Science.gov

Sample records for opposition faults reiljan

  1. The Fault Lies on the Other Side: Altered Brain Functional Connectivity in Psychiatric Disorders is Mainly Caused by Counterpart Regions in the Opposite Hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Kendrick, Keith M; Lu, Guangming; Feng, Jianfeng

    2015-10-01

    Many psychiatric disorders are associated with abnormal resting-state functional connectivity between pairs of brain regions, although it remains unclear whether the fault resides within the pair of regions themselves or other regions connected to them. Identifying the source of dysfunction is crucial for understanding the etiology of different disorders. Using pathway- and network-based techniques to analyze resting-state functional magnetic imaging data from a large population of patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (239 patients, 251 controls), major depression (39 patients, 37 controls), and schizophrenia (69 patients, 62 controls), we show for the first time that only network-based cross-correlation identifies significant functional connectivity changes in all 3 disorders which survive correction. This demonstrates that the primary source of dysfunction resides not in the regional pairs themselves but in their external connections. Combining pathway and network-based functional-connectivity analysis, we established that, in all 3 disorders, the counterparts of pairs of regions in the opposite hemisphere contribute 60-76% to altered functional connectivity, compared with only 17-21% from the regions themselves. Thus, a transdiagnostic feature is of abnormal functional connectivity between brain regions produced via their contralateral counterparts. Our results demonstrate an important role for contralateral counterpart regions in contributing to altered regional connectivity in psychiatric disorders. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Interacting faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, D. C. P.; Nixon, C. W.; Rotevatn, A.; Sanderson, D. J.; Zuluaga, L. F.

    2017-04-01

    The way that faults interact with each other controls fault geometries, displacements and strains. Faults rarely occur individually but as sets or networks, with the arrangement of these faults producing a variety of different fault interactions. Fault interactions are characterised in terms of the following: 1) Geometry - the spatial arrangement of the faults. Interacting faults may or may not be geometrically linked (i.e. physically connected), when fault planes share an intersection line. 2) Kinematics - the displacement distributions of the interacting faults and whether the displacement directions are parallel, perpendicular or oblique to the intersection line. Interacting faults may or may not be kinematically linked, where the displacements, stresses and strains of one fault influences those of the other. 3) Displacement and strain in the interaction zone - whether the faults have the same or opposite displacement directions, and if extension or contraction dominates in the acute bisector between the faults. 4) Chronology - the relative ages of the faults. This characterisation scheme is used to suggest a classification for interacting faults. Different types of interaction are illustrated using metre-scale faults from the Mesozoic rocks of Somerset and examples from the literature.

  3. Opposition Redirected

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwandt, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The discursive arena known as qualitative inquiry initially took shape in opposition to the epistemology and politics associated with philosophies of logical positivism and empiricism and the doctrine of value-free science. An identity of resistance and antagonism continues to characterize many who identify with this arena of activity. This paper…

  4. Opposition Redirected

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwandt, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The discursive arena known as qualitative inquiry initially took shape in opposition to the epistemology and politics associated with philosophies of logical positivism and empiricism and the doctrine of value-free science. An identity of resistance and antagonism continues to characterize many who identify with this arena of activity. This paper…

  5. Zipper Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, J. P.; Passchier, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    Intersecting simultaneously active pairs of faults with different orientations and opposing slip sense ("conjugate faults") present geometrical and kinematic problems. Such faults rarely offset each other, even when they have displacements of many km. A simple solution to the problem is that the two faults merge, either zippering up or unzippering, depending on the relationship between the angle of intersection and the slip senses. A widely recognized example of this is the so-called blind front developed in some thrust belts, where a backthrust branches off a decollement surface at depth. The decollement progressively unzippers, so that its hanging wall becomes the hanging wall of the backthrust, and its footwall becomes the footwall of the active decollement. The opposite situation commonly arises in core complexes, where conjugate low-angle normal faults merge to form a single detachment; in this case the two faults zipper up. Analogous situations may arise for conjugate pairs of strike-slip faults. We present kinematic and geometrical analyses of the Garlock and San Andreas faults in California, the Najd fault system in Saudi Arabia, the North and East Anatolian faults, the Karakoram and Altyn Tagh faults in Tibet, and the Tonale and Guidicarie faults in the southern Alps, all of which appear to have undergone zippering over distances of several tens to hundreds of km. The zippering process may produce complex and significant patterns of strain and rotation in the surrounding rocks, particularly if the angle between the zippered faults is large. A zippering fault may be inactive during active movement on the intersecting faults, or it may have a slip rate that differs from either fault. Intersecting conjugate ductile shear zones behave in the same way on outcrop and micro-scales.

  6. Mars at Opposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2010-01-01

    On January 29, Mars will reach opposition, a point along its orbit around the Sun where Mars will be directly opposite from the Sun in a two-planet and Sun line-up with the Earth in between. At this opposition, the Earth and Mars will be separated by nearly 100 million km. An opposition is similar to a full Moon in that the planet at opposition…

  7. Mars at Opposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddle, Bob

    2010-01-01

    On January 29, Mars will reach opposition, a point along its orbit around the Sun where Mars will be directly opposite from the Sun in a two-planet and Sun line-up with the Earth in between. At this opposition, the Earth and Mars will be separated by nearly 100 million km. An opposition is similar to a full Moon in that the planet at opposition…

  8. Dealing with Oppositional Behaviors

    MedlinePlus

    ... ones that you like.” He again said, “I don’t want those,” but this time he pushed me. I was so surprised by this exchange, I just simply said, “Okay. Let’s go.” We all know oppositional behaviors After raising our ...

  9. Ceres During Opposition Surge.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-16

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft successfully observed Ceres at opposition on April 29, 2017, taking images from a position exactly between the sun and Ceres' surface. Mission specialists had carefully maneuvered Dawn into a special orbit so that the spacecraft could view Occator Crater, which contains the brightest area of Ceres, from this new perspective. A movie shows these opposition images, with contrast enhanced to highlight brightness differences. The bright spots of Occator stand out particularly well on an otherwise relatively bland surface. Dawn took these images from an altitude of about 12,000 miles (20,000 kilometers). Based on data from ground-based telescopes and spacecraft that have previously viewed planetary bodies at opposition, scientists predicted that Ceres would appear brighter from this opposition configuration. This increase in brightness, or "surge," relates the size of the grains of material on the surface, as well as how porous those materials are. The science motivation for performing these observations is further explained in the March 2017 issue of the Dawn Journal blog. A movie can be viewed at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21405

  10. Vote No! Managing Organized Opposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lifto, Don E.; Senden, J. Bradford

    2008-01-01

    Organized opposition from A to Z symbolizes both the breadth and the core values of organized opposition groups that have emerged across the nation in recent years. Technological advances have expanded the reach and impact of oppositional messages. Anti-public school websites, group e-mail, the mushrooming blogosphere and web-based marketing…

  11. Vote No! Managing Organized Opposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lifto, Don E.; Senden, J. Bradford

    2008-01-01

    Organized opposition from A to Z symbolizes both the breadth and the core values of organized opposition groups that have emerged across the nation in recent years. Technological advances have expanded the reach and impact of oppositional messages. Anti-public school websites, group e-mail, the mushrooming blogosphere and web-based marketing…

  12. Understanding the opposition.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    Current debates about sex selection start from a paradox: on the one hand, the 'liberal' argument in favour of sex selection is often thought to be sound; but on the other hand there is widespread public opposition to sex selection. So it is worth spending some time examining the arguments against sex selection. Four different types of argument are identified: (i) religious arguments; (ii) consequentialist arguments, mainly concerning disturbance to the sex ratio; (iii) arguments to the effect that sex selection involves a failure to respect the autonomy of a child; (iv) arguments to the effect that the motivation for sex selection brings with it an instrumental attitude to children not compatible with a child's need for unconditional acceptance and love. In the end the conclusion is reached that none of these arguments provide decisive arguments against the liberal thesis that sex selection ought to be permitted, especially where 'family balancing' is envisaged. In the light of this conclusion the issue of fetal sexing followed by selective feticide as a method of sex selection is discussed. It is argued that sex selection is not in general a good reason for abortion, but that this practice may become unstoppable.

  13. Faulting Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-07-15

    This region of Xanthe Terra has mostly been contracted due to thrust faulting, but this local region shows evidence of extensional faulting, also called normal faulting. When two normal faults face each other, they create a bathtub-like depression called a "graben." http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20813

  14. Oppositions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spindler, George; Spindler, Louise

    1984-01-01

    Sees Dobbert et al's model of cultural transmission (this issue) as generalizing, structural, mechanical, predetermined, formal, digital, and etic. Posits an alternative approach that is idiographic, processual, organic, open, nonformal, analogical, and attentive to emic data. Argues that the Dobbert model accounts inadequately for the implicit,…

  15. The coherent backscattering opposition effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, R. M.; Hapke, B. W.; Smythe, W. D.; Gharakanian, V.; Herrera, P.

    1993-01-01

    We have measured the opposition effect, the nonlinear surge in reflectance seen in particulate materials as phase angle approaches zero degrees, in a suite of materials of varying particle size and reflectance. These samples were illuminated by linearly and circularly polarized monochromatic radiation at two wavelengths, 0.442 and 0.633 microns. By measuring the linear and circular polarization ratios for each sample, we have found that in highly reflective materials the behavior of the reflected radiation is consistent with the coherent backscattering process which has recently been proposed to explain the opposition surge that is seen in such media. The size and width of the coherent backscattering opposition peak vary as a function of reflectance of the sample. The opposition effect has been observed in particulate materials studied in the laboratory and it is also observed in the radiation reflected from solar system bodies which present a regolith to the earth based observer. The traditional explanation of the opposition effect, the shadow-hiding hypothesis, is that it was caused by the elimination of mutual shadows cast between the regolith grains as the phase angle of the observation became smaller. This shadow-hiding hypothesis, however, is unable to explain the opposition effect seen in highly reflective materials such as magnesium oxide and barium sulfate powders. This is because highly reflective media will multiply scatter the incident radiation between the regolith grains. This causes the shadows to be eliminated. We have measured the angular scattering properties of a suite of materials of different reflectivity. We have observed polarization ratios in reflective particulates that are consistent with coherent backscattering as the principal process which causes the opposition surge.

  16. Fault finder

    DOEpatents

    Bunch, Richard H.

    1986-01-01

    A fault finder for locating faults along a high voltage electrical transmission line. Real time monitoring of background noise and improved filtering of input signals is used to identify the occurrence of a fault. A fault is detected at both a master and remote unit spaced along the line. A master clock synchronizes operation of a similar clock at the remote unit. Both units include modulator and demodulator circuits for transmission of clock signals and data. All data is received at the master unit for processing to determine an accurate fault distance calculation.

  17. Oppositional Culture and Educational Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The most common lay explanation for the racial gap in educational achievement in the US is the "oppositional culture hypothesis", which holds that Black students tend to undervalue education and stigmatize their high-achieving peers, accusing them of "acting White". Many believe that, insofar as this hypothesis is true, Black…

  18. When Do Children Understand "Opposite"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Catherine I.; Pexman, Penny M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of the present research were to determine (a) the age at which children with typical development understand the concept of opposite, (b) whether this is related to other cognitive abilities or experiences, and (c) whether there is early implicit understanding of the concept. Method: Children (N = 204) between 3 and 5 years of age…

  19. "Beloved" as an Oppositional Gaze

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mao, Weiqiang; Zhang, Mingquan

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the strategy Morrison adopts in "Beloved" to give voice to black Americans long silenced by the dominant white American culture. Instead of being objects passively accepting their aphasia, black Americans become speaking subjects that are able to cast an oppositional gaze to avert the objectifying gaze of white…

  20. Facility siting and public opposition

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hare, M.H.; Bacow, L.; Sanderson, D.

    1983-01-01

    This book shows developers how to avoid expensive siting disputes that arise over regionally beneficial but locally undesirable facilities, such as prisons, landfills, and oil refineries. It explains the strategy by offering compensation to communities. Guidelines are included for keeping the public informed without increasing opposition.

  1. When Do Children Understand "Opposite"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Catherine I.; Pexman, Penny M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of the present research were to determine (a) the age at which children with typical development understand the concept of opposite, (b) whether this is related to other cognitive abilities or experiences, and (c) whether there is early implicit understanding of the concept. Method: Children (N = 204) between 3 and 5 years of age…

  2. Oppositional Culture and Educational Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The most common lay explanation for the racial gap in educational achievement in the US is the "oppositional culture hypothesis", which holds that Black students tend to undervalue education and stigmatize their high-achieving peers, accusing them of "acting White". Many believe that, insofar as this hypothesis is true, Black…

  3. Fault Branching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmowska, R.; Rice, J. R.; Poliakov, A. N.

    2001-12-01

    Theoretical stress analysis for a propagating shear rupture suggests that the propensity of the rupture path to branch is determined by rupture speed and by the preexisting stress state. See Poliakov, Dmowska and Rice (JGR, submitted April 2001, URL below). Deviatoric stresses near a mode II rupture tip are found to be much higher to both sides of the fault plane than directly ahead, when rupture speed becomes close to the Rayleigh speed. However, the actual pattern of predicted Coulomb failure on secondary faults is strongly dependent on the angle between the fault and the direction of maximum compression Smax in the pre-stress field. Steep Smax angles lead to more extensive failure on the extensional side, whereas shallow angles give comparable failure regions on both. Here we test such concepts against natural examples. For crustal thrust faults we may assume that Smax is horizontal. Thus nucleation on a steeply dipping plane, like the 53 ° dip for the 1971 San Fernando earthquake, is consistent with rupture path kinking to the extensional side, as inferred. Nucleation on a shallow dip, like for the 12 ° -18 ° of the 1985 Kettleman Hills event, should activate both sides, as seems consistent with aftershock patterns. Similarly, in a strike slip example, Smax is inferred to be at approximately 60 ° with the Johnson Valley fault where it branched to the extensional side onto the Landers-Kickapoo fault in the 1992 event, and this too is consistent. Further, geological examination of the activation of secondary fault features along the Johnson Valley fault and the Homestead Valley fault consistently shows that most activity occurs on the extensional side. Another strike-slip example is the Imperial Valley 1979 earthquake. The approximate Smax direction is north-south, at around 35 ° with the main fault, where it branched, on the extensional side, onto Brawley fault, again interpretable with the concepts developed.

  4. Opposition effect of Trojan asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, V. G.; Belskaya, I. N.; Slyusarev, I. G.; Krugly, Yu. N.; Chiorny, V. G.; Gaftonyuk, N. M.; Donchev, Z.; Ivanova, V.; Ibrahimov, M. A.; Ehgamberdiev, Sh. A.; Molotov, I. E.

    2012-01-01

    CCD-photometry of three Jupiter Trojan asteroids were carried out to study their opposition effect. We obtained well-sampled magnitude-phase curves for (588) Achilles, (884) Priamus, and (1143) Odysseus in the maximal attainable phase angle range down to 0.1-0.2°. The magnitude-phase relations have a linear behavior in all observed range of phase angles and do not show any non-linear opposition brightening. We have not found any confident differences between phase slopes measured in B, V and R bands. The values of the measured phase slopes of Trojans are different from available data for Centaurs. They are within the range of phase slopes measured for some low-albedo main belt asteroids, also exhibit a linear behavior down to small phase angles. An absence of non-linear opposition brightening puts constraints on the surface properties of the studied objects, assuming very dark surfaces where single scattering plays dominating role. We also determined the rotation periods, amplitudes, the values of color indexes B-V and V-R, and the absolute magnitudes of these asteroids.

  5. Fault Branching and Rupture Directivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmowska, R.; Rice, J. R.; Kame, N.

    2002-12-01

    also on the main fault), or rather involved arrest by a barrier on the original fault and jumping [Harris and Day, JGR, 1993] to a neighboring fault on which rupture propagated bilaterally to form what appears as a backward-branched structure. Our studies [Poliakov et al., JGR in press, 2002; Kame et al, EOS, 2002] of stress fields around a dynamically moving mode II crack tip show a clear tendency to branch from the straight path at high rupture speeds, but the stress fields never allow the rupture path to directly turn through highly obtuse angles, and hence that mechanism is unlikely. In contrast, study of fault maps in the vicinity of the Kp to HV fault transition [Sowers et al., 1994], discussed as case (1) above, strongly suggest that the large-angle branching occurred as a jump, which we propose as the likely general mechanism. Implications for the Nakata et al. [1998] aim of inferring rupture directivity from branch geometry is that this will be possible only when rather detailed characterization (by surface geology, seismic relocation, trapped waves) of fault connectivity can be carried out in the vicinity of the branching junction, to ascertain whether direct turning of the rupture path through an angle, or jumping and then propagating bilaterally, were involved in prior events. They have opposite implications for how we would associate past directivity with a (nominally) branched fault geometry.

  6. Fault diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, Kathy

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the research in this area of fault management is to develop and implement a decision aiding concept for diagnosing faults, especially faults which are difficult for pilots to identify, and to develop methods for presenting the diagnosis information to the flight crew in a timely and comprehensible manner. The requirements for the diagnosis concept were identified by interviewing pilots, analyzing actual incident and accident cases, and examining psychology literature on how humans perform diagnosis. The diagnosis decision aiding concept developed based on those requirements takes abnormal sensor readings as input, as identified by a fault monitor. Based on these abnormal sensor readings, the diagnosis concept identifies the cause or source of the fault and all components affected by the fault. This concept was implemented for diagnosis of aircraft propulsion and hydraulic subsystems in a computer program called Draphys (Diagnostic Reasoning About Physical Systems). Draphys is unique in two important ways. First, it uses models of both functional and physical relationships in the subsystems. Using both models enables the diagnostic reasoning to identify the fault propagation as the faulted system continues to operate, and to diagnose physical damage. Draphys also reasons about behavior of the faulted system over time, to eliminate possibilities as more information becomes available, and to update the system status as more components are affected by the fault. The crew interface research is examining display issues associated with presenting diagnosis information to the flight crew. One study examined issues for presenting system status information. One lesson learned from that study was that pilots found fault situations to be more complex if they involved multiple subsystems. Another was pilots could identify the faulted systems more quickly if the system status was presented in pictorial or text format. Another study is currently under way to

  7. Fault mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, P. )

    1991-01-01

    Recent observational, experimental, and theoretical modeling studies of fault mechanics are discussed in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics examined include interseismic strain accumulation, coseismic deformation, postseismic deformation, and the earthquake cycle; long-term deformation; fault friction and the instability mechanism; pore pressure and normal stress effects; instability models; strain measurements prior to earthquakes; stochastic modeling of earthquakes; and deep-focus earthquakes. Maps, graphs, and a comprehensive bibliography are provided. 220 refs.

  8. A “mesh” of crossing faults: Fault networks of southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janecke, S. U.

    2009-12-01

    Detailed geologic mapping of active fault systems in the western Salton Trough and northern Peninsular Ranges of southern California make it possible to expand the inventory of mapped and known faults by compiling and updating existing geologic maps, and analyzing high resolution imagery, LIDAR, InSAR, relocated hypocenters and other geophysical datasets. A fault map is being compiled on Google Earth and will ultimately discriminate between a range of different fault expressions: from well-mapped faults to subtle lineaments and geomorphic anomalies. The fault map shows deformation patterns in both crystalline and basinal deposits and reveals a complex fault mesh with many curious and unexpected relationships. Key findings are: 1) Many fault systems have mutually interpenetrating geometries, are grossly coeval, and allow faults to cross one another. A typical relationship reveals a dextral fault zone that appears to be continuous at the regional scale. In detail, however, there are no continuous NW-striking dextral fault traces and instead the master dextral fault is offset in a left-lateral sense by numerous crossing faults. Left-lateral faults also show small offsets where they interact with right lateral faults. Both fault sets show evidence of Quaternary activity. Examples occur along the Clark, Coyote Creek, Earthquake Valley and Torres Martinez fault zones. 2) Fault zones cross in other ways. There are locations where active faults continue across or beneath significant structural barriers. Major fault zones like the Clark fault of the San Jacinto fault system appears to end at NE-striking sinistral fault zones (like the Extra and Pumpkin faults) that clearly cross from the SW to the NE side of the projection of the dextral traces. Despite these blocking structures, there is good evidence for continuation of the dextral faults on the opposite sides of the crossing fault array. In some instances there is clear evidence (in deep microseismic alignments of

  9. FFAG lattice without opposite bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trbojevic, Dejan; Courant, Ernest D.; Garren, Al

    2000-08-01

    A future "neutrino factory" or Muon Collider requires fast muon acceleration before the storage ring. Several alternatives for fast muon acceleration have previously been considered. One of them is the FFAG (Fixed Field Alternating Gradient) synchrotron. The FFAG concept was developed in 1952 by K. R. Symon (ref. 1). The advantages of this design are the fixed magnetic field, large range of particle energy, simple RF; power supplies are simple, and there is no transition energy. But a drawback is that reverse bending magnets are included in the configuration; this increases the size and cost of the ring. Recently some modified FFAG lattice designs have been described where the amount of opposite bending was significantly reduced (ref. 2, ref. 3).

  10. Three Dimensions of Oppositionality in Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringaris, Argyris; Goodman, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Background: Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) in youth is a strong predictor of mental illness yet the wide range of associations with psychiatric disorders remains largely unexplained. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the identification of irritable, headstrong and hurtful dimensions within youth oppositionality would clarify…

  11. Instruction Pamphlet for Parents of Oppositional Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ora, John P.; And Others

    The pamphlet contains explanations and instructions for parents of oppositional preschool children (negative, destructive, or uncooperative children) who are enrolled in a Regional Intervention Project (RIP) behavior modification program. Explained in basic terms are the behavior theories related to why a child becomes oppositional and how to…

  12. Fault tectonics and earthquake hazards in parts of southern California. [penninsular ranges, Garlock fault, Salton Trough area, and western Mojave Desert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merifield, P. M. (Principal Investigator); Lamar, D. L.; Gazley, C., Jr.; Lamar, J. V.; Stratton, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Four previously unknown faults were discovered in basement terrane of the Peninsular Ranges. These have been named the San Ysidro Creek fault, Thing Valley fault, Canyon City fault, and Warren Canyon fault. In addition fault gouge and breccia were recognized along the San Diego River fault. Study of features on Skylab imagery and review of geologic and seismic data suggest that the risk of a damaging earthquake is greater along the northwestern portion of the Elsinore fault than along the southeastern portion. Physiographic indicators of active faulting along the Garlock fault identifiable in Skylab imagery include scarps, linear ridges, shutter ridges, faceted ridges, linear valleys, undrained depressions and offset drainage. The following previously unrecognized fault segments are postulated for the Salton Trough Area: (1) An extension of a previously known fault in the San Andreas fault set located southeast of the Salton Sea; (2) An extension of the active San Jacinto fault zone along a tonal change in cultivated fields across Mexicali Valley ( the tonal change may represent different soil conditions along opposite sides of a fault). For the Skylab and LANDSAT images studied, pseudocolor transformations offer no advantages over the original images in the recognition of faults in Skylab and LANDSAT images. Alluvial deposits of different ages, a marble unit and iron oxide gossans of the Mojave Mining District are more readily differentiated on images prepared from ratios of individual bands of the S-192 multispectral scanner data. The San Andreas fault was also made more distinct in the 8/2 and 9/2 band ratios by enhancement of vegetation differences on opposite sides of the fault. Preliminary analysis indicates a significant earth resources potential for the discrimination of soil and rock types, including mineral alteration zones. This application should be actively pursued.

  13. The Pythagorean table of opposites, symbolic classification, and Aristotle.

    PubMed

    Goldin, Owen

    2015-06-01

    At Metaphysics A 5 986a22-b2, Aristotle refers to a Pythagorean table, with two columns of paired opposites. I argue that 1) although Burkert and Zhmud have argued otherwise, there is sufficient textual evidence to indicate that the table, or one much like it, is indeed of Pythagorean origin; 2) research in structural anthropology indicates that the tables are a formalization of arrays of "symbolic classification" which express a pre-scientific world view with social and ethical implications, according to which the presence of a principle on one column of the table will carry with it another principle within the same column; 3) a close analysis of Aristotle's arguments shows that he thought that the table expresses real causal relationships; and 4) Aristotle faults the table of opposites with positing its principles as having universal application and with not distinguishing between those principles that are causally prior and those that are posterior. Aristotle's account of scientific explanation and his own explanations that he developed in accordance with this account are in part the result of his critical encounter with this prescientific Pythagorean table.

  14. Active faulting in the Walker Lane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesnousky, Steven G.

    2005-06-01

    Lane and that oblique components of displacement are of opposite sense along the Walker Lane (extension) and San Andreas (contraction), respectively. Despite the gross differences in fault pattern, the Walker Lane and San Andreas also share similarities in deformation style, including clockwise rotations of crustal blocks leading to development of structural basins and the partitioning of oblique components of slip onto subparallel strike-slip and dip-slip faults.

  15. Flight elements: Fault detection and fault management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, H.; Patterson-Hine, A.; Edge, J. T.; Lawler, D.

    1990-01-01

    Fault management for an intelligent computational system must be developed using a top down integrated engineering approach. An approach proposed includes integrating the overall environment involving sensors and their associated data; design knowledge capture; operations; fault detection, identification, and reconfiguration; testability; causal models including digraph matrix analysis; and overall performance impacts on the hardware and software architecture. Implementation of the concept to achieve a real time intelligent fault detection and management system will be accomplished via the implementation of several objectives, which are: Development of fault tolerant/FDIR requirement and specification from a systems level which will carry through from conceptual design through implementation and mission operations; Implementation of monitoring, diagnosis, and reconfiguration at all system levels providing fault isolation and system integration; Optimize system operations to manage degraded system performance through system integration; and Lower development and operations costs through the implementation of an intelligent real time fault detection and fault management system and an information management system.

  16. Titania's opposition effect - Analysis of Voyager observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P. C.; Veverka, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Brown, Robert Hamilton; Johnson, T. V.

    1987-01-01

    Voyager 2 obtained images of Titania over phase angles ranging from 0.8 to 150 deg and at sufficient resolution to investigate the photometric behavior of different surface units. The large, relatively narrow opposition surge detected from earth was confirmed and can be successfully modeled with Hapke's (1986) photometric theory. Opposition effects do not vary greatly between bright areas (craters and ejecta) and dark areas, but the brightness of the brighter areas decreases more slowly with increasing phase angle than that of the dark areas. Thus the fresher craters and their ejecta become less prominent in relation to the background as opposition is approached. This effect is best explained by a modest difference in single-scattering albedo.

  17. Porosity variations in and around normal fault zones: implications for fault seal and geomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, David; Neilson, Joyce; Farrell, Natalie; Timms, Nick; Wilson, Moyra

    2015-04-01

    clear lithofacies control on the Vp-porosity and the Vs-Vp relationships for faulted limestones. Using porosity patterns quantified in naturally deformed rocks we have modelled their effect on the mechanical stability of fluid-saturated fault zones in the subsurface. Poroelasticity theory predicts that variations in fluid pressure could influence fault stability. Anisotropic patterns of porosity in and around fault zones can - depending on their orientation and intensity - lead to an increase in fault stability in response to a rise in fluid pressure, and a decrease in fault stability for a drop in fluid pressure. These predictions are the exact opposite of the accepted role of effective stress in fault stability. Our work has provided new data on the spatial and statistical variation of porosity in fault zones. Traditionally considered as an isotropic and scalar value, porosity and pore networks are better considered as anisotropic and as scale-dependent statistical distributions. The geological processes controlling the evolution of porosity are complex. Quantifying patterns of porosity variation is an essential first step in a wider quest to better understand deformation processes in and around normal fault zones. Understanding porosity patterns will help us to make more useful predictive tools for all agencies involved in the study and management of fluids in the subsurface.

  18. Separating the Domains of Oppositional Behavior: Comparing Latent Models of the Conners' Oppositional Subscale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuny, Ana V.; Althoff, Robert R.; Copeland, William; Bartels, Meike; Van Beijsterveldt, C. E. M.; Baer, Julie; Hudziak, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Although oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is usually considered the mildest of the disruptive behavior disorders, it is a key factor in predicting young adult anxiety and depression and is distinguishable from normal childhood behavior. In an effort to understand possible subsets of oppositional defiant behavior (ODB) that may…

  19. Separating the Domains of Oppositional Behavior: Comparing Latent Models of the Conners' Oppositional Subscale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuny, Ana V.; Althoff, Robert R.; Copeland, William; Bartels, Meike; Van Beijsterveldt, C. E. M.; Baer, Julie; Hudziak, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Although oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is usually considered the mildest of the disruptive behavior disorders, it is a key factor in predicting young adult anxiety and depression and is distinguishable from normal childhood behavior. In an effort to understand possible subsets of oppositional defiant behavior (ODB) that may…

  20. Non-coalescence of oppositely charged drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristenpart, W. D.; Bird, J. C.; Belmonte, A.; Dollar, F.; Stone, H. A.

    2009-11-01

    Electrically induced droplet motion manifests itself in processes as diverse as storm cloud formation, commercial ink-jet printing, petroleum and vegetable oil dehydration, electrospray ionization in mass spectrometry, electrowetting and lab-on-a-chip manipulations. An important issue in practical applications is the tendency for adjacent drops to coalesce, and oppositely charged drops have long been assumed to experience an attractive force that favors their coalescence. Here we report the existence of a critical field strength above which oppositely charged drops do not coalesce. We observe that appropriately positioned and oppositely charged drops migrate towards one another in an applied electric field; but whereas the drops coalesce as expected at low field strengths, they are repelled from one another after contact at higher field strengths. Qualitatively, the drops appear to ``bounce'' off one another. We directly image the transient formation of a meniscus bridge between the bouncing drops, and propose that this temporary bridge is unstable with respect to capillary pressure when it forms in an electric field exceeding a critical strength. The observation of oppositely charged drops bouncing in strong electric fields should affect our understanding of any process involving charged liquid drops, including de-emulsification, electrospray ionization and atmospheric conduction.

  1. Synchronized SETI-the case for "opposition".

    PubMed

    Corbet, Robin H D

    2003-01-01

    If the signals being sought in search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) programs exist but are brief (for example, they are produced intermittently to conserve energy), then it is essential to know when these signals will arrive at the Earth. Different types of transmitter/receiver synchronization schemes are possible, which vary in the relative amount of effort required by the transmitter and the receiver. The case is made for a scheme that is extremely simple for the receiver: Make observations of a target when it is at maximum angular distance from the Sun (i.e., "opposition"). This strategy requires that the transmitter has accurate knowledge of the distance and proper motion of the Sun and the orbit of the Earth. It is anticipated that within the next 10-20 years it will be possible to detect directly nearby extrasolar planets of approximately terrestrial mass. Since extraterrestrial transmitters are expected to have significantly more advanced technology, it is not unreasonable to expect that they would be able to detect the presence of the Earth and measure its orbit at even greater distances. This strategy is simple to implement, and opposition is also typically the time when observations are easiest to make. Limited opposition surveys contained in a number of all-sky surveys have already been performed. However, full-sky opposition surveys are best suited to detectors with very large fields of view.

  2. Oppositional Defiant Disorder in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimherr, Frederick W.; Marchant, Barrie K.; Olsen, John L.; Wender, Paul H.; Robison, Reid J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is the most common comorbid condition in childhood ADHD. This trial was prospectively designed to explore ODD symptoms in ADHD adults. Method: A total of 86 patients in this placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of methylphenidate transdermal system (MTS) were categorized based on the presence of ODD…

  3. Opposite RHOA functions within the ATLL category.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Shumpei

    2016-02-04

    In this issue of Blood, Nagata et al reported that different Ras homolog gene family, member A (RHOA) hotspot mutations among the adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) category have opposite biochemical activities, which are linked to different T-cell phenotypes.

  4. Affiliation of Opposite-Sexed Strangers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crouse, Bryant Bernhardt; Mehrabian, Albert

    1977-01-01

    Examines the effects of physical attractiveness on live verbal interactions between males and females. It was assumed that if opposite-sexed individuals primarily base their liking of the other on physical attractiveness, then subjects should be more positive and affiliative with attractive than unattractive others. (Author/RK)

  5. Observations of Iapetus Near True Opposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Thomson M.; Verbiscer, A.; Herbst, T.; Thiele, U.; Guijarro, A.; Pedraz, S.

    2010-10-01

    On 13 January 2005, Saturn and its satellites reached true opposition, providing an opportunity to view them at the minimum solar phase angle ( 0.01). At true opposition, a planetary body aligns with the Earth and Sun such that a transit across the solar disk is visible from the body. The Bonn University Simultaneous Camera (BUSCA) [1] operating at the 2.2 meter telescope at Calar Alto Observatory simultaneously imaged Iapetus in four filters ( Strömgren v, b, y, and Cousins I) 12-14 January, measuring the reflectance of Iapetus' anti-Saturn-facing hemisphere at phase angles between 0.01° and 0.1°. BUSCA's wide (12x12 arcmin) field of view enables the use of on-chip standards to measure the relative change in Iapetus' reflectance and thus its opposition surge at four different wavelengths. Processes such as the redeposition of frost which has sublimated from the moon's leading hemisphere [2] could produce a surface with sufficient microtexture to enhance the reflectance of Iapetus dramatically at true opposition. Support for this work was provided in part by NASA's Planetary Astronomy Program. References [1]Reif, K. et al. 1999. SPIE 3649, 109 [2]Spencer, J. and Denk, T. 2010. Science 327, 432

  6. The Oppositional Consciousness of Yolanda M. Lopez

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davalos, Karen Mary

    2009-01-01

    Based on an oral history interview, this essay examines the work of Yolanda M. Lopez, one of the most significant Chicana artists of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. It posits that her work portrays feminist intersectionality and oppositional consciousness, predating the Chicana feminist literature on these paradigms. Documenting her…

  7. Oppositional Defiant Disorder: A Guide for Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is one of a group of behavioral disorders called disruptive behavior disorders (DBD). These disorders are called this because children who have these disorders tend to disrupt those around them. ODD is one of the more common mental health disorders found in children and adolescents. This paper discusses the…

  8. Treating Depression and Oppositional Behavior in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Rachel H.; Becker-Weidman, Emily G.; Reinecke, Mark A.; Jordan, Neil; Silva, Susan G.; Rohde, Paul; March, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Adolescents with depression and high levels of oppositionality often are particularly difficult to treat. Few studies, however, have examined treatment outcomes among youth with both externalizing and internalizing problems. This study examines the effect of fluoxetine, cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), the combination of fluoxetine and CBT, and…

  9. Treating Depression and Oppositional Behavior in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Rachel H.; Becker-Weidman, Emily G.; Reinecke, Mark A.; Jordan, Neil; Silva, Susan G.; Rohde, Paul; March, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Adolescents with depression and high levels of oppositionality often are particularly difficult to treat. Few studies, however, have examined treatment outcomes among youth with both externalizing and internalizing problems. This study examines the effect of fluoxetine, cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), the combination of fluoxetine and CBT, and…

  10. Oppositional Defiant Disorder in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimherr, Frederick W.; Marchant, Barrie K.; Olsen, John L.; Wender, Paul H.; Robison, Reid J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is the most common comorbid condition in childhood ADHD. This trial was prospectively designed to explore ODD symptoms in ADHD adults. Method: A total of 86 patients in this placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of methylphenidate transdermal system (MTS) were categorized based on the presence of ODD…

  11. Geometric incompatibility in a fault system.

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielov, A; Keilis-Borok, V; Jackson, D D

    1996-01-01

    Interdependence between geometry of a fault system, its kinematics, and seismicity is investigated. Quantitative measure is introduced for inconsistency between a fixed configuration of faults and the slip rates on each fault. This measure, named geometric incompatibility (G), depicts summarily the instability near the fault junctions: their divergence or convergence ("unlocking" or "locking up") and accumulation of stress and deformations. Accordingly, the changes in G are connected with dynamics of seismicity. Apart from geometric incompatibility, we consider deviation K from well-known Saint Venant condition of kinematic compatibility. This deviation depicts summarily unaccounted stress and strain accumulation in the region and/or internal inconsistencies in a reconstruction of block- and fault system (its geometry and movements). The estimates of G and K provide a useful tool for bringing together the data on different types of movement in a fault system. An analog of Stokes formula is found that allows determination of the total values of G and K in a region from the data on its boundary. The phenomenon of geometric incompatibility implies that nucleation of strong earthquakes is to large extent controlled by processes near fault junctions. The junctions that have been locked up may act as transient asperities, and unlocked junctions may act as transient weakest links. Tentative estimates of K and G are made for each end of the Big Bend of the San Andreas fault system in Southern California. Recent strong earthquakes Landers (1992, M = 7.3) and Northridge (1994, M = 6.7) both reduced K but had opposite impact on G: Landers unlocked the area, whereas Northridge locked it up again. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:11607673

  12. Recurrent faulting and petroleum accumulation, Cat Creek Anticline, central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.J. )

    1991-06-01

    The Cat Creek anticline, scene of central Montana's first significant oil discovery, is underlain by a south-dipping high-angle fault (Cat Creek fault) that has undergone several episodes of movement with opposite sense of displacement. Borehole data suggest that the Cat Creek fault originated as a normal fault during Proterozoic rifting concurrent with deposition of the Belt Supergroup. Reverse faulting took place in Late Cambrian time, and again near the end of the Devonian Period. The Devonian episode, coeval with the Antler orogeny, raised the southern block several hundred feet. The southern block remained high through Meramecian time, then began to subside. Post-Atokan, pre-Middle Jurassic normal faulting lowered the southern block as much as 1,500 ft. During the Laramide orogeny (latest Cretaceous-Eocene) the Cat Creek fault underwent as much as 4,000 ft of reverse displacement and a comparable amount of left-lateral displacement. The Cat Creek anticline is a fault-propagation fold; en echelon domes and listric normal faults developed along its crest in response to wrenching. Oil was generated mainly in organic-rich shales of the Heath Formation (upper Chesterian Series) and migrated upward along tectonic fractures into Pennsylvanian, Jurassic, and Cretaceous reservoir rocks in structural traps in en echelon domes. Production has been achieved only from those domes where structural closure was retained from Jurassic through Holocene time.

  13. Structure-, stratigraphy- and fault-guided regularization in geophysical inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xinming

    2017-07-01

    Geophysical inversion is often ill-posed because of inaccurate and insufficient data. Regularization is often applied to the inversion problem to obtain a stable solution by imposing additional constraints on the model. Common regularization schemes impose isotropic smoothness on solutions and may have difficulties in obtaining geologically reasonable models that are often supposed to be anisotropic and conform to subsurface structural and stratigraphic features. I introduce a general method to incorporate constraints of seismic structural and stratigraphic orientations and fault slips into geophysical inversion problems. I first use a migrated seismic image to estimate structural and stratigraphic orientations and fault slip vectors that correlate fault blocks on opposite sides of a fault. I then use the estimated orientations and fault slips to construct simple and convenient anisotropic regularization operators in inversion problems to spread information along structural and stratigraphic orientations and across faults. In this way, we are able to compute inverted models that conform to seismic reflectors, faults and stratigraphic features such as channels. The regularization is also helpful to integrate well-log properties into the inversion by spreading the measured rock properties away from the well-log positions into the whole inverted model across faults and along structural and stratigraphic orientations. I use a 3-D synthetic example of impedance inversion to illustrate the structure-, stratigraphy- and fault-guided regularization method. I further applied the method to estimate seismic interval velocity and to compute structure- and stratigraphy-oriented semblance.

  14. Coalescence and Breakup of Oppositely Charged Droplets

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Bin; Qiu, Huihe

    2014-01-01

    The coalescence process of oppositely charged drops for different electrical conductivities of liquids is presented. When the electrical conductivity was relatively low, oppositely charged drops failed to coalesce under sufficiently high electrical fields and capillary ripples were formed on the surfaces of droplets after rebound. For a high electrically conductive liquid, it was found that a crown profile of drop fission always appeared on the top surface of negatively charged drops after the two charged drops contacted and bounced off. Furthermore, we report here, for the first time, the newly found phenomenon and argue that the break up might be caused by Rayleigh instability, a form of Coulomb fission. The different mobility of positive and negative ions is the underlying mechanism that explains why the break up always happened on the negative side of charged drops. PMID:25410022

  15. Pluto's lightcurve: Results from four oppositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tholen, David J.; Tedesco, Edward F.

    1994-01-01

    The rotational lightcurve, phase function, and orbital lightcurve of the Pluto-Charon system were measured in blue light over four consecutive oppositions spanning 1980 to 1983. Compared with observations made in the three previous decades, our lightcurve shows a higher amplitude of 0.29 mag, as well as a fainter rotationally averaged brightness, which provide constraints on the surface albedo distribution of the two bodies. The synodic rotational period of 6.38726 +/- 0.00007 days is consistent with the orbital period of Charon, which provides evidence for a completely tidally evolved system. The phase coefficient is 0.0372 +/- 0.0016 mag/deg, indicating a very shallow opposition surge compared with asteroids, but consistent with a high albedo surface. The orbital lightcurve shows substantially less fading than the earlier observations, which suggests that there is not a gross difference in average albedo between the southern and northern hemispheres.

  16. Pluto's lightcurve: Results from four oppositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tholen, David J.; Tedesco, Edward F.

    1994-01-01

    The rotational lightcurve, phase function, and orbital lightcurve of the Pluto-Charon system were measured in blue light over four consecutive oppositions spanning 1980 to 1983. Compared with observations made in the three previous decades, our lightcurve shows a higher amplitude of 0.29 mag, as well as a fainter rotationally averaged brightness, which provide constraints on the surface albedo distribution of the two bodies. The synodic rotational period of 6.38726 +/- 0.00007 days is consistent with the orbital period of Charon, which provides evidence for a completely tidally evolved system. The phase coefficient is 0.0372 +/- 0.0016 mag/deg, indicating a very shallow opposition surge compared with asteroids, but consistent with a high albedo surface. The orbital lightcurve shows substantially less fading than the earlier observations, which suggests that there is not a gross difference in average albedo between the southern and northern hemispheres.

  17. Fault zone hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V. F.; Gleeson, T.; Loveless, S. E.; Bour, O.; Scibek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deformation along faults in the shallow crust (< 1 km) introduces permeability heterogeneity and anisotropy, which has an important impact on processes such as regional groundwater flow, hydrocarbon migration, and hydrothermal fluid circulation. Fault zones have the capacity to be hydraulic conduits connecting shallow and deep geological environments, but simultaneously the fault cores of many faults often form effective barriers to flow. The direct evaluation of the impact of faults to fluid flow patterns remains a challenge and requires a multidisciplinary research effort of structural geologists and hydrogeologists. However, we find that these disciplines often use different methods with little interaction between them. In this review, we document the current multi-disciplinary understanding of fault zone hydrogeology. We discuss surface- and subsurface observations from diverse rock types from unlithified and lithified clastic sediments through to carbonate, crystalline, and volcanic rocks. For each rock type, we evaluate geological deformation mechanisms, hydrogeologic observations and conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Outcrop observations indicate that fault zones commonly have a permeability structure suggesting they should act as complex conduit-barrier systems in which along-fault flow is encouraged and across-fault flow is impeded. Hydrogeological observations of fault zones reported in the literature show a broad qualitative agreement with outcrop-based conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Nevertheless, the specific impact of a particular fault permeability structure on fault zone hydrogeology can only be assessed when the hydrogeological context of the fault zone is considered and not from outcrop observations alone. To gain a more integrated, comprehensive understanding of fault zone hydrogeology, we foresee numerous synergistic opportunities and challenges for the discipline of structural geology and hydrogeology to co-evolve and

  18. The Opposition Effect in Two Component Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. M.; Hapke, B. W.; Smythe, W. D.; Hale, A. S.; Piatek, J. L.

    2003-05-01

    Experiments find that the Opposition Effect (OE) in particulate materials is due to two processes, Shadow Hiding (SHOE) and Coherent Backscattering (CBOE)(Nelson, et al. 2000; 2002). SHOE arises because, as phase angle approaches zero, shadows cast by regolith grains on other grains become invisible to the observer. CBOE results from constructive interference beween rays traveling the same path but in opposite directions. We measured the angular scattering properties of 9 mixtures of Aluminum Oxide and Boron Carbide powders of the same particle diameter (25 microns). The reflectance of the materials ranged from 7-91%. Along with the reflectance phase curve we measured the circular polarization ratio, CPR-the ratio of the intensity of the light returned with the same helicity as the incident light to that with the opposite helicity. An increase in CPR with decreasing phase angle indicates increased multiple scattering and is consistent with CBOE. It might be expected that materials of higher albedo would exhibit increased multiple scattering and that CBOE would increase as albedo increases. Remarkably, we find the highest albedo samples did not have the strongest CBOE opposition peaks. Instead, the maximum CBOE contribution was for the samples with reflectance between 15 and 40%. We derived a theoretical model which reproduces the data quite satisfactorily. This model shows that the reflectance where we find the CBOE amplitude to be a maximum is where the contribution of second order scattering is largest relative to the other orders. Hence, for closely packed media the maximum contribution of CBOE does not occur in materials of highest albedo but where the relative contribution of second order scattering is largest. Nelson, et al. 2000. Icarus, 147, 545-558. Nelson, et al., 2002, Planetary and Space Science, 50, 849-856. This work was done at JPL supported by NASA's PGG program.

  19. The opposition of Mars, 2005: Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKim, R. J..

    2011-06-01

    This report analyses nearly 14,000 observations by 188 contributors during 2004 November to 2006 July. Compared with its appearance at opposition in 2003, Pandorae Fretum was dark and complete, as a result of Regional dust activity late in the previous apparition, whilst E. Deucalionis Regio and Mare Serpentis had returned to normal. Dust activity was observed around the south polar cap (SPC) periphery in 2005 July-August, especially in association with the decay of the SPC outliers Thyles Mons and Novus Mons. A Regional storm affecting the Hellas-Margaritifer Sinus-Argyre area began about 2005 June 5 (Ls= 225°), and a more significant one began in eastern Valles Marineris on October 17 (Ls= 308°) with independent bursts of activity over Solis Lacus and Aram. This major event caused only small-scale albedo changes: it also deposited dust over the SPC summer remnant. Local post-opposition dust storms were observed in Chryse-Xanthe, Aetheria, NE Arabia and NE Tempe-Mare Acidalium. As in 2003, but in contrast to 2001 and 2007, there was no planet-encircling storm during 2005. An 'opposition brightening'was observed upon the slopes of Olympus Mons, the Tharsis Montes and Elysium Mons. Part II will discuss white clouds and polar region phenomena.

  20. 37 CFR 2.104 - Contents of opposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Contents of opposition. 2.104 Section 2.104 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Opposition § 2.104 Contents of opposition. (a) The opposition...

  1. Fault-Tree Compiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Boerschlein, David P.

    1993-01-01

    Fault-Tree Compiler (FTC) program, is software tool used to calculate probability of top event in fault tree. Gates of five different types allowed in fault tree: AND, OR, EXCLUSIVE OR, INVERT, and M OF N. High-level input language easy to understand and use. In addition, program supports hierarchical fault-tree definition feature, which simplifies tree-description process and reduces execution time. Set of programs created forming basis for reliability-analysis workstation: SURE, ASSIST, PAWS/STEM, and FTC fault-tree tool (LAR-14586). Written in PASCAL, ANSI-compliant C language, and FORTRAN 77. Other versions available upon request.

  2. Earthquake fault superhighways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, D. P.; Das, S.; Searle, M. P.

    2010-10-01

    Motivated by the observation that the rare earthquakes which propagated for significant distances at supershear speeds occurred on very long straight segments of faults, we examine every known major active strike-slip fault system on land worldwide and identify those with long (> 100 km) straight portions capable not only of sustained supershear rupture speeds but having the potential to reach compressional wave speeds over significant distances, and call them "fault superhighways". The criteria used for identifying these are discussed. These superhighways include portions of the 1000 km long Red River fault in China and Vietnam passing through Hanoi, the 1050 km long San Andreas fault in California passing close to Los Angeles, Santa Barbara and San Francisco, the 1100 km long Chaman fault system in Pakistan north of Karachi, the 700 km long Sagaing fault connecting the first and second cities of Burma, Rangoon and Mandalay, the 1600 km Great Sumatra fault, and the 1000 km Dead Sea fault. Of the 11 faults so classified, nine are in Asia and two in North America, with seven located near areas of very dense populations. Based on the current population distribution within 50 km of each fault superhighway, we find that more than 60 million people today have increased seismic hazards due to them.

  3. Trishear for curved faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, J. P.

    2013-08-01

    Fault-propagation folds form an important trapping element in both onshore and offshore fold-thrust belts, and as such benefit from reliable interpretation. Building an accurate geologic interpretation of such structures requires palinspastic restorations, which are made more challenging by the interplay between folding and faulting. Trishear (Erslev, 1991; Allmendinger, 1998) is a useful tool to unravel this relationship kinematically, but is limited by a restriction to planar fault geometries, or at least planar fault segments. Here, new methods are presented for trishear along continuously curved reverse faults defining a flat-ramp transition. In these methods, rotation of the hanging wall above a curved fault is coupled to translation along a horizontal detachment. Including hanging wall rotation allows for investigation of structures with progressive backlimb rotation. Application of the new algorithms are shown for two fault-propagation fold structures: the Turner Valley Anticline in Southwestern Alberta, and the Alpha Structure in the Niger Delta.

  4. FTAPE: A fault injection tool to measure fault tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Timothy K.; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1995-01-01

    The paper introduces FTAPE (Fault Tolerance And Performance Evaluator), a tool that can be used to compare fault-tolerant computers. The tool combines system-wide fault injection with a controllable workload. A workload generator is used to create high stress conditions for the machine. Faults are injected based on this workload activity in order to ensure a high level of fault propagation. The errors/fault ratio and performance degradation are presented as measures of fault tolerance.

  5. FTAPE: A fault injection tool to measure fault tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Timothy K.; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1994-01-01

    The paper introduces FTAPE (Fault Tolerance And Performance Evaluator), a tool that can be used to compare fault-tolerant computers. The tool combines system-wide fault injection with a controllable workload. A workload generator is used to create high stress conditions for the machine. Faults are injected based on this workload activity in order to ensure a high level of fault propagation. The errors/fault ratio and performance degradation are presented as measures of fault tolerance.

  6. Hetero-aggregation of oppositely charged nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Pooja; Deshpande, Abhijit P; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2017-04-15

    Hetero-aggregation refers to aggregation of particles that are not identical i.e. particles of different physical-chemical properties. The investigation of this phenomenon is important because of the fascinating structures that can be formed and their application in several fields including the synthesis of porous materials and particle stabilized emulsions. We report an experimental study of hetero-aggregation behaviour of oppositely charged nanoparticles of similar size. In this study, the hetero-aggregation phenomenon is investigated using a combination of visual observation, zeta potential measurements, dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy and rheology measurements. We report details of aggregate size, structure, flow properties to provide understanding of hetero-aggregation by a careful examination of different phases formed upon mixing oppositely charged particles. The experiments were carried out at different mixing fraction (defined as the mass of positive particle in the dispersion divided by total mass of particles in the dispersion) varying from 0 to 1 with total concentration of particles ranging from 0.05 to 30wt% (0.023-13.82vol%). At low total particle concentration, four different states of the mixture were observed which includes sediment with turbid supernatant, sediment with clear supernatant, turbid sample with no sediment and a clear dispersion. However, at higher concentration above ∼7.5wt% (3.45vol%), the mixture of oppositely charged particles form - a particulate gel with turbid supernatant at low mixing fraction (from 0.1 to 0.3), a solid-like gel at intermediate mixing fraction (from ∼0.3 to 0.7) and a turbid sample at high mixing fractions from 0.7 to 1.0. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Einstein's opposition to the quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deltete, Robert; Guy, Reed

    1990-07-01

    Einstein's opposition to the quantum theory is well known to physicists, but his reasons for being dissatisfied are not. Einstein regarded the theory as not only incomplete, but as fundamentally inadequate. He believed that the only reasonable interpretation of the quantum formalism was an ``ensemble interpretation,'' but he also thought that this interpretation and others were incomplete and irremediably inadequate, because they failed to describe the objective, real states of individual systems. He hoped, and expected, that a better theory would be developed—one expressed in terms of individuals having their own real states and from which the quantum theory could be recovered as an approximation.

  8. Photometry of Pluto during the 1982 opposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binzel, R. P.; Mulholland, J. D.

    1983-02-01

    Observations of Pluto's brightness were obtained by two-channel photometry on 18 nights during the 1982 opposition, using the 2.1-m and 91-cm reflectors at Mt. Locke. The resulting light curve suggests that the 'secular' decrease in intrinsic brightness is flattening, qualitatively consistent with a latitude dependence of the surface albedo distribution. Speculations are projected for the long-term behavior of the apparent light curve. Understanding of the current rotational brightness variation is important to the maximum utilization of photometric observations obtained during the imminent series of mutual eclipses between Pluto and its satellite.

  9. The Opposition Effect: A Very Unusual Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, R. M.

    2002-01-01

    The reflection of electromagnetic radiation from a planetary regolith involves a combination of geometric and physical optics processes which contribute to the signal returned to the remote observer. The geometric optics effects are the product of singly and multiply scattered radiation from the surfaces of the regolith particles, combined with radiation which has undergone various combinations of transmission through one or more regolith grains followed by one or more scatterings from other particles. The physical optics effects include diffraction of radiation around the edges of large irregular particles and cooperative coherent scattering between particles which are small when compared to the wavelength of the incident radiation. These effects produce measurable changes in the intensity and polarization of reflected light as a function of illumination and viewing geometry. In particular, as phase angle becomes small, the reflectance of a particulate material will increase non-linearly and exhibit the 'opposition effect'. In the planetary science context, the phase curve, and in particular the size of the opposition surge and the width of the phase curve near zero degrees, have been attributed to two processes commonly called 'shadow hiding' (SHOE) and 'coherent backscattering' (CBOE).

