Julie; Degenhardt, Louisa; Hickman, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Objective To quantify the effect of opiate substitution treatment in relation to HIV transmission among people who inject drugs. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective published and unpublished observational studies. Data sources Search of Medline, Embase, PsychINFO, and the Cochrane Library from the earliest year to 2011 without language restriction. Review methods We selected studies that directly assessed the impact of opiate substitution treatment in relation to incidence of HIV and studies that assessed incidence of HIV in people who inject drugs and that might have collected data regarding exposure to opiate substitution treatment but not have reported it. Authors of these studies were contacted. Data were extracted by two reviewers and pooled in a meta-analysis with a random effects model. Results Twelve published studies that examined the impact of opiate substitution treatment on HIV transmission met criteria for inclusion, and unpublished data were obtained from three additional studies. All included studies examined methadone maintenance treatment. Data from nine of these studies could be pooled, including 819 incident HIV infections over 23 608 person years of follow-up. Opiate substitution treatment was associated with a 54% reduction in risk of HIV infection among people who inject drugs (rate ratio 0.46, 95% confidence interval 0.32 to 0.67; P<0.001). There was evidence of heterogeneity between studies (I2=60%, χ2=20.12, P=0.010), which could not be explained by geographical region, site of recruitment, or the provision of incentives. There was weak evidence for greater benefit associated with longer duration of exposure to opiate substitution treatment. Conclusion Opiate substitution treatment provided as maintenance therapy is associated with a reduction in the risk of HIV infection among people who inject drugs. These findings, however, could reflect comparatively high levels of motivation to change behaviour and reduce

  7. Sedatives for opiate withdrawal in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Osborn, D A; Jeffery, H E; Cole, M J

    2005-07-20

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) due to opiate withdrawal may result in disruption of the mother-infant relationship, sleep-wake abnormalities, feeding difficulties, weight loss and seizures. Treatments used to ameliorate symptoms and reduce morbidity include opiates, sedatives and non-pharmacological treatments. To assess the effectiveness and safety of using a sedative compared to a non-opiate control for NAS due to withdrawal from opiates, and to determine which type of sedative is most effective and safe. The standard search strategy of the Neonatal Review Group was used. This update included searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2005), MEDLINE 1966-March 2005 and abstracts of conference proceedings. Trials enrolling infants with NAS born to mothers with an opiate dependence, with > 80% follow up and using random or quasi-random allocation to sedative or control. Control could include another sedative or non-pharmacological treatment. Each author assessed study quality and extracted data independently. Primary outcomes included treatment failure (failure to achieve symptom control or use of additional drug treatment), seizure occurrence, mortality and neurodevelopment. Treatment effect was expressed using (RR), risk difference (RD), mean difference (MD) and weighted mean difference (WMD). Meta-analysis was performed using a fixed effect model. Six studies enrolling a total of 305 patients met inclusion criteria (Coyle 2002; Finnegan 1984; Kahn 1969; Kaltenbach 1986; Khoo 1995; Madden 1977); however, two (Finnegan 1984; Kaltenbach 1986) may be sequential reports that include some identical patients. Methodological concerns included the use of quasi-random allocation methods in four studies, and sizeable, largely unexplained differences in reported numbers allocated to each group in three studies. Phenobarbitone compared to supportive care alone has not been shown to reduce treatment failure or

  8. Gustatory expression pattern of the human TAS2R bitter receptor gene family reveals a heterogenous population of bitter responsive taste receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Maik; Foerster, Susann; Staehler, Frauke; Raguse, Jan-Dirk; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2007-11-14

    Human bitter taste is mediated by approximately 25 members of the human TAS2 receptor (hTAS2R) gene family. The hTAS2R genes are expressed in taste buds of gustatory papillae on the tongue surface. Because many naturally occurring bitter compounds are toxic, bitter taste receptors are believed to serve as warning sensors against the ingestion of toxic food compounds. An important question is whether bitter taste receptor cells are a homogeneous, broadly tuned population of cells, which uniformly express all bitter taste receptor genes, or not. Gene expression analyses in rodents demonstrated an essentially overlapping expression of TAS2R genes indicating a broad tuning, whereas functional in vivo analyses suggest a narrow tuning. The present study demonstrates the expression of all 25 human TAS2R genes in taste receptor cells of human circumvallate papillae. As shown by in situ hybridization experiments, the expression of hTAS2R genes differs in both the apparent level of expression and the number of taste receptor cells expressing these genes, suggesting a heterogeneous bitter taste receptor cell population. Differences in gene expression levels were verified by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR experiments for a subset of hTAS2R genes. Direct evidence for the heterogeneity of bitter taste receptor cells is provided by dual-labeling in situ hybridizations with selected pairs of hTAS2R gene-specific probes. Functional coexpression experiments in heterologous cells show competition among hTAS2Rs, indicating a possible biological reason for the observed expression pattern. From the data, we conclude that human bitter taste receptor cells are tuned to detect a limited subset of bitter stimuli.

  9. Limited heterogeneity of T cell receptor BV usage in aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Weihua; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Chen, Guibin; Young, Neal S.

    2001-01-01

    Immune mediation of aplastic anemia (AA) has been inferred from clinical responsiveness to immunosuppressive therapies and a large body of circumstantial laboratory evidence. However, neither the immune response nor the nature of the antigens recognized has been well characterized. We established a large number of CD4 and CD8 T cell clones from a patient with AA and analyzed their T cell receptor (TCR) usage. Most CD4 clones displayed BV5, whereas most CD8 clones displayed BV13. We found sequence identity for complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) among a majority of CD4 clones; the same sequence was present in marrow lymphocytes from four other patients with AA but was not detected in controls. The dominant CD4 clone showed a Th1 secretion pattern, lysed autologous CD34 cells, and inhibited their hematopoietic colony formation. In three of four patients, successful immunosuppressive treatment led to marked decrease in clones bearing the dominant CDR3 BV5 sequence. These results suggest surprisingly limited heterogeneity of the T cell repertoire in an individual patient and similarity at the molecular level of the likely pathological lymphocyte response among multiple patients with AA, consistent with recognition of limited numbers of antigens shared by individuals with the same HLA type in this disease. PMID:11544283

  10. Molecular characterization of opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this research was to purify and characterize active opioid receptors and elucidate molecular aspects of opioid receptor heterogeneity. Purification to apparent homogeneity of an opioid binding protein from bovine caudate was achieved by solubilization in the non-ionic detergent, digitonin, followed by sequential chromatography on the opiate affinity matrix, ..beta..-naltrexylethylenediamine-CH-Sepharose 4B, and on the lectine affinity matrix, wheat germ agglutinin-agarose. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS-PAGE) followed by autoradiography revealed that radioiodinated purified receptor gave a single band. Purified receptor preparations showed a specific activity of 12,000-15,000 fmol of opiate bound per mg of protein. Radioiodinated human beta-endorphin (/sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/) was used as a probe to investigate the ligand binding subunits of mu and delta opioid receptors. /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ was shown to bind to a variety of opioid receptor-containing tissues with high affinity and specificity with preference for mu and delta sites, and with little, if any, binding to kappa sites. Affinity crosslinking techniques were employed to covalently link /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ to opioid receptors, utilizing derivatives of bis-succinimidyl esters that are bifunctional crosslinkers with specificities for amino and sulfhydryl groups. This, and competition experiments with high type-selective ligands, permitted the assignment of two labeled peptides to their receptor types, namely a peptide of M/sub r/ = 65,000 for mu receptors and one of M/sub r/ = 53,000 for delta receptors.

  11. Pharmacoepidemiology of opiate use in the neonatal ICU: Increasing cumulative doses and iatrogenic opiate withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Tamorah; Erfe, Betty Luan; Ezell, Tarrah; Gauda, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care unit (ICU) care involves use of opiates to treat postoperative, ventilated, or chronically ill infants. Opiates provide necessary analgesia and sedation, but the morbidities include prolonged neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) and extended length of stay for dose tapering. Our objective was to quantify trends in opiate exposure in a tertiary care NICU. The authors hypothesize that medical opiate exposure and resultant ICU-acquired NAS would increase over time. Retrospective cross-sectional cohort study. Tertiary care NICU. High-risk inborn infants admitted in fiscal years 2003-2004, 2007-2008, and 2010-2011. Average cumulative morphine exposure (all opiate doses converted to morphine equivalents) per time epoch was compared in cohorts of clinically similar infants. Linear regression was used to assess the primary outcome, assessing changes in opiate exposure over time. Sixty-three infants were included in the final analysis. The primary analysis assessing cumulative opiate exposure per infant showed an increase of 134 mg per time epoch (95% CI-12, 279 mg, p-value 0.071). There was a statistically significant increase in the percent of infants with a diagnosis of iatrogenic NAS, increasing from 9 to 35 to 50 percent (p-value 0.012).

  12. Opiate agonists and antagonists modulate taste perception in opiate-maintained and recently detoxified subjects.

    PubMed

    Green, Amy; Kaul, Arun; O'Shea, Jacinta; Sharma, Ekta; Bennett, Lisa; Mullings, Emma L; Munafò, Marcus R; Nutt, David J; Melichar, Jan K; Donaldson, Lucy F

    2013-03-01

    Heroin addicts consume large quantities of refined sugars. This study investigated the effect of opiate use and antagonism on sweet taste in opiate-maintained drug users and detoxified former chronic opiate users, using a within-subject design. Seven opiate users received methadone and seven buprenorphine maintenance. Six detoxified subjects received naltrexone. Sucrose recognition thresholds and measurements of pleasantness and intensity were determined before and four hours after 1) a single dose of methadone or buprenorphine or 2) naltrexone. Control data were taken from a cohort of healthy volunteers including smokers. All measures of sweet and salt taste perception were significantly greater in opiate users and recently detoxified subjects compared to control subjects, with the exception of sweet pleasantness, which returned to control level after detoxification. Acute methadone administration reduced salt thresholds and unpleasantness to control levels. Increased sweet thresholds and salt unpleasantness in detoxified subjects were reversed by acute opioid antagonism, returning to control levels. These results suggest that opiate use and antagonism alters taste perception. Some of the alterations reverse on detoxification (sweet pleasantness), and others can be reversed by opioid antagonism (sweet threshold, salt unpleasantness). Changes in taste perception may underlie altered consumption of refined sugars in opiate users.

  13. Opiates and elderly: use and side effects.

    PubMed

    Chau, Diane L; Walker, Vanessa; Pai, Latha; Cho, Lwin M

    2008-01-01

    The evaluation of pain and the subsequent issue of pain control is a clinical challenge that all healthcare providers face. Pain in the elderly population is especially difficult given the myriad of physiological, pharmacological, and psychological aspects of caring for the geriatric patient. Opiates are the mainstay of pain treatment throughout all age groups but special attention must be paid to the efficacy and side effects of these powerful drugs when prescribing to a population with impaired metabolism, excretion and physical reserve. In a random chart review of 300 US veterans, 44% of those receiving an analgesic also received opioids. The increasing use of opiates for pain management by healthcare practitioners requires that those prescribing opioids be aware of the special considerations for treating the elderly. This article will address the precautions one must take when using opiates in the geriatric population, as well as the side effects and ways to minimize them.

  14. Opiates and elderly: Use and side effects

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Diane L; Walker, Vanessa; Pai, Latha; Cho, Lwin M

    2008-01-01

    The evaluation of pain and the subsequent issue of pain control is a clinical challenge that all healthcare providers face. Pain in the elderly population is especially difficult given the myriad of physiological, pharmacological, and psychological aspects of caring for the geriatric patient. Opiates are the mainstay of pain treatment throughout all age groups but special attention must be paid to the efficacy and side effects of these powerful drugs when prescribing to a population with impaired metabolism, excretion and physical reserve. In a random chart review of 300 US veterans, 44% of those receiving an analgesic also received opioids. The increasing use of opiates for pain management by healthcare practitioners requires that those prescribing opioids be aware of the special considerations for treating the elderly. This article will address the precautions one must take when using opiates in the geriatric population, as well as the side effects and ways to minimize them. PMID:18686750

  15. [Impact of opiates on dopaminergic neurons].

    PubMed

    Kaufling, Jennifer; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José; Barrot, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Since the work of Johnson and North, it is known that opiates increase the activity of dopaminergic neurons by a GABA neuron-mediated desinhibition. This model should however be updated based on recent advances. Thus, the neuroanatomical location of the GABA neurons responsible for this desinhibition has been recently detailed: they belong to a brain structure in continuity with the posterior part of the ventral tegmental area and discovered this past decade. Other data also highlighted the critical role played by glutamatergic transmission in the opioid regulation of dopaminergic neuron activity. During protracted opiate withdrawal, the inhibitory/excitatory balance exerted on dopaminergic neurons is altered. These results are now leading to propose an original hypothesis for explaining the impact of protracted opiate withdrawal on mood.

  16. The heterogeneity in GABAA receptor-mediated IPSC kinetics reflects heterogeneity of subunit composition among inhibitory and excitatory interneurons in spinal lamina II

    PubMed Central

    Labrakakis, Charalampos; Rudolph, Uwe; De Koninck, Yves

    2014-01-01

    GABAergic inhibition displays rich functional diversity throughout the CNS, which arises from variations in the nature of inputs, subunit composition, subcellular localization of receptors and synapse geometry, or reuptake mechanisms. In the spinal dorsal horn (SDH), GABAA and glycine receptors play a major role in the control of excitability and accuracy of nociceptive processing. Identifying which components shape the properties of the inhibitory synapses in different cell types is necessary to understand how nociceptive information is integrated. To address this, we used transgenic mice where inhibitory interneurons express GAD65-EGFP. We found that GABAA, but not glycine receptor-mediated evoked IPSCs displayed slower kinetics in EGFP+ vs. EGFP− interneurons. GABAA miniature IPSC decay kinetics showed a large variability in both populations, however the distribution of decays differed between EGFP+ and EGFP− interneurons. The range of mIPSC decay kinetics observed was replicated in experiments using rapid application of GABA on outside-out patches taken from SDH neurons in slices. Furthermore, GABAA decay kinetics were not affected by uptake blockers and were not different in mice lacking δ or α5 subunits, indicating that intrinsic channel properties likely underlie the heterogeneity. To identify whether other α subunits shape the various kinetic properties observed we took advantage of knock-in mice carrying point mutations in either the α1, α2, or α3 subunits rendering Ro 15-4513 a selective agonist at the benzodiazepine modulatory site. We found that α1 and α2 subunit underlie the fast decaying component of IPSCs while the slow component is determined by the α3 subunit. The differential distribution of GABAA subunits at inhibitory synapses thus sculpts the heterogeneity of the SDH inhibitory circuitry. This diversity of inhibitory elements can be harnessed to selectively modulate different components of the spinal nociceptive circuitry for

  17. Opiate and cocaine addiction: from bench to clinic and back to the bench.

    PubMed

    Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Zhou, Yan; Butelman, Eduardo R; Levran, Orna

    2009-02-01

    This review primarily focuses on our recent findings in bidirectional translational research on opiate and cocaine addictions. First, we present neurobiological and molecular studies on endogenous opioid systems (e.g. proopiomelanocortin, mu opioid receptor, dynorphin, and kappa opioid receptor), brain stress-responsive systems (e.g. orexin, arginine vasopressin, V1b receptor, and corticotropin-releasing factor), hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and neurotransmitters (especially dopamine), in response to both chronic cocaine or opiate exposure and to drug withdrawal, using several newly developed animal models and molecular approaches. The second aspect is human molecular genetic association investigations including hypothesis-driven studies and genome-wide array studies, to define particular systems involved in vulnerability to develop specific addictions, and response to pharmacotherapy.

  18. Neonatal opiate abstinence syndrome in term and preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Doberczak, T M; Kandall, S R; Wilets, I

    1991-06-01

    Data on 178 term and 34 preterm infants born to methadone-maintained mothers were analyzed to assess the effects of neonatal opiate abstinence in infants of varying gestational ages. More mothers in the term group (79%) than in the preterm group (53%) had abused other drugs during pregnancy (p less than 0.001). Mean (+/- SD) gestational age was 39.5 weeks +/- 1.4 for term infants and 34.3 weeks +/- 2.6 for preterm infants. On the basis of a semiobjective symptom scoring scale, term infants had more severe abstinence symptoms and more prominent central nervous system manifestations than preterm infants. The severity of abstinence symptoms correlated with maternal methadone dosage in both term and preterm infants. Maternal multiple drug abuse (e.g., heroin, cocaine) did not influence severity of abstinence symptoms in either group. More term infants (145/178) than preterm infants (20/34) required treatment for these symptoms (p less than 0.005). In 13 of 178 term infants, compared with 1 of 34 preterm infants, abstinence-related seizures developed. Peak severity occurred 1 to 2 days earlier in term than in preterm infants. A less severe abstinence syndrome in preterm infants may be due to (1) developmental immaturity of either dendritic ramifications, specific opiate receptors, or neurotransmitter function, or (2) reduced total drug exposure during the intrauterine period.

  19. Reciprocal Evolution of Opiate Science from Medical and Cultural Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Stefano, George B; Pilonis, Nastazja; Ptacek, Radek; Kream, Richard M

    2017-06-13

    Over the course of human history, it has been common to use plants for medicinal purposes, such as for providing relief from particular maladies and self-medication. Opium represents one longstanding remedy that has been used to address a range of medical conditions, alleviating discomfort often in ways that have proven pleasurable. Opium is a combination of compounds obtained from the mature fruit of opium poppy, papaver somniferum. Morphine and its biosynthetic precursors thebaine and codeine constitute the main bioactive opiate alkaloids contained in opium. Opium usage in ancient cultures is well documented, as is its major extract morphine. The presence of endogenous opiate alkaloids and opioid peptides in animals owe their discovery to their consistent actions at particular concentrations via stereo select receptors. In vitro expression of morphine within a microbiological industrial setting underscores the role it plays as a multi-purpose pharmacological agent, as well as reinforcing why it can also lead to long-term social dependence. Furthermore, it clearly establishes a reciprocal effect of human intelligence on modifying evolutionary processes in papaver somniferum and related plant species.

  20. Reciprocal Evolution of Opiate Science from Medical and Cultural Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Stefano, George B.; Pilonis, Nastazja; Ptacek, Radek; Kream, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    Over the course of human history, it has been common to use plants for medicinal purposes, such as for providing relief from particular maladies and self-medication. Opium represents one longstanding remedy that has been used to address a range of medical conditions, alleviating discomfort often in ways that have proven pleasurable. Opium is a combination of compounds obtained from the mature fruit of opium poppy, papaver somniferum. Morphine and its biosynthetic precursors thebaine and codeine constitute the main bioactive opiate alkaloids contained in opium. Opium usage in ancient cultures is well documented, as is its major extract morphine. The presence of endogenous opiate alkaloids and opioid peptides in animals owe their discovery to their consistent actions at particular concentrations via stereo select receptors. In vitro expression of morphine within a microbiological industrial setting underscores the role it plays as a multi-purpose pharmacological agent, as well as reinforcing why it can also lead to long-term social dependence. Furthermore, it clearly establishes a reciprocal effect of human intelligence on modifying evolutionary processes in papaver somniferum and related plant species. PMID:28609429

  1. Carbonylation induces heterogeneity in cardiac ryanodine receptor function in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shao, Chun Hong; Tian, Chengju; Ouyang, Shouqiang; Moore, Caronda J; Alomar, Fadhel; Nemet, Ina; D'Souza, Alicia; Nagai, Ryoji; Kutty, Shelby; Rozanski, George J; Ramanadham, Sasanka; Singh, Jaipaul; Bidasee, Keshore R

    2012-09-01

    Heart failure and arrhythmias occur at 3 to 5 times higher rates among individuals with diabetes mellitus, compared with age-matched, healthy individuals. Studies attribute these defects in part to alterations in the function of cardiac type 2 ryanodine receptors (RyR2s), the principal Ca(2+)-release channels on the internal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). To date, mechanisms underlying RyR2 dysregulation in diabetes remain poorly defined. A rat model of type 1 diabetes, in combination with echocardiography, in vivo and ex vivo hemodynamic studies, confocal microscopy, Western blotting, mass spectrometry, site-directed mutagenesis, and [(3)H]ryanodine binding, lipid bilayer, and transfection assays, was used to determine whether post-translational modification by reactive carbonyl species (RCS) represented a contributing cause. After 8 weeks of diabetes, spontaneous Ca(2+) release in ventricular myocytes increased ~5-fold. Evoked Ca(2+) release from the SR was nonuniform (dyssynchronous). Total RyR2 protein levels remained unchanged, but the ability to bind the Ca(2+)-dependent ligand [(3)H]ryanodine was significantly reduced. Western blotting and mass spectrometry revealed RCS adducts on select basic residues. Mutation of residues to delineate the physiochemical impact of carbonylation yielded channels with enhanced or reduced cytoplasmic Ca(2+) responsiveness. The prototype RCS methylglyoxal increased and then decreased the RyR2 open probability. Methylglyoxal also increased spontaneous Ca(2+) release and induced Ca(2+) waves in healthy myocytes. Treatment of diabetic rats with RCS scavengers normalized spontaneous and evoked Ca(2+) release from the SR, reduced carbonylation of RyR2s, and increased binding of [(3)H]ryanodine to RyR2s. From these data, we conclude that post-translational modification by RCS contributes to the heterogeneity in RyR2 activity that is seen in experimental diabetes.

  2. Inhibition of melanocortin 1 receptor slows melanoma growth, reduces tumor heterogeneity and increases survival

    PubMed Central

    Kansal, Rita G.; McCravy, Matthew S.; Basham, Jacob H.; Earl, Joshua A.; McMurray, Stacy L.; Starner, Chelsey J.

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma risk is increased in patients with mutations of melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) yet the basis for the increased risk remains unknown. Here we report in vivo evidence supporting a critical role for MC1R in regulating melanoma tumor growth and determining overall survival time. Inhibition of MC1R by its physiologically relevant competitive inhibitor, agouti signaling protein (ASIP), reduced melanin synthesis and morphological heterogeneity in murine B16-F10 melanoma cells. In the lungs of syngeneic C57BL/6 mice, mCherry-marked, ASIP-secreting lung tumors inhibited MC1R on neighboring tumors lacking ASIP in a dose dependent manner as evidenced by a proportional loss of pigment in tumors from mice injected with 1:1, 3:1 and 4:1 mixtures of parental B16-F10 to ASIP-expressing tumor cells. ASIP-expressing B16-F10 cells formed poorly pigmented tumors in vivo that correlated with a 20% longer median survival than those bearing parental B16-F10 tumors (p=0.0005). Mice injected with 1:1 mixtures also showed survival benefit (p=0.0054), whereas injection of a 4:1 mixture showed no significant difference in survival. The longer survival time of mice bearing ASIP-expressing tumors correlated with a significantly slower growth rate than parental B16-F10 tumors as judged by quantification of numbers of tumors and total tumor load (p=0.0325), as well as a more homogeneous size and morphology of ASIP-expressing lung tumors. We conclude that MC1R plays an important role in regulating melanoma growth and morphology. Persistent inhibition of MC1R provided a significant survival advantage resulting in part from slower tumor growth, establishing MC1R as a compelling new molecular target for metastatic melanoma. PMID:27028866

  3. Behavioral measures of anxiety during opiate withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Grasing, K; Wang, A; Schlussman, S

    1996-10-01

    Heightened anxiety is a major component of the withdrawal syndromes associated with ethanol and sedative hypnotic medications. Because of similarities between the opiate and sedative-hypnotic withdrawal syndromes as well as data implicating heightened noradrenergic tone with opiate withdrawal, we investigated changes in anxiety measures identified by plus-maze and social interaction testing during opiate withdrawal. Because Sprague Dawley rats had very low levels of entry into plus-maze open arms, further studies were conducted using the Long-Evans strain. Long-Evans rats received continuous infusions of morphine sulfate at 44 mg/kg per day delivered by osmotic pump over 7 days while control animals received inert implants. During the first 3 days of withdrawal, the number and time of entries into open and closed arms of a plus-maze was recorded. Both social and aggressive behaviors were scored durings pairings of groups of two socially naive animals. Body weight was significantly reduced in morphine-treated animals prior to and during withdrawal. Both the number of entries into open plus-maze arms and the time spent in open areas increased over the 3 days of testing. However, no difference in plus-maze activity was detected between morphine-treated and control subjects. On the third day of withdrawal, social interaction time was greater in pairs of withdrawn and control subjects compared to pairs of two control subjects. In conclusion, behavioral measures of anxiety are not increased during opiate withdrawal.

  4. Attributions and Relapse in Opiate Addicts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Brendan P.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Investigated whether attributions of opiate addicts would predict abstinence and reactions to abstinence violations. Found that addicts who at admission attributed to themselves greater responsibility for negative outcomes and who attributed relapse episodes to more personally controllable factors were subsequently more likely either to be…

  5. Opiate antagonist binding sites in discrete brain regions of spontaneously hypertensive and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmani, N.H.; Gulati, A.; Bhargava, H.N. )

    1991-01-01

    The binding of {sup 3}H-naltrexone, an opiate receptor antagonist, to membranes of discrete brain regions and spinal cord of 10 week old spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats was determined. The brain regions examined were hypothalamus, amygdala, hippocampus, corpus striatum, pons and medulla, midbrain and cortex. {sup 3}H-Naltrexone bound to membranes of brain regions and spinal cord at a single high affinity site with an apparent dissociation constant value of 3 nM. The highest density of {sup 3}H-naltrexone binding sites were in hippocampus and lowest in the cerebral cortex. The receptor density (B{sub max}value) and apparent dissociation constant (K{sub d} value) values of {sup 3}H-naltrexone to bind to opiate receptors on the membranes of amygdala, hippocampus, corpus striatum, pons and medulla, midgrain, cortex and spinal cord of WKY and SHR rates did not differ. The B{sub max} value of {sup 3}H-naltrexone binding to membranes of hypothalamus of SHR rates was 518% higher than WKY rats but the K{sub d} values in the two strains did not differ. It is concluded that SHR rats have higher density of opiate receptors labeled with {sup 3}H-naltrexone in the hypothalamus only, in comparison with WKY rats, and that such a difference in the density of opiate receptors may be related to the elevated blood pressure in SHR rats.

  6. Sedatives for opiate withdrawal in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Osborn, D A; Jeffery, H E; Cole, M J

    2002-01-01

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) due to opiate withdrawal may result in disruption of the mother-infant relationship, sleep-wake abnormalities, feeding difficulties, weight loss and seizures. Treatments used to ameliorate symptoms and reduce morbidity include opiates, sedatives and non-pharmacological treatments. To assess the effectiveness and safety of using a sedative compared to a non-opiate control for NAS due to withdrawal from opiates, and to determine which type of sedative is most effective and safe. The standard search strategy of the Neonatal Review Group was used. This included searches of the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2002) and MEDLINE 1966-2002. Trials enrolling infants with NAS born to mothers with an opiate dependence, with > 80% follow up and using random or quasi-random allocation to sedative or control. Control could include another sedative or non-pharmacological treatment. Each author assessed study quality and extracted data independently. Primary outcomes included treatment failure (failure to achieve symptom control or use of additional drug treatment), seizure occurrence, mortality and neurodevelopment. Treatment effect was expressed using (RR), risk difference (RD), mean difference (MD) and weighted mean difference (WMD). Meta-analysis was performed using a fixed effect model. Five studies enrolling a total of 285 patients met inclusion criteria (Finnegan 1984, Kahn 1969, Kaltenbach 1986, Khoo 1995, Madden 1977); however, two (Finnegan 1984, Kaltenbach 1986) may be sequential reports that include some identical patients. Methodological concerns included the use of quasi-random rather than random patient allocation methods in three studies, and sizeable, largely unexplained differences in reported numbers allocated to each group in three studies. Phenobarbital compared to supportive care alone has not been shown to reduce treatment failure or time to regain birthweight (one study). However, the

  7. Chronic opiate treatment enhances both cocaine-reinforced and cocaine-seeking behaviors following opiate withdrawal.

    PubMed

    He, Shaunteng; Grasing, Kenneth

    2004-08-16

    After chronic exposure to psychostimulants or opiates, self-administration or conditioned place preference with either class is increased (sensitized). Cross-sensitization of conditioned place preference, i.e., enhancement of psychostimulant-induced preferences after exposure to opiates, has also been described, but increases in cocaine self-administration after morphine pretreatment have not been reported. The present study evaluated effects of chronic morphine treatment on cocaine reinforcement. Opiate dependence was established in Wistar rats by administration of morphine as a constant infusion that was gradually increased to a dose of 50mg/kg per day over a 1-week period. Immediately after discontinuation of chronic morphine treatment, animals were allowed to acquire cocaine self-administration under a simple fixed-ratio schedule (FR-1), and were subsequently advanced to a progressive ratio schedule. Acquisition of cocaine self-administration under the FR-1 did not differ in saline- and morphine-pretreated animals. For cocaine self-administration under a progressive ratio schedule measured at 5 or more days after the onset of opiate withdrawal, chronic pretreatment with morphine increased the number of ratios completed, augmented final response requirements, and produced a more stable pattern of cocaine self-administration. Responding was also increased in morphine-pretreated animals during an initial extinction session. These results show that chronic opiate treatment can enhance both cocaine-reinforced and cocaine-seeking behaviors following opiate withdrawal. A similar effect may occur in human patients who discontinue methadone or other forms of replacement therapy for opiate abuse, and may contribute to relapse involving use of cocaine or other psychostimulants.

  8. Discrimination of heterogenous mRNAs encoding strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in Xenopus oocytes by antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Akagi, H; Patton, D E; Miledi, R

    1989-01-01

    Three synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides complementary to different parts of an RNA encoding a glycine receptor subunit were used to discriminate heterogenous mRNAs coding for glycine receptors in adult and neonatal rat spinal cord. Injection of the three antisense oligonucleotides into Xenopus oocytes specifically inhibited the expression of glycine receptors by adult spinal cord mRNA. In contrast, the antisense oligonucleotides were much less potent in inhibiting the expression of glycine receptors encoded by neonatal spinal cord mRNA. Northern blot analysis revealed that the oligonucleotides hybridized mostly to an adult cord transcript of approximately 10 kilobases in size. This band was also present in neonatal spinal cord mRNA but its density was about one-fourth of the adult cord message. There was no intense band in the low molecular weight position (approximately 2 kilobases), the existence of which was expected from electrophysiological studies with size-fractionated mRNA of neonatal spinal cord. Our results suggest that in the rat spinal cord there are at least three different types of mRNAs encoding functional strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors. Images PMID:2479016

  9. Detoxification from opiate drugs during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jennifer; Towers, Craig V; Hennessy, Mark D; Heitzman, Callie; Smith, Barbara; Chattin, Katie

    2016-09-01

    The current recommendation regarding the management of a pregnant patient with opioid dependence is not to perform detoxification during pregnancy because of a potential risk for preterm labor, fetal distress, or fetal demise. The objective of the study was to evaluate the safety of full opiate detoxification during pregnancy in a large number of patients through 4 different methods and analyze the rate of newborn treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome for each method. This was a retrospective analysis of data collected prospectively during ongoing prenatal care of opiate-addicted pregnant women. Data were analyzed for pregnancy complications including fetal demise and preterm labor of opiate-addicted pregnant women who underwent detoxification during pregnancy through 4 different methods: acute detoxification of incarcerated patients; inpatient detoxification with intense outpatient follow-up management; inpatient detoxification without intense outpatient follow-up management; and slow outpatient buprenorphine detoxification. The rates of newborns treated for neonatal abstinence syndrome were also assessed for each group. Over 5.5 years, 301 opiate-addicted pregnant patients were fully detoxified during pregnancy with no adverse fetal outcomes related to detoxification identified. There were 94 patients who delivered newborns treated for neonatal abstinence syndrome (31%). There was an 18.5% rate of neonatal abstinence syndrome in the 108 acutely detoxified while incarcerated, a 17.4% rate of neonatal abstinence syndrome in the 23 who had inpatient detoxification with intense outpatient follow-up management, a 17.2% rate of neonatal abstinence syndrome in the 93 who went through slow outpatient buprenorphine detoxification, but a 70.1% rate of neonatal abstinence syndrome in the 77 who had inpatient detoxification without intense outpatient follow-up management. With these data and other published studies, more than 600 patients have been reported to detoxify

  10. Endogenous Opiates and Behavior: 2006

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the twenty-ninth consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system, now spanning thirty years of research. It summarizes papers published during 2006 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (Section 2), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (Section 3); stress and social status (Section 4); tolerance and dependence (Section 5); learning and memory (Section 6); eating and drinking (Section 7); alcohol and drugs of abuse (Section 8); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (Section 9); mental illness and mood (Section 10); seizures and neurological disorders (Section 11); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (Section 12); general activity and locomotion (Section 13); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (Section 14); cardiovascular responses (Section 15); respiration and thermoregulation (Section 16); and immunological responses (Section 17). PMID:17949854

  11. Effects of opiates and opiate antagonists on the Straub tail reaction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Aceto, M. D.; McKean, Donna B.; Pearl, J.

    1969-01-01

    1. Subcutaneous injections of opiates produced the Straub tail reaction in mice. The potencies of the opiates in mice were consistent with previous estimates of the analgesic potencies in animals and in man. 2. The potencies of sixteen antagonists in counteracting the reaction were consistent with those previously obtained with the rat tail-flick test. 3. The (-) isomers of four benzomorphan derivatives were much more potent in counteracting the reaction than their (+) isomers and about twice as potent as their racemates. The activity of the isomers seemed to follow Pfeiffer's rule: the lower the effective dose of a drug, the greater the difference in the pharmacological effects of the optical isomers. One of the trans isomers acted like an opiate, while its cis isomer acted like an antagonist. 4. Naloxone and nalorphine fulfilled conventional criteria for competitive antagonism, whereas atropine and the (-) and the (+) isomers of pentazocine and of cyclazocine did not do so. 5. The Straub tail test seems to be useful for studying structure-activity relations among opiates and opiate antagonists. PMID:4389201

  12. Acupuncture for the Treatment of Opiate Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chan, Yuan-Yu; Chen, Yi-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Acupuncture is an accepted treatment worldwide for various clinical conditions, and the effects of acupuncture on opiate addiction have been investigated in many clinical trials. The present review systematically analyzed data from randomized clinical trials published in Chinese and English since 1970. We found that the majority agreed on the efficacy of acupuncture as a strategy for the treatment of opiate addiction. However, some of the methods in several included trials have been criticized for their poor quality. This review summarizes the quality of the study design, the types of acupuncture applied, the commonly selected acupoints or sites of the body, the effectiveness of the treatment, and the possible mechanism underlying the effectiveness of acupuncture in these trials. PMID:22474521

  13. Functional characterization of insulin receptor gene mutations contributing to Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome - phenotypic heterogeneity of insulin receptor gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Fang, Qichen; Zhang, Feng; Wan, Hui; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Congrong; Bao, Yuqian; Zhang, Lei; Ma, Xiaojing; Lu, Junxi; Gao, Fei; Xiang, Kunsan; Jia, Weiping

    2011-01-01

    Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome (RMS) is a rare disorder that presents as severe insulin resistance as a result of mutations present in the insulin receptor (INSR). A Chinese girl with RMS presented with profound diabetes, hyperinsulinemia, acanthosis nigricans, hirsutism, and abnormalities of teeth and nails. Direct sequencing of the patient's INSR detected heterozygote mutations at Arg83Gln (R83Q) and Ala1028Val (A1028V), with the former representing a novel mutation. Functional studies of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells transfected with wild-type (WT) and mutant forms of INSR were performed to evaluate the effects of these mutations on receptor expression and activation. Receptor expression, insulin binding activity, and phosphorylation of the R83Q variant were comparable to WT. In contrast, expression of the A1028V receptor was much lower than that of WT INSR, and impairment of insulin binding and autophosphorylation were nearly commensurate with the decrease in expression detected. Reductions in the phosphorylation of IRS-1, Akt, and Erk1/2 (60%, 40%, and 50% of WT, respectively) indicate that the A1028V receptor contributes to impaired signal transduction. In conclusion, INSR mutations associated with RMS were identified. Moreover, the A1028V mutation associated with a decrease in expression of INSR potentially accounts for loss of function of the INSR.

  14. Appropriate prescribing of opiates as professional conduct.

    PubMed

    McDonald, James

    2013-11-01

    Prescription drug abuse/misuse in Rhode Island and the US is an epidemic. Chronic pain is often treated with prescription opiates which offer some relief, yet present risks to the patient of dependence, addiction and overdose. Physicians find themselves at times at odds with their patients regarding the management of pain and may feel bullied or pressured regarding prescribing. The Rhode Island Board of Medical Licensure and Discipline recognizes the value of established parameters for responsible and safe prescribing.

  15. Opiate addicts and their perceived parental rearing.

    PubMed

    Anasagasti, J I; Denia, M

    1988-01-01

    A comparison is made between a group of young opiate addicts and a control group on their parents' rearing attitudes. A number of significant differences between the two groups emerged e.g. concerning affection, guilt engendering, favouring self esteem, estimation of school performance, strictness indicating a defective family atmosphere. The presence of a high percentage of alcoholism in fathers of the toxicomanics supports these findings.

  16. Leg edema from intrathecal opiate infusions.

    PubMed

    Aldrete, J A; Couto da Silva JM

    2000-01-01

    Despite the increasing popularity of intrathecal infusions to treat patients with long-term non-cancer-related pain, this therapy is not without serious side-effects. Five out of 23 patients who had intrathecal infusions of opiates for longer than 24 months developed leg and feet edema. As predisposing factors, cardiovascular disease, deep venous thrombosis, peripheral vascular disease, and venous stasis of the lower extremities were considered. Every patient who developed pedal and leg edema after the implantation of an infusion pump was also found to have leg edema and venous stasis prior to the time when the pump was inserted. This complication was severe enough to limit their physical activity, and to produce lymphedema, ulcerations and hyperpigmentation of the skin. Reduction of the edema occurred when the dose of the opiate was decreased, and in two cases in which the infusion was discontinued, there was almost complete resolution of the syndrome. It appears that the pre-existence of pedal edema and of venous stasis is a relative contraindication to the long-term intrathecal infusion of opiates in patients with chronic non-cancer pain.

  17. Opiate withdrawal complicated by tetany and cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Kugasia, Irfanali R; Shabarek, Nehad

    2014-01-01

    Patients with symptoms of opiate withdrawal, after the administration of opiate antagonist by paramedics, are a common presentation in the emergency department of hospitals. Though most of opiate withdrawal symptoms are benign, rarely they can become life threatening. This case highlights how a benign opiate withdrawal symptom of hyperventilation led to severe respiratory alkalosis that degenerated into tetany and cardiac arrest. Though this patient was successfully resuscitated, it is imperative that severe withdrawal symptoms are timely identified and immediate steps are taken to prevent catastrophes. An easier way to reverse the severe opiate withdrawal symptom would be with either low dose methadone or partial opiate agonists like buprenorphine. However, if severe acid-base disorder is identified, it would be safer to electively intubate these patients for better control of their respiratory and acid-base status.

  18. Erythrocyte invasions and receptor heterogeneity in field isolates of Nanay river basin Iquitos.

    PubMed

    Chenniappan, Kuppusamy; Johns, Sarah H

    2012-08-01

    To determine whether the requirements for sialic acid varies and whether several types of silaic acid independent receptors utilized for invasion mechanisms of fresh filed isolates collected around Nanay river basin, Iquitos. The field isolates were cultured as described previously by Jensen and Trager and MR4 protocol with little modifications. The erythrocytes preparation and subsequent enzyme treatment was done as described previously by Sharma. with little modification. Invasion assay was performed as described previously by Sharma et al with little modification. The Nanay river basin isolates showed five types of invasion mechanisms or types of receptors-ligand interactions. Here we observed that an equal numbers of neuraminidase sensitive and resistant invasion receptor-ligand interaction profiles as the most common receptor-ligand invasion profiles. Neuraminidase resistance trypsin sensitive chymotrypsin sensitive (NM(R)T(S)CT(S)) invasion of receptor-ligand interaction profile was found in seven isolates, Five field isolates and one reference strain showed neuraminidase sensitive, trypsin sensitive and chymotrypsin resistant (NM(S)T(S)CT(R)) invasion of receptor-ligand interactions, six isolates including one reference strains dd2 showed neuraminidase sensitive, trypsin and chymotrypsin resistance (NM(S)T(R)CT(R)) indicating its dependence on sialic acids and independence of trypsin and chymotrypsin sensitive proteins. Four isolates showed neuraminidase sensitive, trypsin sensitive and chymotrypsin sensitive (NM(S)T(S)CT(S)) invasion of receptor-ligand interactions, seven isolates were neuraminidase resistant, trypsin sensitive and chymotrypsin resistance (NM(R)T(S)CT(R)) invasion of receptor-ligand interactions, indicating its dependence on trypsin sensitive proteins. The Nanay river basin isolates showed five types of invasion mechanisms or types of receptors-ligand interactions. A full understanding of theses invasion mechanisms may allow the development

  19. Impact of opiate addiction on neuroinflammation in HIV

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, Desiree; Murray, Jacinta; Safdieh, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the independent and interactive effects of opiate addiction and HIV on neuroinflammation, we measured microglial/macrophage activation and astrogliosis in multiple regions of human brain. Samples of thalamus, frontal gray matter, and frontal white matter were obtained from 46 individuals categorized as: HIV negatives, HIV-negative opiate addicts, HIV positives, HIV-positive opiate addicts, HIV encephalitis (HIVE), and HIVE opiate addicts. Activated brain microglia/macrophages and astrocytosis were quantified by morphometric analysis of immunohistochemical stains for CD68, HLA-D, CD163, and GFAP. The effects of HIV grouping, opiate addiction, and their interaction on expression of the markers were examined in a series of two-way ANOVAs. In opiate addicts, there was generally higher baseline expression of CD68 and HLA-D in HIV negatives, and lower expression in HIV and HIVE, compared to individuals without opiate abuse. Thus, for these markers, and for GFAP in frontal gray, opiates were associated with attenuated HIV effect. In contrast, for CD163, opiates did not significantly alter responses to HIV, and HIV effects were variably absent in individuals without opiate abuse. The divergent impact that opiate addiction displays on these markers may suggest a generally immunosuppressive role in the CNS, with decreased HIV-associated activation of markers CD68 and HLA-D that potentially reflect neurotoxic pathways, and preservation of CD163, thought to be an indicator of neuroprotective scavenger systems. These results suggest a complex impact of opiates on neuroinflammation in baseline and virally stimulated states. PMID:22797933

  20. Impact of opiate addiction on neuroinflammation in HIV.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Desiree; Murray, Jacinta; Safdieh, Gabriella; Morgello, Susan

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the independent and interactive effects of opiate addiction and HIV on neuroinflammation, we measured microglial/macrophage activation and astrogliosis in multiple regions of human brain. Samples of thalamus, frontal gray matter, and frontal white matter were obtained from 46 individuals categorized as: HIV negatives, HIV-negative opiate addicts, HIV positives, HIV-positive opiate addicts, HIV encephalitis (HIVE), and HIVE opiate addicts. Activated brain microglia/macrophages and astrocytosis were quantified by morphometric analysis of immunohistochemical stains for CD68, HLA-D, CD163, and GFAP. The effects of HIV grouping, opiate addiction, and their interaction on expression of the markers were examined in a series of two-way ANOVAs. In opiate addicts, there was generally higher baseline expression of CD68 and HLA-D in HIV negatives, and lower expression in HIV and HIVE, compared to individuals without opiate abuse. Thus, for these markers, and for GFAP in frontal gray, opiates were associated with attenuated HIV effect. In contrast, for CD163, opiates did not significantly alter responses to HIV, and HIV effects were variably absent in individuals without opiate abuse. The divergent impact that opiate addiction displays on these markers may suggest a generally immunosuppressive role in the CNS, with decreased HIV-associated activation of markers CD68 and HLA-D that potentially reflect neurotoxic pathways, and preservation of CD163, thought to be an indicator of neuroprotective scavenger systems. These results suggest a complex impact of opiates on neuroinflammation in baseline and virally stimulated states.

