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Sample records for optic neuropathy accompanying

  1. Traumatic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Steinsapir, K D; Goldberg, R A

    1994-01-01

    Knowledge concerning the pathophysiologic mechanisms of traumatic optic neuropathy is limited. The optic nerve is a tract of the brain. Therefore, the cellular and biochemical pathophysiology of brain and spinal cord trauma and ischemia provide insight into mechanisms that may operate in traumatic optic neuropathy. The dosage of methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg/6 hours) which was successful in the National Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study 2 (NASCIS 2) evolved from the unique pharmacology of corticosteroids as antioxidants. The management of traumatic optic neuropathy rests on an accurate diagnosis which begins with a comprehensive clinical assessment and appropriate neuroimaging. The results of medical and surgical strategies for treating this injury have not been demonstrated to be better than those achieved without treatment. The spinal cord is a mixed grey and white matter tract of the brain in contrast to the optic nerve which is a pure white matter tract. The treatment success seen with methylprednisolone in the NASCIS 2 study may not generalize to the treatment of traumatic optic neuropathy. Conversely, if the treatment does generalize to the optic nerve, NASCIS 2 data suggests that treatment must be started within eight hours of injury, making traumatic optic neuropathy one of the true ophthalmic emergencies. Given the uncertainties in the treatment, ophthalmologists involved in the management of traumatic optic neuropathy are encouraged to participate in the collaborative study of traumatic optic neuropathy.

  2. Ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Athappilly, Geetha; Pelak, Victoria S; Mandava, Naresh; Bennett, Jeffrey L

    2008-10-01

    Ischemic optic neuropathy is the most frequent cause of vision loss in middle age. Clinical and laboratory research studies have begun to clarify the natural history, clinical presentation, diagnostic criteria and pathogenesis of various ischemic nerve injuries. As a result, physicians are acquiring new tools to aid in the diagnosis and potential treatment of ischemic nerve injury. The aim of this review is to examine recent data on anterior and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy and to provide a framework for physicians to manage and counsel affected individuals. PMID:18826805

  3. [Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Hilo, Wasseem; Jabaly-Habib, Haneen; Modi, Naftali; Briscoe, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Lebers hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited disease characterized by subacute severe visual loss in both eyes, which usually manifests in young adulthood. The disease has maternal inheritance due to mitochondrial DNA mutation. The final diagnosis is genetic. There is still no proven treatment, but there is significant progress in developments on the genetics of the disease to reach gene therapy. In this article we review the latest literature relevant to this disease.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Leber hereditary optic neuropathy Leber hereditary optic neuropathy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is an inherited form of vision loss. ...

  5. Radiation optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, L.B.; Kim, J.Y.; Ceballos, R.

    1985-08-01

    Following surgery for pituitary adenoma, radiation therapy is an accepted treatment in reducing tumor recurrence. However, a potential therapeutic complication is delayed radionecrosis of perisellar neural structures, including the optic nerves and chiasm. This particular cause of visual loss, radiation optic neuropathy (RON), has not been emphasized in the ophthalmologic literature. Four cases of RON seen in the past five years are reported. Diagnostic criteria include: (1) acute visual loss (monocular or binocular), (2) visual field defects indicating optic nerve or chiasmal dysfunction, (3) absence of optic disc edema, (4) onset usually within three years of therapy (peak: 1-1 1/2 years), and (5) no computed tomographic evidence of visual pathway compression. Pathologic findings, differential diagnosis and therapy will be discussed in outlining the clinical profile of RON.

  6. [Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Leo-Kottler, B; Wissinger, B

    2011-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a rare disease primarily affecting the retinal ganglion cells. In most cases patients with LHON develop permanent visual loss with a large central scotoma in the visual field of both eyes. The optic disc becomes partially or completely pale. At the onset of the disease many patients are considered to suffer from an optic neuritis and are treated under the diagnostic and therapeutic regimen of optic neuritis. LHON is mostly only considered when high dose cortisone therapy fails to be effective or the second eye is affected. Thereafter, molecular genetic analysis will prove LHON in these cases. Detailed anamnesis including pedigree analysis in combination with observance of the peripapillary microangiopathic alterations at the fundus will help to speed up the diagnosis of LHON, but even after exact clinical and molecular genetic diagnosis of LHON some aspects of the disease still remain a mystery today.

  7. Indirect traumatic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Singman, Eric L; Daphalapurkar, Nitin; White, Helen; Nguyen, Thao D; Panghat, Lijo; Chang, Jessica; McCulley, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Indirect traumatic optic neuropathy (ITON) refers to optic nerve injury resulting from impact remote to the optic nerve. The mechanism of injury is not understood, and there are no confirmed protocols for prevention, mitigation or treatment. Most data concerning this condition comes from case series of civilian patients suffering blunt injury, such as from sports- or motor vehicle-related concussion, rather than military-related ballistic or blast damage. Research in this field will likely require the development of robust databases to identify patients with ITON and follow related outcomes, in addition to both in-vivo animal and virtual human models to study the mechanisms of damage and potential therapies. PMID:26759722

  8. [Differential radiodiagnosis of odontogenic mandibular osteomyelitis accompanied by trigeminal neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Solonskaia, N S; Zorina, I S

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the results of radiation examination in 43 patients with clinical manifestations of mandibular osteomyelitis. In 13 of them, the disease was accompanied by trigeminal neuropathy. The radiation semiotics of the changes occurring in the mandibular bone and its adjacent soft tissues in different phases of osteomyelitis is described. Comparative analysis of orthopantomograms and the images obtained by multislice spiral computed tomography has revealed the advantage of the latter in identifying insignificant changes in bone tissue and damages to the mandibular canal. Ultrasound study is of more informative value in detecting soft tissue changes in this area. High-technology radiodiagnostic techniques play a leading role in the differentiation of odontogenic and non-odontogenic trigeminal neuropathies.

  9. Axonal loss and neuroprotection in optic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Levin, Leonard A

    2007-06-01

    Most optic neuropathies do not have effective treatments. Examples are ischemic optic neuropathy, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, optic neuritis, and traumatic optic neuropathy. In some cases, the pathophysiology of the optic nerve injury is not fully understood. For example, while the demyelinative aspects of optic neuritis have been studied, the mechanism by which the axonal loss occurs is less apparent. In other cases, although the pathophysiology of the optic neuropathy may be understood, there is difficulty treating the disease, for example, with traumatic optic neuropathy. In response to this therapeutic dearth, the concept of neuroprotection has arisen. Neuroprotection is a therapeutic paradigm for preventing death of neurons from injury and maintaining function. In optic neuropathies, the corresponding neuron is the retinal ganglion cell. These cells are unable to divide, and optic neuropathies irrevocably result in their death; therefore, the primary target of neuroprotection are retinal ganglion cells and their axons. This review emphasizes that most optic neuropathies are axonal and thus good targets for neuroprotection. PMID:17508035

  10. Optic neuropathy associated with systemic sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Ben J.; Graham, Elizabeth M.; Plant, Gordon T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify and follow a series of 52 patients with optic neuropathy related to sarcoidosis. Methods: Prospective observational cohort study. Results: The disorder was more common in women and affected a wide age range. It was proportionately more common in African and Caribbean ethnic groups. Two clinical subtypes were identified: the more common was a subacute optic neuropathy resembling optic neuritis; a more slowly progressive optic neuropathy arose in the remaining 17%. Sixteen (31%) were bilateral. Concurrent intraocular inflammation was seen in 36%. Pain arose in only 27% of cases. An optic perineuritis was seen in 2 cases, and predominate involvement of the chiasm in one. MRI findings showed optic nerve involvement in 75% of cases, with adjacent and more widespread inflammation in 31%. Treatment with corticosteroids was helpful in those with an inflammatory optic neuropathy, but not those with mass lesions. Relapse of visual signs arose in 25% of cases, necessitating an increase or escalation of treatment, but relapse was not a poor prognostic factor. Conclusions: This is a large prospective study of the clinical characteristics and outcome of treatment in optic neuropathy associated with sarcoidosis. Patients who experience an inflammatory optic neuropathy respond to treatment but may relapse. Those with infiltrative or progressive optic neuropathies improve less well even though the inflammatory disorder responds to therapy. PMID:27536707

  11. Emerging Mitochondrial Therapeutic Targets in Optic Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lopez Sanchez, M I G; Crowston, J G; Mackey, D A; Trounce, I A

    2016-09-01

    Optic neuropathies are an important cause of blindness worldwide. The study of the most common inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) has highlighted a fundamental role for mitochondrial function in the survival of the affected neuron-the retinal ganglion cell. A picture is now emerging that links mitochondrial dysfunction to optic nerve disease and other neurodegenerative processes. Insights gained from the peculiar susceptibility of retinal ganglion cells to mitochondrial dysfunction are likely to inform therapeutic development for glaucoma and other common neurodegenerative diseases of aging. Despite it being a fast-evolving field of research, a lack of access to human ocular tissues and limited animal models of mitochondrial disease have prevented direct retinal ganglion cell experimentation and delayed the development of efficient therapeutic strategies to prevent vision loss. Currently, there are no approved treatments for mitochondrial disease, including optic neuropathies caused by primary or secondary mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent advances in eye research have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms that mediate pathogenesis, and new therapeutic strategies including gene correction approaches are currently being investigated. Here, we review the general principles of mitochondrial biology relevant to retinal ganglion cell function and provide an overview of the major optic neuropathies with mitochondrial involvement, LHON and ADOA, whilst highlighting the emerging link between mitochondrial dysfunction and glaucoma. The pharmacological strategies currently being trialed to improve mitochondrial dysfunction in these optic neuropathies are discussed in addition to emerging therapeutic approaches to preserve retinal ganglion cell function. PMID:27288727

  12. Systemic corticosteroids in nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zubidi, Nagham; Zhang, Jason; Spitze, Arielle; Lee, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is one of the most prevalent optic nerve disorders seen in ophthalmic practice. The role of corticosteroid therapy in NAION remains a highly controversial area of debate in ophthalmology. This brief review will provide an overview of the current clinical evidence on this topic as well as some comment on the medical debate. PMID:25449939

  13. Progressive auditory neuropathy in patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ceranic, B; Luxon, L

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate auditory neural involvement in patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Methods: Auditory assessment was undertaken in two patients with LHON. One was a 45 year old woman with Harding disease (multiple-sclerosis-like illness and positive 11778mtDNA mutation) and mild auditory symptoms, whose auditory function was monitored over five years. The other was a 59 year old man with positive 11778mtDNA mutation, who presented with a long standing progressive bilateral hearing loss, moderate on one side and severe to profound on the other. Standard pure tone audiometry, tympanometry, stapedial reflex threshold measurements, stapedial reflex decay, otoacoustic emissions with olivo-cochlear suppression, auditory brain stem responses, and vestibular function tests were undertaken. Results: Both patients had good cochlear function, as judged by otoacoustic emissions (intact outer hair cells) and normal stapedial reflexes (intact inner hair cells). A brain stem lesion was excluded by negative findings on imaging, recordable stapedial reflex thresholds, and, in one of the patients, olivocochlear suppression of otoacoustic emissions. The deterioration of auditory function implied a progressive course in both cases. Vestibular function was unaffected. Conclusions: The findings are consistent with auditory neuropathy—a lesion of the cochlear nerve presenting with abnormal auditory brain stem responses and with normal inner hair cells and the cochlear nucleus (lower brain stem). The association of auditory neuropathy, or any other auditory dysfunction, with LHON has not been recognised previously. Further studies are necessary to establish whether this is a consistent finding. PMID:15026512

  14. Diagnostic pitfalls: posterior ischemic optic neuropathy mimicking optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Lysandropoulos, Andreas P; Carota, Antonio

    2011-02-01

    In young people, the most frequent cause of isolated monocular visual loss due to an optic neuropathy is optic neuritis. We present the case of a 27 year old woman who presented monocular visual loss, excruciating orbital pain and unusual temporal headache. The initial diagnosis of optic neuritis revealed later to be a posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION). In this case, PION was the first unique presentation of a non-traumatic carotid dissection, and it was followed 24h later by an ischemic stroke. Sudden monocular visual loss associated with a new-onset headache are clinical symptoms that should immediately prompt to a carotid dissection. PMID:21056537

  15. Diagnosis and classification of autoimmune optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Axel; Plant, Gordon T

    2014-01-01

    The spectrum of autoimmune optic neuropathies (ON) is extending. The phenotypic spectrum includes single isolated optic neuritis (SION), relapsing isolated optic neuritis (RION), chronic relapsing inflammatory optic neuropathy (CRION), the neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorder, multiple sclerosis associated optic neuritis (MSON) and unclassified optic neuritis (UCON) forms. Epidemiological data suggests a slight female predominance. The ethnic heritage is relevant as Caucasian patients are more likely to suffer from MSON, whilst SION, RION, CRION and NMO are more frequent in non-Caucasian patients. Importantly, prognosis for recovery of visual function is good in MSON, but poorer in NMO and CRION which also have a high chance for recurrent episodes. Testing for serum anti-AQP4 autoantibodies is advised in all patients with severe, atypical or recurrent ON because of the high diagnostic specificity. The diagnostic specificity may be aided by testing for glial biomarkers in the CSF and prognostic accuracy by testing for biomarkers for neuroaxonal degeneration. Optical coherence tomography is a highly accurate tool to document the final outcome. The current clinical classification criteria rely on the phenotype, response to treatment and presence of anti-AQP4 autoantibodies.

  16. Histopathologic studies of ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, D L; Kerrison, J B; Green, W R

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To define the histopathologic features of eyes in which a pathologic diagnosis of ischemic optic neuropathy had been made in the years 1951 through 1998. METHODS: The following data were documented: age of patient, race, sex, source of tissue, cause of death, clinical history, interval from loss of vision to death, enucleation, exenteration, and biopsy. The histopathologic criteria for diagnosis of ischemic optic neuropathy were the presence of localized ischemic edema, cavernous degeneration, or an area of atrophy located superior or inferior in the optic nerve. Cases with history of abrupt loss of vision were combined with reports from the literature to construct a time table of histopathologic features and associated conditions. RESULTS: Ischemic optic neuropathy was present in 193 eyes. There were 88 females and 65 males. The average age was 71.6 years. Ischemic edema without (early) and with (later) gitter macrophages was present in 26 (13.5%). Cavernous degeneration was present in 69 nerves (36%). Mucopolysaccharide (MPS) was present in 37 cavernous lesions 1 month or longer after loss of vision. Cavernous lesions were seen in 3 eyes in which peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer hemorrhage had been observed prior to death. Atrophic lesions, the most common pattern, were observed in 133 optic nerves (66.8%). More than 1 ischemic lesion was seen in 38 optic nerves (19.7%). Bilateral ischemic lesions were seen in 50 (35.2%) of 142 paired eyes. CONCLUSIONS: Ischemic optic nerve lesions are initially acellular and later show macrophage infiltration. Cavernous lesions with MPS are present 4 weeks or longer after vision loss. The location of MPS posteriorly and along the internal margin suggests that MPS is produced at the edges of lesions. Progressive vision loss in ischemic optic neuropathy may be secondary to compression of intact nerve from ischemic edema and cavernous swelling, or a second ischemic lesion. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5

  17. A review of primary hereditary optic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Votruba, M; Aijaz, S; Moore, A T

    2003-01-01

    The primary inherited optic neuropathies are a heterogeneous group of disorders that result in loss of retinal ganglion cells, leading to the clinical appearance of optic atrophy. They affect between 1:10,000 to 1:50,000 people. The main clinical features are a reduction in visual acuity, colour vision abnormalities, centro-caecal visual field defects and pallor of the optic nerve head. Electrophysiological testing shows a normal flash electroretinogram, absent or delayed pattern visually evoked potentials suggestive of a conduction deficit and N95 waveform reduction on the pattern electroretinogram, consistent with a primary ganglion cell pathology. The primary inherited optic neuropathies may be sporadic or familial. The mode of inheritance may be autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked recessive or mitochondrial. Within each of these groups, the phenotypic characteristics vary in such features as the mode and age of onset, the severity of the visual loss, the colour deficit and the overall prognosis. A number of different genes (most as yet unidentified) in both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, underlie these disorders. The elucidation of the role of the encoded proteins will improve our understanding of basic mechanisms of ganglion cell development, physiology and metabolism and further our understanding of the pathophysiology of optic nerve disease. It will also improve diagnosis, counselling and management of patients, and eventually lead to the development of new therapeutic modalities.

  18. Optic neuropathy associated with periostitis in relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed

    Hirunwiwatkul, Parima; Trobe, Jonathan D

    2007-03-01

    Optic neuropathy is an uncommon manifestation of relapsing polychondritis (RPC), a rare systemic disease affecting cartilaginous and proteoglycan-rich structures. The optic neuropathy has been attributed to ischemia, intrinsic inflammation of the optic nerve, or spread of inflammation to the nerve from adjacent intraconal orbital tissues. We report a case of recurrent corticosteroid-responsive optic neuropathy in which MRI did not show ocular, optic nerve, or intraconal orbital abnormalities but did show periosteal thickening and enhancement in the apical orbit and adjacent intracranial space consistent with periostitis. The periostitis, which is a manifestation of a systemic vasculitis or an autoimmune reaction to progenitors of cartilage, probably caused the optic neuropathy by compression or inflammation. It is important to recognize this mechanism of optic neuropathy as its imaging features may be a subtle yet critical clue to an underlying systemic condition that can be life-threatening if not properly managed.

  19. Chikungunya fever presenting with acute optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mohite, Abhijit Anand; Agius-Fernandez, Adriana

    2015-07-28

    Chikungunya fever is a vector borne virus that typically causes a self-limiting systemic illness with fever, skin rash and joint aches 2 weeks after infection. We present the case of a 69-year-old woman presenting with an acute unilateral optic neuropathy as a delayed complication of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection contracted during a recent trip to the West Indies. She presented to our ophthalmology department with acute painless visual field loss in the right eye and a recent flu-like illness. She was found to have a right relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD) with unilateral optic disc swelling. Serology confirmed recent CHIKV infection. Treatment with intravenous methylprednisolone was delayed while awaiting MRI scans and serology results. At 5-month follow-up, there was a persistent right RAPD and marked optic atrophy with a corresponding inferior scotoma in the visual field.

  20. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Meyerson, Cherise; Van Stavern, Greg; McClelland, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26170609

  1. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy in Australia.

    PubMed

    Mackey, D A; Buttery, R G

    1992-08-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) presents with sudden onset of visual loss mainly in young adult males. LHON is not uncommon in Australia, accounting for 2% of invalid blind pensions. We have identified 20 unrelated families carrying mitochondrial DNA mutations associated with LHON and 135 of 291 individuals with documented LHON are currently alive in Australia. The mean age of onset of visual loss for males was 26 years and for females 27 years, with a range from six to 65 years. The mean risk of visual loss was 20% for males and 4% for females. There are over 1750 male and female carriers living in Australia who have not yet lost vision; 600 carriers are under 24 years of age. The expected number of new cases of blindness from LHON is three to four per year. PMID:1449769

  2. Idebenone for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gueven, N

    2016-03-01

    Idebenone is a rapidly absorbed, safe and well-tolerated drug and is currently the only clinically proven treatment option for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) patients. Idebenone (Raxone®) is approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of LHON and has been available on the European market since 2015. Due to its molecular mode of action of bypassing the defective mitochondrial complex I, idebenone leads to improved energy supply and a functional recovery of retinal ganglion cells during the acute stage of the disease, thereby preventing further vision loss and promoting recovery of vision. Thus, commencing treatment shortly after the onset of symptoms is likely to have the best therapeutic effect, a hypothesis that is supported by the available clinical data. PMID:27186591

  3. Idebenone for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gueven, N

    2016-03-01

    Idebenone is a rapidly absorbed, safe and well-tolerated drug and is currently the only clinically proven treatment option for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) patients. Idebenone (Raxone®) is approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of LHON and has been available on the European market since 2015. Due to its molecular mode of action of bypassing the defective mitochondrial complex I, idebenone leads to improved energy supply and a functional recovery of retinal ganglion cells during the acute stage of the disease, thereby preventing further vision loss and promoting recovery of vision. Thus, commencing treatment shortly after the onset of symptoms is likely to have the best therapeutic effect, a hypothesis that is supported by the available clinical data.

  4. Spheniodal mucocele causing bilateral optic neuropathy and ophthalmoplegia

    PubMed Central

    Selvakumar, Ambika; Mahalaxmi, Balasubramanyam; Ananth, V; Gautam, Cugati

    2014-01-01

    Sphenoid sinus mucocele comprises only 2% of all paranasal sinus mucoceles. In literature, there is a case report on sphenoidal mucocele causing bilateral optic neuropathy, with unilateral partial recovery and cranial nerve palsy, but we did not come across any literature with bilateral optic neuropathy and ophthalmoplegia together caused by spheno-ethmoidal mucocele. We present such a rare case of spheno-ethmoidal mucocele causing bilateral optic neuropathy and unilateral sixth nerve palsy who had postsurgery, unilateral good vision recovery, and complete resolution of sixth nerve palsy. PMID:23571243

  5. Spheniodal mucocele causing bilateral optic neuropathy and ophthalmoplegia.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, Ambika; Mahalaxmi, Balasubramanyam; Ananth, V; Gautam, Cugati

    2014-04-01

    Sphenoid sinus mucocele comprises only 2% of all paranasal sinus mucoceles. In literature, there is a case report on sphenoidal mucocele causing bilateral optic neuropathy, with unilateral partial recovery and cranial nerve palsy, but we did not come across any literature with bilateral optic neuropathy and ophthalmoplegia together caused by spheno-ethmoidal mucocele. We present such a rare case of spheno-ethmoidal mucocele causing bilateral optic neuropathy and unilateral sixth nerve palsy who had postsurgery, unilateral good vision recovery, and complete resolution of sixth nerve palsy.

  6. The clinical spectrum of amiodarone-associated optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lenworth N.; Krohel, Gregory B.; Thomas, Eric R.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the clinical spectrum of amiodarone-associated optic neuropathy. METHODS: Observational cases series and review. RESULTS: Of 55 cases, the median interval for onset of optic neuropathy was four months after initiating amiodarone; 88% occurred within 12 months. Seven (13%) patients were asymptomatic. Twenty-two (40%) patients presented with sudden visual loss, while 26 (47%) had insidious loss of vision. Visual acuity ranged from 20/15 to light perception; 10 (18%) patients had legal blindness with visual acuity of 20/200 or worse. Visual field loss was present in 91% of cases. Color vision loss was present in eight (40%) of 20 cases. Optic disc edema was present in 85% of cases, while eight (15%) patients had retrobulbar optic neuropathy, without evidence of disc edema. Optic disc edema resolved over a median time of three months. Five patients had raised intracranial pressure on lumbar puncture. CONCLUSION: We were able to classify amiodarone-associated optic neuropathy into five clinical categories with respect to temporal characteristics and optic nerve appearance: insidious-onset (43%), acute-onset (28%), retrobulbar (13%), increased intracranial pressure (8%), and delayed-progressive onset (8%). Most cases of optic neuropathy commenced within 12 months of initiating amiodarone, with the median onset being four months. Over 10% of patients will have no visual symptoms at the onset. Ophthalmologic examinations within the first 12 months--and particularly within four months of initiating amiodarone--should improve early detection of amiodarone-associated optic neuropathy. PMID:15586652

  7. [Designation criteria for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Makoto; Mimura, Osamu; Wakakura, Masato; Inatani, Masaru; Nakazawa, Toru; Shiraga, Fumio

    2015-05-01

    Designation criteria for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) have been established by a working group for retino-choroidal and optic atrophy funded by the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare (MHLW) of Japan in collaboration with the Japanese Neuro-ophthalmology Society. The criteria are composed of three major symptoms and three ancillary test findings. According to the number and the combination of these symptoms and findings, subjects are classified into definite, probable, and possible LHON cases and asymptomatic carriers. The major symptoms include bilateral involvement with a time-lag, a papillomacular bundle atrophy, both characteristic optic disc findings at the acute phase. In the ancillary testings, mitochondrial DNA mutations specific for LHON are detailed with a table listing the mutation loci being attached. To enhance readers' understanding of description of the major symptoms and ancillary test findings, explanatory remarks on 11 parameters are supplemented. The establishment of the criteria facilitates epidemiological survey of LHON by MHLW and contributes to improvement of welfare for patients with LHON in Japan.

  8. Traumatic Optic Neuropathy – A Conundrum

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Vinoth Kanna; Devanathan, Vasudevan

    2016-01-01

    Visual impairment following head injury may be an enigma especially if the onset of symptoms were to be few days after the actual trauma and the bias arising out of the initial normal ophthalmological examination is not neutralised by unbiased repeated formal clinical evaluation aided with electrophysiology. We report and discuss here a 32-year-old lady with delayed onset of indirect traumatic visual loss with anaemia who failed to improve after blood transfusion but improved immediately following steroid therapy seven days after trauma. Though steroids have not been shown to have a significant contribution on outcomes following Traumatic optic neuropathy, this report rekindles its role in delayed progressive visual loss following head trauma and the need to re-analyse the role of steroids in patients with delayed progressive visual disturbance following head injury excluding those with acute onset symptoms in view of different pathologies in both these presentations. This paper also highlights potential mechanisms for the two major types of presentation. PMID:27134913

  9. Drug-induced optic neuropathy-TB or not TB.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Monika; Sharp, Dianne; Best, Stephen; Vincent, Andrea; Vaphiades, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy is an inherited optic neuropathy manifesting with variable penetrance and expressivity. Other genetic and environmental factors are postulated to contribute to more marked visual loss in some affected individuals. Optic neuropathy is also a known adverse effect of ethambutol therapy for tuberculosis. This case report demonstrates an atypical presentation of ethambutol toxicity, with progressive profound loss of vision despite drug cessation. A subsequent diagnosis of autosomal dominant optic atrophy was made when the proband's sons presented with mild visual disturbances and color vision defects, confirmed with electrophysiology and OPA1 gene mutational analysis. This case emphasizes the importance of avoiding potentially neurotoxic therapy in predisposed individuals and the influence of environmental factors in patients with inherited optic neuropathies. PMID:20083290

  10. Bilateral compressive optic neuropathy secondary to bilateral sphenoethmoidal mucoceles.

    PubMed

    Newton, N; Baratham, G; Sinniah, R; Lim, A

    1989-01-01

    We have presented a rare case of bilateral posterior sphenoethmoidal sinus mucoceles with bilateral compressive optic neuropathy. While the duration of compression was variably present over a 10-month period, there were nevertheless significant improvements in visual acuity of the right eye and visual fields bilaterally following extensive optic nerve decompression.

  11. Glaucoma progression associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Nucci, Carlo; Martucci, Alessio; Mancino, Raffaele; Cerulli, Luciano

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a case of open-angle glaucoma progression associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. Single case analysis method is used. A 53-year-old woman with a previous diagnosis of glaucoma presented with progressive visual field loss. Complete ophthalmological examination and blood tests were negative for other concomitant diseases. Genetic counseling revealed mitochondrial DNA mutation compatible with the diagnosis of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. In conclusion, the case describes the concomitant occurrence of open-angle glaucoma and Leber's optic neuropathy. We hypothesize that the two diseases may have a cumulative effect on oxidative stress and retinal ganglion cell death with the consequent rapid progression of visual impairment. Screening for mitochondrial DNA mutations may be requested in patients with glaucoma who, despite pharmacologically controlled intraocular pressure, show rapid progression of the disease.

  12. Radial optic neurotomy as a treatment for anterior ischemic optic neuropathy secondary to optic disc drusen

    PubMed Central

    Pinxten, Isabel; Stalmans, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Importance: Radial optic neurotomy (RON) was first described by Opremcak as a treatment for patients with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). The most common cause of visual loss in patients with optic disc drusen is nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). The pathogenesis of nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy associated with optic disc drusen is assumed to be similar to the compartment-like syndrome described by Opremcak in the case of central retinal vein occlusion. Observation: An 82-year-old male with bilateral optic disc drusen presented with bilateral visual loss and severe visual field defects consistent with nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. A radial optic neurotomy was performed to treat the most affected eye. Postoperatively, significant and persistent improvement of visual acuity and improved automated perimetry were observed in the operated eye. Conclusion: Optic nerve head decompression by radial optic neurotomy could be a treatment option in patients with nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy associated with optic disc drusen and severe visual field defects.

  13. Deficiency of thiosulphate sulphurtransferase (rhodanese) in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, C J; Kind, P R

    1986-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a rare cause of progressive visual failure. Its cause is unknown, but one hypothesis is that patients have a defect in the detoxication of cyanide. One of the enzymes used in this detoxication is thiosulphate sulphurtransferase (rhodanese). The activity of this enzyme was measured in the rectal mucosa of a group of subjects with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, and it was found to be considerably reduced compared with that in a group of controls (p less than 0.001). This finding supports the hypothesis of an inborn error of cyanide detoxication in this condition. PMID:3085790

  14. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy in severe dysthyroid optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, J.R.; Fagien, S.; Donovan, J.P.; Rubin, M.L. )

    1989-07-01

    Five patients with severe dysthyroid optic neuropathy were treated with intravenous methylprednisolone (1 g daily for 3 consecutive days). Before administration, visual acuity of the more severely affected eyes of each patient was counting fingers at 5 feet, 8/200, 20/400, 20/200, and 20/80. Immediately after completion of pulse therapy, visual acuity improved to 20/25 in four patients and 20/30 in one. Remissions were maintained with oral prednisone and external beam irradiation of the orbit. Pulse methylprednisolone therapy appears to be beneficial in the initial management of severe dysthyroid optic neuropathy.

  15. Retrobulbar optic neuropathy secondary to isolated sphenoid sinus disease

    PubMed Central

    Chafale, Vishal Annaji; Lahoti, Satish Arunkumar; Pandit, Alak; Gangopadhyay, Goutam; Biswas, Atanu

    2015-01-01

    Paranasal sinus disease can cause a condition that mimics optic neuritis. Simultaneous appearance of both diseases would create etiological dilemma. We report two cases of retrobulbar optic neuropathy secondary to isolated sphenoid sinus disease. In the case of a 65-year-old female who had presented with acute loss of vision in the left eye associated with left-sided frontal headache which subsequently turned out to be caused by optic nerve compression at the orbital apex due to collection in abnormally pneumatized left lesser wing of the sphenoid. In another case, a 65-year-old lady had presented with symptoms of bilateral retrobulbar optic neuropathy which was found to be due to direct compression of optic nerves at the orbital apex secondary to metastases from breast carcinoma. PMID:25883489

  16. Oestrogens ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Carla; Montopoli, Monica; Perli, Elena; Orlandi, Maurizia; Fantin, Marianna; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Caparrotta, Laura; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Ghelli, Anna; Sadun, Alfredo A; d'Amati, Giulia; Carelli, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, the most frequent mitochondrial disease due to mitochondrial DNA point mutations in complex I, is characterized by the selective degeneration of retinal ganglion cells, leading to optic atrophy and loss of central vision prevalently in young males. The current study investigated the reasons for the higher prevalence of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in males, exploring the potential compensatory effects of oestrogens on mutant cell metabolism. Control and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy osteosarcoma-derived cybrids (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1 and 14484/ND6) were grown in glucose or glucose-free, galactose-supplemented medium. After having shown the nuclear and mitochondrial localization of oestrogen receptors in cybrids, experiments were carried out by adding 100 nM of 17β-oestradiol. In a set of experiments, cells were pre-incubated with the oestrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy cybrids in galactose medium presented overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which led to decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, increased apoptotic rate, loss of cell viability and hyper-fragmented mitochondrial morphology compared with control cybrids. Treatment with 17β-oestradiol significantly rescued these pathological features and led to the activation of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 2. In addition, 17β-oestradiol induced a general activation of mitochondrial biogenesis and a small although significant improvement in energetic competence. All these effects were oestrogen receptor mediated. Finally, we showed that the oestrogen receptor β localizes to the mitochondrial network of human retinal ganglion cells. Our results strongly support a metabolic basis for the unexplained male prevalence in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and hold promises for a therapeutic use for oestrogen-like molecules.

  17. [An Undeniable Case of Optic Neuropathy Due to Cabazitaxel].

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Yusuke; Kawashima, Yugo; Kawara, Hiroko; Kaneko, Masatomo; Nakauchi, Hiroo; Tokuyama, Yoko

    2016-06-01

    Cabazitaxelis a taxane-type antineoplastic agent used for treating prostate cancer. Although typical side effects include neutropenia and fatigue, no studies have investigated eye disorders as a possible side effect, and the details are not clear. Herein, we report our experience of an undeniable case of optic neuropathy caused by cabazitaxel. A 78-year-old man had been diagnosed with prostate cancer (cT3aN1M1b, stage IV) 3 years previously, with a treatment history of bicalutamide, leuprorelin, flutamide, docetaxel, abiraterone, and enzalutamide. Because of a decline in vision during the second and third administration cycles of cabazitaxel, the patient visited an ophthalmologist. He was found to have reduced visual acuity, reduced central critical flicker frequency, narrowed field of vision, and impaired color vision, and was diagnosed with optic neuropathy. Although cabazitaxel administration was continued through 6 cycles, the symptoms were unchanged, and no drastic exacerbation was seen. This patient undeniably developed optic neuropathy due to cabazitaxel. Optic neuropathy due to taxane-type antineoplastic agents has also been reported with paclitaxel or docetaxel, and all precautions should be taken when administering such drugs. Detailed studies that include data from a larger number of facilities should be conducted in the future. PMID:27306820

  18. Visual Rehabilitation of Persons with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudanko, S.-L.

    1995-01-01

    This article presents results of a noncontrolled clinical study of 20 persons with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy who were treated from 1976 to 1990 at the Low Vision Centre of the Finnish Federation of the Visually Handicapped. The importance of early functional visual rehabilitation is emphasized, as is the use of low vision aids to help…

  19. Psychophysical testing in rodent models of glaucomatous optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Stephanie L; Koulen, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Processing of visual information begins in the retina, with photoreceptors converting light stimuli into neural signals. Ultimately, signals are transmitted to the brain through signaling networks formed by interneurons, namely bipolar, horizontal and amacrine cells providing input to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which form the optic nerve with their axons. As part of the chronic nature of glaucomatous optic neuropathy, the increasing and irreversible damage and ultimately loss of neurons, RGCs in particular, occurs following progressive damage to the optic nerve head (ONH), eventually resulting in visual impairment and visual field loss. There are two behavioral assays that are typically used to assess visual deficits in glaucoma rodent models, the visual water task and the optokinetic drum. The visual water task can assess an animal's ability to distinguish grating patterns that are associated with an escape from water. The optokinetic drum relies on the optomotor response, a reflex turning of the head and neck in the direction of the visual stimuli, which usually consists of rotating black and white gratings. This reflex is a physiological response critical for keeping the image stable on the retina. Driven initially by the neuronal input from direction-selective RGCs, this reflex is comprised of a number of critical sensory and motor elements. In the presence of repeatable and defined stimuli, this reflex is extremely well suited to analyze subtle changes in the circuitry and performance of retinal neurons. Increasing the cycles of these alternating gratings per degree, or gradually reducing the contrast of the visual stimuli, threshold levels can be determined at which the animal is no longer tracking the stimuli, and thereby visual function of the animal can be determined non-invasively. Integrating these assays into an array of outcome measures that determine multiple aspects of visual function is a central goal in vision research and can be realized, for

  20. Amiodarone-Associated Optic Neuropathy: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Passman, Rod S.; Bennett, Charles L.; Purpura, Joseph M.; Kapur, Rashmi; Johnson, Lenworth N.; Raisch, Dennis W.; West, Dennis P.; Edwards, Beatrice J.; Belknap, Steven M.; Liebling, Dustin B.; Fisher, Mathew J.; Samaras, Athena T.; Jones, Lisa-Gaye A.; Tulas, Katrina-Marie E.; McKoy, June M.

    2011-01-01

    Although amiodarone is the most commonly prescribed antiarrhythmic drug, its use is limited by serious toxicities, including optic neuropathy. Current reports of amiodarone associated optic neuropathy identified from the Food and Drug Administration's Adverse Event Reporting System (FDA-AERS) and published case reports were reviewed. A total of 296 reports were identified: 214 from AERS, 59 from published case reports, and 23 from adverse events reports for patients enrolled in clinical trials. Mean duration of amiodarone therapy before vision loss was 9 months (range 1-84 months). Insidious onset of amiodarone associated optic neuropathy (44%) was the most common presentation, and nearly one-third were asymptomatic. Optic disc edema was present in 85% of cases. Following drug cessation, 58% had improved visual acuity, 21% were unchanged, and 21% had further decreased visual acuity. Legal blindness (< 20/200) was noted in at least one eye in 20% of cases. Close ophthalmologic surveillance of patients during the tenure of amiodarone administration is warranted. PMID:22385784

  1. [Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy after head trauma: a case report].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shintaro; Okamoto, Koichi

    2011-10-01

    A previously healthy 34-year-old man sustained multiple skull fractures in a traffic accident. Radiological findings and visual field examination did not detect any abnormality. Shortly after the accident, he noticed blurred vision in both eyes. Six months after the accident, he gradually developed disturbance of visual acuity in the right eye. His best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 0.8 OD and 1.2 OS and brain MRI did not show any abnormality, while Humphrey visual field analysis demonstrated right homonymous hemianopsia. Two months after the initial presentation, his BCVA showed 0.1 OD and 0.08 OS. Visual field examination suggested that both right homonymous hemianopsia and left blind spot had become enlarged. Mitochondrial DNA analysis demonstrated G11,778A mutation and a diagnosis of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) was made. A few reports have documented mild acute insult to the head or blunt optic trauma as triggers of optic neuropathy in subjects with LHON. Although, the precise mechanism of LHON following trauma remains unknown, it appears that an acute insult may be sufficient to precipitate neuropathy in the optic nerve already compromised by mitochondrial dysfunction. Asymptomatic carriers should be advised to avoid possible precipitating factors such as head trauma.

  2. Graves' disease presenting as unilateral anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Monigari, Naresh; Deshpande, Anirudda; Nalabothu, Murali; Rao, Shilpa

    2014-03-19

    We report a case of a 28-year-old man who presented with 1-day history of sudden diminution of vision in the right eye. Examination showed unilateral exophthalmos with restricted eyeball movement on upward gaze in the right eye. MRI of the orbit showed no evidence of compression of the optic nerve on the right side. Visual-evoked potential showed prolonged P100 in the right eye. Fundus examination revealed swollen optic disc and para papillary nerve fibre layer splinter haemorrhages with corresponding altitudinal field defect on perimetry suggestive of anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy.

  3. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy associated with multiple sclerosis: Harding's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parry-Jones, A R; Mitchell, J D; Gunarwardena, W J; Shaunak, S

    2008-04-01

    We describe a 32-year-old woman with sequential, severe, painless visual loss in one eye and then the other, and three temporally distinct episodes of neurological disturbance suggestive of demyelination in the spinal cord. She was positive for the T14484C mutation in the mitochondrial genome, one of three common mutations causing Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. In addition, MRI identified areas of demyelination within the periventricular white matter of the brain and within the spinal cord. The coexistence of multiple sclerosis and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (Harding's syndrome) is known to occur more often than would be expected by chance; therefore, screening for the Leber's mutations in multiple sclerosis patients with severe visual loss should be considered because this has important prognostic and genetic implications.

  4. Role for rapid surgical intervention in uveal effusion syndrome with associated optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bhullar, Shaminder S; Gray, Matthew J; Kay, Christine N

    2014-01-01

    Uveal effusion syndrome (UES) can be associated with nanophthalmos and rarely can present with concomitant optic neuropathy. This case report describes nanophthalmic UES and optic neuropathy treated with early sclerectomies. One month postoperatively, the patient experienced significant improvement in choroidal effusions and optic neuropathy, with increases in visual acuity and visual fields. Early scleral windows surgery for UES with associated optic neuropathy can provide prompt improvement of choroidal swelling, optic nerve edema, and vision, although the relapsing course of this disease presents a challenge to long-term visual prognosis. PMID:24695046

  5. Optic neuropathy in children with Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Rothermel, H; Hedges, T R; Steere, A C

    2001-08-01

    Involvement of the optic nerve, either because of inflammation or increased intracranial pressure, is a rare manifestation of Lyme disease. Of the 4 children reported here with optic nerve abnormalities, 2 had decreased vision months after disease onset attributable to optic neuritis, and 1 had headache and diplopia early in the infection because of increased intracranial pressure associated with Lyme meningitis. In these 3 children, optic nerve involvement responded well to intravenous ceftriaxone therapy. The fourth child had headache and visual loss attributable to increased intracranial pressure and perhaps also to optic neuritis. Despite treatment with ceftriaxone and steroids, he had persistent increased intracranial pressure leading to permanent bilateral blindness. Clinicians should be aware that neuro-ophthalmologic involvement of Lyme disease may have significant consequences. If increased intracranial pressure persists despite antibiotic therapy, measures must be taken quickly to reduce the pressure.