  10. Isolability of faults in sensor fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Reza; Langari, Reza

    2011-10-01

    A major concern with fault detection and isolation (FDI) methods is their robustness with respect to noise and modeling uncertainties. With this in mind, several approaches have been proposed to minimize the vulnerability of FDI methods to these uncertainties. But, apart from the algorithm used, there is a theoretical limit on the minimum effect of noise on detectability and isolability. This limit has been quantified in this paper for the problem of sensor fault diagnosis based on direct redundancies. In this study, first a geometric approach to sensor fault detection is proposed. The sensor fault is isolated based on the direction of residuals found from a residual generator. This residual generator can be constructed from an input-output or a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) based model. The simplicity of this technique, compared to the existing methods of sensor fault diagnosis, allows for more rational formulation of the isolability concepts in linear systems. Using this residual generator and the assumption of Gaussian noise, the effect of noise on isolability is studied, and the minimum magnitude of isolable fault in each sensor is found based on the distribution of noise in the measurement system. Finally, some numerical examples are presented to clarify this approach.

  11. The role of gravitational collapse in controlling the evolution of crestal fault systems (Espírito Santo Basin, SE Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ze, Tao; Alves, Tiago M.

    2016-11-01

    A high-quality 3D seismic volume from offshore Espírito Santo Basin (SE Brazil) is used to assess the importance of gravitational collapse to the formation of crestal faults above salt structures. A crestal fault system is imaged in detail using seismic attributes such as curvature and variance, which are later complemented by analyses of throw vs. distance (T-D) and throw vs. depth (T-Z). In the study area, crestal faults comprise closely spaced arrays and are bounded by large listric faults, herein called border faults. Two episodes of growth are identified in two opposite-dipping fault families separated by a transverse accommodation zone. Statistical analyses for eighty-four (84) faults show that fault spacing is < 250 m, with border faults showing the larger throw values. Fault throw varies between 8 ms and 80 ms two-way time for crestal faults, and 60-80 ms two-way time for border faults. Fault length varies between ∼410 m and 1750 m, with border faults ranging from 1250 m to 1750 m. This work shows that border faults accommodated most of the strain associated with salt growth and collapse. The growth history of crestal faults favours an isolated fault propagation model with fault segment linkage being associated with the lateral propagation of discrete fault segments. Importantly, two episodes of fault growth are identified as synchronous to two phases of seafloor erosion, rendering local unconformities as competent markers of fault reactivation at a local scale. This paper has crucial implications for the understanding of fault growth as a means to assess drilling risk and oil and gas migration on continental margins. As a corollary, this work demonstrates that: 1) a certain degree of spatial organisation occurs in crestal fault systems; 2) transverse accommodation zones can form regions in which fault propagation is enhanced and regional dips of faults change in 4D.

  12. How Faults Shape the Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bykerk-Kauffman, Ann

    1992-01-01

    Presents fault activity with an emphasis on earthquakes and changes in continent shapes. Identifies three types of fault movement: normal, reverse, and strike faults. Discusses the seismic gap theory, plate tectonics, and the principle of superposition. Vignettes portray fault movement, and the locations of the San Andreas fault and epicenters of…

  13. How Faults Shape the Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bykerk-Kauffman, Ann

    1992-01-01

    Presents fault activity with an emphasis on earthquakes and changes in continent shapes. Identifies three types of fault movement: normal, reverse, and strike faults. Discusses the seismic gap theory, plate tectonics, and the principle of superposition. Vignettes portray fault movement, and the locations of the San Andreas fault and epicenters of…

  14. Repulsion between Oppositely Charged Planar Macroions

    PubMed Central

    Jho, YongSeok; Brown, Frank L. H.; Kim, MahnWon; Pincus, Philip A.

    2013-01-01

    The repulsive interaction between oppositely charged macroions is investigated using Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations of an unrestricted primitive model, including the effect of inhomogeneous surface charge and its density, the depth of surface charge, the cation size, and the dielectric permittivity of solvent and macroions, and their contrast. The origin of the repulsion is a combination of osmotic pressure and ionic screening resulting from excess salt between the macroions. The excess charge over-reduces the electrostatic attraction between macroions and raises the entropic repulsion. The magnitude of the repulsion increases when the dielectric constant of the solvent is lowered (below that of water) and/or the surface charge density is increased, in good agreement with experiment. Smaller size of surface charge and the cation, their discreteness and mobility are other factors that enhance the repulsion and charge inversion phenomenons. PMID:23940518

  15. Flame structure of nozzles offsetting opposite flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahagi, Yuji; Morinaga, Yuichiro; Hamaishi, Kyosuke; Makino, Ikuyo

    2016-09-01

    Effects of vortexes behind flame zone on the flame structures are investigated experimentally by nozzles offsetting opposite flows with 2D laser diagnosis. Methane air premixed gas issued from upper and lower burners with equal flow rate. An imbalanced counter flow is produced to slide the lower burner from the center axis. In our proposed flow system, the vortexes are only formed in the burnt gas region by the shear stress due to the velocity difference between the upper flow and lower flow. Three distinct flames structures, slant flames, edge shape flames, and hyperbolic flames are decided with the offsetting rate and fuel flows composition. The formed vortexes structures changed with the offsetting rate. The vortex formed behind the flame plays an important role for the flame stability.

  16. Fault Diagnosis Method of Fault Indicator Based on Maximum Probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zili; Zhang, Wei

    2017-05-01

    In order to solve the problem of distribution fault diagnosis in case of misreporting or failed-report of fault indicator information, the characteristics of the fault indicator are analyzed, and the concept of the minimum fault judgment area of the distribution network is developed. Based on which, the mathematical model of fault indicator fault diagnosis is evaluated. The characteristics of fault indicator signals are analyzed. Based on two-in-three principle, a probabilistic fault indicator combination signal processing method is proposed. Based on the combination of the minimum fault judgment area model, the fault indicator combination signal and the interdependence between the fault indicators, a fault diagnosis method based on maximum probability is proposed. The method is based on the similarity between the simulated fault signal and the real fault signal, and the detailed formula is given. The method has good fault-tolerance in the case of misreporting or failed-report of fault indicator information, which can more accurately determine the fault area. The probability of each area is given, and fault alternatives are provided. The proposed approach is feasible and valuable for the dispatching and maintenance personnel to deal with the fault.

  17. Opposite polarity subduction in adjacent plate segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peral, Mireia; Király, Ágnes; Zlotnik, Sergio; Funiciello, Francesca; Fernandez, Manel; Faccenna, Claudio

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this work is to understand the dynamics of a subduction system characterized by two adjacent subducting plates with opposite retreating directions as recently proposed for the Westernmost Mediterranean. A series of analogue models based on viscous syrup (representing the mantle) and silicone putty (representing the subducting plate) have been designed to simulate the evolution of a double subduction system. The basic setup contains a pair of plates subducting in opposite directions. The plates are fixed at their back edge to enforce a slab rollback behavior and subduction is started by deflecting manually the leading edge of the plate (i.e., initial slab pull, phase 1). Different setups were designed to test the influence of two variables on the system: i) the width of the plates, that varies from 10 cm to 30 cm (1 cm in model corresponds to 60 km in nature) and ii) the lateral distance between the two subducting plates, that varies from 10 to 0.5 cm. Our results show that trench velocities increase during the stage of approaching trenches (phase 2) and then decrease after trenches pass each other (phase 3). This behavior indicates an interaction of the mantle flows produced by the two retreating slabs. On the other hand, the trench curvature increases linearly during the entire evolution and the lateral distance between plates remains constant along time, indicating that no effective lateral stress is produced when the opposing plates have similar dimensions. In addition, we have reproduced numerically some of the laboratory experiments. This work is part of the projects WE-ME (PIE-CSIC-201330E111) and MITE (CGL2014-59516-P). We also thank to the project AECT-2016-1-0002 of the Barcelona Supercomputing center (BSC-CNS).

  18. 47 CFR 1.294 - Oppositions and replies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Actions in Hearing Proceedings § 1.294 Oppositions and replies. (a) Any party to a hearing may file an... the opposition. (1) Petitions to amend, modify, enlarge, or delete the issues upon which the hearing...

  19. Mars 2012: Opposition and Educational Opportunities at Fernbank Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, E. F.

    2012-03-01

    On March 3, 2012, Mars reaches opposition and is well placed for public viewing. The opposition timeline and educational opportunities are considered, with emphasis on programs presented at the Fernbank Science Center in Atlanta, Georgia.

  20. Fault detection and fault tolerance in robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visinsky, Monica; Walker, Ian D.; Cavallaro, Joseph R.

    1992-01-01

    Robots are used in inaccessible or hazardous environments in order to alleviate some of the time, cost and risk involved in preparing men to endure these conditions. In order to perform their expected tasks, the robots are often quite complex, thus increasing their potential for failures. If men must be sent into these environments to repair each component failure in the robot, the advantages of using the robot are quickly lost. Fault tolerant robots are needed which can effectively cope with failures and continue their tasks until repairs can be realistically scheduled. Before fault tolerant capabilities can be created, methods of detecting and pinpointing failures must be perfected. This paper develops a basic fault tree analysis of a robot in order to obtain a better understanding of where failures can occur and how they contribute to other failures in the robot. The resulting failure flow chart can also be used to analyze the resiliency of the robot in the presence of specific faults. By simulating robot failures and fault detection schemes, the problems involved in detecting failures for robots are explored in more depth.

  1. Tapping the Strengths of Oppositional Youth: Helping Kevin Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendtro, Larry K.; Banbury, James

    1994-01-01

    Demonstrates how rebellion and opposition can be recast as signs of inner strength and resilience and documents strategies for reclaiming oppositional youth. Describes intervention with Kevin (from "My Independence Day," this issue) who had been removed from multiple treatment placements, and explains strategies for empowering oppositional youth.…

  2. Using geochemical fingerprinting to determine transpressive fault movement history: Application to the New Zealand Alpine Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutten, H. N. C.; Korsch, R. J.; Roser, B. P.

    2006-08-01

    Geochemical fingerprinting of conglomerate clasts from depocenters adjacent to a strike-slip fault, and of source areas on the opposite side of the fault, provides a method of determining fault movement history in instances where potential piercing points have been removed by erosion or buried in pull-apart or down-warp basins. Our example demonstrating this method is the Neogene Maruia Basin adjacent to the New Zealand Alpine Fault, the on-land Australian-Pacific plate boundary, which shows Permian Pelorus-Caples terrane offset by 480 km. Twenty-six sandstone and schist conglomerate clasts from the Maruia Basin Rappahannock Group were analyzed for major elements and 18 trace elements by X-ray fluorescence and compared to similar analyses from potential regional source areas. Significant source terranes, the Caples Group and the Torlesse terrane were identified, both located southeast of the fault. Dextral movement on the fault provided a conveyor belt of material to the Maruia Basin, first supplying (at ˜11.5 Ma) Caples sandstone, then Caples schist followed by Torlesse schist (from ˜9.5 Ma), which translates to an average Neogene movement rate of 36-37 mm yr-1. The increase in metamorphic grade reflects accelerated exhumation of source rocks as they passed through a restraining bend adjacent to the Maruia Basin and from later regional uplift from a change in the Australian Pacific plate motion vector and more transpressive movement from ˜5 Ma. This robust method of geochemical fingerprinting could be readily applied to determining movement history of transpressive faults of other regions.

  3. New York Bight fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Grow, John A.

    1985-01-01

    The fault parallels a magnetic low to the east, interpreted as a buried Mesozoic rift basin from seismic-reflection data, and a gravity low to the west, interpreted as a structure within Paleozoic rocks from well data. Whether these structures control the location of, or movement on, the fault is not clear.

  4. Opposition Surge: Sunlight Glinting off Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Mars Global Surveyor was presented with a unique opportunity February 13-18, 1998, to image sunlight glinting off of the surface and atmospheric haze of Mars. Orbits 130-137 were devoted to obtaining MOC images of this effect, also known as opposition surge. During each orbit in mid-February, the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft passed close to and through the line between the Sun and the center of Mars. In other words, the phase angle (angle between the Sun's incident light and the direction from the surface to the spacecraft) was near zero degrees. The sunlight reflecting from Mars near the zero phase angle produces the rare sun-glint phenomenon. The size and brightness of the glint depends on the physical properties of the surface (dust, sand, and rock distribution) and the atmosphere (haze/suspended dust). Studies of these images are expected to yield important information that can be compared with thermal emission observations.

    The picture is a color composite of MOC images 13601 (red wide angle) and 13602 (blue wide angle). The green-color band is synthesized from the red and blue using a relationship well-understood from Viking images of the late 1970s. The large, dark region near the top-center of the picture is Sinus Meridiani. The circular feature at the upper right is the impact basin, Schiaparelli. The opposition surge feature --the sun glint-- is centered around 21.0oS latitude, 4.1oW longitude.

    The two images were taken on Mars Global Surveyor's 136th orbit on February 18, 1998. Orbit 136 was the second-to-last orbit on which MOC obtained images of Mars during the first aerobraking phase (AB-1) of the mission. MOC was off between the end of AB-1 on February 19, 1998, until the start of Science Phasing Orbit-1 phase (SPO-1), which began March 28 and ended April 28, 1998.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its

  5. Solar system fault detection

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, R.B.; Pruett, J.C. Jr.

    1984-05-14

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  6. Solar system fault detection

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, Robert B.; Pruett, Jr., James C.

    1986-01-01

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  7. Characterization of leaky faults

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Chao

    1990-05-01

    Leaky faults provide a flow path for fluids to move underground. It is very important to characterize such faults in various engineering projects. The purpose of this work is to develop mathematical solutions for this characterization. The flow of water in an aquifer system and the flow of air in the unsaturated fault-rock system were studied. If the leaky fault cuts through two aquifers, characterization of the fault can be achieved by pumping water from one of the aquifers, which are assumed to be horizontal and of uniform thickness. Analytical solutions have been developed for two cases of either a negligibly small or a significantly large drawdown in the unpumped aquifer. Some practical methods for using these solutions are presented. 45 refs., 72 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. Potentially active faults in the rapidly eroding landscape adjacent to the Alpine Fault, central Southern Alps, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Simon C.; Stirling, Mark W.; Herman, Frederic; Gerstenberger, Matthew; Ristau, John

    2012-04-01

    Potentially active faults are exposed in the steep glaciated topography of the central Southern Alps, New Zealand, immediately adjacent to the Alpine Fault plate boundary. Four major faults exposed along the flanks of three of the highest mountain ranges strike 10-23 km (potentially 40 km) NNE oblique to the Alpine Fault, dipping 57° ± 12° NW in the opposite direction. Youngest discernable motions were reverse dip-slip, accommodating both margin-perpendicular shortening and dextral margin-parallel components of plate motion. Kinematic analysis yields a compression axis (295/10° ± 9° trend or plunge) equivalent to the contemporary shortening determined from seismological and geodetic studies, suggesting the faults may be active, although definitive evidence for recent movement or single event displacements is lacking. There are 106 other potentially active faults mapped in central Southern Alps with strike lengths 4-73 km. Earthquake parameters were assigned from fault trace lengths and historical earthquake statistics, indicating potential for MW 5.5-7.4 earthquakes at recurrence intervals of 1000-10,000 years. Such long recurrence intervals are consistent with the faults having little surface expression, with rapid erosion of these seismically agitated mountains erasing any evidence of surface rupture during periods between earthquakes. The central Southern Alps faults exemplify the difficulty in fully deciphering long-term (e.g., Holocene or Quaternary) records of seismicity in tectonically active regions with rapidly evolving landscapes. Although there may be little evidence of surface ruptures remaining in the landscape, the faults are still an important potential source of earthquakes and seismic hazard.

  9. Common Questions About Oppositional Defiant Disorder.

    PubMed

    Riley, Margaret; Ahmed, Sana; Locke, Amy

    2016-04-01

    Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is a disruptive behavior disorder characterized by a pattern of angry or irritable mood, argumentative or defiant behavior, or vindictiveness lasting for at least six months. Children and adolescents with ODD may have trouble controlling their temper and are often disobedient and defiant toward others. There are no tools specifically designed for diagnosing ODD, but multiple questionnaires can aid in diagnosis while assessing for other psychiatric conditions. ODD is often comorbid with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, and mood disorders, including anxiety and depression. Behavioral therapy for the child and family members improves symptoms of ODD. Medications are not recommended as first-line treatment for ODD; however, treatment of comorbid mental health conditions with medications often improves ODD symptoms. Adults and adolescents with a history of ODD have a greater than 90% chance of being diagnosed with another mental illness in their lifetime. They are at high risk of developing social and emotional problems as adults, including suicide and substance use disorders. Early intervention seeks to prevent the development of conduct disorder, substance abuse, and delinquency that can cause lifelong social, occupational, and academic impairments.

  10. Observation of an Opposition Surge on Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, B. D.; Buratti, B. J.; Schmidt, B.; Bauer, J. M.; Hicks, M. D.

    2004-11-01

    Ground-based observations of Neptune's moon Triton taken during the summers of 2000, 2003, and 2004 show a rotational light curve with a large amplitude. This is in stark contrast to data from the 1989 Voyager II flyby, which implies significant changes have occurred on Triton's surface since that time. The light curve has two notable regions, one that is significantly brighter than was observed in 1989 and one that is significantly darker. Data were also taken at a broad range of solar phase angles, allowing for a comprehensive study of the effects of phase on Triton's brightness. Analysis of the phase curve yields a solar phase coefficient close to zero for phases greater than 0.08 degrees, a number in close agreement with past studies that focused on higher phase angles. We also report a previously unrecognized opposition surge. Preliminary analysis suggests that the surge has different characteristics in the dark and bright regions currently visible on Triton, implying a non-homogenous regolith. Funding for this project was provided in part by the New York Space Grant Consortium and the NASA Undergraduate Student Research Program.

  11. Opposition to legal abortion: challenges and questions.

    PubMed

    Kissling, F

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of the Roman Catholic Church's arguments against abortion rights suggests that its opposition is grounded more in outmoded views regarding women's roles than in concern for protecting fetal life. The 1st argument raised by Catholics and other anti-abortion forces is that abortion represents the unjustifiable destruction of a human life. A 2nd argument focuses on the status of the fetus as a person from the moment of conception, making abortion murder. A 3rd equates the fetus's potential for personhood with the pregnant woman's actual personhood. Despite the vehement sentiments expressed by Catholic leaders against abortion, the majority of Catholics support legal abortion. The assignment of personhood status to the fetus is contraindicated by actual practice in the Church, where aborted or miscarried products of early pregnancy are not baptized. Also, the Church does not forbid the taking of human life in war or to preserve political freedom. Finally, in countries such as Poland where abortion has been made illegal through religious pressure, there have been drastic cuts in health care and child care programs.

  12. Rough faults, distributed weakening, and off-fault deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, W. Ashley; Nielsen, Stefan; di Toro, Giulio; Smith, Steven A. F.

    2010-08-01

    We report systematic spatial variations in fault rocks along nonplanar strike-slip faults cross-cutting the Lake Edison Granodiorite, Sierra Nevada, California (Sierran wavy fault) and Lobbia outcrops of the Adamello Batholith in the Italian Alps (Lobbia wavy fault). In the case of the Sierran fault, pseudotachylyte formed at contractional fault bends, where it is found as thin (1-2 mm) fault-parallel veins. Epidote and chlorite developed in the same seismic context as the pseudotachylyte and are especially abundant in extensional fault bends. We argue that the presence of fluids, as illustrated by this example, does not necessarily preclude the development of frictional melt. In the case of the Lobbia fault, pseudotachylyte thickness varies along the length of the fault, but the pseudotachylyte veins thicken and pool in extensional bends. We conduct a quantitative analysis of fault roughness, microcrack distribution, stress, and friction along the Lobbia fault. Numerical modeling results show that opening in extensional bends and localized thermal weakening in contractional bends counteract resistance encountered by fault waviness, resulting in an overall weaker fault than suggested by the corresponding static friction coefficient. The models also predict static stress redistribution around bends in the faults which is consistent with distribution of microcracks, indicating significant elastic and inelastic strain energy is dissipated into the wall rocks due to nonplanar fault geometry. Together these observations suggest that damage and energy dissipation occurs along the entire nonplanar fault during slip, rather than being confined to the region close to the dynamically propagating crack tip.

  13. Methods to enhance seismic faults and construct fault surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xinming; Zhu, Zhihui

    2017-10-01

    Faults are often apparent as reflector discontinuities in a seismic volume. Numerous types of fault attributes have been proposed to highlight fault positions from a seismic volume by measuring reflection discontinuities. These attribute volumes, however, can be sensitive to noise and stratigraphic features that are also apparent as discontinuities in a seismic volume. We propose a matched filtering method to enhance a precomputed fault attribute volume, and simultaneously estimate fault strikes and dips. In this method, a set of efficient 2D exponential filters, oriented by all possible combinations of strike and dip angles, are applied to the input attribute volume to find the maximum filtering responses at all samples in the volume. These maximum filtering responses are recorded to obtain the enhanced fault attribute volume while the corresponding strike and dip angles, that yield the maximum filtering responses, are recoded to obtain volumes of fault strikes and dips. By doing this, we assume that a fault surface is locally planar, and a 2D smoothing filter will yield a maximum response if the smoothing plane coincides with a local fault plane. With the enhanced fault attribute volume and the estimated fault strike and dip volumes, we then compute oriented fault samples on the ridges of the enhanced fault attribute volume, and each sample is oriented by the estimated fault strike and dip. Fault surfaces can be constructed by directly linking the oriented fault samples with consistent fault strikes and dips. For complicated cases with missing fault samples and noisy samples, we further propose to use a perceptual grouping method to infer fault surfaces that reasonably fit the positions and orientations of the fault samples. We apply these methods to 3D synthetic and real examples and successfully extract multiple intersecting fault surfaces and complete fault surfaces without holes.

  14. Separating the Domains of Oppositional Behavior: Comparing Latent Models of the Conners’ Oppositional Subscale

    PubMed Central

    Kuny, Ana V.; Althoff, Robert R.; Copeland, William; Bartels, Meike; Beijsterveldt, Van; Baer, Julie; Hudziak, James J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) is usually considered the mildest of the disruptive behavior disorders, it is a key factor in predicting young adult anxiety and depression and is distinguishable from normal childhood behavior. In an effort to understand possible subsets of oppositional defiant behavior (ODB) which may differentially predict outcome, we used Latent Class Analysis (LCA) of mother’s report on the Conners’ Parent Rating Scales Revised Short Forms (CPRS-R:S). METHOD Data were obtained from mother’s report for Dutch twins (7 year-old [n = 7,597], 10 year-old [n = 6,548], and 12 year-old [n = 5,717]) from the Netherlands Twin Registry. Samples partially overlapped at ages 7 and 10 (19% overlapping) and at ages 10 and 12 (30% overlapping), but not at ages 7 and 12. Oppositional defiant behavior was measured using the 6-item Oppositional subscale of the CPRS-R:S. Multilevel LCA with robust standard error estimates was performed using Latent Gold to control for twin-twin dependence in the data. Class assignment across ages was determined and an estimate of heritability for each class was calculated. Comparisons to maternal report Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) scores were examined using linear mixed models at each age, corrected for multiple comparisons. RESULTS The LCA identified an optimal solution of 4-classes across age groups: Class 1 was associated with no or low symptom endorsement (69–75% of the children), class 2 was characterized by defiance (11–12%), class 3 was characterized by irritability (9–11%), and class 4 was associated with elevated scores on all symptoms (5–8%). Odds ratios for twins being in the same class at each successive age point were higher within classes across ages than between classes. Heritability within the two “intermediate” classes was nearly as high as for the class with all symptoms, except for boys at age 12. Children in the Irritable Class were more likely to have mood symptoms

  15. Separating the domains of oppositional behavior: comparing latent models of the conners' oppositional subscale.

    PubMed

    Kuny, Ana V; Althoff, Robert R; Copeland, William; Bartels, Meike; Van Beijsterveldt, C E M; Baer, Julie; Hudziak, James J

    2013-02-01

    Although oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is usually considered the mildest of the disruptive behavior disorders, it is a key factor in predicting young adult anxiety and depression and is distinguishable from normal childhood behavior. In an effort to understand possible subsets of oppositional defiant behavior (ODB) that may differentially predict outcome, we used latent class analysis of mother report on the Conners' Parent Rating Scales Revised Short Forms (CPRS-R:S). Data were obtained from mother report for Dutch twins (7 years old, n = 7,597; 10 years old, n = 6,548; and 12 years old, n = 5,717) from the Netherlands Twin Registry. Samples partially overlapped at ages 7 and 10 years (19% overlapping) and at ages 10 and 12 years (30% overlapping), but not at ages 7 and 12 years. Oppositional defiant behavior was measured using the six-item Oppositional subscale of the CPRS-R:S. Multilevel LCA with robust standard error estimates was performed using the Latent Gold program to control for twin-twin dependence in the data. Class assignment across ages was determined and an estimate of heritability for each class was calculated. Comparisons with maternal report Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) scores were examined using linear mixed models at each age, corrected for multiple comparisons. The LCA identified an optimal solution of four classes across age groups. Class 1 was associated with no or low symptom endorsement (69-75% of the children); class 2 was characterized by defiance (11-12%); class 3 was characterized by irritability (9-11%); and class 4 was associated with elevated scores on all symptoms (5-8%). Odds ratios for twins being in the same class at each successive age point were higher within classes across ages than between classes. Heritability within the two "intermediate" classes was nearly as high as for the class with all symptoms, except for boys at age 12. Children in the Irritable class were more likely to have mood symptoms on the CBCL scales

  16. Fault Management Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Stephen B.; Ghoshal, Sudipto; Haste, Deepak; Moore, Craig

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the theory and considerations in the application of metrics to measure the effectiveness of fault management. Fault management refers here to the operational aspect of system health management, and as such is considered as a meta-control loop that operates to preserve or maximize the system's ability to achieve its goals in the face of current or prospective failure. As a suite of control loops, the metrics to estimate and measure the effectiveness of fault management are similar to those of classical control loops in being divided into two major classes: state estimation, and state control. State estimation metrics can be classified into lower-level subdivisions for detection coverage, detection effectiveness, fault isolation and fault identification (diagnostics), and failure prognosis. State control metrics can be classified into response determination effectiveness and response effectiveness. These metrics are applied to each and every fault management control loop in the system, for each failure to which they apply, and probabilistically summed to determine the effectiveness of these fault management control loops to preserve the relevant system goals that they are intended to protect.

  17. The Kunlun Fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Kunlun fault is one of the gigantic strike-slip faults that bound the north side of Tibet. Left-lateral motion along the 1,500-kilometer (932-mile) length of the Kunlun has occurred uniformly for the last 40,000 years at a rate of 1.1 centimeter per year, creating a cumulative offset of more than 400 meters. In this image, two splays of the fault are clearly seen crossing from east to west. The northern fault juxtaposes sedimentary rocks of the mountains against alluvial fans. Its trace is also marked by lines of vegetation, which appear red in the image. The southern, younger fault cuts through the alluvium. A dark linear area in the center of the image is wet ground where groundwater has ponded against the fault. Measurements from the image of displacements of young streams that cross the fault show 15 to 75 meters (16 to 82 yards) of left-lateral offset. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) acquired the visible light and near infrared scene on July 20, 2000. Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and the U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

  18. Prevalence of oppositional defiant disorder in Spain.

    PubMed

    López-Villalobos, José Antonio; Andrés-De Llano, Jesús María; Rodríguez-Molinero, Luis; Garrido-Redondo, Mercedes; Sacristán-Martín, Ana María; Martínez-Rivera, María Teresa; Alberola-López, Susana; Sánchez-Azón, María Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is characterized by a pattern of negative, defiant, disobedient and hostile behavior toward authority figures. ODD is one of the most frequent reasons for clinical consultation on mental health during childhood and adolescence. ODD has a high morbidity and dysfunction, and has important implications for the future if not treated early. To determine the prevalence of ODD in schoolchildren aged 6-16 years in Castile and Leon (Spain). Population study with a stratified multistage sample, and a proportional cluster design. Sample analyzed: 1,049. Cases were defined according to DSM-IV criteria. An overall prevalence rate of 5.6% was found (95% CI: 4.2%-7%). Male gender prevalence=6.8%; female=4.3%. Prevalence in secondary education=6.2%; primary education=5.3%. No significant differences by gender, age, grade, type of school, or demographic area were found. ODD prevalence without considering functional impairment, such as is performed in some research, would increase the prevalence to 7.4%. ODD cases have significantly worse academic outcomes (overall academic performance, reading, maths and writing), and worse classroom behavior (relationship with peers, respect for rules, organizational skills, academic tasks, and disruption of the class). Castile and Leon has a prevalence rate of ODD slightly higher to that observed in international publications. Depending on the distribution by age, morbidity and clinical dysfunctional impact, an early diagnosis and a preventive intervention are required for health planning. Copyright © 2013 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Measuring fault tolerance with the FTAPE fault injection tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Timothy K.; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes FTAPE (Fault Tolerance And Performance Evaluator), a tool that can be used to compare fault-tolerant computers. The major parts of the tool include a system-wide fault-injector, a workload generator, and a workload activity measurement tool. The workload creates high stress conditions on the machine. Using stress-based injection, the fault injector is able to utilize knowledge of the workload activity to ensure a high level of fault propagation. The errors/fault ratio, performance degradation, and number of system crashes are presented as measures of fault tolerance.

  20. Fault detection and isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernath, Greg

    1993-01-01

    Erroneous measurements in multisensor navigation systems must be detected and isolated. A recursive estimator can find fast growing errors; a least squares batch estimator can find slow growing errors. This process is called fault detection. A protection radius can be calculated as a function of time for a given location. This protection radius can be used to guarantee the integrity of the navigation data. Fault isolation can be accomplished using either a snapshot method or by examining the history of the fault detection statistics.

  1. Fault detection and isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernath, Greg

    1994-01-01

    In order for a current satellite-based navigation system (such as the Global Positioning System, GPS) to meet integrity requirements, there must be a way of detecting erroneous measurements, without help from outside the system. This process is called Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI). Fault detection requires at least one redundant measurement, and can be done with a parity space algorithm. The best way around the fault isolation problem is not necessarily isolating the bad measurement, but finding a new combination of measurements which excludes it.

  2. Fault zone structure of the Wildcat fault in Berkeley, California - Field survey and fault model test -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, K.; Onishi, C. T.; Karasaki, K.; Tanaka, S.; Hamada, T.; Sasaki, T.; Ito, H.; Tsukuda, K.; Ichikawa, K.; Goto, J.; Moriya, T.

    2010-12-01

    In order to develop hydrologic characterization technology of fault zones, it is desirable to clarify the relationship between the geologic structure and hydrologic properties of fault zones. To this end, we are performing surface-based geologic and trench investigations, geophysical surveys and borehole-based hydrologic investigations along the Wildcat fault in Berkeley,California to investigate the effect of fault zone structure on regional hydrology. The present paper outlines the fault zone structure of the Wildcat fault in Berkeley on the basis of results from trench excavation surveys. The approximately 20 - 25 km long Wildcat fault is located within the Berkeley Hills and extends northwest-southeast from Richmond to Oakland, subparallel to the Hayward fault. The Wildcat fault, which is a predominantly right-lateral strike-slip fault, steps right in a releasing bend at the Berkeley Hills region. A total of five trenches have been excavated across the fault to investigate the deformation structure of the fault zone in the bedrock. Along the Wildcat fault, multiple fault surfaces are branched, bent, paralleled, forming a complicated shear zone. The shear zone is ~ 300 m in width, and the fault surfaces may be classified under the following two groups: 1) Fault surfaces offsetting middle Miocene Claremont Chert on the east against late Miocene Orinda formation and/or San Pablo Group on the west. These NNW-SSE trending fault surfaces dip 50 - 60° to the southwest. Along the fault surfaces, fault gouge of up to 1 cm wide and foliated cataclasite of up to 60 cm wide can be observed. S-C fabrics of the fault gouge and foliated cataclasite show normal right-slip shear sense. 2) Fault surfaces forming a positive flower structure in Claremont Chert. These NW-SE trending fault surfaces are sub-vertical or steeply dipping. Along the fault surfaces, fault gouge of up to 3 cm wide and foliated cataclasite of up to 200 cm wide can be observed. S-C fabrics of the fault

  3. OpenStudio - Fault Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Stephen; Robertson, Joseph; Cheung, Howard; Horsey, Henry

    2014-09-19

    This software record documents the OpenStudio fault model development portion of the Fault Detection and Diagnostics LDRD project.The software provides a suite of OpenStudio measures (scripts) for modeling typical HVAC system faults in commercial buildings and also included supporting materials: example projects and OpenStudio measures for reporting fault costs and energy impacts.

  4. Hayward Fault, California Interferogram

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-08-17

    This image of California Hayward fault is an interferogram created using a pair of images taken by ESA ERS-1 and ERS-2 in June 1992 and September 1997 over the central San Francisco Bay in California.

  5. Faults in Claritas Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-15

    NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter captured this image of the Claritas Fossae region, characterized by systems of graben. A graben forms when a block of the planet crust drops down between two faults, due to extension, or pulling, of the crust.

  6. Glossary of normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, D. C. P.; Knipe, R. J.; Sanderson, D. J.

    2000-03-01

    Increased interest in normal faults and extended terranes has led to the development of an increasingly complex terminology. The most important terms are defined in this paper, with original references being given wherever possible, along with examples of current usage.

  7. Hayward Fault, California Interferogram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image of California's Hayward fault is an interferogram created using a pair of images taken by Synthetic Aperture Radar(SAR) combined to measure changes in the surface that may have occurred between the time the two images were taken.

    The images were collected by the European Space Agency's Remote Sensing satellites ERS-1 and ERS-2 in June 1992 and September 1997 over the central San Francisco Bay in California.

    The radar image data are shown as a gray-scale image, with the interferometric measurements that show the changes rendered in color. Only the urbanized area could be mapped with these data. The color changes from orange tones to blue tones across the Hayward fault (marked by a thin red line) show about 2-3centimeters (0.8-1.1 inches) of gradual displacement or movement of the southwest side of the fault. The block west of the fault moved horizontally toward the northwest during the 63 months between the acquisition of the two SAR images. This fault movement is called a seismic creep because the fault moved slowly without generating an earthquake.

    Scientists are using the SAR interferometry along with other data collected on the ground to monitor this fault motion in an attempt to estimate the probability of earthquake on the Hayward fault, which last had a major earthquake of magnitude 7 in 1868. This analysis indicates that the northern part of the Hayward fault is creeping all the way from the surface to a depth of 12 kilometers (7.5 miles). This suggests that the potential for a large earthquake on the northern Hayward fault might be less than previously thought. The blue area to the west (lower left) of the fault near the center of the image seemed to move upward relative to the yellow and orange areas nearby by about 2 centimeters (0.8 inches). The cause of this apparent motion is not yet confirmed, but the rise of groundwater levels during the time between the images may have caused the reversal of a small portion of the subsidence that

  8. Hayward Fault, California Interferogram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image of California's Hayward fault is an interferogram created using a pair of images taken by Synthetic Aperture Radar(SAR) combined to measure changes in the surface that may have occurred between the time the two images were taken.

    The images were collected by the European Space Agency's Remote Sensing satellites ERS-1 and ERS-2 in June 1992 and September 1997 over the central San Francisco Bay in California.

    The radar image data are shown as a gray-scale image, with the interferometric measurements that show the changes rendered in color. Only the urbanized area could be mapped with these data. The color changes from orange tones to blue tones across the Hayward fault (marked by a thin red line) show about 2-3centimeters (0.8-1.1 inches) of gradual displacement or movement of the southwest side of the fault. The block west of the fault moved horizontally toward the northwest during the 63 months between the acquisition of the two SAR images. This fault movement is called a seismic creep because the fault moved slowly without generating an earthquake.

    Scientists are using the SAR interferometry along with other data collected on the ground to monitor this fault motion in an attempt to estimate the probability of earthquake on the Hayward fault, which last had a major earthquake of magnitude 7 in 1868. This analysis indicates that the northern part of the Hayward fault is creeping all the way from the surface to a depth of 12 kilometers (7.5 miles). This suggests that the potential for a large earthquake on the northern Hayward fault might be less than previously thought. The blue area to the west (lower left) of the fault near the center of the image seemed to move upward relative to the yellow and orange areas nearby by about 2 centimeters (0.8 inches). The cause of this apparent motion is not yet confirmed, but the rise of groundwater levels during the time between the images may have caused the reversal of a small portion of the subsidence that

  9. Mechanical interaction among normal faults: A numerical field and seismological investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crider, Juliet Gage

    1998-12-01

    The segmentation of normal faults influences both their structural development and seismogenic character. In this study, field and seismological observations of normal faults from southern Oregon are combined with three-dimensional numerical modeling to illuminate the effect of mechanical interaction among fault segments. Field observations of two overlapping normal faults and associated deformation document features common to many normal-fault relay zones. A boundary element method numerical model, using simple fault-plane geometries, material properties, and boundary conditions, reproduces the principal characteristics of the observed fault scarps. The model produces a region of high Coulomb shear stress in the relay zone. The results suggest that the mechanical interaction between segments of a normal-fault system promote the development of connected, zigzagging fault scarps. The interplay between tectonic tension and lithostatic compression should strongly influence the near-surface behavior of surface-breaking normal faults. Four simple boundary conditions are evaluated for application to modeling surface-breaking normal faults. Map patterns of normal fault linkages from Lake County, Oregon show a systematic relationship between echelon step-sense, oblique extension direction, and the position of linking faults. When the step sense is the same as the sense of oblique extension, the faults are linked in the lower part of their relay ramp. When the step-sense and extension-sense are opposite, the faults are linked in the upper part of the ramp. The calculated stress fields around echelon normal faults reveal a relationship similar to the field observations. Thus, oblique slip alters the mechanical interaction among segments and influences the geometry of fault linkage. The 1993 Klamath Falls, Oregon earthquake sequence shows evidence for fault segmentation in the occurrence of two main shocks and in the spatial distribution of aftershocks. Late stage, off fault

  10. MURAL ON BUILDING OPPOSITE LIBRARY ON LEHIGH AVENUE DEPICTING LIBRARIAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MURAL ON BUILDING OPPOSITE LIBRARY ON LEHIGH AVENUE DEPICTING LIBRARIAN LILLIAN MARRERO - Free Library of Philadelphia, Lehigh Avenue Branch, 601 West Lehigh Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  11. Activity of faults observed in caves of the Eastern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroň, Ivo; Plan, Lukas; Grasemann, Bernhard; Mitrovič, Ivanka; Stemberk, Josef

    2015-04-01

    Major recent tectonic process in the Eastern Alps involves the Neogene and Quaternary lateral extrusion of parts of the Eastern Alps towards the Pannonian Basin coeval with north-south shortening of the collision realm between the Adriatic Plate and the Bohemian Massif (European Plate). Within the framework of the FWF project "Speleotect" (2013-2017), we observe recent activity of the major fault systems of the Eastern Alps, such as the (1) Salzach-Ennstal-Mariazell-Puchberg (SEMP), (2) Mur-Mürz, (3) Periadriatic, (4) Lavanttal, and (5) Vienna Basin marginal Faults. Totally seven high-accuracy 3D crack-gauges TM71 with automated reading devices were installed in five selected karst caves with faults younger than the particular caves and correlated to one of these fault zones. The recorded micro-displacement events have been compared to known regional fault kinematics and to regional seismic activity (seismic data provided by the ZAMG). Already within the first year of observation, several micro displacement events were registered; these events sometimes revealed the same mechanisms as the geologically documented kinematics of the particular active faults, but in some cases performed completely opposite kinematics. These micro displacement events occurred in seismically rather quiet periods, however, usually about 1 - 10 days prior to local seismic events of different magnitudes (varying between ML 0.1 and 3.3). Further, in some caves gravitational mass movements were recorded that accompanied the tectonic moments.

  12. Fault tolerant magnetic bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Maslen, E.H.; Sortore, C.K.; Gillies, G.T.; Williams, R.D.; Fedigan, S.J.; Aimone, R.J.

    1999-07-01

    A fault tolerant magnetic bearing system was developed and demonstrated on a large flexible-rotor test rig. The bearing system comprises a high speed, fault tolerant digital controller, three high capacity radial magnetic bearings, one thrust bearing, conventional variable reluctance position sensors, and an array of commercial switching amplifiers. Controller fault tolerance is achieved through a very high speed voting mechanism which implements triple modular redundancy with a powered spare CPU, thereby permitting failure of up to three CPU modules without system failure. Amplifier/cabling/coil fault tolerance is achieved by using a separate power amplifier for each bearing coil and permitting amplifier reconfiguration by the controller upon detection of faults. This allows hot replacement of failed amplifiers without any system degradation and without providing any excess amplifier kVA capacity over the nominal system requirement. Implemented on a large (2440 mm in length) flexible rotor, the system shows excellent rejection of faults including the failure of three CPUs as well as failure of two adjacent amplifiers (or cabling) controlling an entire stator quadrant.

  13. Pen Branch Fault Program

    SciTech Connect

    Price, V.; Stieve, A.L.; Aadland, R.

    1990-09-28

    Evidence from subsurface mapping and seismic reflection surveys at Savannah River Site (SRS) suggests the presence of a fault which displaces Cretaceous through Tertiary (90--35 million years ago) sediments. This feature has been described and named the Pen Branch fault (PBF) in a recent Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) paper (DP-MS-88-219). Because the fault is located near operating nuclear facilities, public perception and federal regulations require a thorough investigation of the fault to determine whether any seismic hazard exists. A phased program with various elements has been established to investigate the PBF to address the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory guidelines represented in 10 CFR 100 Appendix A. The objective of the PBF program is to fully characterize the nature of the PBF (ESS-SRL-89-395). This report briefly presents current understanding of the Pen Branch fault based on shallow drilling activities completed the fall of 1989 (PBF well series) and subsequent core analyses (SRL-ESS-90-145). The results are preliminary and ongoing: however, investigations indicate that the fault is not capable. In conjunction with the shallow drilling, other activities are planned or in progress. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Packaged Fault Model for Geometric Segmentation of Active Faults Into Earthquake Source Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, T.; Kumamoto, T.

    2004-12-01

    In Japan, the empirical formula proposed by Matsuda (1975) mainly based on the length of the historical surface fault ruptures and magnitude, is generally applied to estimate the size of future earthquakes from the extent of existing active faults for seismic hazard assessment. Therefore validity of the active fault length and defining individual segment boundaries where propagating ruptures terminate are essential and crucial to the reliability for the accurate assessments. It is, however, not likely for us to clearly identify the behavioral earthquake segments from observation of surface faulting during the historical period, because most of the active faults have longer recurrence intervals than 1000 years in Japan. Besides uncertainties of the datasets obtained mainly from fault trenching studies are quite large for fault grouping/segmentation. This is why new methods or criteria should be applied for active fault grouping/segmentation, and one of the candidates may be geometric criterion of active faults. Matsuda (1990) used _gfive kilometer_h as a critical distance for grouping and separation of neighboring active faults. On the other hand, Nakata and Goto (1998) proposed the geometric criteria such as (1) branching features of active fault traces and (2) characteristic pattern of vertical-slip distribution along the fault traces as tools to predict rupture length of future earthquakes. The branching during the fault rupture propagation is regarded as an effective energy dissipation process and could result in final rupture termination. With respect to the characteristic pattern of vertical-slip distribution, especially with strike-slip components, the up-thrown sides along the faults are, in general, located on the fault blocks in the direction of relative strike-slip. Applying these new geometric criteria to the high-resolution active fault distribution maps, the fault grouping/segmentation could be more practically conducted. We tested this model

  15. Fault Roughness Records Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, E. E.; Candela, T.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Fault roughness is commonly ~0.1-1% at the outcrop exposure scale. More mature faults are smoother than less mature ones, but the overall range of roughness is surprisingly limited which suggests dynamic control. In addition, the power spectra of many exposed fault surfaces follow a single power law over scales from millimeters to 10's of meters. This is another surprising observation as distinct structures such as slickenlines and mullions are clearly visible on the same surfaces at well-defined scales. We can reconcile both observations by suggesting that the roughness of fault surfaces is controlled by the maximum strain that can be supported elastically in the wallrock. If the fault surface topography requires more than 0.1-1% strain, it fails. Invoking wallrock strength explains two additional observations on the Corona Heights fault for which we have extensive roughness data. Firstly, the surface is isotropic below a scale of 30 microns and has grooves at larger scales. Samples from at least three other faults (Dixie Valley, Mount St. Helens and San Andreas) also are isotropic at scales below 10's of microns. If grooves can only persist when the walls of the grooves have a sufficiently low slope to maintain the shape, this scale of isotropy can be predicted based on the measured slip perpendicular roughness data. The observed 30 micron scale at Corona Heights is consistent with an elastic strain of 0.01 estimated from the observed slip perpendicular roughness with a Hurst exponent of 0.8. The second observation at Corona Heights is that slickenlines are not deflected around meter-scale mullions. Yielding of these mullions at centimeter to meter scale is predicted from the slip parallel roughness as measured here. The success of the strain criterion for Corona Heights supports it as the appropriate control on fault roughness. Micromechanically, the criterion implies that failure of the fault surface is a continual process during slip. Macroscopically, the

  16. The San Andreas fault experiment. [gross tectonic plates relative velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Vonbun, F. O.

    1973-01-01

    A plan was developed during 1971 to determine gross tectonic plate motions along the San Andreas Fault System in California. Knowledge of the gross motion along the total fault system is an essential component in the construction of realistic deformation models of fault regions. Such mathematical models will be used in the future for studies which will eventually lead to prediction of major earthquakes. The main purpose of the experiment described is the determination of the relative velocity of the North American and the Pacific Plates. This motion being so extremely small, cannot be measured directly but can be deduced from distance measurements between points on opposite sites of the plate boundary taken over a number of years.

  17. The San Andreas fault experiment. [gross tectonic plates relative velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Vonbun, F. O.

    1973-01-01

    A plan was developed during 1971 to determine gross tectonic plate motions along the San Andreas Fault System in California. Knowledge of the gross motion along the total fault system is an essential component in the construction of realistic deformation models of fault regions. Such mathematical models will be used in the future for studies which will eventually lead to prediction of major earthquakes. The main purpose of the experiment described is the determination of the relative velocity of the North American and the Pacific Plates. This motion being so extremely small, cannot be measured directly but can be deduced from distance measurements between points on opposite sites of the plate boundary taken over a number of years.

  18. Rough Faults, Distributed Weakening, and Off-Fault Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, W. A.; Nielsen, S. B.; di Toro, G.; Smith, S. A.; Niemeijer, A. R.

    2009-12-01

    We report systematic spatial variations of fault rocks along non-planar strike-slip faults cross-cutting the Lake Edison Granodiorite, Sierra Nevada, California (Sierran Wavy Fault) and the Lobbia outcrops of the Adamello Batholith in the Italian Alps (Lobbia Wavy Fault). In the case of the Sierran fault, pseudotachylyte formed at contractional fault bends, where it is found as thin (1-2 mm) fault-parallel veins. Epidote and chlorite developed in the same seismic context as the pseudotachylyte and are especially abundant in extensional fault bends. We argue that the presence of fluids, as illustrated by this example, does not necessarily preclude the development of frictional melt. In the case of the Lobbia fault, pseudotachylyte is present in variable thickness along the length of the fault, but the pseudotachylyte veins thicken and pool in extensional bends. The Lobbia fault surface is self-affine, and we conduct a quantitative analysis of microcrack distribution, stress, and friction along the fault. Numerical modeling results show that opening in extensional bends and localized thermal weakening in contractional bends counteract resistance encountered by fault waviness, resulting in an overall weaker fault than suggested by the corresponding static friction coefficient. Models also predict stress redistribution around bends in the faults which mirror microcrack distributions, indicating significant elastic and anelastic strain energy is dissipated into the wall rocks due to non-planar fault geometry. Together these observations suggest that, along non-planar faults, damage and energy dissipation occurs along the entire fault during slip, rather than being confined to the region close to the crack tip as predicted by classical fracture mechanics.

  19. Hydrostratigraphic subdivisions and fault barriers of the Edwards aquifer, south-central Texas, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maclay, R.W.; Small, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    The karstic Edwards Limestone within the Balcones Fault Zone of south-central Texas forms a productive confined aquifer that consists predominately of dense carbonate rocks and contains several layers of highly permeable and porous honeycombed rocks that have been produced by the leaching of evaporitic, tidal flat or reefal deposits. Fractures have hydraulically interconnected these layers at some places. Faults, however, commonly place rocks of very high-permeability opposite rocks of very low permeability, thus creating a lateral discontinuity and a flow barrier. At places, fault barriers probably cause partial to almost complete blockage of groundwater flow normal to the fault. ?? 1982.

  20. Hydrostratigraphic subdivisions and fault barriers of the Edwards aquifer, south-central Texas, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclay, R. W.; Small, T. A.

    1983-02-01

    The karstic Edwards Limestone within the Balcones Fault Zone of south-central Texas forms a productive confined aquifer that consists predominately of dense carbonate rocks and contains several layers of highly permeable and porous honeycombed rocks that have been produced by the leaching of evaporitic, tidal flat or reefal deposits. Fractures have hydraulically interconnected these layers at some places. Faults, however, commonly place rocks of very high-permeability opposite rocks of very low permeability, thus creating a lateral discontinuity and a flow barrier. At places, fault barriers probably cause partial to almost complete blockage of groundwater flow normal to the fault.

  1. The Longitudinal Association between Oppositional and Depressive Symptoms across Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boylan, Khrista; Georgiades, Katholiki; Szatmari, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Symptoms of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and depression show high rates of co-occurrence, both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. This study examines the extent to which variation in oppositional symptoms predict, variation in depressive symptoms over time, accounting for co-occurring depressive symptoms and measurement error.…

  2. 37 CFR 2.101 - Filing an opposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... opposition must be accompanied by the required fee for each party joined as opposer for each class in the... persons are joined as party opposers, each must submit a fee for each class for which opposition is sought... fees submitted are sufficient to pay the fee due for each party opposer. If persons are joined as...

  3. 37 CFR 2.101 - Filing an opposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... opposition must be accompanied by the required fee for each party joined as opposer for each class in the... persons are joined as party opposers, each must submit a fee for each class for which opposition is sought... fees submitted are sufficient to pay the fee due for each party opposer. If persons are joined as...

  4. 37 CFR 2.80 - Publication for opposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Publication for opposition. 2..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Publication and Post Publication § 2.80 Publication for opposition. If, on examination or reexamination of an application for registration on...

  5. 37 CFR 2.80 - Publication for opposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Publication for opposition. 2..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Publication and Post Publication § 2.80 Publication for opposition. If, on examination or reexamination of an application for registration on...

  6. 37 CFR 2.80 - Publication for opposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Publication for opposition. 2..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE RULES OF PRACTICE IN TRADEMARK CASES Publication and Post Publication § 2.80 Publication for opposition. If, on examination or reexamination of an application for registration on...

  7. Patent Opposition Considerations for the Technology Transfer Professional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Mark B.; Alge, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Many jurisdictions, including the European Patent Office (EPO), have opposition proceedings in which an interested third party can challenge the validity of the claims of an issued patent. The United States Congress is considering legislation that would introduce opposition proceedings in the USA. This paper reviews the existing EPO and proposed…

  8. Patent Opposition Considerations for the Technology Transfer Professional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Mark B.; Alge, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Many jurisdictions, including the European Patent Office (EPO), have opposition proceedings in which an interested third party can challenge the validity of the claims of an issued patent. The United States Congress is considering legislation that would introduce opposition proceedings in the USA. This paper reviews the existing EPO and proposed…

  9. Oppositional Culture Theory and the Delusion of Colorblindness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlowitz, Marvin J.; Hutchins, Brandi N.; Jenkins, Derrick J.; Mussman, Mark P.; Schneider, Carri A.

    2006-01-01

    Oppositional culture theory is a widely accepted explanation for disparities in academic performance between middle class Whites and middle class African Americans. The authors make the case that oppositional culture theory has its roots in cultural deficit theory popularized in the early 1960s and present a significant body of evidence to refute…

  10. Adolescents Initiating Cannabis Use: Cultural Opposition or Poor Mental Health?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Willy

    1990-01-01

    Investigated possible links between normative and political opposition, mental health, and the use of cannabis in prospective longitudinal study of Norwegian adolescents (n=1,311). Findings indicated that the group that experimented with cannabis was mainly characterized by political and normative "oppositional" engagement, but heavy…

  11. Diagnosable systems for intermittent faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallela, S.; Masson, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    The fault diagnosis capabilities of systems composed of interconnected units capable of testing each other are studied for the case of systems with intermittent faults. A central role is played by the concept of t(i)-fault diagnosability. A system is said to be t(i)-fault diagnosable when it is such that if no more than t(i) units are intermittently faulty then a fault-free unit will never be diagnosed as faulty and the diagnosis at any time is at worst incomplete. Necessary and sufficient conditions for t(i)-fault diagnosability are proved, and bounds for t(i) are established. The conditions are in general more restrictive than those for permanent-fault diagnosability. For intermittent faults there is only one testing strategy (repetitive testing), and consequently only one type of intermittent-fault diagnosable system.

  12. Validated Fault Tolerant Architectures for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan H.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on validated fault tolerant architectures for space station are presented. Topics covered include: fault tolerance approach; advanced information processing system (AIPS); and fault tolerant parallel processor (FTPP).

