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Sample records for opinion radiotherapy volume

  1. Radiotherapy Dose-Volume Effects on Salivary Gland Function

    SciTech Connect

    Deasy, Joseph O., E-mail: jdeasy@radonc.wustl.ed; Moiseenko, Vitali; Marks, Lawrence

    2010-03-01

    Publications relating parotid dose-volume characteristics to radiotherapy-induced salivary toxicity were reviewed. Late salivary dysfunction has been correlated to the mean parotid gland dose, with recovery occurring with time. Severe xerostomia (defined as long-term salivary function of <25% of baseline) is usually avoided if at least one parotid gland is spared to a mean dose of less than {approx}20 Gy or if both glands are spared to less than {approx}25 Gy (mean dose). For complex, partial-volume RT patterns (e.g., intensity-modulated radiotherapy), each parotid mean dose should be kept as low as possible, consistent with the desired clinical target volume coverage. Amore » lower parotid mean dose usually results in better function. Submandibular gland sparing also significantly decreases the risk of xerostomia. The currently available predictive models are imprecise, and additional study is required to identify more accurate models of xerostomia risk.« less

  2. [Clinical target volume delineation for radiotherapy of the esophagus].

    PubMed

    Lazarescu, I; Thureau, S; Nkhali, L; Pradier, O; Dubray, B

    2013-10-01

    The dense lymphatic network of the esophagus facilitates tumour spreading along the cephalo-caudal axis and to locoregional lymph nodes. A better understanding of microscopic invasion by tumour cells, based on histological analysis of surgical specimens and analysis of recurrence sites, has justified a reduction in radiotherapy target volumes. The delineation of the clinical target volume (CTV) depends on tumour characteristics (site, histology) and on its spread as assessed on endoscopic ultrasonography and ((18)F)-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography (FDG-PET). We propose that positive and negative predictive values for FDG-PET should be used to adapt the CTV according to the risk of nodal involvement. Copyright © 2013 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Xerostomia, salivary characteristics and gland volumes following intensity-modulated radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a two-year follow up.

    PubMed

    Sim, Cpc; Soong, Y L; Pang, Epp; Lim, C; Walker, G D; Manton, D J; Reynolds, E C; Wee, Jts

    2018-06-01

    To evaluate changes in xerostomia status, salivary characteristics and gland volumes 2 years following radiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients. Xerostomia scores, salivary flow rates, pH and buffering capacity were measured at pre-radiotherapy, mid-radiotherapy, 2 weeks, 3 months and 2 years post-radiotherapy. Salivary gland volumes and their correlation with radiation dose were also assessed. Mean radiation dose to oral cavity, parotid and submandibular glands (SMG) was 44.5, 65.0 and 38.6 Gy respectively. Parotid and SMG volumes decreased 33% at 3 months post-radiotherapy; volumes at 2 years post-radiotherapy were 84% and 51% of pre-radiotherapy levels, respectively. Correlations were observed between parotid gland volume per cent reduction and its radiation dose and between resting salivary flow rate reduction and post-radiotherapy/pre-radiotherapy SMG volume ratio. Salivary flow rates and resting saliva pH remained significantly low at 2 years post-radiotherapy (both flow rates, P = 0.001; resting saliva pH, P = 0.005). Similarly, xerostomia scores remained significantly higher compared with pre-radiotherapy levels. Submandibular gland volumetric shrinkage persisted 2 years after radiotherapy. Xerostomia scores remained significantly higher, and salivary flow rates and resting saliva pH remained significantly lower, suggesting that study participants were still at risk for hyposalivation-related oral diseases. © 2018 Australian Dental Association.

  4. Distributed volume rendering and stereoscopic display for radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, David J.

    The thesis describes attempts to use direct volume rendering techniques to produce visualisations useful in the preparation of radiotherapy treatment plans. The selected algorithms allow the generation of data-rich images which can be used to assist the radiologist in comprehending complicated three-dimensional phenomena. The treatment plans are formulated using a three dimensional model which combines patient data acquired from CT scanning and the results of a simulation of the radiation delivery. Multiple intersecting beams with shaped profiles are used and the region of intersection is designed to closely match the position and shape of the targeted tumour region. The proposed treatment must be evaluated as to how well the target region is enveloped by the high dose occurring where the beams intersect, and also as to whether the treatment is likely to expose non-tumour regions to unacceptably high levels of radiation. Conventionally the plans are reviewed by examining CT images overlaid with contours indicating dose levels. Volume visualisation offers a possible saving in time by presenting the data in three dimensional form thereby removing the need to examine a set of slices. The most difficult aspect is to depict unambiguously the relationships between the different data. For example, if a particular beam configuration results in unintended irradiation of a sensitive organ, then it is essential to ensure that this is clearly displayed, and that the 3D relationships between the beams and other data can be readily perceived in order to decide how to correct the problem. The user interface has been designed to present a unified view of the different techniques available for identifying features of interest within the data. The system differs from those previously reported in that complex visualisations can be constructed incrementally, and several different combinations of features can be viewed simultaneously. To maximise the quantity of relevant data presented

  5. [Clinical evaluation of heavy-particle radiotherapy using dose volume histogram (DVH)].

    PubMed

    Terahara, A; Nakano, T; Tsujii, H

    1998-01-01

    Radiotherapy with heavy particles such as proton and heavy-charged particles is a promising modality for treatment of localized malignant tumors because of the good dose distribution. A dose calculation and radiotherapy planning system which is essential for this kind of treatment has been developed in recent years. It has the capability to compute the dose volume histogram (DVH) which contains dose-volume information for the target volume and other interesting volumes. Recently, DVH is commonly used to evaluate and compare dose distributions in radiotherapy with both photon and heavy particles, and it shows that a superior dose distribution is obtained in heavy particle radiotherapy. DVH is also utilized for the evaluation of dose distribution related to clinical outcomes. Besides models such as normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and tumor control probability (TCP), which can be calculated from DVH are proposed by several authors, they are applied to evaluate dose distributions themselves and to evaluate them in relation to clinical results. DVH is now a useful and important tool, but further studies are needed to use DVH and these models practically for clinical evaluation of heavy-particle radiotherapy.

  6. Target volume motion during anal cancer image guided radiotherapy using cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Corrinne J; Bernier, Laurence; Hansen, Vibeke N; Tait, Diana M

    2018-05-01

    Literature regarding image-guidance and interfractional motion of the anal canal (AC) during anal cancer radiotherapy is sparse. This study investigates interfractional AC motion during anal cancer radiotherapy. Bone matched cone beam CT (CBCT) images were acquired for 20 patients receiving anal cancer radiotherapy allowing population systematic and random error calculations. 12 were selected to investigate interfractional AC motion. Primary anal gross tumour volume and clinical target volume (CTVa) were contoured on each CBCT. CBCT CTVa volumes were compared to planning CTVa. CBCT CTVa volumes were combined into a CBCT-CTVa envelope for each patient. Maximum distortion between each orthogonal border of the planning CTVa and CBCT-CTVa envelope was measured. Frequency, volume and location of CBCT-CTVa envelope beyond the planning target volume (PTVa) was analysed. Population systematic and random errors were 1 and 3 mm respectively. 112 CBCTs were analysed in the interfractional motion study. CTVa varied between each imaging session particularly T location patients of anorectal origin. CTVa border expansions ≥ 1 cm were seen inferiorly, anteriorly, posteriorly and left direction. The CBCT-CTVa envelope fell beyond the PTVa ≥ 50% imaging sessions (n = 5). Of these CBCT CTVa distortions beyond PTVa, 44% and 32% were in the upper and lower thirds of PTVa respectively. The AC is susceptible to volume changes and shape deformations. Care must be taken when calculating or considering reducing the PTV margin to the anus. Advances in knowledge: Within a limited field of research, this study provides further knowledge of how the AC deforms during anal cancer radiotherapy.

  7. Radiotherapy volume delineation using 18F-FDG-PET/CT modifies gross node volume in patients with oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Jimenez, E; Mateos, P; Aymar, N; Roncero, R; Ortiz, I; Gimenez, M; Pardo, J; Salinas, J; Sabater, S

    2018-05-02

    Evidence supporting the use of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the segmentation process of oesophageal cancer for radiotherapy planning is limited. Our aim was to compare the volumes and tumour lengths defined by fused PET/CT vs. CT simulation. Twenty-nine patients were analyzed. All patients underwent a single PET/CT simulation scan. Two separate GTVs were defined: one based on CT data alone and another based on fused PET/CT data. Volume sizes for both data sets were compared and the spatial overlap was assessed by the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The gross tumour volume (GTVtumour) and maximum tumour diameter were greater by PET/CT, and length of primary tumour was greater by CT, but differences were not statistically significant. However, the gross node volume (GTVnode) was significantly greater by PET/CT. The DSC analysis showed excellent agreement for GTVtumour, 0.72, but was very low for GTVnode, 0.25. Our study shows that the volume definition by PET/CT and CT data differs. CT simulation, without taking into account PET/CT information, might leave cancer-involved nodes out of the radiotherapy-delineated volumes.

  8. Diffusion and perfusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging for tumor volume definition in radiotherapy of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lu; Wang, Gang; Feng, Yuanming; Yu, Tonggang; Guo, Yu; Bai, Xu; Ye, Zhaoxiang

    2016-09-21

    Accurate target volume delineation is crucial for the radiotherapy of tumors. Diffusion and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide functional information about brain tumors, and they are able to detect tumor volume and physiological changes beyond the lesions shown on conventional MRI. This review examines recent studies that utilized diffusion and perfusion MRI for tumor volume definition in radiotherapy of brain tumors, and it presents the opportunities and challenges in the integration of multimodal functional MRI into clinical practice. The results indicate that specialized and robust post-processing algorithms and tools are needed for the precise alignment of targets on the images, and comprehensive validations with more clinical data are important for the improvement of the correlation between histopathologic results and MRI parameter images.

  9. Dosimetric comparison between conventional and conformal radiotherapy for carcinoma cervix: Are we treating the right volumes?

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Jyotirup; Patra, Niladri B.; Sarkar, Biplab; Basu, Ayan; Pal, Santanu

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Conventional portals, based on bony anatomy, for external beam radiotherapy for cervical cancer have been repeatedly demonstrated as inadequate. Conversely, with image-based conformal radiotherapy, better target coverage may be offset by the greater toxicities and poorer compliance associated with treating larger volumes. This study was meant to dosimetrically compare conformal and conventional radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Five patients of carcinoma cervix underwent planning CT scan with IV contrast and targets, and organs at risk (OAR) were contoured. Two sets of plans-conventional and conformal were generated for each patient. Field sizes were recorded, and dose volume histograms of both sets of plans were generated and compared on the basis of target coverage and OAR sparing. Results: Target coverage was significantly improved with conformal plans though field sizes required were significantly larger. On the other hand, dose homogeneity was not significantly improved. Doses to the OARs (rectum, urinary bladder, and small bowel) were not significantly different across the 2 arms. Conclusion: Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy gives significantly better target coverage, which may translate into better local control and survival. On the other hand, it also requires significantly larger field sizes though doses to the OARs are not significantly increased. PMID:24455584

  10. Modelling duodenum radiotherapy toxicity using cohort dose-volume-histogram data.

    PubMed

    Holyoake, Daniel L P; Aznar, Marianne; Mukherjee, Somnath; Partridge, Mike; Hawkins, Maria A

    2017-06-01

    Gastro-intestinal toxicity is dose-limiting in abdominal radiotherapy and correlated with duodenum dose-volume parameters. We aimed to derive updated NTCP model parameters using published data and prospective radiotherapy quality-assured cohort data. A systematic search identified publications providing duodenum dose-volume histogram (DVH) statistics for clinical studies of conventionally-fractionated radiotherapy. Values for the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) NTCP model were derived through sum-squared-error minimisation and using leave-one-out cross-validation. Data were corrected for fraction size and weighted according to patient numbers, and the model refined using individual patient DVH data for two further cohorts from prospective clinical trials. Six studies with published DVH data were utilised, and with individual patient data included outcomes for 531 patients in total (median follow-up 16months). Observed gastro-intestinal toxicity rates ranged from 0% to 14% (median 8%). LKB parameter values for unconstrained fit to published data were: n=0.070, m=0.46, TD 50(1) [Gy]=183.8, while the values for the model incorporating the individual patient data were n=0.193, m=0.51, TD 50(1) [Gy]=299.1. LKB parameters derived using published data are shown to be consistent to those previously obtained using individual patient data, supporting a small volume-effect and dependence on exposure to high threshold dose. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Krause, Sonja; Debus, Jürgen; Neuhof, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Solitary plasmocytoma occurring in bone (solitary plasmocytoma of the bone, SBP) or in soft tissue (extramedullary plasmocytoma, EP) can be treated effectively and with little toxicity by local radiotherapy. Ten-year local control rates of up to 90% can be achieved. Patients with multiple myeloma often suffer from symptoms such as pain or neurological impairments that are amenable to palliative radiotherapy. In a palliative setting, short treatment schedules and lower radiation doses are used to reduce toxicity and duration of hospitalization. In future, low-dose total body irradiation (TBI) may play a role in a potentially curative regimen with nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by allogenic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

  12. Brain volume reduction after whole-brain radiotherapy: quantification and prognostic relevance.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Christian; Distel, Luitpold; Knippen, Stefan; Gryc, Thomas; Schmidt, Manuel Alexander; Fietkau, Rainer; Putz, Florian

    2018-01-22

    Recent studies have questioned the value of adding whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) to stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastasis treatment. Neurotoxicity, including radiation-induced brain volume reduction, could be one reason why not all patients benefit from the addition of WBRT. In this study, we quantified brain volume reduction after WBRT and assessed its prognostic significance. Brain volumes of 91 patients with cerebral metastases were measured during a 150-day period after commencing WBRT and were compared with their pretreatment volumes. The average daily relative change in brain volume of each patient, referred to as the "brain volume reduction rate," was calculated. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed to assess the prognostic significance of the brain volume reduction rate, as well as of 3 treatment-related and 9 pretreatment factors. A one-way analysis of variance was used to compare the brain volume reduction rate across recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) classes. On multivariate Cox regression analysis, the brain volume reduction rate was a significant predictor of overall survival after WBRT (P < 0.001), as well as the number of brain metastases (P = 0.002) and age (P = 0.008). Patients with a relatively favorable prognosis (RPA classes 1 and 2) experienced significantly less brain volume decrease after WBRT than patients with a poor prognosis (RPA class 3) (P = 0.001). There was no significant correlation between delivered radiation dose and brain volume reduction rate (P = 0.147). In this retrospective study, a smaller decrease in brain volume after WBRT was an independent predictor of longer overall survival. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  13. Clinical target volume delineation in glioblastomas: pre-operative versus post-operative/pre-radiotherapy MRI

    PubMed Central

    Farace, P; Giri, M G; Meliadò, G; Amelio, D; Widesott, L; Ricciardi, G K; Dall'Oglio, S; Rizzotti, A; Sbarbati, A; Beltramello, A; Maluta, S; Amichetti, M

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Delineation of clinical target volume (CTV) is still controversial in glioblastomas. In order to assess the differences in volume and shape of the radiotherapy target, the use of pre-operative vs post-operative/pre-radiotherapy T1 and T2 weighted MRI was compared. Methods 4 CTVs were delineated in 24 patients pre-operatively and post-operatively using T1 contrast-enhanced (T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV) and T2 weighted images (T2PRECTV and T2POSTCTV). Pre-operative MRI examinations were performed the day before surgery, whereas post-operative examinations were acquired 1 month after surgery and before chemoradiation. A concordance index (CI) was defined as the ratio between the overlapping and composite volumes. Results The volumes of T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV were not statistically different (248 ± 88 vs 254 ± 101), although volume differences >100 cm3 were observed in 6 out of 24 patients. A marked increase due to tumour progression was shown in three patients. Three patients showed a decrease because of a reduced mass effect. A significant reduction occurred between pre-operative and post-operative T2 volumes (139 ± 68 vs 78 ± 59). Lack of concordance was observed between T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV (CI = 0.67 ± 0.09), T2PRECTV and T2POSTCTV (CI = 0.39 ± 0.20) and comparing the portion of the T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV not covered by that defined on T2PRECTV images (CI = 0.45 ± 0.16 and 0.44 ± 0.17, respectively). Conclusion Using T2 MRI, huge variations can be observed in peritumoural oedema, which are probably due to steroid treatment. Using T1 MRI, brain shifts after surgery and possible progressive enhancing lesions produce substantial differences in CTVs. Our data support the use of post-operative/pre-radiotherapy T1 weighted MRI for planning purposes. PMID:21045069

  14. Volume Changes After Stereotactic LINAC Radiotherapy in Vestibular Schwannoma: Control Rate and Growth Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Langenberg, Rick van de, E-mail: rickvandelangenberg@hotmail.com; Dohmen, Amy J.C.; Bondt, Bert J. de

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the control rate of vestibular schwannomas (VS) after treatment with linear accelerator (LINAC)-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or radiotherapy (SRT) by using a validated volumetric measuring tool. Volume-based studies on prognosis after LINAC-based SRS or SRT for VS are reported scarcely. In addition, growth patterns and risk factors predicting treatment failure were analyzed. Materials and Methods: Retrospectively, 37 VS patients treated with LINAC based SRS or SRT were analyzed. Baseline and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging scans were analyzed with volume measurements on contrast enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Absence of intervention aftermore » radiotherapy was defined as 'no additional intervention group, ' absence of radiological growth was defined as 'radiological control group. ' Significant growth was defined as a volume change of 19.7% or more, as calculated in a previous study. Results: The cumulative 4-year probability of no additional intervention was 96.4% {+-} 0.03; the 4-year radiological control probability was 85.4% {+-} 0.1). The median follow-up was 40 months. Overall, shrinkage was seen in 65%, stable VS in 22%, and growth in 13%. In 54% of all patients, transient swelling was observed. No prognostic factors were found regarding VS growth. Previous treatment and SRS were associated with transient swelling significantly. Conclusions: Good control rates are reported for LINAC based SRS or SRT in VS, in which the lower rate of radiological growth control is attributed to the use of the more sensitive volume measurements. Transient swelling after radiosurgery is a common phenomenon and should not be mistaken for treatment failure. Previous treatment and SRS were significantly associated with transient swelling.« less

  15. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Craniospinal Irradiation: Target Volume Considerations, Dose Constraints, and Competing Risks

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, William; Filion, Edith; Roberge, David

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To report the results of an analysis of dose received to tissues and organs outside the target volume, in the setting of spinal axis irradiation for the treatment of medulloblastoma, using three treatment techniques. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans (total dose, 23.4 Gy) for a standard two-dimensional (2D) technique, a three-dimensional (3D) technique using a 3D imaging-based target volume, and an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique, were compared for 3 patients in terms of dose-volume statistics for target coverage, as well as organ at risk (OAR) and overall tissue sparing. Results: Planning target volume coverage and dose homogeneity was superiormore » for the IMRT plans for V{sub 95%} (IMRT, 100%; 3D, 96%; 2D, 98%) and V{sub 107%} (IMRT, 3%; 3D, 38%; 2D, 37%). In terms of OAR sparing, the IMRT plan was better for all organs and whole-body contour when comparing V{sub 10Gy}, V{sub 15Gy}, and V{sub 20Gy}. The 3D plan was superior for V{sub 5Gy} and below. For the heart and liver in particular, the IMRT plans provided considerable sparing in terms of V{sub 10Gy} and above. In terms of the integral dose, the IMRT plans were superior for liver (IMRT, 21.9 J; 3D, 28.6 J; 2D, 38.6 J) and heart (IMRT, 9 J; 3D, 14.1J; 2D, 19.4 J), the 3D plan for the body contour (IMRT, 349 J; 3D, 337 J; 2D, 555 J). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is a valid treatment option for spinal axis irradiation. We have shown that IMRT results in sparing of organs at risk without a significant increase in integral dose.« less

  16. Radiotherapy treatment planning: benefits of CT-MR image registration and fusion in tumor volume delineation.

    PubMed

    Djan, Igor; Petrović, Borislava; Erak, Marko; Nikolić, Ivan; Lucić, Silvija

    2013-08-01

    Development of imaging techniques, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET), made great impact on radiotherapy treatment planning by improving the localization of target volumes. Improved localization allows better local control of tumor volumes, but also minimizes geographical misses. Mutual information is obtained by registration and fusion of images achieved manually or automatically. The aim of this study was to validate the CT-MRI image fusion method and compare delineation obtained by CT versus CT-MRI image fusion. The image fusion software (XIO CMS 4.50.0) was applied to delineate 16 patients. The patients were scanned on CT and MRI in the treatment position within an immobilization device before the initial treatment. The gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) were delineated on CT alone and on CT+MRI images consecutively and image fusion was obtained. Image fusion showed that CTV delineated on a CT image study set is mainly inadequate for treatment planning, in comparison with CTV delineated on CT-MRI fused image study set. Fusion of different modalities enables the most accurate target volume delineation. This study shows that registration and image fusion allows precise target localization in terms of GTV and CTV and local disease control.

  17. Conformal radiotherapy, reduced boost volume, hyperfractionated radiotherapy, and online quality control in standard-risk medulloblastoma without chemotherapy: Results of the French M-SFOP 98 protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Carrie, Christian; Muracciole, Xavier; Gomez, Frederic

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: Between December 1998 and October 2001, patients <19 years old were treated for standard-risk medulloblastoma according to the Medulloblastome-Societe Francaise d'Oncologie Pediatrique 1998 (M-SFOP 98) protocol. Patients received hyperfractionated radiotherapy (36 Gy in 36 fractions) to the craniospinal axis, a boost with conformal therapy restricted to the tumor bed (to a total dose of 68 Gy in 68 fractions), and no chemotherapy. Records of craniospinal irradiation were reviewed before treatment start. Results: A total of 48 patients were considered assessable. With a median follow-up of 45.7 months, the overall survival and progression-free survival rate at 3 years was 89%more » and 81%, respectively. Fourteen major deviations were detected and eight were corrected. No relapses occurred in the frontal region and none occurred in the posterior fossa outside the boost volume. Nine patients were available for volume calculation without reduction of the volume irradiated. We observed a reduction in the subtentorial volume irradiated to >60 Gy, but a slight increase in the volume irradiated to 40 Gy. No decrease in intelligence was observed in the 22 children tested during the first 2 years. Conclusion: This hyperfractionated radiotherapy protocol with a reduced boost volume and without chemotherapy was not associated with early relapses in children. Moreover, intellectual function seemed to be preserved. These results are promising.« less

  18. Accurate tracking of tumor volume change during radiotherapy by CT-CBCT registration with intensity correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seyoun; Robinson, Adam; Quon, Harry; Kiess, Ana P.; Shen, Colette; Wong, John; Plishker, William; Shekhar, Raj; Lee, Junghoon

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a CT-CBCT registration method to accurately predict the tumor volume change based on daily cone-beam CTs (CBCTs) during radiotherapy. CBCT is commonly used to reduce patient setup error during radiotherapy, but its poor image quality impedes accurate monitoring of anatomical changes. Although physician's contours drawn on the planning CT can be automatically propagated to daily CBCTs by deformable image registration (DIR), artifacts in CBCT often cause undesirable errors. To improve the accuracy of the registration-based segmentation, we developed a DIR method that iteratively corrects CBCT intensities by local histogram matching. Three popular DIR algorithms (B-spline, demons, and optical flow) with the intensity correction were implemented on a graphics processing unit for efficient computation. We evaluated their performances on six head and neck (HN) cancer cases. For each case, four trained scientists manually contoured the nodal gross tumor volume (GTV) on the planning CT and every other fraction CBCTs to which the propagated GTV contours by DIR were compared. The performance was also compared with commercial image registration software based on conventional mutual information (MI), VelocityAI (Varian Medical Systems Inc.). The volume differences (mean±std in cc) between the average of the manual segmentations and automatic segmentations are 3.70+/-2.30 (B-spline), 1.25+/-1.78 (demons), 0.93+/-1.14 (optical flow), and 4.39+/-3.86 (VelocityAI). The proposed method significantly reduced the estimation error by 9% (B-spline), 38% (demons), and 51% (optical flow) over the results using VelocityAI. Although demonstrated only on HN nodal GTVs, the results imply that the proposed method can produce improved segmentation of other critical structures over conventional methods.

  19. Adaptive Radiotherapy Planning on Decreasing Gross Tumor Volumes as Seen on Megavoltage Computed Tomography Images

    SciTech Connect

    Woodford, Curtis; Yartsev, Slav; Dar, A. Rashid

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate gross tumor volume (GTV) changes for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer by using daily megavoltage (MV) computed tomography (CT) studies acquired before each treatment fraction on helical tomotherapy and to relate the potential benefit of adaptive image-guided radiotherapy to changes in GTV. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients were prescribed 30 fractions of radiotherapy on helical tomotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer at London Regional Cancer Program from Dec 2005 to March 2007. The GTV was contoured on the daily MVCT studies of each patient. Adapted plans were created using merged MVCT-kilovoltage CT image sets to investigate the advantagesmore » of replanning for patients with differing GTV regression characteristics. Results: Average GTV change observed over 30 fractions was -38%, ranging from -12 to -87%. No significant correlation was observed between GTV change and patient's physical or tumor features. Patterns of GTV changes in the 17 patients could be divided broadly into three groups with distinctive potential for benefit from adaptive planning. Conclusions: Changes in GTV are difficult to predict quantitatively based on patient or tumor characteristics. If changes occur, there are points in time during the treatment course when it may be appropriate to adapt the plan to improve sparing of normal tissues. If GTV decreases by greater than 30% at any point in the first 20 fractions of treatment, adaptive planning is appropriate to further improve the therapeutic ratio.« less

  20. Localized volume effects for late rectal and anal toxicity after radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peeters, Stephanie T.H.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric parameters derived from anorectal, rectal, and anal wall dose distributions that correlate with different late gastrointestinal (GI) complications after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In this analysis, 641 patients from a randomized trial (68 Gy vs. 78 Gy) were included. Toxicity was scored with adapted Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) criteria and five specific complications. The variables derived from dose-volume histogram of anorectal, rectal, and anal wall were as follows: % receiving {>=}5-70 Gy (V5-V70), maximum dose (D{sub max}), and mean dose (D{sub mean}).more » The anus was defined as the most caudal 3 cm of the anorectum. Statistics were done with multivariate Cox regression models. Median follow-up was 44 months. Results: Anal dosimetric variables were associated with RTOG/EORTC Grade {>=}2 (V5-V40, D{sub mean}) and incontinence (V5-V70, D{sub mean}). Bleeding correlated most strongly with anorectal V55-V65, and stool frequency with anorectal V40 and D{sub mean}. Use of steroids was weakly related to anal variables. No volume effect was seen for RTOG/EORTC Grade {>=}3 and pain/cramps/tenesmus. Conclusion: Different volume effects were found for various late GI complications. Therefore, to evaluate the risk of late GI toxicity, not only intermediate and high doses to the anorectal wall volume should be taken into account, but also the dose to the anal wall.« less

  1. Automated delineation of radiotherapy volumes: are we going in the right direction?

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, G A; Price, P; Price, G J; Moore, C J

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Rapid and accurate delineation of target volumes and multiple organs at risk, within the enduring International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement framework, is now hugely important in radiotherapy, owing to the rapid proliferation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy and the advent of four-dimensional image-guided adaption. Nevertheless, delineation is still generally clinically performed with little if any machine assistance, even though it is both time-consuming and prone to interobserver variation. Currently available segmentation tools include those based on image greyscale interrogation, statistical shape modelling and body atlas-based methods. However, all too often these are not able to match the accuracy of the expert clinician, which remains the universally acknowledged gold standard. In this article we suggest that current methods are fundamentally limited by their lack of ability to incorporate essential human clinical decision-making into the underlying models. Hybrid techniques that utilise prior knowledge, make sophisticated use of greyscale information and allow clinical expertise to be integrated are needed. This may require a change in focus from automated segmentation to machine-assisted delineation. Similarly, new metrics of image quality reflecting fitness for purpose would be extremely valuable. We conclude that methods need to be developed to take account of the clinician's expertise and honed visual processing capabilities as much as the underlying, clinically meaningful information content of the image data being interrogated. We illustrate our observations and suggestions through our own experiences with two software tools developed as part of research council-funded projects. PMID:23239689

  2. Optimal dose and volume for postoperative radiotherapy in brain oligometastases from lung cancer: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Seung Yeun; Chang, Jong Hee; Kim, Hye Ryun; Cho, Byoung Chul; Lee, Chang Geol; Suh, Chang-Ok

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate intracranial control after surgical resection according to the adjuvant treatment received in order to assess the optimal radiotherapy (RT) dose and volume. Between 2003 and 2015, a total of 53 patients with brain oligometastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) underwent metastasectomy. The patients were divided into three groups according to the adjuvant treatment received: whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) ± boost (WBRT ± boost group, n = 26), local RT/Gamma Knife surgery (local RT group, n = 14), and the observation group (n = 13). The most commonly used dose schedule was WBRT (25 Gy in 10 fractions, equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions [EQD2] 26.04 Gy) with tumor bed boost (15 Gy in 5 fractions, EQD2 16.25 Gy). The WBRT ± boost group showed the lowest 1-year intracranial recurrence rate of 30.4%, followed by the local RT and observation groups, at 66.7%, and 76.9%, respectively (p = 0.006). In the WBRT ± boost group, there was no significant increase in the 1-year new site recurrence rate of patients receiving a lower dose of WBRT (EQD2) <27 Gy compared to that in patients receiving a higher WBRT dose (p = 0.553). The 1-year initial tumor site recurrence rate was lower in patients receiving tumor bed dose (EQD2) of ≥42.3 Gy compared to those receiving <42.3 Gy, although the difference was not significant (p = 0.347). Adding WBRT after resection of brain oligometastases from NSCLC seems to enhance intracranial control. Furthermore, combining lower-dose WBRT with a tumor bed boost may be an attractive option.

  3. Optimal dose and volume for postoperative radiotherapy in brain oligometastases from lung cancer: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Seung Yeun; Chang, Jong Hee; Kim, Hye Ryun; Cho, Byoung Chul; Lee, Chang Geol; Suh, Chang-Ok

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate intracranial control after surgical resection according to the adjuvant treatment received in order to assess the optimal radiotherapy (RT) dose and volume. Materials and Methods Between 2003 and 2015, a total of 53 patients with brain oligometastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) underwent metastasectomy. The patients were divided into three groups according to the adjuvant treatment received: whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) ± boost (WBRT ± boost group, n = 26), local RT/Gamma Knife surgery (local RT group, n = 14), and the observation group (n = 13). The most commonly used dose schedule was WBRT (25 Gy in 10 fractions, equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions [EQD2] 26.04 Gy) with tumor bed boost (15 Gy in 5 fractions, EQD2 16.25 Gy). Results The WBRT ± boost group showed the lowest 1-year intracranial recurrence rate of 30.4%, followed by the local RT and observation groups, at 66.7%, and 76.9%, respectively (p = 0.006). In the WBRT ± boost group, there was no significant increase in the 1-year new site recurrence rate of patients receiving a lower dose of WBRT (EQD2) <27 Gy compared to that in patients receiving a higher WBRT dose (p = 0.553). The 1-year initial tumor site recurrence rate was lower in patients receiving tumor bed dose (EQD2) of ≥42.3 Gy compared to those receiving <42.3 Gy, although the difference was not significant (p = 0.347). conclusions Adding WBRT after resection of brain oligometastases from NSCLC seems to enhance intracranial control. Furthermore, combining lower-dose WBRT with a tumor bed boost may be an attractive option. PMID:28712276

  4. Reirradiation of Large-Volume Recurrent Glioma With Pulsed Reduced-Dose-Rate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Adkison, Jarrod B.; Tome, Wolfgang; Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Pulsed reduced-dose-rate radiotherapy (PRDR) is a reirradiation technique that reduces the effective dose rate and increases the treatment time, allowing sublethal damage repair during irradiation. Patients and Methods: A total of 103 patients with recurrent glioma underwent reirradiation using PRDR (86 considered to have Grade 4 at PRDR). PRDR was delivered using a series of 0.2-Gy pulses at 3-min intervals, creating an apparent dose rate of 0.0667 Gy/min to a median dose of 50 Gy (range, 20-60) delivered in 1.8-2.0-Gy fractions. The mean treatment volume was 403.5 {+-} 189.4 cm{sup 3} according to T{sub 2}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging andmore » a 2-cm margin. Results: For the initial or upgraded Grade 4 cohort (n = 86), the median interval from the first irradiation to PRDR was 14 months. Patients undergoing PRDR within 14 months of the first irradiation (n = 43) had a median survival of 21 weeks. Those treated {>=}14 months after radiotherapy had a median survival of 28 weeks (n = 43; p = 0.004 and HR = 1.82 with a 95% CI ranging from 1.25 to 3.10). These data compared favorably to historical data sets, because only 16% of the patients were treated at first relapse (with 46% treated at the second relapse, 32% at the third or fourth relapse, and 4% at the fourth or fifth relapse). The median survival since diagnosis and retreatment was 6.3 years and 11.4 months for low-grade, 4.1 years and 5.6 months for Grade 3, and 1.6 years and 5.1 months for Grade 4 tumors, respectively, according to the initial histologic findings. Multivariate analysis revealed age at the initial diagnosis, initial low-grade disease, and Karnofsky performance score of {>=}80 to be significant predictors of survival after initiation of PRDR. Conclusion: PRDR allowed for safe retreatment of larger volumes to high doses with palliative benefit.« less

  5. A clip-based protocol for breast boost radiotherapy provides clear target visualisation and demonstrates significant volume reduction over time

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Lorraine; Cox, Jennifer; Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales

    2015-09-15

    The clinical target volume (CTV) for early stage breast cancer is difficult to clearly identify on planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Surgical clips inserted around the tumour bed should help to identify the CTV, particularly if the seroma has been reabsorbed, and enable tracking of CTV changes over time. A surgical clip-based CTV delineation protocol was introduced. CTV visibility and its post-operative shrinkage pattern were assessed. The subjects were 27 early stage breast cancer patients receiving post-operative radiotherapy alone and 15 receiving post-operative chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. The radiotherapy alone (RT/alone) group received a CT scan at median 25 daysmore » post-operatively (CT1rt) and another at 40 Gy, median 68 days (CT2rt). The chemotherapy/RT group (chemo/RT) received a CT scan at median 18 days post-operatively (CT1ch), a planning CT scan at median 126 days (CT2ch), and another at 40 Gy (CT3ch). There was no significant difference (P = 0.08) between the initial mean CTV for each cohort. The RT/alone cohort showed significant CTV volume reduction of 38.4% (P = 0.01) at 40 Gy. The Chemo/RT cohort had significantly reduced volumes between CT1ch: median 54 cm{sup 3} (4–118) and CT2ch: median 16 cm{sup 3}, (2–99), (P = 0.01), but no significant volume reduction thereafter. Surgical clips enable localisation of the post-surgical seroma for radiotherapy targeting. Most seroma shrinkage occurs early, enabling CT treatment planning to take place at 7 weeks, which is within the 9 weeks recommended to limit disease recurrence.« less

  6. Poster - 36: Effect of Planning Target Volume Coverage on the Dose Delivered in Lung Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dekker, Chris; Wierzbicki, Marcin

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: In lung radiotherapy, breathing motion may be encompassed by contouring the internal target volume (ITV). Remaining uncertainties are included in a geometrical expansion to the planning target volume (PTV). In IMRT, the treatment is then optimized until a desired PTV fraction is covered by the appropriate dose. The resulting beams often carry high fluence in the PTV margin to overcome low lung density and to generate steep dose gradients. During treatment, the high density tumour can enter the PTV margin, potentially increasing target dose. Thus, planning lung IMRT with a reduced PTV dose may still achieve the desired ITVmore » dose during treatment. Methods: A retrospective analysis was carried out with 25 IMRT plans prescribed to 63 Gy in 30 fractions. The plans were re-normalized to cover various fractions of the PTV by different isodose lines. For each case, the isocentre was moved using 125 shifts derived from all 3D combinations of 0 mm, (PTV margin - 1 mm), and PTV margin. After each shift, the dose was recomputed to approximate the delivered dose. Results and Conclusion: Our plans typically cover 95% of the PTV by 95% of the dose. Reducing the PTV covered to 94% did not significantly reduce the delivered ITV doses for (PTV margin - 1 mm) shifts. Target doses were reduced significantly for all other shifts and planning goals studied. Thus, a reduced planning goal will likely deliver the desired target dose as long as the ITV rarely enters the last mm of the PTV margin.« less

  7. Using injectable hydrogel markers to assess resimulation for boost target volume definition in a patient undergoing whole-breast radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Henal; Goyal, Sharad; Kim, Leonard, E-mail: kimlh@rutgers.edu

    Several publications have recommended that patients undergoing whole-breast radiotherapy be resimulated for boost planning. The rationale for this is that the seroma may be smaller when compared with the initial simulation. However, the decision remains whether to use the earlier or later images to define an appropriate boost target volume. A patient undergoing whole-breast radiotherapy had new, injectable, temporary hydrogel fiducial markers placed 1 to 3 cm from the seroma at the time of initial simulation. The patient was resimulated 4.5 weeks later for conformal photon boost planning. Computed tomography (CT) scans acquired at the beginning and the end ofmore » whole-breast radiotherapy showed that shrinkage of the lumpectomy cavity was not matched by a corresponding reduction in the surrounding tissue volume, as demarcated by hydrogel markers. This observation called into question the usual interpretation of cavity shrinkage for boost target definition. For this patient, it was decided to define the boost target volume on the initial planning CT instead of the new CT.« less

  8. Involved Node, Site, Field and Residual Volume Radiotherapy for Lymphoma: A Comparison of Organ at Risk Dosimetry and Second Malignancy Risks.

    PubMed

    Murray, L; Sethugavalar, B; Robertshaw, H; Bayman, E; Thomas, E; Gilson, D; Prestwich, R J D

    2015-07-01

    Recent radiotherapy guidelines for lymphoma have included involved site radiotherapy (ISRT), involved node radiotherapy (INRT) and irradiation of residual volume after full-course chemotherapy. In the absence of late toxicity data, we aim to compare organ at risk (OAR) dose-metrics and calculated second malignancy risks. Fifteen consecutive patients who had received mediastinal radiotherapy were included. Four radiotherapy plans were generated for each patient using a parallel pair photon technique: (i) involved field radiotherapy (IFRT), (ii) ISRT, (iii) INRT, (iv) residual post-chemotherapy volume. The radiotherapy dose was 30 Gy in 15 fractions. The OARs evaluated were: breasts, lungs, thyroid, heart, oesophagus. Relative and absolute second malignancy rates were estimated using the concept of organ equivalent dose. Significance was defined as P < 0.005. Compared with ISRT, IFRT significantly increased doses to lung, thyroid, heart and oesophagus, whereas INRT and residual volume techniques significantly reduced doses to all OARs. The relative risks of second cancers were significantly higher with IFRT compared with ISRT for lung, breast and thyroid; INRT and residual volume resulted in significantly lower relative risks compared with ISRT for lung, breast and thyroid. The median excess absolute risks of second cancers were consistently lowest for the residual technique and highest for IFRT in terms of thyroid, lung and breast cancers. The risk of oesophageal cancer was similar for all four techniques. Overall, the absolute risk of second cancers was very similar for ISRT and INRT. Decreasing treatment volumes from IFRT to ISRT, INRT or residual volume reduces radiation exposure to OARs. Second malignancy modelling suggests that this reduction in treatment volumes will lead to a reduction in absolute excess second malignancy. Little difference was observed in second malignancy risks between ISRT and INRT, supporting the use of ISRT in the absence of a pre

  9. Dose response explorer: an integrated open-source tool for exploring and modelling radiotherapy dose volume outcome relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Naqa, I.; Suneja, G.; Lindsay, P. E.; Hope, A. J.; Alaly, J. R.; Vicic, M.; Bradley, J. D.; Apte, A.; Deasy, J. O.

    2006-11-01

    Radiotherapy treatment outcome models are a complicated function of treatment, clinical and biological factors. Our objective is to provide clinicians and scientists with an accurate, flexible and user-friendly software tool to explore radiotherapy outcomes data and build statistical tumour control or normal tissue complications models. The software tool, called the dose response explorer system (DREES), is based on Matlab, and uses a named-field structure array data type. DREES/Matlab in combination with another open-source tool (CERR) provides an environment for analysing treatment outcomes. DREES provides many radiotherapy outcome modelling features, including (1) fitting of analytical normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and tumour control probability (TCP) models, (2) combined modelling of multiple dose-volume variables (e.g., mean dose, max dose, etc) and clinical factors (age, gender, stage, etc) using multi-term regression modelling, (3) manual or automated selection of logistic or actuarial model variables using bootstrap statistical resampling, (4) estimation of uncertainty in model parameters, (5) performance assessment of univariate and multivariate analyses using Spearman's rank correlation and chi-square statistics, boxplots, nomograms, Kaplan-Meier survival plots, and receiver operating characteristics curves, and (6) graphical capabilities to visualize NTCP or TCP prediction versus selected variable models using various plots. DREES provides clinical researchers with a tool customized for radiotherapy outcome modelling. DREES is freely distributed. We expect to continue developing DREES based on user feedback.

  10. Applying the technique of volume-modulated arc radiotherapy to upper esophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ma, Pan; Wang, Xiaozhen; Xu, Yingjie; Dai, Jianrong; Wang, Luhua

    2014-05-08

    This study aims to evaluate the possibility of using the technique of volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to combine the advantages of simplified intensity-modulated radiation therapy (sIMRT) with that of regular intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in upper esophageal cancer. Ten patients with upper esophageal carcinoma were randomly chosen in this retrospective study. sIMRT, IMRT, and VMAT plans were generated to deliver 60 Gy in 30 fractions to the planning target volume (PTV). For each patient, with the same clinical requirements (target dose prescription, and dose/dose-volume constraints to organs at risk (OARs)), three plans were designed for sIMRT (five equispaced coplanar beams), IMRT (seven equispaced coplanar beams), and VMAT (two complete arcs). Comparisons were performed for dosimetric parameters of PTV and of OARs (lungs, spinal cord PRV, heart and normal tissue (NT)). All the plans were delivered to a phantom to evaluate the treatment time. The Wilcoxon matched-pairs, signed-rank test was used for intragroup comparison. For all patients, compared to sIMRT plans, VMAT plans statistically provide: a) significant improvement in HI and CI for PTV; b) significant decrease in delivery time, lung V20, MLD, heart V30 and spinal cord PRV D1cc; c) significant increase in NT V5; and d) no significant reduction in lung V5, V10, and heart MD. For all patients, compared to IMRT plans, VMAT plans statistically provide: a) significant improvement in CI for PTV; b) significant decrease in delivery time, lung V20, MLD, NT and spinal cord PRV D1cc; c) significant increase in NT V5; and d) no significant reduction in HI for PTV, lung V5, V10, heart V30 and heart MD. For patients with upper esophageal carcinoma, using VMAT significantly reduces the delivery time and the dose to the lungs compared with IMRT, and consequently saves as much treatment time as sIMRT. Considering those significant advantages, compared to sIMRT and IMRT, VMAT is the first choice of

  11. Effect of Radiotherapy Dose and Volume on Relapse in Merkel Cell Cancer of the Skin

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, Matthew, E-mail: matthew_foote@health.qld.gov.a; Harvey, Jennifer; Porceddu, Sandro

    Purpose: To assess the effect of radiotherapy (RT) dose and volume on relapse patterns in patients with Stage I-III Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Patients and Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of 112 patients diagnosed with MCC between January 2000 and December 2005 and treated with curative-intent RT. Results: Of the 112 evaluable patients, 88% had RT to the site of primary disease for gross (11%) or subclinical (78%) disease. Eighty-nine percent of patients had RT to the regional lymph nodes; in most cases (71%) this was for subclinical disease in the adjuvant or elective setting, whereas 21 patients (19%)more » were treated with RT to gross nodal disease. With a median follow-up of 3.7 years, the 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 72% and 53%, respectively, and the 2-year locoregional control rate was 75%. The in-field relapse rate was 3% for primary disease, and relapse was significantly lower for patients receiving {>=}50Gy (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.22; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.06-0.86). Surgical margins did not affect the local relapse rate. The in-field relapse rate was 11% for RT to the nodes, with dose being significant for nodal gross disease (HR = 0.24; 95% CI, 0.07-0.87). Patients who did not receive elective nodal RT had a much higher rate of nodal relapse compared with those who did (HR = 6.03; 95% CI, 1.34-27.10). Conclusion: This study indicates a dose-response for subclinical and gross MCC. Doses of {>=}50Gy for subclinical disease and {>=}55Gy for gross disease should be considered. The draining nodal basin should be treated in all patients.« less

  12. Sphere of equivalence--a novel target volume concept for intraoperative radiotherapy using low-energy X rays.

    PubMed

    Herskind, Carsten; Griebel, Jürgen; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Wenz, Frederik

    2008-12-01

    Accelerated partial breast radiotherapy with low-energy photons from a miniature X-ray machine is undergoing a randomized clinical trial (Targeted Intra-operative Radiation Therapy [TARGIT]) in a selected subgroup of patients treated with breast-conserving surgery. The steep radial dose gradient implies reduced tumor cell control with increasing depth in the tumor bed. The purpose was to compare the expected risk of local recurrence in this nonuniform radiation field with that after conventional external beam radiotherapy. The relative biologic effectiveness of low-energy photons was modeled using the linear-quadratic formalism including repair of sublethal lesions during protracted irradiation. Doses of 50-kV X-rays (Intrabeam) were converted to equivalent fractionated doses, EQD2, as function of depth in the tumor bed. The probability of local control was estimated using a logistic dose-response relationship fitted to clinical data from fractionated radiotherapy. The model calculations show that, for a cohort of patients, the increase in local control in the high-dose region near the applicator partly compensates the reduction of local control at greater distances. Thus a "sphere of equivalence" exists within which the risk of recurrence is equal to that after external fractionated radiotherapy. The spatial distribution of recurrences inside this sphere will be different from that after conventional radiotherapy. A novel target volume concept is presented here. The incidence of recurrences arising in the tumor bed around the excised tumor will test the validity of this concept and the efficacy of the treatment. Recurrences elsewhere will have implications for the rationale of TARGIT.

  13. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H.; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  14. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation.

    PubMed

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A

    2014-02-07

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  15. Cone Beam CT Imaging Analysis of Interfractional Variations in Bladder Volume and Position During Radiotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Don, E-mail: dony@ualberta.c; Parliament, Matthew; Rathee, Satyapal

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify daily bladder size and position variations during bladder cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten bladder cancer patients underwent daily cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging of the bladder during radiotherapy. Bladder and planning target volumes (bladder/PTV) from CBCT and planning CT scans were compared with respect to bladder center-of-mass shifts in the x (lateral), y (anterior-posterior), and z (superior-inferior) coordinates, bladder/PTV size, bladder/PTV margin positions, overlapping areas, and mutually exclusive regions. Results: A total of 262 CBCT images were obtained from 10 bladder cancer patients. Bladder center of mass shifted most in the y coordinate (mean, -0.32 cm).more » The anterior bladder wall shifted the most (mean, -0.58 cm). Mean ratios of CBCT-derived bladder and PTV volumes to planning CT-derived counterparts were 0.83 and 0.88. The mean CBCT-derived bladder volume (+- standard deviation [SD]) outside the planning CT counterpart was 29.24 cm{sup 3} (SD, 29.71 cm{sup 3}). The mean planning CT-derived bladder volume outside the CBCT counterpart was 47.74 cm{sup 3} (SD, 21.64 cm{sup 3}). The mean CBCT PTV outside the planning CT-derived PTV was 47.35 cm{sup 3} (SD, 36.51 cm{sup 3}). The mean planning CT-derived PTV outside the CBCT-derived PTV was 93.16 cm{sup 3} (SD, 50.21). The mean CBCT-derived bladder volume outside the planning PTV was 2.41 cm{sup 3} (SD, 3.97 cm{sup 3}). CBCT bladder/ PTV volumes significantly differed from planning CT counterparts (p = 0.047). Conclusions: Significant variations in bladder and PTV volume and position occurred in patients in this trial.« less

  16. [Radiotherapy volume delineation based on (18F)-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for locally advanced or inoperable oesophageal cancer].

    PubMed

    Encaoua, J; Abgral, R; Leleu, C; El Kabbaj, O; Caradec, P; Bourhis, D; Pradier, O; Schick, U

    2017-06-01

    To study the impact on radiotherapy planning of an automatically segmented target volume delineation based on ( 18 F)-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) compared to a manually delineation based on computed tomography (CT) in oesophageal carcinoma patients. Fifty-eight patients diagnosed with oesophageal cancer between September 2009 and November 2014 were included. The majority had squamous cell carcinoma (84.5 %), and advanced stage (37.9 % were stade IIIA) and 44.8 % had middle oesophageal lesion. Gross tumour volumes were retrospectively defined based either manually on CT or automatically on coregistered PET/CT images using three different threshold methods: standard-uptake value (SUV) of 2.5, 40 % of maximum intensity and signal-to-background ratio. Target volumes were compared in length, volume and using the index of conformality. Radiotherapy plans to the dose of 50Gy and 66Gy using intensity-modulated radiotherapy were generated and compared for both data sets. Planification target volume coverage and doses delivered to organs at risk (heart, lung and spinal cord) were compared. The gross tumour volume based manually on CT was significantly longer than that automatically based on signal-to-background ratio (6.4cm versus 5.3cm; P<0.008). Doses to the lungs (V20, D mean ), heart (V40), and spinal cord (D max ) were significantly lower on plans using the PTV SBR . The PTV SBR coverage was statistically better than the PTV CT coverage on both plans. (50Gy: P<0.0004 and 66Gy: P<0.0006). The automatic PET segmentation algorithm based on the signal-to-background ratio method for the delineation of oesophageal tumours is interesting, and results in better target volume coverage and decreased dose to organs at risk. This may allow dose escalation up to 66Gy to the gross tumour volume. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights

  17. Mathematical modelling of tumour volume dynamics in response to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariq, Imran; Humbert-Vidan, Laia; Chen, Tao; South, Christopher P.; Ezhil, Veni; Kirkby, Norman F.; Jena, Rajesh; Nisbet, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports a modelling study of tumour volume dynamics in response to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). The main objective was to develop a model that is adequate to describe tumour volume change measured during SABR, and at the same time is not excessively complex as lacking support from clinical data. To this end, various modelling options were explored, and a rigorous statistical method, the Akaike information criterion, was used to help determine a trade-off between model accuracy and complexity. The models were calibrated to the data from 11 non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with SABR. The results showed that it is feasible to model the tumour volume dynamics during SABR, opening up the potential for using such models in a clinical environment in the future.

  18. Dose-volume histogram analysis of brainstem necrosis in head and neck tumors treated using carbon-ion radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Katsuyuki; Fukata, Kyohei; Adachi, Akiko; Saitoh, Jun-Ichi; Musha, Atsushi; Abe, Takanori; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kobayashi, Daijiro; Shigeta, Yuka; Yokoo, Satoshi; Chikamatsu, Kazuaki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2017-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate the relationship between brainstem necrosis and dose-volume histograms in patients with head and neck tumors after carbon-ion radiotherapy. We evaluated 85 patients with head and neck tumors who underwent carbon-ion radiotherapy and were followed-up for ≥12months. Brainstem necrosis was evaluated using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 4.0). The median follow-up was 24months, and four patients developed grade 1 brainstem necrosis, with 2-year and 3-year cumulative rates of 2.8% and 6.5%, respectively. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed the following significant cut-off values: a maximum brainstem dose of 48Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]), D1cm 3 of 27Gy (RBE), V40Gy (RBE) of 0.1cm 3 , V30Gy (RBE) of 0.7cm 3 , and V20Gy (RBE) of 1.4cm 3 . Multivariate analysis revealed that V30Gy (RBE) was most significantly associated with brainstem necrosis. The 2-year cumulative rates were 33% and 0% for V30Gy (RBE) of ≥0.7cm 3 and <0.7cm 3 , respectively (p<0.001). The present study indicated that the dose constraints might help minimize brainstem necrosis after carbon-ion radiotherapy. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical outcomes using carbon-ion radiotherapy and dose-volume histogram comparison between carbon-ion radiotherapy and photon therapy for T2b-4N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer-A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Katsuyuki; Kawashima, Motohiro; Saitoh, Jun-Ichi; Abe, Takanori; Fukata, Kyohei; Shigeta, Yuka; Irie, Daisuke; Shiba, Shintaro; Okano, Naoko; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of carbon-ion radiotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer have not been established. We evaluated the clinical outcomes and dose-volume histogram parameters of carbon-ion radiotherapy compared with photon therapy in T2b-4N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer. Twenty-three patients were treated with carbon-ion radiotherapy between May 2011 and December 2015. Seven, 14, and 2 patients had T2b, T3, and T4, respectively. The median age was 78 (range, 53-91) years, with 22 male patients. There were 12 adenocarcinomas, 8 squamous cell carcinomas, 1 non-small cell lung carcinoma, and 2 clinically diagnosed lung cancers. Eleven patients were operable, and 12 patients were inoperable. Most patients (91%) were treated with carbon-ion radiotherapy of 60.0 Gy relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in 4 fractions or 64.0 Gy (RBE) in 16 fractions. Local control and overall survival rates were calculated. Dose-volume histogram parameters of normal lung and tumor coverages were compared between carbon-ion radiotherapy and photon therapies, including three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The median follow-up of surviving patients was 25 months. Three patients experienced local recurrence, and the 2-year local control rate was 81%. During follow-up, 5 patients died of lung cancer, and 1 died of intercurrent disease. The 2-year overall survival rate was 70%. Operable patients had a better overall survival rate compared with inoperable patients (100% vs. 43%; P = 0.04). There was no grade ≥2 radiation pneumonitis. In dose-volume histogram analysis, carbon-ion radiotherapy had a significantly lower dose to normal lung and greater tumor coverage compared with photon therapies. Carbon-ion radiotherapy was effectively and safely performed for T2b-4N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer, and the dose distribution was superior compared with those for photon therapies. A Japanese multi-institutional study is

  20. SU-E-J-79: Evaluation of Prostate Volume Changes During Radiotherapy Using Implanted Markers and On-Board Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ispir, B; Akdeniz, Y; Ugurluer, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate prostate volume changes during radiation therapy using implanted gold markers and on-board imaging. Methods: Twenty-five patients were included who underwent an implantation of three gold markers. Cartesian coordinates of markers were assessed in kV-images. The coordinates of centers of two markers were measured on kV-images from the center of the marker at the apex which was reference. The distances between the markers were extrapolated from the coordinates using the Euclid formula. The radius of the sphere through markers was calculated using sinus theorem. The prostate volume for the first and last fraction was substituted with a spheremore » model and was calculated for each patient. The t-test was used for analysis. Results: The mean prostate volume for first and last fraction was 24.65 and 20.87 cc, respectively (p≤0.05). The prostate volume was smaller for 23 patients, whereas there was an expansion for 2 patients. Fifteen patients had androgen deprivation during radiotherapy (H group) and ten did not (NH group). The mean prostate volume for the first and last fraction for the NH group was 30.73 cc and 24.89 cc and for the H group 20.84 cc and 18.19 cc, respectively. There was a 15.8% volume change during treatment for the NH group and 12.2% for the H group, but the difference was not statistically significant. The radius difference of the theoretical sphere for the first and last fraction was 0.98 mm (range, 0.09–2.95 mm) and remained below 2 mm in 88% of measurements. Conclusion: There was a significant volume change during prostate radiotherapy. The difference between H group and NH group was not significant. The radius changes did not exceed 3 mm and it was below adaptive treatment requirements. Our results indicate that prostate volume changes during treatment should be taken into account during contouring and treatment planning.« less

  1. NOTE Thyroid volume measurement in external beam radiotherapy patients using CT imaging: correlation with clinical and anthropometric characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, C.; Garsi, J. P.; Rubino, C.; Pouzoulet, F.; Bidault, F.; Chavaudra, J.; Bridier, A.; Ricard, M.; Ferreira, I.; Lefkopoulos, D.; de Vathaire, F.; Diallo, I.

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study is to define criteria for accurate representation of the thyroid in human models used to represent external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) patients and evaluate the relationship between the volume of this organ and clinical and anthropometric characteristics. From CT images, we segmented the thyroid gland and calculated its volume for a population of 188 EBRT patients of both sexes, with ages ranging from 1 to 89 years. To evaluate uncertainties linked to measured volumes, experimental studies on the Livermore anthropomorphic phantom were performed. For our population of EBRT patients, we observed that in children, thyroid volume increased rapidly with age, from about 3 cm3 at 2 years to about 16 cm3 at 20. In adults, the mean thyroid gland volume was 23.5 ± 9 cm3 for males and 17.5 ± 8 cm3 for females. According to anthropometric parameters, the best fit for children was obtained by modeling the log of thyroid volume as a linear function of body surface area (BSA) (p < 0.0001) and age (p = 0.04) and for adults, as a linear function of BSA (p < 0.0001) and gender (p = 0.01). This work enabled us to demonstrate that BSA was the best indicator of thyroid volume for both males and females. These results should be taken into account when modeling the volume of the thyroid in human models used to represent EBRT patients for dosimetry in retrospective studies of the relationship between the estimated dose to the thyroid and long-term follow-up data on EBRT patients.

  2. Environmental Projects. Volume 17; Biological Assessment, Opinion, and New 34-Meter Beam-Waveguide Antenna (DSS 24) at Apollo Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bengelsdorf, Irving

    1996-01-01

    This report deals with the Biological Assessment, Biological Opinion and Final Report on the construction of a high- efficiency 34-meter, multifrequency beam-waveguide antenna at the Apollo Site of the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex, operated by JPL. According to the Endangered Species Act of 1973, a Biological Assessment must be conducted and a Biological Opinion, with terms and conditions, rendered (the Opinion by the U.S. Department of the Interior) before construction of any federal project that may affect endangered or threatened flora or fauna. After construction, a final report is filed with the Department. The desert tortoise, designated "threatened" by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Mojave ground squirrel and the Lane Mountain milk vetch, both designated "candidate threatened," required the reporting specified by the Act. The Assessment found no significant danger to the animal species if workers are educated about them. No stands of the plant species were observed in the surveyed construction area. The Department issued a Biological Opinion to safeguard the two animal species. The Service and the California Department of Fish and Game both issued a Biological Concurrence that JPL had satisfied all environmental criteria for preserving threatened species.

  3. Tumor-volume simulation during radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer using a four-level cell population model.

    PubMed

    Chvetsov, Alexei V; Dong, Lei; Palta, Jantinder R; Amdur, Robert J

    2009-10-01

    To develop a fast computational radiobiologic model for quantitative analysis of tumor volume during fractionated radiotherapy. The tumor-volume model can be useful for optimizing image-guidance protocols and four-dimensional treatment simulations in proton therapy that is highly sensitive to physiologic changes. The analysis is performed using two approximations: (1) tumor volume is a linear function of total cell number and (2) tumor-cell population is separated into four subpopulations: oxygenated viable cells, oxygenated lethally damaged cells, hypoxic viable cells, and hypoxic lethally damaged cells. An exponential decay model is used for disintegration and removal of oxygenated lethally damaged cells from the tumor. We tested our model on daily volumetric imaging data available for 14 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with an integrated computed tomography/linear accelerator system. A simulation based on the averaged values of radiobiologic parameters was able to describe eight cases during the entire treatment and four cases partially (50% of treatment time) with a maximum 20% error. The largest discrepancies between the model and clinical data were obtained for small tumors, which may be explained by larger errors in the manual tumor volume delineation procedure. Our results indicate that the change in gross tumor volume for head-and-neck cancer can be adequately described by a relatively simple radiobiologic model. In future research, we propose to study the variation of model parameters by fitting to clinical data for a cohort of patients with head-and-neck cancer and other tumors. The potential impact of other processes, like concurrent chemotherapy, on tumor volume should be evaluated.

  4. Analysis of FET-PET imaging for target volume definition in patients with gliomas treated with conformal radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Giesel, Frederik L; Hoffmann, Christoph; Burger, Ute; Rief, Harald; Welzel, Thomas; Haberkorn, Uwe; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2013-12-01

    Modern radiotherapy (RT) techniques such as stereotactic RT, intensity-modulated RT, or particle irradiation allow local dose escalation with simultaneous sparing of critical organs. Several trials are currently investigating their benefit in glioma reirradiation and boost irradiation. Target volume definition is of critical importance especially when steep dose gradient techniques are employed. In this manuscript we investigate the impact of O-(2-(F-18)fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine-positron emission tomography/computer tomography (FET-PET/CT) on target volume definition in low and high grade glioma patients undergoing either first or re-irradiation with particles. We investigated volumetric size and uniformity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)- vs. FET-PET/CT-derived gross tumor volumes (GTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) of 41 glioma patients. Clinical cases are presented to demonstrate potential benefits of integrating FET-PET/CT-planning into daily routine. Integrating FET-uptake into the delineation of GTVs yields larger volumes. Combined modality-derived PTVs are significantly enlarged in high grade glioma patients and in case of primary RT. The congruence of MRI and FET signals for the identification of glioma GTVs is poor with mean uniformity indices of 0.39. MRI-based PTVs miss 17% of FET-PET/CT-based GTVs. Non significant alterations were detected in low grade glioma patients and in those undergoing reirradiation. Target volume definition for malignant gliomas during initial RT may yield significantly differing results depending upon the imaging modality, which the contouring process is based upon. The integration of both MRI and FET-PET/CT may help to improve GTV coverage by avoiding larger incongruences between physical and biological imaging techniques. In low grade gliomas and in cases of reirradiation, more studies are needed in order to investigate a potential benefit of FET-PET/CT for planning of RT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  5. Implications of improved diagnostic imaging of small nodal metastases in head and neck cancer: Radiotherapy target volume transformation and dose de-escalation.

    PubMed

    van den Bosch, Sven; Vogel, Wouter V; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P; Dijkema, Tim; Terhaard, Chris H J; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Kaanders, Johannes H A M

    2018-05-03

    Diagnostic imaging continues to evolve, and now has unprecedented accuracy for detecting small nodal metastasis. This influences the tumor load in elective target volumes and subsequently has consequences for the radiotherapy dose required to control disease in these volumes. Small metastases that used to remain subclinical and were included in elective volumes, will nowadays be detected and included in high-dose volumes. Consequentially, high-dose volumes will more often contain low-volume disease. These target volume transformations lead to changes in the tumor burden in elective and "gross" tumor volumes with implications for the radiotherapy dose prescribed to these volumes. For head and neck tumors, nodal staging has evolved from mere palpation to combinations of high-resolution imaging modalities. A traditional nodal gross tumor volume in the neck typically had a minimum diameter of 10-15 mm, while nowadays much smaller tumor deposits are detected in lymph nodes. However, the current dose levels for elective nodal irradiation were empirically determined in the 1950s, and have not changed since. In this report the radiobiological consequences of target volume transformation caused by modern imaging of the neck are evaluated, and theoretically derived reductions of dose in radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are proposed. The concept of target volume transformation and subsequent strategies for dose adaptation applies to many other tumor types as well. Awareness of this concept may result in new strategies for target definition and selection of dose levels with the aim to provide optimal tumor control with less toxicity. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Predicting Rectal and Bladder Overdose During the Course of Prostate Radiotherapy Using Dose-Volume Data From Initial Treatment Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, Vedang, E-mail: vmurthy@actrec.gov.in; Shukla, Pragya; Adurkar, Pranjal

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether information from the initial fractions can determine which patients are likely to consistently exceed their planning dose-volume constraints during the course of radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated with helical tomotherapy to a dose of 60 Gy in 20 fractions. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were recontoured on their daily megavoltage computed tomography scans and the dose was recalculated. The bladder and rectal volumes (in mL) receiving {>=}100% and {>=}70% of the prescribed dose in each fraction and in the original plans were recorded. A fraction formore » which the difference between planned and delivered was more than 2 mL was considered a volume failure. Similarly if the difference in the planned and delivered maximum dose (D{sub max}) was {>=}1% for the rectum and bladder, the fraction was considered a dose failure. Each patient's first 3 to 5 fractions were analyzed to determine if they correctly identified those patients who would consistently fail (i.e., {>=}20% of fractions) during the course of their radiotherapy. Results: Six parameters were studied; the rectal volume (RV) and bladder volumes (BV) (in mL) received {>=}100% and {>=}70% of the prescribed dose and maximum dose to 2 mL of the rectum and bladder. This was given by RV{sub 100}, RV{sub 70}, BV{sub 100}, BV{sub 70}, RD{sub max}, and BD{sub max}, respectively. When more than 1 of the first 3 fractions exceed the planning constraint as defined, it accurately predicts consistent failures through the course of the treatment. This method is able to correctly identify the consistent failures about 80% (RV{sub 70}, BV{sub 100}, and RV{sub 100}), 90% (BV{sub 70}), and 100% (RD{sub max} and BD{sub max}) of the times. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of a method accurately identifying patients who are likely to consistently exceed the planning constraints during the course of

  7. Toward Semi-automated Assessment of Target Volume Delineation in Radiotherapy Trials: The SCOPE 1 Pretrial Test Case

    SciTech Connect

    Gwynne, Sarah, E-mail: Sarah.Gwynne2@wales.nhs.uk; Spezi, Emiliano; Wills, Lucy

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate different conformity indices (CIs) for use in the analysis of outlining consistency within the pretrial quality assurance (Radiotherapy Trials Quality Assurance [RTTQA]) program of a multicenter chemoradiation trial of esophageal cancer and to make recommendations for their use in future trials. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Research Institute SCOPE 1 trial is an ongoing Cancer Research UK-funded phase II/III randomized controlled trial of chemoradiation with capecitabine and cisplatin with or without cetuximab for esophageal cancer. The pretrial RTTQA program included a detailed radiotherapy protocol, an educational package, and a single mid-esophageal tumor test case that weremore » sent to each investigator to outline. Investigator gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were received from 50 investigators in 34 UK centers, and CERR (Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research) was used to perform an assessment of each investigator GTV against a predefined gold-standard GTV using different CIs. A new metric, the local conformity index (l-CI), that can localize areas of maximal discordance was developed. Results: The median Jaccard conformity index (JCI) was 0.69 (interquartile range, 0.62-0.70), with 14 of 50 investigators (28%) achieving a JCI of 0.7 or greater. The median geographical miss index was 0.09 (interquartile range, 0.06-0.16), and the mean discordance index was 0.27 (95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.30). The l-CI was highest in the middle section of the volume, where the tumor was bulky and more easily definable, and identified 4 slices where fewer than 20% of investigators achieved an l-CI of 0.7 or greater. Conclusions: The available CIs analyze different aspects of a gold standard-observer variation, with JCI being the most useful as a single metric. Additional information is provided by the l-CI and can focus the efforts of the RTTQA team in these areas, possibly leading to semi-automated outlining assessment.« less

  8. Target volume definition for post prostatectomy radiotherapy: Do the consensus guidelines correctly define the inferior border of the CTV?