  6. Optic nerve degeneration and mitochondrial dysfunction: genetic and acquired optic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Carelli, Valerio; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Sadun, Alfredo A

    2002-05-01

    Selective degeneration of the smallest fibers (papillo-macular bundle) of the human optic nerve occurs in a large number of optic neuropathies characterized primarily by loss of central vision. The pathophysiology that underlies this peculiar pattern of cell involvement probably reflects different forms of genetic and acquired mitochondrial dysfunction. Maternally inherited Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), dominant optic atrophy (Kjer disease), the optic atrophy of Leigh's syndrome, Friedreich ataxia and a variety of other conditions are examples of inherited mitochondrial disorders with different etiologies. Tobacco-alcohol amblyopia (TAA), the Cuban epidemic of optic neuropathy (CEON) and other dietary (Vitamins B, folate deficiencies) optic neuropathies, as well as toxic optic neuropathies such as due to chloramphenicol, ethambutol, or more rarely to carbon monoxide, methanol and cyanide are probably all related forms of acquired mitochondrial dysfunction. Biochemical and cellular studies in LHON point to a partial defect of respiratory chain function that may generate either an ATP synthesis defect and/or a chronic increase of oxidative stress. Histopathological studies in LHON cases and a rat model mimicking CEON revealed a selective loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and the corresponding axons, particularly in the temporal-central part of the optic nerve. Anatomical peculiarities of optic nerve axons, such as the asymmetric pattern of myelination, may have functional implications on energy dependence and distribution of mitochondrial populations in the different sections of the nerve. Histological evidence suggests impaired axonal transport of mitochondria in LHON and in the CEON-like rat model, indicating a possible common pathophysiology for this category of optic neuropathies. Histological evidence of myelin pathology in LHON also suggests a role for oxidative stress, possibly affecting the oligodendrocytes of the optic nerves.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA Mutation Associated with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Singh, Gurparkash; Lott, Marie T.; Hodge, Judy A.; Schurr, Theodore G.; Lezza, Angela M. S.; Elsas, Louis J.; Nikoskelainen, Eeva K.

    1988-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited disease resulting in optic nerve degeneration and cardiac dysrhythmia. A mitochondrial DNA replacement mutation was identified that correlated with this disease in multiple families. This mutation converted a highly conserved arginine to a histidine at codon 340 in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 gene and eliminated an Sfa NI site, thus providing a simple diagnostic test. This finding demonstrated that a nucleotide change in a mitochondrial DNA energy production gene can result in a neurological disease.

  8. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Associated with Bilateral Macular Holes

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Yoshiaki; Horiguchi, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) causes visual loss, predominantly in healthy young men. We recently examined a patient who previously had bilateral macular holes and subsequently developed LHON at 74 years of age. Although his central scotomas were initially attributed to the macular holes, his visual acuity declined following an initial improvement after operative closure of the macular holes; thus, other diagnoses, including LHON, were considered. Furthermore, macular optical coherence tomography (OCT) images remained unchanged in this time. A mitochondrial genetic analysis identified a 11778G→A mutation. From this case, we propose that LHON remains in the differential diagnosis even in older patients, as has previously been reported. PMID:27335507

  9. Mitochondrial optic neuropathies – Disease mechanisms and therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Griffiths, Philip G.; Chinnery, Patrick F.

    2011-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal-dominant optic atrophy (DOA) are the two most common inherited optic neuropathies in the general population. Both disorders share striking pathological similarities, marked by the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and the early involvement of the papillomacular bundle. Three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations; m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C account for over 90% of LHON cases, and in DOA, the majority of affected families harbour mutations in the OPA1 gene, which codes for a mitochondrial inner membrane protein. Optic nerve degeneration in LHON and DOA is therefore due to disturbed mitochondrial function and a predominantly complex I respiratory chain defect has been identified using both in vitro and in vivo biochemical assays. However, the trigger for RGC loss is much more complex than a simple bioenergetic crisis and other important disease mechanisms have emerged relating to mitochondrial network dynamics, mtDNA maintenance, axonal transport, and the involvement of the cytoskeleton in maintaining a differential mitochondrial gradient at sites such as the lamina cribosa. The downstream consequences of these mitochondrial disturbances are likely to be influenced by the local cellular milieu. The vulnerability of RGCs in LHON and DOA could derive not only from tissue-specific, genetically-determined biological factors, but also from an increased susceptibility to exogenous influences such as light exposure, smoking, and pharmacological agents with putative mitochondrial toxic effects. Our concept of inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies has evolved over the past decade, with the observation that patients with LHON and DOA can manifest a much broader phenotypic spectrum than pure optic nerve involvement. Interestingly, these phenotypes are sometimes clinically indistinguishable from other neurodegenerative disorders such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, hereditary spastic

  10. Radiation-induced optic neuropathy: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, J.; Mancuso, A.; Beck, R.; Moster, M.L.; Sedwick, L.A.; Quisling, R.G.; Rhoton, A.L. Jr.; Protzko, E.E.; Schiffman, J. )

    1991-03-01

    Optic neuropathy induced by radiation is an infrequent cause of delayed visual loss that may at times be difficult to differentiate from compression of the visual pathways by recurrent neoplasm. The authors describe six patients with this disorder who experienced loss of vision 6 to 36 months after neurological surgery and radiation therapy. Of the six patients in the series, two had a pituitary adenoma and one each had a metastatic melanoma, multiple myeloma, craniopharyngioma, and lymphoepithelioma. Visual acuity in the affected eyes ranged from 20/25 to no light perception. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed sellar and parasellar recurrence of both pituitary adenomas, but the intrinsic lesions of the optic nerves and optic chiasm induced by radiation were enhanced after gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) administration and were clearly distinguishable from the suprasellar compression of tumor. Repeated MR imaging showed spontaneous resolution of gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of the optic nerve in a patient who was initially suspected of harboring recurrence of a metastatic malignant melanoma as the cause of visual loss. The authors found the presumptive diagnosis of radiation-induced optic neuropathy facilitated by MR imaging with gadolinium-DTPA. This neuro-imaging procedure may help avert exploratory surgery in some patients with recurrent neoplasm in whom the etiology of visual loss is uncertain.

  11. Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: The Mitochondrial Connection Revisited.

    PubMed

    Abu-Amero, Khaled K

    2011-01-01

    Our current understanding of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON)-mitochondrial connection falls short of comprehensive. Twenty years of intensive investigation have yielded a wealth of information about mitochondria, the mitochondrial genome, the metabolism of the optic nerve and other structures, and the phenotypic variability of classic LHON. However, we still cannot completely explain how primary LHON mutations injure the optic nerve or why the optic nerve is particularly at risk. We cannot explain the incomplete penetrance or the male predominance of LHON, the typical onset in young adult life without warning, or the synchronicity of visual loss. Moreover, primary LHON mutations clearly are not present in every family with the LHON phenotype (including multigenerational maternal inheritance), and they are present in only a minority of individuals who have the LHON optic neuropathy phenotype without a family history. All lines of evidence point to abnormalities of the mitochondria as the direct or indirect cause of LHON. Therefore, the mitochondria-LHON connection needs to be revisited and examined closely. This review will attempt to do that and provide an update on various aspects of LHON.

  12. Automated Peripheral Neuropathy Assessment Using Optical Imaging and Foot Anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Hafeez-U R; Spruce, Michelle; Alty, Stephen R; Dudley, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    A large proportion of individuals who live with type-2 diabetes suffer from plantar sensory neuropathy. Regular testing and assessment for the condition is required to avoid ulceration or other damage to patient's feet. Currently accepted practice involves a trained clinician testing a patient's feet manually with a hand-held nylon monofilament probe. The procedure is time consuming, labor intensive, requires special training, is prone to error, and repeatability is difficult. With the vast increase in type-2 diabetes, the number of plantar sensory neuropathy sufferers has already grown to such an extent as to make a traditional manual test problematic. This paper presents the first investigation of a novel approach to automatically identify the pressure points on a given patient's foot for the examination of sensory neuropathy via optical image processing incorporating plantar anthropometry. The method automatically selects suitable test points on the plantar surface that correspond to those repeatedly chosen by a trained podiatrist. The proposed system automatically identifies the specific pressure points at different locations, namely the toe (hallux), metatarsal heads and heel (Calcaneum) areas. The approach is generic and has shown 100% reliability on the available database used. The database consists of Chinese, Asian, African, and Caucasian foot images.

  13. Automated Peripheral Neuropathy Assessment Using Optical Imaging and Foot Anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Hafeez-U R; Spruce, Michelle; Alty, Stephen R; Dudley, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    A large proportion of individuals who live with type-2 diabetes suffer from plantar sensory neuropathy. Regular testing and assessment for the condition is required to avoid ulceration or other damage to patient's feet. Currently accepted practice involves a trained clinician testing a patient's feet manually with a hand-held nylon monofilament probe. The procedure is time consuming, labor intensive, requires special training, is prone to error, and repeatability is difficult. With the vast increase in type-2 diabetes, the number of plantar sensory neuropathy sufferers has already grown to such an extent as to make a traditional manual test problematic. This paper presents the first investigation of a novel approach to automatically identify the pressure points on a given patient's foot for the examination of sensory neuropathy via optical image processing incorporating plantar anthropometry. The method automatically selects suitable test points on the plantar surface that correspond to those repeatedly chosen by a trained podiatrist. The proposed system automatically identifies the specific pressure points at different locations, namely the toe (hallux), metatarsal heads and heel (Calcaneum) areas. The approach is generic and has shown 100% reliability on the available database used. The database consists of Chinese, Asian, African, and Caucasian foot images. PMID:26186748

  14. Small Cell Lung Cancer Accompanied by Tonsillar Metastasis and Anti-Hu Antibody-Associated Paraneoplastic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jianjiao; Weng, Linqian; Liu, Mingsheng; Yang, Hua; Wang, Yingyi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tonsillar metastatic small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is rare, while anti-Hu antibodies are frequently found in SCLC. A 66-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with painful dysesthesia and muscle weakness in the distal extremities for over 1 year, progressive dysphagia for over 1 month, and severe cough and dyspnea for over 1 week. He was diagnosed with SCLC accompanied by tonsillar metastasis and anti-Hu antibody-associated paraneoplastic sensory neuropathy (PSN). The patient tolerated 6 cycles of sequential chemoradiotherapy and gradually recovered. The patient's disease remained in remission 2 years after the diagnosis with a remarkable reduction of tumor burden and a persisting high titer of anti-Hu antibodies. To our knowledge, this is the first case of tonsillar metastatic SCLC accompanied by anti-Hu antibody-associated PSN, whereby the anticancer immune response was presumed to play a vital role in disease control. Unilateral tonsillar metastasis of SCLC accompanied by anti-Hu antibody-associated PSN can occur and in certain circumstances, may have a favorable prognosis. PMID:26683964

  15. A retrospective review of 26 cases of dysthyroid optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Panzo, G.J.; Tomsak, R.L.

    1983-08-01

    Sixteen patients (14 women and two men) with dysthyroid optic neuropathy (26 involved eyes) were treated with either oral corticosteroids, orbital irradiation, surgical orbital decompression, combined corticosteroids and irradiation, or combined corticosteroids and surgical decompression. Thirteen of 16 eyes responded favorably to corticosteroid therapy but eight of the 13 relapsed upon discontinuation of treatment. Two of four eyes responded to irradiation initially but later relapsed. The response to orbital decompression was almost uniformly beneficial (eight of nine eyes responded) and lasting in all. Combined modes of therapy offered no additional advantage.

  16. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: Bringing the Lab to the Clinic.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Nailyn; Lessell, Simmons; Cestari, Dean M

    2016-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) was the first clinically characterized mitochondrial disorder. Since its first description in 1871, much has been discovered regarding the genetics and pathophysiology of the disease. This has enabled the development of in vitro cell and animal models that can be used to try to determine not only the effects of the genetic mutation upon the clinical phenotype but to also test potential novel therapies. Treatments for LHON have ranged from vitamins and minerals to immunosuppressants and, more recently, targeted gene therapy. This article reviews the pathophysiology and clinical features of LHON with a focus on translational research. PMID:26959136

  17. Bilateral Glaucomatous Optic Neuropathy Caused by Eye Rubbing.

    PubMed

    Savastano, Alfonso; Savastano, Maria Cristina; Carlomusto, Laura; Savastano, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we describe a particular condition of a 52-year-old man who showed advanced bilateral glaucomatous-like optic disc damage, even though the intraocular pressure resulted normal during all examinations performed. Visual field test, steady-state pattern electroretinogram, retinal nerve fiber layer and retinal tomographic evaluations were performed to evaluate the optic disc damage. Over a 4-year observational period, his visual acuity decreased to 12/20 in the right eye and counting fingers in the left eye. Visual fields were severely compromised, and intraocular pressure values were not superior to 14 mm Hg during routine examinations. An accurate anamnesis and the suspicion of this disease represent a crucial aspect to establish the correct diagnosis. In fact, our patient strongly rubbed his eyes for more than 10 h per day. Recurrent and continuous eye rubbing can induce progressive optic neuropathy, causing severe visual field damage similar to the pathology of advanced glaucoma.

  18. Evaluation of acute radiation optic neuropathy by B-scan ultrasonography

    SciTech Connect

    Lovato, A.A.; Char, D.H.; Quivey, J.M.; Castro, J.R. )

    1990-09-15

    We studied the accuracy of B-scan ultrasonography to diagnose radiation-induced optic neuropathy in 15 patients with uveal melanoma. Optic neuropathy was diagnosed by an observer masked as to clinical and photographic data. We analyzed planimetry area measurements of the retrobulbar nerve before and after irradiation. The retrobulbar area of the optic nerve shadow on B-scan was quantitated with a sonic digitizer. Increased optic nerve shadow area was confirmed in 13 of 15 patients who had radiation optic neuropathy (P less than .004). The correct diagnosis was confirmed when the results of ultrasound were compared to fundus photography and fluorescein angiography. In 13 patients there was acute radiation optic neuropathy. Two patients did not show an enlarged retrobulbar optic nerve, and the clinical appearance suggested early progression to optic atrophy. Ultrasonography documents the enlargement of the optic nerve caused by acute radiation changes.

  19. Treatment strategies for inherited optic neuropathies: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Yu-Wai-Man, P; Votruba, M; Moore, A T; Chinnery, P F

    2014-05-01

    Bilateral visual loss secondary to inherited optic neuropathies is an important cause of registrable blindness among children and young adults. The two prototypal disorders seen in clinical practice are Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). About 90% of LHON cases are due to one of three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations: m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C, which affect critical complex I subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The majority of patients with DOA harbour pathogenic mutations within OPA1, a nuclear gene that codes for a multifunctional inner mitochondrial membrane protein. Despite their contrasting genetic basis, LHON and DOA share overlapping pathological and clinical features that serve to highlight the striking tissue-specific vulnerability of the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer to disturbed mitochondrial function. In addition to severe visual loss secondary to progressive optic nerve degeneration, a subgroup of patients will also develop a more aggressive syndromic phenotype marked by significant neurological deficits. The management of LHON and DOA remains largely supportive, but major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning RGC loss in these two disorders are paving the way for novel forms of treatment aimed at halting or reversing visual deterioration at different stages of the disease process. In addition to neuroprotective strategies for rescuing RGCs from irreversible cell death, innovative in vitro fertilisation techniques are providing the tantalising prospect of preventing the germline transmission of pathogenic mtDNA mutations, eradicating in so doing the risk of disease in future generations.

  20. Treatment strategies for inherited optic neuropathies: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Wai-Man, P; Votruba, M; Moore, A T; Chinnery, P F

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral visual loss secondary to inherited optic neuropathies is an important cause of registrable blindness among children and young adults. The two prototypal disorders seen in clinical practice are Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). About 90% of LHON cases are due to one of three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations: m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C, which affect critical complex I subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The majority of patients with DOA harbour pathogenic mutations within OPA1, a nuclear gene that codes for a multifunctional inner mitochondrial membrane protein. Despite their contrasting genetic basis, LHON and DOA share overlapping pathological and clinical features that serve to highlight the striking tissue-specific vulnerability of the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer to disturbed mitochondrial function. In addition to severe visual loss secondary to progressive optic nerve degeneration, a subgroup of patients will also develop a more aggressive syndromic phenotype marked by significant neurological deficits. The management of LHON and DOA remains largely supportive, but major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning RGC loss in these two disorders are paving the way for novel forms of treatment aimed at halting or reversing visual deterioration at different stages of the disease process. In addition to neuroprotective strategies for rescuing RGCs from irreversible cell death, innovative in vitro fertilisation techniques are providing the tantalising prospect of preventing the germline transmission of pathogenic mtDNA mutations, eradicating in so doing the risk of disease in future generations. PMID:24603424

  1. Auditory function in individuals within Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Rance, Gary; Kearns, Lisa S; Tan, Johanna; Gravina, Anthony; Rosenfeld, Lisa; Henley, Lauren; Carew, Peter; Graydon, Kelley; O'Hare, Fleur; Mackey, David A

    2012-03-01

    The aims of this study are to investigate whether auditory dysfunction is part of the spectrum of neurological abnormalities associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and to determine the perceptual consequences of auditory neuropathy (AN) in affected listeners. Forty-eight subjects confirmed by genetic testing as having one of four mitochondrial mutations associated with LHON (mt11778, mtDNA14484, mtDNA14482 and mtDNA3460) participated. Thirty-two of these had lost vision, and 16 were asymptomatic at the point of data collection. While the majority of individuals showed normal sound detection, >25% (of both symptomatic and asymptomatic participants) showed electrophysiological evidence of AN with either absent or severely delayed auditory brainstem potentials. Abnormalities were observed for each of the mutations, but subjects with the mtDNA11778 type were the most affected. Auditory perception was also abnormal in both symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects, with >20% of cases showing impaired detection of auditory temporal (timing) cues and >30% showing abnormal speech perception both in quiet and in the presence of background noise. The findings of this study indicate that a relatively high proportion of individuals with the LHON genetic profile may suffer functional hearing difficulties due to neural abnormality in the central auditory pathways.

  2. Multiple sclerosis associated with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Palace, Jacqueline

    2009-11-15

    The cause of multiple sclerosis is unknown although it is recognised to involve an inflammatory process associated with demyelinating plaques and more widespread neurodegeneration. It appears to have become progressively more common in females which is further discussed in this issue, and genetic factors, as identified to date, appear to play only a moderate role. One curious observation is that Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON), a rare genetic syndrome, presents clinically overwhelmingly in males, but can be associated with an MS-like illness and when it does it occurs mainly in females. It is interesting to examine this further to assess if this could give us any clues as to the pathogenesis of MS.

  3. Therapeutic strategies for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy: A current update.

    PubMed

    Gueven, Nuri; Faldu, Dharmesh

    2013-11-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a rare mitochondrial retinopathy, caused by mutations in subunits of complex I of the respiratory chain, which leads to elevated levels of oxidative stress and an insufficient energy supply. This molecular pathology is thought to be responsible for the dysfunction and eventual apoptotic loss of retinal ganglion cells in the eye, which ultimately results in blindness. Many strategies, ranging from neuroprotectants, antioxidants, anti-apoptotic- and anti-inflammatory compounds have been tested with mixed results. Currently, the most promising compounds are short-chain quinones that have been shown to protect the vision of LHON patients during the early stages of the disease. This commentary gives a brief overview on the current status of tested therapeutics and also addresses future developments such as the use of gene therapy that hopefully will provide safe and efficient therapy options for all LHON patients.

  4. Nutritional Optic Neuropathy Caused by Copper Deficiency After Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Yuna; Lavin, Patrick J M

    2016-06-01

    A 47-year-old woman developed severe bilateral visual loss 4 years after a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and 24 years after vertical banded gastroplasty. Her serum copper level was 35 μg/dL (normal, 80-155 μg/dL). She was prescribed elemental copper tablets. Because her methylmalonic acid was slightly elevated, she received vitamin B12 injections as well. Five weeks later, she reported that her vision had improved and, at 10 months, her vision had recovered from 20/400 bilaterally to 20/25 in each eye. This case highlights the importance of checking copper levels in addition to the "more routine" vitamin levels, such as B1, B6, B12, E, and serum folate in patients with suspected nutritional optic neuropathy after bariatric surgery, particularly if it involved a bypass procedure. PMID:26828841

  5. Evidence for retrochiasmatic tissue loss in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Barcella, Valeria; Rocca, Maria A; Bianchi-Marzoli, Stefania; Milesi, Jacopo; Melzi, Lisa; Falini, Andrea; Pierro, Luisa; Filippi, Massimo

    2010-12-01

    Patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) have loss of central vision with severe damage of small-caliber fibers of the papillomacular bundle and optic nerve atrophy. The aim of this study was to define the presence and topographical distribution of brain grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) injury in LHON patients using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). The correlation of such changes with neuro-ophthalmologic findings and measurements of peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness by optical coherence tomography (OCT) was also assessed. Dual-echo and fast-field echo scans were acquired from 12 LHON patients and 12 matched controls. VBM analysis was performed using SPM5 and an ANCOVA model. A complete neuro-ophthalmologic examination, including standardized automated Humphrey perimetry as well as average and temporal peripapillary RNFL thickness measurements were obtained in all the patients. Compared with controls, average peripapillary RNFL thickness was significantly decreased in LHON patients. LHON patients also had significant reduced GM volume in the bilateral primary visual cortex, and reduced WM volume in the optic chiasm, optic tract, and several areas located in the optic radiations (OR), bilaterally. Visual cortex and OR atrophy were significantly correlated with average and temporal peripapillary RNFL thickness (P < 0.001; r values ranging from 0.76 to 0.89). Brain damage in patients with LHON is not limited to the anterior visual pathways, but extends posteriorly to the OR and the primary visual cortex. Such a damage to the posterior parts of the visual pathways may be due either to trans-synaptic degeneration secondary to neuroaxonal damage in the retina and optic nerve or to local mitochondrial dysfunction.

  6. Macular thickness as a predictor of loss of visual sensitivity in ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chun-Xia; Zhang, Ai-di; Chen, Bing; Yang, Bing-Jian; Wang, Qiu-Hong; Yang, Mo; Wei, Shi-Hui

    2016-03-01

    Ethambutol is a common cause of drug-related optic neuropathy. Prediction of the onset of ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy and consequent drug withdrawal may be an effective method to stop visual loss. Previous studies have shown that structural injury to the optic nerve occurred earlier than the damage to visual function. Therefore, we decided to detect structural biomarkers marking visual field loss in early stage ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy. The thickness of peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer, macular thickness and visual sensitivity loss would be observed in 11 ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy patients (22 eyes) using optical coherence tomography. Twenty-four healthy age- and sex-matched participants (48 eyes) were used as controls. Results demonstrated that the temporal peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and average macular thickness were thinner in patients with ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy compared with healthy controls. The average macular thickness was strongly positively correlated with central visual sensitivity loss (r (2) =0.878, P=0.000). These findings suggest that optical coherence tomography can be used to efficiently screen patients. Macular thickness loss could be a potential factor for predicting the onset of ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy. PMID:27127488

  7. Macular thickness as a predictor of loss of visual sensitivity in ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chun-xia; Zhang, Ai-di; Chen, Bing; Yang, Bing-jian; Wang, Qiu-hong; Yang, Mo; Wei, Shi-hui

    2016-01-01

    Ethambutol is a common cause of drug-related optic neuropathy. Prediction of the onset of ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy and consequent drug withdrawal may be an effective method to stop visual loss. Previous studies have shown that structural injury to the optic nerve occurred earlier than the damage to visual function. Therefore, we decided to detect structural biomarkers marking visual field loss in early stage ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy. The thickness of peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer, macular thickness and visual sensitivity loss would be observed in 11 ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy patients (22 eyes) using optical coherence tomography. Twenty-four healthy age- and sex-matched participants (48 eyes) were used as controls. Results demonstrated that the temporal peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and average macular thickness were thinner in patients with ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy compared with healthy controls. The average macular thickness was strongly positively correlated with central visual sensitivity loss (r2 =0.878, P=0.000). These findings suggest that optical coherence tomography can be used to efficiently screen patients. Macular thickness loss could be a potential factor for predicting the onset of ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy. PMID:27127488

  8. Congenital optic nerve anomalies and hereditary optic neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Heidary, Gena

    2014-01-01

    Congenital and hereditary optic nerve anomalies represent a significant cause of visual dysfunction. While some optic nerve abnormalities affect the visual system alone, others may be associated with neurologic and systemic findings. Correct identification of the optic nerve disease therefore is crucial both for developing a treatment plan with respect to visual rehabilitation, but also for initiating the appropriate multidisciplinary evaluation. The purpose of this review is to highlight common examples of congenital and inherited optic nerve abnormalities in an effort to familiarize the clinician with salient clinical features of these diseases and to review important systemic testing when relevant. PMID:27625883

  9. Congenital optic nerve anomalies and hereditary optic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Heidary, Gena

    2014-12-01

    Congenital and hereditary optic nerve anomalies represent a significant cause of visual dysfunction. While some optic nerve abnormalities affect the visual system alone, others may be associated with neurologic and systemic findings. Correct identification of the optic nerve disease therefore is crucial both for developing a treatment plan with respect to visual rehabilitation, but also for initiating the appropriate multidisciplinary evaluation. The purpose of this review is to highlight common examples of congenital and inherited optic nerve abnormalities in an effort to familiarize the clinician with salient clinical features of these diseases and to review important systemic testing when relevant. PMID:27625883

  10. High doses of cobalt induce optic and auditory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Apostoli, Pietro; Catalani, Simona; Zaghini, Anna; Mariotti, Andrea; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Vielmi, Valentina; Semeraro, Francesco; Duse, Sarah; Porzionato, Andrea; Macchi, Veronica; Padovani, Alessandro; Rizzetti, Maria Cristina; De Caro, Raffaele

    2013-09-01

    The adverse biological effects of continuous exposure to cobalt and chromium have been well defined. In the past, this toxicity was largely an industrial issue concerning workers exposed in occupational setting. Nevertheless, recent reports have described a specific toxicity mediated by the high levels of cobalt and chromium released by metallic prostheses, particularly in patients who had received hip implants. Clinical symptoms, including blindness, deafness and peripheral neuropathy, suggest a specific neurotropism. However, little is known about the neuropathological basis of this process, and experimental evidence is still lacking. We have investigated this issue in an experimental setting using New Zealand White rabbits treated with repeated intravenous injections of cobalt and chromium, alone or in combination. No evident clinical or pathological alterations were associated after chromium administration alone, despite its high levels in blood and tissue while cobalt-chromium and cobalt-treated rabbits showed clinical signs indicative of auditory and optic system toxicity. On histopathological examination, the animals showed severe retinal and cochlear ganglion cell depletion along with optic nerve damage and loss of sensory cochlear hair cells. Interestingly, the severity of the alterations was related to dosages and time of exposure. These data confirmed our previous observation of severe auditory and optic nerve toxicity in patients exposed to an abnormal release of cobalt and chromium from damaged hip prostheses. Moreover, we have identified the major element mediating neurotoxicity to be cobalt, although the molecular mechanisms mediating this toxicity still have to be defined.

  11. Peripapillary Pachychoroid in Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nagia, Lina; Huisingh, Carrie; Johnstone, John; Kline, Lanning B.; Clark, Mark; Girard, Michael J. A.; Mari, Jean Martial; Girkin, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study examined the peripapillary choroidal thickness (PCT) in nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) in comparison to contralateral eyes and normal eyes. Methods We used enhanced depth imaging spectral-domain optical coherence tomography to image the optic nerve head of 20 NAION, 10 contralateral eyes, and 102 normal eyes. Following compensation, the scans were manually delineated to identify relevant surfaces including Bruch's membrane opening (BMO), Bruch's membrane, and anterior sclera. The PCT was defined as the measurement between Bruch's membrane and the anterior sclera and was measured at increasing distance from BMO. Models adjusted for age, BMO area, and axial length were used to compare the mean PCT between NAION and normal eyes, and contralateral eyes and normal eyes. Paired t-tests were used to compare the PCT between NAION and contralateral eyes. Results The mean PCT was thicker in NAION and contralateral eyes when compared with normal eyes at all distances from BMO (P < 0.001). The PCT was not significantly thicker in contralateral eyes when compared with affected NAION eyes. Choroidal thickness was thinnest in the inferior quadrant in all eyes regardless of the group. Conclusions Increased peripapillary choroidal thickness was noted in both NAION and contralateral eyes. The thicker choroid may be an associated feature or a result of the disorder. Although further longitudinal study is required to determine causation, these findings may suggest that a thickened peripapillary choroid may be a component of the disk-at-risk clinical phenotype. PMID:27583829

  12. Macular spectral domain optical coherence tomography findings in Tanzanian endemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kisimbi, John; Shalchi, Zaid; Mahroo, Omar A; Mhina, Celina; Sanyiwa, Anna J; Mabey, Denise; Mohamed, Moin; Plant, Gordon T

    2013-11-01

    Bilateral optic neuropathy in Dar es Salaam is now considered endemic and is estimated to affect 0.3-2.4% of young adults. The condition is characterized by a subacute bilateral loss of central vision of unknown aetiology. Findings of spectral domain optical coherence tomography have not previously been reported for these patients. All patients diagnosed with endemic optic neuropathy over a 2-year period at the Muhimbili National Hospital underwent spectral domain optical coherence tomography macular imaging. Scans were graded qualitatively for severity of retinal nerve fibre layer loss as well as the presence of microcystic macular changes, which have not previously been described in this condition. Of the 128 patients included (54.7% male; median age 20 years), severe retinal nerve fibre layer loss was found in 185 eyes (74.0%). There was full concordance in retinal nerve fibre layer thickness between the two eyes in 113 (91.1%) patients. Microcystic macular spaces were found in 16 (12.5%) patients and were bilateral in nine (7.0%) individuals. These changes were typically more prominent in the nasal than the temporal macula, predominantly involving the inner nuclear layer, and often occurred in an annular configuration that was evident on en face infra-red imaging, though not discernible on colour fundus photography or clinically. All patients with microcystic macular changes had severe thinning of the retinal nerve fibre layer (P = 0.02). Four patients in whom cystic spaces were demonstrated had sequential scans, and there was no detectable alteration in the configuration of these changes over a period of up to 16 months. This is the first study to document optical coherence tomography findings in endemic optic neuropathy. We have observed symmetrical severe loss of the caeco-central projection (papillomacular bundle) with otherwise well-preserved macular architecture. Also, we have observed microcystic retinal changes in a significant proportion of patients

  13. Secondary post-geniculate involvement in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Giovanni; Tozer, Kevin R; Tonon, Caterina; Manners, David; Testa, Claudia; Malucelli, Emil; Valentino, Maria Lucia; La Morgia, Chiara; Barboni, Piero; Randhawa, Ruvdeep S; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Sadun, Alfredo A; Carelli, Valerio; Lodi, Raffaele

    2012-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is characterized by retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration with the preferential involvement of those forming the papillomacular bundle. The optic nerve is considered the main pathological target for LHON. Our aim was to investigate the possible involvement of the post-geniculate visual pathway in LHON patients. We used diffusion-weighted imaging for in vivo evaluation. Mean diffusivity maps from 22 LHON visually impaired, 11 unaffected LHON mutation carriers and 22 healthy subjects were generated and compared at level of optic radiation (OR). Prefrontal and cerebellar white matter were also analyzed as internal controls. Furthermore, we studied the optic nerve and the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) in post-mortem specimens obtained from a severe case of LHON compared to an age-matched control. Mean diffusivity values of affected patients were higher than unaffected mutation carriers (P<0.05) and healthy subjects (P<0.01) in OR and not in the other brain regions. Increased OR diffusivity was associated with both disease duration (B = 0.002; P<0.05) and lack of recovery of visual acuity (B = 0.060; P<0.01). Post-mortem investigation detected atrophy (41.9% decrease of neuron soma size in the magnocellular layers and 44.7% decrease in the parvocellular layers) and, to a lesser extent, degeneration (28.5% decrease of neuron density in the magnocellular layers and 28.7% decrease in the parvocellular layers) in the LHON LGN associated with extremely severe axonal loss (99%) in the optic nerve. The post-geniculate involvement in LHON patients is a downstream post-synaptic secondary phenomenon, reflecting de-afferentation rather than a primary neurodegeneration due to mitochondrial dysfunction of LGN neurons.

  14. Imaging studies for diagnosing Graves' orbitopathy and dysthyroid optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Allan C. Pieroni; Gebrim, Eloísa M. M. S.; Monteiro, Mário L. R.

    2012-01-01

    Although the diagnosis of Graves' orbitopathy is primarily made clinically based on laboratory tests indicative of thyroid dysfunction and autoimmunity, imaging studies, such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and color Doppler imaging, play an important role both in the diagnosis and follow-up after clinical or surgical treatment of the disease. Imaging studies can be used to evaluate morphological abnormalities of the orbital structures during the diagnostic workup when a differential diagnosis versus other orbital diseases is needed. Imaging may also be useful to distinguish the inflammatory early stage from the inactive stage of the disease. Finally, imaging studies can be of great help in identifying patients prone to develop dysthyroid optic neuropathy and therefore enabling the timely diagnosis and treatment of the condition, avoiding permanent visual loss. In this paper, we review the imaging modalities that aid in the diagnosis and management of Graves' orbitopathy, with special emphasis on the diagnosis of optic nerve dysfunction in this condition. PMID:23184212

  15. [Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy - phenotype, genetics, therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Gallenmüller, C; Klopstock, T

    2014-03-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a rare genetic disorder affecting the retinal ganglion cells leading to a persistent severe bilateral loss of visual acuity within weeks or months. Males are much more likely to be affected than females, disease onset in most cases takes place between age 15 and 35 years. The disease is caused by point mutations in the mitochondrial DNA. The penetrance of the disease is incomplete, i.e., not all mutation carriers develop clinical symptoms. The phenotype is relatively uniform, but age at onset, severity and prognosis may vary even within the same family. Environmental and endocrine factors, optic disc anatomy as well as mitochondrial and nuclear genetic factors are discussed to influence penetrance as well as interindividual and intrafamilial variability. However, only cigarette smoking and excessive alcohol consumption have been shown to trigger disease onset. The disease is characterised by a central visual field defect, impaired colour vision and fundoscopically a peripapillary microangiopathy in the acute phase. Most patients end up after some months with a severe visual loss below 0.1 and in most cases there is no significant improvement of visual acuity in the course. In rare cases patients experience a mostly partial visual recovery which depends on the type of mutation. For confirmation of the diagnosis a detailed ophthalmological examination with fundoscopy, family history and genetic analysis of the mitochondrial DNA is needed. To date, there is no proven causal therapy, but at early disease stages treatment with idebenone can be tried.

  16. Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and its experimental models

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Steven L.; Johnson, Mary A.; Miller, Neil R.

    2011-01-01

    Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) can be divided into nonarteritic (NAION) and arteritic (AAION) forms. NAION makes up ~85% of all cases of AION, and until recently was poorly understood. There is no treatment for NAION, and its initiating causes are poorly understood, in part because NAION is not lethal, making it difficult to obtain fresh, newly affected tissue for study. In-vivo electrophysiology and post-mortem studies reveal specific responses that are associated with NAION. New models of NAION have been developed which enable insights into the pathophysiological events surrounding this disease. These models include both rodent and primate species, and the power of a `vertically integrated' multi-species approach can help in understanding the common cellular mechanisms and physiological responses to clinical NAION, and to identify potential approaches to treatment. The models utilize laser light to activate intravascular photoactive dye to induce capillary vascular thrombosis, while sparing the larger vessels. The observable optic nerve changes associated with rodent models of AION (rAION) and primate NAION (pNAION) are indistinguishable from that seen in clinical disease, including sectoral axonal involvement, and in-vivo electrophysiological data from these models are consistent with clinical data. Early post-infarct events reveal an unexpected inflammatory response, and changes in intraretinal gene expression for both stress response, while sparing outer retinal function, which occurs in AAION models. Histologically, the NAION models reveal an isolated loss of retinal ganglion cells by apoptosis. There are changes detectable by immunohistochemistry suggesting that other retinal cells mount a brisk response to retinal ganglion cell distress without themselves dying. The optic nerve ultimately shows axonal loss and scarring. Inflammation is a prominent early histological feature. This suggests that clinically, specific modulation of inflammation may

  17. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy masquerading as optic neuritis with spontaneous visual recovery.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tsui-Kang; Wang, An-Guor; Yen, May-Yung; Liu, Jorn-Hon

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) masquerading as optic neuritis with late visual recovery. A 28-year-old man had gradual visual loss in both eyes for two weeks. Visual acuity was 0.4 in the right eye and 0.7 in the left. Fundus examination revealed hyperaemic discs in each eye. Fluorescein angiography revealed dye leakage at both optic discs in the late phase. Static perimetry (Humphrey 30-2) revealed bilateral relative central scotomata. Magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerves was normal and his lumbar puncture showed normal opening pressure. He received steroid pulse therapy for three days. Nevertheless, vision in his right eye deteriorated to 0.1 one month later and left vision worsened to 0.05 six months later. Fifteen months after onset, his vision began to improve. At 21 months, his vision recovered to 0.9 R and 1.0 L. Peripheral blood DNA sequencing revealed 14484 mutation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Visual recovery can occur in patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy with mtDNA 14484 mutation. LHON could be misdiagnosed as optic neuritis in some cases. Molecular examination of mtDNA mutation can confirm the diagnosis of LHON in clinically controversial patients. We should keep in mind the diagnosis of LHON when optic neuritis shows poor response to pulse therapy.

  18. Gene–environment interactions in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kirkman, Matthew Anthony; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Korsten, Alex; Leonhardt, Miriam; Dimitriadis, Konstantin; De Coo, Ireneaus F.; Klopstock, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a genetic disorder primarily due to mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Environmental factors are thought to precipitate the visual failure and explain the marked incomplete penetrance of LHON, but previous small studies have failed to confirm this to be the case. LHON has no treatment, so identifying environmental triggers is the key to disease prevention, whilst potentially revealing new mechanisms amenable to therapeutic manipulation. To address this issue, we conducted a large, multicentre epidemiological study of 196 affected and 206 unaffected carriers from 125 LHON pedigrees known to harbour one of the three primary pathogenic mtDNA mutations: m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C. A comprehensive history of exposure to smoking, alcohol and other putative environmental insults was collected using a structured questionnaire. We identified a strong and consistent association between visual loss and smoking, independent of gender and alcohol intake, leading to a clinical penetrance of 93% in men who smoked. There was a trend towards increased visual failure with alcohol, but only with a heavy intake. Based on these findings, asymptomatic carriers of a LHON mtDNA mutation should be strongly advised not to smoke and to moderate their alcohol intake. PMID:19525327

  19. Idebenone: A Review in Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A

    2016-05-01

    Idebenone (Raxone(®)), a short-chain benzoquinone, is the only disease-specific drug approved to treat visual impairment in adolescents and adults with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), a rare genetic mitochondrial disease that causes rapid and progressive bilateral vision loss. The mechanism of action of idebenone involves its antioxidant properties and ability to act as a mitochondrial electron carrier. Idebenone overcomes mitochondrial complex I respiratory chain deficiency in patients with LHON by transferring electrons directly to mitochondrial complex III (by-passing complex I), thereby restoring cellular energy (ATP) production and re-activating inactive-but-viable retinal ganglion cells, which ultimately prevents further vision loss and promotes vision recovery. The approval of idebenone in the treatment of LHON was based on the overall data from a randomized clinical trial, a follow-up study and real-world data. Taken together, these studies provide convincing evidence that oral idebenone 900 mg/day for 24 weeks has persistent beneficial effects in preventing further vision impairment and promoting vision recovery in patients with LHON relative to the natural course of the disease. Therefore, idebenone is a valuable agent to treat visual impairment in adolescents and adults with LHON. PMID:27071925

  20. Novel therapeutic approaches for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shilpa

    2013-03-01

    Many human childhood mitochondrial disorders result from abnormal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and altered bioenergetics. These abnormalities span most of the mtDNA, demonstrating that there are no "unique" positions on the mitochondrial genome that when deleted or mutated produce a disease phenotype. This diversity implies that the relationship between mitochondrial genotype and clinical phenotype is very complex. The origins of clinical phenotypes are thus unclear, fundamentally difficult-to-treat, and are usually clinically devastating. Current treatment is largely supportive and the disorders progress relentlessly causing significant morbidity and mortality. Vitamin supplements and pharmacological agents have been used in isolated cases and clinical trials, but the efficacy of these interventions is unclear. In spite of recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of mitochondrial diseases, a cure remains elusive. An optimal cure would be gene therapy, which involves introducing the missing gene(s) into the mitochondria to complement the defect. Our recent research results indicate the feasibility of an innovative protein-transduction ("protofection") technology, consisting of a recombinant mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) that avidly binds mtDNA and permits efficient targeting into mitochondria in situ and in vivo. Thus, the development of gene therapy for treating mitochondrial disease offers promise, because it may circumvent the clinical abnormalities and the current inability to treat individual disorders in affected individuals. This review aims to focus on current treatment options and future therapeutics in mitochondrial disease treatment with a special emphasis on Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

  1. Idebenone: A Review in Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A

    2016-05-01

    Idebenone (Raxone(®)), a short-chain benzoquinone, is the only disease-specific drug approved to treat visual impairment in adolescents and adults with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), a rare genetic mitochondrial disease that causes rapid and progressive bilateral vision loss. The mechanism of action of idebenone involves its antioxidant properties and ability to act as a mitochondrial electron carrier. Idebenone overcomes mitochondrial complex I respiratory chain deficiency in patients with LHON by transferring electrons directly to mitochondrial complex III (by-passing complex I), thereby restoring cellular energy (ATP) production and re-activating inactive-but-viable retinal ganglion cells, which ultimately prevents further vision loss and promotes vision recovery. The approval of idebenone in the treatment of LHON was based on the overall data from a randomized clinical trial, a follow-up study and real-world data. Taken together, these studies provide convincing evidence that oral idebenone 900 mg/day for 24 weeks has persistent beneficial effects in preventing further vision impairment and promoting vision recovery in patients with LHON relative to the natural course of the disease. Therefore, idebenone is a valuable agent to treat visual impairment in adolescents and adults with LHON.