  1. Pharmacological characterization of 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptors in murine brain and ileum using the novel radioligand [3H]RS-42358-197: evidence for receptor heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Bonhaus, D W; Wong, E H; Stefanich, E; Kunysz, E A; Eglen, R M

    1993-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated species-specific differences in 5-hydroxytryptamine3 (5-HT3) receptors, but unequivocal evidence of 5-HT3 receptor subtypes, within a species, has not yet been obtained. The purpose of the current study was to test for heterogeneity in 5-HT3 receptors in murine tissues. 5-HT3 receptors in membranes derived from brain cerebral cortex of CD-1, C57Bl/6, and Swiss Webster mice and ileum of CD-1 mice were labeled with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist [3H]RS-42358-197. Structurally diverse competing ligands were then used to characterize the binding site. [3H]RS-42358-197 bound with similar affinity in each of the cortical tissues (mean KD = 0.14 nM; range, 0.06-0.32 nM) but bound with lower affinity in ileal tissue (2.5 nM). The density of sites labeled with [3H]RS-42358-197 ranged from 10.4 fmol/mg of protein in Swiss Webster mouse cortex to 44.2 fmol/mg of protein in Sprague-Dawley rat cortex. Displacing ligands produced a pharmacologic profile of the [3H]RS-42358-197 binding site consistent with it being a 5-HT3 receptor: (R)-YM060 > (S)-zacopride > (R)-zacopride > MDL 72222 > 2-methyl-5-HT. However, > or = 10-fold differences in the affinity of certain ligands were found when comparing 5-HT3 binding sites in membranes from cerebral cortex of the different strains of mice and when comparing 5-HT3 binding sites in brain and ileal membranes prepared from the CD-1 mouse strain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Quantification of HER2 and estrogen receptor heterogeneity in breast cancer by single-molecule RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Annaratone, Laura; Marchiò, Caterina; Garnerone, Silvano; Scalzo, Maria Stella; Bienko, Magda; Chiarle, Roberto; Sapino, Anna; Crosetto, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Intra-tumor heterogeneity is a pervasive property of human cancers that poses a major clinical challenge. Here, we describe the characterization, at the transcriptional level, of the intra-tumor topography of two prominent breast cancer biomarkers and drug targets, epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and estrogen receptor 1 (ER) in 49 archival breast cancer samples. We developed a protocol for single-molecule RNA FISH in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections (FFPE-smFISH), which enabled us to simultaneously detect and perform absolute quantification of HER2 and ER mature transcripts in single cells and multiple tumor regions. We benchmarked our method with standard diagnostic techniques, demonstrating that FFPE-smFISH is able to correctly classify breast cancers into well-established molecular subgroups. By counting transcripts in thousands of single cells, we identified different expression modes and levels of inter-cellular variability. In samples expressing both HER2 and ER, many cells co-expressed both genes, although expression levels were typically uncorrelated. Finally, we applied diversity metrics from the field of ecology to assess the intra-tumor topography of HER2 and ER gene expression, revealing that the spatial distribution of these key biomarkers can vary substantially even among breast cancers of the same subtype. Our results demonstrate that FFPE-smFISH is a reliable diagnostic assay and a powerful method for quantification of intra-tumor transcriptional heterogeneity of selected biomarkers in clinical samples. PMID:28423635

  3. Tianeptine prevents respiratory depression without affecting analgesic effect of opiates in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Cavalla, David; Chianelli, Fabio; Korsak, Alla; Hosford, Patrick S; Gourine, Alexander V; Marina, Nephtali

    2015-08-15

    Respiratory depression remains an important clinical problem that limits the use of opiate analgesia. Activation of AMPA glutamate receptors has been shown to reverse fentanyl-induced respiratory changes. Here, we explored whether tianeptine, a drug known for its ability to phosphorylate AMPA receptors, can be used to prevent opiate-induced respiratory depression. A model of respiratory depression in conscious rats was produced by administration of morphine (10mg/kg, i.p.). Rats were pre-treated with test compounds or control solutions 5min prior to administration of morphine. Respiratory activity was measured using whole-body plethysmography. In conscious animals, tianeptine (2 and 10mg/kg, ip) and DP-201 (2-(4-((3-chloro-6-methyl-5,5-dioxido-6,11-dihydrodibenzo[c,f][1,2] thiazepin-11-yl)amino)butoxy)acetic acid; tianeptine analogue; 2mg/kg, ip) triggered significant (~30%) increases in baseline respiratory activity and prevented morphine-induced respiratory depression. These effects were similar to those produced by an ampakine CX-546 (15mg/kg, ip). The antinociceptive effect of morphine (hot plate test) was unaffected by tianeptine pre-treatment. In conclusion, the results of the experiments conducted in conscious rats demonstrate that systemic administration of tianeptine increases respiratory output and prevents morphine-induced respiratory depression without interfering with the antinociceptive effect of opiates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Regulation of neuronal ferritin heavy chain, a new player in opiate-induced chemokine dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Abt, Anna Cook; Meucci, Olimpia

    2013-01-01

    The heavy chain subunit of ferritin (FHC), a ubiquitous protein best known for its iron-sequestering activity as part of the ferritin complex, has recently been described as a novel inhibitor of signaling through the chemokine receptor CXCR4. Levels of FHC as well as its effects on CXCR4 activation increase in cortical neurons exposed to mu-opioid receptor agonists such as morphine, an effect likely specific to neurons. Major actions of CXCR4 signaling in the mature brain include a promotion of neurogenesis, activation of pro-survival signals, and modulation of excitotoxic pathways; thus FHC up-regulation may contribute to the neuronal dysfunction often associated with opiate drug abuse. This review summarizes our knowledge of neuronal CXCR4 function, its regulation by opiates and the role of FHC in this process, and known mechanisms controlling FHC production. We speculate on the mechanism involved in FHC regulation by opiates, and offer FHC as a new target in opioid-induced neuropathology. PMID:21465240

  5. Heterogeneity of prejunctional NPY receptor-mediated inhibition of cardiac neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Serone, Adrian P; Wright, Christine E; Angus, James A

    1999-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has been proposed as the candidate inhibitory peptide mediating interactions between sympathetic and vagal neurotransmission in several species, including man. Here, we have defined the NPY receptors involved in modulation of cardiac autonomic neurotransmission using receptor-selective agonists and antagonists in the rabbit and guinea-pig isolated right atria.In isolated atrial preparations, sympathetically-mediated tachycardia (ST; with atropine 1 μM) or vagally-mediated bradycardia (VB; with propranolol 0.1–1 μM) in response to electrical field stimulation (EFS, 1–4 pulses) were tested 0–30 min after incubation with single concentrations of vehicle, NPY (0.01–10 μM), the Y2 receptor agonist N-Acetyl-[Leu28,31]NPY(24–36) (termed N-A[L]NPY(24–36)) or the Y1 receptor agonist [Leu31,Pro34]NPY (LP). The effect of NPY on the concentration-chronotropic response curves to isoprenaline and bethanechol were also assessed.Guinea-pig atria: NPY and N-A[L]NPY(24–36) caused concentration-dependent inhibition of VB and ST to EFS. Both peptides caused maximal inhibition of VB and ST within 10 min incubation and this remained constant. LP caused a concentration-dependent, transient inhibition of ST which was antagonized by the Y1-receptor antagonist GR231118 (0.3 μM), with apparent competitive kinetics. Rabbit atria: NPY (1 or 10 μM) had no effect on VB at any time point, but both NPY and LP caused a transient (∼10 min) inhibition of sympathetic tachycardia. This inhibition could be prevented by 0.3 μM GR231118. N-A[L]NPY(24–36) had no effect on ST. NPY had no effect on the response to β-adrenoceptor stimulation by isoprenaline nor muscarinic-receptor stimulation by bethanechol in either species.Thus, in the guinea-pig, NPY causes a stable inhibition of both VB and ST to EFS via Y2 receptors and transient inhibition of ST via Y1 receptors. In contrast in the rabbit, NPY has no effect on the cardiac vagus and

  6. Heterogeneous expression of cholecystokinin and gastrin receptor in stomach and pancreatic cancer: An immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rajani; Kim, Jong Joo; Tewari, Mallika; Shukla, Hari Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin (Gs) are a well known trophic factor for the gastrointestinal tract and their trophic effects are shown mainly toward pancreas and stomach, respectively. Though, the exact characterization of CCK and Gs receptors subtype (cholecystokinin type A receptor [CCKAR] and cholecystokinin type B receptor/gastrin receptor [CCKBR/GR]) in stomach cancer (SC) and pancreatic cancer (PC) is still controversial and necessities further validation. CCKAR and CCKBR/GR expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 55 SC, 25 benign gastric diseases (BGDs), 38 PC (including periampullary carcinoma), and 10 normal pancreatic tissue. The results were statistically correlated with the patient's clinical history to observe the prognostic significance if any. CCKAR expression was detected in 18.2% of SC, 20% of BGD, 65.8% of PC, and 30.0% of normal pancreas tissue samples. The CCKBR/GR expression was detected in 58.2% of SC, 48.0% of BGD, 18.4% of PC, and 60.0% of normal pancreas tissue samples. CCKBR/GR expression was significantly high in well and moderately differentiated SC samples as compared to poorly differentiated samples. Our study showed significantly higher expression of CCKAR and down regulation of CCKBR in PC as compared to control while CCKBR/GR was detected in majority of SC samples. Thus, our study suggests that CCK and Gs receptors may have diagnostic and therapeutic implications. However, study need to be validated in significantly bigger sample size and need to be replicated in different cohorts.

  7. Opiate-induced Changes in Brain Adenosine Levels and Narcotic Drug Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Manhong; Sahbaie, Peyman; Zheng, Ming; Lobato, Robert; Boison, Detlev; Clark, J. David; Peltz, Gary

    2012-01-01

    We have very little information about the metabolomic changes that mediate neurobehavioral responses, including addiction. It was possible that opioid-induced metabolomic changes in brain could mediate some of the pharmacodynamic effects of opioids. To investigate this, opiate-induced brain metabolomic responses were profiled using a semi-targeted method in C57BL/6 and 129Sv1 mice, which exhibit extreme differences in their tendency to become opiate dependent. Escalating morphine doses (10–40 mg/kg) administered over a 4-day period selectively induced a two-fold decrease (p<0.00005) in adenosine abundance in the brainstem of C57BL/6 mice, which exhibited symptoms of narcotic drug dependence; but did not decrease adenosine abundance in 129Sv1 mice, which do not exhibit symptoms of dependence. Based on this finding, the effect of adenosine on dependence was investigated in genetically engineered mice with alterations in adenosine tone in the brain and in pharmacologic experiments. Morphine withdrawal behaviors were significantly diminished (P<0.0004) in genetically engineered mice with reduced adenosine tone in the brainstem, and by treatment with an adenosine receptor1 (A1) agonist (2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine, 0.5 mg/kg) or an A2a receptor (A2a) antagonist (SCH 58261 1 mg/kg). These results indicate that adenosine homeostasis plays a crucial role in narcotic drug responses. Opiate-induced changes in brain adenosine levels may explain many important neurobehavioral features associated with opiate addiction and withdrawal. PMID:23098802

  8. Heterogeneity of histamine H3 receptor genomic expression in the cerebral cortex of spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Shaw, J B; Cai, Q; Mtshali, C; Myles, E L; Washington, B

    2007-05-15

    Specific binding of [3H]-N-alpha-methylhistamine to homogenates from cerebral cortex tissue was analyzed in aged Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and Spontaneously Hypertensive rats (SHR). Scatchard plot analysis of [3H]-N-alpha-methylhistamine binding of the H3 receptor in the cerebral cortex from aged (6, 9, 12, and 16 week) SHR animals indicated that Bmax increased, respectively, 38.05 +/- 1.58, 59.63 +/- 2.48, 79.17 +/- 5.02, and 84.41 +/- 3.72 fmol/mg of protein. Binding studies using tissue from WKY rats indicated that maximal binding (Bmax) of the ligand to the receptor was not significantly altered. The analyses also yielded Kd values of 5, 7.2, 6.3 and 3.8 nM in SHR tissue respectively. Primers based on the sequence of the third intracellular loop of the H3 receptor were amplified at 35 cycles yielding several amplicons. These amplicons expressed sizes 875, 485, and 280 bp in 6 and 9 week cortical tissue from WKY animals where as in cortical tissue from 6 and 9 week SHR animals only two amplicons were expressed, 485 and 280 bp, respectively. Differences in gene expression for 12 and 16 week WKY and SHR rats were also compared using identical primers. Five amplicons were expressed in cortical tissue from 12 and 16 week WKY rats with 1000, 900, 821, 485, and 430 bp where as in 12 and 16 week SHR animals only one amplicon was expressed at 485 bp. The present results imply (1) that H3 receptor density in cortical tissue of SHR animals increases with age where as the number of the expressed amplicons of the detected H3 receptor decreases; and (2) even though a decrease in number of expressed amplicons of the H3 receptor were observed, an increase in expression of the larger amplicon (~500 bp) is evident.

  9. Monocyte and macrophage heterogeneity and Toll-like receptors in the lung.

    PubMed

    Schneberger, David; Aharonson-Raz, Karin; Singh, Baljit

    2011-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes are crucial components of the innate host defense system. Cells such as macrophages and monocytes phagocytose and process pathogens, produce inflammatory mediators, and link the innate and the adaptive immune systems. The role of innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the recognition of pathogens is critical for mounting a precise and targeted immune response. This review focuses attention on the development of monocytes and macrophages, various populations of macrophages, and the expression and function of TLRs on macrophages.

  10. Potencies of antagonists chemically related to iodoproxyfan at histamine H3 receptors in mouse brain cortex and guinea-pig ileum: evidence for H3 receptor heterogeneity?

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Kathmann, M; Bitschnau, H; Marr, I; Reidemeister, S; Stark, H; Schunack, W

    1996-04-01

    .001). In each of the three experimental models, iodoproxyfan was the most potent compound; its deiodo analogue was less potent by more than 1.1 log units. The present results show that the compounds under study possess moderate to high affinity and/or (partial) H3 receptor antagonist potency. The two functional H3 receptors in the mouse brain cortex and the guinea-pig ileum may be slightly different; further studies are necessary to clarify whether this difference is due to H3 receptor heterogeneity, species variants or differences in the efficiency of receptor coupling. The marked difference in the affinity/potency between iodoproxyfan and its deiodo analogue may suggest that a highly lipophilic residue in that part of the molecule favours a high affinity/antagonistic potency at H3 receptors.

  11. Heterogeneity of clinical features and corresponding antibodies in seven patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Sühs, Kurt-Wolfram; Wegner, Florian; Skripuletz, Thomas; Trebst, Corinna; Tayeb, Said Ben; Raab, Peter; Stangel, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Anti-N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is the most common type of encephalitis in the spectrum of autoimmune encephalitis defined by antibodies targeting neuronal surface antigens. In the present study, the clinical spectrum of this disease is presented using instructive cases in correlation with the anti-NMDA receptor antibody titers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum. A total of 7 female patients admitted to the hospital of Hannover Medical School (Hannover, Germany) between 2008 and 2014 were diagnosed with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. Among these patients, 3 cases were selected to illustrate the range of similar and distinct clinical features across the spectrum of the disease and to compare anti-NMDA antibody levels throughout the disease course. All patients received immunosuppressive treatment with methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin and/or plasmapheresis, followed in the majority of patients by second-line therapy with rituximab and cyclophosphamide. The disease course correlated with NMDA receptor antibody titers, and to a greater extent with the ratio between antibody titer and protein concentration. A favorable clinical outcome with a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of ≤1 was achieved in 4 patients, 1 patient had an mRS score of 2 after 3 months of observation only, whereas 2 patients remained severely impaired (mRS score 4). Early and aggressive immunosuppressive treatment appears to support a good clinical outcome; however, the clinical signs and symptoms differ distinctively and treatment decisions have to be made on an individual basis.

  12. Characterization and Utilization of Opiate-Like Hibernation Factors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-08

    aforementioned effects are reversed or retarded by the infusion of the opiate antagonists, naloxone and naltrexone . Such evidence enforces our hypothesis...inhibits protein synthesis in continuously growing TRMP cells ................................... 20 10. Low concentrations of plasma form both...infusion of the opiate antagonists naloxone or naltrexone ,(1, 2) and Bruce, et al.,(3) have shown that continuous naloxone infusion will effectively

  13. Regional heterogeneity in the haemodynamic responses to urotensin II infusion in relation to UT receptor localisation

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Sheila M; March, Julie E; Kemp, Philip A; Maguire, Janet J; Kuc, Rhoda E; Davenport, Anthony P; Bennett, Terence

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to measure regional haemodynamic responses to 6 h infusions of human urotensin II (hUII), to identify possible mediators of the effects observed, and to relate the findings to the distribution of urotensin II receptors (UT receptors). Male, Sprague–Dawley rats had pulsed Doppler flow probes and intravascular catheters implanted for measurement of regional haemodynamics in the conscious, freely moving state. Infusions of saline (0.4 ml h−1) or hUII (30, 300 and 3000 pmol kg−1 h−1) were given i.v. for 6 h, and the effects of pretreatment with indomethacin (5 mg kg−1 h−1), NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 3 mg kg−1 h−1) or propranolol (1 mg kg−1; 0.5 mg kg−1 h−1) on responses to hUII (300 pmol kg−1 h−1 for 6 h) were assessed. Cellular localisation of UT receptor-like immunoreactivity was determined in relevant tissues. hUII caused dose-dependent tachycardia and hindquarters vasodilatation, accompanied by a slowly developing rise in blood pressure. Haemodynamic effects of hUII were attenuated by propranolol or L-NAME and abolished by indomethacin. UT receptor-like immunoreactivity was detected in skeletal and vascular smooth muscle. The findings indicate that in conscious rats, infusions of hUII cause vasodilatation, which, of the vascular beds monitored, is selective for the hindquarters and dependent on cyclooxygenase products and nitric oxide. The pressor effect of hUII under these conditions is likely to be due to an increase in cardiac output, possibly due to a positive inotropic effect. UT receptor-like immunoreactivity present in skeletal muscle is consistent with the haemodynamic pattern. PMID:16314853

  14. Functional heterogeneity of NMDA receptors in rat substantia nigra pars compacta and reticulata neurones

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, F.; Zhao, Q.; Monaghan, D. T.; Jane, D. E.; Jones, S.; Gibb, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    The nigra substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and substantia pars reticulata (SNr) form two major basal ganglia components with different functional roles. SNc dopaminergic (DA) neurones are vulnerable to cell death in Parkinson's disease, and NMDA receptor activation is a potential contributing mechanism. We have investigated the sensitivity of whole-cell and synaptic NMDA responses to intracellular ATP and GTP application in the SNc and SNr from rats on postnatal day (P) 7 and P28. Both NMDA current density (pA/pF) and desensitization to prolonged or repeated NMDA application were greater in the SNr than in the SNc. When ATP levels were not supplemented, responses to prolonged NMDA administration desensitized in P7 SNc DA neurones but not at P28. At P28, SNr neurones desensitized more than SNc neurones, with or without added ATP. Responses to brief NMDA applications and synaptic NMDA currents were not sensitive to inclusion of ATP in the pipette solution. To investigate these differences between the SNc and SNr, NR2 subunit-selective antagonists were tested. NMDA currents were inhibited by ifenprodil (10 μm) and UBP141 (4 μm), but not by Zn2+ (100 nm), in both the SNr and SNc, suggesting that SNc and SNr neurones express similar receptor subunits; NR2B and NR2D, but not NR2A. The different NMDA response properties in the SNc and SNr may be caused by differences in receptor modulation and/or trafficking. The vulnerability of SNc DA neurones to cell death is not correlated with NMDA current density or receptor subtypes, but could in part be related to inadequate NMDA receptor desensitization. PMID:20618827

  15. Patient-derived luminal breast cancer xenografts retain hormone receptor heterogeneity and help define unique estrogen-dependent gene signatures.

    PubMed

    Kabos, Peter; Finlay-Schultz, Jessica; Li, Chunling; Kline, Enos; Finlayson, Christina; Wisell, Joshua; Manuel, Christopher A; Edgerton, Susan M; Harrell, J Chuck; Elias, Anthony; Sartorius, Carol A

    2012-09-01

    Bypassing estrogen receptor (ER) signaling during development of endocrine resistance remains the most common cause of disease progression and mortality in breast cancer patients. To date, the majority of molecular research on ER action in breast cancer has occurred in cell line models derived from late stage disease. Here we describe patient-derived ER+ luminal breast tumor models for the study of intratumoral hormone and receptor action. Human breast tumor samples obtained from patients post surgery were immediately transplanted into NOD/SCID or NOD/SCID/ILIIrg(-/-) mice under estrogen supplementation. Five transplantable patient-derived ER+ breast cancer xenografts were established, derived from both primary and metastatic cases. These were assessed for estrogen dependency, steroid receptor expression, cancer stem cell content, and endocrine therapy response. Gene expression patterns were determined in select tumors ±estrogen and ±endocrine therapy. Xenografts morphologically resembled the patient tumors of origin, and expressed similar levels of ER (5-99 %), and progesterone and androgen receptors, over multiple passages. Four of the tumor xenografts were estrogen dependent, and tamoxifen or estrogen withdrawal (EWD) treatment abrogated estrogen-dependent growth and/or tumor morphology. Analysis of the ER transcriptome in select tumors revealed notable differences in ER mechanism of action, and downstream activated signaling networks, in addition to identifying a small set of common estrogen-regulated genes. Treatment of a naïve tumor with tamoxifen or EWD showed similar phenotypic responses, but relatively few similarities in estrogen-dependent transcription, and affected signaling pathways. Several core estrogen centric genes were shared with traditional cell line models. However, novel tumor-specific estrogen-regulated potential target genes, such as cancer/testis antigen 45, were uncovered. These results evoke the importance of mapping both conserved

  16. Opiate-induced respiratory depression in young pediatric burn patients.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, J; Honari, S R; Sharar, S R; Patterson, D R; Dimick, P L; Heimbach, D M

    1998-01-01

    Three children younger than 5 with minor burns (< 5% total body surface area) experienced opiate-induced respiratory depression early in hospitalization. This prompted a decrease in the recommended opiate analgesic-dose ranges on our pediatric worksheet. In reviewing 57 admissions, 31 pre- and 26 post-dose change, the amount of opioid equivalents/kg received on admission day did not differ significantly. However, the incidence of respiratory depressive events decreased. Lower opiate-dose guidelines might improve the safe administration of these medications to young children. Other factors- such as concomitant sedative medications, previously administered opiate analgesics, and underlying medical conditions-also must be considered when giving initial doses of opiate analgesics in the burn center.

  17. Burden and Nutritional Deficiencies in Opiate Addiction- Systematic Review Article

    PubMed Central

    NABIPOUR, Sepideh; AYU SAID, Mas; HUSSAIN HABIL, Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Addiction to the illicit and prescribed use of opiate is an alarming public health issue. Studies on addictive disorders have demonstrated severe nutritional deficiencies in opiate abusers with behavioral, physiological and cognitive symptoms. Opiate addiction is also link with a significant number of diseases including Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and other blood borne diseases generally stem from the use of needles to inject heroin. The use of medication assisted treatment for opioid addicts in combination with behavioural therapies has been considered as a highly effective treatment. Methadone is a long-lasting μ-opioid agonist and a pharmacological tool which attenuates withdrawal symptoms effectively replacement therapies. This review article aims to explain opiate addiction mechanisms, epidemiology and disease burden with emphasis on dietary and nutritional status of opiate dependent patients in methadone maintenance therapy. PMID:25927032

  18. Burden and nutritional deficiencies in opiate addiction- systematic review article.

    PubMed

    Nabipour, Sepideh; Ayu Said, Mas; Hussain Habil, Mohd

    2014-08-01

    Addiction to the illicit and prescribed use of opiate is an alarming public health issue. Studies on addictive disorders have demonstrated severe nutritional deficiencies in opiate abusers with behavioral, physiological and cognitive symptoms. Opiate addiction is also link with a significant number of diseases including Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and other blood borne diseases generally stem from the use of needles to inject heroin. The use of medication assisted treatment for opioid addicts in combination with behavioural therapies has been considered as a highly effective treatment. Methadone is a long-lasting μ-opioid agonist and a pharmacological tool which attenuates withdrawal symptoms effectively replacement therapies. This review article aims to explain opiate addiction mechanisms, epidemiology and disease burden with emphasis on dietary and nutritional status of opiate dependent patients in methadone maintenance therapy.

  19. Heterogeneous function of ryanodine receptors, but not IP3 receptors, in hamster cremaster muscle feed arteries and arterioles.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Erika B; Jackson, William F

    2011-05-01

    The roles played by ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP₃Rs) in vascular smooth muscle in the microcirculation remain unclear. Therefore, the function of both RyRs and IP₃Rs in Ca(²+) signals and myogenic tone in hamster cremaster muscle feed arteries and downstream arterioles were assessed using confocal imaging and pressure myography. Feed artery vascular smooth muscle displayed Ca(²+) sparks and Ca(²+) waves, which were inhibited by the RyR antagonists ryanodine (10 μM) or tetracaine (100 μM). Despite the inhibition of sparks and waves, ryanodine or tetracaine increased global intracellular Ca(²+) and constricted the arteries. The blockade of IP₃Rs with xestospongin D (5 μM) or 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (100 μM) or the inhibition of phospholipase C using U-73122 (10 μM) also attenuated Ca(2+) waves without affecting Ca(²+) sparks. Importantly, the IP₃Rs and phospholipase C antagonists decreased global intracellular Ca(2+) and dilated the arteries. In contrast, cremaster arterioles displayed only Ca(²+) waves: Ca(²+) sparks were not observed, and neither ryanodine (10-50 μM) nor tetracaine (100 μM) affected either Ca(²+) signals or arteriolar tone despite the presence of functional RyRs as assessed by responses to the RyR agonist caffeine (10 mM). As in feed arteries, arteriolar Ca(²+) waves were attenuated by xestospongin D (5 μM), 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (100 μM), and U-73122 (10 μM), accompanied by decreased global intracellular Ca(²+) and vasodilation. These findings highlight the contrasting roles played by RyRs and IP₃Rs in Ca(²+) signals and myogenic tone in feed arteries and demonstrate important differences in the function of RyRs between feed arteries and downstream arterioles.

  20. Heterogeneous function of ryanodine receptors, but not IP3 receptors, in hamster cremaster muscle feed arteries and arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Westcott, Erika B.

    2011-01-01

    The roles played by ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) in vascular smooth muscle in the microcirculation remain unclear. Therefore, the function of both RyRs and IP3Rs in Ca2+ signals and myogenic tone in hamster cremaster muscle feed arteries and downstream arterioles were assessed using confocal imaging and pressure myography. Feed artery vascular smooth muscle displayed Ca2+ sparks and Ca2+ waves, which were inhibited by the RyR antagonists ryanodine (10 μM) or tetracaine (100 μM). Despite the inhibition of sparks and waves, ryanodine or tetracaine increased global intracellular Ca2+ and constricted the arteries. The blockade of IP3Rs with xestospongin D (5 μM) or 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (100 μM) or the inhibition of phospholipase C using U-73122 (10 μM) also attenuated Ca2+ waves without affecting Ca2+ sparks. Importantly, the IP3Rs and phospholipase C antagonists decreased global intracellular Ca2+ and dilated the arteries. In contrast, cremaster arterioles displayed only Ca2+ waves: Ca2+ sparks were not observed, and neither ryanodine (10–50 μM) nor tetracaine (100 μM) affected either Ca2+ signals or arteriolar tone despite the presence of functional RyRs as assessed by responses to the RyR agonist caffeine (10 mM). As in feed arteries, arteriolar Ca2+ waves were attenuated by xestospongin D (5 μM), 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (100 μM), and U-73122 (10 μM), accompanied by decreased global intracellular Ca2+ and vasodilation. These findings highlight the contrasting roles played by RyRs and IP3Rs in Ca2+ signals and myogenic tone in feed arteries and demonstrate important differences in the function of RyRs between feed arteries and downstream arterioles. PMID:21357503

  1. THE CONTRIBUTION OF TYRO3 FAMILY RECEPTOR TYROSINE KINASES TO THE HETEROGENEITY OF APOPTOTIC CELL UPTAKE BY MONONUCLEAR PHAGOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Jeffrey L.; Todt, Jill C.; Hu, Bin; Osterholzer, John J.; Freeman, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes comprise a mobile, broadly dispersed and highly adaptable system that lies at the very epicenter of host defense against pathogens and the interplay of the innate and adaptive arms of immunity. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that control the response of mononuclear phagocytes to apoptotic cells and the anti-inflammatory consequences of that response is an important goal with implications for multiple areas of biomedical sciences. This review details current understanding of the heterogeneity of apoptotic cell uptake by different members of the mononuclear phagocyte family in humans and mice. It also recounts the unique role of the Tyro3 family of receptor tyrosine kinases, best characterized for Mertk, in the signal transduction leading both to apoptotic cell ingestion and the anti-inflammatory effects that result. PMID:19273223

  2. Heterogeneity of human lymphocyte Fc receptors. II. Relationship to antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gormus, B. J.; Woodson, Mildred; Kaplan, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were incubated (stripped) with pronase or papain and compared with unstripped lymphocytes for their ability to mediate antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Despite marked removal or inactivation of receptors for heat-aggregated IgG (aggG) by proteolytic digestion, and pronounced changes in the percentages of cells rosetting with IgG-sensitized erythrocytes (EA) (decreased by papain, increased by pronase), stripped PBL functioned normally in ADCC. Stripped and unstripped lymphocytes were pre-treated with aggG to determine the role of aggG receptors in ADCC. AggG almost totally abolished ADCC by unstripped PBL, but inhibited ADCC by enzyme-stripped lymphocytes relatively poorly. Neither untreated nor stripped PBL were able to induce cytotoxicity of chicken erythrocyte (CRBC) target cells sensitized with the Fab'2 fragment of anti-CRBC IgG antibody (CRBC-A). Exposure of PBL to EA monolayers composed of CRBC-A or of sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) sensitized with rabbit anti-SRBC IgG antibody (SRBC-A) depleted PBL of cells that rosetted with CRBC-A and with human Rh-positive, type O erythrocytes sensitized with the human anti-Rh serum Ripley (HRBC-A Ripley). Non-adherent cells were incapable of binding aggG and had markedly diminished cytotoxicity in ADCC. Similarly, exposure of PBL to HRBC-A Ripley monolayers resulted in non-adherent cells that were incapable of rosette formation with HRBC-A or CRBC-A, failed to bind aggG, and exhibited significantly diminished ADCC activity. These studies indicated that: (1) cytotoxic effector PBL active in ADCC (K cells) have receptors for aggG and for EA; (2) PBL deficient in functional aggG receptors (enzymatically inactivated or removed) are capable of inducing normal levels of ADCC; (3) aggG and EA receptors appear to be closely associated on native K-cell membranes; (4) there is no clear-cut relationship in a given lymphocyte population between the presence of either aggG or

  3. Charge heterogeneity: Basic antibody charge variants with increased binding to Fc receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hintersteiner, Beate; Lingg, Nico; Zhang, Peiqing; Woen, Susanto; Hoi, Kong Meng; Stranner, Stefan; Wiederkum, Susanne; Mutschlechner, Oliver; Schuster, Manfred; Loibner, Hans; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We identified active isoforms of the chimeric anti-GD2 antibody, ch14.18, a recombinant antibody produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells, which is already used in clinical trials.1,2,3 We separated the antibody by high resolution ion-exchange chromatography with linear pH gradient elution into acidic, main and basic charge variants on a preparative scale yielding enough material for an in-depth study of the sources and the effects of microheterogeneity. The binding affinity of the charge variants toward the antigen and various cell surface receptors was studied by Biacore. Effector functions were evaluated using cellular assays for antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Basic charge variants showed increased binding to cell surface receptor FcγRIIIa, which plays a major role in regulating effector functions. Furthermore, increased binding of the basic fractions to the neonatal receptor was observed. As this receptor mediates the prolonged half-life of IgG in human serum, this data may well hint at an increased serum half-life of these basic variants compared to their more acidic counterparts. Different glycoform patterns, C-terminal lysine clipping and N-terminal pyroglutamate formation were identified as the main structural sources for the observed isoform pattern. Potential differences in structural stability between individual charge variant fractions by nano differential scanning calorimetry could not been detected. Our in-vitro data suggests that the connection between microheterogeneity and the biological activity of recombinant antibody therapeutics deserves more attention than commonly accepted. PMID:27559765

  4. Heterogeneity of clinical features and corresponding antibodies in seven patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    SÜHS, KURT-WOLFRAM; WEGNER, FLORIAN; SKRIPULETZ, THOMAS; TREBST, CORINNA; TAYEB, SAID BEN; RAAB, PETER; STANGEL, MARTIN

    2015-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is the most common type of encephalitis in the spectrum of autoimmune encephalitis defined by antibodies targeting neuronal surface antigens. In the present study, the clinical spectrum of this disease is presented using instructive cases in correlation with the anti-NMDA receptor antibody titers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum. A total of 7 female patients admitted to the hospital of Hannover Medical School (Hannover, Germany) between 2008 and 2014 were diagnosed with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis. Among these patients, 3 cases were selected to illustrate the range of similar and distinct clinical features across the spectrum of the disease and to compare anti-NMDA antibody levels throughout the disease course. All patients received immunosuppressive treatment with methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin and/or plasmapheresis, followed in the majority of patients by second-line therapy with rituximab and cyclophosphamide. The disease course correlated with NMDA receptor antibody titers, and to a greater extent with the ratio between antibody titer and protein concentration. A favorable clinical outcome with a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of ≤1 was achieved in 4 patients, 1 patient had an mRS score of 2 after 3 months of observation only, whereas 2 patients remained severely impaired (mRS score 4). Early and aggressive immunosuppressive treatment appears to support a good clinical outcome; however, the clinical signs and symptoms differ distinctively and treatment decisions have to be made on an individual basis. PMID:26622479

  5. Primary breast cancer cell culture yields intra-tumor heterogeneous subpopulations expressing exclusive patterns of receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Esparza-López, José; Ramos-Elías, Pier A; Castro-Sánchez, Andrea; Rocha-Zavaleta, Leticia; Escobar-Arriaga, Elizabeth; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro; León-Rodríguez, Eucario; Medina-Franco, Heriberto; Ibarra-Sánchez, María de Jesus

    2016-09-20

    It has become evident that intra-tumor heterogeneity of breast cancer impact on several biological processes such as proliferation, migration, cell death and also might contribute to chemotherapy resistance. The expression of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs) has not been analyzed in the context of intra-tumor heterogeneity in a primary breast cancer cell culture. Several subpopulations were isolated from the MBCDF (M serial-breast cancer ductal F line) primary breast cancer cells and were successfully maintained in culture and divided in two groups according to their morphology and RTKs expression pattern, and correlated with biological processes like proliferation, migration, anchorage-independent cell growth, and resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Subpopulations were isolated from MBCDF primary breast cancer cell culture by limiting dilution. RTKs and hormone receptors were examined by Western blot. Proliferation was measure by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT assay). Cell viability was evaluated by Crystal Violet. Migration was assessed using Boyden chambers. Anchorage-independent cell growth was evaluated by colony formation in soft agar. Several subpopulations were isolated from the MBCDF breast cancer cells that were divided into two groups according to their morphology. Analysis of RTKs expression pattern showed that HER1, HER3, c-Met and VEGFR2 were expressed exclusively in cells from group 1, but not in cells from group 2. PDGFR was expressed only in cells from group 2, but not in cells from group 1. HER2, HER4, c-Kit, IGF1-R were expressed in all subpopulations. Biological processes correlated with the RTKs expression pattern. Group 2 subpopulations present the highest rate of cell proliferation, migration and anchorage-independent cell growth. Analysis of susceptibility to chemotherapy drugs and TKIs showed that only Paclitaxel and Imatinib behaved differently between groups

  6. Impaired periamygdaloid-cortex prodynorphin is characteristic of opiate addiction and depression.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sarah Ann R; Michaelides, Michael; Zarnegar, Parisa; Ren, Yanhua; Fagergren, Pernilla; Thanos, Panayotis K; Wang, Gene-Jack; Bannon, Michael; Neumaier, John F; Keller, Eva; Volkow, Nora D; Hurd, Yasmin L

    2013-12-01

    Negative affect is critical for conferring vulnerability to opiate addiction as reflected by the high comorbidity of opiate abuse with major depressive disorder (MDD). Rodent models implicate amygdala prodynorphin (Pdyn) as a mediator of negative affect; however, evidence of PDYN involvement in human negative affect is limited. Here, we found reduced PDYN mRNA expression in the postmortem human amygdala nucleus of the periamygdaloid cortex (PAC) in both heroin abusers and MDD subjects. Similar to humans, rats that chronically self-administered heroin had reduced Pdyn mRNA expression in the PAC at a time point associated with a negative affective state. Using the in vivo functional imaging technology DREAMM (DREADD-assisted metabolic mapping, where DREADD indicates designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs), we found that selective inhibition of Pdyn-expressing neurons in the rat PAC increased metabolic activity in the extended amygdala, which is a key substrate of the extrahypothalamic brain stress system. In parallel, PAC-specific Pdyn inhibition provoked negative affect-related physiological and behavioral changes. Altogether, our translational study supports a functional role for impaired Pdyn in the PAC in opiate abuse through activation of the stress and negative affect neurocircuitry implicated in addiction vulnerability.

  7. Further evidence for the heterogeneity of functional muscarinic receptors in guinea pig gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Akici, A; Karaalp, A; Iskender, E; Christopoulos, A; El-Fakahany, E E; Oktay, S

    2000-01-24

    Previous studies have suggested the presence of multiple muscarinic receptor subtypes in guinea pig gallbladder smooth muscle, although the relative abundance and functional role of these subtypes remains an area of significant research efforts. The present study utilized both radioligand kinetic and functional experiments to further probe the nature of the muscarinic receptors in gallbladder smooth muscle and their mode of coupling to intra- and extra-cellular Ca(2+) sources. Dissociation kinetic studies using [3H]N-methylscopolamine ([3H]NMS) indicated that the binding profile in guinea pig gallbladder smooth muscle could not be reconciled with that expected for a single muscarinic receptor subtype, the latter determined in parallel experiments conducted on the cloned muscarinic M(1)-M(5) subtypes in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Furthermore, comparison of the gallbladder data with the dissociation characteristics of [3H]NMS in guinea pig urinary bladder revealed a significantly different kinetic profile, with the urinary bladder, but not the gallbladder, demonstrating biphasic radioligand dissociation kinetics. In functional experiments, carbachol caused a concentration-dependent contraction of guinea pig gallbladder smooth muscle strips in Ca(2+)-free or 5 mM Sr(2+)-substituted physiological salt solutions (PSS) with amplitudes of the maximal contractions corresponding to 45.8+/-8.0% and 33.2+/-6.6% of control responses in normal PSS, respectively. Furthermore, the stimulus-response characteristics of carbachol-mediated contraction appeared significantly altered in Ca(2+)-free PSS relative to normal or Sr(2+)-substituted PSS. The antagonist, methoctramine (1x10(-7)-3x10(-5) M), exerted only a slight inhibition of carbachol (10(-5) M)-induced contractions in 5 mM Sr(2+)-substituted medium, whereas it was significantly more potent in antagonizing gallbladder contractions in response to 10(-5) M carbachol in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). Both atropine

  8. Detection of opiate use in a methadone maintenance treatment population with the CEDIA 6-acetylmorphine and CEDIA DAU opiate assays.

    PubMed

    Spanbauer, A C; Casseday, S; Davoudzadeh, D; Preston, K L; Huestis, M A

    2001-10-01

    Heroin, with a plasma half-life of approximately 5 min, is rapidly metabolized to 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM). 6-AM, a specific marker for heroin use, which also has a short half-life of only 0.6 h, is detected in urine for only a few hours after heroin exposure. Ingestion of poppy seeds and/or licit opiate analgesics can produce positive urine opiate tests. This has complicated the interpretation of positive opiate results and contributed to the decision to raise opiate cutoff concentrations and to require 6-AM confirmation in federally mandated workplace drug-testing programs. Microgenics Corp. has developed the CEDIA 6-AM assay, a homogeneous enzyme immunoassay for semiquantitative determination of 6-AM in human urine, in addition to its CEDIA DAU opiate assay. Urine specimens were collected 3 times per week from 27 participants enrolled in a clinical research trial evaluating a contingency management treatment program for heroin and cocaine abuse. Of the 1377 urine specimens screened, 261 (18.9%) were positive for opiates at > or = 300 ng/mL, 153 (11.1%) were positive for opiates at > or = 2000 ng/mL, and 55 (4.0%) were positive for 6-AM at > or = 10 ng/mL. For opiate-positive screens > or = 300 and > or = 2000 ng/mL, 91.3% and 80.8% confirmed positive for morphine or codeine at the respective gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) cutoffs. All specimens screening positive for 6-AM also confirmed positive by GC-MS at > or = 10 ng/mL. Increasing the opiate screening and confirmation cutoffs for the federal workplace drug-testing program resulted in 8% fewer opiate-positive tests; however, recent heroin use was not affected by this change.

  9. Atrial natriuretic peptide receptor heterogeneity and effects on cyclic GMP accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Leitman, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) on guanylate cyclase activity and cyclic GMP accumulation were examined, since these hormones appear to be intimately associated with blood pressure and intravascular volume homeostasis. ANP was found to increase cyclic GMP accumulation in ten cell culture systems, which were derived from blood vessels, adrenal cortex, kidney, lung, testes and mammary gland. ANP receptors were characterized in intact cultured cells using {sup 125}I-ANP{sub 8-33}. Specific {sup 125}I-ANP binding was saturable and of high affinity. Scratchard analysis of the binding data for all cell types exhibited a straight line, indicating that these cells possessed a single class of binding sites. Despite the presence of linear Scatchard plots, these studies demonstrated that cultured cells possess two functionally and physically distinct ANP-binding sites. Most of the ANP-binding sites in cultured cells have a molecular size of 66,000 daltons under reducing conditions. The identification of cultured cell types in which hormones (ANP and oxytocin) regulate guanylate cyclase activity and increase cyclic GMP synthesis will provide valuable systems to determine the mechanisms of hormone-receptor coupling to guanylate cyclase and the cellular processes regulated by cyclic GMP.

  10. Structural heterogeneity of the μ-opioid receptor's conformational ensemble in the apo state.

    PubMed

    Sena, Diniz M; Cong, Xiaojing; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Kless, Achim; Carloni, Paolo

    2017-04-03

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest and most pharmaceutically relevant family of membrane proteins. Here, fully unbiased, enhanced sampling simulations of a constitutively active mutant (CAM) of a class A GPCR, the μ-opioid receptor (μOR), demonstrates repeated transitions between the inactive (IS) and active-like (AS-L) states. The interconversion features typical activation/inactivation patterns involving established conformational rearrangements of conserved residues. By contrast, wild-type μOR remains in IS during the same course of simulation, consistent with the low basal activity of the protein. The simulations point to an important role of residue W293(6.48) at the "toggle switch" in the mutation-induced constitutive activation. Such role has been already observed for other CAMs of class A GPCRs. We also find a significantly populated intermediate state, rather similar to IS. Based on the remarkable accord between simulations and experiments, we suggest here that this state, which has escaped so far experimental characterization, might constitute an early step in the activation process of the apo μOR CAM.

  11. Increasing opiate abstinence through voucher-based reinforcement therapy.

    PubMed

    Silverman, K; Wong, C J; Higgins, S T; Brooner, R K; Montoya, I D; Contoreggi, C; Umbricht-Schneiter, A; Schuster, C R; Preston, K L

    1996-06-01

    Heroin dependence remains a serious and costly public health problem, even in patients receiving methadone maintenance treatment. This study used a within-subject reversal design to assess the effectiveness of voucher-based abstinence reinforcement in reducing opiate use in patients receiving methadone maintenance treatment in an inner-city program. Throughout the study subjects received standard methadone maintenance treatment involving methadone, counseling, and urine monitoring (three times per week). Thirteen patients who continued to use opiates regularly during a 5-week baseline period were exposed to a 12-week program in which they received a voucher for each opiate-free urine sample provided: the vouchers had monetary values that increased as the number of consecutive opiate-free urines increased. Subjects continued receiving standard methadone maintenance for 8 weeks after discontinuation of the voucher program (return-to-baseline). Tukey's posthoc contrasts showed that the percentage of urine specimens that were positive for opiates decreased significantly when the voucher program was instituted. (P < or = 0.01) and then increased significantly when the voucher program was discontinued during the return-to-baseline condition (P < or = 0.01). Rates of opiate positive urines in the return-to-baseline condition remained significantly below the rates observed in the initial baseline period (P < or = 0.01). Overall, the study shows that voucher-based reinforcement contingencies can decrease opiate use in heroin dependent patients receiving methadone maintenance treatment.