  13. Deformed Neogene basins, active faulting and topography in Westland: Distributed crustal mobility west of the Alpine Fault transpressive plate boundary (South Island, New Zealand)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisetti, Francesca; Sibson, Richard H.; Hamling, Ian

    2016-12-01

    Tectonic activity in the South Island of New Zealand is dominated by the Alpine Fault component of the Australia-Pacific plate boundary. West of the Alpine Fault deformation is recorded by Paleogene-Neogene basins coeval with the evolution of the right-lateral/transpressive plate margin. Initial tectonic setting was controlled by N-S normal faults developed during Late Cretaceous and Eocene-early Miocene rifting. Following inception of the Alpine Fault (c. 25 Ma) reverse reactivation of the normal faults controlled tectonic segmentation that became apparent in the cover sequences at c. 22 Ma. Based on restored transects tied to stratigraphic sections, seismic lines and wells, we reconstruct the vertical mobility of the Top Basement Unconformity west of Alpine Fault. From c. 37-35 Ma to 22 Ma subsidence was controlled by extensional faulting. After 22 Ma the region was affected by differential subsidence, resulting from eastward crustal flexure towards the Alpine Fault boundary and/or components of transtension. Transition from subsidence to uplift started at c. 17 Ma within a belt of basement pop-ups, separated by subsiding basins localised in the common footwall of oppositely-dipping reverse faults. From 17 to 7-3 Ma reverse fault reactivation and uplift migrated to the WSW. Persistent reverse reactivation of the inherited faults in the present stress field is reflected by the close match between tectonic block segmentation and topography filtered at a wavelength of 25 km, i.e. at a scale comparable to crustal thickness in the region. However, topography filtered at wavelength of 75 km shows marked contrasts between the elevated Tasman Ranges region relative to regions to the south. Variations in thickness and rigidity of the Australian lithosphere possibly control N-S longitudinal changes, consistent with our estimates of increase in linear shortening from the Tasman Ranges to the regions located west of the Alpine Fault bend.

  14. Changes in fault length distributions due to fault linkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shunshan; Nieto-Samaniego, A. F.; Alaniz-Álvarez, S. A.; Velasquillo-Martínez, L. G.; Grajales-Nishimura, J. M.; García-Hernández, J.; Murillo-Muñetón, G.

    2010-01-01

    Fault linkage plays an important role in the growth of faults. In this paper we analyze a published synthetic model to simulate fault linkage. The results of the simulation indicate that fault linkage is the cause of the shallower local slopes on the length-frequency plots. The shallower local slopes lead to two effects. First, the curves of log cumulative number against log length exhibit fluctuating shapes as reported in literature. Second, for a given fault population, the power-law exponents after linkage are negatively related to the linked length scales. Also, we present datasets of fault length measured from four structural maps at the Cantarell oilfield in the southern Gulf of Mexico (offshore Campeche). The results demonstrate that the fault length data, corrected by seismic resolution at the tip fault zone, also exhibit fluctuating curves of log cumulative frequency vs. log length. The steps (shallower slopes) on the curves imply the scale positions of fault linkage. We conclude that fault linkage is the main reason for the fluctuating shapes of log cumulative frequency vs. log length. On the other hand, our data show that the two-tip faults are better for linear analysis between maximum displacement ( D) and length ( L). Evidently, two-tip faults underwent fewer fault linkages and interactions.

  15. Fault terminations, Seminoe Mountains, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Dominic, J.B.; McConnell, D.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Two basement-involved faults terminate in folds in the Seminoe Mountains. Mesoscopic and macroscopic structures in sedimentary rocks provide clues to the interrelationship of faults and folds in this region, and on the linkage between faulting and folding in general. The Hurt Creek fault trends 320[degree] and has maximum separation of 1.5 km measured at the basement/cover contact. Separation on the fault decreases upsection to zero within the Jurassic Sundance Formation. Unfaulted rock units form an anticline around the fault tip. The complementary syncline is angular with planar limbs and a narrow hinge zone. The syncline axial trace intersects the fault in the footwall at the basement/cover cut-off. Map patterns are interpreted to show thickening of Mesozoic units adjacent to the syncline hinge. In contrast, extensional structures are common in the faulted anticline within the Permian Goose Egg and Triassic Chugwater Formations. A hanging wall splay fault loses separation into the Goose Egg formation which is thinned by 50% at the fault tip. Mesoscopic normal faults are oriented 320--340[degree] and have an average inclination of 75[degree] SW. Megaboudins of Chugwater are present in the footwall of the Hurt Creek fault, immediately adjacent to the fault trace. The Black Canyon fault transported Precambrian-Pennsylvanian rocks over Pennsylvanian Tensleep sandstone. This fault is layer-parallel at the top of the Tensleep and loses separation along strike into an unfaulted syncline in the Goose Egg Formation. Shortening in the pre-Permian units is accommodated by slip on the basement-involved Black Canyon fault. Equivalent shortening in Permian-Cretaceous units occurs on a system of thin-skinned'' thrust faults.

  16. Fault displacement hazard for strike-slip faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, M.D.; Dawson, T.E.; Chen, R.; Cao, T.; Wills, C.J.; Schwartz, D.P.; Frankel, A.D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a methodology, data, and regression equations for calculating the fault rupture hazard at sites near steeply dipping, strike-slip faults. We collected and digitized on-fault and off-fault displacement data for 9 global strikeslip earthquakes ranging from moment magnitude M 6.5 to M 7.6 and supplemented these with displacements from 13 global earthquakes compiled byWesnousky (2008), who considers events up to M 7.9. Displacements on the primary fault fall off at the rupture ends and are often measured in meters, while displacements on secondary (offfault) or distributed faults may measure a few centimeters up to more than a meter and decay with distance from the rupture. Probability of earthquake rupture is less than 15% for cells 200 m??200 m and is less than 2% for 25 m??25 m cells at distances greater than 200mfrom the primary-fault rupture. Therefore, the hazard for off-fault ruptures is much lower than the hazard near the fault. Our data indicate that rupture displacements up to 35cm can be triggered on adjacent faults at distances out to 10kmor more from the primary-fault rupture. An example calculation shows that, for an active fault which has repeated large earthquakes every few hundred years, fault rupture hazard analysis should be an important consideration in the design of structures or lifelines that are located near the principal fault, within about 150 m of well-mapped active faults with a simple trace and within 300 m of faults with poorly defined or complex traces.

  17. Fault tolerant linear actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2004-09-14

    In varying embodiments, the fault tolerant linear actuator of the present invention is a new and improved linear actuator with fault tolerance and positional control that may incorporate velocity summing, force summing, or a combination of the two. In one embodiment, the invention offers a velocity summing arrangement with a differential gear between two prime movers driving a cage, which then drives a linear spindle screw transmission. Other embodiments feature two prime movers driving separate linear spindle screw transmissions, one internal and one external, in a totally concentric and compact integrated module.

  18. DIFFERENTIAL FAULT SENSING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, J.H.

    1961-09-01

    A differential fault sensing circuit is designed for detecting arcing in high-voltage vacuum tubes arranged in parallel. A circuit is provided which senses differences in voltages appearing between corresponding elements likely to fault. Sensitivity of the circuit is adjusted to some level above which arcing will cause detectable differences in voltage. For particular corresponding elements, a group of pulse transformers are connected in parallel with diodes connected across the secondaries thereof so that only voltage excursions are transmitted to a thyratron which is biased to the sensitivity level mentioned.

  19. Computer hardware fault administration

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Megerian, Mark G.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-09-14

    Computer hardware fault administration carried out in a parallel computer, where the parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes. The compute nodes are coupled for data communications by at least two independent data communications networks, where each data communications network includes data communications links connected to the compute nodes. Typical embodiments carry out hardware fault administration by identifying a location of a defective link in the first data communications network of the parallel computer and routing communications data around the defective link through the second data communications network of the parallel computer.

  20. Fault tree models for fault tolerant hypercube multiprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Mark A.; Tuazon, Jezus O.

    1991-01-01

    Three candidate fault tolerant hypercube architectures are modeled, their reliability analyses are compared, and the resulting implications of these methods of incorporating fault tolerance into hypercube multiprocessors are discussed. In the course of performing the reliability analyses, the use of HARP and fault trees in modeling sequence dependent system behaviors is demonstrated.

  1. Fault tree models for fault tolerant hypercube multiprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Mark A.; Tuazon, Jezus O.

    1991-01-01

    Three candidate fault tolerant hypercube architectures are modeled, their reliability analyses are compared, and the resulting implications of these methods of incorporating fault tolerance into hypercube multiprocessors are discussed. In the course of performing the reliability analyses, the use of HARP and fault trees in modeling sequence dependent system behaviors is demonstrated.

  2. Physical models of normal-fault relays between variably offset grabens

    SciTech Connect

    Vendeville, B.C.; Le Calvez, J.

    1995-08-01

    We conducted a series of scaled models in which two grabens initially offset along the direction of regional extension subsequently propagated freely along strike while synkinematic sediments were added. Models comprised a thick layer of dry sand overlying a thin lubricating layer of viscous silicone. The experiments are applicable to both crustal scale and to the scale of a brittle sedimentary cover above a salt or shale decollement. Results show that fault orientation and linkage vary with graben offset ({Delta}L) and model thickness (h). Grabens with small offset (O < {Delta}L< h/2) propagated along strike while remaining perpendicular to the direction of regional extension; the grabens eventually linked. Fault traces were initially jagged but straightened after further extension and sedimentation. Grabens with moderate offsets (h/2 < {Delta}L < 2h) widened as they propagated toward each other. Soft fault linkage created ramps of strained overburden blocks between faults. Later, ramps were cut by hard-linked faults. Hour-glass structures formed where faults of opposite vergence intersected. Fault slip progressively decreased along strike. Where graben offset was large ({Delta}L > 2h), a transtensional graben was generated oblique to the direction of regional extension, providing hard linkage with each initial graben. Fault-slip gradients along fault strike remained low. We infer that formation of a new oblique graben reflects a size threshold above which the rock volume between the grabens (proportional to graben offset) cannot rotate or deform by soft linkage to accommodate deformation.

  3. Fault diagnosis of analog circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandler, J. W.; Salama, A. E.

    1985-08-01

    Theory and algorithms associated with four main categories of modern techniques used to locate faults in analog circuits are presented. These four general approaches are: the fault dictionary (FDA), the parameter identification (PIA), the fault verification (FVA), and the approximation (AA) approaches. The preliminaries and problems associated with the FDA, such as fault dictionary construction, the methods of optimum measurement selection, fault isolation criteria, and efficient methods of fault simulation, are discussed. The PIA techniques that utilize either linear or nonlinear systems of equations for identification of network elements are examined. Description of the FVA includes node-fault diagnosis, branch-fault diagnosis, subnetwork testability conditions, as well as combinatorial techniques, the failure-bound technique, and the network decomposition technique. In the AA, probabilistic methods and optimization-based methods are considered. In addition, the artificial intelligence technique and the different measures of testability are presented. A series of block diagrams is included.

  4. Fault injection experiments using FIAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barton, James H.; Czeck, Edward W.; Segall, Zary Z.; Siewiorek, Daniel P.

    1990-01-01

    The results of several experiments conducted using the fault-injection-based automated testing (FIAT) system are presented. FIAT is capable of emulating a variety of distributed system architectures, and it provides the capabilities to monitor system behavior and inject faults for the purpose of experimental characterization and validation of a system's dependability. The experiments consist of exhaustively injecting three separate fault types into various locations, encompassing both the code and data portions of memory images, of two distinct applications executed with several different data values and sizes. Fault types are variations of memory bit faults. The results show that there are a limited number of system-level fault manifestations. These manifestations follow a normal distribution for each fault type. Error detection latencies are found to be normally distributed. The methodology can be used to predict the system-level fault responses during the system design stage.

  5. [Renovation of acupuncture teaching based on opposite points].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Han; Yang, Zhi-Xin; Guo, Yu-Cheng; Yu, Shu-Hua

    2013-06-01

    The definition and content of opposite points is updated, and renovation of acupuncture teaching is explored in this article. Opposite points interconnect meridians and acupoints. Location of one point reminds that of the other in pairs. When manipulating, point-to-point puncture from two opposite sides or penetrating method from one side are both applicable. It has the advantages of less point selection and regulating yin and yang. Its application in teaching of meridians, acupoints, acupuncture technique and treatment may bring enthusiasm into the study as well as improve the level of teaching.

  6. Transducer model produces facilitation from opposite-sign flanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, J. A.; Watson, A. B.; Morgan, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Small spots, lines and Gabor patterns can be easier to detect when they are superimposed upon similar spots, lines and Gabor patterns. Traditionally, such facilitation has been understood to be a consequence of nonlinear contrast transduction. Facilitation has also been reported to arise from non-overlapping patterns with opposite sign. We point out that this result does not preclude the traditional explanation for superimposed targets. Moreover, we find that facilitation from opposite-sign flanks is weaker than facilitation from same-sign flanks. Simulations with a transducer model produce opposite-sign facilitation.

  7. Transducer model produces facilitation from opposite-sign flanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, J. A.; Watson, A. B.; Morgan, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Small spots, lines and Gabor patterns can be easier to detect when they are superimposed upon similar spots, lines and Gabor patterns. Traditionally, such facilitation has been understood to be a consequence of nonlinear contrast transduction. Facilitation has also been reported to arise from non-overlapping patterns with opposite sign. We point out that this result does not preclude the traditional explanation for superimposed targets. Moreover, we find that facilitation from opposite-sign flanks is weaker than facilitation from same-sign flanks. Simulations with a transducer model produce opposite-sign facilitation.

  8. The property of fault zone and fault activity of Shionohira Fault, Fukushima, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshimo, K.; Aoki, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Niwa, M.; Kametaka, M.; Sakai, T.; Tanaka, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The April 11, 2011 Fukushima-ken Hamadori Earthquake (hereafter the 4.11 earthquake) formed co-seismic surface ruptures trending in the NNW-SSE direction in Iwaki City, Fukushima Prefecture, which were newly named as the Shionohira Fault by Ishiyama et al. (2011). This earthquake was characterized by a westward dipping normal slip faulting, with a maximum displacement of about 2 m (e.g., Kurosawa et al., 2012). To the south of the area, the same trending lineaments were recognized to exist even though no surface ruptures occurred by the earthquake. In an attempt to elucidate the differences of active and non-active segments of the fault, this report discusses the results of observation of fault outcrops along the Shionohira Fault as well as the Coulomb stress calculations. Only a few outcrops have basement rocks of both the hanging-wall and foot-wall of the fault plane. Three of these outcrops (Kyodo-gawa, Shionohira and Betto) were selected for investigation. In addition, a fault outcrop (Nameishi-minami) located about 300 m south of the southern tip of the surface ruptures was investigated. The authors carried out observations of outcrops, polished slabs and thin sections, and performed X-ray diffraction (XRD) to fault materials. As a result, the fault zones originating from schists were investigated at Kyodo-gawa and Betto. A thick fault gouge was cut by a fault plane of the 4.11 earthquake in each outcrop. The fault materials originating from schists were fault bounded with (possibly Neogene) weakly deformed sandstone at Shionohira. A thin fault gouge was found along the fault plane of 4.11 earthquake. A small-scale fault zone with thin fault gouge was observed in Nameishi-minami. According to XRD analysis, smectite was detected in the gouges from Kyodo-gawa, Shionohira and Betto, while not in the gouge from Nameishi-minami.

  9. Influence of Plastic Deformation on Bimaterial Fault Rupture Directivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton-Barrett, E. L.; Dedontney, N.; Rice, J. R.; Dmowska, R.

    2011-12-01

    Material juxtapositions across mature faults are a common occurrence. Previous work has found that this elastic mismatch results in a rupture that will preferentially propagate in the direction of slip displacement on the more compliant side of the fault, with more off-fault damage in the stiffer material. This result has implications for inferring preferred rupture directions based on observations of damage zone asymmetry. We perform a complete numerical investigation of the role of the stress state on the distribution of plastic deformation and the direction of preferred rupture propagation. We show that there are important factors, in addition to the elastic mismatch, which control the preferred direction of propagation as well as the side of the fault in which damage predominately accumulates. The orientation of the most compressive principal stress is the controlling factor in determining the location of plastic deformation. For different orientations, plastic deformation can accumulate in either the stiffer or the more compliant material. For high angles of most compressive stress, the aforementioned preferred rupture direction prediction holds true. However, the off-fault plastic response can reverse that direction for low angles of most compressive stress so that rupture will preferentially propagate in the direction of slip displacement in the stiffer material. Also, as already established in the case of purely elastic materials, when pre-stress is close to static friction (low seismic S ratio) a transition to supershear may take place in the direction opposite to what was the preferred direction.

  10. The engine fuel system fault analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Song, Hanqiang; Yang, Changsheng; Zhao, Wei

    2017-05-01

    For improving the reliability of the engine fuel system, the typical fault factor of the engine fuel system was analyzed from the point view of structure and functional. The fault character was gotten by building the fuel system fault tree. According the utilizing of fault mode effect analysis method (FMEA), several factors of key component fuel regulator was obtained, which include the fault mode, the fault cause, and the fault influences. All of this made foundation for next development of fault diagnosis system.

  11. Perspective View, Garlock Fault

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-20

    California Garlock Fault, marking the northwestern boundary of the Mojave Desert, lies at the foot of the mountains, running from the lower right to the top center of this image, which was created with data from NASA shuttle Radar Topography Mission.

  12. Faults and Flows

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-20

    Lava flows of Daedalia Planum can be seen at the top and bottom portions of this image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft. The ridge and linear depression in the central part of the image are part of Mangala Fossa, a fault bounded graben.

  13. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2010-02-23

    An apparatus and program product check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  14. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2008-10-14

    An apparatus, program product and method checks for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  15. Dynamic Fault Detection Chassis

    SciTech Connect

    Mize, Jeffery J

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The high frequency switching megawatt-class High Voltage Converter Modulator (HVCM) developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is now in operation. One of the major problems with the modulator systems is shoot-thru conditions that can occur in a IGBTs H-bridge topology resulting in large fault currents and device failure in a few microseconds. The Dynamic Fault Detection Chassis (DFDC) is a fault monitoring system; it monitors transformer flux saturation using a window comparator and dV/dt events on the cathode voltage caused by any abnormality such as capacitor breakdown, transformer primary turns shorts, or dielectric breakdown between the transformer primary and secondary. If faults are detected, the DFDC will inhibit the IGBT gate drives and shut the system down, significantly reducing the possibility of a shoot-thru condition or other equipment damaging events. In this paper, we will present system integration considerations, performance characteristics of the DFDC, and discuss its ability to significantly reduce costly down time for the entire facility.

  16. Fault-Mechanism Simulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guyton, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    An inexpensive, simple mechanical model of a fault can be produced to simulate the effects leading to an earthquake. This model has been used successfully with students from elementary to college levels and can be demonstrated to classes as large as thirty students. (DF)

  17. Row fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens [Rochester, MN; Pinnow, Kurt Walter [Rochester, MN; Ratterman, Joseph D [Rochester, MN; Smith, Brian Edward [Rochester, MN

    2012-02-07

    An apparatus, program product and method check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  18. Fault-Mechanism Simulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guyton, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    An inexpensive, simple mechanical model of a fault can be produced to simulate the effects leading to an earthquake. This model has been used successfully with students from elementary to college levels and can be demonstrated to classes as large as thirty students. (DF)

  19. Fault-Related Sanctuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccardi, L.

    2001-12-01

    Beyond the study of historical surface faulting events, this work investigates the possibility, in specific cases, of identifying pre-historical events whose memory survives in myths and legends. The myths of many famous sacred places of the ancient world contain relevant telluric references: "sacred" earthquakes, openings to the Underworld and/or chthonic dragons. Given the strong correspondence with local geological evidence, these myths may be considered as describing natural phenomena. It has been possible in this way to shed light on the geologic origin of famous myths (Piccardi, 1999, 2000 and 2001). Interdisciplinary researches reveal that the origin of several ancient sanctuaries may be linked in particular to peculiar geological phenomena observed on local active faults (like ground shaking and coseismic surface ruptures, gas and flames emissions, strong underground rumours). In many of these sanctuaries the sacred area is laid directly above the active fault. In a few cases, faulting has affected also the archaeological relics, right through the main temple (e.g. Delphi, Cnidus, Hierapolis of Phrygia). As such, the arrangement of the cult site and content of relative myths suggest that specific points along the trace of active faults have been noticed in the past and worshiped as special `sacred' places, most likely interpreted as Hades' Doors. The mythological stratification of most of these sanctuaries dates back to prehistory, and points to a common derivation from the cult of the Mother Goddess (the Lady of the Doors), which was largely widespread since at least 25000 BC. The cult itself was later reconverted into various different divinities, while the `sacred doors' of the Great Goddess and/or the dragons (offspring of Mother Earth and generally regarded as Keepers of the Doors) persisted in more recent mythologies. Piccardi L., 1999: The "Footprints" of the Archangel: Evidence of Early-Medieval Surface Faulting at Monte Sant'Angelo (Gargano, Italy

  20. Do Trojan Asteroids Have the Brightness Opposition Effect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, V. G.; Krugly, Yu. N.; Belskaya, I. N.; Chiorny, V. G.; Gaftonyuk, N. M.; Slyusarev, I. G.; Tereschenko, I. A.; Donchev, Z.; Ivanova, V.; Borisov, G.; Ibrahimov, M. A.; Marshalkina, A. L.; Molotov, I. E.

    2009-03-01

    Photometric observations of the Trojan asteroids 588 Achilles are presented. The rotation period and the detailed magnitude phase dependence were obtained. We have not revealed any noticeable opposition brightening down to 0.1 deg of phase angle.

  1. 11. View looking from opposite direction (N) at arched opening ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. View looking from opposite direction (N) at arched opening depicted in previous view. - Hacienda Azucarera La Esperanza, Mill (Ruins), 2.65 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Manati River, Manati, Manati Municipio, PR

  2. 37 CFR 2.104 - Contents of opposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... different applications owned by the same party may be joined in a consolidated opposition when appropriate, but the required fee must be included for each party joined as opposer for each class in...

  3. 37 CFR 2.104 - Contents of opposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... different applications owned by the same party may be joined in a consolidated opposition when appropriate, but the required fee must be included for each party joined as opposer for each class in...

  4. 29. Detail view of small triangular openings from opposite side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Detail view of small triangular openings from opposite side of wall. - Hacienda Azurarera Santa Elena, Sugar Mill Ruins, 1.44 miles North of PR Route 2 Bridge Over Rio De La Plata, Toa Baja, Toa Baja Municipio, PR

  5. 47 CFR 24.830 - Opposition to applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....830 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Interim Application, Licensing, and Processing Rules for Broadband PCS § 24.830 Opposition to applications. (a) Petitions to deny (including petitions for other forms of relief) and...

  6. 47 CFR 24.430 - Opposition to applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....430 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Interim Application, Licensing and Processing Rules for Narrowband PCS § 24.430 Opposition to applications. (a) Petitions to deny (including petitions for other forms of relief) and...

  7. 1. Opposition sign posted on private property at the entrance ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Opposition sign posted on private property at the entrance to the road looking NW. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Northshore Road, 1 mile spur at Fontana Dam & Bryson City to Noland Creek, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  8. 17. FIRST FLOOR APARTMENT KITCHEN INTERIOR SHOWING OPPOSITE VIEW FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. FIRST FLOOR APARTMENT KITCHEN INTERIOR SHOWING OPPOSITE VIEW FROM CA-180-A-16. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  9. Considering the opposite: a corrective strategy for social judgment.

    PubMed

    Lord, C G; Lepper, M R; Preston, E

    1984-12-01

    It is proposed that several biases in social judgment result from a failure--first noted by Francis Bacon--to consider possibilities at odds with beliefs and perceptions of the moment. Individuals who are induced to consider the opposite, therefore, should display less bias in social judgment. In two separate but conceptually parallel experiments, this reasoning was applied to two domains--biased assimilation of new evidence on social issues and biased hypothesis testing of personality impressions. Subjects were induced to consider the opposite in two ways: through explicit instructions to do so and through stimulus materials that made opposite possibilities more salient. In both experiments the induction of a consider-the-opposite strategy had greater corrective effect than more demand-laden alternative instructions to be as fair and unbiased as possible. The results are viewed as consistent with previous research on perseverance, hindsight, and logical problem solving, and are thought to suggest an effective method of retraining social judgment.

  10. General view of thurmond, looking north from opposite side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of thurmond, looking north from opposite side of the new river. - Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad, Thurmond Yards, East side New River, mouths of Arbuckle & Dunlop Circles, Thurmond, Fayette County, WV

  11. General view (closer up) of thurmond, looking north from opposite ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view (closer up) of thurmond, looking north from opposite side of new river. - Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad, Thurmond Yards, East side New River, mouths of Arbuckle & Dunlop Circles, Thurmond, Fayette County, WV

  12. 107. Photocopy of plate opposite page 104 in Owen, Hints. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    107. Photocopy of plate opposite page 104 in Owen, Hints. SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, FROM THE NORTH-EAST - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  13. 112. Photocopy of plate opposite page 43 in Owen, Hints. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    112. Photocopy of plate opposite page 43 in Owen, Hints. CENTRAL SOUTHERN TOWER, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION; FROM THE SOUTH-WEST - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  14. 109. Photocopy of plate opposite page 75 in Owen, Hints. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    109. Photocopy of plate opposite page 75 in Owen, Hints. WEST WING, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION: FROM THE NORTH-EAST - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  15. 110. Photocopy of plate opposite page 19 in Owen, Hints. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    110. Photocopy of plate opposite page 19 in Owen, Hints. CAMPANILE, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, FROM THE NORTH-EAST - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  16. 111. Photocopy of plate opposite page 108 in Owen, Hints. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    111. Photocopy of plate opposite page 108 in Owen, Hints. SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION FROM THE SOUTH WEST - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  17. 106. Photocopy of plate opposite pge 99 in Owen, Hints. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    106. Photocopy of plate opposite pge 99 in Owen, Hints. GOTHIC DESIGN FOR SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  18. Thermal Field Indicator for Identifying Active Faults and its Instability From Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Liu, L.; Liu, P.; Ma, S.

    2007-12-01

    The relationship between the thermal filed and strain field during deformation of faults is the physical basis to clarify whether satellite infrared information and the ground temperature field can be used to study fault activity. This study attempts to discuss these problems by experiments in the laboratory. The two-direction servo-control system was used to load on the samples with compressional and extensional en echelon faults. An infrared thermal image system and a contact-type thermometer recorded synchronously variations of the bright temperature field of infrared radiation and temperature field during deformation of the rock specimens. A digital CCD camera and a soft ware based on the digital speckle correlation method (DSCM) was utilized to capture images and to analyze them, yielding processes of displacement and strain fields. The experimental result shows as follows: 1 The temperature is highest at the jog area of the compressional en echelon faults, whereas that is lowest at the extensional en echelon faults prior to failure of the jog area. The record by DSCM displays that the mean strain of the jog area is largest for the compressional en echelon faults, while that is smallest for the extensional en echelon faults. These mean that the temperature field has clear responses to the opposite stress states at the jog areas of two kinds of en echelon faults, providing an indicator for determining whether the fault segment has slid. 2 The en echelon faults experience two deformation stages from stress building up and fault propagating at the jog area to unstable sliding along the fault. Correspondingly the mechanism of heating-up is turned from strain heating into frictional heating. Three kinds of phenomena have been observed at the jog area and its vicinity during the stage of transformation. They are temperature drop, fast fluctuation of temperature, and pulses of temperature rising, respectively. Mechanism of these phenomena is discussed. 3 These

  19. Earthquakes and fault creep on the northern San Andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nason, R.

    1979-01-01

    At present there is an absence of both fault creep and small earthquakes on the northern San Andreas fault, which had a magnitude 8 earthquake with 5 m of slip in 1906. The fault has apparently been dormant after the 1906 earthquake. One possibility is that the fault is 'locked' in some way and only produces great earthquakes. An alternative possibility, presented here, is that the lack of current activity on the northern San Andreas fault is because of a lack of sufficient elastic strain after the 1906 earthquake. This is indicated by geodetic measurements at Fort Ross in 1874, 1906 (post-earthquake), and 1969, which show that the strain accumulation in 1969 (69 ?? 10-6 engineering strain) was only about one-third of the strain release (rebound) in the 1906 earthquake (200 ?? 10-6 engineering strain). The large difference in seismicity before and after 1906, with many strong local earthquakes from 1836 to 1906, but only a few strong earthquakes from 1906 to 1976, also indicates a difference of elastic strain. The geologic characteristics (serpentine, fault straightness) of most of the northern San Andreas fault are very similar to the characteristics of the fault south of Hollister, where fault creep is occurring. Thus, the current absence of fault creep on the northern fault segment is probably due to a lack of sufficient elastic strain at the present time. ?? 1979.

  20. Quantifying Anderson's fault types

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Anderson [1905] explained three basic types of faulting (normal, strike-slip, and reverse) in terms of the shape of the causative stress tensor and its orientation relative to the Earth's surface. Quantitative parameters can be defined which contain information about both shape and orientation [Ce??le??rier, 1995], thereby offering a way to distinguish fault-type domains on plots of regional stress fields and to quantify, for example, the degree of normal-faulting tendencies within strike-slip domains. This paper offers a geometrically motivated generalization of Angelier's [1979, 1984, 1990] shape parameters ?? and ?? to new quantities named A?? and A??. In their simple forms, A?? varies from 0 to 1 for normal, 1 to 2 for strike-slip, and 2 to 3 for reverse faulting, and A?? ranges from 0?? to 60??, 60?? to 120??, and 120?? to 180??, respectively. After scaling, A?? and A?? agree to within 2% (or 1??), a difference of little practical significance, although A?? has smoother analytical properties. A formulation distinguishing horizontal axes as well as the vertical axis is also possible, yielding an A?? ranging from -3 to +3 and A?? from -180?? to +180??. The geometrically motivated derivation in three-dimensional stress space presented here may aid intuition and offers a natural link with traditional ways of plotting yield and failure criteria. Examples are given, based on models of Bird [1996] and Bird and Kong [1994], of the use of Anderson fault parameters A?? and A?? for visualizing tectonic regimes defined by regional stress fields. Copyright 1997 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. A brief argument in opposition to the Orgel hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Baird, M G; Samis, H V; Massie, H R; Zimmerman, J A

    1975-01-01

    The Orgel hypothesis receives considerable attention as a possible explanation for the phenomenon of senescence. Experimental observations which argue in favor of the Orgel hypothesis are discussed, and critized in part. This is followed by a presentation of experimental data which argue in opposition to the notion. On the basis of the considerable body of data which argue in opposition to the Orgel theory, a call for reappraisal of the applicability of this theory to the phenomenon of senescence is suggested.

  2. The San Andreas Fault and a Strike-slip Fault on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The mosaic on the right of the south polar region of Jupiter's moon Europa shows the northern 290 kilometers (180 miles) of a strike-slip fault named Astypalaea Linea. The entire fault is about 810 kilometers (500 miles) long, the size of the California portion of the San Andreas fault on Earth which runs from the California-Mexico border north to the San Francisco Bay.

    The left mosaic shows the portion of the San Andreas fault near California's san Francisco Bay that has been scaled to the same size and resolution as the Europa image. Each covers an area approximately 170 by 193 kilometers(105 by 120 miles). The red line marks the once active central crack of the Europan fault (right) and the line of the San Andreas fault (left).

    A strike-slip fault is one in which two crustal blocks move horizontally past one another, similar to two opposing lanes of traffic. The overall motion along the Europan fault seems to have followed a continuous narrow crack along the entire length of the feature, with a path resembling stepson a staircase crossing zones which have been pulled apart. The images show that about 50 kilometers (30 miles) of displacement have taken place along the fault. Opposite sides of the fault can be reconstructed like a puzzle, matching the shape of the sides as well as older individual cracks and ridges that had been broken by its movements.

    Bends in the Europan fault have allowed the surface to be pulled apart. This pulling-apart along the fault's bends created openings through which warmer, softer ice from below Europa's brittle ice shell surface, or frozen water from a possible subsurface ocean, could reach the surface. This upwelling of material formed large areas of new ice within the boundaries of the original fault. A similar pulling apart phenomenon can be observed in the geological trough surrounding California's Salton Sea, and in Death Valley and the Dead Sea. In those cases, the pulled apart regions can include upwelled

  3. The San Andreas Fault and a Strike-slip Fault on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The mosaic on the right of the south polar region of Jupiter's moon Europa shows the northern 290 kilometers (180 miles) of a strike-slip fault named Astypalaea Linea. The entire fault is about 810 kilometers (500 miles) long, the size of the California portion of the San Andreas fault on Earth which runs from the California-Mexico border north to the San Francisco Bay.

    The left mosaic shows the portion of the San Andreas fault near California's san Francisco Bay that has been scaled to the same size and resolution as the Europa image. Each covers an area approximately 170 by 193 kilometers(105 by 120 miles). The red line marks the once active central crack of the Europan fault (right) and the line of the San Andreas fault (left).

    A strike-slip fault is one in which two crustal blocks move horizontally past one another, similar to two opposing lanes of traffic. The overall motion along the Europan fault seems to have followed a continuous narrow crack along the entire length of the feature, with a path resembling stepson a staircase crossing zones which have been pulled apart. The images show that about 50 kilometers (30 miles) of displacement have taken place along the fault. Opposite sides of the fault can be reconstructed like a puzzle, matching the shape of the sides as well as older individual cracks and ridges that had been broken by its movements.

    Bends in the Europan fault have allowed the surface to be pulled apart. This pulling-apart along the fault's bends created openings through which warmer, softer ice from below Europa's brittle ice shell surface, or frozen water from a possible subsurface ocean, could reach the surface. This upwelling of material formed large areas of new ice within the boundaries of the original fault. A similar pulling apart phenomenon can be observed in the geological trough surrounding California's Salton Sea, and in Death Valley and the Dead Sea. In those cases, the pulled apart regions can include upwelled

  4. High-resolution seismic reflection imaging of growth folding and shallow faults beneath the Southern Puget Lowland, Washington State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Odum, Jackson K.; Stephenson, William J.; Pratt, Thomas L.; Blakely, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Marine seismic reflection data from southern Puget Sound, Washington, were collected to investigate the nature of shallow structures associated with the Tacoma fault zone and the Olympia structure. Growth folding and probable Holocene surface deformation were imaged within the Tacoma fault zone beneath Case and Carr Inlets. Shallow faults near potential field anomalies associated with the Olympia structure were imaged beneath Budd and Eld Inlets. Beneath Case Inlet, the Tacoma fault zone includes an ∼350-m wide section of south-dipping strata forming the upper part of a fold (kink band) coincident with the southern edge of an uplifted shoreline terrace. An ∼2 m change in the depth of the water bottom, onlapping postglacial sediments, and increasing stratal dips with increasing depth are consistent with late Pleistocene to Holocene postglacial growth folding above a blind fault. Geologic data across a topographic lineament on nearby land indicate recent uplift of late Holocene age. Profiles acquired in Carr Inlet 10 km to the east of Case Inlet showed late Pleistocene or Holocene faulting at one location with ∼3 to 4 m of vertical displacement, south side up. North of this fault the data show several other disruptions and reflector terminations that could mark faults within the broad Tacoma fault zone. Seismic reflection profiles across part of the Olympia structure beneath southern Puget Sound show two apparent faults about 160 m apart having 1 to 2 m of displacement of subhorizontal bedding. Directly beneath one of these faults, a dipping reflector that may mark the base of a glacial channel shows the opposite sense of throw, suggesting strike-slip motion. Deeper seismic reflection profiles show disrupted strata beneath these faults but little apparent vertical offset, consistent with strike-slip faulting. These faults and folds indicate that the Tacoma fault and Olympia structure include active structures with probable postglacial motion.

  5. High-resolution seismic reflection imaging of growth folding and shallow faults beneath the Southern Puget Lowland, Washington State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clement, C.R.; Pratt, T.L.; Holmes, M.L.; Sherrod, B.L.

    2010-01-01

    Marine seismic reflection data from southern Puget Sound, Washington, were collected to investigate the nature of shallow structures associated with the Tacoma fault zone and the Olympia structure. Growth folding and probable Holocene surface deformation were imaged within the Tacoma fault zone beneath Case and Carr Inlets. Shallow faults near potential field anomalies associated with the Olympia structure were imaged beneath Budd and Eld Inlets. Beneath Case Inlet, the Tacoma fault zone includes an ???350-m wide section of south-dipping strata forming the upper part of a fold (kink band) coincident with the southern edge of an uplifted shoreline terrace. An ???2 m change in the depth of the water bottom, onlapping postglacial sediments, and increasing stratal dips with increasing depth are consistent with late Pleistocene to Holocene postglacial growth folding above a blind fault. Geologic data across a topographic lineament on nearby land indicate recent uplift of late Holocene age. Profiles acquired in Carr Inlet 10 km to the east of Case Inlet showed late Pleistocene or Holocene faulting at one location with ???3 to 4 m of vertical displacement, south side up. North of this fault the data show several other disruptions and reflector terminations that could mark faults within the broad Tacoma fault zone. Seismic reflection profiles across part of the Olympia structure beneath southern Puget Sound show two apparent faults about 160 m apart having 1 to 2 m of displacement of subhorizontal bedding. Directly beneath one of these faults, a dipping reflector that may mark the base of a glacial channel shows the opposite sense of throw, suggesting strike-slip motion. Deeper seismic reflection profiles show disrupted strata beneath these faults but little apparent vertical offset, consistent with strike-slip faulting. These faults and folds indicate that the Tacoma fault and Olympia structure include active structures with probable postglacial motion.

  6. Effect of surrounding fault on distributed fault of blind reverse fault in sedimentary basin - Uemachi Faults, Osaka Basin, Southwest Japan -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, N.

    2012-12-01

    Several large cities and metropolitan areas, such as Osaka and Kobe are located in the Osaka basin, which has been filled by the Pleistocene Osaka group and the later sediments. The basin is surrounded by E-W trending strike slip faults and N-S trending reverse faults. The N-S trending 42-km-long Uemachi faults traverse in the central part of the Osaka city. The various geological, geophysical surveys, such as seismic reflection, micro tremor, gravity surveys and deep boreholes, revealed the complex basement configuration along the Uemachi faults. The depth of the basement is shallow in the central part of the Osaka plain. The Uemachi faults are locates on the western side of the basement upland. In the central part of the Uemachi faults, the displacement decreases. The fault model of the Uemachi faults consists of the two parts, the north and south parts. The NE-SW trending branch faults, Suminoe and Sakuragawa flexures, are also recognized based on various surveys around the central part. Kusumoto et al. (2001) reported that surrounding faults enable to form the basement configuration without the Uemachi faults model based on a dislocation model. Inoue et al. (2011) performed various parameter studies for dislocation model and gravity changes based on simplified faults model, which were designed based on the distribution of the real faults. The model was consisted of 7 faults including the Uemachi faults. In this study, the Osaka-wan fault was considered for the dislocation model. The results show the basement configuration including NE-SW branch faults. The basement configuration differs from the subsurface structure derived from the investigation of abundance geotechnical borehole data around the central part of the Uemachi faults. The tectonic developing process including the erosion and sea level change are require to understanding the structure from the basement to the surface of the Uemachi Fault Zone. This research is partly funded by the Comprehensive

  7. Abnormal fault-recovery characteristics of the fault-tolerant multiprocessor uncovered using a new fault-injection methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, Peter A.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation was made in AIRLAB of the fault handling performance of the Fault Tolerant MultiProcessor (FTMP). Fault handling errors detected during fault injection experiments were characterized. In these fault injection experiments, the FTMP disabled a working unit instead of the faulted unit once in every 500 faults, on the average. System design weaknesses allow active faults to exercise a part of the fault management software that handles Byzantine or lying faults. Byzantine faults behave such that the faulted unit points to a working unit as the source of errors. The design's problems involve: (1) the design and interface between the simplex error detection hardware and the error processing software, (2) the functional capabilities of the FTMP system bus, and (3) the communication requirements of a multiprocessor architecture. These weak areas in the FTMP's design increase the probability that, for any hardware fault, a good line replacement unit (LRU) is mistakenly disabled by the fault management software.

  8. Fault intersections along the Hosgri Fault Zone, Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, J. T.; Johnson, S. Y.; Langenheim, V. E.

    2011-12-01

    It is well-established that stresses concentrate at fault intersections or bends when subjected to tectonic loading, making focused studies of these areas particularly important for seismic hazard analysis. In addition, detailed fault models can be used to investigate how slip on one fault might transfer to another during an earthquake. We combine potential-field, high-resolution seismic-reflection, and multibeam bathymetry data with existing geologic and seismicity data to investigate the fault geometry and connectivity of the Hosgri, Los Osos, and Shoreline faults offshore of San Luis Obispo, California. The intersection of the Hosgri and Los Osos faults in Estero Bay is complex. The offshore extension of the Los Osos fault, as imaged with multibeam and high-resolution seismic data, is characterized by a west-northwest-trending zone (1-3 km wide) of near vertical faulting. Three distinct strands (northern, central, and southern) are visible on shallow seismic reflection profiles. The steep dip combined with dramatic changes in reflection character across mapped faults within this zone suggests horizontal offset of rock units and argues for predominantly strike-slip motion, however, the present orientation of the fault zone suggests oblique slip. As the Los Osos fault zone approaches the Hosgri fault, the northern and central strands become progressively more northwest-trending in line with the Hosgri fault. The northern strand runs subparallel to the Hosgri fault along the edge of a long-wavelength magnetic anomaly, intersecting the Hosgri fault southwest of Point Estero. Geophysical modeling suggests the northern strand dips 70° to the northeast, which is in agreement with earthquake focal mechanisms that parallel this strand. The central strand bends northward and intersects the Hosgri fault directly west of Morro Rock, corresponding to an area of compressional deformation visible in shallow seismic-reflection profiles. The southern strand of the Los Osos

  9. Fault linkage and continental breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresswell, Derren; Lymer, Gaël; Reston, Tim; Stevenson, Carl; Bull, Jonathan; Sawyer, Dale; Morgan, Julia

    2017-04-01

    The magma-poor rifted margin off the west coast of Galicia (NW Spain) has provided some of the key observations in the development of models describing the final stages of rifting and continental breakup. In 2013, we collected a 68 x 20 km 3D seismic survey across the Galicia margin, NE Atlantic. Processing through to 3D Pre-stack Time Migration (12.5 m bin-size) and 3D depth conversion reveals the key structures, including an underlying detachment fault (the S detachment), and the intra-block and inter-block faults. These data reveal multiple phases of faulting, which overlap spatially and temporally, have thinned the crust to between zero and a few km thickness, producing 'basement windows' where crustal basement has been completely pulled apart and sediments lie directly on the mantle. Two approximately N-S trending fault systems are observed: 1) a margin proximal system of two linked faults that are the upward extension (breakaway faults) of the S; in the south they form one surface that splays northward to form two faults with an intervening fault block. These faults were thus demonstrably active at one time rather than sequentially. 2) An oceanward relay structure that shows clear along strike linkage. Faults within the relay trend NE-SW and heavily dissect the basement. The main block bounding faults can be traced from the S detachment through the basement into, and heavily deforming, the syn-rift sediments where they die out, suggesting that the faults propagated up from the S detachment surface. Analysis of the fault heaves and associated maps at different structural levels show complementary fault systems. The pattern of faulting suggests a variation in main tectonic transport direction moving oceanward. This might be interpreted as a temporal change during sequential faulting, however the transfer of extension between faults and the lateral variability of fault blocks suggests that many of the faults across the 3D volume were active at least in part

  10. Holocene faulting on the Mission fault, northwest Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Ostenaa, D.A.; Klinger, R.E.; Levish, D.R. )

    1993-04-01

    South of Flathead Lake, fault scarps on late Quaternary surfaces are nearly continuous for 45 km along the western flank of the Mission Range. On late Pleistocene alpine lateral moraines, scarp heights reach a maximum of 17 m. Scarp heights on post glacial Lake Missoula surfaces range from 2.6--7.2 m and maximum scarp angles range from 10[degree]--24[degree]. The stratigraphy exposed in seven trenches across the fault demonstrates that the post glacial Lake Missoula scarps resulted from at least two surface-faulting events. Larger scarp heights on late Pleistocene moraines suggests a possible third event. This yields an estimated recurrence of 4--8 kyr. Analyses of scarp profiles show that the age of the most surface faulting is middle Holocene, consistent with stratigraphic evidence found in the trenches. Rupture length and displacement imply earthquake magnitudes of 7 to 7.5. Previous studies have not identified geologic evidence of late Quaternary surface faulting in the Rocky Mountain Trench or on faults north of the Lewis and Clark line despite abundant historic seismicity in the Flathead Lake area. In addition to the Mission fault, reconnaissance studies have located late Quaternary fault scarps along portions of faults bordering Jocko and Thompson Valleys. These are the first documented late Pleistocene/Holocene faults north of the Lewis and Clark line in Montana and should greatly revise estimates of earthquake hazards in this region.

  11. Opposition effect of the Moon from LROC WAC data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikodsky, Yu. I.; Korokhin, V. V.; Shkuratov, Yu. G.; Kaydash, V. G.; Videen, Gorden

    2016-09-01

    LROC WAC images acquired in 5 bands of the visible spectral range were used to study the opposition effect for two mare and two highland regions near the lunar equator. Opposition phase curves were extracted from the images containing the opposition by separating the phase-curve effect from the albedo pattern by comparing WAC images at different phase angles (from 0° to 30°). Akimov's photometric function and the NASA Digital Terrain Model GLD100 were used in the processing. It was found that phase-curve slopes at small phase angles directly correlate with albedo, while at larger phase angles, they are anti-correlated. We suggest a parameter to characterize the coherent-backscattering component of the lunar opposition surge, which is defined as the maximum phase angle for which the opposition-surge slope increases with growing albedo. The width of the coherent-backscattering opposition effect varies from approximately 1.2° for highlands in red light to 3.9° for maria in blue light. The parameter depends on albedo, which is in agreement with the coherent-backscattering theory. The maximum amplitude of the coherent opposition effect is estimated to be near 8%. Maps of albedo and phase-curve slope at phase angles larger than those, at which the coherent-backscattering occurs, were built for the areas under study. Absolute calibration of WAC images was compared with Earth-based observations: the WAC-determined albedo is very close to the mean lunar albedo calculated using available Earth-based observations.

  12. Fluid-injection and the mechanics of frictional stability of shale-bearing faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuderi, Marco Maria; Collettini, Cristiano; Marone, Chris

    2017-04-01

    slip behavior is associated with fault zone compaction and permeability increase as opposite to the dilation hardening mechanism that is usually invoked to quench the instability. We relate this complex fault slip behaviour to the interplay between fault weakening induced by fluid pressurization and the strong rate-strengthening behaviour of shales. Our data show that fault rheology and fault stability is controlled by the coupling between fluid pressure and rate- and state- friction parameters suggesting that their comprehensive characterization is fundamental for assessing the role of fluid pressure in natural and human induced earthquakes.

  13. Randomness fault detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, B. Don (Inventor); Aucoin, B. Michael (Inventor); Benner, Carl L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for detecting a fault on a power line carrying a line parameter such as a load current. The apparatus monitors and analyzes the load current to obtain an energy value. The energy value is compared to a threshold value stored in a buffer. If the energy value is greater than the threshold value a counter is incremented. If the energy value is greater than a high value threshold or less than a low value threshold then a second counter is incremented. If the difference between two subsequent energy values is greater than a constant then a third counter is incremented. A fault signal is issued if the counter is greater than a counter limit value and either the second counter is greater than a second limit value or the third counter is greater than a third limit value.

  14. Managing Fault Management Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDougal, John M.

    2010-01-01

    As the complexity of space missions grows, development of Fault Management (FM) capabilities is an increasingly common driver for significant cost overruns late in the development cycle. FM issues and the resulting cost overruns are rarely caused by a lack of technology, but rather by a lack of planning and emphasis by project management. A recent NASA FM Workshop brought together FM practitioners from a broad spectrum of institutions, mission types, and functional roles to identify the drivers underlying FM overruns and recommend solutions. They identified a number of areas in which increased program and project management focus can be used to control FM development cost growth. These include up-front planning for FM as a distinct engineering discipline; managing different, conflicting, and changing institutional goals and risk postures; ensuring the necessary resources for a disciplined, coordinated approach to end-to-end fault management engineering; and monitoring FM coordination across all mission systems.

  15. Fault Tolerant Paradigms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-26

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0105 BRI) Fault Tolerant Paradigms BENJAMIN ONG MICHIGAN STATE UNIV EAST LANSING Final Report 02/26/2016 DISTRIBUTION A...property allows the algorithm to outperform FFTW over a wide range of sparsity and noise values, and is to the best of our knowledge novel in the...best of our knowledge novel. The new algorithm gives excellent performance in the noisy setting without significantly increasing the computational

  16. Hydrocarbon distribution patterns in Nigerian growth-fault structures controlled by structural style and stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, K.J.

    1986-05-01

    Growth faults are considered to be major migration conduits in the Niger delta. However, the hydrocarbon distribution often shows such seemingly erratic patterns that doubt remains about the actual migration processes. After considering the sequential aspects of hydrocarbon generation and possible contemporaneous structural deformation, some of the apparent inconsistencies in the along-fault migration theory can be explained. When the authors study the relationship of fault-sealing capacity with the sand and shale thickness distribution, systematic patterns of hydrocarbon distribution are clearly revealed in many fields. The occurrence of several thick, somewhat undercompacted clay layers that locally form effective seals to vertical migration is also important. Structures with a predominance of thick sands and thin shales can trap large volumes of hydrocarbons, but only if they are unfaulted. More complex growth-fault structures, cut by secondary faults, will only be prominent oil fields if the shales are sufficiently thick to cause widespread fault sealing and shale-to-shale juxtaposition along faults. In many causes the lateral distribution of hydrocarbons over a series of fault blocks can be predicted fairly accurately on the basis of these considerations. An interesting phenomenon related to the proposed migration system is the occurrence of water trapped downdip from a hydrocarbon accumulation. Differences as large as 1000 ft can exist between the oil-water contacts on opposite flanks of a reservoir.

  17. Fault tolerant control laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ly, U. L.; Ho, J. K.

    1986-01-01

    A systematic procedure for the synthesis of fault tolerant control laws to actuator failure has been presented. Two design methods were used to synthesize fault tolerant controllers: the conventional LQ design method and a direct feedback controller design method SANDY. The latter method is used primarily to streamline the full-state Q feedback design into a practical implementable output feedback controller structure. To achieve robustness to control actuator failure, the redundant surfaces are properly balanced according to their control effectiveness. A simple gain schedule based on the landing gear up/down logic involving only three gains was developed to handle three design flight conditions: Mach .25 and Mach .60 at 5000 ft and Mach .90 at 20,000 ft. The fault tolerant control law developed in this study provides good stability augmentation and performance for the relaxed static stability aircraft. The augmented aircraft responses are found to be invariant to the presence of a failure. Furthermore, single-loop stability margins of +6 dB in gain and +30 deg in phase were achieved along with -40 dB/decade rolloff at high frequency.

  18. Large earthquakes and creeping faults

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, Ruth A.

    2017-01-01

    Faults are ubiquitous throughout the Earth's crust. The majority are silent for decades to centuries, until they suddenly rupture and produce earthquakes. With a focus on shallow continental active-tectonic regions, this paper reviews a subset of faults that have a different behavior. These unusual faults slowly creep for long periods of time and produce many small earthquakes. The presence of fault creep and the related microseismicity helps illuminate faults that might not otherwise be located in fine detail, but there is also the question of how creeping faults contribute to seismic hazard. It appears that well-recorded creeping fault earthquakes of up to magnitude 6.6 that have occurred in shallow continental regions produce similar fault-surface rupture areas and similar peak ground shaking as their locked fault counterparts of the same earthquake magnitude. The behavior of much larger earthquakes on shallow creeping continental faults is less well known, because there is a dearth of comprehensive observations. Computational simulations provide an opportunity to fill the gaps in our understanding, particularly of the dynamic processes that occur during large earthquake rupture and arrest.

  19. Large earthquakes and creeping faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Ruth A.

    2017-03-01

    Faults are ubiquitous throughout the Earth's crust. The majority are silent for decades to centuries, until they suddenly rupture and produce earthquakes. With a focus on shallow continental active-tectonic regions, this paper reviews a subset of faults that have a different behavior. These unusual faults slowly creep for long periods of time and produce many small earthquakes. The presence of fault creep and the related microseismicity helps illuminate faults that might not otherwise be located in fine detail, but there is also the question of how creeping faults contribute to seismic hazard. It appears that well-recorded creeping fault earthquakes of up to magnitude 6.6 that have occurred in shallow continental regions produce similar fault-surface rupture areas and similar peak ground shaking as their locked fault counterparts of the same earthquake magnitude. The behavior of much larger earthquakes on shallow creeping continental faults is less well known, because there is a dearth of comprehensive observations. Computational simulations provide an opportunity to fill the gaps in our understanding, particularly of the dynamic processes that occur during large earthquake rupture and arrest.

  20. San Andreas-sized Strike-slip Fault on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This mosaic of the south polar region of Jupiter's moon Europa shows the northern 290 kilometers (180 miles) of a strike-slip fault named Astypalaea Linea. The entire fault is about 810 kilometers (500 miles) long, about the size of the California portion of the San Andreas fault, which runs from the California-Mexico border north to the San Francisco Bay.

    In a strike-slip fault, two crustal blocks move horizontally past one another, similar to two opposing lanes of traffic. Overall motion along the fault seems to have followed a continuous narrow crack along the feature's entire length, with a path resembling steps on a staircase crossing zones that have been pulled apart. The images show that about 50 kilometers (30 miles) of displacement have taken place along the fault. The fault's opposite sides can be reconstructed like a puzzle, matching the shape of the sides and older, individual cracks and ridges broken by its movements.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The red line marks the once active central crack of the fault. The black line outlines the fault zone, including material accumulated in the regions which have been pulled apart.