    PubMed

    Manji, Mo; Crook, Juanita; Schmid, Matt; Rajapakshe, Rasika

    2016-01-01

    We compare urethrogram delineation of the caudal aspect of the anastomosis to the recommended guidelines of post prostatectomy radiotherapy. Level one evidence has established the indications for, and importance of, adjuvant radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy. Several guidelines have recently addressed delineation of the prostate bed target volume including identification of the vesico-urethral anastomosis, taken as the first CT slice caudal to visible urine in the bladder neck. The inferior border of clinical target volume is then variably defined 5-12 mm below this anastomosis or 15 mm cranial to the penile bulb. Thirty-three patients who received adjuvant radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy were reviewed. All underwent planning CT with urethrogram. The authors (MM, JC) independently identified the CT slice caudal to the last slice showing urine in the bladder neck (called the CT Reference Slice), and measured the distance between this and the tip of the urethrogram cone. Five patients also had a diagnostic MRI at the time of CT planning to better visualize the anatomy. Sixty-six readings were obtained. The mean distance between the Bladder CT Reference Slice and the most cranial urethrogram contrast slice was 16.1 mm (MM 16.4 mm, JC 15.8 mm), range: 6.8-34.2 mm. The mean distance between the urethrogram tip and the ischial tuberosities was 19.9 mm (range 12.5-29.8 mm). The mean distance between the CT Reference Slice and the ischial tuberosities was 36.9 mm (range 28.3-52.4 mm). Guidelines for prostate bed radiation post prostatectomy have been developed after publication of the trials proving benefit of such treatment, and are thus untested. The anastomosis is a frequent site of local relapse but is variably defined by the existing guidelines, none of which take into account anatomic patient variation and all of which are at variance with urethrogram data. We recommend the use of planning urethrogram to better delineate the vesico

  9. Toward semi-automated assessment of target volume delineation in radiotherapy trials: the SCOPE 1 pretrial test case.

    PubMed

    Gwynne, Sarah; Spezi, Emiliano; Wills, Lucy; Nixon, Lisette; Hurt, Chris; Joseph, George; Evans, Mererid; Griffiths, Gareth; Crosby, Tom; Staffurth, John

    2012-11-15

    To evaluate different conformity indices (CIs) for use in the analysis of outlining consistency within the pretrial quality assurance (Radiotherapy Trials Quality Assurance [RTTQA]) program of a multicenter chemoradiation trial of esophageal cancer and to make recommendations for their use in future trials. The National Cancer Research Institute SCOPE 1 trial is an ongoing Cancer Research UK-funded phase II/III randomized controlled trial of chemoradiation with capecitabine and cisplatin with or without cetuximab for esophageal cancer. The pretrial RTTQA program included a detailed radiotherapy protocol, an educational package, and a single mid-esophageal tumor test case that were sent to each investigator to outline. Investigator gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were received from 50 investigators in 34 UK centers, and CERR (Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research) was used to perform an assessment of each investigator GTV against a predefined gold-standard GTV using different CIs. A new metric, the local conformity index (l-CI), that can localize areas of maximal discordance was developed. The median Jaccard conformity index (JCI) was 0.69 (interquartile range, 0.62-0.70), with 14 of 50 investigators (28%) achieving a JCI of 0.7 or greater. The median geographical miss index was 0.09 (interquartile range, 0.06-0.16), and the mean discordance index was 0.27 (95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.30). The l-CI was highest in the middle section of the volume, where the tumor was bulky and more easily definable, and identified 4 slices where fewer than 20% of investigators achieved an l-CI of 0.7 or greater. The available CIs analyze different aspects of a gold standard-observer variation, with JCI being the most useful as a single metric. Additional information is provided by the l-CI and can focus the efforts of the RTTQA team in these areas, possibly leading to semi-automated outlining assessment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Accurate Analysis of the Change in Volume, Location, and Shape of Metastatic Cervical Lymph Nodes During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Takao, Seishin, E-mail: takao@mech-me.eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Tadano, Shigeru; Taguchi, Hiroshi

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To establish a method for the accurate acquisition and analysis of the variations in tumor volume, location, and three-dimensional (3D) shape of tumors during radiotherapy in the era of image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Finite element models of lymph nodes were developed based on computed tomography (CT) images taken before the start of treatment and every week during the treatment period. A surface geometry map with a volumetric scale was adopted and used for the analysis. Six metastatic cervical lymph nodes, 3.5 to 55.1 cm{sup 3} before treatment, in 6 patients with head and neck carcinomas were analyzed inmore » this study. Three fiducial markers implanted in mouthpieces were used for the fusion of CT images. Changes in the location of the lymph nodes were measured on the basis of these fiducial markers. Results: The surface geometry maps showed convex regions in red and concave regions in blue to ensure that the characteristics of the 3D tumor geometries are simply understood visually. After the irradiation of 66 to 70 Gy in 2 Gy daily doses, the patterns of the colors had not changed significantly, and the maps before and during treatment were strongly correlated (average correlation coefficient was 0.808), suggesting that the tumors shrank uniformly, maintaining the original characteristics of the shapes in all 6 patients. The movement of the gravitational center of the lymph nodes during the treatment period was everywhere less than {+-}5 mm except in 1 patient, in whom the change reached nearly 10 mm. Conclusions: The surface geometry map was useful for an accurate evaluation of the changes in volume and 3D shapes of metastatic lymph nodes. The fusion of the initial and follow-up CT images based on fiducial markers enabled an analysis of changes in the location of the targets. Metastatic cervical lymph nodes in patients were suggested to decrease in size without significant changes in the 3D shape during radiotherapy. The

  11. Radiotherapy planning: PET/CT scanner performances in the definition of gross tumour volume and clinical target volume.

    PubMed

    Brianzoni, Ernesto; Rossi, Gloria; Ancidei, Sergio; Berbellini, Alfonso; Capoccetti, Francesca; Cidda, Carla; D'Avenia, Paola; Fattori, Sara; Montini, Gian Carlo; Valentini, Gianluca; Proietti, Alfredo; Algranati, Carlo

    2005-12-01

    Positron emission tomography is the most advanced scintigraphic imaging technology and can be employed in the planning of radiation therapy (RT). The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible role of fused images (anatomical CT and functional FDG-PET), acquired with a dedicated PET/CT scanner, in delineating gross tumour volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) in selected patients and thus in facilitating RT planning. Twenty-eight patients were examined, 24 with lung cancer (17 non-small cell and seven small cell) and four with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the head and neck region. All patients underwent a whole-body PET scan after a CT scan. The CT images provided morphological volumetric information, and in a second step, the corresponding PET images were overlaid to define the effective target volume. The images were exported off-line via an internal network to an RT simulator. Three patient were excluded from the study owing to change in the disease stage subsequent to the PET/CT study. Among the remaining 25 patients, PET significantly altered the GTV or CTV in 11 (44%) . In five of these 11 cases there was a reduction in GTV or CTV, while in six there was an increase in GTV or CTV. FDG-PET is a highly sensitive imaging modality that offers better visualisation of local and locoregional tumour extension. This study confirmed that co-registration of CT data and FDG-PET images may lead to significant modifications of RT planning and patient management.

  12. SU-E-J-238: Monitoring Lymph Node Volumes During Radiotherapy Using Semi-Automatic Segmentation of MRI Images

    SciTech Connect

    Veeraraghavan, H; Tyagi, N; Riaz, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Identification and image-based monitoring of lymph nodes growing due to disease, could be an attractive alternative to prophylactic head and neck irradiation. We evaluated the accuracy of the user-interactive Grow Cut algorithm for volumetric segmentation of radiotherapy relevant lymph nodes from MRI taken weekly during radiotherapy. Method: The algorithm employs user drawn strokes in the image to volumetrically segment multiple structures of interest. We used a 3D T2-wturbo spin echo images with an isotropic resolution of 1 mm3 and FOV of 492×492×300 mm3 of head and neck cancer patients who underwent weekly MR imaging during the course of radiotherapy.more » Various lymph node (LN) levels (N2, N3, N4'5) were individually contoured on the weekly MR images by an expert physician and used as ground truth in our study. The segmentation results were compared with the physician drawn lymph nodes based on DICE similarity score. Results: Three head and neck patients with 6 weekly MR images were evaluated. Two patients had level 2 LN drawn and one patient had level N2, N3 and N4'5 drawn on each MR image. The algorithm took an average of a minute to segment the entire volume (512×512×300 mm3). The algorithm achieved an overall DICE similarity score of 0.78. The time taken for initializing and obtaining the volumetric mask was about 5 mins for cases with only N2 LN and about 15 mins for the case with N2,N3 and N4'5 level nodes. The longer initialization time for the latter case was due to the need for accurate user inputs to separate overlapping portions of the different LN. The standard deviation in segmentation accuracy at different time points was utmost 0.05. Conclusions: Our initial evaluation of the grow cut segmentation shows reasonably accurate and consistent volumetric segmentations of LN with minimal user effort and time.« less

  13. Simulation of tissue activity curves of 64Cu-ATSM for sub-target volume delineation in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalah, E.; Bradley, D.; Nisbet, A.

    2010-02-01

    There is much interest in positron emission tomography (PET) for measurements of regional tracer concentration in hypoxic tumour-bearing tissue, focusing on the need for accurate radiotherapy treatment planning. Generally, relevant data are taken over multiple time frames in the form of tissue activity curves (TACs), thus providing an indication of vasculature structure and geometry. This is a potential key in providing information on cellular perfusion and limited diffusion. A number of theoretical studies have attempted to describe tracer uptake in tissue cells in an effort to understand such complicated behaviour of cellular uptake and the mechanism of washout. More recently, a novel computerized reaction diffusion equation method was developed by Kelly and Brady (2006 A model to simulate tumour oxygenation and dynamic [18F]-FMISO PET data Phys. Med. Biol. 51 5859-73), where they managed to simulate the realistic dynamic TACs of 18F-FMISO. The model was developed over a multi-step process. Here we present a refinement to the work of Kelly and Brady, such that the model allows simulation of a realistic tissue activity curve (TAC) of any hypoxia selective PET tracer, in a single step process. In this work we show particular interest in simulating the TAC of perhaps the most promising hypoxia selective tracer, 64Cu-ATSM. In addition, we demonstrate its potential role in tumour sub-volume delineation for radiotherapy treatment planning. Simulation results have demonstrated the significant high contrast of imaging using ATSM, with a tumour to blood ratio ranging from 2.24 to 4.1.

  14. Dose Distribution in Bladder and Surrounding Normal Tissues in Relation to Bladder Volume in Conformal Radiotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, Wojciech, E-mail: wmajewski1@poczta.onet.p; Wesolowska, Iwona; Urbanczyk, Hubert

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To estimate bladder movements and changes in dose distribution in the bladder and surrounding tissues associated with changes in bladder filling and to estimate the internal treatment margins. Methods and Materials: A total of 16 patients with bladder cancer underwent planning computed tomography scans with 80- and 150-mL bladder volumes. The bladder displacements associated with the change in volume were measured. Each patient had treatment plans constructed for a 'partially empty' (80 mL) and a 'partially full' (150 mL) bladder. An additional plan was constructed for tumor irradiation alone. A subsequent 9 patients underwent sequential weekly computed tomography scanningmore » during radiotherapy to verify the bladder movements and estimate the internal margins. Results: Bladder movements were mainly observed cranially, and the estimated internal margins were nonuniform and largest (>2 cm) anteriorly and cranially. The dose distribution in the bladder worsened if the bladder increased in volume: 70% of patients (11 of 16) would have had bladder underdosed to <95% of the prescribed dose. The dose distribution in the rectum and intestines was better with a 'partially empty' bladder (volume that received >70%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed dose was 23%, 20%, and 15% for the rectum and 162, 144, 123 cm{sup 3} for the intestines, respectively) than with a 'partially full' bladder (volume that received >70%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed dose was 28%, 24%, and 18% for the rectum and 180, 158, 136 cm{sup 3} for the intestines, respectively). The change in bladder filling during RT was significant for the dose distribution in the intestines. Tumor irradiation alone was significantly better than whole bladder irradiation in terms of organ sparing. Conclusion: The displacements of the bladder due to volume changes were mainly related to the upper wall. The internal margins should be nonuniform, with the largest margins cranially and anteriorly. The changes in

  15. Target volume delineation for radical radiotherapy of early oesophageal carcinoma in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Su, J; Zhu, S; Liu, Z; Zhao, Y; Song, C

    2017-02-01

    To compare the prognosis of elderly patients with early oesophageal carcinoma between radical elective nodal prophylactic irradiation and involved-field irradiation and to estimate the failure modes and adverse effects, then to provide the patients the safe and individual therapeutic regimens. The charts of 96 patients aged 65 and over with early stage oesophageal carcinoma receiving radical radiotherapy in our department were retrospectively analysed. Of all the patients, 49 received elective nodal prophylactic irradiation and the other 47 received involved-field irradiation. After completion of the whole treatment, we analysed short-term effects, tumour local control, overall survival of the patients, failure modes and adverse effects. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year local control rate in elective nodal irradiation and involved-field irradiation groups were 80.6%, 57.4%, 54.0% and 65.4%, 46.5%, 30.5% respectively, and the difference was statistically significant (χ 2 =4.478, P=0.03). The differences of overall survival and progression-free survival were not significant (P>0.05). The difference of 1-, 3-, and 5-years local regional failure rate was statistically significant between elective nodal prophylactic irradiation and involved-field irradiation groups, except for the overall failure and distant metastasis rates. The overall incidence of radiation-induced oesophagitis after elective nodal irradiation or involved-field irradiation was 79.6% and 59.6%, and the difference was statistically significant (χ 2 =4.559, P=0.03). The difference of radiation pneumonitis between elective nodal prophylactic irradiation and involved-field irradiation was not significant (12.2% vs 14.9%; χ 2 =0.144, P=0.7). For elderly patients with early stage oesophageal carcinoma receiving radical radiotherapy, although elective nodal prophylactic irradiation could increase the incidence of radiation-induced oesophagitis, patients could tolerate the treatment and benefit from local

  16. Risk factors for neovascular glaucoma after carbon ion radiotherapy of choroidal melanoma using dose-volume histogram analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hirasawa, Naoki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Hitoshi

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the risk factors for neovascular glaucoma (NVG) after carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) of choroidal melanoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 55 patients with choroidal melanoma were treated between 2001 and 2005 with C-ion RT based on computed tomography treatment planning. All patients had a tumor of large size or one located close to the optic disk. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the risk factors of NVG for the following parameters; gender, age, dose-volumes of the iris-ciliary body and the wall of eyeball, and irradiation of the optic disk (ODI). Results: Neovascular glaucomamore » occurred in 23 patients and the 3-year cumulative NVG rate was 42.6 {+-} 6.8% (standard error), but enucleation from NVG was performed in only three eyes. Multivariate analysis revealed that the significant risk factors for NVG were V50{sub IC} (volume irradiated {>=}50 GyE to iris-ciliary body) (p = 0.002) and ODI (p = 0.036). The 3-year NVG rate for patients with V50{sub IC} {>=}0.127 mL and those with V50{sub IC} <0.127 mL were 71.4 {+-} 8.5% and 11.5 {+-} 6.3%, respectively. The corresponding rate for the patients with and without ODI were 62.9 {+-} 10.4% and 28.4 {+-} 8.0%, respectively. Conclusion: Dose-volume histogram analysis with computed tomography indicated that V50{sub IC} and ODI were independent risk factors for NVG. An irradiation system that can reduce the dose to both the anterior segment and the optic disk might be worth adopting to investigate whether or not incidence of NVG can be decreased with it.« less

  17. Effect of androgen deprivation therapy on intraprostatic tumour volume identified on 18F choline PET/CT for prostate dose painting radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Joachim; Carver, Antony; Brunt, John N H; Vinjamuri, Sobhan; Syndikus, Isabel

    2017-03-01

    Prostate dose painting radiotherapy requires the accurate identification of dominant intraprostatic lesions (DILs) to be used as boost volumes; these can be identified on multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) or choline positron emission tomography (PET)/CT. Planning scans are usually performed after 2-3 months of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). We examine the effect of ADT on choline tracer uptake and boost volumes identified on choline PET/CT. Fluoroethylcholine ( 18 F choline) PET/CT was performed for dose painting radiotherapy planning in patients with intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer. Initially, they were performed at planning. Owing to low visual tracer uptake, PET/CT for subsequent patients was performed at staging. We compared these two approaches on intraprostatic lesions obtained on PET using both visual and automatic threshold methods [prostate maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) 60%] when compared with mpMRI. PET/CT was performed during ADT in 11 patients (median duration of 85 days) and before ADT in 29 patients. ADT significantly reduced overall prostate volume by 17%. During ADT, prostate SUV max was lower although it did not reach statistical significance (4.2 vs 6.6, p = 0.06); three patients had no visually identifiable PET DIL; and visually defined PET DILs were significantly smaller than corresponding mpMRI DILs (p = 0.03). However, all patients scanned before ADT had at least one visually identifiable PET DIL, with no significant size difference between MRI and visually defined PET DILs. In both groups, threshold PET produced larger DILs than visual PET. Both PET methods have moderate sensitivity (0.50-0.68) and high specificity (0.85-0.98) for identifying MRI-defined disease. For visual contouring of boost volumes in prostate dose painting radiotherapy, 18 F choline PET/CT should be performed before ADT. For threshold contouring of boost volumes using our PET/CT scanning protocol, threshold levels of above 60% prostate SUV

  18. Beam-specific planning volumes for scattered-proton lung radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flampouri, S.; Hoppe, B. S.; Slopsema, R. L.; Li, Z.

    2014-08-01

    This work describes the clinical implementation of a beam-specific planning treatment volume (bsPTV) calculation for lung cancer proton therapy and its integration into the treatment planning process. Uncertainties incorporated in the calculation of the bsPTV included setup errors, machine delivery variability, breathing effects, inherent proton range uncertainties and combinations of the above. Margins were added for translational and rotational setup errors and breathing motion variability during the course of treatment as well as for their effect on proton range of each treatment field. The effect of breathing motion and deformation on the proton range was calculated from 4D computed tomography data. Range uncertainties were considered taking into account the individual voxel HU uncertainty along each proton beamlet. Beam-specific treatment volumes generated for 12 patients were used: a) as planning targets, b) for routine plan evaluation, c) to aid beam angle selection and d) to create beam-specific margins for organs at risk to insure sparing. The alternative planning technique based on the bsPTVs produced similar target coverage as the conventional proton plans while better sparing the surrounding tissues. Conventional proton plans were evaluated by comparing the dose distributions per beam with the corresponding bsPTV. The bsPTV volume as a function of beam angle revealed some unexpected sources of uncertainty and could help the planner choose more robust beams. Beam-specific planning volume for the spinal cord was used for dose distribution shaping to ensure organ sparing laterally and distally to the beam.

  19. Variations of target volume definition and daily target volume localization in stereotactic body radiotherapy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer patients under abdominal compression.

    PubMed

    Han, Chunhui; Sampath, Sagus; Schultheisss, Timothy E; Wong, Jeffrey Y C

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to compare gross tumor volumes (GTV) in 3-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) simulation and daily cone beam CT (CBCT) with the internal target volume (ITV) in 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) simulation in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment of patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) under abdominal compression. We retrospectively selected 10 patients with NSCLC who received image-guided SBRT treatments under abdominal compression with daily CBCT imaging. GTVs were contoured as visible gross tumor on the planning 3DCT and daily CBCT, and ITVs were contoured using maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of the planning 4DCT. Daily CBCTs were registered with 3DCT and MIP images by matching of bony landmarks in the thoracic region to evaluate interfractional GTV position variations. Relative to MIP-based ITVs, the average 3DCT-based GTV volume was 66.3 ± 17.1% (range: 37.5% to 92.0%) (p < 0.01 in paired t-test), and the average CBCT-based GTV volume was 90.0 ± 6.7% (daily range: 75.7% to 107.1%) (p = 0.02). Based on bony anatomy matching, the center-of-mass coordinates for CBCT-based GTVs had maximum absolute shift of 2.4 mm (left-right), 7.0 mm (anterior-posterior [AP]), and 5.2 mm (superior-inferior [SI]) relative to the MIP-based ITV. CBCT-based GTVs had average overlapping ratio of 81.3 ± 11.2% (range: 45.1% to 98.9%) with the MIP-based ITV, and 57.7 ± 13.7% (range: 35.1% to 83.2%) with the 3DCT-based GTV. Even with abdominal compression, both 3DCT simulations and daily CBCT scans significantly underestimated the full range of tumor motion. In daily image-guided patient setup corrections, automatic bony anatomy-based image registration could lead to target misalignment. Soft tissue-based image registration should be performed for accurate treatment delivery. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Variations of target volume definition and daily target volume localization in stereotactic body radiotherapy for early-stage non–small cell lung cancer patients under abdominal compression

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Chunhui, E-mail: chan@coh.org; Sampath, Sagus; Schultheisss, Timothy E.

    We aimed to compare gross tumor volumes (GTV) in 3-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) simulation and daily cone beam CT (CBCT) with the internal target volume (ITV) in 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) simulation in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment of patients with early-stage non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) under abdominal compression. We retrospectively selected 10 patients with NSCLC who received image-guided SBRT treatments under abdominal compression with daily CBCT imaging. GTVs were contoured as visible gross tumor on the planning 3DCT and daily CBCT, and ITVs were contoured using maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of the planning 4DCT. Daily CBCTs were registeredmore » with 3DCT and MIP images by matching of bony landmarks in the thoracic region to evaluate interfractional GTV position variations. Relative to MIP-based ITVs, the average 3DCT-based GTV volume was 66.3 ± 17.1% (range: 37.5% to 92.0%) (p < 0.01 in paired t-test), and the average CBCT-based GTV volume was 90.0 ± 6.7% (daily range: 75.7% to 107.1%) (p = 0.02). Based on bony anatomy matching, the center-of-mass coordinates for CBCT-based GTVs had maximum absolute shift of 2.4 mm (left-right), 7.0 mm (anterior-posterior [AP]), and 5.2 mm (superior-inferior [SI]) relative to the MIP-based ITV. CBCT-based GTVs had average overlapping ratio of 81.3 ± 11.2% (range: 45.1% to 98.9%) with the MIP-based ITV, and 57.7 ± 13.7% (range: 35.1% to 83.2%) with the 3DCT-based GTV. Even with abdominal compression, both 3DCT simulations and daily CBCT scans significantly underestimated the full range of tumor motion. In daily image-guided patient setup corrections, automatic bony anatomy-based image registration could lead to target misalignment. Soft tissue-based image registration should be performed for accurate treatment delivery.« less

  1. Dose-volume effects for pelvic bone marrow in predicting hematological toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy with pelvic node irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sini, Carla; Fiorino, Claudio; Perna, Lucia; Noris Chiorda, Barbara; Deantoni, Chiara Lucrezia; Bianchi, Marco; Sacco, Vincenzo; Briganti, Alberto; Montorsi, Francesco; Calandrino, Riccardo; Di Muzio, Nadia; Cozzarini, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    To prospectively identify clinical/dosimetric predictors of acute/late hematologic toxicity (HT) in chemo-naÏve patients treated with whole-pelvis radiotherapy (WPRT) for prostate cancer. Data of 121 patients treated with adjuvant/salvage WPRT were analyzed (static-field IMRT n=19; VMAT/Rapidarc n=57; Tomotherapy n=45). Pelvic bone marrow (BM) was delineated as ilium (IL), lumbosacral, lower and whole pelvis (WP), and the relative DVHs were calculated. HT was graded both according to CTCAE v4.03 and as variation in percentage relative to baseline. Logistic regression was used to analyze association between HT and clinical/DVHs factors. Significant differences (p<0.005) in the DVH of BM volumes between different techniques were found: Tomotherapy was associated with larger volumes receiving low doses (3-20 Gy) and smaller receiving 40-50 Gy. Lower baseline absolute values of WBC, neutrophils and lymphocytes (ALC) predicted acute/late HT (p ⩽ 0.001). Higher BM V40 was associated with higher risk of acute Grade3 (OR=1.018) or late Grade2 lymphopenia (OR=1.005). Two models predicting lymphopenia were developed, both including baseline ALC, and BM WP-V40 (AUC=0.73) and IL-V40+smoking (AUC=0.904) for acute/late respectively. Specific regions of pelvic BM predicting acute/late lymphopenia, a risk factor for viral infections, were identified. The 2-variable models including specific constraints to BM may help reduce HT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Volume effects of late term normal tissue toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonta, Dacian Viorel

    Modeling of volume effects for treatment toxicity is paramount for optimization of radiation therapy. This thesis proposes a new model for calculating volume effects in gastro-intestinal and genito-urinary normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) following radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma. The radiobiological and the pathological basis for this model and its relationship to other models are detailed. A review of the radiobiological experiments and published clinical data identified salient features and specific properties a biologically adequate model has to conform to. The new model was fit to a set of actual clinical data. In order to verify the goodness of fit, two established NTCP models and a non-NTCP measure for complication risk were fitted to the same clinical data. The method of fit for the model parameters was maximum likelihood estimation. Within the framework of the maximum likelihood approach I estimated the parameter uncertainties for each complication prediction model. The quality-of-fit was determined using the Aikaike Information Criterion. Based on the model that provided the best fit, I identified the volume effects for both types of toxicities. Computer-based bootstrap resampling of the original dataset was used to estimate the bias and variance for the fitted parameter values. Computer simulation was also used to estimate the population size that generates a specific uncertainty level (3%) in the value of predicted complication probability. The same method was used to estimate the size of the patient population needed for accurate choice of the model underlying the NTCP. The results indicate that, depending on the number of parameters of a specific NTCP model, 100 (for two parameter models) and 500 patients (for three parameter models) are needed for accurate parameter fit. Correlation of complication occurrence in patients was also investigated. The results suggest that complication outcomes are correlated in a patient, although

  3. Planning magnetic resonance imaging for prostate cancer intensity-modulated radiation therapy: Impact on target volumes, radiotherapy dose and androgen deprivation administration.

    PubMed

    Horsley, Patrick J; Aherne, Noel J; Edwards, Grace V; Benjamin, Linus C; Wilcox, Shea W; McLachlan, Craig S; Assareh, Hassan; Welshman, Richard; McKay, Michael J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans are increasingly utilized for radiotherapy planning to contour the primary tumors of patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). These scans may also demonstrate cancer extent and may affect the treatment plan. We assessed the impact of planning MRI detection of extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, or adjacent organ invasion on the staging, target volume delineation, doses, and hormonal therapy of patients with prostate cancer undergoing IMRT. The records of 509 consecutive patients with planning MRI scans being treated with IMRT for prostate cancer between January 2010 and July 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Tumor staging and treatment plans before and after MRI were compared. Of the 509 patients, 103 (20%) were upstaged and 44 (9%) were migrated to a higher risk category as a result of findings at MRI. In 94 of 509 patients (18%), the MRI findings altered management. Ninety-four of 509 patients (18%) had a change to their clinical target volume (CTV) or treatment technique, and in 41 of 509 patients (8%) the duration of hormone therapy was changed because of MRI findings. The use of radiotherapy planning MRI altered CTV design, dose and/or duration of androgen deprivation in 18% of patients in this large, single institution series of men planned for dose-escalated prostate IMRT. This has substantial implications for radiotherapy target volumes and doses, as well as duration of androgen deprivation. Further research is required to investigate whether newer MRI techniques can simultaneously fulfill staging and radiotherapy contouring roles. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Interfractional variation in bladder volume and its impact on cervical cancer radiotherapy: Clinical significance of portable bladder scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Huanli; Jin, Fu; Yang, Dingyi

    Purpose: A constant bladder volume (BV) is essential to direct the radiotherapy (RT) of pelvic tumors with precision. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in BV and their impact on cervical cancer RT and to assess the clinical significance of a portable bladder scanner (BS) in achieving a constant BV. Methods: A standard bladder phantom (133 ml) and measurements of actual urine volume were both used as benchmarks to evaluate the accuracy of the BS. Comparisons of BS with computed tomography (CT), cone-beam CT (CBCT), and an ultrasound diagnostic device (iU22) were made. Twenty-two consecutive patients withmore » cervical cancer treated with external beam radical RT were divided into an experimental group (13 patients) and a control group (9 patients). In the experimental group, the BV was measured multiple times by BS pre-RT until it was consistent with that found by planning CT. Then a CBCT was performed. The BV was measured again immediately post-RT, after which the patient’s urine was collected and recorded. In the control group, CBCT only was performed pre-RT. Interfractional changes in BV and their impact on cervical cancer RT were investigated in both groups. The time of bladder filling was also recorded and analyzed. Results: In measuring the volume of the standard bladder phantom, the BS deviated by 1.4% in accuracy. The difference between the measurements of the BS and the iU22 had no statistical significance (linear correlation coefficient 0.96, P < 0.05). The BV measured by the BS was strongly correlated with the actual urine volume (R = 0.95, P < 0.05), planning CT (R = 0.95, P < 0.05), or CBCT (R = 0.91, P < 0.05). Compared with the BV at the time of CT, its value changed by −36.1% [1 SD (standard deviation) 42.3%; range, −79.1%–29.4%] in the control group, and 5.2% (1 SD 21.5%; range, −13.3%–22.1%) in the experimental group during treatment. The change in BV affected the target position in the superior–inferior (SI

  5. The potential advantages of (18)FDG PET/CT-based target volume delineation in radiotherapy planning of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Moule, Russell N; Kayani, Irfan; Moinuddin, Syed A; Meer, Khalda; Lemon, Catherine; Goodchild, Kathleen; Saunders, Michele I

    2010-11-01

    This study investigated two fixed threshold methods to delineate the target volume using (18)FDG PET/CT before and during a course of radical radiotherapy in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Patients were enrolled into the study between March 2006 and May 2008. (18)FDG PET/CT scans were carried out 72h prior to the start of radiotherapy and then at 10, 44 and 66Gy. Functional volumes were delineated according to the SUV Cut Off (SUVCO) (2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0bwg/ml) and percentage of the SUVmax (30%, 35%, 40%, 45%, and 50%) thresholds. The background (18)FDG uptake and the SUVmax within the volumes were also assessed. Primary and lymph node volumes for the eight patients significantly reduced with each increase in the delineation threshold (for example 2.5-3.0bwg/ml SUVCO) compared to the baseline threshold at each imaging point. There was a significant reduction in the volume (p⩽0.0001-0.01) after 36Gy compared to the 0Gy by the SUVCO method. There was a negative correlation between the SUVmax within the primary and lymph node volumes and delivered radiation dose (p⩽0.0001-0.011) but no difference in the SUV within the background reference region. The volumes delineated by the PTSUVmax method increased with the increase in the delivered radiation dose after 36Gy because the SUVmax within the region of interest used to define the edge of the volume was equal or less than the background (18)FDG uptake and the software was unable to effectively differentiate between tumour and background uptake. The changes in the target volumes delineated by the SUVCO method were less susceptible to background (18)FDG uptake compared to those delineated by the PTSUVmax and may be more helpful in radiotherapy planning. The best method and threshold have still to be determined within institutions, both nationally and internationally. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of dose coverage to target volume and normal tissue sparing in the adjuvant radiotherapy of gastric cancers: 3D-CRT compared with dynamic IMRT.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Kk; Shukeili, Ka; Kumar, Ss; Davis, Ca; Chandran, Rr; Namrata, S

    2010-01-01

    To assess the potential advantage of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) over 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) planning in postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy for patients with gastric carcinoma. In a retrospective study, for plan comparison, dose distribution was recalculated in 15 patients treated with 3D-CRT on the contoured structures of same CT images using an IMRT technique. 3D-conformal plans with three fields and four-fields were compared with seven-field dynamic IMRT plans. The different plans were compared by analyzing the dose coverage of planning target volume using TV(95), D(mean), uniformity index, conformity index and homogeneity index parameters. To assess critical organ sparing, D(mean), D(max), dose to one-third and two-third volumes of the OARs and percentage of volumes receiving more than their tolerance doses were compared. The average dose coverage values of PTV with 3F-CRT and 4F-CRT plans were comparable, where as IMRT plans achieved better target coverage(p<0.001) with higher conformity index value of 0.81±0.07 compared to both the 3D-CRT plans. The doses to the liver and bowel reduced significantly (p<0.001) with IMRT plans compared to other 3D-CRT plans. For all OARs the percentage of volumes receiving more than their tolerance doses were reduced with the IMRT plans. This study showed that a better target coverage and significant dose reduction to OARs could be achieved with the IMRT plans. The IMRT can be preferred with caution for organ motion. The authors are currently studying organ motion in the upper abdomen to use IMRT for patient treatment.

  7. Water-filled balloon in the postoperative resection cavity improves dose distribution to target volumes in radiotherapy of maxillary sinus carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qun; Lin, Shi-Rong; He, Fang; Kang, De-Hua; Chen, Guo-Zhang; Luo, Wei

    2011-11-01

    Postoperative radiotherapy is a major treatment for patients with maxillary sinus carcinoma. However, the irregular resection cavity poses a technical difficulty for this treatment, causing uneven dose distribution to target volumes. In this study, we evaluated the dose distribution to target volumes and normal tissues in postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) after placing a water-filled balloon into the resection cavity. Three postoperative patients with advanced maxillary sinus carcinoma were selected in this trial. Water-filled balloons and supporting dental stents were fabricated according to the size of the maxillary resection cavity. Simulation CT scans were performed with or without water-filled balloons, IMRT treatment plans were established, and dose distribution to target volumes and organs at risk were evaluated. Compared to those in the treatment plan without balloons, the dose (D98) delivered to 98% of the gross tumor volume (GTV) increased by 2.1 Gy (P = 0.009), homogeneity index (HI) improved by 2.3% (P = 0.001), and target volume conformity index (TCI) of 68 Gy increased by 18.5% (P = 0.011) in the plan with balloons. Dosimetry endpoints of normal tissues around target regions in both plans were not significantly different (P > 0.05) except for the optic chiasm. In the plan without balloons, 68 Gy high-dose regions did not entirely cover target volumes in the ethmoid sinus, posteromedial wall of the maxillary sinus, or surgical margin of the hard palate. In contrast, 68 Gy high-dose regions entirely covered the GTV in the plan with balloons. These results suggest that placing a water-filled balloon in the resection cavity for postoperative IMRT of maxillary sinus carcinoma can reduce low-dose regions and markedly and simultaneously increase dose homogeneity and conformity of target volumes.

  8. Cell Death, Inflammation, Tumor Burden, and Proliferation Blood Biomarkers Predict Lung Cancer Radiotherapy Response and Correlate With Tumor Volume and Proliferation Imaging.

    PubMed

    Salem, Ahmed; Mistry, Hitesh; Backen, Alison; Hodgson, Clare; Koh, Pek; Dean, Emma; Priest, Lynsey; Haslett, Kate; Trigonis, Ioannis; Jackson, Alan; Asselin, Marie-Claude; Dive, Caroline; Renehan, Andrew; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Blackhall, Fiona

    2018-05-01

    There is an unmet need to develop noninvasive biomarkers to stratify patients in drug-radiotherapy trials. In this pilot study we investigated lung cancer radiotherapy response and toxicity blood biomarkers and correlated findings with tumor volume and proliferation imaging. Blood samples were collected before and during (day 21) radiotherapy. Twenty-six cell-death, hypoxia, angiogenesis, inflammation, proliferation, invasion, and tumor-burden biomarkers were evaluated. Clinical and laboratory data were collected. Univariate analysis was performed on small-cell and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whereas multivariate analysis focused on NSCLC. Blood samples from 78 patients were analyzed. Sixty-one (78.2%) harbored NSCLC, 48 (61.5%) received sequential chemoradiotherapy. Of tested baseline biomarkers, undetectable interleukin (IL)-1b (hazard ratio [HR], 4.02; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.04-7.93; P < .001) was the only significant survival covariate. Of routinely collected laboratory tests, high baseline neutrophil count was a significant survival covariate (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.02-1.11; P = .017). Baseline IL-1b and neutrophil count were prognostic for survival in a multivariate model. The addition of day-21 cytokeratin-19 antigen modestly improved this model's survival prediction (concordance probability, 0.75-0.78). Chemotherapy (P < .001) and baseline keratinocyte growth factor (P = .019) predicted acute esophagitis, but only chemotherapy remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Baseline angioprotein-1 and hepatocyte growth factor showed a direct correlation with tumor volume whereas changes in vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 showed significant correlations with 18F-fluorothymidine (FLT) positron emission tomography (PET). Select biomarkers are prognostic after radiotherapy in this lung cancer series. The correlation between circulating biomarkers and 18F-FLT PET is shown, to our knowledge for the first time, highlighting their potential

  9. Target volume definition for 18F-FDG PET-positive lymph nodes in radiotherapy of patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Nestle, Ursula; Schaefer-Schuler, Andrea; Kremp, Stephanie; Groeschel, Andreas; Hellwig, Dirk; Rübe, Christian; Kirsch, Carl-Martin

    2007-04-01

    FDG PET is increasingly used in radiotherapy planning. Recently, we demonstrated substantial differences in target volumes when applying different methods of FDG-based contouring in primary lung tumours (Nestle et al., J Nucl Med 2005;46:1342-8). This paper focusses on FDG-positive mediastinal lymph nodes (LN(PET)). In our institution, 51 NSCLC patients who were candidates for radiotherapy prospectively underwent staging FDG PET followed by a thoracic PET scan in the treatment position and a planning CT. Eleven of them had 32 distinguishable non-confluent mediastinal or hilar nodal FDG accumulations (LN(PET)). For these, sets of gross tumour volumes (GTVs) were generated at both acquisition times by four different PET-based contouring methods (visual: GTV(vis); 40% SUVmax: GTV40; SUV=2.5: GTV2.5; target/background (T/B) algorithm: GTV(bg)). All differences concerning GTV sizes were within the range of the resolution of the PET system. The detectability and technical delineability of the GTVs were significantly better in the late scans (e.g. p = 0.02 for diagnostic application of SUVmax = 2.5; p = 0.0001 for technical delineability by GTV2.5; p = 0.003 by GTV40), favouring the GTV(bg) method owing to satisfactory overall applicability and independence of GTVs from acquisition time. Compared with CT, the majority of PET-based GTVs were larger, probably owing to resolution effects, with a possible influence of lesion movements. For nodal GTVs, different methods of contouring did not lead to clinically relevant differences in volumes. However, there were significant differences in technical delineability, especially after early acquisition. Overall, our data favour a late acquisition of FDG PET scans for radiotherapy planning, and the use of a T/B algorithm for GTV contouring.

  10. Percentage of Cancer Volume in Biopsy Cores Is Prognostic for Prostate Cancer Death and Overall Survival in Patients Treated With Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, Sean M.; Stenmark, Matthew H.; Blas, Kevin

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic utility of the percentage of cancer volume (PCV) in needle biopsy specimens for prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The outcomes were analyzed for 599 men treated for localized prostate cancer with external beam radiotherapy to a minimal planning target volume dose of 75 Gy (range, 75-79.2). We assessed the effect of PCV and the pretreatment and treatment-related factors on the freedom from biochemical failure, freedom from metastasis, cause-specific survival, and overall survival. Results: The median number of biopsy cores was 7 (interquartile range, 6-12), median PCV was 10%more » (interquartile range, 2.5-25%), and median follow-up was 62 months. The PCV correlated with the National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group and individual risk features, including T stage, prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, and percentage of positive biopsy cores. On log-rank analysis, the PCV stratified by quartile was prognostic for all endpoints, including overall survival. In addition, the PCV was a stronger prognostic factor than the percentage of positive biopsy cores when the two metrics were analyzed together. On multivariate analysis, the PCV predicted a worse outcome for all endpoints, including freedom from biochemical failure, (hazard ratio, 1.9; p = .0035), freedom from metastasis (hazard ratio, 1.7, p = .09), cause-specific survival (hazard ratio, 3.9, p = .014), and overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.8, p = .02). Conclusions: For patients treated with dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy, the volume of cancer in the biopsy specimen adds prognostic value for clinically relevant endpoints, particularly in intermediate- and high-risk patients. Although the PCV determination is more arduous than the percentage of positive biopsy cores, it provides superior risk stratification.« less

  11. Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy in Postoperative Treatment of Endometrial and Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Small, William; Mell, Loren K.; Anderson, Penny

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an atlas of the clinical target volume (CTV) definitions for postoperative radiotherapy of endometrial and cervical cancer to be used for planning pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group led an international collaberation of cooperative groups in the development of the atlas. The groups included the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Gynecologic Oncology Group, National Cancer Institute of Canada, European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and American College of Radiology Imaging Network. The members of the group were asked by questionnaire to define the areas that were to be included in the CTVmore » and to outline theses areas on individual computed tomography images. The initial formulation of the group began in late 2004 and culminated with a formal consensus conference in June 2005. Results: The committee achieved a consensus CTV definition for postoperative therapy for endometrial and cervical cancer. The CTV should include the common, external, and internal iliac lymph node regions. The upper 3.0 cm of the vagina and paravaginal soft tissue lateral to the vagina should also be included. For patients with cervical cancer, or endometrial cancer with cervical stromal invasion, it is also recommended that the CTV include the presacral lymph node region. Conclusion: This report serves as an international template for the definition of the CTV for postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy for endometrial and cervical cancer.« less

  12. Accuracy of volume measurement using 3D ultrasound and development of CT-3D US image fusion algorithm for prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jihye; Huh, Jangyoung; Kim, Myungsoo; Hyun An, So; Oh, Yoonjin; Kim, DongYoung; Chung, Kwangzoo; Cho, Sungho; Lee, Rena

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of measuring volumes using three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US), and to verify the feasibility of the replacement of CT-MR fusion images with CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning. Phantoms, consisting of water, contrast agent, and agarose, were manufactured. The volume was measured using 3D US, CT, and MR devices. A CT-3D US and MR-3D US image fusion software was developed using the Insight Toolkit library in order to acquire three-dimensional fusion images. The quality of the image fusion was evaluated using metric value and fusion images. Volume measurement, using 3D US, shows a 2.8 ± 1.5% error, 4.4 ± 3.0% error for CT, and 3.1 ± 2.0% error for MR. The results imply that volume measurement using the 3D US devices has a similar accuracy level to that of CT and MR. Three-dimensional image fusion of CT-3D US and MR-3D US was successfully performed using phantom images. Moreover, MR-3D US image fusion was performed using human bladder images. 3D US could be used in the volume measurement of human bladders and prostates. CT-3D US image fusion could be used in monitoring the target position in each fraction of external beam radiation therapy. Moreover, the feasibility of replacing the CT-MR image fusion to the CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning was verified.

  13. Comparison study of portable bladder scanner versus cone-beam CT scan for measuring bladder volumes in post-prostatectomy patients undergoing radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ung, K A; White, R; Mathlum, M; Mak-Hau, V; Lynch, R

    2014-01-01

    In post-prostatectomy radiotherapy to the prostatic bed, consistent bladder volume is essential to maintain the position of treatment target volume. We assessed the differences between bladder volume readings from a portable bladder scanner (BS-V) and those obtained from planning CT (CT-V) or cone-beam CT (CBCT-V). Interfraction bladder volume variation was also determined. BS-V was recorded before and after planning CT or CBCT. The percentage differences between the readings using the two imaging modalities, standard deviations and 95% confidence intervals were determined. Data were analysed for the whole patient cohort and separately for the older BladderScan™ BVI3000 and newer BVI9400 model. Interfraction bladder volume variation was determined from the percentage difference between the CT-V and CBCT-V. Treatment duration, incorporating the time needed for BS and CBCT, was recorded. Fourteen patients were enrolled, producing 133 data sets for analysis. BS-V was taken using the BVI9400 in four patients (43 data sets). The mean BS-V was 253.2 mL, and the mean CT-V or CBCT-V was 199 cm(3). The mean percentage difference between the two modalities was 19.7% (SD 42.2; 95%CI 12.4 to 26.9). The BVI9400 model produced more consistent readings, with a mean percentage difference of -6.2% (SD 27.8; 95% CI -14.7 to -2.4%). The mean percentage difference between CT-V and CBCT-V was 31.3% (range -48% to 199.4%). Treatment duration from time of first BS reading to CBCT was, on average, 12 min (range 6-27). The BS produces bladder volume readings of an average 19.7% difference from CT-V or CBCT-V and can potentially be used to screen for large interfraction bladder volume variations in radiotherapy to prostatic bed. The observed interfraction bladder volume variation suggests the need to improve bladder volume consistency. Incorporating the BS into practice is feasible. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  14. A mathematical approach towards simulating a realistic tissue activity curve of 64Cu-ATSM for the purpose of sub-target volume delineation in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalah, E.; Bradley, D.; Nisbet, A.

    2010-07-01

    One unique feature of positron emission tomography (PET) is that it allows measurements of regional tracer concentration in hypoxic tumour-bearing tissue, supporting the need for accurate radiotherapy treatment planning. Generally the data are taken over multiple time frames, in the form of tissue activity curves (TACs), providing an indication of the presence of hypoxia, the degree of oxygen perfusion, vascular geometry and hypoxia fraction. In order to understand such a complicated phenomenon a number of theoretical studies have attempted to describe tracer uptake in tissue cells. More recently, a novel computerized reaction diffusion equation method developed by Kelly and Brady has allowed simulation of the realistic TACs of 18F-FMISO, with representation of physiological oxygen heterogeneity and tracer kinetics. We present a refinement to the work of Kelly and Brady, with a particular interest in simulating TACs of the most promising hypoxia selective tracer, 64Cu-ATSM, demonstrating its potential role in tumour sub-volume delineation for radiotherapy treatment planning. Simulation results have demonstrated the high contrast of imaging using ATSM, with a tumour to blood ratio ranging 2.24-4.1. Similarly, results of tumour sub-volumes generated using three different thresholding methods were all well correlated.

  15. Delineation of clinical target volume for postoperative radiotherapy in stage IIIA-pN2 non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xuquan; Meng, Xue; Sun, Xindong; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    With the high locoregional relapse rate and the improvement of radiation technology, postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) has been widely used in the treatment of completely resected stage IIIA-pN2 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, there is still no definitive consensus on clinical target volume for the pN2 subgroup. This review will discuss how to delineate the clinical target volume (CTV) for pN2 subgroups of IIIA-N2 NSCLC based on the published literature and to investigate the optimal PORT CTV in this cohort of patients. Besides overall survival (OS), locoregional recurrence (LR), and radiotherapy-related toxicity of this subset of the population in the modern PORT era, selection of proper patients will also be considered in this review. In summary, it is appropriate to include involved lymph node stations and uninvolved stations at high risk in PORT CTV for patients with pN2 disease when PORT is administered. PORT can reduce LR and has the potential to improve OS. In the current era of modern radiation technology, PORT can be administered safely with well-tolerated toxicity. Clinicopathological characteristics may be helpful in selecting proper candidates for PORT. PMID:26929651

  16. Delineation of clinical target volume for postoperative radiotherapy in stage IIIA-pN2 non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xuquan; Meng, Xue; Sun, Xindong; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    With the high locoregional relapse rate and the improvement of radiation technology, postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) has been widely used in the treatment of completely resected stage IIIA-pN2 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, there is still no definitive consensus on clinical target volume for the pN2 subgroup. This review will discuss how to delineate the clinical target volume (CTV) for pN2 subgroups of IIIA-N2 NSCLC based on the published literature and to investigate the optimal PORT CTV in this cohort of patients. Besides overall survival (OS), locoregional recurrence (LR), and radiotherapy-related toxicity of this subset of the population in the modern PORT era, selection of proper patients will also be considered in this review. In summary, it is appropriate to include involved lymph node stations and uninvolved stations at high risk in PORT CTV for patients with pN2 disease when PORT is administered. PORT can reduce LR and has the potential to improve OS. In the current era of modern radiation technology, PORT can be administered safely with well-tolerated toxicity. Clinicopathological characteristics may be helpful in selecting proper candidates for PORT.

  17. SU-E-T-427: Cell Surviving Fractions Derived From Tumor-Volume Variation During Radiotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Comparison with Predictive Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Chvetsov, A; Schwartz, J; Mayr, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To show that a distribution of cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} in a heterogeneous group of patients can be derived from tumor-volume variation curves during radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Our analysis was based on two data sets of tumor-volume variation curves for heterogeneous groups of 17 patients treated for nonsmall cell lung cancer with conventional dose fractionation. The data sets were obtained previously at two independent institutions by using megavoltage (MV) computed tomography (CT). Statistical distributions of cell surviving fractions S{sup 2} and cell clearance half-lives of lethally damaged cells T1/2 have been reconstructed in eachmore » patient group by using a version of the two-level cell population tumor response model and a simulated annealing algorithm. The reconstructed statistical distributions of the cell surviving fractions have been compared to the distributions measured using predictive assays in vitro. Results: Non-small cell lung cancer presents certain difficulties for modeling surviving fractions using tumor-volume variation curves because of relatively large fractional hypoxic volume, low gradient of tumor-volume response, and possible uncertainties due to breathing motion. Despite these difficulties, cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} for non-small cell lung cancer derived from tumor-volume variation measured at different institutions have similar probability density functions (PDFs) with mean values of 0.30 and 0.43 and standard deviations of 0.13 and 0.18, respectively. The PDFs for cell surviving fractions S{sup 2} reconstructed from tumor volume variation agree with the PDF measured in vitro. Comparison of the reconstructed cell surviving fractions with patient survival data shows that the patient survival time decreases as the cell surviving fraction increases. Conclusion: The data obtained in this work suggests that the cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} can be reconstructed from the tumor

  18. Residual tumour volumes and grey zones after external beam radiotherapy (with or without chemotherapy) in cervical cancer patients. A low-field MRI study.

    PubMed

    Schmid, M P; Mansmann, B; Federico, M; Dimopoulous, J C A; Georg, P; Fidarova, E; Dörr, W; Pötter, R

    2013-03-01

    Grey zones, which are defined as tissue with intermediate signal intensity in the area of primary hyperintense tumour extension, can be seen during radiation with or without chemotherapy on the T2-weighted MRI in patients with cervical cancer. The purpose of this study was to systematically measure the tumour volume at the time of diagnosis and the residual tumour volume at the time of brachytherapy without and with consideration of the grey zones and to estimate tumour regression during external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). T2-weighted MRI datasets of 175 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer (FIGO stage IB-IVA), who underwent combined external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy with or without concomitant chemotherapy were available for this study. The gross tumour volume at the time of diagnosis (GTV(init)) and at the time of first brachytherapy without (GTV(res)) and with (GTV(res)+ GZ) consideration of grey zones were measured for each patient. A descriptive statistical analysis was performed and tumour regression rates without (R) and with consideration of grey zones (R(GZ)) were calculated. Further, the role of prognostic factors on GTV(init), GTV(res), GTV(res)+ GZ and tumour regression rates was investigated. The median GTV(init), GTV(res), GTV(res)+ GZ in all patients were 44.4 cm(3), 8.2 cm(3), 20.3 cm(3), respectively. The median R was 78.5% and the median R(GZ) was 50.1%. The histology and FIGO staging showed a significant impact on GTV(init), GTV(res) and GTV(res)+ GZ. Grey zones represent a substantial proportion of the residual tumour volume at the time of brachytherapy. Differentiation of high signal intensity mass and surrounding intermediate signal intensity grey zones may be reasonable.

  19. Metabolic Tumor Volume and Total Lesion Glycolysis in Oropharyngeal Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiotherapy: Which Threshold Is the Best Predictor of Local Control?

    PubMed

    Castelli, Joël; Depeursinge, Adrien; de Bari, Berardino; Devillers, Anne; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Bourhis, Jean; Prior, John O

    2017-06-01

    In the context of oropharyngeal cancer treated with definitive radiotherapy, the aim of this retrospective study was to identify the best threshold value to compute metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and/or total lesion glycolysis to predict local-regional control (LRC) and disease-free survival. One hundred twenty patients with a locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer from 2 different institutions treated with definitive radiotherapy underwent FDG PET/CT before treatment. Various MTVs and total lesion glycolysis were defined based on 2 segmentation methods: (i) an absolute threshold of SUV (0-20 g/mL) or (ii) a relative threshold for SUVmax (0%-100%). The parameters' predictive capabilities for disease-free survival and LRC were assessed using the Harrell C-index and Cox regression model. Relative thresholds between 40% and 68% and absolute threshold between 5.5 and 7 had a similar predictive value for LRC (C-index = 0.65 and 0.64, respectively). Metabolic tumor volume had a higher predictive value than gross tumor volume (C-index = 0.61) and SUVmax (C-index = 0.54). Metabolic tumor volume computed with a relative threshold of 51% of SUVmax was the best predictor of disease-free survival (hazard ratio, 1.23 [per 10 mL], P = 0.009) and LRC (hazard ratio: 1.22 [per 10 mL], P = 0.02). The use of different thresholds within a reasonable range (between 5.5 and 7 for an absolute threshold and between 40% and 68% for a relative threshold) seems to have no major impact on the predictive value of MTV. This parameter may be used to identify patient with a high risk of recurrence and who may benefit from treatment intensification.

  20. Converging stereotactic radiotherapy using kilovoltage X-rays: experimental irradiation of normal rabbit lung and dose-volume analysis with Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Takatsugu; Kunieda, Etsuo; Deloar, Hossain M; Tsunoo, Takanori; Seki, Satoshi; Oku, Yohei; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Ogawa, Eileen N; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Kameyama, Kaori; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-10-01

    To validate the feasibility of developing a radiotherapy unit with kilovoltage X-rays through actual irradiation of live rabbit lungs, and to explore the practical issues anticipated in future clinical application to humans through Monte Carlo dose simulation. A converging stereotactic irradiation unit was developed, consisting of a modified diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scanner. A tiny cylindrical volume in 13 normal rabbit lungs was individually irradiated with single fractional absorbed doses of 15, 30, 45, and 60 Gy. Observational CT scanning of the whole lung was performed every 2 weeks for 30 weeks after irradiation. After 30 weeks, histopathologic specimens of the lungs were examined. Dose distribution was simulated using the Monte Carlo method, and dose-volume histograms were calculated according to the data. A trial estimation of the effect of respiratory movement on dose distribution was made. A localized hypodense change and subsequent reticular opacity around the planning target volume (PTV) were observed in CT images of rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk showed a focused dose distribution to the target and sufficient dose lowering in the organs at risk. Our estimate of the dose distribution, taking respiratory movement into account, revealed dose reduction in the PTV. A converging stereotactic irradiation unit using kilovoltage X-rays was able to generate a focused radiobiologic reaction in rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histogram analysis and estimated sagittal dose distribution, considering respiratory movement, clarified the characteristics of the irradiation received from this type of unit.

  1. A new brain positron emission tomography scanner with semiconductor detectors for target volume delineation and radiotherapy treatment planning in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Norio; Yasuda, Koichi; Shiga, Tohru; Hasegawa, Masakazu; Onimaru, Rikiya; Shimizu, Shinichi; Bengua, Gerard; Ishikawa, Masayori; Tamaki, Nagara; Shirato, Hiroki

    2012-03-15

    We compared two treatment planning methods for stereotactic boost for treating nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC): the use of conventional whole-body bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillator positron emission tomography (PET(CONV)WB) versus the new brain (BR) PET system using semiconductor detectors (PET(NEW)BR). Twelve patients with NPC were enrolled in this study. [(18)F]Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET images were acquired using both the PET(NEW)BR and the PET(CONV)WB system on the same day. Computed tomography (CT) and two PET data sets were transferred to a treatment planning system, and the PET(CONV)WB and PET(NEW)BR images were coregistered with the same set of CT images. Window width and level values for all PET images were fixed at 3000 and 300, respectively. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was visually delineated on PET images by using either PET(CONV)WB (GTV(CONV)) images or PET(NEW)BR (GTV(NEW)) images. Assuming a stereotactic radiotherapy boost of 7 ports, the prescribed dose delivered to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) was set to 2000 cGy in 4 fractions. The average absolute volume (±standard deviation [SD]) of GTV(NEW) was 15.7 ml (±9.9) ml, and that of GTV(CONV) was 34.0 (±20.5) ml. The average GTV(NEW) was significantly smaller than that of GTV(CONV) (p = 0.0006). There was no statistically significant difference between the maximum dose (p = 0.0585) and the mean dose (p = 0.2748) of PTV. The radiotherapy treatment plan based on the new gross tumor volume (PLAN(NEW)) significantly reduced maximum doses to the cerebrum and cerebellum (p = 0.0418) and to brain stem (p = 0.0041). Results of the present study suggest that the new brain PET system using semiconductor detectors can provide more accurate tumor delineation than the conventional whole-body BGO PET system and may be an important tool for functional and molecular radiotherapy treatment planning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of irregular breathing patterns on internal target volumes in four-dimensional CT and cone-beam CT images in the context of stereotactic lung radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Clements, N; Kron, T; Franich, R; Dunn, L; Roxby, P; Aarons, Y; Chesson, B; Siva, S; Duplan, D; Ball, D

    2013-02-01

    Stereotactic lung radiotherapy is complicated by tumor motion from patient respiration. Four-dimensional CT (4DCT) imaging is a motion compensation method used in treatment planning to generate a maximum intensity projection (MIP) internal target volume (ITV). Image guided radiotherapy during treatment may involve acquiring a volumetric cone-beam CT (CBCT) image and visually aligning the tumor to the planning 4DCT MIP ITV contour. Moving targets imaged with CBCT can appear blurred and currently there are no studies reporting on the effect that irregular breathing patterns have on CBCT volumes and their alignment to 4DCT MIP ITV contours. The objective of this work was therefore to image a phantom moving with irregular breathing patterns to determine whether any configurations resulted in errors in volume contouring or alignment. A Perspex thorax phantom was used to simulate a patient. Three wooden "lung" inserts with embedded Perspex "lesions" were moved up to 4 cm with computer-generated motion patterns, and up to 1 cm with patient-specific breathing patterns. The phantom was imaged on 4DCT and CBCT with the same acquisition settings used for stereotactic lung patients in the clinic and the volumes on all phantom images were contoured. This project assessed the volumes for qualitative and quantitative changes including volume, length of the volume, and errors in alignment between CBCT volumes and 4DCT MIP ITV contours. When motion was introduced 4DCT and CBCT volumes were reduced by up to 20% and 30% and shortened by up to 7 and 11 mm, respectively, indicating that volume was being under-represented at the extremes of motion. Banding artifacts were present in 4DCT MIP images, while CBCT volumes were largely reduced in contrast. When variable amplitudes from patient traces were used and CBCT ITVs were compared to 4DCT MIP ITVs there was a distinct trend in reduced ITV with increasing amplitude that was not seen when compared to true ITVs. Breathing patterns with a

  3. The effect of irregular breathing patterns on internal target volumes in four-dimensional CT and cone-beam CT images in the context of stereotactic lung radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, N.; Kron, T.; Roxby, P.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic lung radiotherapy is complicated by tumor motion from patient respiration. Four-dimensional CT (4DCT) imaging is a motion compensation method used in treatment planning to generate a maximum intensity projection (MIP) internal target volume (ITV). Image guided radiotherapy during treatment may involve acquiring a volumetric cone-beam CT (CBCT) image and visually aligning the tumor to the planning 4DCT MIP ITV contour. Moving targets imaged with CBCT can appear blurred and currently there are no studies reporting on the effect that irregular breathing patterns have on CBCT volumes and their alignment to 4DCT MIP ITV contours. The objective of thismore » work was therefore to image a phantom moving with irregular breathing patterns to determine whether any configurations resulted in errors in volume contouring or alignment. Methods: A Perspex thorax phantom was used to simulate a patient. Three wooden 'lung' inserts with embedded Perspex 'lesions' were moved up to 4 cm with computer-generated motion patterns, and up to 1 cm with patient-specific breathing patterns. The phantom was imaged on 4DCT and CBCT with the same acquisition settings used for stereotactic lung patients in the clinic and the volumes on all phantom images were contoured. This project assessed the volumes for qualitative and quantitative changes including volume, length of the volume, and errors in alignment between CBCT volumes and 4DCT MIP ITV contours. Results: When motion was introduced 4DCT and CBCT volumes were reduced by up to 20% and 30% and shortened by up to 7 and 11 mm, respectively, indicating that volume was being under-represented at the extremes of motion. Banding artifacts were present in 4DCT MIP images, while CBCT volumes were largely reduced in contrast. When variable amplitudes from patient traces were used and CBCT ITVs were compared to 4DCT MIP ITVs there was a distinct trend in reduced ITV with increasing amplitude that was not seen when compared to

  4. 18-Fluorodeoxy-Glucose Positron Emission Tomography- Computed Tomography (18-FDG-PET/CT) for Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) Delineation in Gastric Cancer Radiotherapy

    PubMed

    Dębiec, Kinga; Wydmański, Jerzy; Gorczewska, Izabela; Leszczyńska, Paulina; Gorczewski, Kamil; Leszczyński, Wojciech; d’Amico, Andrea; Kalemba, Michał

    2017-11-26

    Purpose: Evaluation of the 18-fluorodeoxy-glucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (18-FDGPET/ CT) for gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation in gastric cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Methods: In this study, 29 gastric cancer patients (17 unresectable and 7 inoperable) were initially enrolled for radical chemoradiotherapy (45Gy/25 fractions + chemotherapy based on 5 fluorouracil) or radiotherapy alone (45Gy/25 fractions) with planning based on the 18-FDG-PET/CT images. Five patients were excluded due to excess blood glucose levels (1), false-negative positron emission tomography (1) and distant metastases revealed by 18-FDG-PET/CT (3). The analysis involved measurement of metabolic tumor volumes (MTVs) performed on PET/CT workstations. Different threshold levels of the standardized uptake value (SUV) and liver uptake were set to obtain MTVs. Secondly, GTVPET values were derived manually using the positron emission tomography (PET) dataset blinded to the computed tomography (CT) data. Subsequently, GTVCT values were delineated using a radiotherapy planning system based on the CT scans blinded to the PET data. The referenced GTVCT values were correlated with the GTVPET and were compared with a conformality index (CI). Results: The mean CI was 0.52 (range, 0.12-0.85). In 13/24 patients (54%), the GTVPET was larger than GTVCT, and in the remainder, GTVPET was smaller. Moreover, the cranio-caudal diameter of GTVPET in 16 cases (64%) was larger than that of GTVCT, smaller in 7 cases (29%), and unchanged in one case. Manual PET delineation (GTVPET) achieved the best correlation with GTVCT (Pearson correlation = 0.76, p <0.0001). Among the analyzed MTVs, a statistically significant correlation with GTVCT was revealed for MTV10%SUVmax (r = 0.63; p = 0.0014), MTVliv (r = 0.60; p = 0.0021), MTVSUV2.5 (r = 0.54; p = 0.0063); MTV20%SUVmax (r = 0.44; p = 0.0344); MTV30%SUVmax (r = 0.44; p = 0.0373). Conclusion: 18-FDG-PET/CT in gastric cancer radiotherapy

  5. A method to combine target volume data from 3D and 4D planned thoracic radiotherapy patient cohorts for machine learning applications.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Corinne; Price, Gareth; Khalifa, Jonathan; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Dekker, Andre; Moore, Christopher; van Herk, Marcel

    2018-02-01

    The gross tumour volume (GTV) is predictive of clinical outcome and consequently features in many machine-learned models. 4D-planning, however, has prompted substitution of the GTV with the internal gross target volume (iGTV). We present and validate a method to synthesise GTV data from the iGTV, allowing the combination of 3D and 4D planned patient cohorts for modelling. Expert delineations in 40 non-small cell lung cancer patients were used to develop linear fit and erosion methods to synthesise the GTV volume and shape. Quality was assessed using Dice Similarity Coefficients (DSC) and closest point measurements; by calculating dosimetric features; and by assessing the quality of random forest models built on patient populations with and without synthetic GTVs. Volume estimates were within the magnitudes of inter-observer delineation variability. Shape comparisons produced mean DSCs of 0.8817 and 0.8584 for upper and lower lobe cases, respectively. A model trained on combined true and synthetic data performed significantly better than models trained on GTV alone, or combined GTV and iGTV data. Accurate synthesis of GTV size from the iGTV permits the combination of lung cancer patient cohorts, facilitating machine learning applications in thoracic radiotherapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Quantification of gross tumour volume changes between simulation and first day of radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced malignancies of the lung and head/neck.

    PubMed

    Kishan, Amar U; Cui, Jing; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Daly, Megan E; Purdy, James A; Chen, Allen M

    2014-10-01

    To quantify changes in gross tumour volume (GTV) between simulation and initiation of radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced malignancies of the lung and head/neck. Initial cone beam computed tomography (CT) scans from 12 patients with lung cancer and 12 with head/neck cancer (head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC)) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy with image guidance were rigidly registered to the simulation CT scans. The GTV was demarcated on both scans. The relationship between percent GTV change and variables including time interval between simulation and start, tumour (T) stage, and absolute weight change was assessed. For lung cancer patients, the GTV increased a median of 35.06% (range, -16.63% to 229.97%) over a median interval of 13 days (range, 7-43), while for HNSCC patients, the median GTV increase was 16.04% (range, -8.03% to 47.41%) over 13 days (range, 7-40). These observed changes are statistically significant. The magnitude of this change was inversely associated with the size of the tumour on the simulation scan for lung cancer patients (P < 0.05). However, the observed changes in GTV did not correlate with the duration of the interval for either disease site. Similarly, T stage, absolute weight change and histologic type (the latter for lung cancer cases) did not correlate with degree of GTV change (P > 0.1). While the observed changes in GTV were moderate from the time of simulation to start of radiotherapy, these findings underscore the importance of image guidance for target localisation and verification, particularly for smaller tumours. Minimising the delay between simulation and treatment initiation may also be beneficial. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  7. Clinical Implications of the Tumor Volume Reduction Rate in Head-and-Neck Cancer During Definitive Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Organ Preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shih-Neng; Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; Liao, Chih-Ying

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of the volume reduction rate (VRR) in patients with head-and-neck cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Seventy-six patients with oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) and another 76 with hypopharyngeal cancer (HPC) were enrolled in volumetric analysis. All patients received allocated radiotherapy courses. Adaptive computed tomography was done 4 to 5 weeks after the start of IMRT. Primary tumor volume measurement was derived using separate images for the pretreatment gross tumor volume (pGTV) and the interval gross tumor volume. Results: In the OPC group, the pGTV ranged from 6.6 to 242.6 mL (mean, 49.9more » mL), whereas the value of the VRR ranged from 0.014 to 0.74 (mean, 0.43). In HPC patients, the pGTV ranged from 4.1 to 152.4 mL (mean, 35.6 mL), whereas the VRR ranged from -1.15 to 0.79 (mean, 0.33). Multivariate analysis of the primary tumor relapse-free survival for OPC revealed three prognostic factors: T4 tumor (p = 0.0001, hazard ratio 7.38), pGTV {>=}20 mL (p = 0.01, hazard ratio 10.61), and VRR <0.5 (p = 0.001, hazard ratio 6.49). Multivariate analysis of the primary tumor relapse-free survival for HPC showed two prognostic factors: pGTV {>=}30 mL (p = 0.001, hazard ratio 2.87) and VRR <0.5 (p = 0.03, hazard ratio 2.25). Conclusion: The VRR is an outcome predictor for local control in OPC and HPC patients treated with IMRT. Those with large tumor volumes or a VRR <0.5 should be considered for a salvage operation or a dose-escalation scheme.« less

  8. Voluntary Deep Inspiration Breath-hold Reduces the Heart Dose Without Compromising the Target Volume Coverage During Radiotherapy for Left-sided Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Al-Hammadi, Noora; Caparrotti, Palmira; Naim, Carole; Hayes, Jillian; Rebecca Benson, Katherine; Vasic, Ana; Al-Abdulla, Hissa; Hammoud, Rabih; Divakar, Saju; Petric, Primoz

    2018-03-01

    During radiotherapy of left-sided breast cancer, parts of the heart are irradiated, which may lead to late toxicity. We report on the experience of single institution with cardiac-sparing radiotherapy using voluntary deep inspiration breath hold (V-DIBH) and compare its dosimetric outcome with free breathing (FB) technique. Left-sided breast cancer patients, treated at our department with postoperative radiotherapy of breast/chest wall +/- regional lymph nodes between May 2015 and January 2017, were considered for inclusion. FB-computed tomography (CT) was obtained and dose-planning performed. Cases with cardiac V25Gy ≥ 5% or risk factors for heart disease were coached for V-DIBH. Compliant patients were included. They underwent additional CT in V-DIBH for planning, followed by V-DIBH radiotherapy. Dose volume histogram parameters for heart, lung and optimized planning target volume (OPTV) were compared between FB and BH. Treatment setup shifts and systematic and random errors for V-DIBH technique were compared with FB historic control. Sixty-three patients were considered for V-DIBH. Nine (14.3%) were non-compliant at coaching, leaving 54 cases for analysis. When compared with FB, V-DIBH resulted in a significant reduction of mean cardiac dose from 6.1 +/- 2.5 to 3.2 +/- 1.4 Gy (p < 0.001), maximum cardiac dose from 51.1 +/- 1.4 to 48.5 +/- 6.8 Gy (p = 0.005) and cardiac V25Gy from 8.5 +/- 4.2 to 3.2 +/- 2.5% (p < 0.001). Heart volumes receiving low (10-20 Gy) and high (30-50 Gy) doses were also significantly reduced. Mean dose to the left anterior coronary artery was 23.0 (+/- 6.7) Gy and 14.8 (+/- 7.6) Gy on FB and V-DIBH, respectively (p < 0.001). Differences between FB- and V-DIBH-derived mean lung dose (11.3 +/- 3.2 vs. 10.6 +/- 2.6 Gy), lung V20Gy (20.5 +/- 7 vs. 19.5 +/- 5.1 Gy) and V95% for the OPTV (95.6 +/- 4.1 vs. 95.2 +/- 6.3%) were non-significant. V-DIBH-derived mean shifts for initial patient setup were ≤ 2.7 mm. Random and systematic errors

  9. Evaluation of volume change in rectum and bladder during application of image-guided radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, J. A.; Rojas, J. I.