  12. [NON-ONCOLOGIC CHRONIC PAIN TREATMENT WITH OPIATES].

    PubMed

    Molas Ferrer, Glòria; Castellà Kastner, Montse; Lombraña Mencia, María

    2014-09-01

    Non-oncologic chronic pain is a very common symptom. It causes great impact on daily activities of people who suffer it. The incidence of this type of pain is rising due to the increase in life expectancy. The most affected population is geriatric population. Back pain, osteoarthritic pain and neuropathic pain are the most prevalent types of non-oncologic chronic pain. Opiates, among other analgesic drugs, are used to alleviate this type of pain. Opiates are divided into minor opiates (tramadol, codeine) and major opiates (morphine, fentanyl, oxycodone, methadone). Opiates are very effective to treat pain, but they also have important adverse effects that we must know and try to prevent. One of these adverse effects is the opiates ability to cause dependence, tolerance, addiction and other aberrant behaviors. Terminology of these concepts is sometimes confusing. It is necessary to be careful and control the patient periodically in order to avoid these aberrant behaviors. However, if health professionals take precautions to prevent these behaviors, the risk is considerably reduced. Controlling patients on opiate treatment is essential to achieve a correct use if these drugs.

  13. Cannabinoid and opioid interactions: implications for opiate dependence and withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Scavone, J.L.; Sterling, R.C.; Van Bockstaele, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    Withdrawal from opiates, such as heroin or oral narcotics, is characterized by a host of aversive physical and emotional symptoms. High rates of relapse and limited treatment success rates for opiate addiction have prompted a search for new approaches. For many opiate addicts, achieving abstinence may be further complicated by poly-drug use and co-morbid mental disorders. Research over the past decade has shed light on the influence of endocannabinoids on the opioid system. Evidence from both animal and clinical studies point towards an interaction between these two systems, and suggest that targeting the endocannabinoid system may provide novel interventions for managing opiate dependence and withdrawal. This review will summarize the literature surrounding the molecular effects of cannabinoids and opioids system on the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system, a key circuit implicated in the negative sequelae of opiate addiction. A consideration of the trends and effects of marijuana use in those seeking treatment to abstain from opiates in the clinical setting will also be presented. In summary, the present review details how cannabinoid-opioid interactions may inform novel interventions in management of opiate dependence and withdrawal. PMID:23624062

  14. The heterogeneous allelic repertoire of human toll-like receptor (TLR) genes.

    PubMed

    Georgel, Philippe; Macquin, Cécile; Bahram, Seiamak

    2009-11-17

    Toll-Like Receptors (TLR) are critical elements of the innate arm of the vertebrate immune system. They constitute a multigenic family of receptors which collectively bind a diverse array of--exogeneous as well as endogeneous--ligands. An exponential burst of knowledge has defined their biological role in fight against infections and generation/modulation of auto-immune disorders. Hence, they could at least be conceptually recognized--despite being structurally unrelated - as innate counterparts to Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) molecules--equally recognizing antigenic ligands (albeit structurally more homogeneous i.e., peptides), again derived from self and/or non-self sources--preeminent this time in adaptive immunity. Our great disparities in face of infections and/or susceptibility to auto-immune diseases have provoked an intense search for genetic explanations, in part satisfied by the extraordinary MHC allelic repertoire. An equally in-depth and systematic analysis of TLR diversity is lacking despite numerous independent reports of a growing number of SNPs within these loci. The work described here aims at providing a preliminary picture of the allelic repertoire--and not purely SNPs--of all 10 human TLR coding sequences (with exception of TLR3) within a single cohort of up to 100 individuals. It appears from our work that TLR are unequally polymorphic: TLR2 (DNA alleles: 7/protein alleles: 3), 4 (4/3), 7 (6/3), 8 (9/2) and 9 (8/3) being comparatively least diverse whereas TLR1 (11/10), 5 (14/12), 6 (10/8) and 10 (15/10) show a substantial number of alleles. In addition to allelic assignment of a large number of SNPs, 10 new polymorphic positions were hereby identified. Hence this work depicts a first overview of the diversity of almost all human TLR genes, a prelude for large-scale population genetics as well as genetic association studies.

  15. Variable angle of strabismus related to timing of opiate ingestion.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jonathan J; Brown, Valerie; Fern, Alasdair I

    2009-04-01

    Heroin (diamorphine) is a highly addictive opiate with potential for misuse. A small number of reports have linked the commencement of heroin misuse to acute exotropia with diplopia and subsequent withdrawal to esotropia in individuals without previous symptoms.(1-5) We describe a young adult who sought strabismus surgery to correct a large-angle exotropia. Detailed patient history and orthoptic measurements at different times of the day revealed a fluctuating angle of divergence relating to the timing of opiate ingestion, rendering surgery inappropriate. We suggest that opiate misuse, which may not willingly be disclosed by patients, should be specifically asked about before acquired-strabismus surgery is undertaken in adults.

  16. HIV, opiates, and enteric neuron dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Galligan, J J

    2015-04-01

    Human immune deficient virus (HIV) is an immunosuppressive virus that targets CD4(+) T-lymphocytes. HIV infections cause increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and cancer. HIV infection can also alter central nervous system (CNS) function causing cognitive impairment. HIV does not infect neurons but it does infect astrocytes and microglia in the CNS. HIV can also infect enteric glia initiating an intestinal inflammatory response which causes enteric neural injury and gut dysfunction. Part of the inflammatory response is HIV induced production of proteins including, Transactivator of transcription (Tat) which contribute to neuronal injury after release from HIV infected glial cells. A risk factor for HIV infection is intravenous drug use with contaminated needles and chronic opiate use can exacerbate neural injury in the nervous system. While most research focuses on the actions of Tat and other HIV related proteins and opiates on the brain, recent data indicate that Tat can cause intestinal inflammation and disruption of enteric neuron function, including alteration of Na(+) channel activity and action potential generation. A paper published in this issue of Neurogastroenterology and Motility extends these findings by identifying an interaction between Tat and morphine on enteric neuron Na(+) channels and on intestinal motility in vivo using a Tat expressing transgenic mouse model. These new data show that Tat protein can enhance the inhibitory actions of morphine on action potential generation and propulsive motility. These findings are important to our understanding of how HIV causes diarrhea in infected patients and for the use of opioid drugs to treat HIV-induced diarrhea.

  17. Cerebellar heterogeneity and its impact on PET data quantification of 5-HT receptor radioligands.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Melanie; Feng, Ling; Hansen, Hanne Demant; Beliveau, Vincent; Svarer, Claus; Knudsen, Gitte M; Greve, Douglas N

    2017-09-01

    In the quantification of positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer binding, a commonly used method is reference tissue modeling (RTM). RTM necessitates a proper reference and a ubiquitous choice for G-protein coupled receptors is the cerebellum. We investigated regional differences in uptake within the grey matter of the cerebellar hemispheres (CH), the cerebellar white matter (CW), and the cerebellar vermis (CV) for five PET radioligands targeting the serotonin system. Furthermore, we evaluated the impact of choosing different reference regions when quantifying neocortical binding. The PET and MR images are part of the Cimbi database: 5-HT1AR ([(11)C]CUMI-101, n = 8), 5-HT1BR ([(11)C]AZ10419369, n = 36), 5-HT2AR ([(11)C]Cimbi-36, n = 29), 5-HT4R ([(11)C]SB207145, n = 59), and 5-HTT ([(11)C]DASB, n = 100). We employed SUIT and FreeSurfer to delineate CV, CW, and CH and quantified mean standardized uptake values (SUV) and nondisplaceable neocortical binding potential (BPND). Statistical difference was assessed with paired nonparametric two-sided Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and multiple comparison corrected via false discovery rate. We demonstrate significant radioligand specific regional differences in cerebellar uptake. These differences persist when using different cerebellar regions for RTM, but the influence on the neocortical BPND is small. Nevertheless, our data highlight the importance of validating each radioligand carefully for defining the optimal reference region.

  18. The opiate-like action of tilidine is mediated by metabolites.

    PubMed

    Schulz, R; Bläsig, J; Wüster, M; Herz, A

    1978-09-01

    The analgesic effect of tilidine in rats is completely antagonized by the narcotic antagonist naloxone. Radioreceptor assays revealed, however, that the main metabolites of tilidine, nortilidine and bisnortilidine, rather than tilidine exhibit affinity to opiate receptors. These findings were confirmed in studies using the electrically stimulated guinea pig ileum and the mouse vas deferens. Chronic tilidine administration to rats caused a considerable degree of physical dependence, which was expected from the ability of the intact animal to metabolize tilidine. In the isolated ileum from chronically morphinized guinea pigs, both nortilidine and bisnortilidine fully substituted for morphine in preventing induction of withdrawal, indicating dependence liability of these metabolites.

  19. A new, highly selective CCK-B receptor radioligand (( sup 3 H)(N-methyl-Nle28,31)CCK26-33): Evidence for CCK-B receptor heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.J.; Vaughn, L.K.; Fang, S.N.; Bogert, C.L.; Yamamura, M.S.; Hruby, V.J.; Yamamura, H.I. )

    1990-12-01

    (N-methyl-Nle28,31)CCK26-33 (SNF 8702) is a nonsulfated cholecystokinin octapeptide analog that is highly selective for cholecystokinin-B (CCK-B) receptors. Inhibition studies using (125I) Bolton-Hunter-labeled CCK-8 show that SNF 8702 has over 4,000-fold greater affinity for CCK receptors in guinea pig cortex relative to those in guinea pig pancreas. SNF 8702 was tritium-labeled to a specific activity of 23.7 Ci/mmol and its binding properties characterized for guinea pig brain membrane preparations. (3H)SNF 8702 binds to a single site with high affinity (Kd = 0.69-0.90 nM) in guinea pig cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus and pons-medulla. Of these four tissues, the highest receptor density was measured in the cortex (86 fmol/mg of protein) and the lowest in the pons-medulla (22 fmol/mg of protein). In contrast to findings of single-site binding in some brain regions, evidence for CCK-B receptor heterogeneity is observed under other conditions. (3H)SNF 8702 binding to membranes prepared from whole guinea pig brain shows biphasic association kinetics at a concentration of 2.0 nM consistent with the presence of binding site heterogeneity. Binding site heterogeneity is consistently observed for (3H)SNF 8702 binding to guinea pig whole brain membranes in saturation studies where a high-affinity site (Kd = 0.31 nM) is distinguished from a low-affinity site (Kd = 3.3 nM). Binding site heterogeneity is also observed for the midbrain-thalamic region. CCK-B receptor heterogeneity is suggested by the effect of the guanyl nucleotide analogue, guanylyl-imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p), on (3H)SNF 8702 binding to CCK-B receptors in the cerebellum.

  20. Heterogeneity of postsynaptic receptor occupancy fluctuations among glycinergic inhibitory synapses in the zebrafish hindbrain

    PubMed Central

    Rigo, Jean-Michel; Badiu, Carmen Ionela; Legendre, Pascal

    2003-01-01

    The amplitude of glycinergic miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) varies considerably in neurons recorded in the isolated hindbrain of 50-h-old zebrafish larvae. At this age, glycinergic synapses are functionally mature. In order to measure the occupancy level of postsynaptic glycine receptors (GlyRs) and to determine the pre- and/or postsynaptic origin of its variability, we analysed mIPSCs within bursts evoked by α-latrotoxin (0.1–1 nm). Two types of burst were observed according to their mIPSC frequencies: ‘slow’ bursts with clearly spaced mIPSCs and ‘fast’ bursts characterised by superimposed events. Non-stationary noise analysis of mIPSCs in some ‘slow’ bursts recorded in the presence or in the absence of Ca2+ denoted that mIPSC amplitude variance did not depend on the quantity of neurotransmitters released (presynaptic origin), but rather on intrinsic stochastic behaviour of the same group of GlyRs (postsynaptic origin). In these bursts, the open probability measured at the peak of the mIPSCs was close to 0.5 while the maximum open probability is close to 0.9 for the synaptic isoform of GlyRs (heteromeric α1/β GlyRs). In ‘fast’ bursts with superimposed events, a correlation was found between the amplitude of mIPSCs and the basal current level measured at their onset, which could suggest that the same group of GlyRs is activated during such bursts. Altogether, our results indicate that glycine synapses can display different release modes in the presence of α-latrotoxin. They also indicate that, in our model, postsynaptic GlyRs cannot be saturated by the release of a single vesicle. PMID:14500774

  1. Patterns of opiate use in a heroin maintenance programme.

    PubMed

    Perneger, T V; Mino, A; Giner, F; Broers, B

    2000-09-01

    Little is known about patterns of opiate use by heroin addicts. To describe opiate use over time among heroin addicts who had access to legally prescribed intravenous heroin and oral opiates. Analysis of daily drug administration records of 37 patients enrolled in the Geneva heroin maintenance programme for 4-29 months (total 23,136 patient-days). The average dose of intravenous heroin was 466 mg/day; the total opiate dose, after conversion of oral opiates to heroin-equivalents, was 543 mg/day. Patients received intravenous heroin only on 39% of days, oral opiates only on 7% of days, and mixed regimens on 49% of days; the remaining 4% of days were spent outside the programme, usually on oral opiates. The daily dose of heroin-equivalents increased during the first trimester in the programme, by 30 mg/day per month (95% confidence interval 12-46 mg/day per month), but decreased gradually thereafter, by 12 mg/day per month (95% confidence interval, 8-17 mg/day per month). In patients who alternated between heroin and methadone, 1 mg methadone typically replaced 4.1 mg heroin. During follow-up, five patients switched to methadone maintenance, five underwent detoxification, and three were discharged for noncompliance with regulations. Heroin users who have facilitated access to legally prescribed drugs consume about 0.5 g heroin per day. Consumption patterns vary, but the daily amount of opiates remains stable or decreases over time. A substantial minority of patients elect for alternative treatments after several months of heroin maintenance.

  2. Translational upregulation of folate receptors is mediated by homocysteine via RNA-heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein E1 interactions

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Aśok C.; Tang, Ying-Sheng; Khan, Rehana A.; Biju, Mangatt P.; Xiao, Xiangli; Li, Qing-Jun; Sun, Xin-Lai; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N.; Stabler, Sally P.

    2004-01-01

    Cellular acquisition of folate is mediated by folate receptors (FRs) in many malignant and normal human cells. Although FRs are upregulated in folate deficiency and downregulated following folate repletion, the mechanistic basis for this relationship is unclear. Previously we demonstrated that interaction of an 18-base cis-element in the 5′-untranslated region of FR mRNA and a cystolic trans-factor (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein E1 [hnRNP E1]) is critical for FR synthesis. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling this interaction, especially within the context of FR regulation and folate status, have remained obscure. Human cervical carcinoma cells exhibited progressively increasing upregulation of FRs after shifting of folate-replete cells to low-folate media, without a proportionate rise in FR mRNA or rise in hnRNP E1. Translational FR upregulation was accompanied by a progressive accumulation of the metabolite homocysteine within cultured cells, which stimulated interaction of the FR mRNA cis-element and hnRNP E1 as well as FR biosynthesis in a dose-dependent manner. Abrupt reversal of folate deficiency also led to a rapid parallel reduction in homocysteine and FR biosynthesis to levels observed in folate-replete cells. Collectively, these results suggest that homocysteine is the key modulator of translational upregulation of FRs and establishes the linkage between perturbed folate metabolism and coordinated upregulation of FRs. PMID:14722620

  3. Heterogeneity of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in lung adenocarcinoma harboring anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangements: A case report.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiong; Wu, Jian-Yu; Jiao, Shun-Chang

    2014-11-01

    Lung cancer is a heterogeneous and complex disease that remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. The identification of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements has changed the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer, creating a personalized treatment era that is based on the appropriate molecular selection of patients. In spite of the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), acquired resistance remains inevitable due to various mechanisms. The present study reports the case of a 30-year-old patient with stage IV lung adenocarcinoma initially harboring an EGFR mutation. However, following disease progression and a series of treatments, the wild-type EGFR gene was observed and the ALK rearrangements were revealed. Erlotinib administration resulted in a good response in the patient initially, but crizotinib did not. This indicated an association between the secondary mutations in kinases and the drug resistance to TKIs. This case should also highlight the clinical significance of repeat biopsies for the subsequent therapeutic choices at the onset of clinical progression.

  4. Acute opiate overdose in Tehran: the forgotten role of opium.

    PubMed

    Karbakhsh, Mojgan; Salehian Zandi, Negar

    2007-09-01

    The global epidemic of opiate use continues to spread and is an increasing burden especially in developing countries. Acute opiate overdose (AOO) is one of the most dramatic complications of drug abuse. The purpose of this study is to examine the epidemiology of acute opiate overdose in a poisoning center in Tehran. In this cross-sectional survey, patients who attended the emergency room of Loghman-Hakim hospital - the only poisoning center in Tehran - and diagnosed with acute opiate overdose over a six month period were included. Overdose was more common among men (91.2%). The mean and standard deviation of age was 36.9+/-15. The most frequent opiate agent was opium (56.5%) followed by heroin. Opium was most commonly used by regular users, as a single agent and through ingestion. Benzodiazepines, antidepressants and alcohol were the most common agents consumed accompanied with opiates. The mortality rate was 8.8% which was not significantly different between cases of heroin and opium overdose. Opium was the major cause of overdose in our study. This result suggests that opium is not a harmless form of addiction although it is regarded as a thing of the past in many countries.

  5. Illicit Use of Prescription Opiates among Graduate Students.

    PubMed

    Varga, Matthew D; Parrish, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Through this study the authors assessed the prevalence rate, reasons for use, and poly-substance use of prescription opiates among graduate students. The authors employed a cross-sectional survey research design using an online, self-administered questionnaire to assess the prevalence rates of prescription opiate use among graduate students (N = 1,033), reasons for use, and their likelihood for poly-substance use. The survey was e-mailed to 5,000 graduate students. Graduate students (19.7%) reported illicit use of prescription opiates in their lifetime and 6.6% reported past-year illicit use. Those who indicated illicitly using prescription opiates did so for self-medication reasons; a few respondents indicated recreational use. Students using prescription opiates were 75% less likely to use marijuana; 79% less likely to use cocaine; and 75% less likely to use ecstasy. Graduate students are illicitly using prescription opiates, but primarily for self-medication, and, while doing so, are less likely to use other substances.

  6. Heterogeneity of the M1 muscarinic receptor subtype between peripheral lung and cerebral cortex demonstrated by the selective antagonist AF-DX 116

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, J.W.; Halonen, M.; Seaver, N.A.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1987-07-27

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the majority of muscarinic receptors in rabbit peripheral lung homogenates bind pirenzepine with high affinity (putative M1 subtype). In experiments of AF-DX 116 inhibiting (TH)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate or (TH)pirenzepine, the authors found similar inhibitory constants for AF-DX 116 binding in rat heart and rabbit peripheral lung that were 4-fold smaller (i.e. of higher affinity) than the inhibitory constant for rat cerebral cortex. This results demonstrates heterogeneity of the M1 muscarinic receptor subtype between peripheral lung and cerebral cortex. 20 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  7. Enhanced bioavailability of opiates after intratracheal administration

    SciTech Connect

    Findlay, J.W.A.; Jones, E.C.; McNulty, M.J.

    1986-03-01

    Several opiate analgesics have low oral bioavailabilities in the dog because of presystemic metabolism. Intratracheal administration may circumvent this first-pass effect. Three anesthetized beagles received 5-mg/kg doses of codeine phosphate intratracheally (i.t.), orally (p.o.) and intravenously (i.v.) in a crossover study. The following drugs were also studied in similar experiments: ethylmorphine hydrochloride (5 mg/kg), pholcodine bitartrate (10 mg/kg, hydrocodone bitartrate (4 mg/kg) and morphine sulfate (2.5 mg/kg). Plasma drug concentrations over the 24- to 48-hr periods after drug administrations were determined by radioimmunoassays. I.t. bioavailabilities (codeine (84%), ethylmorphine (100%), and morphine (87%)) of drugs with poor oral availabilities were all markedly higher than the corresponding oral values (14, 26, and 23%, respectively). I.t. bioavailabilities of pholcodine (93%) and hydrocodone (92%), which have good oral availabilities (74 and 79%, respectively), were also enhanced. In all cases, peak plasma concentrations occurred more rapidly after i.t. (0.08-0.17 hr) than after oral (0.5-2 hr) dosing and i.t. disposition often resembled i.v. kinetics. I.t. administration may be a valuable alternative dosing route, providing rapid onset of pharmacological activity for potent drugs with poor oral bioavailability.

  8. Opiate alkaloids and nitric oxide production in the nematode Ascaris suum.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Pryor, Stephen C; Putnam, Jennifer; Cadet, Patrick; Stefano, George B

    2004-02-01

    The tissue distribution, course of secretion, and sex differences of morphine were delineated in Ascaris suum. Nitric oxide (NO) release in various tissues in response to morphine and its metabolite morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) were also examined. Ascaris suum of both sexes along with their incubation fluid were analyzed for morphine concentrations by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) over a 5-day period. Various tissues were also dissected for HPLC and NO analysis. Morphine was found to be most prevalent in the muscle tissue, and there is significantly more morphine in females than males, probably because of the large amounts present in the female uterus. Morphine (10(-9) M) and M6G (10(-9) M) stimulated the release of NO from muscles. Naloxone (10(-7) M) and N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10(-6) M) blocked (P < 0.005) morphine-stimulated NO release from A. suum muscle tissue. D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Om-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP) (10(-7) M) did not block morphine's NO release. However, naloxone could not block M6G-stimulated NO release by muscles, whereas CTOP (10(-7) M) blocked its release. These findings were in seeming contradiction to our earlier inability to isolate a mu opiate receptor messenger RNA by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction using a human mu primer. This suggests that a novel mu opiate receptor was possibly present and selective toward M6G.

  9. Opiate sensitivity test in patients with stereotypic movement disorder and trichotillomania.

    PubMed

    Frecska, Ede; Arato, Mihaly

    2002-06-01

    Preliminary data about the therapeutic effect of opiate receptor manipulation in self-injurious behavior (SIB) suggest that endogenous opioid mechanisms may have a pathophysiological role in that condition and their involvement may be dependent on the severity of the SIB. The aim of this study was to use fentanyl-induced prolactin response as an opiate receptor sensitivity test in patients with stereotypic movement disorder (SMD) manifesting SIB (skin picking). Healthy volunteers and trichotillomanic patients were enrolled as comparison subjects. Individuals with trichotillomania (TTM) manifest repetitive, less serious self-mutilation (hair pulling) and are classified under different DSM-IV category than SMD. Therefore, they were considered as patient controls. Ten healthy subjects received 0.05 mg/70 kg and another 10 were given 0.1 mg/70 kg dose of fentanyl intravenously in the AM hours. Five of them had placebo trials. A dose of 0.05 mg/70 kg fentanyl was administered to patients with SMD (n = 10) and TTM (n = 12). Serial blood sampling was performed for prolactin measurements. Fentanyl elevated plasma prolactin in a dose-dependent manner. Patients with skin picking, but not with hair pulling, showed significantly increased responses. This finding supports the involvement of endogenous opioids in the pathomechanism of serious SIB.

  10. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutation heterogeneity analysis of pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinoma successfully treated with erlotinib: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZOU, FANGWEN; XIE, GUIYUAN; MA, JIN-AN; ZHOU, DONG-AI; JIANG, YI; ZHENG, JIAO-YUN

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinoma (PSC) is a rare histological subtype of non-small cell lung cancer, and the available studies on the response to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) is limited. In the present study, a 73-year-old female presented with a large mass in the lower right lung, which was diagnosed as a PSC on biopsy. An amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) test revealed that the patient possessed the wild-type EGFR gene, and the patient subsequently underwent radiotherapy (60 Gy) and four 21-day cycles of chemoradiotherapy (1,600 mg gemcitabine, days 1 and 8; 30 mg, cisplatin, days 1–3). Following radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment, a CT scan revealed complete remission of the mass in the lower right lung, however, metastases were identified in the paraaortic lymph node, bilateral iliac fossa and the right gluteal region. Notably, an EGFR exon 21 L858R gene mutation was identified in the mass of the right gluteal metastasis. Therefore, treatment with erlotinib was initiated. The patient continued to experience progression-free survival for six months following the initiation of erlotinib therapy. However, multiple metastases were then identified, and all lesions possessed the wild-type EGFR gene, as identified by the ARMS test. The findings suggest that erlotinib is a viable therapeutic option for the treatment of PSC patients that possess an EGFR mutation. The spatio-temporal evolution of EGFR mutational heterogeneity in PSC may result in drug-resistance, which challenges EGFR-TKI therapy and EGFR gene mutation diagnosis. PMID:26137049

  11. Exploring physician decisions about end-of-life opiate prescribing: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Zerzan, Judy; Lee, Courtney A; Haverhals, Leah M; Nowels, Carolyn T

    2011-05-01

    Opiates are commonly used for symptoms at the end of life (EOL). Little is known about the decision-making process physicians go through when deciding to prescribe opiates for their EOL patients. The study's objective was to explore physician factors affecting EOL opiate prescribing. Qualitative study of 38 physicians in the Denver area in the specialties of outpatient and inpatient medicine, geriatrics, oncology, and palliative care. Semi-structured qualitative interviews by trained interviewers asked physicians about their knowledge, attitudes, and experiences in prescribing opiates, reasons for prescribing opiates, barriers to prescribing opiates, changes in prescribing habits, and perceived patient factors that influence prescribing. Interviews were analyzed using ATLAS.ti qualitative analysis software and independently coded by two reviewers. We found a spectrum of beliefs ranging from the viewpoint that opiates are underused at EOL to overused. We found five key themes: practices in when and how to use opiates, barriers to prescribing, personal experiences drive prescribing, social meaning of opiates, and differences in the role of physician. Physicians interviewed described experiences, both personal and professional, that influenced their opiate-prescribing habits. All respondents expressed positive experiences with prescribing opiates in being able to ease patients' suffering at EOL and to improve their functionality and quality of life. Differences in prescribing habits, attitudes, and experiences of physicians influence opiate prescribing, which may lead to over- and underprescribing. Knowledge, barriers, and fears about EOL opiate prescribing need to be addressed to ensure EOL patients are receiving appropriate symptom relief.

  12. An evaluation of TLC systems for opiate analysis.

    PubMed

    Rajananda, V; Nair, N K; Navaratnam, V

    1985-01-01

    The authors selected 38 thin-layer-chromatography (TLC) systems described in the available literature published over the last 10 years and evaluated those systems with respect to their suitability for detection and identification of opiates in urine, opium and heroin, as well as adulterants in heroin. A total of 14 substances: 8 opiates (morphine, 6-monoacetylmorphine, diacetylmorphine, codeine, acetylcodeine, noscapine, papaverine and thebaine) and 6 adulterants (ephedrine, quinine, methadone, caffeine, cocaine and strychnine) were used as test samples for this research. Using laboratory-coated plates and pre-coated plates, 15 and 13 TLC systems, respectively, were found to be able to detect and identify morphine and codeine in urine without interference from the remaining 12 substances. For the detection of opiates in opium samples as well as opiates and adulterants in illicit heroin samples the TLC system: chloroform-n-hexane-triethylamine (9:9:4) which was developed by the National Drug Research Centre, Penang, Malaysia, was found to be most suitable on both laboratory-coated and pre-coated plates. In addition, the following two systems, one on laboratory-coated plates--hexane-chloroform-diethylamine (50:30:7)--and the other on pre-coated plates--benzene-dioxane-ethanol-ammonia (50:40:5:5; T-7)--were also found to be among most suitable TLC systems for the analysis of opiates in opium samples. The article also presents the relative cost of each of the 38 evaluated TLC systems.

  13. Preparation of a Fentanyl Ligand for the Opiate Receptor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    phenyl to give 13. No attompt wv , I i(, t and characterize 13; however, there is precedence for in ,, tio of c, O.- ,zi’J derived nitrene into phenyl...a (.) w s used at 1000 for 1 hour, the major product i sol at ed , rparat ive T1C appeared to be an internal nitrene inert ion p Cic t. This product

  14. Opioid receptor heteromers in analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Costantino, Cristina M.; Gomes, Ivone; Stockton, Steven D.; Lim, Maribel P.; Devi, Lakshmi A.

    2013-01-01

    Opiates such as morphine and fentanyl, a major class of analgesics used in the clinical management of pain, exert their effects through the activation of opioid receptors. Opioids are among the most commonly prescribed and frequently abused drugs in the USA; however, the prolonged use of opiates often leads to the development of tolerance and addiction. Although blockade of opioid receptors with antagonists such as naltrexone and naloxone can lessen addictive impulses and facilitate recovery from overdose, systemic disruption of endogenous opioid receptor signalling through the use of these antagonistic drugs can have severe side effects. In the light of these challenges, current efforts have focused on identifying new therapeutic targets that selectively and specifically modulate opioid receptor signalling and function so as to achieve analgesia without the adverse effects associated with chronic opiate use. We have previously reported that opioid receptors interact with each other to form heteromeric complexes and that these interactions affect morphine signalling. Since chronic morphine administration leads to an enhanced level of these heteromers, these opioid receptor heteromeric complexes represent novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of pain and opiate addiction. In this review, we discuss the role of heteromeric opioid receptor complexes with a focus on mu opioid receptor (MOR) and delta opioid receptor (DOR) heteromers. We also highlight the evidence for altered pharmacological properties of opioid ligands and changes in ligand function resulting from the heteromer formation. PMID:22490239

  15. Adolescent cannabis exposure alters opiate intake and opioid limbic neuronal populations in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ellgren, Maria; Spano, Sabrina M; Hurd, Yasmin L

    2007-03-01

    Cannabis use is a hypothesized gateway to subsequent abuse of other drugs such as heroin. We currently assessed whether Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) exposure during adolescence modulates opiate reinforcement and opioid neural systems in adulthood. Long-Evan male rats received THC (1.5 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.)) or vehicle every third day during postnatal days (PNDs) 28-49. Heroin self-administration behavior (fixed ratio-1; 3-h sessions) was studied from young adulthood (PND 57) into full adults (PND 102). THC-pretreated rats showed an upward shift throughout the heroin self-administration acquisition (30 microg/kg/infusion) phase, whereas control animals maintained the same pattern once stable intake was obtained. Heightened opiate sensitivity in THC animals was also evidenced by higher heroin consumption during the maintenance phase (30 and 60 microg/kg/infusion) and greater responding for moderate-low heroin doses (dose-response curve: 7.5, 15, 30, 60, and 100 microg/kg/injection). Specific disturbance of the endogenous opioid system was also apparent in the brain of adults with adolescent THC exposure. Striatal preproenkephalin mRNA expression was exclusively increased in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell; the relative elevation of preproenkephalin mRNA in the THC rats was maintained even after heroin self-administration. Moreover, mu opioid receptor (muOR) GTP-coupling was potentiated in mesolimbic and nigrostriatal brainstem regions in THC-pretreated animals. muOR function in the NAc shell was specifically correlated to heroin intake. The current findings support the gateway hypothesis demonstrating that adolescence cannabis exposure has an enduring impact on hedonic processing resulting in enhanced opiate intake, possibly as a consequence of alterations in limbic opioid neuronal populations.

  16. Reduction of opiate withdrawal symptoms with use of clonidine in a county jail.

    PubMed

    Fresquez-Chavez, Kathy R; Fogger, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, addicted inmates admitted to jail in New Mexico are in the process of opiate withdrawal. While the standard for opiate detoxification is a narcotic taper, correctional policy restricts opiate use for safety reasons. An alternative for withdrawal is a supportive intervention with clonidine, a non-opiate. Could clonidine be beneficial for acute opiate withdrawal symptoms in this population? Fifty-five inmates (37 male and 18 female) volunteered to participate in assessing clonidine for the reduction of withdrawal symptoms. Symptoms were assessed with the Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale and treated with a standard clonidine protocol. Clonidine significantly decreased the mean scores at 1 and 4 hours after medication use. Clonidine for opiate withdrawal reduces symptoms when opiate-assisted detoxification is not available.

  17. One-pot heterogeneous synthesis of Δ(3)-tetrahydrocannabinol analogues and xanthenes showing differential binding to CB(1) and CB(2) receptors.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Ornelio; Messina, Federica; Pelosi, Azzurra; Curini, Massimo; Petrucci, Vanessa; Gertsch, Jürg; Chicca, Andrea

    2014-10-06

    Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) is the major psychoactive cannabinoid in hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) and responsible for many of the pharmacological effects mediated via cannabinoid receptors. Despite being the major cannabinoid scaffold in nature, Δ(9)-THC double bond isomers remain poorly studied. The chemical scaffold of tetrahydrocannabinol can be assembled from the condensation of distinctly substituted phenols and monoterpenes. Here we explored a microwave-assisted one pot heterogeneous synthesis of Δ(3)-THC from orcinol (1a) and pulegone (2). Four Δ(3)-THC analogues and corresponding Δ(4a)-tetrahydroxanthenes (Δ(4a)-THXs) were synthesized regioselectively and showed differential binding affinities for CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors. Here we report for the first time the CB1 receptor binding of Δ(3)-THC, revealing a more potent receptor binding affinity for the (S)-(-) isomer (hCB1Ki = 5 nM) compared to the (R)-(+) isomer (hCB1Ki = 29 nM). Like Δ(9)-THC, also Δ(3)-THC analogues are partial agonists at CB receptors as indicated by [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays. Interestingly, the THC structural isomers Δ(4a)-THXs showed selective binding and partial agonism at CB2 receptors, revealing a simple non-natural natural product-derived scaffold for novel CB2 ligands.

  18. Attitudes of Swiss physicians in prescribing opiates for cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Stiefel, F; Morant, R; Radziwill, A; Senn, H J

    1993-09-01

    Following clinical observations showing that opiates are sometimes not consistently administered for chronic cancer pain, a survey was conducted among 1200 physicians in the German-speaking part of Switzerland. Their opium-prescribing habits were assessed by means of a postal questionnaire. The results indicate that, among the majority of physicians completing the questionnaire, established guidelines and basic principles of pain control with opiates in cancer patients are largely understood. Oral morphine is chosen by 89% to initiate treatment of chronic cancer pain, and the correct use of slow-release morphine is known to 87% of the responding physicians. Unfortunately, an important minority of physicians does not follow established guidelines in the treatment of cancer pain, and up to 20% still feel that the danger of addiction, respiratory depression and other side-effects are important reasons for withholding opiates in this patient population. The results and their implications are discussed and compared with the current literature on cancer pain management.

  19. Add-on gabapentin in the treatment of opiate withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Raga, José; Sabater, Ana; Perez-Galvez, Bartolome; Castellano, Miguel; Cervera, Gaspar

    2004-05-01

    Gabapentin is an antiepileptic drug shown to be effective in the treatment of pain disorders and appears to be useful as well for several psychiatric disorders, including bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders, alcohol withdrawal and cocaine dependence. Gabapentin, at a dose of 600 mg three times a day, was evaluated as an add-on medication to a standard detoxification regime in seven heroin dependent individuals undergoing outpatient opiate withdrawal treatment. All seven patients successfully completed opiate detoxification and commenced opiate antagonist treatment with naltrexone on day five of withdrawal treatment, as scheduled. No adverse event was noted. Gabapentin appeared to lead a reduction in symptomatic medication and an overall beneficial effect on symptoms of heroin withdrawal.

  20. Medicaid coverage and access to publicly funded opiate treatment.

    PubMed

    Deck, Dennis D; Wiitala, Wyndy L; Laws, Katherine E

    2006-07-01

    This observational study examines changes in access to methadone maintenance treatment following Oregon's decision to remove substance abuse treatment from the Medicaid benefit for an expansion population. Access was compared before and after the benefit change for two cohorts of adults addicted to opiates presenting for publicly funded treatment. Propensity score analysis helped model some selective disenrollment from Medicaid that occurred after the benefit change. Logistic regression was used to compare access to methadone by cohort controlling for client characteristics. Opiate users presenting for publicly funded treatment after the change were less than half as likely (OR = 0.40) to be placed in an opiate treatment program compared to the prior year. Further analysis revealed that those with no recent treatment history were less likely to present for treatment after the benefit change. These results have implications for states considering Medicaid cuts, especially if the anticipated increases in illegal activity, emergency room utilization, unemployment, and mortality can be demonstrated.

  1. [Mechanism of opiate of oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria].

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, V V; Gegenava, G P

    1976-01-01

    Effect of morphine, codeine, dionine and nalorphine on the oxidative phosphorylation in rat liver mitochondria was studied. Morphine is found to inhibit both ATP-synthetase and ATP-ase activities in mitochondria, but not in submitochondrial particles. Morphine-suppressed oxidative phosphorylation was competitively reversed with high concentrations of ADP, but not of inorganic phosphate. The effect of other opiates (i.e. codeine, dionine, nalorphine) was similar. It is suggested, that opiates inhibit the transport of adenine nucleotides through inner mitochondrial membrane, as it does atractyloside. A significance of the hydrophobic interaction between the inhibitor and adenine nucleotide translocase is outlined, since the degree of the inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation is increased with the increase in the number of non-ionized opiate molecules (at alkaline pH values) and in the length of the carbon chain of narcotic molecule as follows: morphine--codeine--dionine--nalorphine.

  2. Policy Progress for Physician Treatment of Opiate Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Joseph O

    2002-01-01

    Medical treatment of heroin addiction with methadone and other pharmacotherapies has important benefits for individuals and society. However, regulatory policies have separated this treatment from the medical care system, limiting access to care and contributing to the social stigma of even effective addiction pharmacotherapy. Increasing problems caused by heroin addiction have added urgency to the search for policies and programs that improve the access to and quality of opiate addiction treatment. Recent initiatives aiming to reintegrate methadone maintenance and other addiction pharmacotherapies into medical practice may promote both expanded treatment capacity and increased physician expertise in addiction medicine. These initiatives include changes in federal oversight of the opiate addiction treatment system, the approval of physician office–based methadone maintenance programs for stabilized patients, and federal legislation that could enable physicians to treat opiate addiction with new medications in regular medical practice. PMID:12047733

  3. Suboxone misuse along the opiate maintenance treatment pathway.

    PubMed

    Furst, R Terry

    2013-01-01

    This study explores strategies that Suboxone misusers utilize while in drug treatment. Ethnographic interviews were conducted with 14 patients who had cycled in and out of Suboxone treatment. The objective of the study is to identify strategies implemented by patients who intermittently use opiates/opioids while in Suboxone treatment. Findings indicate that some patients serially stop and start treatment in a Harm Reduction setting in New York City. Many patients suggest that they manage their opiate/opioid dependency through a sequential use of Suboxone and heroin to avoid withdrawal and to continue their misuse of opiates/opioids. Results are discussed in conjunction with the difficulties inherent to substance abuse treatment and suggestions for improvement are offered.

  4. Activator of G protein signaling 3 regulates opiate activation of protein kinase A signaling and relapse of heroin-seeking behavior.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lina; McFarland, Krista; Fan, Peidong; Jiang, Zhan; Inoue, Yuichiro; Diamond, Ivan

    2005-06-14

    The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is central to heroin addiction. Activation of opiate receptors in the NAc dissociates G(i/o) into alpha and betagamma subunits. Galpha(i) inhibits cAMP production, but betagamma regulates several molecular pathways, including protein kinase A (PKA). We show in NAc/striatal neurons that opiates paradoxically activate PKA signaling by means of betagamma dimers. Activation requires Galpha(i3) and an activator of G protein signaling 3 (AGS3). AGS3 competes with betagamma for binding to Galpha(i3)-GDP and enhances the action of unbound betagamma. AGS3 and Galpha(i3) knockdown prevents opiate activation of PKA signaling. In rats self-administering heroin, AGS3 antisense in the NAc core, but not shell, eliminates reinstatement of heroin-seeking behavior, a model of human relapse. Thus, Galpha(i3)/betagamma/AGS3 appears to mediate mu opiate receptor activation of PKA signaling as well as heroin-seeking behavior.

  5. Mortality trends in a cohort of opiate addicts, Catalonia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Ortí, R M; Domingo-Salvany, A; Muñoz, A; Macfarlane, D; Suelves, J M; Antó, J M

    1996-06-01

    Opiate addiction affects young adults whose life expectancy is reduced as a consequence of their habit. In the midst of the AIDS epidemic, the present study objective was to analyse recent overall and cause-specific mortality trends among opiate addicts in Catalonia (Spain). Mortality was assessed retrospectively in an opiate addict cohort assembled from admissions to hospital emergency wards and drug treatment centres during the period 1985-1991. The cohort included 12 711 opiate addicts (12 045 men and 3666 women) aged 15-44 years. Overall and cause-specific mortality trends were analysed using age as the time scale and Cox regression with staggered entry determined by the age at entry in the study. Annual trends were adjusted by sex and source of entry, and were stratified by length of opiate use. Mortality rates increased throughout the entire period from 13.8 to 34.8 deaths per 1000 person-years, with a statistically significant increase in 1987-1988 and 1988-1989. In a model including age, gender, source of entry and length of drug use, risk increased significantly in men and for longer length of use, but not with age and for source of entry into the study cohort. The causes of death associated with high mortality rates were AIDS and the causes directly related to addiction. A threefold increase in mortality rates was observed during the period, mainly accounted for by AIDS and direct addiction-related causes. Length of opiate use was an important determinant of mortality.

  6. Maintenance medication for opiate addiction: the foundation of recovery.

    PubMed

    Bart, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    Illicit use of opiates is the fastest growing substance use problem in the United States, and the main reason for seeking addiction treatment services for illicit drug use throughout the world. It is associated with significant morbidity and mortality related to human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C, and overdose. Treatment for opiate addiction requires long-term management. Behavioral interventions alone have extremely poor outcomes, with more than 80% of patients returning to drug use. Similarly poor results are seen with medication-assisted detoxification. This article provides a topical review of the three medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration for long-term treatment of opiate dependence: the opioid-agonist methadone, the partial opioid-agonist buprenorphine, and the opioid-antagonist naltrexone. Basic mechanisms of action and treatment outcomes are described for each medication. Results indicate that maintenance medication provides the best opportunity for patients to achieve recovery from opiate addiction. Extensive literature and systematic reviews show that maintenance treatment with either methadone or buprenorphine is associated with retention in treatment, reduction in illicit opiate use, decreased craving, and improved social function. Oral naltrexone is ineffective in treating opiate addiction, but recent studies using extended-release naltrexone injections have shown promise. Although no direct comparisons between extended-release naltrexone injections and either methadone or buprenorphine exist, indirect comparison of retention shows inferior outcome compared with methadone and buprenorphine. Further work is needed to directly compare each medication and determine individual factors that can assist in medication selection. Until such time, selection of medication should be based on informed choice following a discussion of outcomes, risks, and benefits of each medication.

  7. Maintenance Medication for Opiate Addiction: The Foundation of Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Bart, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    Illicit use of opiates is the fastest growing substance use problem in the United States and the main reason for seeking addiction treatment services for illicit drug use throughout the world. It is associated with significant morbidity and mortality related to HIV, hepatitis C, and overdose. Treatment for opiate addiction requires long-term management. Behavioral interventions alone have extremely poor outcomes, with more than 80% of patients returning to drug use. Similarly poor results are seen with medication assisted detoxification. This article provides a topical review of the three medications approved by the FDA for long-term treatment of opiate dependence: the opioid agonist methadone, the opioid partial agonist buprenorphine, and the opioid antagonist naltrexone. Basic mechanisms of action and treatment outcomes are described for each medication. Results indicate that maintenance medication provides the best opportunity for patients to achieve recovery from opiate addiction. Extensive literature and systematic reviews show that maintenance treatment with either methadone or buprenorphine is associated with retention in treatment, reduction in illicit opiate use, decreased craving, and improved social function. Oral naltrexone is ineffective in treating opiate addiction but recent studies using extended release naltrexone injections have shown promise. While no direct comparisons between extended release naltrexone injections and either methadone or buprenorphine exist, indirect comparison of retention shows inferior outcome compared to methadone and buprenorphine. Further work is needed to compare directly each medication and determine individual factors that can assist in medication selection. Until such time, selection of medication should be based on informed choice following a discussion of outcomes, risks, and benefits of each medication. PMID:22873183

  8. HIV-1 Tat and opiate-induced changes in astrocytes promote chemotaxis of microglia through the expression of MCP-1 and alternative chemokines.