  2. Hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of radiation-induced optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, J.; Schatz, N.J.

    1986-08-01

    Four patients with radiation-induced optic neuropathies were treated with hyperbaric oxygen. They had received radiation therapy for treatment of pituitary tumors, reticulum cell sarcoma, and meningioma. Two presented with amaurosis fugax before the onset of unilateral visual loss and began hyperbaria within 72 hours after development of unilateral optic neuropathy. Both had return of visual function to baseline levels. The others initiated treatment two to six weeks after visual loss occurred in the second eye and had no significant improvement of vision. Treatment consisted of daily administration of 100% oxygen under 2.8 atmospheres of pressure for 14-28 days. There were no medical complications of hyperbaria. While hyperbaric oxygen is effective in the treatment of radiation-induced optic neuropathy, it must be instituted within several days of deterioration in vision for restoration of baseline function.

  3. Complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia with peripheral neuropathy, optic atrophy and mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Miyama, S; Arimoto, K; Kimiya, S; Tomi, H

    2000-08-01

    An 8-year old girl with a not previously described type of complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is presented. Spasticity in her lower limbs had already been recognized during infancy and worsened progressively. Severe delay in mental development was observed. Peripheral neuropathy and optic atrophy developed at 5 years of age. On brain magnetic resonance imaging, an abnormally thin corpus callosum was observed. Involvement of the fasciculus gracilis was suggested by somatosensory evoked potentials. To our knowledge, there has been no reported case of complicated HSP with peripheral neuropathy, optic atrophy and mental retardation so far. We postulate that our patient is a sporadic case of not previously described complicated HSP. PMID:11071149

  4. Unilateral compressive optic neuropathy due to skull hyperostosis secondary to nutritional vitamin A deficiency.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Mohammed G; Hickman, Simon J; Batty, Ruth; McCloskey, Eugene V; Pepper, Irene M

    2015-01-01

    We report a 17-year-old boy who presented with a chronic left unilateral optic neuropathy. Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated compression of the left optic nerve due to skull hyperostosis. He was found to be profoundly vitamin A deficient secondary to an unusual diet consisting predominantly of potato chips and crisps. Skull hyperostosis with cranial neuropathies and other neurological abnormalities has been described in growing animals fed vitamin A deficient diets but has not been previously reported in humans. PMID:26136803

  5. Novel use of idebenone in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Cheng, S W; Ko, C H; Yau, S K; Mak, Chloe; Yuen, Y F; Lee, C Y

    2014-10-01

    We report a case of a young Chinese male presenting with sequential, painless, bilateral visual loss in Hong Kong. He was diagnosed to have Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy with genetic workup showing G11778A mutation with over 80% heteroplasmy. He was started on idebenone treatment 11 months after onset of the binocular disease. To our best knowledge, this is the first case of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy treated with idebenone in Hong Kong. The recent evidence of the diagnosis and treatment of this devastating disease is reviewed.

  6. Vision improvement in a Taiwanese (Han Chinese) family with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong-Zin; Pang, Cheng-Yoong; Chen, Shee-Ping; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2012-12-01

    In this report, we describe a Taiwanese (Han Chinese) family with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. The family carried a mitochondrial DNA mutation (mtDNA m.14484T>C) associated with spontaneous visual improvement. A 15-year-old boy from this family was diagnosed with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy 6 months after losing his vision. His vision recovered after 8 months of supportive treatment. His mother, older brother, and two sisters also had the same mutation and had previously experienced vision loss. In this family, there was no male predominance.

  7. [Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy animal model and its treatment applications].

    PubMed

    Chuman, Hideki

    2014-04-01

    Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is one of the most common acute unilaterally onset optic nerve diseases. One management problem in terms of NAION is the difficulty of differential diagnosis between NAION and anterior optic neuritis (ON). A second problem is that there is no established treatment for the acute stage of NAION. A third problem is that there is no preventive treatment for a subsequent attack on the fellow eye, estimated to occur in 15 to 25% of patients with NAION. For differentiation of acute NAION from anterior optic neuritis, we investigated the usefulness of laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG). In the normal control group, the tissue blood flow did not significantly differ between the right and left eyes. In the NAION group, all 6 patients had 29.5% decreased mean blur rate (MBR), which correlates to optic disc blood flow, of the NAION eye compared with the unaffected eye. In the anterior ON group, all 6 cases had 15.9% increased MBR of the anterior ON eye compared with the unaffected eye. Thus, LSFG showed a difference of the underlying pathophysiology between NAION and anterior ON despite showing disc swelling in both groups and could be useful for differentiating both groups. For the treatment of acute stage of NAION, we tried to reproduce the rodent model of NAION (rNAION) developed by Bernstein and colleagues. To induce rNAION, after the administration of rose bengal(RB) (2.5 mM) into the tail vein of SD rats, the small vessels of the left optic nerve were photoactivated using a 514 nm argon green laser (RB-laser-induction). In the RB-laser-induction eyes, the capillaries within the optic disc were reduced markedly, the optic disc became swollen, and fluorescein angiography showed filling defect in the choroid and the optic disc at an early stage, followed by hyperfluorescence at a late stage. Electrophysiological evaluation revealed that visual evoked potential (VEP) amplitude was significantly decreased but an electroretinogram

  8. Bilateral simultaneous anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, an extrahepatic manifestation of hepatitis C cured with direct acting antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Prud’homme, Sylvie; Nevens, Frederik; Casteels, Ingele

    2016-01-01

    We report a patient with a bilateral optic anterior ischemic neuropathy as an extrahepatic complication of a chronic hepatitis C (HCV) infection. The patient presented with a bilateral visual acuity loss and bilateral optic disc oedema. The optic neuropathy was associated with a sudden increase in the viral HCV load after a recent liver transplantation. The stop of the calcineurin inhibitor had no effect on the course of the optic neuropathy. Visual improvement and normalization of HCV viraemia occurred after treatment with sofosbuvir and daclatasvir, which are direct acting antivirals. PMID:27625964

  9. Bilateral simultaneous anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, an extrahepatic manifestation of hepatitis C cured with direct acting antivirals.

    PubMed

    Prud'homme, Sylvie; Nevens, Frederik; Casteels, Ingele

    2016-01-01

    We report a patient with a bilateral optic anterior ischemic neuropathy as an extrahepatic complication of a chronic hepatitis C (HCV) infection. The patient presented with a bilateral visual acuity loss and bilateral optic disc oedema. The optic neuropathy was associated with a sudden increase in the viral HCV load after a recent liver transplantation. The stop of the calcineurin inhibitor had no effect on the course of the optic neuropathy. Visual improvement and normalization of HCV viraemia occurred after treatment with sofosbuvir and daclatasvir, which are direct acting antivirals. PMID:27625964

  10. Postoperative posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION) following right pterional meningioma surgery

    PubMed Central

    Maramattom, Boby Varkey; Sundar, Shyam; Thomas, Dalvin; Panikar, Dilip

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative visual loss (POVL) is an unpredictable complication of nonocular surgeries. Posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION) is particularly feared in spinal surgeries in the prone position. We report a rare case of PION occurring after surgery for a pterional meningioma and discuss the various factors implicated in POVL. PMID:27570391

  11. Postoperative posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION) following right pterional meningioma surgery.

    PubMed

    Maramattom, Boby Varkey; Sundar, Shyam; Thomas, Dalvin; Panikar, Dilip

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative visual loss (POVL) is an unpredictable complication of nonocular surgeries. Posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION) is particularly feared in spinal surgeries in the prone position. We report a rare case of PION occurring after surgery for a pterional meningioma and discuss the various factors implicated in POVL. PMID:27570391

  12. Should steroids be offered to patients with nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION)?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Andrew G.; Biousse, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of nonarteritic anterior optic neuropathy remains very limited and disappointing. Recent publications have suggested that oral steroids as well as intravitreal injections of steroids might be helpful to accelerate resolution of disc edema and improve visual outcome. However, the use of steroids to treat acute NAION remains largely debated. PMID:20523196

  13. Traumatic Optic Neuropathy: A Potentially Unrecognized Diagnosis after Sports-Related Concussion.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Michael J; Ritchie, Lesley; Cordingley, Dean; Essig, Marco; Mansouri, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic optic neuropathy is a rare cause of visual disturbance after head injury that can be difficult to distinguish from coexisting vestibulo-ocular dysfunction because of the overlap in presenting symptoms in patients with these conditions. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl who sustained a head injury during a ringette game leading to blurred vision and diplopia persisting 5 months after injury. Clinical history and physical examination findings were consistent with a traumatic optic neuropathy, convergence insufficiency, and postconcussion syndrome. Neuroimaging was normal. The patient was managed using a multidisciplinary approach. At 6 months of follow-up, neuro-ophthalmological examination demonstrated evidence of permanent partial optic nerve injury, and formal neuropsychological testing fell primarily within normal limits. The patient was advised to retire from collision sports. The authors discuss the value of a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach to the evaluation and management of concussion patients presenting with persistent visual symptoms.

  14. Successful chemotherapy in a male patient with malignant lymphoma and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON).

    PubMed

    Zanssen, Stefanie; Buse, Gerhard

    2003-04-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a bilateral subacute optic neuropathy caused by hereditary missense mutations of the mitochondrial genome. Primary mutations are located at nucleotide positions 11778, 3460, and 14484 in genes encoding subunits of complex I of the respiratory chain. It has been suggested that degenerative changes in the optic nerve might be mediated by apoptosis. Therefore, we hypothesized that patients affected with LHON might show altered sensitivity to cytotoxic drugs. Here we report the case of a LHON patient carrying the 11778 mutation who required chemotherapy for malignant lymphoma. Using in vitro assays, we found that the patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cells did not show altered vulnerability to cytotoxic drugs. The patient was treated with combination chemotherapy and consolidating radiotherapy, leading to complete remission without inappropriately severe acute or chronic side effects. These data indicate that the 11778 mutation does not change cellular response to cytotoxic drugs in a clinically apparent manner.

  15. Toxic optic neuropathy in the setting of docetaxel chemotherapy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To describe the first reported case of toxic optic neuropathy secondary to docetaxel (Taxotere®) chemotherapy. Case presentation A 53-year-old female presented with predominantly unilateral visual loss, but extensive bilateral visual field defects and bilateral optic nerve head swelling 2 weeks after first dose of docetaxel (Taxotere®) and trastuzumab (Herceptin®) chemotherapy for a left sided node-positive, HER2 positive breast cancer. Extensive investigation ruled out other causes of optic neuropathy. She was treated with high dose corticosteroids intravenously for 1 week then a tapering oral dose over 8 weeks. Visual field defects gradually resolved and visual acuity improved. Docetaxel chemotherapy was discontinued but targeted therapy with trastuzumab continued without further complication. Conclusion Docetaxel can cause a toxic optic neuropathy possibly due to an ischemic or neurotoxic mechanism at the optic nerve head. With cessation of docetaxel therapy and treatment with systemic corticosteroids, visual recovery can occur without significant residual visual deficit. PMID:24564293

  16. Optic neuropathy associated with the use of over-the-counter sexual enhancement supplements.

    PubMed

    Karli, Sapir Z; Liao, Sophie D; Carey, Andrew R; Lam, Byron L; Wester, Sara T

    2014-01-01

    This case report details an association of the use of over-the-counter sexual enhancement supplements with atypical optic neuropathy. A 42-year-old man presented with right-sided headache and vision loss of the right eye, which deteriorated to a single quadrant of hand motion over 11 days. Serial orbital magnetic resonance imaging scans demonstrated progressive orbital optic nerve enhancement extending into the optic canal despite high-dose steroid treatment. The patient eventually admitted to using several over-the-counter sexual enhancement supplements prior to the onset of symptoms and throughout the course of his steroid treatment, which he subsequently discontinued. His vision improved to 20/200 with an expanded visual field. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy has been reported in association with phosphodiesterase (PDE)-5 inhibitor use, but visual loss in association with unregulated sexual enhancement supplements has not been studied. While one case cannot establish association, our case is suggestive of potential dangers of over-the-counter sexual enhancement supplements, which may contain PDE-5 inhibitors, "male hormones," and "substances that enhance blood production." The case also underscores the importance of obtaining a careful history of supplements in patients with optic neuropathies. PMID:25378904

  17. Linezolid-Associated Optic Neuropathy in Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients in Mumbai, India

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Salil; Das, Mrinalini; Laxmeshwar, Chinmay; Jonckheere, Sylvie; Thi, Sein Sein; Isaakidis, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients on linezolid-containing drug-resistant TB (DR-TB) regimen often develop adverse-events, particularly peripheral and optic neuropathy. Programmatic data and experiences of linezolid-associated optic neuropathy from high DR-TB burden settings are lacking. The study aimed to determine the frequency of and risk-factors associated with linezolid-associated optic neuropathy and document the experiences related to treatment/care of DR-TB patients on linezolid-containing regimens. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study using routine clinical and laboratory data in Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) HIV/DR-TB clinic in collaboration with Lilavati Hospital & Research Center, Mumbai, India. All DR-TB patients on linezolid-containing treatment regimens were included in the study and underwent routine evaluations for systemic and/or ocular complaints. Ophthalmological evaluation by a consultant ophthalmologist included visual-acuity screening, slit-lamp examination and dilated fundus examination. Results During January 2013-April 2016, 86 of 136 patients (with/without HIV co-infection) initiated linezolid-containing DR-TB treatment. The median age of these 86 patients was 25 (20–35) years and 47% were males. 20 percent of them had HIV co-infection. Of 86, 24 (27.9%) had at least one episode of ocular complaints (the majority blurred-vision) and among them, five (5.8%) had optic neuropathy. Patients received appropriate treatment and improvements were observed. None of the demographic/clinical factors were associated with optic neuropathy in Poissons or multivariate binary logistic-regression models. Discussion This is the first report focusing on optic neuropathy in a cohort of complex DR-TB patients, including patients co-infected with HIV, receiving linezolid-containing regimens. In our study, one out of four patients on linezolid had at least one episode of ocular complaints; therefore, systematic monitoring of patients by primary physicians

  18. Efficient mitochondrial biogenesis drives incomplete penetrance in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Carla; Iommarini, Luisa; Giordano, Luca; Maresca, Alessandra; Pisano, Annalinda; Valentino, Maria Lucia; Caporali, Leonardo; Liguori, Rocco; Deceglie, Stefania; Roberti, Marina; Fanelli, Francesca; Fracasso, Flavio; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; D'Adamo, Pio; Hudson, Gavin; Pyle, Angela; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Chinnery, Patrick F; Zeviani, Massimo; Salomao, Solange R; Berezovsky, Adriana; Belfort, Rubens; Ventura, Dora Fix; Moraes, Milton; Moraes Filho, Milton; Barboni, Piero; Sadun, Federico; De Negri, Annamaria; Sadun, Alfredo A; Tancredi, Andrea; Mancini, Massimiliano; d'Amati, Giulia; Loguercio Polosa, Paola; Cantatore, Palmiro; Carelli, Valerio

    2014-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited blinding disease caused as a result of homoplasmic point mutations in complex I subunit genes of mitochondrial DNA. It is characterized by incomplete penetrance, as only some mutation carriers become affected. Thus, the mitochondrial DNA mutation is necessary but not sufficient to cause optic neuropathy. Environmental triggers and genetic modifying factors have been considered to explain its variable penetrance. We measured the mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial mass indicators in blood cells from affected and carrier individuals, screening three large pedigrees and 39 independently collected smaller families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, as well as muscle biopsies and cells isolated by laser capturing from post-mortem specimens of retina and optic nerves, the latter being the disease targets. We show that unaffected mutation carriers have a significantly higher mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial mass compared with their affected relatives and control individuals. Comparative studies of fibroblasts from affected, carriers and controls, under different paradigms of metabolic demand, show that carriers display the highest capacity for activating mitochondrial biogenesis. Therefore we postulate that the increased mitochondrial biogenesis in carriers may overcome some of the pathogenic effect of mitochondrial DNA mutations. Screening of a few selected genetic variants in candidate genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis failed to reveal any significant association. Our study provides a valuable mechanism to explain variability of penetrance in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and clues for high throughput genetic screening to identify the nuclear modifying gene(s), opening an avenue to develop predictive genetic tests on disease risk and therapeutic strategies.

  19. Recessive Mutations in RTN4IP1 Cause Isolated and Syndromic Optic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Angebault, Claire; Guichet, Pierre-Olivier; Talmat-Amar, Yasmina; Charif, Majida; Gerber, Sylvie; Fares-Taie, Lucas; Gueguen, Naig; Halloy, François; Moore, David; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Manes, Gael; Hebrard, Maxime; Bocquet, Béatrice; Quiles, Mélanie; Piro-Mégy, Camille; Teigell, Marisa; Delettre, Cécile; Rossel, Mireille; Meunier, Isabelle; Preising, Markus; Lorenz, Birgit; Carelli, Valerio; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Kaplan, Josseline; Roubertie, Agathe; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Bonneau, Dominique; Reynier, Pascal; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Bomont, Pascale; Hamel, Christian P.; Lenaers, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive optic neuropathies are rare blinding conditions related to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) and optic-nerve degeneration, for which only mutations in TMEM126A and ACO2 are known. In four families with early-onset recessive optic neuropathy, we identified mutations in RTN4IP1, which encodes a mitochondrial ubiquinol oxydo-reductase. RTN4IP1 is a partner of RTN4 (also known as NOGO), and its ortholog Rad8 in C. elegans is involved in UV light response. Analysis of fibroblasts from affected individuals with a RTN4IP1 mutation showed loss of the altered protein, a deficit of mitochondrial respiratory complex I and IV activities, and increased susceptibility to UV light. Silencing of RTN4IP1 altered the number and morphogenesis of mouse RGC dendrites in vitro and the eye size, neuro-retinal development, and swimming behavior in zebrafish in vivo. Altogether, these data point to a pathophysiological mechanism responsible for RGC early degeneration and optic neuropathy and linking RTN4IP1 functions to mitochondrial physiology, response to UV light, and dendrite growth during eye maturation. PMID:26593267

  20. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy after conventional coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dorecka, Mariola; Miniewicz-Kurkowska, Joanna; Romaniuk, Dorota; Gajdzik-Gajdecka, Urszula; Wójcik-Niklewska, Bogumiła

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Perioperative optic neuropathy is a disease which can lead to serious, irreversible damage of vision. This complication could be the result of non-ocular surgery, for example, cardiac or spinal procedures. We present a case of anterior ischemic neuropathy (AION) which occurred following a conventional coronary artery bypass graft procedure. Case Report A 57-year-old man, 4 days after Conventional Coronary Artery Bypass Graft surgery as result of multi-vessel stabile coronary artery disease and history of anterolateral wall myocardial infarction, was admitted to the Eye Clinic due to significant loss of vision in his right eye. The patient had hypertension and was a heavy smoker. On admission, the slit lamp examination revealed a relative afferent pupillary defect in the right eye. The fundus examination showed optic disc edema with the presence of flame hemorrhages. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 0.02. The results of eye examination and fluorescein angiography confirmed the diagnosis of AION. Anti-aggregation and antithrombotic treatment was continued with steroids and vasodilators. After 7 days of this treatment we noticed the improvement of BCVA to 0.2. At 6-month follow-up, the vision was stable, and fundus examination revealed optic disc atrophy. Conclusions After cardiac surgical operations, such as coronary artery bypass graft procedures, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy may occur. In those cases, close cooperation between the various specialists is necessary. PMID:21629193

  1. Optic neuropathy secondary to dasatinib in the treatment of a chronic myeloid leukemia case

    PubMed Central

    Monge, Katia Sotelo; Gálvez-Ruiz, Alberto; Alvárez-Carrón, Alberto; Quijada, César; Matheu, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The drug dasatinib is a new therapeutic option for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) as well as acute lymphocytic lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). However, the scientific literature has not reached a consensus regarding the types of secondary ophthalmologic effects that this drug may have. In this study, we present the case of a 36-year-old male patient who was treated with dasatinib. Two and a half months later, this patient began to experience progressive visual loss in the superior visual field of both eyes. After ruling out various diagnostic options and performing extensive complementary tests, the suspected diagnosis was compatible with optic neuropathy secondary to dasatinib. The patient partially improved after stopping this medication and receiving oral corticosteroid treatment. Although secondary ophthalmological effects related to dasatinib are practically non-existent, our case is the first to report optic neuropathy secondary to this drug. PMID:26155085

  2. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy mutations associated with infantile-onset myoclonic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Frye, Richard E

    2011-06-01

    Epilepsy syndromes with onset in the first year of life, especially when they include myoclonic features, have special significance since they are associated with long-term developmental and neurological abnormalities. Dravet's severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy is especially interesting as it is associated with fever-provoked seizures and mutations in the alpha subunit of the sodium channel (SCN1A) in about one-third of the cases. Here, we report 2 children who had clinical features of severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy without mutations in the SCN1A gene who were found to have mitochondrial DNA mutations associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. These 2 children demonstrated markers of mitochondrial dysfunction, drug-resistant epilepsy, and dysfunction of nonneurological systems. These cases demonstrate that mitochondrial DNA mutations, especially those associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, should be considered in cases of myclonic epilepsy starting in infancy, especially when mutations in the SCN1A gene are not found.

  3. Analysis of Fundus Photography and Fluorescein Angiography in Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy and Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated fundus and fluorescein angiography (FAG) findings and characteristics that can help distinguish nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) from optic neuritis (ON). Methods Twenty-three NAION patients and 17 ON with disc swelling patients were enrolled in this study. We performed fundus photography and FAG. The disc-swelling pattern, hyperemia grade, presence of splinter hemorrhages, cotton-wool spots, artery/vein ratio and degree of focal telangiectasia were investigated. The FAG findings for each patient were compared with respect to the following features: the pattern of disc leakage in the early phase, arteriovenous (artery/vein) transit time (second), and the presence and pattern of the filling delay. Results Cotton-wool spots, focal telangiectasia, and venous congestion were more common in the affected eyes of NAION patients. Upon FAG, 76.5% of the patients in the ON group exhibited normal choroidal circulation. However, 56.5% of patients in the NAION group demonstrated abnormal filling defects, such as peripapillary, generalized, or watershed zone filling delays. Conclusions Fundus findings, including cotton-wool spots, focal telangiectasia, and venous congestion in the affected eye, may be clues that can be used to diagnose NAION. In addition, choroidal insufficiencies on FAG could be also helpful in differentiating NAION from ON. PMID:27478356

  4. A randomized placebo-controlled trial of idebenone in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Klopstock, Thomas; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos; Rouleau, Jacinthe; Heck, Suzette; Bailie, Maura; Atawan, Alaa; Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Schubert, Marion; Garip, Aylin; Kernt, Marcus; Petraki, Diana; Rummey, Christian; Leinonen, Mika; Metz, Günther; Griffiths, Philip G; Meier, Thomas; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2011-09-01

    Major advances in understanding the pathogenesis of inherited metabolic disease caused by mitochondrial DNA mutations have yet to translate into treatments of proven efficacy. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is the most common mitochondrial DNA disorder causing irreversible blindness in young adult life. Anecdotal reports support the use of idebenone in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, but this has not been evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. We conducted a 24-week multi-centre double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in 85 patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy due to m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C or mitochondrial DNA mutations. The active drug was idebenone 900 mg/day. The primary end-point was the best recovery in visual acuity. The main secondary end-point was the change in best visual acuity. Other secondary end-points were changes in visual acuity of the best eye at baseline and changes in visual acuity for both eyes in each patient. Colour-contrast sensitivity and retinal nerve fibre layer thickness were measured in subgroups. Idebenone was safe and well tolerated. The primary end-point did not reach statistical significance in the intention to treat population. However, post hoc interaction analysis showed a different response to idebenone in patients with discordant visual acuities at baseline; in these patients, all secondary end-points were significantly different between the idebenone and placebo groups. This first randomized controlled trial in the mitochondrial disorder, Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, provides evidence that patients with discordant visual acuities are the most likely to benefit from idebenone treatment, which is safe and well tolerated. PMID:21788663

  5. An abscess causing a delayed optic neuropathy after decompression for thyroid eye disease.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rakesh M; Aakalu, Vinay K; Joe, Stephanie; Setabutr, Pete

    2014-02-01

    A 63-year-old female with Graves' disease and chronic sinusitis presented with acute left orbital pain and proptosis five years after bilateral orbital decompression and sinus surgery. Imaging revealed bilateral frontal sinus opacification, frontoethmoidal mucoceles and left subperiosteal mass. Presence of an optic neuropathy drove emergent management with intravenous antibiotics and orbitotomy with exploration. Intra-operatively, a left orbital abscess and left frontal sinus purulence were drained. The patient regained her vision with relief of proptosis and pain. PMID:24144317

  6. A randomized placebo-controlled trial of idebenone in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Klopstock, Thomas; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos; Rouleau, Jacinthe; Heck, Suzette; Bailie, Maura; Atawan, Alaa; Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Schubert, Marion; Garip, Aylin; Kernt, Marcus; Petraki, Diana; Rummey, Christian; Leinonen, Mika; Metz, Günther; Griffiths, Philip G; Meier, Thomas; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2011-09-01

    Major advances in understanding the pathogenesis of inherited metabolic disease caused by mitochondrial DNA mutations have yet to translate into treatments of proven efficacy. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is the most common mitochondrial DNA disorder causing irreversible blindness in young adult life. Anecdotal reports support the use of idebenone in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, but this has not been evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. We conducted a 24-week multi-centre double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in 85 patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy due to m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C or mitochondrial DNA mutations. The active drug was idebenone 900 mg/day. The primary end-point was the best recovery in visual acuity. The main secondary end-point was the change in best visual acuity. Other secondary end-points were changes in visual acuity of the best eye at baseline and changes in visual acuity for both eyes in each patient. Colour-contrast sensitivity and retinal nerve fibre layer thickness were measured in subgroups. Idebenone was safe and well tolerated. The primary end-point did not reach statistical significance in the intention to treat population. However, post hoc interaction analysis showed a different response to idebenone in patients with discordant visual acuities at baseline; in these patients, all secondary end-points were significantly different between the idebenone and placebo groups. This first randomized controlled trial in the mitochondrial disorder, Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, provides evidence that patients with discordant visual acuities are the most likely to benefit from idebenone treatment, which is safe and well tolerated.

  7. Change of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with nonarteritic inflammatory anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Bi, Hongsheng; Wang, Xingrong; Wang, Guimin; Li, Haiyan; Wu, Hui; Qu, Yi; Wen, Ying; Cong, Chenyang; Wang, Daoguang

    2012-12-15

    In this study, 16 patients (19 eyes) with nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy in the acute stage (within 4 weeks) and resolving stage (after 12 weeks) were diagnosed by a series of complete ophthalmic examinations, including fundus examination, optical coherence tomography and fluorescein fundus angiography, and visual field defects were measured with standard automated perimetry. The contralateral uninvolved eyes were used as controls. The retinal nerve fiber layer thickness was determined by optical coherence tomography which showed that the mean retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness from temporal, superior, nasal and inferior quadrants were significantly higher for all measurements in the acute stage than the corresponding normal values. In comparison, the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness from each optic disc quadrant was found to be significantly lower when measured at the resolving stages, than in the control group. Statistical analysis on the correlation between optic disc nerve fiber layer thickness and visual defects demonstrated a positive correlation in the acute stage and a negative correlation in the resolving stage. Our experimental findings indicate that optical coherence tomography is a useful diagnostic method for nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and can be used to evaluate the effect of treatment.

  8. Recessive optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy and cataract associated with novel compound heterozygous mutations in OPA1

    PubMed Central

    LEE, JINHO; JUNG, SUNG-CHUL; HONG, YOUNG BIN; YOO, JEONG HYUN; KOO, HEASOO; LEE, JA HYUN; HONG, HYUN DAE; KIM, SANG-BEOM; CHUNG, KI WHA; CHOI, BYUNG-OK

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the optic atrophy 1 gene (OPA1) are associated with autosomal dominant optic atrophy and 20% of patients demonstrate extra-ocular manifestations. In addition to these autosomal dominant cases, only a few syndromic cases have been reported thus far with compound heterozygous OPA1 mutations, suggestive of either recessive or semi-dominant patterns of inheritance. The majority of these patients were diagnosed with Behr syndrome, characterized by optic atrophy, ataxia and peripheral neuropathy. The present study describes a 10-year-old boy with Behr syndrome presenting with early-onset severe optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy, ataxia and congenital cataracts. He had optic atrophy and was declared legally blind at six years old. Electrophysiological, radiological, and histopathological findings were compatible with axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathy. At birth, he presented with a congenital cataract, which has not been previously described in patients with OPA1 mutations. Whole exome sequencing indicated a pair of novel compound heterozygous mutations: p.L620fs*13 (c.1857–1858delinsT) and p.R905Q (c.G2714A). Neither mutation was observed in controls (n=300), and thus, they were predicted to be pathogenic by multiple in silico analyses. The mutation sites were highly conserved throughout different vertebrate species. The patients parents did not have any ophthalmic or neurologic symptoms and the results of electrophysiological studies were normal, suggestive of an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. The present study identified novel compound heterozygous OPA1 mutations in a patient with recessive optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy and congenital cataracts, indicating an expansion of the clinical spectrum of pathologies associated with OPA1 mutations. Thus, OPA1 gene screening is advisable in the workup of patients with recessive optic atrophy, particularly with Behr syndrome and cataracts. PMID:27150940

  9. Mitochondrial EFTs defects in juvenile-onset Leigh disease, ataxia, neuropathy, and optic atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ahola, Sofia; Isohanni, Pirjo; Euro, Liliya; Brilhante, Virginia; Palotie, Aarno; Pihko, Helena; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Lehtonen, Tanita; Laine, Jukka; Tyynismaa, Henna

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We report novel defects of mitochondrial translation elongation factor Ts (EFTs), with high carrier frequency in Finland and expand the manifestations of this disease group from infantile cardiomyopathy to juvenile neuropathy/encephalopathy disorders. Methods: DNA analysis, whole-exome analysis, protein biochemistry, and protein modeling. Results: We used whole-exome sequencing to find the genetic cause of infantile-onset mitochondrial cardiomyopathy, progressing to juvenile-onset Leigh syndrome, neuropathy, and optic atrophy in 2 siblings. We found novel compound heterozygous mutations, c.944G>A [p.C315Y] and c.856C>T [p.Q286X], in the TSFM gene encoding mitochondrial EFTs. The same p.Q286X variant was found as compound heterozygous with a splice site change in a patient from a second family, with juvenile-onset optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, and ataxia. Our molecular modeling predicted the coding-region mutations to cause protein instability, which was experimentally confirmed in cultured patient cells, with mitochondrial translation defect and lacking EFTs. Only a single TSFM mutation has been previously described in different populations, leading to an infantile fatal multisystem disorder with cardiomyopathy. Sequence data from 35,000 Finnish population controls indicated that the heterozygous carrier frequency of p.Q286X change was exceptionally high in Finland, 1:80, but no homozygotes were found in the population, in our mitochondrial disease patient collection, or in an intrauterine fetal death material, suggesting early developmental lethality of the homozygotes. Conclusions: We show that in addition to early-onset cardiomyopathy, TSFM mutations should be considered in childhood and juvenile encephalopathies with optic and/or peripheral neuropathy, ataxia, or Leigh disease. PMID:25037205

  10. Current concepts in the diagnosis, pathogenesis and management of nonarteritic anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, N R; Arnold, A C

    2015-01-01

    Nonarteritic anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is the most common acute optic neuropathy in patients over the age of 50 and is the second most common cause of permanent optic nerve-related visual loss in adults after glaucoma. Patients typically present with acute, painless, unilateral loss of vision associated with a variable visual field defect, a relative afferent pupillary defect, a swollen, hyperaemic optic disc, and one or more flame-shaped peripapillary retinal haemorrhages. The pathogenesis of this condition is unknown, but it occurs primarily in patients with structurally small optic discs that have little or no cup and a variety of underlying vascular disorders that may or may not be known at the time of visual loss. There is no consistently beneficial medical or surgical treatment for the condition, but there are now animal models that allow testing of various potential therapies. About 40% of patients experience spontaneous improvement in visual acuity. Patients in whom NAION occurs in one eye have a 15–19% risk of developing a similar event in the opposite eye over the subsequent 5 years. PMID:24993324

  11. Current concepts in the diagnosis, pathogenesis and management of nonarteritic anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Miller, N R; Arnold, A C

    2015-01-01

    Nonarteritic anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is the most common acute optic neuropathy in patients over the age of 50 and is the second most common cause of permanent optic nerve-related visual loss in adults after glaucoma. Patients typically present with acute, painless, unilateral loss of vision associated with a variable visual field defect, a relative afferent pupillary defect, a swollen, hyperaemic optic disc, and one or more flame-shaped peripapillary retinal haemorrhages. The pathogenesis of this condition is unknown, but it occurs primarily in patients with structurally small optic discs that have little or no cup and a variety of underlying vascular disorders that may or may not be known at the time of visual loss. There is no consistently beneficial medical or surgical treatment for the condition, but there are now animal models that allow testing of various potential therapies. About 40% of patients experience spontaneous improvement in visual acuity. Patients in whom NAION occurs in one eye have a 15-19% risk of developing a similar event in the opposite eye over the subsequent 5 years.

  12. [Past, present, and future in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Oguchi, Y

    2001-12-01

    Leber's disease is a disease of optic atrophy first reported by Theodor Leber in 1871. Since then, 130 years have passed. Recently, several new findings about the pathology, causes, and heredity of this disease have been made. In 1988 Wallace and others reported a new mutation of 11778 base pairs of mtDNA of patients with Leber's disease. Since then, the study of this disease has progressed remarkably. In this review clinical studies on Leber's disease which were carried out in our department from 1990 are summarized. 1. Genetic diagnosis and clinics Two hundred and twenty-four cases were examined, including patients at our hospital, for the 8 years between 1990 and 1998. Among them, 72 cases were diagnosed as Leber's disease. There were 3 cases (4%) of 3460 mutations, 63 cases(83%) of 11778 mutations, and 6 cases(8%) of 14484 mutations as primary mutations. The reasons for performing the genetic diagnosis were mostly the need for a definite diagnosis of Leber's disease and research on the genesis of optic nerve atrophy of unknown origin. Concerning the secondary mutations, it was confirmed that these mutations were polymorphic as seen in European and American patients. There is a problem of heteroplasmy about the mtDNA mutation. We developed a simple and exact method to evaluate heteroplasmy by using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP). In a study of peripheral blood samples in one family, Leber's disease does not appear under conditions of less than 60% mtDNA mutation. As for the three kinds of mutation in Leber's disease, cases of recovery of a visual acuity of 0.3 and above were only 7% in 11778 mutations, but 38% in 3460 mutations and 50% in 14484 mutations. It is assumed that visual prognosis depends on the kind of mutation. 2. Characteristics of visual evoked potential(VEP) In pattern VEP in the acute stage, latency was not delayed very much, but the amplitude was low. On the other hand, in the acute stage of optic

  13. Evaluation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy patients prior to a gene therapy clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuo; Yang, Hong; Ma, Si-qi; Wang, Shuai-shuai; He, Heng; Zhao, Min-jian; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gene therapy may be a promising approach for the treatment of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate patients with this condition who were recruited into an upcoming gene therapy clinical trial and to assess any changes in the detection parameters to provide support for the clinical trial. Sixteen patients with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy were evaluated using visual function tests 12 months before the initiation of gene therapy. Then, the results of visual acuity (VA), visual field (VF), RNFL (retinal nerve fiber layer) thickness, and Pattern-reversal Visual evoked potential (PR-VEP) were compared and analyzed. A total of 32 eyes of 16 patients were evaluated. Based on the best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), 24 eyes were relatively stable compared with the baseline evaluation, and 8 eyes had significant changes, including 5 eyes that showed improvement and 3 eyes that showed impairment. In all eyes, the changes in the best-corrected visual acuity were significantly correlated with the changes in the visual field index (VFI), mean defect (MD), and P100 of the visual evoked potential. In the eyes with relatively stable BCVA and those with an obvious improvement in the BCVA, only the visual mean defect showed a significant change; the other indicators were not significantly different. Aside from the patients showing a tendency of spontaneous improvement, the others were in accordance with the requirement. The effects of Leber hereditary optical neuropathy (LHON) gene therapy should be evaluated primarily based on visual acuity. Additionally, visual field, neural fiber thickness, and electrophysiology should be considered in the evaluation. PMID:27749593

  14. Late ipsilateral recurrence of ischemic optic neuropathy in giant cell arteritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nancy; Trobe, Jonathan D; Flint, Andrew; Keoleian, Gary

    2003-06-01

    A patient with arteriosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, and giant cell arteritis (GCA) treated continuously with low-dose prednisone developed anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) at 5 and 13 months after clinical diagnosis of GCA. At the time of late recurrent AION, there were no systemic symptoms or elevations in acute phase reactants to signal active arteritis, yet temporal artery biopsy disclosed dramatic inflammation, forcing the presumption that the infarct was arteritic. Recurrent systemic symptoms and elevation of acute phase reactants are not reliable warning signs of reactivated GCA. In patients at high risk for corticosteroid complications, late biopsy may be a reasonable guide to corticosteroid weaning.

  15. Identification of small molecules that improve ATP synthesis defects conferred by Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy mutations.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sandipan; Tomilov, Alexey; Cortopassi, Gino

    2016-09-01

    Inherited mitochondrial complex I mutations cause blinding Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), for which no curative therapy exists. A specific biochemical consequence of LHON mutations in the presence of trace rotenone was observed: deficient complex I-dependent ATP synthesis (CIDAS) and mitochondrial O2 consumption, proportional to the clinical severity of the three primary LHON mutations. We optimized a high-throughput assay of CIDAS to screen 1600 drugs to 2, papaverine and zolpidem, which protected CIDAS in LHON cells concentration-dependently. TSPO and cAMP were investigated as protective mechanisms, but a conclusive mechanism remains to be elucidated; next steps include testing in animal models.

  16. Bilateral simultaneous optic neuropathy in adults: clinical, imaging, serological, and genetic studies.

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, S P; Borruat, F X; Miller, D H; Moseley, I F; Sweeney, M G; Govan, G G; Kelly, M A; Francis, D A; Harding, A E; McDonald, W I

    1995-01-01

    To elucidate the cause(s) of acute or subacute bilateral simultaneous optic neuropathy (BSON) in adult life, a follow up study of 23 patients was performed with clinical assessment, brain MRI, HLA typing, and mitochondrial DNA analysis. The results of CSF electrophoresis were available from previous investigations in 11 patients. At follow up, five (22%) had developed clinically definite multiple sclerosis, four (17%) had mitochondrial DNA point mutations indicating a diagnosis of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The remaining 14 patients (61%) still had clinically isolated BSON a mean of 50 months after the onset of visual symptoms: three of 14 (21%) had multiple MRI white matter lesions compatible with multiple sclerosis, three of 14 (21%) had the multiple sclerosis associated HLA-DR15/DQw6 haplotype, and one of seven tested had CSF oligoclonal IgG bands; in total only five (36%) had one or more of these risk factors. The low frequency of risk factors for the development of multiple sclerosis in these 14 patients suggests that few will develop multiple sclerosis with more prolonged follow up. It is concluded that: (a) about 20% of cases of BSON without affected relatives are due to LHON; (b) multiple sclerosis develops after BSON in at least 20% of cases, but the long term conversion rate is likely to be considerably less than the rate of over 70% seen after an episode of acute unilateral optic neuritis in adult life. PMID:7823072

  17. X-inactivation pattern in multiple tissues from two Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) patients.

    PubMed

    Pegoraro, Elena; Vettori, Andrea; Valentino, Maria L; Molon, Annamaria; Mostacciuolo, Maria L; Howell, Neil; Carelli, Valerio

    2003-05-15

    The more frequent manifestation of ophthalmological abnormalities in males, relative to females, is an unexplained feature of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) that suggests an X-linked modifying gene acting in concert with the pathogenic LHON mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation. In addition, segregation analysis of the optic neuropathy in LHON pedigrees was compatible with the presence of a recessive-modifying gene on chromosome X. According to this two-locus model, females would be affected only if homozygous or if they were susceptible to skewed X-inactivation. Attempts both to localize the putative LHON-modifying gene by linkage analysis and to find an excess of skewed X-inactivation in affected females were unsuccessful, although the inactivation pattern was only studied in DNA isolated from blood cells. We had the opportunity to analyze a wide range of tissues at autopsy, including the optic nerves and the retina, from two LHON female patients. We found no evidence of skewed X-inactivation in the affected tissues, thus weakening further the hypothesized involvement of a specific X chromosome locus in the pathophysiological expression of LHON.

  18. Oxidative phosphorylation differences between mitochondrial DNA haplogroups modify the risk of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Durán, Aurora; Pacheu-Grau, David; Martínez-Romero, Iñigo; López-Gallardo, Ester; López-Pérez, Manuel J; Montoya, Julio; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2012-08-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited optic atrophy caused by mitochondrial DNA point mutations. Previous epidemiological studies have shown that individuals from mitochondrial genetic backgrounds (haplogroups) J/Uk and H have a higher and a lower risk, respectively, of suffering this disorder. To analyze the bases of these associations at cellular and molecular levels, functional studies with cybrids provide high quality evidence. Cybrids from haplogroup J contain less mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) and synthesize a smaller amount of mitochondrial DNA-encoded polypeptides than those from haplogroup H. Haplogroup J cybrids also display lower oxygen consumption, mitochondrial inner membrane potential and total adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) levels. Moreover, mitochondrial DNA levels correlate with many parameters of the oxidative phosphorylation system. These results suggest that the mitochondrial DNA amount determines oxidative phosphorylation capacity and, along with other recently published observations, support the possibility that mitochondrial DNA levels may be responsible for the bias of the disorder toward males, for the incomplete penetrance of mutations causing Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and for the association of the disease with particular mitochondrial DNA haplogroups.