    2016-07-01

    All prostate cancer patients from Centro Médico Radioterapia Siglo XXI receive Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). This therapy uses image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with the Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). This study compares the planned dose in the reference CT image against the delivered dose recalculate in the CBCT image. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the anatomic changes and related dosimetric effect based on weekly CBCT directly for patients with prostate cancer undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment. The collected data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA.

  10. A new approach to delineating lymph node target volumes for post-operative radiotherapy in gastric cancer: A phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Haijun, Yu; Qiuji, Wu; Zhenming, Fu; Yong, Huang; Zhengkai, Liao; Conghua, Xie; Yunfeng, Zhou; Yahua, Zhong

    2015-08-01

    In the context of gastric cancer, lymph node target volume delineation for post-operative radiotherapy is currently built on the traditional system of dividing the stomach and 2-D treatment methods. Here, we have proposed a new delineation approach with irradiation indications for lymph node stations. Its safety and efficacy were evaluated in a phase II clinical trial. Fifty-four gastric cancer patients with D2 lymph node dissection received 2 cycles of FOLFOX4. They subsequently received concurrent chemoradiotherapy (45 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction, 5 fractions per week for 5 weeks) with a 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin regimen, followed by 4 additional FOLFOX4 cycles. The target volume included the remnant stomach, anastomosis site, tumor bed, and regional lymph nodes selected through our new approach by taking gastric arteries as references. The most common grade 3-4 adverse event was neutropenia (14.8%). Neutropenia, anemia, and nausea were common grade 1-2 toxicities. No treatment-related deaths occurred during treatment. The 3-year overall, disease-free, and locoregional recurrence-free survival rates were 81.6%, 70.2%, and 91.1%, respectively. Eight patients developed peritoneal or distant metastases. Using our new approach and irradiation indications, delineation of the target volume of post-operative lymph node stations was feasible and well tolerated after D2 resection in patients with gastric cancer. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Utilization of cone-beam CT for offline evaluation of target volume coverage during prostate image-guided radiotherapy based on bony anatomy alignment.

    PubMed

    Paluska, Petr; Hanus, Josef; Sefrova, Jana; Rouskova, Lucie; Grepl, Jakub; Jansa, Jan; Kasaova, Linda; Hodek, Miroslav; Zouhar, Milan; Vosmik, Milan; Petera, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    To assess target volume coverage during prostate image-guided radiotherapy based on bony anatomy alignment and to assess possibility of safety margin reduction. Implementation of IGRT should influence safety margins. Utilization of cone-beam CT provides current 3D anatomic information directly in irradiation position. Such information enables reconstruction of the actual dose distribution. Seventeen prostate patients were treated with daily bony anatomy image-guidance. Cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans were acquired once a week immediately after bony anatomy alignment. After the prostate, seminal vesicles, rectum and bladder were contoured, the delivered dose distribution was reconstructed. Target dose coverage was evaluated by the proportion of the CTV encompassed by the 95% isodose. Original plans employed a 1 cm safety margin. Alternative plans assuming a smaller 7 mm margin between CTV and PTV were evaluated in the same way. Rectal and bladder volumes were compared with the initial ones. Rectal and bladder volumes irradiated with doses higher than 75 Gy, 70 Gy, 60 Gy, 50 Gy and 40 Gy were analyzed. In 12% of reconstructed plans the prostate coverage was not sufficient. The prostate underdosage was observed in 5 patients. Coverage of seminal vesicles was not satisfactory in 3% of plans. Most of the target underdosage corresponded to excessive rectal or bladder filling. Evaluation of alternative plans assuming a smaller 7 mm margin revealed 22% and 11% of plans where prostate and seminal vesicles coverage, respectively, was compromised. These were distributed over 8 and 7 patients, respectively. Sufficient dose coverage of target volumes was not achieved for all patients. Reducing of safety margin is not acceptable. Initial rectal and bladder volumes cannot be considered representative for subsequent treatment.

  12. The role of PET in target localization for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Rembielak, Agata; Price, Pat

    2008-02-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is currently accepted as an important tool in oncology, mostly for diagnosis, staging and restaging purposes. It provides a new type of information in radiotherapy, functional rather than anatomical. PET imaging can also be used for target volume definition in radiotherapy treatment planning. The need for very precise target volume delineation has arisen with the increasing use of sophisticated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy techniques and intensity modulated radiation therapy. It is expected that better delineation of the target volume may lead to a significant reduction in the irradiated volume, thus lowering the risk of treatment complications (smaller safety margins). Better tumour visualisation also allows a higher dose of radiation to be applied to the tumour, which may lead to better tumour control. The aim of this article is to review the possible use of PET imaging in the radiotherapy of various cancers. We focus mainly on non-small cell lung cancer, lymphoma and oesophageal cancer, but also include current opinion on the use of PET-based planning in other tumours including brain, uterine cervix, rectum and prostate.

  13. Tumor volume changes on serial imaging with megavoltage CT for non-small-cell lung cancer during intensity-modulated radiotherapy: how reliable, consistent, and meaningful is the effect?

    PubMed

    Siker, Malika L; Tomé, Wolfgang A; Mehta, Minesh P

    2006-09-01

    Adaptive radiotherapy allows treatment plan modification based on data obtained during treatment. Assessing volume changes during treatment is now possible with intratreatment imaging capabilities on radiotherapy devices. This study assesses non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) volume changes during treatment with conformal intensity-modulated radiotherapy by evaluating serial megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) scans, with a specific emphasis on the frequency, reliability, and meaningfulness of these changes. Megavoltage CTs were retrospectively reviewed for 25 patients treated with the TomoTherapy Hi-Art system at the University of Wisconsin. Twenty-one patients received definitive radiotherapy, 4 with extracranial stereotactic radioablation (60 Gy in five fractions) and 17 on a dose-per-fraction escalation protocol (57-80.5 Gy in 25 fractions). Four patients were treated palliatively (22-30 Gy in 8 to 10 fractions). Gross tumor volumes were contoured on serial MVCTs at weekly intervals. Each patient had 4 to 25 scans, including at least one at the beginning, midway, and one at the end of treatment. At completion of treatment, no patient demonstrated a complete response. Partial response occurred in 3 (12%) and marginal response was noted in 5 (20%). The remaining 17 patients (68%) showed stable disease. The minimum "scorable threshold" for volume discrepancy between scans to account for interscan assessment variability was set at >25% volume change; 10 patients (40%) had >25% tumor regression. None of the patients treated ablatively or palliatively showed tumor regression during treatment. Although gross tumor regression during treatment may be objectively measured using MVCTs, substantial volumetric decrease occurs only in a minority. The clinical significance of this regression is questionable, because there is no way to document histologic tumor clearance, and therefore field reductions during radiotherapy cannot be recommended.

  14. Methods and computer executable instructions for rapidly calculating simulated particle transport through geometrically modeled treatment volumes having uniform volume elements for use in radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Frandsen, Michael W.; Wessol, Daniel E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.

    2001-01-16

    Methods and computer executable instructions are disclosed for ultimately developing a dosimetry plan for a treatment volume targeted for irradiation during cancer therapy. The dosimetry plan is available in "real-time" which especially enhances clinical use for in vivo applications. The real-time is achieved because of the novel geometric model constructed for the planned treatment volume which, in turn, allows for rapid calculations to be performed for simulated movements of particles along particle tracks there through. The particles are exemplary representations of neutrons emanating from a neutron source during BNCT. In a preferred embodiment, a medical image having a plurality of pixels of information representative of a treatment volume is obtained. The pixels are: (i) converted into a plurality of substantially uniform volume elements having substantially the same shape and volume of the pixels; and (ii) arranged into a geometric model of the treatment volume. An anatomical material associated with each uniform volume element is defined and stored. Thereafter, a movement of a particle along a particle track is defined through the geometric model along a primary direction of movement that begins in a starting element of the uniform volume elements and traverses to a next element of the uniform volume elements. The particle movement along the particle track is effectuated in integer based increments along the primary direction of movement until a position of intersection occurs that represents a condition where the anatomical material of the next element is substantially different from the anatomical material of the starting element. This position of intersection is then useful for indicating whether a neutron has been captured, scattered or exited from the geometric model. From this intersection, a distribution of radiation doses can be computed for use in the cancer therapy. The foregoing represents an advance in computational times by multiple factors of

  15. Utilization of PET-CT in target volume delineation for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer and atelectasis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Li-Jie; Yu, Xiao-Bin; Ren, Yan-Gang; Gu, Guang-Hai; Ding, Tian-Gui; Lu, Zhi

    2013-03-18

    To investigate the utilization of PET-CT in target volume delineation for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and atelectasis. Thirty NSCLC patients who underwent radical radiotherapy from August 2010 to March 2012 were included in this study. All patients were pathologically confirmed to have atelectasis by imaging examination. PET-CT scanning was performed in these patients. According to the PET-CT scan results, the gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk (OARs, including the lungs, heart, esophagus and spinal cord) were delineated separately both on CT and PET-CT images. The clinical target volume (CTV) was defined as the GTV plus a margin of 6-8 mm, and the planning target volume (PTV) as the GTV plus a margin of 10-15mm. An experienced physician was responsible for designing treatment plans PlanCT and PlanPET-CT on CT image sets. 95% of the PTV was encompassed by the 90% isodose curve, and the two treatment plans kept the same beam direction, beam number, gantry angle, and position of the multi-leaf collimator as much as possible. The GTV was compared using a target delineation system, and doses distributions to OARs were compared on the basis of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. The GTVCT and GTVPET-CT had varying degrees of change in all 30 patients, and the changes in the GTVCT and GTVPET-CT exceeded 25% in 12 (40%) patients. The GTVPET-CT decreased in varying degrees compared to the GTVCT in 22 patients. Their median GTVPET-CT and median GTVPET-CT were 111.4 cm3 (range, 37.8 cm3-188.7 cm3) and 155.1 cm3 (range, 76.2 cm3-301.0 cm3), respectively, and the former was 43.7 cm3 (28.2%) less than the latter. The GTVPET-CT increased in varying degrees compared to the GTVCT in 8 patients. Their median GTVPET-CT and median GTVPET-CT were 144.7 cm3 (range, 125.4 cm3-178.7 cm3) and 125.8 cm3 (range, 105.6 cm3-153.5 cm3), respectively, and the former was 18.9 cm3 (15.0%) greater than the latter

  16. Dosimetric advantages of generalised equivalent uniform dose-based optimisation on dose–volume objectives in intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning for bilateral breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, T-F; Ting, H-M; Chao, P-J; Wang, H-Y; Shieh, C-S; Horng, M-F; Wu, J-M; Yeh, S-A; Cho, M-Y; Huang, E-Y; Huang, Y-J; Chen, H-C; Fang, F-M

    2012-01-01

    Objective We compared and evaluated the differences between two models for treating bilateral breast cancer (BBC): (i) dose–volume-based intensity-modulated radiation treatment (DV plan), and (ii) dose–volume-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy with generalised equivalent uniform dose-based optimisation (DV-gEUD plan). Methods The quality and performance of the DV plan and DV-gEUD plan using the Pinnacle3® system (Philips, Fitchburg, WI) were evaluated and compared in 10 patients with stage T2–T4 BBC. The plans were delivered on a Varian 21EX linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Milpitas, CA) equipped with a Millennium 120 leaf multileaf collimator (Varian Medical Systems). The parameters analysed included the conformity index, homogeneity index, tumour control probability of the planning target volume (PTV), the volumes V20 Gy and V30 Gy of the organs at risk (OAR, including the heart and lungs), mean dose and the normal tissue complication probability. Results Both plans met the requirements for the coverage of PTV with similar conformity and homogeneity indices. However, the DV-gEUD plan had the advantage of dose sparing for OAR: the mean doses of the heart and lungs, lung V20 Gy, and heart V30 Gy in the DV-gEUD plan were lower than those in the DV plan (p<0.05). Conclusions A better result can be obtained by starting with a DV-generated plan and then improving it by adding gEUD-based improvements to reduce the number of iterations and to improve the optimum dose distribution. Advances to knowledge The DV-gEUD plan provided superior dosimetric results for treating BBC in terms of PTV coverage and OAR sparing than the DV plan, without sacrificing the homogeneity of dose distribution in the PTV. PMID:23091290

  17. Comparison of standardized uptake value-based positron emission tomography and computed tomography target volumes in esophageal cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vali, Faisal S; Nagda, Suneel; Hall, William; Sinacore, James; Gao, Mingcheng; Lee, Steven H; Hong, Robert; Shoup, Margaret; Emami, Bahman

    2010-11-15

    To study various standardized uptake value (SUV)-based approaches to ascertain the best strategy for delineating metabolic tumor volumes (MTV). Twenty-two consecutive previously treated esophageal cancer patients with positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and computed tomography (CT)-based radiotherapy plans were studied. At the level of the tumor epicenter, MTVs were delineated at 11 different thresholds: SUV ≥2, ≥2.5, ≥3, ≥3.5 (SUV(n)); ≥40%, ≥45%, and ≥50% of the maximum (SUV(n%)); and mean liver SUV + 1, 2, 3, and 4 standard deviations (SUV(Lnσ)). The volume ratio and conformality index were determined between MTVs, and the corresponding CT/endoscopic ultrasound-based gross tumor volume (GTV) at the epicenter. Means were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance for repeated measures and further compared using a paired t test for repeated measures. The mean conformality indices ranged from 0.33 to 0.48, being significantly (p < 0.05) closest to 1 at SUV(2.5) (0.47 ± 0.03) and SUV(L4σ) (0.48 ± 0.03). The mean volume ratios ranged from 0.39 to 2.82, being significantly closest to 1 at SUV(2.5) (1.18 ± 0.36) and SUV(L4σ) (1.09 ± 0.15). The mean value of the SUVs calculated using the SUV(L4σ) approach was 2.4. Regardless of the SUV thresholding method used (i.e., absolute or relative to liver mean), a threshold of approximately 2.5 yields the highest conformality index and best approximates the CT-based GTV at the epicenter. These findings may ultimately aid radiation oncologists in the delineation of the entire GTV in esophageal cancer patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The impact of PET/CT scanning on the size of target volumes, radiation exposure of organs at risk, TCP and NTCP, in the radiotherapy planning of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Vojtíšek, Radovan; Mužík, Jan; Slampa, Pavel; Budíková, Marie; Hejsek, Jaroslav; Smolák, Petr; Ferda, Jiří; Fínek, Jindřich

    2014-05-01

    To compare radiotherapy plans made according to CT and PET/CT and to investigate the impact of changes in target volumes on tumour control probability (TCP), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and the impact of PET/CT on the staging and treatment strategy. Contemporary studies have proven that PET/CT attains higher sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of lung cancer and also leads to higher accuracy than CT alone in the process of target volume delineation in NSCLC. Between October 2009 and March 2012, 31 patients with locally advanced NSCLC, who had been referred to radical radiotherapy were involved in our study. They all underwent planning PET/CT examination. Then we carried out two separate delineations of target volumes and two radiotherapy plans and we compared the following parameters of those plans: staging, treatment purpose, the size of GTV and PTV and the exposure of organs at risk (OAR). TCP and NTCP were also compared. PET/CT information led to a significant decrease in the sizes of target volumes, which had the impact on the radiation exposure of OARs. The reduction of target volume sizes was not reflected in the significant increase of the TCP value. We found that there is a very strong direct linear relationship between all evaluated dosimetric parameters and NTCP values of all evaluated OARs. Our study found that the use of planning PET/CT in the radiotherapy planning of NSCLC has a crucial impact on the precise determination of target volumes, more precise staging of the disease and thus also on possible changes of treatment strategy.

  19. Is a Clinical Target Volume (CTV) Necessary in the Treatment of Lung Cancer in the Modern Era Combining 4-D Imaging and Image-guided Radiotherapy (IGRT)?

    PubMed

    Kilburn, Jeremy M; Lucas, John T; Soike, Michael H; Ayala-Peacock, Diandra N; Blackstock, Arthur W; Hinson, William H; Munley, Michael T; Petty, William J; Urbanic, James J

    2016-01-23

    We hypothesized that omission of clinical target volumes (CTV) in lung cancer radiotherapy would not compromise control by determining retrospectively if the addition of a CTV would encompass the site of failure. Stage II-III patients were treated from 2009-2012 with daily cone-beam imaging and a 5 mm planning target volume (PTV) without a CTV. PTVs were expanded 1 cm and termed CTVretro. Recurrences were scored as 1) within the PTV, 2) within CTVretro, or 3) outside the PTV. Locoregional control (LRC), distant control (DC), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were estimated. Among 110 patients, Stage IIIA 57%, IIIB 32%, IIA 4%, and IIB 7%. Eighty-six percent of Stage III patients received chemotherapy. Median dose was 70 Gy (45-74 Gy) and fraction size ranged from 1.5-2.7 Gy. Median follow-up was 12 months, median OS was 22 months (95% CI 19-30 months), and LRC at two years was 69%. Fourteen local and eight regional events were scored with two CTVretro failures equating to a two-year CTV failure-free survival of 98%. Omission of a 1 cm CTV expansion appears feasible based on only two events among 110 patients and should be considered in radiation planning.

  20. Radiotherapy volume delineation using dynamic [18F]-FDG PET/CT imaging in patients with oropharyngeal cancer: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Silvoniemi, Antti; Din, Mueez U; Suilamo, Sami; Shepherd, Tony; Minn, Heikki

    2016-11-01

    Delineation of gross tumour volume in 3D is a critical step in the radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Static [ 18 F]-FDG PET/CT imaging has been suggested as a method to improve the reproducibility of tumour delineation, but it suffers from low specificity. We undertook this pilot study in which dynamic features in time-activity curves (TACs) of [ 18 F]-FDG PET/CT images were applied to help the discrimination of tumour from inflammation and adjacent normal tissue. Five patients with OPC underwent dynamic [ 18 F]-FDG PET/CT imaging in treatment position. Voxel-by-voxel analysis was performed to evaluate seven dynamic features developed with the knowledge of differences in glucose metabolism in different tissue types and visual inspection of TACs. The Gaussian mixture model and K-means algorithms were used to evaluate the performance of the dynamic features in discriminating tumour voxels compared to the performance of standardized uptake values obtained from static imaging. Some dynamic features showed a trend towards discrimination of different metabolic areas but lack of consistency means that clinical application is not recommended based on these results alone. Impact of inflammatory tissue remains a problem for volume delineation in RT of OPC, but a simple dynamic imaging protocol proved practicable and enabled simple data analysis techniques that show promise for complementing the information in static uptake values.

  1. SU-E-J-76: Incorporation of Ultrasound Elastography in Target Volume Delineation for Partial Breast Radiotherapy Planning: A Comparative Study

    SciTech Connect

    Juneja, P; Harris, E; Bamber, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is substantial observer variability in the delineation of target volumes for post-surgical partial breast radiotherapy because the tumour bed has poor x-ray contrast. This variability may result in substantial variations in planned dose distribution. Ultrasound elastography (USE) has an ability to detect mechanical discontinuities and therefore, the potential to image the scar and distortion in breast tissue architecture. The goal of this study was to compare USE techniques: strain elastography (SE), shear wave elastography (SWE) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging using phantoms that simulate features of the tumour bed, for the purpose of incorporating USE inmore » breast radiotherapy planning. Methods: Three gelatine-based phantoms (10% w/v) containing: a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with adhered boundaries, a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with mobile boundaries and fluid cavity inclusion (to mimic seroma), were constructed and used to investigate the USE techniques. The accuracy of the elastography techniques was quantified by comparing the imaged inclusion with the modelled ground-truth using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). For two regions of interest (ROI), the DSC measures their spatial overlap. Ground-truth ROIs were modelled using geometrical measurements from B-mode images. Results: The phantoms simulating stiff scar tissue with adhered and mobile boundaries and seroma were successfully developed and imaged using SE and SWE. The edges of the stiff inclusions were more clearly visible in SE than in SWE. Subsequently, for all these phantoms the measured DSCs were found to be higher for SE (DSCs: 0.91–0.97) than SWE (DSCs: 0.68–0.79) with an average relative difference of 23%. In the case of seroma phantom, DSC values for SE and SWE were similar. Conclusion: This study presents a first attempt to identify the most suitable elastography technique for use in breast radiotherapy planning. Further analysis

  2. Conventional 3D staging PET/CT in CT simulation for lung cancer: impact of rigid and deformable target volume alignments for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Hanna, G G; Van Sörnsen De Koste, J R; Carson, K J; O'Sullivan, J M; Hounsell, A R; Senan, S

    2011-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scans can improve target definition in radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). As staging PET/CT scans are increasingly available, we evaluated different methods for co-registration of staging PET/CT data to radiotherapy simulation (RTP) scans. 10 patients underwent staging PET/CT followed by RTP PET/CT. On both scans, gross tumour volumes (GTVs) were delineated using CT (GTV(CT)) and PET display settings. Four PET-based contours (manual delineation, two threshold methods and a source-to-background ratio method) were delineated. The CT component of the staging scan was co-registered using both rigid and deformable techniques to the CT component of RTP PET/CT. Subsequently rigid registration and deformation warps were used to transfer PET and CT contours from the staging scan to the RTP scan. Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC) was used to assess the registration accuracy of staging-based GTVs following both registration methods with the GTVs delineated on the RTP PET/CT scan. When the GTV(CT) delineated on the staging scan after both rigid registration and deformation was compared with the GTV(CT)on the RTP scan, a significant improvement in overlap (registration) using deformation was observed (mean DSC 0.66 for rigid registration and 0.82 for deformable registration, p = 0.008). A similar comparison for PET contours revealed no significant improvement in overlap with the use of deformable registration. No consistent improvements in similarity measures were observed when deformable registration was used for transferring PET-based contours from a staging PET/CT. This suggests that currently the use of rigid registration remains the most appropriate method for RTP in NSCLC.

  3. Dose Constraint for Minimizing Grade 2 Rectal Bleeding Following Brachytherapy Combined With External Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: Rectal Dose-Volume Histogram Analysis of 457 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Yutaka; Yorozu, Atsunori; Ohashi, Toshio, E-mail: ohashi@rad.med.keio.ac.jp

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the rectal tolerance to Grade 2 rectal bleeding after I-125 seed brachytherapy combined with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), based on the rectal dose-volume histogram. Methods and Materials: A total of 458 consecutive patients with stages T1 to T3 prostate cancer received combined modality treatment consisting of I-125 seed implantation followed by EBRT to the prostate and seminal vesicles. The prescribed doses of brachytherapy and EBRT were 100 Gy and 45 Gy in 25 fractions, respectively. The rectal dosimetric factors were analyzed for rectal volumes receiving >100 Gy and >150 Gy (R100 and R150) during brachytherapy and formore » rectal volumes receiving >30 Gy to 40 Gy (V30-V40) during EBRT therapy in 373 patients for whom datasets were available. The patients were followed from 21 to 72 months (median, 45 months) after the I-125 seed implantation. Results: Forty-four patients (9.7%) developed Grade 2 rectal bleeding. On multivariate analysis, age (p = 0.014), R100 (p = 0.002), and V30 (p = 0.001) were identified as risk factors for Grade 2 rectal bleeding. The rectal bleeding rate increased as the R100 increased: 5.0% (2/40 patients) for 0 ml; 7.5% (20/267 patients) for >0 to 0.5 ml; 11.0% (11/100 patients) for >0.5 to 1 ml; 17.9% (5/28 patients) for >1 to 1.5 ml; and 27.3% (6/22 patients) for >1.5 ml (p = 0.014). Grade 2 rectal bleeding developed in 6.4% (12/188) of patients with a V30 {<=}35% and in 14.1% (26/185) of patients with a V30 >35% (p = 0.02). When these dose-volume parameters were considered in combination, the Grade 2 rectal bleeding rate was 4.2% (5/120 patients) for a R100 {<=}0.5 ml and a V30 {<=}35%, whereas it was 22.4% (13/58 patients) for R100 of >0.5 ml and V30 of >35%. Conclusion: The risk of rectal bleeding was found to be significantly volume-dependent in patients with prostate cancer who received combined modality treatment. Rectal dose-volume analysis is a practical method for predicting the risk of

  4. Dose-Volume Parameters of the Corpora Cavernosa Do Not Correlate With Erectile Dysfunction After External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results From a Dose-Escalation Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wielen, Gerard J. van der; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Dohle, Gert R.

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze the correlation between dose-volume parameters of the corpora cavernosa and erectile dysfunction (ED) after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and February 2003, a randomized dose-escalation trial comparing 68 Gy and 78 Gy was conducted. Patients at our institute were asked to participate in an additional part of the trial evaluating sexual function. After exclusion of patients with less than 2 years of follow-up, ED at baseline, or treatment with hormonal therapy, 96 patients were eligible. The proximal corpora cavernosa (crura), the superiormost 1-cm segment of the crura, and themore » penile bulb were contoured on the planning computed tomography scan and dose-volume parameters were calculated. Results: Two years after EBRT, 35 of the 96 patients had developed ED. No statistically significant correlations between ED 2 years after EBRT and dose-volume parameters of the crura, the superiormost 1-cm segment of the crura, or the penile bulb were found. The few patients using potency aids typically indicated to have ED. Conclusion: No correlation was found between ED after EBRT for prostate cancer and radiation dose to the crura or penile bulb. The present study is the largest study evaluating the correlation between ED and radiation dose to the corpora cavernosa after EBRT for prostate cancer. Until there is clear evidence that sparing the penile bulb or crura will reduce ED after EBRT, we advise to be careful in sparing these structures, especially when this involves reducing treatment margins.« less

  5. Low-Dose and Limited-Volume Radiotherapy Alone for Primary Dural Marginal Zone Lymphoma: Treatment Approach and Review of Published Data

    SciTech Connect

    Puri, Dev R.; Tereffe, Welela; Yahalom, Joachim

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: Primary dural lymphoma is a rare intracranial lymphoma that almost always has a marginal zone histologic type and immunophenotype and often remains localized and is thus potentially curable with radiotherapy (RT) alone. The unusual location and histologic type of primary dural marginal zone lymphoma (PDMZL) distinguish it from primary central nervous system lymphoma and poses treatment dilemmas of technique, volume, and dose that have not been well addressed. We set out to analyze our recent experience in treating PDMZL and reviewed the limited published data available. Methods and Materials: Between 2002 and 2006, we treated 5 patients with localizedmore » PDMZL. Of these 5 patients, 3 had unilateral and 2 had bilateral/multifocal involvement, and 3 underwent subtotal tumor resection and 2 biopsy only. Whole brain RT was given before involved-field RT (IFRT) in 4 patients and 1 received IFRT alone. The median whole brain RT, IFRT, and total RT dose was 20, 12, and 30 Gy, respectively. The planning computed tomography scan was always fused with the post-gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging scan to assist in the IFRT volume determination. We also analyzed the published data from 27 additional patients. Results: The median follow-up was 34 months (range, 31-52). All obtained lasting local control. One patient developed a relapse in the soft tissue of the flank and additional systemic progression but no central nervous system recurrence. At last follow-up, no significant treatment-related neurotoxicity was detected. Conclusion: The results of our study have demonstrated that a combination of whole brain RT/IFRT or even low-dose IFRT alone provides excellent durable local control of PDMZL. This approach is potentially curative, possibly without significant neurotoxicity. Additional study and longer follow-up are needed to determine the appropriate RT dose and volume parameters for this rare, debilitating, and yet potentially curable lymphoma.« less

  6. [Low dose volume histogram analysis of the lungs in prediction of acute radiation pneumonitis in patients with esophageal cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Shen, Wen-bin; Zhu, Shu-chai; Gao, Hong-mei; Li, You-mei; Liu, Zhi-kun; Li, Juan; Su, Jing-wei; Wan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the predictive value of low dose volume of the lung on acute radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients with esophageal cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) only, and to analyze the relation of comprehensive parameters of the dose-volume V5, V20 and mean lung dose (MLD) with acute RP. Two hundred and twenty-two patients with esophageal cancer treated by 3D-CRT have been followed up. The V5-V30 and MLD were calculated from the dose-volume histogram system. The clinical factors and treatment parameters were collected and analyzed. The acute RP was evaluated according to the RTOG toxicity criteria. The acute RP of grade 1, 2, 3 and 4 were observed in 68 (30.6%), 40 (18.0%), 8 (3.6%) and 1 (0.5%) cases, respectively. The univariate analysis of measurement data:The primary tumor length, radiation fields, MLD and lung V5-V30 had a significant relationship with the acute RP. The magnitude of the number of radiation fields, the volume of GTV, MLD and Lung V5-V30 had a significant difference in whether the ≥ grade 1 and ≥ grade 2 acute RP developed or not. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that MLD, Lung V5, V20 and V25 were independent risk factors of ≥ grade 1 acute RP, and the radiation fields, MLD and Lung V5 were independent risk factors of ≥ grade 2 acute RP. The ≥ grade 1 and ≥ grade 2 acute RP were significantly decreased when MLD less than 14 Gy, V5 and V20 were less than 60% and 28%,respectively. When the V20 ≤ 28%, the acute RP was significantly decreased in V5 ≤ 60% group. When the MLD was ≤ 14 Gy, the ≥ 1 grade acute RP was significantly decreased in the V5 ≤ 60% group. When the MLD was >14 Gy, the ≥ grade 2 acute RP was significantly decreased in the V5 ≤ 60% group. The low dose volume of the lung is effective in predicting radiation pneumonitis in patients with esophageal cancer treated with 3D-CRT only. The comprehensive parameters combined with V5, V20 and MLD may increase the

  7. Variation in the Gross Tumor Volume and Clinical Target Volume for Preoperative Radiotherapy of Primary Large High-Grade Soft Tissue Sarcoma of the Extremity Among RTOG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dian, E-mail: dwang@mcw.edu; Bosch, Walter; Kirsch, David G.

    Purpose: To evaluate variability in the definition of preoperative radiotherapy gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) delineated by sarcoma radiation oncologists. Methods and Materials: Extremity sarcoma planning CT images along with the corresponding diagnostic MRI from two patients were distributed to 10 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group sarcoma radiation oncologists with instructions to define GTV and CTV using standardized guidelines. The CT data with contours were then returned for central analysis. Contours representing statistically corrected 95% (V95) and 100% (V100) agreement were computed for each structure. Results: For the GTV, the minimum, maximum, mean (SD) volumes (mL) weremore » 674, 798, 752 {+-} 35 for the lower extremity case and 383, 543, 447 {+-} 46 for the upper extremity case. The volume (cc) of the union, V95 and V100 were 882, 761, and 752 for the lower, and 587, 461, and 455 for the upper extremity, respectively. The overall GTV agreement was judged to be almost perfect in both lower and upper extremity cases (kappa = 0.9 [p < 0.0001] and kappa = 0.86 [p < 0.0001]). For the CTV, the minimum, maximum, mean (SD) volumes (mL) were 1145, 1911, 1605 {+-} 211 for the lower extremity case and 637, 1246, 1006 {+-} 180 for the upper extremity case. The volume (cc) of the union, V95, and V100 were 2094, 1609, and 1593 for the lower, and 1533, 1020, and 965 for the upper extremity cases, respectively. The overall CTV agreement was judged to be almost perfect in the lower extremity case (kappa = 0.85 [p < 0.0001]) but only substantial in the upper extremity case (kappa = 0.77 [p < 0.0001]). Conclusions: Almost perfect agreement existed in the GTV of these two representative cases. Tshere was no significant disagreement in the CTV of the lower extremity, but variation in the CTV of upper extremity was seen, perhaps related to the positional differences between the planning CT and the diagnostic MRI.« less

  8. SU-E-J-179: Assessment of Tumor Volume Change and Movement During Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Lung Cancer: Is Adaptive Radiation Therapy (ART) Necessary?

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C; Lee, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Delineation of gross tumor volumes (GTVs) is important for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). However, tumor volume changes during treatment response. Here, we have investigated tumor volume changes and movement during SBRT for lung cancer, as a means of examining the need for adaptive radiation therapy (ART). Methods: Fifteen tumors in 15 patients with lung cancer were treated with SBRT (total dose: 60 Gy in 4 fractions). GTVs were obtained from cone-beam computed tomography scans (CBCT1–4) taken before each of the 4 fractions was administered. GTVs were delineated and measured by radiation oncologists using a treatment planning system. Variance inmore » the tumor position was assessed between the planning CT and the CBCT images. To investigate the dosimetric effects of tumor volume changes, planning CT and CBCT4 treatment plans were compared using the conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and Paddick’s index (PCI). Results: The GTV on CBCT1 was employed as a baseline for comparisons. GTV had decreased by a mean of 20.4% (range: 0.7% to 47.2%) on CBCT4. Most patients had smaller GTVs on CBCT4 than on CBCT1. The interfractional shifts of the tumor position between the planning CT and CBCT1–4 were as follows: right-left, −0.4 to 1.3 mm; anterior-posterior, −0.8 to 0.5 mm; and superiorinferior, −0.9 to 1.1 mm. Indices for plans from the planning CT and CBCT4 were as follows: CI = 0.94±0.02 and 1.11±0.03; HI= 1.1±0.02 and 1.10±0.03; and PCI = 1.35±0.16 and 1.11±0.02, respectively. Conclusion: CI, HI, and PCI did not differ between the planning CT and CBCTs. However, daily CBCT revealed a significant decrease in the GTV during lung SBRT. Furthermore, there was an obvious interfractional shift in tumor position. Using ART could potentially lead to a reduced GTV margin and improved regional tumor control for lung cancer patients with significantly decreased GTV.« less

  9. Target volume geometric change and/or deviation from the cranium during fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastases: potential pitfalls in image guidance based on bony anatomy alignment.

    PubMed

    Ohtakara, Kazuhiro; Hoshi, Hiroaki

    2014-12-01

    This study sought to evaluate the potential geometrical change and/or displacement of the target relative to the cranium during fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for treating newly developed brain metastases. For 16 patients with 21 lesions treated with image-guided frameless FSRT in 5 or 10 fractions using a 6-degree-of-freedom image guidance system-integrated platform, the unenhanced computed tomography or T2-weighted magnetic resonance images acquired until the completion of FSRT were fused to the planning image datasets for comparison. Significant change was defined as ≥3-mm change in the tumour diameter or displacement of the tumour centroid. FSRT was started 1 day after planning image acquisition. Tumour shrinkage, deviation and both were observed in 2, 1 and 1 of the 21 lesions, respectively, over a period of 7-13 days. Tumour shrinkage or deviation resulted in an increase or decrease in the marginal dose to the tumour, respectively, and a substantial increase in the irradiated volume for the surrounding tissue irrespective of the pattern of alteration. No obvious differences in the clinical and treatment characteristics were noted among the populations with or without significant changes in tumour volume or position. Target deformity and/or deviation can unexpectedly occur even during relatively short-course FSRT, inevitably leading to a gradual discrepancy between the planned and actually delivered doses to the tumour and surrounding tissue. To appropriately weigh the treatment outcome against the planned dose distribution, target deformity and/or deviation should also be considered in addition to the immobilisation accuracy, as image guidance with bony anatomy alignment does not necessarily guarantee accurate target localisation until completion of FSRT. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  10. Bone fractures following external beam radiotherapy and limb-preservation surgery for lower extremity soft tissue sarcoma: relationship to irradiated bone length, volume, tumor location and dose.

    PubMed

    Dickie, Colleen I; Parent, Amy L; Griffin, Anthony M; Fung, Sharon; Chung, Peter W M; Catton, Charles N; Ferguson, Peter C; Wunder, Jay S; Bell, Robert S; Sharpe, Michael B; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2009-11-15

    To examine the relationship between tumor location, bone dose, and irradiated bone length on the development of radiation-induced fractures for lower extremity soft tissue sarcoma (LE-STS) patients treated with limb-sparing surgery and radiotherapy (RT). Of 691 LE-STS patients treated from 1989 to 2005, 31 patients developed radiation-induced fractures. Analysis was limited to 21 fracture patients (24 fractures) who were matched based on tumor size and location, age, beam arrangement, and mean total cumulative RT dose to a random sample of 53 nonfracture patients and compared for fracture risk factors. Mean dose to bone, RT field size (FS), maximum dose to a 2-cc volume of bone, and volume of bone irradiated to >or=40 Gy (V40) were compared. Fracture site dose was determined by comparing radiographic images and surgical reports to fracture location on the dose distribution. For fracture patients, mean dose to bone was 45 +/- 8 Gy (mean dose at fracture site 59 +/- 7 Gy), mean FS was 37 +/- 8 cm, maximum dose was 64 +/- 7 Gy, and V40 was 76 +/- 17%, compared with 37 +/- 11 Gy, 32 +/- 9 cm, 59 +/- 8 Gy, and 64 +/- 22% for nonfracture patients. Differences in mean, maximum dose, and V40 were statistically significant (p = 0.01, p = 0.02, p = 0.01). Leg fractures were more common above the knee joint. The risk of radiation-induced fracture appears to be reduced if V40 <64%. Fracture incidence was lower when the mean dose to bone was <37 Gy or maximum dose anywhere along the length of bone was <59 Gy. There was a trend toward lower mean FS for nonfracture patients.

  11. Low-dose external beam radiotherapy for greater trochanteric pain syndrome : Target volume definition and treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Kaltenborn, Alexander; Carl, Ulrich Martin; Hinsche, Tanja; Nitsche, Mirko; Hermann, Robert Michael

    2017-04-01

    Low-dose external beam radiotherapy (ED-EBRT) is frequently used in the therapy of refractory greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS). As studies reporting treatment results are scarce, we retrospectively analyzed our own patient collectives. In all, 60 patients (74 hips) received LD-EBRT (6 × 0.5 Gy in 29 hips, 6 × 1 Gy in 45). The endpoint was the patient's reported subjective response to treatment. The influence of different patient and treatment characteristics on treatment outcome was investigated. At the end of LD-EBRT, 69% reported partial remission, 4% complete remission, no change 28%. A total of 3 months later (n = 52 hips), the results were 37, 33, and 30% and 18 months after LD-EBRT (n = 47) 21, 51, and 28%. In univariate analysis "inclusion of the total femoral head into the PTV" and "night pain before LD-EBRT" were correlated with symptom remission at the end of LD-EBRT, while "initial increase in pain during LD-EBRT" was significantly associated with treatment failure. In multivariable modeling "initial increase in pain" was identified as a risk factor for treatment failure (p = 0.007; odds ratio [OR] 0.209; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.048-0.957), while "night pain" was an independent factor for remission (p = 0.038; OR 3.484; 95% CI 1.004-12.6). Three months after LD-EBRT "night pain" and "inclusion of the complete femoral neck circumference into the PTV" were predictive for remission. LD-EBRT represents a useful treatment option for patients suffering from GTPS. Three months after therapy two-thirds of the patients reported a partial or complete symptom remission. Especially patients who suffered from nocturnal pain seemed to benefit. Treatment appeared to be more effective when the entire circumference of the femoral neck was encompassed.

  12. Optimal gross tumor volume definition in lung-sparing intensity modulated radiotherapy for pleural mesothelioma: an in silico study.

    PubMed

    Botticella, Angela; Defraene, Gilles; Nackaerts, Kristiaan; Deroose, Christophe M; Coolen, Johan; Nafteux, Philippe; Peeters, Stephanie; Ricardi, Umberto; De Ruysscher, Dirk

    2016-12-01

    The gross tumor volume (GTV) definition for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is ill-defined. We therefore investigated which imaging modality is optimal: computed tomography (CT) with intravenous contrast (IVC), positron emission tomography-CT (PET/CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sixteen consecutive patients with untreated stage I-IV MPM were included. Patients with prior pleurodesis were excluded. CT with IVC, 18FDG-PET/CT and MRI (T2 and contrast-enhanced T1) were obtained. CT was rigidly co-registered with PET/CT and with MRI. Three sets of pleural GTVs were defined: GTV CT , GTV CT+PET/CT and GTV CT+MRI . Quantitative and qualitative evaluations of the contoured GTVs were performed. Compared to CT-based GTV definition, PET/CT identified additional tumor sites (defined as either separate nodules or greater extent of a known tumor) in 12/16 patients. Compared to either CT or PET/CT, MRI identified additional tumor sites in 15/16 patients (p = .7). The mean GTV CT , GTV CT+PET/CT and GTV CT+MRI [±standard deviation (SD)] were 630.1 cm 3 (±302.81), 640.23 cm 3 (±302.83) and 660.8 cm 3 (±290.8), respectively. Differences in mean volumes were not significant. The mean Jaccard Index was significantly lower in MRI-based contours versus all the others. As MRI identified additional pleural disease sites in the majority of patients, it may play a role in optimal target volume definition.

  13. SU-E-T-294: Dosimetric Analysis of Planning Phase Using Overlap Volume Histogram for Respiratory Gated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S; Kim, D; Kim, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: End-of-exhale (EOE) phase is generally preferred for gating window because tumor position is more reproducible. However, other gating windows might be more appropriate for dose distribution perspective. In this pilot study, we proposed to utilize overlap volume histogram (OVH) to search optimized gating window and demonstrated its feasibility. Methods: We acquired 4DCT of 10 phases for 3 lung patients (2 with a target at right middle lobe and 1 at right upper lobe). After structures were defined in every phase, the OVH of each OAR was generated to quantify the three dimensional spatial relationship between the PTV and OARsmore » (bronchus, esophagus, heart and cord etc.) at each phase. OVH tells the overlap volume of an OAR according to outward distance from the PTV. Relative overlap volume at 20 mm outward distance from the PTV (ROV-20) was also defined as a metric for measuring overlap volume and obtained. For dose calculation, 3D CRT plans were made for all phases under the same beam angles and objectives (e.g., 95% of the PTV coverage with at least 100% of the prescription dose of 50 Gy). The gating window phase was ranked according to ROV-20, and the relationship between the OVH and dose distribution at each phase was evaluated by comparing the maximum dose, mean dose, and equivalent uniform dose of OAR. Results: OVHs showed noticeable difference from phase to phase, implying it is possible to find optimal phases for gating window. For 2 out of 3 patients (both with a target at RML), maximum dose, mean dose, and EUD increased as ROV-20 increased. Conclusion: It is demonstrated that optimal phases (in dose distribution perspective) for gating window could exist and OVH can be a useful tool for determining such phases without performing dose optimization calculations in all phases. This work was supported by the Radiation Technology R&D program (No. 2013M2A2A7043498) and the Mid-career Researcher Program (2012-007883) through the National Research

  14. Impact of the radiotherapy technique on the correlation between dose-volume histograms of the bladder wall defined on MRI imaging and dose-volume/surface histograms in prostate cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggio, Angelo; Carillo, Viviana; Cozzarini, Cesare; Perna, Lucia; Rancati, Tiziana; Valdagni, Riccardo; Gabriele, Pietro; Fiorino, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the ‘true’ absolute and relative dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the bladder wall, dose-wall histogram (DWH) defined on MRI imaging and other surrogates of bladder dosimetry in prostate cancer patients, planned both with 3D-conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques. For 17 prostate cancer patients, previously treated with radical intent, CT and MRI scans were acquired and matched. The contours of bladder walls were drawn by using MRI images. External bladder surfaces were then used to generate artificial bladder walls by performing automatic contractions of 5, 7 and 10 mm. For each patient a 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and an IMRT treatment plan was generated with a prescription dose of 77.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fr) and DVH of the whole bladder of the artificial walls (DVH-5/10) and dose-surface histograms (DSHs) were calculated and compared against the DWH in absolute and relative value, for both treatment planning techniques. A specific software (VODCA v. 4.4.0, MSS Inc.) was used for calculating the dose-volume/surface histogram. Correlation was quantified for selected dose-volume/surface parameters by the Spearman correlation coefficient. The agreement between %DWH and DVH5, DVH7 and DVH10 was found to be very good (maximum average deviations below 2%, SD < 5%): DVH5 showed the best agreement. The correlation was slightly better for absolute (R = 0.80-0.94) compared to relative (R = 0.66-0.92) histograms. The DSH was also found to be highly correlated with the DWH, although slightly higher deviations were generally found. The DVH was not a good surrogate of the DWH (R < 0.7 for most of parameters). When comparing the two treatment techniques, more pronounced differences between relative histograms were seen for IMRT with respect to 3DCRT (p < 0.0001).

  15. Language Loyalty in South Africa. Volume 3: Motivations to Language Use: Opinions and Attitudes of White Adults in Urban Areas. Languages Survey First Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauptfleisch, T.

    This volume reports on the results of a survey conducted to determine the language attitudes of South Africans. Speakers of Afrikaans as a first language (Afrikaners) appear more willing than native speakers of English (ESSAs) to use a second language (L2), but only outside the family circle. The ESSA feels comfortable using the L2 with the…

  16. Consequences of additional use of PET information for target volume delineation and radiotherapy dose distribution for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Muijs, Christina T; Schreurs, Liesbeth M; Busz, Dianne M; Beukema, Jannet C; van der Borden, Arnout J; Pruim, Jan; Van der Jagt, Eric J; Plukker, John Th; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2009-12-01

    To determine the consequences of target volume (TV) modifications, based on the additional use of PET information, on radiation planning, assuming PET/CT-imaging represents the true extent of the tumour. For 21 patients with esophageal cancer, two separate TV's were retrospectively defined based on CT (CT-TV) and co-registered PET/CT images (PET/CT-TV). Two 3D-CRT plans (prescribed dose 50.4 Gy) were constructed to cover the corresponding TV's. Subsequently, these plans were compared for target coverage, normal tissue dose-volume histograms and the corresponding normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) values. The addition of PET led to the modification of CT-TV with at least 10% in 12 of 21 patients (57%) (reduction in 9, enlargement in 3). PET/CT-TV was inadequately covered by the CT-based treatment plan in 8 patients (36%). Treatment plan modifications resulted in significant changes (p<0.05) in dose distributions to heart and lungs. Corresponding changes in NTCP values ranged from -3% to +2% for radiation pneumonitis and from -0.2% to +1.2% for cardiac mortality. This study demonstrated that TV's based on CT might exclude PET-avid disease. Consequences are under dosing and thereby possibly ineffective treatment. Moreover, the addition of PET in radiation planning might result in clinical important changes in NTCP.

  17. Opinion Integration and Summarization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Yue

    2011-01-01

    As Web 2.0 applications become increasingly popular, more and more people express their opinions on the Web in various ways in real time. Such wide coverage of topics and abundance of users make the Web an extremely valuable source for mining people's opinions about all kinds of topics. However, since the opinions are usually expressed as…

  18. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 06: Optimizing planning target volume in lung radiotherapy using deformable registration

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, P; Wierzbicki, M; Juravinski Cancer Centre, Medical Physics Department, Hamilton, Ontario

    A four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) image is acquired for all radically treated, lung cancer patients to define the internal target volume (ITV), which encompasses tumour motion due to breathing and subclinical disease. Patient set-up error and anatomical motion that is not due to breathing is addressed through an additional 1 cm margin around the ITV to obtain the planning target volume (PTV). The objective of this retrospective study is to find the minimum PTV margin that provides an acceptable probability of delivering the prescribed dose to the ITV. Acquisition of a kV cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image atmore » each fraction was used to shift the treatment couch to accurately align the spinal cord and carina. Our method utilized deformable image registration to automatically position the planning ITV on each CBCT. We evaluated the percentage of the ITV surface that fell within various PTVs for 79 fractions across 18 patients. Treatment success was defined as a situation where at least 99% of the ITV is covered by the PTV. Overall, this is to be achieved in at least 90% of the treatment fractions. The current approach with a 1cm PTV margin was successful ∼96% of the time. This analysis revealed that the current margin can be reduced to 0.8cm isotropic or 0.6×0.6×1 cm{sup 3} non-isotropic, which were successful 92 and 91 percent of the time respectively. Moreover, we have shown that these margins maintain accuracy, despite intrafractional variation, and maximize CBCT image guidance capabilities.« less

  19. Setup Variations in Radiotherapy of Anal Cancer: Advantages of Target Volume Reduction Using Image-Guided Radiation Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yijen, E-mail: yichen@coh.org; Suh, Steve; Nelson, Rebecca A.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To define setup variations in the radiation treatment (RT) of anal cancer and to report the advantages of image-guided RT (IGRT) in terms of reduction of target volume and treatment-related side effects. Methods and Materials: Twelve consecutive patients with anal cancer treated by combined chemoradiation by use of helical tomotherapy from March 2007 to November 2008 were selected. With patients immobilized and positioned in place, megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) scans were performed before each treatment and were automatically registered to planning CT scans. Patients were shifted per the registration data and treated. A total of 365 MVCT scans weremore » analyzed. The primary site received a median dose of 55 Gy. To evaluate the potential dosimetric advantage(s) of IGRT, cases were replanned according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0529, with and without adding recommended setup variations from the current study. Results: Significant setup variations were observed throughout the course of RT. The standard deviations for systematic setup correction in the anterior-posterior (AP), lateral, and superior-inferior (SI) directions and roll rotation were 1.1, 3.6, and 3.2 mm, and 0.3 Degree-Sign , respectively. The average random setup variations were 3.8, 5.5, and 2.9 mm, and 0.5 Degree-Sign , respectively. Without daily IGRT, margins of 4.9, 11.1, and 8.5 mm in the AP, lateral, and SI directions would have been needed to ensure that the planning target volume (PTV) received {>=}95% of the prescribed dose. Conversely, daily IGRT required no extra margins on PTV and resulted in a significant reduction of V15 and V45 of intestine and V10 of pelvic bone marrow. Favorable toxicities were observed, except for acute hematologic toxicity. Conclusions: Daily MVCT scans before each treatment can effectively detect setup variations and thereby reduce PTV margins in the treatment of anal cancer. The use of concurrent chemotherapy and IGRT provided favorable

  20. Explaining opinion polarisation with opinion copulas.

    PubMed

    Askitas, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    An empirically founded and widely established driving force in opinion dynamics is homophily i.e. the tendency of "birds of a feather" to "flock together". The closer our opinions are the more likely it is that we will interact and converge. Models using these assumptions are called bounded confidence models (BCM) as they assume a tolerance threshold after which interaction is unlikely. They are known to produce one or more clusters, depending on the size of the bound, with more than one cluster being possible only in the deterministic case. Introducing noise, as is likely to happen in a stochastic world, causes BCM to produce consensus which leaves us with the open problem of explaining the emergence and sustainance of opinion clusters and polarisation. We investigate the role of heterogeneous priors in opinion formation, introduce the concept of opinion copulas, argue that it is well supported by findings in Social Psychology and use it to show that the stochastic BCM does indeed produce opinion clustering without the need for extra assumptions.

  1. Explaining opinion polarisation with opinion copulas

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    An empirically founded and widely established driving force in opinion dynamics is homophily i.e. the tendency of “birds of a feather” to “flock together”. The closer our opinions are the more likely it is that we will interact and converge. Models using these assumptions are called bounded confidence models (BCM) as they assume a tolerance threshold after which interaction is unlikely. They are known to produce one or more clusters, depending on the size of the bound, with more than one cluster being possible only in the deterministic case. Introducing noise, as is likely to happen in a stochastic world, causes BCM to produce consensus which leaves us with the open problem of explaining the emergence and sustainance of opinion clusters and polarisation. We investigate the role of heterogeneous priors in opinion formation, introduce the concept of opinion copulas, argue that it is well supported by findings in Social Psychology and use it to show that the stochastic BCM does indeed produce opinion clustering without the need for extra assumptions. PMID:28829802

  2. Interobserver variability in target volume delineation of hepatocellular carcinoma : An analysis of the working group "Stereotactic Radiotherapy" of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO).

    PubMed

    Gkika, E; Tanadini-Lang, S; Kirste, S; Holzner, P A; Neeff, H P; Rischke, H C; Reese, T; Lohaus, F; Duma, M N; Dieckmann, K; Semrau, R; Stockinger, M; Imhoff, D; Kremers, N; Häfner, M F; Andratschke, N; Nestle, U; Grosu, A L; Guckenberger, M; Brunner, T B

    2017-10-01

    Definition of gross tumor volume (GTV) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) requires dedicated imaging in multiple contrast medium phases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interobserver agreement (IOA) in gross tumor delineation of HCC in a multicenter panel. The analysis was performed within the "Stereotactic Radiotherapy" working group of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). The GTVs of three anonymized HCC cases were delineated by 16 physicians from nine centers using multiphasic CT scans. In the first case the tumor was well defined. The second patient had multifocal HCC (one conglomerate and one peripheral tumor) and was previously treated with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). The peripheral lesion was adjacent to the previous TACE site. The last patient had an extensive HCC with a portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and an inhomogeneous liver parenchyma due to cirrhosis. The IOA was evaluated according to Landis and Koch. The IOA for the first case was excellent (kappa: 0.85); for the second case moderate (kappa: 0.48) for the peripheral tumor and substantial (kappa: 0.73) for the conglomerate. In the case of the peripheral tumor the inconsistency is most likely explained by the necrotic tumor cavity after TACE caudal to the viable tumor. In the last case the IOA was fair, with a kappa of 0.34, with significant heterogeneity concerning the borders of the tumor and the PVT. The IOA was very good among the cases were the tumor was well defined. In complex cases, where the tumor did not show the typical characteristics, or in cases with Lipiodol (Guerbet, Paris, France) deposits, IOA agreement was compromised.

  3. Comparison of stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of acoustic neurinomas according to 3-D tumor volume shrinkage and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Henzel, Martin; Hamm, Klaus; Sitter, Helmut; Gross, Markus W; Surber, Gunnar; Kleinert, Gabriele; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita

    2009-09-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and also fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) offer high local control (LC) rates (> 90%). This study aimed to evaluate three-dimensional (3-D) tumor volume (TV) shrinkage and to assess quality of life (QoL) after SRS/SRT. From 1999 to 2005, 35/74 patients were treated with SRS, and 39/74 with SRT. Median age was 60 years. Treatment was delivered by a linear accelerator. Median single dose was 13 Gy (SRS) or 54 Gy (SRT). Patients were followed up > or = 12 months after SRS/SRT. LC and toxicity were evaluated by clinical examinations and magnetic resonance imaging. 3-D TV shrinkage was evaluated with the planning system. QoL was assessed using the questionnaire Short Form-36. Median follow-up was 50/36 months (SRS/SRT). Actuarial 5-year freedom from progression/overall survival was 88.1%/100% (SRS), and 87.5%/87.2% (SRT). TV shrinkage was 15.1%/40.7% (SRS/SRT; p = 0.01). Single dose (< 13 Gy) was the only determinant factor for TV shrinkage after SRS (p = 0.001). Age, gender, initial TV, and previous operations did not affect TV shrinkage. Acute or late toxicity (> or = grade 3) was never seen. Concerning QoL, no significant differences were observed after SRS/SRT. Previous operations and gender did not affect QoL (p > 0.05). Compared with the German normal population, patients had worse values for all domains except for mental health. TV shrinkage was significantly higher after SRT than after SRS. Main symptoms were not affected by SRS/SRT. Retrospectively, QoL was neither affected by SRS nor by SRT.

  4. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances. Opinions and decisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with selected orders: July 1, 1992--December 31, 1992, Volume 36, Pages 1--396

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This is the thirty-sixth volume of issuances (1-396) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and its Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, Administrative Law Judges, and Office Directors. It covers the period from July 1, 1992-December 31, 1992. Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards are authorized by Section 191 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. These Boards, comprised of three members conduct adjudicatory hearings on applications to construct and operate nuclear power plants and related facilities and issue initial decisions which, subject to internal review and appellate procedures, become the final Commission action with respect to those applications. Boards are drawn frommore » the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel, comprised of lawyers, nuclear physicists and engineers, environmentalists, chemists, and economists. The Atomic Energy Commission first established Licensing Boards in 1962 and the Panel in 1967.« less

  5. Highly Conformal Craniospinal Radiotherapy Techniques Can Underdose the Cranial Clinical Target Volume if Leptomeningeal Extension through Skull Base Exit Foramina is not Contoured.

    PubMed

    Noble, D J; Ajithkumar, T; Lambert, J; Gleeson, I; Williams, M V; Jefferies, S J

    2017-07-01

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) remains a crucial treatment for patients with medulloblastoma. There is uncertainty about how to manage meningeal surfaces and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that follows cranial nerves exiting skull base foramina. The purpose of this study was to assess plan quality and dose coverage of posterior cranial fossa foramina with both photon and proton therapy. We analysed the radiotherapy plans of seven patients treated with CSI for medulloblastoma and primitive neuro-ectodermal tumours and three with ependymoma (total n = 10). Four had been treated with a field-based technique and six with TomoTherapy™. The internal acoustic meatus (IAM), jugular foramen (JF) and hypoglossal canal (HC) were contoured and added to the original treatment clinical target volume (Plan_CTV) to create a Test_CTV. This was grown to a test planning target volume (Test_PTV) for comparison with a Plan_PTV. Using Plan_CTV and Plan_PTV, proton plans were generated for all 10 cases. The following dosimetry data were recorded: conformity (dice similarity coefficient) and homogeneity index (D 2  - D 98 /D 50 ) as well as median and maximum dose (D 2% ) to Plan_PTV, V 95% and minimum dose (D 99.9% ) to Plan_CTV and Test_CTV and Plan_PTV and Test_PTV, V 95% and minimum dose (D 98% ) to foramina PTVs. Proton and TomoTherapy™ plans were more conformal (0.87, 0.86) and homogeneous (0.07, 0.04) than field-photon plans (0.79, 0.17). However, field-photon plans covered the IAM, JF and HC PTVs better than proton plans (P = 0.002, 0.004, 0.003, respectively). TomoTherapy™ plans covered the IAM and JF better than proton plans (P = 0.000, 0.002, respectively) but the result for the HC was not significant. Adding foramen CTVs/PTVs made no difference for field plans. The mean D min dropped 3.4% from Plan_PTV to Test_PTV for TomoTherapy™ (not significant) and 14.8% for protons (P = 0.001). Highly conformal CSI techniques may underdose meninges and CSF in the dural

  6. Survival of extreme opinions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jiann-wien; Huang, Ding-wei

    2009-12-01

    We study the survival of extreme opinions in various processes of consensus formation. All the opinions are treated equally and subjected to the same rules of changing. We investigate three typical models to reach a consensus in each case: (A) personal influence, (B) influence from surroundings, and (C) influence to surroundings. Starting with uniformly distributed random opinions, our calculated results show that the extreme opinions can survive in both models (A) and (B), but not in model (C). We obtain a conclusion that both personal influence and passive adaptation to the environment are not sufficient enough to eradicate all the extreme opinions. Only the active persuasion to change the surroundings eliminates the extreme opinions completely.

  7. A comparative study of the target volume definition in radiotherapy with «Slow CT Scan» vs. 4D PET/CT Scan in early stages non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Molla, M; Anducas, N; Simó, M; Seoane, A; Ramos, M; Cuberas-Borros, G; Beltran, M; Castell, J; Giralt, J

    To evaluate the use of 4D PET/CT to quantify tumor respiratory motion compared to the «Slow»-CT (CTs) in the radiotherapy planning process. A total of 25 patients with inoperable early stage non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were included in the study. Each patient was imaged with a CTs (4s/slice) and 4D PET/CT. The adequacy of each technique for respiratory motion capture was evaluated using the volume definition for each of the following: Internal target volume (ITV) 4D and ITVslow in relation with the volume defined by the encompassing volume of 4D PET/CT and CTs (ITVtotal). The maximum distance between the edges of the volume defined by each technique to that of the total volume was measured in orthogonal beam's eye view. The ITV4D showed less differences in relation with the ITVtotal in both the cranio-caudal and the antero-posterior axis compared to the ITVslow. The maximum differences were 0.36mm in 4D PET/CTand 0.57mm in CTs in the antero-posterior axis. 4D PET/CT resulted in the definition of more accurate (ITV4D/ITVtotal 0.78 vs. ITVs/ITVtotal 0.63), and larger ITVs (19.9 cc vs. 16.3 cc) than those obtained with CTs. Planning with 4D PET/CT in comparison with CTs, allows incorporating tumor respiratory motion and improving planning radiotherapy of patients in early stages of lung cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  8. Dose-Volume Analysis of Predictors for Gastrointestinal Toxicity After Concurrent Full-Dose Gemcitabine and Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jiayi; Robertson, John M., E-mail: jrobertson@beaumont.edu; Ye Hong

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric predictors for the development of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma (LAPC) treated with concurrent full-dose gemcitabine and radiotherapy (GemRT). Methods and Materials: From June 2002 to June 2009, 46 LAPC patients treated with definitive GemRT were retrospectively analyzed. The stomach and duodenum were retrospectively contoured separately to determine their dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. GI toxicity was defined as Grade 3 or higher GI toxicity. The follow-up time was calculated from the start of RT to the date of death or last contact. Univariate analysis (UVA) and multivariate analysis (MVA) using Kaplan-Meiermore » and Cox regression models were performed to identify risk factors associated with GI toxicity. The receiver operating characteristic curve and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) were used to determine the best DVH parameter to predict for GI toxicity. Results: Of the patients, 28 (61%) received concurrent gemcitabine alone, and 18 (39%) had concurrent gemcitabine with daily erlotinib. On UVA, only the V{sub 20Gy} to V{sub 35Gy} of duodenum were significantly associated with GI toxicity (all p {<=} 0.05). On MVA, the V{sub 25Gy} of duodenum and the use of erlotinib were independent risk factors for GI toxicity (p = 0.006 and 0.02, respectively). For the entire cohort, the V{sub 25Gy} of duodenum is the best predictor for GI toxicity (AUC = 0.717), and the 12-month GI toxicity rate was 8% vs. 48% for V{sub 25Gy} {<=} 45% and V{sub 25Gy} > 45%, respectively (p = 0.03). However, excluding the erlotinib group, the V{sub 35Gy} is the best predictor (AUC = 0.725), and the 12-month GI toxicity rate was 0% vs. 41% for V{sub 35Gy} {<=} 20% and V{sub 35Gy} > 20%, respectively (p = 0.04). Conclusions: DVH parameters of duodenum may predict Grade 3 GI toxicity after GemRT for LAPC. Concurrent use of erlotinib during GemRT may increase

  9. Dose calculations accounting for breathing motion in stereotactic lung radiotherapy based on 4D-CT and the internal target volume.

    PubMed

    Admiraal, Marjan A; Schuring, Danny; Hurkmans, Coen W

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the 4D accumulated dose delivered to the CTV in stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumours, for treatments planned on an average CT using an ITV derived from the Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) CT. For 10 stage I lung cancer patients, treatment plans were generated based on 4D-CT images. From the 4D-CT scan, 10 time-sorted breathing phases were derived, along with the average CT and the MIP. The ITV with a margin of 0mm was used as a PTV to study a worst case scenario in which the differences between 3D planning and 4D dose accumulation will be largest. Dose calculations were performed on the average CT. Dose prescription was 60Gy to 95% of the PTV, and at least 54Gy should be received by 99% of the PTV. Plans were generated using the inverse planning module of the Pinnacle(3) treatment planning system. The plans consisted of nine coplanar beams with two segments each. After optimisation, the treatment plan was transferred to all breathing phases and the delivered dose per phase was calculated using an elastic body spline model available in our research version of Pinnacle (8.1r). Then, the cumulative dose to the CTV over all breathing phases was calculated and compared to the dose distribution of the original treatment plan. Although location, tumour size and breathing-induced tumour movement varied widely between patients, the PTV planning criteria could always be achieved without compromising organs at risk criteria. After 4D dose calculations, only very small differences between the initial planned PTV coverage and resulting CTV coverage were observed. For all patients, the dose delivered to 99% of the CTV exceeded 54Gy. For nine out of 10 patients also the criterion was met that the volume of the CTV receiving at least the prescribed dose was more than 95%. When the target dose is prescribed to the ITV (PTV=ITV) and dose calculations are performed on the average CT, the cumulative CTV dose compares well to the

  10. Patterns of failure after postoperative radiotherapy for incompletely resected (R1) non-small cell lung cancer: implications for radiation target volume design.