    PubMed

    El-Hage, Nazira; Wu, Guanghan; Wang, Juan; Ambati, Jayakrishna; Knapp, Pamela E; Reed, Janelle L; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Hauser, Kurt F

    2006-01-15

    Opiates exacerbate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat(1-72)-induced release of key proinflammatory cytokines by astrocytes, which may accelerate HIV neuropathogenesis in opiate abusers. The release of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, also known as CCL2), in particular, is potentiated by opiate-HIV Tat interactions in vitro. Although MCP-1 draws monocytes/macrophages to sites of CNS infection, and activated monocytes/microglia release factors that can damage bystander neurons, the role of MCP-1 in neuro-acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (neuroAIDS) progression in opiate abusers, or nonabusers, is uncertain. Using a chemotaxis assay, N9 microglial cell migration was found to be significantly greater in conditioned medium from mouse striatal astrocytes exposed to morphine and/or Tat(1-72) than in vehicle-, mu-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonist-, or inactive, mutant Tat(delta31-61)-treated controls. Conditioned medium from astrocytes treated with morphine and Tat caused the greatest increase in motility. The response was attenuated using conditioned medium immunoneutralized with MCP-1 antibodies, or medium from MCP-1(-/-) astrocytes. In the presence of morphine (time-release, subcutaneous implant), intrastriatal Tat increased the proportion of neural cells that were astroglia and F4/80+ macrophages at 7 days post-injection. This was not seen after treatment with Tat alone, or with morphine plus inactive Tat(delta31-61) or naltrexone. Glia displayed increased MOR and MCP-1 immunoreactivity after morphine and/or Tat exposure. The findings indicate that MCP-1 underlies most of the response of microglia, suggesting that one way in which opiates exacerbate neuroAIDS is by increasing astroglial-derived proinflammatory chemokines at focal sites of CNS infection and promoting macrophage entry and local microglial activation. Importantly, increased glial expression of MOR can trigger an opiate-driven amplification/positive feedback of MCP-1 production and

  9. HIV Tat1-72 and Opiate-induced changes in astrocytes promote chemotaxis of microglia through the expression of MCP-1 and alternative chemokines

    PubMed Central

    El-Hage, Nazira; Wu, Guanghan; Wang, Juan; Ambati, Jayakrishna; Knapp, Pamela E.; Reed, Janelle L.; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J.; Hauser, Kurt F.

    2011-01-01

    Opiates exacerbate HIV-1 Tat1-72–induced release of key proinflammatory cytokines by astrocytes, which may accelerate HIV neuropathogenesis in opiate abusers. The release of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 or CCL2), in particular, is potentiated by opiate-HIV Tat interactions in vitro. Although MCP-1 draws monocytes/macrophages to sites of CNS infection, and activated monocytes/microglia release factors that can damage bystander neurons, its role in neuroAIDS progression in opiate abusers, or non-abusers, is uncertain. Using a chemotaxis assay, N9 microglial cell migration was significantly greater in conditioned medium from mouse striatal astrocytes exposed to morphine and/or Tat1-72 than in vehicle-, μ opioid receptor (MOR) antagonist-, or inactive, mutant TatΔ31-61-treated controls. Conditioned medium from astrocytes treated with morphine and Tat caused the greatest increase in motility. The response was attenuated using conditioned medium immunoneutralized with MCP-1 antibodies, or medium from MCP-1−/− astrocytes. In the presence of morphine (time-release, subcutaneous implant), intrastriatal Tat increased the proportion of neural cells that were astroglia and F4/80+ macrophages at 7 days post-injection. This was not seen following treatment with Tat alone, or with morphine plus inactive TatΔ31-61 or naltrexone. Glia displayed increased MOR and MCP-1 immunoreactivity following morphine and/or Tat exposure. The findings indicate that MCP-1 underlies most of the response of microglia, suggesting that one way in which opiates exacerbate neuroAIDS is by increasing astroglial-derived proinflammatory chemokines at focal sites of CNS infection and promoting macrophage entry and local microglial activation. Importantly, increased glial expression of MOR can trigger an opiate-driven amplification/positive feedback of MCP-1 production and inflammation. PMID:16206161

  10. Activation of reward circuitry in human opiate addicts.

    PubMed

    Sell, L A; Morris, J; Bearn, J; Frackowiak, R S; Friston, K J; Dolan, R J

    1999-03-01

    The neurobiological mechanisms of opiate addictive behaviour in humans are unknown. A proposed model of addiction implicates ascending brainstem neuromodulatory systems, particularly dopamine. Using functional neuroimaging, we assessed the neural response to heroin and heroin-related cues in established opiate addicts. We show that the effect of both heroin and heroin-related visual cues are maximally expressed in the sites of origin of ascending midbrain neuromodulatory systems. These context-specific midbrain activations predict responses to salient visual cues in cortical and subcortical regions implicated in reward-related behaviour. These findings implicate common neurobiological processes underlying drug and drug-cue-related effects.

  11. Pholcodine interference in the immunoassay for opiates in urine.

    PubMed

    Svenneby, G; Wedege, E; Karlsen, R L

    1983-01-01

    The excretion in urine after single oral therapeutic doses of morphine derivatives was analysed with radioimmunoassay (RIA) and homogeneous enzyme immunoassay (EMIT) for opiates. In contrast to the rapid excretion of ethylmorphine and codeine, pholcodine showed positive results for opiates 2-6 weeks after intake when the urines were analysed with the RIA-method. When analysed with the EMIT-method, positive results were obtained for pholcodine for approximately 10 days. As pholcodine is a common component in cough mixtures, its prolonged excretion could represent a hazard in interpreting the results from drug analyses of urines.

  12. Dracunculus medinensis and Schistosoma mansoni contain opiate alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Baggerman, G; Secor, W Evan; Casares, F; Pryor, S C; Fricchione, G L; Ruiz-Tiben, E; Eberhard, M L; Bimi, L; Stefano, G B

    2002-04-01

    The results of analysis, by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrochemical detection and by nano-electrospray-ionization, double quadrupole/orthogonal-acceleration, time-of-flight mass spectrometry, indicate that adult Dracunculus medinensis and Schistosoma mansoni both contain the opiate alkaloid morphine and that D. medinesis also contains the active metabolite of morphine, morphine 6-glucuronide. From these and previous observations, it would appear that many helminths are probably using opiate alkaloids as potent immunosuppressive and antinociceptive signal molecules, to down-regulate immunosurveillance responsiveness and pain signalling in their hosts.

  13. New methodology for the N-demethylation of opiate alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zemin; Scammells, Peter J

    2007-12-21

    N-Demethylation is a key step in the preparation of a number of semisynthetic opiate pharmaceuticals. Herein we report a high-yielding, catalytic procedure for the N-demethylation of opiates which has a number of advantages over existing methods. For example, tetrasodium 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-sulfophenyl)porphyrinatoiron(II) (0.3 molar equiv) effected the transformation of codeine methyl ether to the corresponding N-nor analogue in 91% yield. The catalyst was readily removed and recycled.

  14. Sibling aggregation for psychopathology in offspring of opiate addicts: effects of parental comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Rende, R; Weissman, M M

    1999-09-01

    Applied a new analytic approach within the high-risk paradigm, the analysis of sibling aggregation, to identify homogeneous subtypes of familial risk for psychopathology and addiction. All sibling pairs participating in a study of offspring of opiate-addicted parents were identified and their aggregation for psychiatric disorders was determined using pairwise odds ratios, an analytic technique used in genetic epidemiology. Sibling aggregation was most notable for depressive and anxiety disorders but only in the presence of comorbid depressive disorders in the parents. Parental comorbid alcoholism did not impact sibling aggregation. We emphasize methodological implications of this approach for addressing issues of phenotypic and etiologic heterogeneity in the study of developmental risk for substance abuse.

  15. Evidence from opiate binding studies that heroin acts through its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Inturrisi, C E; Schultz, M; Shin, S; Umans, J G; Angel, L; Simon, E J

    1983-01-01

    The relative affinity to opiate receptors of heroin, 6-acetylmorphine and morphine was estimated by determining their ability to displace specifically bound 3H-naltrexone from rat brain opiate binding sites. In vitro hydrolysis of heroin to 6-acetylmorphine was monitored in the binding assay filtrate by use of a quantitative HPLC procedure. The rate of heroin hydrolysis was significantly slower at 0 degrees C than at 37 degrees C. The displacement of 1 nM 3H-naltrexone by unlabeled ligand at concentrations ranging from 7 to 500 nM was measured at 0 degrees C for 120 minutes, yielding IC50 values of heroin = 483 nM, 6-acetylmorphine = 73 nM and morphine = 53 nM. When the binding data for heroin were recalculated to include the displacement that could be attributed to the 6-acetylmorphine derived from heroin degradation during the incubation, all of the apparent heroin binding was accounted for by the 6-acetylmorphine. These results are consistent with previous reports of the low binding affinity of morphine congeners (e.g., codeine) that lack a free phenolic 3-hydroxyl group and support the view that heroin is a prodrug which serves to determine the distribution of its intrinsically active metabolites, 6-acetylmorphine and morphine.

  16. Photoperiodic changes in opiate binding and their functional implications in golden hamsters.

    PubMed

    Tubbiola, M L; Nock, B; Bittman, E L

    1989-11-27

    Daylength modulates gonadotropin secretion, gonadal steroid hormone feedback, sexual behavior and body weight in male golden hamsters. Endogenous opiates regulate each of these phenomena, and the ability of opiate receptor blockade to elevate serum LH secretion is photoperiod-dependent. We used in vitro autoradiography to localize and quantify effects of daylength in golden hamsters. Hamsters were exposed to stimulatory (14 h light: 10 h dark) or inhibitory (10 h light: 14 h dark) photoperiods for 10 weeks before specific [3H]naloxone binding was assessed. Short days significantly decreased binding in medial amygdala and the intercalated amygdaloid nucleus. This effect was reversed by superior cervical ganglionectomy. No significant effects of daylength were observed in other amygdaloid, hypothalamic or preoptic areas. Lesions of the medial amygdala decreased copulatory behavior, short day-induced weight loss, and anogenital chemoinvestigation but did not affect gonadal regression or other forms of chemoinvestigation. These lesions facilitated testosterone's negative feedback on luteinizing hormone in long days but did not interfere with the potentiation of negative feedback by short days.

  17. Comparison of buprenorphine and methadone in the treatment of opiate withdrawal: possible advantages of buprenorphine for the treatment of opiate-benzodiazepine codependent patients?

    PubMed

    Reed, Laurence J; Glasper, Anthony; de Wet, Cornelis J; Bearn, Jennifer; Gossop, Michael

    2007-04-01

    The study is a preliminary investigation to compare the effectiveness of buprenorphine and methadone as opiate detoxification treatments. The sample comprised 123 drug misusers who were dependent upon opiates only or who were codependent upon opiates and benzodiazepines. Drug misusers dependent upon methadone doses up to 70 mg were eligible for the study. Detoxification took place within a specialist inpatient drug-dependence unit. Withdrawal symptom severity was assessed on a daily basis by means of the Short Opiate Withdrawal Scale. Outcome was assessed for reductions in severity of withdrawal symptoms, treatment retention, and treatment completion. Buprenorphine detoxification was associated with less severe opiate withdrawal symptoms than methadone. Opiate/Benzodiazepine codependent patients reported less severe withdrawal symptoms during treatment with buprenorphine than with methadone and were also more likely to complete detoxification when treated with buprenorphine.

  18. Opiate Pharmacology and Relief of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2014-01-01

    Opioids remain the mainstay of severe pain management in patients with cancer. The hallmark of pain management is individualization of therapy. Although almost all clinically used drugs act through mu opioid receptors, they display subtle but important differences pharmacologically. Furthermore, not all patients respond equally well to all drugs. Evidence suggests that these variable responses among patients have a biologic basis and are likely to involve both biased agonism and the many mu opioid receptor subtypes that have been cloned. PMID:24799496

  19. Neurotransmitter Receptor Binding in Bovine Cerebral Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Reinhard, John F.; Synder, Solomon H.

    1980-05-01

    Purified preparations of microvessels from bovine cerebral cortex contain substantial levels of alpha-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, and histamine 1 receptor binding sites but only negligible serotonin, muscarinic cholinergic, opiate, and benzodiazepine receptor binding. Norepinephrine and histamine may be endogenous regulators of the cerebral microcirculation at the observed receptors.

  20. Contingent methadone delivery: effects on illicit-opiate use.

    PubMed

    Higgins, S T; Stitzer, M L; Bigelow, G E; Liebson, I A

    1986-07-01

    This study examined the effects of contingent vs. non-contingent delivery of a methadone dose supplement on relapse to illicit opiate use in the context of a methadone outpatient detoxification program. Following a 3-week methadone stabilization period on 30 mg, patients (N = 39) were randomly assigned to a contingent, a non-contingent, or a control treatment group. All patients received identical gradual reductions in their assigned methadone dose. During the dose reduction period (weeks 4-11), members of the contingent (N = 13) and non-contingent groups (N = 13) could obtain daily methadone-dose supplements up to 20 mg, but contingent group members could obtain supplements only if their most recent urinalysis results were opiate negative. Control subjects (N = 13) did not have dose increases available. The contingent group presented significantly lower opiate-positive urines during weeks 8-11 (14% positive) of the detox than the non-contingent (38% positive) or control (50% positive) groups. Additionally, the availability of extra methadone improved treatment retention and increased clinic attendance above levels observed in the control group. The potential for further use of methadone's reinforcing properties in the treatment of opiate dependence is discussed.

  1. Reinforcement processes in opiate addiction: a homeostatic model.

    PubMed

    Schulteis, G; Koob, G F

    1996-11-01

    The development of tolerance and dependence has traditionally been considered an integral aspect of the drug addiction process, and opiate dependence has been studied extensively as a model system in this regard. However, recent emphasis on the positive reinforcing properties of drugs has led to the suggestion that tolerance, dependence, and withdrawal may be of secondary or even negligible importance in motivating compulsive drug use. The current article argues for an integrated view of addiction in the form of a homeostatic neuroadaptation model which emphasizes the motivational significance of both the positive affective state produced by opiates and the negative affective state characteristic of drug withdrawal. The model is supported by evidence at both the behavioral and neural systems levels of analysis. Understanding the important distinction between somatic and affective components of opiate withdrawal is key to recognizing the factors which contribute to the motivational significance of opiate dependence and withdrawal. In addition, the critical role of conditioning processes in the maintenance of compulsive drug use and relapse after periods of abstention is discussed. Finally, it is argued that both the positive reinforcement produced by acute administration of a drug and the negative affective state produced by withdrawal are common to multiple classes of abused drugs, suggesting that an understanding of homeostatic neuroadaptation within motivational systems provides a key to the etiology, treatment and prevention of drug addiction.

  2. [Benzodiazepine withdrawal in subjects on opiate substitution treatment].

    PubMed

    Fatséas, Mélina; Lavie, Estelle; Denis, Cécile; Franques-Rénéric, Pascale; Tignol, Jean; Auriacombe, Marc

    2006-04-01

    Benzodiazepines are the most widely used psychotropic agents in the world. Abuse and dependence are reported in the general population and among drug misusers, including those dependent on heroine. Benzodiazepine use by heroine users increases their risk of overdose, not only from heroin but also substitution drugs such as methadone and more recently buprenorphine. Hence, detoxification from benzodiazepines is desirable. The objective of this paper was to review the literature and determine the best benzodiazepine detoxification procedure for opiate-dependent individuals receiving substitution treatment. Relevant studies were sought through systematic searches of Medline and Toxibase (a database focusing on substance abuse). There were fewer controlled studies than expected about benzodiazepine detoxification, and all of them excluded subjects who misused opiates or were in opiate substitution treatment. The best evidence supports a procedure where the patient is switched to a long-lasting benzodiazepine and the dose then tapered by 25% of the initial dose each week. Diazepam is the drug most often used in the framework. In opiate users, diazepam may raise special problems of misuse, as suggested by clinical and epidemiologic studies. Nonetheless, diazepam is the only benzodiazepine found to be effective for this withdrawal in controlled studies and some studies indicate that unprescribed diazepam use in heroin users is sometimes motivated by the desire to alleviate withdrawal symptoms and discomfort. Although diazepam appears to have potential for abuse, the available data does not rule out its therapeutic interest for benzodiazepine withdrawal in patients on opiate substitution treatment in an adequate treatment setting. Specific studies of this population are needed.

  3. Delta-opiate DPDPE in magnetically oriented phospholipid micelles: binding and arrangement of aromatic pharmacophores.

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, F; Lin, M; Shapiro, M J; Petersheim, M

    1997-01-01

    D-Penicillamine(2,5)-enkephalin (DPDPE) is a potent opioid peptide that exhibits a high selectivity for the delta-opiate receptors. This zwitterionic peptide has been shown, by pulsed-field gradient 1H NMR diffusion studies, to have significant affinity for a zwitterionic phospholipid bilayer. The bilayer lipid is in the form of micelles composed of dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) mixtures, where the DMPC forms the bilayer structure. At high lipid concentration (25% w/w) these micelles orient in the magnetic field of an NMR spectrometer. The resulting 1H-13C dipolar couplings and chemical shift changes in the natural abundance 13C resonances for the Tyr and Phe aromatic rings were used to characterize the orientations in the bilayer micelles of these two key pharmacophores. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 8 PMID:9414244

  4. Pharmacogenetics of opiates in clinical practice: the visible tip of the iceberg.

    PubMed

    Hajj, Aline; Khabbaz, Lydia; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Peoc'h, Katell

    2013-04-01

    Opioids are the cornerstone of analgesic therapy and are used as a substitution therapy for opiate addiction. Interindividual variability in response to opioids is a significant challenge in the management of pain and substitution. Therefore, treatment with opioids requires a careful individualization of dosage to achieve an appropriate balance of efficacy and adverse effects and, consequently, avoid toxicity, particularly respiratory depression, sedation and for some, cardiac ventricular fibrillations. Many studies have investigated the association between genetic factors and the variability of response to opioids. Variants in genes encoding proteins implied in opioid pharmacokinetics (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity), together with those implied in opioids direct and indirect pharmacodynamics (genes of opioid receptors and monoaminergic systems), are the most studied. Many association studies have not been replicated. The purpose of this article is to summarize pharmacogenetic data associated with some opioids frequently encountered in managed care settings.

  5. REM sleep deprivation decreases the grooming and shaking behaviour induced by enkephalinase inhibitor or opiate withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Ukponmwan, O E; vd Poel-Heisterkamp, A L; Dzoljic, M R

    1985-09-01

    Intraventricular administration of enkephalinase inhibitor, phosphoramidon (1 X 10(-8)-5.6 X 10(-7) moles ICV) induced a behavioural syndrome consisting of excessive grooming with the body scratching as the most prominent symptom and wet-dog-shakes (WDS). The frequency of the phosphoramidon-induced WDS and body scratching were decreased by the pretreatment with the opiate receptor blocking agent, naltrexone (2.9 X 10(-6) moles/kg IP). Both the phosphoramidon-induced WDS in naive rats and naloxone-precipitated withdrawal WDS were decreased in REM sleep deprived rats compared with animals allowed normal sleep (control and stress groups). The results are discussed in light of a possible functional insufficiency of endorphinergic system during REMSD. It has been suggested that this insufficiency might be a background to the increased neuronal excitability during REMSD.

  6. Rates of prescription opiate use before and after injury in patients with orthopaedic trauma and the risk factors for prolonged opiate use.

    PubMed

    Holman, Joel E; Stoddard, Gregory J; Higgins, Thomas F

    2013-06-19

    The prudent use of prescription opiate medications is a central aspect of postoperative pain management. The mortality associated with prescription opiate overdose is reaching epidemic proportions nationally, and is the leading cause of accidental death in greater than half the states in the United States. This study sought to determine the rates of preinjury opiate use in patients with orthopaedic trauma and the risk factors for prolonged use postinjury. The Utah Controlled Substance Database was queried to determine the use of prescription opiates by all patients admitted to the orthopaedic trauma service for a two-year period with isolated musculoskeletal injuries. Usage three months prior to injury and six months postinjury was examined. Six hundred and thirteen patients met inclusion criteria. Among patients with orthopaedic trauma, 15.5% had filled a prescription for opiates in the three months prior to injury, compared with 9.2% of the general population (p < 0.001). More than one prescription was filled by 12.2% of the patients with trauma preinjury compared with 6.4% of the general population (p < 0.001). Postoperatively, 68.4% of all patients filled opiate prescriptions for less than six weeks, 11.9% filled opiate prescriptions between six and twelve weeks, and 19.7% filled opiate prescriptions past twelve weeks. Patients with preinjury use of more than one opiate prescription in the three months preinjury were six times as likely to continue use past twelve weeks, and 3.5 times as likely to obtain opiates from a provider other than their surgeon (p < 0.001). Opiate use was briefest with upper-extremity injuries, followed by lower-extremity injuries and pelvic or acetabular injuries. Regression models demonstrate that risk factors for prolonged use of opiates include advancing age and extent of preinjury use. Patients with orthopaedic trauma are significantly more likely than the general population to use prescription opiates prior to injury. Preinjury

  7. Role of endogenous opiates in the expression of negative feedback actions of androgen and estrogen on pulsatile properties of luteinizing hormone secretion in man.

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, J D; Rogol, A D; Samojlik, E; Ertel, N H

    1984-01-01

    We have tested the participation of endogenous opiate pathways in the negative feedback actions of gonadal steroids on pulsatile properties of luteinizing (LH) hormone release in normal men. To this end, sex steroid hormones were infused intravenously at dosages that under steady state conditions selectively suppressed either the frequency or the amplitude of the pulsatile LH signal. The properties of pulsatile LH secretion were assessed quantitatively by computerized analysis of LH series derived from serial blood sampling over 12 h of observation. When the pure (nonaromatizable) androgen, 5-alpha-dihydrotestosterone, was infused continuously for 108 h at the blood production rate of testosterone, we were able to achieve selective inhibition of LH pulse frequency akin to that observed in experimental animals after low-dosage androgen replacement. Under these conditions, serum concentrations of testosterone and estradiol-17 beta did not change significantly, but serum 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone concentrations increased approximately two- to threefold, with a corresponding increase in levels of its major metabolite, 5 alpha-androstan-3 alpha, 17 beta-diol. In separate experiments, the infusion of estradiol-17 beta at its blood production rate over a 4.5-d interval selectively suppressed LH pulse amplitude without influencing LH pulse frequency. Estrogen infusion increased serum estradiol-17 beta levels approximately twofold without significantly altering blood androgen concentrations. We then used these schedules of selective androgen or estrogen infusion to investigate the participation of endogenous opiates in the individual inhibitory feedback actions of pure androgen or estrogen on pulsatile LH release by administering a potent and specific opiate-receptor antagonist, naltrexone, during the infusions. Our observations indicate that, despite the continuous infusion of a dosage of 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone that significantly suppresses LH pulse frequency, co

  8. Adolescent exposure to chronic delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol blocks opiate dependence in maternally deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Morel, Lydie J; Giros, Bruno; Daugé, Valérie

    2009-10-01

    Maternal deprivation in rats specifically leads to a vulnerability to opiate dependence. However, the impact of cannabis exposure during adolescence on this opiate vulnerability has not been investigated. Chronic dronabinol (natural delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol, THC) exposure during postnatal days 35-49 was made in maternal deprived (D) or non-deprived (animal facility rearing, AFR) rats. The effects of dronabinol exposure were studied after 2 weeks of washout on the rewarding effects of morphine measured in the place preference and oral self-administration tests. The preproenkephalin (PPE) mRNA levels and the relative density and functionality of CB1, and mu-opioid receptors were quantified in the striatum and the mesencephalon. Chronic dronabinol exposure in AFR rats induced an increase in sensitivity to morphine conditioning in the place preference paradigm together with a decrease of PPE mRNA levels in the nucleus accumbens and the caudate-putamen nucleus, without any modification for preference to oral morphine consumption. In contrast, dronabinol treatment on D-rats normalized PPE decrease in the striatum, morphine consumption, and suppressed sensitivity to morphine conditioning. CB1 and mu-opioid receptor density and functionality were not changed in the striatum and mesencephalon of all groups of rats. These results indicate THC potency to act as a homeostatic modifier that would worsen the reward effects of morphine on naive animals, but ameliorate the deficits in maternally D-rats. These findings point to the self-medication use of cannabis in subgroups of individuals subjected to adverse postnatal environment.

  9. OPIATE EXPOSURE AND WITHDRAWAL DYNAMICALLY REGULATE mRNA EXPRESSION IN THE SEROTONERGIC DORSAL RAPHE NUCLEUS

    PubMed Central

    Lunden, Jason; Kirby, Lynn G.

    2013-01-01

    Previous results from our lab suggest that hypofunctioning of the serotonergic (5-HT) dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is involved in stress-induced opiate reinstatement. To further investigate the effects of morphine dependence and withdrawal on the 5-HT DRN system, we measured gene expression at the level of mRNA in the DRN during a model of morphine dependence, withdrawal and post withdrawal stress exposure in rats. Morphine pellets were implanted for 72h and then either removed or animals were injected with naloxone to produce spontaneous or precipitated withdrawal, respectively. Animals exposed to these conditions exhibited withdrawal symptoms including weight loss, wet dog shakes and jumping behavior. Gene expression for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB, corticotrophin releasing-factor (CRF)-R1, CRF-R2, GABAA-α1, μ-opioid receptor (MOR), 5-HT1A, tryptophan hydroxylase2 and the 5-HT transporter was then measured using quantitative real-time PCR at multiple time-points across the model of morphine exposure, withdrawal and post withdrawal stress. Expression levels of BDNF, TrkB and CRF-R1 mRNA were decreased during both morphine exposure and following seven days of withdrawal. CRF-R2 mRNA expression was elevated after seven days of withdrawal. 5-HT1A receptor mRNA expression was decreased following 3 hours of morphine exposure, while TPH2 mRNA expression was decreased after seven days of withdrawal with swim stress. There were no changes in the expression of GABAA-α1, MOR or 5-HT transporter mRNA. Collectively these results suggest that alterations in neurotrophin support, CRF-dependent stress signaling, 5-HT synthesis and release may underlie 5-HT DRN hypofunction that can potentially lead to stress-induced opiate relapse. PMID:24055683

  10. Biphasic competition between opiates and enkephalins: does it indicate the existence of a common high affinity (mu-1) binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Sarne, Y.; Kenner, A.

    1987-08-03

    Displacement from brain membranes of labeled opiates by low concentrations of enkephalins and of labeled enkephalins by low concentrations of opiates has been previously explained by the existance of a common high affinity site termed mu-1. An alternative interpretation of the same results is that the trough seen in the low concentration zone of the displacement curves represents cross binding of mu and delta opioid ligands to delta and mu receptors, respectively. In three sets of experiments with brain membranes, the size of the trough is shown to be dependent on the labeled ligand used: The ratio between the size of troughs seen with (TH)D-Ala, D-Leu enkephalin and with (TH)morphine varies with experimental conditions (storage of membranes at 4C for 72h), with ratio of mu:delta receptors (e.g. in thalamus and cortex which are enriched in mu and delta sites, respectively) and with pretreatment of membranes with naloxonazine. These results cannot be explained by a common high affinity site, but rather by binding of (TH)D-Ala, D-Leu enkephalin to mu and of (TH)morphine to delta opioid receptors. 17 references, 3 figures.

  11. Analysis of the clinical indications for opiate use in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sundas; Akerman, Meredith; Sultan, Keith

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Opiate use for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), particularly high-dose (HD) use, is associated with increased mortality. It's assumed that opiate use is directly related to IBD-related complaints, although this hasn't been well defined. Our goal was to determine the indications for opiate use as a first step in developing strategies to prevent or decrease opiate use. Methods A retrospective cohort was formed of adults who were diagnosed with IBD and for whom outpatient evaluations from 2009 to 2014 were documented. Opiate use was defined if opiates were prescribed for a minimum of 30 days over a 365-day period. Individual chart notes were then reviewed to determine the clinical indication(s) for low-dose (LD) and HD opiate use. Results After a search of the electronic records of 1,109,277 patients, 3,226 patients with IBD were found. One hundred four patients were identified as opiate users, including 65 patients with Crohn's and 39 with ulcerative colitis; a total of 134 indications were available for these patients. IBD-related complaints accounted for 49.25% of the opiate indications, with abdominal pain (23.13%) being the most common. Overall, opiate use for IBD-related complaints (81.40% vs. 50.82%; P=0.0014) and abdominal pain (44.19% vs. 19.67%; P=0.0071) was more common among HD than among LD. Conclusions Our findings show that most IBD patients using opiates, particularly HD users, used opiates for IBD-related complaints. Future research will need to determine the degree to which these complaints are related to disease activity and to formulate non-opiate pain management strategies for patients with both active and inactive IBD. PMID:28239317

  12. Heterogeneity of alpha1 receptors associated with vascular smooth muscle: evidence from functional and ligand binding studies

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, M.; Pedigo, N.W.; Butler, B.T.; Piascik, M.T.

    1987-08-10

    The nature of the alpha1 receptor associated with rabbit aorta has been examined in functional and receptor binding studies. In isolated aortic rings the dose-response curve for (-)metaraminol was not parallel to that of (-)epinephrine, (-)norepinephrine or (-)phenylephrine. Following inactivation of a portion of the alpha receptors with phenoxybenzamine, the occupancy versus response relationship for metaraminol, in contrast to the other test agonists, was biphasic. In microsomes prepared from aorta, metaraminol bound to two classes of sites labelled by the selective alpha1 antagonist (TH) prazosin. Norepinephrine also bound to two sites on the alpha receptor in all three preparations tested. The Scatchard plot of (TH)prazosin binding to microsomes prepared from frozen aorta was curvilinear. Estimates of the affinities and site densities were 49.6 +/- 15.3 pM and 44.8 +/- 11.8 pmol/gm protein and 1.0 +/- 0.2 nM and 43.8 +/- 17.4 pmol/gm for the high and low affinity sites, respectively. These data are consistent with the idea that there are subtypes of the alpha1 receptor. 33 references, 5 figures.

  13. Heterogeneity of nonimmune immunoglobulin Fc reactivity among gram-positive cocci: description of three major types of receptors for human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Myhre, E B; Kronvall, G

    1977-09-01

    Two hundred and thirty strains of various gram-positive cocci were tested for quantitative, nonimmune binding of radiolabeled human polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG). The majority of coagulase-positive staphylococci and streptococci belonging to serogroups C and G showed a high uptake of IgG. The binding of immunoglobulin to group A streptococci was considerably less, with a number of strains completely negative. None of the pneumococcal or the group B or D streptococcal strains displayed any binding capacity. Heterogeneity of the IgG reactivity of various reactive strains was studied in an inhibition assay using 10 different animal serum pools. Three different inhibition patterns were seen, each of them revealing a striking degree of homogeneity within single bacterial species. Staphylococcus aureus and group A streptococci, respectively, constituted two homogeneous groups which differed markedly from each other and from C and G streptococci. No differences were observed between group C and G streptococci. Based on the profound differences between these homogeneous groups, three major types of Fc receptors could be defined. Type I and II Fc receptors were found on S. aureus and on group A streptococci, respectively. Fc receptor type III represented the immunoglobulin-binding structure of both group C and G streptococci.

  14. Amenability to counseling of opiate addicts on probation or parole.

    PubMed

    Goodkin, K; Wilson, K E

    1982-08-01

    Fifty-two opiate addicts were classified as abstainers or continued abusers by their probation or parole officer. Eighteen variables--nine demographic and nine psychological--were evaluated for all subjects. Following factor analysis, 13 remaining variables were entered into a stepwise discriminant function analysis which significantly differentiated the abstaining and abusing groups. Abstainers were characterized by less dogmatism, higher education and personality integration, fewer aggressive incidents and previous drug arrests, and older age. The discriminant function classified 78.8% of the observations correctly and accounted for 27% of the variance. Rokeach's Dogmatism Scale, the Personality Integration Subscale of the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale, and the effective demographic discriminators have been included in a screening battery for counseling amenability by which incoming opiate addicts scoring like abstainers are granted priority in treatment assignment.

  15. [Withdrawal in opiate addicts in an internal medicine hospital unit].

    PubMed

    Crémer, G A; Boissonnas, A

    1995-10-01

    Withdrawal of opiates drug addicts in Internal Medicine is unusual in France. Four main preliminary conditions are requested: 1--Drug addict preparation and self motivation, 2--Inter and intra institution team collaboration, 3--Opening the hospital towards community agencies, 4--Hospital staff recruited on volunteer basis. Within two years (1992-1993), 210 opiates drug addicts were hospitalized for withdrawal. Two third were males, median age was 27, median years of addiction was 7. Thirty percent were seropositive for HIV, 70% for HCV. Hospitalisation lasted 7 days for heroin addicts and 10 days for morphin, codein or buprenorphin addicts. Successful withdrawn was observed for 70% patients but six months after withdrawal, only 15% remained abstinent.

  16. Use of very low-dose naltrexone during opiate detoxification.

    PubMed

    Mannelli, Paolo; Gottheil, Edward; Buonanno, Antonio; De Risio, Sergio

    2003-01-01

    The use of antagonist drugs to reduce the duration of opiate detoxification severely enhances withdrawal symptoms. To investigate the feasibility of administering antagonists with opiates without intense withdrawal during detoxification, 5 methadone maintained patients were evaluated while tapering methadone and receiving at the same time very low (0.125 mg), then increasing daily doses of naltrexone in the course of a 6-day, day hospital treatment. Reduced quantities of adjunctive medications were administered, as compared to the standard protocols, the treatment was completed without incidents or particular discomfort and all patients were easily induced to naltrexone maintenance by the day of discharge. Controlled studies will clarify whether very low-dose naltrexone provides a safe and comfortable detoxification technique to reduce withdrawal intensity and duration without the problems of heavy sedation, as suggested by the description of these clinical cases.

  17. [Reimbursement of opiate substitution drugs to militaries in 2007].

    PubMed

    d'Argouges, F; Desjeux, G; Marsan, P; Thevenin-Garron, V

    2012-09-01

    The use of psychoactive drugs by militaries is not compatible with the analytical skills and self-control required by their jobs. Military physicians take this problem into consideration by organising systematic drugs screening in the French forces. However, for technical reasons, opiates are not concerned by this screening with the agreement of the people concerned. The estimated number of militaries who use an opiate substitute may be an approach of heroin consumption in the French forces. This study describes buprenorphine and methadone reimbursements made during 2007 by the national military healthcare centre to French militaries. Each French soldier is affiliated to a special health insurance. The national military healthcare centre has in its information system, all the data concerning drug reimbursement made to French military personnel. This is a retrospective study of buprenorphine and methadone reimbursements made during 2007 by the military healthcare centre, to militaries from the three sectors of the French forces, and from the gendarmerie and joint forces. Only one reimbursement of one of these two drugs during this period allowed the patient to be included in our study. Daily drug dose and treatment steadiness profile have been calculated according to the criteria of the French monitoring centre for drugs and drug addiction. The criteria of the National guidelines against frauds have been used to identify misuse of these drugs. Doctors' shopping behaviour has also been studied. Finally, the nature of the prescriber and the consumption of other drugs in combination with opiate substitute have been analysed. One hundred and eighty-one military consumers of opiate substitute drugs (167 men and 14 women) participated. This sample included people from the three sectors of the French forces as well as from the gendarmerie and from the joint forces. The average age of the consumers was 26.6 years (20-42 years). The average length of service was 6.1 years

  18. Opiate versus psychostimulant addiction: the differences do matter

    PubMed Central

    Badiani, Aldo; Belin, David; Epstein, David; Calu, Donna; Shaham, Yavin

    2013-01-01

    The publication of the psychomotor stimulant theory of addiction in 1987 and the finding that addictive drugs increase dopamine concentrations in the rat mesolimbic system in 1988 have led to a predominance of psychobiological theories that consider addiction to opiates and addiction to psychostimulants as essentially identical phenomena. Indeed, current theories of addiction — hedonic allostasis, incentive sensitization, aberrant learning and frontostriatal dysfunction — all argue for a unitary account of drug addiction. This view is challenged by behavioural, cognitive and neurobiological findings in laboratory animals and humans. Here, we argue that opiate addiction and psychostimulant addiction are behaviourally and neurobiologically distinct and that the differences have important implications for addiction treatment, addiction theories and future research. PMID:21971065

  19. Opiate versus psychostimulant addiction: the differences do matter.

    PubMed

    Badiani, Aldo; Belin, David; Epstein, David; Calu, Donna; Shaham, Yavin

    2011-10-05

    The publication of the psychomotor stimulant theory of addiction in 1987 and the finding that addictive drugs increase dopamine concentrations in the rat mesolimbic system in 1988 have led to a predominance of psychobiological theories that consider addiction to opiates and addiction to psychostimulants as essentially identical phenomena. Indeed, current theories of addiction - hedonic allostasis, incentive sensitization, aberrant learning and frontostriatal dysfunction - all argue for a unitary account of drug addiction. This view is challenged by behavioural, cognitive and neurobiological findings in laboratory animals and humans. Here, we argue that opiate addiction and psychostimulant addiction are behaviourally and neurobiologically distinct and that the differences have important implications for addiction treatment, addiction theories and future research.

  20. Individual variation of human S1P₁ coding sequence leads to heterogeneity in receptor function and drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Obinata, Hideru; Gutkind, Sarah; Stitham, Jeremiah; Okuno, Toshiaki; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Hwa, John; Hla, Timothy

    2014-12-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P₁), an abundantly-expressed G protein-coupled receptor which regulates key vascular and immune responses, is a therapeutic target in autoimmune diseases. Fingolimod/Gilenya (FTY720), an oral medication for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, targets S1P₁ receptors on immune and neural cells to suppress neuroinflammation. However, suppression of endothelial S1P₁ receptors is associated with cardiac and vascular adverse effects. Here we report the genetic variations of the S1P₁ coding region from exon sequencing of >12,000 individuals and their functional consequences. We conducted functional analyses of 14 nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the S1PR1 gene. One SNP mutant (Arg¹²⁰ to Pro) failed to transmit sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)-induced intracellular signals such as calcium increase and activation of p44/42 MAPK and Akt. Two other mutants (Ile⁴⁵ to Thr and Gly³⁰⁵ to Cys) showed normal intracellular signals but impaired S1P-induced endocytosis, which made the receptor resistant to FTY720-induced degradation. Another SNP mutant (Arg¹³ to Gly) demonstrated protection from coronary artery disease in a high cardiovascular risk population. Individuals with this mutation showed a significantly lower percentage of multi-vessel coronary obstruction in a risk factor-matched case-control study. This study suggests that individual genetic variations of S1P₁ can influence receptor function and, therefore, infer differential disease risks and interaction with S1P₁-targeted therapeutics.

  1. Sigma opiates and certain antipsychotic drugs mutually inhibit (+)-[3H] SKF 10,047 and [3H]haloperidol binding in guinea pig brain membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Tam, S W; Cook, L

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between binding of antipsychotic drugs and sigma psychotomimetic opiates to binding sites for the sigma agonist (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047 (N-allylnormetazocine) and to dopamine D2 sites was investigated. In guinea pig brain membranes, (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047 bound to a single class of sites with a Kd of 4 X 10(-8) M and a Bmax of 333 fmol/mg of protein. This binding was different from mu, kappa, or delta opiate receptor binding. It was inhibited by opiates that produce psychotomimetic activities but not by opiates that lack such activities. Some antipsychotic drugs inhibited (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047 binding with high to moderate affinities in the following order of potency: haloperidol greater than perphenazine greater than fluphenazine greater than acetophenazine greater than trifluoperazine greater than molindone greater than or equal to pimozide greater than or equal to thioridazine greater than or equal to chlorpromazine greater than or equal to triflupromazine. However, there were other antipsychotic drugs such as spiperone and clozapine that showed low affinity for the (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047 binding sites. Affinities of antipsychotic drugs for (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047 binding sites did not correlate with those for [3H]spiperone (dopamine D2) sites. [3H]-Haloperidol binding in whole brain membranes was also inhibited by the sigma opiates pentazocine, cyclazocine, and (+)-SKF 10,047. In the striatum, about half of the saturable [3H]haloperidol binding was to [3H]spiperone (D2) sites and the other half was to sites similar to (+)-[3H]SKF 10,047 binding sites. PMID:6147851

  2. sigma opiates and certain antipsychotic drugs mutually inhibit (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 and (/sup 3/H)haloperidol binding in guinea pig brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, S.W.; Cook, L.

    1984-09-01

    The relationship between binding of antipsychotic drugs and sigma psychotomimetic opiates to binding sites for the sigma agonist (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 (N-allylnormetazocine) and to dopamine D/sub 2/ sites was investigated. In guinea pig brain membranes, (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 bound to single class of sites with a K/sub d/ of 4 x 10/sup -8/ M and a B/sub max/ of 333 fmol/mg of protein. This binding was different from ..mu.., kappa, or delta opiate receptor binding. It was inhibited by opiates that produce psychotomimetic activities but not by opiates that lack such activities. Some antipsychotic drugs inhibited (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding with high to moderate affinities in the following order of potency: haloperidol > perphenazine > fluphenazine > acetophenazine > trifluoperazine > molindone greater than or equal to pimozide greater than or equal to thioridazine greater than or equal to chlorpromazine greater than or equal to triflupromazine. However, there were other antipsychotic drugs such as spiperone and clozapine that showed low affinity for the (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding sites. Affinities of antipsychotic drugs for (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding sites did not correlate with those for (/sup 3/H)spiperone (dopamine D/sub 2/) sites. (/sup 3/H)-Haloperidol binding in whole brain membranes was also inhibited by the sigma opiates pentazocine, cyclazocine, and (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047. In the striatum, about half of the saturable (/sup 3/H)haloperidol binding was to (/sup 3/H)spiperone (D/sub 2/) sites and the other half was to sites similar to (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding sites. 15 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  3. Uzbekistan: government discontinues pilot opiate substitution therapy program.

    PubMed

    Khachatrian, Avet

    2009-12-01

    In this decade, with support from the international community, most countries of the former Soviet Union introduced opiate substitution therapy (OST) programs, using methadone or buprenorphine, in order to curb the spread of HIV and to introduce more efficient drug dependence treatment options. However, the development is uneven:While some countries have expanded their pilot projects, others have not gone beyond the pilot stage. One Central Asian country--Uzbekistan--has recently closed its pilot OST project.

  4. Total biosynthesis of opiates by stepwise fermentation using engineered Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Akira; Matsumura, Eitaro; Koyanagi, Takashi; Katayama, Takane; Kawano, Noriaki; Yoshimatsu, Kayo; Yamamoto, Kenji; Kumagai, Hidehiko; Sato, Fumihiko; Minami, Hiromichi

    2016-01-01

    Opiates such as morphine and codeine are mainly obtained by extraction from opium poppies. Fermentative opiate production in microbes has also been investigated, and complete biosynthesis of opiates from a simple carbon source has recently been accomplished in yeast. Here we demonstrate that Escherichia coli serves as an efficient, robust and flexible platform for total opiate synthesis. Thebaine, the most important raw material in opioid preparations, is produced by stepwise culture of four engineered strains at yields of 2.1 mg l−1 from glycerol, corresponding to a 300-fold increase from recently developed yeast systems. This improvement is presumably due to strong activity of enzymes related to thebaine synthesis from (R)-reticuline in E. coli. Furthermore, by adding two genes to the thebaine production system, we demonstrate the biosynthesis of hydrocodone, a clinically important opioid. Improvements in opiate production in this E. coli system represent a major step towards the development of alternative opiate production systems. PMID:26847395

  5. Increased vulnerability to stress following opiate exposures: behavioral and autonomic correlates.

    PubMed

    Blatchford, Kate E; Diamond, Keri; Westbrook, R Frederick; McNally, Gavan P

    2005-08-01

    The authors used rats to study the impact of a history of opiate exposures on behavioral and autonomic responses to restraint stress. Brief restraint (30 min) provoked tachycardia and a pressor response, anxiety (as indexed by social interaction), grooming, and reduced exploration. The pressor response was reduced at 1 day, but not 7 days, after last opiate exposure; tachycardia was unaffected (Experiment 1). Stress-induced anxiety was potentiated 1 and 7 days after last opiate exposure (Experiment 2), and this potentiation was a function of dose (Experiment 3) and duration (Experiment 4) of opiate exposure. The results show that a history of opiate exposures alters vulnerability to stress and has implications for understanding coping, anxiety, and emotionality in former opiate users.