  19. Electrophysiological changes in optic neuropathy of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Ghita, AM; Parvu, D; Sava, R; Georgescu, L; Zagrean, L

    2013-01-01

    The visually evoked potentials are electrical signals generated by the occipital cortex due to electrical stimulus. The clinical importance of VEP is to diagnose the functional changes of the optic nerve in different diseases such as diabetic mellitus. Our study sought latency of VEP changes depending on glycemic value and duration of diabetes in Wistar rats. Methods: this study evaluated the VEP of 25 rats in three groups: control group, diabetic group 1 with glycemic values between 200-400mg/dl and diabetic group 2 with glycemic values between 400 and 600mg/dl. These rats from diabetic group 2 were followed for 4 months and the ones in control group and diabetic group 1 for 5 months. Results: the latency of VEP shows slight changes without any statistical significance in the control group. In diabetic group 1 and 2 similar changes occurred, with statistical significance and the amplitude of the changes was proportional with the glycemic value. The rats had a rapid increase of VEP latency after the induction of diabetes and returned to a normal range in the first month. After a time, when the latencies of VEP were in normal range, a new growth appeared faster and larger as the glycemic values were higher. Conclusion: diabetes brings changes to the visual signal transmission and to the central processing, this being revealed by the examination of the visually evoked potential. Increased VEP latency is statistically correlated with the changes that occur at the level of the values of glucose in blood. A rapid growth in blood sugar lowers the visual signal transmission. This change is temporary despite the persistence of elevated blood glucose values, probably by adjusting to the new condition. However, maintaining high glycemic values remotely produces a progressive increase of the delay of the visual signal. This progressive increase is faster as blood glucose levels are higher. PMID:24155786

  20. Gene expression and histopathological evaluation of thiamine pyrophosphate on optic neuropathy induced with ethambutol in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cinici, Emine; Cetin, Nihal; Suleyman, Bahadir; Altuner, Durdu; Yarali, Oguzhan; Balta, Hilal; Calik, Ilknur; Tumkaya, Levent; Suleyman, Halis

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the effects of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) and thiamine (TM) in oxidative optic neuropathy in rats induced by ethambutol. METHODS The animals were divided into four groups: a control group (CG), an ethambutol control (ETC) group, TM plus ethambutol group (TMG), and TPP plus ethambutol group (TPPG). One hour after intraperitoneal administration of TM 20 mg/kg to the TMG group and TPP 20 mg/kg to TPPG group, 30 mg/kg ethambutol was given via gavage to all the groups but the CG. This procedure was repeated once daily for 90d. After that period, all rats were exposed to high levels of anaesthesia in order to investigate the gene expression of malondialdehyde and glutathione in removed optic nerve tissue and histopathologically to examine these tissues. RESULTS Malondialdehyde gene expression significantly increased, whereas glutathione gene expression significantly decreased in the ETC group compared to the CG. TM could not prevent the increase of malondialdehyde gene expression and the decrease of glutathione, while TPP significantly could suppress. Histopathologically, significant vacuolization in the optic nerve, single-cell necrosis in the glial cells, and a decrease in oligodendrocytes were observed in the ETC group. Vacuolization in the optic nerve, a decrease in oligodendrocytes and single-cell necrosis were found in the TMG group, while no pathological finding was observed in the TPPG group except for mild vacuolization. CONCLUSION TPP protects the optic nerve against the ethambutol-induced toxicity but TM does not. TPP can be beneficial in prophilaxis of optic neuropathy in ethambutol therapy. PMID:27803853

  1. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy complicating interferon alpha and ribavirin therapy in patients with chronic hepatitisC.

    PubMed

    Kabbaj, N; Sentissi, S; Mohammadi, M; Benaïssa, A; Amrani, N

    2009-02-01

    Ophthalmological complications with interferon therapy are rare, usually mild and reversible, and do not require the withdrawal of antiviral treatment. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy is an uncommon complication of interferon treatment. From January 1998 to December 2007, three patients developed anterior ischemic optic neuropathy during antiviral treatment, with a favourable course after interferon was discontinued. Periodic Ophthalmological examinations, including visual acuity and fundus examinations should be performed before starting and during treatment, particularly in patients with vascular risk factors. Antiviral therapy should be stopped immediately if severe ophthalmologic complications occur. PMID:19201118

  2. Unilateral optic neuropathy from possible sphenoidal sinus barotrauma after recreational scuba diving: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gunn, David J; O'Hagan, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    A case report is presented of a 35-year-old woman who developed a progressive right optic neuropathy while surfacing from a series of four recreational dives on the Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia. The patient reported severe sudden onset blurred vision in the right eye associated with a mild headache and epistaxis on surfacing from diving. The patient had her first medical review the day after returning from her trip. At this time visual acuity in the right eye was 20/80, with left eye 20/20. There was a relative afferent pupillary defect in the right eye. A high-resolution computed tomography scan showed fluid in the right sphenoid sinus. Computed perimetry revealed patchy visual field loss in the right eye. The provisional diagnosis of sphenoidal sinus barotrauma-induced optic neuropathy was made. Over 10 days of observation, the visual acuity returned to 20/20 in the right eye and visual field changes resolved. This case highlights a very unusual cause of visual loss associated with diving.

  3. A mitochondrial DNA mutation as a cause of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Singh, G; Lott, M T; Wallace, D C

    1989-05-18

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited disease associated with the late onset of bilateral loss of central vision and cardiac dysrhythmias. The maternal inheritance is explained by the mitochondrial origin of the disease. Analysis of the sequence of a mitochondrial DNA has indicated that a single nucleotide change at position 11778 is associated with this disease. This mutation converts the 340th amino acid of NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 from an arginine to a histidine and eliminates an SfaNI endonuclease restriction site. A survey of restriction-fragment-length polymorphisms in the mitochondrial DNA of three independent families with this disease (an American black and two white European families) and 10 controls confirmed that this SfaNI site is associated with the disease. A phylogenetic tree for mitochondrial DNA polymorphism and sequence variants from three probands with Leber's disease and four controls was constructed, and the mutation at position 11778 was found to be associated with two mitochondrial DNA backgrounds--an American black mitochondrial DNA and a European mitochondrial DNA. Thus, this mutation must have arisen twice independently. Since the mutation correlated with symptoms of Leber's disease in both cases, these findings indicate that the mutation is a cause of the disease. This genetic analysis has identified the specific point mutation in the mitochondrial DNA that results in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. PMID:2566116

  4. Acute ischemic optic neuropathy with extended prone position ventilation in a lung transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Kapoor, Aanchal; Akindipe, Olufemi; Lane, Charles; Krishnan, Sudhir

    2016-01-01

    Prone position ventilation (PPV) improves mortality in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but outcomes following its use in lung transplant recipients are not known. We report the case of a 42-year-old Caucasian man who presented with severe ARDS from Bordetella pertussis, 5 years after bilateral sequential lung transplant for cystic fibrosis. He was managed with PPV for 22 days and had a prolonged ICU stay complicated by hypoxic ischemic optic neuropathy leading to blindness. Since his discharge from the ICU 6 months ago, his FEV1 has recovered to 47% predicted compared to his pre-ICU peak FEV1 of 85% predicted, suggesting recovery of lung function. This is the first report of optic nerve damage and vision loss in patients undergoing PPV. Our report also suggests that, in appropriately selected lung transplant recipients, severe hypoxemia could potentially be managed with prone ventilation. PMID:27051622

  5. Differential cerebro spinal fluid proteome investigation of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    D'Aguanno, Simona; Barassi, Alessandra; Lupisella, Santina; d'eril, Gianlodovico Melzi; Del Boccio, Piero; Pieragostino, Damiana; Pallotti, Francesco; Carelli, Valerio; Valentino, Maria Lucia; Liguori, Rocco; Avoni, Patrizia; Bernardini, Sergio; Gambi, Domenico; Urbani, Andrea; Federici, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a genetic disease leading to the loss of central vision and optic nerve atrophy. The existence of occasional cases of LHON patients developing a Multiple Sclerosis (MS)-like illness and the hypothesis that mtDNA variants may be involved in MS suggest the possibility of some common molecular mechanisms linking the two diseases. We have pursued a comparative proteomics approach on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from LHON and MS patients, as well as healthy donors by employing 2-DE gel separations coupled to MALDI-TOF-MS and nLC-MS/MS investigations. 7 protein spots showed significant differential distribution among the three groups. Both CSF of LHON or MS patients are characterized by lower level of transthyretin dimer adduct while a specific up regulation of Apo A-IV was detected in LHON CSF.

  6. Long-term evaluation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy-like symptoms in rotenone administered rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Laura; Philip, Ann L; Martinez, Juan C; Guttierez, Juan C; Marella, Mathieu; Patki, Gaurav; Matsuno-Yagi, Akemi; Yagi, Takao; Thomas, Biju B

    2015-01-12

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is an inherited disorder affecting the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons that lead to the loss of central vision. This study is aimed at evaluating the LHON symptoms in rats administered with rotenone microspheres into the superior colliculus (SC). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) analysis showed substantial loss of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in rotenone injected rats. Optokinetic testing in rotenone treated rats showed decrease in head-tracking response. Electrophysiological mapping of the SC surface demonstrated attenuation of visually evoked responses; however, no changes were observed in the ERG data. The progressive pattern of disease manifestation in rotenone administered rats demonstrated several similarities with human disease symptoms. These rats with LHON-like symptoms can serve as a model for future investigators to design and implement reliable tests to assess the beneficial effects of therapeutic interventions for LHON disease.

  7. Macular Microcysts in Mitochondrial Optic Neuropathies: Prevalence and Retinal Layer Thickness Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Carbonelli, Michele; La Morgia, Chiara; Savini, Giacomo; Cascavilla, Maria Lucia; Borrelli, Enrico; Chicani, Filipe; do V. F. Ramos, Carolina; Salomao, Solange R.; Parisi, Vincenzo; Sebag, Jerry; Bandello, Francesco; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Carelli, Valerio; Barboni, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the thickness of the retinal layers and to assess the prevalence of macular microcysts (MM) in the inner nuclear layer (INL) of patients with mitochondrial optic neuropathies (MON). Methods All patients with molecularly confirmed MON, i.e. Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) and Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA), referred between 2010 and 2012 were enrolled. Eight patients with MM were compared with two control groups: MON patients without MM matched by age, peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, and visual acuity, as well as age-matched controls. Retinal segmentation was performed using specific Optical coherence tomography (OCT) software (Carl Zeiss Meditec). Macular segmentation thickness values of the three groups were compared by one-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc corrections. Results MM were identified in 5/90 (5.6%) patients with LHON and 3/58 (5.2%) with DOA. The INL was thicker in patients with MON compared to controls regardless of the presence of MM [133.1±7μm vs 122.3±9μm in MM patients (p<0.01) and 128.5±8μm vs. 122.3±9μm in no-MM patients (p<0.05)], however the outer nuclear layer (ONL) was thicker in patients with MM (101.4±1mμ) compared to patients without MM [77.5±8mμ (p<0.001)] and controls [78.4±7mμ (p<0.001)]. ONL thickness did not significantly differ between patients without MM and controls. Conclusion The prevalence of MM in MON is low (5-6%), but associated with ONL thickening. We speculate that in MON patients with MM, vitreo-retinal traction contributes to the thickening of ONL as well as to the production of cystic spaces. PMID:26047507

  8. Shape Analysis of the Peripapillary RPE Layer in Papilledema and Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kupersmith, Mark J.; Rohlf, F. James

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Geometric morphometrics (GM) was used to analyze the shape of the peripapillary retinal pigment epithelium–Bruch's membrane (RPE/BM) layer imaged on the SD-OCT 5-line raster in normal subjects and in patients with papilledema and ischemic optic neuropathy. Methods. Three groups of subjects were compared: 30 normals, 20 with anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION), and 25 with papilledema and intracranial hypertension. Twenty equidistant semilandmarks were digitized on OCT images of the RPE/BM layer spanning 2500 μm on each side of the neural canal opening (NCO). The data were analyzed using standard GM techniques, including a generalized least-squares Procrustes superimposition, principal component analysis, thin-plate spline (to visualize deformations), and permutation statistical analysis to evaluate differences in shape variables. Results. The RPE/BM layer in normals and AION have a characteristic V shape pointing away from the vitreous; the RPE/BM layer in papilledema has an inverted U shape, skewed nasally inward toward the vitreous. The differences were statistically significant. There was no significant difference in shapes between normals and AION. Pre- and posttreatment OCTs, in select cases of papilledema, showed that the inverted U-shaped RPE/BM moved posteriorly into a normal V shape as the papilledema resolved with weight loss or shunting. Conclusions. The shape difference in papilledema, absent in AION, cannot be explained by disc edema alone. The difference is a consequence of both the translaminar pressure gradient and the material properties of the peripapillary sclera. GM offers a novel way of statistically assessing shape differences of the peripapillary optic nerve head. PMID:21896851

  9. Multiplex MALDI-TOF MS detection of mitochondrial variants in Brazilian patients with hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Matilde da Silva-Costa, Sueli; Balieiro, Juliane Cristina; Fernandes, Marcela Scabello Amaral; Alves, Rogério Marins; Guerra, Andrea Trevas Maciel; Marcondes, Ana Maria; Sartorato, Edi Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disease characterized by bilateral vision loss. More than 95% of LHON cases are associated with one of the three main mtDNA mutations: G11778A, T14484C, and G3460A. The other 5% of cases are due to other rare mutations related to the disease. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence and spectrum of LHON mtDNA mutations, including the haplogroup, in a cohort of Brazilian patients with optic neuropathy and to evaluate the usefulness of iPLEX Gold/matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) technology in detecting LHON mutations. Methods We analyzed a total of 101 patients; 67 had a clinical diagnosis of LHON and 34 had optic neuropathy of unknown etiology. Direct sequencing and iPLEX Gold/MALDI-TOF MS were used to screen for the most common pathogenic point mutations in LHON, together with the rare mutations G3733A, C4171A, T10663C, G14459A, C14482G, A14495G, C14568T, and C14482A. Results We identified mutations in 36 patients, of whom 83.3% carried the G11778A mutation and 16.7% carried the T14484C mutation. In individuals with mutations, the haplogroups found were L1/L2, L3, C, R, U, D, and H. Rare mutations were not detected in any of the patients analyzed. Conclusions The frequencies of the main LHON mutations were similar to those previously reported for Latin America. A different frequency was found only for the A3460G mutation. The most frequent haplogroups identified were of African origin. The iPLEX Gold/MALDI-TOF MS technology proved to be highly accurate and efficient for screening mutations and identifying the haplogroups related to LHON. The MassArray platform, combined with other techniques, enabled definitive diagnosis of LHON in 36% (36/101) of the cases studied. PMID:27582625

  10. Hereditary Neuropathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Hereditary Neuropathies Information Page Synonym(s): Neuropathy - Hereditary Table of Contents ( ... and Information Publicaciones en Español What are Hereditary Neuropathies? Hereditary neuropathies are a group of inherited disorders ...

  11. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Peripheral Neuropathy Information Page Condensed from Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Peripheral Neuropathy? Peripheral neuropathy describes damage to the peripheral nervous ...

  12. Anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy in patient with rheumatoid arthritis--case report.

    PubMed

    Perić, S; Cerovski, B; Perić, P

    2001-01-01

    This case report presents a patient with long-lasting rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of fourth clinical grade, having ocular complications. RA was diagnosed according to current modified ARA criteria from 1987. Upon admission to the Department of Ophthalmology clinical examination revealed anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy (AION), which is not characteristic manifestation of RA in the eye. The occurrence of AION in patients with RA has been explained in literature as a secondary manifestation of hypertension in these patients or, by the presence of other connective tissue disease apart from RA (for example, MCTD--mixed connective tissue disease). Both mentioned causes were excluded in our case, as well as any other condition that could lead to AION. Therefore, we had concluded that AION presented a late complication of RA.

  13. Parietal and bi-occipital lobe infarction confounded by ethanol-induced optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Tornatore, C W; Townsend, J C; Selvin, G J

    1991-08-01

    A frequent occurrence in geriatric and chronically ill patients is the exhibition of several simultaneously occurring and confounding health problems. This paper reports the case of a 61-year-old-white male who presented with an extensive history of multiple brain infarcts, hemiparesis, personality changes and varied visual complaints. Tests in the neurooptometric work-up for this patient included static automated perimetry, stereoacuity and optokinetic nystagmus evaluation. The results were suggestive of multiple cerebrovascular accidents which included the right and left occipital lobes as well as the right parietal lobe. This clinical picture was complicated by the presence of nutritional or ethanol-induced optic neuropathy. Emphasis was placed on a detailed sequential history of events and a complete neurological and optometric evaluation to ascertain the multiple foci of cortical infarction. Corroboration of clinical findings was obtained by computerized axial tomography (CT scan).

  14. Chronic relapsing inflammatory optic neuropathy: a systematic review of 122 cases reported.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Axel; Plant, Gordon T

    2014-01-01

    Chronic relapsing inflammatory optic neuropathy (CRION) is an entity that was described in 2003. Early recognition of patients suffering from CRION is relevant because of the associated risk for blindness if treated inappropriately. It seems timely to have a clinical review on this recently defined entity. A systematic literature review, irrespective of language, retrieved 22 case series and single reports describing 122 patients with CRION between 2003 and 2013. We review the epidemiology, diagnostic workup, differential diagnosis, and treatment (acute, intermediate, and long term) in view of the collective data. These data suggest that CRION is a distinct nosological entity, which is seronegative for anti-aquaporin four auto-antibodies and recognized by and managed through its dependency on immuno-suppression. Revised diagnostic criteria are proposed in light of the data compromising a critical discussion of relevant limitations.

  15. Could Topical Minoxidil Cause Non-Arteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy?

    PubMed

    Aktas, Habibullah; Alan, Sevil; Türkoglu, Elif Betül; Sevik, Özge

    2016-08-01

    Minoxidil hair formulation is commonly used for the treatment of male or female androgenic alopecia. Minoxidil is a Health Canada and US FDA-approved medication for hair loss in men and women. The drug is marketed as 2% and 5% topical solutions. This over-the-counter product is considered safe, but should be used with caution. Furthermore, minoxidil is an orally active vasodilator for treatment of severe hypertension. Typical side effects of minoxidil are faster heart rate, augmented heart function and stroke volume (which can be associated with reduced vascular resistance upon baroflex stimulus), retained sodium and water and abnormal hair growth. The most common adverse reactions of the topical formulation are limited to irritant and allergic contact dermatitis on the scalp. Herein, we report a non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy caused by topical 5% minoxidil treatment that was resolved after discontinuation of minoxidil. PMID:27656541

  16. Gene-Based Therapies for Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy. Hype or Hope?

    PubMed

    Mackey, David A; Kearns, Lisa S; Hewitt, Alex W

    2016-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy has now joined Leber congenital amaurosis in the list of genetic eye diseases undergoing gene therapy clinical trials. Although a dramatic response to treatment would be welcome, a minor improvement in vision is a major challenge in efficacy assessment, given this may occur spontaneously as part of the natural history of minor recovery in some patients. Thus, we must await the outcome of adequately powered clinical trials to know if the treatment is effective, particularly given the likely high cost of such therapeutic interventions in the future. We need global cooperation to ensure that the most suitable patients are enrolled in these trials and that support is provided for participants who need to travel from the Asia-Pacific region to Europe or North America if there are no local arms of these trials. PMID:27488066

  17. SUR1-Associated Mechanisms Are Not Involved in Ischemic Optic Neuropathy 1 Day Post-Injury

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, James D.; Guo, Yan; Bernstein, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury after central nervous system (CNS) injury presents a major health care challenge with few promising treatments. Recently, it has become possible to reduce edema after CNS injury by antagonizing a sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) regulated ion channel expressed after injury. SUR1 upregulation after injury is a necessary precondition for the formation of this channel, and has been implicated in white matter injury after clinical spinal cord trauma. Glibenclamide, an SUR1 antagonist, appears to have neuroprotective effect against cerebral stroke in an open-label small clinical trial and great effectiveness in reducing damage after varied experimental CNS injury models. Despite its importance in CNS injuries, SUR1 upregulation appears to play no part in rodent anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION) injury as tested by real-time PCR and immunohistochemical staining of rAION-injured rat optic nerve (ON). Furthermore, the SUR1 antagonist glibenclamide administered immediately after rAION injury provided no protection to proximal ON microvasculature 1 day post-injury but may reduce optic nerve head edema in a manner unrelated to ON SUR1 expression. Our results suggest that there may be fundamental differences between rAION optic nerve ischemia and other CNS white matter injuries where SUR1 appears to play a role. PMID:27560494

  18. SUR1-Associated Mechanisms Are Not Involved in Ischemic Optic Neuropathy 1 Day Post-Injury.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, James D; Guo, Yan; Bernstein, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury after central nervous system (CNS) injury presents a major health care challenge with few promising treatments. Recently, it has become possible to reduce edema after CNS injury by antagonizing a sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) regulated ion channel expressed after injury. SUR1 upregulation after injury is a necessary precondition for the formation of this channel, and has been implicated in white matter injury after clinical spinal cord trauma. Glibenclamide, an SUR1 antagonist, appears to have neuroprotective effect against cerebral stroke in an open-label small clinical trial and great effectiveness in reducing damage after varied experimental CNS injury models. Despite its importance in CNS injuries, SUR1 upregulation appears to play no part in rodent anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION) injury as tested by real-time PCR and immunohistochemical staining of rAION-injured rat optic nerve (ON). Furthermore, the SUR1 antagonist glibenclamide administered immediately after rAION injury provided no protection to proximal ON microvasculature 1 day post-injury but may reduce optic nerve head edema in a manner unrelated to ON SUR1 expression. Our results suggest that there may be fundamental differences between rAION optic nerve ischemia and other CNS white matter injuries where SUR1 appears to play a role.

  19. SUR1-Associated Mechanisms Are Not Involved in Ischemic Optic Neuropathy 1 Day Post-Injury.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, James D; Guo, Yan; Bernstein, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury after central nervous system (CNS) injury presents a major health care challenge with few promising treatments. Recently, it has become possible to reduce edema after CNS injury by antagonizing a sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) regulated ion channel expressed after injury. SUR1 upregulation after injury is a necessary precondition for the formation of this channel, and has been implicated in white matter injury after clinical spinal cord trauma. Glibenclamide, an SUR1 antagonist, appears to have neuroprotective effect against cerebral stroke in an open-label small clinical trial and great effectiveness in reducing damage after varied experimental CNS injury models. Despite its importance in CNS injuries, SUR1 upregulation appears to play no part in rodent anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION) injury as tested by real-time PCR and immunohistochemical staining of rAION-injured rat optic nerve (ON). Furthermore, the SUR1 antagonist glibenclamide administered immediately after rAION injury provided no protection to proximal ON microvasculature 1 day post-injury but may reduce optic nerve head edema in a manner unrelated to ON SUR1 expression. Our results suggest that there may be fundamental differences between rAION optic nerve ischemia and other CNS white matter injuries where SUR1 appears to play a role. PMID:27560494

  20. Crystallins are regulated biomarkers for monitoring topical therapy of glaucomatous optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Prokosch, Verena; Schallenberg, Maurice; Thanos, Solon

    2013-01-01

    Optic nerve atrophy caused by abnormal intraocular pressure (IOP) remains the most common cause of irreversible loss of vision worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine whether topically applied IOP-lowering eye drugs affect retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and retinal metabolism in a rat model of optic neuropathy. IOP was elevated through cauterization of episcleral veins, and then lowered either by the daily topical application of timolol, timolol/travoprost, timolol/dorzolamide, or timolol/brimonidine, or surgically with sectorial iridectomy. RGCs were retrogradely labeled 4 days prior to enucleation, and counted. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry allowed the identification of IOP-dependent proteomic changes. Genomic changes were scrutinized using microarrays and qRT-PCR. The significant increase in IOP induced by episcleral vein cauterization that persisted until 8 weeks of follow-up in control animals (p<0.05) was effectively lowered by the eye drops (p<0.05). As anticipated, the number of RGCs decreased significantly following 8 weeks of elevated IOP (p<0.05), while treatment with combination compounds markedly improved RGC survival (p<0.05). 2D-PAGE and Western blot analyses revealed an IOP-dependent expression of crystallin cry-βb2. Microarray and qRT-PCR analyses verified the results at the mRNA level. IHC demonstrated that crystallins were expressed mainly in the ganglion cell layer. The data suggest that IOP and either topically applied antiglaucomatous drugs influence crystallin expression within the retina. Neuronal crystallins are thus suitable biomarkers for monitoring the progression of neuropathy and evaluating any neuroprotective effects. PMID:23468831

  1. Crystallins Are Regulated Biomarkers for Monitoring Topical Therapy of Glaucomatous Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Prokosch, Verena; Schallenberg, Maurice; Thanos, Solon

    2013-01-01

    Optic nerve atrophy caused by abnormal intraocular pressure (IOP) remains the most common cause of irreversible loss of vision worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine whether topically applied IOP-lowering eye drugs affect retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and retinal metabolism in a rat model of optic neuropathy. IOP was elevated through cauterization of episcleral veins, and then lowered either by the daily topical application of timolol, timolol/travoprost, timolol/dorzolamide, or timolol/brimonidine, or surgically with sectorial iridectomy. RGCs were retrogradely labeled 4 days prior to enucleation, and counted. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry allowed the identification of IOP-dependent proteomic changes. Genomic changes were scrutinized using microarrays and qRT-PCR. The significant increase in IOP induced by episcleral vein cauterization that persisted until 8 weeks of follow-up in control animals (p<0.05) was effectively lowered by the eye drops (p<0.05). As anticipated, the number of RGCs decreased significantly following 8 weeks of elevated IOP (p<0.05), while treatment with combination compounds markedly improved RGC survival (p<0.05). 2D-PAGE and Western blot analyses revealed an IOP-dependent expression of crystallin cry-βb2. Microarray and qRT-PCR analyses verified the results at the mRNA level. IHC demonstrated that crystallins were expressed mainly in the ganglion cell layer. The data suggest that IOP and either topically applied antiglaucomatous drugs influence crystallin expression within the retina. Neuronal crystallins are thus suitable biomarkers for monitoring the progression of neuropathy and evaluating any neuroprotective effects. PMID:23468831

  2. Antivascular Endothelial Growth Factor Bevacizumab for Radiation Optic Neuropathy: Secondary to Plaque Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, Paul T.; Chin, Kimberly J.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the intravitreal antivascular endothelial growth factor, bevacizumab, for treatment of radiation optic neuropathy (RON). Methods and Materials: A prospective interventional clinical case series was performed of 14 patients with RON related to plaque radiotherapy for choroidal melanoma. The RON was characterized by optic disc edema, hemorrhages, microangiopathy, and neovascularization. The entry criteria included a subjective or objective loss of vision, coupled with findings of RON. The study subjects received a minimum of two initial injections of intravitreal bevacizumab (1.25 mg in 0.05 mL) every 6-8 weeks. The primary objectives included safety and tolerability. The secondary objectives included the efficacy as measured using the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study chart for visual acuity, fundus photography, angiography, and optical coherence tomography/scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Results: Reductions in optic disc hemorrhage and edema were noted in all patients. The visual acuity was stable or improved in 9 (64%) of the 14 patients. Of the 5 patients who had lost vision, 2 had relatively large posterior tumors, 1 had had the vision decrease because of intraocular hemorrhage, and 1 had developed optic atrophy. The fifth patient who lost vision was noncompliant. No treatment-related ocular or systemic side effects were observed. Conclusions: Intravitreal antivascular endothelial growth factor bevacizumab was tolerated and generally associated with improved vision, reduced papillary hemorrhage, and resolution of optic disc edema. Persistent optic disc neovascularization and fluorescein angiographic leakage were invariably noted. The results of the present study support additional evaluation of antivascular endothelial growth factor medications as treatment of RON.

  3. Peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Hanewinckel, R; Ikram, M A; Van Doorn, P A

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are diseases of the peripheral nervous system that can be divided into mononeuropathies, multifocal neuropathies, and polyneuropathies. Symptoms usually include numbness and paresthesia. These symptoms are often accompanied by weakness and can be painful. Polyneuropathies can be divided into axonal and demyelinating forms, which is important for diagnostic reasons. Most peripheral neuropathies develop over months or years, but some are rapidly progressive. Some patients only suffer from mild, unilateral, slowly progressive tingling in the fingers due to median nerve compression in the wrist (carpal tunnel syndrome), while other patients can be tetraplegic, with respiratory insufficiency within 1-2 days due to Guillain-Barré syndrome. Carpal tunnel syndrome, with a prevalence of 5% and incidence of 1-2 per 1000 person-years, is the most common mononeuropathy. Population-based data for chronic polyneuropathy are relatively scarce. Prevalence is estimated at 1% and increases to 7% in persons over 65 years of age. Incidence is approximately 1 per 1000 person-years. Immune-mediated polyneuropathies like Guillain-Barré syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy are rare diseases, with an annual incidence of approximately 1-2 and 0.2-0.5 per 100 000 persons respectively. Most peripheral neuropathies are more prevalent in older adults and in men, except for carpal tunnel syndrome, which is more common in women. Diabetes is a common cause of peripheral neuropathy and is associated with both mono- and polyneuropathies. Among the group of chronic polyneuropathies, in about 20-25% no direct cause can be found. These are slowly progressive axonal polyneuropathies. PMID:27637963

  4. Safety and effects of the vector for the Leber hereditary optic neuropathy gene therapy clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Koilkonda, Rajeshwari D; Yu, Hong; Chou, Tsung-Han; Feuer, William J; Ruggeri, Marco; Porciatti, Vittorio; Tse, David; Hauswirth, William W; Chiodo, Vince; Boye, Sanford L; Lewin, Alfred S; Neuringer, Martha; Renner, Lauren; Guy, John

    2014-04-01

    IMPORTANCE We developed a novel strategy for treatment of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) caused by a mutation in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase subunit IV (ND4) mitochondrial gene. OBJECTIVE To demonstrate the safety and effects of the gene therapy vector to be used in a proposed gene therapy clinical trial. DESIGN AND SETTING In a series of laboratory experiments, we modified the mitochondrial ND4 subunit of complex I in the nuclear genetic code for import into mitochondria. The protein was targeted into the organelle by agency of a targeting sequence (allotopic expression). The gene was packaged into adeno-associated viral vectors and then vitreally injected into rodent, nonhuman primate, and ex vivo human eyes that underwent testing for expression and integration by immunohistochemical analysis and blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. During serial follow-up, the animal eyes underwent fundus photography, optical coherence tomography, and multifocal or pattern electroretinography. We tested for rescue of visual loss in rodent eyes also injected with a mutant G11778A ND4 homologue responsible for most cases of LHON. EXPOSURE Ocular infection with recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors containing a wild-type allotopic human ND4 gene. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Expression of human ND4 and rescue of optic neuropathy induced by mutant human ND4. RESULTS We found human ND4 expressed in almost all mouse retinal ganglion cells by 1 week after injection and ND4 integrated into the mouse complex I. In rodent eyes also injected with a mutant allotopic ND4, wild-type allotopic ND4 prevented defective adenosine triphosphate synthesis, suppressed visual loss, reduced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells, and prevented demise of axons in the optic nerve. Injection of ND4 in the ex vivo human eye resulted in expression in most retinal ganglion cells. Primates undergoing vitreal injection with the ND4 test article and followed up for 3

  5. Second-order bosonic Kadanoff-Baym equations for plasmon-accompanied optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüler, Michael; Pavlyukh, Yaroslav

    2016-03-01

    The availability of ultra-short and strong light sources opens the door for a variety of new experiments such as transient absorption, where optical properties of systems can be studied in extreme nonequilibrium situations. The nonequilibrium Green's function formalism is an efficient approach to investigate these processes theoretically. Here we apply the method to the light-matter interaction of the magnesium 2p core level accompanied by electron-plasmon interaction due to collective excitations in the conduction band. The plasmons are described as massive bosonic quasi-particle excitations, leading to a second-order equations of motion, requiring a new approach for their propagation.

  6. Targeting estrogen receptor β as preventive therapeutic strategy for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Annalinda; Preziuso, Carmela; Iommarini, Luisa; Perli, Elena; Grazioli, Paola; Campese, Antonio F; Maresca, Alessandra; Montopoli, Monica; Masuelli, Laura; Sadun, Alfredo A; d'Amati, Giulia; Carelli, Valerio; Ghelli, Anna; Giordano, Carla

    2015-12-15

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited blinding disease characterized by degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and consequent optic nerve atrophy. Peculiar features of LHON are incomplete penetrance and gender bias, with a marked male prevalence. Based on the different hormonal metabolism between genders, we proposed that estrogens play a protective role in females and showed that these hormones ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction in LHON through the estrogen receptors (ERs). We also showed that ERβ localize to the mitochondria of RGCs. Thus, targeting ERβ may become a therapeutic strategy for LHON specifically aimed at avoiding or delaying the onset of disease in mutation carriers. Here, we tested the effects of ERβ targeting on LHON mitochondrial defective metabolism by treating LHON cybrid cells carrying the m.11778G>A mutation with a combination of natural estrogen-like compounds that bind ERβ with high selectivity. We demonstrated that these molecules improve cell viability by reducing apoptosis, inducing mitochondrial biogenesis and strongly reducing the levels of reactive oxygen species in LHON cells. These effects were abolished in cells with ERβ knockdown by silencing receptor expression or by using specific receptor antagonists. Our observations support the hypothesis that estrogen-like molecules may be useful in LHON prophylactic therapy. This is particularly important for lifelong disease prevention in unaffected LHON mutation carriers. Current strategies attempting to combat degeneration of RGCs during the acute phase of LHON have not been very effective. Implementing a different and preemptive approach with a low risk profile may be very helpful.

  7. Efficacy and Safety of rAAV2-ND4 Treatment for Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xing; Pei, Han; Zhao, Min-jian; Yang, Shuo; Hu, Wei-kun; He, Heng; Ma, Si-qi; Zhang, Ge; Dong, Xiao-yan; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dao-wen; Li, Bin

    2016-02-19

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrially inherited disease leading to blindness. A mitochondrial DNA point mutation at the 11778 nucleotide site of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4) gene is the most common cause. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) carrying ND4 (rAAV2-ND4) in LHON patients carrying the G11778A mutation. Nine patients were administered rAAV2-ND4 by intravitreal injection to one eye and then followed for 9 months. Ophthalmologic examinations of visual acuity, visual field, and optical coherence tomography were performed. Physical examinations included routine blood and urine. The visual acuity of the injected eyes of six patients improved by at least 0.3 log MAR after 9 months of follow-up. In these six patients, the visual field was enlarged but the retinal nerve fibre layer remained relatively stable. No other outcome measure was significantly changed. None of the nine patients had local or systemic adverse events related to the vector during the 9-month follow-up period. These findings support the feasible use of gene therapy for LHON.

  8. Efficacy and Safety of rAAV2-ND4 Treatment for Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xing; Pei, Han; Zhao, Min-jian; Yang, Shuo; Hu, Wei-kun; He, Heng; Ma, Si-qi; Zhang, Ge; Dong, Xiao-yan; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dao-wen; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrially inherited disease leading to blindness. A mitochondrial DNA point mutation at the 11778 nucleotide site of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4) gene is the most common cause. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) carrying ND4 (rAAV2-ND4) in LHON patients carrying the G11778A mutation. Nine patients were administered rAAV2-ND4 by intravitreal injection to one eye and then followed for 9 months. Ophthalmologic examinations of visual acuity, visual field, and optical coherence tomography were performed. Physical examinations included routine blood and urine. The visual acuity of the injected eyes of six patients improved by at least 0.3 log MAR after 9 months of follow-up. In these six patients, the visual field was enlarged but the retinal nerve fibre layer remained relatively stable. No other outcome measure was significantly changed. None of the nine patients had local or systemic adverse events related to the vector during the 9-month follow-up period. These findings support the feasible use of gene therapy for LHON. PMID:26892229

  9. Evaluation of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurements using optical coherence tomography in patients with tobacco-alcohol-induced toxic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Moura, Frederico C; Monteiro, Mario L

    2010-01-01

    Three patients with progressive visual loss, chronic alcoholism and tabagism were submitted to a complete neuro-ophthalmic examination and to retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) measurements using optical coherence tomography (OCT) scanning. Two patients showed marked RNFL loss in the temporal sector of the optic disc. However, a third patient presented RNFL measurements within or above normal limits, based on the Stratus-OCT normative database. Such findings may be due to possible RNFL edema similar to the one that may occur in the acute phase of toxic optic neuropathies. Stratus-OCT was able to detect RNFL loss in the papillomacular bundle of patients with tobacco-alcohol-induced toxic optic neuropathy. However, interpretation must be careful when OCT does not show abnormality in order to prevent diagnostic confusion, since overestimation of RNFL thickness measurements is possible in such cases. PMID:20195038

  10. Evaluation of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurements using optical coherence tomography in patients with tobacco-alcohol-induced toxic optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Frederico C; Monteiro, Mário L

    2010-01-01

    Three patients with progressive visual loss, chronic alcoholism and tabagism were submitted to a complete neuro-ophthalmic examination and to retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) measurements using optical coherence tomography (OCT) scanning. Two patients showed marked RNFL loss in the temporal sector of the optic disc. However, a third patient presented RNFL measurements within or above normal limits, based on the Stratus-OCT normative database. Such findings may be due to possible RNFL edema similar to the one that may occur in the acute phase of toxic optic neuropathies. Stratus-OCT was able to detect RNFL loss in the papillomacular bundle of patients with tobacco-alcohol-induced toxic optic neuropathy. However, interpretation must be careful when OCT does not show abnormality in order to prevent diagnostic confusion, since overestimation of RNFL thickness measurements is possible in such cases. PMID:20195038

  11. [Diabetic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Lechleitner, Monika; Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Francesconi, Claudia; Kofler, Markus

    2016-04-01

    These are the guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of diabetic neuropathy. This diabetic late complication comprises a number of mono- and polyneuropathies, plexopathies, radiculopathies and autonomic neuropathy. The position statement summarizes characteristic clinical symptoms and techniques for diagnostic assessment of diabetic neuropathy. Recommendations for the therapeutic management of diabetic neuropathy, especially for the control of pain in sensorimotor neuropathy, are provided.

  12. Diabetic Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Diabetic Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... Organizations Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Diabetic Neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy is a peripheral nerve disorder caused ...

  13. Metabolic neuropathies

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - metabolic ... can be caused by many different things. Metabolic neuropathy may be caused by: A problem with the ... one of the most common causes of metabolic neuropathies. People who are at the highest risk for ...

  14. Analysis of optic disc damage by optical coherence tomography in terms of therapy in non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Balogh, Zsuzsa; Kasza, Márta; Várdai, Julianna; Reznek, Izabella; Damjanovich, Judit; Csutak, Adrienne; Berta, András; Nagy, Valéria

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the relationship between the rate of nerve fiber loss in non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and time delay before therapy. Total 24 patients received the same treatment within or after 2wk (early and late groups). There were significantly lower level of destruction of nerve fibers (P=0.0014) and significantly better visual field sensitivity (P=0.039) in early group. The results indicate that therapy should be started within 2wk. The degree of ischemic damage due to NAION correlates well with retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and the ischemia-induced decrease in visual field sensitivity.

  15. Analysis of optic disc damage by optical coherence tomography in terms of therapy in non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Balogh, Zsuzsa; Kasza, Márta; Várdai, Julianna; Reznek, Izabella; Damjanovich, Judit; Csutak, Adrienne; Berta, András; Nagy, Valéria

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the relationship between the rate of nerve fiber loss in non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and time delay before therapy. Total 24 patients received the same treatment within or after 2wk (early and late groups). There were significantly lower level of destruction of nerve fibers (P=0.0014) and significantly better visual field sensitivity (P=0.039) in early group. The results indicate that therapy should be started within 2wk. The degree of ischemic damage due to NAION correlates well with retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and the ischemia-induced decrease in visual field sensitivity. PMID:27672604

  16. Analysis of optic disc damage by optical coherence tomography in terms of therapy in non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Zsuzsa; Kasza, Márta; Várdai, Julianna; Reznek, Izabella; Damjanovich, Judit; Csutak, Adrienne; Berta, András; Nagy, Valéria

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the relationship between the rate of nerve fiber loss in non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and time delay before therapy. Total 24 patients received the same treatment within or after 2wk (early and late groups). There were significantly lower level of destruction of nerve fibers (P=0.0014) and significantly better visual field sensitivity (P=0.039) in early group. The results indicate that therapy should be started within 2wk. The degree of ischemic damage due to NAION correlates well with retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and the ischemia-induced decrease in visual field sensitivity.