    PubMed

    Olszyna-Serementa, Marta; Socha, Joanna; Wierzchowski, Marek; Kępka, Lucyna

    2013-05-01

    Overall survival (OS) and pattern of failure in R1-resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with 3D-planned postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) was retrospectively evaluated. The outcomes and patterns of failure in patients with (+) and without (-) extracapsular nodal extension (ECE) were compared and analyzed with respect to the radiation target volume design. Eighty R1-resected (37 ECE+ and 43 ECE-) patients received PORT (60Gy, 2Gy daily) between 2002 and 2011. Patients with N2 disease received limited elective nodal irradiation (ENI); for pN0-1 disease the use of ENI was optional. Among ECE- (extranodal-R1) patients there were 35 pN0-1 and eight pN2 cases; in pN0-1 patients, patterns of failure and outcomes were analyzed with respect to the use of ENI. Loco-regional failure (LRF) was defined as in-field relapse; isolated nodal failure (INF) was defined as out-of-field regional nodal recurrence occurring without LRF, irrespective of distant metastases. The actuarial 3-year OS rate was 36.3% (median: 30 months). Three-year OS rates in the ECE- and ECE+ group were 40.4% and 31.4%, with median OS of 31 and 24 months, respectively (p=0.43). In multivariate analysis, the presence of ECE was correlated with OS (HR=3.02; 95% CI: 1.00-9.16; p=0.05). Three-year cumulative incidence of LRF (CILRF) was 14.5% and 15.5% in the ECE- and ECE+ groups, respectively (p=0.98). Three-year cumulative incidence of INF (CIINF) was 14.1% in the ECE- group and 11.1% in the ECE+ group (p=0.76). For pN0-1 patients treated with and without ENI (13 and 22 patients) 3-year CILRF rates were 7.7% and 20.8%, respectively (p=0.20); 3-year CIINF rates were 9.1% and 16.3%, respectively (p=0.65). PORT resulted in a relatively good survival of R1-resected NSCLC patients. Relatively high incidence of INF was found in both ECE+ and ECE- patients. For ECE+ patients, treated with limited ENI, distant failure remains a major concern, so the design of ENI fields seems of lesser

  11. SU-F-T-347: An Absolute Dose-Volume Constraint Based Deterministic Optimization Framework for Multi-Co60 Source Focused Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, B; Liu, B; Li, Y

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Treatment plan optimization in multi-Co60 source focused radiotherapy with multiple isocenters is challenging, because dose distribution is normalized to maximum dose during optimization and evaluation. The objective functions are traditionally defined based on relative dosimetric distribution. This study presents an alternative absolute dose-volume constraint (ADC) based deterministic optimization framework (ADC-DOF). Methods: The initial isocenters are placed on the eroded target surface. Collimator size is chosen based on the area of 2D contour on corresponding axial slice. The isocenter spacing is determined by adjacent collimator sizes. The weights are optimized by minimizing the deviation from ADCs using the steepest descentmore » technique. An iterative procedure is developed to reduce the number of isocenters, where the isocenter with lowest weight is removed without affecting plan quality. The ADC-DOF is compared with the genetic algorithm (GA) using the same arbitrary shaped target (254cc), with a 15mm margin ring structure representing normal tissues. Results: For ADC-DOF, the ADCs imposed on target and ring are (D100>10Gy, D50,10, 0<12Gy, 15Gy and 20Gy) and (D40<10Gy). The resulting D100, 50, 10, 0 and D40 are (9.9Gy, 12.0Gy, 14.1Gy and 16.2Gy) and (10.2Gy). The objectives of GA are to maximize 50% isodose target coverage (TC) while minimize the dose delivered to the ring structure, which results in 97% TC and 47.2% average dose in ring structure. For ADC-DOF (GA) techniques, 20 out of 38 (10 out of 12) initial isocenters are used in the final plan, and the computation time is 8.7s (412.2s) on an i5 computer. Conclusion: We have developed a new optimization technique using ADC and deterministic optimization. Compared with GA, ADC-DOF uses more isocenters but is faster and more robust, and achieves a better conformity. For future work, we will focus on developing a more effective mechanism for initial isocenter determination.« less

  12. [4D-CT-based plan target volume (PTV) definition compared with conventional PTV definition using general margin in radiotherapy for lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Ju, Xiao; Li, Minghui; Zhou, Zongmei; Zhang, Ke; Han, Wei; Fu, Guishan; Cao, Ying; Wang, Lyuhua

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the dosimetric benefit of 4D-CT in the planning target volume (PTV) definition process compared with conventional PTV definition using general margin in radiotherapy of lung cancer. A set of 4D-CT images and multiphase helical CT scans were obtained in 10 patients with lung cancer. The radiotherapeutic plans based on PTV determined by 4D-CT and in addition of general margin were performed, respectively. The 3D motion of the centroid of GTV and the 3D spatial motion vectors were calculated. The differences of the two kinds of PTVs, mean lung dose (MLD), V5,V10,V15,V20 of total lung, mean heart dose (MHD), V30 and V40 of heart, D99 and D95 were compared, and the correlation between them and the 3D spatial motion vector was analyzed. The PTV4D in eight patients were smaller than PTVconv, with a mean reduction of (13.0 ± 8.0)% (P = 0.018). In other two patients, whose respiration motion was great, PTV4D was larger than PTVconv. The mean 3D spatial motion vector of GTV centroid was (0.78 ± 0.72)cm. By using 4D-CT, the mean reduction of MLD was (8.6 ± 9.9)% (P = 0.037). V5, V10, V15, V20 of total lung were decreased averagely by (7.2 ± 10.5)%, (5.5 ± 8.9)%, (6.5 ± 8.4)% and (5.7 ± 7.4)%, respectively (P < 0.05 for all). There was a significant positive correlation between PTV4D/PTVconv and the 3D spatial motion vector of the GTV centroid (P = 0.008). A significant inverse correlation was found between D994D/D99conv and the 3D spatial motion vector of the GTV centroid (P = 0.002). D994D/D99conv, (MLDconv-MLD4D) /MLDconv, total lung (V5conv-V54D)/V5conv, total lung (V10conv-V104D)/V10conv, (MHDconv-MHD4D)/MHDconv, heart (V30conv-V304D)/V30conv were inversely correlated with PTV4D/PTVconv (P < 0.05 for all). 4D-CT can be used to evaluate the respiration motion of lung tumor accurately. The 4D-CT-based PTV definition and radiotherapeutic planing can reduce the volume of PTV in patients with small respiration motion, increase the intra-target dose, and

  13. [Task sharing with radiotherapy technicians in image-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Diaz, O; Lorchel, F; Revault, C; Mornex, F

    2013-10-01

    The development of accelerators with on-board imaging systems now allows better target volumes reset at the time of irradiation (image-guided radiotherapy [IGRT]). However, these technological advances in the control of repositioning led to a multiplication of tasks for each actor in radiotherapy and increase the time available for the treatment, whether for radiotherapy technicians or radiation oncologists. As there is currently no explicit regulatory framework governing the use of IGRT, some institutional experiments show that a transfer is possible between radiation oncologists and radiotherapy technicians for on-line verification of image positioning. Initial training for every technical and drafting procedures within institutions will improve audit quality by reducing interindividual variability. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  14. Bladder filling variation during conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sithamparam, S.; Ahmad, R.; Sabarudin, A.; Othman, Z.; Ismail, M.

    2017-05-01

    Conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer is associated with small bowel toxicity mainly diarrhea. Treating patients with a full bladder is one of the practical solutions to reduce small bowel toxicity. Previous studies on prostate and cervix cancer patients revealed that maintaining consistent bladder volume throughout radiotherapy treatment is challenging. The aim of this study was to measure bladder volume variation throughout radiotherapy treatment. This study also measured the association between bladder volume changes and diarrhea. Twenty two rectal cancer patients were recruited prospectively. Patients were planned for treatment with full bladder following departmental bladder filling protocol and the planning bladder volume was measured during CT-simulation. During radiotherapy, the bladder volume was measured weekly using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and compared to planning bladder volume. Incidence and severity of diarrhea were recorded during the weekly patient review. There was a negative time trend for bladder volume throughout five weeks treatment. The mean bladder volume decreased 18 % from 123 mL (SD 54 mL) during CT-simulation to 101 mL (SD 71 mL) on the 5th week of radiotherapy, but the decrease is not statistically significant. However, there was a large variation of bladder volume within each patient during treatment. This study showed an association between changes of bladder volume and diarrhea (P = 0.045). In conclusion bladder volume reduced throughout radiotherapy treatment for conformal radiotherapy for rectal cancer and there was a large variation of bladder volume within patients.

  15. [Hippocampus, brainstem and brain dose-volume constraints for fractionated 3-D radiotherapy and for stereotactic radiation therapy: Limits and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Gérard, M; Jumeau, R; Pichon, B; Biau, J; Blais, E; Horion, J; Noël, G

    2017-10-01

    Cerebral radiation-induced toxicities after radiotherapy (RT) of brain tumors are frequent. The protection of organs at risk (OAR) is crucial, especially for brain tumors, to preserve cognition in cancer survivors. Dose constraints of cerebral OAR used in conventional RT, radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) are debated. In fact, they are based on historical cohorts or calculated with old mathematical models. Values of α/β ratio of cerebral OAR are also controversial leading to misestimate the equivalent dose in 2Gy fractions or the biological equivalent dose, especially during hypofractionated RT. Although recent progresses in medical imaging, the diagnosis of radionecrosis remains difficult. In this article, we propose a large review of dose constraints used for three major cerebral OAR: the brain stem, the hippocampus and the brain. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Public Opinion as Collective Coorientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tipton, Leonard; And Others

    To conceptualize public opinion as something other than "mere aggregation" of individual opinions requires systemic models that identify component parts of public opinion and their structural/functional relationships. Operationalization requires asking respondents not only their individual opinion, but also their perception of public…

  17. Pre- and postoperative radiotherapy for extremity soft tissue sarcoma: Evaluation of inter-observer target volume contouring variability among French sarcoma group radiation oncologists.

    PubMed

    Sargos, P; Charleux, T; Haas, R L; Michot, A; Llacer, C; Moureau-Zabotto, L; Vogin, G; Le Péchoux, C; Verry, C; Ducassou, A; Delannes, M; Mervoyer, A; Wiazzane, N; Thariat, J; Sunyach, M P; Benchalal, M; Laredo, J D; Kind, M; Gillon, P; Kantor, G

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate, during a national workshop, the inter-observer variability in target volume delineation for primary extremity soft tissue sarcoma radiation therapy. Six expert sarcoma radiation oncologists (members of French Sarcoma Group) received two extremity soft tissue sarcoma radiation therapy cases 1: one preoperative and one postoperative. They were distributed with instructions for contouring gross tumour volume or reconstructed gross tumour volume, clinical target volume and to propose a planning target volume. The preoperative radiation therapy case was a patient with a grade 1 extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma of the thigh. The postoperative case was a patient with a grade 3 pleomorphic undifferentiated sarcoma of the thigh. Contour agreement analysis was performed using kappa statistics. For the preoperative case, contouring agreement regarding GTV, gross tumour volume GTV, clinical target volume and planning target volume were substantial (kappa between 0.68 and 0.77). In the postoperative case, the agreement was only fair for reconstructed gross tumour volume (kappa: 0.38) but moderate for clinical target volume and planning target volume (kappa: 0.42). During the workshop discussion, consensus was reached on most of the contour divergences especially clinical target volume longitudinal extension. The determination of a limited cutaneous cover was also discussed. Accurate delineation of target volume appears to be a crucial element to ensure multicenter clinical trial quality assessment, reproducibility and homogeneity in delivering RT. radiation therapy RT. Quality assessment process should be proposed in this setting. We have shown in our study that preoperative radiation therapy of extremity soft tissue sarcoma has less inter-observer contouring variability. Copyright © 2018 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Anisotropic opinion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neirotti, Juan

    2016-07-01

    We consider the process of opinion formation in a society of interacting agents, where there is a set B of socially accepted rules. In this scenario, we observed that agents, represented by simple feed-forward, adaptive neural networks, may have a conservative attitude (mostly in agreement with B ) or liberal attitude (mostly in agreement with neighboring agents) depending on how much their opinions are influenced by their peers. The topology of the network representing the interaction of the society's members is determined by a graph, where the agents' properties are defined over the vertexes and the interagent interactions are defined over the bonds. The adaptability of the agents allows us to model the formation of opinions as an online learning process, where agents learn continuously as new information becomes available to the whole society (online learning). Through the application of statistical mechanics techniques we deduced a set of differential equations describing the dynamics of the system. We observed that by slowly varying the average peer influence in such a way that the agents attitude changes from conservative to liberal and back, the average social opinion develops a hysteresis cycle. Such hysteretic behavior disappears when the variance of the social influence distribution is large enough. In all the cases studied, the change from conservative to liberal behavior is characterized by the emergence of conservative clusters, i.e., a closed knitted set of society members that follow a leader who agrees with the social status quo when the rule B is challenged.

  19. Vocational Opinion Index.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Stephen D.; Whittington, Marna C.

    The Vocational Opinion Index (VOI) is an instrument used to measure an individual's job readiness posture (JRP). JRP is a term used to define an individual's attitudes, perceptions, and motivations as they reflect on his ability to obtain and maintain a job. The VOI determines an individual's JRP by assessing three psychological diminsions:…

  20. Opinions of Inservice Experts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Vera R.; Hahn, Margaret

    Two hundred and twenty-five inservice experts (administrators, counselors, teachers, and curriculum specialists) from 15 school districts were surveyed, and their opinions used in planning an improved mathematics education teacher preparation program at a Texas university. Results of the survey indicate that although most of the parties felt…

  1. Risk-adaptive radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yusung

    Currently, there is great interest in integrating biological information into intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning with the aim of boosting high-risk tumor subvolumes. Selective boosting of tumor subvolumes can be accomplished without violating normal tissue complication constraints using information from functional imaging. In this work we have developed a risk-adaptive optimization-framework that utilizes a nonlinear biological objective function. Employing risk-adaptive radiotherapy for prostate cancer, it is possible to increase the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) by up to 35.4 Gy in tumor subvolumes having the highest risk classification without increasing normal tissue complications. Subsequently, we have studied the impact of functional imaging accuracy, and found on the one hand that loss in sensitivity had a large impact on expected local tumor control, which was maximal when a low-risk classification for the remaining low risk PTV was chosen. While on the other hand loss in specificity appeared to have a minimal impact on normal tissue sparing. Therefore, it appears that in order to improve the therapeutic ratio a functional imaging technique with a high sensitivity, rather than specificity, is needed. Last but not least a comparison study between selective boosting IMRT strategies and uniform-boosting IMRT strategies yielding the same EUD to the overall PTV was carried out, and found that selective boosting IMRT considerably improves expected TCP compared to uniform-boosting IMRT, especially when lack of control of the high-risk tumor subvolumes is the cause of expected therapy failure. Furthermore, while selective boosting IMRT, using physical dose-volume objectives, did yield similar rectal and bladder sparing when compared its equivalent uniform-boosting IMRT plan, risk-adaptive radiotherapy, utilizing biological objective functions, did yield a 5.3% reduction in NTCP for the rectum. Hence, in risk-adaptive radiotherapy the

  2. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography-based radiotherapy target volume definition in non-small-cell lung cancer: delineation by radiation oncologists vs. joint outlining with a PET radiologist?

    PubMed

    Hanna, Gerard G; Carson, Kathryn J; Lynch, Tom; McAleese, Jonathan; Cosgrove, Vivian P; Eakin, Ruth L; Stewart, David P; Zatari, Ashraf; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Hounsell, Alan R

    2010-11-15

    (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has benefits in target volume (TV) definition in radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC); however, an optimal protocol for TV delineation has not been determined. We investigate volumetric and positional variation in gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation using a planning PET/CT among three radiation oncologists and a PET radiologist. RTP PET/CT scans were performed on 28 NSCLC patients (Stage IA-IIIB) of which 14 patients received prior induction chemotherapy. Three radiation oncologists and one PET radiologist working with a fourth radiation oncologist independently delineated the GTV on CT alone (GTV(CT)) and on fused PET/CT images (GTV(PETCT)). The mean percentage volume change (PVC) between GTV(CT) and GTV(PETCT) for the radiation oncologists and the PVC between GTV(CT) and GTV(PETCT) for the PET radiologist were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Concordance index (CI) was used to assess both positional and volume change between GTV(CT) and GTV(PETCT) in a single measurement. For all patients, a significant difference in PVC from GTV(CT) to GTV(PETCT) exists between the radiation oncologist (median, 5.9%), and the PET radiologist (median, -0.4%, p = 0.001). However, no significant difference in median concordance index (comparing GTV(CT) and GTV(FUSED) for individual cases) was observed (PET radiologist = 0.73; radiation oncologists = 0.66; p = 0.088). Percentage volume changes from GTV(CT) to GTV(PETCT) were lower for the PET radiologist than for the radiation oncologists, suggesting a lower impact of PET/CT in TV delineation for the PET radiologist than for the oncologists. Guidelines are needed to standardize the use of PET/CT for TV delineation in RTP. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Opinion strength influences the spatial dynamics of opinion formation

    PubMed Central

    Baumgaertner, Bert O.; Tyson, Rebecca T.; Krone, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Opinions are rarely binary; they can be held with different degrees of conviction, and this expanded attitude spectrum can affect the influence one opinion has on others. Our goal is to understand how different aspects of influence lead to recognizable spatio-temporal patterns of opinions and their strengths. To do this, we introduce a stochastic spatial agent-based model of opinion dynamics that includes a spectrum of opinion strengths and various possible rules for how the opinion strength of one individual affects the influence that this individual has on others. Through simulations, we find that even a small amount of amplification of opinion strength through interaction with like-minded neighbors can tip the scales in favor of polarization and deadlock. PMID:28529381

  4. Intensity-modulated salvage radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost for local recurrence of prostate carcinoma: a pilot study on the place of PET-choline for guiding target volume delineation.

    PubMed

    Wahart, Aurélien; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Vallard, Alexis; Geissler, Benjamin; Ben Mrad, Majed; Falk, Alexander T; Prevot, Nathalie; de Laroche, Guy; Rancoule, Chloé; Chargari, Cyrus; Magné, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to report the first cases of salvage radiotherapy (RT) using the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) targeted on choline positron emission tomography (PET) uptake in a local recurrent prostate cancer, after a radical prostatectomy. Four patients received salvage irradiation for biochemical relapse that occurred after the initial radical prostatectomy. The relapse occurred from 10 months to 6 years with PSA levels ranging from 2.35 to 4.86 ng ml(-1). For each patient, an (18)F-choline PET-CT showed a focal choline uptake in prostatic fossa, with standardized uptake value calculated on the basis of predicted lean body mass (SUL) max of 3.3-6.8. No involved lymph node or distant metastases were diagnosed. IMRT doses were of 62.7 Gy (1.9 Gy/fraction, 33 fractions), with a SIB of 69.3 Gy (2.1 Gy/fraction, 33 fractions) to a PET-guided target volume. Acute toxicities were limited. We observed no gastrointestinal toxicity ≥grade 2 and only one grade 2 genitourinary toxicity. At 1-month follow-up evaluation, no complication and a decrease in PSA level (6.8-43.8% of the pre-therapeutic level) were reported. After 4 months, a decrease in PSA level was obtained for all the patients, ranging from 30% to 70%. At a median follow-up of 15 months, PSA level was controlled for all the patients, but one of them experienced a distant lymph node recurrence. Salvage irradiation to the prostate bed with SIB guided by PET-CT is feasible, with biological efficacy and no major acute toxicity. IMRT with PET-oriented SIB for salvage treatment of prostate cancer is possible, without major acute toxicity.

  5. [Advance directives. Representatives' opinions].

    PubMed

    Busquets I Font, J M; Hernando Robles, P; Font I Canals, R; Diestre Ortin, G; Quintana, S

    The use and usefulness of Advance Directives has led to a lot of controversy about their validity and effectiveness. Those areas are unexplored in our country from the perspective of representatives. To determine the opinion of the representatives appointed in a registered Statement of Advance Directives (SAD) on the use of this document. Telephone survey of representatives of 146 already dead people and who, since February 2012, had registered a SAD document. More the two-thirds (98) of respondents recalled that the SAD was consulted, with 86 (58.9%) saying that their opinion as representative was consulted, and 120 (82.1%) believe that the patient's will was respected. Of those interviewed, 102 (69.9%) believe that patients who had previously planned their care using a SAD had a good death, with 33 (22.4%) saying it could have been better, and 10 (6.9%) believe they suffered greatly. The SAD were mostly respected and consulted, and possibly this is related to the fact that most of the representatives declare that the death of those they represented was perceived as comfortable. It would be desirable to conduct further studies addressed at health personnel in order to know their perceptions regarding the use of Advance Directives in the process of dying. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury after intensity-modulated radiotherapy in lung cancer: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinmei; Hong, Jinsheng; Zou, Xi; Lv, Wenlong; Guo, Feibao; Hong, Hualan; Zhang, Weijian

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for lung cancer. The normal lung relative volumes receiving greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (V5-30) mean lung dose (MLD), and absolute volumes spared from greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (AVS5-30) for the bilateral and ipsilateral lungs of 83 patients were recorded. Any association of clinical factors and dose-volume parameters with Grade ≥2 RILI was analyzed. The median follow-up was 12.3 months; 18 (21.7%) cases of Grade 2 RILI, seven (8.4%) of Grade 3 and two (2.4%) of Grade 4 were observed. Univariate analysis revealed the located lobe of the primary tumor. V5, V10, V20, MLD of the ipsilateral lung, V5, V10, V20, V30 and MLD of the bilateral lung, and AVS5 and AVS10 of the ipsilateral lung were associated with Grade ≥2 RILI (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung was prognostic for Grade ≥2 RILI (P = 0.010, OR = 0.272, 95% CI: 0.102-0.729). Receiver operating characteristic curves indicated Grade ≥2 RILI could be predicted using AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung (area under curve, 0.668; cutoff value, 564.9 cm(3); sensitivity, 60.7%; specificity, 70.4%). The incidence of Grade ≥2 RILI was significantly lower with AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung ≥564.9 cm(3) than with AVS5 < 564.9 cm(3) (P = 0.008). Low-dose irradiation relative volumes and MLD of the bilateral or ipsilateral lung were associated with Grade ≥2 RILI, and AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung was prognostic for Grade ≥2 RILI for lung cancer after IMRT. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  7. Expert opinion vs. empirical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Rod A; Raybould, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Expert opinion is often sought by government regulatory agencies when there is insufficient empirical evidence to judge the safety implications of a course of action. However, it can be reckless to continue following expert opinion when a preponderance of evidence is amassed that conflicts with this opinion. Factual evidence should always trump opinion in prioritizing the information that is used to guide regulatory policy. Evidence-based medicine has seen a dramatic upturn in recent years spurred by examples where evidence indicated that certain treatments recommended by expert opinions increased death rates. We suggest that scientific evidence should also take priority over expert opinion in the regulation of genetically modified crops (GM). Examples of regulatory data requirements that are not justified based on the mass of evidence are described, and it is suggested that expertise in risk assessment should guide evidence-based regulation of GM crops. PMID:24637724

  8. Comparison of different contouring definitions of the rectum as organ at risk (OAR) and dose-volume parameters predicting rectal inflammation in radiotherapy of prostate cancer: which definition to use?

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Mirko; Brannath, Werner; Brückner, Matthias; Wagner, Dirk; Kaltenborn, Alexander; Temme, Nils; Hermann, Robert M

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this retrospective planning study was to find a contouring definition for the rectum as an organ at risk (OAR) in curative three-dimensional external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer (PCa) with a predictive correlation between the dose-volume histogram (DVH) and rectal toxicity. In a pre-study, the planning CT scans of 23 patients with PCa receiving definitive EBRT were analyzed. The rectum was contoured according to 13 different definitions, and the dose distribution was correlated with the respective rectal volumes by generating DVH curves. Three definitions were identified to represent the most distinct differences in the shapes of the DVH curves: one anatomical definition recommended by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) and two functional definitions based on the target volume. In the main study, the correlation between different relative DVH parameters derived from these three contouring definitions and the occurrence of rectal toxicity during and after EBRT was studied in two consecutive collectives. The first cohort consisted of 97 patients receiving primary curative EBRT and the second cohort consisted of 66 patients treated for biochemical recurrence after prostatectomy. Rectal toxicity was investigated by clinical investigation and scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Candidate parameters were the volume of the rectum, mean dose, maximal dose, volume receiving at least 60 Gy (V 60 ), area under the DVH curve up to 25 Gy and area under the DVH curve up to 75 Gy in dependence of each chosen rectum definition. Multivariable logistic regression considered other clinical factors such as pelvine lymphatics vs local target volume, diabetes, prior rectal surgery, anticoagulation or haemorrhoids too. In Cohort 1 (primary EBRT), the mean rectal volumes for definitions "RTOG", planning target volume "(PTV)-based" and "PTV-linked" were 100 cm 3 [standard deviation (SD) 43 cm 3 ], 60

  9. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary lung cancer at a dose of 50 Gy total in five fractions to the periphery of the planning target volume calculated using a superposition algorithm.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Kunieda, Etsuo; Ohashi, Toshio; Oku, Yohei; Takeda, Toshiaki; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-02-01

    To retrospectively analyze the clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with Stages 1A and 1B non-small-cell lung cancer. We reviewed the records of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with curative intent between Dec 2001 and May 2007. All patients had histopathologically or cytologically confirmed disease, increased levels of tumor markers, and/or positive findings on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. Staging studies identified their disease as Stage 1A or 1B. Performance status was 2 or less according to World Health Organization guidelines in all cases. The prescribed dose of 50 Gy total in five fractions, calculated by using a superposition algorithm, was defined for the periphery of the planning target volume. One hundred twenty-one patients underwent SBRT during the study period, and 63 were eligible for this analysis. Thirty-eight patients had Stage 1A (T1N0M0) and 25 had Stage 1B (T2N0M0). Forty-nine patients were not appropriate candidates for surgery because of chronic pulmonary disease. Median follow-up of these 49 patients was 31 months (range, 10-72 months). The 3-year local control, disease-free, and overall survival rates in patients with Stages 1A and 1B were 93% and 96% (p = 0.86), 76% and 77% (p = 0.83), and 90% and 63% (p = 0.09), respectively. No acute toxicity was observed. Grade 2 or higher radiation pneumonitis was experienced by 3 patients, and 1 of them had fatal bacterial pneumonia. The SBRT at 50 Gy total in five fractions to the periphery of the planning target volume calculated by using a superposition algorithm is feasible. High local control rates were achieved for both T2 and T1 tumors.

  10. Rectal Bleeding After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Combined With Hypofractionated External-Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: The Relationship Between Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters and the Occurrence Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Masahiko, E-mail: masaoka@showa.gunma-u.ac.jp; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Ebara, Takeshi

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the predictive risk factors for Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding after high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) combined with hypofractionated external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer using dose-volume histogram analysis. Methods and Materials: The records of 216 patients treated with HDR-BT combined with EBRT were analyzed. The treatment protocols for HDR-BT were 5 Gy Multiplication-Sign five times in 3 days or 7 Gy Multiplication-Sign three, 10.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign two, or 9 Gy Multiplication-Sign two in 2 days. The EBRT doses ranged from 45 to 51 Gy with a fractional dose of 3 Gy. Results: In 20 patients Grade 2more » or worse rectal bleeding developed, and the cumulative incidence rate was 9% at 5 years. By converting the HDR-BT and EBRT radiation doses into biologic effective doses (BED), the BED{sub 3} at rectal volumes of 5% and 10% in the patients who experienced bleeding were significantly higher than those in the remaining 196 patients. Univariate analysis showed that a higher rectal BED{sub 3-5%} and the use of fewer needles in brachytherapy were correlated with the incidence of bleeding, but BED{sub 3-5%} was found to be the only significant factor on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: The radiation dose delivered to small rectal lesions as 5% is important for predicting Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding after HDR-BT combined with EBRT for prostate cancer.« less

  11. How Public Opinion is Formed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Edward M.

    1977-01-01

    Investigates the evolution of the definition of public relations by examining cultural and personal determinants of public opinion. Outlines functions of communicators and opinionmakers in forming and influencing public opinion. Available from: Public Relations Review, Ray Hiebert, Dean, College of Journalism, University of Maryland, College Park,…

  12. [Role of 18FDG-PET/CT in the management and gross tumor volume definition for radiotherapy of head and neck cancer; single institution experiences based on long-term follow-up].

    PubMed

    Hideghéty, Katalin; Cserháti, Adrienne; Besenyi, Zsuzsanna; Zag, Levente; Gaál, Szilvia; Együd, Zsófia; Mózes, Petra; Szántó, Erika; Csenki, Melinda; Rusz, Orsolya; Varga, Zoltán; Dobi, Ágnes; Maráz, Anikó; Pávics, László; Lengyel, Zsolt

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of our work is evaluation of the impact of 18FDG-PET/CT on the complex management of locoregionally advanced (T3-4N1-3) head and neck squamous cell cancer (LAHNSC), and on the target definition for 3D conformal (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). 18FDG-PET/CT were performed on 185 patients with LAHNSC prior to radiotherapy/chemoradiation in the treatment position between 2006 and 2011. Prior to it 91 patients received induction chemotherapy (in 20 cases of these, baseline PET/CT was also available). The independently delineated CT-based gross tumor volume (GTVct) and PET/CT based ones (GTVpet) were compared. Impact of PET/CT on the treatment strategy, on tumor response evaluation to ICT, on GTV definition furthermore on overall and disease-specific survival (OS, DSS) was analysed. PET/CT revealed 10 head and neck, 2 lung cancers for 15 patients with carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP) while 3 remained unknown. Second tumors were detected in 8 (4.4%), distant metastasis in 15 (8.2%) cases. The difference between GTVct and GTVpet was significant (p=0.001). In 16 patients (14%) the GTVpet were larger than GTVct due to multifocal manifestations in the laryngo-pharyngeal regions (4 cases) or lymph node metastases (12 cases). In the majority of the cases (82 pts, 72%) PET/CT-based conturing resulted in remarkable decrease in the volume (15-20%: 4 cases, 20-50%: 46 cases, >50%: 32 cases). On the basis of the initial and post-ICT PET/CT comparison in 15/20 patients more than 50% volume reduction and in 6/20 cases complete response were achieved. After an average of 6.4 years of follow-up the OS (median: 18.3±2.6 months) and DSS (median: 25.0±4.0 months) exhibited close correlation (p=0.0001) to the GTVpet. In cases with GTVpet <10 cm3 prior to RT, DSS did not reach the median, the mean is 82.1±6.1 months, while in cases with GTVpet 10-40 cm3 the median of the DSS was 28.8±4.9 months (HR = 3.57; 95% CI: 1.5-8.3), and in those with GTVpet >40

  13. 'Compromise position' image alignment to accommodate independent motion of multiple clinical target volumes during radiotherapy: A high risk prostate cancer example.

    PubMed

    Rosewall, Tara; Yan, Jing; Alasti, Hamideh; Cerase, Carla; Bayley, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Inclusion of multiple independently moving clinical target volumes (CTVs) in the irradiated volume causes an image guidance conundrum. The purpose of this research was to use high risk prostate cancer as a clinical example to evaluate a 'compromise' image alignment strategy. The daily pre-treatment orthogonal EPI for 14 consecutive patients were included in this analysis. Image matching was performed by aligning to the prostate only, the bony pelvis only and using the 'compromise' strategy. Residual CTV surrogate displacements were quantified for each of the alignment strategies. Analysis of the 388 daily fractions indicated surrogate displacements were well-correlated in all directions (r 2  = 0.95 (LR), 0.67 (AP) and 0.59 (SI). Differences between the surrogates displacements (95% range) were -0.4 to 1.8 mm (LR), -1.2 to 5.2 mm (SI) and -1.2 to 5.2 mm (AP). The distribution of the residual displacements was significantly smaller using the 'compromise' strategy, compared to the other strategies (p 0.005). The 'compromise' strategy ensured the CTV was encompassed by the PTV in all fractions, compared to 47 PTV violations when aligned to prostate only. This study demonstrated the feasibility of a compromise position image guidance strategy to accommodate simultaneous displacements of two independently moving CTVs. Application of this strategy was facilitated by correlation between the CTV displacements and resulted in no geometric excursions of the CTVs beyond standard sized PTVs. This simple image guidance strategy may also be applicable to other disease sites that concurrently irradiate multiple CTVs, such as head and neck, lung and cervix cancer. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  14. [Volume changes to the neck lymph node metastases in head-neck tumors. The evaluation of radiotherapeutic treatment success].

    PubMed

    Liszka, G; Thalacker, U; Somogyi, A; Németh, G

    1997-08-01

    This work is engaged with the volume change of neck lymph node metastasis of malignant tumors in the head-neck region during radiotherapy. In 54 patients with head and neck tumors, the volume of neck lymph nodes before and after radiation was measured. The volumetry was done with CT planimetry. The total dose was 66 Gy (2 Gy/d) telecobalt from 2 lateral opponated fields. The time of volume change could be defined with measuring of the half-time and the doubling-time by the help of Schwartz formula. After 10 Gy the volume diminution was about 20% and half-time 24 to 26 days. Afterwards the time of volume diminution picked up speed and finally achieved 60 to 72%. Meanwhile the half-time decreased to the half value. The result was independent of the site of primary tumor, the patient's sex and age. In our opinion the effectivity of radiotherapy can best be judged with defining of the volume change of lymph nodes of the neck.

  15. ESTRO ACROP guidelines for target volume definition in the treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Nestle, Ursula; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Ricardi, Umberto; Geets, Xavier; Belderbos, Jose; Pöttgen, Christoph; Dziadiuszko, Rafal; Peeters, Stephanie; Lievens, Yolande; Hurkmans, Coen; Slotman, Ben; Ramella, Sara; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; McDonald, Fiona; Manapov, Farkhad; Putora, Paul Martin; LePéchoux, Cécile; Van Houtte, Paul

    2018-04-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) plays a major role in the curative treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Therefore, the ACROP committee was asked by the ESTRO to provide recommendations on target volume delineation for standard clinical scenarios in definitive (chemo)radiotherapy (RT) and adjuvant RT for locally advanced NSCLC. The guidelines given here are a result of the evaluation of a structured questionnaire followed by a consensus discussion, voting and writing procedure within the committee. Hence, we provide advice for methods and time-points of diagnostics and imaging before the start of treatment planning and for the mandatory and optional imaging to be used for planning itself. Concerning target volumes, recommendations are given for GTV delineation of primary tumour and lymph nodes followed by issues related to the delineation of CTVs for definitive and adjuvant radiotherapy. In the context of PTV delineation, recommendations about the management of geometric uncertainties and target motion are given. We further provide our opinions on normal tissue delineation and organisational and responsibility questions in the process of target volume delineation. This guideline intends to contribute to the standardisation and optimisation of the process of RT treatment planning for clinical practice and prospective studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Contribution of FDOPA PET to radiotherapy planning for advanced glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowson, Nicholas; Fay, Michael; Thomas, Paul; Jeffree, Rosalind; McDowall, Robert; Winter, Craig; Coulthard, Alan; Smith, Jye; Gal, Yaniv; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Salvado, Olivier; Crozier, Stuart; Rose, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Despite radical treatment with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, advanced gliomas recur within months. Geographic misses in radiotherapy planning may play a role in this seemingly ineluctable recurrence. Planning is typically performed on post-contrast MRIs, which are known to underreport tumour volume relative to FDOPA PET scans. FDOPA PET fused with contrast enhanced MRI has demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity than MRI alone. One sign of potential misses would be differences between gross target volumes (GTVs) defined using MRI alone and when fused with PET. This work examined whether such a discrepancy may occur. Materials and Methods: For six patients, a 75 minute PET scan using 3,4-dihydroxy-6-18F-fluoro-L-phynel-alanine (18F-FDOPA) was taken within 2 days of gadolinium enhanced MRI scans. In addition to standard radiotherapy planning by an experienced radiotherapy oncologist, a second gross target volume (GTV) was defined by an experienced nuclear medicine specialist for fused PET and MRI, while blinded to the radiotherapy plans. The volumes from standard radiotherapy planning were compared to the PET defined GTV. Results: The comparison indicated radiotherapy planning would change in several cases if FDOPA PET data was available. PET-defined contours were external to 95% prescribed dose for several patients. However, due to the radiotherapy margins, the discrepancies were relatively small in size and all received a dose of 50 Gray or more. Conclusions: Given the limited size of the discrepancies it is uncertain that geographic misses played a major role in patient outcome. Even so, the existence of discrepancies indicates that FDOPA PET could assist in better defining margins when planning radiotherapy for advanced glioma, which could be important for highly conformal radiotherapy plans.

  17. Leader's opinion priority bounded confidence model for network opinion evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Meixia; Xie, Guangqiang

    2017-08-01

    Aiming at the weight of trust someone given to participate in the interaction in Hegselmann-Krause's type consensus model is the same and virtual social networks among individuals with different level of education, personal influence, etc. For differences between agents, a novelty bounded confidence model was proposed with leader's opinion considered priority. Interaction neighbors can be divided into two kinds. The first kind is made up of "opinion leaders" group, another kind is made up of ordinary people. For different groups to give different weights of trust. We also analyzed the related characteristics of the new model under the symmetrical bounded confidence parameters and combined with the classical HK model were analyzed. Simulation experiment results show that no matter the network size and initial view is subject to uniform distribution or discrete distribution. We can control the "opinion-leader" good change the number of views and values, and even improve the convergence speed. Experiment also found that the choice of "opinion leaders" is not the more the better, the model well explain how the "opinion leader" in the process of the evolution of the public opinion play the role of the leader.

  18. Alport syndrome: facts and opinions.

    PubMed

    Kashtan, Clifford

    2017-01-01

    In this commentary, I review recent advances in Alport syndrome genetics, diagnostics, and therapeutics. I also offer some opinions regarding strategies to optimize the early identification of affected individuals to promote early therapeutic intervention.

  19. Alport syndrome: facts and opinions

    PubMed Central

    Kashtan, Clifford

    2017-01-01

    In this commentary, I review recent advances in Alport syndrome genetics, diagnostics, and therapeutics. I also offer some opinions regarding strategies to optimize the early identification of affected individuals to promote early therapeutic intervention. PMID:28163907

  20. Abbott Opinions #1-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Law Center, Inc., Newark, NJ.

    This document contains the following "Abbott Opinions": (1) "Early Childhood Education"; (2) "Adequate School Facilities"; (3) "Supplemental Programs and Whole School Reform in Elementary Schools"; (4) "Supplemental Programs in Middle and High Schools"; and (5) "Planning Programs and Budgets…

  1. SU-F-T-348: The Impact of Model Library Population On RapidPlan Based Dose-Volume Histograms (DVHs) Prediction for Rectal Cancer Patients Treated with Volumetric-Modulated Radiotherapy (VMAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K; Zhou, L; Chen, Z

    Purpose: RapidPlan uses a library consisting of expert plans from different patients to create a model that can predict achievable dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for new patients. The goal of this study is to investigate the impacts of model library population (plan numbers) on the DVH prediction for rectal cancer patients treated with volumetric-modulated radiotherapy (VMAT) Methods: Ninety clinically accepted rectal cancer patients’ VMAT plans were selected to establish 3 models, named as Model30, Model60 and Model90, with 30,60, and 90 plans in the model training. All plans had sufficient target coverage and bladder and femora sparings. Additional 10 patients weremore » enrolled to test the DVH prediction differences with these 3 models. The predicted DVHs from these 3 models were compared and analyzed. Results: Predicted V40 (Vx, percent of volume that received x Gy for the organs at risk) and Dmean (mean dose, cGy) of the bladder were 39.84±13.38 and 2029.4±141.6 for the Model30,37.52±16.00 and 2012.5±152.2 for the Model60, and 36.33±18.35 and 2066.5±174.3 for the Model90. Predicted V30 and Dmean of the left femur were 23.33±9.96 and 1443.3±114.5 for the Model30, 21.83±5.75 and 1436.6±61.9 for the Model60, and 20.31±4.6 and 1415.0±52.4 for the Model90.There were no significant differences among the 3 models for the bladder and left femur predictions. Predicted V40 and Dmean of the right femur were 19.86±10.00 and 1403.6±115.6 (Model30),18.97±6.19 and 1401.9±68.78 (Model60), and 21.08±7.82 and 1424.0±85.3 (Model90). Although a slight lower DVH prediction of the right femur was found on the Model60, the mean differences for V30 and mean dose were less than 2% and 1%, respectively. Conclusion: There were no significant differences among Model30, Model60 and Model90 for predicting DVHs on rectal patients treated with VMAT. The impact of plan numbers for model library might be limited for cancers with similar target shape.« less

  2. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.

    1996-08-20

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue. 25 figs.

  3. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Kevin M.; Doyle, Barney L.

    1996-01-01

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue.

  4. Opinion dynamics in activity-driven networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dandan; Han, Dun; Ma, Jing; Sun, Mei; Tian, Lixin; Khouw, Timothy; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2017-10-01

    Social interaction between individuals constantly affects the development of their personal opinions. Previous models such as the Deffuant model and the Hegselmann-Krause (HK) model have assumed that individuals only update their opinions after interacting with neighbors whose opinions are similar to their own. However, people are capable of communicating widely with all of their neighbors to gather their ideas and opinions, even if they encounter a number of opposing attitudes. We propose a model in which agents listen to the opinions of all their neighbors. Continuous opinion dynamics are investigated in activity-driven networks with a tolerance threshold. We study how the initial opinion distribution, tolerance threshold, opinion-updating speed, and activity rate affect the evolution of opinion. We find that when the initial fraction of positive opinion is small, all opinions become negative by the end of the simulation. As the initial fraction of positive opinions rises above a certain value —about 0.45— the final fraction of positive opinions sharply increases and eventually equals 1. Increased tolerance threshold δ is found to lead to a more varied final opinion distribution. We also find that if the negative opinion has an initial advantage, the final fraction of negative opinion increases and reaches its peak as the updating speed λ approaches 0.5. Finally we show that the lower the activity rate of individuals, the greater the fluctuation range of their opinions.

  5. Opinion Dynamics with Confirmation Bias

    PubMed Central

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Galstyan, Aram

    2014-01-01

    Background Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science. Methodology/Principal Findings We formulate a (non-Bayesian) model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect–when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preference is given to the last opinion (recency) or the first opinion (primacy) –and relates recency to confirmation bias. Finally, we study the model in the case of repeated persuasion and analyze its convergence properties. Conclusions The standard Bayesian approach to probabilistic opinion revision is inadequate for describing the observed phenomenology of persuasion process. The simple non-Bayesian model proposed here does agree with this phenomenology and is capable of reproducing a spectrum of effects observed in psychology: primacy-recency phenomenon, boomerang effect and cognitive dissonance. We point out several limitations of the model that should motivate its future development. PMID:25007078

  6. Antiproton radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bassler, Niels; Alsner, Jan; Beyer, Gerd; DeMarco, John J; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Jäkel, Oliver; Knudsen, Helge V; Kovacevic, Sandra; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B; Solberg, Timothy D; Sørensen, Brita S; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Bradly G; Holzscheiter, Michael H

    2008-01-01

    Antiprotons are interesting as a possible future modality in radiation therapy for the following reasons: When fast antiprotons penetrate matter, protons and antiprotons have near identical stopping powers and exhibit equal radiobiology well before the Bragg-peak. But when the antiprotons come to rest at the Bragg-peak, they annihilate, releasing almost 2 GeV per antiproton-proton annihilation. Most of this energy is carried away by energetic pions, but the Bragg-peak of the antiprotons is still locally augmented with approximately 20-30 MeV per antiproton. Apart from the gain in physical dose, an increased relative biological effect also has been observed, which can be explained by the fact that some of the secondary particles from the antiproton annihilation exhibit high-LET properties. Finally, the weakly interacting energetic pions, which are leaving the target volume, may provide a real time feedback on the exact location of the annihilation peak. We have performed dosimetry experiments and investigated the radiobiological properties using the antiproton beam available at CERN, Geneva. Dosimetry experiments were carried out with ionization chambers, alanine pellets and radiochromic film. Radiobiological experiments were done with V79 WNRE Chinese hamster cells. The radiobiological experiments were repeated with protons and carbon ions at TRIUMF and GSI, respectively, for comparison. Several Monte Carlo particle transport codes were investigated and compared with our experimental data obtained at CERN. The code that matched our data best was used to generate a set of depth dose data at several energies, including secondary particle-energy spectra. This can be used as base data for a treatment planning software such as TRiP. Our findings from the CERN experiments indicate that the biological effect of antiprotons in the plateau region may be reduced by a factor of 4 for the same biological target dose in a spread-out Bragg-peak, when comparing with protons. The

  7. Can adaptive threshold-based metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and lean body mass corrected standard uptake value (SUL) predict prognosis in head and neck cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy/chemoradiotherapy?

    PubMed

    Akagunduz, Ozlem Ozkaya; Savas, Recep; Yalman, Deniz; Kocacelebi, Kenan; Esassolak, Mustafa

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the predictive value of adaptive threshold-based metabolic tumor volume (MTV), maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and maximum lean body mass corrected SUV (SULmax) measured on pretreatment positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging in head and neck cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy/chemoradiotherapy. Pretreatment PET/CT of the 62 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer who were treated consecutively between May 2010 and February 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. The maximum FDG uptake of the primary tumor was defined according to SUVmax and SULmax. Multiple threshold levels between 60% and 10% of the SUVmax and SULmax were tested with intervals of 5% to 10% in order to define the most suitable threshold value for the metabolic activity of each patient's tumor (adaptive threshold). MTV was calculated according to this value. We evaluated the relationship of mean values of MTV, SUVmax and SULmax with treatment response, local recurrence, distant metastasis and disease-related death. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was done to obtain optimal predictive cut-off values for MTV and SULmax which were found to have a predictive value. Local recurrence-free (LRFS), disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were examined according to these cut-offs. Forty six patients had complete response, 15 had partial response, and 1 had stable disease 6 weeks after the completion of treatment. Median follow-up of the entire cohort was 18 months. Of 46 complete responders 10 had local recurrence, and of 16 partial or no responders 10 had local progression. Eighteen patients died. Adaptive threshold-based MTV had significant predictive value for treatment response (p=0.011), local recurrence/progression (p=0.050), and disease-related death (p=0.024). SULmax had a predictive value for local recurrence/progression (p=0.030). ROC curves analysis revealed a cut-off value of 14.00 mL for

  8. Public School Principals: Opinions and Status. ERS Educator Opinion Poll.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Research Service, Arlington, VA.

    The opinion poll of public school administrators reported in this document is part of a series designed to report scientifically collected data that accurately reflects the views and experiences of specific groups of educators. For this study, a total of 3,300 principals were included in the random sample and 1,502 (46 percent) responded. Tables…

  9. Community Size, Perceptions of Majority Opinion and Opinion Expression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Charles T.; Oshagan, Hayg

    A study examined structural determinants of opinion expression by merging two theoretical perspectives: the "spiral of silence" model advanced by Elisabeth Noelle-Neumann, and the structural approach to communication research offered by Phillip Tichenor, George Donohue, and Clarice Olien. The study also distinguished between different…

  10. Opinion evolution in open community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Qiuhui; Qin, Yao; Xu, Yiqun; Tong, Mengfei; He, Mingfeng

    We consider a dynamic group composed with a constant number of people and the people will change periodically. Every member in the community owns a value of confidence — a mechanism that measures the agent’s coherence to his or her own attitude. Based on Cellular Automata, the opinions of all agents are synchronously updated. As long as the updating frequency and updating proportion are appropriate, the open system can reach a democracy-like steady state. The majority of agents in the community will hold the same opinion.

  11. Sociophysics simulations II: opinion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, Dietrich

    2005-07-01

    Individuals have opinions but can change them under the influence of others. The recent models of Sznajd (missionaries), of Deffuant et al. (negotiators), and of Krause and Hegselmann (opportunists) are reviewed here, while the voter and Ising models, Galam's majority rule and the Axelrod multicultural model were dealt with by other lecturers at this 8th Granada Seminar.

  12. Opinion Summarizationof CustomerComments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Miao; Wu, Guoshi

    Web 2.0 technologies have enabled more and more customers to freely comment on different kinds of entities, such as sellers, products and services. The large scale of information poses the need and challenge of automatic summarization. In many cases, each of the user-generated short comments implies the opinions which rate the target entity. In this paper, we aim to mine and to summarize all the customer comments of a product. The algorithm proposed in this researchis more reliable on opinion identification because it is unsupervised and the accuracy of the result improves as the number of comments increases. Our research is performed in four steps: (1) mining the frequent aspects of a product that have been commented on by customers; (2) mining the infrequent aspects of a product which have been commented by customers (3) identifying opinion words in each comment and deciding whether each opinion word is positive, negative or neutral; (4) summarizing the comments. This paper proposes several novel techniques to perform these tasks. Our experimental results using comments of a number of products sold online demonstrate the effectiveness of the techniques.

  13. Enraged about radiotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Sikora, K.

    1994-01-01

    The use of radiotherapy in treating breast cancer has meant that many women are able to avoid mastectomy, which is both physically and psychologically damaging. The side effects of radiotherapy, however, are given little attention. Many women have developed brachial plexus injury after radiotherapy for breast cancer, often resulting in severe pain and loss of use of the arm. There is no effective treatment for this injury and little help can be offered. In addition, many of the women did not require radiotherapy of nodal areas. A pressure group has been formed to support these women, to establish the right to compensation, and to ensure that radiotherapy regimens given to future patients will not damage the brachial plexus. Images p188-a PMID:8312773

  14. 17 CFR 200.63 - Commission opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Canons of Ethics § 200.63 Commission opinions. The opinions... guided in his decisions by a deep regard for the integrity of the system of law which he administers. He...

  15. Opinion evolution influenced by informed agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Kangqi; Pedrycz, Witold

    2016-11-01

    Guiding public opinions toward a pre-set target by informed agents can be a strategy adopted in some practical applications. The informed agents are common agents who are employed or chosen to spread the pre-set opinion. In this work, we propose a social judgment based opinion (SJBO) dynamics model to explore the opinion evolution under the influence of informed agents. The SJBO model distinguishes between inner opinions and observable choices, and incorporates both the compromise between similar opinions and the repulsion between dissimilar opinions. Three choices (support, opposition, and remaining undecided) are considered in the SJBO model. Using the SJBO model, both the inner opinions and the observable choices can be tracked during the opinion evolution process. The simulation results indicate that if the exchanges of inner opinions among agents are not available, the effect of informed agents is mainly dependent on the characteristics of regular agents, including the assimilation threshold, decay threshold, and initial opinions. Increasing the assimilation threshold and decay threshold can improve the guiding effectiveness of informed agents. Moreover, if the initial opinions of regular agents are close to null, the full and unanimous consensus at the pre-set opinion can be realized, indicating that, to maximize the influence of informed agents, the guidance should be started when regular agents have little knowledge about a subject under consideration. If the regular agents have had clear opinions, the full and unanimous consensus at the pre-set opinion cannot be achieved. However, the introduction of informed agents can make the majority of agents choose the pre-set opinion.

  16. Phase transitions in Nowak Sznajd opinion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wołoszyn, Maciej; Stauffer, Dietrich; Kułakowski, Krzysztof

    2007-05-01

    The Nowak modification of the Sznajd opinion dynamics model on the square lattice assumes that with probability β the opinions flip due to mass-media advertising from down to up, and vice versa. Besides, with probability α the Sznajd rule applies that a neighbour pair agreeing in its two opinions convinces all its six neighbours of that opinion. Our Monte Carlo simulations and mean-field theory find sharp phase transitions in the parameter space.

  17. The potential failure risk of the cone-beam computed tomography-based planning target volume margin definition for prostate image-guided radiotherapy based on a prospective single-institutional hybrid analysis.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Katsumi; Sato, Mariko; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Komai, Fumio; Sohma, Makoto; Obara, Hideki; Suzuki, Masashi; Tanaka, Mitsuki; Fujioka, Ichitaro; Ichise, Koji; Takai, Yoshihiro; Aoki, Masahiko

    2018-06-07

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of markerless on-board kilovoltage (kV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-based positioning uncertainty on determination of the planning target volume (PTV) margin by comparison with kV on-board imaging (OBI) with gold fiducial markers (FMs), and to validate a methodology for the evaluation of PTV margins for markerless kV-CBCT in prostate image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). A total of 1177 pre- and 1177 post-treatment kV-OBI and 1177 pre- and 206 post-treatment kV-CBCT images were analyzed in 25 patients who received prostate IGRT with daily localization by implanted FMs. Intrafractional motion of the prostate was evaluated between each pre- and post-treatment image with these two different techniques. The differences in prostate deviations and intrafractional motions between matching by FM in kV-OBI (OBI-FM) and matching by soft tissues in kV-CBCT (CBCT-ST) were compared by Bland-Altman limits of agreement. Compensated PTV margins were determined and compensated by references. Mean differences between OBI-FM and CBCT-ST in the anterior to posterior (AP), superior to inferior (SI), and left to right (LR) directions were - 0.43 ± 1.45, - 0.09 ± 1.65, and - 0.12 ± 0.80 mm, respectively, with R 2  = 0.85, 0.88, and 0.83, respectively. Intrafractional motions obtained from CBCT-ST were 0.00 ± 1.46, 0.02 ± 1.49, and 0.15 ± 0.64 mm, respectively, which were smaller than the results from OBI-FM, with 0.43 ± 1.90, 0.12 ± 1.98, and 0.26 ± 0.80 mm, respectively, with R 2  = 0.42, 0.33, and 0.16, respectively. Bland-Altman analysis showed a significant proportional bias. PTV margins of 1.5 mm, 1.4 mm, and 0.9 mm for CBCT-ST were calculated from the values of CBCT-ST, which were also smaller than the values of 3.15 mm, 3.66 mm, and 1.60 mm from OBI-FM. The practical PTV margin for CBCT-ST was compensated with the values from OBI-FM as 4.1 mm, 4.8

  18. Identifying Opinion Leaders to Promote Behavior Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valente, Thomas W.; Pumpuang, Patchareeya

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews 10 techniques used to identify opinion leaders to promote behavior change. Opinion leaders can act as gatekeepers for interventions, help change social norms, and accelerate behavior change. Few studies document the manner in which opinion leaders are identified, recruited, and trained to promote health. The authors categorize…

  19. 5 CFR 2638.313 - Agency opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ....313 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS GOVERNMENT ETHICS OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS AND EXECUTIVE AGENCY ETHICS PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITIES Formal Advisory Opinion Service § 2638.313 Agency opinions. If the designated agency ethics official issues a written opinion concerning the application of...

  20. Opinion Expression as a Rational Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sei-Hill

    This study looks at individuals' opinion expressions as a rational behavior based on a conscious calculus of expected benefits and costs (economic analysis). The influences of "issue benefit,""opinion congruence," and "issue knowledge," as sources of benefits and costs on opinion expression were hypothesized and tested. The study also examined the…

  1. PET imaging in adaptive radiotherapy of gastrointestinal tumours.

    PubMed

    Bulens, Philippe; Thomas, Melissa; Deroose, Christophe M; Haustermans, Karin

    2018-06-04

    Radiotherapy is the standard of care in the multimodality treatment of a variety of gastrointestinal (GI) tumours, such as oesophageal cancer, gastric cancer, rectal cancer and anal cancer. Additionally, radiotherapy has served as an alternative for surgery in patients with liver cancer, cancer of the biliary tract and pancreatic cancer. Positron-emission tomography (PET), generally in combination with computed tomography (CT), has an established role in the diagnosis, response assessment and (re-)staging of several GI tumours. However, the additional value of PET in adaptive radiotherapy, i.e. during the radiation treatment course and in the delineation process, is still unclear. When performed during radiotherapy, PET aims at assessing treatment-induced variations in functional tumour volumes to reduce the radiation target volume. Moreover, in the radiation treatment planning, tumour delineation could be more accurate by incorporating PET to identify the metabolic tumour volume. This review focuses on the additional value of PET for adaptive radiotherapy protocols as well as for the target volume adaptation for individualised treatment strategies in oesophageal, gastric, pancreatic, liver, biliary tract, rectal and anal neoplasms.

  2. Recruitment in Radiotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeley, T. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Faculty Board of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Royal College of Radiobiologists surveyed the factors thought to influence recruitment into the specialty. Possible factors listed in replies of 36 questionnaires are offered. (LBH)

  3. Modelling the public opinion transmission on social networks under opinion leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zuozhi; Li, Meng; Ji, Wanwan

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, based on Social Network Analysis (SNA), the social network model of opinion leaders influencing the public opinion transmission is explored. The hot event, A Female Driver Was Beaten Due To Lane Change, has characteristics of individual short-term and non-government intervention, which is used to data extraction, and formed of the network structure on opinion leaders influencing the public opinion transmission. And the evolution mechanism are analyzed in the three evolutionary situations. Opinion leaders influence micro-blogging public opinion on social network evolution model shows that this type of network public opinion transmission is largely constrained by opinion leaders, so the opinion leaders behavior supervising on the spread of this public opinion is pivotal, and which has a guiding significance.

  4. Late temporal lobe necrosis after conventional radiotherapy for carcinoma of maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Kanakamedala, Madhava R; Mahta, Ali; Liu, Jianlin; Kesari, Santosh

    2012-12-01

    Cerebral radiation necrosis is a serious late complication after conventional radiotherapy that can present with focal neurologic deficits or with more generalized signs and symptoms of increased intracranial pressure, depending on the location. The incidence and severity of radionecrosis are dose-volume dependent. We report a case of cerebral radiation necrosis 5 years after radiotherapy for a maxillary sinus carcinoma.

  5. Advances in Radiotherapy for Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Justin; Ramakrishna, Rohan; Magge, Rajiv; Wernicke, A. Gabriella

    2018-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (RT) has long played a crucial role in the treatment of glioblastoma. Over the past several decades, significant advances in RT treatment and image-guidance technology have led to enormous improvements in the ability to optimize definitive and salvage treatments. This review highlights several of the latest developments and controversies related to RT, including the treatment of elderly patients, who continue to be a fragile and vulnerable population; potential salvage options for recurrent disease including reirradiation with chemotherapy; the latest imaging techniques allowing for more accurate and precise delineation of treatment volumes to maximize the therapeutic ratio of conformal RT; the ongoing preclinical and clinical data regarding the combination of immunotherapy with RT; and the increasing evidence of cancer stem-cell niches in the subventricular zone which may provide a potential target for local therapies. Finally, continued development on many fronts have allowed for modestly improved outcomes while at the same time limiting toxicity. PMID:29379468

  6. Advances in Radiotherapy for Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Mann, Justin; Ramakrishna, Rohan; Magge, Rajiv; Wernicke, A Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (RT) has long played a crucial role in the treatment of glioblastoma. Over the past several decades, significant advances in RT treatment and image-guidance technology have led to enormous improvements in the ability to optimize definitive and salvage treatments. This review highlights several of the latest developments and controversies related to RT, including the treatment of elderly patients, who continue to be a fragile and vulnerable population; potential salvage options for recurrent disease including reirradiation with chemotherapy; the latest imaging techniques allowing for more accurate and precise delineation of treatment volumes to maximize the therapeutic ratio of conformal RT; the ongoing preclinical and clinical data regarding the combination of immunotherapy with RT; and the increasing evidence of cancer stem-cell niches in the subventricular zone which may provide a potential target for local therapies. Finally, continued development on many fronts have allowed for modestly improved outcomes while at the same time limiting toxicity.

  7. [Target volume margins for lung cancer: internal target volume/clinical target volume].

    PubMed

    Jouin, A; Pourel, N

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a review of margins that should be used for the delineation of target volumes in lung cancer, with a focus on margins from gross tumour volume (GTV) to clinical target volume (CTV) and internal target volume (ITV) delineation. Our review was based on a PubMed literature search with, as a cornerstone, the 2010 European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) recommandations by De Ruysscher et al. The keywords used for the search were: radiotherapy, lung cancer, clinical target volume, internal target volume. The relevant information was categorized under the following headings: gross tumour volume definition (GTV), CTV-GTV margin (first tumoural CTV then nodal CTV definition), in field versus elective nodal irradiation, metabolic imaging role through the input of the PET scanner for tumour target volume and limitations of PET-CT imaging for nodal target volume definition, postoperative radiotherapy target volume definition, delineation of target volumes after induction chemotherapy; then the internal target volume is specified as well as tumoural mobility for lung cancer and respiratory gating techniques. Finally, a chapter is dedicated to planning target volume definition and another to small cell lung cancer. For each heading, the most relevant and recent clinical trials and publications are mentioned. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  8. Public opinion about doctors' pay.

    PubMed

    Ross, C E; Lauritsen, J

    1985-06-01

    Public opinion about doctors' incomes was examined in a national random sample of 843 respondents; 70.1 per cent of those questioned felt physicians are overpaid. There was a high degree of agreement among various groups that physicians are overpaid, but older people and Whites were more likely to think so than younger people and other ethnic groups. People who believe that the United States is characterized by unequal educational opportunity, unfair income distribution, and limited resources were also more likely to think physicians are overpaid.

  9. Public opinion about doctors' pay.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, C E; Lauritsen, J

    1985-01-01

    Public opinion about doctors' incomes was examined in a national random sample of 843 respondents; 70.1 per cent of those questioned felt physicians are overpaid. There was a high degree of agreement among various groups that physicians are overpaid, but older people and Whites were more likely to think so than younger people and other ethnic groups. People who believe that the United States is characterized by unequal educational opportunity, unfair income distribution, and limited resources were also more likely to think physicians are overpaid. PMID:4003637

  10. Impacts of opinion leaders on social contagions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quan-Hui; Lü, Feng-Mao; Zhang, Qian; Tang, Ming; Zhou, Tao

    2018-05-01

    Opinion leaders are ubiquitous in both online and offline social networks, but the impacts of opinion leaders on social behavior contagions are still not fully understood, especially by using a mathematical model. Here, we generalize the classical Watts threshold model and address the influences of the opinion leaders, where an individual adopts a new behavior if one of his/her opinion leaders adopts the behavior. First, we choose the opinion leaders randomly from all individuals in the network and find that the impacts of opinion leaders make other individuals adopt the behavior more easily. Specifically, the existence of opinion leaders reduces the lowest mean degree of the network required for the global behavior adoption and increases the highest mean degree of the network that the global behavior adoption can occur. Besides, the introduction of opinion leaders accelerates the behavior adoption but does not change the adoption order of individuals. The developed theoretical predictions agree with the simulation results. Second, we randomly choose the opinion leaders from the top h % of the highest degree individuals and find an optimal h % for the network with the lowest mean degree that the global behavior adoption can occur. Meanwhile, the influences of opinion leaders on accelerating the adoption of behaviors become less significant and can even be ignored when reducing the value of h % .

  11. Dose constraints for moderate hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: The French genito-urinary group (GETUG) recommendations.

    PubMed

    Langrand-Escure, J; de Crevoisier, R; Llagostera, C; Créhange, G; Delaroche, G; Lafond, C; Bonin, C; Bideault, F; Sargos, P; Belhomme, S; Pasquier, D; Latorzeff, I; Supiot, S; Hennequin, C

    2018-04-01

    Considering recent phase III trials results, moderate hypofractionated radiotherapy can be considered as a standard treatment for low and intermediate risk prostate cancer management. This assessment call for a framework allowing homogeneous and reproducible practices in the different centers using this radiotherapy schedule. The French Genito-Urinary Group (GETUG) provides here recommendations for daily practice of moderate hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer, with indications, dose, fractionation, pre-treatment planning, volume of interest delineation (target volume and organs at risk) and margins, dose constraints and radiotherapy techniques. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  12. Big Data Analytics for Prostate Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Coates, James; Souhami, Luis; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a first-line treatment option for localized prostate cancer and radiation-induced normal tissue damage are often the main limiting factor for modern radiotherapy regimens. Conversely, under-dosing of target volumes in an attempt to spare adjacent healthy tissues limits the likelihood of achieving local, long-term control. Thus, the ability to generate personalized data-driven risk profiles for radiotherapy outcomes would provide valuable prognostic information to help guide both clinicians and patients alike. Big data applied to radiation oncology promises to deliver better understanding of outcomes by harvesting and integrating heterogeneous data types, including patient-specific clinical parameters, treatment-related dose-volume metrics, and biological risk factors. When taken together, such variables make up the basis for a multi-dimensional space (the "RadoncSpace") in which the presented modeling techniques search in order to identify significant predictors. Herein, we review outcome modeling and big data-mining techniques for both tumor control and radiotherapy-induced normal tissue effects. We apply many of the presented modeling approaches onto a cohort of hypofractionated prostate cancer patients taking into account different data types and a large heterogeneous mix of physical and biological parameters. Cross-validation techniques are also reviewed for the refinement of the proposed framework architecture and checking individual model performance. We conclude by considering advanced modeling techniques that borrow concepts from big data analytics, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, before discussing the potential future impact of systems radiobiology approaches.

  13. Radiotherapy Improvements by Using Au Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Torrisi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Au nanoparticles can be prepared inside biological solutions and incorporated in special molecules for their transport through blood, drugs and proteins up to the tumour sites or directly injected in their volume when it is possible. The Au nanoparticles are biocompatible and can be accepted locally in the organism also at relatively high concentrations. The use of Au nanoparticles injected in the tumour site enhances significantly the effective atomic number of the medium, depending on the used concentration, and consequently the proton and electron energy loss and the X-ray absorption coefficient determining an increment of the local absorbed dose during radiotherapy. Traditional radiotherapy using electrons, X-rays and gamma rays, and innovative protontherapy can benefit the increment of the effective atomic number of the tissue in the presence of Au-nanoparticles embedded in the tumour volume with an adaptive up-take procedure. This method decreases the dose released to the healthy tissues permitting a better cantering of the irradiated targets and shielding the healthy tissue placed behind the tumour. The presented theoretical study approach permits to evaluate an enhancement of the radiotherapy dose of the order of 1 % using 60 MeV protons, of the order of 10% using 6 MeV electrons and of the order of 100 % using 100 keV X-ray photons. Here, we also disccused for patents relaed to the topic.

  14. Intra-fraction motion of larynx radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durmus, Ismail Faruk; Tas, Bora

    2018-02-01

    In early stage laryngeal radiotherapy, movement is an important factor. Thyroid cartilage can move from swallowing, breathing, sound and reflexes. The effects of this motion on the target volume (PTV) during treatment were examined. In our study, the target volume movement during the treatment for this purpose was examined. Thus, setup margins are re-evaluated and patient-based PTV margins are determined. Intrafraction CBCT was scanned in 246 fractions for 14 patients. During the treatment, the amount of deviation which could be lateral, vertical and longitudinal axis was determined. ≤ ± 0.1cm deviation; 237 fractions in the lateral direction, 202 fractions in the longitudinal direction, 185 fractions in the vertical direction. The maximum deviation values were found in the longitudinal direction. Intrafraction guide in laryngeal radiotherapy; we are sure of the correctness of the treatment, the target volume is to adjust the margin and dose more precisely, we control the maximum deviation of the target volume for each fraction. Although the image quality of intrafraction-CBCT scans was lower than the image quality of planning CT, they showed sufficient contrast for this work.

  15. [Radiotherapy in cancers of the oesophagus, the gastric cardia and the stomach].

    PubMed

    Créhange, G; Huguet, F; Quero, L; N'Guyen, T V; Mirabel, X; Lacornerie, T

    2016-09-01

    Localized oesophageal and gastric cancers have a poor prognosis. In oesophageal cancer, external radiotherapy combined with concomitant chemotherapy is accepted as part of the therapeutic armamentarium in a curative intent in the preoperative setting for resectable tumours; or without surgery in inoperable patients or non-resectable tumours due to wide local and/or regional extension. Data from the literature show conflicting results with no clinical evidence in favour of either a unique dose protocol or consensual target volume definition in the setting of exclusive chemoradiation. In the preoperative setting, chemoradiotherapy has become the standard in oesophageal cancer, even though there is no evidence that surgery may be beneficial in locally advanced tumours that respond to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The main cause of failure after exclusive chemoradiotherapy in oesophageal cancer is locoregional relapse suggesting that doses and volumes usually considered may be inadequate. In gastric cancer, radiotherapy may be indicated postoperatively in patients with resected tumours that include less than D2 lymph node dissection or in the absence of perioperative chemotherapy. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy in gastric cancers is still under investigation. The evolving techniques of external radiotherapy, such as image-guided radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arctherapy (VMAT) have reduced the volume of lung and heart exposed to radiation, which seems to have diminished radiotherapy-related morbi-mortality rates. Given this, quality assurance for radiotherapy and protocols for radiotherapy delivery must be better standardized. This article on the indications for radiotherapy and the techniques used in oesophageal and gastric cancers is included in a special issue dedicated to national recommendations from the French society of radiation oncology (SFRO) on radiotherapy indications, planning, dose prescription, and techniques of radiotherapy delivery

  16. Quality assurance in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kouloulias, V E

    2003-03-01

    In 1999, the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), being a European pioneer in the field of cancer research as well as in quality assurance (QA), launched an Emmanuel van der Schueren fellowship for QA in radiotherapy. In this paper, the work that has been done during the first E. van der Schueren fellowship is reported, focusing on four phase III EORTC clinical trials: 22921 for rectal cancer, 22961 and 22991 for prostate cancer and 22922 for breast cancer. A historical review of the QA programme of the EORTC Radiotherapy group during the past 20 years is included.

  17. Methods and computer readable medium for improved radiotherapy dosimetry planning

    DOEpatents

    Wessol, Daniel E.; Frandsen, Michael W.; Wheeler, Floyd J.; Nigg, David W.