  6. Total biosynthesis of opiates by stepwise fermentation using engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Akira; Matsumura, Eitaro; Koyanagi, Takashi; Katayama, Takane; Kawano, Noriaki; Yoshimatsu, Kayo; Yamamoto, Kenji; Kumagai, Hidehiko; Sato, Fumihiko; Minami, Hiromichi

    2016-02-05

    Opiates such as morphine and codeine are mainly obtained by extraction from opium poppies. Fermentative opiate production in microbes has also been investigated, and complete biosynthesis of opiates from a simple carbon source has recently been accomplished in yeast. Here we demonstrate that Escherichia coli serves as an efficient, robust and flexible platform for total opiate synthesis. Thebaine, the most important raw material in opioid preparations, is produced by stepwise culture of four engineered strains at yields of 2.1 mg l(-1) from glycerol, corresponding to a 300-fold increase from recently developed yeast systems. This improvement is presumably due to strong activity of enzymes related to thebaine synthesis from (R)-reticuline in E. coli. Furthermore, by adding two genes to the thebaine production system, we demonstrate the biosynthesis of hydrocodone, a clinically important opioid. Improvements in opiate production in this E. coli system represent a major step towards the development of alternative opiate production systems.

  7. Opiate overdose in an adolescent after a dental procedure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, James; Stein, Pamela; Aulisio, Madeline; Humphries, Laurie; Martin, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Oxycodone/acetaminophen is a combination of acetaminophen and the opiate oxycodone. It is an effective analgesic that is commonly prescribed postoperatively. The potential for misuse, diversion, abuse, and overdose with opiates in general is an area of increasing concern to all prescribing clinicians. This case report illustrates the possibility of a severe or potentially fatal outcome to a common prescribing practice. Caution is emphasized when prescribing opiates, and screening for substance misuse and suicide risk factors is recommended.

  8. Molecular analysis of the sea anemone toxin Av3 reveals selectivity to insects and demonstrates the heterogeneity of receptor site-3 on voltage-gated Na+ channels.

    PubMed

    Moran, Yehu; Kahn, Roy; Cohen, Lior; Gur, Maya; Karbat, Izhar; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael

    2007-08-15

    Av3 is a short peptide toxin from the sea anemone Anemonia viridis shown to be active on crustaceans and inactive on mammals. It inhibits inactivation of Na(v)s (voltage-gated Na+ channels) like the structurally dissimilar scorpion alpha-toxins and type I sea anemone toxins that bind to receptor site-3. To examine the potency and mode of interaction of Av3 with insect Na(v)s, we established a system for its expression, mutagenized it throughout, and analysed it in toxicity, binding and electrophysiological assays. The recombinant Av3 was found to be highly toxic to blowfly larvae (ED50=2.65+/-0.46 pmol/100 mg), to compete well with the site-3 toxin LqhalphaIT (from the scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus) on binding to cockroach neuronal membranes (K(i)=21.4+/-7.1 nM), and to inhibit the inactivation of Drosophila melanogaster channel, DmNa(v)1, but not that of mammalian Na(v)s expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Moreover, like other site-3 toxins, the activity of Av3 was synergically enhanced by ligands of receptor site-4 (e.g. scorpion beta-toxins). The bioactive surface of Av3 was found to consist mainly of aromatic residues and did not resemble any of the bioactive surfaces of other site-3 toxins. These analyses have portrayed a toxin that might interact with receptor site-3 in a different fashion compared with other ligands of this site. This assumption was corroborated by a D1701R mutation in DmNa(v)1, which has been shown to abolish the activity of all other site-3 ligands, except Av3. All in all, the present study provides further evidence for the heterogeneity of receptor site-3, and raises Av3 as a unique model for design of selective anti-insect compounds.

  9. Molecular analysis of the sea anemone toxin Av3 reveals selectivity to insects and demonstrates the heterogeneity of receptor site-3 on voltage-gated Na+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Yehu; Kahn, Roy; Cohen, Lior; Gur, Maya; Karbat, Izhar; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Av3 is a short peptide toxin from the sea anemone Anemonia viridis shown to be active on crustaceans and inactive on mammals. It inhibits inactivation of Navs (voltage-gated Na+ channels) like the structurally dissimilar scorpion α-toxins and type I sea anemone toxins that bind to receptor site-3. To examine the potency and mode of interaction of Av3 with insect Navs, we established a system for its expression, mutagenized it throughout, and analysed it in toxicity, binding and electrophysiological assays. The recombinant Av3 was found to be highly toxic to blowfly larvae (ED50=2.65±0.46 pmol/100 mg), to compete well with the site-3 toxin LqhαIT (from the scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus) on binding to cockroach neuronal membranes (Ki=21.4±7.1 nM), and to inhibit the inactivation of Drosophila melanogaster channel, DmNav1, but not that of mammalian Navs expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Moreover, like other site-3 toxins, the activity of Av3 was synergically enhanced by ligands of receptor site-4 (e.g. scorpion β-toxins). The bioactive surface of Av3 was found to consist mainly of aromatic residues and did not resemble any of the bioactive surfaces of other site-3 toxins. These analyses have portrayed a toxin that might interact with receptor site-3 in a different fashion compared with other ligands of this site. This assumption was corroborated by a D1701R mutation in DmNav1, which has been shown to abolish the activity of all other site-3 ligands, except Av3. All in all, the present study provides further evidence for the heterogeneity of receptor site-3, and raises Av3 as a unique model for design of selective anti-insect compounds. PMID:17492942

  10. Loss of striatal Mu/sub 1/ opiate binding by substantia nigra lesions in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Bodnar, R.J.; Clark, J.A.; Cooper, M.L.; Pasternak, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    Opiate receptors have been identified within the striatum and some have been localized presynaptically to nigrostriatal neurons. Using unilateral ablative lesion of the substantia nigra, the authors examined binding in the ipsilateral and contralateral striata. Lesions significantly lowered both /sup 3/H(D-Ala/sup 2/, MePhe/sup 4/, Gly(ol)/sup 5/) enkephalin (DAGO) and /sup 3/H(D-Ala/sup 2/,Leu/sup 5/) enkephalin (DADL) binding. The inclusion of competitors in these assays revealed a decrease in both mu/sub 1/ and mu/sub 2/ receptors. Mu/sub 1/ binding was slightly more sensitive to the lesioning than mu/sub 2/ binding. Selective mu/sub 1/ and mu/sub 2/ binding assays supported these observations. No change in delta binding was observed in the lesioned striata. These studies raise the possibility that both mu/sub 1/ and mu/sub 2/, but not delta, receptors are localized presynaptically on nigrostriatal neurons.

  11. What happens to opiate addicts immediately after treatment: a prospective follow up study.

    PubMed Central

    Gossop, M; Green, L; Phillips, G; Bradley, B

    1987-01-01

    In the first British study to investigate systematically what happens to opiate addicts after treatment 50 opiate addicts admitted for inpatient treatment of their drug dependence were followed up for six months after discharge. All had been withdrawn from opiates before follow up. Six months later 26 were not using opiates: 12 had not used opiates at any time since discharge. When subjects in hospital or in prison were excluded from the analysis 21 (47%) of the subjects living in the community were not taking opiates. Many subjects used opiates within days of leaving the inpatient unit, but this first lapse did not necessarily lead to a full relapse into addictive use. During the six months after discharge several subjects used opiates on a less than daily basis. During each two month period throughout the six months of follow up the proportion of subjects who were occasional users fell, the proportion of abstinent subjects grew, and the proportion of daily users (assumed to be readdicted) remained constant. Although many of the addicts relapsed soon after treatment, it was encouraging that almost half were opiate free after six months. These results have important implications for the treatment of drug addicts. PMID:3109662

  12. More mysteries of opium reveal'd: 300 years of opiates.

    PubMed

    Miller, R J; Tran, P B

    2000-08-01

    This year is the 300th anniversary of the publication of one of the first books written about opiates and their subjective effects. Since that time the influence of opiates in Western society has grown enormously, as has our knowledge of the mechanisms by which these drugs produce their effects. Wars have been fought over the use of opiates and the economies of several countries depend on their production. In this article, some aspects of the history and effects of opiates on the arts in particular are explored.

  13. Ultra-deep T cell receptor sequencing reveals the complexity and intratumour heterogeneity of T cell clones in renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Gerlinger, Marco; Quezada, Sergio A; Peggs, Karl S; Furness, Andrew J S; Fisher, Rosalie; Marafioti, Teresa; Shende, Vishvesh H; McGranahan, Nicholas; Rowan, Andrew J; Hazell, Steven; Hamm, David; Robins, Harlan S; Pickering, Lisa; Gore, Martin; Nicol, David L; Larkin, James; Swanton, Charles

    2013-12-01

    The recognition of cancer cells by T cells can impact upon prognosis and be exploited for immunotherapeutic approaches. This recognition depends on the specific interaction between antigens displayed on the surface of cancer cells and the T cell receptor (TCR), which is generated by somatic rearrangements of TCR α- and β-chains (TCRb). Our aim was to assess whether ultra-deep sequencing of the rearranged TCRb in DNA extracted from unfractionated clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) samples can provide insights into the clonality and heterogeneity of intratumoural T cells in ccRCCs, a tumour type that can display extensive genetic intratumour heterogeneity (ITH). For this purpose, DNA was extracted from two to four tumour regions from each of four primary ccRCCs and was analysed by ultra-deep TCR sequencing. In parallel, tumour infiltration by CD4, CD8 and Foxp3 regulatory T cells was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and correlated with TCR-sequencing data. A polyclonal T cell repertoire with 367-16 289 (median 2394) unique TCRb sequences was identified per tumour region. The frequencies of the 100 most abundant T cell clones/tumour were poorly correlated between most regions (Pearson correlation coefficient, -0.218 to 0.465). 3-93% of these T cell clones were not detectable across all regions. Thus, the clonal composition of T cell populations can be heterogeneous across different regions of the same ccRCC. T cell ITH was higher in tumours pretreated with an mTOR inhibitor, which could suggest that therapy can influence adaptive tumour immunity. These data show that ultra-deep TCR-sequencing technology can be applied directly to DNA extracted from unfractionated tumour samples, allowing novel insights into the clonality of T cell populations in cancers. These were polyclonal and displayed ITH in ccRCC. TCRb sequencing may shed light on mechanisms of cancer immunity and the efficacy of immunotherapy approaches.

  14. Pharmacological modulation of protein kinases as a new approach to treat addiction to cocaine and opiates.

    PubMed

    García-Pardo, María Pilar; Roger-Sanchez, Concepción; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta; Miñarro, Jose; Aguilar, María Asunción

    2016-06-15

    Drug addiction shares brain mechanisms and molecular substrates with learning and memory processes, such as the stimulation of glutamate receptors and their downstream signalling pathways. In the present work we provide an up-to-date review of studies that have demonstrated the implication of the main memory-related calcium-dependent protein kinases in opiate and cocaine addiction. The effects of these drugs of abuse in different animal models of drug reward, dependence and addiction are altered by manipulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, particularly extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), the protein kinase C (PKC) family (including PKMζ), cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), cGMP-dependent protein kinase G (PKG), the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway and its downstream target mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR), cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), heat-shock proteins (Hsp) and other enzymes and proteins. Research suggests that drugs of abuse induce dependence and addiction by modifying the signalling pathways that involve these memory-related protein kinases, and supports the idea that drug addiction is an excessive aberrant learning disorder in which the maladaptive memory of drug-associated cues maintains compulsive drug use and contributes to relapse. Moreover, the studies we review offer new pharmacological strategies to treat opiate and cocaine dependence based on the manipulation of these protein kinases. In particular, disruption of reconsolidation of drug-related memories may have a high therapeutic value in the treatment of drug addiction.

  15. R7BP modulates opiate analgesia and tolerance but not withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Dimitra; Cao, Yan; Agrimaki, Ioanna; Martemyanov, Kirill A; Zachariou, Venetia

    2012-03-01

    The adaptor protein R7 family binding protein (R7BP) modulates G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling and desensitization by controlling the function of regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins. R7BP is expressed throughout the brain and appears to modulate the membrane localization and stability of three proteins that belong to R7 RGS family: RGS6, RGS7, and RGS9-2. RGS9-2 is a potent negative modulator of opiate and psychostimulant addiction and promotes the development of analgesic tolerance to morphine, whereas the role of RGS6 and RGS7 in addiction remains unknown. Recent studies revealed that functional deletion of R7BP reduces R7 protein activity by preventing their anchoring to the cell membrane and enhances GPCR responsiveness in the basal ganglia. Here, we take advantage of R7BP knockout mice in order to examine the way interventions in R7 proteins function throughout the brain affect opiate actions. Our results suggest that R7BP is a negative modulator of the analgesic and locomotor activating actions of morphine. We also report that R7BP contributes to the development of morphine tolerance. Finally, our data suggest that although prevention of R7BP actions enhances the analgesic responses to morphine, it does not affect the severity of somatic withdrawal signs. Our data suggest that interventions in R7BP actions enhance the analgesic effect of morphine and prevent tolerance, without affecting withdrawal, pointing to R7BP complexes as potential new targets for analgesic drugs.

  16. Radiosynthesis of F-18-3-acetylcyclofoxy: A high affinity opiate antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Channing, M.A.; Eckelman, W.C.; Bennett, J.M.; Burke, T.R. Jr.; Rice, K.C.; Larson, S.M.

    1985-05-01

    A convenient method for the preparation of F-18-3-acetylcyclofoxy (3-acetyl-6-deoxy-6-beta-F-18-fluoronaltrexone was developed. The method uses reactor-produced F-18-fluoride as its tetraethylammonium salt. F-18 fluoride is produced at the National Bureau of Standards nuclear reactor by the Li-6(n,..cap alpha..)H-3, 0-16(H-3,n) F-18 nuclear reaction. A sealed quartz tube containing enriched lithium carbonate (0.4 g) was irradiated in a neutron flux of 1.1 x 10/sup 14/ n/cm/sup 2//s for 2h to produce 80 mCi. The lithium is removed by cation exchange resin. The fluoride is then adsorbed on a strong anion exchange column which is rinsed to remove H-3 and any remaining cations. The F-18 is then eluted with tetraethylammonium hydroxide to produce tetraethylammonium fluoride (TEAF). The triflate of 3-acetyl-6-alpha-naltrexol, synthesized by reaction of the alcohol with trifluoromethanesulfonic anhydride was added in anhydrous acetonitrile to the dry F-18 TEAF containing 0.2 ..mu..mol F-19 TEAF. The mixture was refluxed for 15 minutes after which the product was purified by reversed phase chromatography. F-18-acetylcyclofoxy was prepared in 35% radiochemical yield. About 55% of the F-18 was lost by decay (36%) and by incomplete transfer (19%). The specific activity of the final product was approximately 50 Ci/mmol but the effective specific activity was approximately 25 Ci/mmol. Visualization of the basal ganglia in baboons was possible using PET. F-18 3-acetylcyclofoxy is the first positron-emitting opiate for which the active and inactive forms of naloxone were used to unequivocially demonstrate stereospecific displacement from opiate receptor-rich regions.

  17. Differential expression of CD14, CD36 and the LDL receptor on human monocyte-derived macrophages. A novel cell culture system to study macrophage differentiation and heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Wintergerst, E S; Jelk, J; Asmis, R

    1998-09-01

    Macrophages are key players in many aspects of human physiology and disease. It has been hypothesized that in a given microenvironment monocytes differentiate into specific subpopulations with distinct functions. In order to study the role of macrophage heterogeneity in atherogenesis, we established a novel isolation and culture technique for human monocyte-derived macrophages. The present technique does not select for monocyte subpopulations prior to the onset of differentiation. Monocytes were cultured for 2 weeks in the presence of autologous lymphocytes before being plated quantitatively. They differentiated into mature macrophages in terms of morphology, lipid composition, and biological activity. Based on phagocytic activity as well as on the expression of CD14, CD36, and the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, we have identified macrophage subpopulations that may play distinct roles in atherogenesis. While virtually all adherence-purified monocytes expressed CD14, CD36, and the LDL-R, we characterized three subpopulations of macrophages based on the expression of these antigens: CD36+CD14-LDL-R-(58+/-12%), CD36+CD14+LDL-R+(18+/-5%), the remaining cells being CD36-CD14- LDL-R-. The first two subsets decreased in size during further differentiation (51+/-12% and 8+/-3%, respectively). Our culture technique may also serve as a good model for studying the implications of macrophage heterogeneity in diseases other than atherosclerosis.

  18. Pain reporting, opiate dosing, and the adverse effects of opiates after hip or knee replacement in patients 60 years old or older.

    PubMed

    Petre, Benjamin M; Roxbury, Christopher R; McCallum, Jeremy R; Defontes, Kenneth W; Belkoff, Stephen M; Mears, Simon C

    2012-03-01

    Our goal was to determine whether there were age-related differences in pain, opiate use, and opiate side effects after total hip or knee arthroplasty in patients 60 years old or older. We hypothesized that there would be no significant differences between age groups in (1) mean pain score, (2) opiate use after adjusting for pain, or (3) opiate side effects after adjusting for opiate use and pain score. We retrospectively reviewed the electronic and paper charts of all patients undergoing total joint replacements at our institution over 3 years who met the following criteria: (1) 60 years old or older, (2) primary single total knee or total hip replacement, and (3) no preoperative dementia. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative course data were collected using a customized data entry process and database. We divided the patients into 2 age groups, those 60 to 79 years old and those 80 years old or older. Using a marginal model with the panel variable of postoperative day, we investigated the associations between age group and pain, age group and pain adjusting for opiate use, and age group and complications (respiratory depression, naloxone usage as a measure of respiratory arrest, delirium, constipation, and urinary retention) adjusting for opiate use (Xtgee, Stata10, Stata Corp. LP, College Station, Texas). Significance was set at P < .05. We found no significant difference in pain scores between groups, but the older group had significantly fewer opiates prescribed yet significantly more side effects, including delirium (odds ratio 4.2), than did the younger group, even after adjusting for opiate dose and pain score.

  19. The Ron Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Regulates Macrophage Heterogeneity and Plays a Protective Role in Diet-Induced Obesity, Atherosclerosis, and Hepatosteatosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shan; Allen, Joselyn N; Dey, Adwitia; Zhang, Limin; Balandaram, Gayathri; Kennett, Mary J; Xia, Mingcan; Xiong, Na; Peters, Jeffrey M; Patterson, Andrew; Hankey-Giblin, Pamela A

    2016-07-01

    Obesity is a chronic inflammatory disease mediated in large part by the activation of inflammatory macrophages. This chronic inflammation underlies a whole host of diseases including atherosclerosis, hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cancer, among others. Macrophages are generally classified as either inflammatory or alternatively activated. Some tissue-resident macrophages are derived from yolk sac erythromyeloid progenitors and fetal liver progenitors that seed tissues during embryogenesis and have the ability to repopulate through local proliferation. These macrophages tend to be anti-inflammatory in nature and are generally involved in tissue remodeling, repair, and homeostasis. Alternatively, during chronic inflammation induced by obesity, bone marrow monocyte-derived macrophages are recruited to inflamed tissues, where they produce proinflammatory cytokines and exacerbate inflammation. The extent to which these two populations of macrophages are plastic in their phenotype remains controversial. We have demonstrated previously that the Ron receptor tyrosine kinase is expressed on tissue-resident macrophages, where it limits inflammatory macrophage activation and promotes a repair phenotype. In this study, we demonstrate that Ron is expressed in a subpopulation of macrophages during chronic inflammation induced by obesity that exhibit a repair phenotype as determined by the expression of arginase 1. In addition, we demonstrate that the Ron receptor plays a protective role in the progression of diet-induced obesity, hepatosteatosis, and atherosclerosis. These results suggest that altering macrophage heterogeneity in vivo could have the potential to alleviate obesity-associated diseases. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. Effects of specific mu and kappa opiate tolerance and abstinence on hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis secretion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ignar, D M; Kuhn, C M

    1990-12-01

    Chronic administration of opiates to rats results in HPA axis tolerance and abstinence-induced hypersecretion. The effects of specific mu and kappa tolerance and withdrawal on the functional secretion of the HPA axis were evaluated in this study. Adult male rats were injected s.c. twice daily with saline, morphine or U50,488 for 5 days. Serum adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) or corticosterone (CS) were determined by radioimmunoassay as measures of HPA axis function. Tolerance to morphine (10 mg/kg) and U50,488 (1 mg/kg), but no cross-tolerance, was observed suggesting the development of mu- or kappa-specific tolerance, respectively. Tolerance does not occur at the pituitary or adrenal levels after these paradigms because ACTH and CS responses to exogenous corticotropin-releasing factor and ACTH, respectively, were not attenuated. CS secretion in response to novelty stress was not affected by either chronic opiate treatment, but the circadian variation of CS levels was slightly blunted after chronic morphine. In contrast, the elevation of CS secretion by quipazine (0.5 mg/kg) and physostigmine (0.1 mg/kg) was attenuated after chronic U50,488, but not morphine administration. Both spontaneous and antagonist-precipitated withdrawal from morphine, but not U50,488, resulted in elevation of CS levels. Low doses of morphine suppressed morphine abstinence-induced CS hypersecretion, whereas, U50,488 and clonidine had no effect. In conclusion, alterations of HPA axis function occur during chronic mu or kappa opiate administration that are receptor-specific and involve multiple neural controls of the HPA axis.

  1. Opiate dependence in schizophrenia: case presentation and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kern, Audrey M; Akerman, Sarah C; Nordstrom, Benjamin R

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade opioid pain reliever misuse among the U.S. population has increased to epidemic proportions. While the U.S. has only 4% of the world's population, Americans consume 86% of the world's opioids. In 2011, approximately 13 million people (5% of the U.S. population) reported nonmedical use of prescription opioids, which are now the second most commonly abused class of drug behind cannabis. There has been little in the way of formal study examining the association between mental illness and prescription opiate abuse, but preliminary evidence suggests a strong association. Neurobiological processes involved in psychosis and opiate abuse may partially explain this association. Despite compelling evidence of the growth in opiate misuse and the potential relationship with mental illness, patients with mental disorders and/or substance abuse are routinely excluded from randomized trials, making it impossible to better understand these phenomena. Treatment guidelines, especially regarding opioid agonists such as methadone and buprenorphine for people with mental illness, are woefully inadequate. We present the case of a young man with schizoaffective disorder who sustained an injury and developed chronic back pain. Opioids were prescribed and he quickly progressed to abusing increasing doses of opioids, which eventually led to daily heroin use. The young man struggled with repeated relapses, serious use-related consequences and suicide attempts. This case highlights the role of chronic pain and opioid prescribing, the segue from prescribed use to abuse and dependence, and the transition to heroin use. It demonstrates the difficulty patients may have in obtaining adequate treatment for co-occurring mental illness and substance abuse and how outcomes are improved when treatment is integrated to address both disorders. Comprehensive treatment must involve a combination of case management and medical management, including possible opioid replacement therapy.

  2. HIV-1 incidence among opiate users in northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Celentano, D D; Hodge, M J; Razak, M H; Beyrer, C; Kawichai, S; Cegielski, J P; Nelson, K E; Jittiwutikarn, J

    1999-03-15

    The incidence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection among opiate users was determined in a retrospective cohort of 436 patients with multiple admissions to the only inpatient drug treatment program in northern Thailand between October 1993 and September 1995. During 323.4 person-years of follow-up, 60 patients presenting for detoxification acquired HIV-1 infection, for a crude incidence rate of 18.6 per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval 14.4-23.9). All seroconverters were male. HIV-1 incidence varied by the current route of drug administration: 31.3 per 100 person-years for injectors and 2.8 per 100 person-years for noninjectors (smoking and ingestion). Significant differences were found by ethnicity: HIV-1 incidence was 29.3 per 100 person-years for Thai lowlanders and 8.5 per 100 person-years for hill tribes. Multivariate relative risk estimates showed that injecting opiates (vs. use by other routes), being unmarried, being under age 40 years, being a Thai lowlander, having a primary and secondary education, and being employed in the business sector were each independently associated with human immunodeficiency virus seroconversion. This HIV-1 incidence rate is double that reported for Bangkok and suggests that prevention and control programs for drug users need to be expanded throughout Thailand. Improved availability of more-effective treatment regimens and increased access to sterile injection equipment are needed to confront the HIV-1 epidemic among opiate users in northern Thailand.

  3. Identification of the convulsant opiate thebaine in mammalian brain.

    PubMed Central

    Kodaira, H; Lisek, C A; Jardine, I; Arimura, A; Spector, S

    1989-01-01

    The convulsant opiate thebaine, an intermediate of morphine biosynthesis, was purified from bovine brain to homogeneity by gel filtration and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) monitored by a radioimmunoassay. The immunoreactive material behaved identically to standard thebaine in two HPLC systems and was confirmed to be thebaine by combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. To our knowledge, the presence of thebaine in mammalian tissue has not been demonstrated previously. Codeine and morphine were also found to exist in ovine brain. The presence of thebaine in ovine brain provides strong evidence that morphine and codeine, in various mammalian tissues, are of endogenous origin and actually biosynthesized from a precursor. Images PMID:2911601

  4. ADHD risk alleles associated with opiate addiction: study of addicted parents and their children.

    PubMed

    Ornoy, Asher; Finkel-Pekarsky, Victoria; Peles, Einat; Adelson, Miriam; Schreiber, Shaul; Ebstein, P Richard

    2016-08-01

    Polymorphisms in genes such as DAT1, 5HTTLPR, D4DR4, and MAO-A have been linked to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and susceptibility for opiate addiction. We investigated in opiate-addicted parents and their children the rate of ADHD and genetic markers that could predict susceptibility to ADHD and/or opiate addiction. We studied 64 heroin-addicted, methadone-maintained parents, and their 94 children who had or had not been exposed prenatally to opiates. DNA extracted from mouthwash was assessed for genetic polymorphism for six polymorphic sites of four different genes. Study subjects also filled a variety of questionnaires assessing the rate of ADHD in the parents and children and the children's intelligence quotient. Children of opiate-dependent mothers had a higher rate of ADHD compared to those of the opiate-dependent fathers. Opiate-dependent parents have a high risk of being carriers of most risk alleles examined except DRD4EX3 (allele 7). There was no difference whether the addicted parents had or did not have ADHD. Serotonergic and dopaminergic risk alleles seem to be mainly related to opiate dependence with no effect on the occurrence of ADHD. People carrying those polymorphisms are susceptible to opioid addiction and not necessarily to ADHD.

  5. Knowledge of Medical Students, Residents, and Attending Physicians About Opiate Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shine, Daniel, Demas, Penelope

    1984-01-01

    A questionnaire concerning knowledge of opiate abuse and attitudes about abusers was administered to 94 randomly selected physicians and medical students at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. The results indicated that physicians might benefit from improved teaching in the area of opiate abuse. (Author/MLW)

  6. Ultra-low-dose naltrexone suppresses rewarding effects of opiates and aversive effects of opiate withdrawal in rats.

    PubMed

    Olmstead, Mary C; Burns, Lindsay H

    2005-09-01

    Ultra-low-dose opioid antagonists enhance opiate analgesia and attenuate tolerance and withdrawal. To determine whether ultra-low-dose naltrexone (NTX) coadministration alters the rewarding effects of opiates or the aversive effects of opiate withdrawal. We used the conditioned place preference (CPP) and conditioned place aversion (CPA) paradigms to assess whether ultra-low-dose NTX alters the acute rewarding effects of oxycodone or morphine, or the aversive aspect of withdrawal from either drug. To assess the dose response for ultra-low-dose NTX, a range of NTX doses (0.03-30 ng/kg) was tested in the oxycodone CPP experiment. In order to avoid tolerance or sensitization effects, we used single conditioning sessions and female rats, as females are more sensitive to the conditioning effects of these drugs. Ultra-low-dose NTX (5 ng/kg) blocked the CPP to morphine (5 mg/kg) and the CPA to withdrawal from chronic morphine (5 mg/kg, for 7 days). Coadministration of ultra-low-dose NTX (30 pg/kg) also blocked the CPA to withdrawal from chronic oxycodone administration (3 mg/kg, for 7 days). The effects of NTX on the CPP to oxycodone (3 mg/kg) revealed a biphasic dose response. The two lowest doses (0.03 and 0.3 ng/kg) blocked the CPP, the middle dose (3 ng/kg) was ineffective, and oxycodone combined with the highest dose (30 ng/kg) produced a trend toward a CPP. Ultra-low-dose NTX coadministration blocks the acute rewarding effects of analgesic doses of oxycodone or morphine as well as the anhedonia of withdrawal from chronic administration.

  7. 5'-heterogeneity of glucocorticoid receptor messenger RNA is tissue specific: differential regulation of variant transcripts by early-life events.

    PubMed

    McCormick, J A; Lyons, V; Jacobson, M D; Noble, J; Diorio, J; Nyirenda, M; Weaver, S; Ester, W; Yau, J L; Meaney, M J; Seckl, J R; Chapman, K E

    2000-04-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene expression is regulated in a complex tissue-specific manner, notably by early-life environmental events that program tissue GR levels. We have identified and characterized several new rat GR mRNAs. All encode a common protein, but differ in their 5'-leader sequences as a consequence of alternate splicing of, potentially, 11 different exon 1 sequences. Most are located in a 3-kb CpG island, upstream of exon 2, that exhibits substantial promoter activity in transfected cells. Ribonuclease (RNase) protection analysis demonstrated significant levels of six alternate exons 1 in vivo in rat, with differences between liver, hippocampus, and thymus reflecting tissue-specific differences in promoter activity. Two of the alternate exons 1 (exons 1(6) and 1(10)) were expressed in all tissues examined, together present in 77-87% of total GR mRNA. The remaining GR transcripts contained tissue-specific alternate first exons. Importantly, tissue-specific first exon usage was altered by perinatal environmental manipulations. Postnatal handling, which permanently increases GR in the hippocampus, causing attenuation of stress responses, selectively elevated GR mRNA containing the hippocampus-specific exon 1(7). Prenatal glucocorticoid exposure, which increases hepatic GR expression and produces adult hyperglycemia, decreased the proportion of hepatic GR mRNA containing the predominant exon 1(10), suggesting an increase in a minor exon 1 variant. Such tissue specificity of promoter usage allows differential GR regulation and programming.

  8. Ultra-deep T cell receptor sequencing reveals the complexity and intratumour heterogeneity of T cell clones in renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Gerlinger, Marco; Quezada, Sergio A; Peggs, Karl S; Furness, Andrew JS; Fisher, Rosalie; Marafioti, Teresa; Shende, Vishvesh H; McGranahan, Nicholas; Rowan, Andrew J; Hazell, Steven; Hamm, David; Robins, Harlan S; Pickering, Lisa; Gore, Martin; Nicol, David L; Larkin, James; Swanton, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The recognition of cancer cells by T cells can impact upon prognosis and be exploited for immunotherapeutic approaches. This recognition depends on the specific interaction between antigens displayed on the surface of cancer cells and the T cell receptor (TCR), which is generated by somatic rearrangements of TCR α- and β-chains (TCRb). Our aim was to assess whether ultra-deep sequencing of the rearranged TCRb in DNA extracted from unfractionated clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) samples can provide insights into the clonality and heterogeneity of intratumoural T cells in ccRCCs, a tumour type that can display extensive genetic intratumour heterogeneity (ITH). For this purpose, DNA was extracted from two to four tumour regions from each of four primary ccRCCs and was analysed by ultra-deep TCR sequencing. In parallel, tumour infiltration by CD4, CD8 and Foxp3 regulatory T cells was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and correlated with TCR-sequencing data. A polyclonal T cell repertoire with 367–16 289 (median 2394) unique TCRb sequences was identified per tumour region. The frequencies of the 100 most abundant T cell clones/tumour were poorly correlated between most regions (Pearson correlation coefficient, –0.218 to 0.465). 3–93% of these T cell clones were not detectable across all regions. Thus, the clonal composition of T cell populations can be heterogeneous across different regions of the same ccRCC. T cell ITH was higher in tumours pretreated with an mTOR inhibitor, which could suggest that therapy can influence adaptive tumour immunity. These data show that ultra-deep TCR-sequencing technology can be applied directly to DNA extracted from unfractionated tumour samples, allowing novel insights into the clonality of T cell populations in cancers. These were polyclonal and displayed ITH in ccRCC. TCRb sequencing may shed light on mechanisms of cancer immunity and the efficacy of immunotherapy approaches. Copyright © 2013 Pathological Society of

  9. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  10. Binding of kappa- and sigma-opiates in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Wolozin, B.L.; Nishimura, S.; Pasternak, G.W.

    1982-06-01

    Detailed displacements of (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine by ketocyclazocine and SKF 10,047, (/sup 3/H)ethylketocyclazocine by SKF 10,047, and (/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 by ketocyclazocine are all multiphasic, suggesting multiple binding sites. After treating brain tissue in vitro with naloxazone, all displacements lose the initial inhibition of /sup 3/H-ligand binding by low concentrations of unlabeled drugs. Together with Scatchard analysis of saturation experiments, these studies suggest a common site which binds mu-, kappa, and sigma-opiates and enkephalins equally well and with highest affinity (KD less than 1 nM). The ability of unlabeled drugs to displace the low affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)dihydromorphine (KD . 3 nM), (/sup 3/H)ethylketocyclazocine (KD . 4 nM), (/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 (KD . 6 nM), and D-Ala2-D-Leu5-(/sup 3/H)enkephalin (KD . 5 nM) remaining after treating tissue with naloxazone demonstrates unique pharmacological profiles for each. These results suggest the existence of distinct binding sites for kappa- and sigma-opiates which differ from those sites which selectively bind morphine (mu) and enkephalin (delta).

  11. Effect of craving induction on inhibitory control in opiate dependence.

    PubMed

    Verdejo-García, Antonio; Lubman, Dan I; Schwerk, Anne; Roffel, Kim; Vilar-López, Raquel; Mackenzie, Trudi; Yücel, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Current neurobiological models of addiction posit that drug seeking is much more likely to occur during emotionally charged states (such as craving), as deficits in inhibitory control become more pronounced during heightened motivational states. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of cue-induced craving states on attention and inhibitory control within addicted individuals. We tested the performance of 39 opiate-dependent individuals on cognitive measures of attention (Digit Span, Digit Symbol, and Telephone Search) and inhibitory control (Counting Stroop and Go-No-Go) both before and after exposure to an autobiographical craving script. A non-drug using healthy control group (n = 19) performed the same tasks before and after listening to a relaxation tape. Following craving induction, opiate-dependent individuals demonstrated improved performance on tests of processing speed and attentional span (consistent with the practice effect observed in controls) and increased their response errors on the Stroop task (in contrast to controls), while selective attention was unaffected. Individual differences in compulsivity mediated the association between craving and Stroop performance, such that low-compulsive (but not high-compulsive) individuals committed more response errors after craving induction. These findings challenge the notion of cue-induced craving as a primary trigger of disrupted cognition and drug-seeking behavior in addicted individuals, and raise the need to explore individual differences in compulsivity when addressing the links between craving and loss of control within research and clinical settings.

  12. Dissociable influences of opiates and expectations on pain

    PubMed Central

    Atlas, Lauren Y.; Whittington, Robert A.; Lindquist, Martin A.; Wielgosz, Joe; Sonty, Nomita; Wager, Tor D.

    2012-01-01

    Placebo treatments and opiate drugs are thought to have common effects on the opioid system and pain-related brain processes. This has created excitement about the potential for expectations to modulate drug effects themselves. If drug effects differ as a function of belief, this would challenge the assumptions underlying the standard clinical trial. We conducted two studies to directly examine the relationship between expectations and opioid analgesia. We administered the opioid agonist remifentanil to human subjects during experimental thermal pain and manipulated participants’ knowledge of drug delivery using an open-hidden design. This allowed us to test drug effects, expectancy (knowledge) effects, and their interactions on pain reports and pain-related responses in the brain. Remifentanil and expectancy both reduced pain, but drug effects on pain reports and fMRI activity did not interact with expectancy. Regions associated with pain processing showed drug-induced modulation during both Open and Hidden conditions, with no differences in drug effects as a function of expectation. Instead, expectancy modulated activity in frontal cortex, with a separable time course from drug effects. These findings reveal that opiates and placebo treatments both influence clinically relevant outcomes and operate without mutual interference. PMID:22674280

  13. Opiate antagonists reduce cocaine but not nicotine self-administration.

    PubMed

    Corrigall, W A; Coen, K M

    1991-01-01

    Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine in 1-h sessions on a fixed ratio 5 (FR5) schedule of reinforcement. Acquisition was carried out at a unit dose of 0.3 mg/kg and responding was then stabilized at cocaine doses of 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0 mg/kg/infusion. Pretreatments with naltrexone (0.1-10 mg/kg, SC) 20 min prior to the start of self-administration sessions resulted in decreases in cocaine self-administration at doses of 0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg/infusion, but not at 1.0 mg/kg/infusion. Decreases depended on the dose of naltrexone used, with greater decreases in self-administration occurring at higher antagonist doses. In addition, treatment with the opiate antagonist naloxone also reduced cocaine self-administration at a unit dose of 0.3 mg/kg. A group of rats trained to self-administer nicotine at a dose of 0.03 mg/kg/infusion on the same schedule of reinforcement was unaffected by naltrexone treatment. These results may indicate that an endogenous opiate system plays a role in cocaine reinforcement.

  14. Violent conflict and opiate use in low and middle-income countries: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jack, Helen; Masterson, Amelia Reese; Khoshnood, Kaveh

    2014-03-01

    Violent conflicts disproportionately affect populations in low and middle-income countries, and exposure to conflict is a known risk factor for mental disorders and substance use, including use of illicit opiates. Opiate use can be particularly problematic in resource-limited settings because few treatment options are available and dependence can impede economic development. In this systematic review, we explore the relationship between violent conflict and opiate use in conflict-affected populations in low and middle-income countries. We searched MEDLINE, PsychINFO, SCOPUS, PILOTS, and select grey literature databases using a defined list of key terms related to conflict and opiate use, screened the results for relevant and methodologically rigorous studies, and conducted a forward search of the bibliographies of selected results to identify additional studies. We screened 707 articles, selecting 6 articles for inclusion: 4 quantitative studies and 2 qualitative studies that examined populations in 9 different countries. All study participants were adults (aged 15-65) living in or displaced from a conflict-affected country. Data sources included death records, hospital records, and interviews with refugees, internally displaced persons, and others affected by conflict. Overall, we found a positive, but ambiguous, association between violent conflict and opiate use, with five of six studies suggesting that opiate use increases with violent conflict. Five key factors mediate the conceptual relationship between opiate use and violent conflict: (1) pre-conflict opiate presence, (2) mental disorders, (3) lack of economic opportunity, (4) changes in social norms or structure, and (5) changes in drug availability. The strength and direction of the association between opiate use and violent conflict and the proposed mediating factors may differ between contexts, necessitating country and population-specific research and interventions. Prevalence of opiate use prior to the

  15. Heterogeneity Among Ly-49C Natural Killer (NK) Cells: Characterization of Highly Related Receptors with Differing Functions and Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Jack; Lemieux, Suzanne; Freeman, J. Douglas; Mager, Dixie L.; Takei, Fumio

    1996-01-01

    Ly-49C is a member of the polymorphic family of murine NK cell inhibitory receptors. The 5E6 antibody that defines a subset of NK cells responsible for the rejection of parental H-2d bone marrow by F1 mice has been shown previously to react with Ly-49C. Here, the 5E6 antibody was found to detect two Ly-49C-related molecules in B6 mice. Two cDNA clones were isolated from B6 NK cells, one identical to previously reported Ly-49CB6 and the other a novel cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence of the latter differs from that of Ly-49CBALB at only 4 residues, whereas the previously reported Ly-49CB6 differs at 22 residues. Flow cytometric analyses of COS cells transfected with the two cDNAs showed that the 5E6 antibody binds to both Ly-49 molecules, while another anti-Ly-49C antibody, 4LO3311, binds to the newly described Ly-49C but not the previously reported Ly-49CB6. Two-color flow cytometric analysis detected 5E6+4LO3311− as well as 5E6+4LO3311+ subsets of NK cells from B6, but not BALB/c, mice. The level of Ly-49C expression on B6 NK cells detected by the 4LO3311 antibody was substantially lower than that on BALB/c NK cells. Binding specificity of the novel Ly-49CB6 was indistinguishable from that of Ly-49CBALB, whereas no binding was detectable with previously reported Ly-49CB6. These results demonstrate that the newly described Ly-49CB6, not the previously reported Ly-49CB6, is the probable B6 allelic form of Ly49C. The previously reported Ly-49CB6 must be encoded by a separate gene and should be renamed Ly-49I. The implication of these results with respect to the role of Ly-49C in hybrid resistance is discussed. PMID:8976165

  16. Heterogeneous susceptibility of GABA(A) receptor-mediated IPSCs to depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Martin, L A; Wei, D S; Alger, B E

    2001-05-01

    Depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition (DSI) in central neurons is mediated by a transient reduction of [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release from interneurons. DSI is induced by a retrograde signal emitted from principal cells. We used electrophysiological recordings from CA1 neurons of the rat hippocampal slice to test the hypothesis that only certain classes of interneurons are susceptible to DSI. DSI of action potential-dependent, spontaneous, inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) in hippocampus is facilitated by carbachol (3 microM), which increases the occurrence of large sIPSCs. Besides carbachol, noradrenaline (norepinephrine; 10 microM), or elevated extracellular potassium (8 mM), could abruptly increase the occurrence of large sIPSCs and DSI in many cases. DSI appeared and disappeared concomitantly with the onset and offset of these large sIPSCs. In contrast, application of AP-5 and CNQX often markedly increased baseline sIPSC activity without enhancing DSI. A brief train of extracellular electrical stimulation could trigger the onset of prolonged, repetitive IPSC activity that was susceptible to DSI. The magnitude of DSI of single evoked IPSCs (eIPSCs) in a given pyramidal cell could be altered by changes in stimulus strength, but there was no simple relationship between stimulus strength and DSI. Baclofen (0.5-5 microM) eliminated the increase in sIPSC activity and DSI induced by carbachol. A GABA(B)receptor antagonist, CGP 35348, reversed the effects of baclofen. Carbachol-induced sIPSCs had relatively rapid rise and decay phases. There was no marked distinction between DSI-susceptible and non-susceptible sIPSCs. Nevertheless, two kinetically distinct components of the eIPSC could be distinguished by their decay times. DSI reduced GABA(A),(fast) without affecting GABA(A),(slow). Furosemide (frusemide), which blocks only GABA(A),(fast), reduced the eIPSC and occluded DSI. The data suggest that, with respect to DSI, there are at least

  17. Temporal Heterogeneity of Estrogen Receptor Expression in Bone-Dominant Breast Cancer: 18F-Fluoroestradiol PET Imaging Shows Return of ER Expression

    PubMed Central

    Currin, Erin; Peterson, Lanell M.; Schubert, Erin K.; Link, Jeanne M.; Krohn, Kenneth A.; Livingston, Robert B.; Mankoff, David A.; Linden, Hannah M.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in estrogen receptor (ER) expression over the course of therapy may affect response to endocrine therapy. However, measuring temporal changes in ER expression requires serial biopsies, which are impractical and poorly tolerated by most patients. Functional ER imaging using 18F-fluoroestradiol (FES)-PET provides a noninvasive measure of regional ER expression and is ideally suited to serial studies. Additionally, lack of measurable FES uptake in metastatic sites of disease predict tumor progression in patients with ER-positive primary tumors treated with endocrine therapy. This report presents a case of restored sensitivity to endocrine therapy in a patient with bone-dominant breast cancer who underwent serial observational FES-PET imaging over the course of several treatments at our center, demonstrating the temporal heterogeneity of regional ER expression. Although loss and restoration of endocrine sensitivity in patients who have undergone prior hormonal and cytotoxic treatments has been reported, this is, to our knowledge, the first time the accompanying changes in ER expression have been documented by molecular imaging. PMID:26850484

  18. The effect of pain on stroop performance in patients with opiate dependence in sustained remission.

    PubMed

    Aniskin, Dmitry B; Fink, Evgeny; Prosser, James; Cohen, Lisa J; Boda, Namratha; Steinfeld, Matthew; Galynker, Igor I

    2011-03-01

    We have demonstrated previously that former opiate-dependent subjects treated and detoxified from methadone maintenance therapy suffer deficits in neuropsychological performance and have abnormal pain thresholds. This study examined the impact of pain on the performance of the Stroop test, a well-known test of neuropsychological performance. Twenty-three former opiate-dependent subjects treated and detoxified from methadone maintenance therapy and 24 comparison (COM) subjects without a history of opiate dependence were tested using the Stroop test under 2 conditions: Stroop under usual conditions and Stroop under painful conditions. The painful condition was induced using a Medoc Thermal Sensory Analyzer to deliver a heat stimulus at and below the subjects' pain threshold. COM subjects performed better than former opiate-dependent subjects, and females performed better than males on the Stroop under usual conditions. These differences were missing when the Stroop under painful conditions was performed. Analysis of these differences revealed that male former opiate-dependent subjects had a larger improvement in Stroop scores under the painful condition than male COM subjects or females of either group. Performance on a neuropsychological test was adversely impacted by previous opiate addiction, and these effects seemed to be greater in males compared with females. Treated patients with opiate dependence showed improvement in Stroop test performance under painful conditions, and this improvement was greater in males than females.