    Bends in the fault have allowed the surface to be pulled apart. This process created openings through which warmer, softer ice from below Europa's brittle ice shell surface, or frozen water from a possible subsurface ocean, could reach the surface. This upwelling of material formed large areas of new ice within the boundaries of the original fault. A similar pulling-apart phenomenon can be observed in the geological trough surrounding California's Salton Sea, in Death Valley and the Dead Sea. In those cases, the pulled-apart regions can include upwelled materials, but may be filled mostly by sedimentary and eroded material from above.

    One theory is that fault motion on Europa is induced by the pull of variable daily tides generated by Jupiter's gravitational tug on Europa. Tidal tension

  1. San Andreas-sized Strike-slip Fault on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This mosaic of the south polar region of Jupiter's moon Europa shows the northern 290 kilometers (180 miles) of a strike-slip fault named Astypalaea Linea. The entire fault is about 810 kilometers (500 miles) long, about the size of the California portion of the San Andreas fault, which runs from the California-Mexico border north to the San Francisco Bay.

    In a strike-slip fault, two crustal blocks move horizontally past one another, similar to two opposing lanes of traffic. Overall motion along the fault seems to have followed a continuous narrow crack along the feature's entire length, with a path resembling steps on a staircase crossing zones that have been pulled apart. The images show that about 50 kilometers (30 miles) of displacement have taken place along the fault. The fault's opposite sides can be reconstructed like a puzzle, matching the shape of the sides and older, individual cracks and ridges broken by its movements.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The red line marks the once active central crack of the fault. The black line outlines the fault zone, including material accumulated in the regions which have been pulled apart.

    Bends in the fault have allowed the surface to be pulled apart. This process created openings through which warmer, softer ice from below Europa's brittle ice shell surface, or frozen water from a possible subsurface ocean, could reach the surface. This upwelling of material formed large areas of new ice within the boundaries of the original fault. A similar pulling-apart phenomenon can be observed in the geological trough surrounding California's Salton Sea, in Death Valley and the Dead Sea. In those cases, the pulled-apart regions can include upwelled materials, but may be filled mostly by sedimentary and eroded material from above.

    One theory is that fault motion on Europa is induced by the pull of variable daily tides generated by Jupiter's gravitational tug on Europa. Tidal tension

  2. Geodetic evidence for aseismic reverse creep across the Teton fault, Teton Range, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvester, A.G. ); Byrd, J.O.D.; Smith R.B. )

    1991-06-01

    The valley block (hanging wall) of the central segment of the Teton fault rose 8 {plus minus} 0.7 mm during 1988 and 1989, relative to the mountain block west of the fault, a displacement opposite to that expected on a normal fault. The height change is based on first-order leveling data over a 21.2 km-long fault-crossing line of 42 permanent bench marks established and initially surveyed in 1988 and resurveyed in 1989. The rapid height change took place across a 1,200 m-wide zone coincident with the steep escarpment at the base of the range front including the surface trace of the east-dipping Teton fault, a major, active, range-front normal fault bounding the east side of the Teton Range at the northeastern edge of the Basin and Range province. The total stratigraphic offset across the fault, as much as 9 km, accumulated over the last 7 to 9 million years. Quaternary fault scarps, up to 52 m in height, cut Pinedale (about 14,000 yr) glacial and younger fluvial-alluvial deposits, indicating that the Teton fault has been the locus of several large, scarp-forming earthquakes in the past 14,000 years, and it exhibits up to 25 m of latest Quarternary displacement where crossed by the level line. Although the relative uplift of the hanging wall may be local and unique to the Teton fault, this unexpected observation of aseismic, reverse creep may have a variety of tectonic and non-tectonic causes, including hydrologic effects, aseismic fault creep or tilt, and pre-seismic dilation.

  3. The opposite induced magnetic moment in narrow zigzag graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong; Hu, Bian; Liu, Na

    2016-11-01

    Based on the analysis of band structure and edge states on zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs), we can study theoretically the origination of two minimal quantum conductance. At the two energy points - 0.20 eV and 0.15 eV corresponding to the two dips of quantum conductance, the spin-polarized quantum conductance is about 45%. Furthermore, the two types of edge-localized carriers in the opposite transport directions along the two opposite edge sides form the quantum internal loop current, which can generate one big magnetic moment. At these two energy points - 0.17 eV and 0.15 eV the two induced magnetic moments are in opposite signals.

  4. Imaging of subsurface faults using refraction migration with fault flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metwally, Ahmed; Hanafy, Sherif; Guo, Bowen; Kosmicki, Maximillian

    2017-08-01

    We propose a novel method for imaging shallow faults by migration of transmitted refraction arrivals. The assumption is that there is a significant velocity contrast across the fault boundary that is underlain by a refracting interface. This procedure, denoted as refraction migration with fault flooding, largely overcomes the difficulty in imaging shallow faults with seismic surveys. Numerical results successfully validate this method on three synthetic examples and two field-data sets. The first field-data set is next to the Gulf of Aqaba and the second example is from a seismic profile recorded in Arizona. The faults detected by refraction migration in the Gulf of Aqaba data were in agreement with those indicated in a P-velocity tomogram. However, a new fault is detected at the end of the migration image that is not clearly seen in the traveltime tomogram. This result is similar to that for the Arizona data where the refraction image showed faults consistent with those seen in the P-velocity tomogram, except that it also detected an antithetic fault at the end of the line. This fault cannot be clearly seen in the traveltime tomogram due to the limited ray coverage.

  5. 13. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM NO. 1 IN OPPOSITE VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. INTERIOR OF LIVING ROOM NO. 1 IN OPPOSITE VIEW FROM 145-6-A-12 SHOWING TILED HEATER CORNER WITH WING-WALL AND REMNANTS OF ROOM DIVIDER WALL. DOOR TO BEDROOM NO. 3 AND DOOR TO ALTERNATIVE MAIN FRONT ENTRYWAY ARE VISIBLE ABOVE WING-WALL AT LEFT PHOTO CENTER. DOORWAY TO KITCHEN NO. 2 IS VISIBLE AT OPPOSITE CORNER OF THE ROOM AT RIGHT PHOTO CENTER. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 6, Cashbaugh-Kilpatrick House, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  6. Symmetry breaking in clogging for oppositely driven particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glanz, Tobias; Wittkowski, Raphael; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-11-01

    The clogging behavior of a symmetric binary mixture of colloidal particles that are driven in opposite directions through constrictions is explored by Brownian dynamics simulations and theory. A dynamical state with a spontaneously broken symmetry occurs where one species is flowing and the other is blocked for a long time, which can be tailored by the size of the constrictions. Moreover, we find self-organized oscillations in clogging and unclogging of the two species. Apart from statistical physics, our results are of relevance for fields like biology, chemistry, and crowd management, where ions, microparticles, pedestrians, or other particles are driven in opposite directions through constrictions.

  7. Fatal attraction: the intuitive appeal of GMO opposition.

    PubMed

    Blancke, Stefaan; Van Breusegem, Frank; De Jaeger, Geert; Braeckman, Johan; Van Montagu, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Public opposition to genetically modified organisms (GMOs) remains strong. By contrast, studies demonstrate again and again that GM crops make a valuable contribution to the development of a sustainable type of agriculture. The discrepancy between public opinion and the scientific evidence requires an explanation. We argue that intuitive expectations about the world render the human mind vulnerable to particular misrepresentations of GMOs. We explain how the involvement of particular intuitions accounts for the popularity, persistence, and typical features of GM opposition and tackle possible objections to our approach. To conclude, we discuss the implications for science education, science communication, and the environmental movement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Analytic Study of Three-Dimensional Rupture Propagation in Strike-Slip Faulting with Analogue Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Pei-Chen; Chu, Sheng-Shin; Lin, Ming-Lang

    2014-05-01

    Strike-slip faults are high angle (or nearly vertical) fractures where the blocks have moved along strike way (nearly horizontal). Overburden soil profiles across main faults of Strike-slip faults have revealed the palm and tulip structure characteristics. McCalpin (2005) has trace rupture propagation on overburden soil surface. In this study, we used different offset of slip sandbox model profiles to study the evolution of three-dimensional rupture propagation by strike -slip faulting. In strike-slip faults model, type of rupture propagation and width of shear zone (W) are primary affecting by depth of overburden layer (H), distances of fault slip (Sy). There are few research to trace of three-dimensional rupture behavior and propagation. Therefore, in this simplified sandbox model, investigate rupture propagation and shear zone with profiles across main faults when formation are affecting by depth of overburden layer and distances of fault slip. The investigators at the model included width of shear zone, length of rupture (L), angle of rupture (θ) and space of rupture. The surface results was follow the literature that the evolution sequence of failure envelope was R-faults, P-faults and Y-faults which are parallel to the basement fault. Comparison surface and profiles structure which were curved faces and cross each other to define 3-D rupture and width of shear zone. We found that an increase in fault slip could result in a greater width of shear zone, and proposed a W/H versus Sy/H relationship. Deformation of shear zone showed a similar trend as in the literature that the increase of fault slip resulted in the increase of W, however, the increasing trend became opposite after a peak (when Sy/H was 1) value of W was reached (small than 1.5). The results showed that the W width is limited at a constant value in 3-D models by strike-slip faulting. In conclusion, this study helps evaluate the extensions of the shear zone influenced regions for strike

  9. Fault management for data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Mark A.; Iverson, David L.; Patterson-Hine, F. Ann

    1993-01-01

    Issues related to automating the process of fault management (fault diagnosis and response) for data management systems are considered. Substantial benefits are to be gained by successful automation of this process, particularly for large, complex systems. The use of graph-based models to develop a computer assisted fault management system is advocated. The general problem is described and the motivation behind choosing graph-based models over other approaches for developing fault diagnosis computer programs is outlined. Some existing work in the area of graph-based fault diagnosis is reviewed, and a new fault management method which was developed from existing methods is offered. Our method is applied to an automatic telescope system intended as a prototype for future lunar telescope programs. Finally, an application of our method to general data management systems is described.

  10. Mechanical stratigraphy and normal faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrill, David A.; Morris, Alan P.; McGinnis, Ronald N.; Smart, Kevin J.; Wigginton, Sarah S.; Hill, Nicola J.

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical stratigraphy encompasses the mechanical properties, thicknesses, and interface properties of rock units. Although mechanical stratigraphy often relates directly to lithostratigraphy, lithologic description alone does not adequately describe mechanical behavior. Analyses of normal faults with displacements of millimeters to 10's of kilometers in mechanically layered rocks reveal that mechanical stratigraphy influences nucleation, failure mode, fault geometry, displacement gradient, displacement distribution, fault core and damage zone characteristics, and fault zone deformation processes. The relationship between normal faulting and mechanical stratigraphy can be used either to predict structural style using knowledge of mechanical stratigraphy, or conversely to interpret mechanical stratigraphy based on characterization of the structural style. This review paper explores a range of mechanical stratigraphic controls on normal faulting illustrated by natural and modeled examples.

  11. Handling Software Faults with Redundancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carzaniga, Antonio; Gorla, Alessandra; Pezzè, Mauro

    Software engineering methods can increase the dependability of software systems, and yet some faults escape even the most rigorous and methodical development process. Therefore, to guarantee high levels of reliability in the presence of faults, software systems must be designed to reduce the impact of the failures caused by such faults, for example by deploying techniques to detect and compensate for erroneous runtime conditions. In this chapter, we focus on software techniques to handle software faults, and we survey several such techniques developed in the area of fault tolerance and more recently in the area of autonomic computing. Since practically all techniques exploit some form of redundancy, we consider the impact of redundancy on the software architecture, and we propose a taxonomy centered on the nature and use of redundancy in software systems. The primary utility of this taxonomy is to classify and compare techniques to handle software faults.

  12. Effect of Hydrothermally Produced Talc Upon Fault Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, A. C.; Rutter, E. H.; Brodie, K. H.; Mecklenburgh, J.

    2010-12-01

    The effect of low-temperature metamorphic and metasomatic reactions and frictionally weak reaction products upon fault behaviour is becoming increasingly apparent. We performed experiments to establish the kinetics of the hydrothermal reaction lizardite+quartz → talc+H2O, at elevated confining pressure and pore water pressure in the temperature range 350°C-500°C. This reaction may be significant at oceanic spreading centers where the production of weak phyllosilicates, such as talc, by hydrothermal reaction may have considerable effect upon lithospheric strength. The production of mechanically weak reaction products is currently favoured as a possible facilitator of aseismic creep, as observed on major fault zones including the San Andreas Fault. Additionally, the syntectonic growth of reaction products may influence resistance to sliding. To determine experimentally the effect of syntectonic talc growth upon fault behaviour, we conducted three types of deformation experiment. In preliminary tests, a talc gouge was introduced to sawcut samples, between serpentinite and quartzite forcing blocks representing opposite sides of the fault surface. These samples were subjected to constant displacement rate deformation at elevated confining pressure, temperature and pore pressure. Further experiments take the form of “cook and kick” or “cook and creep” tests. So-called “cook and kick” tests involved the growth of a talc veneer by reaction of the serpentine and quartzite surfaces at their interface over 72 hours under hydrostatic conditions, subsequently subjected to constant displacement rate deformation. Novel “cook and creep” experiments involved application of a constant load during talc growth. These tests examine not only the effect of the presence of talc upon fault strength but also how the progress of the reaction itself may influence apparent shear strength.

  13. Dynamic Models of Earthquake Rupture on Fault Stepovers and Dip-Slip Faults Using Various Friction Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Kenny

    the initial stress conditions would preclude such a result on a planar strike-slip fault (Andrews, 1976b). Secondly, we add to the stepover simulations by introducing the Linker-Dieterich formulation, in which friction coefficient depends on normal stress. It is well known that stepovers exhibit perturbations in normal stress along the offset region during rupture, with the sign being opposite for compressional and dilational stepovers. Adding the normal-stress-dependent state variable to the friction formulation decreases the maximum rupture jump for both types of stepover, however. Additionally, we apply the Linker-Dieterich formulation to normal and reverse dip-slip faults, both of which are known to exhibit dynamic fluctuations in normal stress due to the free surface (Brune, 1996; Nielsen, 1998; Oglesby et al., 1998). Differences in shear stress direction between normal and reverse faults produce asymmetric normal stress perturbations along the fault during rupture, causing the motion from a reverse fault to be larger than that of an otherwise equivalent normal fault. Adding a normal-stress-dependent state variable serves to mitigate this effect. We also find that decreasing the initial shear stress inhibits rupture more on normal faults than on reverse faults, given that the faults intersect the free surface.

  14. Software Evolution and the Fault Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikora, Allen P.; Munson, John C.

    1999-01-01

    In developing a software system, we would like to estimate the way in which the fault content changes during its development, as well determine the locations having the highest concentration of faults. In the phases prior to test, however, there may be very little direct information regarding the number and location of faults. This lack of direct information requires developing a fault surrogate from which the number of faults and their location can be estimated. We develop a fault surrogate based on changes in the fault index, a synthetic measure which has been successfully used as a fault surrogate in previous work. We show that changes in the fault index can be used to estimate the rates at which faults are inserted into a system between successive revisions. We can then continuously monitor the total number of faults inserted into a system, the residual fault content, and identify those portions of a system requiring the application of additional fault detection and removal resources.

  15. Fault-bound valley associated with the Rembrandt basin on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watters, Thomas R.; Montési, Laurent G. J.; Oberst, Jürgen; Preusker, Frank

    2016-11-01

    The Rembrandt basin is crosscut by the largest fault scarp on Mercury, Enterprise Rupes, and a second scarp complex, Belgica Rupes, extends to the basin's rim. Topographic data derived from MESSENGER orbital stereo images show that these tectonic landforms bound a broad, relatively flat-floored valley with a mean width of 400 km. Crosscutting relations suggest that the accumulation of structural relief likely postdates the formation and volcanic infilling of the Rembrandt basin. The valley floor, bound by fault scarps of opposite vergence, is significantly offset below the elevation of the back-scarp terrains. Along with an offset section of Rembrandt's rim, the elevation differences are evidence that the valley floor was lowered as a result of the formation of bounding fault scarps. The localization of the widely spaced thrust faults of Enterprise and Belgica Rupis and the offset of the valley floor may be the result of long-wavelength buckling of Mercury's lithosphere.

  16. Final Technical Report: PV Fault Detection Tool.

    SciTech Connect

    King, Bruce Hardison; Jones, Christian Birk

    2015-12-01

    The PV Fault Detection Tool project plans to demonstrate that the FDT can (a) detect catastrophic and degradation faults and (b) identify the type of fault. This will be accomplished by collecting fault signatures using different instruments and integrating this information to establish a logical controller for detecting, diagnosing and classifying each fault.

  17. 20 CFR 404.507 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fault. 404.507 Section 404.507 Employees... Officer § 404.507 Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see § 404.506 and 42 CFR 405.355) applies only to the individual. Although the Administration may have been at fault in making the overpayment,...

  18. 20 CFR 404.507 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fault. 404.507 Section 404.507 Employees... Officer § 404.507 Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see § 404.506 and 42 CFR 405.355) applies only to the individual. Although the Administration may have been at fault in making the overpayment,...

  19. 20 CFR 404.507 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fault. 404.507 Section 404.507 Employees... Officer § 404.507 Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see § 404.506 and 42 CFR 405.355) applies only to the individual. Although the Administration may have been at fault in making the overpayment,...

  20. Experimental Fault Reactivation on Favourably and Unfavourably Oriented Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, T. M.; Sibson, R. H.; Renner, J.; Toy, V. G.; di Toro, G.; Smith, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we introduce work which aims assess the loading of faults to failure under different stress regimes in a triaxial deformation apparatus. We explore experimentally the reshear of an existing fault in various orientations for particular values of (σ1 - σ3) and σ3' for contrasting loading systems - load-strengthening (equivalent to a thrust fault) with σ1' increasing at constant σ3', versus load-weakening (equivalent to a normal fault) with reducing σ3' under constant σ1'. Experiments are conducted on sawcut granite samples with fault angles at a variety of orientations relative to σ1 , ranging from an optimal orientation for reactivation to lockup angles where new faults are formed in preference to reactivating the existing sawcut orientation. Prefailure and postfailure behaviour is compared in terms of damage zone development via monitoring variations in ultrasonic velocity and acoustic emission behaviour. For example, damage surrounding unfavourably oriented faults is significantly higher than that seen around favourably orientated faults due to greater maximum stresses attained prior to unstable slip, which is reflected by the increased acoustic emission activity leading up to failure. In addition, we also experimentally explore the reshear of natural pseudotachylytes (PSTs) from two different fault zones; the Gole Larghe Fault, Adamello, Italy in which the PSTs are in relatively isotropic Tonalite (at lab sample scale) and the Alpine Fault, New Zealand in which the PSTs are in highly anisotropic foliated shist. We test whether PSTs will reshear in both rock types under the right conditions, or whether new fractures in the wall rock will form in preference to reactivating the PST (PST shear strength is higher than that of the host rock). Are PSTs representative of one slip event?

  1. SEISMOLOGY: Watching the Hayward Fault.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R W

    2000-08-18

    The Hayward fault, located on the east side of the San Francisco Bay, represents a natural laboratory for seismologists, because it does not sleep silently between major earthquakes. In his Perspective, Simpson discusses the study by Bürgmann et al., who have used powerful new techniques to study the fault. The results indicate that major earthquakes cannot originate in the northern part of the fault. However, surface-rupturing earthquakes have occurred in the area, suggesting that they originated to the north or south of the segment studied by Bürgmann et al. Fundamental questions remain regarding the mechanism by which plate tectonic stresses are transferred to the Hayward fault.

  2. Physical fault tolerance of nanoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Szkopek, Thomas; Roychowdhury, Vwani P; Antoniadis, Dimitri A; Damoulakis, John N

    2011-04-29

    The error rate in complementary transistor circuits is suppressed exponentially in electron number, arising from an intrinsic physical implementation of fault-tolerant error correction. Contrariwise, explicit assembly of gates into the most efficient known fault-tolerant architecture is characterized by a subexponential suppression of error rate with electron number, and incurs significant overhead in wiring and complexity. We conclude that it is more efficient to prevent logical errors with physical fault tolerance than to correct logical errors with fault-tolerant architecture.

  3. Stacking Faults in Cotton Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divakara, S.; Niranjana, A. R.; Siddaraju, G. N.; Somashekar, R.

    2011-07-01

    The stacking faults in different variety of cotton fibers have been quantified using wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) data. Exponential functions for the column length distribution have been used for the determination of microstructural parameters. The crystal imperfection parameters like crystal size , lattice strain (g in %), stacking faults (αd) and twin faults (β) have been determined by profile analysis using Fourier method of Warren. We examined different variety of raw cotton fibers using WAXS techniques. In all these cases we note that, the stacking faults are quite significant in determining the property of cotton fibers.

  4. Fault trees and sequence dependencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, Joanne Bechta; Boyd, Mark A.; Bavuso, Salvatore J.

    1990-01-01

    One of the frequently cited shortcomings of fault-tree models, their inability to model so-called sequence dependencies, is discussed. Several sources of such sequence dependencies are discussed, and new fault-tree gates to capture this behavior are defined. These complex behaviors can be included in present fault-tree models because they utilize a Markov solution. The utility of the new gates is demonstrated by presenting several models of the fault-tolerant parallel processor, which include both hot and cold spares.

  5. Fault-Tree Compiler Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Martensen, Anna L.

    1992-01-01

    FTC, Fault-Tree Compiler program, is reliability-analysis software tool used to calculate probability of top event of fault tree. Five different types of gates allowed in fault tree: AND, OR, EXCLUSIVE OR, INVERT, and M OF N. High-level input language of FTC easy to understand and use. Program supports hierarchical fault-tree-definition feature simplifying process of description of tree and reduces execution time. Solution technique implemented in FORTRAN, and user interface in Pascal. Written to run on DEC VAX computer operating under VMS operating system.

  6. Fault interaction near Hollister, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavko, Gerald M.

    1982-09-01

    A numerical model is used to study fault stress and slip near Hollister, California. The geometrically complex system of interacting faults, including the San Andreas, Calaveras, Sargent, and Busch faults, is approximated with a two-dimensional distribution of short planar fault segments in an elastic medium. The steady stress and slip rate are simulated by specifying frictional strength and stepping the remote stress ahead in time. The resulting computed fault stress is roughly proportional to the observed spatial density of small earthquakes, suggesting that the distinction between segments characterized by earthquakes and those with aseismic creep results, in part, from geometry. A nosteady simulation is made by introducing, in addition, stress drops for individual moderate earthquakes. A close fit of observed creep with calculated slip on the Calaveras and San Andreas faults suggests that many changes in creep rate (averaged over several months) are caused by local moderate earthquakes. In particular, a 3-year creep lag preceding the August 6, 1979, Coyote Lake earthquake on the Calaveras fault seems to have been a direct result of the November 28, 1974, Thanksgiving Day earthquake on the Busch fault. Computed lags in slip rate preceding some other moderate earthquakes in the area are also due to earlier earthquakes. Although the response of the upper 1 km of the fault zone may cause some individual creep events and introduce delays in others, the long-term rate appears to reflect deep slip.

  7. Fault interaction near Hollister, California

    SciTech Connect

    Mavko, G.M.

    1982-09-10

    A numerical model is used to study fault stress slip near Hollister, California. The geometrically complex system of interacting faults, including the San Andreas, Calaveras, Sargent, and Busch faults, is approximated with a two-dimensional distribution of short planar fault segments in an elastic medium. The steady stress and slip rate are simulated by specifying frictional strength and stepping the remote stress ahead in time. The resulting computed fault stress is roughly proportional to the observed spatial density of small earthquakes, suggesting that the distinction between segments characterized by earthquakes and those with aseismic creep results, in part, from geometry. A nonsteady simulation is made by introducing, in addition, stress drops for individual moderate earthquakes. A close fit of observed creep with calculated slip on the Calaveras and San Andreas faults suggests that many changes in creep rate (averaged over several months) are caused by local moderate earthquakes. In particular, a 3-year creep lag preceding the August 6, 1979, Coyote Lake earthquake on the Calaveras fault seems to have been a direct result of the November 28, 1974, Thanksgiving Day earthquake on the Busch fault. Computed lags in slip rate preceding some other moderate earthquakes in the area are also due to earlier earthquakes. Although the response of the upper 1 km of the fault zone may cause some individual creep events and introduce delays in others, the long-term rate appears to reflect deep slip.

  8. Perspective View, Garlock Fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    California's Garlock Fault, marking the northwestern boundary of the Mojave Desert, lies at the foot of the mountains, running from the lower right to the top center of this image, which was created with data from NASA's shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), flown in February 2000. The data will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. These mountains are the southern end of the Sierra Nevada and the prominent canyon emerging at the lower right is Lone Tree canyon. In the distance, the San Gabriel Mountains cut across from the leftside of the image. At their base lies the San Andreas Fault which meets the Garlock Fault near the left edge at Tejon Pass. The dark linear feature running from lower right to upper left is State Highway 14 leading from the town of Mojave in the distance to Inyokern and the Owens Valley in the north. The lighter parallel lines are dirt roads related to power lines and the Los Angeles Aqueduct which run along the base of the mountains.

    This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast

  9. Fault Tree Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    uat r CmIi S ft II >5±4"’’ NUREG-0492 Fault Tree Handbook Date Published: January 1981 W. E. Vesely, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission F. F...Goldberg, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission N. H. Roberts, University of Washington D. F. Haasl, Institute of System Sciences, Inc. Systems and...Reliability Research Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Washington, D.C. 20555 RG &,, ý0 For sale by the U.S

  10. Perspective View, Garlock Fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    California's Garlock Fault, marking the northwestern boundary of the Mojave Desert, lies at the foot of the mountains, running from the lower right to the top center of this image, which was created with data from NASA's shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), flown in February 2000. The data will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. These mountains are the southern end of the Sierra Nevada and the prominent canyon emerging at the lower right is Lone Tree canyon. In the distance, the San Gabriel Mountains cut across from the leftside of the image. At their base lies the San Andreas Fault which meets the Garlock Fault near the left edge at Tejon Pass. The dark linear feature running from lower right to upper left is State Highway 14 leading from the town of Mojave in the distance to Inyokern and the Owens Valley in the north. The lighter parallel lines are dirt roads related to power lines and the Los Angeles Aqueduct which run along the base of the mountains.

    This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast

  11. Nonlinear Fault Diagnosis,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    Systems, New York, Marcel Dekker, (to appear). 3. Desoer , C.A. and S.E. Kuh, Basic Circuit Theory, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1969, pp. 423-425. 130 NONLINEAR...DIAGNOSIS A 7*ssior For 1 MU3 CRA&T IY’IC TAB Ju-st i.cat IC- P.U A: CONTENTS Fault Diagnosis in Electronic Circuits , R. Saeks and R.-w. Liu...Vincentelli and R. Saeks .............. 61 Multitest Diagnosibility of Nonlinear Circuits and Systems, A. Sangiovanni-Vincentelli and R. Saeks

  12. Fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Darmann, Francis Anthony

    2013-10-08

    A fault current limiter (FCL) includes a series of high permeability posts for collectively define a core for the FCL. A DC coil, for the purposes of saturating a portion of the high permeability posts, surrounds the complete structure outside of an enclosure in the form of a vessel. The vessel contains a dielectric insulation medium. AC coils, for transporting AC current, are wound on insulating formers and electrically interconnected to each other in a manner such that the senses of the magnetic field produced by each AC coil in the corresponding high permeability core are opposing. There are insulation barriers between phases to improve dielectric withstand properties of the dielectric medium.

  13. Cross-Cutting Faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    16 May 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows cross-cutting fault scarps among graben features in northern Tempe Terra. Graben form in regions where the crust of the planet has been extended; such features are common in the regions surrounding the vast 'Tharsis Bulge' on Mars.

    Location near: 43.7oN, 90.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Summer

  14. Cross-Cutting Faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    16 May 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows cross-cutting fault scarps among graben features in northern Tempe Terra. Graben form in regions where the crust of the planet has been extended; such features are common in the regions surrounding the vast 'Tharsis Bulge' on Mars.

    Location near: 43.7oN, 90.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Summer

  15. Integrated design of fault reconstruction and fault-tolerant control against actuator faults using learning observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qingxian; Chen, Wen; Zhang, Yingchun; Li, Huayi

    2016-12-01

    This paper addresses the problem of integrated fault reconstruction and fault-tolerant control in linear systems subject to actuator faults via learning observers (LOs). A reconfigurable fault-tolerant controller is designed based on the constructed LO to compensate for the influence of actuator faults by stabilising the closed-loop system. An integrated design of the proposed LO and the fault-tolerant controller is explored such that their performance can be simultaneously considered and their coupling problem can be effectively solved. In addition, such an integrated design is formulated in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) that can be conveniently solved in a unified framework using LMI optimisation technique. At last, simulation studies on a micro-satellite attitude control system are provided to verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  16. Burnout and Work Engagement: Independent Factors or Opposite Poles?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Roma, Vicente; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.; Bakker, Arnold B.; Lloret, Susana

    2006-01-01

    Burnout researchers have proposed that the conceptual opposites of emotional exhaustion and cynicism (the core dimensions of burnout) are vigor and dedication (the core dimensions of engagement), respectively (Maslach & Leiter, 1997; Schaufeli, Salanova, Gonzalez-Roma, & Bakker, 2002). We tested this proposition by ascertaining whether two sets of…

  17. Burnout and Work Engagement: Independent Factors or Opposite Poles?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Roma, Vicente; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.; Bakker, Arnold B.; Lloret, Susana

    2006-01-01

    Burnout researchers have proposed that the conceptual opposites of emotional exhaustion and cynicism (the core dimensions of burnout) are vigor and dedication (the core dimensions of engagement), respectively (Maslach & Leiter, 1997; Schaufeli, Salanova, Gonzalez-Roma, & Bakker, 2002). We tested this proposition by ascertaining whether two sets of…

  18. Opposition logic and neural network models in artificial grammar learning.

    PubMed

    Vokey, John R; Higham, Philip A

    2004-09-01

    Following neural network simulations of the two experiments of, argued that the opposition logic advocated by was incapable of distinguishing between single and multiple influences on performance of artificial grammar learning and more generally. We show that their simulations do not support their conclusions. We also provide different neural network simulations that do simulate the essential results of Higham et al. (2000).

  19. Whites' Opposition to "Busing": Self-Interest of Symbolic Politics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears, David O.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Examines whether opposition to busing springs from self-interest (such as having children susceptible to busing) or merely racial attitudes on the part of those not involved. Concludes that self-interest is overestimated as a determinant of public opinion. Available from The American Political Science Association, 1527 New Hampshire Ave., N.W.,…

  20. The great perihelic opposition of Mars, 2003: Part 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKim, R.

    2010-12-01

    In concluding the BAA report upon the 2003 perihelic opposition we examine white cloud statistics and both polar regions. The SPC recession curve was very similar to 2001 and 1988 but showed significant differences from earlier decades. Novus Mons was detached at the same seasonal date as in 1988.

  1. Opposition to the Mexican War of 1846. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Patricia

    1994-01-01

    Contends that studying the opposition to the Mexican American War helps students understand Manifest Destiny and assess foreign policy issues on moral, political, and historical terms. Presents a three-day lesson plan employing a series of primary sources to analyze issues of the time. Includes a political cartoon and eight documents. (CFR)

  2. Full Angular Profile of the Coherent Polarization Opposition Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Luck, Jean-Marc; Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.

    1999-01-01

    We use the rigorous vector theory of weak photon localization for a semi-infinite medium composed of nonabsorbing Rayleigh scatterers to compute the full angular profile of the polarization opposition effect. The latter is caused by coherent backscattering of unpolarized incident light and accompanies the renowned backscattering intensity peak.

  3. Turkish Children's Conversational Oppositions: Usage of Two Discourse Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Köymen, Bahar; Küntay, Aylin C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how Turkish-speaking preschoolers displayed oppositions in their peer interactions through two adversative discourse markers, "ya" and "ki". These two markers differ in their syntactic mobility. The data came from seminaturalistic peer interactions of 78 preschoolers. The discursive properties of children's…

  4. 14. LOW OBLIQUE VIEW OF WEST ELEVATION, FROM OPPOSITE BANK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. LOW OBLIQUE VIEW OF WEST ELEVATION, FROM OPPOSITE BANK OF BUTTE CREEK Historic photograph no. 136, no date, held at Media Arts and Services Department, Pacific Gas & Electric Co., San Francisco, CA. - Centerville Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse, Butte Creek, Centerville, Butte County, CA

  5. Attachment Behavior in Thirteen-Month-Old, Opposite Sex Twins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Jeanne; Lewis, Michael

    Seventeen sets of opposite sex twins, 13 to 14 months old, were observed in a playroom situation with their mothers. Attachment behaviors, toy preference, style of play, and activity level were recorded. Analysis of four attachment behaviors indicated that girls looked at, vocalized to, and maintained proximity with their mothers significantly…

  6. Oppositional Defiant Disorder in Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Lisa; Baker, Bruce L.; Blacher, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The study examines the epidemiology of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) for children with intellectual disabilities (ID; n = 49), children with borderline intellectual functioning (BIF; n = 20), and typically developing children (TD; n = 115). The Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children was administered to mothers at child ages 5, 6, 7, 8,…

  7. Doing the opposite to what another person is doing.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Ivana; Savardi, Ugo; Burro, Roberto; Martelli, Maria Francesca

    2014-09-01

    The three studies presented here aim to contribute to a better understanding of the role of the coordinate system of a person's body and of the environment in spatial organization underlying the recognition and production of gestures. The paper introduces a new approach by investigating what people consider to be opposite gestures in addition to identical gestures. It also suggests a new point of view setting the issue in the framework of egocentric versus allocentric spatial encoding as compared to the anatomical versus non-anatomical matching which is usually adopted in the literature. The results showed that the role of the allocentric system as a key player was much more evident when participants were asked to "do the opposite" as compared to when they imitated which indicates that the two tasks really are different from each other. Response times were also quicker when people "did the opposite" indicating that this is an immediate response and not the result of "reversing an imitation". These findings suggest that the issue of how the oppositional structure of space impacts on human perception and the performance of gestures has probably been underestimated in an area of research which traditionally focuses exclusively on imitation.

  8. Challenging Social Hierarchy: Playing with Oppositional Identities in Family Talk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bani-Shoraka, Helena

    2008-01-01

    This study examines how bilingual family members use language choice and language alternation as a local scheme of interpretation to distinguish different and often contesting social identities in interaction. It is argued that the playful creation of oppositional identities in interaction relieves the speakers from responsibility and creates a…

  9. Racial Threat and White Opposition to Bilingual Education in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hempel, Lynn M.; Dowling, Julie A.; Boardman, Jason D.; Ellison, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines local contextual conditions that influence opposition to bilingual education among non-Hispanic Whites, net of individual-level characteristics. Data from the Texas Poll (N = 615) are used in conjunction with U.S. Census data to test five competing hypotheses using binomial and multinomial logistic regression models. Our…

  10. Oppositional Defiant Disorder in Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Lisa; Baker, Bruce L.; Blacher, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The study examines the epidemiology of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) for children with intellectual disabilities (ID; n = 49), children with borderline intellectual functioning (BIF; n = 20), and typically developing children (TD; n = 115). The Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children was administered to mothers at child ages 5, 6, 7, 8,…

  11. 37 CFR 42.23 - Oppositions and replies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Oppositions and replies. 42.23 Section 42.23 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRIAL PRACTICE BEFORE THE PATENT TRIAL AND APPEAL BOARD Trial Practice and Procedure...

  12. 37 CFR 42.23 - Oppositions and replies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oppositions and replies. 42.23 Section 42.23 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRIAL PRACTICE BEFORE THE PATENT TRIAL AND APPEAL BOARD Trial Practice and Procedure...

  13. Whites' Opposition to "Busing": Self-Interest of Symbolic Politics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears, David O.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Examines whether opposition to busing springs from self-interest (such as having children susceptible to busing) or merely racial attitudes on the part of those not involved. Concludes that self-interest is overestimated as a determinant of public opinion. Available from The American Political Science Association, 1527 New Hampshire Ave., N.W.,…

  14. 11. INTERIOR OF WEST SIDE ENCLOSED SCREEN PORCH IN OPPOSITE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. INTERIOR OF WEST SIDE ENCLOSED SCREEN PORCH IN OPPOSITE VIEW FROM CA-167-A-8. DOUBLE FRENCH DOORS LEAD TO BEDROOM #2. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Big Creek Hydroelectric System, Powerhouse 8, Operator Cottage, Big Creek, Big Creek, Fresno County, CA

  15. Polarization opposition effect and second-order ray tracing.

    PubMed

    Videen, Gorden

    2002-08-20

    I develop a second-order ray-tracing model of the light scattered by a cloud of randomly oriented facets having sizes much larger than the incident wavelength. My results suggest that both symmetric and asymmetric branches of the polarization opposition effect can be produced by the same mechanism responsible for the photometric opposition effect, i.e., constructive interference of light rays traversing reciprocal paths that is associated with coherent backscattering enhancement. The model provides a greatly simplified representation of the physical phenomena to isolate the two mechanisms that may be responsible for the effect. The shapes and positions of the two branches of the polarization opposition effect calculated with the model are consistent with observation, so the model may provide a rapid technique to characterize the optical and physical properties of a scattering system. I note, however, that the model is a gross simplification containing only two physical mechanisms, Fresnel reflections and coherent interference, and it is possible that it represents a nonphysical description of particles smaller than the wavelength or that other mechanisms contributing to the polarization opposition effect are not included.

  16. Opposition to the Mexican War of 1846. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Patricia

    1994-01-01

    Contends that studying the opposition to the Mexican American War helps students understand Manifest Destiny and assess foreign policy issues on moral, political, and historical terms. Presents a three-day lesson plan employing a series of primary sources to analyze issues of the time. Includes a political cartoon and eight documents. (CFR)

  17. Racial Threat and White Opposition to Bilingual Education in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hempel, Lynn M.; Dowling, Julie A.; Boardman, Jason D.; Ellison, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines local contextual conditions that influence opposition to bilingual education among non-Hispanic Whites, net of individual-level characteristics. Data from the Texas Poll (N = 615) are used in conjunction with U.S. Census data to test five competing hypotheses using binomial and multinomial logistic regression models. Our…

  18. Improving Treatment Outcome for Oppositional Defiant Disorder in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, Elizabeth P.

    2007-01-01

    Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) is relatively common among 3-8 year-old children and its presence puts children at risk for more serious and stable behavior problems. Behavioral Parent Training (BPT) as the most empirical support as a treatment for children with ODD as well as for children with clinically significant conduct problems. The…

  19. 30. Miscellaneous gauges and recorders on the wall opposite the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Miscellaneous gauges and recorders on the wall opposite the Panellit gauges in a typical control room, 105-F Reactor in this case in February 1945. The temperature recorder for the 2,004 process tubes is at the far right side. D-8308 - B Reactor, Richland, Benton County, WA

  20. 26. SECOND FLOOR EAST SIDE APARTMENT KITCHEN INTERIOR IN OPPOSITE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. SECOND FLOOR EAST SIDE APARTMENT KITCHEN INTERIOR IN OPPOSITE VIEW FROM CA-180-A-25. OPEN DOORWAY AT PHOTO RIGHT CENTER LEADS TO PANTRY. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  1. 21. FIRST FLOOR APARTMENT NORTH BEDROOM INTERIOR IN OPPOSITE VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. FIRST FLOOR APARTMENT NORTH BEDROOM INTERIOR IN OPPOSITE VIEW FROM CA-180-A-20. OPEN LOUVERED DOORS ON CLOSET AT LEFT PHOTO CENTER. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Lee Vining Creek Hydroelectric System, Triplex Cottage, Lee Vining Creek, Lee Vining, Mono County, CA

  2. 37 CFR 2.101 - Filing an opposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for one person to oppose the registration of a mark in at least one class, the opposition will be... registration in at least one class, but fees are insufficient to oppose registration in all the classes in the... there is no attorney, on the applicant or on the applicant's domestic representative, if one has...

  3. Perspectives on Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Conduct Disorder, and Psychopathic Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loeber, Rolf; Burke, Jeffrey; Pardini, Dustin A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a few perspectives on oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), conduct disorder (CD), and early forms of psychopathy. The developmental changes and stability of each, and the interrelationship between the three conditions are reviewed, and correlates and predictors are highlighted. The paper also examines effective interventions…

  4. Effects of partner beauty on opposite-sex attractiveness judgments.

    PubMed

    Little, Anthony C; Caldwell, Christine A; Jones, Benedict C; DeBruine, Lisa M

    2011-12-01

    Many studies show mate choice copying effects on mate preferences in non-human species in which individuals follow or copy the mate choices of same-sex conspecifics. Recent studies suggest that social learning also influences mate preferences in humans. Studies on heterosexual humans have focused on rating the attractiveness of potential mates (targets) presented alongside individuals of the opposite sex to the target (models). Here, we examined several different types of pairing to examine how specific social learning is to mate preferences. In Study 1, we replicated a previous effect whereby target faces of the opposite sex to the subject were rated as more attractive when paired with attractive than unattractive partner models of the same sex as the subject. Using the same paired stimuli, Study 2 demonstrated no effect of a paired model if subjects were asked to rate targets who were the same sex as themselves. In Study 3, we used pairs of the same sex, stating the pair were friends, and subjects rated targets of the opposite sex to themselves. Attractive models decreased targets' attractiveness, opposite to the effect in Study 1. Finally, Study 4 examined if attractive versus unattractive non-face stimuli might influence attraction. Unlike in Study 1, pairing with attractive stimuli either had no effect or decreased the attractiveness of paired target face images. These data suggest that social transmission of preferences via pairing with attractive/unattractive images is relatively specific to learning about mate preferences but does not influence attractiveness judgments more generally.

  5. 105. Photocopy of plate opposite page 105 in Robert Dale ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    105. Photocopy of plate opposite page 105 in Robert Dale Owen, Hints on Public Architecture (New York, G. P. Putnam, 1849). GROUND-PLANS, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  6. Perspectives on Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Conduct Disorder, and Psychopathic Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loeber, Rolf; Burke, Jeffrey; Pardini, Dustin A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a few perspectives on oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), conduct disorder (CD), and early forms of psychopathy. The developmental changes and stability of each, and the interrelationship between the three conditions are reviewed, and correlates and predictors are highlighted. The paper also examines effective interventions…

  7. AGSM Functional Fault Models for Fault Isolation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harp, Janicce Leshay

    2014-01-01

    This project implements functional fault models to automate the isolation of failures during ground systems operations. FFMs will also be used to recommend sensor placement to improve fault isolation capabilities. The project enables the delivery of system health advisories to ground system operators.

  8. Complexation of Oppositely Charged Polyelctrolytes and Diblock Polyampholytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The conformational properties of both symmetric and asymmetric flexible diblock polyampholytes and oppositely charged polyelectrolytes are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations and scaling theory. The electrostatically driven coil-globule transition of a symmetric diblock polyampholyte consist of three regimes identified with increasing electrostatic interaction strength: the folding regime, the weak association regime dominated by the fluctuation-induced attractions between oppositely charged sections of the chains, and the ion binding regime that starts with direct binding of oppositely charged monomers (dipole formation), followed by a cascade of multipole formation leading to multiplets analogous to those found in ionomers. In asymmetric block polyampholytes we find the globule to tadpole transition with the increase of charge asymmetry. In the weak association regime this transition is controlled by the balance of net charge and surface tension of the complex and characterized by the ratio of the difference in the number of electrostatic ``blobs'' between oppositely charged blocks and one third power of the total number of electrostatic blobs. We find the maximum overcharging of the complexes formed by either asymmetric diblock polyampholytes or by pairs of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes is by 50% independent of system parameters. We use scaling theory to estimate the average size of the complex and the electrostatic correlation length as functions of chains length, strength of electrostatic interactions, charge fractions, and solvent quality. The theoretically predicted scaling laws of these conformational properties are in good agreement with our simulation results. This work was done in collaboration with Dr. Zuowei Wang and supported by National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health.

  9. Central Asia Active Fault Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohadjer, Solmaz; Ehlers, Todd A.; Kakar, Najibullah

    2014-05-01

    The ongoing collision of the Indian subcontinent with Asia controls active tectonics and seismicity in Central Asia. This motion is accommodated by faults that have historically caused devastating earthquakes and continue to pose serious threats to the population at risk. Despite international and regional efforts to assess seismic hazards in Central Asia, little attention has been given to development of a comprehensive database for active faults in the region. To address this issue and to better understand the distribution and level of seismic hazard in Central Asia, we are developing a publically available database for active faults of Central Asia (including but not limited to Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, northern Pakistan and western China) using ArcGIS. The database is designed to allow users to store, map and query important fault parameters such as fault location, displacement history, rate of movement, and other data relevant to seismic hazard studies including fault trench locations, geochronology constraints, and seismic studies. Data sources integrated into the database include previously published maps and scientific investigations as well as strain rate measurements and historic and recent seismicity. In addition, high resolution Quickbird, Spot, and Aster imagery are used for selected features to locate and measure offset of landforms associated with Quaternary faulting. These features are individually digitized and linked to attribute tables that provide a description for each feature. Preliminary observations include inconsistent and sometimes inaccurate information for faults documented in different studies. For example, the Darvaz-Karakul fault which roughly defines the western margin of the Pamir, has been mapped with differences in location of up to 12 kilometers. The sense of motion for this fault ranges from unknown to thrust and strike-slip in three different studies despite documented left-lateral displacements of Holocene and late

  10. Structure and flow properties of syn-rift border faults: The interplay between fault damage and fault-related chemical alteration (Dombjerg Fault, Wollaston Forland, NE Greenland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Thomas B.; Rotevatn, Atle; Peacock, David C. P.; Henstra, Gijs A.; Midtkandal, Ivar; Grundvåg, Sten-Andreas

    2016-11-01

    Structurally controlled, syn-rift, clastic depocentres are of economic interest as hydrocarbon reservoirs; understanding the structure of their bounding faults is of great relevance, e.g. in the assessment of fault-controlled hydrocarbon retention potential. Here we investigate the structure of the Dombjerg Fault Zone (Wollaston Forland, NE Greenland), a syn-rift border fault that juxtaposes syn-rift deep-water hanging-wall clastics against a footwall of crystalline basement. A series of discrete fault strands characterize the central fault zone, where discrete slip surfaces, fault rock assemblages and extreme fracturing are common. A chemical alteration zone (CAZ) of fault-related calcite cementation envelops the fault and places strong controls on the style of deformation, particularly in the hanging-wall. The hanging-wall damage zone includes faults, joints, veins and, outside the CAZ, disaggregation deformation bands. Footwall deformation includes faults, joints and veins. Our observations suggest that the CAZ formed during early-stage fault slip and imparted a mechanical control on later fault-related deformation. This study thus gives new insights to the structure of an exposed basin-bounding fault and highlights a spatiotemporal interplay between fault damage and chemical alteration, the latter of which is often underreported in fault studies. To better elucidate the structure, evolution and flow properties of faults (outcrop or subsurface), both fault damage and fault-related chemical alteration must be considered.

  11. Along-strike changes in fault array and rift basin geometry of the Carboniferous Billefjorden Trough, Svalbard, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bælum, Karoline; Braathen, Alvar

    2012-06-01

    The Billefjorden fault zone (BFZ) of Svalbard, Norway, is a long-lived major tectonic lineament with significant influence on the structural style of the northwestern Barents Shelf. The fault zone can be traced for around 2-300 km in an N-S direction, where it is made up of three major fault strands, all dipping 50-70° to the east. Field and seismic data delineate gradual shifts in displacement between master faults (northern Odelfjellet, Balliolbreen, and southern Drønbreen faults) and suggest that two c. 20 km long, 2-3 km wide relay zones exist along strike. The western fault strand consistently has a pre-Carboniferous reverse character; placing basement on top of Devonian sedimentary units with a throw estimated at 10 km. Subsequent Carboniferous extensional reactivation of segments of the BFZ resulted in formation of the Billefjorden Trough, with a rift basin showing a fairly consistent polarity for its length. This suggests a profound control by the older, Devonian reverse faults on the extensional structural style. The Billefjorden Trough extends for a minimum of 110 km along strike, and is 20-30 km wide at the most. A gentle north plunge of the basin axis in the south is mirrored by an opposite plunge in the north, offering a depth/thickness of around 2000 m in the central realm, diminishing to 500 m in the south. Geometries of the trough suggest sedimentary response to fault-growth, with weak lithologies such as evaporites promoting fault-monocline formation and associated lenticular basin geometries. On the contrary, wedged shaped fill geometries toward major faults is consistent with significant fault movement and growth sequences. Subsequent mild Tertiary reactivation of fault segments of the BFZ is suggested by local reverse faults and deep-seated anticline-syncline pairs.

  12. The 2013, Mw 7.7 Balochistan earthquake, energetic strike-slip reactivation of a thrust fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Ayoub, Francois; Wei, Shengji; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Meng, Lingsen; Leprince, Sebastien; Jolivet, Romain; Duputel, Zacharie; Helmberger, Don

    2014-04-01

    We analyse the Mw 7.7 Balochistan earthquake of 09/24/2013 based on ground surface deformation measured from sub-pixel correlation of Landsat-8 images, combined with back-projection and finite source modeling of teleseismic waveforms. The earthquake nucleated south of the Chaman strike-slip fault and propagated southwestward along the Hoshab fault at the front of the Kech Band. The rupture was mostly unilateral, propagated at 3 km/s on average and produced a 200 km surface fault trace with purely strike-slip displacement peaking to 10 m and averaging around 6 m. The finite source model shows that slip was maximum near the surface. Although the Hoshab fault is dipping by 45° to the North, in accordance with its origin as a thrust fault within the Makran accretionary prism, slip was nearly purely strike-slip during that earthquake. Large seismic slip on such a non-optimally oriented fault was enhanced possibly due to the influence of the free surface on dynamic stresses or to particular properties of the fault zone allowing for strong dynamic weakening. Strike-slip faulting on thrust fault within the eastern Makran is interpreted as due to eastward extrusion of the accretionary prism as it bulges out over the Indian plate. Portions of the Makran megathrust, some thrust faults in the Kirthar range and strike-slip faults within the Chaman fault system have been brought closer to failure by this earthquake. Aftershocks cluster within the Chaman fault system north of the epicenter, opposite to the direction of rupture propagation. By contrast, few aftershocks were detected in the area of maximum moment release. In this example, aftershocks cannot be used to infer earthquake characteristics.

  13. Colorado Regional Faults

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Colorado Geological Survey (CGS) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Regional Faults Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the regional faults of Colorado Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4543192.100000 m Left: 144385.020000 m Right: 754585.020000 m Bottom: 4094592.100000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  14. Fault Management Design Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John C.; Johnson, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Development of dependable systems relies on the ability of the system to determine and respond to off-nominal system behavior. Specification and development of these fault management capabilities must be done in a structured and principled manner to improve our understanding of these systems, and to make significant gains in dependability (safety, reliability and availability). Prior work has described a fundamental taxonomy and theory of System Health Management (SHM), and of its operational subset, Fault Management (FM). This conceptual foundation provides a basis to develop framework to design and implement FM design strategies that protect mission objectives and account for system design limitations. Selection of an SHM strategy has implications for the functions required to perform the strategy, and it places constraints on the set of possible design solutions. The framework developed in this paper provides a rigorous and principled approach to classifying SHM strategies, as well as methods for determination and implementation of SHM strategies. An illustrative example is used to describe the application of the framework and the resulting benefits to system and FM design and dependability.

  15. Fault Management Design Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John C.; Johnson, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Development of dependable systems relies on the ability of the system to determine and respond to off-nominal system behavior. Specification and development of these fault management capabilities must be done in a structured and principled manner to improve our understanding of these systems, and to make significant gains in dependability (safety, reliability and availability). Prior work has described a fundamental taxonomy and theory of System Health Management (SHM), and of its operational subset, Fault Management (FM). This conceptual foundation provides a basis to develop framework to design and implement FM design strategies that protect mission objectives and account for system design limitations. Selection of an SHM strategy has implications for the functions required to perform the strategy, and it places constraints on the set of possible design solutions. The framework developed in this paper provides a rigorous and principled approach to classifying SHM strategies, as well as methods for determination and implementation of SHM strategies. An illustrative example is used to describe the application of the framework and the resulting benefits to system and FM design and dependability.

  16. SFT: Scalable Fault Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Petrini, Fabrizio; Nieplocha, Jarek; Tipparaju, Vinod

    2006-04-15

    In this paper we will present a new technology that we are currently developing within the SFT: Scalable Fault Tolerance FastOS project which seeks to implement fault tolerance at the operating system level. Major design goals include dynamic reallocation of resources to allow continuing execution in the presence of hardware failures, very high scalability, high efficiency (low overhead), and transparency—requiring no changes to user applications. Our technology is based on a global coordination mechanism, that enforces transparent recovery lines in the system, and TICK, a lightweight, incremental checkpointing software architecture implemented as a Linux kernel module. TICK is completely user-transparent and does not require any changes to user code or system libraries; it is highly responsive: an interrupt, such as a timer interrupt, can trigger a checkpoint in as little as 2.5μs; and it supports incremental and full checkpoints with minimal overhead—less than 6% with full checkpointing to disk performed as frequently as once per minute.