    2005-11-15

    Methods and computer readable media are disclosed for ultimately developing a dosimetry plan for a treatment volume irradiated during radiation therapy with a radiation source concentrated internally within a patient or incident from an external beam. The dosimetry plan is available in near "real-time" because of the novel geometric model construction of the treatment volume which in turn allows for rapid calculations to be performed for simulated movements of particles along particle tracks therethrough. The particles are exemplary representations of alpha, beta or gamma emissions emanating from an internal radiation source during various radiotherapies, such as brachytherapy or targeted radionuclide therapy, or they are exemplary representations of high-energy photons, electrons, protons or other ionizing particles incident on the treatment volume from an external source. In a preferred embodiment, a medical image of a treatment volume irradiated during radiotherapy having a plurality of pixels of information is obtained.

  18. In vivo dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mijnheer, Ben; Beddar, Sam; Izewska, Joanna; Reft, Chester

    2013-07-01

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) is in use in external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to detect major errors, to assess clinically relevant differences between planned and delivered dose, to record dose received by individual patients, and to fulfill legal requirements. After discussing briefly the main characteristics of the most commonly applied IVD systems, the clinical experience of IVD during EBRT will be summarized. Advancement of the traditional aspects of in vivo dosimetry as well as the development of currently available and newly emerging noninterventional technologies are required for large-scale implementation of IVD in EBRT. These new technologies include the development of electronic portal imaging devices for 2D and 3D patient dosimetry during advanced treatment techniques, such as IMRT and VMAT, and the use of IVD in proton and ion radiotherapy by measuring the decay of radiation-induced radionuclides. In the final analysis, we will show in this Vision 20∕20 paper that in addition to regulatory compliance and reimbursement issues, the rationale for in vivo measurements is to provide an accurate and independent verification of the overall treatment procedure. It will enable the identification of potential errors in dose calculation, data transfer, dose delivery, patient setup, and changes in patient anatomy. It is the authors' opinion that all treatments with curative intent should be verified through in vivo dose measurements in combination with pretreatment checks.

  19. Opinion evolution in different social acquaintance networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Zhang, Xiao; Wu, Zhan; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Guohua; Li, Wei

    2017-11-01

    Social acquaintance networks influenced by social culture and social policy have a great impact on public opinion evolution in daily life. Based on the differences between socio-culture and social policy, three different social acquaintance networks (kinship-priority acquaintance network, independence-priority acquaintance network, and hybrid acquaintance network) incorporating heredity proportion p h and variation proportion p v are proposed in this paper. Numerical experiments are conducted to investigate network topology and different phenomena during opinion evolution, using the Deffuant model. We found that in kinship-priority acquaintance networks, similar to the Chinese traditional acquaintance networks, opinions always achieve fragmentation, resulting in the formation of multiple large clusters and many small clusters due to the fact that individuals believe more in their relatives and live in a relatively closed environment. In independence-priority acquaintance networks, similar to Western acquaintance networks, the results are similar to those in the kinship-priority acquaintance network. In hybrid acquaintance networks, similar to the Chinese modern acquaintance networks, only a few clusters are formed indicating that in modern China, opinions are more likely to reach consensus on a large scale. These results are similar to the opinion evolution phenomena in modern society, proving the rationality and applicability of network models combined with social culture and policy. We also found a threshold curve p v +2p h =2.05 in the results for the final opinion clusters and evolution time. Above the threshold curve, opinions could easily reach consensus. Based on the above experimental results, a culture-policy-driven mechanism for the opinion dynamic is worth promoting in this paper, that is, opinion dynamics can be driven by different social cultures and policies through the influence of heredity and variation in interpersonal relationship networks. This

  20. Opinion evolution in different social acquaintance networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Zhang, Xiao; Wu, Zhan; Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Guohua; Li, Wei

    2017-11-01

    Social acquaintance networks influenced by social culture and social policy have a great impact on public opinion evolution in daily life. Based on the differences between socio-culture and social policy, three different social acquaintance networks (kinship-priority acquaintance network, independence-priority acquaintance network, and hybrid acquaintance network) incorporating heredity proportion ph and variation proportion pv are proposed in this paper. Numerical experiments are conducted to investigate network topology and different phenomena during opinion evolution, using the Deffuant model. We found that in kinship-priority acquaintance networks, similar to the Chinese traditional acquaintance networks, opinions always achieve fragmentation, resulting in the formation of multiple large clusters and many small clusters due to the fact that individuals believe more in their relatives and live in a relatively closed environment. In independence-priority acquaintance networks, similar to Western acquaintance networks, the results are similar to those in the kinship-priority acquaintance network. In hybrid acquaintance networks, similar to the Chinese modern acquaintance networks, only a few clusters are formed indicating that in modern China, opinions are more likely to reach consensus on a large scale. These results are similar to the opinion evolution phenomena in modern society, proving the rationality and applicability of network models combined with social culture and policy. We also found a threshold curve pv+2 ph=2.05 in the results for the final opinion clusters and evolution time. Above the threshold curve, opinions could easily reach consensus. Based on the above experimental results, a culture-policy-driven mechanism for the opinion dynamic is worth promoting in this paper, that is, opinion dynamics can be driven by different social cultures and policies through the influence of heredity and variation in interpersonal relationship networks. This

  1. Innovations in Radiotherapy Technology.

    PubMed

    Feain, I J; Court, L; Palta, J R; Beddar, S; Keall, P

    2017-02-01

    Many low- and middle-income countries, together with remote and low socioeconomic populations within high-income countries, lack the resources and services to deal with cancer. The challenges in upgrading or introducing the necessary services are enormous, from screening and diagnosis to radiotherapy planning/treatment and quality assurance. There are severe shortages not only in equipment, but also in the capacity to train, recruit and retain staff as well as in their ongoing professional development via effective international peer-review and collaboration. Here we describe some examples of emerging technology innovations based on real-time software and cloud-based capabilities that have the potential to redress some of these areas. These include: (i) automatic treatment planning to reduce physics staffing shortages, (ii) real-time image-guided adaptive radiotherapy technologies, (iii) fixed-beam radiotherapy treatment units that use patient (rather than gantry) rotation to reduce infrastructure costs and staff-to-patient ratios, (iv) cloud-based infrastructure programmes to facilitate international collaboration and quality assurance and (v) high dose rate mobile cobalt brachytherapy techniques for intraoperative radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of 12 strategies for obtaining second opinions to improve interpretation of breast histopathology: simulation study.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Joann G; Tosteson, Anna Na; Pepe, Margaret S; Longton, Gary M; Nelson, Heidi D; Geller, Berta; Carney, Patricia A; Onega, Tracy; Allison, Kimberly H; Jackson, Sara L; Weaver, Donald L

    2016-06-22

     To evaluate the potential effect of second opinions on improving the accuracy of diagnostic interpretation of breast histopathology.  Simulation study.  12 different strategies for acquiring independent second opinions.  Interpretations of 240 breast biopsy specimens by 115 pathologists, one slide for each case, compared with reference diagnoses derived by expert consensus.  Misclassification rates for individual pathologists and for 12 simulated strategies for second opinions. Simulations compared accuracy of diagnoses from single pathologists with that of diagnoses based on pairing interpretations from first and second independent pathologists, where resolution of disagreements was by an independent third pathologist. 12 strategies were evaluated in which acquisition of second opinions depended on initial diagnoses, assessment of case difficulty or borderline characteristics, pathologists' clinical volumes, or whether a second opinion was required by policy or desired by the pathologists. The 240 cases included benign without atypia (10% non-proliferative, 20% proliferative without atypia), atypia (30%), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS, 30%), and invasive cancer (10%). Overall misclassification rates and agreement statistics depended on the composition of the test set, which included a higher prevalence of difficult cases than in typical practice.  Misclassification rates significantly decreased (P<0.001) with all second opinion strategies except for the strategy limiting second opinions only to cases of invasive cancer. The overall misclassification rate decreased from 24.7% to 18.1% when all cases received second opinions (P<0.001). Obtaining both first and second opinions from pathologists with a high volume (≥10 breast biopsy specimens weekly) resulted in the lowest misclassification rate in this test set (14.3%, 95% confidence interval 10.9% to 18.0%). Obtaining second opinions only for cases with initial interpretations of atypia, DCIS, or invasive

  3. Evaluation of 12 strategies for obtaining second opinions to improve interpretation of breast histopathology: simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Tosteson, Anna NA; Pepe, Margaret S; Longton, Gary M; Nelson, Heidi D; Geller, Berta; Carney, Patricia A; Onega, Tracy; Allison, Kimberly H; Jackson, Sara L; Weaver, Donald L

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the potential effect of second opinions on improving the accuracy of diagnostic interpretation of breast histopathology. Design Simulation study. Setting 12 different strategies for acquiring independent second opinions. Participants Interpretations of 240 breast biopsy specimens by 115 pathologists, one slide for each case, compared with reference diagnoses derived by expert consensus. Main outcome measures Misclassification rates for individual pathologists and for 12 simulated strategies for second opinions. Simulations compared accuracy of diagnoses from single pathologists with that of diagnoses based on pairing interpretations from first and second independent pathologists, where resolution of disagreements was by an independent third pathologist. 12 strategies were evaluated in which acquisition of second opinions depended on initial diagnoses, assessment of case difficulty or borderline characteristics, pathologists’ clinical volumes, or whether a second opinion was required by policy or desired by the pathologists. The 240 cases included benign without atypia (10% non-proliferative, 20% proliferative without atypia), atypia (30%), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS, 30%), and invasive cancer (10%). Overall misclassification rates and agreement statistics depended on the composition of the test set, which included a higher prevalence of difficult cases than in typical practice. Results Misclassification rates significantly decreased (P<0.001) with all second opinion strategies except for the strategy limiting second opinions only to cases of invasive cancer. The overall misclassification rate decreased from 24.7% to 18.1% when all cases received second opinions (P<0.001). Obtaining both first and second opinions from pathologists with a high volume (≥10 breast biopsy specimens weekly) resulted in the lowest misclassification rate in this test set (14.3%, 95% confidence interval 10.9% to 18.0%). Obtaining second opinions only for

  4. Internet Censorship in Turkey: University Students' Opinions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozkan, Hasan; Arikan, Arda

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study university students' opinions toward online censorship with references to their socio-political and economic variables. Considering the upwards trend and the increasing number of online restrictions in Turkey, the opinions of university students (n=138) are thought to give significant findings. The questionnaire…

  5. Competing opinion diffusion on social networks.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haibo

    2017-11-01

    Opinion competition is a common phenomenon in real life, such as with opinions on controversial issues or political candidates; however, modelling this competition remains largely unexplored. To bridge this gap, we propose a model of competing opinion diffusion on social networks taking into account degree-dependent fitness or persuasiveness. We study the combined influence of social networks, individual fitnesses and attributes, as well as mass media on people's opinions, and find that both social networks and mass media act as amplifiers in opinion diffusion, the amplifying effect of which can be quantitatively characterized. We analytically obtain the probability that each opinion will ultimately pervade the whole society when there are no committed people in networks, and the final proportion of each opinion at the steady state when there are committed people in networks. The results of numerical simulations show good agreement with those obtained through an analytical approach. This study provides insight into the collective influence of individual attributes, local social networks and global media on opinion diffusion, and contributes to a comprehensive understanding of competing diffusion behaviours in the real world.

  6. Public Opinion Poll on Community Priorities: Sacramento

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierra Health Foundation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to measure public perceptions, opinions and priorities as they pertain to youth issues in Sacramento for the purposes of further developing public and private youth programming and public policy in the Sacramento region. By presenting a "statistically reliable" profile of public opinion on youth issues,…

  7. 2001 traffic safety issues opinion survey.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-02-01

    As a means of determining public opinion on specific traffic safety issues, a public opinion survey was conducted. A total of 4,500 mail surveys were sent to a stratified sample of drivers selected from the drivers license file. The state was divided...

  8. 38 CFR 14.507 - Opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... involving veterans' benefits under laws administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs shall be... been a material change in controlling statute or regulation, a superseding written legal opinion by the... in the Office of the General Counsel. Written legal opinions involving veterans' benefits under laws...

  9. Environment and Public Opinion in Minnesota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tichenor, P. J.; And Others

    Surveys conducted in Minnesota in 1969 and 1970 to obtain public opinion regarding environmental issues are discussed. Several generalizations are made about the state of public opinion about the environmental issue, as follows: (1) The environmental issue has reached public prominence through a sequence from professional and interest-group…

  10. Competing opinion diffusion on social networks

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Opinion competition is a common phenomenon in real life, such as with opinions on controversial issues or political candidates; however, modelling this competition remains largely unexplored. To bridge this gap, we propose a model of competing opinion diffusion on social networks taking into account degree-dependent fitness or persuasiveness. We study the combined influence of social networks, individual fitnesses and attributes, as well as mass media on people’s opinions, and find that both social networks and mass media act as amplifiers in opinion diffusion, the amplifying effect of which can be quantitatively characterized. We analytically obtain the probability that each opinion will ultimately pervade the whole society when there are no committed people in networks, and the final proportion of each opinion at the steady state when there are committed people in networks. The results of numerical simulations show good agreement with those obtained through an analytical approach. This study provides insight into the collective influence of individual attributes, local social networks and global media on opinion diffusion, and contributes to a comprehensive understanding of competing diffusion behaviours in the real world. PMID:29291101

  11. Public Opinion Poll Question Databases: An Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    This paper evaluates five polling resource: iPOLL, Polling the Nations, Gallup Brain, Public Opinion Poll Question Database, and Polls and Surveys. Content was evaluated on disclosure standards from major polling organizations, scope on a model for public opinion polls, and presentation on a flow chart discussing search limitations and usability.

  12. Opinion competition dynamics on multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, R.; Kouvaris, N. E.; San Miguel, M.; Díaz-Guilera, A.

    2017-12-01

    Multilayer and multiplex networks represent a good proxy for the description of social phenomena where social structure is important and can have different origins. Here, we propose a model of opinion competition where individuals are organized according to two different structures in two layers. Agents exchange opinions according to the Abrams-Strogatz model in each layer separately and opinions can be copied across layers by the same individual. In each layer a different opinion is dominant, so each layer has a different absorbing state. Consensus in one opinion is not the only possible stable solution because of the interaction between the two layers. A new mean field solution has been found where both opinions coexist. In a finite system there is a long transient time for the dynamical coexistence of both opinions. However, the system ends in a consensus state due to finite size effects. We analyze sparse topologies in the two layers and the existence of positive correlations between them, which enables the coexistence of inter-layer groups of agents sharing the same opinion.

  13. History, Philosophy, and Public Opinion Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbst, Susan

    1993-01-01

    Argues for the importance of the classical tradition (broad, speculative, and historically informed writing and research) in public opinion research. Argues that asking large, normative questions about public opinion processes, trying to build grand theory, and taking history seriously will enrich the field and command the attention of scholars in…

  14. Museum Personnel's Opinions on Mobile Guidance Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshimura, Hirokazu; Sekiguchi, Hiromi; Yabumoto, Yoshitaka

    2007-01-01

    While opinions from the general public are certainly important, opinions from the museum staff are also necessary to improve user service systems. this article introduces two groups of museum staff who have evaluated the usability of mobile guidance systems in Japanese museums. One group is the research team who used the PDA system in the National…

  15. Opinion Leadership, Poverty, and Information Sharing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatman, Elfreda A.

    1987-01-01

    This test of theory of opinion leadership in a low-income environment addressed three questions: (1) whether opinion leaders exist, their characteristics, and their role in information dissemination; (2) what the information world of this population is; and (3) whether this population views the library as a source of useful information. (EM)

  16. Identifying opinion leaders to promote behavior change.

    PubMed

    Valente, Thomas W; Pumpuang, Patchareeya

    2007-12-01

    This article reviews 10 techniques used to identify opinion leaders to promote behavior change. Opinion leaders can act as gatekeepers for interventions, help change social norms, and accelerate behavior change. Few studies document the manner in which opinion leaders are identified, recruited, and trained to promote health. The authors categorize close to 200 studies that have studied or used opinion leaders to promote behavior change into 10 different methods. They present the advantages and disadvantages of the 10 opinion leader identification methods and provide sample instruments for each. Factors that might influence programs to select one or another method are then discussed, and the article closes with a discussion of combining and comparing methods.

  17. Opinion Formation Models on a Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Gastner, Michael T.; Markou, Nikolitsa; Pruessner, Gunnar; Draief, Moez

    2014-01-01

    Statistical physicists have become interested in models of collective social behavior such as opinion formation, where individuals change their inherently preferred opinion if their friends disagree. Real preferences often depend on regional cultural differences, which we model here as a spatial gradient g in the initial opinion. The gradient does not only add reality to the model. It can also reveal that opinion clusters in two dimensions are typically in the standard (i.e., independent) percolation universality class, thus settling a recent controversy about a non-consensus model. However, using analytical and numerical tools, we also present a model where the width of the transition between opinions scales , not as in independent percolation, and the cluster size distribution is consistent with first-order percolation. PMID:25474528

  18. Postoperative Radiotherapy Patterns of Care and Survival Implications for Medulloblastoma in Young Children.

    PubMed

    Kann, Benjamin H; Park, Henry S; Lester-Coll, Nataniel H; Yeboa, Debra N; Benitez, Viviana; Khan, Atif J; Bindra, Ranjit S; Marks, Asher M; Roberts, Kenneth B

    2016-12-01

    postoperative radiotherapy deferred (5-year OS: 82.0% vs 63.4%; P < .001). On multivariable analysis, variables associated with poorer OS were postoperative radiotherapy deferral (hazards ratio [HR], 1.95; 95% CI, 1.15-3.31); stage M1-3 disease (HR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.10-3.16), and low facility volume (HR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.04-2.94). Our national database analysis reveals a higher-than-expected and increasing rate of postoperative radiotherapy deferral in children with medulloblastoma ages 3 to 8 years. The analysis suggests that postoperative radiotherapy deferral is associated with worse survival in this age group, even in the modern era of chemotherapy.

  19. Quantifying Discrepancies in Opinion Spectra from Online and Offline Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Deokjae; Hahn, Kyu S.; Yook, Soon-Hyung; Park, Juyong

    2015-01-01

    Online social media such as Twitter are widely used for mining public opinions and sentiments on various issues and topics. The sheer volume of the data generated and the eager adoption by the online-savvy public are helping to raise the profile of online media as a convenient source of news and public opinions on social and political issues as well. Due to the uncontrollable biases in the population who heavily use the media, however, it is often difficult to measure how accurately the online sphere reflects the offline world at large, undermining the usefulness of online media. One way of identifying and overcoming the online–offline discrepancies is to apply a common analytical and modeling framework to comparable data sets from online and offline sources and cross-analyzing the patterns found therein. In this paper we study the political spectra constructed from Twitter and from legislators' voting records as an example to demonstrate the potential limits of online media as the source for accurate public opinion mining, and how to overcome the limits by using offline data simultaneously. PMID:25915931

  20. Quantifying discrepancies in opinion spectra from online and offline networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Deokjae; Hahn, Kyu S; Yook, Soon-Hyung; Park, Juyong

    2015-01-01

    Online social media such as Twitter are widely used for mining public opinions and sentiments on various issues and topics. The sheer volume of the data generated and the eager adoption by the online-savvy public are helping to raise the profile of online media as a convenient source of news and public opinions on social and political issues as well. Due to the uncontrollable biases in the population who heavily use the media, however, it is often difficult to measure how accurately the online sphere reflects the offline world at large, undermining the usefulness of online media. One way of identifying and overcoming the online-offline discrepancies is to apply a common analytical and modeling framework to comparable data sets from online and offline sources and cross-analyzing the patterns found therein. In this paper we study the political spectra constructed from Twitter and from legislators' voting records as an example to demonstrate the potential limits of online media as the source for accurate public opinion mining, and how to overcome the limits by using offline data simultaneously.

  1. Food irradiation: Public opinion surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, S.D.

    The Canadian government are discussing the legislation, regulations and practical protocol necessary for the commercialization of food irradiation. Food industry marketing, public relations and media expertise will be needed to successfully introduce this new processing choice to retailers and consumers. Consumer research to date including consumer opinion studies and market trials conducted in the Netherlands, United States, South Africa and Canada will be explored for signposts to successful approaches to the introduction of irradiated foods to retailers and consumers. Research has indicated that the terms used to describe irradiation and information designed to reduce consumer fears will be important marketingmore » tools. Marketers will be challenged to promote old foods, which look the same to consumers, in a new light. Simple like or dislike or intention to buy surveys will not be effective tools. Consumer fears must be identified and effectively handled to support a receptive climate for irradiated food products. A cooperative government, industry, health professional, consumer association and retailer effort will be necessary for the successful introduction of irradiated foods into the marketplace. Grocery Products Manufacturers of Canada is a national trade association of more than 150 major companies engaged in the manufacture of food, non-alcoholic beverages and array of other national-brand consumer items sold through retail outlets.« less

  2. Reproducible research: a minority opinion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Chris

    2018-01-01

    Reproducible research, a growing movement within many scientific fields, including machine learning, would require the code, used to generate the experimental results, be published along with any paper. Probably the most compelling argument for this is that it is simply following good scientific practice, established over the years by the greats of science. The implication is that failure to follow such a practice is unscientific, not a label any machine learning researchers would like to carry. It is further claimed that misconduct is causing a growing crisis of confidence in science. That, without this practice being enforced, science would inevitably fall into disrepute. This viewpoint is becoming ubiquitous but here I offer a differing opinion. I argue that far from being central to science, what is being promulgated is a narrow interpretation of how science works. I contend that the consequences are somewhat overstated. I would also contend that the effort necessary to meet the movement's aims, and the general attitude it engenders would not serve well any of the research disciplines, including our own.

  3. OpinionFlow: Visual Analysis of Opinion Diffusion on Social Media.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingcai; Liu, Shixia; Yan, Kai; Liu, Mengchen; Wu, Fangzhao

    2014-12-01

    It is important for many different applications such as government and business intelligence to analyze and explore the diffusion of public opinions on social media. However, the rapid propagation and great diversity of public opinions on social media pose great challenges to effective analysis of opinion diffusion. In this paper, we introduce a visual analysis system called OpinionFlow to empower analysts to detect opinion propagation patterns and glean insights. Inspired by the information diffusion model and the theory of selective exposure, we develop an opinion diffusion model to approximate opinion propagation among Twitter users. Accordingly, we design an opinion flow visualization that combines a Sankey graph with a tailored density map in one view to visually convey diffusion of opinions among many users. A stacked tree is used to allow analysts to select topics of interest at different levels. The stacked tree is synchronized with the opinion flow visualization to help users examine and compare diffusion patterns across topics. Experiments and case studies on Twitter data demonstrate the effectiveness and usability of OpinionFlow.

  4. SU-F-J-22: Lung VolumeVariability Assessed by Bh-CBCT in 3D Surface Image Guided Deep InspirationBreath Hold (DIBH) Radiotherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, A; Stanley, D; Papanikolaou, N

    Purpose: With the increasing use of DIBH techniques for left-sided breast cancer, 3D surface-image guided DIBH techniques have improved patient setup and facilitated DIBH radiation delivery. However, quantification of the daily separation between the heart and left breast still presents a challenge. One method of assuring separation is to ensure consistent left lung filling. With this in mind, the aim of this study is to retrospectively quantify left lung volume from weekly breath hold-CBCTs (bh-CBCT) of left-sided breast patients treated using a 3D surface imaging system. Methods: Ten patients (n=10) previously treated to the left breast using the C-Rad CatalystHDmore » system (C-RAD AG, Uppsala Sweden) were evaluated. Patients were positioned with CatalystHD and with bh-CBCT. bh-CBCTs were acquired at the validation date, first day of treatment and at subsequent weekly intervals. Total treatment courses spanned from 3 to 5 weeks. bh-CBCT images were exported to VelocityAI and the left lung volume was segmented. Volumes were recorded and analyzed. Results: A total of 41 bh-CBCTs were contoured in VelocityAI for the 10 patients. The mean left lung volume for all patients was 1657±295cc based on validation bh-CBCT. With the subsequent lung volumes normalized to the validation lung volume, the mean relative ratios for all patients were 1.02±0.11, 0.97±0.14, 0.98±0.11, 1.02±0.01, and 0.96±0.02 for week 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. Overall, the mean left lung volume change was ≤4.0% over a 5-week course; however left lung volume variations of up to 28% were noted in a select patient. Conclusion: With the use of the C-RAD CatalystHD system, the mean lung volume variability over a 5-week course of DIBH treatments was ≤4.0%. By minimizing left lung volume variability, heart to left breast separation maybe more consistently maintained. AN Gutierrez has a research grant from C-RAD AG.« less

  5. Reirradiation for recurrent head and neck cancers using charged particle or photon radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Demizu, Yusuke; Okimoto, Tomoaki; Ogita, Mikio; Himei, Kengo; Nakamura, Satoaki; Suzuki, Gen; Yoshida, Ken; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Oh, Ryoongjin

    2017-07-01

    To examine the outcomes of reirradiation for recurrent head and neck cancers using different modalities. This retrospective study included 26 patients who received charged particle radiotherapy (CP) and 150 who received photon radiotherapy (117 CyberKnife radiotherapy [CK] and 36 intensity-modulated radiotherapy [IMRT]). Inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) involving propensity scores was used to reduce background selection bias. Higher prescribed doses were used in CP than photon radiotherapy. The 1‑year overall survival (OS) rates were 67.9% for CP and 54.1% for photon radiotherapy (p = 0.15; 55% for CK and 51% for IMRT). In multivariate Cox regression, the significant prognostic factors for better survival were nasopharyngeal cancer, higher prescribed dose, and lower tumor volume. IPTW showed a statistically significant difference between CP and photon radiotherapy (p = 0.04). The local control rates for patients treated with CP and photon radiotherapy at 1 year were 66.9% (range 46.3-87.5%) and 67.1% (range 58.3-75.9%), respectively. A total of 48 patients (27%) experienced toxicity grade ≥3 (24% in the photon radiotherapy group and 46% in the CP group), including 17 patients with grade 5 toxicity. Multivariate analysis revealed that younger age and a larger planning target volume (PTV) were significant risk factors for grade 3 or worse toxicity. CP provided superior survival outcome compared to photon radiotherapy. Tumor volume, primary site (nasopharyngeal), and prescribed dose were identified as survival factors. Younger patients with a larger PTV experienced toxicity grade ≥3.

  6. Radiotherapy for gastric lymphoma: a planning study of 3D conformal radiotherapy, the half-beam method, and intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Koji; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Wakita, Akihisa; Nakamura, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Kazuma; Harada, Ken; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Yoshio, Kotaro; Murakami, Naoya; Morota, Madoka; Ito, Yoshinori; Sumi, Minako; Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun

    2014-11-01

    During radiotherapy for gastric lymphoma, it is difficult to protect the liver and kidneys in cases where there is considerable overlap between these organs and the target volume. This study was conducted to compare the three radiotherapy planning techniques of four-fields 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), half-field radiotherapy (the half-beam method) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) used to treat primary gastric lymphoma in which the planning target volume (PTV) had a large overlap with the left kidney. A total of 17 patients with gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) were included. In DLBCL, immunochemotherapy (Rituximab + CHOP) was followed by radiotherapy of 40 Gy to the whole stomach and peri-gastric lymph nodes. 3DCRT, the half-field method, and IMRT were compared with respect to the dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) to the kidneys, liver and PTV. The mean dose and gEUD for 3DCRT was higher than for IMRT and the half-beam method in the left kidney and both kidneys. The mean dose and gEUD of the left kidney was 2117 cGy and 2224 cGy for 3DCRT, 1520 cGy and 1637 cGy for IMRT, and 1100 cGy and 1357 cGy for the half-beam method, respectively. The mean dose and gEUD of both kidneys was 1335 cGy and 1559 cGy for 3DCRT, 1184 cGy and 1311 cGy for IMRT, and 700 cGy and 937 cGy for the half-beam method, respectively. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the liver revealed a larger volume was irradiated in the dose range <25 Gy with 3DCRT, while the half-beam method irradiated a larger volume of liver with the higher dose range (>25 Gy). IMRT and the half-beam method had the advantages of dose reduction for the kidneys and liver. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  7. Dosimetric comparison of carbon ion and X-ray radiotherapy for Stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Nobuteru; Saitoh, Jun-Ichi; Shimada, Hirofumi; Shirai, Katsuyuki; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    The present study compared the dose-volume histograms of patients with Stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with carbon ion radiotherapy with those of patients treated with X-ray radiotherapy. Patients with Stage IIIA NSCLC (n = 10 patients for each approach) were enrolled. Both radiotherapy plans were calculated with the same targets and organs at risk on the same CT. The treatment plan for the prophylactic lymph node and primary tumor (PTV1) delivered 40 Gy for X-ray radiotherapy and 40 Gy (relative biological effectiveness; RBE) for carbon ion radiotherapy. The total doses for the primary tumor and clinically positive lymph nodes (PTV2) were 60 Gy for X-ray radiotherapy and 60 Gy (RBE) for carbon ion radiotherapy. The homogeneity indexes for PTV1 and PTV2 were superior for carbon ion radiotherapy in comparison with X-ray radiotherapy (PTV1, 0.57 vs 0.65, P = 0.009; PTV2, 0.07 vs 0.16, P = 0.005). The normal lung mean dose, V5, V10 and V20 for carbon ion radiotherapy were 7.7 Gy (RBE), 21.4%, 19.7% and 17.0%, respectively, whereas the corresponding doses for X-ray radiotherapy were 11.9 Gy, 34.9%, 26.6% and 20.8%, respectively. Maximum spinal cord dose, esophageal maximum dose and V50, and bone V10, V30 and V50 were lower with carbon ion radiotherapy than with X-ray radiotherapy. The present study indicates that carbon ion radiotherapy provides a more homogeneous target dose and a lower dose to organs at risk than X-ray radiotherapy for Stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  8. Protons and more: state of the art in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hoskin, Peter J; Bhattacharya, Indrani S

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of modern radiotherapy is to deliver a precise high dose of radiation which will result in reproductive death of the cells. Radiation should transverse within the tumour volume whilst minimising damage to surrounding normal tissue. Overall 40% of cancers which are cured will have received radiotherapy. Current state of the art treatment will incorporate cross-sectional imaging and multiple high energy X-ray beams in processes called intensity modulated radiotherapy and image guided radiotherapy. Brachytherapy enables very high radiation doses to be delivered by the direct passage of a radiation source through or within the tumour volume and similar results can be achieved using rotational stereotactic X-ray beam techniques. Protons have the characteristics of particle beams which deposit their energy in a finite fixed peak at depth in tissue with no dose beyond this point - the Bragg peak. This has advantages in certain sites such as the spine adjacent to the spinal cord and particularly in children when the overall volume of tissue receiving radiation can be minimised. © 2014 Royal College of Physicians.

  9. Nonconsensus opinion model on directed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Bo; Li, Qian; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene; Wang, Huijuan

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic social opinion models have been widely studied on undirected networks, and most of them are based on spin interaction models that produce a consensus. In reality, however, many networks such as Twitter and the World Wide Web are directed and are composed of both unidirectional and bidirectional links. Moreover, from choosing a coffee brand to deciding who to vote for in an election, two or more competing opinions often coexist. In response to this ubiquity of directed networks and the coexistence of two or more opinions in decision-making situations, we study a nonconsensus opinion model introduced by Shao et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 018701 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.018701] on directed networks. We define directionality ξ as the percentage of unidirectional links in a network, and we use the linear correlation coefficient ρ between the in-degree and out-degree of a node to quantify the relation between the in-degree and out-degree. We introduce two degree-preserving rewiring approaches which allow us to construct directed networks that can have a broad range of possible combinations of directionality ξ and linear correlation coefficient ρ and to study how ξ and ρ impact opinion competitions. We find that, as the directionality ξ or the in-degree and out-degree correlation ρ increases, the majority opinion becomes more dominant and the minority opinion's ability to survive is lowered.

  10. Choice Shift in Opinion Network Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbay, Michael

    Choice shift is a phenomenon associated with small group dynamics whereby group discussion causes group members to shift their opinions in a more extreme direction so that the mean post-discussion opinion exceeds the mean pre-discussion opinion. Also known as group polarization, choice shift is a robust experimental phenomenon and has been well-studied within social psychology. In opinion network models, shifts toward extremism are typically produced by the presence of stubborn agents at the extremes of the opinion axis, whose opinions are much more resistant to change than moderate agents. However, we present a model in which choice shift can arise without the assumption of stubborn agents; the model evolves member opinions and uncertainties using coupled nonlinear differential equations. In addition, we briefly describe the results of a recent experiment conducted involving online group discussion concerning the outcome of National Football League games are described. The model predictions concerning the effects of network structure, disagreement level, and team choice (favorite or underdog) are in accord with the experimental results. This research was funded by the Office of Naval Research and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency.

  11. Opinion Dynamics with Disagreement and Modulated Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sîrbu, Alina; Loreto, Vittorio; Servedio, Vito D. P.; Tria, Francesca

    2013-04-01

    Opinion dynamics concerns social processes through which populations or groups of individuals agree or disagree on specific issues. As such, modelling opinion dynamics represents an important research area that has been progressively acquiring relevance in many different domains. Existing approaches have mostly represented opinions through discrete binary or continuous variables by exploring a whole panoply of cases: e.g. independence, noise, external effects, multiple issues. In most of these cases the crucial ingredient is an attractive dynamics through which similar or similar enough agents get closer. Only rarely the possibility of explicit disagreement has been taken into account (i.e., the possibility for a repulsive interaction among individuals' opinions), and mostly for discrete or 1-dimensional opinions, through the introduction of additional model parameters. Here we introduce a new model of opinion formation, which focuses on the interplay between the possibility of explicit disagreement, modulated in a self-consistent way by the existing opinions' overlaps between the interacting individuals, and the effect of external information on the system. Opinions are modelled as a vector of continuous variables related to multiple possible choices for an issue. Information can be modulated to account for promoting multiple possible choices. Numerical results show that extreme information results in segregation and has a limited effect on the population, while milder messages have better success and a cohesion effect. Additionally, the initial condition plays an important role, with the population forming one or multiple clusters based on the initial average similarity between individuals, with a transition point depending on the number of opinion choices.

  12. Perspectives: A Journal of Research and Opinion about Educational Service Agencies, 1995-1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keane, William G., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document consists of the first four volumes of the annual serial publication "Perspectives: A Journal of Research and Opinion about Educational Service Agencies." Educational service agencies (ESAs) have various names and characteristics across states, but all provide services to local education agencies in a specific geographic region. ESAs…

  13. Estimation of daily interfractional larynx residual setup error after isocentric alignment for head and neck radiotherapy: Quality-assurance implications for target volume and organ-at-risk margination using daily CT-on-rails imaging

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Charles A.; Awan, Musaddiq J.; Mohamed, Abdallah S. R.; Akel, Imad; Rosenthal, David I.; Gunn, G. Brandon; Garden, Adam S.; Dyer, Brandon A.; Court, Laurence; Sevak, Parag R; Kocak-Uzel, Esengul; Fuller, Clifton D.

    2016-01-01

    Larynx may alternatively serve as a target or organ-at-risk (OAR) in head and neck cancer (HNC) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The objective of this study was to estimate IGRT parameters required for larynx positional error independent of isocentric alignment and suggest population–based compensatory margins. Ten HNC patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) with daily CT-on-rails imaging were assessed. Seven landmark points were placed on each daily scan. Taking the most superior anterior point of the C5 vertebra as a reference isocenter for each scan, residual displacement vectors to the other 6 points were calculated post-isocentric alignment. Subsequently, using the first scan as a reference, the magnitude of vector differences for all 6 points for all scans over the course of treatment were calculated. Residual systematic and random error, and the necessary compensatory CTV-to-PTV and OAR-to-PRV margins were calculated, using both observational cohort data and a bootstrap-resampled population estimator. The grand mean displacements for all anatomical points was 5.07mm, with mean systematic error of 1.1mm and mean random setup error of 2.63mm, while bootstrapped POIs grand mean displacement was 5.09mm, with mean systematic error of 1.23mm and mean random setup error of 2.61mm. Required margin for CTV-PTV expansion was 4.6mm for all cohort points, while the bootstrap estimator of the equivalent margin was 4.9mm. The calculated OAR-to-PRV expansion for the observed residual set-up error was 2.7mm, and bootstrap estimated expansion of 2.9mm. We conclude that the interfractional larynx setup error is a significant source of RT set-up/delivery error in HNC both when the larynx is considered as a CTV or OAR. We estimate the need for a uniform expansion of 5mm to compensate for set up error if the larynx is a target or 3mm if the larynx is an OAR when using a non-laryngeal bony isocenter. PMID:25679151

  14. Estimation of daily interfractional larynx residual setup error after isocentric alignment for head and neck radiotherapy: quality assurance implications for target volume and organs‐at‐risk margination using daily CT on‐rails imaging

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Charles A.; Awan, Musaddiq J.; Mohamed, Abdallah S.R.; Akel, Imad; Rosenthal, David I.; Gunn, G. Brandon; Garden, Adam S.; Dyer, Brandon A.; Court, Laurence; Sevak, Parag R.; Kocak‐Uzel, Esengul

    2014-01-01

    Larynx may alternatively serve as a target or organs at risk (OAR) in head and neck cancer (HNC) image‐guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The objective of this study was to estimate IGRT parameters required for larynx positional error independent of isocentric alignment and suggest population‐based compensatory margins. Ten HNC patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) with daily CT on‐rails imaging were assessed. Seven landmark points were placed on each daily scan. Taking the most superior‐anterior point of the C5 vertebra as a reference isocenter for each scan, residual displacement vectors to the other six points were calculated postisocentric alignment. Subsequently, using the first scan as a reference, the magnitude of vector differences for all six points for all scans over the course of treatment was calculated. Residual systematic and random error and the necessary compensatory CTV‐to‐PTV and OAR‐to‐PRV margins were calculated, using both observational cohort data and a bootstrap‐resampled population estimator. The grand mean displacements for all anatomical points was 5.07 mm, with mean systematic error of 1.1 mm and mean random setup error of 2.63 mm, while bootstrapped POIs grand mean displacement was 5.09 mm, with mean systematic error of 1.23 mm and mean random setup error of 2.61 mm. Required margin for CTV‐PTV expansion was 4.6 mm for all cohort points, while the bootstrap estimator of the equivalent margin was 4.9 mm. The calculated OAR‐to‐PRV expansion for the observed residual setup error was 2.7 mm and bootstrap estimated expansion of 2.9 mm. We conclude that the interfractional larynx setup error is a significant source of RT setup/delivery error in HNC, both when the larynx is considered as a CTV or OAR. We estimate the need for a uniform expansion of 5 mm to compensate for setup error if the larynx is a target, or 3 mm if the larynx is an OAR, when using a nonlaryngeal bony isocenter. PACS numbers: 87.55.D‐, 87.55.Qr

  15. 32 CFR 1698.2 - Requests for advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.2 Requests for advisory opinions. (a) Any male born after December 31, 1959 who... advisory opinion as to the liability of any male person born after December 31, 1959 who has attained 18...

  16. 32 CFR 1698.2 - Requests for advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.2 Requests for advisory opinions. (a) Any male born after December 31, 1959 who... advisory opinion as to the liability of any male person born after December 31, 1959 who has attained 18...

  17. Recommendations for the use of radiotherapy in nodal lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hoskin, P J; Díez, P; Williams, M; Lucraft, H; Bayne, M

    2013-01-01

    These guidelines have been developed to define the use of radiotherapy for lymphoma in the current era of combined modality treatment taking into account increasing concern over the late side-effects associated with previous radiotherapy. The role of reduced volume and reduced doses is addressed, integrating modern imaging with three-dimensional planning and advanced techniques of treatment delivery. Both wide-field and involved-field techniques have now been supplanted by the use of defined volumes based on node involvement shown on computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and applying the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements concepts of gross tumour volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV). The planning of lymphoma patients for radical radiotherapy should now be based upon contrast enhanced 3 mm contiguous CT with three-dimensional definition of volumes using the convention of GTV, CTV and PTV. The involved-site radiotherapy concept defines the CTV based on the PET-defined pre-chemotherapy sites of involvement with an expansion in the cranio-caudal direction of lymphatic spread by 1.5 cm, constrained to tissue planes such as bone, muscle and air cavities. The margin allows for uncertainties in PET resolution, image registration and changes in patient positioning and shape. There is increasing evidence in both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma that traditional doses are higher than necessary for disease control and related to the incidence of late effects. No more than 30 Gy for Hodgkin and aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 24 Gy for indolent lymphomas is recommended; lower doses of 20 Gy in combination therapy for early-stage low-risk Hodgkin lymphoma may be sufficient. As yet there are no large datasets validating the use of involved-site radiotherapy; these will emerge from the current generation of clinical trials. Radiotherapy remains the most effective single

  18. Comparison between the four-field box and field-in-field techniques for conformal radiotherapy of the esophagus using dose-volume histograms and normal tissue complication probabilities.

    PubMed

    Allaveisi, Farzaneh; Moghadam, Amir Nami

    2017-06-01

    We evaluated and compared the performance of the field-in-field (FIF) to that of the four-field box (4FB) technique regarding dosimetric and radiobiological parameters for radiotherapy of esophageal carcinoma. Twenty patients with esophageal cancer were selected. For each patient, two treatment plans were created: 4FB and FIF. The parameters compared included the conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), D mean , D max , tumor control probability (TCP), V 20Gy and V 30Gy of the heart and lungs, normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), and monitor units per fraction (MU/fr). A paired t-test analysis did not show any significant differences (p > 0.05) between the two techniques in terms of the CI and TCP. However, the HI significantly improved when the FIF was applied. D max of the PTV, lung, and spinal cord were also significantly better with the FIF. Moreover, the lung V 20Gy as well as the NTCPs of the lung and spinal cord significantly reduced when the FIF was used, and the MU/fr was significantly decreased. The FIF showed evident advantages over 4FB: a more homogeneous dose distribution, lower D max values, and fewer required MUs, while it also retained PTV dose conformality. FIF should be considered as a simple technique to use clinically in cases with esophageal malignancies, especially in clinics with no IMRT.

  19. A hybrid model for opinion formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borra, Domenica; Lorenzi, Tommaso

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a hybrid model for opinion formation in a large group of agents exposed to the persuasive action of a small number of strong opinion leaders. The model is defined by coupling a finite difference equation for the dynamics of leaders opinion with a continuous integro-differential equation for the dynamics of the others. Such a definition stems from the idea that the leaders are few and tend to retain original opinions, so that their dynamics occur on a longer time scale with respect to the one of the other agents. A general well-posedness result is established for the initial value problem linked to the model. The asymptotic behavior in time of the related solution is characterized for some general parameter settings, which mimic distinct social scenarios, where different emerging behaviors can be observed. Analytical results are illustrated and extended through numerical simulations.

  20. Social opinion dynamics is not chaotic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chjan; Zhang, Weituo

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the research on social opinion dynamics over large and dense networks, a general framework for verifying the monotonicity property of multi-agent dynamics is introduced. This allows a derivation of sociologically meaningful sufficient conditions for monotonicity that are tailor-made for social opinion dynamics, which typically have high nonlinearity. A direct consequence of monotonicity is that social opinion dynamics is nonchaotic. A key part of this framework is the definition of a partial order relation that is suitable for a large class of social opinion dynamics such as the generalized naming games. Comparisons are made to previous techniques to verify monotonicity. Using the results obtained, we extend many of the consequences of monotonicity to this class of social dynamics, including several corollaries on their asymptotic behavior, such as global convergence to consensus and tipping points of a minority fraction of zealots or leaders.

  1. 2004 Traveler Opinion and Perception Survey

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-01-01

    "In November 2004 the Federal Highway Administration conducted the Traveler Opinion & Perception Survey : (TOPS). This was a nationwide survey with the objective of understanding the needs and expectations of users of the : nations transportation ...

  2. Opinion Analysis on Rohingya using Twitter Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochmawati, N.; Wibawa, S. C.

    2018-04-01

    Rohingya is an ethnicity in Myanmar. Recently there was a conflict in the area between the Rakhine population and the Myanmar army. Many opinions are pro and contra in addressing this issue. There is a critic, there is a support and there is a neutral. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the world public opinion about the case of Rohingya. The opinion data to be processed is taken from twitter. the reason for using twitter is because twitter has become one of the popular social media and includes the most frequently visited social media. Therefore, it would be a lot of data that can be taken from twitter to be processed in the process of sentiment analysis. The grouping of opinions will be divided into 3 parts of positive, negative and neutral. the method used in grouping is the naïve Bayes method.

  3. Getting a Second Opinion Before Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... your care. Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) helps pay for a second opinion before surgery. When your ... if you’ll have surgery. Medicare doesn’t pay for surgeries or procedures that aren’t medically ...

  4. Big Data Analytics for Prostate Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Coates, James; Souhami, Luis; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a first-line treatment option for localized prostate cancer and radiation-induced normal tissue damage are often the main limiting factor for modern radiotherapy regimens. Conversely, under-dosing of target volumes in an attempt to spare adjacent healthy tissues limits the likelihood of achieving local, long-term control. Thus, the ability to generate personalized data-driven risk profiles for radiotherapy outcomes would provide valuable prognostic information to help guide both clinicians and patients alike. Big data applied to radiation oncology promises to deliver better understanding of outcomes by harvesting and integrating heterogeneous data types, including patient-specific clinical parameters, treatment-related dose–volume metrics, and biological risk factors. When taken together, such variables make up the basis for a multi-dimensional space (the “RadoncSpace”) in which the presented modeling techniques search in order to identify significant predictors. Herein, we review outcome modeling and big data-mining techniques for both tumor control and radiotherapy-induced normal tissue effects. We apply many of the presented modeling approaches onto a cohort of hypofractionated prostate cancer patients taking into account different data types and a large heterogeneous mix of physical and biological parameters. Cross-validation techniques are also reviewed for the refinement of the proposed framework architecture and checking individual model performance. We conclude by considering advanced modeling techniques that borrow concepts from big data analytics, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, before discussing the potential future impact of systems radiobiology approaches. PMID:27379211

  5. Kinetic model for multidimensional opinion formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudin, Laurent; Monaco, Roberto; Salvarani, Francesco

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we deal with a kinetic model to describe the evolution of the opinion in a closed group with respect to a choice between multiple options (e.g., political parties), which takes into account two main mechanisms of opinion formation, namely, the interaction between individuals and the effect of the mass media. We numerically test the model in some relevant cases and eventually provide an existence and a uniqueness result for it.

  6. Reporting on a Talk I Gave Some Months Ago, the Headline in "La Opinion," Los Angeles' Premier Spanish Language Newspaper, Declared the City's School System "en crisis permanente." No One Wrote in to Disagree. The Claremont Letter. Volume 3, Issue 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerchner, Charles T.

    2008-01-01

    Reporting on a talk the author gave some months ago, the headline in "La Opinion," Los Angeles' premier Spanish language newspaper, declared the city's school system "en crisis permanente." No one wrote in to disagree. Indeed, at the end of "Learning from L.A.: Institutional Change in American Public Education" (Harvard Education Press) the author…

  7. Topological evolution of the internet public opinion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Ying; Dong, Xuefan; Liu, Yijun

    2017-11-01

    The Internet forms a platform featured with high liquidity, accessibility and concealment for the public to express their respective views on certain events, thus leading to a large network graph. Due to such environmental features, the public opinions formed on the Internet are different from those on traditional media. Studies focusing on the former area are relatively fewer. In addition, the majority of existing methods proposed for constructing the Internet public opinion topological structure are based on the classic BA model, thus resulting in drawbacks in the range of simplicity and a lack of strict deduction. Therefore, based on the complex networks theory, a model applied to describe the topology of the Internet public opinion is deduced with rigorous derivation in the present paper. Results show that the proposed expression could well reflect the degree distribution of Internet public opinion which follows an analogous power law distribution, and that the peak value and the degree distribution are not correlative to each other. Moreover, it has been also proved that compared to the classic BA model, the proposed model has better accuracy performance in the description of the degree distribution of the Internet public opinion, which contributes to future studies focusing on this area. Thus, an attempt has been made to give the first theoretical description of the Internet public opinion topology in the present paper. In addition, it is also the first paper focusing on the solution of networks degree distribution with an exponential growth form.

  8. Dose masking feature for BNCT radiotherapy planning

    DOEpatents

    Cook, Jeremy L.; Wessol, Daniel E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.

    2000-01-01

    A system for displaying an accurate model of isodoses to be used in radiotherapy so that appropriate planning can be performed prior to actual treatment on a patient. The nature of the simulation of the radiotherapy planning for BNCT and Fast Neutron Therapy, etc., requires that the doses be computed in the entire volume. The "entire volume" includes the patient and beam geometries as well as the air spaces in between. Isodoses derived from the computed doses will therefore extend into the air regions between the patient and beam geometries and thus depict the unrealistic possibility that radiation deposition occurs in regions containing no physical media. This problem is solved by computing the doses for the entire geometry and then masking the physical and air regions along with the isodose contours superimposed over the patient image at the corresponding plane. The user is thus able to mask out (remove) the contour lines from the unwanted areas of the image by selecting the appropriate contour masking region from the raster image.

  9. [Description of latest generation equipment in external radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Pellejero, S; Lozares, S; Mañeru, F

    2009-01-01

    Both the planning systems and the form of administering radiotherapy have changed radically since the introduction of 3D planning. At present treatment planning based on computerised axial tomography (CAT) images is standard practice in radiotherapy services. In recent years lineal accelerators for medical use have incorporated technology capable of administering intensity modulated radiation beams (IMRT). With this mode distributions of conformed doses are generated that adjust to the three dimensional form of the white volume, providing appropriate coverage and a lower dose to nearby risk organs. The use of IMRT is rapidly spreading amongst radiotherapy centres throughout the world. This growing use of IMRT has focused attention on the need for greater control of the geometric uncertainties in positioning the patient and control of internal movements. To this end, both flat and volumetric image systems have been incorporated into the treatment equipment, making image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) possible. This article offers a brief description of the latest advances included in the planning and administration of radiotherapy treatment.

  10. Demand for radiotherapy in Spain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, A; Borrás, J M; López-Torrecilla, J; Algara, M; Palacios-Eito, A; Gómez-Caamaño, A; Olay, L; Lara, P C

    2017-02-01

    Assessing the demand for radiotherapy in Spain based on existing evidence to estimate the human resources and equipment needed so that every person in Spain has access to high-quality radiotherapy when they need it. We used data from the European Cancer Observatory on the estimated incidence of cancer in Spain in 2012, along with the evidence-based indications for radiotherapy developed by the Australian CCORE project, to obtain an optimal radiotherapy utilisation proportion (OUP) for each tumour. About 50.5 % of new cancers in Spain require radiotherapy at least once over the course of the disease. Additional demand for these services comes from reradiation therapy and non-melanoma skin cancer. Approximately, 25-30 % of cancer patients with an indication for radiotherapy do not receive it due to factors that include access, patient preference, familiarity with the treatment among physicians, and especially resource shortages, all of which contribute to its underutilisation. Radiotherapy is underused in Spain. The increasing incidence of cancer expected over the next decade and the greater frequency of reradiations necessitate the incorporation of radiotherapy demand into need-based calculations for cancer services planning.

  11. Practical problems in aggregating expert opinions

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, J.M.; Picard, R.R.; Meyer, M.A.

    1993-11-01

    Expert opinion is data given by a qualified person in response to a technical question. In these analyses, expert opinion provides information where other data are either sparse or non-existent. Improvements in forecasting result from the advantageous addition of expert opinion to observed data in many areas, such as meteorology and econometrics. More generally, analyses of large, complex systems often involve experts on various components of the system supplying input to a decision process; applications include such wide-ranging areas as nuclear reactor safety, management science, and seismology. For large or complex applications, no single expert may be knowledgeable enough aboutmore » the entire application. In other problems, decision makers may find it comforting that a consensus or aggregation of opinions is usually better than a single opinion. Many risk and reliability studies require a single estimate for modeling, analysis, reporting, and decision making purposes. For problems with large uncertainties, the strategy of combining as diverse a set of experts as possible hedges against underestimation of that uncertainty. Decision makers are frequently faced with the task of selecting the experts and combining their opinions. However, the aggregation is often the responsibility of an analyst. Whether the decision maker or the analyst does the aggregation, the input for it, such as providing weights for experts or estimating other parameters, is imperfect owing to a lack of omniscience. Aggregation methods for expert opinions have existed for over thirty years; yet many of the difficulties with their use remain unresolved. The bulk of these problem areas are summarized in the sections that follow: sensitivities of results to assumptions, weights for experts, correlation of experts, and handling uncertainties. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the sources of these problems and describe their effects on aggregation.« less

  12. Laryngeal chondroradionecrosis following radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Melo, Giulianno Molina; Souza, Paula Demetrio; Bastos, Luiz Castro; Neves, Murilo Catafesta; Espirito Santo, Kleber Simões do; Cervantes, Onivaldo; Abrahão, Márcio

    2017-01-01

    to study larynx chondroradionecrosis related to radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatment and provide a treatment flowchart. retrospective study with clinical data analysis of all larynx cancer patients admitted in a two tertiary hospital in a five years period. from 131 patients treated for larynx cancer, 28 underwent chemoradiotherapy with curative intent and three of them presented chondroradionecrosis. They were treated with hiperbaric oxigen therapy and surgical debridment following our flowchart, preserving the larynx in all. the incidence of chondroradionecrosis as a complication of chemoradiotherapy in our series was 10,7% and the treatment with hiperbaric oxigen therapy, based in our flowchart, was effective to control this complication.

  13. Trend in and Correlates of Undergoing Radiotherapy in Taiwanese Cancer Patients' Last Month of Life.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yen-Ni; Cheng, Skye Hung-Chun; Liu, Tsang-Wu; Chang, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Jen-Shi; Tang, Siew Tzuh

    2016-09-01

    A significant proportion of cancer patients at end of life (EOL) undergo radiotherapy, but this evidence is not from nationwide population-based studies. The aims of this population-based study were to investigate the trend in undergoing radiotherapy among Taiwanese cancer patients' last month of life (EOL radiotherapy) in 2001-2010 and to identify factors associated with EOL radiotherapy. This was a population-based retrospective cohort study analyzing data from Taiwan's national death registry, cancer registry, and National Health Insurance claims for EOL radiotherapy using multilevel generalized linear mixed modeling. Participants were Taiwanese cancer patients (N = 339,546) who died in 2001-2010. Overall, 8.59% (7.97%-9.85%) of patients underwent EOL radiotherapy with a decreasing trend over time. Correlates of EOL radiotherapy included male gender, younger age, residing in less urbanized areas, diagnosis of lung cancer, metastatic disease, death within two years of diagnosis, and without comorbidities. Cancer patients were more likely to undergo EOL radiotherapy if they received primary care from medical oncologists and pediatricians, in a nonprofit, teaching hospital with a larger case volume of terminally ill cancer patients, and greater EOL care intensity. Approximately one-tenth of Taiwanese cancer patients underwent EOL radiotherapy with a decreasing trend over time. Undergoing EOL radiotherapy was associated with demographics, disease characteristics, physician specialty, and primary hospital's characteristics and EOL care practice patterns. Clinical and financial interventions should target hospitals/physicians that tend to aggressively treat at-risk cancer patients at EOL to carefully evaluate the appropriateness and effectiveness of using EOL radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) high risk gross tumor volume boost (HR GTV boost) contour delineation agreement among NRG sarcoma radiation and surgical oncologists.

    PubMed

    Baldini, Elizabeth H; Bosch, Walter; Kane, John M; Abrams, Ross A; Salerno, Kilian E; Deville, Curtiland; Raut, Chandrajit P; Petersen, Ivy A; Chen, Yen-Lin; Mullen, John T; Millikan, Keith W; Karakousis, Giorgos; Kendrick, Michael L; DeLaney, Thomas F; Wang, Dian

    2015-09-01

    Curative intent management of retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) requires gross total resection. Preoperative radiotherapy (RT) often is used as an adjuvant to surgery, but recurrence rates remain high. To enhance RT efficacy with acceptable tolerance, there is interest in delivering "boost doses" of RT to high-risk areas of gross tumor volume (HR GTV) judged to be at risk for positive resection margins. We sought to evaluate variability in HR GTV boost target volume delineation among collaborating sarcoma radiation and surgical oncologist teams. Radiation planning CT scans for three cases of RPS were distributed to seven paired radiation and surgical oncologist teams at six institutions. Teams contoured HR GTV boost volumes for each case. Analysis of contour agreement was performed using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm and kappa statistics. HRGTV boost volume contour agreement between the seven teams was "substantial" or "moderate" for all cases. Agreement was best on the torso wall posteriorly (abutting posterior chest abdominal wall) and medially (abutting ipsilateral para-vertebral space and great vessels). Contours varied more significantly abutting visceral organs due to differing surgical opinions regarding planned partial organ resection. Agreement of RPS HRGTV boost volumes between sarcoma radiation and surgical oncologist teams was substantial to moderate. Differences were most striking in regions abutting visceral organs, highlighting the importance of collaboration between the radiation and surgical oncologist for "individualized" target delineation on the basis of areas deemed at risk and planned resection.

  15. A Self-Categorization Explanation for Opinion Consensus Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jinguang; Reid, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    The public expression of opinions (and related communicative activities) hinges upon the perception of opinion consensus. Current explanations for opinion consensus perceptions typically focus on egocentric and other biases, rather than functional cognitions. Using self-categorization theory we showed that opinion consensus perceptions flow from…

  16. 28 CFR 80.11 - Effect of FCPA Opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effect of FCPA Opinion. 80.11 Section 80.11 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT OPINION PROCEDURE § 80.11 Effect of FCPA Opinion. Except as specified in § 80.10, an FCPA Opinion will not bind or...

  17. Beyond mean pharyngeal constrictor dose for beam path toxicity in non-target swallowing muscles: dose-volume correlates of chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after oropharyngeal intensity modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) We sought to identify swallowing muscle dose-response thresholds associated with chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after IMRT for oropharyngeal cancer. Materials/Methods T1-4 N0-3 M0 oropharyngeal cancer patients who received definitive IMRT and systemic therapy were examined. Chronic RAD was coded as any of the following ≥ 12 months post-IMRT: videofluoroscopy/endoscopy detected aspiration or stricture, gastrostomy tube and/or aspiration pneumonia. DICOM-RT plan data were autosegmented using a custom region-of-interest (ROI) library and included inferior, middle and superior constrictors (IPC, MPC, and SPC), medial and lateral pterygoids (MPM, LPM), anterior and posterior digastrics (ADM, PDM), intrinsic tongue muscles (ITM), mylo/geniohyoid complex (MHM), genioglossus (GGM), ), masseter (MM), Buccinator (BM), palatoglossus (PGM), and cricopharyngeus (CPM), with ROI dose-volume histograms (DVHs) calculated. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was used to identify dose-volume effects associated with chronic-RAD, for use in a multivariate (MV) model. Results Of 300 patients, 34 (11%) had chronic-RAD. RPA showed DVH-derived MHM V69 (i.e. the volume receiving ≥69Gy), GGM V35, ADM V60, MPC V49, and SPC V70 were associated with chronic-RAD. A model including age in addition to MHM V69 as continuous variables was optimal among tested MV models (AUC 0.835). Conclusion In addition to SPCs, dose to MHM should be monitored and constrained, especially in older patients (>62-years), when feasible. PMID:26897515

  18. Beyond mean pharyngeal constrictor dose for beam path toxicity in non-target swallowing muscles: Dose-volume correlates of chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after oropharyngeal intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    We sought to identify swallowing muscle dose-response thresholds associated with chronic radiation-associated dysphagia (RAD) after IMRT for oropharyngeal cancer. T1-4 N0-3 M0 oropharyngeal cancer patients who received definitive IMRT and systemic therapy were examined. Chronic RAD was coded as any of the following ⩾12months post-IMRT: videofluoroscopy/endoscopy detected aspiration or stricture, gastrostomy tube and/or aspiration pneumonia. DICOM-RT plan data were autosegmented using a custom region-of-interest (ROI) library and included inferior, middle and superior constrictors (IPC, MPC, and SPC), medial and lateral pterygoids (MPM, LPM), anterior and posterior digastrics (ADM, PDM), intrinsic tongue muscles (ITM), mylo/geniohyoid complex (MHM), genioglossus (GGM), masseter (MM), buccinator (BM), palatoglossus (PGM), and cricopharyngeus (CPM), with ROI dose-volume histograms (DVHs) calculated. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) was used to identify dose-volume effects associated with chronic-RAD, for use in a multivariate (MV) model. Of 300 patients, 34 (11%) had chronic-RAD. RPA showed DVH-derived MHM V69 (i.e. the volume receiving⩾69Gy), GGM V35, ADM V60, MPC V49, and SPC V70 were associated with chronic-RAD. A model including age in addition to MHM V69 as continuous variables was optimal among tested MV models (AUC 0.835). In addition to SPCs, dose to MHM should be monitored and constrained, especially in older patients (>62-years), when feasible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical experience with image-guided radiotherapy in an accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy protocol.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Charles E; Tallhamer, Michael; Johnson, Tim; Hunter, Kari; Howell, Kathryn; Kercher, Jane; Widener, Jodi; Kaske, Terese; Paul, Devchand; Sedlacek, Scot; Carter, Dennis L

    2010-02-01

    To explore the feasibility of fiducial markers for the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in an accelerated partial breast intensity modulated radiotherapy protocol. Nineteen patients consented to an institutional review board approved protocol of accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy with fiducial marker placement and treatment with IGRT. Patients (1 patient with bilateral breast cancer; 20 total breasts) underwent ultrasound guided implantation of three 1.2- x 3-mm gold markers placed around the surgical cavity. For each patient, table shifts (inferior/superior, right/left lateral, and anterior/posterior) and minimum, maximum, mean error with standard deviation were recorded for each of the 10 BID treatments. The dose contribution of daily orthogonal films was also examined. All IGRT patients underwent successful marker placement. In all, 200 IGRT treatment sessions were performed. The average vector displacement was 4 mm (range, 2-7 mm). The average superior/inferior shift was 2 mm (range, 0-5 mm), the average lateral shift was 2 mm (range, 1-4 mm), and the average anterior/posterior shift was 3 mm (range, 1 5 mm). This study shows that the use of IGRT can be successfully used in an accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy protocol. The authors believe that this technique has increased daily treatment accuracy and permitted reduction in the margin added to the clinical target volume to form the planning target volume. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Information Filtering Based on Users' Negative Opinions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qiang; Li, Yang; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2013-05-01

    The process of heat conduction (HC) has recently found application in the information filtering [Zhang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett.99, 154301 (2007)], which is of high diversity but low accuracy. The classical HC model predicts users' potential interested objects based on their interesting objects regardless to the negative opinions. In terms of the users' rating scores, we present an improved user-based HC (UHC) information model by taking into account users' positive and negative opinions. Firstly, the objects rated by users are divided into positive and negative categories, then the predicted interesting and dislike object lists are generated by the UHC model. Finally, the recommendation lists are constructed by filtering out the dislike objects from the interesting lists. By implementing the new model based on nine similarity measures, the experimental results for MovieLens and Netflix datasets show that the new model considering negative opinions could greatly enhance the accuracy, measured by the average ranking score, from 0.049 to 0.036 for Netflix and from 0.1025 to 0.0570 for Movielens dataset, reduced by 26.53% and 44.39%, respectively. Since users prefer to give positive ratings rather than negative ones, the negative opinions contain much more information than the positive ones, the negative opinions, therefore, are very important for understanding users' online collective behaviors and improving the performance of HC model.

  1. Assessment of three-dimensional setup errors in image-guided pelvic radiotherapy for uterine and cervical cancer using kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography and its effect on planning target volume margins.

    PubMed

    Patni, Nidhi; Burela, Nagarjuna; Pasricha, Rajesh; Goyal, Jaishree; Soni, Tej Prakash; Kumar, T Senthil; Natarajan, T

    2017-01-01

    To achieve the best possible therapeutic ratio using high-precision techniques (image-guided radiation therapy/volumetric modulated arc therapy [IGRT/VMAT]) of external beam radiation therapy in cases of carcinoma cervix using kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT). One hundred and five patients of gynecological malignancies who were treated with IGRT (IGRT/VMAT) were included in the study. CBCT was done once a week for intensity-modulated radiation therapy and daily in IGRT/VMAT. These images were registered with the planning CT scan images and translational errors were applied and recorded. In all, 2078 CBCT images were studied. The margins of planning target volume were calculated from the variations in the setup. The setup variation was 5.8, 10.3, and 5.6 mm in anteroposterior, superoinferior, and mediolateral direction. This allowed adequate dose delivery to the clinical target volume and the sparing of organ at risks. Daily kV-CBCT is a satisfactory method of accurate patient positioning in treating gynecological cancers with high-precision techniques. This resulted in avoiding geographic miss.

  2. A lexicon based method to search for extreme opinions.

    PubMed

    Almatarneh, Sattam; Gamallo, Pablo

    2018-01-01

    Studies in sentiment analysis and opinion mining have been focused on many aspects related to opinions, namely polarity classification by making use of positive, negative or neutral values. However, most studies have overlooked the identification of extreme opinions (most negative and most positive opinions) in spite of their vast significance in many applications. We use an unsupervised approach to search for extreme opinions, which is based on the automatic construction of a new lexicon containing the most negative and most positive words.

  3. Analysing Customer Opinions with Text Mining Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consoli, Domenico

    2009-08-01

    Knowing what the customer thinks of a particular product/service helps top management to introduce improvements in processes and products, thus differentiating the company from their competitors and gain competitive advantages. The customers, with their preferences, determine the success or failure of a company. In order to know opinions of the customers we can use technologies available from the web 2.0 (blog, wiki, forums, chat, social networking, social commerce). From these web sites, useful information must be extracted, for strategic purposes, using techniques of sentiment analysis or opinion mining.

  4. Comparison of Tennessee Opinions with U.S. and Other States' Opinions. 1974 Statewide Opinion Survey. Preliminary Report No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskins, Jack B.

    Information gathered in the 1974 statewide survey of Tennesseeans' opinions on higher education is compared with similar information gathered in other states. Questions asked concerned confidence in institutions, freedom to teach, quality of education and college type, favorability to increased spending, favorability to institutional expansion,…

  5. New Language and Old Problems in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chiricuţă, Ion Christian

    2017-01-01

    New developments in breast cancer radiotherapy make possible new standards in treatment recommandations based on international guidelines. Developments in radiotherapy irradiation techniques from 2D to 3D-Conformal RT and to IMRT (Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy) make possible to reduce the usual side effects on the organs at risk as: skin, lung, miocard, bone, esophagus and brahial plexus. Dispite of all these progresses acute and late side effects are present. Side effects are as old as the radiotherapy was used. New solutions are available now by improving irradiation techniques. New techniques as sentinel node procedure (SNP) or partial breast irradiation (PBRT) and immediate breast reconstruction with silicon implants (IBRIS) make necessary new considerations regarding the target volume delineations. A new language for definition of gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV) based on the new diagnostic methods as PET/CT,nonaparticle MRI will have real impact on target delineation and irradiation techniques. "The new common language in breast cancer therapy" would be the first step to improve the endresults and finally the quality of life of the patients. Celsius.

  6. Radiotherapy on hidradenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lalya, Issam; Hadadi, Khalid; Tazi, El Mehdi; Lalya, Ilham; Bazine, Amine; Andaloussy, Khalid; Elmarjany, Mohamed; Sifat, Hassan; Hassouni, Khalid; Kebdani, Tayeb; Mansouri, Hamid; Benjaafar, Noureddine; Elgueddari, Brahim Khalil

    2011-01-01

    Clear cell Hidradenocarcinoma is a rare carcinoma arising from sweat glands. It is an aggressive tumor that most metastasizes to regional lymph nodes and distant viscera; surgery with safe margins is the mainstay of treatment. We report a case of 68-year-old woman who presented with an invasive clear cell hidradenocarcinoma situated in the left parotid area which recurred 5 months after surgery, this recurrence was managed successfully by high-dose irradiation of the tumor bed (66 Gy) and regional lymphatic chains (50 Gy), after a follow-up of more than 15 months, the patient is in good local control without significant toxicity. POST OPERATIVE RADIOTHERAPY ALLOWS BETTER LOCAL CONTROL AND SHOULD BE MANDATORY WHEN HISTOLOGICAL FEATURES PREDICTIVE OF RECURRENCE ARE PRESENT: positive margins, histology poorly differentiated, perineural invasion, vascular and lymphatic invasion, lymph node involvement, and extracapsular spread.