  19. Cannabis as an adjunct to or substitute for opiates in the treatment of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence to support the use of medical cannabis as an adjunct to or substitute for prescription opiates in the treatment of chronic pain. When used in conjunction with opiates, cannabinoids lead to a greater cumulative relief of pain, resulting in a reduction in the use of opiates (and associated side-effects) by patients in a clinical setting. Additionally, cannabinoids can prevent the development of tolerance to and withdrawal from opiates, and can even rekindle opiate analgesia after a prior dosage has become ineffective. Novel research suggests that cannabis may be useful in the treatment of problematic substance use. These findings suggest that increasing safe access to medical cannabis may reduce the personal and social harms associated with addiction, particularly in relation to the growing problematic use of pharmaceutical opiates. Despite a lack of regulatory oversight by federal governments in North America, community-based medical cannabis dispensaries have proven successful at supplying patients with a safe source of cannabis within an environment conducive to healing, and may be reducing the problematic use of pharmaceutical opiates and other potentially harmful substances in their communities.

  20. Forensic drug testing for opiates. VI. Urine testing for hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone with commercial opiate immunoassays and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smith, M L; Hughes, R O; Levine, B; Dickerson, S; Darwin, W D; Cone, E J

    1995-01-01

    Opiate testing for morphine and codeine is performed routinely in forensic urine drug-testing laboratories in an effort to identify illicit opiate abusers. In addition to heroin, the 6-keto-opioids, including hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone, have high abuse liability and are self-administered by opiate abusers, but only limited information is available on detection of these compounds by current immunoassay and gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) methods. In this study, single doses of hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone were administered to human subjects, and urine samples were collected before and periodically after dosing. Opiate levels were determined in a quantitative mode with four commercial immunoassays, TDx opiates (TDx), Abuscreen radioimmunoassay (ABUS), Coat-A-Count morphine in urine (CAC), and EMIT d.a.u. opiate assay (EMIT), and by GC-MS. GC-MS assay results indicated that hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone administration resulted in rapid excretion of parent drug and O-demethylated metabolites in urine. Peak concentrations occurred within 8 h after drug administration and declined below 300 ng/mL within 24-48 h. Immunoassay testing indicated that hydromorphone, hydrocodone, and oxycodone, but not oxymorphone, were detectable in urine by TDx and EMIT (300-ng/mL cutoff) for 6-24 h. ABUS detected only hydrocodone, and CAC failed to detect any of the four 6-keto-opioid analgesics. Generally, immunoassays for opiates in urine displayed substantially lower sensitivities for 6-keto-opioids compared with GC-MS. Consequently, urine samples containing low to moderate concentrations of hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone will likely go undetected when tested by conventional immunoassays.

  1. Maintenance agonist treatments for opiate dependent pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Minozzi, S; Amato, L; Vecchi, S; Davoli, M

    2008-04-16

    The prevalence of opiate use among pregnant women ranges from 1% to 2% to as much as 21%. Heroin crosses the placenta and pregnant opiate dependent women experience a six fold increase in maternal obstetric complications such as low birth weight, toxaemia, 3rd trimester bleeding, malpresentation, puerperal morbidity, fetal distress and meconium aspiration. Neonatal complications include narcotic withdrawal, postnatal growth deficiency, microcephaly, neurobehavioral problems, increased neonatal mortality and a 74-fold increase in sudden infant death syndrome. To assess the effectiveness of any maintenance treatment alone or in combination with psychosocial intervention compared to no intervention, other pharmacological intervention or psychosocial interventions on child health status, neonatal mortality, retaining pregnant women in treatment, and reducing use of substances We searched Cochrane Drugs and Alcohol Group' Register of Trials (June 2007), PubMed (1966 - June 2007), CINAHL (1982- June 2007), reference lists of relevant papers, sources of ongoing trials, conference proceedings, National focal points for drug research. Authors of included studies and experts in the field were contacted. Randomised controlled trials enrolling opiate dependent pregnant women The authors assessed independently the studies for inclusion and methodological quality. Doubts were solved by discussion. We found three trials with 96 pregnant women. Two compared methadone with buprenorphine and one methadone with oral slow morphine. For the women there was no difference in drop out rate RR 1.00 (95% CI 0.41 to 2.44) and use of primary substance RR 2.50 (95% CI 0.11 to 54.87) between methadone and buprenorphine, whereas oral slow morphine seemed superior to methadone in abstaining women from the use of heroin RR 2.40 (95% CI 1.00 to 5.77)For the newborns in one trial buprenorphine performed better than methadone for birth weight WMD -530 gr (95% CI -662 to -397), this result is not

  2. Five-Factor Model Personality Profiles: The Differences between Alcohol and Opiate Addiction among Females.

    PubMed

    Raketic, Diana; Barisic, Jasmina V; Svetozarevic, Snezana M; Gazibara, Tatjana; Tepavcevic, Darija Kisic; Milovanovic, Srdjan D

    2017-03-01

    The prevalence of female alcohol and substance abusers has markedly increased. The main objective of this research was to explore personality profiles among females who had alcohol and opiate dependence. The aim of the study is to analyse if there is differences in personality profiles of females addicted to alcohol and opiates. We hypothesized that there might be significant differences in personality profiles among subgroups of women who present with alcohol and opiate use disorders. Of 157 consecutive women with diagnosis of alcohol/opiate addiction, 62 fulfilled following inclusion criteria: age 19-45 years, abstinence from alcohol and opiates for at least 10 days prior to enrollment. Alcohol-dependent group consisted of 30 females, while opiate-dependent group consisted of 32 females. The control group involved 30 age-matched randomly chosen healthy women. The data were collected using the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R). The multiple stepwise discriminant analysis was used to determine relations between personality traits and the probability of belonging to one of the study groups. Significant differences in the NEO-PI-R scores were observed between groups for all main personality traits except for Openness to Experience. Compared with controls, substance-dependent women scored significantly higher on Neuroticism and lower on Conscientiousness. Opiate-dependent females scored the highest on Neuroticism and on Extraversion and lowest on Agreeableness and on Conscientiousness. Alcohol-dependent females scored higher on Conscientiousness and lower on Neuroticism compared to opiate-dependent women. The results of our study confirmed significant characteristics in personality profiles among females with alcohol and opiate dependence, as well as the difference between these two groups of substance abusers and their healthy controls. The distinct personality characteristics among different groups of substance addicted women should be taken into account

  3. Decreased Substance P and NK1 Receptor Immunoreactivity and Function in the Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn of Morphine-Treated Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Lisa M.; Terman, Gregory W.; Zeng, Jinsong; Lowe, Janet; Chavkin, Charles; Hermes, Sam M.; Hegarty, Deborah M.; Aicher, Sue A.

    2008-01-01

    Opiate analgesic tolerance is defined as a need for higher doses of opiates to maintain pain relief following prolonged opiate exposure. Though changes in the opioid receptor undoubtedly occur during conditions of opiate tolerance, there is increasing evidence that opiate analgesic tolerance is also caused by pronociceptive adaptations in the spinal cord. We have previously observed increased glutamate release in the spinal cord dorsal horn of neonatal rats made tolerant to the opiate morphine. Here we investigate whether spinal substance P (SP) and its receptor, the neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor, are also modulated by prolonged morphine exposure. Immunocytochemical studies show decreased SP- and NK1-immunoreactivity in the dorsal horn of morphine-treated rats, whereas SP mRNA in the dorsal root ganglia is not changed. Electrophysiological studies show that SP fails to activate the NK1 receptor in the morphine-treated rat. Taken together, the data indicate that chronic morphine treatment in the neonatal rat is characterized by a loss of SP effects on the NK1 receptor in lamina I of the neonatal spinal cord dorsal horn. The results are discussed in terms of compensatory spinal cord processes that may contribute to opiate analgesic tolerance. Perspective This article describes anatomical and physiological changes that occur in the spinal cord dorsal horn of neonatal rats following chronic morphine treatment. These changes may represent an additional compensatory process of morphine tolerance and may represent an additional therapeutic target for the retention and restoration of pain relief with prolonged morphine treatment. PMID:17950674

  4. Reduction in arterial stiffness and vascular age by naltrexone-induced interruption of opiate agonism: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Reece, Albert Stuart; Hulse, Gary Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Objective To prospectively assess if opiate antagonist treatment or the opiate-free status could reverse opiate-related vasculopathy. Design Longitudinal Open Observational, Serial ‘N of One’, over 6.5 years under various treatment conditions: opiate dependence, naltrexone and opiate-free. Setting Primary care, Australia. Participants 20 opiate-dependent patients (16 males: 16 cases of buprenorphine 4.11±1.17 mg, two of methadone 57.5±12.5 mg and two of heroin 0.75±0.25 g). Intervention Studies of central arterial stiffness and vascular reference age (RA) were performed longitudinally by SphygmoCor Pulse Wave Analysis (AtCor, Sydney). Primary outcomes Primary outcome was vascular age and arterial stiffness accrual under different treatment conditions. Results The mean chronological age (CA) was 33.62±2.03 years. The opiate-free condition was associated with a lower apparent vascular age both in itself (males: p=0.0402 and females: p=0.0360) and in interaction with time (males: p=0.0001 and females: p=0.0004), and confirmed with other measures of arterial stiffness. The mean modelled RA was 38.82, 37.73 and 35.05 years in the opiate, naltrexone and opiate-free conditions, respectively. The opiate-free condition was superior to opiate agonism after full multivariate adjustment (p=0.0131), with modelled RA/CA of 1.0173, 0.9563 and 0.8985 (reductions of 6.1% and 11.9%, respectively). Conclusions Data demonstrate that opiate-free status improves vascular age and arterial stiffness in previous chronic opiate users. The role of opiate antagonist treatment in achieving these outcomes requires future clarification and offers hope of novel therapeutic remediation. PMID:23524044

  5. Nonmedical use of sedative-hypnotics and opiates among rural and urban women with protective orders.

    PubMed

    Cole, Jennifer; Logan, T K

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence and risk factors for lifetime nonmedical use of sedative-hypnotics and opiates among a sample of rural and urban women with recent partner violence victimization (n=756). Nearly one third of the sample (32.8%) reported ever using illicit sedative-hypnotics or opiates. Nonmedical use of sedative-hypnotics and opiates was significantly associated with lifetime cumulative exposure to interpersonal victimization, rural Appalachian residency, past-year use of other substances and other substance-related problems, and lifetime unmet health care needs. Findings have implications for substance abuse prevention and treatment and victim advocacy programs.

  6. Opiate addiction and cocaine addiction: underlying molecular neurobiology and genetics.

    PubMed

    Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Levran, Orna; Reed, Brian; Schlussman, Stefan D; Zhou, Yan; Butelman, Eduardo R

    2012-10-01

    Addictive diseases, including addiction to heroin, prescription opioids, or cocaine, pose massive personal and public health costs. Addictions are chronic relapsing diseases of the brain caused by drug-induced direct effects and persisting neuroadaptations at the epigenetic, mRNA, neuropeptide, neurotransmitter, or protein levels. These neuroadaptations, which can be specific to drug type, and their resultant behaviors are modified by various internal and external environmental factors, including stress responsivity, addict mindset, and social setting. Specific gene variants, including variants encoding pharmacological target proteins or genes mediating neuroadaptations, also modify vulnerability at particular stages of addiction. Greater understanding of these interacting factors through laboratory-based and translational studies have the potential to optimize early interventions for the therapy of chronic addictive diseases and to reduce the burden of relapse. Here, we review the molecular neurobiology and genetics of opiate addiction, including heroin and prescription opioids, and cocaine addiction.

  7. Determination of opiate alkaloids in process liquors using capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Hindson, Benjamin J; Francis, Paul S; Purcell, Stuart D; Barnett, Neil W

    2007-02-19

    This paper describes the determination of opiate alkaloids (morphine, codeine, oripavine and thebaine) in industrial process liquors using capillary zone electrophoresis with UV-absorption detection at 214 nm. A study of cyclodextrin type and concentration revealed that the addition of 30 mM hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin to the electrolyte solution (100mM Tris adjusted to pH 2.8) was suitable to resolve the four analytes of interest. Typical analysis time was 12 min and the limit of detection for each alkaloid was 2.5 x 10(-6) M. The results for the proposed methodology were in good agreement with those of a conventional HPLC procedure. Under the same conditions, short-end injection was used to reduce the effective separation length from 41.5 to 8.5 cm, which allowed the determination of morphine and thebaine in process liquors within 2.5 min.

  8. Tumor Heterogeneity in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2)-Positive Advanced Gastric Cancer Assessed by CT Texture Analysis: Association with Survival after Trastuzumab Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sung Hyun; Lee, Yoon Jin; Park, Jihoon; Kim, Jin Won; Lee, Hye Seung; Kim, Bohyoung

    2016-01-01

    Background Image texture analysis is a noninvasive technique for quantifying intratumoral heterogeneity, with derived texture features reported to be closely related to the treatment outcome of tumors. Gastric cancer is one of the most common tumors and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Although trastuzumab is associated with a survival gain among patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive advanced gastric cancer, optimal patient selection is challenging. The purpose of this study was to determine whether CT texture features of HER2-positive gastric cancer were related to the survival rate after trastuzumab treatment. Methods and Findings Patients diagnosed with HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer from February 2007 to August 2014 were retrospectively selected. Using in-house built software, histogram features (kurtosis and skewness) and gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) features (angular second moment [ASM], contrast, entropy, variance, and correlation) were derived from the CT images of HER2-positive advanced gastric cancer in 26 patients. All the patients were followed up for more than 6 months, with no confirmed deaths. The patients were dichotomized into a good and poor survival group based on cutoff points of overall survival of 12 months. A receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was performed to test the ability of each texture parameter to identify the good survival group. Kaplan–Meier curves for patients above and below each threshold were constructed. Using a threshold of >265.8480 for contrast, >488.3150 for variance, and ≤0.1319×10−3. for correlation, all of the area under the ROC curves showed fair accuracy (>0.7). Kaplan–Meier analysis showed statistically significant survival difference between two groups according to optimal cutoff values of contrast, variance, correlation and ASM. However, as this study had a small number of patients, a further study with a larger

  9. Enhanced recovery programme reduces opiate consumption in hip hemiarthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Talboys, Rupert; Mak, Mandy; Modi, Nitin; Fanous, Nabil; Cutts, Steven

    2016-02-01

    The enhanced recovery programme (ERP) is used to improve patient experience before, during and after an operation. Initially designed for colorectal surgery, it has now been adopted by many other disciplines, including orthopaedics. Where applicable, ERP has shown to be associated with less pain, reduced length of hospital stay and increased patient satisfaction in elective orthopaedic procedures. There is, however, a paucity of data regarding the use of ERP in fractured neck of femur (NOF) operations. Our aim was to investigate the effect of ERP on analgesic requirements and hospital length of stay during hemiarthroplasty. Consecutive notes of 100 patients who received a hemiarthroplasty for a fractured NOF were reviewed retrospectively. In one group (n = 50), patients received routine pre- and post-operative care; the second (n = 50) were on the ERP. All patients were previously mobile with an abbreviated mental test score of more than eight and lived in their own home. With ERP, oral opiate consumption fell dramatically in the first three post-operative days (4.7 vs. 14.0 mg, p > 0.005). The use of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) was also significantly reduced (odds ratio 0.16, p > 0.05). Although ERP had no statistically significant effect on length of stay (7 vs. 8.5 days, p = 0.2), it saw a greater proportion of patients being discharged back to their own home (25 vs. 19 patients, p < 0.05). The ERP reduces post-operative oral opiates and PCA requirements in fractured NOF cases and by inference reduces pain. It does not appear to affect length of hospital stay in an acute unit.

  10. Simultaneous quantification of opiates, cocaine and cannabinoids in hair.

    PubMed

    Jurado, C; Giménez, M P; Menéndez, M; Repetto, M

    1995-01-05

    The present paper describes a sensitive method developed in our laboratory for the simultaneous analysis of opiates (morphine, codeine and monoacetylmorphine), cocainis (cocaine and benzoylecgonine) and cannabinoids (delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid) in hair samples. After decontaminating the sample with dichloromethane, two consecutive hydrolyses were performed in order to achieve the best conditions for extracting the three kinds of drugs from the protein matrix. First the opiate and cocainic compounds were extracted by means of a soft acidic hydrolysis with 0.1 N HCl at 50 degrees C overnight and organic solvent extraction at pH 9.2. The cannabinoids need a stronger basic hydrolysis with 11.8 N KOH for 10 min at laboratory temperature. After adding maleic acid, the cannabinoids were extracted with an organic solvent. The derivatization was carried out with heptafluorobutyric anhydride and hexafluoropropanol. Calibration curves were linear between 0.5-100 ng/mg of hair. Recovery and reproducibility were assured. The quantification limits ranged between 0.04-0.26 ng/mg of hair. Seventy hair samples from known drug abusers were cut into 1-cm segments and analyzed by this method. The ranges of measured concentrations (ng/mg) were 0.31-89 for cocaine, 0.1-5.76 for benzoylecgonine, 0.34-45.79 for morphine, 0.45-39.59 for codeine, 0.09-48.18 for monoacetylmorphine, 0.06-7.63 for THC and 0.06-3.87 for THC-COOH. The results of sectional analyses agreed with the self reported drug histories. The usefulness of this method is in assessing earlier drug consumption, and also at the same time obtaining a chronological profile of the consumption of these three types of drugs.

  11. Poppy seed ingestion and opiates urinalysis: a closer look.

    PubMed

    elSohly, H N; elSohly, M A; Stanford, D F

    1990-01-01

    Review of scientific literature shows that ingestion of poppy seed containing products can result in a positive urinalysis test for opiates. In many cases the amount of seeds ingested is unrealistically high or is not specified. This study is designed to correlate the amount of seeds ingested with the urinary concentration of total morphine as a function of time. Two males and two females were involved in all four protocols, which were separated by at least one week. Subjects ingested one, two, or three poppy seed rolls, each containing 2 g of Australian seeds (108 micrograms morphine/g seed) in three protocols. In the fourth protocol subjects ingested two rolls per day for four consecutive days. Urine specimens were collected for 48 h after ingestion, analyzed by RIA, EMIT, and TDx, and selected samples were confirmed by GC/MS. The data show that the highest concentrations of total morphine in urine were found 3-8 h after ingestion or in the first-void samples. Of the 264 samples collected, there were only 16 specimens that exceeded 300 ng/mL by any of the methods used for analysis with only three samples exceeding 400 ng/mL by GC/MS (406, 611, and 954 ng/mL). In all cases, the total opiates level was less than 150 ng/mL 24 h after ingestion. Following these studies, one of the subjects ingested a poppy seed cake containing 15 g seed obtained from a bakery which analyzed for 169 micrograms morphine/g seed. Urine specimens were collected over 48 h, and all specimens were analyzed by GC/MS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Determination of opiates in human fingernail--comparison to hair.

    PubMed

    Shen, Min; Chen, Hang; Xiang, Ping

    2014-09-15

    6-Monoacetylmorphine in keratinized matrices can be used to discriminate between heroin users and individuals exposed to other sources of morphine alkaloids. Frozen pulverization is effective in preventing 6-monoacetylmorphine hydrolysis. The main aim of this study was to develop an LC-MS/MS method for the determination of five opiates in human fingernails using a frozen pulverization preparation method and to investigate the correlation between the concentration of opiates in nail and hair samples from subjects whose urine specimens were positive for morphine. Borate buffer (500 μL; pH 9.2) was added to 20mg of pulverized fingernail, followed by ultrasonication and liquid-liquid extraction. Analytes were analyzed on an Allure PFP propyl column by gradient elution. The mass spectrometer was operated in the positive electrospray ionization mode and multiple reactions monitoring mode. A total of 12 of 18 fingernail samples contained detectable 6-monoacetylmorphine (mean=0.43 ng/mg, range=0.10-1.37 ng/mg), morphine (mean=1.74 ng/mg, range=0.58-3.16 ng/mg) and codeine (range from

  13. [Serotoninergic antidepressants and opiate analgesics: a sometimes-painful association. A case report].

    PubMed

    Reich, M; Lefebvre-Kuntz, D

    2010-06-01

    We report a case of serotonin syndrome caused by interaction between nasal fentanyl, oxycodone and escitalopram. Due to chronic painful episodes with paroxistic level of pain, a 66-year-old patient, treated for prostate adenocarcinoma and bone metastases received an association of major opiate analgesics (oxycodone 120 mg/day for 6 months, and fentanyl nasal spray four puff of 200 microg/puff). After the addition, for mood disorders, of a small dose of escitalopram (5 mg/day), he developed severe serotoninergic features including diaphoresis, night sweating, tremor, diarrhea, visual disorders with mydriasis and weight loss of 8.8 lbs (4 kg). Discontinuation of escitalopram resulted in complete resolution of his symptoms within 48 h except for persistent blurred vision. The clinical manifestations of this case meet Sternbach's criteria of serotonin syndrome. Its possible etiologic factors include adverse drug reaction and pharmacodynamic interaction between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant and opioid analgesics. The Naranjo probability scale suggested a probable causality of escitalopram, oxycodone and fentanyl treatment on the serotonin syndrome. Serotonin syndrome occurrence is estimated around 0.04% in the literature with incidence rates between 14 to 16% in voluntary overdose with serotoninergic agents. It is an infrequent syndrome with, most of the time, a mild to moderate clinical expression. Nevertheless, lethal evolution might occur resulting from either monotherapy with serotoninergic agents (eg: SSRI antidepressants) or the combination of several medications that will increase serotoninergic transmission and therefore intra cerebral serotonin levels. Its physiopathology is related to a hyperstimulation of 5-HT(1A) receptors. Its clinical manifestations involve mental status impairment and cognitive disorders, neuromuscular disorders and neurovegetative impairment. The prescription of SSRI antidepressants among patients depressed

  14. [Functional selectivity of opioid receptors ligands].

    PubMed

    Audet, Nicolas; Archer-Lahlou, Elodie; Richard-Lalonde, Mélissa; Piñeyro-Filpo, Graciela

    2010-01-01

    Opiates are the most effective analgesics available for the treatment of severe pain. However, their clinical use is restricted by unwanted side effects such as tolerance, physical dependence and respiratory depression. The strategy to develop new opiates with reduced side effects has mainly focused on the study and production of ligands that specifically bind to different opiate receptors subtypes. However, this strategy has not allowed the production of novel therapeutic ligands with a better side effects profile. Thus, other research strategies need to be explored. One which is receiving increasing attention is the possibility of exploiting ligand ability to stabilize different receptor conformations with distinct signalling profiles. This newly described property, termed functional selectivity, provides a potential means of directing the stimulus generated by an activated receptor towards a specific cellular response. Here we summarize evidence supporting the existence of ligand-specific active conformations for two opioid receptors subtypes (delta and mu), and analyze how functional selectivity may contribute in the production of longer lasting, better tolerated opiate analgesics. double dagger.

  15. Two short children born small for gestational age with insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor haploinsufficiency illustrate the heterogeneity of its phenotype.

    PubMed

    Ester, Wietske A; van Duyvenvoorde, Hermine A; de Wit, Caroline C; Broekman, Alexander J; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Govaerts, Lutgarde C P; Wit, Jan M; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C S; Losekoot, Monique

    2009-12-01

    Small for gestational age (SGA)-born children comprise a heterogeneous group in which only few genetic causes have been identified. To determine copy number variations in 18 growth-related genes in 100 SGA children with persistent short stature. Copy number variations in 18 growth-related genes (SHOX, GH1, GHR, IGF1, IGF1R, IGF2, IGFBP1-6, NSD1, GRB10, STAT5B, ALS, SOCS2, and SOCS3) were determined by an "in house" multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification kit. The deletions were further characterized by single-nucleotide polymorphism array analysis. Two heterozygous de novo insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) deletions were found: a deletion of the complete IGF1R gene (15q26.3, exons 1-21), including distally flanking sequences, and a deletion comprising exons 3-21, extending further into the telomeric region. In one case, serum IGF-I was low (-2.78 sd score), probably because of a coexisting growth hormone (GH) deficiency. Both children increased their height during GH treatment (1 mg/m(2) per day). Functional studies in skin fibroblast cultures demonstrated similar levels of IGF1R autophosphorylation and a reduced activation of protein kinase B/Akt upon a challenge with IGF-I in comparison with controls. IGF1R haploinsufficiency was present in 2 of 100 short SGA children. GH therapy resulted in moderate catch-up growth in our patients. A review of the literature shows that small birth size, short stature, small head size, relatively high IGF-I levels, developmental delay, and micrognathia are the main predictors for an IGF1R deletion.

  16. Recent developments in the study of opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Cox, Brian M

    2013-04-01

    It is now about 40 years since Avram Goldstein proposed the use of the stereoselectivity of opioid receptors to identify these receptors in neural membranes. In 2012, the crystal structures of the four members of the opioid receptor family were reported, providing a structural basis for understanding of critical features affecting the actions of opiate drugs. This minireview summarizes these recent developments in our understanding of opiate receptors. Receptor function is also influenced by amino acid substitutions in the protein sequence. Among opioid receptor genes, one polymorphism is much more frequent in human populations than the many others that have been found, but the functional significance of this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) has been unclear. Recent studies have shed new light on how this SNP might influence opioid receptor function. In this minireview, the functional significance of the most prevalent genetic polymorphism among the opioid receptor genes is also considered.

  17. Opiate Addicted and Non-Addicted Siblings in a Slum Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Daniel; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Compares addicted and non-addicted siblings of families residing in and around a slum block in New York. Data supporting an ideographic relative deprivation-differential anticipation" explanation for current opiate addiction in the U. S. was produced. (JM)

  18. Opiate addiction and the entanglements of imperialism and patriarchy in Manchukuo, 1932-45.

    PubMed

    Smith, Norman

    2005-01-01

    In the Japanese colonial state of Manchukuo, opiate addiction was condemned by officials and critics alike. But the state-sponsored creation of a monopoly, opium laws, and rehabilitation programs failed to reduce rates of addiction. Further, official media condemnation of opiate addiction melded with local Chinese-language literature to stigmatise addiction, casing a negative light over the state's failure to realise its own anti-opiate agenda. Chinese writers were thus transfixed in a complex colonial environment in which they applauded measures to reduce harm to the local population while levelling critiques of Japanese colonial rule. This paper demonstrates how the Chinese-language literature of Manchukuo did not simply parrot official politics. It also delegitimised Japanese rule through opiate narratives that are gendered, consistently negative, and more critical of the state than might be expected in a colonial literature.

  19. Opiate Addicted and Non-Addicted Siblings in a Slum Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Daniel; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Compares addicted and non-addicted siblings of families residing in and around a slum block in New York. Data supporting an ideographic relative deprivation-differential anticipation" explanation for current opiate addiction in the U. S. was produced. (JM)

  20. Preclinical Assessment of a Strategy to Minimize the Abuse Liability of Opiate Medications for Pain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    liability of an excessive dose of morphine. This is a novel strategy to eliminate the prevalence of substance abuse in returning and active military...especially vulnerable to mental illness and substance abuse , we offer a potential approach to decrease the widespread risk of opiate addiction in...1 Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0305 TITLE: Preclinical Assessment of a Strategy to Minimize the Abuse Liability of Opiate Medications for Pain

  1. Pain acceptance and opiate use disorders in addiction treatment patients with comorbid pain.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lewei Allison; Bohnert, Amy S B; Price, Amanda M; Jannausch, Mary; Bonar, Erin E; Ilgen, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    Studies from pain treatment settings indicate that poor acceptance of pain may be an important and modifiable risk factor for higher severity of opioid use. However, the degree to which pain acceptance relates to opioid use severity in the addiction treatment population is unknown. In this study of addiction treatment patients with co-morbid pain, we examined correlates of severity of opiate (heroin and prescription opioid) use, with a particular focus on the role of pain acceptance. Patients in residential addiction treatment with comorbid pain (N=501) were stratified into low, moderate and high severity of opiate use. Demographic and clinical characteristics were compared across opiate severity categories. 72% (N=360) of the participants had symptoms that were consistent with an opiate use disorder. Younger age, Caucasian race, female gender, cocaine use and lower pain acceptance were associated with higher severity of opiate use, whereas pain intensity was not. Controlling for demographic and other risk factors, such as substance use and pain intensity, higher pain acceptance was associated with lower odds of severe prescription opioid (AOR 0.50, 95% CI 0.38-0.68 for a one SD increase in pain acceptance) and heroin use (AOR 0.57, 95% CI 0.44-0.75 for a one SD increase in pain acceptance). Problematic opiate use is common in addictions treatment patients with chronic pain. Lower pain acceptance is related to greater opiate use severity, and may be an important modifiable target for interventions to successfully treat both pain and opiate use disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cocaine- and opiate-related fatal overdose in New York City, 1990-2000.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Kyle T; Bucciarelli, Angela; Piper, Tinka Markham; Gross, Charles; Tardiff, Ken; Galea, Sandro

    2007-03-09

    In New York City (NYC), the annual mortality rate is higher for accidental drug overdoses than for homicides; cocaine and opiates are the drugs most frequently associated with drug overdose deaths. We assessed trends and correlates of cocaine- and opiate-related overdose deaths in NYC during 1990-2000. Data were collected from the NYC Office of the Chief Medical Examiner (OCME) on all fatal drug overdoses involving cocaine and/or opiates that occurred between 1990-2000 (n = 8,774) and classified into three mutually exclusive groups (cocaine only; opiates-only; cocaine and opiates). Risk factors for accidental overdose were examined in the three groups and compared using multinomial logistic regression. Overall, among decedents ages 15-64, 2,392 (27.3%) were attributed to cocaine only and 2,825 (32.2%) were attributed to opiates-only. During the interval studied, the percentage of drug overdose deaths attributed to cocaine only fell from 29.2% to 23.6% while the percentage of overdose deaths attributed to opiates-only rose from 30.6% to 40.1%. Compared to New Yorkers who fatally overdosed from opiates-only, fatal overdose attributed to cocaine-only was associated with being male (OR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.62-0.82), Black (OR = 4.73, 95% CI 4.08-5.49) or Hispanic (OR = 1.51, 95% CI 1.29-1.76), an overdose outside of a residence or building (OR = 1.34, 95% CI 1.06-1.68), having alcohol detected at autopsy (OR = 0.50, 95% CI 0.44-0.56) and older age (55-64) (OR = 2.53 95% CI 1.70-3.75)). As interventions to prevent fatal overdose become more targeted and drug specific, understanding the different populations at risk for different drug-related overdoses will become more critical.

  3. Inhibition of Morphine Tolerance and Dependence by the NMDA Receptor Antagonist MK-801

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Keith A.; Akil, Huda

    1991-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of the glutamate receptor is an important mediator of several forms of neural and behavioral plasticity. The present studies examined whether NMDA receptors might be involved in the development of opiate tolerance and dependence, two examples of behavioral plasticity. The noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 attenuated the development of tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine without affecting acute morphine analgesia. In addition, MK-801 attenuated the development of morphine dependence as assessed by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. These results suggest that NMDA receptors may be important in the development of opiate tolerance and dependence.

  4. The contribution of opiate analgesics to the development of infectious complications in trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Oppeltz, Richard F; Holloway, Travis L; Covington, Cody J; Schwacha, Martin G

    2015-01-01

    Trauma-related pain is a natural consequence of injury and its surgical management; however, the relationship between opiates and complications in trauma patients is unknown. To study this a retrospective chart review of selected subjects following traumatic injury with admission to the SICU for > 3 days was performed, and opiate administration data was collected for the first 3 days of admission. Associated data from each subject’s chart was also collected. Analysis of the data revealed that increased opiate intake after admission to the SICU was associated with significantly increased SICU and hospital LOS independent of injury severity. This increase in LOS was independent of mechanical ventilation in the moderate ISS group. Infectious complications were also more prevalent in the moderate ISS group with higher opiate use. These findings suggest that increased doses of opiate analgesics in trauma patients may contribute to an increased overall LOS and associated infectious complications. Analgesic regimes that minimize opiate intake, while still providing adequate pain relief, may be advantageous in reducing LOS, complications and reduce hospitalization costs. PMID:26309777

  5. Outcomes of coronary artery bypass grafting in patients with a history of opiate use.

    PubMed

    Safaei, Nasser

    2008-11-15

    This study aimed at evaluating the outcome of CABG in patients with a history of opiate use. Two hundred male patients, underwent CABG surgery, were evaluated and followed up for 6 months. The patients classified as Group P (with Previous history of opiate use) and Group N (with No history of opiate use). The characteristics and 6-month outcomes were compared between the two groups. Patients in group P further categorized into two subgroups of active and non-active abusers. Two hundred male-patients enrolled in the study, 23 (11.5%) patients had a history of opiate abuse. Nine (4.5%) patients were past users and 14 (7%) cases were current users. There were no significant differences regarding the age, history of hypertension, smoking, ejection fraction before and 6 months after CABG, duration of hospital stay, complications of surgery and function class (p<0.05). The level of patients obeys from physician's medical, nutritional and activity recommendations after CABG was significantly lower for current opiate users. Also, the need for readmission after CABG due to cardiac complications was independently higher in current opiate users. Carrying out the educational programs to correct the misconception about the beneficial effects of illicit drugs on cardio-vascular disease makes sense.

  6. Psychopathology in children of parents with opiate dependence and/or major depression.

    PubMed

    Nunes, E V; Weissman, M M; Goldstein, R B; McAvay, G; Seracini, A M; Verdeli, H; Wickramaratne, P J

    1998-11-01

    To evaluate psychiatric disorders and impairment in school-age and adolescent children of opiate-dependent patients. One hundred fourteen children, aged 6 to 17 years, of 69 white methadone maintenance patients with (n = 30) and without (n = 39) major depression were evaluated for DSM-III-R diagnoses by the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Epidemiologic version and best estimate, and by measures of functioning (Children's Global Assessment Scale, Social Adjustment Inventory for Children and Adolescents, WISC, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test), and compared with children of historical controls without substance abuse history. Sons of opiate addicts with major depression were at increased risk for conduct disorder and global, social, and intellectual impairment compared with sons of opiate addicts without major depression and/or sons of controls with neither drug dependence nor depression. Sons of opiate addicts without major depression differed little from controls. Daughters of opiate addicts did not differ from controls in rates of disorders but had poorer social adjustment and nonverbal intelligence. Children of opiate-dependent patients, particularly sons of addicts with depression, may be at risk for a developmental path toward antisocial personality and poor social and intellectual functioning. Treatment settings such as methadone maintenance might afford an opportunity for primary and secondary prevention, both through early detection of childhood disorders and treatment of parental drug dependence and psychopathology.

  7. The Role of Family Atmosphere in the Relapse Behavior of Iranian Opiate Users: a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Peyrovi, Hamid; Seyedfatemi, Naiemeh; Jalali, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Many Iranian opiate users live with family members and family atmosphere can be influential on reducing such social behaviors of opiate users as substance use and relapses. This paper reports the impact of family atmosphere on relapse behavior as a part of the findings of a larger study that explored the relapse process among Iranian opiate users. Methods: In this qualitative research, we selected 17 participants (5 women and 12 men). The questions were been asked through semi-structured interviews. The researchers analyzed the verbatim transcripts using content analysis method. Results: "Family atmosphere" with three sub-themes (family and tribes' interaction, family challenges and family structure) was been found as determinants of relapse behavior. The quality of the family atmosphere could be in harmony with or against the willingness or motivation of the opiate user towards the relapse. Conclusion Health care providers should reinforce involvement of the family members in the treatment and rehabilitation of opiate users. The opiate user's family and even relatives may benefit from learning how to manage their own feelings and attitude towards the client and being supportive during interactions. PMID:26464835

  8. Effect of moderate alcohol consumption on plasma opiate levels in premenopausal women

    SciTech Connect

    Bhathena, S.J.; Kim, Y.C.; Law, J.S.; Berlin, E.; Judd. J.T.; Reichman, M.E.; Taylor, P.R.; Schatzkin, A. NCI, Bethesda, MD )

    1991-03-15

    Opiate changes have been reported in response to excessive alcohol consumption. Different phases of the menstrual cycle also affect the opiate tone. The authors studied the effect of moderate alcohol consumption and the menstrual cycle per se on plasma opiates. Forty premenopausal women were given alcohol or a soft drink of equal caloric value for 3 menstrual cycles in a cross over study. The subjects were fed a controlled diet containing 35% of energy from fat. Blood was collected in the third menstrual cycle of each period during follicular (F), ovulatory (O) and luteal (L) phases. {beta}-endorphin, met-enkephalin and lwu-enkephalin (LE) were measured by radioimmunoassay. None of the opiates showed significant change after alcohol consumption though LE was consistently higher after alcohol consumption during all three phases of the menstrual cycle. There was a significant decrease in BEN during L phase compared to F phase while both enkephalins were higher during L phase than during F phase. Opiate levels during O phase were intermediate between F and L. Thus, in contrast to previously observed opiate changes following excessive alcohol consumption, they did not observe changes with moderate consumption.

  9. Distinction among eight opiate drugs in urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nowatzke, W; Zeng, J; Saunders, A; Bohrer, A; Koenig, J; Turk, J

    1999-09-01

    Opiates are commonly abused substances, and forensic urine drug-testing for them requires gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) confirmation. There are also medical reasons to test urine for opiates, and confirmation procedures other than GC-MS are often used for medical drug-testing. A thin-layer chromatographic (TLC) method distinguishes morphine, acetylmorphine, hydromorphone, oxymorphone, codeine, dihydrocodeine, hydrocodone, and oxycodone in clinical specimens. In certain clinical circumstances, GC-MS confirmation is requested for opiates identified by TLC, but, to our knowledge, no previous report examines all of the above opiates in a single GC-MS procedure. We find that they can be distinguished by GC-MS analyses of trimethylsilyl (TMS) ether derivatives, and identities of 6-keto opiates can be further confirmed by GC-MS analysis of methoxime (MO)-TMS derivatives. Inclusion of deuterium-labeled internal standards permits identification of the opiates in urine at concentrations below the TLC cutoff level of 600 ng/ml, and the GC-MS assay is linear over a concentration range that spans that level. This GC-MS procedure has proved useful as a third-stage identification step in a medical drug-testing sequence involving prior immunoassay and TLC.

  10. Role of Temperament, Personality Traits and Onset Age of Smoking in Predicting Opiate Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Amirabadi, Bahareh; Nikbakht, Mohammad; Nokani, Mostafa; Alibeygi, Neda; Safari, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: According to drug gateway theory, smoking cigarettes, especially, low onset age of smoking, is one of the risk factors for future use. Objectives: The present study aimed to compare nicotine and opiate addicts to identify the differences in personality traits and onset age of smoking in the two groups that cause some individuals to appeal to other substances after starting to use cigarettes. Patients and Methods: Two groups of opiate and nicotine addicts were randomly selected. Revised version of the Cloninger temperament inventory questionnaire, the Fagrastrom nicotine dependence and the Maudsley addiction profile were used. ANOVA and logistic regression were applied for data analysis. Results: Opiate addicts had higher scores in novelty seeking dimension and lower scores in cooperativeness compared to nicotine addicts. The onset age of smoking cigarette in opiate addicts was lower than nicotine addicts. Conclusions: Low onset age of smoking cigarettes, high novelty seeking and low cooperativeness in opiate dependents are among the important personality traits in future use of drugs that can predict the subsequent onset of using opiate drugs. PMID:26870712

  11. Receptor-mediated regulation of neuropeptide gene expression in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, J P; Nishiyama, N; Wilson, D; Taniwaki, T

    1994-06-01

    One of the functions of glial receptors is to regulate synthesis and release of a variety of neuropeptides and growth factor peptides, which in turn act on neurons or other glia. Because of the potential importance of these interactions in injured brain, we have examined the role of two different receptors in the regulation of astrocyte neuropeptide synthesis. Stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors on type 1 astrocytes resulted in increased mRNA and protein for the proenkephalin (PE) and somatostatin genes. This receptor also increased expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The potential role of opiate receptors was examined in several ways. Treatment of newborn rats for 7 days with the opiate antagonist naltrexone, prior to preparation of astrocytes, had no effect on PE mRNA or met-enkephalin content but resulted in a significant increase in NGF content. However, treatment of astrocytes in culture with met-enkephalin, morphine, or naltrexone had no effect on any of these parameters. No opiate binding could be detected, using either etorphine or bremazocine, to membranes of astrocytes prepared from cortex, cerebellum, striatum, or hippocampus of 1-day, 7-day, or 14-day postnatal rats. Thus we conclude that type 1 astrocytes do not express opiate receptors and that the in vivo effects of naltrexone are mediated indirectly via some other cell type/receptor.

  12. Opiate-like analgesic activity in general anaesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, D.; Livingston, A.

    1981-01-01

    1 The interaction of naloxone with various anaesthetics was studied both in vivo and in vitro. 2 Naloxone (10 mg/kg) did not significantly alter the anaesthetic duration of halothane, diethylether, ketamine, pentobarbitone or Althesin. 3 Naloxone (10 mg/kg) reduced the analgesic activity of nitrous oxide, ketamine and morphine in the rat tail-flick test. With the exception of pentobarbitone and Althesin, the other anaesthetic agents also induced analgesia but were not antagonized by naloxone. 4 Specific [3H]-dihydromorphine binding was displaced by the opiates naloxone (IC50 = 7.6 nm), methionine-enkephalin (Met-enkephalin, IC50 = 40 nm) and morphine (IC50 = 54 nm). Similarly, displacement was observed with xylazine (IC50 = 9 μm), ketamine (IC50 = 130 μm) and Althesin (IC50 = 150 μm); other anaesthetics agents tested were inactive in mm concentrations. 5 Ketamine (IC50 = 200 μm) and xylazine (IC50 = 9.5 μm) were also capable of displacing specific [3H]-D-Ala2-enkephalin (D-Leu) binding, as were morphine (IC50 = 95 nm) and Met-enkephalin (IC50 = 40 nm). 6 On the stimulated guinea-pig ileum, Met-enkephalin and morphine inhibited the contractions, the IC50 values were 30 nm and 50 nm respectively. The anaesthetics ketamine (IC50 = 10 μm) and Althesin (IC50 = 8 μm) were active. Xylazine (IC50 = 12 nm) exhibited considerable potency in inhibiting the contractions on this preparation. Naloxone 0.5 μm produced a 1000 fold shift in the opiate dose-response curve but the anaesthetic responses showed only slight sensitivity to antagonism by naloxone. 7 The activity of Althesin was found to be due to the vehicle in which this anaesthetic is solubilised. 8 Whilst several anaesthetic agents showed analgesic activity, specific dihydromorphine binding displacement or guinea pig ileum inhibiting activity, these effects showed variable sensitivity to naloxone. PMID:6113017

  13. Genetic determinants of fetal opiate exposure and risk of neonatal abstinence syndrome: Knowledge deficits and prospects for future research.