  17. Analysis of optic disc damage by optical coherence tomography in terms of therapy in non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Balogh, Zsuzsa; Kasza, Márta; Várdai, Julianna; Reznek, Izabella; Damjanovich, Judit; Csutak, Adrienne; Berta, András; Nagy, Valéria

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the relationship between the rate of nerve fiber loss in non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and time delay before therapy. Total 24 patients received the same treatment within or after 2wk (early and late groups). There were significantly lower level of destruction of nerve fibers (P=0.0014) and significantly better visual field sensitivity (P=0.039) in early group. The results indicate that therapy should be started within 2wk. The degree of ischemic damage due to NAION correlates well with retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and the ischemia-induced decrease in visual field sensitivity. PMID:27672604

  18. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with mitochondrial ND6 T14502C mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Fuxin; Guan, Minqiang; Zhou, Xiangtian; Yuan, Meixia; Liang, Ming; Liu, Qi; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Yongmei; Yang, Li; Tong, Yi; Wei, Qi-Ping; Sun, Yan-Hong; Qu, Jia; and others

    2009-11-20

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of three Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). There were variable severity and age of onset in visual impairment among these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the homoplasmic T14502C (I58V) mutation, which localized at a highly conserved isoleucine at position 58 of ND6, and distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphisms belonging to haplogroups M10a, F1a1, and H2. The occurrence of T14502C mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by visual impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of visual impairment. Here, mtDNA variants I187T in the ND1, A122V in CO1, S99A in the A6, and V254I in CO3 exhibited an evolutionary conservation, indicating a potential modifying role in the development of visual impairment associated with T14502C mutation in those families. Furthermore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or environmental factor(s) may play a role in the phenotypic manifestation of the LHON-associated T14502C mutation in these Chinese families.

  19. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with mitochondrial ND1 T3394C mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Min; Guan, Minqiang; Zhao, Fuxing; Zhou, Xiangtian; Yuan, Meixia; Tong, Yi; Yang, Li; Wei, Qi-Ping; Sun, Yan-Hong; Lu, Fan; Qu, Jia; and others

    2009-06-05

    We report here the clinical, genetic and molecular characterization of four Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). There were variable severity and age-of-onset in visual impairment among these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the homoplasmic T3394C (Y30H) mutation, which localized at a highly conserved tyrosine at position 30 of ND1, and distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphisms belonging to haplogroups D4b and M9a. The occurrence of T3394C mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by visual impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of visual impairment. However, there was the absence of functionally significant mtDNA mutations in these four Chinese pedigrees carrying the T3394C mutation. Therefore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or environmental factor(s) may play a role in the phenotypic expression of the LHON-associated T3394C mutation.

  20. Smoking as an aetiological factor in a pedigree with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, K.; Aitken, P.; Johns, D.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial DNA mediated disease which causes severe visual deficits. Although expressivity of the disease is 100%, penetrance is variable, and environmental factors may influence risk of becoming symptomatic. The causative relation between cigarette smoking and disease penetrance was examined.
METHODS—The incidence of smoking in 65 age matched family members of one LHON pedigree was retrospectively obtained. Smoking in groups which expressed disease was compared with those which did not. Male subgroups were analysed separately in addition to combined sex groups.
RESULTS—The association between smoking and disease penetrance was significant in all subgroups (p values from p=0.0009 to p=0.0001, 95% confidence intervals). Disease penetrance was higher in males than females. The association was weaker in the male group than combined sex groups (p values from p=0.0146 to p=0.0008, 95% confidence intervals), probably because of elimination of female asymptomatic non-smokers in the comparison groups. The association was strengthened in older age groups and in groups which smoked more heavily.
CONCLUSIONS—Smoking is significantly associated with disease penetrance in this LHON pedigree. Degree of smoking and number of years smoked correlate with increased risk of developing symptoms.

 PMID:10216058

  1. Clinical Expression of Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Is Affected by the Mitochondrial DNA–Haplogroup Background

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Gavin ; Carelli, Valerio ; Spruijt, Liesbeth ; Gerards, Mike ; Mowbray, Catherine ; Achilli, Alessandro ; Pyle, Angela ; Elson, Joanna ; Howell, Neil ; La Morgia, Chiara ; Valentino, Maria Lucia ; Huoponen, Kirsi ; Savontaus, Marja-Liisa ; Nikoskelainen, Eeva ; Sadun, Alfredo A. ; Salomao, Solange R. ; Belfort Jr., Rubens ; Griffiths, Philip ; Man, Patrick Yu Wai ; de Coo, Rene F. M. ; Horvath, Rita ; Zeviani, Massimo ; Smeets, Hubert J. T. ; Torroni, Antonio ; Chinnery, Patrick F. 

    2007-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is due primarily to one of three common point mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), but the incomplete penetrance implicates additional genetic or environmental factors in the pathophysiology of the disorder. Both the 11778G→A and 14484T→C LHON mutations are preferentially found on a specific mtDNA genetic background, but 3460G→A is not. However, there is no clear evidence that any background influences clinical penetrance in any of these mutations. By studying 3,613 subjects from 159 LHON-affected pedigrees, we show that the risk of visual failure is greater when the 11778G→A or 14484T→C mutations are present in specific subgroups of haplogroup J (J2 for 11778G→A and J1 for 14484T→C) and when the 3460G→A mutation is present in haplogroup K. By contrast, the risk of visual failure is significantly less when 11778G→A occurs in haplogroup H. Substitutions on MTCYB provide an explanation for these findings, which demonstrate that common genetic variants have a marked effect on the expression of an ostensibly monogenic mtDNA disorder. PMID:17668373

  2. MRI in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy: the relationship to multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Lucy; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz; Rovira, Alex; Ciccarelli, Olga; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Filippi, Massimo; Frederiksen, Jette L; Giorgio, Antonio; Küker, Wilhelm; Lukas, Carsten; Rocca, Maria A; De Stefano, Nicola; Toosy, Ahmed; Yousry, Tarek; Palace, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Background Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and a multiple sclerosis (MS)-like illness appear to coexist 50 times more frequently than would be expected by chance. This association of LHON and MS (LMS) raises an important question about whether there could be a common pathophysiological mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction. Objective The primary aim was to define MRI features of LMS and LHON, and to assess the proportions of individuals displaying features typical of MS. Secondarily, we investigated the effect of gender on the risk of developing white matter lesions in the context of LHON. Methods A blinded standardised review of conventional brain MRIs of 30 patients with MS, 31 patients with LHON and 11 patients with LMS was conducted by three independent experts in the field. MS-like MRI features were assessed. Results All patients with LMS and 26% of patients with LHON had white matter lesions. Of these, all patients with LMS and 25% with LHON were found to have an MRI appearance typical of MS. Female patients with LHON had a significantly greater risk of having white matter lesions consistent with MS compared with male patients (relative risk 8.3). Conclusions A blinded review of conventional brain MRIs shows that patients with LMS have a scan appearance indistinguishable from MS. Mitochondrial dysfunction could be a common pathophysiological pathway in the formation of white matter lesions. There appears to be a strong female influence on the radiological appearance as well as clinical development of MS in patients with LHON. PMID:25053773

  3. A Female Patient with Down Syndrome and Low-Penetrance Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Frousiakis, Starleen E; Pouw, Andrew E; Karanjia, Rustum; Sadun, Alfredo A

    2014-09-01

    We present the case of a 19-year-old female with a history of Down syndrome (DS) who was referred to our neuro-ophthalmology clinic for evaluation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The patient's family history was significant for a known G11778A mutation in a maternal relative, consistent with LHON. The patient was also positive for the G11778A mutation; however, the genotype demonstrated low penetrance in the pedigree, with only 1 out of 10 adult male offspring showing signs or symptoms of the disease. Mitochondrial mutations implicated in LHON have been shown to impair complex I of the electron transport chain and thereby reducing the effective generation of adenosine triphosphate and increasing the production of toxic reactive oxygen species. Although the partial or complete triplicate of chromosome 21 constitutes the etiology of DS, some of the pleiotropic phenotypes of the syndrome have been attributed to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Given the low penetrance of the mutation and the patient's sex, this case illustrates the possibility that the mitochondrial mutation demonstrated increased penetrance due to pre-existing mitochondrial dysfunction related to DS.

  4. White Matter Changes in Two Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Pedigrees: 12-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Jančić, Jasna; Dejanović, Ivana; Radovanović, Saša; Ostojić, Jelena; Kozić, Duško; Đurić-Jovičić, Milica; Samardžić, Janko; Ćetković, Mila; Kostić, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    We are presenting two Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) pedigrees with abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H-MRS) findings but without neurological manifestation associated with LHON. The study included 14 LHON patients and 41 asymptomatic family members from 12 genealogically unrelated families. MRI showed white matter involvement and H-MRS exhibited metabolic anomalies within 12 LHON families. Main outcome measures were abnormal MRI and H-MRS findings in two pedigrees. MRI of the proband of the first pedigree showed a single demyelinating lesion in the right cerebellar hemisphere, while the proband of the second family displayed multiple supratentorial and infratentorial lesions, compatible with the demyelinating process, and both the absolute choline (Cho) concentration and Cho/creatinine ratio were increased. MRI and H-MRS profiles of both affected and unaffected mitochondrial DNA mutation carriers suggest more widespread central nervous involvement in LHON. Although even after 12 years our patients did not develop neurological symptoms, MRI could still be used to detect possible changes during the disease progression.

  5. Mitochondrial ND3 as the novel causative gene for Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dystonia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kang; Takahashi, Yuji; Gao, Zong-Liang; Wang, Guo-Xiang; Chen, Xian-Wen; Goto, Jun; Lou, Jin-Ning; Tsuji, Shoji

    2009-10-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dystonia (LDYT) is a mitochondrial disorder associated with variable combinations of vision loss and progressive generalized dystonia. LDYT is a unique oxidative phosphorylation disorder caused by mutations in mitochondrial ND6 or ND4 gene. In this paper, we describe a Chinese family with 18 LDYT patients. The comprehensive nucleotide sequence analysis of the entire mitochondrial genome using resequencing microarray revealed a mutation (mtND3*10197A (m.10197G>A)) substituting a threonine for a highly conserved alanine at codon 47 of MTND3 on the background of haplogroup D4b. Quantitative analysis of the heteroplasmy of the mutation revealed a homoplasmy in the leukocytes of all the affected individuals on the maternal side. This is the first description of the ND3 mutation causing LDYT. The mtND3*10197A (m.10197G>A) mutation has recently been described in French and Korean patients with Leigh syndrome. These findings suggest that the clinical presentations associated with the mtND3*10197A (m.10197G>A) mutation (ND3) are much wider, encompassing those of LDYT and Leigh syndrome. PMID:19458970

  6. White Matter Changes in Two Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Pedigrees: 12-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Jančić, Jasna; Dejanović, Ivana; Radovanović, Saša; Ostojić, Jelena; Kozić, Duško; Đurić-Jovičić, Milica; Samardžić, Janko; Ćetković, Mila; Kostić, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    We are presenting two Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) pedigrees with abnormal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H-MRS) findings but without neurological manifestation associated with LHON. The study included 14 LHON patients and 41 asymptomatic family members from 12 genealogically unrelated families. MRI showed white matter involvement and H-MRS exhibited metabolic anomalies within 12 LHON families. Main outcome measures were abnormal MRI and H-MRS findings in two pedigrees. MRI of the proband of the first pedigree showed a single demyelinating lesion in the right cerebellar hemisphere, while the proband of the second family displayed multiple supratentorial and infratentorial lesions, compatible with the demyelinating process, and both the absolute choline (Cho) concentration and Cho/creatinine ratio were increased. MRI and H-MRS profiles of both affected and unaffected mitochondrial DNA mutation carriers suggest more widespread central nervous involvement in LHON. Although even after 12 years our patients did not develop neurological symptoms, MRI could still be used to detect possible changes during the disease progression. PMID:26540208

  7. Peripheral neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral neuritis; Neuropathy - peripheral; Neuritis - peripheral; Nerve disease; Polyneuropathy ... Neuropathy is very common. There are many types and causes. Often, no cause can be found. Some ...

  8. Neuron-Specific Enolase Is Elevated in Asymptomatic Carriers of Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Kenneth M.; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N.; Lee, Jeong Goo; Da Rosa, Arlon Bastos; Salomao, Solange R.; Berezovsky, Adriana; Belfort, Rubens; Chicani, Filipe; Moraes-Filho, Milton; Sebag, Jerry; Carelli, Valerio; Sadun, Alfredo A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Neuron-specific enolase (NSE) is a biomarker for neuronal stress. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disease affecting retinal ganglion cells (RGC). These RGCs and their axons in the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and optic nerve head may show subclinical pathology in unaffected mutation carriers, or undergo cell death in affected patients. We hypothesize that increased levels of blood NSE may characterize LHON carriers as a biomarker of ongoing RGC stress. Methods. Serum was obtained from 74 members of a Brazilian pedigree with LHON carrying the homoplasmic 11778/ND4 mitochondrial DNA mutation. Classified by symptoms and psychophysical metrics, 46/74 patients were unaffected mutation “carriers,” 14/74 were “affected,” and 14/74 were “off-pedigree” controls. Serum NSE levels were determined by ELISA specific for the γ subunit of NSE. Results. Serum NSE concentrations in carriers (27.17 ± 39.82 μg/L) were significantly higher than affected (5.66 ± 4.19 μg/L; P = 0.050) and off-pedigree controls (6.20 ± 2.35 μg/L; P = 0.047). Of the 14/46 (30.4 %) carriers with significantly elevated NSE levels (mean = 75.8 ± 42.3 μg/L), 9/14 (64.3%) were male. Furthermore, NSE levels were nearly three times greater in asymptomatic male carriers (40.65 ± 51.21 μg/L) than in asymptomatic female carriers (15.85 ± 22.27 μg/L; P = 0.034). Conclusions. Serum NSE levels are higher in LHON carriers compared with affected and off-pedigree individuals. A subgroup of mostly male carriers had significantly elevated serum NSE levels. Thus, male carriers are at higher risk for LHON-related neuronal stress. PMID:22893673

  9. Long-term outcomes of gene therapy for the treatment of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuo; Ma, Si-Qi; Wan, Xing; He, Heng; Pei, Han; Zhao, Min-Jian; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dao-Wen; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Yuan, Jia-Jia; Li, Bin

    2016-08-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a disease that leads to blindness. Gene therapy has been investigated with some success, and could lead to important advancements in treating LHON. This was a prospective, open-label trial involving 9 LHON patients at Tongji Hospital, Wuhan, China, from August 2011 to December 2015. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of gene therapy for LHON. Nine LHON patients voluntarily received an intravitreal injection of rAAV2-ND4. Systemic examinations and visual function tests were performed during the 36-month follow-up period to determine the safety and efficacy of this gene therapy. Based on successful experiments in an animal model of LHON, 1 subject also received an rAAV2-ND4 injection in the second eye 12months after gene therapy was administered in the first eye. Recovery of visual acuity was defined as the primary outcome of this study. Changes in the visual field, visual evoked potential (VEP), optical coherence tomography findings, liver and kidney function, and antibodies against AAV2 were defined as secondary endpoints. Eight patients (Patients 2-9) received unilateral gene therapy and visual function improvement was observed in both treated eyes (Patients 4, 6, 7, and 8) and untreated eyes (Patients 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8). Visual regression fluctuations, defined as changes in visual acuity greater than or equal to 0.3 logMAR, were observed in Patients 2 and 9. Age at disease onset, disease duration, and the amount of remaining optic nerve fibers did not have a significant effect on the visual function improvement. The visual field and pattern reversal VEP also improved. The patient (Patient 1) who received gene therapy in both eyes had improved visual acuity in the injected eye after the first treatment. Unfortunately, visual acuity in this eye decreased 3months after he received gene therapy in the second eye. Animal experiments suggested that ND4 expression remains stable in the

  10. Potential role of A2A adenosine receptor in traumatic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saif; Fatteh, Nadeem; El-Sherbiny, Nehal M; Naime, Mohammad; Ibrahim, Ahmed S; El-Sherbini, Ahmed M; El-Shafey, Sally A; Khan, Sohail; Fulzele, Sadanand; Gonzales, Joyce; Liou, Gregory I

    2013-11-15

    In traumatic optic neuropathy (TON), apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells is closely related to the local production of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory mediators from activated microglial cells. Adenosine receptor A2A (A2AAR) has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties that have not been studied in TON. In the present study, we examined the role of A2AAR in retinal complications associated with TON. Initial studies in wild-type mice revealed that treatment with the A2AAR agonist resulted in marked decreases in the TON-induced microglial activation, retinal cell death and releases of reactive oxygen species and pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6. To further assess the role of A2AAR in TON, we studied the effects of A2AAR ablation on the TON-induced retinal abnormalities. A2AAR-/- mice with TON showed a significantly higher mRNA level of TNF-α, Iba1-1 in retinal tissue, and ICAM-1 expression in retinal sections compared with wild-type mice with TON. To explore a potential mechanism by which A2AAR-signaling regulates inflammation in TON, we performed additional studies using hypoxia- or LPS-treated microglial cells as an in vitro model for TON. Activation of A2AAR attenuates hypoxia or LPS-induced TNF-α release and significantly repressed the inflammatory signaling, ERK in the activated microglia. Collectively, this work provides pharmacological and genetic evidence for A2AAR signaling as a control point of cell death in TON and suggests that the retinal protective effect of A2AAR is mediated by attenuating the inflammatory response that occurs in microglia via interaction with MAPKinase pathway.

  11. Point mutations associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy in a Latvian population

    PubMed Central

    Baumane, Kristine; Zalite, Solveiga; Ranka, Renate; Zole, Egija; Pole, Ilva; Sepetiene, Svetlana; Laganovska, Guna; Baumanis, Viesturs; Pliss, Liana

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To study mutations associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) in patients suspected of having this mitochondrial disorder in a Latvian population. Additional aims were to determine the heteroplasmy status of all non-synonymous polymorphisms identified in the current study and to identify the mitochondrial haplogroups of the studied participants because these factors may contribute to the manifestation of LHON. Methods Twelve patients, including patients in two families, were enrolled in the current study. LHON was suspected based on the findings of ophthalmologic examinations. In clinically affected individuals, the presence of all previously reported LHON-associated mutations was assessed with sequencing analysis. Additionally, the SURVEYOR endonuclease assay was used to detect heteroplasmy. The mitochondrial haplogroups were identified with restriction analysis and the sequencing of hypervariable segment 1. Results In one family (mother and son), there was one primary LHON-associated mutation, G11778A. In addition, one rare previously reported LHON-associated polymorphism, A13637G, was detected in two unrelated patients. A non-synonymous polymorphism at T6253C was found in one individual. This mutation was reported in the background of the 3460 mutation among LHON patients in a Chinese population. No non-synonymous point mutations in mitochondrial DNA were found in five of the study participants. Conclusions Molecular analysis of 12 patients with suspected LHON confirmed the diagnosis in four patients and allowed the use of appropriate prophylactic measures and treatment. Further investigations and additional studies of different populations are necessary to confirm the role of the non-synonymous polymorphisms A13637G and T6253C in the manifestation of LHON and the associations of these polymorphisms with mitochondrial haplogroups and heteroplasmy. PMID:24319328

  12. Long-term Evaluation of Radiation-Induced Optic Neuropathy After Single-Fraction Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Leavitt, Jacqueline A.; Stafford, Scott L.; Link, Michael J.; Pollock, Bruce E.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the long-term risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) in patients having single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for benign skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of 222 patients having Gamma Knife radiosurgery for benign tumors adjacent to the anterior visual pathway (AVP) between 1991 and 1999. Excluded were patients with prior or concurrent external beam radiation therapy or SRS. One hundred twenty-nine patients (58%) had undergone previous surgery. Tumor types included confirmed World Health Organization grade 1 or presumed cavernous sinus meningioma (n=143), pituitary adenoma (n=72), and craniopharyngioma (n=7). The maximum dose to the AVP was ≤8.0 Gy (n=126), 8.1-10.0 Gy (n=39), 10.1-12.0 Gy (n=47), and >12 Gy (n=10). Results: The mean clinical and imaging follow-up periods were 83 and 123 months, respectively. One patient (0.5%) who received a maximum radiation dose of 12.8 Gy to the AVP developed unilateral blindness 18 months after SRS. The chance of RION according to the maximum radiation dose received by the AVP was 0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0-3.6%), 0 (95% CI 0-10.7%), 0 (95% CI 0-9.0%), and 10% (95% CI 0-43.0%) for patients receiving ≤8 Gy, 8.1-10.0 Gy, 10.1-12.0 Gy, and >12 Gy, respectively. The overall risk of RION in patients receiving >8 Gy to the AVP was 1.0% (95% CI 0-6.2%). Conclusions: The risk of RION after single-fraction SRS in patients with benign skull base tumors who have no prior radiation exposure is very low if the maximum dose to the AVP is ≤12 Gy. Physicians performing single-fraction SRS should remain cautious when treating lesions adjacent to the AVP, especially when the maximum dose exceeds 10 Gy.

  13. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: identification of the same mitochondrial ND1 mutation in six pedigrees.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, N; Bindoff, L A; McCullough, D A; Kubacka, I; Poulton, J; Mackey, D; Taylor, L; Turnbull, D M

    1991-01-01

    Biochemical and molecular genetic evidence is presented that in six independent pedigrees the development of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is due to the same primary mutation in the mitochondrial ND1 gene. A LHON family from the Newcastle area of Great Britain was analyzed in depth to determine the mitochondrial genetic etiology of their disease. Biochemical assays of mitochondrial electron transport in organelles isolated from the platelet/white-blood-cell fraction have established that the members of this family have a substantial and specific lowering of flux through complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase). To determine the site of the primary mitochondrial gene mutation in this pedigree, all seven mitochondrial complex I genes were sequenced, in their entirety, from two family members. The primary mutation was identified as a homoplasmic transition at nucleotide 3460, which results in the substitution of threonine for alanine at position 52 of the ND1 protein. This residue occurs within a very highly conserved hydrophilic loop, is invariantly alanine or glycine in all ND1 proteins, and is adjacent to an invariant aspartic acid residue. This is only the second instance in which both a biochemical abnormality and a mitochondrial gene mutation have been identified in an LHON pedigree. The sequence analysis of the ND81 gene was extended to a further 11, unrelated LHON pedigrees that had been screened previously and found not to carry the mitochondrial ND4/R340H mutation. The ND1/A52T mutation at nucleotide 3460 was found in five of these 11 pedigrees. In contrast, this sequence change was not found in any of the 47 non-LHON controls. The possible role of secondary complex I mutations in the etiology of LHON is also addressed in these studies. PMID:1928099

  14. Pedigree analysis in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy families with a pathogenic mtDNA mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Harding, A E; Sweeney, M G; Govan, G G; Riordan-Eva, P

    1995-01-01

    Eighty-nine index patients from 85 families were defined as having Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) by the presence of one of the mtDNA mutations at positions 11778 (66 families), 3460 (8 families), or 14484 (11 families). There were 62 secondary cases. Overall, 64% of index cases had a history of similarly affected relatives. The ratios of affected males to affected females were 3.7:1 (11778), 4.3:1 (3460), and 7.7:1 (14484). The 95th centile for age at onset of symptoms was close to 50 years in index, secondary, male, and female patients. There were no differences in the distributions of age at onset between different mutation groups, between index and secondary cases, or between males and females, apart from this being slightly later in all female patients than in male 11778 patients. There was no significant correlation between age at onset in index cases and that in their affected siblings or cousins. Heteroplasmy (< 96% mutant mtDNA) was detected in 4% of affected subjects (67%-90% mutant mtDNA) and in 13.6% of 140 unaffected relatives (< 5%-90% mutant mtDNA). Analysis of all pedigrees, excluding sibships < 50 years of age and index cases, indicated recurrence risks of 30%, 8%, 46%, 10%, 31%, and 6%, respectively, to the brothers, sisters, nephews, nieces, and male and female matrilineal first cousins of index cases. Affected females were more likely to have affected children, particularly daughters, than were unaffected female carriers. The pedigree data were entirely compatible with the previously proposed X-linked susceptibility locus, with a gene frequency of .08, penetrance of .11 in heterozygous females, and 40% of affected females being homozygous, the remainder being explained by heterozygosity and disadvantageous X inactivation. PMID:7611298

  15. Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy: associations with homozygosity for the C677T methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutation.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Wang, Ping; Bell, Howard; Rangaraj, Venkat; Goldenberg, Naila

    2004-03-01

    The association between nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and coagulation disorders was prospectively assessed at least 3 months after the occurrence of ocular vascular events in 12 white patients in an outpatient clinical research center. Two community-based ophthalmologists evaluated the 12 NAION patients in the consecutive order of their referral. Polymerase chain reaction-complementary DNA assays of gene mutations associated with coagulation disorders and serologic coagulation measurements in study patients were compared with those in 36 healthy, normal race-, sex-, and age-matched controls, with 3 controls matched for each case. Of the 12 patients, 4 men and 8 women (mean age 62 +/- 15 years, 3 of them 55 years or older), 8 had unilateral NAION (bilateral in 4). The 12 patients with NAION were more likely than controls to demonstrate homozygosity for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutation (50% vs 11 %; Fisher's P =.009, with the likelihood of a type I error quite small, 0.9%). Our sample size had a power of 80% to detect this case-control difference in C677T MTHFR homozygosity at an alpha value of.05. Of the 12 NAION patients, 7 (58%) had at least 1 gene mutation in the C677T MTHFR, G1691A V Leiden, or G20210A prothrombin gene, compared with 5 of 36 controls (14%) (chi(2) = 9.48, P =. 002, with the likelihood of a type I error quite small, 0.2%). Our sample size had a power of 85% to detect this case-control difference at alpha =. 05. Of the 8 women with NAION, 5 (63%) first experienced the condition while taking hormone replacement therapy (n = 4) or during pregnancy (n = 1), with superposition of estrogen-induced thrombophilia on heritable thrombophilia and hypofibrinolysis. Confirmation of a causal relationship between coagulation disorders and NAION should facilitate its prevention and treatment and help protect against thrombi in other vascular beds. PMID:15007309

  16. Diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vinik, Aaron I; Nevoret, Marie-Laure; Casellini, Carolina; Parson, Henri

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is the most common and troublesome complication of diabetes mellitus, leading to the greatest morbidity and mortality and resulting in a huge economic burden for diabetes care. The clinical assessment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and its treatment options are multifactorial. Patients with DN should be screened for autonomic neuropathy, as there is a high degree of coexistence of the two complications. A review of the clinical assessment and treatment algorithms for diabetic neuropathy, painful neuropathy, and autonomic dysfunction is provided.

  17. Characterization of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness changes associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy by optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yixin; Huang, Houbin; Wei, Shihui; Qiu, Huaiyu; Gong, Yan; Li, Hongyang; Dai, Yanli; Jiang, Zhaocai; Liu, Zihao

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, the changes in the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) were examined by Cirrus high definition-optical coherence tomography (OCT), and the correlation between the RNFL thickness and the best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was evaluated. A cross-sectional study was performed. Sixty-eight eyes from patients with LHON and 30 eyes from healthy individuals were scanned. Affected eyes were divided into 5 groups according to disease duration: Group 1, ≤3 months; group 2, 4-6 months; group 3, 7-9 months; group 4, 10-12 months; and group 5, >12 months. The RNFL thickness of the temporal, superior, nasal and inferior quadrants and the 360° average were compared between the LHON groups and the control group. The eyes in groups 1 and 2 were observed to have a thicker RNFL in the superior, nasal and inferior quadrants and a higher 360°-average RNFL thickness compared with those of the control group (P<0.05), the RNFL was observed to be thinner in the temporal quadrant in groups 1 and 2. The eyes in groups 3 and 4 showed a thinner RNFL in the temporal (P=0.001), superior and inferior (both P<0.05) quadrants, and a lower 360°-average RNFL thickness as compared with controls (P=0.001). No significant correlation was identified between BCVA and RNFL thickness. RNFL thickness was observed to undergo a unique process from thickening to thinning in the patients with LHON. Changes in different quadrants occurred at different time periods and the BCVA was not found to be correlated with RNFL thickness.

  18. Interaction of heritable and estrogen-induced thrombophilia: possible etiologies for ischemic optic neuropathy and ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Glueck, C J; Fontaine, R N; Wang, P

    2001-02-01

    Our specific aim was to assess how thrombophilic exogenous estrogens interacted with heritable thrombophilias leading to non-arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and ischemic stroke. Coagulation measures were performed in a 74 year old patient and her immediate family. The proband had a 47 year history of 9 previous thrombotic episodes, and developed unilateral NAION 4 years after starting estrogen replacement therapy (ERT). The proband was heterozygous for two thrombophilic gene mutations (G20210A prothrombin gene, platelet glycoprotein IIIa P1A1/A2 polymorphism), and homozygous for the C677T mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene. Of 238 normal controls, none had these 3 gene mutations together. The proband's mother and brother had deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The proband's brother, sister, nephew, daughter, and two granddaughters were homozygous for the C677T MTHFR mutation. The proband's brother was heterozygous for the G20210A prothrombin gene mutation. The proband's niece was heterozygous for the G20210A prothrombin gene mutation, homozygous for the C677T MTHFR mutation, homozygous for the hypofibrinolytic 4G polymorphism of the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene, and heterozygous for the platelet glycoprotein IIIa P1A1/A2 polymorphism. Of 238 normal controls, none had the niece's combination of 4 gene mutations. When ERT-mediated thrombophilia was superimposed on the proband's heritable thrombophilias, unilateral ischemic optic neuropathy developed, her tenth thrombotic event over a 5 decade period. When estrogen-progestin oral contraceptives were given to the proband's niece, she had an ischemic stroke at age 22. Exogenous estrogen-mediated thrombophilia superimposed on heritable thrombophilia and hypofibrinolysis is associated with arterial and venous thrombi, and appears to be a preventable, and potentially reversible etiology for ischemic optic neuropathy and ischemic stroke. PMID:11246543

  19. Analysis of Retinal Layer Thicknesses and Their Clinical Correlation in Patients with Traumatic Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Yeun; Cho, Kyuyeon; Park, Kyung-Ah; Oh, Sei Yeul

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were 1) To evaluate retinal nerve fiber layer (fRNFL) thickness and ganglion cell layer plus inner plexiform layer (GCIPL) thickness at the fovea in eyes affected with traumatic optic neuropathy (TON) compared with contralateral normal eyes, 2) to further evaluate these thicknesses within 3 weeks following trauma (defined as “early TON”), and 3) to investigate the relationship between these retinal layer thicknesses and visual function in TON eyes. Twenty-nine patients with unilateral TON were included. Horizontal and vertical spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) scans of the fovea were taken in patients with unilateral TON. The main outcome measure was thickness of the entire retina, fRNFL, and GCIPL in eight areas. Thickness of each retinal layer was compared between affected and unaffected eyes. The correlation between the thickness of each retinal layer and visual function parameters, including best corrected visual acuity, color vision, P100 latency, and P100 amplitude in visual evoked potential (VEP), mean deviation (MD) and visual field index (VFI) in Humphrey visual field analysis in TON eyes was analyzed. Thicknesses of the entire retina, fRNFL, and GCIPL in SD-OCT were significantly thinner (3–36%) in all measurement areas of TON eyes compared to those in healthy eyes (all p<0.05). Whereas, only GCIPL in the outer nasal, superior, and inferior areas was significantly thinner (5–10%) in the early TON eyes than that in the control eyes (all p<0.01). A significant correlation was detected between retinal layer thicknesses and visual function parameters including color vision, P100 latency and P100 amplitude in VEP, MD, and VFI (particularly P100 latency, MD, and VFI) (r = -0.70 to 0.84). Among the retinal layers analyzed in this study, GCIPL (particularly in the superior and inferior areas) was most correlated with these five visual function parameters (r = -0.70 to 0.71). Therefore, evaluation of morphological

  20. Optic Neuropathy in McCune-Albright Syndrome: Effects of Early Diagnosis and Treatment of Growth Hormone Excess

    PubMed Central

    Glover, McKinley; Kelly, Marilyn H.; Brillante, Beth A.; Butman, John A.; Fitzgibbon, Edmond J.; Brewer, Carmen C.; Zalewski, Christopher K.; Cutler Peck, Carolee M.; Kim, H. Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Context: GH excess is a serious complication of McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) and has been associated with craniofacial morbidity. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine whether early diagnosis and treatment of MAS-associated GH excess prevents optic neuropathy and hearing impairment, the major morbidities associated with GH excess. Design and Setting: A retrospective cross-sectional analysis was conducted at a clinical research center. Patients: Twenty-two subjects with MAS-associated GH excess and 21 control MAS subjects without GH excess were included in the study. Intervention: Biochemical testing included random GH, nadir GH after glucose load, nadir GH on frequent sampling, and IGF-I Z-score. Subjects underwent imaging, ophthalmological, audiological, and otolaryngological assessment. Treatment included octreotide, pegvisomant, transphenoidal surgery, and/or radiotherapy as indicated. Main Outcome Measure: Association of optic neuropathy and hearing impairment to age at GH excess diagnosis/treatment was measured. Results: Of 129 MAS subjects, 26 (20%) were diagnosed with GH excess based on elevation of two measures of GH function. Of these, 22 subjects were candidates for pharmacological intervention. Optic neuropathy was significantly correlated with intervention status, with no cases in the early intervention group (diagnosed/treated before age 18) or the control group, and four of seven (57%) in the late intervention group (diagnosed/treated after age 18) (Fisher's exact test; odds ratio, 0.027; P = 0.0058). Early diagnosis/intervention was not associated with reduction in hearing deficits (odds ratio, 1.25; P = 1.00). Mean head circumference sd score was significantly higher in the late (6.08; range, 2.70 to 22.56) than the early intervention (2.67; range, −0.65 to 6.72) or control groups (2.13; range, −2.06 to 7.79) (P = 0.003). Conclusions: Early diagnosis/treatment of GH excess in MAS is important to prevent optic neuropathy and

  1. Risk of Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy Following End-Stage Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yuh-Shin; Weng, Shih-Feng; Chang, Chun; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Su, Shih-Bin; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Jan, Ren-Long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the risk of nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) following end-stage renal disease (ESRD). A retrospective, nationwide, matched cohort study. ESRD patients identified by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code 585. The study cohort included 93,804 ESRD patients registered with the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database between January 2000 and December 2009. An age- and sex-matched control group comprised 93,804 patients (case:control = 1:1) selected from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. Information for each patient was collected from the index date until December 2011. The incidence and risk of NAION were compared between the ESRD and control groups. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for NAION after adjustment for potential confounders was obtained by a Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. A Kaplan–Meier analysis was used to calculate the cumulative incidence rate of NAION. The incidence of NAION following ESRD. In total, 133 ESRD patients (0.14%) and 51 controls (0.05%) had NAION (P < 0.001) during the follow-up period, leading to a significantly elevated risk of NAION in the ESRD patients compared with the controls (incidence rate ratio = 3.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.11–4.67). After adjustment for potential confounders including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypotension, hyperlipidemia, and 2-way interaction terms between any 2 factors, ESRD patients were 3.12 times more likely to develop NAION than non-ESRD patients in the full cohort (adjusted HR = 3.12, 95% CI = 2.10–4.64). Additionally, patients with hypertension and hyperlipidemia showed higher incidence rates of NAION in the ESRD group compared with the controls: 2.31 (95% CI = 1.40–3.82) for hypertension and 2.72 (95% CI = 1.14–6.50) for hyperlipidemia. ESRD increased the risk of NAION, which is an

  2. Neuroprotective effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Avraham-Lubin, Bat-Chen R; Dratviman-Storobinsky, Olga; El, Shimrit Dadon-Bar; Hasanreisoglu, Murat; Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza

    2011-01-01

    The study investigated the therapeutic effect of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) on anterior ischemic optic neuropathy in a rodent model (rAION). rAION was laser-induced in one eye of 63 mice. The fellow (uninjured) eye served as an internal control. Thirty-three mice underwent two 90-min sessions of 100% oxygen (2 atm) treatment immediately following injury and one session daily thereafter for up to 14 days. The remaining mice were untreated. Retinas were harvested at different time points, and mRNA levels of various genes were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and histologic study. Untreated mice: day 1 post-rAION - SOD-1 (oxidative-stress-related) decreased to 82% of control (uninjured eye) levels (P < 0.05), Caspase-3 (proapoptotic) decreased to 89%, Bcl-xL mildly increased (117%; all NS); day 3 - HO-1 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS; ischaemia-related) decreased to 74%, and Bcl-2-associated X protein, Caspase-3, and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2; apoptotic) increased by 170, 120, and 111%, respectively (all NS); day21 - HO-1 increased to 222% (NS) and eNOS decreased to 48% (P < 0.05). Treated mice: day 1 - SOD-1 and Caspase-3 remained unchanged, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL mildly increased (112 and 126% respectively); day 3 - HO-1 and eNOS increased, apoptosis-related gene decreased; day 21 - SOD-1 decreased whereas eNOS increased (P < 0.05), and HO-1 increased to a lesser degree than without treatment. None of the oxygen-treated animals had retinal ganglion cell loss or a decrease in Thy-1 expression. In conclusion, HBO treatment after rAION induction influences the expression of apoptosis-related genes as well as oxidative-stress-induced and ischaemia-related genes and may exert a neuroprotective effect. PMID:21577253

  3. A retrospective analysis of characteristics of visual field damage in patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ran, Ruijin; Yang, Shuo; He, Heng; Ma, Shiqi; Chen, Zhiqi; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the characteristics and the evolution of visual field damage caused by Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and to provide clinical data for the diagnosis of LHON. Parameters of visual field in 32 consecutive patients (49 eyes) with LHON who were confirmed by genetic diagnostic tests were retrospectively measured within 1 week, between three to six months, and at six months after onset. Visual field defects revealed central scotoma in 26 eyes (53.1 %), paracentral scotoma in 12 eyes (24.5 %), ceco-central defects in 6 eyes (12.2 %), blind spot enlargenment in 3 eyes (6.1 %), quadrantanopia in 2 eyes (4.1 %) within 1 week after onset. After 3 to 6 months, ceco-central defects were detected in 22 eyes (44.9 %), central isopter constriction in 10 eyes (20.4 %), hemianopia or quadrantanopia in 5 eyes (10.2 %), central scotoma in 4 eyes (8.2 %), and paracentral scotoma in 1 eye (2.0 %). After 6 months, central isopter constriction was observed in 18 eyes (36.7 %), diffuse defects in 21 eyes (42.9 %), ceco-central defects in 3 eyes (6.1 %), hemianopia or quadrantanopia in 5 eyes (10.2 %), and central scotoma in 2 eyes (4.1 %). LHON at different stages was characterized by different focal visual field defects: visual field defects in LHON patients within 1 week after onset were mostly central or paracentral scotoma, which was enlarged around the ceco-central defect, or connected to form a blind spot after 3-6 months. Diffuse and central isopter constriction defects were usually developed after 6 months. Damages firstly appeared in papillomacular bundle and gradually expanded outward. These characteristics of visual field defects reported in this study might provide a clinical basis for better diagnosis of LHON.

  4. Risk of Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy Following End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuh-Shin; Weng, Shih-Feng; Chang, Chun; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Su, Shih-Bin; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Jan, Ren-Long

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the risk of nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) following end-stage renal disease (ESRD).A retrospective, nationwide, matched cohort study.ESRD patients identified by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code 585.The study cohort included 93,804 ESRD patients registered with the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database between January 2000 and December 2009. An age- and sex-matched control group comprised 93,804 patients (case:control = 1:1) selected from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. Information for each patient was collected from the index date until December 2011. The incidence and risk of NAION were compared between the ESRD and control groups. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for NAION after adjustment for potential confounders was obtained by a Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. A Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate the cumulative incidence rate of NAION.The incidence of NAION following ESRD.In total, 133 ESRD patients (0.14%) and 51 controls (0.05%) had NAION (P < 0.001) during the follow-up period, leading to a significantly elevated risk of NAION in the ESRD patients compared with the controls (incidence rate ratio = 3.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.11-4.67). After adjustment for potential confounders including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypotension, hyperlipidemia, and 2-way interaction terms between any 2 factors, ESRD patients were 3.12 times more likely to develop NAION than non-ESRD patients in the full cohort (adjusted HR = 3.12, 95% CI = 2.10-4.64). Additionally, patients with hypertension and hyperlipidemia showed higher incidence rates of NAION in the ESRD group compared with the controls: 2.31 (95% CI = 1.40-3.82) for hypertension and 2.72 (95% CI = 1.14-6.50) for hyperlipidemia.ESRD increased the risk of NAION, which is an interdisciplinary emergency. Close

  5. Toxic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Misra, Usha Kant; Kalita, Jayantee

    2009-01-01

    Toxic neuropathies generally result in length dependent axonal neuropathy with the exception of diphtheria and a few toxic neuropathies. In spite of occurrence of diphtheria in India there is paucity of published reports on diphtheritic neuropathy. Arsenic neuropathy commonly occurs in Bengal and Bangladesh because of ground water contamination whereas in Punjab it is due to contamination of opium. Lead neuropathy is rare and has been reported in battery workers and silver refining workers. It produces motor neuropathy resulting in foot drop and wrist drop. Organophosphates are used as pesticides, industrial chemicals and food adulterant. Certain organophosphates such as triorthocresyl phosphate used for or oil adulteration inhibit neurotoxic esterase and result in a delayed type of axonal neuropathy. Alcohol related neuropathy is a controversial issue whether it is due to alcohol related toxicity or due to nutritional deficiencies. Indian studies have revealed that neuropathy occurs both in alcoholic and nonalcoholic cirrhosis. Hexane neuropathy is reported in screen printers and these cases highlight the need for better preventive and occupational measures. Iatrogenic toxic neuropathies have been reported with cisplatin and vincristine. Because of geographical, occupational and health related conditions toxic neuropathies are likely to be more common than reported and greater awareness is needed.