  7. Radiotherapy on hidradenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lalya, Issam; Hadadi, Khalid; Tazi, El Mehdi; Lalya, Ilham; Bazine, Amine; Andaloussy, Khalid; Elmarjany, Mohamed; Sifat, Hassan; Hassouni, Khalid; Kebdani, Tayeb; Mansouri, Hamid; Benjaafar, Noureddine; Elgueddari, Brahim Khalil

    2011-01-01

    Context: Clear cell Hidradenocarcinoma is a rare carcinoma arising from sweat glands. It is an aggressive tumor that most metastasizes to regional lymph nodes and distant viscera; surgery with safe margins is the mainstay of treatment. Case Report: We report a case of 68-year-old woman who presented with an invasive clear cell hidradenocarcinoma situated in the left parotid area which recurred 5 months after surgery, this recurrence was managed successfully by high-dose irradiation of the tumor bed (66 Gy) and regional lymphatic chains (50 Gy), after a follow-up of more than 15 months, the patient is in good local control without significant toxicity. Conclusion: Post operative radiotherapy allows better local control and should be mandatory when histological features predictive of recurrence are present: positive margins, histology poorly differentiated, perineural invasion, vascular and lymphatic invasion, lymph node involvement, and extracapsular spread. PMID:22540063

  8. Radiotherapy Planning using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Maria A; Payne, Geoffrey S

    2016-01-01

    The use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Radiotherapy (RT) planning is rapidly expanding. We review the wide range of image contrast mechanisms available to MRI and the way they are exploited for RT planning. However a number of challenges are also considered: the requirements that MR images are acquired in the RT treatment position, that they are geometrically accurate, that effects of patient motion during the scan are minimised, that tissue markers are clearly demonstrated, that an estimate of electron density can be obtained. These issues are discussed in detail, prior to the consideration of a number of specific clinical applications. This is followed by a brief discussion on the development of real-time MRI-guided RT. PMID:26509844

  9. A longitudinal study on the radiation-induced thyroid gland changes after external beam radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhixiong; Wu, Vincent Wing-Cheung; Lin, Jing; Feng, Huiting; Chen, Longhua

    2011-01-01

    Radiation-induced thyroid disorders have been reported in radiotherapy of head and neck cancers. This study evaluated the radiation-induced damages to thyroid gland in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Forty-five patients with NPC treated by radiotherapy underwent baseline thyroid hormones (free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine [fT4], and thyrotropin [TSH]) examination and CT scan before radiotherapy. The volume of the thyroid gland was calculated by delineating the structure in the corresponding CT slices using the radiotherapy treatment planning system. The thyroid doses were estimated using the treatment planning system. Subsequent CT scans were conducted at 6, 12, and 18 months after radiotherapy, whereas the hormone levels were assessed at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months after radiotherapy. Trend lines of the volume and hormone level changes against time were plotted. The relationship between the dose and the change of thyroid volume and hormone levels were evaluated using the Pearson correlation test. An average of 20% thyroid volume reduction in the first 6 months and a further 8% shrinkage at 12 months after radiotherapy were observed. The volume reduction was dependent on the mean thyroid doses at 6, 12, and 18 months after radiotherapy (r = -0.399, -0.472, and -0.417, respectively). Serum free triiodothyronine and fT4 levels showed mild changes of <2.5% at 6 months, started to drop by 8.8% and 11.3%, respectively, at 12 months, and became stable at 18 months. The mean serum TSH level increased mildly at 6 months after radiotherapy and more steeply after 18 months. At 18 months after radiotherapy, 12 patients had primary hypothyroidism with an elevated serum TSH, in which 4 of them also presented with low serum fT4. There was a significant difference (p = 0.014) in the mean thyroid doses between patients with hypothyroidism and normal thyroid function. Radiotherapy for patients with NPC caused radiation-induced changes of the thyroid gland. The

  10. Political opinion formation: Initial opinion distribution and individual heterogeneity of tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Cheng; Li, Yifu; Jin, Xiaogang

    2017-02-01

    Opinion dynamics on networks have received serious attention for its profound prospects in social behaviours and self-organized systems. However, political opinion formation, as one typical and significant case, remains lacking in discussion. Previous agent-based simulations propose various models that are based on different mechanisms like the coevolution between network topology and status transition. Nonetheless, even under the same network topology and with the same simple mechanism, forming opinions can still be uncertain. In this work, we propose two features, the initial distribution of opinions and the individual heterogeneity of tolerances on opinion changing, in political opinion formation. These two features are imbedded in the network construction phase of a classical model. By comparing multi simple-party systems, along with a detailed analysis on the two-party system, we capture the critical phenomenon of fragmentation, polarization and consensus both in the persistent stable stage and in-process. We further introduce the average ratio of nearest neighbours to characterize the stage of opinion formation. The results show that the initial distribution of opinions leads to different evolution results on similar random networks. In addition, the existence of stubborn nodes plays a special role: only nodes that are extremely stubborn can cause the change of final opinion distribution while in other cases they only delay the time to reach stability. If stubborn nodes are small in number, their effects are confined within a small range. This theoretical work goes deeper on an existing model, it is an early exploration on qualitative and quantitative simulation of party competition.

  11. Feasibility study of stereotactic body radiotherapy for peripheral lung tumors with a maximum dose of 100 Gy in five fractions and a heterogeneous dose distribution in the planning target volume.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Atsuya; Oku, Yohei; Sanuki, Naoko; Eriguchi, Takahisa; Aoki, Yousuke; Enomoto, Tatsuji; Kaneko, Takeshi; Nishimura, Shuichi; Kunieda, Etsuo

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated toxicity and outcomes for patients with peripheral lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in a dose-escalation and dose-convergence study. A total of 15 patients were enrolled. SBRT was performed with 60 Gy in 5 fractions (fr.) prescribed to the 60% isodose line of maximum dose, which was 100 Gy in 5 fr., covering the planning target volume (PTV) surface (60 Gy/5 fr. - (60%-isodose)) using dynamic conformal multiple arc therapy (DCMAT). The primary endpoint was radiation pneumonitis (RP) ≥ Grade 2 within 6 months. Toxicities were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Using dose-volumetric analysis, the trial regimen of 60 Gy/5 fr. - (60%-isodose) was compared with our institutional conventional regimen of 50 Gy/5 fr. - (80%-isodose). The enrolled consecutive patients had either a solitary peripheral tumor or two ipsilateral tumors. The median follow-up duration was 22.0 (12.0-27.0) months. After 6 months post-SBRT, the respective number of RP Grade 0, 1 and 2 cases was 5, 9 and 1. In the Grade 2 RP patient, the image showed an organizing pneumonia pattern at 6.0 months post-SBRT. No other toxicity was found. At last follow-up, there was no evidence of recurrence of the treated tumors. The target volumes of 60 Gy/ 5 fr. - (60%-isodose) were irradiated with a significantly higher dose than those of 50 Gy/5 fr. - (80%-isodose), while the former dosimetric parameters of normal lung were almost equivalent to the latter. SBRT with 60 Gy/5 fr. - (60%-isodose) using DCMAT allowed the delivery of very high and convergent doses to peripheral lung tumors with feasibility in the acute and subacute phases. Further follow-up is required to assess for late toxicity. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  12. Target margins in radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bauman, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed the literature on the use of margins in radiotherapy of patients with prostate cancer, focusing on different options for image guidance (IG) and technical issues. The search in PubMed database was limited to include studies that involved external beam radiotherapy of the intact prostate. Post-prostatectomy studies, brachytherapy and particle therapy were excluded. Each article was characterized according to the IG strategy used: positioning on external marks using room lasers, bone anatomy and soft tissue match, usage of fiducial markers, electromagnetic tracking and adapted delivery. A lack of uniformity in margin selection among institutions was evident from the review. In general, introduction of pre- and in-treatment IG was associated with smaller planning target volume (PTV) margins, but there was a lack of definitive experimental/clinical studies providing robust information on selection of exact PTV values. In addition, there is a lack of comparative research regarding the cost–benefit ratio of the different strategies: insertion of fiducial markers or electromagnetic transponders facilitates prostate gland localization but at a price of invasive procedure; frequent pre-treatment imaging increases patient in-room time, dose and labour; online plan adaptation should improve radiation delivery accuracy but requires fast and precise computation. Finally, optimal protocols for quality assurance procedures need to be established. PMID:27377353

  13. Opinion formation on social media: An empirical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Fei; Liu, Yun

    2014-03-01

    Opinion exchange models aim to describe the process of public opinion formation, seeking to uncover the intrinsic mechanism in social systems; however, the model results are seldom empirically justified using large-scale actual data. Online social media provide an abundance of data on opinion interaction, but the question of whether opinion models are suitable for characterizing opinion formation on social media still requires exploration. We collect a large amount of user interaction information from an actual social network, i.e., Twitter, and analyze the dynamic sentiments of users about different topics to investigate realistic opinion evolution. We find two nontrivial results from these data. First, public opinion often evolves to an ordered state in which one opinion predominates, but not to complete consensus. Second, agents are reluctant to change their opinions, and the distribution of the number of individual opinion changes follows a power law. Then, we suggest a model in which agents take external actions to express their internal opinions according to their activity. Conversely, individual actions can influence the activity and opinions of neighbors. The probability that an agent changes its opinion depends nonlinearly on the fraction of opponents who have taken an action. Simulation results show user action patterns and the evolution of public opinion in the model coincide with the empirical data. For different nonlinear parameters, the system may approach different regimes. A large decay in individual activity slows down the dynamics, but causes more ordering in the system.

  14. Legal Decisions and Opinions in Pollution Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hills, John P.

    1976-01-01

    When dealing with the "frontier of scientific knowledge" and questions of public health, United States courts are waiving traditional burdens of proof, giving increased weight to expert opinions and/or lowering their standard of necessary proof. Recent cases involving asbestos, pesticides, lead in gasoline, and vinyl chlorides are discussed. (BT)

  15. Public Opinion and the NCAA Proposal 42.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Lawrence H.; Koball, Elizabeth G.

    1991-01-01

    Surveyed opinions on the National Collegiate Athletic Association's Proposal 42 using a convenience sample of 872 persons. Most respondents felt that college admission tests are biased. Concludes that the controversy will be resolved when American society comes to grips with inequalities in educational and socioeconomic opportunity. (DM)

  16. Online vs. Print Publications: Users' Opinions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chih

    The rapid expansion of online publications has raised some concerns about the use of online databases in comparison with using traditional print publications. To determine the opinions of end users about using Dialog online databases versus their corresponding print versions, three libraries in Atlanta, Georgia--Atlanta-Fulton Public Library,…

  17. Secondary School Students' Opinions about Readers' Theatre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karabag, S. Gulin

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a teaching strategy which not only blends yesterday and today in a meaningful way but also powerfully integrates literacy and history will be examined. Firstly Readers' Theatre as a technique will be introduced. Secondly, the usage guidelines of Readers' Theatre will be presented. Finally the opinions of secondary school students…

  18. No Common Opinion on the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Michael B.; Peterson, Paul E.; West, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    According to the three authors of this article, the 2014 "EdNext" poll yields four especially important new findings: (1) Opinion with respect to the Common Core has yet to coalesce. The idea of a common set of standards across the country has wide appeal, and the Common Core itself still commands the support of a majority of the public.…

  19. Arms and alliance in Japanese public opinion

    SciTech Connect

    Umemoto, T.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis analyzes the transformation of Japanese public opinion concerning the nation's security posture during the past decade. Until the early 1970s, the peculiar strength of a neutralist-pacifist outlook among the Japanese people, which arose in large part from the absence of a serious external threat severely encumbered Tokyo's defense efforts in the context of the alliance with the United States. In particular, such state of domestic opinion gave rise to what the author has elected to call the institutionalized constraints - limitations deriving from constitutional interpretation, the Three Non-Nuclear Principles, and the Three Principles on Weapons Exports - onmore » the scope of such endeavors. It moreover prepared the condition for the Government's adoption of restrictive military buildup policies in the National Defense Program Outline. Over the past decade, however, as Japan's security environment has deteriorated with the growth of the putative Soviet threat, and as the United States and China have come to expect greater Japanese defense efforts, the climate of opinion within Japan has gradually shifted in favor of a security posture based on the Mutual Security Treaty (MST) and the Self-Defense Forces (SDFs). Opinion polls have come to indicate solid popular approval of maintenance of armament and participation in alliance.« less

  20. Determination of Student Opinions in Augmented Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bicen, Huseyin; Bal, Erkan

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of the new technology has changed classroom teaching methods and tools in a positive way. This study investigated the classroom learning with augmented reality and the impact of student opinions. 97 volunteer undergraduate students took part in this study. Results included data in the form of frequencies, percentages and…

  1. Decision-Making When Public Opinion Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coppock, Rob

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the impact of public opinion on government decision-making, and develops a model that describes how certain input or control factors can combine to produce discontinuous or divergent policy decisions. Available from: Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company, Box 211, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, single copies available. (Author/JG)

  2. Reliability of the Suicide Opinion Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, James R.; DeShon, Richard P.

    The lack of systematic psychometric information on the Suicide Opinion Questionnaire (SOQ) was addressed by investigating the factor structure and reliability of the eight-factor clinical scale model (mental illness, cry for help, right to die, religion, impulsivity, normality, aggression, and moral evil), developed for interpreting responses to…

  3. Psychiatric Opinion and Homosexuality: A Short Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, R. F.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    In a survey of opinion among 100 psychiatrists and 93 trainees in Australia, the majority endorsed the view either that "homosexuality is a developmental anomaly not necessarily or commonly associated with neurotic symptoms" or that "homosexuality is a normal variant like left-handedness." (Author)

  4. Farmers' Opinions about Third-Wave Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasley, Paul; Bultena, Gordon

    The opinions of 1,585 Iowa farmers about 8 emergent agricultural technologies (energy production from feed grains and oils; energy production from livestock waste; genetic engineering research on plants, livestock, and humans; robotics for on-farm use; confinement livestock facilities; and personal computers for farm families) were found to be…

  5. Students and Instructors Opinions about Piano Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilic, Deniz Beste Çevik

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the opinions of the students and piano instructors in the Turkish Education Faculties' Fine Arts Instruction Departments' music instruction programs about piano instruction. The study data were collected using a questionnaire administered to the piano instructors and the students who took lessons from them. The study results…

  6. 19 CFR 210.79 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Revocation. The Commission may at any time reconsider any advice given under this section and, where the public interest requires, revoke its prior advice. In such event the person will be given notice of the... advice and has framed his request as fully and accurately as possible. Advisory opinion proceedings are...

  7. 19 CFR 210.79 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Revocation. The Commission may at any time reconsider any advice given under this section and, where the public interest requires, revoke its prior advice. In such event the person will be given notice of the... advice and has framed his request as fully and accurately as possible. Advisory opinion proceedings are...

  8. Detecting opinion spams through supervised boosting approach.

    PubMed

    Hazim, Mohamad; Anuar, Nor Badrul; Ab Razak, Mohd Faizal; Abdullah, Nor Aniza

    2018-01-01

    Product reviews are the individual's opinions, judgement or belief about a certain product or service provided by certain companies. Such reviews serve as guides for these companies to plan and monitor their business ventures in terms of increasing productivity or enhancing their product/service qualities. Product reviews can also increase business profits by convincing future customers about the products which they have interest in. In the mobile application marketplace such as Google Playstore, reviews and star ratings are used as indicators of the application quality. However, among all these reviews, hereby also known as opinions, spams also exist, to disrupt the online business balance. Previous studies used the time series and neural network approach (which require a lot of computational power) to detect these opinion spams. However, the detection performance can be restricted in terms of accuracy because the approach focusses on basic, discrete and document level features only thereby, projecting little statistical relationships. Aiming to improve the detection of opinion spams in mobile application marketplace, this study proposes using statistical based features that are modelled through the supervised boosting approach such as the Extreme Gradient Boost (XGBoost) and the Generalized Boosted Regression Model (GBM) to evaluate two multilingual datasets (i.e. English and Malay language). From the evaluation done, it was found that the XGBoost is most suitable for detecting opinion spams in the English dataset while the GBM Gaussian is most suitable for the Malay dataset. The comparative analysis also indicates that the implementation of the proposed statistical based features had achieved a detection accuracy rate of 87.43 per cent on the English dataset and 86.13 per cent on the Malay dataset.

  9. Breast Imaging Second Opinions Impact Surgical Management.

    PubMed

    Spivey, Tara Lynn; Carlson, Kjirsten Ayn; Janssen, Imke; Witt, Thomas R; Jokich, Peter; Madrigrano, Andrea

    2015-07-01

    Breast surgeons often see women for second opinions for abnormalities found on breast imaging. For second opinions, these images are submitted for review and interpretation by dedicated breast imagers. This study evaluated the conformity of results among interpretation of imaging submitted from outside hospitals both from tertiary care centers, as well as community programs, in an attempt to evaluate the utility of this practice for the sake of clinical management and resource utilization. A retrospective chart review was conducted on all breast patients that submitted outside imaging films for the years 2011 to 2013 at Rush University Medical Center (RUMC). The radiologic diagnosis and each patient's proposed management plan was collected and evaluated for concordance between the outside institutions and RUMC. A total of 380 patients who presented for second opinions with an interpretation of outside exams were evaluated. In 47.4 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 42.4-52.4] of cases there was distinct variance in radiologic impression. For 53.5 % (95 % CI 48.4-58.5) of patients, there was a change in recommended management plan, which included recommendations for either additional imaging or need for additional biopsy. In total, this changed the overall surgical management in 27.1 % (95 % CI 22.8-31.9) of cases. In six patients, the reinterpretation of outside imaging detected new malignancies not previously identified. Overall, 83.7 % (95 % CI 79.7-87.1) of patients who submitted imaging from outside institutions chose to complete the remainder of their treatment at RUMC. The practice of second opinion review changed overall definitive management at our specialty center in more than one in four cases. In addition, the review identified six previously unrecognized malignancies. Given this data, the practice of second opinions and interpretation of outside exams should continue despite the additional resources required.

  10. Quality assurance of the SCOPE 1 trial in oesophageal radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wills, Lucy; Maggs, Rhydian; Lewis, Geraint; Jones, Gareth; Nixon, Lisette; Staffurth, John; Crosby, Tom

    2017-11-15

    SCOPE 1 was the first UK based multi-centre trial involving radiotherapy of the oesophagus. A comprehensive radiotherapy trials quality assurance programme was launched with two main aims: 1. To assist centres, where needed, to adapt their radiotherapy techniques in order to achieve protocol compliance and thereby enable their participation in the trial. 2. To support the trial's clinical outcomes by ensuring the consistent planning and delivery of radiotherapy across all participating centres. A detailed information package was provided and centres were required to complete a benchmark case in which the delineated target volumes and organs at risk, dose distribution and completion of a plan assessment form were assessed prior to recruiting patients into the trial. Upon recruiting, the quality assurance (QA) programme continued to monitor the outlining and planning of radiotherapy treatments. Completion of a questionnaire was requested in order to gather information about each centre's equipment and techniques relating to their trial participation and to assess the impact of the trial nationally on standard practice for radiotherapy of the oesophagus. During the trial, advice was available for individual planning issues, and was circulated amongst the SCOPE 1 community in response to common areas of concern using bulletins. 36 centres were supported through QA processes to enable their participation in SCOPE1. We discuss the issues which have arisen throughout this process and present details of the benchmark case solutions, centre questionnaires and on-trial protocol compliance. The range of submitted benchmark case GTV volumes was 29.8-67.8cm 3 ; and PTV volumes 221.9-513.3 cm 3 . For the dose distributions associated with these volumes, the percentage volume of the lungs receiving 20Gy (V20Gy) ranged from 20.4 to 33.5%. Similarly, heart V40Gy ranged from 16.1 to 33.0%. Incidence of incorrect outlining of OAR volumes increased from 50% of centres at benchmark

  11. [Big data, generalities and integration in radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Le Fèvre, C; Poty, L; Noël, G

    2018-02-01

    The many advances in data collection computing systems (data collection, database, storage), diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities are responsible for an increase and a diversification of available data. Big data offers the capacities, in the field of health, to accelerate the discoveries and to optimize the management of patients by combining a large volume of data and the creation of therapeutic models. In radiotherapy, the development of big data is attractive because data are very numerous et heterogeneous (demographics, radiomics, genomics, radiogenomics, etc.). The expectation would be to predict the effectiveness and tolerance of radiation therapy. With these new concepts, still at the preliminary stage, it is possible to create a personalized medicine which is always more secure and reliable. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  12. A Review of Update Clinical Results of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tsujii, Hirohiko; Kamada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Among various types of ion species, carbon ions are considered to have the most balanced, optimal properties in terms of possessing physically and biologically effective dose localization in the body. This is due to the fact that when compared with photon beams, carbon ion beams offer improved dose distribution, leading to the concentration of the sufficient dose within a target volume while minimizing the dose in the surrounding normal tissues. In addition, carbon ions, being heavier than protons, provide a higher biological effectiveness, which increases with depth, reaching the maximum at the end of the beam's range. This is practically an ideal property from the standpoint of cancer radiotherapy. Clinical studies have been carried out in the world to confirm the efficacy of carbon ions against a variety of tumors as well as to develop effective techniques for delivering an efficient dose to the tumor. Through clinical experiences of carbon ion radiotherapy at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences and Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, a significant reduction in the overall treatment time with acceptable toxicities has been obtained in almost all types of tumors. This means that carbon ion radiotherapy has meanwhile achieved for itself a solid place in general practice. This review describes clinical results of carbon ion radiotherapy together with physical, biological and technological aspects of carbon ions. PMID:22798685

  13. Palliative Radiotherapy for Bone Metastases: An ASTRO Evidence-Based Guideline

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Stephen, E-mail: slutz@bvha.or; Berk, Lawrence; Chang, Eric

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To present guidance for patients and physicians regarding the use of radiotherapy in the treatment of bone metastases according to current published evidence and complemented by expert opinion. Methods and Materials: A systematic search of the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database between 1998 and 2009 yielded 4,287 candidate original research articles potentially applicable to radiotherapy for bone metastases. A Task Force composed of all authors synthesized the published evidence and reached a consensus regarding the recommendations contained herein. Results: The Task Force concluded that external beam radiotherapy continues to be the mainstay for the treatment of pain and/ormore » prevention of the morbidity caused by bone metastases. Various fractionation schedules can provide significant palliation of symptoms and/or prevent the morbidity of bone metastases. The evidence for the safety and efficacy of repeat treatment to previously irradiated areas of peripheral bone metastases for pain was derived from both prospective studies and retrospective data, and it can be safe and effective. The use of stereotactic body radiotherapy holds theoretical promise in the treatment of new or recurrent spine lesions, although the Task Force recommended that its use be limited to highly selected patients and preferably within a prospective trial. Surgical decompression and postoperative radiotherapy is recommended for spinal cord compression or spinal instability in highly selected patients with sufficient performance status and life expectancy. The use of bisphosphonates, radionuclides, vertebroplasty, and kyphoplasty for the treatment or prevention of cancer-related symptoms does not obviate the need for external beam radiotherapy in appropriate patients. Conclusions: Radiotherapy is a successful and time efficient method by which to palliate pain and/or prevent the morbidity of bone metastases. This Guideline reviews the available data to define its

  14. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Might Increase Pneumonitis Risk Relative to Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Patients Receiving Combined Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy: A Modeling Study of Dose Dumping

    SciTech Connect

    Vogelius, Ivan S.; Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI; Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To model the possible interaction between cytotoxic chemotherapy and the radiation dose distribution with respect to the risk of radiation pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 18 non-small-cell lung cancer patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy at the University of Wisconsin were selected for the present modeling study. Three treatment plans were considered: the delivered tomotherapy plans; a three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan; and a fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan. The IMRT and 3D-CRT plans were generated specifically for the present study. The plans were optimized without adjusting for the chemotherapy effect. The effect of chemotherapy was modeledmore » as an independent cell killing process by considering a uniform chemotherapy equivalent radiation dose added to all voxels of the organ at risk. The risk of radiation pneumonitis was estimated for all plans using the Lyman and the critical volume models. Results: For radiotherapy alone, the critical volume model predicts that the two IMRT plans are associated with a lower risk of radiation pneumonitis than the 3D-CRT plan. However, when the chemotherapy equivalent radiation dose exceeds a certain threshold, the radiation pneumonitis risk after IMRT is greater than after 3D-CRT. This threshold dose is in the range estimated from clinical chemoradiotherapy data sets. Conclusions: Cytotoxic chemotherapy might affect the relative merit of competing radiotherapy plans. More work is needed to improve our understanding of the interaction between chemotherapy and the radiation dose distribution in clinical settings.« less

  15. Radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    James, Nicholas D; Hussain, Syed A; Hall, Emma; Jenkins, Peter; Tremlett, Jean; Rawlings, Christine; Crundwell, Malcolm; Sizer, Bruce; Sreenivasan, Thiagarajan; Hendron, Carey; Lewis, Rebecca; Waters, Rachel; Huddart, Robert A

    2012-04-19

    Radiotherapy is an alternative to cystectomy in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. In other disease sites, synchronous chemoradiotherapy has been associated with increased local control and improved survival, as compared with radiotherapy alone. In this multicenter, phase 3 trial, we randomly assigned 360 patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer to undergo radiotherapy with or without synchronous chemotherapy. The regimen consisted of fluorouracil (500 mg per square meter of body-surface area per day) during fractions 1 to 5 and 16 to 20 of radiotherapy and mitomycin C (12 mg per square meter) on day 1. Patients were also randomly assigned to undergo either whole-bladder radiotherapy or modified-volume radiotherapy (in which the volume of bladder receiving full-dose radiotherapy was reduced) in a partial 2-by-2 factorial design (results not reported here). The primary end point was survival free of locoregional disease. Secondary end points included overall survival and toxic effects. At 2 years, rates of locoregional disease-free survival were 67% (95% confidence interval [CI], 59 to 74) in the chemoradiotherapy group and 54% (95% CI, 46 to 62) in the radiotherapy group. With a median follow-up of 69.9 months, the hazard ratio in the chemoradiotherapy group was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.48 to 0.96; P=0.03). Five-year rates of overall survival were 48% (95% CI, 40 to 55) in the chemoradiotherapy group and 35% (95% CI, 28 to 43) in the radiotherapy group (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.63 to 1.09; P=0.16). Grade 3 or 4 adverse events were slightly more common in the chemoradiotherapy group than in the radiotherapy group during treatment (36.0% vs. 27.5%, P=0.07) but not during follow-up (8.3% vs. 15.7%, P=0.07). Synchronous chemotherapy with fluorouracil and mitomycin C combined with radiotherapy significantly improved locoregional control of bladder cancer, as compared with radiotherapy alone, with no significant increase in adverse events. (Funded by Cancer

  16. Chaotic Modes in Scale Free Opinion Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmartsev, Feo V.; Kürten, Karl E.

    In this paper, we investigate processes associated with formation of public opinion in varies directed random, scale free and small-world social networks. The important factor of the opinion formation is the existence of contrarians which were discovered by Granovetter in various social psychology experiments1,2,3 long ago and later introduced in sociophysics by Galam.4 When the density of contrarians increases the system behavior drastically changes at some critical value. At high density of contrarians the system can never arrive to a consensus state and periodically oscillates with different periods depending on specific structure of the network. At small density of the contrarians the behavior is manifold. It depends primary on the initial state of the system. If initially the majority of the population agrees with each other a state of stable majority may be easily reached. However when originally the population is divided in nearly equal parts consensus can never be reached. We model the emergence of collective decision making by considering N interacting agents, whose opinions are described by two state Ising spin variable associated with YES and NO. We show that the dynamical behaviors are very sensitive not only to the density of the contrarians but also to the network topology. We find that a phase of social chaos may arise in various dynamical processes of opinion formation in many realistic models. We compare the prediction of the theory with data describing the dynamics of the average opinion of the USA population collected on a day-by-day basis by varies media sources during the last six month before the final Obama-McCain election. The qualitative ouctome is in reasonable agreement with the prediction of our theory. In fact, the analyses of these data made within the paradigm of our theory indicates that even in this campaign there were chaotic elements where the public opinion migrated in an unpredictable chaotic way. The existence of such a phase

  17. Chaotic Modes in Scale Free Opinion Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmartsev, Feo V.; Kürten, Karl E.

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate processes associated with formation of public opinion in varies directed random, scale free and small-world social networks. The important factor of the opinion formation is the existence of contrarians which were discovered by Granovetter in various social psychology experiments1,2,3 long ago and later introduced in sociophysics by Galam.4 When the density of contrarians increases the system behavior drastically changes at some critical value. At high density of contrarians the system can never arrive to a consensus state and periodically oscillates with different periods depending on specific structure of the network. At small density of the contrarians the behavior is manifold. It depends primary on the initial state of the system. If initially the majority of the population agrees with each other a state of stable majority may be easily reached. However when originally the population is divided in nearly equal parts consensus can never be reached. We model the emergence of collective decision making by considering N interacting agents, whose opinions are described by two state Ising spin variable associated with YES and NO. We show that the dynamical behaviors are very sensitive not only to the density of the contrarians but also to the network topology. We find that a phase of social chaos may arise in various dynamical processes of opinion formation in many realistic models. We compare the prediction of the theory with data describing the dynamics of the average opinion of the USA population collected on a day-by-day basis by varies media sources during the last six month before the final Obama-McCain election. The qualitative ouctome is in reasonable agreement with the prediction of our theory. In fact, the analyses of these data made within the paradigm of our theory indicates that even in this campaign there were chaotic elements where the public opinion migrated in an unpredictable chaotic way. The existence of such a phase

  18. Oesophagus side effects related to the treatment of oesophageal cancer or radiotherapy of other thoracic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Adebahr, Sonja; Schimek-Jasch, Tanja; Nestle, Ursula; Brunner, Thomas B

    2016-08-01

    The oesophagus as a serial organ located in the central chest is frequent subject to "incidental" dose application in radiotherapy for several thoracic malignancies including oesophageal cancer itself. Especially due to the radiosensitive mucosa severe radiotherapy induced sequelae can occur, acute oesophagitis and strictures as late toxicity being the most frequent side-effects. In this review we focus on oesophageal side effects derived from treatment of gastrointestinal cancer and secondly provide an overview on oesophageal toxicity from conventional and stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy to the thoracic area in general. Available data on pathogenesis, frequency, onset, and severity of oesophageal side effects are summarized. Whereas for conventional radiotherapy the associations of applied doses to certain volumes of the oesophagus are well described, the tolerance dose to the mediastinal structures for hypofractionated therapy is unknown. The review provides available attempts to predict the risk of oesophageal side effects from dosimetric parameters of SBRT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer Patients With Pelvic Lymphocele After Surgery: Clinical and Dosimetric Data of 30 Patients.

    PubMed

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Colangione, Sarah Pia; Fodor, Cristiana; Russo, Stefania; Cambria, Raffaella; Zerini, Dario; Bonora, Maria; Cecconi, Agnese; Vischioni, Barbara; Vavassori, Andrea; Matei, Deliu Victor; Bottero, Danilo; Brescia, Antonio; Musi, Gennaro; Mazzoleni, Federica; Orsi, Franco; Bonomo, Guido; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of irradiation after prostatectomy in the presence of asymptomatic pelvic lymphocele. The inclusion criteria for this study were: (1) patients referred for postoperative (adjuvant or salvage) intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT; 66-69 Gy in 30 fractions); (2) detection of postoperative pelvic lymphocele at the simulation computed tomography [CT] scan; (3) no clinical symptoms; and (4) written informed consent. Radiotherapy toxicity and occurrence of symptoms or complications of lymphocele were analyzed. Dosimetric data (IMRT plans) and the modification of lymphocele volume during radiotherapy (cone beam CT [CBCT] scan) were evaluated. Between January 2011 and July 2013, in 30 of 308 patients (10%) treated with radiotherapy after prostatectomy, pelvic lymphocele was detected on the simulation CT. The median lymphocele volume was 47 cm(3) (range, 6-467.3 cm(3)). Lymphocele was not included in planning target volume (PTV) in 8 cases (27%). Maximum dose to lymphocele was 57 Gy (range, 5.7-73.3 Gy). Radiotherapy was well tolerated. In all but 2 patients, lymphoceles remained asymptomatic. Lymphocele drainage-because of symptom occurrence-had to be performed in 2 patients during IMRT and in one patient, 7 weeks after IMRT. CBCT at the end of IMRT showed reduction in lymphocele volume and position compared with the initial data (median reduction of 37%), more pronounced in lymphoceles included in PTV. Radiotherapy after prostatectomy in the presence of pelvic asymptomatic lymphocele is feasible with acceptable acute and late toxicity. The volume of lymphoceles decreased during radiotherapy and this phenomenon might require intermediate radiotherapy plan evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Enhancing radiotherapy for lung cancer using immunoadjuvants delivered in situ from new design radiotherapy biomaterials: a preclinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yao; Yasmin-Karim, Sayeda; Moreau, Michele; Sinha, Neeharika; Sajo, Erno; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2016-12-01

    Studies show that radiotherapy of a primary tumor in combination with immunoadjuvants (IA) can result in increased survival or immune-mediated regression of metastasis outside the radiation field, a phenomenon known as abscopal effect. However, toxicities due to repeated systematic administration of IA have been shown to be a major obstacle in clinical trials. To minimize the toxicities and prime a more potent immune response, Ngwa et al have proposed that inert radiotherapy biomaterials such as fiducials could be upgraded to multifunctional ones loaded with IA for in situ delivery directly into the tumor sub-volume at no additional inconvenience to patients. In this preliminary study, the potential of such an approach is investigated for lung cancer using anti-CD40 antibody. First the benefit of using the anti-CD40 delivered in situ to enhance radiotherapy was tested in mice with subcutaneous tumors generated with the Lewis Lung cancer cell line LL/2 (LLC-1). The tumors were implanted on both flanks of the mice to simulate metastasis. Tumors on one flank were treated with and without anti-CD40 and the survival benefits compared. An experimentally determined in vivo diffusion coefficient for nanoparticles was then employed to estimate the time for achieving intratumoral distribution of the needed minimal concentrations of anti-CD40 nanoparticles if released from a multifuntional radiotherapy biomaterials. The studies show that the use of anti-CD40 significantly enhanced radiotherapy effect, slowing the growth of the treated and untreated tumors, and increasing survival. Meanwhile our calculations indicate that for a 2-4 cm tumor and 7 mg g-1 IA concentrations, it would take 4.4-17.4 d, respectively, following burst release, for the required concentration of IA nanoparticles to accumulate throughout the tumor during image-guided radiotherapy. The distribution of IA could be customized as a function of loading concentrations or nanoparticle size to fit current

  1. Enhancing radiotherapy for lung cancer using immunoadjuvants delivered in situ from new design radiotherapy biomaterials: a preclinical study.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yao; Yasmin-Karim, Sayeda; Moreau, Michele; Sinha, Neeharika; Sajo, Erno; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2016-12-21

    Studies show that radiotherapy of a primary tumor in combination with immunoadjuvants (IA) can result in increased survival or immune-mediated regression of metastasis outside the radiation field, a phenomenon known as abscopal effect. However, toxicities due to repeated systematic administration of IA have been shown to be a major obstacle in clinical trials. To minimize the toxicities and prime a more potent immune response, Ngwa et al have proposed that inert radiotherapy biomaterials such as fiducials could be upgraded to multifunctional ones loaded with IA for in situ delivery directly into the tumor sub-volume at no additional inconvenience to patients. In this preliminary study, the potential of such an approach is investigated for lung cancer using anti-CD40 antibody. First the benefit of using the anti-CD40 delivered in situ to enhance radiotherapy was tested in mice with subcutaneous tumors generated with the Lewis Lung cancer cell line LL/2 (LLC-1). The tumors were implanted on both flanks of the mice to simulate metastasis. Tumors on one flank were treated with and without anti-CD40 and the survival benefits compared. An experimentally determined in vivo diffusion coefficient for nanoparticles was then employed to estimate the time for achieving intratumoral distribution of the needed minimal concentrations of anti-CD40 nanoparticles if released from a multifuntional radiotherapy biomaterials. The studies show that the use of anti-CD40 significantly enhanced radiotherapy effect, slowing the growth of the treated and untreated tumors, and increasing survival. Meanwhile our calculations indicate that for a 2-4 cm tumor and 7 mg g -1 IA concentrations, it would take 4.4-17.4 d, respectively, following burst release, for the required concentration of IA nanoparticles to accumulate throughout the tumor during image-guided radiotherapy. The distribution of IA could be customized as a function of loading concentrations or nanoparticle size to fit current

  2. Discrepancy and Disliking Do Not Induce Negative Opinion Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Flache, Andreas; Mäs, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Both classical social psychological theories and recent formal models of opinion differentiation and bi-polarization assign a prominent role to negative social influence. Negative influence is defined as shifts away from the opinion of others and hypothesized to be induced by discrepancy with or disliking of the source of influence. There is strong empirical support for the presence of positive social influence (a shift towards the opinion of others), but evidence that large opinion differences or disliking could trigger negative shifts is mixed. We examine positive and negative influence with controlled exposure to opinions of other individuals in one experiment and with opinion exchange in another study. Results confirm that similarities induce attraction, but results do not support that discrepancy or disliking entails negative influence. Instead, our findings suggest a robust positive linear relationship between opinion distance and opinion shifts. PMID:27333160

  3. External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Patients on Anticoagulation Therapy: How Significant is the Bleeding Toxicity?

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, Kevin S.; Jani, Ashesh B.; Liauw, Stanley L., E-mail: sliauw@radonc.uchicago.ed

    Purpose: To characterize the bleeding toxicity associated with external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer patients receiving anticoagulation (AC) therapy. Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of 568 patients with adenocarcinoma of the prostate who were treated with definitive external beam radiotherapy. Of these men, 79 were receiving AC therapy with either warfarin or clopidogrel. All patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Bleeding complications were recorded during treatment and subsequent follow-up visits. Results: With a median follow-up of 48 months, the 4-year actuarial risk of Grade 3 or worse bleeding toxicity was 15.5% for those receivingmore » AC therapy compared with 3.6% among those not receiving AC (p < .0001). On multivariate analysis, AC therapy was the only significant factor associated with Grade 3 or worse bleeding (p < .0001). For patients taking AC therapy, the crude rate of bleeding was 39.2%. Multivariate analysis within the AC group demonstrated that a higher radiotherapy dose (p = .0408), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (p = 0.0136), and previous transurethral resection of the prostate (p = .0001) were associated with Grade 2 or worse bleeding toxicity. Androgen deprivation therapy was protective against bleeding, with borderline significance (p = 0.0599). Dose-volume histogram analysis revealed that Grade 3 or worse bleeding was minimized if the percentage of the rectum receiving >=70 Gy was <10% or the rectum receiving >=50 Gy was <50%. Conclusion: Patients taking AC therapy have a substantial risk of bleeding toxicity from external beam radiotherapy. In this setting, dose escalation or intensity-modulated radiotherapy should be used judiciously. With adherence to strict dose-volume histogram criteria and minimizing hotspots, the risk of severe bleeding might be reduced.« less

  4. How to use PET/CT in the evaluation of response to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Decazes, Pierre; Thureau, Sébastien; Dubray, Bernard; Vera, Pierre

    2018-06-01

    Radiotherapy is a major treatment modality for many cancers. Tumor response after radiotherapy determines the subsequent steps of the patient's management (surveillance, adjuvant or salvage treatment and palliative care). Tumor response assessed during radiotherapy offers a promising opportunity to adapt the treatment plan to reduced or increased target volume, to specifically target sub-volumes with relevant biological characteristics (metabolism, hypoxia, proliferation, etc.) and to further spare the organs at risk. In addition to its role in the diagnosis and the initial staging, Positron Emission Tomography combined with a Computed Tomography (PET/CT) provides functional information and is therefore attractive to evaluate tumor response. The aim of this paper is to review the published data addressing PET/CT as an evaluation tool in irradiated tumors. Reports on PET/CT acquired at various times (during radiotherapy, after initial (chemo-) radiotherapy, after definitive radiotherapy and during posttreatment follow-up) in solid tumors (lung, head-and-neck, cervix, esophagus, prostate and rectum) were collected and reviewed. Various tracers and technical aspects are also discussed. 18F-FDG PET/CT has a well-established role in clinical routine after definitive chemo-radiotherapy for locally advanced head-and-neck cancers. 18F-choline PET/CT is indicated in prostate cancer patients with biochemical failure. 18F-FDG PET/CT is optional in many other circumstances and the clinical benefits of assessing tumor response with PET/CT remain a field of very active research. The combination of PET with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET/MRI) may prove to be valuable in irradiated rectal and cervix cancers. Tumor response can be evaluated by PET/CT with clinical consequences in multiple situations, notably in head and neck and prostate cancers, after radiotherapy. Further clinical evaluation for most cancers is still needed, possibly in association to MRI.

  5. A teledentistry system for the second opinion.

    PubMed

    Gambino, Orazio; Lima, Fausto; Pirrone, Roberto; Ardizzone, Edoardo; Campisi, Giuseppina; di Fede, Olga

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a Teledentistry system aimed to the Second Opinion task. It make use of a particular camera called intra-oral camera, also called dental camera, in order to perform the photo shooting and real-time video of the inner part of the mouth. The pictures acquired by the Operator with such a device are sent to the Oral Medicine Expert (OME) by means of a current File Transfer Protocol (FTP) service and the real-time video is channeled into a video streaming thanks to the VideoLan client/server (VLC) application. It is composed by a HTML5 web-pages generated by PHP and allows to perform the Second Opinion both when Operator and OME are logged and when one of them is offline.

  6. Employee benefits managers' opinions about addiction treatment.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Bentson H; Lierman, Walter K; Penner, Norman R; McCamant, Lynn E; Zani, Brigid G

    2003-01-01

    Employee benefits managers arrange addictive disease treatment insurance coverage for the majority of people in the United States but little is known about these decision-makers. Managers were surveyed to learn their opinions about addiction treatment. Subjects were 131 people (61 percent female, 94 percent white, average age 46, average of 14 years in the human resources field). Managers were asked to rank health benefits (physical health, dental, alcohol-drug, vision, mental health, employee assistance program, and pharmaceuticals) on 15 dimensions. Managers ranked alcohol-drug abuse treatment worst on fiveitems and second to the worst on another four of the 15 dimensions. On the item considered most important by the managers, respondents noted that employees often (2.8) ask for improved physical health benefits but rarely do so for alcohol and drug (4.1) benefits (p < .001). Education of workers and payers will be needed to change opinions about treatment of addictive disorders.

  7. ETI, SETI and today's public opinion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, Roberto

    During the last three decades the general public's initial opinions about ETI and SETI changed, turning ignorance, fear and superficiality into a gradual understanding of the importance of these concepts. After a brief analysis of this changing psycho-sociological attitude, the paper provides an "estimate of the situation" about general interest for ETI and SETI, suggesting a growing awareness in today's public opinion. Science fiction movies like Close Encounters of the Third Kind and E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial and popular interest in UFOs as visitors from outer space played a major role in the average man's acceptance of the reality of extra-terrestrial life and its meaning for mankind.

  8. Distributed Time Synchronization Algorithms and Opinion Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manita, Anatoly; Manita, Larisa

    2018-01-01

    We propose new deterministic and stochastic models for synchronization of clocks in nodes of distributed networks. An external accurate time server is used to ensure convergence of the node clocks to the exact time. These systems have much in common with mathematical models of opinion formation in multiagent systems. There is a direct analogy between the time server/node clocks pair in asynchronous networks and the leader/follower pair in the context of social network models.

  9. Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of benign meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Candish, Charles; McKenzie, Michael; Clark, Brenda G.

    Purpose: To assess the use of stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SRT) for the treatment of meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between April 1999 and October 2004, 38 patients underwent SRT. Of 34 patients (36 tumors) assessed, the median age was 53 years. The indication was primary treatment in 26 cases (no histology) and postoperative in 10 cases. The most common sites were cavernous sinus (17), optic nerve (6), and cerebellopontine angle (5). The median gross target volume and planning target volume were 8.9 cm{sup 3} and 18.9 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Stereotactic treatment was delivered with 6-MV photons with static conformal fields (custom-mademore » blocks, 9 patients, and micromultileaf collimator, 25 patients). Median number of fields was six. The median dose prescribed was 50 Gy (range, 45-50.4 Gy) in 28 fractions. The median homogeneity and conformality indices were 1.1 and 1.79, respectively. Results: Treatment was well tolerated. Median follow-up was 26 months with 100% progression-free survival. One patient developed an area of possible radionecrosis related to previous radiotherapy, and 2 men developed mild hypogonadism necessitating testosterone replacement. The vision of 5 of 6 patients with optic pathway meningiomas improved or remained static. Conclusions: Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy for the treatment of meningiomas is practical, and with early follow-up, seems to be effective.« less

  10. Chefs' opinions of restaurant portion sizes.

    PubMed

    Condrasky, Marge; Ledikwe, Jenny H; Flood, Julie E; Rolls, Barbara J

    2007-08-01

    The objectives were to determine who establishes restaurant portion sizes and factors that influence these decisions, and to examine chefs' opinions regarding portion size, nutrition information, and weight management. A survey was distributed to chefs to obtain information about who is responsible for determining restaurant portion sizes, factors influencing restaurant portion sizes, what food portion sizes are being served in restaurants, and chefs' opinions regarding nutrition information, health, and body weight. The final sample consisted of 300 chefs attending various culinary meetings. Executive chefs were identified as being primarily responsible for establishing portion sizes served in restaurants. Factors reported to have a strong influence on restaurant portion sizes included presentation of foods, food cost, and customer expectations. While 76% of chefs thought that they served "regular" portions, the actual portions of steak and pasta they reported serving were 2 to 4 times larger than serving sizes recommended by the U.S government. Chefs indicated that they believe that the amount of food served influences how much patrons consume and that large portions are a problem for weight control, but their opinions were mixed regarding whether it is the customer's responsibility to eat an appropriate amount when served a large portion of food. Portion size is a key determinant of energy intake, and the results from this study suggest that cultural norms and economic value strongly influence the determination of restaurant portion sizes. Strategies are needed to encourage chefs to provide and promote portions that are appropriate for customers' energy requirements.

  11. Opinion dynamics on an adaptive random network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benczik, I. J.; Benczik, S. Z.; Schmittmann, B.; Zia, R. K. P.

    2009-04-01

    We revisit the classical model for voter dynamics in a two-party system with two basic modifications. In contrast to the original voter model studied in regular lattices, we implement the opinion formation process in a random network of agents in which interactions are no longer restricted by geographical distance. In addition, we incorporate the rapidly changing nature of the interpersonal relations in the model. At each time step, agents can update their relationships. This update is determined by their own opinion, and by their preference to make connections with individuals sharing the same opinion, or rather with opponents. In this way, the network is built in an adaptive manner, in the sense that its structure is correlated and evolves with the dynamics of the agents. The simplicity of the model allows us to examine several issues analytically. We establish criteria to determine whether consensus or polarization will be the outcome of the dynamics and on what time scales these states will be reached. In finite systems consensus is typical, while in infinite systems a disordered metastable state can emerge and persist for infinitely long time before consensus is reached.

  12. 42 CFR 57.1511 - Opinion of legal counsel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Opinion of legal counsel. 57.1511 Section 57.1511... Personnel § 57.1511 Opinion of legal counsel. At appropriate stages in the application and approval... memorandum or opinion of legal counsel with respect to the legality of any proposed note issue, the legal...

  13. 42 CFR 57.1511 - Opinion of legal counsel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Opinion of legal counsel. 57.1511 Section 57.1511... Personnel § 57.1511 Opinion of legal counsel. At appropriate stages in the application and approval... memorandum or opinion of legal counsel with respect to the legality of any proposed note issue, the legal...

  14. 29 CFR 18.610 - Religious beliefs or opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Religious beliefs or opinions. 18.610 Section 18.610 Labor... OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Witnesses § 18.610 Religious beliefs or opinions. Evidence of the beliefs or opinions of a witness on matters of religion is not admissible for the purpose...

  15. 29 CFR 18.610 - Religious beliefs or opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Religious beliefs or opinions. 18.610 Section 18.610 Labor... OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Witnesses § 18.610 Religious beliefs or opinions. Evidence of the beliefs or opinions of a witness on matters of religion is not admissible for the purpose...

  16. 29 CFR 18.610 - Religious beliefs or opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Religious beliefs or opinions. 18.610 Section 18.610 Labor... OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Witnesses § 18.610 Religious beliefs or opinions. Evidence of the beliefs or opinions of a witness on matters of religion is not admissible for the purpose...

  17. 49 CFR 1503.645 - Expert or opinion witnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PROCEDURES Rules of Practice in TSA Civil Penalty Actions § 1503.645 Expert or opinion witnesses. An employee of the agency may not be called as an expert or opinion witness, for any party other than TSA, in any... an expert or opinion witness for TSA in any proceeding governed by this subpart to which the...

  18. Opinion data mining based on DNA method and ORA software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ru-Ya; Wu, Lei; Liang, Xiao-He; Zhang, Xue-Fu

    2018-01-01

    Public opinion, especially the online public opinion is a critical issue when it comes to mining its characteristics. Because it can be formed directly and intensely in a short time, and may lead to the outbreak of online group events, and the formation of online public opinion crisis. This may become the pushing hand of a public crisis event, or even have negative social impacts, which brings great challenges to the government management. Data from the mass media which reveal implicit, previously unknown, and potentially valuable information, can effectively help us to understand the evolution law of public opinion, and provide a useful reference for rumor intervention. Based on the Dynamic Network Analysis method, this paper uses ORA software to mine characteristics of public opinion information, opinion topics, and public opinion agents through a series of indicators, and quantitatively analyzed the relationships between them. The results show that through the analysis of the 8 indexes associating with opinion data mining, we can have a basic understanding of the public opinion characteristics of an opinion event, such as who is important in the opinion spreading process, the information grasping condition, and the opinion topics release situation.

  19. 29 CFR 18.610 - Religious beliefs or opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Religious beliefs or opinions. 18.610 Section 18.610 Labor... OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Witnesses § 18.610 Religious beliefs or opinions. Evidence of the beliefs or opinions of a witness on matters of religion is not admissible for the purpose...

  20. 29 CFR 18.610 - Religious beliefs or opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Religious beliefs or opinions. 18.610 Section 18.610 Labor... OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Witnesses § 18.610 Religious beliefs or opinions. Evidence of the beliefs or opinions of a witness on matters of religion is not admissible for the purpose...

  1. 10 CFR 590.404 - Final opinions and orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final opinions and orders. 590.404 Section 590.404 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES WITH RESPECT TO THE IMPORT AND EXPORT OF NATURAL GAS Opinions and Orders § 590.404 Final opinions and...

  2. Phase Transition in Opinion Diffusion in Social Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    the opinions of social agents diffuse in a network under a so-called hard-interaction model, in which the agents inter- act more strongly with...gent behavior. Index Terms— opinion diffusion , opinion dynamics, social net- works, phase transition, herding. 1. INTRODUCTION The study of the

  3. 12 CFR 211.11 - Advisory opinions under Regulation K.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advisory opinions under Regulation K. 211.11... INTERNATIONAL BANKING OPERATIONS (REGULATION K) International Operations of U.S. Banking Organizations § 211.11 Advisory opinions under Regulation K. (a) Request for advisory opinion. Any person may submit a request to...

  4. 12 CFR 211.11 - Advisory opinions under Regulation K.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advisory opinions under Regulation K. 211.11... INTERNATIONAL BANKING OPERATIONS (REGULATION K) International Operations of U.S. Banking Organizations § 211.11 Advisory opinions under Regulation K. (a) Request for advisory opinion. Any person may submit a request to...

  5. 12 CFR 211.11 - Advisory opinions under Regulation K.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advisory opinions under Regulation K. 211.11... INTERNATIONAL BANKING OPERATIONS (REGULATION K) International Operations of U.S. Banking Organizations § 211.11 Advisory opinions under Regulation K. (a) Request for advisory opinion. Any person may submit a request to...

  6. 12 CFR 211.11 - Advisory opinions under Regulation K.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advisory opinions under Regulation K. 211.11... INTERNATIONAL BANKING OPERATIONS (REGULATION K) International Operations of U.S. Banking Organizations § 211.11 Advisory opinions under Regulation K. (a) Request for advisory opinion. Any person may submit a request to...

  7. 12 CFR 211.11 - Advisory opinions under Regulation K.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Advisory opinions under Regulation K. 211.11... INTERNATIONAL BANKING OPERATIONS (REGULATION K) International Operations of U.S. Banking Organizations § 211.11 Advisory opinions under Regulation K. (a) Request for advisory opinion. Any person may submit a request to...

  8. 28 CFR 80.8 - Attorney General opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Attorney General opinion. 80.8 Section 80.8 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT OPINION PROCEDURE § 80.8 Attorney General opinion. The Attorney General or his designee shall, within 30 days after...

  9. 22 CFR 126.9 - Advisory opinions and related authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Advisory opinions and related authorizations. 126.9 Section 126.9 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS GENERAL POLICIES AND PROVISIONS § 126.9 Advisory opinions and related authorizations. (a) Advisory opinion...

  10. Opinion Dynamics with Heterogeneous Interactions and Information Assimilation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mir Tabatabaei, Seydeh Anahita

    2013-01-01

    In any modern society, individuals interact to form opinions on various topics, including economic, political, and social aspects. Opinions evolve as the result of the continuous exchange of information among individuals and of the assimilation of information distributed by media. The impact of individuals' opinions on each other forms a network,…

  11. Does a too risk-averse approach to the implementation of new radiotherapy technologies delay their clinical use?

    PubMed

    Garcia, R; Nyström, H; Fiorino, C; Thwaites, D

    2015-07-01

    Radiotherapy is a generally safe treatment modality in practice; nevertheless, recent well-reported accidents also confirm its potential risks. However, this may obstruct or delay the introduction of new technologies and treatment strategies/techniques into clinical practice. Risks must be addressed and judged in a realistic context: risks must be assessed realistically. Introducing new technology may introduce new possibilities of errors. However, delaying the introduction of such new technology therefore means that patients are denied the potentially better treatment opportunities. Despite the difficulty in quantitatively assessing the risks on both sides of the possible choice of actions, including the "lost opportunity", the best estimates should be included in the overall risk-benefit and cost-benefit analysis. Radiotherapy requires a sufficiently high level of support for the safety, precision and accuracy required: radiotherapy development and implementation is exciting. However, it has been anxious with a constant awareness of the consequences of mistakes or misunderstandings. Recent history can be used to show that for introduction of advanced radiotherapy, the risk-averse medical physicist can act as an electrical fuse in a complex circuit. The lack of sufficient medical physics resource or expertise can short out this fuse and leave systems unsafe. Future technological developments will continue to present further safety and risk challenges. The important evolution of radiotherapy brings different management opinions and strategies. Advanced radiotherapy technologies can and should be safely implemented in as timely a manner as possible for the patient groups where clinical benefit is indicated.

  12. Small animal radiotherapy research platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaegen, Frank; Granton, Patrick; Tryggestad, Erik

    2011-06-01

    Advances in conformal radiation therapy and advancements in pre-clinical radiotherapy research have recently stimulated the development of precise micro-irradiators for small animals such as mice and rats. These devices are often kilovolt x-ray radiation sources combined with high-resolution CT imaging equipment for image guidance, as the latter allows precise and accurate beam positioning. This is similar to modern human radiotherapy practice. These devices are considered a major step forward compared to the current standard of animal experimentation in cancer radiobiology research. The availability of this novel equipment enables a wide variety of pre-clinical experiments on the synergy of radiation with other therapies, complex radiation schemes, sub-target boost studies, hypofractionated radiotherapy, contrast-enhanced radiotherapy and studies of relative biological effectiveness, to name just a few examples. In this review we discuss the required irradiation and imaging capabilities of small animal radiation research platforms. We describe the need for improved small animal radiotherapy research and highlight pioneering efforts, some of which led recently to commercially available prototypes. From this, it will be clear that much further development is still needed, on both the irradiation side and imaging side. We discuss at length the need for improved treatment planning tools for small animal platforms, and the current lack of a standard therein. Finally, we mention some recent experimental work using the early animal radiation research platforms, and the potential they offer for advancing radiobiology research.

  13. Expanding global access to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Atun, Rifat; Jaffray, David A; Barton, Michael B; Bray, Freddie; Baumann, Michael; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Hanna, Timothy P; Knaul, Felicia M; Lievens, Yolande; Lui, Tracey Y M; Milosevic, Michael; O'Sullivan, Brian; Rodin, Danielle L; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Van Dyk, Jacob; Yap, Mei Ling; Zubizarreta, Eduardo; Gospodarowicz, Mary

    2015-09-01

    Radiotherapy is a critical and inseparable component of comprehensive cancer treatment and care. For many of the most common cancers in low-income and middle-income countries, radiotherapy is essential for effective treatment. In high-income countries, radiotherapy is used in more than half of all cases of cancer to cure localised disease, palliate symptoms, and control disease in incurable cancers. Yet, in planning and building treatment capacity for cancer, radiotherapy is frequently the last resource to be considered. Consequently, worldwide access to radiotherapy is unacceptably low. We present a new body of evidence that quantifies the worldwide coverage of radiotherapy services by country. We show the shortfall in access to radiotherapy by country and globally for 2015-35 based on current and projected need, and show substantial health and economic benefits to investing in radiotherapy. The cost of scaling up radiotherapy in the nominal model in 2015-35 is US$26·6 billion in low-income countries, $62·6 billion in lower-middle-income countries, and $94·8 billion in upper-middle-income countries, which amounts to $184·0 billion across all low-income and middle-income countries. In the efficiency model the costs were lower: $14·1 billion in low-income, $33·3 billion in lower-middle-income, and $49·4 billion in upper-middle-income countries-a total of $96·8 billion. Scale-up of radiotherapy capacity in 2015-35 from current levels could lead to saving of 26·9 million life-years in low-income and middle-income countries over the lifetime of the patients who received treatment. The economic benefits of investment in radiotherapy are very substantial. Using the nominal cost model could produce a net benefit of $278·1 billion in 2015-35 ($265·2 million in low-income countries, $38·5 billion in lower-middle-income countries, and $239·3 billion in upper-middle-income countries). Investment in the efficiency model would produce in the same period an even

  14. Biological PET-guided adaptive radiotherapy for dose escalation in head and neck cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Navran, Arash; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Vogel, Wouter V

    2018-06-04

    In recent years, the possibility of adapting radiotherapy to changes in biological tissue parameters has emerged. It is hypothesized that early identification of radio-resistant parts of the tumor during treatment provides the possibility to adjust the radiotherapy plan to improve outcome. The aim of this systematic literature review was to evaluate the current state of the art of biological PET-guided adaptive radiotherapy, focusing on dose escalation to radio-resistant tumor. A structured literature search was done to select clinical trials including patients with head and neck cancer of the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx or larynx, with a PET performed during treatment used to develop biological adaptive radiotherapy by i) delineation of sub-volumes suitable for adaptive re-planning, ii) in silico adaptive treatment planning or iii) treatment of patients with PET based dose escalated adaptive radiotherapy. Nineteen articles were selected, 12 articles analyzing molecular imaging signal during treatment and 7 articles focused on biological adaptive treatment planning, of which two were clinical trials. Studied biological pathways include metabolism (FDG), hypoxia (MISO, FAZA and HX4) and proliferation (FLT). In the development of biological dose adaptation in radiotherapy for head-neck tumors, many aspects of the procedure remain ambiguous. Patient selection, tracer selection for detection of the radio-resistant sub-volumes, timing of adaptive radiotherapy, workflow and treatment planning aspects are discussed in a clinical context.

  15. A lexicon based method to search for extreme opinions

    PubMed Central

    Gamallo, Pablo

    2018-01-01

    Studies in sentiment analysis and opinion mining have been focused on many aspects related to opinions, namely polarity classification by making use of positive, negative or neutral values. However, most studies have overlooked the identification of extreme opinions (most negative and most positive opinions) in spite of their vast significance in many applications. We use an unsupervised approach to search for extreme opinions, which is based on the automatic construction of a new lexicon containing the most negative and most positive words. PMID:29799867

  16. Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Low-Risk Endometrial Cancers: Final Results of a Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Macchia, Gabriella, E-mail: gmacchia@rm.unicatt.i; Cilla, Savino M.P.; Ferrandina, Gabriella

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose of short-course radiotherapy (intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique) to the upper two thirds of the vagina in endometrial cancers with low risk of local recurrence. Patients and Methods: A Phase I clinical trial was performed. Eligible patients had low-risk resected primary endometrial adenocarcinomas. Radiotherapy was delivered in 5 fractions over 1 week. The planning target volume was the clinical target volume plus 5 mm. The clinical target volume was defined as the upper two thirds of the vagina as evidenced at CT simulation by a vaginal radio-opaque device. The planning target volume was irradiated bymore » a seven-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique, planned by the Plato Sunrise inverse planning system. A first cohort of 6 patients received 25 Gy (5-Gy fractions), and a subsequent cohort received 30 Gy (6-Gy fractions). The Common Toxicity Criteria scale, version 3.0, was used to score toxicity. Results: Twelve patients with endometrial cancer were enrolled. Median age was 58 years (range, 49-74 years). Pathologic stage was IB (83.3%) and IC (16.7%). Median tumor size was 30 mm (range, 15-50 mm). All patients completed the prescribed radiotherapy. No patient experienced a dose-limiting toxicity at the first level, and the radiotherapy dose was escalated from 25 to 30 Gy. No patients at the second dose level experienced dose-limiting toxicity. The most common Grade 2 toxicity was gastrointestinal, which was tolerable and manageable. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose of short-course radiotherapy was 30 Gy at 6 Gy per fraction. On the basis of this result, we are conducting a Phase II study with radiotherapy delivered at 30 Gy.« less

  17. OpinionSeer: interactive visualization of hotel customer feedback.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingcai; Wei, Furu; Liu, Shixia; Au, Norman; Cui, Weiwei; Zhou, Hong; Qu, Huamin

    2010-01-01

    The rapid development of Web technology has resulted in an increasing number of hotel customers sharing their opinions on the hotel services. Effective visual analysis of online customer opinions is needed, as it has a significant impact on building a successful business. In this paper, we present OpinionSeer, an interactive visualization system that could visually analyze a large collection of online hotel customer reviews. The system is built on a new visualization-centric opinion mining technique that considers uncertainty for faithfully modeling and analyzing customer opinions. A new visual representation is developed to convey customer opinions by augmenting well-established scatterplots and radial visualization. To provide multiple-level exploration, we introduce subjective logic to handle and organize subjective opinions with degrees of uncertainty. Several case studies illustrate the effectiveness and usefulness of OpinionSeer on analyzing relationships among multiple data dimensions and comparing opinions of different groups. Aside from data on hotel customer feedback, OpinionSeer could also be applied to visually analyze customer opinions on other products or services.

  18. Non-consensus Opinion Models on Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Braunstein, Lidia A.; Wang, Huijuan; Shao, Jia; Stanley, H. Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2013-04-01

    Social dynamic opinion models have been widely studied to understand how interactions among individuals cause opinions to evolve. Most opinion models that utilize spin interaction models usually produce a consensus steady state in which only one opinion exists. Because in reality different opinions usually coexist, we focus on non-consensus opinion models in which above a certain threshold two opinions coexist in a stable relationship. We revisit and extend the non-consensus opinion (NCO) model introduced by Shao et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 103:01870, 2009). The NCO model in random networks displays a second order phase transition that belongs to regular mean field percolation and is characterized by the appearance (above a certain threshold) of a large spanning cluster of the minority opinion. We generalize the NCO model by adding a weight factor W to each individual's original opinion when determining their future opinion (NCO W model). We find that as W increases the minority opinion holders tend to form stable clusters with a smaller initial minority fraction than in the NCO model. We also revisit another non-consensus opinion model based on the NCO model, the inflexible contrarian opinion (ICO) model (Li et al. in Phys. Rev. E 84:066101, 2011), which introduces inflexible contrarians to model the competition between two opinions in a steady state. Inflexible contrarians are individuals that never change their original opinion but may influence the opinions of others. To place the inflexible contrarians in the ICO model we use two different strategies, random placement and one in which high-degree nodes are targeted. The inflexible contrarians effectively decrease the size of the largest rival-opinion cluster in both strategies, but the effect is more pronounced under the targeted method. All of the above models have previously been explored in terms of a single network, but human communities are usually interconnected, not isolated. Because opinions propagate not

  19. Radiobiological concepts for treatment planning of schemes that combines external beam radiotherapy and systemic targeted radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabián Calderón Marín, Carlos; González González, Joaquín Jorge; Laguardia, Rodolfo Alfonso

    2017-09-01

    The combination of radiotherapy modalities with external bundles and systemic radiotherapy (CIERT) could be a reliable alternative for patients with multiple lesions or those where treatment planning maybe difficult because organ(s)-at-risk (OARs) constraints. Radiobiological models should have the capacity for predicting the biological irradiation response considering the differences in the temporal pattern of dose delivering in both modalities. Two CIERT scenarios were studied: sequential combination in which one modality is executed following the other one and concurrent combination when both modalities are running simultaneously. Expressions are provided for calculation of the dose-response magnitudes Tumor Control Probability (TCP) and Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP). General results on radiobiological modeling using the linear-quadratic (LQ) model are also discussed. Inter-subject variation of radiosensitivity and volume irradiation effect in CIERT are studied. OARs should be under control during the planning in concurrent CIERT treatment as the administered activity is increased. The formulation presented here may be used for biological evaluation of prescriptions and biological treatment planning of CIERT schemes in clinical situation.