    PubMed

    Lewis, T; Dinh, J; Leeder, J S

    2015-09-01

    Opiate-dependent pregnant women receive opiate maintenance medications to prevent illicit use and withdrawal. Fetal opiate exposure causes central nervous system (CNS) alterations which manifest as postnatal physical withdrawal. The extensive variability in the Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome phenotype remains unexplained and may be related to variability in fetal exposure and response. Improved understanding of functionally significant genetic variants in pathways influencing placental opiate transfer and fetal response can lead to personalized maternal therapy and optimized neonatal outcomes. © 2015 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  14. Migrating opiate pump: atypical [corrected] cause of meralgia paresthetica.

    PubMed

    Windsor, Robert E; Thampi, Samuel

    2003-10-01

    This is a case report of a 60 year-old female who presented with pain on the anterolateral aspect of her right thigh. The patient had a history of placement of a Drug Administration System (DAS, Opiate pump) in August, 1998 for chronic lumbar radiculopathy and a multiply operated on spine which she had suffered with since October, 1991. She presented with the subacute onset of focal pain on the anterior aspect of her right superior iliac crest region and dysesthesias on the anterolateral aspect of her right thigh. There was no history of recent trauma, worsening low back pain, or any other sensori-motor change. There was no history of anterior iliac crest bone graft for her spinal fusion and she had no anterolateral thigh symptoms related to her lumbar radiculopathy. Her neurological examination was significant only for decreased sensation on the anterolateral aspect of her right thigh. On abdominal examination the DAS pump was found at a low-lying location and was closely abutting the anterior and medial aspect of her superior iliac spine. She underwent revision of the DAS pump site with obliteration of the inferior and lateral aspect of the pump pocket. Her symptoms improved by 30% immediately and completely dissipated within two month following the procedure. This is the first reported case of lateral femoral cutaneous nerve neuropathy with DAS use. Recognition of focal compressive neuropathy by distal migration of a DAS is important, as they are potentially treatable with recognition.

  15. Characteristics of opiate users leaving detoxification treatment against medical advice.

    PubMed

    Kenne, Deric R; Boros, Alec P; Fischbein, Rebecca L

    2010-07-01

    Substance-dependent patients leaving against medical advice (AMA) pose a unique challenge to detoxification programs. Most notably, AMA patients fail to access residential or outpatient treatment needed after detoxification and often return to detoxification treatment multiple times which has deleterious results for the patient and is taxing to the healthcare system. Using retrospective data from 89 daily opiate-using detoxification patients completing detoxification and 95 patients leaving AMA, we sought to identify patient characteristics useful in predicting AMA discharges from detoxification. Bivariate analyses indicated that AMA patients reported drug use did not impair their health, were injection drug users, younger and had fewer previous treatment admissions. Binomial logistic regression indicated that AMA patients were more likely to be unemployed and report that drug use did not impair their health. Patients completing detoxification were less likely to be injection drug users and less likely to be self-referred to treatment. Identifying patients at risk of leaving AMA provides an opportunity for clinicians to intervene in an effort to increase treatment engagement for these patients.

  16. Evaluation of the usefulness of an oxycodone immunoassay in combination with a traditional opiate immunoassay for the screening of opiates in urine.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Marie; Laberge, Marie-Hélène; Lefebvre, Michel

    2010-03-01

    Oxycodone is a semisynthetic opioid analgesic largely prescribed for post-operative and chronic pain management. The introduction of a slow release formulation of oxycodone has led to its frequent abuse and to an increase in emergency cases related to oxycodone overdose. Until recently, oxycodone testing has been confined to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis because the widely used automated opiate immunoassays poorly react to this compound. We investigated the utility of a new oxycodone immunoassay as a screening procedure to eliminate inappropriate GC-MS testing of negative urine specimens. We analyzed 96 urine specimens using GC-MS and two immunoassays, CEDIA((R)) opiates and DRI((R)) oxycodone assays from Microgenics, on a Hitachi 917 analyzer. The GC-MS allowed us to detect codeine, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, morphine, oxycodone, and oxymorphone following enzymatic hydrolysis and derivation by acetylation. The combination of the two immunoassays gave the best performance (98% sensitivity and specificity) when considering a positive result from GC-MS for any of the opiates. Considering positive GC-MS results for oxycodone or oxymorphone only, the oxycodone immunoassay resulted in two false-positives and one false-negative (50 ng/mL cutoff). Using these immunoassays for screening before GC-MS analysis provides a reduced opiate GC-MS workload without compromising quality.

  17. Fiscal strain and access to opiate substitution therapy at Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.

    PubMed

    Rosenheck, Robert; Leslie, Douglas; Woody, George

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between institutional fiscal strain and the availability of opiate substitution therapy (eg, methadone maintenance), an effective but relatively expensive treatment for heroin addiction. An observational design was used to examine the association of changes in funding and changes in provision for treating opiate addiction at 29 VA Medical Centers (VAMCs). We hypothesized that VAMCs experiencing greater fiscal strain would show reduced availability of opiate substitution treatment. Administrative records from each of 29 VAMCs that provided opiate substitution therapy in both Fiscal Year (FY) 1995 and FY 1999 were used to measure changes in the availability of this service, ie, the percent change in total patients treated, annual visits per patient, and total services delivered. Institutional fiscal strain was measured by the percent decline in per capita funding at four levels at each VAMC: the entire medical center, all mental health programs, all substance abuse programs (inpatient and outpatient), and outpatient substance abuse programs alone. The total number of patients receiving opiate substitution increased from 5,549 in FY 1995 to 6,884 in FY 1999 (24%), annual visits per patient decreased by 16%, and the total number of units of services increased by 4%. There were no significant relationships between changes in the delivery of opiate substitution services and changes in per capita funding at any of the four institutional levels. No new programs were started during these years. Although no new programs were started, the availability of opiate substitution therapy at VA facilities with existing programs was maintained over a five-year period regardless of local funding changes, although at somewhat reduced intensity.

  18. Observed Patterns of Illicit Opiate Overdose Deaths in Chicago, 1999–2003

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sandra D.; Pollack, Harold A.; Ray, Bradley

    2007-01-01

    This article explores trends and correlates of Chicago’s opiate-related overdose (OD) deaths. We manually examined data from every death certificate filed between 1999 and 2003 to identify all Chicago residents’ accidental deaths involving acute intoxication with illicit opiates, OD, or opiate poisoning. The analysis includes an examination of contextual characteristics in 77 Chicago neighborhoods. Negative binomial regression analysis permits the calculation of incidence rate ratios (IRR) associated with time trends. OD incidence peaked in 2000 and then declined markedly by 2003 [year 2000–2003 IRR = 0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.54, 0.78)]. Over the 2000–2003 period, overall incidence of fatal OD declined by 34%. Over this period, the sharpest observed declines occurred among African-Americans [IRR = 0.64, 95% CI (0.51, 0.81)] and Hispanics/Latinos [IRR = 0.53, 95% CI (0.32, 0.88)]. The opiate-related fatality incidence also declined among non-Hispanic whites [IRR = 0.743, 95% CI (0.52, 1.06)]. Even at the end of the study period, illicit opiate-related OD accounted for 35% of all accidental deaths to Chicago adults aged 18–64, with 45% of OD deaths occurring among African-American men. In summary, illicit opiate OD in Chicago peaked in 2000 and markedly declined by 2003. Opiate OD continues to pose a major threat of mortality to Chicago adults. PMID:17334938

  19. Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, R.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a heterogeneous catalysis course which has elements of materials processing embedded in the classical format of catalytic mechanisms and surface chemistry. A course outline and list of examples of recent review papers written by students are provided. (MVL)

  20. Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, R.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a heterogeneous catalysis course which has elements of materials processing embedded in the classical format of catalytic mechanisms and surface chemistry. A course outline and list of examples of recent review papers written by students are provided. (MVL)

  1. Heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Schlögl, Robert

    2015-03-09

    A heterogeneous catalyst is a functional material that continually creates active sites with its reactants under reaction conditions. These sites change the rates of chemical reactions of the reactants localized on them without changing the thermodynamic equilibrium between the materials.

  2. Does prescribing for opiate addiction change after national guidelines? Methadone and buprenorphine prescribing to opiate addicts by general practitioners and hospital doctors in England, 1995-2005.

    PubMed

    Strang, John; Manning, Victoria; Mayet, Soraya; Ridge, Gayle; Best, David; Sheridan, Janie

    2007-05-01

    To assess changes in opiate prescribing (1995-2005) following a decade of national guidelines to address substandard opiate substitution prescribing for heroin addiction. A repeat national survey (1995 and 2005) using random one-in-four samples of all community pharmacies in England, achieving response rates of 75% (1847/2475) in 1995 and 95% (2349/2473) in 2005. Data were obtained on 3732 (1995 data) and 9620 (2005 data) prescriptions dispensed in the preceding month from the 936 and 1463 pharmacies who were currently dispensing. We have measured impact on practice for seven specific recommended changes. Between 1995 and 2005 the number of substitute opiate prescriptions doubled (x 2.03). By 2005, methadone still dominated (down from 97% to 83%), buprenorphine increased (from 1% to 16%) and other opiate medications virtually disappeared. Changes in the direction of national guidelines included: increased daily dose of methadone (from 47.3 mg to 56.3 mg), more frequent dispensing (from 38% to 60% as daily installments), more supervised consumption (from 0% to 36%) and fewer methadone tablets (from 10.9% to 1.8%). Nevertheless, despite the increased mean daily dose, only 41.0% of prescriptions for methadone were for daily doses in the recommended 60-120 mg dose range. Only one change was not in the direction of the national guidelines--the proportion of prescriptions from GPs fell from 41% to 30%, although this still represented an approximate 50% increase in the extent of GP prescribing. Doubling in provision of opiate substitute treatment has occurred, alongside significant improvements in the nature of this treatment. These positive changes have occurred in the direction of six out of seven of the UK national guidelines.

  3. [Spinal opiates in obstetrics. Theoretical aspects and criteria for practical use].

    PubMed

    Miranda, A

    1995-11-01

    Spinal opiates were introduced for use in obstetrics during the 1980's. The possibility of achieving analgesic effects with small doses, without motor and/or vegetative involvement, initially aroused a great deal of enthusiasm. After extensive experience using these drugs, however, it seems they only partially live up to these great expectations. Savings on dose seem to be attained only with morphine and the efficacy of spinal opiates used as the only agents against pain during childbirth is limited. Intradural administration is often accompanied by vegetative involvement, and the reduction in motor blockade generally does not have substantial effect on the progression of labor. On the other hand, it is important to underline the advantages of combining opiates with local anesthesia: both doses are reduced, quality of analgesia is greater, as is maternal satisfaction, and fetal/neonatal repercussions are scarce. Finally, in certain cases, opiates may constitute a valid alternative for local anesthesia, especially if delivery is intradural. The use of spinal opiates is certainly an important qualitative advance, though not a definitive one, in obstetrics.

  4. Simultaneous quantification of opiates and effect of pigmentation on its deposition in hair.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sooyeun; Han, Eunyoung; Kim, Eunmi; Choi, Hwakyung; Chung, Heesun; Oh, Seung Min; Yun, Young Mi; Jwa, Seok Hun; Chung, Kyu Hyuck

    2010-11-01

    In forensic toxicology, the abuse of various opiate preparations, such as raw opium and heroin, is of interest since the metabolic pathways of these opiates overlap. Although the pharmaco(toxico)kinetics in hair is not clearly understood, melanin is thought to play a key part in the incorporation and distribution of drugs and metabolites in hair. Therefore, in the present study, a simultaneous quantification method for the determination of codeine, morphine, norcodeine, normorphine and 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM) in hair was developed in order to analytically diagnose chronic users of opiates including morphine and codeine preparations, raw opium and heroin. Furthermore, the effect of hair pigmentation on the distribution of opiates in hair was investigated using lean Zucker rats with both dark grey and white hair on the same body. Opiates were extracted using 0.1 M hydrochloric acid followed by solid phase extraction. The extracts were derivatized with N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The method was fully validated and applied to the animal study. In conclusion, the current study demonstrates that codeine, morphine and their metabolites were successfully determined in both pigmented and non-pigmented hair. However, the melanin content plays an important role in the degree of incorporation of morphine, codeine and their metabolites into hair.

  5. Heroin-assisted treatment as a response to the public health problem of opiate dependence.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Benedikt; Rehm, Jürgen; Kirst, Maritt; Casas, Miguel; Hall, Wayne; Krausz, Michael; Metrebian, Nicky; Reggers, Jean; Uchtenhagen, Ambros; van den Brink, Wim; van Ree, Jan M

    2002-09-01

    Injection drug use (involving the injection of illicit opiates) poses serious public health problems in many countries. Research has indicated that injection drug users are at higher risk for morbidity in the form of HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis B and C, and drug-related mortality, as well as increased criminal activity. Methadone maintenance treatment is the most prominent form of pharmacotherapy treatment for illicit opiate dependence in several countries, and its application varies internationally with respect to treatment regulations and delivery modes. In order to effectively treat those patients who have previously been resistant to methadone maintenance treatment, several countries have been studying and/or considering heroin-assisted treatment as a complementary form of opiate pharmacotherapy treatment. This paper provides an overview of the prevalence of injection drug use and the opiate dependence problem internationally, the current opiate dependence treatment landscape in several countries, and the status of ongoing or planned heroin-assisted treatment trials in Australia, Canada and certain European countries.

  6. Effect of poppy seed consummation on the positive results of opiates screening in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Jankovicová, Katarína; Ulbrich, Pavol; Fuknová, Mária

    2009-04-01

    Poppy seed is a popular substance of many traditional Slovak cakes. We can eat quite great amount of it, sometimes more than 50 g. Existing problem in interpreting the results of opiate urine analysis in case of drug abuse arises from the natural occurrence of opiate alkaloids in poppy seed. Interpretation of morphine presence in urine sample is in some cases a problem because morphine present in the urine sample may come from different "sources". The presence of additional, respectively, other opiate in urine sample is significant help when interpreting the presence of morphine. We used poppy seed bought in supermarket for our experiment. Presence of morphine and codeine was determined in poppy seed extracts, whereas the concentration of majority opiate-morphine was 0.9 mg/100 g (9 ppm). This poppy seed was used for two series of experiment-poppy seed consummation, where four persons consumed 100g of poppy seed in the first series and 50 g in the second series. Urine samples were taken in regular 1h intervals where first urine sample was given for testing 3 h after consummation. Concentrations of total opiates were determined in each urine sample by screening examination. Morphine concentrations were determined in selected urine samples using GC/MS with internal standard.

  7. Laboratory analysis of remotely collected oral fluid specimens for opiates by immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Niedbala, R S; Kardos, K; Waga, J; Fritch, D; Yeager, L; Doddamane, S; Schoener, E

    2001-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a method for detecting opiates (morphine, codeine, heroin, and 6-acetylmorphine [6-AM]) in oral fluid specimens were examined and compared with methods for urine specimens. The oral fluid was easily obtained using a simple device that collects between 1 and 1.5 mL of fluid for laboratory analysis. Simultaneously collected specimens from 60 known opiate abusers from a drug-treatment center were first tested using an immunoassay cutoff of 10 ng/mL in oral fluids and 2,000 ng/mL in urine. Using a second aliquot, opiate confirmation in urine was performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and in oral fluids by GC-MS-MS. The combined immunoassay and GC-MS-MS procedures were completed with less than 250 pL of oral fluid. Opiates identified in oral fluid specimens from heroin users included morphine, codeine, heroin, and 6-AM. The immunoassay was tested for precision, stability, and the effects of potential cross-reactants. The results yielded 93.6% agreement between oral fluid and urine, suggesting that oral fluid may be a reliable matrix for opiate detection.

  8. Decision-making ability in current and past users of opiates: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Biernacki, Kathryn; McLennan, Skye N; Terrett, Gill; Labuschagne, Izelle; Rendell, Peter G

    2016-12-01

    Opiate use is associated with deficits in decision-making. However, the impact of abstinence and co-morbid factors, like head injury and poly-substance abuse, on this ability, is currently unclear. This meta-analysis aimed to assess 1) the magnitude of decision-making deficits in opiate users; 2) whether co-morbid factors moderate the severity of these deficits; 3) whether ex-opiate users demonstrate smaller decision-making deficits than current users; and 4) whether the length of abstinence is related to the magnitude of decision-making deficits. We analysed 22 studies that compared the performance of current and ex-opiate users to healthy controls on decision-making measures such as the Iowa Gambling Task. Current users demonstrated a moderately strong impairment in decision-making relative to controls, which was not significantly moderated by co-morbid factors. The magnitude of the impairment did not significantly differ between studies assessing current or ex-users, and this impairment was not related to length of abstinence. Thus, it appears that opiate users have relatively severe decision-making deficits that persist at least 1.5 years after cessation of use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Opioid receptor desensitization: mechanisms and its link to tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Allouche, Stéphane; Noble, Florence; Marie, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors (OR) are part of the class A of G-protein coupled receptors and the target of the opiates, the most powerful analgesic molecules used in clinic. During a protracted use, a tolerance to analgesic effect develops resulting in a reduction of the effectiveness. So understanding mechanisms of tolerance is a great challenge and may help to find new strategies to tackle this side effect. This review will summarize receptor-related mechanisms that could underlie tolerance especially receptor desensitization. We will focus on the latest data obtained on molecular mechanisms involved in opioid receptor desensitization: phosphorylation, receptor uncoupling, internalization, and post-endocytic fate of the receptor. PMID:25566076

  10. Maintenance agonist treatments for opiate-dependent pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Minozzi, Silvia; Amato, Laura; Bellisario, Cristina; Ferri, Marica; Davoli, Marina

    2013-12-23

    The prevalence of opiate use among pregnant women can range from 1% to 2% to as high as 21%. Heroin crosses the placenta and pregnant, opiate-dependent women experience a six-fold increase in maternal obstetric complications such as low birth weight, toxaemia, third trimester bleeding, malpresentation, puerperal morbidity, fetal distress and meconium aspiration. Neonatal complications include narcotic withdrawal, postnatal growth deficiency, microcephaly, neuro-behavioural problems, increased neonatal mortality and a 74-fold increase in sudden infant death syndrome. To assess the effectiveness of any maintenance treatment alone or in combination with psychosocial intervention compared to no intervention, other pharmacological intervention or psychosocial interventions for child health status, neonatal mortality, retaining pregnant women in treatment and reducing the use of substances. We searched the Cochrane Drugs and Alcohol Group Trials Register (September 2013), PubMed (1966 to September 2013), CINAHL (1982 to September 2013), reference lists of relevant papers, sources of ongoing trials, conference proceedings and national focal points for drug research. We contacted authors of included studies and experts in the field. Randomised controlled trials assessing the efficacy of any maintenance pharmacological treatment for opiate-dependent pregnant women. We used the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We found four trials with 271 pregnant women. Three compared methadone with buprenorphine and one methadone with oral slow-release morphine. Three out of four studies had adequate allocation concealment and were double-blind. The major flaw in the included studies was attrition bias: three out of four had a high drop-out rate (30% to 40%) and this was unbalanced between groups.Methadone versus buprenorphine: the drop-out rate from treatment was lower in the methadone group (risk ratio (RR) 0.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0

  11. A new approach to preventing relapse in opiate addicts: a psychometric evaluation.

    PubMed

    Grüsser, Sabine M; Thalemann, Carolin N; Platz, Werner; Gölz, Jörg; Partecke, Gerlinde

    2006-03-01

    The present study investigated psychological aspects after different methods of withdrawal treatments in opiate addicts had been conducted. Two pharmacological strategies based on delivering an opioid agonist or antagonist were used for withdrawal in opiate addicts. After detoxification, the antagonist was delivered by a pellet implanted subcutaneously. Four days after the beginning of the treatment several psychological variables such as craving, anxiety, depression, and mood were assessed and compared with data from actively consuming opiate addicts and healthy controls. In addition, 6 and 12 weeks later the relapse rates were assessed. Compared with addicts detoxified and treated with Levomethadone as well as actively heroin consuming addicts, subjects treated with Naltrexone demonstrated significantly higher positive psychological outcome concerning all assessed variables and significantly lower relapse rates. Naltrexone implants prove prevention of relapse during the most vulnerable period after detoxification. Compared with Levomethadone withdrawal, they lead to a significantly better psychological condition in patients.

  12. Opiate refractory pain from an intestinal obstruction responsive to an intravenous lidocaine infusion.

    PubMed

    Bafuma, Patrick J; Nandi, Arun; Weisberg, Michael

    2015-10-01

    A 24-year-old female patient presented to our community emergency department (ED) for abdominal pain that had progressively worsened over the last 28 hours. Of note, 1 month prior to her presentation, the patient had a colostomy due to a rectal abscess and required stoma revision 5 days prior to her visit to our ED. The patient's pain was refractory to opiate analgesia in our ED, but experienced significant relief after an intravenous lidocaine infusion. Computer tomography of the abdomen and pelvis ultimately revealed a large bowel obstruction just proximal to the colostomy site. Historically, options for ED management of severe pain have been limited beyond narcotic analgesia. For patients whom are refractory to opiates in the ED, or for whom opiates are contraindicated, lidocaine infusions have shown promise for a variety of both acute and chronic painful conditions.

  13. Treatment of experimental stroke with opiate antagonists. Effects on neurological function, infarct size, and survival.

    PubMed

    Baskin, D S; Hosobuchi, Y; Grevel, J C

    1986-01-01

    The effects are reported of acute and long-term continuous administration of three opiate antagonists--naloxone, naltrexone, and diprenorphine--on neurological function, survival, and infarct size in a feline model of acute focal cerebral ischemia. All three drugs produced statistically significant improvement in motor function following acute administration without concomitant changes in level of consciousness; saline had no effect. Naloxone and naltrexone significantly prolonged survival (p less than 0.01); diprenorphine did not. Infarct size was not altered by any treatment administered. These findings confirm previous work suggesting that, with the appropriate methodology, treatment with opiate antagonists partially reverses neurological deficits. They also show that opiate antagonists prolong survival in certain conditions of acute and subacute focal cerebral ischemia without altering the area of infarcted tissue.

  14. Bystander killing effect of DS-8201a, a novel anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 antibody-drug conjugate, in tumors with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Ogitani, Yusuke; Hagihara, Katsunobu; Oitate, Masataka; Naito, Hiroyuki; Agatsuma, Toshinori

    2016-07-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates deliver anticancer agents selectively and efficiently to tumor tissue and have significant antitumor efficacy with a wide therapeutic window. DS-8201a is a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeting antibody-drug conjugate prepared using a novel linker-payload system with a potent topoisomerase I inhibitor, exatecan derivative (DX-8951 derivative, DXd). It was effective against trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1)-insensitive patient-derived xenograft models with both high and low HER2 expression. In this study, the bystander killing effect of DS-8201a was evaluated and compared with that of T-DM1. We confirmed that the payload of DS-8201a, DXd (1), was highly membrane-permeable whereas that of T-DM1, Lys-SMCC-DM1, had a low level of permeability. Under a coculture condition of HER2-positive KPL-4 cells and negative MDA-MB-468 cells in vitro, DS-8201a killed both cells, whereas T-DM1 and an antibody-drug conjugate with a low permeable payload, anti-HER2-DXd (2), did not. In vivo evaluation was carried out using mice inoculated with a mixture of HER2-positive NCI-N87 cells and HER2-negative MDA-MB-468-Luc cells by using an in vivo imaging system. In vivo, DS-8201a reduced the luciferase signal of the mice, indicating suppression of the MDA-MB-468-Luc population; however, T-DM1 and anti-HER2-DXd (2) did not. Furthermore, it was confirmed that DS-8201a was not effective against MDA-MB-468-Luc tumors inoculated at the opposite side of the NCI-N87 tumor, suggesting that the bystander killing effect of DS-8201a is observed only in cells neighboring HER2-positive cells, indicating low concern in terms of systemic toxicity. These results indicated that DS-8201a has a potent bystander effect due to a highly membrane-permeable payload and is beneficial in treating tumors with HER2 heterogeneity that are unresponsive to T-DM1.

  15. Opiate addiction and overdose: experiences, attitudes, and appetite for community naloxone provision.

    PubMed

    Barry, Tomás; Klimas, Jan; Tobin, Helen; Egan, Mairead; Bury, Gerard

    2017-04-01

    More than 200 opiate overdose deaths occur annually in Ireland. Overdose prevention and management, including naloxone prescription, should be a priority for healthcare services. Naloxone is an effective overdose treatment and is now being considered for wider lay use. To establish GPs' views and experiences of opiate addiction, overdose care, and naloxone provision. An anonymous postal survey to GPs affiliated with the Department of Academic General Practice, University College Dublin, Ireland. A total of 714 GPs were invited to complete an anonymous postal survey. Results were compared with a parallel GP trainee survey. A total of 448/714 (62.7%) GPs responded. Approximately one-third of GPs were based in urban, rural, and mixed areas. Over 75% of GPs who responded had patients who used illicit opiates, and 25% prescribed methadone. Two-thirds of GPs were in favour of increased naloxone availability in the community; almost one-third would take part in such a scheme. A higher proportion of GP trainees had used naloxone to treat opiate overdose than qualified GPs. In addition, a higher proportion of GP trainees were willing to be involved in naloxone distribution than qualified GPs. Intranasal naloxone was much preferred to single (P<0.001) or multiple dose (P<0.001) intramuscular naloxone. Few GPs objected to wider naloxone availability, with 66.1% (n = 292) being in favour. GPs report extensive contact with people who have opiate use disorders but provide limited opiate agonist treatment. They support wider availability of naloxone and would participate in its expansion. Development and evaluation of an implementation strategy to support GP-based distribution is urgently needed. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  16. Comparison of methadone and buprenorphine for opiate detoxification (LEEDS trial): a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Nat MJ; Sheard, Laura; Adams, Clive E; Rushforth, Bruno J; Harrison, Wendy; Bound, Nicole; Hart, Roger; Tompkins, Charlotte NE

    2011-01-01

    Background Many opiate users require prescribed medication to help them achieve abstinence, commonly taking the form of a detoxification regime. In UK prisons, drug users are nearly universally treated for their opiate use by primary care clinicians, and once released access GP services where 40% of practices now treat drug users. There is a paucity of evidence evaluating methadone and buprenorphine (the two most commonly prescribed agents in the UK) for opiate detoxification. Aim To evaluate whether buprenorphine or methadone help to achieve drug abstinence at completion of a reducing regimen for heroin users presenting to UK prison health care for detoxification. Design Open-label, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial in three prison primary healthcare departments in the north of England. Method Prisoners (n = 306) using illicit opiates were recruited and given daily sublingual buprenorphine or oral methadone, in the context of routine care, over a standard reduced regimen of not more than 20 days. The primary outcome measure was abstinence from illicit opiates at 8 days post detoxification, as indicated by urine test (self-report/clinical notes where urine sample was not feasible). Secondary outcomes were also recorded. Results Abstinence was ascertained for 73.7% at 8 days post detoxification (urine sample = 52.6%, self report = 15.2%, clinical notes = 5.9%). There was no statistically significant difference in the odds of achieving abstinence between methadone and buprenorphine (odds ratio [OR] = 1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.81 to 3.51; P = 0.163). Abstinence was associated solely with whether or not the participant was still in prison at that time (15.22 times the odds; 95% CI = 4.19 to 55.28). The strongest association for lasting abstinence was abstinence at an earlier time point. Conclusion There is equal clinical effectiveness between methadone and buprenorphine in achieving abstinence from opiates at 8 days post detoxification within prison

  17. The effect of opiates on the activity of human placental aromatase/CYP19.

    PubMed

    Zharikova, Olga L; Deshmukh, Sujal V; Kumar, Meena; Vargas, Ricardo; Nanovskaya, Tatiana N; Hankins, Gary D V; Ahmed, Mahmoud S

    2007-01-15

    Aromatase, cytochrome P450 19, is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of estrogens by the human placenta. It is also the major placental enzyme that metabolizes the opiates L-acetylmethadol (LAAM), methadone, and buprenorphine (BUP). Methadone and BUP are used in treatment of the opiate addict and are competitive inhibitors of testosterone conversion to estradiol (E(2)) and 16alpha-hydroxytestosterone (16-OHT) to estriol (E(3)) by aromatase. The aim of this investigation is to determine the effect of 20 opiates, which can be administered to pregnant patients for therapeutic indications or abused, on E(2) and E(3) formation by placental aromatase. Data obtained indicated that the opiates increased, inhibited, or had no effect on aromatase activity. Their effect on E(3) formation was more pronounced than that on E(2) due to the lower affinity of 16-OHT than testosterone to aromatase. The K(i) values for the opiates that inhibited E(3) formation were sufentanil, 7 +/- 1 microM; LAAM, 13 +/- 8 microM; fentanyl, 25 +/- 5 microM; oxycodone, 92 +/- 22 microM; codeine, 218 +/- 69 microM; (+)-pentazocine, 225 +/- 73 microM. The agonists morphine, heroin, hydromorphone, oxymorphone, hydrocodone, propoxyphene, meperidine, levorphanol, dextrorphan, and (-)-pentazocine and the antagonists naloxone and naltrexone caused an increase in E(3) formation by 124-160% of control but had no effect on E(2) formation. Moreover, oxycodone and codeine did not inhibit E(2) formation and the IC(50) values for fentanyl, sufentanil, and (+)-pentazocine were >1000 microM. It is unlikely that the acute administration of the opiates that inhibit estrogen formation would affect maternal and/or neonatal outcome. However, the effects of abusing any of them during the entire pregnancy are unclear at this time.

  18. Experience with a urine opiate screening and confirmation cutoff of 2000 ng/mL.

    PubMed

    Fraser, A D; Worth, D

    1999-10-01

    Until recently, most laboratories used an opiate immunoassay screening and confirmation cutoff value of 300 ng/mL for codeine and morphine detection by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The cutoff value for opiates was increased to 2000 ng/mL or higher in various laboratories because of concerns that small doses of codeine and foods containing poppy seeds would give a positive opiate-screening result. Workplace drug-testing programs in the U.S. raised the opiate cutoff value to 2000 ng/mL on 30 November 1998. The objective of this study is to describe the results of opiate testing of 8600 urine specimens collected over 24 months with a 2000-ng/mL screening and confirmation (codeine and morphine) cutoff value. Specimens were screened by the EMITdau opiate assay using an in-house 2000-ng/mL morphine calibrator. Presumptive positive findings (N = 621) were analyzed quantitatively by GC-MS for codeine and morphine. One hundred and eighty six urine specimens were positive for codeine and morphine (> 2000 ng/mL), 298 specimens were positive for codeine only (> 2000 ng/mL) and 26 specimens were positive for morphine only (> 2000 ng/mL). All remaining specimens had codeine and morphine values < 2000 ng/mL. The codeine and morphine confirmation rate in this program reduced from 7.1% in 1994-1996 (300-ng/mL cutoff) to 2.1% in 1997-1998 with a 2000-ng/mL cutoff value. The codeine-only confirmation rate lowered from 6.6% (300-ng/mL cutoff) to 3.4% (2000-ng/mL cutoff). It was concluded that increasing opiate screening and codeine and morphine confirmation cutoff values led to > 300% reduction in the confirmed-positive rate for codeine and morphine and a 47% reduction in codeine-only confirmations in a urine drug-testing program where codeine was the major opiate used.

  19. Opiate addiction in adult offspring through possible imprinting after obstetric treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, B; Nyberg, K; Grönbladh, L; Eklund, G; Bygdeman, M; Rydberg, U

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To test the hypothesis that opiate addiction in adults might stem partly from an imprinting process during birth when certain drugs are given to the mother. DESIGN--Retrospective study by logistic regression of opiate addicts with siblings as controls. SETTING--Stockholm, Sweden. SUBJECTS--200 Opiate addicts born in Stockholm during 1945-66, comprising 41 identified during interviews of probands for an earlier study; 75 patients whose death from opiate addiction had been confirmed during 1978-88; and 84 accepted for the methadone programme. 262 Siblings (controls) born in Stockholm during the same period, 24 of whom were excluded for drug addiction or being brought up outside the family. Birth records were unavailable for eight, leaving 230 siblings and 139 corresponding probands. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Administration of opiates, barbiturates, and nitrous oxide (for greater than 1 h) to mothers of all subjects during labour within 10 hours before birth as a risk factor for adult opiate addiction. RESULTS--In subjects who had subsequently become addicts a significant proportion of mothers had received opiates or barbiturates, or both, compared with unmatched siblings (25% v 16%, chi 2 = 5.83, df = 1, p = 0.02), and these mothers had received nitrous oxide for longer and more often. After controlling for hospital of birth, order of birth, duration of labour, presentation other than vertex, surgical intervention, asphyxia, meconium stained amniotic fluid, and birth weight the relative risk for offspring subsequently becoming an adult opiate addict increased with the number of administrations of any of the three drugs. When the addicts were matched with their own siblings the estimated relative risk was 4.7 (95% confidence interval 1.8 to 12.4, p for trend = 0.002) for three administrations compared with when no drug was given. CONCLUSIONS--The results are compatible with the imprinting hypothesis. Therefore, for obstetric pain relief methods are preferable

  20. Lifetime opiate exposure as an independent and interactive cardiovascular risk factor in males: a cross-sectional clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Reece, Albert S; Hulse, Gary K

    2013-01-01

    Introduction While several studies have identified an increased incidence of cardiovascular disorders in opiate dependence, neither opiates as a cardiovascular risk factor nor their effect on central arterial function has been considered. Methods Pulse wave analysis (SphygmoCor, AtCorMedical Pty Limited, Sydney, NSW, Australia) was undertaken on a cohort of controls and opiate dependent patients and the results compared to their lifetime opiate exposure. Results Controls (N = 401) were compared with 465 opiate dependent men. The mean (log) ages were different and were found to be 28.80 ± 0.49 years versus 35.02 ± 0.39 years (P < 0.0001), respectively. Of the opiate dependent group, 87.7% were treated with buprenorphine, 8.8% with methadone, and 3.4% with naltrexone. Multiple regression analysis was used to adjust for chronologic age (CA). At CA of 60 years, the modeled age in the controls was 66.40 years, and that in the addicted group was 73.11 years, an advancement of 6.71 years, or 10.10%. Exacerbations of age dependent changes in central arterial stiffness, central pressures, pulse rate, ejection duration, diastolic duration, and subendocardial perfusion ratio by opiate dependence were all noted (P < 0.05). Current heroin dose, heroin duration, and the dose duration interaction were all significantly related to the vascular (or “reference”) age (RA)/CA ratio (all P < 0.006). After multivariate adjustment, the opiate dose duration was independently predictive of RA (P < 0.02). Opiate dose and/or duration were included in a further 25 terms. Conclusion These data show that opiate use is not benign for the male cardiovascular system, but has a dose response relationship to central arterial stiffness and thus cardiovascular aging, acting independently and interactively with established cardiovascular risk factors. These findings imply accelerated organismal aging. PMID:24124373

  1. Simultaneous Liquid Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry Quantification of Urinary Opiates, Cocaine, and Metabolites in Opiate-Dependent Pregnant Women in Methadone-Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shakleya, Diaa M.; Dams, Riet; Choo, Robin E.; Jones, Hendree; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    Opiates, cocaine, and metabolites were quantified by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) in 284 urine specimens, collected thrice weekly, to monitor possible drug relapse in 15 pregnant heroin-dependent women. Opiates were detected in 149 urine specimens (52%) with limits of quantification (LOQ) of 10–50 μg/L. Morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide, and/or morphine-6-glucuronide were positive in 121 specimens; 6-acetylmorphine, a biomarker of heroin ingestion, was quantifiable in only 7. No heroin, 6-acetylcodeine, papaverine, or noscapine were detected. One hundred and sixty-five urine specimens (58%) from all 15 participants were positive for one or more cocaine analytes (LOQ 10–100 μg/L). Ecgonine methylester (EME) and/or benzoylecgonine were the major cocaine biomarkers in 142. Anhydroecgonine methylester, a biomarker of smoked cocaine, was positive in six; cocaethylene and/or ecgonine ethylester, biomarkers of cocaine and ethanol co-ingestion, were found in 25. At the current Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration cutoffs for total morphine (2000 μg/L), codeine (2000 μg/L), 6-acetylmorphine (10 μg/L), and benzoylecgonine (100 μg/L), 16 opiate- and 29 cocaine-positive specimens were identified. Considering 100 μg/L EME as an additional urinary cocaine biomarker would identify 51 more positive cocaine specimens. Of interest is the differential pattern of opiate and cocaine biomarkers observed after LC–MS as compared to gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis. PMID:20109298

  2. [Role of benzodiazepine receptors in regulating aggressive behavior].

    PubMed

    Vasar, E E; Riago, L K; Allikmets, L Kh

    1983-01-01

    In experiments of male Wistar rats, it was established that a long-term apomorphine treatment caused changes in density of benzodiazepine receptors in forebrain structures opposite to those elicited by acute administration. The changes in benzodiazepine binding correlated with decrease of antiaggressive effect of diazepam and Ro 15-1788 after long-term apomorphine administration. The action of apomorphine on the benzodiazepine receptors was not direct, as apomorphine did not change the benzodiazepine agonist-antagonist interaction, and naloxone, opiate blocator, was a more powerful antagonist of antiaggressive action of diazepam than Ro 15-1788. The involvement of the two types of benzodiazepine receptors in the regulation of aggressive behavior is suggested, the first being apparently linked with GABA and opiate receptors and the other one--with the serotoninergic system. Ro 15-1788 was able to antagonize the effects of diazepam on the first but not on the second type of benzodiazepine receptors.

  3. A meta-analysis of marijuana, cocaine and opiate toxicology study findings among homicide victims.

    PubMed

    Kuhns, Joseph B; Wilson, David B; Maguire, Edward R; Ainsworth, Stephanie A; Clodfelter, Tammatha A

    2009-07-01

    ABSTRACT Aim To synthesize the results of marijuana, cocaine and opiate drug toxicology studies of homicide victims and examine variation in results across person and setting characteristics. Methods A meta-analysis of 18 independent studies identified from an extensive review of 239 published articles that met the inclusion criteria of reporting marijuana, cocaine and/or opiate toxicology test results for homicide victims. A total of 28 868 toxicology test results derived from 30 482 homicide victims across five countries were examined. Results On average, 6% of homicide victims tested positive for marijuana, 11% tested positive for cocaine, and 5% tested positive for opiates. The proportion of homicide victims testing positive for illicit drugs has increased over time. Age had a strong curvilinear relationship with toxicology test results, but gender differences were not apparent. Hispanic and African American homicide victims were more likely to test positive for cocaine; Caucasians were most likely to test positive for opiates. Cocaine use appeared to be related to increased risk of death from a firearm and was a greater risk factor for violent victimization in the United States than in Newfoundland and Scandinavia. Conclusion There are relatively few studies of illicit drug toxicology reports from homicide victims that allow for cross-cultural comparisons. This study provides a basis for comparing future local toxicology test results to estimates from existing research.

  4. Review article: lack of effect of opiates in the treatment of acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema.

    PubMed

    Sosnowski, Marcin A

    2008-10-01

    Opiates have traditionally been used as one of the main treatments of acute heart failure and are still recognized as such. Most current textbooks and official guidelines advise the use of morphine as one of the first-line treatments for patients in acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema and a majority of physicians accept it to be the case. The author performed an extensive literature search in order to validate the evidence for the use of opiates in this condition. A total of seven papers, six in English and one in Polish, were found that directly investigated or reported the clinically important outcomes of treatment of acute pulmonary oedema. Only five of these dealt specifically with the effects of administration of opiates in acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema. None of the above publications suggested a clinically significant improvement in outcomes of patients treated with morphine, although early research did suggest reduced anxiety, blood pressure and pulse rate as well as a reduction in arterial oxygen contents. The more recent studies suggest a strong association between increased mortality and morbidity (e.g. intensive care unit admissions or intubation rates), although causality is difficult to establish because of research methodologies. The current evidence does not support the routine use of opiates in the treatment of acute pulmonary oedema.

  5. Opiates for chronic nonmalignant pain syndromes: can appropriate candidates be identified for outpatient clinic management?

    PubMed

    White, Kevin T; Dillingham, Timothy R; González-Fernández, Marlís; Rothfield, Linda

    2009-12-01

    To better define patients appropriate for opiate management for chronic pain syndromes. Retrospective study of 65 patients with noncancerous pain syndromes who were on or being considered for opiates and who were transitioned into a structured outpatient clinic with close monitoring and management. Noncompliance with this outpatient pain management program was the primary outcome. Noncompliance was defined as (1) receipt of prescriptions from providers outside of this clinic, (2) increase in medication dosage without proper approval, (3) refusing toxicology screening on entrance into the program, (4) negative toxicology tests for prescribed medications, (5) positive toxicology tests for psychoactive medications not prescribed, or (6) discovery on toxicology tests of the presence of illicit substances. There were 24 cases of noncompliance (37%), with age <56 yrs old demonstrating significant (P = 0.02) association with persons who were noncompliant with the outpatient program. Forty-three percent of those younger than 56 yrs were noncompliant with program, yet no patient older than 56 yrs was noncompliant. Working status approached significance (P = 0.07) with those patients out of work demonstrating a greater likelihood of noncompliance. There were no correlations found between other patient characteristics and the level of compliance with the program. When considering opiates as a treatment option, pain clinics should have a heightened suspicion for younger and unemployed patients. Although these findings should be examined in larger studies, they suggest that nonmedical factors play a substantial role regarding success in such a structured opiate pain program.

  6. Technique for greatly shortening the transition from methadone to naltrexone maintenance of patients addicted to opiates.

    PubMed

    Loimer, N; Lenz, K; Schmid, R; Presslich, O

    1991-07-01

    Acute methadone detoxification was induced by the intravenous administration of naloxone during simultaneous intravenous sedation with midazolam, a fully reversible short-acting benzodiazepine, in seven patients addicted to opiates. Within hours the patients tolerated full doses of naltrexone. This technique enables patients to transfer easily, quickly, and safely from methadone to naltrexone maintenance.

  7. 49 CFR 40.139 - On what basis does the MRO verify test results involving opiates?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false On what basis does the MRO verify test results... Verification Process § 40.139 On what basis does the MRO verify test results involving opiates? As the MRO, you... laboratory confirms the presence of 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM) in the specimen, you must verify the test result...

  8. 49 CFR 40.139 - On what basis does the MRO verify test results involving opiates?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false On what basis does the MRO verify test results... Verification Process § 40.139 On what basis does the MRO verify test results involving opiates? As the MRO, you... laboratory confirms the presence of 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM) in the specimen, you must verify the test result...

  9. The neuropeptide galanin modulates behavioral and neurochemical signs of opiate withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Zachariou, Venetia; Brunzell, Darlene H.; Hawes, Jessica; Stedman, Diann R.; Bartfai, Tamas; Steiner, Robert A.; Wynick, David; Langel, Ülo; Picciotto, Marina R.