  6. Axonal degeneration, regeneration and ganglion cell death in a rodent model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Guo, Yan; Slater, Bernard J; Miller, Neil R; Bernstein, Steven L

    2010-08-01

    Using laser-induced photoactivation of intravenously administered rose Bengal in rats, we generated an ischemic infarction of the intrascleral portion of the optic nerve (ON) comparable to that which occurs in humans to investigate optic nerve axon degenerative events following optic nerve infarct and the potential for axon re-growth. Animals were euthanized at different times post infarct. Axon degeneration was evaluated with SMI312 immunolabeling, and GAP-43 immunostaining was used to identify axon regeneration. Terminal dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was used to evaluate retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death. There was significant axon structural disruptinot ion at the anterior intrascleral portion of the ON by 3d post-infarct, extending to the posterior ON by 7d post-stroke. Destruction of normal axon structure and massive loss of axon fibers occurred by 2 weeks. GAP-43 immunoreactivity occurred in the anterior ON by 7d post-infarct, lasting 3-4 weeks, without extension past the primary ischemic lesion. TUNEL-positive cells in the RGC layer appeared by 7d post-insult. These results indicate that following induction of ischemic optic neuropathy, significant axon damage occurs by 3d post-infarct, with later neuronal death. Post-stroke adult rat retinal ganglion cells attempt to regenerate their axons, but this effort is restricted to the unmyelinated region of the anterior ON. These responses are important in understanding pathologic process that underlies human non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and may guide both the appropriate treatment of NAION and the window of opportunity for such treatment. PMID:20621651

  7. Neuropathy Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Neuropathy Share this page: Was this page helpful? Overview | ... of testing are: To diagnose the presence of neuropathy and distinguish it from other conditions that may ...

  8. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be associated with peripheral neuropathy. Metabolic and endocrine disorders impair the body’s ability to transform nutrients into ... to neuropathies as a result of chemical imbalances. Endocrine disorders that lead to hormonal imbalances can disturb normal ...

  9. Alcoholic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - alcoholic; Alcoholic polyneuropathy ... The exact cause of alcoholic neuropathy is unknown. It likely includes both a direct poisoning of the nerve by the alcohol and the effect of poor nutrition ...

  10. Features of mtDNA mutation patterns in European pedigrees and sporadic cases with leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Obermaier-Kusser, B.; Schubring, S.; Paprotta, A.; Meitinger, T.; Jaksch, M.; Gerbitz, K.D.; Lorenz, B.; Zerres, K.; Meire, F.; Cochaux, P.

    1994-11-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is maternally transmitted and is characterized by bilateral loss of central vision in young adults as a result of optic nerve degeneration. Fifteen transition mutations located in different genes for the mitochondrially encoded subunits of respiratory chain complexes have been associated thus far with the disease. Genetic studies have led to the classification of the pathogenic significance of these different mutations. However, more research is required to determine the causality of the mutations and the penetrance of the disease. The present study compares studies of populations of different ethnic origins, namely European LHON pedigrees and sporadic cases, in order to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms involved. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Impending anterior ischemic optic neuropathy with elements of retinal vein occlusion in a patient on interferon for polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Rue, Kelly S; Hirsch, Louis K; Sadun, Alfredo A

    2012-01-01

    We describe the course and likely pathophysiology of impending anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) and retinal vein occlusion in a 56-year-old man with polycythemia vera managed with interferon alpha for 2 years. Our patient presented with decreased vision, scintillating scotomata, and floaters. Fundus examination findings and results of a fluorescein angiogram led to the diagnosis of impending AION and retinal vein occlusion. Considering that both polycythemia vera and interferon have possible influences on vascular occlusion and optic disc edema, we stopped interferon treatment and immediately attempted to treat the polycythemia vera empirically with pentoxifylline and any interferon-associated inflammation with prednisone. Our patient experienced complete resolution of fundus abnormalities and return of normal vision within 3 weeks, which may be attributed to our successful treatment of both etiologies. Thus, further study is warranted to elucidate the treatment of both polycythemia vera and interferon-induced impending AION.

  12. Gene therapy for mitochondrial diseases: Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy as the first candidate for a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Cwerman-Thibault, Hélène; Augustin, Sébastien; Ellouze, Sami; Sahel, José-Alain; Corral-Debrinski, Marisol

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondrial disorders cannot be ignored anymore in most medical disciplines; indeed their minimum estimated prevalence is superior to 1 in 5000 births. Despite the progress made in the last 25 years on the identification of gene mutations causing mitochondrial pathologies, only slow progress was made towards their effective treatments. Ocular involvement is a frequent feature in mitochondrial diseases and corresponds to severe and irreversible visual handicap due to retinal neuron loss and optic atrophy. Interestingly, three clinical trials for Leber Congenital Amaurosis due to RPE65 mutations are ongoing since 2007. Overall, the feasibility and safety of ocular Adeno-Associated Virus delivery in adult and younger patients and consistent visual function improvements have been demonstrated. The success of gene-replacement therapy for RPE65 opens the way for the development of similar approaches for a broad range of eye disorders, including those with mitochondrial etiology such as Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON).

  13. Very high penetrance and occurrence of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in a large Han Chinese pedigree carrying the ND4 G11778A mutation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangtian; Zhang, Hongxing; Zhao, Fuxin; Ji, Yanchun; Tong, Yi; Zhang, Juanjuan; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Li; Qian, Yaping; Lu, Fan; Qu, Jia; Guan, Min-Xin

    2010-08-01

    We report here the clinical, genetics and molecular characterization of a five-generation Han Chinese family with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Strikingly, this family exhibits very high penetrance and occurrence of optic neuropathy. In particular, 25 (10 males/15 females) of 30 matrilineal relatives exhibited the variable severity, ranging from profound to mild of visual impairment. This penetrance of optic neuropathy in this Chinese family is much higher than those in many families with LHON worldwide. The age-at-onset for visual impairment in matrilineal relatives in this Chinese family varied from 7 to 24years old, with the average of 15 years old. Furthermore, the ratio between affected male and female matrilineal relatives is 1:1.5 in the Chinese family. This observation is in contrast with the typical features in LHON pedigrees that there was predominance of affected males in LHON in many families from different ethnic origins. Molecular analysis of mitochondrial genome identified the known ND4 G11778A mutation and 51 variants, belonging to Asian haplogroup C4a1. The absence of other known secondary LHON-associated and functionally significant mtDNA mutations in this Chinese family suggested that mitochondrial variants may not play an important role in the phenotypic manifestation of the G11778A mutation in this Chinese family. Therefore, nuclear modifier gene(s) may be responsible for very high penetrance and occurrence of optic neuropathy in this Chinese pedigree.

  14. Evidence for Detrimental Cross Interactions between Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Cells

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Here we have collected evidence suggesting that chronic changes in the NO homeostasis and the rise of reactive oxygen species bioavailability can contribute to cell dysfunction in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) patients. We report that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), derived from a female LHON patient with bilateral reduced vision and carrying the pathogenic mutation 11778/ND4, display increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), as revealed by flow cytometry, fluorometric measurements of nitrite/nitrate, and 3-nitrotyrosine immunodetection. Moreover, viability assays with the tetrazolium dye MTT showed that lymphoblasts from the same patient are more sensitive to prolonged NO exposure, leading to cell death. Taken together these findings suggest that oxidative and nitrosative stress cooperatively play an important role in driving LHON pathology when excess NO remains available over time in the cell environment. PMID:26881022

  15. Previously Unclassified Mutation of mtDNA m.3472T>C: Evidence of Pathogenicity in Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sheremet, N L; Nevinitsyna, T A; Zhorzholadze, N V; Ronzina, I A; Itkis, Y S; Krylova, T D; Tsygankova, P G; Malakhova, V A; Zakharova, E Y; Tokarchuk, A V; Panteleeva, A A; Karger, E M; Lyamzaev, K G; Avetisov, S E

    2016-07-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) refers to a group of mitochondrial diseases and is characterized by defects of the mitochondrial electron transport chain and decreased level of oxidative phosphorylation. The list of LHON primary mtDNA mutations is regularly updated. In this study, we describe the homoplasmic nucleotide substitution m.3472T>C in the MT-ND1 (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase chain 1) gene and specific changes in cell metabolism in a patient with LHON and his asymptomatic sister. To confirm the presence of mutation-related mitochondrial dysfunction, respiration of skin fibroblasts and platelets from the patient and his sister was studied, as well as the mitochondrial potential and production of reactive oxygen species in the skin fibroblasts. In addition, based on characteristics of the toxic effect of paraquat, a new approach was developed for detecting the functional activity of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain.

  16. Evidence for Detrimental Cross Interactions between Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Cells.

    PubMed

    Falabella, Micol; Forte, Elena; Magnifico, Maria Chiara; Santini, Paolo; Arese, Marzia; Giuffrè, Alessandro; Radić, Kristina; Chessa, Luciana; Coarelli, Giulia; Buscarinu, Maria Chiara; Mechelli, Rosella; Salvetti, Marco; Sarti, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Here we have collected evidence suggesting that chronic changes in the NO homeostasis and the rise of reactive oxygen species bioavailability can contribute to cell dysfunction in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) patients. We report that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), derived from a female LHON patient with bilateral reduced vision and carrying the pathogenic mutation 11778/ND4, display increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), as revealed by flow cytometry, fluorometric measurements of nitrite/nitrate, and 3-nitrotyrosine immunodetection. Moreover, viability assays with the tetrazolium dye MTT showed that lymphoblasts from the same patient are more sensitive to prolonged NO exposure, leading to cell death. Taken together these findings suggest that oxidative and nitrosative stress cooperatively play an important role in driving LHON pathology when excess NO remains available over time in the cell environment.

  17. [A case or Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON): differential diagnosis with post inflammatory atrophy of nerve II using the mtDNA analysis].

    PubMed

    Lubos, Leszek; Wajgt, Andrzej; Maciejowski, Maciej; Mroczek-Tońska, Katarzyna; Bartnik, Ewa; Dziekanowska, Danuta

    2003-01-01

    The Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a disease due to a mtDNA mutation. The disorder results from enzymatic perturbations in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Clinically the LHON may present as a progressive axonal atrophy of the optic nerves with or without other neurological symptoms. The process of reaching the diagnosis of the LHON by means of the molecular analysis of mtDNA is discussed.

  18. Predictive Factors for Vision Recovery after Optic Nerve Decompression for Chronic Compressive Neuropathy: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Andrew P.; Stippler, Martina; Myers, Orrin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Surgical optic nerve decompression for chronic compressive neuropathy results in variable success of vision improvement. We sought to determine the effects of various factors using meta-analysis of available literature. Design Systematic review of MEDLINE databases for the period 1990 to 2010. Setting Academic research center. Participants Studies reporting patients with vision loss from chronic compressive neuropathy undergoing surgery. Main outcome measures Vision outcome reported by each study. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for predictor variables were calculated. Overall odds ratios were then calculated for each factor, adjusting for inter study heterogeneity. Results Seventy-six studies were identified. Factors with a significant odds of improvement were: less severe vision loss (OR 2.31[95% CI = 1.76 to 3.04]), no disc atrophy (OR 2.60 [95% CI = 1.17 to 5.81]), smaller size (OR 1.82 [95% CI = 1.22 to 2.73]), primary tumor resection (not recurrent) (OR 3.08 [95% CI = 1.84 to 5.14]), no cavernous sinus extension (OR 1.88 [95% CI = 1.03 to 3.43]), soft consistency (OR 4.91 [95% CI = 2.27 to 10.63]), presence of arachnoid plane (OR 5.60 [95% CI = 2.08 to 15.07]), and more extensive resection (OR 0.61 [95% CI = 0.4 to 0.93]). Conclusions Ophthalmologic factors and factors directly related to the lesion are most important in determining vision outcome. The decision to perform optic nerve decompression for vision loss should be made based on careful examination of the patient and realistic discussion regarding the probability of improvement. PMID:24436885

  19. Measurement of Systemic Mitochondrial Function in Advanced Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma and Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Van Bergen, Nicole J; Crowston, Jonathan G; Craig, Jamie E; Burdon, Kathryn P; Kearns, Lisa S; Sharma, Shiwani; Hewitt, Alex W; Mackey, David A; Trounce, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) is a common neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective and gradual loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Aging and increased intraocular pressure (IOP) are glaucoma risk factors; nevertheless patients deteriorate at all levels of IOP, implying other causative factors. Recent evidence presents mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex-I impairments in POAG. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) patients suffer specific and rapid loss of RGCs, predominantly in young adult males, due to complex-I mutations in the mitochondrial genome. This study directly compares the degree of OXPHOS impairment in POAG and LHON patients, testing the hypothesis that the milder clinical disease in POAG is due to a milder complex-I impairment. To assess overall mitochondrial capacity, cells can be forced to produce ATP primarily from mitochondrial OXPHOS by switching the media carbon source to galactose. Under these conditions POAG lymphoblasts grew 1.47 times slower than controls, whilst LHON lymphoblasts demonstrated a greater degree of growth impairment (2.35 times slower). Complex-I enzyme specific activity was reduced by 18% in POAG lymphoblasts and by 29% in LHON lymphoblasts. We also assessed complex-I ATP synthesis, which was 19% decreased in POAG patients and 17% decreased in LHON patients. This study demonstrates both POAG and LHON lymphoblasts have impaired complex-I, and in the majority of aspects the functional defects in POAG were milder than LHON, which could reflect the milder disease development of POAG. This new evidence places POAG in the spectrum of mitochondrial optic neuropathies and raises the possibility for new therapeutic targets aimed at improving mitochondrial function.

  20. Measurement of Systemic Mitochondrial Function in Advanced Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma and Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Van Bergen, Nicole J; Crowston, Jonathan G.; Craig, Jamie E.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Kearns, Lisa S.; Sharma, Shiwani; Hewitt, Alex W.; Mackey, David A.; Trounce, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) is a common neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective and gradual loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Aging and increased intraocular pressure (IOP) are glaucoma risk factors; nevertheless patients deteriorate at all levels of IOP, implying other causative factors. Recent evidence presents mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex-I impairments in POAG. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) patients suffer specific and rapid loss of RGCs, predominantly in young adult males, due to complex-I mutations in the mitochondrial genome. This study directly compares the degree of OXPHOS impairment in POAG and LHON patients, testing the hypothesis that the milder clinical disease in POAG is due to a milder complex-I impairment. To assess overall mitochondrial capacity, cells can be forced to produce ATP primarily from mitochondrial OXPHOS by switching the media carbon source to galactose. Under these conditions POAG lymphoblasts grew 1.47 times slower than controls, whilst LHON lymphoblasts demonstrated a greater degree of growth impairment (2.35 times slower). Complex-I enzyme specific activity was reduced by 18% in POAG lymphoblasts and by 29% in LHON lymphoblasts. We also assessed complex-I ATP synthesis, which was 19% decreased in POAG patients and 17% decreased in LHON patients. This study demonstrates both POAG and LHON lymphoblasts have impaired complex-I, and in the majority of aspects the functional defects in POAG were milder than LHON, which could reflect the milder disease development of POAG. This new evidence places POAG in the spectrum of mitochondrial optic neuropathies and raises the possibility for new therapeutic targets aimed at improving mitochondrial function. PMID:26496696

  1. [The mitochondrial ND5 T12338C mutation may be associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in two Chinese families].

    PubMed

    Ji, Yan-Chun; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Zhao, Fu-Xin; Zhang, Juan-Juan; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Xiang-Tian; Qu, Jia; Guan, Min-Xin

    2011-04-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) associated with mitochondrial DNA mutation is a maternally inherited eye disease. We reported here the clinical, genetic and molecular characterization of two Han Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. Ophthalmologic examinations revealed that the variable severity and age-of-onset in visual impairment among probands and other matrilineal relatives of these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of visual impairment in these families. Sequence analysis of complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees identified the homoplasmic ND4 G11696A and ND5 T12338C mutation and distinct sets of polymorphism belonging to haplogroups F2. It is well known that mitochondrial DNA ND4 G11696A is associated with LHON. The ND5 T12338C mutation resulted in replacement of the first amino acid, translation-initiating methionine with a threonine, and shortening two amino acids of ND5. This mutation also locates in two nucleotides adjacent to the 3' end of the tRNALeu(Cun). Thus, this mutation may alter structural formation and stabilization of functional tRNA, thereby leading to a failure in protein synthesis and mitochondrial dysfunction involved in visual impairment. Therefore, the ND4 G11696A and ND5 T12338C mutation is likely associated with LHON in these two Chinese families. But these families exhibited extremely low penetrances of visual impairment. It suggests that other factors, such as nuclear modifier gene(s) or environmental factor(s), may play a role in the phenotypic expression of the LHON-associated ND4 G11696A and ND5 T12338C mutation.

  2. A variant of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy characterized by recovery of vision and by an unusual mitochondrial genetic etiology

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, D. ); Howell, N. )

    1992-12-01

    The Tas2 and Vic2 Australian families are affected with a variant of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The risk of developing the optic neuropathy shows strict maternal inheritance, and the opthalmological changes in affected family members are characteristic of LHON. However, in contrast to the common form of the disease, members of these two families show a high frequency of vision recovery. To ascertain the mitochondrial genetic etiology of the LHON in these families, both (a) the nucleotide sequences of the seven mitochondrial genes encoding subunits of respiratory-chain complex I and (b) the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene were determined for representatives of both families. Neither family carries any of the previously identified primary mitochondrial LHON mutations: ND4/11778, ND1/3460, or ND1/4160. Instead, both LHON families carry multiple nucleotide changes in the mitochondrial complex I genes, which produce conservative amino acid changes. From the available sequence data, it is inferred that the Vic2 and Tas2 LHON families are phylogenetically related to each other and to a cluster of LHON families in which mutations in the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene have been hypothesized to play a primary etiological role. However, sequencing analysis establishes that the Vic2 and Tas2 LHON families do not carry these cytochrome b mutations. There are two hypotheses to account for the unusual mitochondrial genetic etiology of the LHON in the Tas2 and Vic2 LHON families. One possibility is that there is a primary LHON mutation within the mitochondrial genome but that it is at a site that was not included in the sequencing analyses. Alternatively, the disease in these families may result from the cumulative effects of multiple secondary LHON mutations that have less severe phenotypic consequences. 29 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. [New insights into the pathogenesis of glaucomatous optic neuropathy and refinement of the objective assessment of its functional damage].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Makoto

    2012-03-01

    Glaucomatous optic neuropathy is a primary pathological condition responsible for visual dysfunction due to glaucoma. However, how intraocular pressure and other risk factors lead to glaucomatous optic neuropathy is not fully understood. Given that static or kinetic visual field tests for evaluating visual dysfunction in glaucomatous optic neuropathy are a subjective assessments based on a psychophysical principle, the development of a tool for objective assessment of the visual field is needed. In this study, we attempt to elucidate the pathophysiology of glaucomatous optic neuropathy and to refine a modality for the objective assessment of the visual dysfunction due to it. Aquaporin (AQP) water channels are located primarily in the plasma membrane. These proteins form either a homo- or hetero-tetramer and allow water to cross the plasma membrane bi-directionally. The transmembrane water movement through AQPs is critically involved in the maintenance of normal neuronal activity. Among the 13 isoforms indentified so far, AQP-4 is known to be expressed in the retrobulbar portion of the optic nerve. However, the optic nerve head, the primary pathological site of glaucomatous optic neuropathy, reportedly does not express AQP-4. We found that in control rats, astrocytes throughout the optic nerve express AQP-9. The chronic elevation of intraocular pressure due to cauterization of three episcleral veins substantially reduced both gene expression and immunoreactivity of AQP-9, whereas it did not change the AQP-4 gene or protein expression in the retrobulbar portion of the optic nerve. These findings are implicated in the chronic elevation of intraocular pressure in astrocytes. Similar findings were also observed in the eyes of a monkey with angle-laser-induced ocular hypertension and of a human with primary open-angle glaucoma. AQP-9 was also expressed in the cell bodies of retinal ganglion cells in control rats and its expression was significantly reduced in the eyes of

  4. [Optic nerve swelling and gadolinium contrast enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging in the subacute stage of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy: a case report].

    PubMed

    Furuki, Misako; Ohkubo, Takuya; Ota, Kiyobumi; Ishikawa, Kinya; Yokota, Takanori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2012-01-01

    We report the case of a 50-year-old man with subacute onset of bilateral visual field loss and visual acuity loss. His visual acuity was 0.07 OD/0.09 OS and Goldmann perimetry showed central scotomas. The optic fundi were normal bilaterally. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed hyperintensity in the right optic nerve on T(2) weighted imaging and swelling of the optic chiasm with slight enhancement of the bilateral optic nerves and the optic chiasm on gadolinium-enhanced imaging. Since sensory disturbance in the left hand and leg was noted in addition to the visual problem, multiple sclerosis (MS) was suspected initially. The patient was treated with intravenous methylprednisolone (1,000 mg/day), plasma exchange therapy, and immunosuppressant therapy. However, his visual disturbance did not improve. He had a history of deafness and family history of visual disturbance, because of which we performed an analysis of mitochondrial DNA. G11778A point mutation was found, and a diagnosis of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) was made. Although gadolinium contrast enhancement and swelling of the optic nerve are rare, this case shows that these findings are not in conflict with LHON. The present case also suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction may trigger the onset of MS-like extraocular symptoms in patients with LHON.

  5. Patterns of white matter diffusivity abnormalities in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy: a tract-based spatial statistics study.

    PubMed

    Milesi, Jacopo; Rocca, Maria A; Bianchi-Marzoli, Stefania; Petrolini, Melissa; Pagani, Elisabetta; Falini, Andrea; Comi, Giancarlo; Filippi, Massimo

    2012-09-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disease characterized by retinal ganglion cell degeneration and optic nerve atrophy, leading to a loss of central vision. The aim of this study was to explore the topographical pattern of damage to the brain white matter (WM) tracts from patients with chronic LHON using diffusion tensor (DT) MRI and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). Brain dual-echo and DT MRI scans were acquired from 13 patients with chronic LHON and 25 matched controls using a 3.0 T scanner. TBSS analysis was performed using the FMRIB's Diffusion Toolbox. A complete neuro-ophthalmologic examination, including standardized automated Humphrey perimetry as well as average and temporal peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (PRNFL) measurements, was obtained in all patients. Mean average and temporal PRNFL thicknesses were decreased significantly in LHON patients. Compared to controls, TBSS analysis revealed significant diffusivity abnormalities in these patients, which were characterized by a decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) and an increased mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity, affecting exclusively the optic tracts and optic radiations (OR). In patients, a significant correlation was found between optic tract average FA and mean visual acuity (r = 0.57, p = 0.04). In LHON patients, DT MRI reveals a microstructural alteration of the WM along the entire visual pathways, with a sparing of the other main WM tracts of the brain. Damage to the OR may be secondary either to trans-synaptic degeneration, which in turn is due to neuroaxonal loss in the retina and optic nerve, or to local mitochondrial dysfunction.

  6. Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Swelling Predicts Peripapillary Atrophy in a Primate Model of Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Mary A.; Miller, Neil R.; Nolan, Theresa; Bernstein, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the relationship between peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (PRNFL) swelling and eventual PRNFL atrophy, and between PRNFL swelling/atrophy and neural function, in a nonhuman primate model of nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (pNAION). Methods pNAION was induced in five normal, adult male rhesus monkeys by laser activation of intravenously injected rose bengal at the optic nerve head. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography measurements of the PRNFL were performed at baseline; 1 day; 1, 2, and 4 weeks; and several later times over a period of an additional 2 to 3 months. Simultaneous pattern-reversal electroretinograms (PERGs) and visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded and color fundus photographs taken at the same time points. Results In all cases, initial PRNFL swelling was associated with atrophy, and the greater the initial swelling, the greater the degree of eventual atrophy (r = 0.65, P = 0.0002). The change in PRNFL thickness closely correlated with VEP amplitude loss (r = 0.90), although this relationship was only a strong trend (P = 0.083). Furthermore, VEP amplitude loss closely correlated with PERG N95 amplitude loss (r = 0.80, P = 0.00002) Conclusions In our model of human NAION, the degree of initial PRNFL swelling correlated with the severity of atrophy. Areas that did not swell developed little to no atrophy. The amount of PRNFL loss was reflected in VEP and PERG N95 amplitude reductions. PMID:26868755

  7. Diabetic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Russell, James W.; Zilliox, Lindsay A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article provides an overview for understanding the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and management of diabetic neuropathy. Recent Findings: New information about the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy continues to emerge, which will lead to identifying new drug targets. It is clear that the natural history of diabetic neuropathy is changing and the rate of progression is slowing. This is likely because of a combination of earlier diagnosis, improved glycemic management, and improved control of related complications such as hyperlipidemia and hypertension. Early diagnosis is critical, and small fiber neuropathy or subclinical diabetic neuropathy may be reversed or significantly improved with appropriate intervention. The American Academy of Neurology recently published guidelines for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. Summary: Diabetic neuropathy is common and can present with varied clinical presentations discussed in this article. Although treatment currently focuses on pain management, attention should be paid to potential risk factors for neuropathy. For example, glycemic control, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension should be managed with diet, exercise, and medications. Class I or II clinical studies indicate that pregabalin, duloxetine, amitriptyline, gabapentin, and opioids are effective in the management of diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:25299279

  8. The transcorneal electrical stimulation as a novel therapeutic strategy against retinal and optic neuropathy: a review of experimental and clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ye; Chen, Tao; Liu, Bei; Wang, Li-Qiang; Peng, Guang-Hua; Qin, Li-Min; Yan, Zhong-Jun; Huang, Yi-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Transcorneal electrical stimulation (TES) is a novel therapeutic approach to activate the retina and related downstream structures. TES has multiple advantages over traditional treatments, such as being minimally invasive and readily applicable in a routine manner. Series of animal experiments have shown that TES protects the retinal neuron from traumatic or genetic induced degeneration. These laboratory evidences support its utilization in ophthalmological therapies against various retinal and optical diseases including retinitis pigmentosa (RP), traumatic optic neuropathy, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION), and retinal artery occlusions (RAOs). Several pioneering explorations sought to clarify the functional mechanism underlying the neuroprotective effects of TES. It seems that the neuroprotective effects should not be attributed to a solitary pathway, on the contrary, multiple mechanisms might contribute collectively to maintain cellular homeostasis and promote cell survival in the retina. More precise evaluations via functional and morphological techniques would determine the exact mechanism underlying the remarkable neuroprotective effect of TES. Further studies to determine the optimal parameters and the long-term stability of TES are crucial to justify the clinical significance and to establish TES as a popularized therapeutic modality against retinal and optic neuropathy. PMID:27366697

  9. Differential visual system organization and susceptibility to experimental models of optic neuropathies in three commonly used mouse strains.

    PubMed

    De Groef, Lies; Dekeyster, Eline; Geeraerts, Emiel; Lefevere, Evy; Stalmans, Ingeborg; Salinas-Navarro, Manuel; Moons, Lieve

    2016-04-01

    Mouse disease models have proven indispensable in glaucoma research, yet the complexity of the vast number of models and mouse strains has also led to confusing findings. In this study, we evaluated baseline intraocular pressure, retinal histology, and retinofugal projections in three mouse strains commonly used in glaucoma research, i.e. C57Bl/6, C57Bl/6-Tyr(c), and CD-1 mice. We found that the mouse strains under study do not only display moderate variations in their intraocular pressure, retinal architecture, and retinal ganglion cell density, also the retinofugal projections to the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus and the superior colliculus revealed striking differences, potentially underlying diverging optokinetic tracking responses and visual acuity. Next, we reviewed the success rate of three models of (glaucomatous) optic neuropathies (intravitreal N-methyl-d-aspartic acid injection, optic nerve crush, and laser photocoagulation-induced ocular hypertension), looking for differences in disease susceptibility between these mouse strains. Different genetic backgrounds and albinism led to differential susceptibility to experimentally induced retinal ganglion cell death among these three mouse strains. Overall, CD-1 mice appeared to have the highest sensitivity to retinal ganglion cell damage, while the C57Bl/6 background was more resistant in the three models used. PMID:26791081

  10. Inner retinal contributions to the multifocal electroretinogram: patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Multifocal ERG in patients with LHON.

    PubMed

    Kurtenbach, Anne; Leo-Kottler, Beate; Zrenner, Eberhart

    2004-05-01

    In this study we examine the multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) recorded from patients suffering from Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), a degeneration of the ganglion cell and nerve fibre layers of the retina. We compared the mfERGs recorded from 11 patients with LHON, to those from 11 control subjects. The pattern ERG (PERG) was additionally performed with 9 of the patients. MfERGs were recorded and analysed using the VERIS 3.01 system with a stimulus of 103 equal-sized hexagons. For analysis, hexagons were grouped according to distance from the optic nerve head (ONH) and according to distance from the fovea. Two significant differences were found between the waveforms of the two groups: In the first order kernel, the control group showed a component around 34 ms that decreased with distance from the ONH. This component was reduced in the LHON group of subjects. In the second order (first slice) kernel, the patient group was missing features that decrease with distance from the fovea in the control group. PERG amplitudes showed a significant correlation with the amplitude of the second order mfERG kernel. The results show that the damage to ganglion cells and nerve fibres caused by LHON can be detected in mfERG recordings and indicate that activity from the inner retina can contribute significantly to first and second order waveforms.

  11. Efficacy and Safety of rAAV2-ND4 Treatment for Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xing; Pei, Han; Zhao, Min-jian; Yang, Shuo; Hu, Wei-kun; He, Heng; Ma, Si-qi; Zhang, Ge; Dong, Xiao-yan; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dao-wen; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrially inherited disease leading to blindness. A mitochondrial DNA point mutation at the 11778 nucleotide site of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4) gene is the most common cause. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) carrying ND4 (rAAV2-ND4) in LHON patients carrying the G11778A mutation. Nine patients were administered rAAV2-ND4 by intravitreal injection to one eye and then followed for 9 months. Ophthalmologic examinations of visual acuity, visual field, and optical coherence tomography were performed. Physical examinations included routine blood and urine. The visual acuity of the injected eyes of six patients improved by at least 0.3 log MAR after 9 months of follow-up. In these six patients, the visual field was enlarged but the retinal nerve fibre layer remained relatively stable. No other outcome measure was significantly changed. None of the nine patients had local or systemic adverse events related to the vector during the 9-month follow-up period. These findings support the feasible use of gene therapy for LHON. PMID:26892229

  12. Idebenone protects against retinal damage and loss of vision in a mouse model of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Heitz, Fabrice D; Erb, Michael; Anklin, Corinne; Robay, Dimitri; Pernet, Vincent; Gueven, Nuri

    2012-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is an inherited disease caused by mutations in complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The disease is characterized by loss of central vision due to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) dysfunction and optic nerve atrophy. Despite progress towards a better understanding of the disease, no therapeutic treatment is currently approved for this devastating disease. Idebenone, a short-chain benzoquinone, has shown promising evidence of efficacy in protecting vision loss and in accelerating recovery of visual acuity in patients with LHON. It was therefore of interest to study suitable LHON models in vitro and in vivo to identify anatomical correlates for this protective activity. At nanomolar concentrations, idebenone protected the rodent RGC cell line RGC-5 against complex I dysfunction in vitro. Consistent with the reported dosing and observed effects in LHON patients, we describe that in mice, idebenone penetrated into the eye at concentrations equivalent to those which protected RGC-5 cells from complex I dysfunction in vitro. Consequently, we next investigated the protective effect of idebenone in a mouse model of LHON, whereby mitochondrial complex I dysfunction was caused by exposure to rotenone. In this model, idebenone protected against the loss of retinal ganglion cells, reduction in retinal thickness and gliosis. Furthermore, consistent with this protection of retinal integrity, idebenone restored the functional loss of vision in this disease model. These results support the pharmacological activity of idebenone and indicate that idebenone holds potential as an effective treatment for vision loss in LHON patients.

  13. Autonomic neuropathies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    A limited autonomic neuropathy may underlie some unusual clinical syndromes, including the postural tachycardia syndrome, pseudo-obstruction syndrome, heat intolerance, and perhaps chronic fatigue syndrome. Antibodies to autonomic structures are common in diabetes, but their specificity is unknown. The presence of autonomic failure worsens prognosis in the diabetic state. Some autonomic neuropathies are treatable. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy may respond to liver transplantation. There are anecdotal reports of acute panautonomic neuropathy responding to intravenous gamma globulin. Orthostatic hypotension may respond to erythropoietin or midodrine.

  14. Clinical and color Doppler imaging features of one patient with occult giant cell arteritis presenting arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Jianu, Dragoş Cătălin; Jianu, Silviana Nina; Petrica, Ligia; Motoc, Andrei Gheorghe Marius; Dan, Traian Flavius; Lăzureanu, Dorela CodruŢa; Munteanu, Mihnea

    2016-01-01

    Anterior ischemic optic neuropathies (AIONs) represent a segmental infarction of the optic nerve head (ONH) supplied by the posterior ciliary arteries (PCAs). Blood supply blockage can occur with or without arterial inflammation. For this reason, there are two types of AIONs: non-arteritic (NA-AION), and arteritic (A-AION), the latter is almost invariably due to giant cell arteritis (GCA). GCA is a primary vasculitis that predominantly affects extracranial medium-sized arteries, particularly the branches of the external carotid arteries (including superficial temporal arteries - TAs). One patient with clinical suspicion of acute left AION was examined at admission following a complex protocol including color Doppler imaging (CDI) of orbital vessels, and color duplex sonography of the TAs and of the carotid arteries. She presented an equivocal combination of an abrupt, painless, and severe vision loss in the left eye, and an atypical diffuse hyperemic left optic disc edema. She had characteristic CDI features for GCA with eye involvement: high resistance index, with absent, or severe diminished blood flow velocities, especially end-diastolic velocities, in all orbital vessels, especially on the left side (A-AION). Typical sonographic feature in temporal arteritis as part of GCA was "dark halo" sign. On the other hand, she did not present classic clinical or systemic symptoms of GCA: temporal headache, tender TAs, malaise (occult GCA). The left TA biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of GCA. The ultrasound investigations enabled prompt differentiation between NA-AION and A-AION, the later requiring in her case immediate steroid treatment, to prevent further visual loss in the right eye. PMID:27516038

  15. Subacute myelo-optic neuropathy and clioquinol. An epidemiological case-history for diagnosis.

    PubMed Central

    Meade, T W

    1975-01-01

    Between about 1955 and 1970, some 100,000 Japanese were diagnosed as having subacute myelooptic neuropathy (SMON), a new disease characterized by abdominal and neurological manifestations, the former nearly always preceding the latter. Circumstantial evidence obtained in 1969-70 suggested that SMON might have been caused by clioquinol (CQL), a gastrointestinal disinfectant, and led to the suspension of further sales of CQL in Japan. However, several inconsistencies for the CQL theory of SMON have now emerged; first, CQL had been widely used in Japan for nearly 20 years before SMON occurred. Secondly, the SMON epidemic began to subside several months before CQL sales were suspended. Thirdly, a large proportion of SMON patients--probably about one-third and possibly more--had not taken CQL within six months of the onset of the disease (the modal interval between first taking CQL and the onset of SMON being about three weeks, and more than 100 days in only 4% of SMON patients); of the remaining two-thirds or so, many had taken CQL as part of the treatment of the first (that is, abdominal) symptoms of SMON itself. Fourthly, there was no dose-response relationship. Finally, SMON rarely, if ever, occurred outside Japan. CQL could, however, have been involved in the causation of SMON as an optional enhancer of some other necessary cause; the history of post-war environmental pollution in Japan is compatible with this hypothesis. Over-readiness to accept postulated toxic effects of medicines and chemicals as proven is likely to do at least as much harm as good to individual and community health. PMID:127638

  16. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with the mitochondrial ND4 G11696A mutation in five Chinese families

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Xiangtian |; Wei Qiping; Yang Li; Tong Yi |; Zhao Fuxin; Lu Chunjie; Qian Yaping; Sun Yanghong; Lu Fan; Qu Jia |. E-mail: jqu@wzmc.net; Guan Minxin ||. E-mail: min-xin.guan@cchmc.org

    2006-02-03

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of five Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Clinical and genetic evaluations revealed the variable severity and age-of-onset in visual impairment in these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphism, in addition to the identical ND4 G11696A mutation associated with LHON. Indeed, this mutation is present in homoplasmy only in the maternal lineage of those pedigrees but not other members of these families. In fact, the occurrence of the G11696A mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by visual impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of visual impairment. Furthermore, the N405D in the ND5 and G5820A in the tRNA{sup Cys}, showing high evolutional conservation, may contribute to the phenotypic expression of G11696A mutation in the WZ10 pedigree. However, there was the absence of functionally significant mtDNA mutations in other four Chinese pedigrees carrying the G11696A mutation. Therefore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or environmental factor(s) may play a role in the phenotypic expression of the LHON-associated G11696A mutation in these Chinese pedigrees.

  17. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with the mitochondrial ND6 T14484C mutation in three Chinese families

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yanhong; Wei Qiping; Zhou Xiangtian; Qian Yaping; Zhou Jian; Lu Fan; Qu Jia . E-mail: jqu@wzmc.net; Guan Minxin . E-mail: min-xin.guan@cchmc.org

    2006-08-18

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of three Chinese families with maternally transmitted Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Clinical and genetic evaluations revealed the variable severity and age-of-onset in visual impairment in these families. In the affected matrilineal relatives, the loss of central vision is bilateral, the fellow eye becoming affected either simultaneously (45%) or sequentially (55%). The penetrances of vision loss in these pedigrees were 27%, 50%, and 60%, respectively. The age-at-onset of vision loss in these families was 14, 19, and 24 years, respectively. Furthermore, the ratios between affected male and female matrilineal relatives were 1:1, 1:1.2, and 1:2, respectively. Mutational analysis of mitochondrial DNA revealed the presence of homoplasmic ND6 T14484C mutation, which has been associated with LHON. The incomplete penetrance and phenotypic variability implicate the involvement of nuclear modifier gene(s), environmental factor(s) or mitochondrial haplotype(s) in the phenotypic expression of the LHON-associated T14484C mutation in these Chinese pedigrees.

  18. Haplogroup Effects and Recombination of Mitochondrial DNA: Novel Clues from the Analysis of Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Carelli, Valerio; Achilli, Alessandro; Valentino, Maria Lucia; Rengo, Chiara; Semino, Ornella; Pala, Maria; Olivieri, Anna; Mattiazzi, Marina; Pallotti, Francesco; Carrara, Franco; Zeviani, Massimo; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Carducci, Carla; Valle, Giorgio; Simionati, Barbara; Mendieta, Luana; Salomao, Solange; Belfort, Rubens; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Torroni, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of 87 index cases with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) sequentially diagnosed in Italy, including an extremely large Brazilian family of Italian maternal ancestry, was evaluated in detail. Only seven pairs and three triplets of identical haplotypes were observed, attesting that the large majority of the LHON mutations were due to independent mutational events. Assignment of the mutational events into haplogroups confirmed that J1 and J2 play a role in LHON expression but narrowed the association to the subclades J1c and J2b, thus suggesting that two specific combinations of amino acid changes in the cytochrome b are the cause of the mtDNA background effect and that this may occur at the level of the supercomplex formed by respiratory-chain complexes I and III. The families with identical haplotypes were genealogically reinvestigated, which led to the reconnection into extended pedigrees of three pairs of families, including the Brazilian family with its Italian counterpart. The sequencing of entire mtDNA samples from the reconnected families confirmed the genealogical reconstruction but showed that the Brazilian family was heteroplasmic at two control-region positions. The survey of the two sites in 12 of the Brazilian subjects revealed triplasmy in most cases, but there was no evidence of the tetraplasmy that would be expected in the case of mtDNA recombination. PMID:16532388

  19. A case of polyarteritis nodosa complicated by left central retinal artery occlusion, ischemic optic neuropathy, and retinal vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Emad, Y; Basaffar, S; Ragab, Y; Zeinhom, F; Gheita, T

    2007-05-01

    A 23-year-old single female patient developed constitutional manifestations in the form of fever, weight loss, anorexia, malaise, fatigue, and generalized aches in January 1995, 2 weeks after an attack of German measles. This was followed by painful, reddish, macular skin lesions over both legs which healed by dark pigmentation (leucocytoclastic vasculitis), mononeuritis multiplex, and Raynaud's phenomena of both hands and feet. Angiography of lower limbs was done to visualize the arterial tree of both lower limbs and revealed typical beading of distal arterial branches, a diagnosis compatible with polyarteritis nodosa (PAN). At that time, the patient received prednisone (45 mg/day) and azatioprin (100 mg/day) and responded well to treatment. In a second presentation in June 2005, the patient developed sudden attack of loss of vision in her left eye. Ophthalmological examination of the patient revealed evidence of left central retinal artery occlusion, ischemic optic neuropathy. The patient received methyl prednisolone, 1 g IV infusion, daily infusion for three consecutive days followed by oral prednisolone, 30 mg/day. The patient received pulse cyclophosphamide IV infusion (0.6 g/m2) on the fourth day. One week after receiving therapy, the patient progressed from having light perception to counting of fingers from a distance of 1 m.