  20. Radiotherapy of rectal cancer in elderly patients: Real-world data assessment in a decade.

    PubMed

    Diao, Peng; Langrand-Escure, Julien; Garcia, Max-Adrien; Espenel, Sophie; Rehailia-Blanchard, Amel; de Lavigerie, Blandine; Vial, Nicolas; de Laroche, Guy; Vallard, Alexis; Magné, Nicolas

    2018-06-01

    There is paucity of data on the efficacy and toxicity of radiotherapy in rectal cancer (RC) elderly patients. The objective was to identify management strategies and resulting outcomes in RC patients ≥70 years undergoing radiotherapy. A retrospective study included consecutive RC patients ≥70 years undergoing rectal radiotherapy. From 2004-2015, 340 RC patients underwent pre-operative (n = 238; 70%), post-operative (n = 41, 12%), or exclusive (n = 61, 18%) radiotherapy, with a median age of 78.5 years old (range: 70-96). Radiotherapy protocols were tailored, with 54 different radiotherapy programs (alteration of the total dose, and/or fractionation, and/or volume). Median follow-up was 27.1 months. Acute and late grade 3-4 radio-induced toxicities were reported in 3.5% and 0.9% of patients. Metastatic setting (OR = 6.60, CI95% 1.47-46.03, p = 0.02), exclusive radiotherapy (OR = 5.08, CI95% 1.48-18.21, p = 0.009), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (OR = 6.42, CI95% 1.31-24.73, p = 0.01) were associated with grade ≥3 acute toxicities in univariate analysis. Exclusive radiotherapy (OR = 9.79, CI95% 2.49-43.18, p = 0.001) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (OR = 12.62, CI95% 2.05-71.26, p = 0.003) were independent predictive factors of grade ≥3 acute toxicities in multivariate analysis. A complete pathological response was achieved in 12 out of 221 pre-operative patients (5.4%). Age, tumor stage, and surgery were independent predictive factors of survival in multivariate analysis. At end of follow-up, 7.1% of patients experienced local relapse. Radiotherapy for RC in elderly patients appeared safe and manageable, perhaps due to the tailoring of radiotherapy protocols. Tailored management resulted in acceptable rate of local tumor control. Copyright © 2018 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of memory on opinion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jędrzejewski, Arkadiusz; Sznajd-Weron, Katarzyna

    2018-09-01

    We investigate an agent-based model of opinion dynamics with two types of social response: conformity and independence. Conformity is introduced to the model analogously as in the Sznajd model or q-voter model, which means that only unanimous group exerts peer pressure on individuals. The novelty, in relation to previous versions of the q-voter model, is memory possessed by each agent and external noise T, which plays the role of social temperature. Each agent has its own memories of past experiences related to the social costs and benefits of being independent or conformist. If an agent was awarded in past more for being independent, it will have a greater tendency to be independent than conformist and vice versa. We will show that depending on the social temperature T the system spontaneously organizes into one of two regimes. Below a certain critical social temperature Tc, all agents in the society acquire personal traits (so called person state). Some of them become permanent conformists and others start to behave forever independently. This means that initially homogeneous population becomes heterogeneous, and agents respond differently to social influence. For T >Tc, all agents with equal probabilities behave independently or conform to peer pressure (so called situation state). This regime change between person and situation state, which reminds the idea of an annealed vs. quenched disorder, affects also public opinion. Particularly interesting results are obtained for individualistic societies, in which public opinion is non-monotonic function of T, which means that there is an optimal social temperature for which an agreement in the society is the highest.

  2. Second consultant opinion for elective orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, E G; Finkel, M L

    1981-01-01

    We abstracted records of 369 patients whose recommendations for elective orthopedic surgery were not confirmed by a second opinion consultant. Six months or more after the initial recommendation for surgery, 82 per cent had not had the operation performed, irrespective of the diagnosis and the characteristics of the physician recommending surgery. Reasons for consultant non-confirmation included: use of a cast, brace, or corrective footwear preferable (26.3 per cent), symptoms not severe enough (18.4 per cent), and physical therapy/exercises preferable (17.8 per cent). PMID:7294266

  3. A Kindler syndrome-associated squamous cell carcinoma treated with radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Caldeira, Ademar; Trinca, William Correia; Flores, Thais Pires; Costa, Andrea Barleze; Brito, Claudio de Sá; Weigert, Karen Loureiro; Matos, Maryana Schwartzhaupt; Nicolini, Carmela; Obst, Fernando Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Kindler syndrome1, 2 is a genetic disorder mainly characterized by increased skin fragility and photosensitivity,3, 4 making the use of treatments based on radiation difficult or even prohibited. Thus, cases reporting Kindler syndrome patients treated with radiotherapy are rare. In this study, we report clinical outcomes and care provided for a rare case of a Kindler syndrome patient submitted to radiotherapy. Diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma involving the buccal mucosa, the patient was exclusively treated with radiotherapy, with 70 Gy delivered on the PTV with the Volumetric Modulated Arc technique. The patient's reaction regarding control of the lesion is relevant compared to patients not affected by the syndrome. We noticed acute reactions of the skin and buccal mucosa after few radiotherapy sessions, followed by a fast reduction in the tumor volume. The efficacy of radiotherapy along with multidisciplinary actions allowed treatment continuity, leading to a complete control of the lesion and life quality improvement and showed that the use of radiotherapy on Kindler syndrome patients is possible.

  4. Optical spectroscopy of radiotherapy and photodynamic therapy responses in normal rat skin shows vascular breakdown products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teles de Andrade, Cintia; Nogueira, Marcelo S.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Marra, Kayla; Gunn, Jason; Andreozzi, Jacqueline; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Kurachi, Cristina; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and radiotherapy are non-systemic cancer treatment options with different mechanisms of damage. So combining these techniques has been shown to have some synergy, and can mitigate their limitations such as low PDT light penetration or radiotherapy side effects. The present study monitored the induced tissue changes after PDT, radiotherapy, and a combination protocol in normal rat skin, using an optical spectroscopy system to track the observed biophysical changes. The Wistar rats were treated with one of the protocols: PDT followed by radiotherapy, PDT, radiotherapy and radiotherapy followed by PDT. Reflectance spectra were collected in order to observe the effects of these combined therapies, especially targeting vascular response. From the reflectance, information about oxygen saturation, met-hemoglobin and bilirubin concentration, blood volume fraction (BVF) and vessel radius were extracted from model fitting of the spectra. The rats were monitored for 24 hours after treatment. Results showed that there was no significant variation in the vessel size or BVF after the treatments. However, the PDT caused a significant increase in the met-hemoglobin and bilirubin concentrations, indicating an important blood breakdown. These results may provide an important clue on how the damage establishment takes place, helping to understand the effect of the combination of those techniques in order to verify the existence of a known synergistic effect.

  5. Recent advances in intensity modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Xi, Mian; Lin, Steven H

    2017-07-01

    Radiotherapy is an important component of the standard of care for esophageal cancer. In the past decades, significant improvements in the planning and delivery of radiation techniques have led to better dose conformity to the target volume and improved normal tissue sparing. Areas covered: This review focuses on the advances in radiotherapy techniques and summarizes the availably dosimetric and clinical outcomes of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy, proton therapy, and four-dimensional radiotherapy for esophageal cancer, and discusses the challenges and future development of proton therapy. Expert commentary: Although three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy is the standard radiotherapy technique in esophageal cancer, the retrospectively comparative studies strongly suggest that the dosimetric advantage of IMRT over three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy can translate into improved clinical outcomes, despite the lack of prospective randomized evidence. As a novel form of conventional IMRT technique, volumetric modulated arc therapy can produce equivalent or superior dosimetric quality with significantly higher treatment efficiency in esophageal cancer. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy has the potential to achieve further clinical improvement due to their physical properties; however, prospective clinical data, long-term results, and cost-effectiveness are needed.

  6. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using robotic radiotherapy: a dosimetric comparison with tomotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rault, Erwann; Lacornerie, Thomas; Dang, Hong-Phuong; Crop, Frederik; Lartigau, Eric; Reynaert, Nick; Pasquier, David

    2016-02-27

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is a new breast treatment modality aiming to reduce treatment time using hypo fractionation. Compared to conventional whole breast irradiation that takes 5 to 6 weeks, APBI is reported to induce worse cosmetic outcomes both when using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). These late normal tissue effects may be attributed to the dose volume effect because a large portion of the non-target breast tissue volume (NTBTV) receives a high dose. In the context of APBI, non-coplanar beams could spare the NTBTV more efficiently. This study evaluates the dosimetric benefit of using the Cyberknife (CK) for APBI in comparison to IMRT (Tomotherapy) and three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). The possibility of using surgical clips, implanted during surgery, to track target movements is investigated first. A phantom of a female thorax was designed in-house using the measurements of 20 patients. Surgical clips of different sizes were inserted inside the breast. A treatment plan was delivered to the mobile and immobile phantom. The motion compensation accuracy was evaluated using three radiochromic films inserted inside the breast. Three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), Tomotherapy (TOMO) and CK treatment plans were calculated for 10 consecutive patients who received APBI in Lille. To ensure a fair comparison of the three techniques, margins applied to the CTV were set to 10 mm. However, a second CK plan was prepared using 3 mm margins to evaluate the benefits of motion compensation. Only the larger clips (VITALITEC Medium-Large) could be tracked inside the larger breast (all gamma indices below 1 for 1 % of the maximum dose and 1 mm). All techniques meet the guidelines defined in the NSABP/RTOG and SHARE protocols. As the applied dose volume constraints are very strong, insignificant dosimetric differences exist between techniques regarding the PTV

  7. Conformal Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Advanced Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma With Intracranial Extension: An Institutional Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Santam, E-mail: drsantam@gmail.com; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Patil, Vijay Maruti

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To describe the results of conformal radiotherapy in advanced juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in a tertiary care institution. Methods and Materials: Retrospective chart review was conducted for 8 patients treated with conformal radiotherapy between 2006 and 2009. The median follow-up was 17 months. All patients had Stage IIIB disease with intracranial extension. Radiotherapy was considered as treatment because patients were deemed inoperable owing to extensive intracranial/intraorbital extension or proximity to optic nerve. All but 1 patient were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy using seven coplanar fields. Median (range) dose prescribed was 39.6 (30-46) Gy. Actuarial analysis of local control and descriptivemore » analysis of toxicity profile was conducted. Results: Despite the large and complex target volume (median planning target volume, 292 cm{sup 3}), intensity-modulated radiotherapy achieved conformal dose distributions (median van't Reit index, 0.66). Significant sparing of the surrounding organs at risk was obtained. No significant Grade 3/4 toxicities were experienced during or after treatment. Actual local control at 2 years was 87.5%. One patient died 1 month after radiotherapy secondary to massive epistaxis. The remaining 7 patients had progressive resolution of disease and were symptom-free at last follow-up. Persistent rhinitis was the only significant toxicity, seen in 1 patient. Conclusions: Conformal radiotherapy results in good local control with minimal acute and late side effects in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas, even in the presence of advanced disease.« less

  8. Evaluation of Thyroid Disorders During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy by Using Functional Analysis and Ultrasonography

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhshandeh, Mohsen; Hashemi, Bijan, E-mail: bhashemi@modares.ac.ir; Mahdavi, Seyed Rabie

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate thyroid function and vascular changes during radiotherapy for patients with head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients treated with primary or postoperative radiotherapy for various cancers in the head and neck region were prospectively evaluated. The serum samples (triiodothyronine [T3], thyroxine [T4], thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free triiodothyronine [FT3], and free thyroxine [FT4]), the echo level of the thyroid gland, and color Doppler ultrasonography (CDU) parameters of the right inferior thyroid artery (RITA) of the patients were measured before and at regular intervals during radiotherapy. The thyroid gland dose-volume histograms of the patients were derived frommore » their computed tomography-based treatment plans. Results: There was a significant fall in TSH level (p < 0.0001) but an increase in FT4 (p < 0.0001) and T4 (p < 0.022) levels during the radiotherapy course. The threshold dose required to produce significant changes was 12 Gy (Biologically Effective Dose in 2-Gy fractions, BED{sub 2}). There were significant rises in the patients' pulsatility index, resistive index, peak systolic velocity, blood volume flow levels, and RITA diameter (p < 0.0001), as detected by CDU during radiotherapy, compared to those parameters measured before the treatment. Hypoechogenicity and irregular echo patterns (p < 0.0001) were seen during radiotherapy compared to those before treatment. There was significant Pearson's correlation between the CDU parameters and T4, FT4, and TSH levels. Conclusions: Radiation-induced thyroiditis is regarded as primary damage to the thyroid gland. Thyroiditis can subsequently result in hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. Our results demonstrated that changes in thyroid vessels occur during radiotherapy delivered to patients. Vessel changes also can be attributed to the late effect of radiation on the thyroid gland. The hypoechogenicity and irregular echo patterns observed in patients may

  9. Analysis and application of opinion model with multiple topic interactions.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Fei; Liu, Yun; Wang, Liang; Wang, Ximeng

    2017-08-01

    To reveal heterogeneous behaviors of opinion evolution in different scenarios, we propose an opinion model with topic interactions. Individual opinions and topic features are represented by a multidimensional vector. We measure an agent's action towards a specific topic by the product of opinion and topic feature. When pairs of agents interact for a topic, their actions are introduced to opinion updates with bounded confidence. Simulation results show that a transition from a disordered state to a consensus state occurs at a critical point of the tolerance threshold, which depends on the opinion dimension. The critical point increases as the dimension of opinions increases. Multiple topics promote opinion interactions and lead to the formation of macroscopic opinion clusters. In addition, more topics accelerate the evolutionary process and weaken the effect of network topology. We use two sets of large-scale real data to evaluate the model, and the results prove its effectiveness in characterizing a real evolutionary process. Our model achieves high performance in individual action prediction and even outperforms state-of-the-art methods. Meanwhile, our model has much smaller computational complexity. This paper provides a demonstration for possible practical applications of theoretical opinion dynamics.

  10. Opinion formation of free speech on the directed social network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jiongming; Ma, Hongxu; Liu, Baohong; Li, Qi

    2014-12-01

    A dynamical model with continuous opinion is proposed to study how the speech order and the topology of directed social network affect the opinion formation of free speech. In the model, agents express their opinions one by one with random order (RO) or probability order (PO), other agents paying attentions to the speaking agent, receive provider's opinion, update their opinions and then express their new opinions in their turns. It is proved that with the same agent j repeats its opinion more, other agents who pay their attentions to j and include j's opinion in their confidence level at initial time, will continue approaching j's opinion. Simulation results reveal that on directed scale-free network: (1) the model for PO forms fewer opinion clusters, larger maximum cluster (MC), smaller standard deviation (SD), and needs less waiting time to reach a middle level of consensus than RO; (2) as the parameter of scale-free degree distribution decreases or the confidence level increases, the results often get better for both speech orders; (3) the differences between PO and RO get smaller as the size of network decreases.

  11. How does public opinion become extreme?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Marlon; Shao, Jia; Reis, Saulo D. S.; Anteneodo, Celia; Andrade, José S.; Havlin, Shlomo; Makse, Hernán A.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the emergence of extreme opinion trends in society by employing statistical physics modeling and analysis on polls that inquire about a wide range of issues such as religion, economics, politics, abortion, extramarital sex, books, movies, and electoral vote. The surveys lay out a clear indicator of the rise of extreme views. The precursor is a nonlinear relation between the fraction of individuals holding a certain extreme view and the fraction of individuals that includes also moderates, e.g., in politics, those who are “very conservative” versus “moderate to very conservative” ones. We propose an activation model of opinion dynamics with interaction rules based on the existence of individual “stubbornness” that mimics empirical observations. According to our modeling, the onset of nonlinearity can be associated to an abrupt bootstrap-percolation transition with cascades of extreme views through society. Therefore, it represents an early-warning signal to forecast the transition from moderate to extreme views. Moreover, by means of a phase diagram we can classify societies according to the percolative regime they belong to, in terms of critical fractions of extremists and people’s ties.

  12. Public opinion about energy: a literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Farhar, B.C.; Weis, P.; Unseld, C.T.

    1979-06-01

    A review and analysis of 115 surveys of the general population between 1973 and 1978 (before the Three Mile Island accident, sudden gasoline price increases, and spot gasoline shortages) are presented. The survey data are organized and analyzed according to a set of categories described in Chapter 2. The public's definition of the energy situation is the focus of Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes public opinion concerning energy conservation pertaining to transportation and domestic energy use -- whether it is efficacious, how knowledgeable people are about conservation, whether they favor it, and whether they engage in it. Findings on themore » solar energy alternative are described in Chapter 5. Public opinion concerning more conventional sources of energy -- oil and natural gas, coal, and nuclear energy -- are discussed in Chapter 6. In Chapter 7, a summary of analytical findings by 10 major sociodemographic characteristics is presented. Chapter 8 describes analytical findings using various social-psychological variables. A summary is presented in Chapter 9.« less

  13. How does public opinion become extreme?

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Marlon; Shao, Jia; Reis, Saulo D. S.; Anteneodo, Celia; Andrade, José S.; Havlin, Shlomo; Makse, Hernán A.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the emergence of extreme opinion trends in society by employing statistical physics modeling and analysis on polls that inquire about a wide range of issues such as religion, economics, politics, abortion, extramarital sex, books, movies, and electoral vote. The surveys lay out a clear indicator of the rise of extreme views. The precursor is a nonlinear relation between the fraction of individuals holding a certain extreme view and the fraction of individuals that includes also moderates, e.g., in politics, those who are “very conservative” versus “moderate to very conservative” ones. We propose an activation model of opinion dynamics with interaction rules based on the existence of individual “stubbornness” that mimics empirical observations. According to our modeling, the onset of nonlinearity can be associated to an abrupt bootstrap-percolation transition with cascades of extreme views through society. Therefore, it represents an early-warning signal to forecast the transition from moderate to extreme views. Moreover, by means of a phase diagram we can classify societies according to the percolative regime they belong to, in terms of critical fractions of extremists and people’s ties. PMID:25989484

  14. How does public opinion become extreme?

    PubMed

    Ramos, Marlon; Shao, Jia; Reis, Saulo D S; Anteneodo, Celia; Andrade, José S; Havlin, Shlomo; Makse, Hernán A

    2015-05-19

    We investigate the emergence of extreme opinion trends in society by employing statistical physics modeling and analysis on polls that inquire about a wide range of issues such as religion, economics, politics, abortion, extramarital sex, books, movies, and electoral vote. The surveys lay out a clear indicator of the rise of extreme views. The precursor is a nonlinear relation between the fraction of individuals holding a certain extreme view and the fraction of individuals that includes also moderates, e.g., in politics, those who are "very conservative" versus "moderate to very conservative" ones. We propose an activation model of opinion dynamics with interaction rules based on the existence of individual "stubbornness" that mimics empirical observations. According to our modeling, the onset of nonlinearity can be associated to an abrupt bootstrap-percolation transition with cascades of extreme views through society. Therefore, it represents an early-warning signal to forecast the transition from moderate to extreme views. Moreover, by means of a phase diagram we can classify societies according to the percolative regime they belong to, in terms of critical fractions of extremists and people's ties.

  15. 38 CFR 20.901 - Rule 901. Medical opinions and opinions of the General Counsel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Health Administration. The Board may obtain a medical opinion from an appropriate health care professional in the Veterans Health Administration of the Department of Veterans Affairs on medical questions... warranted by the medical complexity or controversy involved in an appeal, the Board may obtain an advisory...

  16. 38 CFR 20.901 - Rule 901. Medical opinions and opinions of the General Counsel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Health Administration. The Board may obtain a medical opinion from an appropriate health care professional in the Veterans Health Administration of the Department of Veterans Affairs on medical questions... warranted by the medical complexity or controversy involved in an appeal, the Board may obtain an advisory...

  17. Standard and Nonstandard Craniospinal Radiotherapy Using Helical TomoTherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, William, E-mail: william@medphys.mcgill.c; Brodeur, Marylene; Roberge, David

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To show the advantages of planning and delivering craniospinal radiotherapy with helical TomoTherapy (TomoTherapy Inc., Madison, WI) by presenting 4 cases treated at our institution. Methods and Materials: We first present a standard case of craniospinal irradiation in a patient with recurrent myxopapillary ependymoma (MPE) and follow this with 2 cases requiring differential dosing to multiple target volumes. One of these, a patient with recurrent medulloblastoma, required a lower dose to be delivered to the posterior fossa because the patient had been previously irradiated to the full dose, and the other required concurrent boosts to leptomeningeal metastases as partmore » of his treatment for newly diagnosed MPE. The final case presented is a patient with pronounced scoliosis who required spinal irradiation for recurrent MPE. Results: The four cases presented were planned and treated successfully with Helical Tomotherapy. Conclusions: Helical TomoTherapy delivers continuous arc-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy that gives high conformality and excellent dose homogeneity for the target volumes. Increased healthy tissue sparing is achieved at higher doses albeit at the expense of larger volumes of tissue receiving lower doses. Helical TomoTherapy allows for differential dosing of multiple targets, resulting in very elegant dose distributions. Daily megavoltage computed tomography imaging allows for precision of patient positioning, permitting a reduction in planning margins and increased healthy tissue sparing in comparison with standard techniques.« less

  18. The anal canal as a risk organ in cervical cancer patients with hemorrhoids undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyunsoo; Baek, Jong Geun; Jo, Sunmi

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance of the anal canal tends to be ignored in patients with cervical cancer undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy. However, patients with hemorrhoids may be troubled with low radiation dose. We tried to analyze the dose-volume statistics of the anal canal in patients undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy. The records of 31 patients with cervical cancer who received definite or postoperative radiotherapy at one institution were reviewed. Acute anal symptoms, such as anal pain and bleeding, were evaluated from radiotherapy start to 1 month after radiotherapy completion. Various clinical and dosimetric factors were analyzed to characterize relations with acute anal complications. The anal verge was located an average of 1.2 cm (range -0.6~3.9) below the lower border of the ischial tuberosity and an average of 2.7 cm (range -0.6~5.7) behind the sacral promontory level. The presence of hemorrhoids before radiotherapy was found to be significantly associated with acute radiation-induced anal symptoms (p = 0.001), and the mean induction dose for anal symptoms was 36.9 Gy. No patient without hemorrhoids developed an anal symptom during radiotherapy. Dosimetric analyses of V30 and V40 showed marginal correlations with anal symptoms (p = 0.07). The present study suggests a relation between acute anal symptoms following radiotherapy and acute hemorrhoid aggravation. Furthermore, the location of the anal verge was found to be variable, and consequently doses administered to the anal canal also varied substantially. Our results caution careful radiation treatment planning for whole pelvic radiotherapy, and that proper clinical management be afforded patients with hemorrhoids during radiotherapy.

  19. Dosimetric Evaluation of Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and 4-Field 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Uysal, Bora; Beyzadeoğlu, Murat; Sager, Ömer; Dinçoğlan, Ferrat; Demiral, Selçuk; Gamsız, Hakan; Sürenkök, Serdar; Oysul, Kaan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this dosimetric study is the targeted dose homogeneity and critical organ dose comparison of 7-field Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and 3-D 4-field conformal radiotherapy. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with low and moderate risk prostate cancer treated at Gülhane Military Medical School Radiation Oncology Department between January 2009 and December 2009 are included in this study. Two seperate dosimetric plans both for 7-field IMRT and 3D-CRT have been generated for each patient to comparatively evaluate the dosimetric status of both techniques and all the patients received 7-field IMRT. Results: Dose-comparative evaluation of two techniques revealed the superiority of IMRT technique with statistically significantly lower femoral head doses along with reduced critical organ dose-volume parameters of bladder V60 (the volume receiving 60 Gy) and rectal V40 (the volume receiving 40 Gy) and V60. Conclusion: It can be concluded that IMRT is an effective definitive management tool for prostate cancer with improved critical organ sparing and excellent dose homogenization in target organs of prostate and seminal vesicles. PMID:25207069

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging for precise radiotherapy of small laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Thorsten; Kaul, Michael Gerhard; Ernst, Thomas Michael; Salamon, Johannes; Jäckel, Maria; Schumacher, Udo; Krüll, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Radiotherapy of small laboratory animals (SLA) is often not as precisely applied as in humans. Here we describe the use of a dedicated SLA magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner for precise tumor volumetry, radiotherapy treatment planning, and diagnostic imaging in order to make the experiments more accurate. Different human cancer cells were injected at the lower trunk of pfp/rag2 and SCID mice to allow for local tumor growth. Data from cross sectional MRI scans were transferred to a clinical treatment planning system (TPS) for humans. Manual palpation of the tumor size was compared with calculated tumor size of the TPS and with tumor weight at necropsy. As a feasibility study MRI based treatment plans were calculated for a clinical 6MV linear accelerator using a micro multileaf collimator (μMLC). In addition, diagnostic MRI scans were used to investigate animals which did clinical poorly during the study. MRI is superior in precise tumor volume definition whereas manual palpation underestimates their size. Cross sectional MRI allow for treatment planning so that conformal irradiation of mice with a clinical linear accelerator using a μMLC is in principle feasible. Several internal pathologies were detected during the experiment using the dedicated scanner. MRI is a key technology for precise radiotherapy of SLA. The scanning protocols provided are suited for tumor volumetry, treatment planning, and diagnostic imaging. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  1. [Clinical experience of carbon ion radiotherapy for malignant tumors].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2006-04-01

    The carbon ion (C-ion) beams provide unique advantageous biological and physical properties in radiotherapy (RT) for malignant tumors. C-ion beams have a high relative biological effectiveness (RBE) resulting from the high linear energy transfer (LET). In terms of their physical characteristics, C-ion beams exhibit a spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) and make for a better dose distribution of the target volume by specified beam modulations. Between June 1994 and August 2005, a total of 2,371 patients with malignant tumors were registered in phase I/II dose-escalation studies and clinical phase II trials using C-ion beams generated at Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC). In the initial dose-escalation studies, grade 3 or more late rectal complications had developed in some patients. However, the adverse effects were resolved because of the use of appropriate dose levels and modification of the radiation technique. C-ion beams can carry out hypofractionated radiotherapy with a large fraction dose and reduce the overall treatment times compared with conventional radiotherapy. They can also achieve better local tumor control even for radio-resistant tumors such as malignant melanoma, hepatocellular carcinoma and bone and soft tissue sarcomas with minimal morbidity to the normal surrounding tissues.

  2. How to Read a U.S. Supreme Court Opinion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Tiffany

    2013-01-01

    Reading U.S. Supreme Court opinions can be intimidating. Yet, in the digital age, it has never been easier to access them. The average opinion is about 4,750 words, and is one of approximately 75 issued by the Court each year. It might be reassuring to know that opinions contain similar parts and tend to follow a similar format. There are also…

  3. Modeling Expert Opinion: Likelihoods under Incomplete Probabilistic Specification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-09

    regarding points per game for participants in the 1991 NBA championship basketball series. 2 1. Introduction Expert opinion is often sought with regard to...for the participants in the 1991 NBA championship basketball series. We present a synthesis of this opinion. The key features of our approach are...applied to opinion collected regarding points per game for participants in the 1991 NBA championship basketball series.

  4. Competing opinions and stubborness: Connecting models to data.

    PubMed

    Burghardt, Keith; Rand, William; Girvan, Michelle

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a general contagionlike model for competing opinions that includes dynamic resistance to alternative opinions. We show that this model can describe candidate vote distributions, spatial vote correlations, and a slow approach to opinion consensus with sensible parameter values. These empirical properties of large group dynamics, previously understood using distinct models, may be different aspects of human behavior that can be captured by a more unified model, such as the one introduced in this paper.

  5. Analysis of Electronic Densities and Integrated Doses in Multiform Glioblastomas Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baron-Aznar, C.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Celis, M. A.

    2008-08-11

    Integrated dose is the total energy delivered in a radiotherapy target. This physical parameter could be a predictor for complications such as brain edema and radionecrosis after stereotactic radiotherapy treatments for brain tumors. Integrated Dose depends on the tissue density and volume. Using CT patients images from the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery and BrainScan(c) software, this work presents the mean density of 21 multiform glioblastomas, comparative results for normal tissue and estimated integrated dose for each case. The relationship between integrated dose and the probability of complications is discussed.

  6. Analysis of Electronic Densities and Integrated Doses in Multiform Glioblastomas Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barón-Aznar, C.; Moreno-Jiménez, S.; Celis, M. A.; Lárraga-Gutiérrez, J. M.; Ballesteros-Zebadúa, P.

    2008-08-01

    Integrated dose is the total energy delivered in a radiotherapy target. This physical parameter could be a predictor for complications such as brain edema and radionecrosis after stereotactic radiotherapy treatments for brain tumors. Integrated Dose depends on the tissue density and volume. Using CT patients images from the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery and BrainScansoftware, this work presents the mean density of 21 multiform glioblastomas, comparative results for normal tissue and estimated integrated dose for each case. The relationship between integrated dose and the probability of complications is discussed.

  7. Harry and Louise and health care reform: romancing public opinion.

    PubMed

    Goldsteen, R L; Goldsteen, K; Swan, J H; Clemeña, W

    2001-12-01

    The question whether the "Harry and Louise" campaign ads, sponsored by the Health Insurance Association of America (HIAA) during the 1993-1994 health care reform debate, influenced public opinion has particular relevance today since interest groups are increasingly choosing commercial-style mass media campaigns to sway public opinion about health policy issues. Our study revisits the issue of the Harry and Louise campaign's influence on public opinion, comparing the ad campaign's messages to changes in opinion about health care reform over a twenty-six-month period in Oklahoma. Looking at the overall trends just prior to the introduction of the Harry and Louise campaign, public opinion was going in the "wrong" direction, from the HIAA perspective. Moreover, public opinion continued in the wrong direction until the mid-point of the campaign. However, in either the turning point of the campaign in terms of message content and tone or in the lag period following it, public opinion reversed on each health reform issue and returned to pre-campaign levels. It appears from these findings that the campaign captured public opinion when support for issues that were unfavorable to HIAA members was increasing and turned public opinion back to pre-campaign levels. The campaign may result in many more such marriages of political interest groups and commercial advertisers for the purpose of demobilizing public support for health policy initiatives that are unfavorable to special interests.

  8. Sznajd Opinion Dynamics with Global and Local Neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Christian

    In this modification of the Sznajd consensus model on the square lattice, two people of arbitrary distance who agree in their opinions convince their nearest neighbors of this opinion. Similarly to the mean field theory of Slanina and Lavicka, the times needed to reach consensus are distributed exponentially and are quite small. The width of the phase transition vanishes reciprocally to the linear lattice dimension. Advertising has effects independent of the system size. For more than two opinions, three opinions reach a consensus in roughly half of the samples, and four only rarely and only for small lattices. Up to 109 agents were simulated.

  9. Correlation between information diffusion and opinion evolution on social media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Fei; Liu, Yun; Zhang, Zhenjiang

    2014-12-01

    Information diffusion and opinion evolution are often treated as two independent processes. Opinion models assume the topic reaches each agent and agents initially have their own ideas. In fact, the processes of information diffusion and opinion evolution often intertwine with each other. Whether the influence between these two processes plays a role in the system state is unclear. In this paper, we collected more than one million real data from a well-known social platform, and analysed large-scale user diffusion behaviour and opinion formation. We found that user inter-event time follows a two-scaling power-law distribution with two different power exponents. Public opinion stabilizes quickly and evolves toward the direction of convergence, but the consensus state is prevented by a few opponents. We propose a three-state opinion model accompanied by information diffusion. Agents form and exchange their opinions during information diffusion. Conversely, agents' opinions also influence their diffusion actions. Simulations show that the model with a correlation of the two processes produces similar statistical characteristics as empirical results. A fast epidemic process drives individual opinions to converge more obviously. Unlike previous epidemic models, the number of infected agents does not always increase with the update rate, but has a peak with an intermediate value of the rate.

  10. The impact of competing zealots on opinion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Gunjan; Swami, Ananthram; Chan, Kevin

    2014-02-01

    An individual’s opinion on an issue is greatly impacted by others in his or her social network. Most people are open-minded and ready to change their opinion when presented evidence; however, some are zealots or inflexibles, that is, individuals who refuse to change their opinion while staunchly advocating an opinion in hopes of convincing others. Zealotry is present in opinions of significant personal investment, such as political, religious or corporate affiliation; it tends to be less commonplace in opinions involving rumors or fashion trends. In this paper, we examine the effect that zealots have in a population whose opinion dynamics obey the naming game model. We present numerical and analytical results about the number and nature of steady state solutions, demonstrating the existence of a bifurcation in the space of zealot fractions. Our analysis indicates conditions under which a minority zealot opinion ultimately prevails, and conditions under which neither opinion attains a majority. We also present numerical and simulation analysis of finite populations and on networks with partial connectivity.

  11. Projected Improvements in Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using a Novel Breast Stereotactic Radiotherapy Device: A Dosimetric Analysis.

    PubMed

    Snider, James W; Mutaf, Yildirim; Nichols, Elizabeth; Hall, Andrea; Vadnais, Patrick; Regine, William F; Feigenberg, Steven J

    2017-01-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation has caused higher than expected rates of poor cosmesis. At our institution, a novel breast stereotactic radiotherapy device has demonstrated dosimetric distributions similar to those in brachytherapy. This study analyzed comparative dose distributions achieved with the device and intensity-modulated radiation therapy accelerated partial breast irradiation. Nine patients underwent computed tomography simulation in the prone position using device-specific immobilization on an institutional review board-approved protocol. Accelerated partial breast irradiation target volumes (planning target volume_10mm) were created per the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B-39 protocol. Additional breast stereotactic radiotherapy volumes using smaller margins (planning target volume_3mm) were created based on improved immobilization. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy and breast stereotactic radiotherapy accelerated partial breast irradiation plans were separately generated for appropriate volumes. Plans were evaluated based on established dosimetric surrogates of poor cosmetic outcomes. Wilcoxon rank sum tests were utilized to contrast volumes of critical structures receiving a percentage of total dose ( Vx). The breast stereotactic radiotherapy device consistently reduced dose to all normal structures with equivalent target coverage. The ipsilateral breast V20-100 was significantly reduced ( P < .05) using planning target volume_10mm, with substantial further reductions when targeting planning target volume_3mm. Doses to the chest wall, ipsilateral lung, and breast skin were also significantly lessened. The breast stereotactic radiotherapy device's uniform dosimetric improvements over intensity-modulated accelerated partial breast irradiation in this series indicate a potential to improve outcomes. Clinical trials investigating this benefit have begun accrual.

  12. Opinion survey: materials management and purchasing habits.

    PubMed

    1988-01-01

    This opinion survey was undertaken to gauge the current status of materials management and purchasing departments at hospitals throughout the southern and southeastern United States. The survey was based on lengthy telephone interviews (from 30 to 60 minutes) and followup discussions with materials managers, purchasing agents and administrators. Interviews covered a variety of topics, including: cost-containment strategies; group purchasing and consignment purchasing; and current and anticipated trends in materials management. Many questions were left open-ended, so the survey could gauge attitudes, as well as determine contemporary practices and procedures. (In some cases, respondents were also given the opportunity to comment on the statements of their peers, in order to corroborate and substantiate data.)

  13. Public opinion on childhood immunisations in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Óskarsson, Ýmir; Guðnason, Þórólfur; Jónsdóttir, Guðbjörg A; Kristinsson, Karl G; Briem, Haraldur; Haraldsson, Ásgeir

    2015-12-16

    In recent years, vaccine preventable diseases such as measles and pertussis have been re-emerging in Western countries, maybe because of decreasing participation in childhood vaccination programs in some countries. There is clear evidence for vaccine efficacy and the risk of adverse effects is low. This needs to be communicated to the general public. The aim of the study was to evaluate the public opinion on childhood vaccinations in Iceland. An internet based study was used to evaluate the opinion on childhood immunisations in Iceland. The cohort was divided in three groups: (a) general public (b) employees of the University Hospital Iceland and (c) employees (teachers and staff) of the University of Iceland. The cohorts could be stratified according to age, gender, education, household income, parenthood and residency. Responses were received from 5584 individuals (53% response rate). When asked about childhood vaccinations in the first and second year of life, approximately 95% of participants were "positive" or "very positive", approximately 1% were "negative" or "very negative". When participants were asked whether they would have their child immunized according to the Icelandic childhood vaccination schedule, 96% were "positive" or "very positive", 1.2% were "negative" or "very negative". Similarly, 92% trust Icelandic Health authorities to decide on childhood vaccination schedule, 2.3% did not. In total, 9.3% "rather" or "strongly" agreed to the statement "I fear that vaccinations can cause severe adverse effects", 17.5% were undecided and 66.9% "disagreed" or "strongly disagreed". Individuals with higher education were more likely to disagree with this statement (OR=1.45, CI95=1.29-1.64, p<0.001) as did males (OR=1.22, CI95=1.087-1.379, p=0.001). This study shows a very positive attitude towards vaccinations raising expectations for an ongoing success in preventing preventable communicable diseases in childhood in Iceland. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd

  14. Doses to organs and tissues from concomitant imaging in radiotherapy: a suggested framework for clinical justification.

    PubMed

    Harrison, R M

    2008-12-01

    The increasing use of imaging for localization and verification in radiotherapy has raised issues concerning the justifiable doses to critical organs and tissues from concomitant exposures, particularly when extensive image-guided radiotherapy is indicated. Doses at positions remote from the target volume include components from high-energy leakage and scatter, as well as from concomitant imaging. In this paper, simulated prostate, breast and larynx treatments are used to compare doses from both high-energy and concomitant exposures as a function of distance from the target volume. It is suggested that the fraction, R, of the total dose at any point within the patient that is attributable to concomitant exposures may be a useful aid in their justification. R is small within the target volume and at large distances from it. However, there is a critical region immediately adjacent to the planning target volume where the dose from concomitant imaging combines with leakage and scatter to give values of R that approach 0.5 in the examples given here. This is noteworthy because the regions just outside the target volume will receive total doses in the order of 1 Gy, where commensurately high risk factors may not be substantially reduced because of cell kill. Other studies have identified these regions as sites of second cancers. The justification of an imaging regimen might therefore usefully take into account the maximum value of R encountered from the combination of imaging and radiotherapy for particular treatment sites.

  15. Radiotherapy quality assurance report from children's oncology group AHOD0031

    PubMed Central

    Dharmarajan, Kavita V.; Friedman, Debra L.; FitzGerald, T.J.; McCarten, Kathleen M.; Constine, Louis S.; Chen, Lu; Kessel, Sandy K.; Iandoli, Matt; Laurie, Fran; Schwartz, Cindy L.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A phase III trial assessing response-based therapy in intermediate-risk Hodgkin lymphoma, mandated real-time central review of involved field radiotherapy and imaging records by a centralized review center to maximize protocol compliance. We report the impact of centralized radiotherapy review upon protocol compliance. Methods Review of simulation films, port films, and dosimetry records was required pre-treatment and after treatment completion. Records were reviewed by study-affiliated or review center-affiliated radiation oncologists. A 6–10% deviation from protocol-specified dose was scored as “minor”; >10% was “major”. A volume deviation was scored as “minor” if margins were less than specified, or “major” if fields transected disease-bearing areas. Interventional review and final compliance review scores were assigned to each radiotherapy case and compared. Results Of 1712 patients enrolled, 1173 underwent IFRT at 256 institutions in 7 countries. An interventional review was performed in 88% and a final review in 98%. Overall, minor and major deviations were found in 12% and 6%, respectively. Among the cases for which ≥ 1 pre-IFRT modification was requested by QARC and subsequently made by the treating institution, 100% were made compliant on final review. In contrast, among the cases for which ≥ 1 modification was requested but not made by the treating institution, 10% were deemed compliant on final review. Conclusion In a large trial with complex treatment pathways and heterogeneous radiotherapy fields, central review was performed in a large percentage of cases pre-IFRT and identified frequent potential deviations in a timely manner. When suggested modifications were performed by the institutions, deviations were almost eliminated. PMID:25670539

  16. [Head and neck adaptive radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Graff, P; Huger, S; Kirby, N; Pouliot, J

    2013-10-01

    Onboard volumetric imaging systems can provide accurate data of the patient's anatomy during a course of head and neck radiotherapy making it possible to assess the actual delivered dose and to evaluate the dosimetric impact of complex daily positioning variations and gradual anatomic changes such as geometric variations of tumors and normal tissues or shrinkage of external contours. Adaptive radiotherapy is defined as the correction of a patient's treatment planning to adapt for individual variations observed during treatment. Strategies are developed to selectively identify patients that require replanning because of an intolerable dosimetric drift. Automated tools are designed to limit time consumption. Deformable image registration algorithms are the cornerstones of these strategies, but a better understanding of their limits of validity is required before adaptive radiotherapy can be safely introduced to daily practice. Moreover, strict evaluation of the clinical benefits is yet to be proven. Copyright © 2013 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Year-Round Daylight Saving Time Study : Volume 2. Supporting Studies

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1975-06-01

    This volume contains detailed background material in support of findings of the Interim Report. It includes the findings of a survey of attifudes towards daylight saving conducted by the National Opinion Research Center; description of sunrise and su...

  18. Technological advances in radiotherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Lorraine; Morgia, Marita; Fyles, Anthony; Milosevic, Michael

    2011-09-01

    To discuss the important technological advances that have taken place in the planning and delivery of both external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, and the implications for improved clinical outcomes. Technological advances in external beam radiation treatment and brachytherapy for patients with cervical cancer allow more precise targeting of tumour and relative sparing of surrounding normal organs and tissues. Early evidence is emerging to indicate that these advances will translate into improvements in tumour control and reduced side effects. However, there are patient, tumour and treatment-related factors that can detract from these benefits. Foremost among these is complex, unpredictable and sometimes dramatic internal tumour and normal organ motion during treatment. The focus of current research and clinical development is on tracking internal anatomic change in individual patients and adapting treatment plans as required to assure that optimal tumour coverage and normal tissue sparing is maintained at all times. The success of this approach will depend on clear definitions of target volumes, high resolution daily soft tissue imaging, and new software tools for rapid contouring, treatment planning and quality assurance. Radiation treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer is evolving rapidly, driven by advances in technology, towards more individualized patient care that has the potential to substantially improve clinical outcomes.

  19. Present Status of Radiotherapy in Clinical Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duehmke, Eckhart

    Aims of radiation oncology are cure from malignant diseases and - at the same time preservation of anatomy (e.g. female breast, uterus, prostate) and organ functions (e.g. brain, eye, voice, sphincter ani). At present, methods and results of clinical radiotherapy (RT) are based on experiences with natural history and radiobiology of malignant tumors in properly defined situations as well as on technical developments since World War II in geometrical and biological treatment planning in teletherapy and brachytherapy. Radiobiological research revealed tolerance limits of healthy tissues to be respected, effective total treatment doses of high cure probability depending on histology and tumor volume, and - more recently - altered fractionation schemes to be adapted to specific growth fractions and intrinsic radiosensitivities of clonogenic tumor cells. In addition, Biological Response Modifiers (BRM), such as cis-platinum, oxygen and hyperthermia may steepen cell survival curves of hypoxic tumor cells, others - such as tetrachiordekaoxid (TCDO) - may enhance repair of normal tissues. Computer assisted techniques in geometrical RT-planning based on individual healthy and pathologic anatomy (CT, MRT) provide high precision RT for well defined brain lesions by using dedicated linear accelerators (Stereotaxy). CT-based individual tissue compensators help with homogenization of distorted dose distributions in magna field irradiation for malignant lymphomas and with total body irradiation (TBI) before allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, e.g. for leukemia. RT with fast neutrons, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), RT with protons and heavy ions need to be tested in randomized trials before implementation into clinical routine.

  20. 49 CFR 604.21 - Special considerations for advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Desist Orders § 604.21 Special considerations for advisory opinions. Based on new facts involving significant financial considerations, the Chief Counsel may take appropriate enforcement action contrary to an... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special considerations for advisory opinions. 604...

  1. [Medical data security in medico-legal opinioning].

    PubMed

    Susło, Robert; Swiatek, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Medical data security can be approached in medico-legal opinioning in three main situations: security of medical data, on which the opinion should be based, opinioning itself and whether the medical data security was properly ensured and ensuring medical data security during medico-legal opinion giving. The importance of medical data security, during collecting, processing and storing, as well in medical as in legal institutions, is of major importance for the possibility of providing a proper medico-legal opinion. Theoretically speeking, it is possible to give a proper medico-legal opinion using incorrect data, but the possibility is low. When the expert is given improper, unreadable, incomplete or even bogus in part or in the whole medical data it is extremely possible, that he fails in giving his opinion. The term "medical data" was defined and subsequently there was a brief review of medical data storing methods made and specific threats bound with them, based on modern literature. The authors also pointed out possible methods of preventing the threats. They listed Polish as well as international regulations and laws concerning the problem, accenting the importance of preserving medical data for the purposes of medico-legal opinioning.

  2. 29 CFR 18.704 - Opinion on ultimate issue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Opinion on ultimate issue. 18.704 Section 18.704 Labor... ultimate issue. Testimony in the form of an opinion or inference otherwise admissible is not objectionable because it embraces an ultimate issue to be decided by the judge as trier of fact. ...

  3. An Investigation of the Intellectual Structure of Opinion Mining Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Yongjun; Kim, Meen Chul; Chen, Chaomei

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Opinion mining has been receiving increasing attention from a broad range of scientific communities since early 2000s. The present study aims to systematically investigate the intellectual structure of opinion mining research. Method: Using topic search, citation expansion, and patent search, we collected 5,596 bibliographic records…

  4. The Opinions of Economics Majors before and after Learning Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammock, Michael R.; Routon, P. Wesley; Walker, Jay K.

    2016-01-01

    Using longitudinal data on undergraduates from 463 American colleges and universities from 1994-99, the authors examine how majoring in economics affects student opinions on 13 social, political, and economic issues. Economics majors were found to begin and end their college tenure with differing opinions on several issues when compared to other…

  5. Media Consumption and Population Characteristics of Political Opinion Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, John P.; Andersen, Peter A.

    This study examines the information sources and population characteristics that differentiate political opinion-leaders from nonleaders. A telephone poll of 339 subjects provided data indicating that political opinion leaders receive more information about candidates from all media, as well as through interpersonal communication, than do…

  6. Surveying Older Adults' Opinions on Housing: Recommendations for Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Shannon L.; Shubair, Mamdouh M.; Michalos, Alex C.

    2010-01-01

    There is paucity of research investigating opinions and attitudes of seniors 55 years of age and older in relation to housing accommodation and services sensitive to the needs of the senior population. We describe the results of a cross-sectional survey soliciting opinions and attitudes of seniors with respect to a variety of housing issues…

  7. Principals' Opinions of Organisational Justice in Elementary Schools in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Inayet; Karaman-Kepenekci, Yasemin

    2008-01-01

    Purpose--This study aims to present the opinions of public elementary school principals in Turkey about the current organisational justice practices among teachers from the distributive, procedural, interactional, and rectificatory dimensions. Design/methodology/approach--The opinions of 11 public elementary school principals in Ankara about…

  8. 29 CFR 18.701 - Opinion testimony by lay witnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Opinion testimony by lay witnesses. 18.701 Section 18.701 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE FOR ADMINISTRATIVE HEARINGS... Opinion testimony by lay witnesses. If the witness is not testifying as an expert, the witness' testimony...

  9. 38 CFR 3.328 - lndependent medical opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false lndependent medical... Connection § 3.328 lndependent medical opinions. (a) General. When warranted by the medical complexity or controversy involved in a pending claim, an advisory medical opinion may be obtained from one or more medical...

  10. 38 CFR 3.328 - lndependent medical opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false lndependent medical... Connection § 3.328 lndependent medical opinions. (a) General. When warranted by the medical complexity or controversy involved in a pending claim, an advisory medical opinion may be obtained from one or more medical...

  11. 38 CFR 3.328 - lndependent medical opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false lndependent medical... Connection § 3.328 lndependent medical opinions. (a) General. When warranted by the medical complexity or controversy involved in a pending claim, an advisory medical opinion may be obtained from one or more medical...

  12. 42 CFR 1008.5 - Matters subject to advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Matters subject to advisory opinions. 1008.5... SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG General Provisions § 1008.5 Matters subject to...) What constitutes prohibited remuneration within the meaning of section 1128B(b) of the Act; (2) Whether...

  13. Essays of a peripheral mind: An opinion on policy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Strengthening the connections between science and policy is critical if science is to have meaningful impacts. Policy is often primarily based on arrays of opinion and experience. Science typically shapes some of these opinions. This essay addresses characteristics of science and its communicatio...

  14. Nanotechnology Awareness, Opinions and Risk Perceptions among Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Nurettin; Ekli, Emel

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates awareness, factual knowledge, opinions, and risk perceptions of students from Turkish middle schools with regard to nanotechnology in a very general sense. The study was carried out among 1,396 middle school 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students. The students' perceptions of and opinions about nanotechnology were elicited…

  15. Scientific Opinion on Risk Assessment of Synthetic Biology.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Michelle M; Vermeire, Theo

    2016-08-01

    In 2013, three Scientific Committees of the European Commission (EC) drafted Scientific Opinions on synthetic biology that provide an operational definition and address risk assessment methodology, safety aspects, environmental risks, knowledge gaps, and research priorities. These Opinions contribute to the international discussions on the risk governance for synthetic biology developments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Assigned Positions for In-Class Debates Influence Student Opinions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilly, Emily

    2012-01-01

    In-class debates are frequently used to encourage student engagement. Ideally, after researching both sides of the debate, students will form their own opinions based on what they have learned. However, in a large course of Environmental Science, opinions of students, when surveyed after the debate, were remarkably consistent with the position…

  17. Opinions of Physical Education Teachers on the Concept of Sportsmanship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koç, Yakup; Esentürk, Oguz Kaan

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the opinions of physical education teachers on the concept of sportsmanship. This study, which has been based on the qualitative research paradigm, involves opinions of 13 physical education teachers (9 males and 4 females) which serve in public schools of Turkey and which have been specified through a…

  18. 10 CFR 590.503 - Opinion and order on rehearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Opinion and order on rehearing. 590.503 Section 590.503 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES WITH RESPECT TO THE IMPORT AND EXPORT OF NATURAL GAS Applications for Rehearing § 590.503 Opinion...

  19. The Davis Social Environment-1990: A Report of Student Opinions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Low, Jane M.

    A study was done to examine student opinion of the social environment on the University of California Davis campus in Spring 1990 as a follow up to a similar study conducted in 1987. The study used the Student Opinion Survey and mailed it to a stratified random sample of 1,649 students. Of the surveys sent, 57.7 percent were returned. The…

  20. Attitudes and Opinions of Classroom Teacher Candidates Regarding Multiculturalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akar, Cuneyt; Ulu, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is twofold. The first objective is to develop a valid and reliable measurement tool for measuring the attitudes and opinions of classroom teachers regarding multiculturalism. The second one is to study the classroom teachers' attitudes and opinions towards multiculturalism in terms of gender, socio-economic and devoutness…

  1. 29 CFR 1608.2 - Written interpretation and opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Written interpretation and opinion. 1608.2 Section 1608.2... ACTION APPROPRIATE UNDER TITLE VII OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964, AS AMENDED § 1608.2 Written interpretation and opinion. These Guidelines constitute “a written interpretation and opinion” of the Equal...

  2. Understanding public opinion regarding transit in southeast Michigan.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2015-04-01

    This report presents findings from a study on public opinion regarding transit in Southeast Michigan. The overall goals of this : study were to assess the nature of public opinion regarding regional transit and to understand its relation to socio-dem...

  3. University Opinion Poll 9: Child Care, MPIRG, Lettuce. Preliminary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matross, Ronald; And Others

    The University Opinion Poll conducted a survey of student opinion on issues related to University-sponsored day care, the role of the Minnesota Public Interest Research Group (MPIRG) and the University's policy on buying lettuce for its food services. Four hundred fifty-two respondents, 76% of a random sample of University of Minnesota students,…

  4. Florida Employer Opinion Survey. Annual Report, August 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    The third in a series of annual employer opinion reports from the Florida Education and Training Placement Information Program (FETPIP), this 1991 report summarizes the results of three surveys of Florida employers known to have hired former vocational education program participants. One survey solicited employers' general opinions about…

  5. Students' Opinions on Facebook Supported Blended Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdem, Mukaddes; Kibar, Pinar Nuhoglu

    2014-01-01

    The first purpose of this study was to determine students' opinions on blended learning and its implementation. The other purpose was to explore the students' opinions on Facebook integration into blended learning environment. The participants of this study were 40 undergraduate students in their fourth semester of the program.…

  6. Opinions of the Geography Teacher Candidates toward Mind Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seyihoglu, Aysegul

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to reveal the opinions of the teacher candidates about mind mapping technique used in Geography education of undergraduate program. In this study, the qualitative research techniques were used. The study group consists of 55 teacher candidates. The teacher candidates have been asked for their opinions about the process…

  7. Phase II Study to Assess the Efficacy of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Patients With Large Cavernous Sinus Hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xin; Liu Xiaoxia; Mei Guanghai

    Purpose: Cavernous sinus hemangioma is a rare vascular tumor. The direct microsurgical approach usually results in massive hemorrhage. Although radiosurgery plays an important role in managing cavernous sinus hemangiomas as a treatment alternative to microsurgery, the potential for increased toxicity with single-session treatment of large tumors is a concern. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with large cavernous sinus hemangiomas. Methods: Fourteen patients with large (volume >20 cm{sup 3}) cavernous sinus hemangiomas were enrolled in a prospective Phase II study between December 2007 and December 2010. The hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapymore » dose was 21 Gy delivered in 3 fractions. Results: After a mean follow-up of 15 months (range, 6-36 months), the magnetic resonance images showed a mean of 77% tumor volume reduction (range, 44-99%). Among the 6 patients with cranial nerve impairments before hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, 1 achieved symptomatic complete resolution and 5 had improvement. No radiotherapy-related complications were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: Our current experience, though preliminary, substantiates the role of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for large cavernous sinus hemangiomas. Although a longer and more extensive follow-up is needed, hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of 21 Gy delivered in 3 fractions is effective in reducing the tumor volume without causing any new deficits and can be considered as a treatment modality for large cavernous sinus hemangiomas.« less

  8. Boltzmann-type control of opinion consensus through leaders

    PubMed Central

    Albi, G.; Pareschi, L.; Zanella, M.

    2014-01-01

    The study of formations and dynamics of opinions leading to the so-called opinion consensus is one of the most important areas in mathematical modelling of social sciences. Following the Boltzmann-type control approach recently introduced by the first two authors, we consider a group of opinion leaders who modify their strategy accordingly to an objective functional with the aim of achieving opinion consensus. The main feature of the Boltzmann-type control is that, owing to an instantaneous binary control formulation, it permits the minimization of the cost functional to be embedded into the microscopic leaders’ interactions of the corresponding Boltzmann equation. The related Fokker–Planck asymptotic limits are also derived, which allow one to give explicit expressions of stationary solutions. The results demonstrate the validity of the Boltzmann-type control approach and the capability of the leaders’ control to strategically lead the followers’ opinion. PMID:25288820

  9. An opinion formation based binary optimization approach for feature selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamedmoghadam, Homayoun; Jalili, Mahdi; Yu, Xinghuo

    2018-02-01

    This paper proposed a novel optimization method based on opinion formation in complex network systems. The proposed optimization technique mimics human-human interaction mechanism based on a mathematical model derived from social sciences. Our method encodes a subset of selected features to the opinion of an artificial agent and simulates the opinion formation process among a population of agents to solve the feature selection problem. The agents interact using an underlying interaction network structure and get into consensus in their opinions, while finding better solutions to the problem. A number of mechanisms are employed to avoid getting trapped in local minima. We compare the performance of the proposed method with a number of classical population-based optimization methods and a state-of-the-art opinion formation based method. Our experiments on a number of high dimensional datasets reveal outperformance of the proposed algorithm over others.

  10. Opinion dynamics in a group-based society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargiulo, F.; Huet, S.

    2010-09-01

    Many models have been proposed to analyze the evolution of opinion structure due to the interaction of individuals in their social environment. Such models analyze the spreading of ideas both in completely interacting backgrounds and on social networks, where each person has a finite set of interlocutors. In this paper we analyze the reciprocal feedback between the opinions of the individuals and the structure of the interpersonal relationships at the level of community structures. For this purpose we define a group-based random network and we study how this structure co-evolves with opinion dynamics processes. We observe that the adaptive network structure affects the opinion dynamics process helping the consensus formation. The results also show interesting behaviors in regards to the size distribution of the groups and their correlation with opinion structure.

  11. The effects of information and social conformity on opinion change

    PubMed Central

    Hatemi, Peter K.

    2018-01-01

    Extant research shows that social pressures influence acts of political participation, such as turning out to vote. However, we know less about how conformity pressures affect one’s deeply held political values and opinions. Using a discussion-based experiment, we untangle the unique and combined effects of information and social pressure on a political opinion that is highly salient, politically charged, and part of one’s identity. We find that while information plays a role in changing a person’s opinion, the social delivery of that information has the greatest effect. Thirty three percent of individuals in our treatment condition change their opinion due to the social delivery of information, while ten percent respond only to social pressure and ten percent respond only to information. Participants that change their opinion due to social pressure in our experiment are more conservative politically, conscientious, and neurotic than those that did not. PMID:29718958

  12. The effects of information and social conformity on opinion change.

    PubMed

    Mallinson, Daniel J; Hatemi, Peter K

    2018-01-01

    Extant research shows that social pressures influence acts of political participation, such as turning out to vote. However, we know less about how conformity pressures affect one's deeply held political values and opinions. Using a discussion-based experiment, we untangle the unique and combined effects of information and social pressure on a political opinion that is highly salient, politically charged, and part of one's identity. We find that while information plays a role in changing a person's opinion, the social delivery of that information has the greatest effect. Thirty three percent of individuals in our treatment condition change their opinion due to the social delivery of information, while ten percent respond only to social pressure and ten percent respond only to information. Participants that change their opinion due to social pressure in our experiment are more conservative politically, conscientious, and neurotic than those that did not.

  13. Quality of radiotherapy reporting in randomized controlled trials of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Soon, Yu Yang; Chen, Desiree; Tan, Teng Hwee; Tey, Jeremy

    2018-06-07

    Good radiotherapy reporting in clinical trials of prostate radiotherapy is important because it will allow accurate reproducibility of radiotherapy treatment and minimize treatment variations that can affect patient outcomes. The aim of our study is to assess the quality of prostate radiotherapy (RT) treatment reporting in randomized controlled trials in prostate cancer. We searched MEDLINE for randomized trials of prostate cancer, published from 1996 to 2016 and included prostate RT as one of the intervention arms. We assessed if the investigators reported the ten criteria adequately in the trial reports: RT dose prescription method; RT dose-planning procedures; organs at risk (OAR) dose constraints; target volume definition, simulation procedures; treatment verification procedures; total RT dose; fractionation schedule; conduct of quality assurance (QA) as well as presence or absence of deviations in RT treatment planning and delivery. We performed multivariate logistic regression to determine the factors that may influence the quality of reporting. We found 59 eligible trials. There was significant variability in the quality of reporting. Target volume definition, total RT dose and fractionation schedule were reported adequately in 97% of included trials. OAR constraints, simulation procedures and presence or absence of deviations in RT treatment planning and delivery were reported adequately in 30% of included trials. Twenty-four trials (40%) reported seven criteria or more adequately. Multivariable logistic analysis showed that trials that published their quality assurance results and cooperative group trials were more likely to have adequate quality in reporting in at least seven criteria. There is significant variability in the quality of reporting on prostate radiotherapy treatment in randomized trials of prostate cancer. We need to have consensus guidelines to standardize the reporting of radiotherapy treatment in randomized trials.

  14. Opinion Formation by Social Influence: From Experiments to Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Chacoma, Andrés; Zanette, Damián H.

    2015-01-01

    Predicting different forms of collective behavior in human populations, as the outcome of individual attitudes and their mutual influence, is a question of major interest in social sciences. In particular, processes of opinion formation have been theoretically modeled on the basis of a formal similarity with the dynamics of certain physical systems, giving rise to an extensive collection of mathematical models amenable to numerical simulation or even to exact solution. Empirical ground for these models is however largely missing, which confine them to the level of mere metaphors of the real phenomena they aim at explaining. In this paper we present results of an experiment which quantifies the change in the opinions given by a subject on a set of specific matters under the influence of others. The setup is a variant of a recently proposed experiment, where the subject’s confidence on his or her opinion was evaluated as well. In our realization, which records the quantitative answers of 85 subjects to 20 questions before and after an influence event, the focus is put on characterizing the change in answers and confidence induced by such influence. Similarities and differences with the previous version of the experiment are highlighted. We find that confidence changes are to a large extent independent of any other recorded quantity, while opinion changes are strongly modulated by the original confidence. On the other hand, opinion changes are not influenced by the initial difference with the reference opinion. The typical time scales on which opinion varies are moreover substantially longer than those of confidence change. Experimental results are then used to estimate parameters for a dynamical agent-based model of opinion formation in a large population. In the context of the model, we study the convergence to full consensus and the effect of opinion leaders on the collective distribution of opinions. PMID:26517825

  15. Involved-node radiotherapy in early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma. Definition and guidelines of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG).

    PubMed

    Eich, Hans Theodor; Müller, Rolf-Peter; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Lukas, Peter; Schmidberger, Heinz; Staar, Susanne; Willich, Normann

    2008-08-01

    Radiotherapy of Hodgkin's Lymphoma has evolved from extended-field to involved-field (IF) radiotherapy reducing toxicity whilst maintaining high cure rates. Recent publications recommend further reduction in the radiation field to involved-node (IN) radiotherapy; however, this concept has never been tested in a randomized trial. The German Hodgkin Study Group aims to compare it with standard IF radiotherapy in their future HD17 trial. ALL patients must be examined by the radiation oncologist before the start of chemotherapy. At that time, patients must have complete staging CT scans. For patients with IN radiotherapy, a radiation planning CT before and after chemotherapy with patients in the treatment position is recommended. Fusion techniques, allowing the overlapping of the pre- and postchemotherapy CT scans, should be used. Usage of PET-CT scans with patients in the treatment position is recommended, whenever possible. The clinical target volume encompasses the initial volume of the Lymph node(s) before chemotherapy and incorporates the initial Location and extent of the disease taking the displacement of the normal tissues into account. The margin of the planning target volume should be 2 cm in axial and 3 cm in craniocaudal direction. If necessary, it can be reduced to 1-1.5 cm. To minimize Lung and cardiac toxicity, the target definition in the mediastinum is different. The concept of IN radiotherapy has been proposed as a means to further improve the therapeutic ratio by reducing the risk of radiation-induced toxicity, including second malignancies. Field sizes wiLL further decrease compared to IF radiotherapy.

  16. [Technique of complex mammary irradiation: Mono-isocentric 3D conformational radiotherapy and helical tomotherapy].

    PubMed

    Vandendorpe, B; Guilbert, P; Champagne, C; Antoni, T; Nguyen, T D; Gaillot-Petit, N; Servagi Vernat, S

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the dosimetric contribution of helical tomotherapy for breast cancers compared with conformal radiotherapy in mono-isocentric technique. For 23 patients, the dosimetric results in mono-isocentric 3D conformational radiotherapy did not satisfy the constraints either of target volumes nor organs at risk. A prospective dosimetric comparison between mono-isocentric 3D conformational radiotherapy and helical tomotherapy was therefore carried out. The use of helical tomotherapy showed a benefit in these 23 patients, with either an improvement in the conformity index or homogeneity, but with an increase in low doses. Of the 23 patients, two had pectus excavatum, five had past thoracic irradiation and two required bilateral irradiation. The other 14 patients had a combination of morphology and/or indication of lymph node irradiation. For these patients, helical tomotherapy was therefore preferred to mono-isocentric 3D conformational radiotherapy. Tomotherapy appears to provide better homogeneity and tumour coverage. This technique of irradiation may be justified in the case of morphological situations such as pectus exavatum and in complex clinical situations. In other cases, conformal radiotherapy in mono-isocentric technique remains to be favoured. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Consumer opinions of emergency room medical care.

    PubMed

    McMillan, J R; Younger, M S; DeWine, L C

    1984-12-01

    If hospital management is to adapt successfully to an increasingly competitive environment, and to retain a viable emergency department, it well be necessary to objectively and accurately assess the hospital's image in the community served. Knowledge of the consumers' views is an essential input into the formulation of strategic plans. This article reports on a study in which consumer opinions on 15 dimensions of emergency room health care were obtained from 723 respondents using a mail questionnaire. Findings reveal that consumers view the emergency room as being more expensive than other health care providers. Except for being available or convenient, little or no advantage is perceived for the emergency room over the personal physician. Even though the emergency room has specialized staff and equipment, consumers do not believe patients receive better or faster treatment in an emergency room than would be obtained in a physician's office. Unless changed, these perceptions will diminish the role of the emergency room in the delivery of health care services.

  18. College Students Opinions on Gun Violence.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Rhonda K; LoCurto, Jamie; Brown, Kyrah; Stowell, David; Maryman, J'Vonnah; Dean, Amber; McNair, Thoi; Ojeda, Debbie; Siwierka, Julia

    2016-06-01

    Gun violence and control issues have become serious public health problems. This study gathered the opinions from 419 college students from a Midwestern University. Participants were asked about beliefs about purchasing assault weapons, beliefs about bringing handguns to college campuses and beliefs about contributing factors that lead to gun violence. Participants completed surveys online. The findings showed that overall 54 % of respondents believed that military assault weapons should be banned and 53 % agree that teachers should be allowed to carry a registered handgun on campus. There were statistically significant differences between males and females on these issues. For instance, females believed military assault weapons and high capacity magazines should be banned more than 1.9 times (p = .004) p < .05 compared to male students. On the other hand, female students were more likely to believe that school teachers should be allowed to carry registered handguns on school campuses more than 1.55 times (p = .046) p < .05 compared to their male student counterparts. There were no statistically significant differences between ethnic groups. The top four contributing factors that students believed led to gun violence were decline in parenting and family values (17 %), gang involvement (14 %), bullying (13.8 %) and guns being easy to obtain (13.8 %). Limitations and implications for policy work are discussed.

  19. [Double diagnosis and forensic psychiatric opinion].

    PubMed

    Kocur, Józef; Trendak, Wiesława

    2009-01-01

    Addiction to alcohol or any other psychoactive substance can run parallel with other diseases or mental disorders. One can then observe co-occurrence and mutual interaction of dysfunctions typical of addiction and of other mental disorders that accompany addiction. That is why, clinical pictures of such states (double diagnosis) are usually less unique, have an unusual course and cause diagnostic and therapeutic difficulty. The problem of forensic psychiatric opinion and treatment of people with a double diagnosis is another aspect of these difficulties. It is caused by the fact that forensic psychiatric assessment of the mental state of such people requires taking into consideration a very complex clinical and legal situation triggered by the interference of various ethiopathogenetic and clinical disorders. It leads to the need for complex evaluation and reference to sanity or other signs of functioning within the current law should result, first of all, from the analyses directly pertaining to the influence of the diagnosed disorders on the state of patients with double diagnosis. The forensic psychiatric aspect of disorders connected with double diagnosis is particularly significant as there is a relatively high risk of behaviours posing a threat to public order in this group of patients.

  20. Attitude and opinion towards essential medicine formulary.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sangeeta; Kh, Reeta; Chaudhury, R Roy

    2010-06-01

    The Delhi State Drug Policy was adopted in 1994 following which the first Essential Medicines List (EML) was developed in 1996. The Delhi State Essential Medicines Formulary was brought out in 1997. A need was felt to revise the formulary to match with the EML as the EML is renewed every 2 years. A survey was undertaken to elicit the opinions of the doctors practicing in the state on the usefulness of the formulary before revising and printing the updated version. The survey covered dispensaries, 10-20 bedded hospitals, 100-bedded hospitals and two tertiary care hospitals. Discussions were focused on questionnaires on attitudes toward adopting Essential Medicines Formulary using a 10-point scale. Of the 200 doctors approached, only 90 doctors completed the questionnaire. Sixty-nine respondents (76.6%) had received the copy of the formulary. Most practitioners welcomed the formulary and were satisfied with the coverage and selection of the medicines. Most respondents (76.9%) agreed that a well-developed formulary would improve the quality of the public health care system, although they had reservations about the authority, relevance and effect on professional autonomy. About 74% of the respondents used the formulary in clinical practice as a source of medicine information, which makes its regular revision necessary.

  1. Attitude and opinion towards essential medicine formulary

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sangeeta; Kh, Reeta; Chaudhury, R. Roy

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The Delhi State Drug Policy was adopted in 1994 following which the first Essential Medicines List (EML) was developed in 1996. The Delhi State Essential Medicines Formulary was brought out in 1997. A need was felt to revise the formulary to match with the EML as the EML is renewed every 2 years. Materials and Methods: A survey was undertaken to elicit the opinions of the doctors practicing in the state on the usefulness of the formulary before revising and printing the updated version. The survey covered dispensaries, 10–20 bedded hospitals, 100-bedded hospitals and two tertiary care hospitals. Discussions were focused on questionnaires on attitudes toward adopting Essential Medicines Formulary using a 10-point scale. Results: Of the 200 doctors approached, only 90 doctors completed the questionnaire. Sixty-nine respondents (76.6%) had received the copy of the formulary. Most practitioners welcomed the formulary and were satisfied with the coverage and selection of the medicines. Most respondents (76.9%) agreed that a well-developed formulary would improve the quality of the public health care system, although they had reservations about the authority, relevance and effect on professional autonomy. Conclusion: About 74% of the respondents used the formulary in clinical practice as a source of medicine information, which makes its regular revision necessary. PMID:20871765

  2. "We Don't Want Your Opinion": Knowledge Construction and the Discourse of Opinion in the Equity Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diangelo, Robin; Sensoy, Ozlem

    2009-01-01

    As educators who teach courses that examine social power, we often struggle with a specific form of resistance in the equity-oriented classroom: "That's just [the author]'s opinion." This "opinion discourse" emerges when students study scholarship that unsettles dominant knowledge claims and methods or when students are themselves asked to situate…

  3. The influence of bone density on the radiotherapy of cervix cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, M. R.; Souza, D. N.