  17. Heterogeneous strength and fault zone complexity of carbonate-bearing thrusts with possible implications for seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesei, Telemaco; Collettini, Cristiano; Barchi, Massimiliano R.; Carpenter, Brett M.; Di Stefano, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    The understanding of fault-slip behaviour in carbonates has an important societal impact due to the widespread occurrence and propagation of earthquakes in these rocks. Fault rock variations in carbonates are systematically controlled by the lithology of the faulted protolith: cataclasis and hydraulic fracturing with evidence of past seismic slip commonly affect fault rocks in competent limestone formations whereas widespread pressure-solution and sliding along clay foliation are observed in marly rocks. We performed a series of friction experiments on carbonatic fault rocks sampled from mature thrusts (>2 km displacement) in the Apennines of Italy. We sheared both intact wafers and powdered fault materials at low (10 MPa) and in situ (53 MPa) normal stress under room-humidity and water-saturated conditions. We used velocity steps (1 to 300 μm/s) and slide-hold-slide (3-1000 s holds) to assess the frictional stability and healing behaviour of these rocks. We observe that cataclastic fault rocks derived from competent limestones are characterized by high friction coefficients coupled with significant post-slip restrengthening and velocity-weakening behaviour. Conversely, intact foliated marly tectonites, sheared under the same conditions, show low friction, null post-slip healing and stable velocity-strengthening behaviour suggesting that these rocks deform aseismically. To extrapolate these opposite mechanical behaviours to the entire fault surface we developed a fault model integrating our mechanical data, field observations and balanced geological cross-sections. The mechanical heterogeneities highlighted in the model provide constraints for the distribution of fault patches with higher seismogenic potential.

  18. Persistent fine-scale fault structures control rupture development in Parkfield, CA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, C.; Waldhauser, F.; Scholz, C. H.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the fine-scale geometry and structure of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) near Parkfield, CA, and their role in the development of the 1966 and 2004 M6 earthquakes. Both events broke the fault mainly unilaterally with similar length ( 30 km) but in opposite directions. Seismic slip occurred in a narrow zone between 5 and 10 km depth, as outlined by the concentration of aftershocks along the edge of the slip area. Across fault distribution of the 2004 aftershocks show a rapid decrease of event density away from the fault core. The damage zone is narrower in the Parkfield section (few 100 meters) than in the creeping section ( 1 km). We observe a similar but broader distribution during the interseismic periods. This implies that stress accumulates in a volume around the fault during interseismic periods, whereas coseismic deformation is more localized on the mature SAF. Large aftershocks are concentrated at both rupture tips, characterized by strong heterogeneities in the fault structure at the surface and at depth: i) in the south near Gold Hill-Cholame, a large releasing bend (>25°) separates the Parkfield section from the southern section of the SAF; ii) in the north at Middle Mountain, the surface fault trace goes through an ancient restraining step-over connecting the Parkfield and creeping sections. Fine-scale analysis of the 2004 aftershocks reveals a change in the fault dip and local variations of the fault strike (up to 25°) beneath Middle Mountain, in good agreement with focal mechanisms, which show oblique normal and reverse faulting. We observe these variations during the interseismic periods before and after the 2004 event, suggesting that the structural heterogeneities persisted through at least two earthquake cycles. These heterogeneities act as barriers to rupture propagation of moderate size earthquakes at Parkfield, but also as stress concentrations where rupture initiates.

  19. Accelerometer having integral fault null

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An improved accelerometer is introduced. It comprises a transducer responsive to vibration in machinery which produces an electrical signal related to the magnitude and frequency of the vibration; and a decoding circuit responsive to the transducer signal which produces a first fault signal to produce a second fault signal in which ground shift effects are nullified.

  20. Naval Weapons Center Active Fault Map Series.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-31

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF ’MiS PACE NWC TP 6828 CONTENTS Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........... 2 Active Fault Definition ...established along the trace of the Little Take fault zone, within the City of Ridgecrest. ACTIVE FAULT DEFINITION Although it is a commonly used term...34active fault" lacks a pre- cise and universally accepted definition . Most workers, however, accept the following: "Active fault - a fault along

  1. Experimental Fault Reactivation on Favourably and Unfavourably Oriented Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, T. M.; Renner, J.; Sibson, R. H.

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we assess the loading of faults to failure under different stress regimes in a triaxial deformation apparatus, both in dry and saturated conditions. We explore experimentally the reshear of an existing fault in various orientations for particular values of (σ_1 - σ_3) and σ_3' for contrasting loading systems - load-strengthening (equivalent to a thrust fault) with σ1' increasing at constant σ_3', versus load-weakening (equivalent to a normal fault) with reducing σ_3' under constant σ_1'. Experiments are conducted on sawcut granite samples with fault angles at a variety of orientations relative to σ_1, ranging from an optimal orientation for reactivation to lockup angles where new faults are formed in preference to reactivating the existing sawcut orientation. Prefailure and postfailure behaviour is compared in terms of damage zone development via monitoring variations in ultrasonic velocity and acoustic emission behaviour. For example, damage surrounding unfavourably oriented faults is significantly higher than that seen around favourably orientated faults due to greater maximum stresses attained prior to unstable slip, which is reflected by the increased acoustic emission activity leading up to failure. In addition, we explore reshear conditions under an initial condition of (σ_1' = σ_3'), then inducing reshear on the existing fault first by increasing σ_1'(load-strengthening), then by decreasing σ_3' (load-weakening), again comparing relative damage zone development and acoustic emission levels. In saturated experiments, we explore the values of pore fluid pressure (P_f) needed for re-shear to occur in preference to the formation of a new fault. Typically a limiting factor in conventional triaxial experiments performed in compression is that P_f cannot exceed the confining pressure (σ_2 and σ_3). By employing a sample assembly that allows deformation while the loading piston is in extension, it enables us to achieve pore pressures in

  2. Synchronized sampling improves fault location

    SciTech Connect

    Kezunovic, M.; Perunicic, B.

    1995-04-01

    Transmission line faults must be located accurately to allow maintenance crews to arrive at the scene and repair the faulted section as soon as possible. Rugged terrain and geographical layout cause some sections of power transmission lines to be difficult to reach. In the past, a variety of fault location algorithms were introduced as either an add-on feature in protective relays or stand-alone implementation in fault locators. In both cases, the measurements of current and voltages were taken at one terminal of a transmission line only. Under such conditions, it may become difficult to determine the fault location accurately, since data from other transmission line ends are required for more precise computations. In the absence of data from the other end, existing algorithms have accuracy problems under several circumstances, such as varying switching and loading conditions, fault infeed from the other end, and random value of fault resistance. Most of the one-end algorithms were based on estimation of voltage and current phasors. The need to estimate phasors introduces additional difficulty in high-speed tripping situations where the algorithms may not be fast enough in determining fault location accurately before the current signals disappear due to the relay operation and breaker opening. This article introduces a unique concept of high-speed fault location that can be implemented either as a simple add-on to the digital fault recorders (DFRs) or as a stand-alone new relaying function. This advanced concept is based on the use of voltage and current samples that are synchronously taken at both ends of a transmission line. This sampling technique can be made readily available in some new DFR designs incorporating receivers for accurate sampling clock synchronization using the satellite Global Positioning System (GPS).

  3. Frictional Heterogeneities Along Carbonate Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collettini, C.; Carpenter, B. M.; Scuderi, M.; Tesei, T.

    2014-12-01

    The understanding of fault-slip behaviour in carbonates has an important societal impact as a) a significant number of earthquakes nucleate within or propagate through these rocks, and b) half of the known petroleum reserves occur within carbonate reservoirs, which likely contain faults that experience fluid pressure fluctuations. Field studies on carbonate-bearing faults that are exhumed analogues of currently active structures of the seismogenic crust, show that fault rock types are systematically controlled by the lithology of the faulted protolith: localization associated with cataclasis, thermal decomposition and plastic deformation commonly affect fault rocks in massive limestone, whereas distributed deformation, pressure-solution and frictional sliding along phyllosilicates are observed in marly rocks. In addition, hydraulic fractures, indicating cyclic fluid pressure build-ups during the fault activity, are widespread. Standard double direct friction experiments on fault rocks from massive limestones show high friction, velocity neutral/weakening behaviour and significant re-strengthening during hold periods, on the contrary, phyllosilicate-rich shear zones are characterized by low friction, significant velocity strengthening behavior and no healing. We are currently running friction experiments on large rock samples (20x20 cm) in order to reproduce and characterize the interaction of fault rock frictional heterogeneities observed in the field. In addition we have been performing experiments at near lithostatic fluid pressure in the double direct shear configuration within a pressure vessel to test the Rate and State friction stability under these conditions. Our combination of structural observations and mechanical data have been revealing the processes and structures that are at the base of the broad spectrum of fault slip behaviors recently documented by high-resolution geodetic and seismological data.

  4. Constraint of fault parameters inferred from nonplanar fault modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aochi, Hideo; Madariaga, Raul; Fukuyama, Eiichi

    2003-02-01

    We study the distribution of initial stress and frictional parameters for the 28 June 1992 Landers, California, earthquake through dynamic rupture simulation along a nonplanar fault system. We find that observational evidence of large slip distribution near the ground surface requires large nonzero cohesive forces in the depth-dependent friction law. This is the only way that stress can accumulate and be released at shallow depths. We then study the variation of frictional parameters along the strike of the fault. For this purpose we mapped into our segmented fault model the initial stress heterogeneity inverted by Peyrat et al. [2001] using a planar fault model. Simulations with this initial stress field improved the overall fit of the rupture process to that inferred from kinematic inversions, and also improved the fit to the ground motion observed in Southern California. In order to obtain this fit, we had to introduce an additional variations of frictional parameters along the fault. The most important is a weak Kickapoo fault and a strong Johnson Valley fault.

  5. Inattention, hyperactivity, oppositional-defiant symptoms and school failure.

    PubMed

    Serra-Pinheiro, Maria Antonia; Mattos, Paulo; Regalla, Maria Angélica; de Souza, Isabella; Paixão, Cristiane

    2008-12-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with school failure. Inattention has been mainly implicated for this association. Oppositional-defiant disorder's (ODD) impact on academic performance remains controversial, because of the high comorbidity between ODD and ADHD. To understand the role of inattention (IN), hyperactivity (H/I) and ODD in school failure. Parents and teachers filled out SNAP-IV questionnaires for 241 / 6th grade students. The associations of the scores of oppositional-defiant (OP), H/I and IN symptoms with school year failure were calculated. IN was strongly correlated with school failure. H/I and OP were not associated with school failure, when controlled for IN. OP and H/I symptoms do not play an important role in school failure, when controlled for IN symptoms. Our study supports the cross-cultural role of IN as a major predictor of school failure.

  6. Fault Tolerant Cache Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, H.-Yu.; Tasneem, Sarah

    Most of modern microprocessors employ on—chip cache memories to meet the memory bandwidth demand. These caches are now occupying a greater real es tate of chip area. Also, continuous down scaling of transistors increases the possi bility of defects in the cache area which already starts to occupies more than 50% of chip area. For this reason, various techniques have been proposed to tolerate defects in cache blocks. These techniques can be classified into three different cat egories, namely, cache line disabling, replacement with spare block, and decoder reconfiguration without spare blocks. This chapter examines each of those fault tol erant techniques with a fixed typical size and organization of L1 cache, through extended simulation using SPEC2000 benchmark on individual techniques. The de sign and characteristics of each technique are summarized with a view to evaluate the scheme. We then present our simulation results and comparative study of the three different methods.

  7. Fault Tolerant State Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Gary R.; Taft, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    State machines are commonly used to control sequential logic in FPGAs and ASKS. An errant state machine can cause considerable damage to the device it is controlling. For example in space applications, the FPGA might be controlling Pyros, which when fired at the wrong time will cause a mission failure. Even a well designed state machine can be subject to random errors us a result of SEUs from the radiation environment in space. There are various ways to encode the states of a state machine, and the type of encoding makes a large difference in the susceptibility of the state machine to radiation. In this paper we compare 4 methods of state machine encoding and find which method gives the best fault tolerance, as well as determining the resources needed for each method.

  8. Faulted Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    27 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the layered, sedimentary rock outcrops that occur in a crater located at 8oN, 7oW, in western Arabia Terra. Dark layers and dark sand have enhanced the contrast of this scene. In the upper half of the image, one can see numerous lines that off-set the layers. These lines are faults along which the rocks have broken and moved. The regularity of layer thickness and erosional expression are taken as evidence that the crater in which these rocks occur might once have been a lake. The image covers an area about 1.9 km (1.2 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  9. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, K.N.

    1999-05-18

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

  10. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, Kamal N.

    1999-01-01

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

  11. Classes of Oppositional-Defiant behaviour: Concurrent and predictive validity

    PubMed Central

    Althoff, Robert R.; Kuny-Slock, Ana V.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Hudziak, James J.; van der Ende, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) has components of both irritability and defiance. It remains unclear whether children with variation in these domains have different adult outcomes. This study examined the concurrent and predictive validity of classes of oppositional defiant behavior. Methods Latent Class Analysis was performed on the Oppositional Defiant Problems scale of the Child Behavior Checklist in two samples, one in the U.S. (the Achenbach Normative Sample, N=2029) and one in The Netherlands (the Zuid-Holland Study, N=2076). A third sample of American children (The Vermont Family Study, N=399) was examined to determine concurrent validity with DSM diagnoses. Predictive validity over 14 years was assessed using the Zuid-Holland Study. Results 4 classes of oppositional defiant problems were consistent in the two latent class analyses: No Symptoms, All Symptoms, Irritable, and Defiant. Individuals in the No Symptoms Class were rarely diagnosed concurrently with ODD or any future disorder. Individuals in the All Symptoms Class had an increased frequency of concurrent childhood diagnosis of ODD and of violence in adulthood. Subjects in the Irritable Class had low concurrent diagnosis of ODD, but increased odds of adult mood disorders. Individuals in the Defiant Class had low concurrent diagnosis of ODD, but had increased odds of violence as adults. Conclusions Only children in the All Symptoms class were likely to have a concurrent diagnosis of ODD. Although not diagnosed with ODD, children in the Irritable Class were more likely to have adult mood disorders and children in the Defiant Class were more likely to engage in violent behavior. PMID:24673629

  12. Classes of oppositional-defiant behavior: concurrent and predictive validity.

    PubMed

    Althoff, Robert R; Kuny-Slock, Ana V; Verhulst, Frank C; Hudziak, James J; van der Ende, Jan

    2014-10-01

    Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) has components of both irritability and defiance. It remains unclear whether children with variation in these domains have different adult outcomes. This study examined the concurrent and predictive validity of classes of oppositional defiant behavior. Latent class analysis was performed on the oppositional defiant problems scale of the Child Behavior Checklist in two samples, one in the US (the Achenbach Normative Sample, N = 2029) and one in the Netherlands (the Zuid-Holland Study, N = 2076). A third sample of American children (The Vermont Family Study, N = 399) was examined to determine concurrent validity with DSM diagnoses. Predictive validity over 14 years was assessed using the Zuid-Holland Study. Four classes of oppositional defiant problems were consistent in the two latent class analyses: No Symptoms, All Symptoms, Irritable, and Defiant. Individuals in the No Symptoms Class were rarely diagnosed concurrently with ODD or any future disorder. Individuals in the All Symptoms Class had an increased frequency of concurrent childhood diagnosis of ODD and of violence in adulthood. Subjects in the Irritable Class had low concurrent diagnosis of ODD, but increased odds of adult mood disorders. Individuals in the Defiant Class had low concurrent diagnosis of ODD, but had increased odds of violence as adults. Only children in the All Symptoms class were likely to have a concurrent diagnosis of ODD. Although not diagnosed with ODD, children in the Irritable Class were more likely to have adult mood disorders and children in the Defiant Class were more likely to engage in violent behavior. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. © 2014 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  13. Planetary Regolith Microstructure: An Unexpected Opposition Effect Result

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, R. M.; Hapke, B. W.; Smythe, W. D.; Hale, A. S.; Piatek, J. L.

    2004-01-01

    The Opposition Effect (OE) is the non-linear increase in the intensity of light scattered from a surface as phase angle approaches 0 deg. It is seen in laboratory experiments and in remote sensing observations of planetary surfaces. Understanding the OE is a requirement to fitting photometric models which will produce meaningful results about regolith texture. Our previous laboratory studies are consistent with the hypothesis that the OE in particulate materials is due to two processes, Shadow Hiding (SHOE) and Coherent Backscattering (CBOE). SHOE arises because, as phase angle approaches zero, shadows cast by regolith grains on other grains become invisible to the observer. CBOE results from constructive interference between rays traveling the same path but in opposite directions. In this study we measured the angular scattering properties of 9 mixtures of Aluminum Oxide and Boron Carbide powders of the same particle diameter (25 microns). The reflectance of the materials ranged from 7% (pure B4C) to 91% (pure Al2O3). Along with the reflectance phase curve we measured the circular polarization ratio (CPR) - the ratio of the intensity of the light returned with the same helicity as the incident light to that with the opposite helicity. An increase in CPR with decreasing phase angle indicates increased multiple scattering and is consistent with CBOE (Hapke, 1993). Popular conceptions of CBOE (Belskaya et al, 2003) hold that materials of higher albedo would exhibit increased multiple scattering and that the contribution of CBOE to the OE would increase as albedo increases. Remarkably, we find the highest albedo samples did not have the strongest CBOE opposition peaks. Instead, the maximum CBOE contribution is observed in samples with reflectance between 15 and 40%.

  14. LRO Diviner Nonlinear Response and Opposition Effect Corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyalay, S.; Aye, K. M.; Paige, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment measures thermal radiation to determine the brightness temperature of the lunar surface. As with the Mars Climate Sounder (upon which Diviner is based), we use pre-flight calibration data to correct for the nonlinear response in Diviner's detectors, which in-turn accounts for much of the detector non-uniformity within channels. Furthermore, channels 8 and 9 exhibit unexpectedly high brightness temperatures close to the equator around midday, with even higher brightness temperatures when observing lunar highlands as opposed to maria. Unexpectedly high brightness temperatures around midday at the equator is reminiscent of the opposition effect known to exist on the Moon at low phase angles in Visual to Near Infra-Red (VNIR) wavelengths. Diviner channel 2 data (which detects solar radiation reflected by the Moon) shows this opposition effect, which is more pronounced in the highlands than the maria. We interpret a correlation we observe between channel 2 detected radiance and channel 8 and 9 brightness temperature as due to incomplete blocking of reflected solar radiation. This leads us to an opposition effect correction for Diviner channels 8 and 9 dependent on Diviner's solar channel data. Whether this is a direct leak of VNIR light upon the detectors, or solar heating of blocking filters, which then radiate infrared radiation upon the detectors, is yet to be determined. We can use the nonlinearity and opposition effect corrections to recharacterize the spectral emissivity of the lunar regolith, which we can then compare to laboratory spectra.

  15. Perception of oppositely moving verniers and spatio-temporal interpolation.

    PubMed

    Fahle, M

    1995-04-01

    Even at moderate speeds, moving objects stimulate many retinal photoreceptors within the integration time of the receptors, yet usually no motion blur is experienced. An elegant model for the elimination of motion blur was proposed by Anderson and van Essen [(1987) Proceedings of the National Academy of Science U.S.A., 84, 6297-6301]. These authors suggested that so-called shifter circuits shift the neuronal representation of retinal images on their way to the cortex. The retinal image of an object moving in the outer world is thus shifted in the opposite direction to the object motion, and the cortical representation of objects would be stable at least during short periods of time. To test the hypothesis of "shifter circuits", I measured thresholds for two vernier stimuli, moving simultaneously into opposite directions over identical parts of the retina. Motion blur for these stimuli was not stronger than with a single moving stimulus, and thresholds for the detection of vernier offsets could be below a photoreceptor diameter. This finding poses serious problems for the hypothesis of shifter circuits, since shifter circuits would be able to stabilize only one of the stimuli. In additional experiments, stimuli moved discontinuously, requiring spatio-temporal interpolation for the perception of smooth motion. The results are consistent with those obtained with continuous motion. Precision of spatio-temporal interpolation is in the hyperacuity range even for stimuli moving in opposite directions over the same small part of the visual field.

  16. Educational Opportunities for the 2014 Opposition of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, Edward F.

    2013-10-01

    Mars reaches opposition and is well placed for public viewing on April 8, 2014 at 20:57 UT. The opposition timeline and educational opportunities are considered, with emphasis on programs presented at the Fernbank Science Center in Atlanta, Georgia. Educational programs include a planetarium presentation, observations of Mars through telescopes, and activities associated with the ongoing Curiosity Rover (MSL) / anticipated Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft. When at opposition in 2014, Mars will have an apparent diameter of 15.1 arcseconds and will be visible in the evening sky for a little over a year until it is lost in the glare of the Sun in late April 2015. At closest approach, the planet will be a bit more than 57 million miles (92 million kilometers) from the Earth. Mars is especially well placed in the evening sky for viewing between the months of March and May of 2014. During this period, the planet can be found in retrograde motion within the constellation pattern of Virgo. Fernbank Science Center will offer public viewing of Mars through the observatory’s 36-inch (0.9 meter) reflecting telescope on Thursday and Friday evenings. The observatory is open immediately after the evening planetarium program. We anticipate showing a fulldome planetarium presentation about Mars entitled, "Mars Quest," which includes a live update about the Red Planet and how to find it among the stars in the current evening sky.

  17. Tracing Developmental Trajectories of Oppositional Defiant Behaviors in Preschool Children

    PubMed Central

    Ezpeleta, Lourdes; Granero, Roser; de la Osa, Núria; Navarro, José Blas; Penelo, Eva; Domènech, Josep M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Previous studies on developmental trajectories have used ad hoc definitions of oppositional defiant behaviors (ODB), which makes it difficult to compare results. This article defines developmental trajectories of ODB from ages 3–5 based on five different standard measurements derived from three separate instruments. Method A sample of 622 three-year-old preschoolers, followed up at ages 4, 5, and 6, was assessed with the five measures of oppositionality answered by parents and teachers. Growth-Mixture-Modeling (GMM) estimated separate developmental trajectories for each ODB measure for ages 3 to 5. Results The number of classes-trajectories obtained in each GMM depended on the ODB measure, but two clear patterns emerged: four trajectories (persistent low, decreasers, increasers/high increasers, persistent moderate/persistent high) or three trajectories (persistent low, decreasers, increasers/high increasers). Persistent high trajectories accounted for 4.4%–9.5% of the children. The trajectories emerging from the different ODB measures at ages 3 to 5 discriminated disruptive disorders, comorbidity, use of services, and impairment at age 6, and globally showed a similar pattern, summarizing longitudinal information on oppositionality in preschool children in a similar way. Conclusions Trajectories resulting from standard scales of the questionnaires have predictive validity for identifying relevant clinical outcomes, but are measure-specific. The results contribute to knowledge about the development of ODB in preschool children. PMID:24972147

  18. Tracing developmental trajectories of oppositional defiant behaviors in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Ezpeleta, Lourdes; Granero, Roser; de la Osa, Núria; Navarro, José Blas; Penelo, Eva; Domènech, Josep M

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies on developmental trajectories have used ad hoc definitions of oppositional defiant behaviors (ODB), which makes it difficult to compare results. This article defines developmental trajectories of ODB from ages 3-5 based on five different standard measurements derived from three separate instruments. A sample of 622 three-year-old preschoolers, followed up at ages 4, 5, and 6, was assessed with the five measures of oppositionality answered by parents and teachers. Growth-Mixture-Modeling (GMM) estimated separate developmental trajectories for each ODB measure for ages 3 to 5. The number of classes-trajectories obtained in each GMM depended on the ODB measure, but two clear patterns emerged: four trajectories (persistent low, decreasers, increasers/high increasers, persistent moderate/persistent high) or three trajectories (persistent low, decreasers, increasers/high increasers). Persistent high trajectories accounted for 4.4%-9.5% of the children. The trajectories emerging from the different ODB measures at ages 3 to 5 discriminated disruptive disorders, comorbidity, use of services, and impairment at age 6, and globally showed a similar pattern, summarizing longitudinal information on oppositionality in preschool children in a similar way. Trajectories resulting from standard scales of the questionnaires have predictive validity for identifying relevant clinical outcomes, but are measure-specific. The results contribute to knowledge about the development of ODB in preschool children.

  19. Improving Multiple Fault Diagnosability using Possible Conflicts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Matthew J.; Bregon, Anibal; Biswas, Gautam; Koutsoukos, Xenofon; Pulido, Belarmino

    2012-01-01

    Multiple fault diagnosis is a difficult problem for dynamic systems. Due to fault masking, compensation, and relative time of fault occurrence, multiple faults can manifest in many different ways as observable fault signature sequences. This decreases diagnosability of multiple faults, and therefore leads to a loss in effectiveness of the fault isolation step. We develop a qualitative, event-based, multiple fault isolation framework, and derive several notions of multiple fault diagnosability. We show that using Possible Conflicts, a model decomposition technique that decouples faults from residuals, we can significantly improve the diagnosability of multiple faults compared to an approach using a single global model. We demonstrate these concepts and provide results using a multi-tank system as a case study.

  20. Comparison of Cenozoic Faulting at the Savannah River Site to Fault Characteristics of the Atlantic Coast Fault Province: Implications for Fault Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Cumbest, R.J.

    2000-11-14

    This study compares the faulting observed on the Savannah River Site and vicinity with the faults of the Atlantic Coastal Fault Province and concludes that both sets of faults exhibit the same general characteristics and are closely associated. Based on the strength of this association it is concluded that the faults observed on the Savannah River Site and vicinity are in fact part of the Atlantic Coastal Fault Province. Inclusion in this group means that the historical precedent established by decades of previous studies on the seismic hazard potential for the Atlantic Coastal Fault Province is relevant to faulting at the Savannah River Site. That is, since these faults are genetically related the conclusion of ''not capable'' reached in past evaluations applies.In addition, this study establishes a set of criteria by which individual faults may be evaluated in order to assess their inclusion in the Atlantic Coast Fault Province and the related association of the ''not capable'' conclusion.

  1. Holocene tectonics and fault reactivation in the foothills of the north Cascade Mountains, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, Brian L.; Barnett, Elizabeth; Schermer, Elizabeth; Kelsey, Harvey M.; Hughes, Jonathan; Foit, Franklin F.; Weaver, Craig S.; Haugerud, Ralph; Hyatt, Tim

    2013-01-01

    We use LiDAR imagery to identify two fault scarps on latest Pleistocene glacial outwash deposits along the North Fork Nooksack River in Whatcom County, Washington (United States). Mapping and paleoseismic investigation of these previously unknown scarps provide constraints on the earthquake history and seismic hazard in the northern Puget Lowland. The Kendall scarp lies along the mapped trace of the Boulder Creek fault, a south-dipping Tertiary normal fault, and the Canyon Creek scarp lies in close proximity to the south-dipping Canyon Creek fault and the south-dipping Glacier Extensional fault. Both scarps are south-side-up, opposite the sense of displacement observed on the nearby bedrock faults. Trenches excavated across these scarps exposed folded and faulted late Quaternary glacial outwash, locally dated between ca. 12 and 13 ka, and Holocene buried soils and scarp colluvium. Reverse and oblique faulting of the soils and colluvial deposits indicates at least two late Holocene earthquakes, while folding of the glacial outwash prior to formation of the post-glacial soil suggests an earlier Holocene earthquake. Abrupt changes in bed thickness across faults in the Canyon Creek excavation suggest a lateral component of slip. Sediments in a wetland adjacent to the Kendall scarp record three pond-forming episodes during the Holocene—we infer that surface ruptures on the Boulder Creek fault during past earthquakes temporarily blocked the stream channel and created an ephemeral lake. The Boulder Creek and Canyon Creek faults formed in the early to mid-Tertiary as normal faults and likely lay dormant until reactivated as reverse faults in a new stress regime. The most recent earthquakes—each likely Mw > 6.3 and dating to ca. 8050–7250 calendar years B.P. (cal yr B.P.), 3190–2980 cal. yr B.P., and 910–740 cal. yr B.P.—demonstrate that reverse faulting in the northern Puget Lowland poses a hazard to urban areas between Seattle (Washington) and Vancouver

  2. ANNs pinpoint underground distribution faults

    SciTech Connect

    Glinkowski, M.T.; Wang, N.C.

    1995-10-01

    Many offline fault location techniques in power distribution circuits involve patrolling along the lines or cables. In overhead distribution lines, most of the failures can be located quickly by visual inspection without the aid of special equipment. However, locating a fault in underground cable systems is more difficult. It involves additional equipment (e.g., thumpers, radars, etc.) to transform the invisibility of the cable into other forms of signals, such as acoustic sound and electromagnetic pulses. Trained operators must carry the equipment above the ground, follow the path of the signal, and draw lines on their maps in order to locate the fault. Sometimes, even smelling the burnt cable faults is a way of detecting the problem. These techniques are time consuming, not always reliable, and, as in the case of high-voltage dc thumpers, can cause additional damage to the healthy parts of the cable circuit. Online fault location in power networks that involve interconnected lines (cables) and multiterminal sources continues receiving great attention, with limited success in techniques that would provide simple and practical solutions. This article features a new online fault location technique that: uses the pattern recognition feature of artificial neural networks (ANNs); utilizes new capabilities of modern protective relaying hardware. The output of the neural network can be graphically displayed as a simple three-dimensional (3-D) chart that can provide an operator with an instantaneous indication of the location of the fault.

  3. Subaru FATS (fault tracking system)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winegar, Tom W.; Noumaru, Junichi

    2000-07-01

    The Subaru Telescope requires a fault tracking system to record the problems and questions that staff experience during their work, and the solutions provided by technical experts to these problems and questions. The system records each fault and routes it to a pre-selected 'solution-provider' for each type of fault. The solution provider analyzes the fault and writes a solution that is routed back to the fault reporter and recorded in a 'knowledge-base' for future reference. The specifications of our fault tracking system were unique. (1) Dual language capacity -- Our staff speak both English and Japanese. Our contractors speak Japanese. (2) Heterogeneous computers -- Our computer workstations are a mixture of SPARCstations, Macintosh and Windows computers. (3) Integration with prime contractors -- Mitsubishi and Fujitsu are primary contractors in the construction of the telescope. In many cases, our 'experts' are our contractors. (4) Operator scheduling -- Our operators spend 50% of their work-month operating the telescope, the other 50% is spent working day shift at the base facility in Hilo, or day shift at the summit. We plan for 8 operators, with a frequent rotation. We need to keep all operators informed on the current status of all faults, no matter the operator's location.

  4. Dynamic Rupture Along a Material Interface With Creation of Off-fault Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Z.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Recent geological observations along several large strike slip faults show clear asymmetry in the damage pattern of fault zone rocks, with one side having considerably more damage than the other (Dor et al., 2004). The observed asymmetry implies that ruptures along these faults propagate preferentially in one direction. A preferred propagation direction is a predicted outcome of rupture along an interface that separates different elastic media (e.g., Weertman, 1980; Andrews and Ben-Zion, 1997; Ben-Zion and Huang, 2002). Such ruptures produce dynamic dilation at the tip that propagates in the direction of slip on the more compliant side of the fault, and dynamic compression at the opposite tip. Consequently, rupture along a material interface evolves to a unidirectional wrinkle-like pulse that propagates in the direction of slip on the compliant side of the fault. In addition, wrinkle-like ruptures along a material interface produce strongly asymmetric fault-normal motion near the propagating tip, with larger motion on the compliant side. Rupture along a material interface has the following two competing mechanisms for creation of off-fault damage. (1) Anelastic deformation on the extensional quadrant in the preferred propagation direction, which for a bi-material configuration is on the stiffer side, as was calculated by Andrews (2004) for rupture in a homogenous solid. (2) Anelastic deformation on the more compliant side due to the asymmetric motion across the fault. Mechanism (1) is favored by low normal stress, small contrast of material properties across the fault, and large difference between the static and kinetic coefficients of friction. Mechanism (2) is favored by the opposite set of conditions. In this study we attempt to quantify the conditions for which the above two mechanisms are active. Previous analytical and numerical studies found that wrinkle-like ruptures between two purely elastic materials diverge for a broad range of conditions (e.g., Adams

  5. [Children's oppositional behaviour, practice of parental authority and temporal anomie].

    PubMed

    Gadeau, L

    2014-02-01

    This article examines the relationship between children's oppositional behaviour and the exercise of parental authority. It seeks to explore the value of a heuristic approach to psychic temporality in exercising parental authority. The study aims to better understand the role of psychic temporality in operations producing symbolic law. It goes on to describe a disorder of temporality, known as temporal anomie, which may be involved in a child's oppositional disorders. Psychiatric or psychological consultations motivated by oppositional disorders in children have increased steadily in the past fifteen years in France. The primary reason for consultation is in the form of difficulties for children in accepting the social rules or constraints, but also the difficulties of parenting while coping with the opposition of their children. This increase is made in connection with the works analysing the social and psychological effects imposed by modernity and its acceleration. Correspondingly, we find that some parents do not prioritize their educational requirements, do not know when or how to frustrate their child, or even if it is legitimate to expect from him/her a certain type of behaviour. They seem more preoccupied with the fear of not being loved by their child more than their duty to educate. A general trend suggests an alteration of psychological time, characterized by: a) a disinvestment of links between present and past for the enjoyment of the moment and its extension in the immediate future ; b) a difficulty in supporting educational responses causing frustration for the child ; c) a lack of continuity and constancy in educational requirements. The author proposes to define temporal anomie as the psychical time that weakens the consistency of educational responses. A link between psychological temporality and the symbolic law is discussed. Specifically, the study notes that: in intersubjective relations, mastery of psychological time by parents is an

  6. Why the 2002 Denali fault rupture propagated onto the Totschunda fault: implications for fault branching and seismic hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, David P.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Dawson, Timothy E.

    2012-01-01

    The propagation of the rupture of the Mw7.9 Denali fault earthquake from the central Denali fault onto the Totschunda fault has provided a basis for dynamic models of fault branching in which the angle of the regional or local prestress relative to the orientation of the main fault and branch plays a principal role in determining which fault branch is taken. GeoEarthScope LiDAR and paleoseismic data allow us to map the structure of the Denali-Totschunda fault intersection and evaluate controls of fault branching from a geological perspective. LiDAR data reveal the Denali-Totschunda fault intersection is structurally simple with the two faults directly connected. At the branch point, 227.2 km east of the 2002 epicenter, the 2002 rupture diverges southeast to become the Totschunda fault. We use paleoseismic data to propose that differences in the accumulated strain on each fault segment, which express differences in the elapsed time since the most recent event, was one important control of the branching direction. We suggest that data on event history, slip rate, paleo offsets, fault geometry and structure, and connectivity, especially on high slip rate-short recurrence interval faults, can be used to assess the likelihood of branching and its direction. Analysis of the Denali-Totschunda fault intersection has implications for evaluating the potential for a rupture to propagate across other types of fault intersections and for characterizing sources of future large earthquakes.

  7. Experimental Modeling of Dynamic Shallow Dip-Slip Faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uenishi, K.

    2010-12-01

    In our earlier study (AGU 2005, SSJ 2005, JPGU 2006), using a finite difference technique, we have conducted some numerical simulations related to the source dynamics of shallow dip-slip earthquakes, and suggested the possibility of the existence of corner waves, i.e., shear waves that carry concentrated kinematic energy and generate extremely strong particle motions on the hanging wall of a nonvertical fault. In the numerical models, a dip-slip fault is located in a two-dimensional, monolithic linear elastic half space, and the fault plane dips either vertically or 45 degrees. We have investigated the seismic wave field radiated by crack-like rupture of this straight fault. If the fault rupture, initiated at depth, arrests just below or reaches the free surface, four Rayleigh-type pulses are generated: two propagating along the free surface into the opposite directions to the far field, the other two moving back along the ruptured fault surface (interface) downwards into depth. These downward interface pulses may largely control the stopping phase of the dynamic rupture, and in the case the fault plane is inclined, on the hanging wall the interface pulse and the outward-moving Rayleigh surface pulse interact with each other and the corner wave is induced. On the footwall, the ground motion is dominated simply by the weaker Rayleigh pulse propagating along the free surface because of much smaller interaction between this Rayleigh and the interface pulse. The generation of the downward interface pulses and corner wave may play a crucial role in understanding the effects of the geometrical asymmetry on the strong motion induced by shallow dip-slip faulting, but it has not been well recognized so far, partly because those waves are not expected for a fault that is located and ruptures only at depth. However, the seismological recordings of the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, the 2004 Niigata-ken Chuetsu, Japan, earthquakes as well as a more recent one in Iwate-Miyagi Inland

  8. Oppositional Defiant Disorder toward Adults and Oppositional Defiant Disorder toward Peers: Initial Evidence for Two Separate Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ted K.; Burns, G. Leonard; Rusby, Julie C.; Foster, E. Michael

    2008-01-01

    Confirmatory factor analysis of 25 items on the Child and Adolescent Disruptive Behavior Inventory (CADBI v.2.3) was conducted on teacher ratings of 824 kindergarten children and replicated on 534 children. Model fit was improved when correcting for two method effects: (a) adjacent items, and (b) identical behaviors (e.g., argues with adults, argues with peers). The results showed that the 25 items load on three distinct but correlated factors: Hyperactivity, Oppositional to Adults, and Oppositional to Peers. These more refined constructs from the CADBI may be useful for practitioners in identifying children who are at risk and for helping define appropriate contexts in which to intervene. The CADBI and analytic procedures also may contribute to future psychoeducational research on the development of problem behavior. PMID:17154765

  9. Fault Injection Campaign for a Fault Tolerant Duplex Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacco, Gian Franco; Ferraro, Robert D.; von llmen, Paul; Rennels, Dave A.

    2007-01-01

    Fault tolerance is an efficient approach adopted to avoid or reduce the damage of a system failure. In this work we present the results of a fault injection campaign we conducted on the Duplex Framework (DF). The DF is a software developed by the UCLA group [1, 2] that uses a fault tolerant approach and allows to run two replicas of the same process on two different nodes of a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) computer cluster. A third process running on a different node, constantly monitors the results computed by the two replicas, and eventually restarts the two replica processes if an inconsistency in their computation is detected. This approach is very cost efficient and can be adopted to control processes on spacecrafts where the fault rate produced by cosmic rays is not very high.

  10. Method of locating ground faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L. (Inventor); Rose, Allen H. (Inventor); Cull, Ronald C. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention discloses a method of detecting and locating current imbalances such as ground faults in multiwire systems using the Faraday effect. As an example, for 2-wire or 3-wire (1 ground wire) electrical systems, light is transmitted along an optical path which is exposed to magnetic fields produced by currents flowing in the hot and neutral wires. The rotations produced by these two magnetic fields cancel each other, therefore light on the optical path does not read the effect of either. However, when a ground fault occurs, the optical path is exposed to a net Faraday effect rotation due to the current imbalance thereby exposing the ground fault.

  11. Granular Packings and Fault Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åström, J. A.; Herrmann, H. J.; Timonen, J.

    2000-01-01

    The failure of a two-dimensional packing of elastic grains is analyzed using a numerical model. The packing fails through formation of shear bands or faults. During failure there is a separation of the system into two grain-packing states. In a shear band, local ``rotating bearings'' are spontaneously formed. The bearing state is favored in a shear band because it has a low stiffness against shearing. The ``seismic activity'' distribution in the packing has the same characteristics as that of the earthquake distribution in tectonic faults. The directions of the principal stresses in a bearing are reminiscent of those found at the San Andreas Fault.

  12. Method of locating ground faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Rose, Allen H.; Cull, Ronald C.

    1994-11-01

    The present invention discloses a method of detecting and locating current imbalances such as ground faults in multiwire systems using the Faraday effect. As an example, for 2-wire or 3-wire (1 ground wire) electrical systems, light is transmitted along an optical path which is exposed to magnetic fields produced by currents flowing in the hot and neutral wires. The rotations produced by these two magnetic fields cancel each other, therefore light on the optical path does not read the effect of either. However, when a ground fault occurs, the optical path is exposed to a net Faraday effect rotation due to the current imbalance thereby exposing the ground fault.

  13. Finding faults with the data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Rudolph Giuliani and Hillary Rodham Clinton are crisscrossing upstate New York looking for votes in the U.S. Senate race. Also cutting back and forth across upstate New York are hundreds of faults of a kind characterized by very sporadic seismic activity according to Robert Jacobi, professor of geology at the University of Buffalo (UB), who conducted research with fellow UB geology professor John Fountain."We have proof that upstate New York is crisscrossed by faults," Jacobi said. "In the past, the Appalachian Plateau—which stretches from Albany to Buffalo—was considered a pretty boring place structurally without many faults or folds of any significance."

  14. The Nature of Extension on the Western Edge of the Basin and Range: Evolution of the Surprise Valley Fault System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surpless, B.; Egger, A. E.

    2006-12-01

    The Warner Range is a major west-tilted fault block in northeastern California bound on its eastern side by the Surprise Valley normal fault system, which has accommodated a minimum of 3 km of uplift. The fault system separates the northeastern Basin and Range Province on the east, which has undergone 10-15% extension since the Miocene, from the Modoc Plateau to the west, a relatively unextended region with a thick sequence of flat-lying Pliocene and younger volcanic rocks. Although no major earthquakes have occurred along the fault system in historic times, significant Quaternary fault scarps, ~3 Ma U-Th/He ages, and trenching suggest that the system is still active, and recently published GPS data suggest ongoing extension and right- lateral deformation across the region. Thus, the Surprise Valley fault system is ideally located to gain insight into extensional processes at the edge of the Basin and Range province and to reveal potential seismic hazard. Dip-slip displacement along the Surprise Valley fault system decreases toward the system's north and south terminations. The northern termination is complicated by the Fandango Valley, a northwest-trending, graben- like structure that cuts across the Warner Range at an oblique angle. South of the Fandango Valley, Eocene to Miocene volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks in the range dip ~25 degrees to the west, and the east- dipping Surprise Valley fault system bounds the east side of the range. North of the valley, Miocene age volcanic rocks in the range dip gently to the east, and the dominant normal fault system is west-dipping and bounds the west side of the range. These two significant normal fault systems overlap at the latitude of the Fandango Valley, suggesting that the structure is an antithetic accommodation zone, but the Valley's northwest-trending orientation is orthogonal to that expected for an accommodation zone controlled exclusively by the propagation of oppositely-dipping normal faults. It is possible

  15. Preliminary Holocene History of Fault Slip for the Mojave Section of the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, T.; Cowgill, E.; Scharer, K. M.; Gold, R. D.; Westerteiger, R.; Bernardin, T. S.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2012-12-01

    dateable offsets preserved along the MSAF, we used available airborne LiDAR and virtual-reality visualization software Crusta. Crusta is a virtual globe application that supports real-time interactive visualization of large (>60GB) LiDAR digital elevation models and merges the mapping functionality of ArcMap with the terrain visualization capabilities of Google Earth. On a 100km section of the MSAF we found 60 offsets ranging from 20 to 297m, many of which show promise as potential slip-rate sites. We determined offset uncertainties using the slicer tool, which is a recently developed function in Crusta that allows the user to assign a fault plane by dropping nodes along a linear fault trace and interactively moving one fault block relative to the other in any slip direction. This functionality allows the user to incrementally restore fault slip until topographic features on opposite sides of the fault are aligned. This tool has been helpful in identifying, evaluating, and reconstructing possible landform offsets. We plan to continue remote analysis using additional visualization tools such as a fully immersive CAVE environment and we will conduct fieldwork to determine ages of numerous identified offsets to build a more robust dataset for further slip history analysis.

  16. 20 CFR 410.561b - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fault. 410.561b Section 410.561b Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Payment of Benefits § 410.561b Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see §...

  17. 20 CFR 410.561b - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fault. 410.561b Section 410.561b Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Payment of Benefits § 410.561b Fault. Fault as used in without fault (see §...

  18. Expert System Detects Power-Distribution Faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, Jerry L.; Quinn, Todd M.

    1994-01-01

    Autonomous Power Expert (APEX) computer program is prototype expert-system program detecting faults in electrical-power-distribution system. Assists human operators in diagnosing faults and deciding what adjustments or repairs needed for immediate recovery from faults or for maintenance to correct initially nonthreatening conditions that could develop into faults. Written in Lisp.

  19. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of... agency may have been at fault in initiating an overpayment will not necessarily relieve the...

  20. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of... agency may have been at fault in initiating an overpayment will not necessarily relieve the...

  1. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of... agency may have been at fault in initiating an overpayment will not necessarily relieve the...

  2. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of... agency may have been at fault in initiating an overpayment will not necessarily relieve the...

  3. 22 CFR 17.3 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fault. 17.3 Section 17.3 Foreign Relations...) § 17.3 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of... agency may have been at fault in initiating an overpayment will not necessarily relieve the...

  4. Spontaneous rupture on irregular faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.

    2014-12-01

    It is now know (e.g. Robinson et al., 2006) that when ruptures propagate around bends, the rupture velocity decrease. In the extreme case, a large bend in the fault can stop the rupture. We develop a 2-D finite difference method to simulate spontaneous dynamic rupture on irregular faults. This method is based on a second order leap-frog finite difference scheme on a uniform mesh of triangles. A relaxation method is used to generate an irregular fault geometry-conforming mesh from the uniform mesh. Through this numerical coordinate mapping, the elastic wave equations are transformed and solved in a curvilinear coordinate system. Extensive numerical experiments using the linear slip-weakening law will be shown to demonstrate the effect of fault geometry on rupture properties. A long term goal is to simulate the strong ground motion near the vicinity of bends, jogs, etc.

  5. The fault-tree compiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martensen, Anna L.; Butler, Ricky W.

    1987-01-01

    The Fault Tree Compiler Program is a new reliability tool used to predict the top event probability for a fault tree. Five different gate types are allowed in the fault tree: AND, OR, EXCLUSIVE OR, INVERT, and M OF N gates. The high level input language is easy to understand and use when describing the system tree. In addition, the use of the hierarchical fault tree capability can simplify the tree description and decrease program execution time. The current solution technique provides an answer precise (within the limits of double precision floating point arithmetic) to the five digits in the answer. The user may vary one failure rate or failure probability over a range of values and plot the results for sensitivity analyses. The solution technique is implemented in FORTRAN; the remaining program code is implemented in Pascal. The program is written to run on a Digital Corporation VAX with the VMS operation system.

  6. Fault Interactions in Extensional Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streepey, M.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C.

    2001-12-01

    Fault Interactions in Extensional Regimes M. Streepey and C. Lithgow-Bertelloni Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 Studies have shown that faults generally tend to reactivate over long histories of deformation, often in spite of less favorable orientations or changing stress regimes in the region. Reactivation of faults suggests that rheology is a key determining factor in the localization of intense deformation in orogenic belts. It is evident in these studies that stresses are preferentially partitioned into pre-existing weak zones of the crust. This is shown commonly in orogenic belts, where thrust faults reactivate as normal faults during syn- to post-orogenic extension. Therefore, the interaction of faults might be an important element in the deformation of the lithosphere during pre- and post-orogenic tectonics. On shorter timescales, it has been suggested that fault interactions are commonplace in areas of active seismicity, and that those interactions can be related to earthquake triggering and therefore may be critically important in assessing the behavior of the lithosphere during deformation. We investigate this problem concentrating on the time evolution of faults in extensional regimes. Geologic evidence in ancient orogenic belts shows periods of protracted normal fault motion over timescales of hundreds of millions of years after orogenesis. This motion is likely episodic rather than continuous; however, this is not constrained by field and geochronological studies. Fault evolution on these timescales is modeled using the finite element code ABAQUS. Our elastic results show, as expected from dislocation theory, that stress shadows produced by motion along faults can be linearly superposed and that faults do not have a high degree of interaction. We have constructed new models of two-dimensional finite elements that represent a block of crust under extensional stresses. Sited in these blocks are weak zones

  7. Cell boundary fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens [Rochester, MN; Pinnow, Kurt Walter [Rochester, MN; Ratterman, Joseph D [Rochester, MN; Smith, Brian Edward [Rochester, MN

    2009-05-05

    A method determines a nodal fault along the boundary, or face, of a computing cell. Nodes on adjacent cell boundaries communicate with each other, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  8. Weakening inside incipient thrust fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, B.; Tesei, T.; Collettini, C.; Oliot, E.

    2013-12-01

    In fold-and-thrust belts, shortening is mainly accommodated by thrust faults that nucleate along décollement levels. Geological and geophysical evidence suggests that these faults might be weak because of a combination of processes such as pressure-solution, phyllosilicates reorientation and delamination, and fluid pressurization. In this study we aim to decipher the processes and the kinetics responsible for weakening of tectonic décollements. We studied the Millaris thrust (Southern Pyrenees): a fault representative of a décollement in its incipient stage. This fault accommodated a total shortening of about 30 meters and is constituted by a 10m thick, intensively foliated phyllonite developed inside a homogeneous marly unit. Detailed chemical and mineralogical analyses have been carried out to characterize the mineralogical change, the chemical transfers and volume change in the fault zone compared to non-deformed parent sediments. We also carried out microstructural analysis on natural and experimentally deformed rocks. Illite and chlorite are the main hydrous minerals. Inside fault zone, illite minerals are oriented along the schistosity whereas chlorite coats the shear surfaces. Mass balance calculations demonstrated a volume loss of up to 50% for calcite inside fault zone (and therefore a relative increase of phyllosilicates contents) because of calcite pressure solution mechanisms. We performed friction experiments in a biaxial deformation apparatus using intact rocks sheared in the in-situ geometry from the Millaris fault and its host sediments. We imposed a range of normal stresses (10 to 50 MPa), sliding velocity steps (3-100 μm/s) and slide-hold slide sequences (3 to 1000 s hold) under saturated conditions. Mechanical results demonstrate that both fault rocks and parent sediments are weaker than average geological materials (friction μ<<0.6) and have velocity-strengthening behavior because of the presence of phyllosilicate horizons. Fault rocks are

  9. Three dimensions of oppositionality in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Mandy, William; Roughan, Laura; Skuse, David

    2014-02-01

    In autism spectrum disorder (ASD), symptoms of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) are common but poorly understood. DSM-5 has adopted a tripartite model of ODD, parsing its features into 'angry and irritable symptoms' (AIS), 'argumentative and defiant behavior' (ADB) and 'vindictiveness'. This was based on findings in non-autistic populations that each of these dimensions of oppositionality has a distinct constellation of associations with internalising and externalising psychopathology. We applied the tripartite DSM-5 ODD model to ASD to test its generalisability beyond non-ASD populations; and to elucidate the nature of ODD symptoms in ASD. Participants were 216 verbally-fluent young people (mean age = 9.6 years, range 3.0 to 16.2 years, 82 % male) with ASD. Cross-sectional parent-and teacher-report data were analysed using bootstrap multiple regression to test the following predictions, derived from studies of non-ASD young people: (1) AIS will be the main predictor of internalising problems; (2) ADB will be the main predictor of ADHD symptoms; (3) all ODD traits will independently predict conduct disorder symptoms; (4) vindictiveness will be the main predictor of aggressive conduct problems. Our findings using both parent and teacher data were consistent with the non-ASD ODD literature. AIS were associated with internalising but not externalising problems; ADB and vindictiveness were associated with externalising but not internalising problems; and vindictiveness was the main predictor of aggression. The DSM-5 tripartite model of ODD appears to be generalisable to ASD: for people with an autistic disorder, AIS, ADB and vindictive dimensions of oppositionality have distinct associations with concurrent psychopathology, suggesting the need to assess them as separate constructs.

  10. Cassini VIMS Observes the Opposition Effect in Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. M.; Hapke, B. W.; Brown, R. H.; Spilker, L. J.; Smythe, W. D.; Kamp, L.; Boryta, M.; Leader, F.; Matson, D. L.; Nicholson, P. D.; Cassini Vims Rings Team

    On May 20 2005 the Cassini spacecraft flew between the sun and Saturn on a trajectory such that the zero phase point passed through the rings The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer VIMS recorded a number of spectral image cubes 0 4 lambda 5 2 mu m that showed the opposition effect OE at zero phase The OE is a spike in the reflected intensity observed near 0 o phase when it is displayed as a function of phase angle This is the first time the OE has been resolved for small areas on the rings Previous work has shown that the OE arises from two distinct processes shadow hiding SHOE and coherent backscattering CBOE The SHOE process causes an OE by the elimination of shadows cast by regolith grains upon one another as phase angle decreases The CBOE process causes an OE by constructive interference between photons traveling in opposite directions along the same path within the medium SHOE is expected to dominate the contribution to the OE in absorbing media where multiple scattering of photons is not significant CBOE is expected to dominate the contribution to the OE in highly reflective media with much multiple scattering Using the individual image cubes a total of 32 areas containing 4 pixels each were selected that lay along the same ringlet as the opposition point and bracketed it in phase angle Because water ice is a major component of the rings the spectra are predominantly that of water Within each spectrum 9 narrow spectral bands were chosen to reflect a variety of wavelengths and reflectance levels In this

  11. Examination of Interactions of Oppositely Charged Proteins in Gels

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasamy,P.; El-Maghrabi, M.; Halada, G.; Miller, L.; Rafailovich, M.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the interactions of proteins with one another serves as an important step for developing faster protein separation methods. To examine protein-protein interactions of oppositely charged proteins, fluorescently labeled albumin and poly-L-lysine were subjected to electrophoresis in agarose gels, in which the cationic albumin and the anionic poly-L-lysine were allowed to migrate toward each other and interact. Fluorescence microscopy was used to image fluorescently tagged proteins in the gel. The secondary structure of the proteins in solution was studied using conventional FTIR spectroscopy. Results showed that sharp interfaces were formed where FITC tagged albumin met poly-L-lysine and that the interfaces did not migrate after they had been formed. The position of the interface in the gel was found to be linearly dependent upon the relative concentration of the proteins. The formation of the interface also depended upon the fluorescent tag attached to the protein. The size of the aggregates at the interface, the fluorescence intensity modifications, and the mobility of the interface for different pore sizes of the gel were investigated. It was observed that the interface was made up of aggregates of about 1 {mu}m in size. Using dynamic light scattering, it was observed that the size of the aggregates that formed due to interactions of oppositely charged proteins depended upon the fluorescent tags attached to the proteins. The addition of small amounts of poly-L-lysine to solutions containing FITC albumin decreased the zeta potential drastically. For this, we propose a model suggesting that adding small amounts of poly-L-lysine to solutions containing FITC -albumin favors the formation of macromolecular complexes having FITC albumin molecules on its surface. Although oppositely charged FITC tagged poly-L-lysine and FITC tagged albumin influence each other's migration velocities by forming aggregates, there were no observable secondary structural

  12. Fault Tree Analysis: A Bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Fault tree analysis is a top-down approach to the identification of process hazards. It is as one of the best methods for systematically identifying an graphically displaying the many ways some things can go wrong. This bibliography references 266 documents in the NASA STI Database that contain the major concepts. fault tree analysis, risk an probability theory, in the basic index or major subject terms. An abstract is included with most citations, followed by the applicable subject terms.