  20. Radiation-induced optic neuropathy following external beam radiation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: A retrospective case-control study

    PubMed Central

    WANG, WEI; YANG, HUI; GUO, LING; SU, HONGYU; WEI, SHIHUI; ZHANG, XIULAN

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) is a severe ocular complication in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) following external beam radiation therapy. However, the systemic risk factors for this condition remain unclear. Therefore, patients with NPC who received radiotherapy between 2004 and 2007 at the Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center were retrospectively reviewed in this case-control study. The study included 40 RION patients and 40 patients in the control group, who were strictly matched to the RION patients by tumor histopathology, location, Union for International Cancer Control-Tumor Node Metastasis classification and radiotherapy protocol. Univariate and multivariate statistical regression analyses were performed to identify factors predictive of RION. The univariate analysis demonstrated that age (>60 years), gender (female) and chemotherapy significantly affected the risk of RION, whereas diabetes, hypertension and hepatitis B virus infection did not exert a significant effect. The results of the multivariate analysis suggested that only gender and chemotherapy were significantly associated with an increased incidence of RION. Therefore, the results of the present study suggested that female gender and chemotherapy constitute risk factors for the development of RION following radiotherapy for NPC. The ocular symptoms of high-risk patients should be carefully investigated and reported by ophthalmologists. PMID:27123298

  1. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) pathogenic mutations induce mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic death in transmitochondrial cells incubated with galactose medium.

    PubMed

    Ghelli, Anna; Zanna, Claudia; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Schapira, Anthony H V; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Carelli, Valerio; Rugolo, Michela

    2003-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), a maternally inherited form of central vision loss, is associated with mitochondrial DNA pathogenic point mutations affecting different subunits of complex I. We here report that osteosarcoma-derived cytoplasmic hybrids (cybrid) cell lines harboring one of the three most frequent LHON pathogenic mutations, at positions 11778/ND4, 3460/ND1, and 14484/ND6, undergo cell death when galactose replaces glucose in the medium, contrary to control cybrids that maintain some growth capabilities. This is a well known way to produce a metabolic stress, forcing the cells to rely on the mitochondrial respiratory chain to produce ATP. We demonstrate that LHON cybrid cell death is apoptotic, showing chromatin condensation and nuclear DNA laddering. Moreover, we also document the mitochondrial involvement in the activation of the apoptotic cascade, as shown by the increased release of cytochrome c into the cytosol in LHON cybrid cells as compared with controls. Cybrids bearing the 3460/ND1 and 14484/ND6 mutations seemed more readily prone to undergo apoptosis as compared with the 11778/ND4 mutation. In conclusion, LHON cybrid cells forced by the reduced rate of glycolytic flux to utilize oxidative metabolism are sensitized to an apoptotic death through a mechanism involving mitochondria.

  2. Minocycline, a possible neuroprotective agent in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON): studies of cybrid cells bearing 11,778 mutation.

    PubMed

    Haroon, Mohammad Fahad; Fatima, Ambrin; Schöler, Susanne; Gieseler, Anne; Horn, Thomas F W; Kirches, Elmar; Wolf, Gerald; Kreutzmann, Peter

    2007-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a retinal neurodegenerative disorder caused by mitochondrial DNA point mutations. Complex I of the respiratory chain affected by the mutation results in a decrease in ATP and an increase of reactive oxygen species production. Evaluating the efficacy of minocycline in LHON, the drug increased the survival of cybrid cells in contrast to the parental cells after thapsigargin-induced calcium overload. Similar protection was observed by treatment with cyclosporine A, a blocker of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Ratiometric Ca(2+) imaging reveals that acetylcholine/thapsigargin triggered elevation of the cytosolic calcium concentration is alleviated by minocycline and cyclosporine A. The mitochondrial membrane potential of LHON cybrids was significantly conserved and the active-caspase-3/procaspase-3 ratio was decreased in both treatments. Our observations show that minocycline inhibits permeability transition induced by thapsigargin in addition to its antioxidant effects. In relation with its high safety profile, these results would suggest minocycline as a promising neuroprotective agent in LHON.

  3. Mitochondrial tRNA(Thr) A15951G mutation may not be associated with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Yu, Shuaishuai; Tu, Yunhai; Huang, Wenjie

    2016-07-01

    Mutation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been found to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON). Three primary mutations, the ND4 G11778A, ND6 T14484C, and ND1 G3460A, have been found to account more than 90% of LHON patients in many families worldwide. In addition to the mutations in genes encoding the respiratory chain complex I, reports concerning the mt-tRNA gene mutations associated with LHON have increased, some pathogenic mutations caused the failure in mt-tRNA metabolism, thereby worsened the mitochondrial dysfunction that is responsible for LHON. Recently, the A15951G mutation in mt-tRNA(Thr) gene has been reported to be a "modified" factor in increasing the penetrance and expressivity of LHON-associated ND4 G11778A mutation in three Chinese families. However, evolutionary conservation analysis of this mutation suggested a poor conservation index and the pathogenicity scoring system showed that this mutation was a neutral polymorphism.

  4. Optical properties of ITO films obtained by high-frequency magnetron sputtering with accompanying ion treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Krylov, P. N. Zakirova, R. M.; Fedotova, I. V.

    2013-10-15

    A variation in the properties of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) films obtained by the method of reactive magnetron sputtering with simultaneous ion treatment is reported. The ITO films feature the following parameters in the optical range of 450-1100 nm: a transmission coefficient of 80%, band gap of 3.50-3.60 eV, and a refractive index of 1.97-2.06. All characteristics of the films depend on the ion-treatment current. The latter, during the course of deposition, reduces the resistivity of the ITO films with the smallest value of the resistivity being equal to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} {Omega} cm. The degradation of films with a high resistivity when kept in air is observed.

  5. Genetic and biochemical impairment of mitochondrial complex I activity in a family with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and hereditary spastic dystonia

    SciTech Connect

    De Vries, D.D.; Oost, B.A. van; Went, L.N.; Bruyn, G.W.

    1996-04-01

    A rare form of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) that is associated with hereditary spastic dystonia has been studied in a large Dutch family. Neuropathy and ophthalmological lesions were present together in some family members, whereas only one type of abnormality was found in others. mtDNA mutations previously reported in LHON were not present. Sequence analysis of the protein-coding mitochondrial genes revealed two previously unreported mtDNA mutations. A heteroplasmic A{yields}G transition at nucleotide position 11696 in the ND4 gene resulted in the substitution of an isoleucine for valine at amino acid position 312. A second mutation, a homoplasmic T{yields}A transition at nucleotide position 14596 in the ND6 gene, resulted in the substitution of a methionine for the isoleucine at amino acid residue 26. Biochemical analysis of a muscle biopsy revealed a severe complex I deficiency, providing a link between these unique mtDNA mutations and this rare, complex phenotype including Leber optic neuropathy. 80 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Optic neuropathy in a herd of beef cattle in Alberta associated with consumption of moldy corn

    PubMed Central

    Sandmeyer, Lynne S.; Vujanovic, Vladimir; Petrie, Lyall; Campbell, John R.; Bauer, Bianca S.; Allen, Andrew L.; Grahn, Bruce H.

    2015-01-01

    A group of beef cattle in eastern Alberta was investigated due to sudden onset of blindness after grazing on standing corn in mid-winter. Fumonisin-producing Fusarium spp. were isolated from the corn. Blindness was due to an optic nerve degeneration suspected to be secondary to fumonisin mycotoxin. PMID:25750444

  7. Longitudinal study of a heteroplasmic 3460 Leber hereditary optic neuropathy family by multiplexed primer-extension analysis and nucleotide sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.S.; Fahy, E.; Bodis-Wollner, I.

    1996-02-01

    Nucleotide-sequencing and multiplexed primer-extension assays have been used to quantitate the mutant-allele frequency in 14 maternal relatives, spanning three generations, from a family that is heteroplasmic for the primary Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) mutation at nucleotide 3460 of the mitochondrial genome. There was excellent agreement between the values that were obtained with the two different methods. The longitudinal study shows that the mutant-allele frequency was constant within individual family members over a sampling period of 3.5 years. Second, although there was an overall increase in the mutant-allele frequency in successive generations, segregation in the direction of the mutant allele was not invariant, and there was one instance in which there was a significant decrease in the frequency from parent to offspring. From these two sets of results, and from previous studies of heteroplasmic LHON families, we conclude that there is no evidence for a marked selective pressure that determines the replication, segregation, or transmission of primary LHON mutations to white blood cells and platelets. Instead, the mtDNA molecules are most likely to replicate and segregate under conditions of random drift at the cellular level. Finally, the pattern of transmission in this maternal lineage is compatible with a developmental bottleneck model in which the number of mitochondrial units of segregation in the female germ line is relatively small in relation to the number of mtDNA molecules within a cell. However, this is not an invariant pattern for humans, and simple models of mitochondrial gene transmission are inappropriate at the present time. 37 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Cigarette toxicity triggers Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy by affecting mtDNA copy number, oxidative phosphorylation and ROS detoxification pathways

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, L; Deceglie, S; d'Adamo, P; Valentino, M L; La Morgia, C; Fracasso, F; Roberti, M; Cappellari, M; Petrosillo, G; Ciaravolo, S; Parente, D; Giordano, C; Maresca, A; Iommarini, L; Del Dotto, V; Ghelli, A M; Salomao, S R; Berezovsky, A; Belfort, R; Sadun, A A; Carelli, V; Loguercio Polosa, P; Cantatore, P

    2015-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), the most frequent mitochondrial disease, is associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations affecting Complex I subunits, usually homoplasmic. This blinding disorder is characterized by incomplete penetrance, possibly related to several genetic modifying factors. We recently reported that increased mitochondrial biogenesis in unaffected mutation carriers is a compensatory mechanism, which reduces penetrance. Also, environmental factors such as cigarette smoking have been implicated as disease triggers. To investigate this issue further, we first assessed the relationship between cigarette smoke and mtDNA copy number in blood cells from large cohorts of LHON families, finding that smoking was significantly associated with the lowest mtDNA content in affected individuals. To unwrap the mechanism of tobacco toxicity in LHON, we exposed fibroblasts from affected individuals, unaffected mutation carriers and controls to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). CSC decreased mtDNA copy number in all cells; moreover, it caused significant reduction of ATP level only in mutated cells including carriers. This implies that the bioenergetic compensation in carriers is hampered by exposure to smoke derivatives. We also observed that in untreated cells the level of carbonylated proteins was highest in affected individuals, whereas the level of several detoxifying enzymes was highest in carriers. Thus, carriers are particularly successful in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging capacity. After CSC exposure, the amount of detoxifying enzymes increased in all cells, but carbonylated proteins increased only in LHON mutant cells, mostly from affected individuals. All considered, it appears that exposure to smoke derivatives has a more deleterious effect in affected individuals, whereas carriers are the most efficient in mitigating ROS rather than recovering bioenergetics. Therefore, the identification of genetic modifiers that

  9. Cigarette toxicity triggers Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy by affecting mtDNA copy number, oxidative phosphorylation and ROS detoxification pathways.

    PubMed

    Giordano, L; Deceglie, S; d'Adamo, P; Valentino, M L; La Morgia, C; Fracasso, F; Roberti, M; Cappellari, M; Petrosillo, G; Ciaravolo, S; Parente, D; Giordano, C; Maresca, A; Iommarini, L; Del Dotto, V; Ghelli, A M; Salomao, S R; Berezovsky, A; Belfort, R; Sadun, A A; Carelli, V; Loguercio Polosa, P; Cantatore, P

    2015-12-17

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), the most frequent mitochondrial disease, is associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations affecting Complex I subunits, usually homoplasmic. This blinding disorder is characterized by incomplete penetrance, possibly related to several genetic modifying factors. We recently reported that increased mitochondrial biogenesis in unaffected mutation carriers is a compensatory mechanism, which reduces penetrance. Also, environmental factors such as cigarette smoking have been implicated as disease triggers. To investigate this issue further, we first assessed the relationship between cigarette smoke and mtDNA copy number in blood cells from large cohorts of LHON families, finding that smoking was significantly associated with the lowest mtDNA content in affected individuals. To unwrap the mechanism of tobacco toxicity in LHON, we exposed fibroblasts from affected individuals, unaffected mutation carriers and controls to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). CSC decreased mtDNA copy number in all cells; moreover, it caused significant reduction of ATP level only in mutated cells including carriers. This implies that the bioenergetic compensation in carriers is hampered by exposure to smoke derivatives. We also observed that in untreated cells the level of carbonylated proteins was highest in affected individuals, whereas the level of several detoxifying enzymes was highest in carriers. Thus, carriers are particularly successful in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging capacity. After CSC exposure, the amount of detoxifying enzymes increased in all cells, but carbonylated proteins increased only in LHON mutant cells, mostly from affected individuals. All considered, it appears that exposure to smoke derivatives has a more deleterious effect in affected individuals, whereas carriers are the most efficient in mitigating ROS rather than recovering bioenergetics. Therefore, the identification of genetic modifiers that

  10. The pattern visual evoked potential and pattern electroretinogram in drusen-associated optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Scholl, G B; Song, H S; Winkler, D E; Wray, S H

    1992-01-01

    Sixteen patients (29 eyes) with optic disc drusen were studied prospectively for clinical and electrophysiologic evidence of impaired optic nerve conduction. Abnormalities were detected in the following areas: visual acuity, eight (28%) of 29 eyes; kinetic visual field, 22 (76%) of 29 eyes; results of Farnsworth-Munsell 100-Hue test, 12 (41%) of 29 eyes; and flash visual evoked potential, 13 (54%) of 24 eyes. Simultaneous pattern visual evoked potentials and results of pattern electroretinograms were recorded. The P100 latency of the pattern visual evoked potential was prolonged in 41% of eyes. The P50 and N95 components of the pattern electroretinogram were also analyzed. The P50 amplitude was reduced in only four (17%) of 24 eyes. The most common abnormality was a reduction in amplitude or the absence of the N95 component in 19 (79%) of 24 eyes, reflecting ganglion cell dysfunction. The data support mounting evidence that the P50 and N95 components of the pattern electroretinogram have different retinal origins. PMID:1731726

  11. [The analysis of mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and variants for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in Chinese families carrying the m.14484T >C mutation].

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangjuan; Zhu, Jinping; Gao, Min; Zhang, Sai; Zhao, Fuxin; Zhang, Juanjuan; Liu, Xiaoling; Wei, Qiping; Tong, Yi; Zhang, Minglian; Qu, Jia; Guan, Minxin

    2014-04-01

    The m.14484T>C mutation in mitochondrial ND6 gene (MT-ND6) is a primary mutation underlying the development of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) , but by itself not enough to cause visual loss. To explore the role of mitochondrial haplogroups on the expression of LHON for the people carrying the m.14484T>C mutation, we performed systematic and extended mutational screening of MT-ND6 gene in a cohort of 1177 Han Chinese patients with LHON. A total of 67 affected subjects carried the homoplasmic m.14484T>C mutation, accounting for 5.7% of this LHON population. The penetrances of optic neuropathy among 51 pedigrees carrying the m.14484T>C mutation ranged from 5.6% to 100.0%, with the average of 21.5%. The sequence analysis of entire mitochondrial genomes of 51 probands exhibited distinct sets of polymorphisms belonging to 18 Eastern Asian haplogroups. The frequencies of haplogroup A and haplogroup F were sig-nificantly less in the LHON mtDNA samples than those in 106 Chinese controls. On the other hand, the haplogroup M10a accounted for 9.8% of the patient's mtDNA samples but was absent in 106 Chinese controls. Strikingly, the average pene-trance (46.13%) of optic neuropathy for the pedigrees carrying mitochondrial haplogroup M10a was higher than those car-rying other mtDNA haplogroups. These observations indicated that mitochondrial haplogroup M10a may increase the risk of visual loss.

  12. Wolfram Syndrome: a rare optic neuropathy in youth with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bucca, Brian C; Klingensmith, Georgeanna; Bennett, Jeffrey L

    2011-11-01

    Wolfram Syndrome (WS) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder that causes non-autoimmune type 1 diabetes. The etiology involves a single gene mutation of the wolframin protein inducing endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in selected cell types with resultant diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and sensory-neural deafness. Symptoms are initially absent and signs within the posterior segment of the eye are usually the earliest indicator of WS.These cases characterize unusual and poorly described findings of pigmentary maculopathy in WS and illustrate the importance of collaboration between diabetes and eye care providers; especially in cases of non-autoimmune type 1 diabetes exhibiting atypical human leukocyte-associated antigen haplotypes.

  13. Crowdsourcing as a Screening Tool to Detect Clinical Features of Glaucomatous Optic Neuropathy from Digital Photography

    PubMed Central

    Mitry, Danny; Peto, Tunde; Hayat, Shabina; Blows, Peter; Morgan, James; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Foster, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Crowdsourcing is the process of simplifying and outsourcing numerous tasks to many untrained individuals. Our aim was to assess the performance and repeatability of crowdsourcing in the classification of normal and glaucomatous discs from optic disc images. Methods Optic disc images (N = 127) with pre-determined disease status were selected by consensus agreement from grading experts from a large cohort study. After reading brief illustrative instructions, we requested that knowledge workers (KWs) from a crowdsourcing platform (Amazon MTurk) classified each image as normal or abnormal. Each image was classified 20 times by different KWs. Two study designs were examined to assess the effect of varying KW experience and both study designs were conducted twice for consistency. Performance was assessed by comparing the sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results Overall, 2,540 classifications were received in under 24 hours at minimal cost. The sensitivity ranged between 83–88% across both trials and study designs, however the specificity was poor, ranging between 35–43%. In trial 1, the highest AUC (95%CI) was 0.64(0.62–0.66) and in trial 2 it was 0.63(0.61–0.65). There were no significant differences between study design or trials conducted. Conclusions Crowdsourcing represents a cost-effective method of image analysis which demonstrates good repeatability and a high sensitivity. Optimisation of variables such as reward schemes, mode of image presentation, expanded response options and incorporation of training modules should be examined to determine their effect on the accuracy and reliability of this technique in retinal image analysis. PMID:25692287

  14. [SUPRASCAPULAR NEUROPATHY].

    PubMed

    Massenet, V; Crielaard, J M

    2016-05-01

    Supra-scapular nerve (SSN) damage is a rare, but classical diagnosis that can often be overlooked since the nonspecific clinical history and examination commonly lead to the misdiagnosis of another shoulder disorder. This article details the etiopathology, the patients at risk, the reasons for consultation and the clinical aspects of suprascapular neuropathy; it also outlines its diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:27337843

  15. A case of neuromyelitis optica harboring both anti-aquaporin-4 antibodies and a pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutation for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Wataru; Hayashi, Shintaro; Kamada, Takashi; Isobe, Noriko; Yamasaki, Ryo; Murai, Hiroyuki; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2014-02-01

    We report the first case of definite neuromyelitis optica (NMO) with a pathogenic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) (G11778A point mutation). A 36-year-old Japanese woman had experienced recurrent neurological symptoms originating from involvements of the optic nerves and spinal cord. She finally lost her bilateral vision, and spastic paraparesis and sensory disturbances below the T6 level remained despite intensive immunotherapies. Brain and spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed T2-high-intensity lesions in the optic nerves and thoracic spinal cord, but no lesions in the brain. A blood examination revealed positivity for both anti-aquaproin-4 antibodies and an LHON mtDNA mutation.

  16. Automatic quantitative analysis of experimental primary and secondary retinal neurodegeneration: implications for optic neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Davis, B M; Guo, L; Brenton, J; Langley, L; Normando, E M; Cordeiro, M F

    2016-01-01

    Secondary neurodegeneration is thought to play an important role in the pathology of neurodegenerative disease, which potential therapies may target. However, the quantitative assessment of the degree of secondary neurodegeneration is difficult. The present study describes a novel algorithm from which estimates of primary and secondary degeneration are computed using well-established rodent models of partial optic nerve transection (pONT) and ocular hypertension (OHT). Brn3-labelled retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) were identified in whole-retinal mounts from which RGC density, nearest neighbour distances and regularity indices were determined. The spatial distribution and rate of RGC loss were assessed and the percentage of primary and secondary degeneration in each non-overlapping segment was calculated. Mean RGC number (82 592±681) and RGC density (1695±23.3 RGC/mm2) in naïve eyes were comparable with previous studies, with an average decline in RGC density of 71±17 and 23±5% over the time course of pONT and OHT models, respectively. Spatial analysis revealed greatest RGC loss in the superior and central retina in pONT, but significant RGC loss in the inferior retina from 3 days post model induction. In comparison, there was no significant difference between superior and inferior retina after OHT induction, and RGC loss occurred mainly along the superior/inferior axis (~30%) versus the nasal–temporal axis (~15%). Intriguingly, a significant loss of RGCs was also observed in contralateral eyes in experimental OHT. In conclusion, a novel algorithm to automatically segment Brn3a-labelled retinal whole-mounts into non-overlapping segments is described, which enables automated spatial and temporal segmentation of RGCs, revealing heterogeneity in the spatial distribution of primary and secondary degenerative processes. This method provides an attractive means to rapidly determine the efficacy of neuroprotective therapies with implications for any

  17. Analysis of Vision Loss Caused by Radiation-Induced Optic Neuropathy After Particle Therapy for Head-and-Neck and Skull-Base Tumors Adjacent to Optic Nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Demizu, Yusuke; Murakami, Masao; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Niwa, Yasue; Akagi, Takashi; Sasaki, Ryohei; Terashima, Kazuki; Suga, Daisaku; Kamae, Isao; Hishikawa, Yoshio

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the incident rates of vision loss (VL; based on counting fingers or more severe) caused by radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) after particle therapy for tumors adjacent to optic nerves (ONs), and to evaluate factors that may contribute to VL. Methods and Materials: From August 2001 to August 2006, 104 patients with head-and-neck or skull-base tumors adjacent to ONs were treated with carbon ion or proton radiotherapy. Among them, 145 ONs of 75 patients were irradiated and followed for greater than 12 months. The incident rate of VL and the prognostic factors for occurrence of VL were evaluated. The late effects of carbon ion and proton beams were compared on the basis of a biologically effective dose at alpha/beta = 3 gray equivalent (GyE{sub 3}). Results: Eight patients (11%) experienced VL resulting from RION. The onset of VL ranged from 17 to 58 months. The median follow-up was 25 months. No significant difference was observed between the carbon ion and proton beam treatment groups. On univariate analysis, age (>60 years), diabetes mellitus, and maximum dose to the ON (>110 GyE{sub 3}) were significant, whereas on multivariate analysis only diabetes mellitus was found to be significant for VL. Conclusions: The time to the onset of VL was highly variable. There was no statistically significant difference between carbon ion and proton beam treatments over the follow-up period. Based on multivariate analysis, diabetes mellitus correlated with the occurrence of VL. A larger study with longer follow-up is warranted.

  18. Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Giant Axonal Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Giant Axonal Neuropathy? Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare inherited ...

  19. Multifocal Motor Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multifocal Motor Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Multifocal Motor Neuropathy? Multifocal motor neuropathy is a progressive muscle disorder ...

  20. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  1. Generalized pruritus preceding paraneoplastic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hébant, Benjamin; Miret, Nicolas; Berthelot, Lucile; Jaafar, Mohamad; Maltête, David; Lefaucheur, Romain

    2016-04-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes are a group of rare disorders involving non-metastatic systemic effects accompanying malignancies, and occur remotely from the tumor itself. Chronic pruritus lasting more than 6 weeks can be from paraneoplastic origin. A 65-year-old woman was admitted for generalized pruritus lasting for 1 month, despite treatment with prednisolone, levocetirizine and hydroxyzine. General examination was normal. Biological data and gastroscopy were normal. One month later, the patient was readmitted for worsening of her pruritus and walking impairment, revealing a severe sensory neuropathy. Blood anti-Hu antibodies returned positive at a level of 400 (normal <100). Bronchoscopy and bronchial biopsies revealed small-cell lung carcinoma. To our knowledge, the association of generalized pruritus and paraneoplastic neuropathy has been rarely reported. Our observation raises the question of a pathophysiological continuum between pruritus and neuropathy in a paraneoplastic context. PMID:26633089

  2. Simultaneous occurrence of the 11778 (ND4) and the 9438 (COX III) mtDNA mutations in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: Molecular, biochemical, and clinical findings

    SciTech Connect

    Oostra, R.J.; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E.M.; Zwart, R.

    1995-10-01

    Three mtDNA point mutations at nucleotide position (np) 3460, at np 11778 and at np 14484, are thought to be of primary importance in the pathogenesis of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), a maternally inherited disease characterized by subacute central vision loss. These mutations are present in genes coding for subunits of complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) of the respiratory chain, occur exclusively in LHON maternal pedigrees, and have never been reported to occur together. Johns and Neufeld postulated that an mtDNA mutation at np 9438, in the gene coding for one of the subunits (COX III) of complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase), was also of primary importance. Johns and Neufeld (1993) found this mutation, which changed a conserved glycine to a serine, in 5 unrelated LHON probands who did not carry one of the presently known primary mutations, but they did not find it in 400 controls. However, the role of this sequence variant has been questioned in the Journal when it has been found to occur in apparently healthy African and Cuban individuals. Subsequently, Johns et al. described this mutation in two Cuban individuals presenting with optic and peripheral neuropathy. 22 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Severe manifestation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy due to 11778G>A mtDNA mutation in a female with hypoestrogenism due to Perrault syndrome.

    PubMed

    Badura-Stronka, Magdalena; Wawrocka, Anna; Zawieja, Krzysztof; Silska, Sylwia; Krawczyński, Maciej Robert

    2013-11-01

    Perrault syndrome (PS) is a rare autosomal recessive condition with ovarian dysgenesis, hearing deficit and neurological abnormalities in female patients. The molecular basis of the syndrome is heterogeneous, mutations in the HSD17B4 gene have been identified in one family and mutations in the HARS2 gene have been found in another one. We have excluded pathogenic changes in the HSD17B4 gene and in the HARS2 gene by a direct sequencing of all coding exons in a female with clinical hallmarks of PS, ataxia and mild mental retardation. In addition, the patient suffers from severe Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) due to 11778G>A mtDNA mutation. This case is the first reported patient with PS and LHON. Possible influence of hypoestrogenism on the manifestation of optic neuropathy in this patient is discussed in the context of recent findings concerning the crucial role of estrogens in supporting the vision capacity in LHON-related mtDNA mutation carriers.

  4. Optic nerve atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Optic atrophy; Optic neuropathy ... There are many causes of optic atrophy. The most common is poor blood flow. This is called ischemic optic neuropathy. The problem most often affects older adults. ...

  5. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the commonest cause of an autonomic neuropathy in the developed world. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy causes a constellation of symptoms and signs affecting cardiovascular, urogenital, gastrointestinal, pupillomotor, thermoregulatory, and sudomotor systems. Several discrete syndromes associated with diabetes cause autonomic dysfunction. The most prevalent of these are: generalized diabetic autonomic neuropathy, autonomic neuropathy associated with the prediabetic state, treatment-induced painful and autonomic neuropathy, and transient hypoglycemia-associated autonomic neuropathy. These autonomic manifestations of diabetes are responsible for the most troublesome and disabling features of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and result in a significant proportion of the mortality and morbidity associated with the disease.

  6. Subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pascoe, M. K.; Low, P. A.; Windebank, A. J.; Litchy, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical, electrophysiologic, autonomic, and neuropathologic characteristics and the natural history of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy and its response to immunotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: For the 12-year period from 1983 to 1995, we conducted a retrospective review of medical records of Mayo Clinic patients with diabetes who had subacute onset and progression of proximal weakness. The responses of treated versus untreated patients were compared statistically. RESULTS: During the designated study period, 44 patients with subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy were encountered. Most patients were middle-aged or elderly, and no sex preponderance was noted. The proximal muscle weakness often was associated with reduced or absent lower extremity reflexes. Associated weight loss was a common finding. Frequently, patients had some evidence of demyelination on nerve conduction studies, but it invariably was accompanied by concomitant axonal degeneration. The cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration was usually increased. Diffuse and substantial autonomic failure was generally present. In most cases, a sural nerve biopsy specimen suggested demyelination, although evidence of an inflammatory infiltrate was less common. Of 12 patients who received treatment (with prednisone, intravenous immune globulin, or plasma exchange), 9 had improvement of their conditions, but 17 of 29 untreated patients (59%) with follow-up also eventually had improvement, albeit at a much slower rate. Improvement was usually incomplete. CONCLUSION: We suggest that the entity of subacute diabetic proximal neuropathy is an extensive and severe variant of bilateral lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy, with some features suggestive of an immune-mediated cause. It differs from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in that most cases have a more restricted distribution and seem to be monophasic and self-limiting. The efficacy of immunotherapy is unproved

  7. Detection of the mtDNA 14484 mutation on an African-specific haplotype: Implications about its role in causing Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Torroni, A.; Petrozzi, M.; Terracina, M.

    1996-07-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally transmitted disease whose primary clinical manifestation is acute or subacute bilateral loss of central vision leading to central scotoma and blindness. To date, LHON has been associated with 18 mtDNA missense mutations, even though, for many of these mutations, it remains unclear whether they cause the disease, contribute to the pathology, or are nonpathogenic mtDNA polymorphisms. On the basis of numerous criteria, which include the specificity for LHON, the frequency in the general population, and the penetrance within affected pedigrees, the detection of associated defects in the respiratory chain, mutations at three nucleotide positions (nps), 11778 (G{r_arrow}A), 3460 (G{r_arrow}A), and 14484 (T{r_arrow}C) have been classified as high-risk and primary LHON mutations. Overall, these three mutations encompass {ge}90% of the LHON cases. 29 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Genetic heterogeneity of primary open angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension: linkage to GLC1A associated with an increased risk of severe glaucomatous optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Brézin, A P; Béchetoille, A; Hamard, P; Valtot, F; Berkani, M; Belmouden, A; Adam, M F; Dupont de Dinechin, S; Bach, J F; Garchon, H J

    1997-01-01

    The GLC1A locus for autosomal dominant juvenile and middle age onset primary open angle glaucoma (OAG) has been mapped to chromosome 1q21-q31. OAG, however, is a heterogeneous disease. We tested linkage of OAG and ocular hypertension (OHT), a major risk factor for OAG, to GLC1A in eight French families with multiple cases of juvenile and middle age onset OAG. There was strong evidence of genetic heterogeneity, four families being linked to GLC1A and two or three others being unlinked, depending on whether the complete OAG phenotype was analysed alone or jointly with OHT. Peak intraocular pressure (IOP) did not differ significantly between the two groups of families, while linkage to GLC1A conferred a highly increased risk of developing OAG and of having severe glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Testing linkage of familial OAG to GLC1A may therefore have prognostic value too. PMID:9222961

  9. Partial mitochondrial complex I inhibition induces oxidative damage and perturbs glutamate transport in primary retinal cultures. Relevance to Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON).

    PubMed

    Beretta, Simone; Wood, John P M; Derham, Barry; Sala, Gessica; Tremolizzo, Lucio; Ferrarese, Carlo; Osborne, Neville N

    2006-11-01

    Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited form of visual loss, due to selective degeneration of retinal ganglion cells. Despite the established aetiological association between LHON and mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I of the electron transport chain, the pathophysiology of this disorder remains obscure. Primary rat retinal cultures were exposed to increasing concentrations of rotenone to titrate complex I inhibition. Neural cells were more sensitive than Müller glial cells to rotenone toxicity. Rotenone induced an increase in mitochondrial-derived free radicals and lipid peroxidation. Sodium-dependent glutamate uptake, which is mostly mediated by the glutamate transporter GLAST expressed by Müller glial cells, was reduced dose-dependently by rotenone with no changes in GLAST expression. Our findings suggest that complex I-derived free radicals and disruption of glutamate transport might represent key elements for explaining the selective retinal ganglion cell death in LHON.

  10. Mitochondrial gene therapy improves respiration, biogenesis, and transcription in G11778A Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and T8993G Leigh's syndrome cells.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shilpa; Bergquist, Kristen; Young, Kisha; Gnaiger, Erich; Rao, Raj R; Bennett, James P

    2012-06-01

    Many incurable mitochondrial disorders result from mutant mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and impaired respiration. Leigh's syndrome (LS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder of infants, and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) causes blindness in young adults. Treatment of LHON and LS cells harboring G11778A and T8993G mutant mtDNA, respectively, by >90%, with healthy donor mtDNA complexed with recombinant human mitochondrial transcription factor A (rhTFAM), improved mitochondrial respiration by ∼1.2-fold in LHON cells and restored >50% ATP synthase function in LS cells. Mitochondrial replication, transcription, and translation of key respiratory genes and proteins were increased in the short term. Increased NRF1, TFAMB1, and TFAMA expression alluded to the activation of mitochondrial biogenesis as a mechanism for improving mitochondrial respiration. These results represent the development of a therapeutic approach for LHON and LS patients in the near future.

  11. Searching the co-occurrence of pathogenic mutations for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and hearing loss in more than 26,000 whole mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haixin; Liu, Rui; Wang, Chuan-Chao

    2016-09-01

    The co-occurrence of pathogenic or candidate mutations for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and hearing loss has long been suggested to be a rare incident. The "rare" is probably caused by inadequate database searches. In this study, we created and released a comprehensive database with detailed information of haplogroup, variants, coding sites, and potential pathogenic mutations for more than 26,000 whole mitochondrial genomes. We found the co-occurrence in more than 200 individuals including not only LHON or hearing loss patients but also individuals sampled from general populations with various haplogroup backgrounds. The results highlighted the significant importance of adequate database searching in the genetic analysis of mitochondrial disorders.

  12. Very low penetrance of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in five Han Chinese families carrying the ND1 G3460A mutation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yi; Sun, Yan-Hong; Zhou, Xiangtian; Zhao, Fuxin; Mao, Yijian; Wei, Qi-ping; Yang, Li; Qu, Jia; Guan, Min-Xin

    2010-04-01

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of five Han Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Strikingly, there were very low penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families, ranging from 4.2% to 22.2%, with an average of 10.2%. In particular, only 7 (4 males/3 females) of 106 matrilineal relatives in these families exhibited the variable severity and age-at-onset in visual dysfunction. The age-at-onset for visual impairment in matrilineal relatives in these families, varied from 20 to 25 years, with an average of 21.8 years old. Molecular analysis of mitochondrial genomes identified the homoplasmic ND1 G3460A mutation and distinct sets of variants, belonging to the Asian haplogroups B5b, C4a1, D5, F1, and R9, respectively. This suggests that the G3640A mutation occurred sporadically and multiplied through evolution of the mtDNA in China. However, there was the absence of known secondary LHON-associated mtDNA mutations in these Chinese families. Very low penetrance of visual loss in these five Chinese pedigrees strongly indicated that the G3640A mutation was itself insufficient to develop the optic neuropathy. The absence of secondary LHON mtDNA mutations suggest that these mtDNA haplogroup-specific variants may not play an important role in the phenotypic expression of the G3640A mutation in those Chinese families with low penetrance of vision loss. However, nuclear modifier genes, epigenetic and environmental factors appear to be modifier factors for the phenotypic manifestation of the G3640A mutation in these Chinese families.

  13. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy caused by the homoplasmic ND1 m.3635G>A mutation in nine Han Chinese families.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juanjuan; Jiang, Pingping; Jin, Xiaofen; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhang, Minglian; Xie, Shipeng; Gao, Min; Zhang, Sai; Sun, Yan-Hong; Zhu, Jinping; Ji, Yanchun; Wei, Qi-Ping; Tong, Yi; Guan, Min-Xin

    2014-09-01

    In this report, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON)-associated mitochondrial m.3635G>A (p.S110N, ND1) mutation. A mutational screening of ND1 gene in a cohort of 1070 Han Chinese subjects LHON identified the m.3635G>A mutation in nine Chinese families with suggestively maternally transmitted LHON. Thirty-eight (22 males/16 females) of 162 matrilineal relatives in these families exhibited the variable severity and age-at-onset of optic neuropathy. Molecular analysis of their mitochondrial genomes identified the homoplasmic m.3635G>A mutation and distinct sets of polymorphisms belonging to the Asian haplogroups G2a1, R11a, D4, R11a, M7b2, G1a, F1a1, B4, and N9a3, respectively. Using cybrids constructed by transferring mitochondria from lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from one Chinese family into mtDNA-less (ρ(0)) cells, we showed ~27% decrease in the activity of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in mutant cybrids carrying the m.3635G>A mutation, compared with control cybrids. The respiratory deficiency caused by the m.3635G>A mutation results in decreased efficiency of mitochondrial ATP synthesis. These mitochondrial dysfunctions caused an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species in the mutant cybrids. The data provide the direct evidence for the m.3635G>A mutation leading to LHON. Our findings may provide new insights into the understanding of pathophysiology of LHON.

  14. N-hexane neuropathy in offset printers.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C M; Yu, C W; Fong, K Y; Leung, S Y; Tsin, T W; Yu, Y L; Cheung, T F; Chan, S Y

    1993-01-01

    In an offset printing factory with 56 workers, 20 (36%) developed symptomatic peripheral neuropathy due to exposure to n-hexane. Another 26 workers (46%) were found to have subclinical neuropathy. The initial change in the nerve conduction study was reduced amplitude of the sensory action potentials, followed by reduced amplitude of the motor action potentials, reduction in motor conduction velocities and increase in distal latencies. These changes indicate primary axonal degeneration with secondary demyelination. Sural nerve biopsy in a severe case showed giant axonal swellings due to accumulation of 10nm neurofilaments, myelin sheath attenuation and widening of nodal gaps. The development of neuropathy bore no direct relationship to the duration of exposure, hence factors such as individual susceptibility may be important. Optic neuropathy and CNS involvement were uncommon and autonomic neuropathy was not encountered. Images PMID:8505647

  15. Neuroprotective effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION).

    PubMed

    Chang, Chung-Hsing; Huang, Tzu-Lun; Huang, Shun-Ping; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), as administered in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION). Using laser-induced photoactivation of intravenously administered Rose Bengal in the optic nerve head of 60 adult male Wistar rats, an anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION) was inducted. Rats either immediately received G-CSF (subcutaneous injections) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for 5 consecutive days. Rats were euthanized at 4 weeks post infarct. Density of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) was counted using retrograde labeling of Fluoro-gold. Visual function was assessed by flash visual-evoked potentials (FVEP) at 4 weeks. TUNEL assay in the retinal sections and immunohistochemical staining of ED1 (marker of macrophage/microglia) were investigated in the optic nerve (ON) specimens. The RGC densities in the central and mid-peripheral retinas in the G-CSF treated rats were significantly higher than those of the PBS-treated rats (survival rate was 71.4% vs. 33.2% in the central retina; 61.8% vs. 22.7% in the mid-peripheral retina, respectively; both p < 0.05). FVEP measurements showed a significantly better preserved latency and amplitude of the p1 wave in the G-CSF-treated rats than that of the PBS-treated rats (latency120 ± 11 ms vs. 142 ± 12 ms, p = 0.03; amplitude 50 ± 11 μv vs. 31 ± 13 μv, p = 0.04). TUNEL assays showed fewer apoptotic cells in the retinal ganglion cell layers of G-CSF treated rats [2.1 ± 1.0 cells/high power field (HPF) vs. 8.0 ± 1.5/HPF; p = 0.0001]. In addition, the number of ED1 positive cells was attenuated at the optic nerve sections of G-CSF-treated rats (16 ± 6/HPF vs. 35 ± 10/HPF; p = 0.016). In conclusion, administration of G-CSF is neuroprotective in the rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, as demonstrated both structurally by RGC density and functionally by

  16. A Single Intravitreal Injection of Ranibizumab Provides No Neuroprotection in a Nonhuman Primate Model of Moderate-to-Severe Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Neil R.; Johnson, Mary A.; Nolan, Theresa; Guo, Yan; Bernstein, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Ranibizumab, a vascular endothelial growth factor-antagonist, is said to be neuroprotective when injected intravitreally in patients with nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). We evaluated the efficacy of a single intravitreal (IVT) injection of ranibizumab in a nonhuman primate model of NAION (pNAION). Methods We induced pNAION in one eye of four adult male rhesus monkeys using a laser-activated rose Bengal induction method. We then immediately injected the eye with either ranibizumab or normal saline (NS) intravitreally. We performed a clinical assessment, optical coherence tomography, electrophysiological testing, fundus photography, and fluorescein angiography in three of the animals (one animal developed significant retinal hemorrhages and, therefore, could not be analyzed completely) prior to induction, 1 day and 1, 2, and 4 weeks thereafter. Following the 4-week analysis of the first eye, we induced pNAION in the contralateral eye and then injected either ranibizumab or NS, whichever substance had not been injected in the first eye. We euthanized all animals 5 to 12 weeks after the final assessment of the second eye and performed both immunohistochemical and light and electron microscopic analyses of the retina and optic nerves of both eyes. Results A single IVT dose of ranibizumab administered immediately after induction of pNAION resulted in no significant reduction of clinical, electrophysiological, or histologic damage compared with vehicle-injected eyes. Conclusions A single IVT dose of ranibizumab is not neuroprotective when administered immediately after induction of pNAION. PMID:26624498

  17. Cell therapy using retinal progenitor cells shows therapeutic effect in a chemically-induced rotenone mouse model of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mansergh, Fiona C; Chadderton, Naomi; Kenna, Paul F; Gobbo, Oliviero L; Farrar, G Jane

    2014-11-01

    Primary mitochondrial disorders occur at a prevalence of one in 10 000; ∼50% of these demonstrate ocular pathology. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is the most common primary mitochondrial disorder. LHON results from retinal ganglion cell pathology, which leads to optic nerve degeneration and blindness. Over 95% of cases result from one of the three common mutations in mitochondrial genes MTND1, MTND4 and MTND6, which encode elements of the complex I respiratory chain. Various therapies for LHON are in development, for example, intravitreal injection of adeno-associated virus carrying either the yeast NDI1 gene or a specific subunit of mammalian Complex I have shown visual improvement in animal models. Given the course of LHON, it is likely that in many cases prompt administration may be necessary before widespread cell death. An alternative approach for therapy may be the use of stem cells to protect visual function; this has been evaluated by us in a rotenone-induced model of LHON. Freshly dissected embryonic retinal cells do not integrate into the ganglion cell layer (GCL), unlike similarly obtained photoreceptor precursors. However, cultured retinal progenitor cells can integrate in close proximity to the GCL, and act to preserve retinal function as assessed by manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, optokinetic responses and ganglion cell counts. Cell therapies for LHON therefore represent a promising therapeutic approach, and may be of particular utility in treating more advanced disease. PMID:24569607

  18. Cell therapy using retinal progenitor cells shows therapeutic effect in a chemically-induced rotenone mouse model of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Mansergh, Fiona C; Chadderton, Naomi; Kenna, Paul F; Gobbo, Oliviero L; Farrar, G Jane

    2014-01-01

    Primary mitochondrial disorders occur at a prevalence of one in 10 000; ∼50% of these demonstrate ocular pathology. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is the most common primary mitochondrial disorder. LHON results from retinal ganglion cell pathology, which leads to optic nerve degeneration and blindness. Over 95% of cases result from one of the three common mutations in mitochondrial genes MTND1, MTND4 and MTND6, which encode elements of the complex I respiratory chain. Various therapies for LHON are in development, for example, intravitreal injection of adeno-associated virus carrying either the yeast NDI1 gene or a specific subunit of mammalian Complex I have shown visual improvement in animal models. Given the course of LHON, it is likely that in many cases prompt administration may be necessary before widespread cell death. An alternative approach for therapy may be the use of stem cells to protect visual function; this has been evaluated by us in a rotenone-induced model of LHON. Freshly dissected embryonic retinal cells do not integrate into the ganglion cell layer (GCL), unlike similarly obtained photoreceptor precursors. However, cultured retinal progenitor cells can integrate in close proximity to the GCL, and act to preserve retinal function as assessed by manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, optokinetic responses and ganglion cell counts. Cell therapies for LHON therefore represent a promising therapeutic approach, and may be of particular utility in treating more advanced disease. PMID:24569607

  19. High-titer collapsin response-mediating protein-associated (CRMP-5) paraneoplastic optic neuropathy and Vitritis as the only clinical manifestations in a patient with small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Margolin, Edward; Flint, Andrew; Trobe, Jonathan D

    2008-03-01

    Paraneoplastic optic neuropathy (PON) is a rare syndrome usually associated with small cell lung carcinoma. In the 27 rigorously reported cases, neurologic manifestations other than visual loss have been present in all but 2. In the single case in which vision improved in response to treatment of the cancer, the collapsin response-mediating protein (CRMP)-5 titer did not change, and the ophthalmic examination was not detailed. We describe a patient with optic neuropathy and vitritis as the only clinical manifestations of PON marked by an extremely high titer of CRMP-5 antibody. Treatment of the underlying small cell lung cancer coincided with resolution of the visual abnormalities and a dramatic decrease in the CRMP-5 titer.