    2011-10-01

    Until the 1970s the irradiated region of a patient undergoing external beam radiotherapy was considered a homogeneous volume and a regular surface, with physical characteristics similar to water. With the improvement of medical imaging equipment, it has become possible to conduct planning in radiotherapy treatment that considers the heterogeneities and irregularities of a patient's anatomy. Consequently, such technological resources have brought greater accuracy to radiotherapy. In this study, we determined the variation in the average amount of absorbed dose on the target volume and at the point of prescription treatment by comparing the doses which were calculated in a planning system considering the patient both as a homogeneous, and as a heterogeneous medium. The results showed that when we take into account the volume of the upper vagina and cervix, and consider the pelvis as a heterogeneous medium, the calculated dose was under-estimated at some points in the studied volume with respect to the dose when this region was considered homogeneous.

  4. Evaluation of radiotherapy techniques for radical treatment of lateralised oropharyngeal cancers : Dosimetry and NTCP.

    PubMed

    McQuaid, D; Dunlop, A; Nill, S; Franzese, C; Nutting, C M; Harrington, K J; Newbold, K L; Bhide, S A

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate potential advantages and disadvantages of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), multiple fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in terms of dose to the planning target volume (PTV), organs at risk (OARs) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for delivering ipsilateral radiotherapy. 3DCRT, IMRT and VMAT were compared in patients with well-lateralised primary tonsillar cancers who underwent primary radical ipsilateral radiotherapy. The following parameters were compared: conformity index (CI); homogeneity index (HI); dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of PTVs and OARs; NTCP, risk of radiation-induced cancer and dose accumulation during treatment. IMRT and VMAT were superior to 3DCRT in terms of CI, HI and dose to the target volumes, as well as mandible and dose accumulation robustness. The techniques were equivalent in terms of dose and NTCP for the contralateral oral cavity, contralateral submandibular gland and mandible, when specific dose constraint objectives were used on the oral cavity volume. Although the volume of normal tissue exposed to low-dose radiation was significantly higher with IMRT and VMAT, the risk of radiation-induced secondary malignancy was dependant on the mathematical model used. This study demonstrates the superiority of IMRT/VMAT techniques over 3DCRT in terms of dose homogeneity, conformity and consistent dose delivery to the PTV throughout the course of treatment in patients with lateralised oropharyngeal cancers. Dosimetry and NTCP calculations show that these techniques are equivalent to 3DCRT with regard to the risk of acute mucositis when specific dose constraint objectives were used on the contralateral oral cavity OAR.

  5. Microcystic adnexal carcinoma following radiotherapy in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Borenstein, A.; Seidman, D.S.; Trau, H.

    1991-04-01

    A 36-year-old man was treated by radiotherapy for tinea capitis many years before discovery of microcystic adnexal carcinoma (MAC). Because of patient's refusal of any surgical intervention, we were able to follow the natural course of this tumor for 13 years. This case emphasizes the typical slow development of (MAC). The implication of the association of MAC and radiotherapy are discussed.

  6. Radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Giaj-Levra, Niccolò; Sciascia, Savino; Fiorentino, Alba; Fersino, Sergio; Mazzola, Rosario; Ricchetti, Francesco; Roccatello, Dario; Alongi, Filippo

    2016-03-01

    The decision to offer radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases continues to be challenging. Radiotherapy might trigger the onset of connective tissue diseases by increasing the expression of self-antigens, diminishing regulatory T-cell activity, and activating effectors of innate immunity (dendritic cells) through Toll-like receptor-dependent mechanisms, all of which could potentially lead to breaks of immune tolerance. This potential risk has raised some debate among radiation oncologists about whether patients with connective tissue diseases can tolerate radiation as well as people without connective tissue diseases. Because the number of patients with cancer and connective tissue diseases needing radiotherapy will probably increase due to improvements in medical treatment and longer life expectancy, the issue of interactions between radiotherapy and connective tissue diseases needs to be clearer. In this Review, we discuss available data and evidence for patients with connective tissue diseases treated with radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiation dose-volume effects in the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Werner-Wasik, Maria; Yorke, Ellen; Deasy, Joseph; Nam, Jiho; Marks, Lawrence B

    2010-03-01

    Publications relating esophageal radiation toxicity to clinical variables and to quantitative dose and dose-volume measures derived from three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer are reviewed. A variety of clinical and dosimetric parameters have been associated with acute and late toxicity. Suggestions for future studies are presented. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Continuous Opinion Dynamics Under Bounded Confidence:. a Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Jan

    Models of continuous opinion dynamics under bounded confidence have been presented independently by Krause and Hegselmann and by Deffuant et al. in 2000. They have raised a fair amount of attention in the communities of social simulation, sociophysics and complexity science. The researchers working on it come from disciplines such as physics, mathematics, computer science, social psychology and philosophy. In these models agents hold continuous opinions which they can gradually adjust if they hear the opinions of others. The idea of bounded confidence is that agents only interact if they are close in opinion to each other. Usually, the models are analyzed with agent-based simulations in a Monte Carlo style, but they can also be reformulated on the agent's density in the opinion space in a master equation style. The contribution of this survey is fourfold. First, it will present the agent-based and density-based modeling frameworks including the cases of multidimensional opinions and heterogeneous bounds of confidence. Second, it will give the bifurcation diagrams of cluster configuration in the homogeneous model with uniformly distributed initial opinions. Third, it will review the several extensions and the evolving phenomena which have been studied so far, and fourth it will state some open questions.

  9. Zealotry effects on opinion dynamics in the adaptive voter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klamser, Pascal P.; Wiedermann, Marc; Donges, Jonathan F.; Donner, Reik V.

    2017-11-01

    The adaptive voter model has been widely studied as a conceptual model for opinion formation processes on time-evolving social networks. Past studies on the effect of zealots, i.e., nodes aiming to spread their fixed opinion throughout the system, only considered the voter model on a static network. Here we extend the study of zealotry to the case of an adaptive network topology co-evolving with the state of the nodes and investigate opinion spreading induced by zealots depending on their initial density and connectedness. Numerical simulations reveal that below the fragmentation threshold a low density of zealots is sufficient to spread their opinion to the whole network. Beyond the transition point, zealots must exhibit an increased degree as compared to ordinary nodes for an efficient spreading of their opinion. We verify the numerical findings using a mean-field approximation of the model yielding a low-dimensional set of coupled ordinary differential equations. Our results imply that the spreading of the zealots' opinion in the adaptive voter model is strongly dependent on the link rewiring probability and the average degree of normal nodes in comparison with that of the zealots. In order to avoid a complete dominance of the zealots' opinion, there are two possible strategies for the remaining nodes: adjusting the probability of rewiring and/or the number of connections with other nodes, respectively.

  10. Applications of flow-networks to opinion-dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tupikina, Liubov; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Networks were successfully applied to describe complex systems, such as brain, climate, processes in society. Recently a socio-physical problem of opinion-dynamics was studied using network techniques. We present the toy-model of opinion-formation based on the physical model of advection-diffusion. We consider spreading of the opinion on the fixed subject, assuming that opinion on society is binary: if person has opinion then the state of the node in the society-network equals 1, if the person doesn't have opinion state of the node equals 0. Opinion can be spread from one person to another if they know each other, or in the network-terminology, if the nodes are connected. We include into the system governed by advection-diffusion equation the external field to model such effects as for instance influence from media. The assumptions for our model can be formulated as the following: 1.the node-states are influenced by the network structure in such a way, that opinion can be spread only between adjacent nodes (the advective term of the opinion-dynamics), 2.the network evolution can have two scenarios: -network topology is not changing with time; -additional links can appear or disappear each time-step with fixed probability which requires adaptive networks properties. Considering these assumptions for our system we obtain the system of equations describing our model-dynamics which corresponds well to other socio-physics models, for instance, the model of the social cohesion and the famous voter-model. We investigate the behavior of the suggested model studying "waiting time" of the system, time to get to the stable state, stability of the model regimes for different values of model parameters and network topology.

  11. Medical faculty opinions of peer tutoring.

    PubMed

    Rudland, Joy R; Rennie, Sarah C

    2014-01-01

    Peer tutoring is a well-researched and established method of learning defined as 'a medical student facilitating the learning of another medical student'. While it has been adopted in many medical schools, other schools may be reluctant to embrace this approach. The attitude of the teaching staff, responsible for organizing and or teaching students in an undergraduate medical course to formal peer teaching will affect how it is introduced and operationalized. This study elicits faculty opinions on how best to introduce peer tutoring for medical students. Structured telephone interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis. The interviews were with medically qualified staff responsible for organizing or teaching undergraduate medical students at a New Zealand medical school. Six questions were posed regarding perceived advantages and disadvantages of peer tutoring and how the school and staff could support a peer-tutoring scheme if one was introduced. Staff generally supported the peer tutoring concept, offering a safe environment for learning with its teachers being so close in career stage to the learners. They also say disadvantages when the student-teachers imparted wrong information and when schools used peer tutoring to justify a reduction in teaching staff. Subjects felt that faculty would be more accepting of peer tutoring if efforts were made to build staff 'buy in' and empowerment, train peer tutors and introduce a solid evaluation process. Staff of our school expressed some concerns about peer tutoring that are not supported in the literature, signaling a need for better communication about the benefits and disadvantages of peer tutoring.

  12. Public opinions on community water fluoridation.

    PubMed

    Quiñonez, Carlos R; Locker, David

    2009-01-01

    Community water fluoridation (CWF) is currently experiencing social resistance in Canada. Petitions have been publicly registered, municipal plebiscites have occurred, and media attention is growing. There is now concern among policy leaders whether the practice is acceptable to Canadians. As a result, this study asks: What are public opinions on CWF? Data were collected in April 2008 from 1,005 Canadian adults by means of a national telephone interview survey using random digit dialling and computer-assisted telephone interview technology. Descriptive and bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were undertaken. Approximately 1 in 2 Canadian adults surveyed knew about CWF. Of these, 80% understood its intended use, approximately 60% believed that it was both safe and effective, and 62% supported the idea of having fluoride added to their local drinking water. Those with greater incomes [OR=1.4; p<0.001] and education [OR=1.6; p<0.001] were more likely to know about CWF. Those with greater incomes [OR=1.3; p<0.03] and those who visited the dentist more frequently [OR=1.8; p<0.002] were more likely to support CWF, and those with children [OR=0.5; p<0.02], those who accessed dental care using public insurance [OR=0.2; p<0.03], and those who avoided fluoride [OR=0.04; p<0.001] were less likely to support CWF. It appears that Canadians still support CWF. In moving forward, policy leaders will need to attend to two distinct challenges: the influence of anti-fluoride sentiment, and the potential risks created by avoiding fluoride.

  13. [Role of radiotherapy in the treatment of multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Mose, S; Pfitzner, D; Rahn, A; Nierhoff, C; Schiemann, M; Böttcher, H D

    2000-11-01

    Chemotherapy is the treatment of choice in multiple myeloma; but there are no curative options. Therefore, the treatment rationale is characterized by reduction of symptoms and inhibition of complications. Regarding reduction of pain, treatment of (impending) fractures, and spinal cord compression radiation is an important part of palliative treatment. In our retrospective study we report the effect of radiotherapy on reduction of pain, recalcification and the reduction of neurological symptoms and evaluate factors which have an impact on therapeutic outcome. From 1, Jan 1988 to 31, Dec 1998, 42 patients (19 women, 23 men; range of ages 46 to 85 years, median age 64.9 years) with 71 target volumes were irradiated (median dose 36 Gy, 2 to 3 Gy 5 times/week) because of symptomatic disease (67/71: osseous pain, 45/71: fractures/impending fractures, 13/71: spinal cord compression) (Tables 1 and 2). The median time from diagnosis to the first course of radiotherapy was 11.9 months (0.3 to 90 months). At the time of first irradiation, 5 and 37 patients were in tumor Stage II and III (Salmon/Durie), respectively. The median value of the Karnofsky performance was 70% (40 to 90%). During follow-up (at least 6 months) in 85% of target volumes complete and partial pain relief (measured by patients' perception and the use of analgetic medication) was achieved; recurrences were seen in 8.8%. In 26/56 (46.4%) lesions evaluable a recalcification was seen whereas 17.9% showed progressive disease (comparison of radiographs before and after radiation). In 22.3% of all lesions initially with impending fracture (4/18) radiotherapy failed because of fracture after treatment (Tables 3 and 4). Simultaneous chemotherapy and a Karnofsky performance > or = 70 had a significant impact on a positive response to treatment, respectively. Spinal cord compression symptoms were reduced in 7/13 (53.8%) of patients (scaled due to the classification by Findlay 1987). The median survival from

  14. Implications of Public Opinion for Space Program Planning, 1980 - 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overholt, W.; Wiener, A. J.; Yokelson, D.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of public opinion on future space programs is discussed in terms of direct support, apathy, or opposition, and concern about the tax burden, budgetary pressures, and national priorities. Factors considered include: the salience and visibility of NASA as compared with other issues, the sources of general pressure on the federal budget which could affect NASA, the public's opinions regarding the size and priority of NASA'S budget, the degree to which the executive can exercise leverage over NASA's budget through influencing or disregarding public opinion, the effects of linkages to other issues on space programs, and the public's general attitudes toward the progress of science.

  15. [State school children's opinions regarding violence in the media].

    PubMed

    Piedrahita S, Laura E

    2009-01-01

    To describe the opinion of schoolage children, from a public school, regarding the violence they perceive in the media. Descriptive-exploratory research with a sample, selected according to the child's age in a public school. Quantitative data were collected. There were found common issues related to the child's opinion about the violence present in the media such as frequent exposure to the media violence and lack of parental supervision. Social context and constant exposure to the media violence affect the children's opinion about the violence phenomenon and their predisposition to it.

  16. Simple Carotid-Sparing Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Technique and Preliminary Experience for T1-2 Glottic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, David I., E-mail: dirosenthal@mdanderson.or; Fuller, Clifton D.; Barker, Jerry L.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetry and feasibility of carotid-sparing intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for early glottic cancer and to report preliminary clinical experience. Methods and Materials: Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine radiotherapy (DICOM-RT) datasets from 6 T1-2 conventionally treated glottic cancer patients were used to create both conventional IMRT plans. We developed a simplified IMRT planning algorithm with three fields and limited segments. Conventional and IMRT plans were compared using generalized equivalent uniform dose and dose-volume parameters for in-field carotid arteries, target volumes, and organs at risk. We have treated 11 patients with this simplified IMRT technique. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapymore » consistently reduced radiation dose to the carotid arteries (p < 0.05) while maintaining the clinical target volume coverage. With conventional planning, median carotid V35, V50, and V63 were 100%, 100%, and 69.0%, respectively. With IMRT planning these decreased to 2%, 0%, and 0%, respectively (p < 0.01). Radiation planning and treatment times were similar for conventional radiotherapy and IMRT. Treatment results have been excellent thus far. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy significantly reduced unnecessary radiation dose to the carotid arteries compared with conventional lateral fields while maintaining clinical target volume coverage. Further experience and longer follow-up will be required to demonstrate outcomes for cancer control and carotid artery effects.« less

  17. Lifelong-RL: Lifelong Relaxation Labeling for Separating Entities and Aspects in Opinion Targets.

    PubMed

    Shu, Lei; Liu, Bing; Xu, Hu; Kim, Annice

    2016-11-01

    It is well-known that opinions have targets. Extracting such targets is an important problem of opinion mining because without knowing the target of an opinion, the opinion is of limited use. So far many algorithms have been proposed to extract opinion targets. However, an opinion target can be an entity or an aspect (part or attribute) of an entity. An opinion about an entity is an opinion about the entity as a whole, while an opinion about an aspect is just an opinion about that specific attribute or aspect of an entity. Thus, opinion targets should be separated into entities and aspects before use because they represent very different things about opinions. This paper proposes a novel algorithm, called Lifelong-RL , to solve the problem based on lifelong machine learning and relaxation labeling . Extensive experiments show that the proposed algorithm Lifelong-RL outperforms baseline methods markedly.

  18. Evaluation of fractionated radiotherapy and gamma knife radiosurgery in cavernous sinus meningiomas: treatment strategy.

    PubMed

    Metellus, Philipe; Regis, Jean; Muracciole, Xavier; Fuentes, Stephane; Dufour, Henry; Nanni, Isabelle; Chinot, Oliver; Martin, Pierre-Marie; Grisoli, Francois

    2005-11-01

    To investigate the respective role of fractionated radiotherapy (FR) and gamma knife stereotactic (GKS) radiosurgery in cavernous sinus meningioma (CSM) treatment. The authors report the long-term follow-up of two populations of patients harboring CSMs treated either by FR (Group I, 38 patients) or GKS radiosurgery (Group II, 36 patients). There were 31 females with a mean age of 53 years in Group I and 29 females with a mean age of 51.2 years in Group II. In 20 patients (Group I) and 13 patients (Group II), FR and GKS radiosurgery were performed as an adjuvant treatment. In 18 patients (Group I) and in 23 patients (Group II), FR and GKS radiosurgery were performed as first line treatment. In our early experience with GKS radiosurgery (1992, date of gamma knife availability in the department), patients with tumors greater than 3 cm, showing close relationship with the optic apparatus (<3 mm) or skull base dural spreading, were treated by FR. Secondarily, with the advent of new devices and our growing experience, these criteria have evolved. The median follow-up period was 88.6 months (range, 42-168 mo) for Group I and 63.6 months (range, 48-92 mo) for Group II. According to Sekhar's classification, 26 (68.4%) patients were Grade III to IV in Group I and 10 (27.8%) patients in Group II (P < 0.05); 23 (60.5%) patients had extensive lesions in Group I and 7 (19.4%) patients in Group II (P < 0.05). Mean tumor volume was 13.5 cm in Group I and 5.2 cm in Group II (P < 0.05). Actuarial progression-free survival was 94.7% and 94.4% in Group I and II, respectively. Clinically, improvement was seen for 24 (63.2%) patients in Group I and for 21 (53.8%) patients in Group II (P > 0.05). Radiologically, 11 (29%, Group I) patients and 19 (Group II, 52.7%) patients showed tumor shrinkage (P = 0.04). Transient morbidity was 10.5% in Group I and 2.8% in Group II. Permanent morbidity was 2.6% in Group I and 0% in Group II. FR and GKS radiosurgery are safe and efficient techniques in

  19. SU-E-J-206: Adaptive Radiotherapy for Gynecological Malignancies with MRIGuided Cobolt-60 Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J; Kamrava, M; Agazaryan, N

    Purpose: Even in the IMRT era, bowel toxicity and bone marrow irradiation remain concerns with pelvic irradiation. We examine the potential gain from an adaptive radiotherapy workflow for post-operative gynecological patients treated to pelvic targets including lymph nodes using MRI-guided Co-60 radiation therapy. Methods: An adaptive workflow was developed with the intent of minimizing time overhead of adaptive planning. A pilot study was performed using retrospectively analyzed images from one patient’s treatment. The patient’s treated plan was created using conventional PTV margins. Adaptive treatment was simulated on the patient’s first three fractions. The daily PTV was created by removing non-targetmore » tissue, including bone, muscle and bowel, from the initial PTV based on the daily MRI. The number of beams, beam angles, and optimization parameters were kept constant, and the plan was re-optimized. Normal tissue contours were not adjusted for the re-optimization, but were adjusted for evaluation of plan quality. Plan quality was evaluated based on PTV coverage and normal tissue DVH points per treatment protocol. Bowel was contoured as the entire bowel bag per protocol at our institution. Pelvic bone marrow was contoured per RTOG protocol 1203. Results: For the clinically treated plan, the volume of bowel receiving 45 Gy was 380 cc, 53% of the rectum received 30 Gy, 35% of the bladder received 45 Gy, and 28% of the pelvic bone marrow received 40 Gy. For the adaptive plans, the volume of bowel receiving 45 Gy was 175–201 cc, 55–62% of the rectum received 30 Gy, 21– 27% of the bladder received 45 Gy, and 13–17% of the pelvic bone marrow received 40 Gy. Conclusion: Adaptive planning led to a large reduction of bowel and bone marrow dose in this pilot study. Further study of on-line adaptive techniques for the radiotherapy of pelvic lymph nodes is warranted. Dr. Low is a member of the scientific advisory board of ViewRay, Inc.« less

  20. Toxicity and dosimetric analysis of non-small cell lung cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy with 4DCT and image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy: a regional centre's experience.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Gareth C; Last, Andrew J; Shakespeare, Thomas P; Dwyer, Patrick M; Westhuyzen, Justin; McKay, Michael J; Connors, Lisa; Leader, Stephanie; Greenham, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    For patients receiving radiotherapy for locally advance non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the probability of experiencing severe radiation pneumonitis (RP) appears to rise with an increase in radiation received by the lungs. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) provides the ability to reduce planned doses to healthy organs at risk (OAR) and can potentially reduce treatment-related side effects. This study reports toxicity outcomes and provides a dosimetric comparison with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Thirty curative NSCLC patients received radiotherapy using four-dimensional computed tomography and five-field IMRT. All were assessed for early and late toxicity using common terminology criteria for adverse events. All plans were subsequently re-planned using 3DCRT to the same standard as the clinical plans. Dosimetric parameters for lungs, oesophagus, heart and conformity were recorded for comparison between the two techniques. IMRT plans achieved improved high-dose conformity and reduced OAR doses including lung volumes irradiated to 5-20 Gy. One case each of oesophagitis and erythema (3%) were the only Grade 3 toxicities. Rates of Grade 2 oesophagitis were 40%. No cases of Grade 3 RP were recorded and Grade 2 RP rates were as low as 3%. IMRT provides a dosimetric benefit when compared to 3DCRT. While the clinical benefit appears to increase with increasing target size and increasing complexity, IMRT appears preferential to 3DCRT in the treatment of NSCLC.

  1. Radiotherapy in marginal zone lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of radiotherapy (RT) for early-stage nodal and extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (MZL). Materials and methods Patients with stage I (n = 22) and stage II (n = 8) MZL, who were treated with RT were reviewed. The primary tumor localisation was in the orbita (n = 12), stomach (n = 8), head and neck other than the orbita (n = 8), breast (n = 1) and one case of marginal zone lymphoma of the skin (n = 1). The median radiotherapy dose was 40 Gy (5 to 45 Gy). Results The median follow-up time was 103 months. The 5-year overall survival and event-free survival rates were 85 ± 7% and 71 ± 9%, respectively. There was no infield recurrence. Recurrence occurred outside of the radiation field in six patients. The relapses were treated with salvage RT and had excellent local control (100%) at five years after salvage RT. Conclusions Localized extranodal MZL have an excellent prognosis following moderate-dose RT. RT is also an effective salvage therapy in cases of localized recurrence. Further clinical studies should evaluate the optimal dose for MZL. PMID:23281682

  2. Sparing functional anatomical structures during intensity-modulated radiotherapy: an old problem, a new solution.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wenyong; Han, Guang; Wei, Shaozhong; Hu, Desheng

    2014-08-01

    During intensity-modulated radiotherapy, an organ is usually assumed to be functionally homogeneous and, generally, its anatomical and spatial heterogeneity with respect to radiation response are not taken into consideration. However, advances in imaging and radiation techniques as well as an improved understanding of the radiobiological response of organs have raised the possibility of sparing the critical functional structures within various organs at risk during intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Here, we discuss these structures, which include the critical brain structure, or neural nuclei, and the nerve fiber tracts in the CNS, head and neck structures related to radiation-induced salivary and swallowing dysfunction, and functional structures in the heart and lung. We suggest that these structures can be used as potential surrogate organs at risk in order to minimize their radiation dose and/or irradiated volume without compromising the dose coverage of the target volume during radiation treatment.

  3. MO-G-BRF-06: Radiotherapy and Prompt Oxygen Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kissick, M; Campos, D; Adamson, E

    Purpose: Adaptive radiotherapy requires a knowledge of the changing local tumor oxygen concentrations for times on the order of the treatment time, a time scale far shorter than cell death and proliferation. This knowledge will be needed to guide hypofractionated radiotherapy. Methods: A diffuse optical probe system was developed to spatially average over the whole interior of athymic Sprague Dawley nude mouse xenografts of human head and neck cancers. The blood volume and hemoglobin saturation was measured in real time. The quantities were measured with spectral fitting before and after 10 Gy of radiation is applied. An MRI BOLD scanmore » is acquired before and after 10 Gy that measures regional changes in R2* which is inversely proportional to oxygen availability. Simulations were performed to fit the blood oxygen dynamics and infer changes in hypoxia within the tumor. Results: The optical probe measured nearly constant blood volume and a significant drop in hemoglobin saturation of about 30% after 10 Gy over the time scale of less than 30 minutes. The averaged R2* within the tumor volume increased by 15% after the 10 Gy dose, which is consistent with the optical results. The simulations and experiments support likely dynamic metabolic changes and/or fast vasoconstrictive signals are occurring that change the oxygen concentrations significantly, but not cell death or proliferation. Conclusion: Significant oxygen changes were observed to occur within 30 minutes, coinciding with the treatment time scale. This dynamic is very important for patient specific adaptive therapy. For hypofractionated therapy, the local instantaneous oxygen content is likely the most important variable to control. The invention of a bedside device for the purpose of measuring the instantaneous response to large radiation doses would be an important step to future improvements in outcome.« less

  4. Interobserver delineation variation in lung tumour stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Persson, G F; Nygaard, D E; Hollensen, C; Munck af Rosenschöld, P; Mouritsen, L S; Due, A K; Berthelsen, A K; Nyman, J; Markova, E; Roed, A P; Roed, H; Korreman, S; Specht, L

    2012-01-01

    Objectives In radiotherapy, delineation uncertainties are important as they contribute to systematic errors and can lead to geographical miss of the target. For margin computation, standard deviations (SDs) of all uncertainties must be included as SDs. The aim of this study was to quantify the interobserver delineation variation for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of peripheral lung tumours using a cross-sectional study design. Methods 22 consecutive patients with 26 tumours were included. Positron emission tomography/CT scans were acquired for planning of SBRT. Three oncologists and three radiologists independently delineated the gross tumour volume. The interobserver variation was calculated as a mean of multiple SDs of distances to a reference contour, and calculated for the transversal plane (SDtrans) and craniocaudal (CC) direction (SDcc) separately. Concordance indexes and volume deviations were also calculated. Results Median tumour volume was 13.0 cm3, ranging from 0.3 to 60.4 cm3. The mean SDtrans was 0.15 cm (SD 0.08 cm) and the overall mean SDcc was 0.26 cm (SD 0.15 cm). Tumours with pleural contact had a significantly larger SDtrans than tumours surrounded by lung tissue. Conclusions The interobserver delineation variation was very small in this systematic cross-sectional analysis, although significantly larger in the CC direction than in the transversal plane, stressing that anisotropic margins should be applied. This study is the first to make a systematic cross-sectional analysis of delineation variation for peripheral lung tumours referred for SBRT, establishing the evidence that interobserver variation is very small for these tumours. PMID:22919015

  5. The first patient treatment of electromagnetic-guided real time adaptive radiotherapy using MLC tracking for lung SABR.

    PubMed

    Booth, Jeremy T; Caillet, Vincent; Hardcastle, Nicholas; O'Brien, Ricky; Szymura, Kathryn; Crasta, Charlene; Harris, Benjamin; Haddad, Carol; Eade, Thomas; Keall, Paul J

    2016-10-01

    Real time adaptive radiotherapy that enables smaller irradiated volumes may reduce pulmonary toxicity. We report on the first patient treatment of electromagnetic-guided real time adaptive radiotherapy delivered with MLC tracking for lung stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy. A clinical trial was developed to investigate the safety and feasibility of MLC tracking in lung. The first patient was an 80-year old man with a single left lower lobe lung metastasis to be treated with SABR to 48Gy in 4 fractions. In-house software was integrated with a standard linear accelerator to adapt the treatment beam shape and position based on electromagnetic transponders implanted in the lung. MLC tracking plans were compared against standard ITV-based treatment planning. MLC tracking plan delivery was reconstructed in the patient to confirm safe delivery. Real time adaptive radiotherapy delivered with MLC tracking compared to standard ITV-based planning reduced the PTV by 41% (18.7-11cm 3 ) and the mean lung dose by 30% (202-140cGy), V20 by 35% (2.6-1.5%) and V5 by 9% (8.9-8%). An emerging technology, MLC tracking, has been translated into the clinic and used to treat lung SABR patients for the first time. This milestone represents an important first step for clinical real-time adaptive radiotherapy that could reduce pulmonary toxicity in lung radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of clinical hypothyroidism risk due to irradiation of thyroid and pituitary glands in radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhixiong; Wang, Xiaoyan; Xie, Wenjia; Yang, Zhining; Che, Kaijun; Wu, Vincent W C

    2013-12-01

    Radiation-induced thyroid dysfunction after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) has been reported. This study investigated the radiation effects of the thyroid and pituitary glands on thyroid function after radiotherapy for NPC. Sixty-five NPC patients treated with radiotherapy were recruited. Baseline thyroid hormone levels comprising free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) were taken before treatment and at 3, 6, 12 and 18 months. A seven-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan was generated for each patient. Thyroid and pituitary gland dose volume histograms were generated, dividing the patients into four groups: high (>50 Gy) thyroid and pituitary doses (HTHP group); high thyroid and low pituitary doses (HTLP group); low thyroid and high pituitary doses; and low thyroid and pituitary doses. Incidence of hypothyroidism was analysed. Twenty-two (34%) and 17 patients (26%) received high mean thyroid and pituitary doses, respectively. At 18 months, 23.1% of patients manifested various types of hypothyroidism. The HTHP group showed the highest incidence (83.3%) of hypothyroidism, followed by the HTLP group (50%). NPC patients with high thyroid and pituitary gland doses carried the highest risk of abnormal thyroid physiology. The dose to the thyroid was more influential than the pituitary dose at 18 months after radiotherapy, and therefore more attention should be given to the thyroid gland in radiotherapy planning. © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  7. Bias, belief, and consensus: Collective opinion formation on fluctuating networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngampruetikorn, Vudtiwat; Stephens, Greg J.

    2016-11-01

    With the advent of online networks, societies have become substantially more interconnected with individual members able to easily both maintain and modify their own social links. Here, we show that active network maintenance exposes agents to confirmation bias, the tendency to confirm one's beliefs, and we explore how this bias affects collective opinion formation. We introduce a model of binary opinion dynamics on a complex, fluctuating network with stochastic rewiring and we analyze these dynamics in the mean-field limit of large networks and fast link rewiring. We show that confirmation bias induces a segregation of individuals with different opinions and stabilizes the consensus state. We further show that bias can have an unusual, nonmonotonic effect on the time to consensus and this suggests a novel avenue for large-scale opinion manipulation.

  8. 49 CFR 604.18 - Request for an advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... B. An affirmation that the undersigned swears, to the best of his/her knowledge and belief, this... opinion may be denied if: (1) The request contains incomplete information on which to base an informed...

  9. Bifurcation Phenomena of Opinion Dynamics in Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Long; Cai, Xu

    In this paper, we study the opinion dynamics of Improved Deffuant model (IDM), where the convergence parameter μ is a function of the opposite’s degree K according to the celebrity effect, in small-world network (SWN) and scale-free network (SFN). Generically, the system undergoes a phase transition from the plurality state to the polarization state and to the consensus state as the confidence parameter ɛ increasing. Furthermore, the evolution of the steady opinion s * as a function of ɛ, and the relation between the minority steady opinion s_{*}^{min} and the individual connectivity k also have been analyzed. Our present work shows the crucial role of the confidence parameter and the complex system topology in the opinion dynamics of IDM.

  10. Pattern Selection and Super-Patterns in Opinion Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, Eli; Scheel, Arnd

    We study pattern formation in the bounded confidence model of opinion dynamics. In this random process, opinion is quantified by a single variable. Two agents may interact and reach a fair compromise, but only if their difference of opinion falls below a fixed threshold. Starting from a uniform distribution of opinions with compact support, a traveling wave forms and it propagates from the domain boundary into the unstable uniform state. Consequently, the system reaches a steady state with isolated clusters that are separated by distance larger than the interaction range. These clusters form a quasi-periodic pattern where the sizes of the clusters and the separations between them are nearly constant. We obtain analytically the average separation between clusters L. Interestingly, there are also very small quasi-periodic modulations in the size of the clusters. The spatial periods of these modulations are a series of integers that follow from the continued-fraction representation of the irrational average separation L.

  11. Towards understanding what contributes to forming an opinion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Song, Jia; Huo, Jie; Hao, Rui; Wang, Xu-Ming

    Opinion evolution mechanism can be captured by physical modeling. In this paper, a kinetic equation is established by defining a generalized displacement(cognitive level), a driving force and the related factors such as generalized potential, information quantity and attitude. It has been shown that the details of opinion evolution depend on the type of the driving force, self-dominated driving or environment-dominated driving. In the former case, the participants can have their attitudes changed in the process of competition between the self-driving force and environment-driving force. In the latter case, all of the participants are pulled by the environment. Some regularities behind the dynamics of opinion are also revealed, for instance, the information entropy decays with time in a special way, etc. The results may help us to get some deep understanding for the formation of a public opinion.

  12. 42 CFR 411.386 - CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Relationships Between Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.386 CMS's advisory... § 411.370, in either oral or written form, except through written opinions it issues in accordance with...

  13. 42 CFR 411.386 - CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Relationships Between Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.386 CMS's advisory... § 411.370, in either oral or written form, except through written opinions it issues in accordance with...

  14. 42 CFR 411.386 - CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Relationships Between Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.386 CMS's advisory... § 411.370, in either oral or written form, except through written opinions it issues in accordance with...

  15. 42 CFR 411.386 - CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Relationships Between Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.386 CMS's advisory... § 411.370, in either oral or written form, except through written opinions it issues in accordance with...

  16. 42 CFR 411.386 - CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Relationships Between Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.386 CMS's advisory... § 411.370, in either oral or written form, except through written opinions it issues in accordance with...

  17. 38 CFR 3.328 - lndependent medical opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... would be harmful to the physical or mental health of the claimant, disclosure shall be subject to the... experts who are not employees of VA. Opinions shall be obtained from recognized medical schools...

  18. 2004 traveler opinion and perception survey : summary report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-01-01

    In November 2004 the Federal Highway Administration conducted the Traveler Opinion & Perception Survey (TOPS). This was a nationwide survey with the objective of understanding the needs and expectations of users of the nations transportation syste...

  19. Symmetry breaking by heating in a continuous opinion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anteneodo, Celia; Crokidakis, Nuno

    2017-04-01

    We study the critical behavior of a continuous opinion model, driven by kinetic exchanges in a fully connected population. Opinions range in the real interval [-1 ,1 ] , representing the different shades of opinions against and for an issue under debate. Individuals' opinions evolve through pairwise interactions, with couplings that are typically positive, but a fraction p of negative ones is allowed. Moreover, a social temperature parameter T controls the tendency of the individual responses toward neutrality. Depending on p and T , different collective states emerge: symmetry broken (one side wins), symmetric (tie of opposite sides), and absorbing neutral (indecision wins). We find the critical points and exponents that characterize the phase transitions between them. The symmetry breaking transition belongs to the usual Ising mean-field universality class, but the absorbing-phase transitions, with β =0.5 , are out of the paradigmatic directed percolation class. Moreover, ordered phases can emerge by increasing social temperature.

  20. Bias, belief, and consensus: Collective opinion formation on fluctuating networks.

    PubMed

    Ngampruetikorn, Vudtiwat; Stephens, Greg J

    2016-11-01

    With the advent of online networks, societies have become substantially more interconnected with individual members able to easily both maintain and modify their own social links. Here, we show that active network maintenance exposes agents to confirmation bias, the tendency to confirm one's beliefs, and we explore how this bias affects collective opinion formation. We introduce a model of binary opinion dynamics on a complex, fluctuating network with stochastic rewiring and we analyze these dynamics in the mean-field limit of large networks and fast link rewiring. We show that confirmation bias induces a segregation of individuals with different opinions and stabilizes the consensus state. We further show that bias can have an unusual, nonmonotonic effect on the time to consensus and this suggests a novel avenue for large-scale opinion manipulation.

  1. Persistence of opinion in the Sznajd consensus model: computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, D.; de Oliveira, P. M. C.

    2002-12-01

    The density of never changed opinions during the Sznajd consensus-finding process decays with time t as 1/t^θ. We find θ simeq 3/8 for a chain, compatible with the exact Ising result of Derrida et al. In higher dimensions, however, the exponent differs from the Ising θ. With simultaneous updating of sublattices instead of the usual random sequential updating, the number of persistent opinions decays roughly exponentially. Some of the simulations used multi-spin coding.

  2. The role of radiotherapy in the management of patients with diffuse low grade glioma: A systematic review and evidence-based clinical practice guideline.

    PubMed

    Ryken, Timothy C; Parney, Ian; Buatti, John; Kalkanis, Steven N; Olson, Jeffrey J

    2015-12-01

    (1) What is the optimal role of external beam radiotherapy in the management of adult patients with newly diagnosed low-grade glioma (LGG) in terms of improving outcome (i.e., survival, complications, seizure control or other reported outcomes of interest)? (2) Which radiation strategies (dose, timing, fractionation, stereotactic radiation, brachytherapy, chemotherapy) improve outcomes compared to standard external beam radiation therapy in the initial management of low grade gliomas in adults? (3) Do specific factors (e.g., age, volume, extent of resection, genetic subtype) identify subgroups with better outcomes following radiation therapy than the general population of adults with newly diagnosed low-grade gliomas? These recommendations apply to adults with newly diagnosed diffuse LGG. OUTCOMES IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH NEWLY DIAGNOSED LOW GRADE GLIOMA TREATED WITH RADIOTHERAPY: Level I Radiotherapy is recommended in the management of newly diagnosed low-grade glioma in adults to prolong progression free survival, irrespective of extent of resection. Level II Radiotherapy is recommended in the management of newly diagnosed low grade glioma in adults as an equivalent alternative to observation in preserving cognitive function, irrespective of extent of resection. Level III Radiotherapy is recommended in the management of newly diagnosed low grade glioma in adults to improve seizure control in patients with epilepsy and subtotal resection. Level III Radiotherapy is recommended in the management of newly diagnosed low-grade glioma in adults to prolong overall survival in patients with subtotal resection. Level III Consideration of the risk of radiation induced morbidity, including cognitive decline, imaging abnormalities, metabolic dysfunction and malignant transformation, is recommended when the delivery of radiotherapy is selected in the management of newly diagnosed low-grade glioma in adults. STRATEGIES OF RADIOTHERAPY IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH NEWLY DIAGNOSED LOW

  3. Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy for Vestibular Schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Meijer, Otto W.M.; Hoorn, Elles A.P. van der

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (RapidArc [RA]), a novel approach allowing for rapid treatment delivery, for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma (VS). Methods and Materials: The RA plans were generated for a small (0.5 cm{sup 3}), intermediate (2.8 cm{sup 3}), and large (14.8 cm{sup 3}) VS. The prescription dose was 12.5 Gy to the encompassing 80% isodose. The RA plans were compared with conventional radiosurgery plans using both a single dynamic conformal arc (1DCA) and five noncoplanar dynamic conformal arcs (5DCA). Conformity indices (CI) and dose-volume histograms of critical organs were compared. The RA plan for the medium-sizedmore » VS was measured in a phantom using Gafchromic EBT films and compared with calculated dose distributions. Results: The RA planning was completed within 30 min in all cases, and calculated treatment delivery time (after patient setup) was 5 min vs. 20 min for 5DCA. A superior CI was achieved with RA, with a substantial decrease in low-dose irradiation of the normal brain achieved relative to 5DCA plans. Maximum doses to critical organs were similar for RA and 5DCA but were higher for 1DCA. Film measurements showed the differences between calculated and measured doses to be smaller than 1.5% in the high-dose area and smaller than 3% in the low-dose area. Conclusion: The RA plans consistently achieved a higher CI and decrease in areas of low-dose irradiation. This, together with shorter treatment delivery times, has led to RA replacing our conventional five-arc radiosurgery technique for VS.« less

  4. Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Unresectable Retroperitoneal Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Serizawa, Itsuko, E-mail: s_itsuko@nirs.go.j; Kagei, Kenji; Kamada, Tadashi

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the applicability of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for unresectable retroperitoneal sarcomas with regard to normal tissue morbidity and local tumor control. Methods and Materials: From May 1997 to February 2006, 24 patients (17 male and 7 female) with unresectable retroperitoneal sarcoma received CIRT. Age ranged from 16 to 77 years (median, 48.6 years). Of the patients, 16 had primary disease and 8 recurrent disease. Histologic diagnoses were as follows: malignant fibrous histiocytoma in 6, liposarcoma in 3, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in 3, Ewing/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) in 2, and miscellaneous in 10 patients. The histologicmore » grades were as follows: Grade 3 in 15, Grade 2-3 in 2, Grade 2 in 3, and unknown in 4. Clinical target volumes ranged between 57 cm{sup 3} and 1,194 cm{sup 3} (median 525 cm{sup 3}). The delivered carbon ion dose ranged from 52.8 to 73.6 GyE in 16 fixed fractions over 4 weeks. Results: The median follow-up was 36 months (range, 6-143 months). The overall survival rates at 2 and 5 years were 75% and 50%, respectively. The local control rates at 2 and 5 years were 77% and 69%. No complications of the gastrointestinal tract were encountered. No other toxicity greater than Grade 2 was observed. Conclusions: Use of CIRT is suggested to be effective and safe for retroperitoneal sarcomas. The results obtained with CIRT were a good overall survival rate and local control, notwithstanding the fact that most patients were not eligible for surgical resection and had high-grade sarcomas.« less

  5. Sudden transitions in coupled opinion and epidemic dynamics with vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, Marcelo A.; Oestereich, André L.; Crokidakis, Nuno

    2018-05-01

    This work consists of an epidemic model with vaccination coupled with an opinion dynamics. Our objective was to study how disease risk perception can influence opinions about vaccination and therefore the spreading of the disease. Differently from previous works we have considered continuous opinions. The epidemic spreading is governed by an SIS-like model with an extra vaccinated state. In our model individuals vaccinate with a probability proportional to their opinions. The opinions change due to peer influence in pairwise interactions. The epidemic feedback to the opinion dynamics acts as an external field increasing the vaccination probability. We performed Monte Carlo simulations in fully-connected populations. Interestingly we observed the emergence of a first-order phase transition, besides the usual active-absorbing phase transition presented in the SIS model. Our simulations also show that with a certain combination of parameters, an increment in the initial fraction of the population that is pro-vaccine has a twofold effect: it can lead to smaller epidemic outbreaks in the short term, but it also contributes to the survival of the chain of infections in the long term. Our results also suggest that it is possible that more effective vaccines can decrease the long-term vaccine coverage. This is a counterintuitive outcome, but it is in line with empirical observations that vaccines can become a victim of their own success.

  6. A consensus opinion model based on the evolutionary game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Han-Xin

    2016-08-01

    We propose a consensus opinion model based on the evolutionary game. In our model, both of the two connected agents receive a benefit if they have the same opinion, otherwise they both pay a cost. Agents update their opinions by comparing payoffs with neighbors. The opinion of an agent with higher payoff is more likely to be imitated. We apply this model in scale-free networks with tunable degree distribution. Interestingly, we find that there exists an optimal ratio of cost to benefit, leading to the shortest consensus time. Qualitative analysis is obtained by examining the evolution of the opinion clusters. Moreover, we find that the consensus time decreases as the average degree of the network increases, but increases with the noise introduced to permit irrational choices. The dependence of the consensus time on the network size is found to be a power-law form. For small or larger ratio of cost to benefit, the consensus time decreases as the degree exponent increases. However, for moderate ratio of cost to benefit, the consensus time increases with the degree exponent. Our results may provide new insights into opinion dynamics driven by the evolutionary game theory.

  7. Public authority control strategy for opinion evolution in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Xiong, Xi; Zhang, Minghong; Li, Wei

    2016-08-01

    This paper addresses the need to deal with and control public opinion and rumors. Existing strategies to control public opinion include degree, random, and adaptive bridge control strategies. In this paper, we use the HK model to present a public opinion control strategy based on public authority (PA). This means utilizing the influence of expert or high authority individuals whose opinions we control to obtain the optimum effect in the shortest time possible and thus reach a consensus of public opinion. Public authority (PA) is only influenced by individuals' attributes (age, economic status, and education level) and not their degree distribution; hence, in this paper, we assume that PA complies with two types of public authority distribution (normal and power-law). According to the proposed control strategy, our experiment is based on random, degree, and public authority control strategies in three different social networks (small-world, scale-free, and random) and we compare and analyze the strategies in terms of convergence time (T), final number of controlled agents (C), and comprehensive efficiency (E). We find that different network topologies and the distribution of the PA in the network can influence the final controlling effect. While the effect of PA strategy differs in different network topology structures, all structures achieve comprehensive efficiency with any kind of public authority distribution in any network. Our findings are consistent with several current sociological phenomena and show that in the process of public opinion/rumor control, considerable attention should be paid to high authority individuals.

  8. Opinion diversity and community formation in adaptive networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y.; Xiao, G.; Li, G.; Tay, W. P.; Teoh, H. F.

    2017-10-01

    It is interesting and of significant importance to investigate how network structures co-evolve with opinions. In this article, we show that, a simple model integrating consensus formation, link rewiring, and opinion change allows complex system dynamics to emerge, driving the system into a dynamic equilibrium with the co-existence of diversified opinions. Specifically, similar opinion holders may form into communities yet with no strict community consensus; and rather than being separated into disconnected communities, different communities are connected by a non-trivial proportion of inter-community links. More importantly, we show that the complex dynamics may lead to different numbers of communities at the steady state with a given tolerance between different opinion holders. We construct a framework for theoretically analyzing the co-evolution process. Theoretical analysis and extensive simulation results reveal some useful insights into the complex co-evolution process, including the formation of dynamic equilibrium, the transition between different steady states with different numbers of communities, and the dynamics between opinion distribution and network modularity.

  9. Rise of an alternative majority against opinion leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucci, K.; González-Avella, J. C.; Cosenza, M. G.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the role of opinion leaders or influentials in the collective behavior of a social system. Opinion leaders are characterized by their unidirectional influence on other agents. We employ a model based on Axelrod's dynamics for cultural interaction among social agents that allows for non-interacting states. We find three collective phases in the space of parameters of the system, given by the fraction of opinion leaders and a quantity representing the number of available states: one ordered phase having the state imposed by the leaders; another nontrivial ordered phase consisting of a majority group in a state orthogonal or alternative to that of the opinion leaders, and a disordered phase, where many small groups coexist. We show that the spontaneous rise of an alternative group in the presence of opinion leaders depends on the existence of a minimum number of long-range connections in the underlying network. This phenomenon challenges the common idea that influentials are fundamental to propagation processes in society, such as the formation of public opinion.

  10. Public authority control strategy for opinion evolution in social networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Xiong, Xi; Zhang, Minghong; Li, Wei

    2016-08-01

    This paper addresses the need to deal with and control public opinion and rumors. Existing strategies to control public opinion include degree, random, and adaptive bridge control strategies. In this paper, we use the HK model to present a public opinion control strategy based on public authority (PA). This means utilizing the influence of expert or high authority individuals whose opinions we control to obtain the optimum effect in the shortest time possible and thus reach a consensus of public opinion. Public authority (PA) is only influenced by individuals' attributes (age, economic status, and education level) and not their degree distribution; hence, in this paper, we assume that PA complies with two types of public authority distribution (normal and power-law). According to the proposed control strategy, our experiment is based on random, degree, and public authority control strategies in three different social networks (small-world, scale-free, and random) and we compare and analyze the strategies in terms of convergence time (T), final number of controlled agents (C), and comprehensive efficiency (E). We find that different network topologies and the distribution of the PA in the network can influence the final controlling effect. While the effect of PA strategy differs in different network topology structures, all structures achieve comprehensive efficiency with any kind of public authority distribution in any network. Our findings are consistent with several current sociological phenomena and show that in the process of public opinion/rumor control, considerable attention should be paid to high authority individuals.

  11. Five-year follow-up using a prostate stent as fiducial in image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Carl, Jesper; Sander, Lotte

    2015-06-01

    To report results from the five-year follow-up on a previously reported study using image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of localized or locally advanced prostate cancer (PC) and a removable prostate stent as fiducial. Patients with local or locally advanced PC were treated using five-field 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DRT). The clinical target volumes (CTV) were treated to 78 Gy in 39 fractions using daily on-line image guidance (IG). Late genito-urinary (GU) and gastro-intestinal (GI) toxicities were scored using the radiotherapy oncology group (RTOG) score and the common toxicity score of adverse events (CTC) score. Urinary symptoms were also scored using the international prostate symptom score (IPSS). Median observation time was 5.4 year. Sixty-two of the 90 patients from the original study cohort were eligible for toxicity assessment. Overall survival, cancer-specific survival and biochemical freedom from failure were 85%, 96% and 80%, respectively at five years after radiotherapy. Late toxicity GU and GI RTOG scores≥2 were 5% and 0%. Comparing pre- and post-radiotherapy IPSS scores indicate that development in urinary symptoms after radiotherapy may be complex. Prostate image-guided radiotherapy using a prostate stent demonstrated survival data comparable with recently published data. GU and GI toxicities at five-year follow-up were low and comparable to the lowest toxicity rates reported. These findings support that the precision of the prostate stent technique is at least as good as other techniques. IPSS revealed a complex development in urinary symptoms after radiotherapy.

  12. Does adjuvant radiotherapy suppress liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy?

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-Hwa; Kim, Kyubo; Chie, Eui Kyu; Jang, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun Whe; Oh, Do-Youn; Im, Seock-Ah; Kim, Tae-You; Bang, Yung-Jue; Ha, Sung W

    2009-05-01

    To analyze the influence of the adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) on the liver regeneration and liver function after partial hepatectomy (PH). Thirty-four patients who underwent PH for biliary tract cancer between October 2003 and July 2005 were reviewed. Hemihepatectomy was performed in 14 patients and less extensive surgery in 20. Of the patients, 19 patients had no adjuvant therapy (non-RT group) and 15 underwent adjuvant RT by a three-dimensional conformal technique (RT group). Radiation dose range was 40 to 50 Gy (median, 40 Gy). Liver volume on computed tomography and the results of liver function tests at 1, 4, 12, 24, and 52 weeks after PH were compared between the RT and non-RT groups. The preoperative characteristics were identical for both groups. During the interval between Weeks 4 and 12 when adjuvant RT was delivered in the RT group, the increase in liver volume was significantly smaller in the RT group than non-RT group (22.9 +/- 38.3cm(3) and 81.5 +/- 75.6cm(3), respectively, p = 0.007). However, the final liver volume measured at 1 year after PH did not differ between the two groups (p = 0.878). Liver function tests were comparable for both groups. The resection extent and original liver volume was independent factors for final liver volume measured at 1 year after PH. In this study, adjuvant RT delayed the liver regeneration process after PH, but the volume difference between the two study groups became nonsignificant after 1 year. Adjuvant RT had no additional adverse effect on liver function after PH.

  13. MR-CBCT image-guided system for radiotherapy of orthotopic rat prostate tumors.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Tsuicheng D; Arai, Tatsuya J; Campbell Iii, James; Jiang, Steve B; Mason, Ralph P; Stojadinovic, Strahinja

    2018-01-01

    Multi-modality image-guided radiotherapy is the standard of care in contemporary cancer management; however, it is not common in preclinical settings due to both hardware and software limitations. Soft tissue lesions, such as orthotopic prostate tumors, are difficult to identify using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging alone. In this study, we characterized a research magnetic resonance (MR) scanner for preclinical studies and created a protocol for combined MR-CBCT image-guided small animal radiotherapy. Two in-house dual-modality, MR and CBCT compatible, phantoms were designed and manufactured using 3D printing technology. The phantoms were used for quality assurance tests and to facilitate end-to-end testing for combined preclinical MR and CBCT based treatment planning. MR and CBCT images of the phantoms were acquired utilizing a Varian 4.7 T scanner and XRad-225Cx irradiator, respectively. The geometry distortion was assessed by comparing MR images to phantom blueprints and CBCT. The corrected MR scans were co-registered with CBCT and subsequently used for treatment planning. The fidelity of 3D printed phantoms compared to the blueprint design yielded favorable agreement as verified with the CBCT measurements. The geometric distortion, which varied between -5% and 11% throughout the scanning volume, was substantially reduced to within 0.4% after correction. The distortion free MR images were co-registered with the corresponding CBCT images and imported into a commercial treatment planning software SmART Plan. The planning target volume (PTV) was on average 19% smaller when contoured on the corrected MR-CBCT images relative to raw images without distortion correction. An MR-CBCT based preclinical workflow was successfully designed and implemented for small animal radiotherapy. Combined MR-CBCT image-guided radiotherapy for preclinical research potentially delivers enhanced relevance to human radiotherapy for various disease sites. This novel protocol

  14. Neurovascular bundle–sparing radiotherapy for prostate cancer using MRI-CT registration: A dosimetric feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Cassidy, R.J., E-mail: richardjcassidy@emory.edu; Yang, X.; Liu, T.

    Purpose: Sexual dysfunction after radiotherapy for prostate cancer remains an important late adverse toxicity. The neurovascular bundles (NVB) that lie posterolaterally to the prostate are typically spared during prostatectomy, but in traditional radiotherapy planning they are not contoured as an organ-at-risk with dose constraints. Our goal was to determine the dosimetric feasibility of “NVB-sparing” prostate radiotherapy while still delivering adequate dose to the prostate. Methods: Twenty-five consecutive patients with prostate cancer (with no extraprostatic disease on pelvic magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) who that were treated with external beam radiotherapy, with the same primary planning target volume margins, to a dosemore » of 79.2 Gy were evaluated. Pelvic MRI and simulation computed tomography scans were registered using dedicated software to allow for bilateral NVB target delineation on T2-weighted MRI. A volumetric modulated arc therapy plan was generated using the NVB bilaterally with 2 mm margin as an organ to spare and compared to the patient’s previously delivered plan. Dose-volume histogram endpoints for NVB, rectum, bladder, and planning target volume 79.2 were compared between the 2 plans using a 2-tailed paired t-test. Results: The V70 for the NVB was significantly lower on the NVB-sparing plan (p <0.01), while rectum and bladder endpoints were similar. Target V100% was similar but V{sub 105%} was higher for the NVB-sparing plans (p <0.01). Conclusions: “NVB-sparing” radiotherapy is dosimetrically feasible using CT-MRI registration, and for volumetric modulated arc therapy technology — target coverage is acceptable without increased dose to other normal structures, but with higher target dose inhomogeneity. The clinical impact of “NVB-sparing” radiotherapy is currently under study at our institution.« less

  15. Radiogenomics and radiotherapy response modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Naqa, Issam; Kerns, Sarah L.; Coates, James; Luo, Yi; Speers, Corey; West, Catharine M. L.; Rosenstein, Barry S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2017-08-01

    Advances in patient-specific information and biotechnology have contributed to a new era of computational medicine. Radiogenomics has emerged as a new field that investigates the role of genetics in treatment response to radiation therapy. Radiation oncology is currently attempting to embrace these recent advances and add to its rich history by maintaining its prominent role as a quantitative leader in oncologic response modeling. Here, we provide an overview of radiogenomics starting with genotyping, data aggregation, and application of different modeling approaches based on modifying traditional radiobiological methods or application of advanced machine learning techniques. We highlight the current status and potential for this new field to reshape the landscape of outcome modeling in radiotherapy and drive future advances in computational oncology.

  16. Intraoperative radiotherapy and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yeung, J M C; Ngan, S; Lynch, C; Heriot, A G

    2010-04-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) is a highly specialized component of multidisciplinary management of advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer. The aim of this review was to assess its role and effectiveness in the management of colorectal cancer. A literature search was performed using Medline, Embase, Ovid and Cochrane to identify English language studies which have used IORT in the multidisciplinary management of primary and recurrent colon and rectal cancers. Improved survival and local control in patients with involved surgical margins treated with IORT have been shown in many studies, but these results have been mainly from retrospective studies. There is associated morbidity from IORT. IORT does have a role in the management of colorectal cancer. Further research needs to be performed to optimize the application of this therapy.

  17. Target dose conformity in 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Vincent W C; Kwong, Dora L W; Sham, Jonathan S T

    2004-05-01

    Dose conformity to the planning target volume is an important criterion in radiotherapy treatment planning, for which the conformity index is a useful assessment tool. The purpose of this study is to compare the differences in CI for the treatment planning of four cancers including the nasopharynx, oesophagus, lung and prostate. Seventy patients with cancers of nasopharynx (30), oesophagus (15), lung (15) and prostate (10) were recruited. Each of these patients was planned with three sets of treatment plans using the FOCUS treatment planning system: the forward and inverse 3DCRT plans and the IMRT plan. The CI was generated for each treatment plan. The mean CI from each cancer patient group was calculated and compared with the other three cancer groups. The mean value of CI was also compared among the three planning methods. The oesophageal and lung cancers demonstrated relatively higher overall mean CI values (0.64 and 0.62, respectively), whereas that of the nasopharynx and prostate were lower (0.54 and 0.50, respectively). With regards to the planning method groups, the IMRT plans produced the highest overall mean CI (0.62), while those for the forward and inverse 3DCRT were similar (0.57 and 0.55, respectively). For the four selected cancers, oesophageal and lung cancers were easier to conform than the nasopharyngeal and prostate cancers. The IMRT plans were more effective in achieving better dose conformity than that of the 3DCRT.

  18. Does the weather influence public opinion about climate change?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, S. D.; McDaniel, J.

    2010-12-01

    Public opinion in North America about the science of anthropogenic climate change and the motivation for policy action has been variable over the past twenty years. The trends in public opinion over time have been attributed the general lack of pressing public concern about climate change to a range of political, economic and psychological factors. One driving force behind the variability in polling data from year to year may be the weather itself. The difference between what we “expect” - the climate - and what we “get” - the weather - can be a major source of confusion and obfuscation in the public discourse about climate change. For example, reaction to moderate global temperatures in 2007 and 2008 may have helped prompt the spread of a “global cooling” meme in the public and the news media. At the same time, a decrease in the belief in the science of climate change and the need for action has been noted in opinion polls. This study analyzes the relationship between public opinion about climate change and the weather in the U.S. since the mid-1980s using historical polling data from several major organizations (e.g. Gallup, Pew, Harris Interactive, ABC News), historical monthly air temperature (NCDC) and a survey of opinion articles from major U.S. newspapers (Washington Post, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Houston Chronicle, USA Today). Seasonal and annual monthly temperature anomalies for the northeastern U.S and the continental U.S are compared with available national opinion data for three general categories of questions: i) Is the climate warming?, ii) Is the observed warming due to human activity?, and iii) Are you concerned about climate change? The variability in temperature and public opinion over time is also compared with the variability in the fraction of opinion articles in the newspapers (n ~ 7000) which express general agreement or disagreement with IPCC Summary for Policymakers consensus statements on climate change (“most of

  19. In vivo skin dose measurement in breast conformal radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Aledavood, Seyed Amir; Noghreiyan, Atefeh Vejdani; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Jamali, Farideh; Davenport, David

    2016-01-01

    Accurate skin dose assessment is necessary during breast radiotherapy to assure that the skin dose is below the tolerance level and is sufficient to prevent tumour recurrence. The aim of the current study is to measure the skin dose and to evaluate the geometrical/anatomical parameters that affect it. Forty patients were simulated by TIGRT treatment planning system and treated with two tangential fields of 6 MV photon beam. Wedge filters were used to homogenise dose distribution for 11 patients. Skin dose was measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) and the effects of beam incident angle, thickness of irradiated region, and beam entry separation on the skin dose were analysed. Average skin dose in treatment course of 50 Gy to the clinical target volume (CTV) was 36.65 Gy. The corresponding dose values for patients who were treated with and without wedge filter were 35.65 and 37.20 Gy, respectively. It was determined that the beam angle affected the average skin dose while the thickness of the irradiated region and the beam entry separation did not affect dose. Since the skin dose measured in this study was lower than the amount required to prevent tumour recurrence, application of bolus material in part of the treatment course is suggested for post-mastectomy advanced breast radiotherapy. It is more important when wedge filters are applied to homogenize dose distribution.

  20. Retrospective evaluation of dosimetric quality for prostate carcinomas treated with 3D conformal, intensity modulated and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Scott B; Kairn, Tanya; Middlebrook, Nigel; Hill, Brendan; Christie, David R H; Knight, Richard T; Kenny, John; Langton, Christian M; Trapp, Jamie V

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This study examines and compares the dosimetric quality of radiotherapy treatment plans for prostate carcinoma across a cohort of 163 patients treated across five centres: 83 treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), 33 treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and 47 treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods Treatment plan quality was evaluated in terms of target dose homogeneity and organs at risk (OAR), through the use of a set of dose metrics. These included the mean, maximum and minimum doses; the homogeneity and conformity indices for the target volumes; and a selection of dose coverage values that were relevant to each OAR. Statistical significance was evaluated using two-tailed Welch's T-tests. The Monte Carlo DICOM ToolKit software was adapted to permit the evaluation of dose metrics from DICOM data exported from a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system. Results The 3DCRT treatment plans offered greater planning target volume dose homogeneity than the other two treatment modalities. The IMRT and VMAT plans offered greater dose reduction in the OAR: with increased compliance with recommended OAR dose constraints, compared to conventional 3DCRT treatments. When compared to each other, IMRT and VMAT did not provide significantly different treatment plan quality for like-sized tumour volumes. Conclusions This study indicates that IMRT and VMAT have provided similar dosimetric quality, which is superior to the dosimetric quality achieved with 3DCRT. PMID:26229621

  1. Patterns of radiotherapy infrastructure in Japan and in other countries with well-developed radiotherapy infrastructures.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Katsumasa; Konishi, Kenta; Komatsu, Tetsuya; Sasaki, Tomonari; Shikama, Naoto

    2018-05-01

    In high-income countries, the number of radiotherapy machine per population reaches a sufficient level. However, the patterns of infrastructure of radiotherapy in high-income countries are not well known. Among 29 high-income countries with gross national income of $25,000 or more per capita, we selected 23 countries whose total number of newly diagnosed cancer patients in 2012 was reported in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Health Statistics 2017. The numbers of radiotherapy centers and teletherapy machines in each of these 23 countries were collected using the Dictionary of Radiotherapy Centers database. The number of cancer patients per teletherapy machine was 452.35-1398.22 (median 711.66) with a three-fold variation, whereas the number of cancer patients per radiotherapy center varied even more widely, from 826.16 to 5159.86 (median 2259.83) with a six-fold variation. The average number of teletherapy machines per radiotherapy center also ranged widely, from 1.24 to 8.29 (median 3.11) with a seven-fold variation. The number of teletherapy machines in each country was almost proportional to that of cancer patients, and the number of teletherapy machines per radiotherapy center was inversely related to the number of radiotherapy centers per cancer patients. The number of teletherapy machines per radiotherapy center in Japan was 1.24, the most fragmented among the high-income countries. The percentage of large radiotherapy centers having three or more teletherapy machines in Japan was the smallest among 23 high-income countries. Optimization of the radiotherapy infrastructure in Japan should be carefully considered.

  2. SU-C-17A-01: MRI-Based Radiotherapy Treatment Planning In Pelvis

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, S; Cao, Y; Jolly, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To support radiotherapy dose calculation, synthetic CT (MRCT) image volumes need to represent the electron density of tissues with sufficient accuracy. This study compares CT and MRCT for pelvic radiotherapy. Methods: CT and multi-contrast MRI acquired using T1- based Dixon, T2 TSE, and PETRA sequences were acquired on an IRBapproved protocol patient. A previously published method was used to create a MRCT image volume by applying fuzzy classification on T1- weighted and calculated water image volumes (air and fluid voxels were excluded using thresholds applied to PETRA and T2-weighted images). The correlation of pelvic bone intensity between CT andmore » MRCT was investigated. Two treatment plans, based on CT and MRCT, were performed to mimic treatment for: (a) pelvic bone metastasis with a 16MV parallel beam arrangement, and (b) gynecological cancer with 6MV volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using two full arcs. The CT-calculated fluence maps were used to recalculate doses using the MRCT-derived density grid. The dose-volume histograms and dose distributions were compared. Results: Bone intensities in the MRCT volume correlated linearly with CT intensities up to 800 HU (containing 96% of the bone volume), and then decreased with CT intensity increase (4% volume). There was no significant difference in dose distributions between CT- and MRCTbased plans, except for the rectum and bladder, for which the V45 differed by 15% and 9%, respectively. These differences may be attributed to normal and visualized organ movement and volume variations between CT and MR scans. Conclusion: While MRCT had lower bone intensity in highly-dense bone, this did not cause significant dose deviations from CT due to its small percentage of volume. These results indicate that treatment planning using MRCT could generate comparable dose distributions to that using CT, and further demonstrate the feasibility of using MRI-alone to support Radiation Oncology workflow. NIH R01

  3. Radiotherapy for Vestibular Schwannomas: A Critical Review

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Erin S., E-mail: murphye3@ccf.or; Suh, John H.

    2011-03-15

    Vestibular schwannomas are slow-growing tumors of the myelin-forming cells that cover cranial nerve VIII. The treatment options for patients with vestibular schwannoma include active observation, surgical management, and radiotherapy. However, the optimal treatment choice remains controversial. We have reviewed the available data and summarized the radiotherapeutic options, including single-session stereotactic radiosurgery, fractionated conventional radiotherapy, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and proton beam therapy. The comparisons of the various radiotherapy modalities have been based on single-institution experiences, which have shown excellent tumor control rates of 91-100%. Both stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy have successfully improved cranial nerve V and VII preservation tomore » >95%. The mixed data regarding the ideal hearing preservation therapy, inherent biases in patient selection, and differences in outcome analysis have made the comparison across radiotherapeutic modalities difficult. Early experience using proton therapy for vestibular schwannoma treatment demonstrated local control rates of 84-100% but disappointing hearing preservation rates of 33-42%. Efforts to improve radiotherapy delivery will focus on refined dosimetry with the goal of reducing the dose to the critical structures. As future randomized trials are unlikely, we suggest regimented pre- and post-treatment assessments, including validated evaluations of cranial nerves V, VII, and VIII, and quality of life assessments with long-term prospective follow-up. The results from such trials will enhance the understanding of therapy outcomes and improve our ability to inform patients.« less

  4. Sexual and marital relationships after radiotherapy for seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schover, L.R.; Gonzales, M.; von Eschenbach, A.C.

    Questionnaires on sexual function, marital status, and fertility were returned by 84 men who received radiotherapy for seminoma (Stage I, II, or III). The mean length of follow-up was ten years. Although 93 per cent were married, 19 per cent had low rates of sexual activity, 12 per cent reported low sexual desire, 15 per cent had erectile dysfunction, 10 per cent had difficulty reaching orgasm, and 14 per cent had premature ejaculation. The most common problems were reduced intensity of orgasm (33%) and reduc