  13. Fault-tolerant rotary actuator

    DOEpatents

    Tesar, Delbert

    2006-10-17

    A fault-tolerant actuator module, in a single containment shell, containing two actuator subsystems that are either asymmetrically or symmetrically laid out is provided. Fault tolerance in the actuators of the present invention is achieved by the employment of dual sets of equal resources. Dual resources are integrated into single modules, with each having the external appearance and functionality of a single set of resources.

  14. Interaction modes between asymmetrically and oppositely charged rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antila, Hanne S.; Van Tassel, Paul R.; Sammalkorpi, Maria

    2016-02-01

    The interaction of oppositely and asymmetrically charged rods in salt—a simple model of (bio)macromolecular assembly—is observed via simulation to exhibit two free energy minima, separated by a repulsive barrier. In contrast to similar minima in the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, the governing mechanism includes electrostatic attraction at large separation, osmotic repulsion at close range, and depletion attraction near contact. A model accounting for ion condensation and excluded volume is shown to be superior to a mean-field treatment in predicting the effect of charge asymmetry on the free-energy profile.

  15. An Unexpected Finding Regarding the Opposition Effect in Planetary Regoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. M.; Hapke, B. W.; Smythe, W. D.; Hale, A. S.; Piatek, J. L.

    2003-12-01

    Understanding how to model the Opposition Effect (OE) in remote sensing data is a requirement to fitting photometric models which will produce meaningful results. Our previous work has found that the OE in particulate materials is due to two processes, Shadow Hiding (SHOE) and Coherent Backscattering (CBOE)(Nelson, et al. 2000; 2002). SHOE arises because, as phase angle approaches zero, shadows cast by regolith grains on other grains become invisible to the observer. CBOE results from constructive interference beween rays traveling the same path but in opposite directions. We measured the angular scattering properties of 9 mixtures of Aluminum Oxide and Boron Carbide powders of the same particle diameter (25 microns). The reflectance of the materials ranged from 7-91%. Along with the reflectance phase curve we measured the circular polarization ratio, CPR-the ratio of the intensity of the light returned with the same helicity as the incident light to that with the opposite helicity. An increase in CPR with decreasing phase angle indicates increased multiple scattering and is consistent with CBOE. It might be expected that materials of higher albedo would exhibit increased multiple scattering and that CBOE would increase as albedo increases. Remarkably, we find the highest albedo samples did not have the strongest CBOE opposition peaks. Instead, the maximum CBOE contribution was for the samples with reflectance between 15 and 40%. We derived a theoretical model which reproduces the data quite satisfactorily. This model shows that the reflectance where we find the CBOE amplitude to be a maximum is where the contribution of second order scattering is largest relative to the other orders. Hence, for closely packed media the maximum contribution of CBOE does not occur in materials of highest albedo but where the relative contribution of second order scattering is largest. Nelson, et al. 2000. Icarus, 147, 545-558. Nelson, et al., 2002, Planetary and Space Science, 50

  16. Tutorial: Advanced fault tree applications using HARP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, Joanne Bechta; Bavuso, Salvatore J.; Boyd, Mark A.

    1993-01-01

    Reliability analysis of fault tolerant computer systems for critical applications is complicated by several factors. These modeling difficulties are discussed and dynamic fault tree modeling techniques for handling them are described and demonstrated. Several advanced fault tolerant computer systems are described, and fault tree models for their analysis are presented. HARP (Hybrid Automated Reliability Predictor) is a software package developed at Duke University and NASA Langley Research Center that is capable of solving the fault tree models presented.

  17. Developing Fault Models for Space Mission Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikora, Allen P.; Munson, John C.

    2003-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the development of fault models for space mission software is shown. The topics include: 1) Goal: Improve Understanding of Technology Fault Generation Process; 2) Required Measurement; 3) Measuring Structural Evolution; 4) Module Attributes; 5) Principal Components of Raw Metrics; 6) The Measurement Process; 7) View of Structural Evolution at the System and Module Level; 8) Identifying and Counting Faults; 9) Fault Enumeration; 10) Modeling Fault Content; 11) Modeling Results; 12) Current and Future Work; and 13) Discussion and Conclusions.

  18. Error latency estimation using functional fault modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manthani, S. R.; Saxena, N. R.; Robinson, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    A complete modeling of faults at gate level for a fault tolerant computer is both infeasible and uneconomical. Functional fault modeling is an approach where units are characterized at an intermediate level and then combined to determine fault behavior. The applicability of functional fault modeling to the FTMP is studied. Using this model a forecast of error latency is made for some functional blocks. This approach is useful in representing larger sections of the hardware and aids in uncovering system level deficiencies.

  19. Fault diagnosis of power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine, Y. ); Akimoto, Y. ); Kunugi, M. )

    1992-05-01

    Fault diagnosis of power systems plays a crucial role in power system monitoring and control that ensures stable supply of electrical power to consumers. In the case of multiple faults or incorrect operation of protective devices, fault diagnosis requires judgment of complex conditions at various levels. For this reason, research into application of knowledge-based systems go an early start and reports of such systems have appeared in may papers. In this paper, these systems are classified by the method of inference utilized in the knowledge-based systems for fault diagnosis of power systems. The characteristics of each class and corresponding issues as well as the state-of-the-art techniques for improving their performance are presented. Additional topics covered are user interfaces, interfaces with energy management systems (EMS's), and expert system development tools for fault diagnosis. Results and evaluation of actual operation in the field are also discussed. Knowledge-based fault diagnosis of power systems will continue to disseminate.

  20. Software Fault Tolerance: A Tutorial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

    2000-01-01

    Because of our present inability to produce error-free software, software fault tolerance is and will continue to be an important consideration in software systems. The root cause of software design errors is the complexity of the systems. Compounding the problems in building correct software is the difficulty in assessing the correctness of software for highly complex systems. After a brief overview of the software development processes, we note how hard-to-detect design faults are likely to be introduced during development and how software faults tend to be state-dependent and activated by particular input sequences. Although component reliability is an important quality measure for system level analysis, software reliability is hard to characterize and the use of post-verification reliability estimates remains a controversial issue. For some applications software safety is more important than reliability, and fault tolerance techniques used in those applications are aimed at preventing catastrophes. Single version software fault tolerance techniques discussed include system structuring and closure, atomic actions, inline fault detection, exception handling, and others. Multiversion techniques are based on the assumption that software built differently should fail differently and thus, if one of the redundant versions fails, it is expected that at least one of the other versions will provide an acceptable output. Recovery blocks, N-version programming, and other multiversion techniques are reviewed.

  1. Normal fault earthquakes or graviquakes.

    PubMed

    Doglioni, C; Carminati, E; Petricca, P; Riguzzi, F

    2015-07-14

    Earthquakes are dissipation of energy throughout elastic waves. Canonically is the elastic energy accumulated during the interseismic period. However, in crustal extensional settings, gravity is the main energy source for hangingwall fault collapsing. Gravitational potential is about 100 times larger than the observed magnitude, far more than enough to explain the earthquake. Therefore, normal faults have a different mechanism of energy accumulation and dissipation (graviquakes) with respect to other tectonic settings (strike-slip and contractional), where elastic energy allows motion even against gravity. The bigger the involved volume, the larger is their magnitude. The steeper the normal fault, the larger is the vertical displacement and the larger is the seismic energy released. Normal faults activate preferentially at about 60° but they can be shallower in low friction rocks. In low static friction rocks, the fault may partly creep dissipating gravitational energy without releasing great amount of seismic energy. The maximum volume involved by graviquakes is smaller than the other tectonic settings, being the activated fault at most about three times the hypocentre depth, explaining their higher b-value and the lower magnitude of the largest recorded events. Having different phenomenology, graviquakes show peculiar precursors.

  2. Normal fault earthquakes or graviquakes

    PubMed Central

    Doglioni, C.; Carminati, E.; Petricca, P.; Riguzzi, F.

    2015-01-01

    Earthquakes are dissipation of energy throughout elastic waves. Canonically is the elastic energy accumulated during the interseismic period. However, in crustal extensional settings, gravity is the main energy source for hangingwall fault collapsing. Gravitational potential is about 100 times larger than the observed magnitude, far more than enough to explain the earthquake. Therefore, normal faults have a different mechanism of energy accumulation and dissipation (graviquakes) with respect to other tectonic settings (strike-slip and contractional), where elastic energy allows motion even against gravity. The bigger the involved volume, the larger is their magnitude. The steeper the normal fault, the larger is the vertical displacement and the larger is the seismic energy released. Normal faults activate preferentially at about 60° but they can be shallower in low friction rocks. In low static friction rocks, the fault may partly creep dissipating gravitational energy without releasing great amount of seismic energy. The maximum volume involved by graviquakes is smaller than the other tectonic settings, being the activated fault at most about three times the hypocentre depth, explaining their higher b-value and the lower magnitude of the largest recorded events. Having different phenomenology, graviquakes show peculiar precursors. PMID:26169163

  3. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Daniel J.; Cha, Yung S.

    1999-01-01

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment.

  4. Passive fault current limiting device

    DOEpatents

    Evans, D.J.; Cha, Y.S.

    1999-04-06

    A passive current limiting device and isolator is particularly adapted for use at high power levels for limiting excessive currents in a circuit in a fault condition such as an electrical short. The current limiting device comprises a magnetic core wound with two magnetically opposed, parallel connected coils of copper, a high temperature superconductor or other electrically conducting material, and a fault element connected in series with one of the coils. Under normal operating conditions, the magnetic flux density produced by the two coils cancel each other. Under a fault condition, the fault element is triggered to cause an imbalance in the magnetic flux density between the two coils which results in an increase in the impedance in the coils. While the fault element may be a separate current limiter, switch, fuse, bimetal strip or the like, it preferably is a superconductor current limiter conducting one-half of the current load compared to the same limiter wired to carry the total current of the circuit. The major voltage during a fault condition is in the coils wound on the common core in a preferred embodiment. 6 figs.

  5. Aeromagnetic anomalies over faulted strata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grauch, V.J.S.; Hudson, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution aeromagnetic surveys are now an industry standard and they commonly detect anomalies that are attributed to faults within sedimentary basins. However, detailed studies identifying geologic sources of magnetic anomalies in sedimentary environments are rare in the literature. Opportunities to study these sources have come from well-exposed sedimentary basins of the Rio Grande rift in New Mexico and Colorado. High-resolution aeromagnetic data from these areas reveal numerous, curvilinear, low-amplitude (2–15 nT at 100-m terrain clearance) anomalies that consistently correspond to intrasedimentary normal faults (Figure 1). Detailed geophysical and rock-property studies provide evidence for the magnetic sources at several exposures of these faults in the central Rio Grande rift (summarized in Grauch and Hudson, 2007, and Hudson et al., 2008). A key result is that the aeromagnetic anomalies arise from the juxtaposition of magnetically differing strata at the faults as opposed to chemical processes acting at the fault zone. The studies also provide (1) guidelines for understanding and estimating the geophysical parameters controlling aeromagnetic anomalies at faulted strata (Grauch and Hudson), and (2) observations on key geologic factors that are favorable for developing similar sedimentary sources of aeromagnetic anomalies elsewhere (Hudson et al.).

  6. Study of Magnetic Fabrics across the Central Part of the Chimei Fault, the Coastal Range of Eastern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, E. C.; Chu, Y. R.; Chou, Y. M.; Lee, T. Q.; Kuo, S. T.; Cai, Y. M.

    2015-12-01

    Taiwan is an ongoing collisional mountain belt located in the conjunction of two subduction-arc systems with opposite vergences between the Philippine Sea and Eurasian plates. The Coastal Range along the eastern Taiwan is the accreted Luzon arcs and surrounding basins onto the Eurasian crust. The Chimei fault, a typical lithology-contrast fault thrusting the Miocene volcanic Tuluanshan Formation over the Pleistocene sedimentary Paliwan Formation, is the only major reverse fault across the entire Coastal Range. To investigate the deformation pattern and strain history across the Chimei fault, we analyzed oriented samples of mudstone and volcanic rocks across the fault zone, fold zone, damage zone, and wall rocks along the Hsiukuluan River via anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS). AMS can be represented as a susceptibility ellipsoid with 3 principal directions and values (Kmax, Kint, Kmin) and therefore is well known as a tool of magnetic fabrics to study the deformation. Results of AMS across the central part of the Chimei fault show that the direction of Kmax changed from N-S orientation to sub-vertical and the orientation of Kmin switched from 270/70 to N-S orientation when samples were closed to the fault zone. At the same time, anisotropy was increasing and susceptibility ellipsoid changed from oblate to prolate in the fold zone back to oblate in the fault zone. Based on identification works of magnetic minerals, the major magnetic carrier is magnetite with pseudo-single domain. As a result, it strongly speculated when samples were approaching to the central part of Chimei fault, stress altered from sub-vertical sedimentary loading to horizontally N-S tectonic compression. Due to increasing deformation, oblate ellipsoids with strong anisotropy developed within the fault zone highlighted the strain history of the central part of the Chimei fault.

  7. Emerging and continuing trends in vaccine opposition website content.

    PubMed

    Bean, Sandra J

    2011-02-24

    Anti-vaccination websites appeal to persons searching the Internet for vaccine information that reinforces their predilection to avoid vaccination for themselves or their children. Few published studies have systematically examined these sites. The aim of this study was to employ content analysis as a useful tool for examining and comparing anti-vaccination websites for recurring and changing emphases in content, design, and credibility themes since earlier anti-vaccination website content analyses were conducted. Between February and May 2010, using a commonly available search engine followed by a deep web search, 25 websites that contained anti-vaccination content were reviewed and analyzed for 24 content, 14 design, and 13 credibility attributes. Although several content claims remained similar to earlier analyses, two new themes emerged: (1) the 2009 H1N1 epidemic threat was "manufactured," and (2) the increasing presence of so-called "expert" testimony in opposing vaccination. Anti-vaccination websites are constantly changing in response to the trends in public health and the success of vaccination. Monitoring the changes can permit public health workers to mount programs more quickly to counter the opposition arguments. Additionally, opposition claims commonly appeal to emotions whereas the supporting claims appeal to reason. Effective vaccine support may be better served by including more emotionally compelling content. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Viscosity of Aqueous Polyelectrolyte Solutions with Oppositely Charged Surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggert, Matthew; Colby, Ralph

    2006-03-01

    The viscosity of polyelectrolyte solutions with oppositely charged surfactants is measured for a series of anionic polyelectrolytes of variable hydrophobicity (alternating copolymers of sodium maleate with hydrocarbon comonomers) in the presence of cationic trimethyl ammonium bromides with various alkyl tail lengths. These results are compared with a simple model that modifies the scaling theory for unentangled semidilute polyelectrolyte solutions to account for the addition of oppositely charged surfactant. The surfactant lowers the viscosity of these solutions through two means. The polyelectrolyte binds to the surface of the surfactant micelle, reducing the effective chain length of the polymer. The binding also causes counterions of the polyelectrolyte and the surfactant to be released into solution, acting as a salt that screens the repulsion between charges of the polyelectrolyte, causing the chains to have smaller size. The fraction of effectively charged monomers (i.e., free counterions) on the polyelectrolyte is measured via an ion-selective electrode, meaning the simple model has no adjustable parameters. Additional electrodes are used to measure the amount of free surfactant in solution in order to estimate the amount of surfactant associated with each polyelectrolyte chain.

  9. Craniofacial skeletal dysplasia of opposite-sex dizygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Chou, Szu-Ting; Tseng, Yu-Chuan; Pan, Chin-Yun; Chang, Jenny Zwei-Chieng; Chang, Hong-Po

    2011-05-01

    Craniofacial skeletal dysplasia can lead to different skeletal malocclusions. Both environmental factors and heredity contribute to the formation of malocclusions. There are strong familial tendencies in the development of Angle's Class II and III malocclusions. Cases such as opposite-typed (Class II and III) malocclusions with skeletal and dentoalveolar discordance in siblings or dizygotic (DZ) twins have seldom been reported. We describe the rare case of a pair of opposite-sex DZ twins with completely different skeletal malocclusions, and discuss the clinical considerations for treatment. The patients were twins aged 13 years and 4 months. The girl had mandibular prognathism and a Class III dentoskeletal relationship, whereas the boy had skeletal Class II with mandibular retrusion. Several morphological traits have been implicated with hormonal effect. However, there was no evidence of whether the masculinization effect had any impact on jaw size in the female fetus or whether this effect lasted into adolescence. We suggest that, although DZ twins share the same growth environment, genetic or other unknown extrinsic factors can result in discordance of characteristics of the craniofacial skeleton, dentition, and occlusion. Copyright © 2011 Formosan Medical Association & Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Character of the opposition effect and negative polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieters, Carle M.; Shkuratov, Yu. G.; Stankevich, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    Photometric and polarimetric properties at small phase angles were measured for silicates with controlled surface properties in order to distinguish properties that are associated with surface reflection from those that are associated with multiple scattering from internal grain boundaries. These data provide insight into the causes and conditions of photometric properties observed at small phase angles for dark bodies of the solar system. Obsidian was chosen to represent a silicate dielectric with no internal scattering boundaries. Because obsidian is free of internal scatterers, light reflected from both the rough and smooth obsidian samples is almost entirely single and multiple Fresnel reflections form surface facets with no body component. Surface structure alone cannot produce an opposition effect. Comparison of the obsidian and basalt results indicates that for an opposition effect to occur, surface texture must be both rough and contain internal scattering interfaces. Although the negative polarization observed for the obsidian samples indicates single and multiple reflections are part of negative polarization, the longer inversion angle of the multigrain inversion samples implies that internal reflections must also contribute a significant negative polarization component.

  11. Imaging enhancement of malignancy by cyclophosphamide: surprising chemotherapy opposite effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Kensuke; Yang, Meng; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Jiang, Ping; Xu, Mingxu; Yamamoto, Norio; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Tomita, Katsuro; Moossa, A. R.; Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2008-02-01

    Although side effects of cancer chemotherapy are well known, "opposite effects" of chemotherapy which enhance the malignancy of the treated cancer are not well understood. We have observed a number of steps of malignancy that are enhanced by chemotherapy pre-treatment of mice before transplantation of human tumor cells. The induction of intravascular proliferation, extravasation, and colony formation by cancer cells, critical steps of metastasis was enhanced by pretreatment of host mice with the commonly-used chemotherapy drug cyclophosphamide. Cyclophosphamide appears to interfere with a host process that inhibits intravascular proliferation, extravasation, and extravascular colony formation by at least some tumor cells. Cyclophosphamide does not directly affect the cancer cells since cyclophosphamide has been cleared by the time the cancer cells were injected. Without cyclophosphamide pretreatment, human colon cancer cells died quickly after injection in the portal vein of nude mice. Extensive clasmocytosis (destruction of the cytoplasm) of the cancer cells occurred within 6 hours. The number of apoptotic cells rapidly increased within the portal vein within 12 hours of injection. However, when the host mice were pretreated with cyclophosphamide, the cancer cells survived and formed colonies in the liver after portal vein injection. These results suggest that a cyclophosphamide-sensitive host cellular system attacked the cancer cells. This review describes an important unexpected "opposite effects" of chemotherapy that enhances critical steps in malignancy rather than inhibiting them, suggesting that certain current approaches to cancer chemotherapy should be modified.

  12. Itokawa's Opposition Surge seen by Hayabusa/AMICA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominque, D.; Tatsumi, E.; Vilas, F.; Hirata, N.; Lederer, S.

    2017-01-01

    Using images acquired by the Hayabusa/AMICA instrument, along with Lederer et al.'s (2008) ground-based observations, we re-examine Itokawa's disk-integrated phase curve. The AMICA images provide critical opposition measurements (between 0.7deg - 9.3deg phase at 540 nm). Using Hapke's model (2012), we fit the updated phase curves at 5 different wavelengths. Preliminary modeling results show a range of porosity values commensurate with those in the literature (Ostro et al. 2004, Gundlach and Blum, 2012, Kiuchi and Nakamura 2014) based on an impact-generated grain size distribution function and grain size range evaluations from the AMICA data (Yano et al. 2006). This wide range on a global porosity is indicative of a highly variable porosity across the surface. The derived transport mean free path and the generally forward scattering nature of the global regolith are indicative of scattering centers (such as cracks, bubbles, and inclusions) that are small compared to the observational wavelengths. The derived regolith properties are compared with the imaging and sample analysis results, providing a test of the predictive capabilities of global disk-integrated measurements. This work suggests that the sub-pixel grain information could be extracted from the photometry, especially around opposition.

  13. The California geodimeter network; measuring movement along the San Andreas Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.

    1974-01-01

    Following the great California earthquake of 1906 H. F. Reid, a contemporary seismologist, proposed the elastic rebound theory which in effect says that earthquake potential arises from the accumulation of elastic strain within the Earth's crust, just as the stretching of a rubberband creates the potential for violent rebound upon rupture. A direct manifestation of this crustal strain accumulation is the change in distance between adjacent points along opposite sides of a fault. In order to measure the rate at which strain is accumulating along California's San Andreas fault, a netwrok of precise survey lines which criss-cross the fault along its entire lenght in the State is periodically resurveyed with very accurate electro-opitcal distance measuring devices called geodimeters. 

  14. Fault Analysis in Solar Photovoltaic Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ye

    Fault analysis in solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays is a fundamental task to increase reliability, efficiency and safety in PV systems. Conventional fault protection methods usually add fuses or circuit breakers in series with PV components. But these protection devices are only able to clear faults and isolate faulty circuits if they carry a large fault current. However, this research shows that faults in PV arrays may not be cleared by fuses under some fault scenarios, due to the current-limiting nature and non-linear output characteristics of PV arrays. First, this thesis introduces new simulation and analytic models that are suitable for fault analysis in PV arrays. Based on the simulation environment, this thesis studies a variety of typical faults in PV arrays, such as ground faults, line-line faults, and mismatch faults. The effect of a maximum power point tracker on fault current is discussed and shown to, at times, prevent the fault current protection devices to trip. A small-scale experimental PV benchmark system has been developed in Northeastern University to further validate the simulation conclusions. Additionally, this thesis examines two types of unique faults found in a PV array that have not been studied in the literature. One is a fault that occurs under low irradiance condition. The other is a fault evolution in a PV array during night-to-day transition. Our simulation and experimental results show that overcurrent protection devices are unable to clear the fault under "low irradiance" and "night-to-day transition". However, the overcurrent protection devices may work properly when the same PV fault occurs in daylight. As a result, a fault under "low irradiance" and "night-to-day transition" might be hidden in the PV array and become a potential hazard for system efficiency and reliability.

  15. Critical fault patterns determination in fault-tolerant computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccluskey, E. J.; Losq, J.

    1978-01-01

    The method proposed tries to enumerate all the critical fault-patterns (successive occurrences of failures) without analyzing every single possible fault. The conditions for the system to be operating in a given mode can be expressed in terms of the static states. Thus, one can find all the system states that correspond to a given critical mode of operation. The next step consists in analyzing the fault-detection mechanisms, the diagnosis algorithm and the process of switch control. From them, one can find all the possible system configurations that can result from a failure occurrence. Thus, one can list all the characteristics, with respect to detection, diagnosis, and switch control, that failures must have to constitute critical fault-patterns. Such an enumeration of the critical fault-patterns can be directly used to evaluate the overall system tolerance to failures. Present research is focused on how to efficiently make use of these system-level characteristics to enumerate all the failures that verify these characteristics.

  16. Fault Management Guiding Principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newhouse, Marilyn E.; Friberg, Kenneth H.; Fesq, Lorraine; Barley, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Regardless of the mission type: deep space or low Earth orbit, robotic or human spaceflight, Fault Management (FM) is a critical aspect of NASA space missions. As the complexity of space missions grows, the complexity of supporting FM systems increase in turn. Data on recent NASA missions show that development of FM capabilities is a common driver for significant cost overruns late in the project development cycle. Efforts to understand the drivers behind these cost overruns, spearheaded by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD), indicate that they are primarily caused by the growing complexity of FM systems and the lack of maturity of FM as an engineering discipline. NASA can and does develop FM systems that effectively protect mission functionality and assets. The cost growth results from a lack of FM planning and emphasis by project management, as well the maturity of FM as an engineering discipline, which lags behind the maturity of other engineering disciplines. As a step towards controlling the cost growth associated with FM development, SMD has commissioned a multi-institution team to develop a practitioner's handbook representing best practices for the end-to-end processes involved in engineering FM systems. While currently concentrating primarily on FM for science missions, the expectation is that this handbook will grow into a NASA-wide handbook, serving as a companion to the NASA Systems Engineering Handbook. This paper presents a snapshot of the principles that have been identified to guide FM development from cradle to grave. The principles range from considerations for integrating FM into the project and SE organizational structure, the relationship between FM designs and mission risk, and the use of the various tools of FM (e.g., redundancy) to meet the FM goal of protecting mission functionality and assets.

  17. Fault Management Guiding Principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newhouse, Marilyn E.; Friberg, Kenneth H.; Fesq, Lorraine; Barley, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Regardless of the mission type: deep space or low Earth orbit, robotic or human spaceflight, Fault Management (FM) is a critical aspect of NASA space missions. As the complexity of space missions grows, the complexity of supporting FM systems increase in turn. Data on recent NASA missions show that development of FM capabilities is a common driver for significant cost overruns late in the project development cycle. Efforts to understand the drivers behind these cost overruns, spearheaded by NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD), indicate that they are primarily caused by the growing complexity of FM systems and the lack of maturity of FM as an engineering discipline. NASA can and does develop FM systems that effectively protect mission functionality and assets. The cost growth results from a lack of FM planning and emphasis by project management, as well the maturity of FM as an engineering discipline, which lags behind the maturity of other engineering disciplines. As a step towards controlling the cost growth associated with FM development, SMD has commissioned a multi-institution team to develop a practitioner's handbook representing best practices for the end-to-end processes involved in engineering FM systems. While currently concentrating primarily on FM for science missions, the expectation is that this handbook will grow into a NASA-wide handbook, serving as a companion to the NASA Systems Engineering Handbook. This paper presents a snapshot of the principles that have been identified to guide FM development from cradle to grave. The principles range from considerations for integrating FM into the project and SE organizational structure, the relationship between FM designs and mission risk, and the use of the various tools of FM (e.g., redundancy) to meet the FM goal of protecting mission functionality and assets.

  18. Fault branching and rupture directivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fliss, Sonia; Bhat, Harsha S.; Dmowska, Renata; Rice, James R.

    2005-06-01

    Could the directivity of a complex earthquake be inferred from the ruptured fault branches it created? Typically, branches develop in forward orientation, making acute angles relative to the propagation direction. Direct backward branching of the same style as the main rupture (e.g., both right lateral) is disallowed by the stress field at the rupture front. Here we propose another mechanism of backward branching. In that mechanism, rupture stops along one fault strand, radiates stress to a neighboring strand, nucleates there, and develops bilaterally, generating a backward branch. Such makes diagnosing directivity of a past earthquake difficult without detailed knowledge of the branching process. As a field example, in the Landers 1992 earthquake, rupture stopped at the northern end of the Kickapoo fault, jumped onto the Homestead Valley fault, and developed bilaterally there, NNW to continue the main rupture but also SSE for 4 km forming a backward branch. We develop theoretical principles underlying such rupture transitions, partly from elastostatic stress analysis, and then simulate the Landers example numerically using a two-dimensional elastodynamic boundary integral equation formulation incorporating slip-weakening rupture. This reproduces the proposed backward branching mechanism based on realistic if simplified fault geometries, prestress orientation corresponding to the region, standard lab friction values for peak strength, and fracture energies characteristic of the Landers event. We also show that the seismic S ratio controls the jumpable distance and that curving of a fault toward its compressional side, like locally along the southeastern Homestead Valley fault, induces near-tip increase of compressive normal stress that slows rupture propagation.

  19. Fault detection and isolation for complex system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Chan Shi; Bayuaji, Luhur; Samad, R.; Mustafa, M.; Abdullah, N. R. H.; Zain, Z. M.; Pebrianti, Dwi

    2017-07-01

    Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI) is a method to monitor, identify, and pinpoint the type and location of system fault in a complex multiple input multiple output (MIMO) non-linear system. A two wheel robot is used as a complex system in this study. The aim of the research is to construct and design a Fault Detection and Isolation algorithm. The proposed method for the fault identification is using hybrid technique that combines Kalman filter and Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The Kalman filter is able to recognize the data from the sensors of the system and indicate the fault of the system in the sensor reading. Error prediction is based on the fault magnitude and the time occurrence of fault. Additionally, Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is another algorithm used to determine the type of fault and isolate the fault in the system.

  20. Fault seal analysis in the North Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, S.D. )

    1993-05-01

    The majority of North Sea structural traps requires that at least one fault be a sealing fault. Over 400 faults from 101 exploration targets and 25 oil and gas fields were analyzed in a regional study of the North Sea. The faults cut clastic successions from a variety of depositional environments (marine, paralic, and nonmarine). The emphasis of the study was on fault-related seals that act as pressure or migration barriers over geologic time. Parameters such as fault strike and throw, reservoir thickness, depth, net-to-gross ratio, porosity, and net sand connectivity were plotted against seal performance to define trends and correlations to predict fault seal characteristics. A correlation appears to exist between fault orientation and sealing, although this is not statistically significant. Sealing is proportional to fault throw norminalized as a fraction of the reservoir thickness. The great majority of faults with throw greater than the thickness of the reservoir interval were sealing faults. The most useful parameters in fault seal prediction are fault displacement, net-to-gross ratio, and net sand connectivity. The conclusions of this study have general applicability to fault seal prediction in exploration, development, and production of hydrocarbons in clastic successions in the North Sea and perhaps other areas as well. 15 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Anisotropy of permeability in faulted porous sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, N. J. C.; Healy, D.; Taylor, C. W.

    2014-06-01

    Studies of fault rock permeabilities advance the understanding of fluid migration patterns around faults and contribute to predictions of fault stability. In this study a new model is proposed combining brittle deformation structures formed during faulting, with fluid flow through pores. It assesses the impact of faulting on the permeability anisotropy of porous sandstone, hypothesising that the formation of fault related micro-scale deformation structures will alter the host rock porosity organisation and create new permeability pathways. Core plugs and thin sections were sampled around a normal fault and oriented with respect to the fault plane. Anisotropy of permeability was determined in three orientations to the fault plane at ambient and confining pressures. Results show that permeabilities measured parallel to fault dip were up to 10 times higher than along fault strike permeability. Analysis of corresponding thin sections shows elongate pores oriented at a low angle to the maximum principal palaeo-stress (σ1) and parallel to fault dip, indicating that permeability anisotropy is produced by grain scale deformation mechanisms associated with faulting. Using a soil mechanics 'void cell model' this study shows how elongate pores could be produced in faulted porous sandstone by compaction and reorganisation of grains through shearing and cataclasis.

  2. Fault prediction for nonlinear stochastic system with incipient faults based on particle filter and nonlinear regression.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bo; Fang, Huajing

    2017-03-31

    This paper is concerned with the fault prediction for the nonlinear stochastic system with incipient faults. Based on the particle filter and the reasonable assumption about the incipient faults, the modified fault estimation algorithm is proposed, and the system state is estimated simultaneously. According to the modified fault estimation, an intuitive fault detection strategy is introduced. Once each of the incipient fault is detected, the parameters of which are identified by a nonlinear regression method. Then, based on the estimated parameters, the future fault signal can be predicted. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by the simulations of the Three-tank system.

  3. Software reliability through fault-avoidance and fault-tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vouk, Mladen A.; Mcallister, David F.

    1991-01-01

    Twenty independently developed but functionally equivalent software versions were used to investigate and compare empirically some properties of N-version programming, Recovery Block, and Consensus Recovery Block, using the majority and consensus voting algorithms. This was also compared with another hybrid fault-tolerant scheme called Acceptance Voting, using dynamic versions of consensus and majority voting. Consensus voting provides adaptation of the voting strategy to varying component reliability, failure correlation, and output space characteristics. Since failure correlation among versions effectively reduces the cardinality of the space in which the voter make decisions, consensus voting is usually preferable to simple majority voting in any fault-tolerant system. When versions have considerably different reliabilities, the version with the best reliability will perform better than any of the fault-tolerant techniques.

  4. Complexation behavior of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes: Effect of charge distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mingtian; Zhou, Jihan; Su, Cuicui; Niu, Lin; Liang, Dehai; Li, Baohui

    2015-05-01

    Complexation behavior of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes in a solution is investigated using a combination of computer simulations and experiments, focusing on the influence of polyelectrolyte charge distributions along the chains on the structure of the polyelectrolyte complexes. The simulations are performed using Monte Carlo with the replica-exchange algorithm for three model systems where each system is composed of a mixture of two types of oppositely charged model polyelectrolyte chains (EGEG)5/(KGKG)5, (EEGG)5/(KKGG)5, and (EEGG)5/(KGKG)5, in a solution including explicit solvent molecules. Among the three model systems, only the charge distributions along the chains are not identical. Thermodynamic quantities are calculated as a function of temperature (or ionic strength), and the microscopic structures of complexes are examined. It is found that the three systems have different transition temperatures, and form complexes with different sizes, structures, and densities at a given temperature. Complex microscopic structures with an alternating arrangement of one monolayer of E/K monomers and one monolayer of G monomers, with one bilayer of E and K monomers and one bilayer of G monomers, and with a mixture of monolayer and bilayer of E/K monomers in a box shape and a trilayer of G monomers inside the box are obtained for the three mixture systems, respectively. The experiments are carried out for three systems where each is composed of a mixture of two types of oppositely charged peptide chains. Each peptide chain is composed of Lysine (K) and glycine (G) or glutamate (E) and G, in solution, and the chain length and amino acid sequences, and hence the charge distribution, are precisely controlled, and all of them are identical with those for the corresponding model chain. The complexation behavior and complex structures are characterized through laser light scattering and atomic force microscopy measurements. The order of the apparent weight-averaged molar

  5. Physical properties of the Saturn's rings with the opposition effect.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deau, E.

    2012-04-01

    We use the Cassini/ISS images from the early prime mission to build lit phase curves data from 0.01 degrees to 155 degrees at a solar elevation of 23-20 degrees. All the main rings exhibit on their phase curves a prominent surge at small phase angles. We use various opposition effect models to explain the opposition surge of the rings, including the coherent backscattering, the shadow hiding and a combination of the two (Kawata & Irvine 1974 In: Exploration of the planetary system Book p441; Shkuratov et al. 1999, Icarus, 141, p132; Poulet et al. 2002 Icarus, 158, p224 ; Hapke et al. 2002 Icarus, 157, p523). Our results show that either the coherent backscattering alone or a combination of the shadow hiding and the coherent backscattering can explain the observations providing physical properties (albedo, filling factor, grain size) consistent with previous other studies. However, they disagree with the most recent work of Degiorgio et al. 2011 (EPSC-DPS Abstract #732). We think that their attempt to use the shadow hiding alone lead to unrealistic values of the filling factor of the ring particles layer. For example they found 10^-3 in one of the thickest regions of the C ring (a plateau at R=88439km with an optical depth tau=0.22). We totally disagree with their conclusions stating that these values are consistent for the C ring plateaux and did not found any references that are consistent with theirs, as they claimed. We believe that their unrealistic values originated from the assumptions of the models they used (Kawata & Irvine and Hapke), which are basically an uniform size distribution. Any model using an uniform size distribution force the medium to be very diluted to reproduce the opposition surge. Our modeling that uses a power law size distribution provides realistic values. All these results have been already published previously (http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PhDT........25D) and are summarized in a forthcoming manuscript submitted to publication so

  6. Evaluation of Wasatch fault segmentation and slip rates using Lake Bonneville shorelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, Paul W.; Bruhn, Ronald L.

    2013-05-01

    ABSTRACT Analysis of Lake Bonneville shorelines using lidar digital elevation data challenges accepted models of Wasatch fault deformation since the late Pleistocene. While footwall deformation of the Weber segment of the Wasatch fault is consistent with back-rotation of the footwall block and greatest displacement rate toward the center of the segment, shorelines along the footwall of the Salt Lake City segment decrease in elevation toward the interior and are highest at the segment boundaries, an opposite pattern of footwall deformation than predicted for boundaries arresting or strongly inhibiting displacement during earthquakes. The spatial pattern of footwall rebound implies that some of the proposed persistent fault segment boundaries do not stop earthquake ruptures that originate on adjacent fault segments, nor constrain ruptures initiated within the Salt Lake City segment. Net vertical fault displacement at the boundary between the Salt Lake and Provo segments is 16-20 m over the past 16.3-18.5 ka, corresponding to a vertical displacement rate of 0.8-1.2 mm/yr, a net fault slip rate of 2.0-2.8 mm/yr, and horizontal extension rate of 1.8-2.6 mm/yr on the 25° west-southwest dipping fault that forms the southern Salt Lake City segment boundary. Shoreline analysis suggests isostatic rebound caused by a drop in lake level was concentrated during a relatively short (~2000 year) time period following the Bonneville flood at ~16 ka. Lidar-derived topography in conjunction with robust geomorphic datums improves our ability to map deformation associated with lithospheric flexure and faulting while demonstrating the limitation of lacustrine shorelines in this type of analysis.

  7. PC-based fault finder

    SciTech Connect

    Bengiamin, N.N. ); Jensen, C.A. . Electrical Engineering Dept. Otter Tail Power Co., Fergus Falls, MN . System Protection Group); McMahon, H. )

    1993-07-01

    Electric utilities are continually pressed to stay competitive while meeting the increasing demand of today's sophisticated customer. Advances in electron equipment and the improved array of electric driven devices are setting new standards for improved reliability and quality of service. Besides the specifications on voltage and frequency regulation and the permitted harmonic content, to name a few, the number and duration of service interruptions have a dramatic direct effect on the customer. Accurate fault locating reduces transmission line patrolling and is of particular significance in repairing long lines in rough terrain. Shortened outage times, reduced equipment degrading and stress on the system, fast restored service, and improved revenue are immediate outcomes of fast fault locating which insure minimum loss of system security. This article focuses on a PC-based (DOS) computer program that has unique features for identifying the type of fault and its location on overhead transmission/distribution lines. Balanced and unbalanced faults are identified and located accurately while accounting for changes in conductor sizes and network configuration. The presented concepts and methodologies have been spurred by Otter Tail Power's need for an accurate fault locating scheme to accommodate multiple feeders with mixed lone configurations. A case study based on a section of the Otter Tail network is presented to illustrate the features and capabilities of the developed software.

  8. Quaternary faults of west Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.W.; Raney, J.A. . Bureau of Economic Geology)

    1993-04-01

    North- and northwest-striking intermontane basins and associated normal faults in West Texas and adjacent Chihuahua, Mexico, formed in response to Basin and Range tectonism that began about 24 Ma ago. Data on the precise ages of faulted and unfaulted Quaternary deposits are sparse. However, age estimates made on the basis of field stratigraphic relationships and the degree of calcic soil development have helped determine that many of the faults that bound the basin margins ruptured since the middle Pleistocene and that some faults probably ruptured during the Holocene. Average recurrence intervals between surface ruptures since the middle Pleistocene appear to be relatively long, about 10,000 to 100,000 yr. Maximum throw during single rupture events have been between 1 and 3 m. Historic seismicity in West Texas is low compared to seismicity in many parts of the Basin and Range province. The largest historic earthquake, the 1931 Valentine earthquake in Ryan Flat/Lobo Valley, had a magnitude of 6.4 and no reported surface rupture. The most active Quaternary faults occur within the 120-km-long Hueco Bolson, the 70-km-long Red Light Bolson, and the > 200-km-long Salt Basins/Wild Horse Flat/Lobo Valley/Ryan Flat.

  9. Where's the Hayward Fault? A Green Guide to the Fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoffer, Philip W.

    2008-01-01

    This report describes self-guided field trips to one of North America?s most dangerous earthquake faults?the Hayward Fault. Locations were chosen because of their easy access using mass transit and/or their significance relating to the natural and cultural history of the East Bay landscape. This field-trip guidebook was compiled to help commemorate the 140th anniversary of an estimated M 7.0 earthquake that occurred on the Hayward Fault at approximately 7:50 AM, October 21st, 1868. Although many reports and on-line resources have been compiled about the science and engineering associated with earthquakes on the Hayward Fault, this report has been prepared to serve as an outdoor guide to the fault for the interested public and for educators. The first chapter is a general overview of the geologic setting of the fault. This is followed by ten chapters of field trips to selected areas along the fault, or in the vicinity, where landscape, geologic, and man-made features that have relevance to understanding the nature of the fault and its earthquake history can be found. A glossary is provided to define and illustrate scientific term used throughout this guide. A ?green? theme helps conserve resources and promotes use of public transportation, where possible. Although access to all locations described in this guide is possible by car, alternative suggestions are provided. To help conserve paper, this guidebook is available on-line only; however, select pages or chapters (field trips) within this guide can be printed separately to take along on an excursion. The discussions in this paper highlight transportation alternatives to visit selected field trip locations. In some cases, combinations, such as a ride on BART and a bus, can be used instead of automobile transportation. For other locales, bicycles can be an alternative means of transportation. Transportation descriptions on selected pages are intended to help guide fieldtrip planners or participants choose trip

  10. NMR studies on an oligodeoxynucleotide containing 2-aminopurine opposite adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Fazakerley, G.V.; Sowers, L.C.; Eritja, R.; Kaplan, B.E.; Goodman, M.F.

    1987-09-08

    A heteroduplex containing the mismatch 2-aminopurine (AP)-adenine has been synthesized and studied by proton NMR. The mismatch was incorporated into the sequence d(CGG(AP)GGC) x d-(GCCACCG). One-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect measurements in H/sub 2/O and two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectra in D/sub 2/O show AP x A base pairs in a wobble structure in which both bases are in the anti conformation. The adenine is stacked well in the helix, but the helix twist between the adenine and neighboring cytosine in the 3' direction is unusually small. As a result, the aminopurine on the opposite strand is somewhat pushed out of the helix. From the measurements of the imino proton line widths, the two adjacent G x C base pairs are not found to be significantly destabilized by the presence of the purine-purine wobble pair.

  11. Resisting the Bohr Atom: The Early British Opposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragh, Helge

    2011-03-01

    When Niels Bohr's theory of atomic structure appeared in the summer and fall of 1913, it quickly attracted attention among British physicists. While some of the attention was supportive, others was critical. I consider the opposition to Bohr's theory from 1913 to about 1915, including attempts to construct atomic theories on a classical basis as alternatives to Bohr's. I give particular attention to the astrophysicist John W. Nicholson, who was Bohr's most formidable and persistent opponent in the early years. Although in the long run Nicholson's objections were inconsequential, for a short period of time his atomic theory was considered to be a serious rival to Bohr's. Moreover, Nicholson's theory is of interest in its own right.

  12. The Uranian satellites - Surface compositions and opposition brightness surges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. H.; Cruikshank, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    The present, 5 percent-resolution spectrophotometry for the Uranian satellites Ariel, Umbriel, Titania and Oberon cover the 1.43-2.57 wavelength region and confirm the presence of a spectrally dominant water ice component in their surfaces. The 1.5- and 2.0-micron water absorption band depths and continuum reflectance indicate significant differences among the surface compositional properties of the four satellites, and comparisons of the spectra with those of other solar system bodies and of laboratory water ice spectra imply the presence of a significant nonwater ice component on/in their surfaces. The nature of this nonwater ice component is suggested by the data to be similar to that of such substances as carbon black. Near-IR opposition brightness surges of Ariel, Titania and Oberon are found to be among the largest in the solar system.

  13. The opposite of republican: polarization and political categorization.

    PubMed

    Heit, Evan; Nicholson, Stephen P

    2010-11-01

    Two experiments examined the typicality structure of contrasting political categories. In Experiment 1, two separate groups of participants rated the typicality of 15 individuals, including political figures and media personalities, with respect to the categories Democrat or Republican. The relation between the two sets of ratings was negative, linear, and extremely strong, r = -.9957. Essentially, one category was treated as a mirror image of the other. Experiment 2 replicated this result, showing some boundary conditions, and extending the result to liberal and conservative categories. The same method was applied to two other pairs of contrasting categories, healthy and junk foods, and male and female jobs. For those categories, the relation between contrasting pairs was weaker and there was less of a direct trade-off between typicality in one category versus typicality in its opposite. The results are discussed in terms of implications for political decision making and reasoning, and conceptual representation.

  14. Mars - near-infrared comparative spectroscopy during the 1986 opposition

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.F. III; Mccord, T.B.

    1989-01-01

    Near-IR, 0.7-2.5 micron spectra were obtained for several Martian locations during the 1986 opposition, using a continuously variable filter spectrometer; approximately 60 distinct spots were observed at 0.5-1.5 arcsec (200-460 km) resolution which are distinguishable into eight distinct geologic types: (1) volcanic regions, (2) ridged plains, (3) ridged volcanic plains, (4) scoured plains, (5) impact basins, (6) channels and canyons, (7) densely-cratered regions, and (8) layered terrain and ice. Spectral features observed in the spot-to-spot ratios for spectra from different geologic regions are used as indicators of mineralogic differences. Little difference is found among spectra from areas that appear to have very different morphologies in Viking Orbiter images. 30 references.

  15. [Oppositional defiant disorder: aspects related to sex differences and informant].

    PubMed

    Cardo, E; Meisel, V; García-Banda, G; Palmer, C; Riutort, L; Bernad, M; Servera, M

    2009-02-27

    Oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) is one of the most common externalizing disorders in childhood. ODD prevalence global rates vary from 2% to 16%. Along with conduct disorder and attention deficit disorder, ODD is one of the leading reasons for referral to neuropediatric and psychiatric services. Even though ODD has recognized clinical importance, key aspects of its conceptualization and prevalence in childhood and adolescence remain uncertain. We examine previous research findings of ODD prevalence and analyze sex differences and differences according to informants. ODD prevalence rates present high variability. A number of studies suggest that ODD is more common in boys than in girls. Nevertheless, some authors point that this sex differences may be due to methodological bias. We recommend the validation of an ODD scale that has into consideration the following aspects: level of the subject's development (age), gender and environment.

  16. Opposite musical-manual interference in young vs expert musicians.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, F; Brusaferro, A; Bava, A

    1990-01-01

    Cerebral lateralization for music has been studied through a music-manual interference paradigm (tapping) in a group of young musicians (seven males and seven females) attending the 1st and 3rd intermediate grades of Udine's "J. Tomadini" State Conservatory of Music and in a group of graduated expert musicians or higher course students during the execution of three distinct tasks (singing notes, whistling a melody and singing a melody). A significant superiority of the right hemisphere (greater degree of interference with the left hand) in these tasks has been found in young musicians, while an opposite left hemisphere superiority (greater degree of interference with the right hand) was evident in the expert musicians. Other differences between sexes and tasks were not significant. The modification of hemispheric specialization occurring during academical musical training are discussed in terms of the role of education in the cerebral organization of superior cognitive functions.

  17. Short and long term measures of anxiety exhibit opposite results.

    PubMed

    Fonio, Ehud; Benjamini, Yoav; Golani, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    Animal models of human diseases of the central nervous system, generalized anxiety disorder included, are essential for the study of the brain-behavior interface and obligatory for drug development; yet, these models fail to yield new insights and efficacious drugs. By increasing testing duration hundredfold and arena size tenfold, and comparing the behavior of the common animal model to that of wild mice, we raise concerns that chronic anxiety might have been measured at the wrong time, for the wrong duration, and in the wrong animal. Furthermore, the mice start the experimental session with a short period of transient adaptation to the novel environment (habituation period) and a long period reflecting the respective trait of the mice. Using common measures of anxiety reveals that mice exhibit opposite results during these periods suggesting that chronic anxiety should be measured during the post-habituation period. We recommend tools for measuring the transient period, and provide suggestions for characterizing the post habituation period.

  18. IR Observations of Mars during the August 2003 Opposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, J.; Chamberlain, S.; Walter, M.; Crisp, D.

    We present some preliminary results of observations obtained during the very favourable opposition of Mars in August 2003 using the UIST instrument on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) at Mauna Kea, Hawaii. We obtained narrow band images, which we believe are probably the sharpest ever obtained with a ground-based telescope, as well as spectral scans of the disk at a range of near-IR wavelengths and resolving powers. The observations include absorption features of atmospheric gases, CO2 ice at the south pole, and water ice in the north. We can use the atmospheric CO2 band strength to image the distribution of surface atmospheric pressure and hence topography. The data may be used to search for absorption features due to hydrated clay minerals, carbonates and sulphates, which might provide further evidence for the past presence of surface water.

  19. 31. WEST TO PARTS AND TOOLS LOCATED DIRECTLY OPPOSITE FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. WEST TO PARTS AND TOOLS LOCATED DIRECTLY OPPOSITE FROM THE BLACKSMITH SHOP AREA IN THE NORTHEAST QUADRANT OF THE FACTORY. ON THE FLOOR AT THE LEFT SIDE IS A MANUAL PIPE THREADER FOR LARGE-DIAMETER PIPE (AS DROP PIPE IN WELLS FOR WATER SYSTEMS). BENEATH THE BENCH ARE UNMACHINED NEW OLD STOCK MAIN CASTINGS FOR ELI WINDMILLS, TOGETHER WITH A USED MAIN SHAFT/WHEEL HUB/CRANK PLATE ASSEMBLY WITH 1920S-1930S OIL RESERVOIR FROM ELI WINDMILL. THE CIRCULAR CASTING WITH CRESCENT-SHAPED PATTERNS IS A PORTION OF THE CAM MECHANISM FROM A 'WESTERN GEARED GEARLESS' WINDMILL MADE BY THE WESTERN LAND ROLLER CO., HASTINGS, NEB. TO THE RIGHT ON THE BENCH IS A GEARED TIRE BENDER USED TO GIVE CURVATURE TO WHEEL RIMS OF ELI WINDMILLS. IN THE BACKGROUND ARE ... - Kregel Windmill Company Factory, 1416 Central Avenue, Nebraska City, Otoe County, NE

  20. Reconsidering Fault Slip Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomberg, J. S.; Wech, A.; Creager, K. C.; Obara, K.; Agnew, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    The scaling of fault slip events given by the relationship between the scalar moment M0, and duration T, potentially provides key constraints on the underlying physics controlling slip. Many studies have suggested that measurements of M0 and T are related as M0=KfT3 for 'fast' slip events (earthquakes) and M0=KsT for 'slow' slip events, in which Kf and Ks are proportionality constants, although some studies have inferred intermediate relations. Here 'slow' and 'fast' refer to slip front propagation velocities, either so slow that seismic radiation is too small or long period to be measurable or fast enough that dynamic processes may be important for the slip process and measurable seismic waves radiate. Numerous models have been proposed to explain the differing M0-T scaling relations. We show that a single, simple dislocation model of slip events within a bounded slip zone may explain nearly all M0-T observations. Rather than different scaling for fast and slow populations, we suggest that within each population the scaling changes from M0 proportional to T3 to T when the slipping area reaches the slip zone boundaries and transitions from unbounded, 2-dimensional to bounded, 1-dimensional growth. This transition has not been apparent previously for slow events because data have sampled only the bounded regime and may be obscured for earthquakes when observations from multiple tectonic regions are combined. We have attempted to sample the expected transition between bounded and unbounded regimes for the slow slip population, measuring tremor cluster parameters from catalogs for Japan and Cascadia and using them as proxies for small slow slip event characteristics. For fast events we employed published earthquake slip models. Observations corroborate our hypothesis, but highlight observational difficulties. We find that M0-T observations for both slow and fast slip events, spanning 12 orders of magnitude in M0, are consistent with a single model based on dislocation

  1. Cause of the Infrared Opposition Surge in Saturn's C Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Neal J.; Morishima, Ryuji; Spilker, Linda

    2016-10-01

    Saturn's C ring shows an opposition surge at infrared wavelengths, perhaps due to inter or intra-particle surface roughness. Blackbody fits to data from the Cassini spacecraft's Composite Infrared Spectrometer at wavelengths 20-200 um yield temperatures that rise about 4 K per radian as the solar phase angle decreases towards zero, while fits at 13.3-16.7 um yield slopes up to 8 K per radian. We explore ring particle structures compatible with this dependence on phase angle and wavelength, using Monte Carlo radiative transfer modeling. The candidate ring particle is illuminated with photon packets having wavelengths drawn from the Solar spectrum. When absorbed and re-emitted within the particle, the packets are given new wavelengths drawn from the local thermal spectrum. Each packet undergoes repeated scattering, absorption and re-emission till it escapes to infinity, so that energy is conserved exactly. The wavelength-dependent volume absorption and scattering coefficients and scattering anisotropy come from Mie calculations in which we assume the meter-sized ring particle is made up of spherical ice grains with a power-law distribution in size from um to cm. Diffraction is removed by the delta-Eddington method, since the grains lie too close together for the diffraction that occurs around isolated bodies. The Monte Carlo transfer calculations thus treat both regolith radiative transfer and the self-illumination possible on irregular surfaces. The results indicate the opposition surge is consistent with the C ring's particles having significant surface roughness in the form of craters or pits.