    2003-01-01

    Much research has focused on pathways leading to opiate addiction. Pathways opposing addiction are more difficult to study but may be critical in developing interventions to combat drug dependence and withdrawal. Galanin decreases firing of locus coeruleus neurons, an effect hypothesized to decrease signs of opiate withdrawal. The current study addresses whether galanin affects morphine withdrawal signs by using a galanin agonist, galnon, that crosses the blood–brain barrier, and mice genetically engineered to under- or overexpress galanin peptide. Galnon significantly decreased morphine withdrawal signs in C57BL/6 mice. Further, knockout mice lacking galanin showed exacerbated morphine withdrawal signs, suggesting that endogenous galanin normally counteracts opiate withdrawal. Transgenic mice overexpressing galanin in noradrenergic neurons also showed decreased morphine withdrawal signs, suggesting a possible neuroanatomical locus for these effects of galanin. Both c-fos immunoreactivity, a marker of neuronal activity, and phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase at Ser-40, a marker of cAMP levels, are decreased in the locus coeruleus by galnon treatment after morphine withdrawal, suggesting a possible molecular mechanism for the behavioral effects of galanin. These studies suggest that galanin normally acts to counteract opiate withdrawal and that small molecule galanin agonists could be effective in diminishing the physical signs of withdrawal. PMID:12853567

  10. Drugs and Personality: Personality Correlates and Predictors of Non-Opiate Drug Use. Research Issues 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Gregory A., Ed.; And Others

    This collection of abstracts from current research and theoretical studies explores various aspects of the relationship between non-opiate drug use and personality. The literature covers a period from 1968 through 1975 and focuses on tests that were conducted on adolescents and college students from the United States, Canada and Sydney, Australia.…

  11. Poppy seed ingestion as a contributing factor to opiate-positive urinalysis results: the Pacific perspective.

    PubMed

    Selavka, C M

    1991-05-01

    The possible contribution of poppy seed foods to positive opiate urinalysis results, especially from foods available in the Pacific Rim area, has recently become an issue for the U.S. Army Forensic Toxicology Drug Testing Laboratory in Hawaii. To assess the likelihood of this possible contribution, seven different poppy seed food products were consumed by male and female volunteers, and urine specimens were collected at time increments up to either 24 or 72 h. Specimens were evaluated for opiates using Roche Abuscreen radioimmunoassay (RIA), and all RIA positive specimens were analyzed for morphine and codeine using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Poppy seed cake, bagels, muffins, and rolls did not contain sufficient quantities of poppy seeds to give rise to opiate positive specimens by U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) GC-MS cutoff levels (morphine = 4000 ng/mL, codeine = 2000 ng/mL), although a number of specimens were positive by National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) cutoff levels (morphine and codeine = 300 ng/mL). However, ingestion of poppy seed streusel or Danish pastry led to confirmed morphine and codeine positive specimens, irrespective of the use of DOD or NIDA confirmation cutoff values. In addition, significant amounts of codeine were observed in a number of these specimens. These findings argue against the unqualified application of previously published quantitative guidelines for eliminating poppy seed ingestion as a possible cause for a positive opiate urinalysis result.

  12. Predicting Sobriety from the Employment Status of Dually Diagnosed Clients Who Are Opiate Dependent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scorzelli, James F.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (E. S. Neukrug & R. C. Fawcett, 2006) profiles and employment status for clients who are opiate dependent. A discriminant function analysis indicated that employment was a predictor in maintaining sobriety after 6 months. (Contains…

  13. The opiate analgesic buprenorphine decreases proliferation of adult hippocampal neuroblasts and increases survival of their progeny.

    PubMed

    Pettit, A S; Desroches, R; Bennett, S A L

    2012-01-03

    Although opiate drugs of abuse have been shown to decrease adult hippocampal neurogenesis, the impact of opiate analgesics has not been tested. North American regulatory boards governing the ethical treatment of experimental animals require the administration of analgesics, such as buprenorphine, following minor surgical interventions. Here, we show that two commonly used post-operative buprenorphine dosing regimes significantly inhibit the proliferation of doublecortin-positive neuroblasts but not other hippocampal stem and progenitor cell populations in adult mice. Buprenorphine, administered in schedules of three 0.05 mg/kg subcutaneous injections over a single day or seven 0.05 mg/kg injections over a 3-day period decreased the number of actively proliferating 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeled doublecortin-positive cells for up to 6 days after opiate withdrawal. The minimal (three injection), but not standard (seven injection), analgesic paradigm also reduced basal indices of hippocampal progenitor cell apoptosis and enhanced survival of newly born cells for up to 28 days. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence that the routine administration of opiate analgesics has transient but long-lasting effects on neurogenesis and further emphasize that analgesic dosage and schedule should be reported and considered when interpreting the magnitude of neural stem and progenitor cell activation in response to in vivo intervention. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Drugs and Personality: Personality Correlates and Predictors of Non-Opiate Drug Use. Research Issues 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Gregory A., Ed.; And Others

    This collection of abstracts from current research and theoretical studies explores various aspects of the relationship between non-opiate drug use and personality. The literature covers a period from 1968 through 1975 and focuses on tests that were conducted on adolescents and college students from the United States, Canada and Sydney, Australia.…

  15. Dissociation of POMC Peptides after Self-Injury Predicts Responses To Centrally Acting Opiate Blockers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandman, Curt A.; Hetrick, William; Taylor, Derek V.; Chicz-DeMet, Aleksandra

    1997-01-01

    This study investigated whether blood plasma levels of pro-opiomelanocortin-derived (POMC) peptides, beta-endorphin-like activity, adrenocorticotrophic hormone, and adrenal cortisol immediately after self injurious behavior (SIB) episodes predicted subsequent response to an opiate blocker in 10 patients with mental retardation. Results suggest…

  16. Predicting Sobriety from the Employment Status of Dually Diagnosed Clients Who Are Opiate Dependent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scorzelli, James F.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (E. S. Neukrug & R. C. Fawcett, 2006) profiles and employment status for clients who are opiate dependent. A discriminant function analysis indicated that employment was a predictor in maintaining sobriety after 6 months. (Contains…

  17. Automated multiple development thin-layer chromatography for separation of opiate alkaloids and derivatives.

    PubMed

    Pothier, Jacques; Galand, Nicole

    2005-07-08

    There are three types of opiate alkaloids. First, the poppy alkaloids: morphine, codeine, thebaine, noscapine and papaverine; then, the semi-synthetic and synthetic derivatives used in therapy as antitussives and analgesics, such as pholcodine, ethylmorphine and dextromethorphan; at last narcotic compounds, diacetylmorphine (heroin) and opiates employed as substitutes in treatment of addiction: buprenorphine and methadone. For classical thin-layer chromatography (TLC) of opium alkaloids, it is necessary to use complex eluents with strong alkaline substances to obtain a clean separation between morphinan and isoquinoline compounds. This study purposes the planar chromatographic analysis of these substances by the automated multiple development (AMD) compared with results obtained by classical TLC method. The aim of this work was to achieve the best separation of these opiate alkaloids and derivatives by this modern technique of planar chromatography. The AMD system provided a clean separation for each of three opiates groups studied and the best results have been obtained with universal gradient: methanol 100, methanol-dichloromethane 50/50, dichloromethane 100, dichloromethane 100, hexane 100 for opium alkaloids and with gradient A: 5% of 28% ammonia in methanol 100, acetone 100, acetone 100, ethyl acetate-dichloromethane 50/50, dichloromethane 100 for antitussives and substitutes. Two reagents were used for the detection of alkaloids by spraying: Dragendorff and iodoplatinate reagents. The detection limits with these two reagents were 1 microg for ethylmorphine, thebaine, papaverine, codeine, and 2 microg for morphine and noscapine and other alkaloids.

  18. Differentiating Violent and Nonviolent Opiate-Addicted Reformatory Inmates with the MMPI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chick, Garry E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Discriminated among four groups of male opiate-addicted reformatory inmates (N=193) according to degree of criminal violence using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). Results showed that discriminant analysis was moderately successful for classifying Bodily Violent and Nonbodily Violent groups on the basis of their MMPI scores.…

  19. Dissociation of POMC Peptides after Self-Injury Predicts Responses To Centrally Acting Opiate Blockers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandman, Curt A.; Hetrick, William; Taylor, Derek V.; Chicz-DeMet, Aleksandra

    1997-01-01

    This study investigated whether blood plasma levels of pro-opiomelanocortin-derived (POMC) peptides, beta-endorphin-like activity, adrenocorticotrophic hormone, and adrenal cortisol immediately after self injurious behavior (SIB) episodes predicted subsequent response to an opiate blocker in 10 patients with mental retardation. Results suggest…

  20. Psychometric Evaluation of the Life Orientation Test-Revised in Treated Opiate Dependent Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Jameson K.; Britton, Peter C.; Conner, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    We examined internal consistency and test-retest reliability of a measure of dispositional optimism, the Life Orientation Test-Revised, in 121 opiate-dependent patients seeking methadone treatment. Internal consistency was adequate at baseline (alpha = 0.69) and follow-up (alpha = 0.72). Low socioeconomic status and being on disability were…

  1. Correlation of stable elevations in striatal mu-opioid receptor availability in detoxified alcoholic patients with alcohol craving: a positron emission tomography study using carbon 11-labeled carfentanil.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Andreas; Reimold, Matthias; Wrase, Jana; Hermann, Derik; Croissant, Bernhard; Mundle, Götz; Dohmen, Bernhard M; Braus, Dieter F; Braus, Dieter H; Schumann, Gunter; Machulla, Hans-Jürgen; Bares, Roland; Mann, Karl

    2005-01-01

    The pleasant effects of food and alcohol intake are partially mediated by mu-opiate receptors in the ventral striatum, a central area of the brain reward system. Blockade of mu-opiate receptors with naltrexone reduces the relapse risk among some but not all alcoholic individuals. To test the hypothesis that alcohol craving is pronounced among alcoholic individuals with a high availability of mu-opiate receptors in the brain reward system. Patients and comparison sample. The availability of central mu-opiate receptors was measured in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET) and the radioligand carbon 11-labeled carfentanil in the ventral striatum and compared with the severity of alcohol craving as assessed by the Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale (OCDS). Hospitalized care. Volunteer sample of 25 male alcohol-dependent inpatients assessed after detoxification of whom 12 underwent PET again 5 weeks later. Control group of 10 healthy men. After 1 to 3 weeks of abstinence, the availability of mu-opiate receptors in the ventral striatum, including the nucleus accumbens, was significantly elevated in alcoholic patients compared with healthy controls and remained elevated when 12 alcoholic patients had these levels measured 5 weeks later (P<.05 corrected for multiple testing). Higher availability of mu-opiate receptors in this brain area correlated significantly with the intensity of alcohol craving as assessed by the OCDS. Abstinent alcoholic patients displayed an increase in mu-opiate receptors in the ventral striatum, including the nucleus accumbens, which correlated with the severity of alcohol craving. These findings point to a neuronal correlate of alcohol urges.

  2. Acquisition, extinction, and recall of opiate reward memory are signaled by dynamic neuronal activity patterns in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ninglei; Chi, Ning; Lauzon, Nicole; Bishop, Stephanie; Tan, Huibing; Laviolette, Steven R

    2011-12-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) comprises an important component in the neural circuitry underlying drug-related associative learning and memory processing. Neuronal activation within mPFC circuits is correlated with the recall of opiate-related drug-taking experiences in both humans and other animals. Using an unbiased associative place conditioning procedure, we recorded mPFC neuronal populations during the acquisition, recall, and extinction phases of morphine-related associative learning and memory. Our analyses revealed that mPFC neurons show increased activity both in terms of tonic and phasic activity patterns during the acquisition phase of opiate reward-related memory and demonstrate stimulus-locked associative activity changes in real time, during the recall of opiate reward memories. Interestingly, mPFC neuronal populations demonstrated divergent patterns of bursting activity during the acquisition versus recall phases of newly acquired opiate reward memory, versus the extinction of these memories, with strongly increased bursting during the recall of an extinction memory and no associative bursting during the recall of a newly acquired opiate reward memory. Our results demonstrate that neurons within the mPFC are involved in both the acquisition, recall, and extinction of opiate-related reward memories, showing unique patterns of tonic and phasic activity patterns during these separate components of the opiate-related reward learning and memory recall.

  3. Opiate Dependence as an Independent and Interactive Risk Factor for Arterial Stiffness and Cardiovascular Ageing - A Longitudinal Study in Females

    PubMed Central

    Reece, Albert Stuart; Hulse, Gary Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite intriguing observational cross-sectional data there are no longitudinal studies of opiate related arterial disease. As opiates act via P16INK4A/CDKN2A, and vascular ageing has been thought to be a surrogate for organismal ageing, the subject has far-reaching implications. Methods Pulse Wave Analysis (PWA) by radial arterial tonometry (SphygmoCor) was performed on control and opiate dependent patients. Results A total of 37 controls were compared with 93 opiate dependents. They were studied on 117 and 275 occasions respectively up to 1,797 days. The mean (± S.E.M.) ages were 38.72 ± 2.64 and 33.78 ± 0.90 years (P = 0.0260), 91.4% and 10.8% smoked (P < 0.0001). Body mass index rose more in controls (P = 0.0185) and in interaction with time (P = 0.0025). When controlled for time and BMI, opiate dependency status was shown to be associated with vascular age and central arterial stiffness and pressure indices (all P < 0.05). When repeated measures multiple regression was performed on all traditional cardiovascular risk factors, the opiate dose-duration interaction was significant and appeared in 12 terms in the final model. It was also independently significant (P = 0.0153). Opiate dose or duration appeared in a further 15 terms. The model was shown to be significantly improved by the inclusion of terms for opiate dependency (A.I.C. 71.10 v 54.31, P < 0.0001). Conclusion These data confirm increased vascular stiffness and ageing in a longitudinal study, and thereby imply advanced organismal ageing. These multivariate studies are consistent with opiate dependency as an interactive and multivariate cardiovascular risk factor and emphasize the role of treatment duration. PMID:23976908

  4. Predicting functional resilience among young-adult children of opiate-dependent parents.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Martie L; Haggerty, Kevin P; Fleming, Charles B; Catalano, Richard F

    2009-03-01

    This study describes the adversities experienced by a sample of children of opiate-dependent parents, examines criteria for young adulthood functional resilience, and tests parent, child, and school predictors of resilience. The Focus on Families (FOF) project was a randomized trial of a family-focused intervention with opiate-dependent individuals in methadone treatment and their children. Analyses were conducted on data from the children in treatment and control families during the original study (1991-1995) and a long-term follow-up interview (2005-2006). Although all participants had an opiate-dependent parent, 70% experienced two or more additional types of childhood adversity and 20% experienced four or more types. A total of 24% met the following three criteria for functional resilience at the time of their young-adult interview: (1) working or being enrolled in school, (2) no history of substance abuse or dependence, and (3) no adult criminal charges in the prior 5 years. The FOF intervention did not significantly predict functional resilience. Girls were approximately four times more likely to exhibit resilience than boys. Experiencing a wider range of adversities in addition to having an opiate-dependent parent did not reduce the likelihood of functional resilience. Of the five child, family, and school predictors tested, only externalizing or internalizing problems in childhood were significantly associated with the likelihood of functional resilience (odds ratio = .30, p = .04) as a young adult. These findings suggest that early intervention with families with opiate-dependent parents to prevent and reduce internalizing and externalizing problems in their children holds the most promise of supporting resilient adaptation in early adulthood.

  5. Direct analysis of opiates in urine by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Edinboro, Leslie E; Backer, Ronald C; Poklis, Alphonse

    2005-10-01

    A method for the direct analysis of 10 opiate compounds in urine was developed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) with electrospray ionization interface (ESI). Opiates included were morphine-3-P-glucuronide, morphine-6--glucuronide, morphine, oxymorphone, hydromorphone, norcodeine, codeine, oxycodone, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6MAM), and hydrocodone. Urine samples were prepared by centrifugation to remove large particles and direct injection into the LC-MS-MS. Separation and detection of all compounds was accomplished within 6 min. Linearity was established for all opiates except 6MAM from 50 ng/mL to 10,000 ng/mL; 6MAM from 0.25 ng/mL to 50 ng/mL with all correlation coefficients (r) > 0.99. Interrun precision (%CV) ranged from 1.1% to 16.7%, and intrarun precision ranged from 1.3% to 16.3%. Accuracy (% bias) ranged from -7.3% to 13.6% and -8.5% to 11.8 for inter- and intrarun, respectively. Eighty-nine urine samples previously analyzed by gas chromatography-MS were re-analyzed by the LC-MS-MS method. The qualitative results found an 88% agreement for negative samples between the two methods and 94% for positive samples. The LC-MS-MS method identified 19 samples with additional opiates in the positive samples. Overall, the direct injection LC-MS-MS method performed well and permitted the rapid analysis of urine samples for several opiates simultaneously without extensive sample preparation.

  6. The Relationship between Childhood Maltreatment and Opiate Dependency in Adolescence and Middle Age

    PubMed Central

    Naqavi, Mohammad Reza; Mohammadi, Masood; Salari, Vahid; Nakhaee, Nouzar

    2011-01-01

    Background Child maltreatment is a global phenomenon with possible serious long-term consequences. The present study aimed to determine the relationship between childhood maltreatment and opiate dependency in older age. Methods In this study, 212 opiate dependent individuals and 216 control subjects were selected consecutively. The data collection instrument was a questionnaire which consisted of background variables, General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12), and Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). The questionnaires were anonymously completed by both groups in a private environment after obtaining informed consents. Findings The mean age in the addicts and non-addicts were 31.4 ± 6.7 and 30.8 ± 7.5, respectively (P = 0.367). Moreover, 84.4% of the opiate abusers and 76.9% percent of the control group were male (P = 0.051). The mean score of CTQ in the study and control groups were 47.2 ± 1.0 and 35.8 ± 0.6, respectively (P < 0.001). The frequency of all types of abuse and neglect were higher in the addicted group. While 70.3% of the study group reported at least one type of childhood maltreatment, this figure was as low as 33.8% in the control group (P < 0.001). After adjusting the two groups for differing background characteristics and the GHQ-12 score, emotional abuse (OR = 5.06), physical neglect (OR = 1.96), and sexual abuse (OR = 1.89) were proved to have significant relationships with addiction to opiates. Conclusion The frequency of all types of childhood maltreatment in the group addicted to opiates was higher than the control group. Emotional abuse, physical neglect, and sexual abuse had significant effects after adjusting other variables. PMID:24494122

  7. Opiate Analgesia Treatment Reduced Early Inflammatory Response After Severe Chest Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Krdzalic, Goran; Musanovic, Nermin; Krdzalic, Alisa; Mehmedagic, Indira; Kesetovic, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The frequency of severe chest injuries are increased. Their high morbidity is followed by systemic inflammatory response. The efficacy of pharmacological blockade of the response could prevent complications after chest injures. Aim: The aim of the study was to show an inflammatory response level, its prognostic significant and length of hospital stay after chest injures opiate analgesia treatment. Methods: Sixty patients from Department of Thoracic Surgery with severe chest injures were included in the prospective study. With respect of non opiate or opiate analgesia treatment, the patients were divided in two groups consisted of 30 patients. As a inflammatory markers, serum values of leukocytes, neutrophils, C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen in three measurements: at the time of admission, 24hours and 48 hours after admission, were followed. Results: Statistically significant differences were found between the examined groups in mean serum values of neutrophils (p=0.026 and p=0.03) in the second and the third measurement, CRP (p=0.05 and 0.25) in the second and the third measurement and leukocytes in the third measurement (p=0.016). 6 patients in group I and 3 in group II had initial stage of pneumonia, 13 patients in group I and 6 in group II had atelectasis and 7 patients from group I and 4 from group II had pleural effusion. The rate of complications was lower in group of patient who were under opiate analgesia treatment but without significant difference. The length of hospital stay for the patients in group I was 7.3±1.15 days and for the patients in group II it was 6.1±0.87 days with statistically significant difference p=0.017. Conclusion: The opiate analgesia in patients with severe chest injures reduced level of early inflammatory response, rate of intra hospital complications and length of hospital stay. PMID:28210021

  8. Behavioral expression of opiate withdrawal is altered after prefrontocortical dopamine depletion in rats: monoaminergic correlates.

    PubMed

    Espejo, E F; Serrano, M I; Caillé, S; Stinus, L

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the effects of prefrontocortical dopamine depletion on opiate withdrawal and prefrontocortical neurochemical changes elicited by morphine dependence and withdrawal. The dopaminergic content was also measured in the nucleus accumbens during withdrawal, in order to detect reactive changes induced by prefrontocortical lesion. Withdrawal was induced by naloxone in morphine-dependent rats. Monoamine levels were analyzed post-mortem by high performance liquid cromatography. The results showed that chronic morphine dependence did not modify basal levels of monoamines in sham rats, revealing neuroadaptation of prefrontocortical dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin systems to chronic morphine. The neuroadaptive phenomenon remained after prefrontocortical lesion (> 79% dopamine depletion). On the other hand, a strong increase of dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin contents in the medial prefrontal cortex of sham rats was detected during opiate withdrawal. However, in lesioned rats, the increase of prefrontocortical dopamine and serotonin content, but not that of noradrenaline, was much lower. In the nucleus accumbens, prefrontocortical lesion reactively enhanced the dopaminergic tone and, although opiate withdrawal reduced dopaminergic activity in both sham and lesioned rats, this reduction was less intense in the latter group. At a behavioral level, some symptoms of physical opiate withdrawal were exacerbated in lesioned rats (writhing, mastication, teeth-chattering, global score) and exploration was reduced. The findings hence indicate that: (i) prefrontocortical monoaminergic changes play a role in the behavioral expression of opiate withdrawal; (ii) the severity of some withdrawal signs are related to the dopaminergic and serotonergic tone of the medial prefrontal cortex rather than to the noradrenergic one, and (iii) an inverse relationship between mesocortical and mesolimbic dopaminergic systems exists.

  9. Major disruptions of sleep during treatment of the opiate withdrawal syndrome: differences between methadone and lofexidine detoxification treatments.

    PubMed

    Beswick, Tracy; Best, David; Rees, Sian; Bearn, Jenny; Gossop, Michael; Strang, John

    2003-03-01

    Sleep disturbance experienced during methadone or lofexidine opiate detoxification was investigated in 118 opiate-dependent patients receiving inpatient detoxification treatment. Sleep was assessed at four time-points during opiate detoxification using a self-report questionnaire. Maximum sleep disruption occurred at completion of detoxification and during the protracted withdrawal period, with patients in the methadone group reporting higher levels of withdrawal symptoms, lower overall sleep, longer sleep latencies and significantly longer periods of time awake than lofexidine patients. Regression analyses demonstrated a significant relationship between sleep disturbance, protracted withdrawal and retention in treatment, in addition to the major treatment benefit of reduced sleep disturbance conferred by lofexidine treatment.

  10. "Pro-dopamine regulation (KB220Z™)" as a long-term therapeutic modality to overcome reduced resting state dopamine tone in opiate/opioid epidemic in America.

    PubMed

    Blum, K; Marcelo, F; Dushaj, K; Fried, L; Badgaiyan, R D

    2016-09-01

    Since it is known that relapse, morality, and hospitalizations have been tied to the presence of the Dopamine D2 Receptor A1 allele, as one example, and carriers of this gene variant have a proclivity to favor amino-acid therapy, it seems intuitive that the incorporation of modalities to provide a balance and or restoration of hypodopaminergia should be considered as a front-line tactic to overcome the current American opiate/opioid epidemic, saving millions from death and unwanted locked-in-addiction. If we continue down the prim road path of fighting addiction to narcotics with narcotics, we are doomed to fail. This lesson can also have global interest.

  11. Sigma-1 receptors modulate functional activity of rat splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Whitlock, B B; Pultz, J A; Wolfe, S A

    1995-06-01

    Neuroleptics, opiates, and cocaine are commonly prescribed for or abused by humans. Although primarily used for their actions at other receptors in brain, these compounds also act at sigma receptors. We have previously identified sigma-1 receptors on human peripheral blood leukocytes and rat spleen, and in the present study we demonstrate a correlation between the pharmacology of these receptors and the ability of drugs to suppress concanavalin A-induced splenocyte proliferation. These results support the hypothesis that sigma-1 receptors regulate functional activities of immune cells, and suggest that sigma agonists may cause changes in immune competence in vivo.

  12. Aberrant mesolimbic dopamine-opiate interaction in obesity.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, Lauri; Tuulari, Jetro; Karlsson, Henry; Hirvonen, Jussi; Helin, Semi; Salminen, Paulina; Parkkola, Riitta; Hietala, Jarmo; Nuutila, Pirjo; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2015-11-15

    Dopamine and opioid neurotransmitter systems share many functions such as regulation of reward and pleasure. μ-Opioid receptors (MOR) modulate the mesolimbic dopamine system in ventral tegmental area and striatum, key areas implicated in reward. We hypothesized that dopamine and opioid receptor availabilities correlate in vivo and that this correlation is altered in obesity, a disease with altered reward processing. Twenty lean females (mean BMI 22) and 25 non-binge eating morbidly obese females (mean BMI 41) underwent two positron emission tomography scans with [(11)C]carfentanil and [(11)C]raclopride to measure the MOR and dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) availability, respectively. In lean subjects, the MOR and DRD2 availabilities were positively associated in the ventral striatum (r=0.62, p=0.003) and dorsal caudate nucleus (r=0.62, p=0.004). Moreover, DRD2 availability in the ventral striatum was associated with MOR availability in other regions of the reward circuitry, particularly in the ventral tegmental area. In morbidly obese subjects, this receptor interaction was significantly weaker in ventral striatum but unaltered in the caudate nucleus. Finally, the association between DRD2 availability in the ventral striatum and MOR availability in the ventral tegmental area was abolished in the morbidly obese. The study demonstrates a link between DRD2 and MOR availabilities in living human brain. This interaction is selectively disrupted in mesolimbic dopamine system in morbid obesity. We propose that interaction between the dopamine and opioid systems is a prerequisite for normal reward processing and that disrupted cross-talk may underlie altered reward processing in obesity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Abnormal pain response in pain-sensitive opiate addicts after prolonged abstinence predicts increased drug craving

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhen-Yu; Shi, Jie; Epstein, David H.; Wang, Jun; Lu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Craving is a primary feature of opiate addiction and is clinically significant because of its potential to trigger opiate use and relapse. Opiate use can also produce abnormal pain perception. We predicted that for opiate addicts (OAs), there may be an association between these two major features of addiction (drug craving and abnormal pain responses). Objectives To examine pain responses in abstinent opiate addicts in comparison with healthy controls using a cold-pressor test (CPT) and investigate the correlations of cue-induced drug craving with pain responses. Material and methods Fifty-four abstinent OAs and 46 healthy subjects participated in the CPT, and the OAs were also exposed to heroin-related cues the day before the pain test. Outcome measures included pain-tolerance time, VAS ratings of pain intensity and distress, and (in the cue-exposure procedure) VAS ratings of heroin craving and anxiety. Results In the CPT, abstinent addicts showed shorter pain-tolerance time (85.1±14.1 s vs. 133.7±16.7 s, p<0.05) and higher ratings of pain distress (61±3.2 vs. 45.6±3.2, p< 0.01) compared to healthy controls. When we divided the addicts and controls into pain-sensitive (PS) and pain-tolerant (PT) groups by dichotomizing each group in terms of pain-tolerance time, we again found differences between the two PS groups (37.3±3.5 s vs. 57.4±5.1 s, p<0.01 for pain-tolerance time; 66.7±3.2 vs. 52.4±3.3, p<0.01 for distress ratings). For all participants, pain-tolerance time was negatively correlated with VAS ratings for pain intensity and distress. More importantly, the PS addicts reported greater cue-induced craving than the PT addicts (17.8±2.2 vs. 4.5±4.2, p<0.05). For the addict group as a whole, pain distress (the affective aspect of pain) was positively correlated with intensity of cue-induced craving measured on a different day (r=0.33, p=0.01). Conclusions A hyperalgesic state persists for at least 5 months in abstinent OAs and is predictive of

  14. Morphine and codeine concentrations in human urine following controlled poppy seeds administration of known opiate content.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael L; Nichols, Daniel C; Underwood, Paula; Fuller, Zachary; Moser, Matthew A; LoDico, Charles; Gorelick, David A; Newmeyer, Matthew N; Concheiro, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-08-01

    Opiates are an important component for drug testing due to their high abuse potential. Proper urine opiate interpretation includes ruling out poppy seed ingestion; however, detailed elimination studies after controlled poppy seed administration with known morphine and codeine doses are not available. Therefore, we investigated urine opiate pharmacokinetics after controlled oral administration of uncooked poppy seeds with known morphine and codeine content. Participants were administered two 45 g oral poppy seed doses 8 h apart, each containing 15.7 mg morphine and 3mg codeine. Urine was collected ad libitum up to 32 h after the first dose. Specimens were analyzed with the Roche Opiates II immunoassay at 2000 and 300 μg/L cutoffs, and the ThermoFisher CEDIA(®) heroin metabolite (6-acetylmorphine, 6-AM) and Lin-Zhi 6-AM immunoassays with 10 μg/L cutoffs to determine if poppy seed ingestion could produce positive results in these heroin marker assays. In addition, all specimens were quantified for morphine and codeine by GC/MS. Participants (N=22) provided 391 urine specimens over 32 h following dosing; 26.6% and 83.4% were positive for morphine at 2000 and 300 μg/L GC/MS cutoffs, respectively. For the 19 subjects who completed the study, morphine concentrations ranged from <300 to 7522 μg/L with a median peak concentration of 5239 μg/L. The median first morphine-positive urine sample at 2000 μg/L cutoff concentration occurred at 6.6 h (1.2-12.1), with the last positive from 2.6 to 18 h after the second dose. No specimens were positive for codeine at a cutoff concentration of 2000 μg/L, but 20.2% exceeded 300 μg/L, with peak concentrations of 658 μg/L (284-1540). The Roche Opiates II immunoassay had efficiencies greater than 96% for the 2000 and 300 μg/L cutoffs. The CEDIA 6-AM immunoassay had a specificity of 91%, while the Lin-Zhi assay had no false positive results. These data provide valuable information for interpreting urine opiate results. Copyright

  15. Morphine and Codeine Concentrations in Human Urine following Controlled Poppy Seeds Administration of Known Opiate Content

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael L.; Nichols, Daniel C.; Underwood, Paula; Fuller, Zachary; Moser, Matthew A.; LoDico, Charles; Gorelick, David A.; Newmeyer, Matthew N.; Concheiro, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Opiates are an important component for drug testing due to their high abuse potential. Proper urine opiate interpretation includes ruling out poppy seed ingestion; however, detailed elimination studies after controlled poppy seed administration with known morphine and codeine doses are not available. Therefore, we investigated urine opiate pharmacokinetics after controlled oral administration of uncooked poppy seeds with known morphine and codeine content. Participants were administered two 45g oral poppy seed doses 8h apart, each containing 15.7mg morphine and 3mg codeine. Urine was collected ad libitum up to 32h after the first dose. Specimens were analyzed with the Roche Opiates II immunoassay at 2,000 and 300μg/L cutoffs, and the ThermoFisher CEDIA® Heroin Metabolite (6-acetylmorphine, 6AM) and Lin-Zhi 6AM immunoassays with 10μg/L cutoffs to determine if poppy seed ingestion could produce positive results in these heroin marker assays. In addition, all specimens were quantified for morphine and codeine by GC/MS. Participants (N=22) provided 391 urine specimens over 32h following dosing; 26.6% and 83.4% were positive for morphine at 2,000 and 300μg/L GC/MS cutoffs, respectively. For the 19 subjects who completed the study, morphine concentrations ranged from <300 to 7,522μg/L with a median peak concentration of 5,239μg/L. The median first morphine-positive urine sample at 2,000μg/L cutoff concentration occurred at 6.6h (1.2-12.1), with the last positive from 2.6 to 18h after the second dose. No specimens were positive for codeine at a cutoff concentration of 2,000μg/L, but 20.2% exceeded 300μg/L, with peak concentrations of 658 μg/L (284-1540). The Roche Opiates II immunoassay had efficiencies greater than 96% for the 2000 and 300μg/L cutoffs. The CEDIA 6AM immunoassay had a specificity of 91%, while the Lin-Zhi assay had no false positive results. These data provide valuable information for interpreting urine opiate results. PMID:24887324

  16. Opiate concentrations following the ingestion of poppy seed products--evidence for 'the poppy seed defence'.

    PubMed

    Meadway, C; George, S; Braithwaite, R

    1998-08-31

    The universally accepted 300 ng/ml cut-off limit for opiate assays stated to be mandatory for all drug screening laboratories by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, has been questioned recently due to positive results being obtained following the ingestion of poppy seed containing food products. To establish the plausibility of the 'the poppy seed defence' the concentrations of codeine, norcodeine, morphine, normorphine and thebaine (a potential marker for seed ingestion) in several varieties of poppy seeds from different countries were quantified by GC-MS. The country of origin of the seed specimen analysed and the preparation of the seeds prior to their culinary use was found to influence the alkaloid concentration determined. The maximum morphine and codeine concentrations determined in the seeds were found to be 33.2 and 13.7 micrograms/g seed respectively. In addition, thebaine concentrations were found to vary with each seed sample analysed. Following the consumption of bread rolls (mean 0.76 g seed covering per roll) by four subjects, all urine specimens analysed produced negative results (using the Dade Bebring EMIT II opiate screening assay) with the exception of one subject (body weight 63.0 kg) who consumed two poppy seed rolls. In this subject opiate positive screening results were obtained for up to 6 h post ingestion with maximum urinary morphine and codeine concentrations of 832.0 ng/ml (@ 2-4 h post ingestion) and 47.9 ng/ml (@ 0-2 h post ingestion) respectively being achieved. Following the ingestion of poppy seed cake containing an average of 4.69 g of seed per slice by four individuals, opiate positive screening results were obtained for up to 24 h. In one subject (dose equivalent to 0.07 g poppy seed/kg body weight) maximum urinary morphine and codeine concentrations of 302.1 ng/ml (@ 0-2 h) and 83.8 ng/ml (@ 2-4 h) respectively were recorded. The elimination of thebaine was found to vary widely between individuals

  17. Abnormal pain response in pain-sensitive opiate addicts after prolonged abstinence predicts increased drug craving.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhen-Yu; Shi, Jie; Epstein, David H; Wang, Jun; Lu, Lin

    2009-06-01

    Craving is a primary feature of opiate addiction and is clinically significant because of its potential to trigger opiate use and relapse. Opiate use can also produce abnormal pain perception. We predicted that for opiate addicts (OAs), there may be an association between these two major features of addiction (drug craving and abnormal pain responses). To examine pain responses in abstinent opiate addicts in comparison with healthy controls using a cold-pressor test (CPT) and investigate the correlations of cue-induced drug craving with pain responses. Fifty-four abstinent OAs and 46 healthy subjects participated in the CPT, and the OAs were also exposed to heroin-related cues the day before the pain test. Outcome measures included pain-tolerance time, VAS ratings of pain intensity and distress, and (in the cue-exposure procedure) VAS ratings of heroin craving and anxiety. In the CPT, abstinent addicts showed shorter pain-tolerance time (85.1 +/- 14.1 s vs. 133.7 +/- 16.7 s, p < 0.05) and higher ratings of pain distress (61 +/- 3.2 vs. 45.6 +/- 3.2, p < 0.01) compared to healthy controls. When we divided the addicts and controls into pain-sensitive (PS) and pain-tolerant (PT) groups by dichotomizing each group in terms of pain-tolerance time, we again found differences between the two PS groups (37.3 +/- 3.5 s vs. 57.4 +/- 5.1 s, p < 0.01 for pain-tolerance time; 66.7 +/- 3.2 vs. 52.4 +/- 3.3, p < 0.01 for distress ratings). For all participants, pain-tolerance time was negatively correlated with VAS ratings for pain intensity and distress. More importantly, the PS addicts reported greater cue-induced craving than the PT addicts (17.8 +/- 2.2 vs. 4.5 +/- 4.2, p < 0.05). For the addict group as a whole, pain distress (the affective aspect of pain) was positively correlated with intensity of cue-induced craving measured on a different day (r = 0.33, p = 0.01). A hyperalgesic state persists for at least 5 months in abstinent OAs and is predictive of cue

  18. Usefulness of multi-parameter opiate analysis in hair of drug users and victims of fatal poisonings.

    PubMed

    Kłys, Małgorzata; Rojek, Sebastian; Kulikowska, Joanna; Bozek, Edward; Scisłowski, Mariusz

    2005-01-01

    The results of a multi-parameter analysis of opiates in the hair of drug users and victims of fatal poisonings with these xenobiotics have been presented. The analysis was carried out with the use of liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The article discusses the monitoring of the drug users' adherence to pharmacotherapy and the usefulness of hair analysis for medico-legal purposes. The authors evaluate the differences in the contents of particular opiates in the hair as related to the origin of a sample (untreated drug user, drug user in the course of treatment, victim of fatal poisoning). The report presents differences between the Polish and American profiles of abuse, providing confirmation that a great part of drug users undergoing methadone treatment do not abstain from opiates and/or amphetamine, the latter as a rule being very often taken with opiates.

  19. Opioid receptor trafficking and interaction in nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X; Bao, L; Li, S

    2015-01-01

    Opiate analgesics such as morphine are often used for pain therapy. However, antinociceptive tolerance and dependence may develop with long-term use of these drugs. It was found that μ-opioid receptors can interact with δ-opioid receptors, and morphine antinociceptive tolerance can be reduced by blocking δ-opioid receptors. Recent studies have shown that μ- and δ-opioid receptors are co-expressed in a considerable number of small neurons in the dorsal root ganglion. The interaction of μ-opioid receptors with δ-opioid receptors in the nociceptive afferents is facilitated by the stimulus-induced cell-surface expression of δ-opioid receptors, and contributes to morphine tolerance. Further analysis of the molecular, cellular and neural circuit mechanisms that regulate the trafficking and interaction of opioid receptors and related signalling molecules in the pain pathway would help to elucidate the mechanism of opiate analgesia and improve pain therapy. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24611685

  20. An Anadysplasia-Like, Spontaneously Remitting Spondylometaphyseal Dysplasia Secondary to Lamin B Receptor (LBR) Gene Mutations: Further Definition of the Phenotypic Heterogeneity of LBR-Bone Dysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Sobreira, Nara; Modaff, Peggy; Steel, Gary; You, Jing; Nanda, Sonia; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Valle, David; Pauli, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    We describe a boy who has an anadysplasia-like spondylometaphyseal dysplasia. By whole exome sequencing he was shown to have compound heterozygous mutations of LBR that codes for the lamin B receptor. He shares many similarities with a case previously described, but in whom the early natural history could not be established [Borovik et al., 2013]. Thus, in addition to Greenberg dysplasia (a perinatal lethal disorder), homozygosity or compound heterozygosity of mutations in LBR can result in a mild, spontaneously regressing bone dysplasia. PMID:25348816

  1. Individual differences in initial morphine sensitivity as a predictor for the development of opiate addiction in rats.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kevin S; Park, Thomas Y; Lee, Bong Hyo; Ursano, Robert J; Choi, Kwang H

    2016-10-15

    Individuals report a wide range of analgesia to similar doses of opiates, and not all opiate users become addicted. This suggests that there may be certain predispositions that influence one to develop opiate addiction. We investigated the relationship between the individual differences in initial morphine sensitivity and the subsequent development of opiate addiction-like behavior using a hot plate test and an intravenous morphine self-administration (MSA) paradigm in rats. Using a median split of initial morphine antinociception, animals were defined as low antinociception (LA) and high antinociception (HA) groups. Thus, the LA group represents the animals that were less sensitive to initial morphine antinociception as compared to those of the HA group. The animals were allowed to self-administer either saline or morphine (0.5mg/kg/infusion, 4hr/day) 5days per week for 3 weeks. Spontaneous locomotor activity was measured on self-administration days 10 and 15. Individual differences in initial morphine sensitivity were not correlated with the amount of morphine self-administered by the animals on day 1. In the second-week of MSA, the LA group exhibited increased morphine intake and locomotor hyperactivity as compared to those of the HA group. Therefore, certain animals that are less sensitive to initial morphine antinociception may be susceptible to developing opiate addiction. The current findings may have clinical implications for future research on the biological mechanisms of opiate addiction and preclinical medication development.

  2. Molecular Heterogeneity and Response to Neoadjuvant Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Targeting in CALGB 40601, a Randomized Phase III Trial of Paclitaxel Plus Trastuzumab With or Without Lapatinib.

    PubMed

    Carey, Lisa A; Berry, Donald A; Cirrincione, Constance T; Barry, William T; Pitcher, Brandelyn N; Harris, Lyndsay N; Ollila, David W; Krop, Ian E; Henry, Norah Lynn; Weckstein, Douglas J; Anders, Carey K; Singh, Baljit; Hoadley, Katherine A; Iglesia, Michael; Cheang, Maggie Chon U; Perou, Charles M; Winer, Eric P; Hudis, Clifford A

    2016-02-20

    Dual human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) targeting can increase pathologic complete response rates (pCRs) to neoadjuvant therapy and improve progression-free survival in metastatic disease. CALGB 40601 examined the impact of dual HER2 blockade consisting of trastuzumab and lapatinib added to paclitaxel, considering tumor and microenvironment molecular features. Patients with stage II to III HER2-positive breast cancer underwent tumor biopsy followed by random assignment to paclitaxel plus trastuzumab alone (TH) or with the addition of lapatinib (THL) for 16 weeks before surgery. An investigational arm of paclitaxel plus lapatinib (TL) was closed early. The primary end point was pCR in the breast; correlative end points focused on molecular features identified by gene expression-based assays. Among 305 randomly assigned patients (THL, n = 118; TH, n = 120; TL, n = 67), the pCR rate was 56% (95% CI, 47% to 65%) with THL and 46% (95% CI, 37% to 55%) with TH (P = .13), with no effect of dual therapy in the hormone receptor-positive subset but a significant increase in pCR with dual therapy in those with hormone receptor-negative disease (P = .01). The tumors were molecularly heterogeneous by gene expression analysis using mRNA sequencing (mRNAseq). pCR rates significantly differed by intrinsic subtype (HER2 enriched, 70%; luminal A, 34%; luminal B, 36%; P < .001). In multivariable analysis treatment arm, intrinsic subtype, HER2 amplicon gene expression, p53 mutation signature, and immune cell signatures were independently associated with pCR. Post-treatment residual disease was largely luminal A (69%). pCR to dual HER2-targeted therapy was not significantly higher than single HER2 targeting. Tissue analysis demonstrated a high degree of intertumoral heterogeneity with respect to both tumor genomics and tumor microenvironment that significantly affected pCR rates. These factors should be considered when interpreting and designing trials in HER2-positive

  3. Desensitization of brain opiate receptor mechanisms by gonadal steroid treatments that stimulate luteinizing hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Berglund, L A; Derendorf, H; Simpkins, J W

    1988-06-01

    We studied the effects of two ovarian steroid treatments that induce proestrous-like surges in LH secretion on responsiveness to morphine sulfate (MS), as measured by induced hypothermic, antinociceptive, behavioral, and LH secretory changes. Ovariectomized rats received no steroids (OVX), 7.5 micrograms estradiol benzoate 2 days before the experiment (EB), or EB and then 5 mg progesterone 48 h later (EBP). MS administration coincided with the steroid-induced LH hypersecretion that occurs in the EB and EBP rats at 1530-1630 h. Serum LH concentrations were determined 30 min after administration of MS. In OVX and EB rats, MS caused a dose-dependent decrease in serum LH, but even 20 mg/kg MS did not alter serum LH during the EBP-induced LH surge. Brain-mediated morphine-induced analgesia was evaluated in the three steroid treatment groups from measurement of latency to pawlick on a hot plate. EB and EBP rats were less responsive than OVX rats to MS-induced antinociception. EB and EBP rats were also less responsive than OVX animals to the spinal cord-mediated analgesia due to MS, as calculated by tail-flick latency. MS-induced hypothermia revealed a responsiveness order of OVX greater than EB greater than EBP. Whereas MS caused a dose-dependent reduction in locomotor activity in OVX and EB rats, EBP rats showed marked hyperactivity at low MS doses and were less responsive to the suppression of locomotor activity at higher doses. These marked steroid-induced changes in MS responsiveness could not be explained by altered pharmacokinetic disposition of morphine. These data indicate that treatment with EBP, which stimulates a preovulatory-like LH surge, decreases the ability of MS to induce hypothermic, antinociceptive, and behavioral responses and abolishes its capacity to suppress LH release. These effects of gonadal steroids were not observed before the LH surge, which suggests that this surge is linked to the decline in MS sensitivity. Further, the diminished response to MS appears to be a function of the magnitude of the LH surge.

  4. 2D-ELDOR study of heterogeneity and domain structure changes in plasma membrane vesicles upon cross-linking of receptors.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yun-Wei; Costa-Filho, Antonio J; Baird, Barbara; Freed, Jack H

    2011-09-08

    2D electron-electron double resonance (2D-ELDOR) with the "full Sc-" method of analysis is applied to the study of plasma membrane vesicles. Membrane structural changes upon antigen cross-linking of IgE receptors (IgE-FcεRI) in plasma membrane vesicles (PMVs) isolated from RBL-2H3 mast cells are investigated, for the first time, by means of these 2D-ELDOR techniques. Spectra of 1-palmitoyl-2-(16-doxyl stearoyl) phosphatidylcholine (16-PC) from PMVs before and after this stimulation at several temperatures are reported. The results demonstrate a coexistence of liquid-ordered (L(o)) and liquid-disordered (L(d)) components. We find that upon cross-linking, the membrane environment is remodeled to become more disordered, as shown by a moderate increase in the population of the L(d) component. This change in the relative amount of the L(o) versus L(d) com