  2. Firearm homicide and firearm suicide: opposite but equal.

    PubMed Central

    Branas, Charles C.; Richmond, Therese S.; Schwab, C. William

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Homicide and suicide are intentional acts of violence that disproportionately involve firearms. Much more effort has been devoted to the ecological study of homicide; methods that have been developed to better understand and subsequently prevent homicide may be applicable to suicide. The purpose of the present study was to compare the occurrence of firearm homicide and firearm suicide using routine activity theory as a framework for analysis. METHODS: Detailed mortality data pertaining to decedents, their neighborhoods, and use of firearms were collected from 1994 to 1998 for the counties containing and surrounding three small to medium-sized U.S. cities. Data from a total of 468 neighborhoods that collectively experienced 1,025 intentional deaths from firearms (396 firearm homicides and 629 firearm suicides) were analyzed. RESULTS: Firearm homicide was consistently associated with out-of-home, nighttime activity in neighborhoods where many people were likely to be coming and going. In an opposite-but-equal fashion, firearm suicide was consistently associated with in-home, daytime activity in out-of-the-way neighborhoods. CONCLUSIONS: Firearm homicide and firearm suicide were found to be consistently associated with markers of routine activity in all three cities, albeit in an opposite-but-equal manner. Because firearm suicides very often occur as lonely events in lonely neighborhoods, they may go under-noticed relative to firearm homicides. More awareness and additional public health studies of firearm suicide, in tandem with firearm homicide, should be pursued to better identify individuals and neighborhoods that are at greatest risk of experiencing each event. PMID:15192897

  3. Line bisection by eye and by hand reveal opposite biases.

    PubMed

    Leonards, Ute; Stone, Samantha; Mohr, Christine

    2013-08-01

    The vision-for-action literature favours the idea that the motor output of an action-whether manual or oculomotor-leads to similar results regarding object handling. Findings on line bisection performance challenge this idea: healthy individuals bisect lines manually to the left of centre and to the right of centre when using eye fixation. In case that these opposite biases for manual and oculomotor action reflect more universal compensatory mechanisms that cancel each other out to enhance overall accuracy, one would like to observe comparable opposite biases for other material. In the present study, we report on three independent experiments in which we tested line bisection (by hand, by eye fixation) not only for solid lines, but also for letter lines; the latter, when bisected manually, is known to result in a rightward bias. Accordingly, we expected a leftward bias for letter lines when bisected via eye fixation. Analysis of bisection biases provided evidence for this idea: manual bisection was more rightward for letter as compared to solid lines, while bisection by eye fixation was more leftward for letter as compared to solid lines. Support for the eye fixation observation was particularly obvious in two of the three studies, for which comparability between eye and hand action was increasingly adjusted (paper-pencil versus touch screen for manual action). These findings question the assumption that ocular motor and manual output are always inter-changeable, but rather suggest that at least for some situations ocular motor and manual output biases are orthogonal to each other, possibly balancing each other out.

  4. Community water fluoridation support and opposition in Australia.

    PubMed

    Armfield, J M; Akers, H F

    2011-03-01

    To estimate the level of support for water fluoridation across Australia and examine the association between water fluoridation stance and demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, commitment to the stance, and opinions, beliefs and knowledge regarding water fluoridation. Cross-sectional questionnaire data were obtained from 510 Australian adults (response rate = 34%) in 2008. Data were weighted by age, gender and state and territory estimated resident population. Participants were asked to rate the strength of their support for or opposition to water fluoridation on a 7-point scale. Approximately 70% of survey respondents supported water fluoridation, 15.4% were opposed, and 14.5% were neutral. Those strongly opposed were most resistant to altering their opinion on the basis of new information or research. However, approximately 90% of people who were neutral, slightly supportive or moderately supportive would "maybe" or "definitely" change their stance. Fluoridation opposition was associated with lower income and educational attainment, more self-rated knowledge, and with beliefs about reduced benefits and greater harms. Opinions about who should be responsible for the introduction of water fluoridation and sources of information on fluoridation varied significantly by water fluoridation opinion. While this survey lends further weight to the evidence confirming extensive support for water fluoridation in Australia, a large percentage of the public may be open to changing their stance if presented with new information or research. To maintain the widespread acceptance of water fluoridation, it is important that the public are provided with unbiased and accurate interpretations of the continual stream of research related to fluorides and water fluoridation.

  5. Risk perception and water fluoridation support and opposition in Australia.

    PubMed

    Armfield, Jason Mathew; Akers, Harry Francis

    2010-01-01

    A considerable body of evidence confirms that water fluoridation effectively reduces the community incidence of dental caries with minimal side effects. However, proposals to introduce this widely endorsed public-health measure are often perceived as controversial, and public opinion frequently plays a role in the outcome. Despite this, the public's perception of risk associated with water fluoridation has not been well researched and remains poorly understood. Our objectives were to determine whether risk perceptions reflecting various "outrage" factors are associated with water fluoridation support and opposition. We conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire survey of a national sample of 517 Australian adults (response rate = 34.7 percent) aged 18-92 years. Approximately 70.5 percent of respondents supported water fluoridation, with 15.1 percent opposed and 14.3 percent neutral. Sixteen of the 20 assessed outrage factors were significantly associated with water fluoridation stance in the predicted direction, with greater outrage being related to increased water fluoridation opposition. An overall outrage index computed from the 16 significant outrage factors accounted for a statistically significant 58 percent of the variance in water fluoridation stance beyond the effects of age, gender, socioeconomic status, and age and presence of children. Outrage factors are important aspects of the public's perception of risk in relation to water fluoridation. Given that water fluoridation appears to be a low-risk, high-outrage controversy, efforts to mitigate the level of public outrage, rather than continuing to deny possible hazards, may offer a worthwhile strategy in gaining public acceptance for the extension of water fluoridation.

  6. University opposition to unfettered research: a new bedfellow for biotech?

    PubMed

    Record, Katherine L

    2012-01-01

    This Article examines university opposition to a proposed statutory exemption to infringement liability for basic genetic research and patient care. Gene patenting has allowed patentees to bar basic genetic research, slowing the progress of developing and administering diagnostics and gene-targeting therapeutics. Debates over the merits of gene patents have been heated, most recently leading to an unprecedented invalidation of several broad patents covering all variations and use of two genes linked to breast and ovarian cancers. More important, however (as this ruling was reversed in part), are proposed statutory exemptions to infringement liability. The Department of Health and Human Services' Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health, and Society (SACGHS) has promulgated an exemption from liability for infringement that occurs in the course of research. This exemption would promote basic research by granting academic scientists unfettered access to genetic material. The proposal does not alter the patentability of gene sequences; it merely restricts patentees from using infringement threats to stop research. Surprisingly, the Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM), an organization responsible for promoting development of university research, opposes such an exemption. The AUTM alleges that the exemption would slow research by reducing the incentive for private firms to invest in upstream discoveries made in university laboratories. Yet the exemption would do the opposite: by opening the doors to research relating to any gene segment, a research exemption would accelerate basic research. Moreover, it would not affect collaboration with private industry: where there is potential to commercialize basic research, biomedical companies would continue to license the rights to university discoveries. Thus, the AUTM's motivations in opposing the proposed research exemption are suspect. They appear to reflect either a misunderstanding of the purpose

  7. Transient Faults in Computer Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, Gerald M.

    1993-01-01

    A powerful technique particularly appropriate for the detection of errors caused by transient faults in computer systems was developed. The technique can be implemented in either software or hardware; the research conducted thus far primarily considered software implementations. The error detection technique developed has the distinct advantage of having provably complete coverage of all errors caused by transient faults that affect the output produced by the execution of a program. In other words, the technique does not have to be tuned to a particular error model to enhance error coverage. Also, the correctness of the technique can be formally verified. The technique uses time and software redundancy. The foundation for an effective, low-overhead, software-based certification trail approach to real-time error detection resulting from transient fault phenomena was developed.

  8. Recordings of the 2004 Parkfield Earthquake on the General Earthquake Observation System Array: Implications for Earthquake Precursors, Fault Rupture, and Coseismic Strain Changes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Borcherdt, R.D.; Johnston, M.J.S.; Glassmoyer, G.; Dietel, C.

    2006-01-01

    The 2004 Parkfield earthquake generated a unique set of near-field, high-resolution colocated measurements of acceleration, volumetric strain, and velocity at 11 stations in the General Earthquake Observation System (GEOS) array. The recordings indicate no precursory strain or displacement was discernable at sensitivities of 10-11 strain and 5 ?? 10 -8 m 25 sec prior to the earthquake at distances of 0.5 to 12 km of fault rupture. Coherent fault-parallel and fault-normal displacement pulses, observed along the fault north of the epicenter, are consistent with model predictions for "fling," directivity, and displacement for right-lateral, strike-slip fault rupture. The fault-parallel and fault-normal pulses imply apparent rupture velocities of 2.86 ?? 0.15 and 3.03 ?? 0.24 km/sec, respectively. Unprecedented high-resolution volumetric-strain recordings on opposite sides of the fault show that dynamic strains radiated from ruptured segments of the fault are more than an order of magnitude larger than final coseismic strain offsets associated with fault slip, suggesting that dynamic radiated strain may have contributed to the triggering of failure on unruptured segments. High-resolution recordings show that coseismic strain offsets occur abruptly over time intervals of less than 10 sec near the time of arrival of the dominant radiated fault-parallel and fault-normal displacements. Subsequent measurements show that the strain offsets continue to increase by as much as 69% in 5 min and 300% in 24 hr over that measured during initial fault slip at depth. Estimates of local material parameters from simultaneous measurements of volumetric strain and acceleration confirm seismic calibration factors previously measurable in situ only at tidal periods.

  9. InSAR measurements around active faults: creeping Philippine Fault and un-creeping Alpine Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time-series analyses have been frequently applied to measure the time-series of small and quasi-steady displacements in wide areas. Large efforts in the methodological developments have been made to pursue higher temporal and spatial resolutions by using frequently acquired SAR images and detecting more pixels that exhibit phase stability. While such a high resolution is indispensable for tracking displacements of man-made and other small-scale structures, it is not necessarily needed and can be unnecessarily computer-intensive for measuring the crustal deformation associated with active faults and volcanic activities. I apply a simple and efficient method to measure the deformation around the Alpine Fault in the South Island of New Zealand, and the Philippine Fault in the Leyte Island. I use a small-baseline subset (SBAS) analysis approach (Berardino, et al., 2002). Generally, the more we average the pixel values, the more coherent the signals are. Considering that, for the deformation around active faults, the spatial resolution can be as coarse as a few hundred meters, we can severely 'multi-look' the interferograms. The two applied cases in this study benefited from this approach; I could obtain the mean velocity maps on practically the entire area without discarding decorrelated areas. The signals could have been only partially obtained by standard persistent scatterer or single-look small-baseline approaches that are much more computer-intensive. In order to further increase the signal detection capability, it is sometimes effective to introduce a processing algorithm adapted to the signal of interest. In an InSAR time-series processing, one usually needs to set the reference point because interferograms are all relative measurements. It is difficult, however, to fix the reference point when one aims to measure long-wavelength deformation signals that span the whole analysis area. This problem can be

  10. Growth of faults in crystalline rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, S. J.

    2009-04-01

    The growth of faults depends on the coupled interplay of the distribution of slip, fault geometry, the stress field in the host rock, and deformation of the host rock, which commonly is manifest in secondary fracturing. The distribution of slip along a fault depends highly on its structure, the stress perturbation associated with its interaction with nearby faults, and its strength distribution; mechanical analyses indicate that the first two factors are more influential than the third. Slip distribution data typically are discrete, but commonly are described, either explicitly or implicitly, using continuous interpolation schemes. Where the third derivative of a continuous slip profile is discontinuous, the compatibility conditions of strain are violated, and fracturing and perturbations to fault geometry should occur. Discontinuous third derivatives accompany not only piecewise linear functions, but also functions as seemingly benign as cubic splines. The stress distribution and fracture distribution along a fault depends strongly on how the fault grows. Evidence to date indicates that a fault that nucleates along a pre-existing, nearly planar joint or a dike typically develops secondary fractures only near its tipline when the slip is small relative to the fault length. In contrast, stress concentrations and fractures are predicted where a discontinuous or non-planar fault exhibits steps and bends; field observations bear this prediction out. Secondary fracturing influences how faults grow by creating damage zones and by linking originally discontinuous elements into a single fault zone. Field observations of both strike-slip faults and dip-slip faults show that linked segments usually will not be coplanar; elastic stress analyses indicate that this is an inherent tendency of how three-dimensional faults grow. Advances in the data we collect and in the rigor and sophistication of our analyses seem essential to substantially advance our ability to successfully

  11. Faulting at Mormon Point, Death Valley, California: A low-angle normal fault cut by high-angle faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keener, Charles; Serpa, Laura; Pavlis, Terry L.

    1993-04-01

    New geophysical and fault kinematic studies indicate that late Cenozoic basin development in the Mormon Point area of Death Valley, California, was accommodated by fault rotations. Three of six fault segments recognized at Mormon Point are now inactive and have been rotated to low dips during extension. The remaining three segments are now active and moderately to steeply dipping. From the geophysical data, one active segment appears to offset the low-angle faults in the subsurface of Death Valley.

  12. Is There an Oppositional Culture among Immigrant Adolescents in the Netherlands?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Tubergen, Frank; van Gaans, Milou

    2016-01-01

    This study examines oppositional culture among immigrant and majority adolescents in the Netherlands. Oppositional culture theory expects that immigrant adolescents would uphold positive attitudes towards education. The social exclusion theory predicts instead that immigrant adolescents develop an oppositional culture, particularly in ethnically…

  13. Is There an Oppositional Culture among Immigrant Adolescents in the Netherlands?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Tubergen, Frank; van Gaans, Milou

    2016-01-01

    This study examines oppositional culture among immigrant and majority adolescents in the Netherlands. Oppositional culture theory expects that immigrant adolescents would uphold positive attitudes towards education. The social exclusion theory predicts instead that immigrant adolescents develop an oppositional culture, particularly in ethnically…

  14. Dimensions of Oppositionality in a Brazilian Community Sample: Testing the "DSM-5" Proposal and Etiological Links

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieger, Fernanda Valle.; Polanczyk, Guilherme Vanoni; Goodman, Robert; Rohde, Luis Augusto; Graeff-Martins, Ana Soledade; Salum, Giovanni; Gadelha, Ary; Pan, Pedro; Stahl, Daniel; Stringaris, Argyris

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Investigating dimensions of oppositional symptoms may help to explain heterogeneity of etiology and outcomes for mental disorders across development and provide further empirical justification for the "DSM-5"-proposed modifications of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD). However, dimensions of oppositionality have not…

  15. Dimensions of Oppositionality in a Brazilian Community Sample: Testing the "DSM-5" Proposal and Etiological Links

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieger, Fernanda Valle.; Polanczyk, Guilherme Vanoni; Goodman, Robert; Rohde, Luis Augusto; Graeff-Martins, Ana Soledade; Salum, Giovanni; Gadelha, Ary; Pan, Pedro; Stahl, Daniel; Stringaris, Argyris

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Investigating dimensions of oppositional symptoms may help to explain heterogeneity of etiology and outcomes for mental disorders across development and provide further empirical justification for the "DSM-5"-proposed modifications of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD). However, dimensions of oppositionality have not…

  16. Seismology: Diary of a wimpy fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürgmann, Roland

    2015-05-01

    Subduction zone faults can slip slowly, generating tremor. The varying correlation between tidal stresses and tremor occurring deep in the Cascadia subduction zone suggests that the fault is inherently weak, and gets weaker as it slips.

  17. Parametric Modeling and Fault Tolerant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, N. Eva; Ju, Jianhong

    2000-01-01

    Fault tolerant control is considered for a nonlinear aircraft model expressed as a linear parameter-varying system. By proper parameterization of foreseeable faults, the linear parameter-varying system can include fault effects as additional varying parameters. A recently developed technique in fault effect parameter estimation allows us to assume that estimates of the fault effect parameters are available on-line. Reconfigurability is calculated for this model with respect to the loss of control effectiveness to assess the potentiality of the model to tolerate such losses prior to control design. The control design is carried out by applying a polytopic method to the aircraft model. An error bound on fault effect parameter estimation is provided, within which the Lyapunov stability of the closed-loop system is robust. Our simulation results show that as long as the fault parameter estimates are sufficiently accurate, the polytopic controller can provide satisfactory fault-tolerance.

  18. Solar Dynamic Power System Fault Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momoh, James A.; Dias, Lakshman G.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to conduct various fault simulation studies for diagnosing the type and location of faults in the power distribution system. Different types of faults are simulated at different locations within the distribution system and the faulted waveforms are monitored at measurable nodes such as at the output of the DDCU's. These fault signatures are processed using feature extractors such as FFT and wavelet transforms. The extracted features are fed to a clustering based neural network for training and subsequent testing using previously unseen data. Different load models consisting of constant impedance and constant power are used for the loads. Open circuit faults and short circuit faults are studied. It is concluded from present studies that using features extracted from wavelet transforms give better success rates during ANN testing. The trained ANN's are capable of diagnosing fault types and approximate locations in the solar dynamic power distribution system.

  19. An experimental study of memory fault latency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chillarege, Ram; Iyer, Ravi K.

    1989-01-01

    The difficulty with the measurement of fault latency is due to the lack of observability of the fault occurrence and error generation instants in a production environment. The authors describe an experiment, using data from a VAX 11/780 under real workload, to study fault latency in the memory subsystem accurately. Fault latency distributions are generated for stuck-at-zero (s-a-0) and stuck-at-one (s-a-1) permanent fault models. The results show that the mean fault latency of an s-a-0 fault is nearly five times that of the s-a-1 fault. An analysis of variance is performed to quantify the relative influence of different workload measures on the evaluated latency.

  20. Detection of faults and software reliability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    Specific topics briefly addressed include: the consistent comparison problem in N-version system; analytic models of comparison testing; fault tolerance through data diversity; and the relationship between failures caused by automatically seeded faults.

  1. A summary of the active fault investigation in the extension sea area of Kikugawa fault and the Nishiyama fault , N-S direction fault in south west Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, S.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we carried out two sets of active fault investigation by the request from Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in the sea area of the extension of Kikugawa fault and the Nishiyama fault. We want to clarify the five following matters about both active faults based on those results. (1)Fault continuity of the land and the sea. (2) The length of the active fault. (3) The division of the segment. (4) Activity characteristics. In this investigation, we carried out a digital single channel seismic reflection survey in the whole area of both active faults. In addition, a high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection survey was carried out to recognize the detailed structure of a shallow stratum. Furthermore, the sampling with the vibrocoring to get information of the sedimentation age was carried out. The reflection profile of both active faults was extremely clear. The characteristics of the lateral fault such as flower structure, the dispersion of the active fault were recognized. In addition, from analysis of the age of the stratum, it was recognized that the thickness of the sediment was extremely thin in Holocene epoch on the continental shelf in this sea area. It was confirmed that the Kikugawa fault extended to the offing than the existing results of research by a result of this investigation. In addition, the width of the active fault seems to become wide toward the offing while dispersing. At present, we think that we can divide Kikugawa fault into some segments based on the distribution form of the segment. About the Nishiyama fault, reflection profiles to show the existence of the active fault was acquired in the sea between Ooshima and Kyushu. From this result and topographical existing results of research in Ooshima, it is thought that Nishiyama fault and the Ooshima offing active fault are a series of structure. As for Ooshima offing active fault, the upheaval side changes, and a direction changes too. Therefore, we

  2. Oppositional Defiant Behavior toward Adults and Oppositional Defiant Behavior toward Other Children: Evidence for Two Separate Constructs with Mothers' and Fathers' Ratings of Brazilian Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Moura, Marcela Alves; Burns, G. Leonard

    2010-01-01

    Background: Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to determine if oppositional defiant behavior (ODB) toward adults and oppositional defiant behavior toward other children were constructs distinct from each other as well as from attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder-hyperactivity/impulsivity (ADHD-HI), attention-deficit/hyperactivity…

  3. Tectonic Inheritance at Transform Faults in Successive Wilson Cycles (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, W. A.

    2010-12-01

    , but not at, the rift margin. Continental breakup generally is interpreted to include shallow brittle extension of the upper crust and deeper extensional ductile flow of the lower crust and mantle lithosphere perpendicular to the continental rift and parallel with transform faults. Brittle, extensional listric faults flatten downward into the brittle-ductile transition or lower crust. Kinematic considerations require that transform faults are nearly vertical brittle fractures in the crust and extend down into zones of ductile shear in the mantle lithosphere. Ductile extension in the mantle lithosphere beneath continental crust some distance inboard from the opening rift accounts for brittle extensional faults in the upper crust inboard from the rift margin. Because the magnitude of ductile extension must decrease with distance from the opening rift, large transform-fault offsets of a continental margin must bound domains of differential flow on opposite sides of the transform, generating a zone of distributed ductile shear in the mantle lithosphere along the transform. Seismic anisotropy provides a record of transform-parallel distributed-shear fabric along transforms in the mantle lithosphere. Tectonic inheritance of large-scale transforms from one Wilson cycle to another indicates long-term preservation of the distributed shear fabric.

  4. Hydraulic Diagnostics and Fault Isolation Test Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-13

    and Fault Isolation Test Program was to demonstrate and evaluate the practicality of a fault detection and isolation system on an aircraft. The...system capable of fault detection and isolation in a hydraulic subsystem through the use of sensors and a microprocessor (Fig. 1). The microprocessor...DISCUSSION 2.1 DESCRIPTION OF HYDRAULIC SYSTEM SIMULATOR The fault detection and isolation test arrangement consisted of a high pressure, lightweight

  5. Does fault size control earthquake size?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, A.; Jackson, D.

    2003-04-01

    We examine the hypothesis that earthquake size is limited by fault length. Large earthquakes generally have longer and wider rupture surfaces and greater displacement than small ones. Several publications (e.g. Wells and Coppersmith, 1995) present regression relationships between earthquake size and extent of faulting. In these studies, earthquake size is generally measured by the seismic moment and faulting extent is measured by length or area of the rupture surface. The regression relationships are frequently used to estimate the upper magnitude limit for future earthquakes based on the dimensions of mapped faults. Two assumptions are crucial: (1) that future ruptures will be limited by the mapped fault dimensions, and (2) that the relationship between earthquake size and fault rupture is the same for ordinary earthquakes as for fault-limited ones. To test the first assumption we compared rupture lengths of California earthquakes with previously mapped fault length. There are 14 California earthquakes and 5 Italian earthquakes after 1976 for which this comparison can be made. Neither rupture length nor moment correlates significantly with prior fault length. For five California and three Italian events, the rupture extends beyond both ends of the previously mapped fault, or else there was no mapped fault. None of the 19 ruptures stopped at the end of a fault trace. For California and Italy, earthquakes don't stop at the ends of mapped faults, assumption (1) fails, and the regression relationships are not valid estimators of maximum magnitude. Today's faults were not always there, so some earthquakes must create or lengthen faults However, we don't know whether the maverick earthquakes actually ruptured virgin rock, or whether the fault maps were merely inadequate.

  6. Ground Fault--A Health Hazard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Clinton O.

    1977-01-01

    A ground fault is especially hazardous because the resistance through which the current is flowing to ground may be sufficient to cause electrocution. The Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (G.F.C.I.) protects 15 and 25 ampere 120 volt circuits from ground fault condition. The design and examples of G.F.C.I. functions are described in this article.…

  7. Fault-related clay authigenesis along the Moab Fault: Implications for calculations of fault rock composition and mechanical and hydrologic fault zone properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solum, J.G.; Davatzes, N.C.; Lockner, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of clays in fault rocks influences both the mechanical and hydrologic properties of clay-bearing faults, and therefore it is critical to understand the origin of clays in fault rocks and their distributions is of great importance for defining fundamental properties of faults in the shallow crust. Field mapping shows that layers of clay gouge and shale smear are common along the Moab Fault, from exposures with throws ranging from 10 to ???1000 m. Elemental analyses of four locations along the Moab Fault show that fault rocks are enriched in clays at R191 and Bartlett Wash, but that this clay enrichment occurred at different times and was associated with different fluids. Fault rocks at Corral and Courthouse Canyons show little difference in elemental composition from adjacent protolith, suggesting that formation of fault rocks at those locations is governed by mechanical processes. Friction tests show that these authigenic clays result in fault zone weakening, and potentially influence the style of failure along the fault (seismogenic vs. aseismic) and potentially influence the amount of fluid loss associated with coseismic dilation. Scanning electron microscopy shows that authigenesis promotes that continuity of slip surfaces, thereby enhancing seal capacity. The occurrence of the authigenesis, and its influence on the sealing properties of faults, highlights the importance of determining the processes that control this phenomenon. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Ground Fault--A Health Hazard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Clinton O.

    1977-01-01

    A ground fault is especially hazardous because the resistance through which the current is flowing to ground may be sufficient to cause electrocution. The Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (G.F.C.I.) protects 15 and 25 ampere 120 volt circuits from ground fault condition. The design and examples of G.F.C.I. functions are described in this article.…

  9. Measurement and application of fault latency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, K. G.; Lee, Y.-H.

    1986-01-01

    The time interval between the occurrence of a fault and the detection of the error caused by the fault is divided by the generation of that error into two parts: fault latency and error latency. Since the moment of error generation is not directly observable, all related works in the literature have dealt with only the sum of fault and error latencies, thereby making the analysis of their separate effects impossible. To remedy this deficiency, (1) a new methodology for indirectly measuring fault latency is presented; the distribution of fault latency is derived from the methodology; and (3) the knowledge of fault latency is applied to the analysis of two important examples. The proposed methodology has been implemented for measuring fault latency in the Fault-Tolerant Multiprocessor (FTMP) at the NASA Airlab. The experimental results show wide variations in the mean fault latencies of different function circuits within FTMP. Also, the measured distributions of fault latency are shown to have monotone hazard rates. Consequently, Gamma and Weibull distributions are selected for the least-squares fit as the distribution of fault latency.

  10. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.

    1997-02-04

    A fault current limiter for an electrical circuit is disclosed. The fault current limiter includes a high temperature superconductor in the electrical circuit. The high temperature superconductor is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter. 15 figs.

  11. High temperature superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.

    1997-01-01

    A fault current limiter (10) for an electrical circuit (14). The fault current limiter (10) includes a high temperature superconductor (12) in the electrical circuit (14). The high temperature superconductor (12) is cooled below its critical temperature to maintain the superconducting electrical properties during operation as the fault current limiter (10).

  12. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees... § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment may be waived, it must be determined that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If recovery is sought from other than...

  13. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEBT COLLECTION Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of commission or omission...

  14. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees... § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment may be waived, it must be determined that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If recovery is sought from other than...

  15. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEBT COLLECTION Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of commission or omission...

  16. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees... § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment may be waived, it must be determined that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If recovery is sought from other than...

  17. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402...) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of commission or omission which resulted in the overpayment. The...

  18. 40 CFR 258.13 - Fault areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fault areas. 258.13 Section 258.13... SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.13 Fault areas. (a) New MSWLF units and lateral expansions shall not be located within 200 feet (60 meters) of a fault that has had displacement in...

  19. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEBT COLLECTION Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of commission or omission...

  20. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEBT COLLECTION Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of commission or omission...

  1. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402...) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of commission or omission which resulted in the overpayment. The...

  2. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402...) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of commission or omission which resulted in the overpayment. The...

  3. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402...) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of commission or omission which resulted in the overpayment. The...

  4. 5 CFR 845.302 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fault. 845.302 Section 845.302... EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-DEBT COLLECTION Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 845.302 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he or she performed no act of commission or omission...

  5. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees... § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment may be waived, it must be determined that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If recovery is sought from other than...

  6. 20 CFR 255.11 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fault. 255.11 Section 255.11 Employees... § 255.11 Fault. (a) Before recovery of an overpayment may be waived, it must be determined that the overpaid individual was without fault in causing the overpayment. If recovery is sought from other than...

  7. 5 CFR 831.1402 - Fault.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fault. 831.1402 Section 831.1402...) RETIREMENT Standards for Waiver of Overpayments § 831.1402 Fault. A recipient of an overpayment is without fault if he/she performed no act of commission or omission which resulted in the overpayment. The...

  8. Tsunamis and splay fault dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wendt, J.; Oglesby, D.D.; Geist, E.L.

    2009-01-01

    The geometry of a fault system can have significant effects on tsunami generation, but most tsunami models to date have not investigated the dynamic processes that determine which path rupture will take in a complex fault system. To gain insight into this problem, we use the 3D finite element method to model the dynamics of a plate boundary/splay fault system. We use the resulting ground deformation as a time-dependent boundary condition for a 2D shallow-water hydrodynamic tsunami calculation. We find that if me stress distribution is homogeneous, rupture remains on the plate boundary thrust. When a barrier is introduced along the strike of the plate boundary thrust, rupture propagates to the splay faults, and produces a significantly larger tsunami man in the homogeneous case. The results have implications for the dynamics of megathrust earthquakes, and also suggest mat dynamic earthquake modeling may be a useful tool in tsunami researcn. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. MOS integrated circuit fault modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sievers, M.

    1985-01-01

    Three digital simulation techniques for MOS integrated circuit faults were examined. These techniques embody a hierarchy of complexity bracketing the range of simulation levels. The digital approaches are: transistor-level, connector-switch-attenuator level, and gate level. The advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Failure characteristics are also described.

  10. Fault current limiters using superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, W. T.; Power, A.

    Fault current limiters on power systems are to reduce damage by heating and electromechanical forces, to alleviate duty on switchgear used to clear the fault, and to mitigate disturbance to unfaulted parts of the system. A basic scheme involves a super-resistor which is a superconductor being driven to high resistance when fault current flows either when current is high during a cycle of a.c. or, if the temperature of the superconductive material rises, for the full cycle. Current may be commuted from superconductor to an impedance in parallel, thus reducing the energy dispersed at low temperature and saving refrigeration. In a super-shorted transformer the ambient temperature primary carries the power system current; the superconductive secondary goes to a resistive condition when excessive currents flow in the primary. A super-transformer has the advantage of not needing current leads from high temperature to low temperature; it behaves as a parallel super-resistor and inductor. The supertransductor with a superconductive d.c. bias winding is large and has small effect on the rate of fall of current at current zero; it does little to alleviate duty on switchgear but does reduce heating and electromechanical forces. It is fully active after a fault has been cleared. Other schemes depend on rapid recooling of the superconductor to achieve this.

  11. Fault Tolerant Frequent Pattern Mining

    SciTech Connect

    Shohdy, Sameh; Vishnu, Abhinav; Agrawal, Gagan

    2016-12-19

    FP-Growth algorithm is a Frequent Pattern Mining (FPM) algorithm that has been extensively used to study correlations and patterns in large scale datasets. While several researchers have designed distributed memory FP-Growth algorithms, it is pivotal to consider fault tolerant FP-Growth, which can address the increasing fault rates in large scale systems. In this work, we propose a novel parallel, algorithm-level fault-tolerant FP-Growth algorithm. We leverage algorithmic properties and MPI advanced features to guarantee an O(1) space complexity, achieved by using the dataset memory space itself for checkpointing. We also propose a recovery algorithm that can use in-memory and disk-based checkpointing, though in many cases the recovery can be completed without any disk access, and incurring no memory overhead for checkpointing. We evaluate our FT algorithm on a large scale InfiniBand cluster with several large datasets using up to 2K cores. Our evaluation demonstrates excellent efficiency for checkpointing and recovery in comparison to the disk-based approach. We have also observed 20x average speed-up in comparison to Spark, establishing that a well designed algorithm can easily outperform a solution based on a general fault-tolerant programming model.

  12. Cell boundary fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian Edward

    2011-04-19

    An apparatus and program product determine a nodal fault along the boundary, or face, of a computing cell. Nodes on adjacent cell boundaries communicate with each other, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  13. Geometric Analyses of Rotational Faults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwert, Donald Peters; Peck, Wesley David

    1986-01-01

    Describes the use of analysis of rotational faults in undergraduate structural geology laboratories to provide students with applications of both orthographic and stereographic techniques. A demonstration problem is described, and an orthographic/stereographic solution and a reproducible black model demonstration pattern are provided. (TW)

  14. Deep pulverization along active faults ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, M.

    2013-12-01

    Pulverization is a intensive damage observed along some active faults. Rarely found in the field, it has been associated with dynamic damage produced by large earthquakes. Pulverization has been so far only described at the ground surface, consistent with the high frequency tensile loading expected for earthquake occurring along bimaterial faults. However, we discuss here a series of hints suggesting that pulverization is expected also several hundred of meters deep. In the deep well drilled within Nojima fault after the 1995 Kobe earthquake, thin sections reveal non localized damage, with microfractured pervading a sample, but with little shear disturbing the initial microstructure. In the SAFOD borehole drilled near Parkfield, Wiersberg and Erzinger (2008) made gas monitoring while drilling found large amount of H2 gas in the sandstone west to the fault. They attribute this high H2 concentration to mechanochemical origin, in accordance with some example of diffuse microfracturing found in thin sections from cores of SAFOD phase 3 and from geophysical data from logs. High strain rate experiments in both dry (Yuan et al, 2011) and wet samples (Forquin et al, 2010) show that even under confining pressures of several tens of megapascals, diffuse damage similar to pulverization is possible. This could explain the occurrence of pulverization at depth.

  15. Implementing fault-tolerant sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzullo, Keith

    1989-01-01

    One aspect of fault tolerance in process control programs is the ability to tolerate sensor failure. A methodology is presented for transforming a process control program that cannot tolerate sensor failures to one that can. Additionally, a hierarchy of failure models is identified.

  16. MOS integrated circuit fault modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sievers, M.

    1985-01-01

    Three digital simulation techniques for MOS integrated circuit faults were examined. These techniques embody a hierarchy of complexity bracketing the range of simulation levels. The digital approaches are: transistor-level, connector-switch-attenuator level, and gate level. The advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Failure characteristics are also described.

  17. Embryonic pattern scaling achieved by oppositely directed morphogen gradients.

    PubMed

    McHale, Peter; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Levine, Herbert

    2006-05-16

    Morphogens are proteins, often produced in a localized region, whose concentrations spatially demarcate regions of differing gene expression in developing embryos. The boundaries of gene expression are typically sharp and the genes can be viewed as abruptly switching from on to off or vice versa upon crossing the boundary. To ensure the viability of the organism these boundaries must be set at certain fractional positions within the corresponding developing field. Remarkably this can be done with high precision despite the fact that the size of the developing field itself can vary widely from embryo to embryo. How this scaling is accomplished is unknown but it is clear that a single morphogen gradient is insufficient. Here we show how a pair of morphogens A and B, produced at opposite ends of a one-dimensional developing field, can solve the pattern-scaling problem. In the most promising scenario the morphogens interact via an effective annihilation reaction A + B --> slashed circle and the switch occurs according to the absolute concentration of A or B. We define a scaling criterion and show that morphogens coupled in this way can set embryonic markers across the entire developing field in proportion to the field size. This scaling occurs at developing-field sizes of a few times the morphogen decay length. The scaling criterion is not met if instead the gradients couple combinatorially such that downstream genes are regulated by the ratio A/B of the morphogen concentrations.

  18. Study on Consumer Opposition to Exporting Recyclable Wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Koizumi, Kunishige; Zhou, Weisheng

    Trans-boundary trade from Japan to China of recyclable wastes such as waste copper has increased rapidly, because of resource demands through economic growth. These wastes are recycled at high rates thanks to the Chinese manual recycling process by a lot of low wage migrant workers from rural districts. China benefits by supplying jobs to many migrant workers and getting cheap resources. Although, Japanese consumers may have some opposition to exporting end-of-pipe home appliance wastes to foreign countries. From the results of the path-analysis from the questionnaire to Japanese consumers, it became clear that their reluctance came from anxiety about illegal dumping, the labor environment at the import country and the destruction of the ecosystem. Through conjoint analysis, willingness to pay the recycling fee decreases - 1,625 yen (equal to 34% of the current recycling fee of 4,630 yen) when choosing global recycling as opposed to domestic recycling, hypothesizing that consumers would rather recycle domestically instead of globally.

  19. Underwater Reversible Adhesion Between Oppositely Charged Weak Polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfhaid, Latifah; Geoghegan, Mark; Williams, Nicholas; Seddon, William

    2015-03-01

    Force-distance data has shown that the adhesion between two oppositely charged polyelectrolytes: poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA, a polyacid) and poly[2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDEAEMA, a polybase), was controllable by varying the pH level of their surrounding. Accordingly, adhesive force at the interface between these two polymers was higher inside basic surroundings at pH 6 and 7, and then it started to decrease at pH level below 3 and above 8. Stimulating adhesion between PMAA gel and PDEAEMA brushes by adding salt to their surrounded water has only a limited effect on the adhesive force between them, contradicting previous results. Increasing the molar concentration of sodium chloride (NaCl) in the surrounded water of these two polymers from 0.1 to 1M did not decrease the adhesion forces between a PMAA gel and a grafted PDEAEMA layer (brush). The JKR equation was used to evaluate the adhesion forces between the polymer gel and the brushes and it was observed that the adhesion increased with the elastic modulus of the gel decreased.

  20. Testing Multiple Conceptualizations of Oppositional Defiant Disorder in Youth.

    PubMed

    Ollendick, Thomas H; Booker, Jordan A; Ryan, Sarah; Greene, Ross W

    2017-03-13

    Recent theories conceptualize oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) as a two-dimensional construct with angry/irritable (i.e., affective) and argumentative/defiant (i.e., behavioral) components. This view has been supported by studies of nonreferred youth but not yet examined in clinic-referred youth. In a reanalysis of data regarding children who received one of two psychosocial ODD treatments, we examined multiple conceptualizations of ODD, whether children showed improvements across these ODD dimensions, and whether main and joint effects of ODD dimension improvement predicted clinical outcome. One hundred thirty-four clinic-referred youth (ages 7-14 years, 38% female, 84% White) who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.) criteria for ODD received 1 of 2 psychosocial treatments. At pretreatment, 1-week follow-up, and 6-month follow-up, mothers reported child aggression and conduct problems, clinicians reported global clinical impairment and clinical improvement, and ODD symptom counts were collected from a semistructured diagnostic interview with mothers. Baseline ODD symptom were used to test previously supported multidimensional models. One- and two-factor conceptualizations were supported; however, the two-factor solution was preferred. With this solution, each dimension significantly and similarly improved across treatment conditions. Improvements across affective and behavioral ODD factors also had significant effects on clinician- and mother-reported clinical outcomes. The current findings provide empirical support for the ongoing study of multidimensional ODD conceptualizations in clinic-referred youth.

  1. Surfactant self-assembly in oppositely charged polymer networks. Theory.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Per

    2009-10-01

    The interaction of ionic surfactants with polyion networks of opposite charge in an aqueous environment is analyzed theoretically by applying a recent theory of surfactant ion-polyion complex salts (J. Colloid. Int. Sci. 2009, 332, 183). The theory takes into account attractive and repulsive polyion-mediated interactions between the micelles, the deformation of the polymer network, the mixing of micelles, polyion chains, and simple ions with water, and the hydrophobic free energy at the micelle surface. The theory is used to calculate binding isotherms, swelling isotherms, surfactant aggregation numbers, compositions of complexes,and phase structure under various conditions. Factors controlling the gel volume transition and conditions for core/shell phase coexistence are investigated in detail, as well as the influence of salt. In particular, the interplay between electrostatic and elastic interactions is highlighted. Results from theory are compared with experimental data reported in the literature. The agreement is found to be semiquantitative or qualitative. The theory explains both the discrete volume transition observed in systems where the surfactant is in excess over the polyion and the core/shell phase coexistence in systems where the polyion is in excess.

  2. Infrared photometric behavior and opposition effect of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erard, S.; Bibring, J-P.; Drossart, P.

    1992-01-01

    Although the instrument wasn't designed for this purpose, data from the imaging spectrometer ISM may be used for studying photometric variations of Mars reflectance, that are related to the surface materials and aerosols physical properties. ISM flew aboard the Phobos-2 spacecraft which orbited Mars from January to March, 1989. About 40,000 spectra were acquired in 128 channels ranging from 0.76 to 3.16 micro-m, with a spatial resolution of 25 km and a signal-to-noise ratio ranging up to 1000. Analysis of the results leads to the following conclusions: width variations of the opposition surge can be related to differences in porosity or grain size distribution on the various domains, with little or no effect from suspended dust. As the biggest effects are observed on dark and bright materials, intermediate behaviors on average-bright regions cannot result from a mixing process, but are more likely to come from either cementation processes or modification of the grain size distribution under the influence of wind, which under Martian conditions preferentially removes the biggest particles. Thus, a surface dust consisting in big bright and small dark grains could explain the observations.

  3. Sex-typed play in opposite-sex twins.

    PubMed

    Henderson, B A; Berenbaum, S A

    1997-09-01

    To examine possible prenatal hormonal influences on sex-typed play, we compared girls with a boy co-twin to girls with a girl co-twin and girls with an older brother. In opposite-sex dizygotic twin pairs, the uterine environment may allow transfer of testosterone from the male to the female fetus. Singletons with an older brother provide a control for shared social environment. Girls aged 3 to 8 years (N = 91) were observed playing with sex-typed toys, and mothers completed questionnaires about the child's activities. Contrary to expectation, girls with a boy co-twin did not spend more time playing with boys' toys than girls with a girl co-twin or girls with an older brother. Although these results might suggest that normal variations in hormones do not contribute to within-sex variations in childhood activities, they combine with other work to suggest factors to consider in evaluating hormonal influences on human behavior, including level and timing of exposure.

  4. Infrared photometric behavior and opposition effect of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erard, S.; Bibring, J-P.; Drossart, P.

    1992-01-01

    Although the instrument wasn't designed for this purpose, data from the imaging spectrometer ISM may be used for studying photometric variations of Mars reflectance, that are related to the surface materials and aerosols physical properties. ISM flew aboard the Phobos-2 spacecraft which orbited Mars from January to March, 1989. About 40,000 spectra were acquired in 128 channels ranging from 0.76 to 3.16 micro-m, with a spatial resolution of 25 km and a signal-to-noise ratio ranging up to 1000. Analysis of the results leads to the following conclusions: width variations of the opposition surge can be related to differences in porosity or grain size distribution on the various domains, with little or no effect from suspended dust. As the biggest effects are observed on dark and bright materials, intermediate behaviors on average-bright regions cannot result from a mixing process, but are more likely to come from either cementation processes or modification of the grain size distribution under the influence of wind, which under Martian conditions preferentially removes the biggest particles. Thus, a surface dust consisting in big bright and small dark grains could explain the observations.

  5. Short and Long Term Measures of Anxiety Exhibit Opposite Results

    PubMed Central

    Fonio, Ehud; Benjamini, Yoav; Golani, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    Animal models of human diseases of the central nervous system, generalized anxiety disorder included, are essential for the study of the brain-behavior interface and obligatory for drug development; yet, these models fail to yield new insights and efficacious drugs. By increasing testing duration hundredfold and arena size tenfold, and comparing the behavior of the common animal model to that of wild mice, we raise concerns that chronic anxiety might have been measured at the wrong time, for the wrong duration, and in the wrong animal. Furthermore, the mice start the experimental session with a short period of transient adaptation to the novel environment (habituation period) and a long period reflecting the respective trait of the mice. Using common measures of anxiety reveals that mice exhibit opposite results during these periods suggesting that chronic anxiety should be measured during the post-habituation period. We recommend tools for measuring the transient period, and provide suggestions for characterizing the post habituation period. PMID:23119008

  6. Uncertainty and opposition of medical students toward assisted death practices.

    PubMed

    Warner, T D; Roberts, L W; Smithpeter, M; Rogers, M; Roberts, B; McCarty, T; Franchini, G; Geppert, C; Obenshain, S S

    2001-08-01

    To explore medical students' views of assisted death practices in patient cases that describe different degrees and types of physical and mental suffering, an anonymous survey was administered to all students at one medical school. Respondents were asked about the acceptability of assisted death activities in five patient vignettes and withdrawal of life support in a sixth vignette. In the vignettes, actions were performed by four possible agents: the medical student personally; a referral physician; physicians in general; or non-physicians. Of 306 medical students, 166 (54%) participated. Respondents expressed opposition or uncertainty about assisted death practices in the five patient cases that illustrated severe forms of suffering which were secondary to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, treatment-resistant depressive and somatoform disorders, antisocial and sexually violent behavior, or AIDS. Students supported the withdrawal of life support in the sixth vignette depicting exceptional futility secondary to AIDS. Students were especially opposed to their own involvement and to the participation of non-physicians in assisted death activities. Differences in views related to sex, religious beliefs, and personal philosophy were found. Medical students do not embrace assisted death practices, although they exhibit tolerance regarding the choices of medical colleagues. How these attributes of medical students will translate into future behaviors toward patients and peers remains uncertain. Medical educators must strive to understand the perspectives of physicians-in-training. Expanded, empirically informed education that is attuned to the attitudes of medical students may be helpful in fulfilling the responsibility of imparting optimal clinical care skills.

  7. Doppler effect in opposite propagating modes of cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enaki, Nicolae; Bazgan, Sergiu

    2016-12-01

    It is proposed a new approach in the estimation of quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field and Doppler effect using a model formed from two quantum modes of the cavity which propagate in opposite direction. The Doppler effect plays a significant role in the model in which an atom flies through the nodes and anti-nodes of the standing wave. It is shown that if the vacuum Rabi frequency achieves the value of Doppler shift kv, where k is the wave vector and v represents the atomic velocity, then the collective interactive and non-interactive modes of the resonator become connected. The interaction process looks like in the case of two coupled cavities in one of which is placed an atom. The comparison between the proposed approach and existing time dependent coupling model is given. In our model, it is obtained the non-zero value of quantum fluctuations in the nodes of the standing wave during the time in which atom flies through the cavity.

  8. Developmental pathways in Oppositional Defiant Disorder and Conduct Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Richard; Costello, E. Jane; Angold, Adrian; Copeland, William E; Maughan, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    DSM-IV specifies a developmental relationship between Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) and Conduct Disorder (CD). Evidence for this link is mixed, however, and recent studies suggest that different symptom dimensions in ODD may have different outcomes. We examined links between ODD, CD and their young adult outcomes in the Great Smoky Mountains Study; a longitudinal dataset with over 8000 observations of 1420 individuals (56% male) covering ages 9 to 21 years. ODD was a significant predictor of later CD in boys but not in girls after control for comorbid CD and sub-threshold CD symptomatology. Transitions between ODD and CD were less common than anticipated, however, particularly during adolescence. We examined characteristics and outcomes of children with pure ODD, pure CD and combined CD/ODD. Alongside many similarities in childhood and adolescent correlates, key differences were also identified: CD largely predicted behavioral outcomes, whereas ODD showed stronger prediction to emotional disorders in early adult life. Factor analysis identified irritable and headstrong dimensions in ODD symptoms that showed differential prediction to later behavioral and emotional disorders. Overall, the results underscore the utility of retaining separate ODD and CD diagnoses in DSM-V. PMID:21090876

  9. Precipitation of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes in salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Kudlay, Alexander; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2004-01-01

    We study phase separation in symmetric solutions of weakly charged flexible chains of opposite sign. Precipitation is caused by effective attractions due to charge fluctuations and by short-range attractions between monomers. The contribution from charge fluctuations is computed within the random phase approximation (RPA), which takes into account the connectivity of charges in the polyions. The impenetrability of the ions is accounted for by using a modified Coulomb potential in the RPA. In good solvent conditions the precipitate monotonically swells and eventually dissolves upon addition of salt. However, near the theta-solvent condition, but still in the good solvent, the precipitate can be stable at any salt concentration. Moreover, the density of the precipitate after initial decrease can increase with addition of salt. This effect is a result of redistribution of salt between the precipitate and the supernatant, which is due to an interplay of electrostatic and hardcore interactions. For not too weakly charged polyions the precipitate properties become strongly dependent on temperature even in good solvent conditions.

  10. Fault-Tolerant Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izenson, Michael G.; Crowley, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    A compact, lightweight heat exchanger has been designed to be fault-tolerant in the sense that a single-point leak would not cause mixing of heat-transfer fluids. This particular heat exchanger is intended to be part of the temperature-regulation system for habitable modules of the International Space Station and to function with water and ammonia as the heat-transfer fluids. The basic fault-tolerant design is adaptable to other heat-transfer fluids and heat exchangers for applications in which mixing of heat-transfer fluids would pose toxic, explosive, or other hazards: Examples could include fuel/air heat exchangers for thermal management on aircraft, process heat exchangers in the cryogenic industry, and heat exchangers used in chemical processing. The reason this heat exchanger can tolerate a single-point leak is that the heat-transfer fluids are everywhere separated by a vented volume and at least two seals. The combination of fault tolerance, compactness, and light weight is implemented in a unique heat-exchanger core configuration: Each fluid passage is entirely surrounded by a vented region bridged by solid structures through which heat is conducted between the fluids. Precise, proprietary fabrication techniques make it possible to manufacture the vented regions and heat-conducting structures with very small dimensions to obtain a very large coefficient of heat transfer between the two fluids. A large heat-transfer coefficient favors compact design by making it possible to use a relatively small core for a given heat-transfer rate. Calculations and experiments have shown that in most respects, the fault-tolerant heat exchanger can be expected to equal or exceed the performance of the non-fault-tolerant heat exchanger that it is intended to supplant (see table). The only significant disadvantages are a slight weight penalty and a small decrease in the mass-specific heat transfer.

  11. Fault Diagnosis in HVAC Chillers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Kihoon; Namuru, Setu M.; Azam, Mohammad S.; Luo, Jianhui; Pattipati, Krishna R.; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    2005-01-01

    Modern buildings are being equipped with increasingly sophisticated power and control systems with substantial capabilities for monitoring and controlling the amenities. Operational problems associated with heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems plague many commercial buildings, often the result of degraded equipment, failed sensors, improper installation, poor maintenance, and improperly implemented controls. Most existing HVAC fault-diagnostic schemes are based on analytical models and knowledge bases. These schemes are adequate for generic systems. However, real-world systems significantly differ from the generic ones and necessitate modifications of the models and/or customization of the standard knowledge bases, which can be labor intensive. Data-driven techniques for fault detection and isolation (FDI) have a close relationship with pattern recognition, wherein one seeks to categorize the input-output data into normal or faulty classes. Owing to the simplicity and adaptability, customization of a data-driven FDI approach does not require in-depth knowledge of the HVAC system. It enables the building system operators to improve energy efficiency and maintain the desired comfort level at a reduced cost. In this article, we consider a data-driven approach for FDI of chillers in HVAC systems. To diagnose the faults of interest in the chiller, we employ multiway dynamic principal component analysis (MPCA), multiway partial least squares (MPLS), and support vector machines (SVMs). The simulation of a chiller under various fault conditions is conducted using a standard chiller simulator from the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). We validated our FDI scheme using experimental data obtained from different types of chiller faults.

  12. Fault tolerant control of spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godard

    Autonomous multiple spacecraft formation flying space missions demand the development of reliable control systems to ensure rapid, accurate, and effective response to various attitude and formation reconfiguration commands. Keeping in mind the complexities involved in the technology development to enable spacecraft formation flying, this thesis presents the development and validation of a fault tolerant control algorithm that augments the AOCS on-board a spacecraft to ensure that these challenging formation flying missions will fly successfully. Taking inspiration from the existing theory of nonlinear control, a fault-tolerant control system for the RyePicoSat missions is designed to cope with actuator faults whilst maintaining the desirable degree of overall stability and performance. Autonomous fault tolerant adaptive control scheme for spacecraft equipped with redundant actuators and robust control of spacecraft in underactuated configuration, represent the two central themes of this thesis. The developed algorithms are validated using a hardware-in-the-loop simulation. A reaction wheel testbed is used to validate the proposed fault tolerant attitude control scheme. A spacecraft formation flying experimental testbed is used to verify the performance of the proposed robust control scheme for underactuated spacecraft configurations. The proposed underactuated formation flying concept leads to more than 60% savings in fuel consumption when compared to a fully actuated spacecraft formation configuration. We also developed a novel attitude control methodology that requires only a single thruster to stabilize three axis attitude and angular velocity components of a spacecraft. Numerical simulations and hardware-in-the-loop experimental results along with rigorous analytical stability analysis shows that the proposed methodology will greatly enhance the reliability of the spacecraft, while allowing for potentially significant overall mission cost reduction.

  13. Fault Diagnosis in HVAC Chillers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Kihoon; Namuru, Setu M.; Azam, Mohammad S.; Luo, Jianhui; Pattipati, Krishna R.; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    2005-01-01

    Modern buildings are being equipped with increasingly sophisticated power and control systems with substantial capabilities for monitoring and controlling the amenities. Operational problems associated with heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems plague many commercial buildings, often the result of degraded equipment, failed sensors, improper installation, poor maintenance, and improperly implemented controls. Most existing HVAC fault-diagnostic schemes are based on analytical models and knowledge bases. These schemes are adequate for generic systems. However, real-world systems significantly differ from the generic ones and necessitate modifications of the models and/or customization of the standard knowledge bases, which can be labor intensive. Data-driven techniques for fault detection and isolation (FDI) have a close relationship with pattern recognition, wherein one seeks to categorize the input-output data into normal or faulty classes. Owing to the simplicity and adaptability, customization of a data-driven FDI approach does not require in-depth knowledge of the HVAC system. It enables the building system operators to improve energy efficiency and maintain the desired comfort level at a reduced cost. In this article, we consider a data-driven approach for FDI of chillers in HVAC systems. To diagnose the faults of interest in the chiller, we employ multiway dynamic principal component analysis (MPCA), multiway partial least squares (MPLS), and support vector machines (SVMs). The simulation of a chiller under various fault conditions is conducted using a standard chiller simulator from the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). We validated our FDI scheme using experimental data obtained from different types of chiller faults.

  14. Miocene extension and fault-related folding in the Highland Range, southern Nevada: A three-dimensional perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faulds, J.E.; Olson, E.L.; Harlan, S.S.; McIntosh, W.C.

    2002-01-01

    The Highland Range of southern Nevada contains a major anticline and syncline that constitute the westernmost segments of the Black Mountains accommodation zone in the highly extended Colorado River extensional corridor. The folds are defined by thick tilted sections of Miocene volcanic and sedimentary strata that accumulated immediately prior to and during regional extension. The folds are generally symmetrical, with interlimb angles that exceed 90??, subhorizontal hingelines, and steeply inclined axial surfaces. East- and west-dipping normal faults dominate the west- and east-tilted limbs of the folds, respectively. The limbs of the folds are parts of major half grabens. Tilt fanning within these half grabens and 15 new 40Ar/39Ar dates bracket major extension between about 16.5 and 11 Ma. Tilting of the opposing fold limbs occurred simultaneously and was contemporaneous with extension. The anticline and syncline are therefore interpreted as fault-related extensional folds produced by the partial, along-strike overlap of oppositely dipping normal-fault systems and attendant tilt-block domains. The anticline developed between overlapping listric normal faults that dip toward one another, including the east-dipping McCullough Range and west-dipping Keyhole Canyon faults. Each limb of the anticline is a rollover fold developed in the hanging wall of the inwardly dipping listric normal faults. The syncline formed between overlapping outwardly dipping listric faults, as adjacent fault blocks were tilted toward one another. The dominant folding style was fault-bend folding, with drag-folding and displacement-gradient folding playing subsidiary roles. The anticline and syncline significantly affected depositional patterns, with synextensional units, including two major ash-flow tuffs, thinning toward the anticlinal hinge and thickening toward the synclinal hinge. The Black Mountains accommodation zone is largely composed of intersecting northwest-trending anticlines and

  15. Predeployment validation of fault-tolerant systems through software-implemented fault insertion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czeck, Edward W.; Siewiorek, Daniel P.; Segall, Zary Z.

    1989-01-01

    Fault injection-based automated testing (FIAT) environment, which can be used to experimentally characterize and evaluate distributed realtime systems under fault-free and faulted conditions is described. A survey is presented of validation methodologies. The need for fault insertion based on validation methodologies is demonstrated. The origins and models of faults, and motivation for the FIAT concept are reviewed. FIAT employs a validation methodology which builds confidence in the system through first providing a baseline of fault-free performance data and then characterizing the behavior of the system with faults present. Fault insertion is accomplished through software and allows faults or the manifestation of faults to be inserted by either seeding faults into memory or triggering error detection mechanisms. FIAT is capable of emulating a variety of fault-tolerant strategies and architectures, can monitor system activity, and can automatically orchestrate experiments involving insertion of faults. There is a common system interface which allows ease of use to decrease experiment development and run time. Fault models chosen for experiments on FIAT have generated system responses which parallel those observed in real systems under faulty conditions. These capabilities are shown by two example experiments each using a different fault-tolerance strategy.

  16. Novel neural networks-based fault tolerant control scheme with fault alarm.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qikun; Jiang, Bin; Shi, Peng; Lim, Cheng-Chew

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the problem of adaptive active fault-tolerant control for a class of nonlinear systems with unknown actuator fault is investigated. The actuator fault is assumed to have no traditional affine appearance of the system state variables and control input. The useful property of the basis function of the radial basis function neural network (NN), which will be used in the design of the fault tolerant controller, is explored. Based on the analysis of the design of normal and passive fault tolerant controllers, by using the implicit function theorem, a novel NN-based active fault-tolerant control scheme with fault alarm is proposed. Comparing with results in the literature, the fault-tolerant control scheme can minimize the time delay between fault occurrence and accommodation that is called the time delay due to fault diagnosis, and reduce the adverse effect on system performance. In addition, the FTC scheme has the advantages of a passive fault-tolerant control scheme as well as the traditional active fault-tolerant control scheme's properties. Furthermore, the fault-tolerant control scheme requires no additional fault detection and isolation model which is necessary in the traditional active fault-tolerant control scheme. Finally, simulation results are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the developed techniques.

  17. Multiple Fault Isolation in Redundant Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pattipati, Krishna R.; Patterson-Hine, Ann; Iverson, David

    1997-01-01

    Fault diagnosis in large-scale systems that are products of modern technology present formidable challenges to manufacturers and users. This is due to large number of failure sources in such systems and the need to quickly isolate and rectify failures with minimal down time. In addition, for fault-tolerant systems and systems with infrequent opportunity for maintenance (e.g., Hubble telescope, space station), the assumption of at most a single fault in the system is unrealistic. In this project, we have developed novel block and sequential diagnostic strategies to isolate multiple faults in the shortest possible time without making the unrealistic single fault assumption.

  18. Multiple Fault Isolation in Redundant Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pattipati, Krishna R.

    1997-01-01

    Fault diagnosis in large-scale systems that are products of modem technology present formidable challenges to manufacturers and users. This is due to large number of failure sources in such systems and the need to quickly isolate and rectify failures with minimal down time. In addition, for fault-tolerant systems and systems with infrequent opportunity for maintenance (e.g., Hubble telescope, space station), the assumption of at most a single fault in the system is unrealistic. In this project, we have developed novel block and sequential diagnostic strategies to isolate multiple faults in the shortest possible time without making the unrealistic single fault assumption.

  19. Bridging faults in BiCMOS circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Sankaran M.; Malaiya, Yashwant K.; Jayasumana, Anura P.

    1993-01-01

    Combining the advantages of CMOS and bipolar, BiCMOS is emerging as a major technology for many high performance digital and mixed signal applications. Recent investigations revealed that bridging faults can be a major failure mode in IC's. Effects of bridging faults in BiCMOS circuits are presented. Bridging faults between logical units without feedback and logical units with feedback are considered. Several bridging faults can be detected by monitoring the power supply current (I(sub DDQ) monitoring). Effects of bridging faults and bridging resistance on output logic levels were examined along with their effects on noise immunity.

  20. Magnetic fields of opposite polarity in sunspot penumbrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, M.; Collados, M.; Bethge, C.; Schlichenmaier, R.; Borrero, J. M.; Schmidt, W.; Lagg, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Berkefeld, T.; Kiess, C.; Rezaei, R.; Schmidt, D.; Sigwarth, M.; Soltau, D.; Volkmer, R.; von der Luhe, O.; Waldmann, T.; Orozco, D.; Pastor Yabar, A.; Denker, C.; Balthasar, H.; Staude, J.; Hofmann, A.; Strassmeier, K.; Feller, A.; Nicklas, H.; Kneer, F.; Sobotka, M.

    2016-11-01

    Context. A significant part of the penumbral magnetic field returns below the surface in the very deep photosphere. For lines in the visible, a large portion of this return field can only be detected indirectly by studying its imprints on strongly asymmetric and three-lobed Stokes V profiles. Infrared lines probe a narrow layer in the very deep photosphere, providing the possibility of directly measuring the orientation of magnetic fields close to the solar surface. Aims: We study the topology of the penumbral magnetic field in the lower photosphere, focusing on regions where it returns below the surface. Methods: We analyzed 71 spectropolarimetric datasets from Hinode and from the GREGOR infrared spectrograph. We inferred the quality and polarimetric accuracy of the infrared data after applying several reduction steps. Techniques of spectral inversion and forward synthesis were used to test the detection algorithm. We compared the morphology and the fractional penumbral area covered by reversed-polarity and three-lobed Stokes V profiles for sunspots at disk center. We determined the amount of reversed-polarity and three-lobed Stokes V profiles in visible and infrared data of sunspots at various heliocentric angles. From the results, we computed center-to-limb variation curves, which were interpreted in the context of existing penumbral models. Results: Observations in visible and near-infrared spectral lines yield a significant difference in the penumbral area covered by magnetic fields of opposite polarity. In the infrared, the number of reversed-polarity Stokes V profiles is smaller by a factor of two than in the visible. For three-lobed Stokes V profiles the numbers differ by up to an order of magnitude.

  1. Dynamic evolution process of turbulent channel flow after opposition control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Mingwei; Tian, De; Yongqian, Liu

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic evolution of turbulent channel flow after application of opposition control (OC), together with the mechanism of drag reduction, is studied through direct numerical simulation (DNS). In the simulation, the pressure gradient is kept constant, and the flow rate increases due to drag reduction. In the transport of mean kinetic energy (MKE), one part of the energy from the external pressure is dissipated by the mean shear, and the other part is transported to the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) through a TKE production term (TKP). It is found that the increase of MKE is mainly induced by the reduction of TKP that is directly affected by OC. Further analysis shows that the suppression of the redistribution term of TKE in the wall normal direction plays a key role in drag reduction, which represses the wall normal velocity fluctuation and then reduces TKP through the attenuation of its main production term. When OC is suddenly applied, an acute imbalance of energy in space is induced by the wall blowing and suction. Both the skin-friction and TKP terms exhibit a transient growth in the initial phase of OC, which can be attributed to the local effect of and <-u‧v‧> in the viscous sublayer. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11402088 and Grant No. 51376062) , State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources (Grant No. LAPS15005), and ‘the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities’ (Grant No.2014MS33).

  2. Discovery of a Remarkable Opposition Surge on Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, B. J.; Bauer, J.; Hicks, M.; Herbert, B.; Schmidt, B.; Cobb, B.; Ward, J.

    2006-05-01

    The large Neptunian satellite Triton is one of three moons in the outer Solar System that exhibit volcanism. Triton's volcanoes appear to be driven by solar heating. In addition, significant seasonal volatile is expected to occur on Triton. To understand the nature and extent of activity on Triton, including volcanism and seasonal volatile transport, we have undertaken a program of deriving the surface properties of Triton through time by means of ground- based observations. Another motivation for our work is to closely study a body that may bear a strong resemblance to the planet Pluto and the swarm of icy bodies in the outer Solar System now known as Kuiper Belt Objects. One important measurement is the solar phase curve, or the brightness as a function of the angle between the observer, the object being observed, and the sun. Most significant are observations at large solar phase angles, which probe the roughness of the surface, and small angles, which characterize the fluffiness of the surface and give clues to optical phenomena such as coherent backscatter. For Triton, large phase angles are not observable from Earth, but the 2004 season presented an opportunity in which the solar phase angle reached the exceedingly low value of 0.002 degrees. During the 2004 season, photometric observations of Triton's phase curve were obtained in the astronomical BVRI filters, spanning wavelengths from 0.45 to 0.89 microns. Triton exhibits a large increase in its brightness as the solar phase angle approaches zero. There is a wavelength dependence to this opposition surge, the term commonly used to describe the non-linear increase in brightness observed on almost all airless bodies.

  3. Trajectories of Oppositional Defiant Disorder Irritability Symptoms in Preschool Children.

    PubMed

    Ezpeleta, Lourdes; Granero, Roser; de la Osa, Núria; Trepat, Esther; Domènech, Josep M

    2016-01-01

    This study traces the developmental course of irritability symptoms in oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) from ages 3-5 and examines the psychopathological outcomes of the different trajectories at age 6. A sample of 622 3-year-old preschoolers (311 were boys), followed up until age 6, was assessed yearly with a semi-structured diagnostic interview with parents and at age 6 with questionnaires answered by parents, teachers and children. Growth-Mixture-Modeling yielded five trajectories of irritability levels for the whole sample (high-persistent 3.5%, decreasing 3.8%, increasing 2.6%, low-persistent 44.1% and null 46.0%). Among the children who presented with ODD during preschool age, three trajectories of irritability symptoms resulted (high-persistent 31.9%, decreasing 34.9% and increasing 33.2%). Null, low-persistent and decreasing irritability courses in the sample as a whole gave very similar discriminative capacity for children's psychopathological state at age 6, while the increasing and high-persistent categories involved poorer clinical outcomes than the null course. For ODD children, the high-persistent and increasing trajectories of irritability predicted disruptive behavior disorders, comorbidity, high level of functional impairment, internalizing and externalizing problems and low anger control at age 6. Irritability identifies a subset of ODD children at high risk of poorer longitudinal psychopathological and functional outcomes. It might be clinically relevant to identify this subset of ODD children with a high number of irritability symptoms throughout development with a view to preventing comorbid and future adverse longitudinal outcomes.

  4. A Quaternary fault database for central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohadjer, Solmaz; Ehlers, Todd Alan; Bendick, Rebecca; Stübner, Konstanze; Strube, Timo

    2016-02-01

    Earthquakes represent the highest risk in terms of potential loss of lives and economic damage for central Asian countries. Knowledge of fault location and behavior is essential in calculating and mapping seismic hazard. Previous efforts in compiling fault information for central Asia have generated a large amount of data that are published in limited-access journals with no digital maps publicly available, or are limited in their description of important fault parameters such as slip rates. This study builds on previous work by improving access to fault information through a web-based interactive map and an online database with search capabilities that allow users to organize data by different fields. The data presented in this compilation include fault location, its geographic, seismic, and structural characteristics, short descriptions, narrative comments, and references to peer-reviewed publications. The interactive map displays 1196 fault traces and 34 000 earthquake locations on a shaded-relief map. The online database contains attributes for 123 faults mentioned in the literature, with Quaternary and geodetic slip rates reported for 38 and 26 faults respectively, and earthquake history reported for 39 faults. All data are accessible for viewing and download via http://www.geo.uni-tuebingen.de/faults/. This work has implications for seismic hazard studies in central Asia as it summarizes important fault parameters, and can reduce earthquake risk by enhancing public access to information. It also allows scientists and hazard assessment teams to identify structures and regions where data gaps exist and future investigations are needed.

  5. Experiments in fault tolerant software reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcallister, David F.; Vouk, Mladen A.

    1989-01-01

    Twenty functionally equivalent programs were built and tested in a multiversion software experiment. Following unit testing, all programs were subjected to an extensive system test. In the process sixty-one distinct faults were identified among the versions. Less than 12 percent of the faults exhibited varying degrees of positive correlation. The common-cause (or similar) faults spanned as many as 14 components. However, a majority of these faults were trivial, and easily detected by proper unit and/or system testing. Only two of the seven similar faults were difficult faults, and both were caused by specification ambiguities. One of these faults exhibited variable identical-and-wrong response span, i.e. response span which varied with the testing conditions and input data. Techniques that could have been used to avoid the faults are discussed. For example, it was determined that back-to-back testing of 2-tuples could have been used to eliminate about 90 percent of the faults. In addition, four of the seven similar faults could have been detected by using back-to-back testing of 5-tuples. It is believed that most, if not all, similar faults could have been avoided had the specifications been written using more formal notation, the unit testing phase was subject to more stringent standards and controls, and better tools for measuring the quality and adequacy of the test data (e.g. coverage) were used.

  6. Fault diagnosis for magnetic bearing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Nan-Chyuan; King, Yueh-Hsun; Lee, Rong-Mao

    2009-05-01

    A full fault diagnosis for active magnetic bearing (AMB) and rotor systems to monitor the closed-loop operation and analyze fault patterns on-line in case any malfunction occurs is proposed in this paper. Most traditional approaches for fault diagnosis are based on actuator or sensor diagnosis individually and can solely detect a single fault at a time. This research combines two diagnosis methodologies by using both state estimators and parameter estimators to detect, identify and analyze actuators and sensors faults in AMB/rotor systems. The proposed fault diagnosis algorithm not only enhances the diagnosis accuracy, but also illustrates the capability to detect multiple sensors faults which occur concurrently. The efficacy of the presented algorithm has been verified by computer simulations and intensive experiments. The test rig for experiments is equipped with AMB, interface module (dSPACE DS1104), data acquisition unit MATLAB/Simulink simulation environment. At last, the fault patterns, such as bias, multiplicative loop gain variation and noise addition, can be identified by the algorithm presented in this work. In other words, the proposed diagnosis algorithm is able to detect faults at the first moment, find which sensors or actuators under failure and identify which fault pattern the found faults belong to.

  7. Model-Based Fault Tolerant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Aditya; Viassolo, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The Model Based Fault Tolerant Control (MBFTC) task was conducted under the NASA Aviation Safety and Security Program. The goal of MBFTC is to develop and demonstrate real-time strategies to diagnose and accommodate anomalous aircraft engine events such as sensor faults, actuator faults, or turbine gas-path component damage that can lead to in-flight shutdowns, aborted take offs, asymmetric thrust/loss of thrust control, or engine surge/stall events. A suite of model-based fault detection algorithms were developed and evaluated. Based on the performance and maturity of the developed algorithms two approaches were selected for further analysis: (i) multiple-hypothesis testing, and (ii) neural networks; both used residuals from an Extended Kalman Filter to detect the occurrence of the selected faults. A simple fusion algorithm was implemented to combine the results from each algorithm to obtain an overall estimate of the identified fault type and magnitude. The identification of the fault type and magnitude enabled the use of an online fault accommodation strategy to correct for the adverse impact of these faults on engine operability thereby enabling continued engine operation in the presence of these faults. The performance of the fault detection and accommodation algorithm was extensively tested in a simulation environment.

  8. Tool for Viewing Faults Under Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Herbert, L.; Li, P. Peggy

    2005-01-01

    Multi Surface Light Table (MSLT) is an interactive software tool that was developed in support of the QuakeSim project, which has created an earthquake- fault database and a set of earthquake- simulation software tools. MSLT visualizes the three-dimensional geometries of faults embedded below the terrain and animates time-varying simulations of stress and slip. The fault segments, represented as rectangular surfaces at dip angles, are organized into collections, that is, faults. An interface built into MSLT queries and retrieves fault definitions from the QuakeSim fault database. MSLT also reads time-varying output from one of the QuakeSim simulation tools, called "Virtual California." Stress intensity is represented by variations in color. Slips are represented by directional indicators on the fault segments. The magnitudes of the slips are represented by the duration of the directional indicators in time. The interactive controls in MSLT provide a virtual track-ball, pan and zoom, translucency adjustment, simulation playback, and simulation movie capture. In addition, geographical information on the fault segments and faults is displayed on text windows. Because of the extensive viewing controls, faults can be seen in relation to one another, and to the terrain. These relations can be realized in simulations. Correlated slips in parallel faults are visible in the playback of Virtual California simulations.

  9. Rule-based fault diagnosis of hall sensors and fault-tolerant control of PMSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ziyou; Li, Jianqiu; Ouyang, Minggao; Gu, Jing; Feng, Xuning; Lu, Dongbin

    2013-07-01

    Hall sensor is widely used for estimating rotor phase of permanent magnet synchronous motor(PMSM). And rotor position is an essential parameter of PMSM control algorithm, hence it is very dangerous if Hall senor faults occur. But there is scarcely any research focusing on fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control of Hall sensor used in PMSM. From this standpoint, the Hall sensor faults which may occur during the PMSM operating are theoretically analyzed. According to the analysis results, the fault diagnosis algorithm of Hall sensor, which is based on three rules, is proposed to classify the fault phenomena accurately. The rotor phase estimation algorithms, based on one or two Hall sensor(s), are initialized to engender the fault-tolerant control algorithm. The fault diagnosis algorithm can detect 60 Hall fault phenomena in total as well as all detections can be fulfilled in 1/138 rotor rotation period. The fault-tolerant control algorithm can achieve a smooth torque production which means the same control effect as normal control mode (with three Hall sensors). Finally, the PMSM bench test verifies the accuracy and rapidity of fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control strategies. The fault diagnosis algorithm can detect all Hall sensor faults promptly and fault-tolerant control algorithm allows the PMSM to face failure conditions of one or two Hall sensor(s). In addition, the transitions between health-control and fault-tolerant control conditions are smooth without any additional noise and harshness. Proposed algorithms can deal with the Hall sensor faults of PMSM in real applications, and can be provided to realize the fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control of PMSM.

  10. Arc burst pattern analysis fault detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, B. Don (Inventor); Aucoin, B. Michael (Inventor); Benner, Carl L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for detecting an arcing fault on a power line carrying a load current. Parameters indicative of power flow and possible fault events on the line, such as voltage and load current, are monitored and analyzed for an arc burst pattern exhibited by arcing faults in a power system. These arcing faults are detected by identifying bursts of each half-cycle of the fundamental current. Bursts occurring at or near a voltage peak indicate arcing on that phase. Once a faulted phase line is identified, a comparison of the current and voltage reveals whether the fault is located in a downstream direction of power flow toward customers, or upstream toward a generation station. If the fault is located downstream, the line is de-energized, and if located upstream, the line may remain energized to prevent unnecessary power outages.

  11. Multiple sensor fault diagnosis for dynamic processes.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Chih; Jeng, Jyh-Cheng

    2010-10-01

    Modern industrial plants are usually large scaled and contain a great amount of sensors. Sensor fault diagnosis is crucial and necessary to process safety and optimal operation. This paper proposes a systematic approach to detect, isolate and identify multiple sensor faults for multivariate dynamic systems. The current work first defines deviation vectors for sensor observations, and further defines and derives the basic sensor fault matrix (BSFM), consisting of the normalized basic fault vectors, by several different methods. By projecting a process deviation vector to the space spanned by BSFM, this research uses a vector with the resulted weights on each direction for multiple sensor fault diagnosis. This study also proposes a novel monitoring index and derives corresponding sensor fault detectability. The study also utilizes that vector to isolate and identify multiple sensor faults, and discusses the isolatability and identifiability. Simulation examples and comparison with two conventional PCA-based contribution plots are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  12. Naval weapons center active fault map series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roquemore, G. R.; Zellmer, J. T.

    1987-08-01

    The NWC Active Fault Map Series shows the locations of active faults and features indicative of active faulting within much of Indian Wells Valley and portions of the Randsburg Wash/Mojave B test range areas of the Naval Weapons Center. Map annotations are used extensively to identify criteria employed in identifying the fault offsets, and to present other valuable data. All of the mapped faults show evidence of having moved during about the last 12,500 years or represent geologically young faults that occur within seismic gaps. Only faults that offset the surface or show other evidence of surface deformation were mapped. A portion of the City of Ridgecrest is recommended as being a Seismic Hazard Special Studies Zone in which detailed earthquake hazard studies should be required.

  13. Alp Transit: Crossing Faults 44 and 49

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Tani, M.; Bremen, R.

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes the crossing of faults 44 and 49 when constructing the 57 km Gotthard base tunnel of the Alp Transit project. Fault 44 is a permeable fault that triggered significant surface deformations 1,400 m above the tunnel when it was reached by the advancing excavation. The fault runs parallel to the downstream face of the Nalps arch dam. Significant deformations were measured at the dam crown. Fault 49 is sub-vertical and permeable, and runs parallel at the upstream face of the dam. It was necessary to assess the risk when crossing fault 49, as a limit was put on the acceptable dam deformation for structural safety. The simulation model, forecasts and action decided when crossing over the faults are presented, with a brief description of the tunnel, the dam, and the monitoring system.

  14. Silica Lubrication in Faults (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, C. D.; Rempe, M.; Lamothe, K.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; White, J. C.; Mitchell, T. M.; Andrews, M.; Di Toro, G.

    2013-12-01

    Silica-rich rocks are common in the crust, so silica lubrication may be important for causing fault weakening during earthquakes if the phenomenon occurs in nature. In laboratory friction experiments on chert, dramatic shear weakening has been attributed to amorphization and attraction of water from atmospheric humidity to form a 'silica gel'. Few observations of the slip surfaces have been reported, and the details of weakening mechanism(s) remain enigmatic. Therefore, no criteria exist on which to make comparisons of experimental materials to natural faults. We performed a series of friction experiments, characterized the materials formed on the sliding surface, and compared these to a geological fault in the same rock type. Experiments were performed in the presence of room humidity at 2.5 MPa normal stress with 3 and 30 m total displacement for a variety of slip rates (10-4 - 10-1 m/s). The friction coefficient (μ) reduced from >0.6 to ~0.2 at 10-1 m/s, but only fell to ~0.4 at 10-2 - 10-4 m/s. The slip surfaces and wear material were observed using laser confocal Raman microscopy, electron microprobe, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Experiments at 10-1 m/s formed wear material consisting of ≤1 μm powder that is aggregated into irregular 5-20 μm clumps. Some material disaggregated during analysis with electron beams and lasers, suggesting hydrous and unstable components. Compressed powder forms smooth pavements on the surface in which grains are not visible (if present, they are <100 nm). Powder contains amorphous material and as yet unidentified crystalline and non-crystalline forms of silica (not quartz), while the worn chert surface underneath shows Raman spectra consistent with a mixture of quartz and amorphous material. If silica amorphization facilitates shear weakening in natural faults, similar wear materials should be formed, and we may be able to identify them through microstructural studies. However, the sub

  15. Frictional constraints on crustal faulting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boatwright, J.; Cocco, M.

    1996-01-01

    We consider how variations in fault frictional properties affect the phenomenology of earthquake faulting. In particular, we propose that lateral variations in fault friction produce the marked heterogeneity of slip observed in large earthquakes. We model these variations using a rate- and state-dependent friction law, where we differentiate velocity-weakening behavior into two fields: the strong seismic field is very velocity weakening and the weak seismic field is slightly velocity weakening. Similarly, we differentiate velocity-strengthening behavior into two fields: the compliant field is slightly velocity strengthening and the viscous field is very velocity strengthening. The strong seismic field comprises the seismic slip concentrations, or asperities. The two "intermediate" fields, weak seismic and compliant, have frictional velocity dependences that are close to velocity neutral: these fields modulate both the tectonic loading and the dynamic rupture process. During the interseismic period, the weak seismic and compliant regions slip aseismically, while the strong seismic regions remain locked, evolving into stress concentrations that fail only in main shocks. The weak seismic areas exhibit most of the interseismic activity and aftershocks but can also creep seismically. This "mixed" frictional behavior can be obtained from a sufficiently heterogenous distribution of the critical slip distance. The model also provides a mechanism for rupture arrest: dynamic rupture fronts decelerate as they penetrate into unloaded complaint or weak seismic areas, producing broad areas of accelerated afterslip. Aftershocks occur on both the weak seismic and compliant areas around a fault, but most of the stress is diffused through aseismic slip. Rapid afterslip on these peripheral areas can also produce aftershocks within the main shock rupture area by reloading weak fault areas that slipped in the main shock and then healed. We test this frictional model by comparing the

  16. Geophysical Characterization of Yucca Fault in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, B. L.; Haines, S. S.; Sweetkind, D. S.; Asch, T. H.

    2007-12-01

    total-field magnetic data exhibit a relatively sharp 180 nT transition across the fault, which we interpret to be due to the fault offset of alluvial fill and underlying Miocene welded tuff. Two AMT profiles were collected coincident with two of the dc resistivity profiles, and they exhibit lateral variations in resistivity that correlate with the mapped surface expression of Yucca Fault. At shallow depths, the AMT data show the same resistivity trend across the fault as do the dc resistivity data, but the AMT data show the opposite transition at greater depths. The results of these geophysical methods encompass varying scales of resolution and depths of investigation and aid in the characterization of fault effects in the alluvium and underlying volcanic rocks.

  17. From Fault Seal to Fault Leak: Effect of Mechanical Stratigraphy on the Evolution of Transport Processes in Fault Zones (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urai, J. L.; Schmatz, J.; van Gent, H. W.; Abe, S.; Holland, M.

    2009-12-01

    Predictions of the transport properties of faults in layered sequences are usually based on geometry and lithology of the faulted sequence. Mechanical properties and fault resealing processes are used much less frequently. Based on laboratory, field and numerical studies we present a model, which takes into account these additional factors. When the ratio of rock strength and in-situ mean effective stress is high enough to allow hybrid failure, dilatant fracture networks will form in that part of the sequence which meets this condition, dramatically increasing permeability along the fault, with possibility of along-fault fluid flow and vertical transport of fine grained sediment to form clay gouge in dilatant jogs. A key parameter here is the 3D connectivity of the dilatant fracture network. In systems where fracturing is non-dilatant and the mechanical contrast between the layers is small, the fault zones are relatively simple in structure, with complexity concentrated in relay zones between segments at different scales. With increasing mechanical contrast between the layers (and the presence of preexisting fractures), patterns of localization and fault zone structure become increasingly complex. Mechanical mixing in the fault gouge is a major process especially when one of the lithologies is highly permeable. Reworking of wall rocks composed of hard claystones produces a low-permeability clay gouge in critical state. Circulating supersaturated fluids in the fault zone produce vein networks, which reseal the fault zone, typically in a cyclic fashion.

  18. New insights on Southern Coyote Creek Fault and Superstition Hills Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Zandt, A. J.; Mellors, R. J.; Rockwell, T. K.; Burgess, M. K.; O'Hare, M.

    2007-12-01

    Recent field work has confirmed an extension of the southern Coyote Creek (CCF) branch of the San Jacinto fault in the western Salton trough. The fault marks the western edge of an area of subsidence caused by groundwater extraction, and field measurements suggest that recent strike-slip motion has occurred on this fault as well. We attempt to determine whether this fault connects at depth with the Superstition Hills fault (SHF) to the southeast by modeling observed surface deformation between the two faults measured by InSAR. Stacked ERS (descending) InSAR data from 1992 to 2000 is initially modeled using a finite fault in an elastic half-space. Observed deformation along the SHF and Elmore Ranch fault is modeled assuming shallow (< 5 km) creep. We test various models to explain surface deformation between the two faults.

  19. The susitna glacier thrust fault: Characteristics of surface ruptures on the fault that initiated the 2002 denali fault earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crone, A.J.; Personius, S.F.; Craw, P.A.; Haeussler, P.J.; Staft, L.A.

    2004-01-01

    The 3 November 2002 Mw 7.9 Denali fault earthquake sequence initiated on the newly discovered Susitna Glacier thrust fault and caused 48 km of surface rupture. Rupture of the Susitna Glacier fault generated scarps on ice of the Susitna and West Fork glaciers and on tundra and surficial deposits along the southern front of the central Alaska Range. Based on detailed mapping, 27 topographic profiles, and field observations, we document the characteristics and slip distribution of the 2002 ruptures and describe evidence of pre-2002 ruptures on the fault. The 2002 surface faulting produced structures that range from simple folds on a single trace to complex thrust-fault ruptures and pressure ridges on multiple, sinuous strands. The deformation zone is locally more than 1 km wide. We measured a maximum vertical displacement of 5.4 m on the south-directed main thrust. North-directed backthrusts have more than 4 m of surface offset. We measured a well-constrained near-surface fault dip of about 19?? at one site, which is considerably less than seismologically determined values of 35??-48??. Surface-rupture data yield an estimated magnitude of Mw 7.3 for the fault, which is similar to the seismological value of Mw 7.2. Comparison of field and seismological data suggest that the Susitna Glacier fault is part of a large positive flower structure associated with northwest-directed transpressive deformation on the Denali fault. Prehistoric scarps are evidence of previous rupture of the Sustina Glacier fault, but additional work is needed to determine if past failures of the Susitna Glacier fault have consistently induced rupture of the Denali fault.

  20. Fault linkage: Three-dimensional mechanical interaction between echelon normal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crider, Juliet G.; Pollard, David D.

    1998-10-01

    Field observations of two overlapping normal faults and associated deformation document features common to many normal-fault relay zones: a topographic ramp between the fault segments, tapering slip on the faults as they enter the overlap zone, and associated fracturing, especially at the top of the ramp. These observations motivate numerical modeling of the development of a relay zone. A three-dimensional boundary element method numerical model, using simple fault-plane geometries, material properties, and boundary conditions, reproduces the principal characteristics of the observed fault scarps. The model, with overlapping, semicircular fault segments under orthogonal extension, produces a region of high Coulomb shear stress in the relay zone that would favor fault linkage at the center to upper relay ramp. If the fault height is increased, the magnitude of the stresses in the relay zone increases, but the position of the anticipated linkage does not change. The amount of fault overlap changes the magnitude of the Coulomb stress in the relay zone: the greatest potential for fault linkage occurs with the closest underlapping fault tips. Ultimately, the mechanical interaction between segments of a developing normal-fault system promote the development of connected, zigzagging fault scarps.

  1. Fault trees and imperfect coverage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, Joanne B.

    1989-01-01

    A new algorithm is presented for solving the fault tree. The algorithm includes the dynamic behavior of the fault/error handling model but obviates the need for the Markov chain solution. As the state space is expanded in a breadth-first search (the same is done in the conversion to a Markov chain), the state's contribution to each future state is calculated exactly. A dynamic state truncation technique is also presented; it produces bounds on the unreliability of the system by considering only part of the state space. Since the model is solved as the state space is generated, the process can be stopped as soon as the desired accuracy is reached.

  2. Perspective View, San Andreas Fault

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The prominent linear feature straight down the center of this perspective view is California's famous San Andreas Fault. The image, created with data from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), will be used by geologists studying fault dynamics and landforms resulting from active tectonics. This segment of the fault lies west of the city of Palmdale, Calif., about 100 kilometers (about 60 miles) northwest of Los Angeles. The fault is the active tectonic boundary between the North American plate on the right, and the Pacific plate on the left. Relative to each other, the Pacific plate is moving away from the viewer and the North American plate is moving toward the viewer along what geologists call a right lateral strike-slip fault. Two large mountain ranges are visible, the San Gabriel Mountains on the left and the Tehachapi Mountains in the upper right. Another fault, the Garlock Fault lies at the base of the Tehachapis; the San Andreas and the Garlock Faults meet in the center distance near the town of Gorman. In the distance, over the Tehachapi Mountains is California's Central Valley. Along the foothills in the right hand part of the image is the Antelope Valley, including the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve. The data used to create this image were acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000.

    This type of display adds the important dimension of elevation to the study of land use and environmental processes as observed in satellite images. The perspective view was created by draping a Landsat satellite image over an SRTM elevation model. Topography is exaggerated 1.5 times vertically. The Landsat image was provided by the United States Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observations Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    SRTM uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space

  3. Fault Injection Techniques and Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsueh, Mei-Chen; Tsai, Timothy K.; Iyer, Ravishankar K.

    1997-01-01

    Dependability evaluation involves the study of failures and errors. The destructive nature of a crash and long error latency make it difficult to identify the causes of failures in the operational environment. It is particularly hard to recreate a failure scenario for a large, complex system. To identify and understand potential failures, we use an experiment-based approach for studying the dependability of a system. Such an approach is applied not only during the conception and design phases, but also during the prototype and operational phases. To take an experiment-based approach, we must first understand a system's architecture, structure, and behavior. Specifically, we need to know its tolerance for faults and failures, including its built-in detection and recovery mechanisms, and we need specific instruments and tools to inject faults, create failures or errors, and monitor their effects.

  4. Folding above faults, Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, D.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Asymmetric folds formed above basement faults can be observed throughout the Rocky Mountains. Several previous interpretations of the folding process made the implicit assumption that one or both fold hinges migrated or rolled'' through the steep forelimb of the fold as the structure evolved (rolling hinge model). Results of mapping in the Bighorn and Seminoe Mountains, WY, and Sangre de Cristo Range, CO, do not support this hypothesis. An alternative interpretation is presented in which fold hinges remained fixed in position during folding (fixed hinge model). Mapped folds share common characteristics: (1) axial traces of the folds intersect faults at or near the basement/cover interface, and diverge from faults upsection; (2) fold hinges are narrow and interlimb angles cluster around 80--100[degree] regardless of fold location; (3) fold shape is typically angular, despite published cross sections that show concentric folds; and, (4) beds within the folds show thickening and/or thinning, most commonly adjacent to fold hinges. The rolling hinge model requires that rocks in the fold forelimbs bend through narrow fold hinges as deformation progressed. Examination of massive, competent rock units such as the Ord. Bighorn Dolomite, Miss. Madison Limestone, and, Penn. Tensleep Sandstone reveals no evidence of the extensive internal deformation that would be expected if hinges rolled through rocks of the forelimb. The hinges of some folds (e.g. Golf Creek anticline, Bighorn Mountains) are offset by secondary faults, effectively preventing the passage of rocks from backlimb to forelimb. The fixed hinge model proposes that the fold hinges were defined early in fold evolution, and beds were progressively rotated and steepened as the structure grew.

  5. Inverter Ground Fault Overvoltage Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Hoke, Andy; Nelson, Austin; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Chebahtah, Justin; Wang, Trudie; McCarty, Michael

    2015-08-12

    This report describes testing conducted at NREL to determine the duration and magnitude of transient overvoltages created by several commercial PV inverters during ground fault conditions. For this work, a test plan developed by the Forum on Inverter Grid Integration Issues (FIGII) has been implemented in a custom test setup at NREL. Load rejection overvoltage test results were reported previously in a separate technical report.

  6. Fault Tolerance of Neural Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    Systematic Ap - proach, Proc. Government Microcircuit Application Conf. (GOMAC), San Diego, Nov. 1986. [10] D.E.Goldberg, Genetic Algorithms in Search...s l m n ttempt to develop fault tolerant neural networks. The lows. Given a well-trained network, we first eliminate temp todevlopfaut tlernt eurl ...both ap - proaches, and this resulted in very slight improve- ments over the addition/deletion procedure. 103 Fisher’s Iris data in average case Fisher’s

  7. Kinematics of a growth fault/raft system on the West African margin using 3-D restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouby, Delphine; Raillard, Stéphane; Guillocheau, François; Bouroullec, Renaud; Nalpas, Thierry

    2002-04-01

    The ability to quantify the movement history associated with growth structures is crucial in the understanding of fundamental processes such as the growth of folds or faults in 3-D. In this paper, we present an application of an original approach to restore in 3-D a listric growth fault system resulting from gravity-induced extension located on the West African margin. Our goal is to establish the 3-D structural framework and kinematics of the study area. We construct a 3-D geometrical model of the fault system (from 3-D seismic data), then restore six stratigraphic surfaces and reconstruct the 3-D geometry of the system at six incremental steps of its history. The evolution of the growth fault/raft system corresponds to the progressive separation of two rafts by regional extension, resulting in the development of an intervening basin located between them that evolved in three main stages: (1) the rise of an evaporite wall, (2) the development of a symmetric basin as the elevation of the diapir is reduced and buried, and (3) the development of asymmetric basins related to two systems of listric faults (the main fault F1 and the graben located between the rollovers and the lower raft). Important features of the growth fault/raft system could only be observed in 3-D and with increments of deformation restored. The rollover anticline (associated with the listric fault F1) is composed of two sub-units separated by an E-W oriented transverse graben indicating that the displacement field was divergent in map view. The rollover units are located within the overlap area of two fault systems and displays a 'mock-turtle' anticline structure. The seaward translation of the lower raft is associated with two successive vertical axis rotations in the opposite sense (clockwise then counter-clockwise by about 10°). This results from the fact that the two main fault systems developed successively. Fault system F1 formed during the Upper Albian, and the graben during the Cenomanian

  8. Watching Faults Grow in Sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Accretionary sandbox experiments provide a rich environment for investigating the processes of fault development. These experiments engage students because 1) they enable direct observation of fault growth, which is impossible in the crust (type 1 physical model), 2) they are not only representational but can also be manipulated (type 2 physical model), 3) they can be used to test hypotheses (type 3 physical model) and 4) they resemble experiments performed by structural geology researchers around the world. The structural geology courses at UMass Amherst utilize a series of accretionary sandboxes experiments where students first watch a video of an experiment and then perform a group experiment. The experiments motivate discussions of what conditions they would change and what outcomes they would expect from these changes; hypothesis development. These discussions inevitably lead to calculations of the scaling relationships between model and crustal fault growth and provide insight into the crustal processes represented within the dry sand. Sketching of the experiments has been shown to be a very effective assessment method as the students reveal which features they are analyzing. Another approach used at UMass is to set up a forensic experiment. The experiment is set up with spatially varying basal friction before the meeting and students must figure out what the basal conditions are through the experiment. This experiment leads to discussions of equilibrium and force balance within the accretionary wedge. Displacement fields can be captured throughout the experiment using inexpensive digital image correlation techniques to foster quantitative analysis of the experiments.

  9. CONTROL AND FAULT DETECTOR CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Winningstad, C.N.

    1958-04-01

    A power control and fault detectcr circuit for a radiofrequency system is described. The operation of the circuit controls the power output of a radio- frequency power supply to automatically start the flow of energizing power to the radio-frequency power supply and to gradually increase the power to a predetermined level which is below the point where destruction occurs upon the happening of a fault. If the radio-frequency power supply output fails to increase during such period, the control does not further increase the power. On the other hand, if the output of the radio-frequency power supply properly increases, then the control continues to increase the power to a maximum value. After the maximumn value of radio-frequency output has been achieved. the control is responsive to a ''fault,'' such as a short circuit in the radio-frequency system being driven, so that the flow of power is interrupted for an interval before the cycle is repeated.

  10. Fault detection using genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; B. Jack, Lindsay; Nandi, Asoke K.

    2005-03-01

    Genetic programming (GP) is a stochastic process for automatically generating computer programs. GP has been applied to a variety of problems which are too wide to reasonably enumerate. As far as the authors are aware, it has rarely been used in condition monitoring (CM). In this paper, GP is used to detect faults in rotating machinery. Featuresets from two different machines are used to examine the performance of two-class normal/fault recognition. The results are compared with a few other methods for fault detection: Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been used in this field for many years, while support vector machines (SVMs) also offer successful solutions. For ANNs and SVMs, genetic algorithms have been used to do feature selection, which is an inherent function of GP. In all cases, the GP demonstrates performance which equals or betters that of the previous best performing approaches on these data sets. The training times are also found to be considerably shorter than the other approaches, whilst the generated classification rules are easy to understand and independently validate.

  11. On the opposite-spin to same-spin ratio of absolute and interaction MP2 correlation energy in parameter-free spin-opposite-scaled double hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour, Mojtaba

    2017-09-01

    In this report, applicability of the two types of opposite-spin to same-spin ratio of second-order Møller-Plesset correlation energy, namely the ratio of opposite-spin to same-spin of the absolute correlation energy and the most recently proposed ratio of opposite-spin to same-spin of the interaction correlation energy, in spin-opposite-scaled parameter-free double-hybrid density functionals has been evaluated. Considering the interaction energies and hydrogen transfer barrier heights benchmark sets and comparing various functionals, it is shown that using the ratio related to the absolute correlation energy in double-hybrid calculations provides lower deviations than that of the same ratio for the interaction correlation energy.

  12. Influence of fault trend, fault bends, and fault convergence on shallow structure, geomorphology, and hazards, Hosgri strike-slip fault, offshore central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. Y.; Watt, J. T.; Hartwell, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    We mapped a ~94-km-long portion of the right-lateral Hosgri Fault Zone from Point Sal to Piedras Blancas in offshore central California using high-resolution seismic reflection profiles, marine magnetic data, and multibeam bathymetry. The database includes 121 seismic profiles across the fault zone and is perhaps the most comprehensive reported survey of the shallow structure of an active strike-slip fault. These data document the location, length, and near-surface continuity of multiple fault strands, highlight fault-zone heterogeneity, and demonstrate the importance of fault trend, fault bends, and fault convergences in the development of shallow structure and tectonic geomorphology. The Hosgri Fault Zone is continuous through the study area passing through a broad arc in which fault trend changes from about 338° to 328° from south to north. The southern ~40 km of the fault zone in this area is more extensional, resulting in accommodation space that is filled by deltaic sediments of the Santa Maria River. The central ~24 km of the fault zone is characterized by oblique convergence of the Hosgri Fault Zone with the more northwest-trending Los Osos and Shoreline Faults. Convergence between these faults has resulted in the formation of local restraining and releasing fault bends, transpressive uplifts, and transtensional basins of varying size and morphology. We present a hypothesis that links development of a paired fault bend to indenting and bulging of the Hosgri Fault by a strong crustal block translated to the northwest along the Shoreline Fault. Two diverging Hosgri Fault strands bounding a central uplifted block characterize the northern ~30 km of the Hosgri Fault in this area. The eastern Hosgri strand passes through releasing and restraining bends; the releasing bend is the primary control on development of an elongate, asymmetric, "Lazy Z" sedimentary basin. The western strand of the Hosgri Fault Zone passes through a significant restraining bend and

  13. Fault tolerant operation of switched reluctance machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    The energy crisis and environmental challenges have driven industry towards more energy efficient solutions. With nearly 60% of electricity consumed by various electric machines in industry sector, advancement in the efficiency of the electric drive system is of vital importance. Adjustable speed drive system (ASDS) provides excellent speed regulation and dynamic performance as well as dramatically improved system efficiency compared with conventional motors without electronics drives. Industry has witnessed tremendous grow in ASDS applications not only as a driving force but also as an electric auxiliary system for replacing bulky and low efficiency auxiliary hydraulic and mechanical systems. With the vast penetration of ASDS, its fault tolerant operation capability is more widely recognized as an important feature of drive performance especially for aerospace, automotive applications and other industrial drive applications demanding high reliability. The Switched Reluctance Machine (SRM), a low cost, highly reliable electric machine with fault tolerant operation capability, has drawn substantial attention in the past three decades. Nevertheless, SRM is not free of fault. Certain faults such as converter faults, sensor faults, winding shorts, eccentricity and position sensor faults are commonly shared among all ASDS. In this dissertation, a thorough understanding of various faults and their influence on transient and steady state performance of SRM is developed via simulation and experimental study, providing necessary knowledge for fault detection and post fault management. Lumped parameter models are established for fast real time simulation and drive control. Based on the behavior of the faults, a fault detection scheme is developed for the purpose of fast and reliable fault diagnosis. In order to improve the SRM power and torque capacity under faults, the maximum torque per ampere excitation are conceptualized and validated through theoretical analysis and

  14. Are Satisfaction and Dissatisfaction Really Opposites?: Ordered Versus Unordered Models of Satisfaction with Military Life

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    CRC 582 / January 1989 0 ARE SATISFACTION AND DISSATISFACTION REALLY OPPOSITES? ORDERED VERSUS UNORDERED MODELS OF SATISFACTION WITH MILITARY LIFE ...Dissatistaction Really Opposites? Ordered Versus Unordered Models of Satisfaction with Military Life "!2. -.. SO.AL AUhOR(S) Ed vard S. Cavin 13a. TYPE OF... satisfaction and dissatisfaction with military life represent directionally opposite aspects of the same basic phenomenon. The analysis app’oach is to

  15. A Quaternary Fault Database for Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohadjer, S.; Ehlers, T. A.; Bendick, R.; Stübner, K.; Strube, T.

    2015-09-01

    Earthquakes represent the highest risk in terms of potential loss of lives and economic damage for Central Asian countries. Knowledge of fault location and behavior is essential in calculating and mapping seismic hazard. Previous efforts in compiling fault information for Central Asia have generated a large amount of data that are published in limited-access journals with no digital maps publicly available, or are limited in their description of important fault parameters such as slip rates. This study builds on previous work by improving access to fault information through a web-based interactive map and an online database with search capabilities that allow users to organize data by different fields. The data presented in this compilation include fault location, its geographic, seismic and structural characteristics, short descriptions, narrative comments and references to peer-reviewed publications. The interactive map displays 1196 fault segments and 34 000 earthquake locations on a shaded-relief map. The online database contains attributes for 122 faults mentioned in the literature, with Quaternary and geodetic slip rates reported for 38 and 26 faults respectively, and earthquake history reported for 39 faults. This work has implications for seismic hazard studies in Central Asia as it summarizes important fault parameters, and can reduce earthquake risk by enhancing public access to information. It also allows scientists and hazard assessment teams to identify structures and regions where data gaps exist and future investigations are needed.

  16. Determining Fault Orientation with Sagnac Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruenwald, Konstantin; Dunn, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Typically, earthquake fault ruptures emit seismic waves in directions dependent on the fault's orientation. Specifically, as the fault slips to release strain, compressional P-waves propagate parallel and perpendicular to the fault plane, and transverse S-waves propagate at 45 degree angles to the fault-a result of the double-couple model of fault slippage. Sagnac Interferometers (ring-lasers) have been used to study wave components of several natural phenomena. We used the initial responses of a ring-laser from transverse S-waves to determine the orientation of the nearby Guy/Greenbrier fault, the source of an earthquake swarm in 2010-11 purportedly caused by hydraulic fracturing. This orientation was compared to the structure of the fault extracted by nearby seismogram responses. Our goal was to determine if ring-lasers could reinforce or add to the models of fault orientation constructed from seismographs. The results indicate that the ring-laser's responses can aid in constructing fault orientation in a manner similar to traditional seismographs. Funded by the Arkansas Space Grant Consortium and the National Science Foundation.

  17. Learning and diagnosing faults using neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehead, Bruce A.; Kiech, Earl L.; Ali, Moonis

    1990-01-01

    Neural networks have been employed for learning fault behavior from rocket engine simulator parameters and for diagnosing faults on the basis of the learned behavior. Two problems in applying neural networks to learning and diagnosing faults are (1) the complexity of the sensor data to fault mapping to be modeled by the neural network, which implies difficult and lengthy training procedures; and (2) the lack of sufficient training data to adequately represent the very large number of different types of faults which might occur. Methods are derived and tested in an architecture which addresses these two problems. First, the sensor data to fault mapping is decomposed into three simpler mappings which perform sensor data compression, hypothesis generation, and sensor fusion. Efficient training is performed for each mapping separately. Secondly, the neural network which performs sensor fusion is structured to detect new unknown faults for which training examples were not presented during training. These methods were tested on a task of fault diagnosis by employing rocket engine simulator data. Results indicate that the decomposed neural network architecture can be trained efficiently, can identify faults for which it has been trained, and can detect the occurrence of faults for which it has not been trained.

  18. Seismological Constraints on Fault Plane Curvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, K.

    2015-12-01

    The down-dip geometry of seismically active normal faults is not well known. Many examples of normal faults with down-dip curvature exist, such as listric faults revealed in cross-section or in seismic reflection data, or the exposed domes of core complexes. However, it is not understood: (1) whether curved faults fail in earthquakes, and (2) if those faults have generated earthquakes, is the curvature a primary feature of the rupture or due to later modification of the plane? Even if an event is surface-rupturing, because of the limited depth-extent over which observations can be made, it is difficult to reliably constrain the change in dip with depth (if any) and therefore the fault curvature. Despite the uncertainty in seismogenic normal fault geometries, published slip inversions most commonly use planar fault models. We investigate the seismological constraints on normal fault geometry using a forward-modelling approach and present a seismological technique for determining down-dip geometry. We demonstrate that complexity in the shape of teleseismic body waveforms may be used to investigate the presence of down-dip fault plane curvature. We have applied this method to a catalogue of continental and oceanic normal faulting events. Synthetic models demonstrate that the shapes of SH waveforms at along-strike stations are particularly sensitive to fault plane geometry. It is therefore important to consider the azimuthal station coverage before modelling an event. We find that none of the data require significant down-dip curvature, although the modelling results for some events remain ambiguous. In some cases we can constrain that the down-dip fault geometry is within 20° of planar.

  19. West Coast Tsunami: Cascadia's Fault?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y.; Bernard, E. N.; Titov, V.

    2013-12-01

    The tragedies of 2004 Sumatra and 2011 Japan tsunamis exposed the limits of our knowledge in preparing for devastating tsunamis. The 1,100-km coastline of the Pacific coast of North America has tectonic and geological settings similar to Sumatra and Japan. The geological records unambiguously show that the Cascadia fault had caused devastating tsunamis in the past and this geological process will cause tsunamis in the future. Hypotheses of the rupture process of Cascadia fault include a long rupture (M9.1) along the entire fault line, short ruptures (M8.8 - M9.1) nucleating only a segment of the coastline, or a series of lesser events of M8+. Recent studies also indicate an increasing probability of small rupture occurring at the south end of the Cascadia fault. Some of these hypotheses were implemented in the development of tsunami evacuation maps in Washington and Oregon. However, the developed maps do not reflect the tsunami impact caused by the most recent updates regarding the Cascadia fault rupture process. The most recent study by Wang et al. (2013) suggests a rupture pattern of high- slip patches separated by low-slip areas constrained by estimates of coseismic subsidence based on microfossil analyses. Since this study infers that a Tokohu-type of earthquake could strike in the Cascadia subduction zone, how would such an tsunami affect the tsunami hazard assessment and planning along the Pacific Coast of North America? The rapid development of computing technology allowed us to look into the tsunami impact caused by above hypotheses using high-resolution models with large coverage of Pacific Northwest. With the slab model of MaCrory et al. (2012) (as part of the USGS slab 1.0 model) for the Cascadia earthquake, we tested the above hypotheses to assess the tsunami hazards along the entire U.S. West Coast. The modeled results indicate these hypothetical scenarios may cause runup heights very similar to those observed along Japan's coastline during the 2011

  20. Fault segmentation and fluid flow in the Geneva Basin (France & Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardello, Giovanni Luca; Lupi, Matteo; Makhloufi, Yasin; Do Couto, Damien; Clerc, Nicolas; Sartori, Mario; Samankassou, Elias; Moscariello, Andrea; Gorin, Georges; Meyer, Michel

    2017-04-01

    . Cathodoluminescence analysis show that cataclasite mineralization from both the "wet" sets (1) and (2) show fluid evolution through time, possibly from more calcitic to dolomitic composition, testifying for fluids crossing the entire Meso-Cenozoic sequence. Two "dry" fault sets characterized by fault length up to 4 km and N- and NE-strike occur, as they are associated with tightly spaced (5-10 cm) open joints and karstic forms. Locally, a consistent transition from less to well-developed en échelon fracture sets can be recognized both at vertical (plan) and horizontal view. While the study of their arrangement at the plan view leads to a regional fault-evolution model, the horizontal view brings to a more general fault-evolution model in carbonates, where the coalescence of Mode-I veins is associated with larger amount of accumulated displacement. In both views, faulting is the result of strain localization and changing fluid circulation, accompanying the activity of progressively longer and mature faults. In conclusion, our observations show that: 1) faults are segmented in the basin as on the relieves, thus not providing structure capable of giving any earthquake significantly larger than the already measured ones; 2) NNW- and W/NW- striking systems are vein-rich and therefore "wet" whereas N- and NE-striking systems are "dry" although they may work with opposite fluid-flow vertical directivity.