  20. Bilateral paraneoplastic optic neuropathy and unilateral retinal compromise in association with prostate cancer: a differential diagnostic challenge in a patient with unexplained visual loss

    PubMed Central

    Carboni, Giovannella; Forma, Gina; Bond, April D.; Adamus, Grazyna

    2012-01-01

    We report a 77-year-old Caucasian man with a 1-year complaint of unexplained visual loss and a 4-year history of prostate cancer. A complete ophthalmologic exam, Goldmann visual fields (GVFs), intravenous fluorescein angiography (IVFA), macular and disc optical coherence tomography (OCT), pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (PVEPs), and flash electroretinograms (ERGs) were performed. On examination, visual acuity was reduced bilaterally. Fundus exam showed juxtapapillary changes (OS > OD) and, in OS, disc pallor, peripheral RPE dropout and whitish retinal discoloration along the arcades. OCTs were normal OU. Cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) was suspected. A flash ERG was normal OD and markedly reduced and electronegative OS. An IVFA showed bilateral juxtapapillary staining and changes highly suggestive of sequelae of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) OS, in which a cilioretinal artery existed along the papillomacular bundle. GVFs showed bilateral blind spot enlargement and centrocecal scotomas, and PVEPs were delayed. These findings suggested cancer-associated optic neuropathy (CAON), confirmed by presence of anti-optic nerve autoantibodies (auto-Abs). No anti-retinal auto-Abs were found. CAON is a less common paraneoplastic manifestation than CAR and it is rarely observed in association with prostate cancer. A combination of visual function testing methods permitted the recognition, in this highly unusual case, of the concurrent presence of unilateral ERG changes most likely attributable to CRAO complications in OS, in all likelihood unrelated to CAON, and not to be confused with unilateral CAR. Auto-Ab testing in combination with visual function tests helps achieve a better understanding of the pathophysiology of vision loss in paraneoplastic visual syndromes. PMID:22569848

  1. Bilateral paraneoplastic optic neuropathy and unilateral retinal compromise in association with prostate cancer: a differential diagnostic challenge in a patient with unexplained visual loss.

    PubMed

    Carboni, Giovannella; Forma, Gina; Bond, April D; Adamus, Grazyna; Iannaccone, Alessandro

    2012-08-01

    We report a 77-year-old Caucasian man with a 1-year complaint of unexplained visual loss and a 4-year history of prostate cancer. A complete ophthalmologic exam, Goldmann visual fields (GVFs), intravenous fluorescein angiography (IVFA), macular and disc optical coherence tomography (OCT), pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (PVEPs), and flash electroretinograms (ERGs) were performed. On examination, visual acuity was reduced bilaterally. Fundus exam showed juxtapapillary changes (OS > OD) and, in OS, disc pallor, peripheral RPE dropout and whitish retinal discoloration along the arcades. OCTs were normal OU. Cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) was suspected. A flash ERG was normal OD and markedly reduced and electronegative OS. An IVFA showed bilateral juxtapapillary staining and changes highly suggestive of sequelae of central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) OS , in which a cilioretinal artery existed along the papillomacular bundle. GVFs showed bilateral blind spot enlargement and centrocecal scotomas, and PVEPs were delayed. These findings suggested cancer-associated optic neuropathy (CAON), confirmed by presence of anti-optic nerve autoantibodies (auto-Abs). No anti-retinal auto-Abs were found. CAON is a less common paraneoplastic manifestation than CAR and it is rarely observed in association with prostate cancer. A combination of visual function testing methods permitted the recognition, in this highly unusual case, of the concurrent presence of unilateral ERG changes most likely attributable to CRAO complications in OS, in all likelihood unrelated to CAON, and not to be confused with unilateral CAR. Auto-Ab testing in combination with visual function tests helps achieve a better understanding of the pathophysiology of vision loss in paraneoplastic visual syndromes.

  2. Protective effects of systemic treatment with methylprednisolone in a rodent model of non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION).

    PubMed

    Huang, Tzu-Lun; Huang, Shun-Ping; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Lin, Kung-Hung; Chang, Shu-Wen; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the protective effects of the administration of steroids on optic nerves (ON) and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in a rodent model of non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION). We induced rAION using rose bengal and argon laser irradiation in a photodynamic procedure on the optic discs of rats. The treated groups received methylprednisolone (MP) via peritoneal injection for 2 weeks. The control group received intraperitoneal injections of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) post-rAION. At the 4th week post-infarct, MP treatments significantly rescued the RGCs (mm(2)) in the central retinas (1920 ± 210, p < 0.001) and mid-peripheral retinas (950 ± 240, respectively, p = 0.018) compared with those of the PBS-treated rats (central: 900 ± 210 and mid-peripheral: 440 ± 180). Functional assessment with flash visual-evoked potentials demonstrated that P1 latency (ms) was shortened in the MP group compared to the PBS group (108 ± 14 and 147 ± 9, respectively, p < 0.001). In addition, the P1 amplitude (uV) was enhanced in the MP group compared to the PBS group (55 ± 12 and 41 ± 13, respectively, p < 0.05). TUNEL assays showed a decrease in the number of apoptotic cells in the RGC layers of MP-treated retinas compared to the PBS-treated group (p < 0.05). ED1 positive cells (/HPF) were significantly decreased in the ONs of the MP group compared to the PBS group (p < 0.001). In conclusion, systemic administration of MP had neuroprotective effects on RGC survival and ON function in the rAION animal model. PMID:25543054

  3. X-inactivation patterns in female Leber`s hereditary optic neuropathy patients do not support a strong X-linked determinant

    SciTech Connect

    Pegoraro, E.; Hoffman, E.P.; Carelli, V.; Cortelli, P.

    1996-02-02

    Leber`s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) accounts for about 3% of the cases of blindness in young adult males. The underlying mitochondrial pathogenesis of LHON has been well studied, with specific mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations of structural genes described and well characterized. However, enigmatic aspects of the disease are not explained by mutation data, such as the higher proportion of affected males, the later onset of the disease in females, and the presence of unaffected individuals with a high proportion of mutant mtDNA. A hypothesis which has been put forward to explain the unusual disease expression is a dual model of mtDNA and X-linked nuclear gene inheritance. If a nuclear X-linked modifier gene influences the expression of the mitochondrial-linked mutant gene then the affected females should be either homozygous for the nuclear determinant, or if heterozygous, lyonization should favor the mutant X. In order to determine if an X-linked gene predisposes to LHON phenotype we studied X-inactivation patterns in 35 females with known mtDNA mutations from 10 LHON pedigrees. Our results do not support a strong X-linked determinant in LHON cause: 2 of the 10 (20%) manifesting carriers showed skewing of X-inactivation, as did 3 of the 25 (12%) nonmanifesting carriers. 39 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Mitochondrial tRNAThr 15891C>G mutation was not associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in Han Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhaochang; Yu, Jinfang; Xia, Bohou; Zhuo, Guangchao

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were the most important causes of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). To date, approximately 25 LHON-associated mtDNA mutations have been identified in various ethnic populations. Three primary mutations, the 3460G > A, 11778G > A and 14484T > C, in genes encoding the subunits of respiratory chain complex I, were the most common LHON-associated mtDNA mutations. Moreover, secondary mutations in mt-tRNA genes have been reported increasingly to be associated with LHON, simply due to the high mutation rates of mt-tRNAs. There is a lack of functional analysis and a poor genetic evaluation of a certain mt-tRNA mutation, which failed to meet the classic pathogenicity scoring system. As a result, how to classify a pathogenic mutation in mt-tRNA gene became important for both geneticist and clinician to diagnosis the LHON or the suspicious of LHON. In this study, we reassessed the role of a point mutation in mt-tRNA(Thr) gene which had been reported to be a mutation associated with LHON, the pathogenicity of this mutation has been discussed in this context.

  5. A Meta-analysis of the association between different genotypes (G11778A, T14484C and G3460A) of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and visual prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong-Yu; Wang, Xia-Wei; Hong, Nan; Gu, Yang-Shun

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyze the influences of different genotypes (G11778A, T14484C and G3460A) of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) on visual prognosis. METHODS After a systematic literature search, all relevant studies evaluating the association between the three primary mutations of LHON and visual prognosis were included. All statistical tests were calculated with Revman 5.2 and STATA 12.0. RESULTS Ten independent studies were included finally. A significant association between the three primary mutations and prognostic vision over 0.3 were found in G11778A versus T14484C [odds ratio (OR)=0.10, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.05-0.17, P<0.001], G11778A versus G3460A (OR=0.18, 95%CI=0.09-0.37, P<0.001) and T14484C versus G3460A (OR=2.45, 95%CI=1.10-5.48, P<0.05). In addition, obtained by pairwise comparison, the vision during onset, age of onset and sex ratio of these three kinds of patients, have no statistical significance (P>0.05). CONCLUSION From pairwise comparison, we conclude that these three different genotypes of LHON are related to patients' visual prognosis. The T14484C patients might have a best prognostic vision, G3460A second, and G11778A worst. And there is little relation between the three different genotypes and patients' vision, age of onset and sex ratio. PMID:27803870

  6. Yeast NDI1 Improve Oxidative Phosphorylation Capacity and Increases Protection Against Oxidative Stress and Cell Death in Cells Carrying a Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Soon; Li, You-fen; Bai, Yidong

    2007-01-01

    G11778A in the subunit ND4 gene of NADH dehydrogenase complex is the most common primary mutation found in Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) patients. The NDI1 gene, which encodes the internal NADH -quinone oxidoreductase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was introduced into the nuclear genome of a mitochondrial defective human cell line, Le1.3.1, carrying the G11778A mutation. In transformant cell lines, LeNDI1-1 and -2, total and complex I-dependent respiration were fully restored and largely resistant to complex I inhibitor, rotenone, indicating a dominant role of NDI1 in the transfer of electrons in the host cells. Whereas the original mutant Le1.3.1 cell grows poorly in medium containing galactose, the transformants have a fully restored growth capacity in galactose medium, although the ATP production was not totally recovered. Furthermore, the increased oxidative stress in the cells carrying the G11778A mutation was alleviated in transformants, demonstrated by a decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) level. Finally, transformants were also shown to be desensitized to induction to apoptosis and also exhibit greater resistance to paraquat-induced cell death. It is concluded that the yeast ND11 enzyme can improve the oxidative phosphorylation capacity in cells carrying the G11778A mutation and protect the cells from oxidative stress and cell death. PMID:17320357

  7. Two families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy carrying G11778A and T14502C mutations with haplogroup H2a2a1 in mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chen; Wei, Tanwei; Hu, Bo; Peng, Chunyan; Qiu, Xueping; Wei, Li; Yan, Ming

    2015-08-01

    The mitochondrial haplogroup has been reported to affect the clinical expression of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The present study aimed to investigate the interaction between mutations and the haplogroup of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in families. Two unrelated families with LHON were enrolled in the study, and clinical, genetic and molecular characterizations were determined in the affected and unaffected family members. Polymerase chain reaction direct sequencing was performed using 24 pairs of overlapping primers for whole mtDNA to screen for mutations and haplogroup. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to evaluate the pathogenic effect of these mtDNA mutations and the haplogroup. The G11778A mutation was identified in the two families. In addition, the members of family 2 exhibited the T14502C mutation and those in family 1 exhibited the T3394C and T14502C mutations, which were regarded as secondary mutations. The penetrance of visual loss in families 1 and 2 were 30.8 and 33.3%, respectively. In addition, the two families were found to be in the H2a2a1 haplogroup. In this limited sample size, it was demonstrated that the H2a2a1 haplogroup had a possible protective effect against LHON. Additional modifying factors, including environmental factors, lifestyle, estrogen levels and nuclear genes may also be important in LHON.

  8. Fifteen novel mutations in the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1, 2, 3, 4, 4L, 5 and 6 genes from Iranian patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON).

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Zahra; Didari, Elmira; Arastehkani, Ahoura; Ghodsinejad, Vadieh; Aryani, Omid; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Houshmand, Massoud

    2013-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is an optic nerve dysfunction resulting from mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which is transmitted in a maternal pattern of inheritance. It is caused by three primary point mutations: G11778A, G3460A and T14484C; in the mitochondrial genome. These mutations are sufficient to induce the disease, accounting for the majority of LHON cases, and affect genes that encode for the different subunits of mitochondrial complexes I and III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Other mutations are secondary mutations associated with the primary mutations. The purpose of this study was to determine MT-ND variations in Iranian patients with LHON. In order to determine the prevalence and distribution of mitochondrial mutations in the LHON patients, their DNA was studied using PCR and DNA sequencing analysis. Sequencing of MT-ND genes from 35 LHON patients revealed a total of 44 nucleotide variations, in which fifteen novel variations-A14020G, A13663G, C10399T, C4932A, C3893G, C10557A, C12012A, C13934T, G4596A, T12851A, T4539A, T4941A, T13255A, T14353C and del A 4513-were observed in 27 LHON patients. However, eight patients showed no variation in the ND genes. These mutations contribute to the current database of mtDNA polymorphisms in LHON patients and may facilitate the definition of disease-related mutations in human mtDNA. This research may help to understand the disease mechanism and open up new diagnostic opportunities for LHON.

  9. Inverted optical intrinsic response accompanied by decreased cerebral blood flow are related to both neuronal inhibition and excitation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zengguang; Cao, Pengjia; Sun, Pengcheng; Zhao, Linna; Li, Liming; Tong, Shanbao; Lu, Yiliang; Yan, Yan; Chen, Yao; Chai, Xinyu

    2016-01-01

    Negative hemodynamic response has been widely reported in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, however its origin is still controversial. Optical intrinsic signal (OIS) imaging can be used to study brain activity by simultaneously recording hemodynamic signals at different wavelengths with high spatial resolution. In this study, we found transcorneal electrical stimulation (TcES) could elicit both positive OIS response (POR) and negative OIS response (NOR) in cats’ visual cortex. We then investigated the property of this negative response to TcES and its relationship with cerebral blood flow (CBF) and neuronal activity. Results from laser speckle contrast imaging showed decreased CBF in the NOR region while increased CBF in the POR region. Both planar and laminar electrophysiological recordings in the middle (500–700 μm) cortical layers demonstrated that decreased and increased neuronal activities were coexisted in the NOR region. Furthermore, decreased neuronal activity was also detected in the deep cortical layers in the NOR region. This work provides evidence that the negative OIS together with the decreased CBF should be explained by mechanisms of both neuronal inhibition and excitation within middle cortical layers. Our results would be important for interpreting neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the negative BOLD signals. PMID:26860040

  10. [Genetics of neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Gess, B; Schirmacher, A; Young, P

    2013-02-01

    Hereditary neuropathies belong to the most common neurogenetic disorders. They appear mostly as sensory and motor neuropathies but there are also pure sensory, pure motor as well as sensory and autonomic hereditary neuropathies. In clinical practice, knowledge of hereditary neuropathies is important in order to recognize them among polyneuropathies and achieve a successful genetic diagnosis. The molecular genetics of hereditary neuropathies are very heterogeneous with currently more than 40 known disease-causing genes. The 4 most common genes account for almost 90% of the genetically diagnosed hereditary neuropathies. In this review article we provide an overview of the currently known genes and propose a rational genetic work-up protocol of the most common genes.

  11. Peripheral Neuropathy: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research News Make a Difference Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy Print This Page Peripheral Neuropathy symptoms usually start ... slowly over many years. The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy often include: A sensation of wearing an invisible “ ...

  12. Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Mario A.; Shy, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Charcot Marie Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of inherited peripheral neuropathies in which the neuropathy is the sole or primary component of the disorder, as opposed to diseases in which the neuropathy is part of a more generalized neurological or multisystem syndrome. Due to the great genetic heterogeneity of this condition, it can be challenging for the general neurologist to diagnose patients with specific types of CMT. Here, we review the biology of the inherited peripheral neuropathies, delineate major phenotypic features of the CMT subtypes and suggest strategies for focusing genetic testing. PMID:23642725

  13. Defining “occludable” angles in population surveys: drainage angle width, peripheral anterior synechiae, and glaucomatous optic neuropathy in east Asian people

    PubMed Central

    Foster, P J; Aung, T; Nolan, W P; Machin, D; Baasanhu, J; Khaw, P T; Alsbirk, P-H; Lee, P S; Seah, S K L; Johnson, G J

    2004-01-01

    Background/aim: A current consensus in epidemiological studies of primary angle closure (PAC) is to diagnose the condition only if the posterior (usually pigmented) trabecular meshwork is seen for less than 90° of the angle circumference, termed an “occludable angle.” The authors sought to assess the validity of this epidemiological classification by exploring the relation between drainage angle width, peripheral anterior synechiae (PAS) and glaucomatous optic neuropathy (GON). Methods: 918 Mongolians and 995 Chinese Singaporeans, both groups aged 40 years and older were examined in two population based surveys. Gonioscopic angle width was graded in five categories (0 = closed to 4 = wide open) according the scheme described by Shaffer. Cases with secondary PAS were excluded. Results: The rate of PAS was between 0.3% and 1.7% in people with wide angles (grades 3 and 4). In those with grade 2 angles, PAS were seen in between 8% of eyes. In eyes with grade 1 angles, the rate rose to 17% in Chinese Singaporeans, and 31% in Mongolians. The odds of PAS were higher in people with narrower angles. However, there was a greater absolute number of people with PAS whose drainage angles were classified as “not occludable” than those classified “occludable.” Conclusions: The traditional view that primary angle closure becomes a significant possibility in drainage angles of ⩽ grade 2 (approximately 20°) is valid in east Asians. The definition of an “occludable” angle examined here excludes many people with PAS. This probably serves to underemphasise the role of PAC in population surveys of glaucoma prevalence in Asian people. PMID:15031161

  14. A simple oligonucleotide biochip capable of rapidly detecting known mitochondrial DNA mutations in Chinese patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON).

    PubMed

    Du, Wei-Dong; Chen, Gang; Cao, Hui-Min; Jin, Qing-Hui; Liao, Rong-Feng; He, Xiang-Cheng; Chen, Da-Ben; Huang, Shu-Ren; Zhao, Hui; Lv, Yong-Mei; Tang, Hua-Yang; Tang, Xian-Fa; Wang, Yong-Qing; Sun, Song; Zhao, Jian-Long; Zhang, Xue-Jun

    2011-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally transmitted disease. Clinically, no efficient assay protocols have been available. In this study, we aimed to develop an oligonucleotide biochip specialized for detection of known base substitution mutations in mitochondrial DNA causing LHON and to investigate frequencies of LHON relevant variants in Anhui region of China. Thirty-two pairs of oligonucleotide probes matched with the mutations potentially linked to LHON were covalently immobilized. Cy5-lablled targets were amplified from blood DNA samples by a multiplex PCR method. Two kinds of primary mutations 11778 G > A and 14484 T > C from six confirmed LHON patients were interrogated to validate this biochip format. Further, fourteen Chinese LHON pedigrees and twenty-five unrelated healthy individuals were investigated by the LHON biochip, direct sequencing and pyrosequencing, respectively. The biochip was found to be able efficiently to discriminate homoplasmic and heteroplasmic mtDNA mutations in LHON. Biochip analysis revealed that twelve of eighteen LHON symptomatic cases from the 14 Chinese pedigree harbored the mutations either 11778G > A, 14484T > C or 3460G A, respectively, accounting for 66.7%. The mutation 11778G > A in these patients was homoplasmic and prevalent (55.5%, 10 of 18 cases). The mutations 3460G > A and 3394T > C were found to co-exist in one LHON case. The mutation 13708G > A appeared in one LHON pedigree. Smaller amount of sampling and reaction volume, easier target preparation, fast and high-throughput were the main advantages of the biochip over direct DNA sequencing and pyrosequencing. Our findings suggested that primary mutations of 11778G > A, 14484T > C or 3460G > A are main variants of mtDNA gene leading to LHON in China. The biochip would easily be implemented in clinical diagnosis.

  15. Painful Traumatic Trigeminal Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rafael, Benoliel; Sorin, Teich; Eli, Eliav

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses neuropathic pain of traumatic origin affecting the trigeminal nerve. This syndrome has been termed painful traumatic trigeminal neuropathy by the International Headache Society and replaces atypical odontalgia, deafferentation pain, traumatic neuropathy, and phantom toothache. The discussion emphasizes the diagnosis and the early and late management of injuries to the trigeminal nerve and subsequent painful conditions.

  16. Treatment of peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, M; Tandon, D; Berardelli, A

    1985-01-01

    There are three general approaches to treatment of peripheral neuropathy. First, an attempt should be made to reverse the pathophysiological process if its nature can be elucidated. Second, nerve metabolism can be stimulated and regeneration encouraged. Third, even if the neuropathy itself cannot be improved, symptomatic therapy can be employed. This review outlines the options available for each approach. PMID:3003254

  17. Gene delivery to mitochondria by targeting modified adenoassociated virus suppresses Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Koilkonda, Rajeshwari D; Chou, Tsung-Han; Porciatti, Vittorio; Ozdemir, Sacide S; Chiodo, Vince; Boye, Sanford L; Boye, Shannon E; Hauswirth, William W; Lewin, Alfred S; Guy, John

    2012-05-15

    To introduce DNA into mitochondria efficiently, we fused adenoassociated virus capsid VP2 with a mitochondrial targeting sequence to carry the mitochondrial gene encoding the human NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase subunit 4 (ND4). Expression of WT ND4 in cells with the G11778A mutation in ND4 led to restoration of defective ATP synthesis. Furthermore, with injection into the rodent eye, human ND4 DNA levels in mitochondria reached 80% of its mouse homolog. The construct expressed in most inner retinal neurons, and it also suppressed visual loss and optic atrophy induced by a mutant ND4 homolog. The adenoassociated virus cassette accommodates genes of up to ∼5 kb in length, thus providing a platform for introduction of almost any mitochondrial gene and perhaps even allowing insertion of DNA encompassing large deletions of mtDNA, some associated with aging, into the organelle of adults.

  18. Persisting nutritional neuropathy amongst former war prisoners.

    PubMed Central

    Gill, G V; Bell, D R

    1982-01-01

    Of 898 former Far East prisoners of war, assessed between 1968 and 1981, 49 (5.5%) had evidence of persisting symptomatic neurological disease dating back to their periods of malnutrition in captivity. The commonest syndromes were peripheral neuropathy (often of "burning foot" type), optic atrophy, and sensori-neural deafness. Though nutritional neuropathies disappeared soon after release in most ex-Far East prisoners of war, in some they have persisted up to 36 years since exposure to the nutritional insult. PMID:6292369

  19. Acetylator phenotype in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    McLaren, E H; Burden, A C; Moorhead, P J

    1977-07-30

    The proportions of slow and fast acetylators in a group of diabetics with symptomatic peripheral neuropathy were compared with those in a group of diabetics who had had the disease for at least 10 years without developing neuropathy. There was a significantly higher proportion of fast acetylators in the group of diabetics without neuropathy than in those with neuropathy or in the normal population. Hence genetic factors separate from the diabetic diathesis may determine the development of neuropathy in any particular diabetic.

  20. Hereditary sensory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2004-05-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSNs) are a group of genetically determined peripheral neuropathies with prominent disturbance of the peripheral sensory neurons. They are characterized by sensory loss, insensitivity to pain, a variable degree of muscle weakness and wasting, as well as autonomic features. Frequent complications are foot ulcerations and infections that may lead to osteomyelitis, followed by necrosis and amputations. Consequently, the hereditary sensory neuropathies have also been termed ulceromutilating neuropathies. On the other hand, in the presence of additional motor weakness, they have been subclassified among the group of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disorders. Sporadic and familial cases with different modes of inheritance are known to affect both children and adults. The most prevalent forms of the autosomal dominantly inherited hereditary sensory neuropathies are HSN I and CMT 2b. HSN I is associated with mutations in the SPTLC1 gene, whereas mutations in the RAB7 gene have been identified in CMT 2b. However, at least one more hitherto unknown gene responsible for autosomal-dominant hereditary sensory neuropathies must exist. Autosomal-recessive hereditary sensory neuropathies types III and IV, and probably also type V, result from mutations in the IKBKAP and NTRK1 genes. Very recently, the gene in HSN II (HSN2) has been identified. A spontaneous autosomal-recessive mutation in the Cct4 gene has been reported in the Sprague-Dawley rat strain with early onset sensory neuropathy. Although no curative treatment is available so far, and current therapy is limited to symptom relief, these molecular genetic advances in knowledge about the hereditary sensory neuropathies can be translated into clinical practice by improving diagnosis and genetic counseling. They will also be the basis for functional studies in the future. PMID:15319794

  1. A real-time ARMS PCR/high-resolution melt curve assay for the detection of the three primary mitochondrial mutations in Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Fergus; O’Dwyer, Veronica; Neylan, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Approximately 95% of patients who are diagnosed with Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) have one of three mitochondrial point mutations responsible for the disease, G3460A, G11778A, and T14484C. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel multiplex real-time amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) PCR combined with high-resolution melt curves to identify the individual mutations involved. The study aimed to provide a more robust, cost- and time-effective mutation detection strategy than that offered with currently available methods. The assay reported in this study will allow diagnostic laboratories to avoid costly next-generation sequencing (NGS) assays for most patients with LHON and to focus resources on patients with unknown mutations that require further analysis. Methods The test uses a combination of multiplex allele-specific PCR (ARMS PCR) in combination with a high-resolution melt curve analysis to detect the presence of the mutations in G3460A, G11778A, and T14484C. PCR primer sets were designed to produce a control PCR product and PCR products only in the presence of the mutations in 3460A, 11778A, and 14484C in a multiplex single tube format. Products produce discrete well-separated melt curves to clearly detect the mutations. Results This novel real-time ARMS PCR/high-resolution melt curve assay accurately detected 95% of the mutations that cause LHON. The test has proved to be robust, cost- and time-effective with the real-time closed tube system taking approximately 1 h to complete. Conclusions A novel real-time ARMS PCR/high-resolution melt curve assay is described for the detection of the three primary mitochondrial mutations in LHON. This test provides a simple, robust, easy-to-read output that is cost- and time-effective, thus providing an alternative method to individual endpoint PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), PCR followed by Sanger sequencing or pyrosequencing, and next-generation sequencing

  2. Electrodiagnosis of peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ross, Mark A

    2012-05-01

    Electrodiagnostic studies are an important component of the evaluation of patients with suspected peripheral nerve disorders. The pattern of findings and the features that are seen on the motor and sensory nerve conduction studies and needle electromyography can help to identify the type of neuropathy, define the underlying pathophysiology (axonal or demyelinating), and ultimately help to narrow the list of possible causes. This article reviews the electrodiagnostic approach to and interpretation of findings in patients with peripheral neuropathies.

  3. Permanent Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The health risks and side effects of fluoroquinolone use include the risk of tendon rupture and myasthenia gravis exacerbation, and on August 15, 2013, the Food and Drug Administration updated its warning to include the risk of permanent peripheral neuropathy. We present a case of fluoroquinolone-induced peripheral neuropathy in a patient treated for clinically diagnosed urinary tract infection with ciprofloxacin antibiotic. PMID:26425618

  4. [Painful neuropathies and small fiber involvement].

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, J-P

    2014-12-01

    It is customary to consider that a purely sensory and painful neuropathy accompanied by normal electroneuromyographic examination may be or must be a small fiber neuropathy. This leads to perform specific tests, such as measuring the intra-epidermal nerve fiber density on skin biopsy or neurophysiological tests, such as evoked potentials to noxious stimuli (laser) or quantification of thermal sensory thresholds. However, these tests are only sensitive to the loss of small fibers (A-delta and C), which does not reflect the mechanisms responsible for peripheral neuropathic pain. Selective loss of small sensory fibers inherently generates a sensory deficit that does not necessarily present a painful character. Also, assigning the cause of a painful neuropathy to a small fiber neuropathy has no pathophysiological sense, although there are indirect links between these two conditions. In fact, it is not possible to explain univocally peripheral neuropathic pain, which reflects complex and diverse mechanisms, involving different types of nerve fibers. In this context, the clinical and laboratory approach must be improved to better understand the underlying mechanisms. It is imperative to interpret the data provided by laboratory tests and to correlate these data to the clinical signs and symptoms presented by the patients. Thus, one must go beyond many a priori and misinterpretations that unfortunately exist in this area at present and are not based on any solid pathophysiological basis.

  5. Diabetic neuropathy in children.

    PubMed

    Mah, Jean K; Pacaud, Danièle

    2014-01-01

    The worldwide burden of diabetes and its complications in children continues to increase due to the rise in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Although overt diabetic neuropathy is rarely present in children and adolescents with diabetes, subclinical diabetic neuropathy has been estimated to occur in approximately half of all children with type 1 diabetes with a duration of 5 years or longer and up to 25% of pediatric patients with newly diagnosed diabetes have abnormal findings on nerve conduction studies. The present review on the state of pediatric diabetic neuropathy covers the definition, prevalence, pathogenesis, diagnosis, risk factors, and possible treatment approaches specific to children and adolescents with diabetes. It also highlights the many unknowns in this field. Nonetheless, new emerging interventions that can either prevent or delay the progression of diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications may become available in the near future. Until specific interventions for diabetic neuropathy are available for use in children, it will be hard to justify screening for neuropathy other than through clinical assessment. Meanwhile, the search for quicker, easily administered, and quantifiable tests for diabetic neuropathy and efforts to establish valid pediatric norms for well-established measures used in adults will need to continue.

  6. Intravenous immunoglobulins in peripheral neuropathy associated with vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Y; Uziel, Y; Zandman, G; Amital, H; Sherer, Y; Langevitz, P; Goldman, B; Shoenfeld, Y

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To present patients who exhibited various inflammatory diseases accompanied with vasculitic peripheral neuropathies for which intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) was used for treatment. Methods: Six patients with Sjögren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), vaccination induced vasculitis, Churg-Strauss vasculitis, mixed cryoglobulinaemia associated with hepatitis C infection, or sarcoidosis were included. All developed vasculitic peripheral neuropathy, and were treated with high dose IVIg (2 g/kg body weight). The patients were followed up for 1–5 years after this treatment. Results: In four patients (Sjögren's syndrome, Churg-Strauss vasculitis, SLE, and vaccination induced vasculitis) the neuropathy resolved after IVIg treatment. Conclusion: IVIg may be beneficial in cases of resistant vasculitic peripheral neuropathy. IVIg should probably be considered as a sole or adjuvant treatment for patients with contraindications to conventional treatment, or alternatively, for patients in whom conventional treatment has failed. PMID:14644864

  7. [Acute optic neuropathy: differential diagnoses].

    PubMed

    Buompadre, María Celeste

    2013-09-01

    Introduccion. La alteracion funcional del nervio optico se caracteriza por un deficit en la agudeza visual, en la vision cromatica y en el campo visual, defecto pupilar aferente y, en algunos casos, edema del nervio o atrofia y palidez. Objetivo. Describir el espectro de neuropatias opticas agudas, su clinica, diagnostico y tratamiento, con mayor interes en aquellas de presentacion en la edad pediatrica. Desarrollo. La neuritis optica puede ser monofasica, recurrente o el componente de un cuadro desmielinizante polisintomatico. El objetivo del tratamiento es reducir el numero y la gravedad de los ataques y prevenir discapacidad. La infecciosa es secundaria a diferentes microorganismos (bacterias, virus, hongos y protozoos). El tratamiento depende de la etiologia. La isquemica anterior no arteritica o idiopatica es la forma mas frecuente y es secundaria a enfermedad de pequeños vasos (ciliares posteriores). La neuropatia optica hereditaria o de Leber representa una causa importante de afectacion visual cronica y se caracteriza por la afectacion selectiva de las celulas ganglionares de la retina. Hasta el momento, la terapia solo es de apoyo. En el papiledema asociado a hipertension endocraneal, la agudeza visual generalmente se conserva pero existe aumento de la mancha ciega. El tratamiento se basa en disminuir la hipertension y el factor etiologico si existe. Conclusiones. Las neuropatias opticas agudas constituyen un amplio grupo de entidades, de etiologia diversa y con un pronostico visual variable. La presencia de signos del examen neurologico, fondo de ojo y neuroimagenes pueden orientar hacia el diagnostico y tratamiento oportuno.

  8. Inherited peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Keller, M P; Chance, P F

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary disorders of the peripheral nerves constitute a group of frequently encountered neurological diseases. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1 (CMT1) is genetically heterogeneous and characterized by demyelination with moderately to severely reduced nerve conduction velocities, absent muscle stretch reflexes and onion bulb formation. Genetic loci for CMT1 map to chromosome 17 (CMT1A), chromosome 1 (CMT1B), and another unknown autosome (CMT1C). CMT1A is most often associated with a tandem 1.5-megabase (Mb) duplication in chromosome 17p11.2-12, or in rare patients may result from a point mutation in the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene. CMT1 B result from point mutations in the myelin protein zero (Po or MPZ) gene. The molecular defect in CMT1 C is unknown. Mutations in the early growth response 2 gene (EGR2) are also associated with demyelinating neuropathy. Other rare forms of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies map to chromosome 8q, 10q, and 11q. X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMTX), which has clinical features similar to CMT1, is associated with mutations in the connexin32 gene. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2 (CMT2) is characterized by normal or mildly reduced nerve conduction velocity with decreased amplitude and axonal loss without hypertrophic features. One form of CMT2 maps to chromosome 1 p36 (CMT2A), another to chromosome 3p (CMT2B) and another to 7p (CMT2D). Dejerine-Sottas disease (DSD), also called hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type III (HMSNIII), is a severe, infantile-onset demyelinating polyneuropathy that may be associated with point mutations in either the PMP22 gene or the Po gene and shares considerable clinical and pathological features with CMT1. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder that results in a recurrent, episodic demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP is associated with a 1.5-Mb deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-12 and results from reduced

  9. Herpes zoster laryngitis accompanied by Ramsay Hunt syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lee, Joon Kyoo; Joo, Young Eun; Lim, Sang Chul

    2013-01-01

    The most common presentation of herpes zoster in the head and neck region is called Ramsay Hunt syndrome (RHS), which rarely accompanies multiple cranial neuropathy. Herpes zoster also involves the mucous membrane of the tongue, palate, pharynx, and larynx. Herpes zoster infection of the larynx accompanied by Ramsay Hunt syndrome with cranial polyneuropathy is extremely rare, with only few reported cases in the literature. At the time of this report, a review of the medical literature disclosed 4 reported cases of herpes zoster laryngitis accompanied by Ramsay Hunt syndrome. Herein, we present 2 additional cases and report the clinical outcome of cranial polyneuropathy with a review of the literature.

  10. Clinical description of toxic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Little, Ann A; Albers, James W

    2015-01-01

    Toxic neuropathy, although rare, is an important consideration in the setting of a known or suspected toxic exposure in the workplace or other environment. This chapter discusses the clinical and electrodiagnostic evaluation of peripheral neuropathies, highlighting findings that direct further workup and may point to specific toxins as etiology. The difficulty of establishing causality of a toxin in relation to peripheral neuropathy is discussed; guidelines for establishing causality are presented. Examples of common industrial toxins are listed, including their typical industrial uses and their mechanisms of action in producing neuropathy. Characteristic clinical presentations of specific toxic neuropathies are highlighted with selected case studies. PMID:26563794

  11. Acetylator phenotype in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    McLaren, E H; Burden, A C; Moorhead, P J

    1977-01-01

    The proportions of slow and fast acetylators in a group of diabetics with symptomatic peripheral neuropathy were compared with those in a group of diabetics who had had the disease for at least 10 years without developing neuropathy. There was a significantly higher proportion of fast acetylators in the group of diabetics without neuropathy than in those with neuropathy or in the normal population. Hence genetic factors separate from the diabetic diathesis may determine the development of neuropathy in any particular diabetic. PMID:871863

  12. Early applications of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) can stabilize the blood–optic-nerve barrier and ameliorate inflammation in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION)

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yao-Tseng; Huang, Tzu-Lun; Huang, Sung-Ping; Chang, Chung-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was reported to have a neuroprotective effect in a rat model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION model). However, the therapeutic window and anti-inflammatory effects of G-CSF in a rAION model have yet to be elucidated. Thus, this study aimed to determine the therapeutic window of G-CSF and investigate the mechanisms of G-CSF via regulation of optic nerve (ON) inflammation in a rAION model. Rats were treated with G-CSF on day 0, 1, 2 or 7 post-rAION induction for 5 consecutive days, and a control group were treated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Visual function was assessed by flash visual evoked potentials at 4 weeks post-rAION induction. The survival rate and apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells were determined by FluoroGold labeling and TUNEL assay, respectively. ON inflammation was evaluated by staining of ED1 and Iba1, and ON vascular permeability was determined by Evans Blue extravasation. The type of macrophage polarization was evaluated using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The protein levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were analyzed by western blotting. A therapeutic window during which G-CSF could rescue visual function and retinal ganglion cell survival was demonstrated at day 0 and day 1 post-infarct. Macrophage infiltration was reduced by 3.1- and 1.6-fold by G-CSF treatment starting on day 0 and 1 post-rAION induction, respectively, compared with the PBS-treated group (P<0.05). This was compatible with 3.3- and 1.7-fold reductions in ON vascular permeability after G-CSF treatment compared with PBS treatment (P<0.05). Microglial activation was increased by 3.8- and 3.2-fold in the early (beginning treatment at day 0 or 1) G-CSF-treated group compared with the PBS-treated group (P<0.05). Immediate (within 30 mins of infarct) treatment with G-CSF also induced M2 microglia/macrophage activation. The cytokine levels were lower in the group that received immediate G-CSF treatment

  13. Mitochondria and peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Vital, Anne; Vital, Claude

    2012-12-01

    There has been considerable progress during the past 24 years in the molecular genetics of mitochondrial DNA and related nuclear DNA mutations, and more than 100 nerve biopsies from hereditary neuropathies related to mitochondrial cytopathy have been accurately examined. Neuropathies were first reported in diseases related to point mutations of mitochondrial DNA, but they proved to be a prominent feature of the phenotype in mitochondrial disorders caused by defects in nuclear DNA, particularly in 3 genes: polymerase gamma 1 (POLG1), mitofusin 2 (MFN2), and ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 1 (GDAP1). Most patients have sensory-motor neuropathy, sometimes associated with ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, seizures, parkinsonism, myopathy, or visceral disorders. Some cases are caused by consanguinity, but most are sporadic with various phenotypes mimicking a wide range of other etiologies. Histochemistry on muscle biopsy, as well as identification of crystalloid inclusions at electron microscopy, may provide a diagnostic clue to mitochondriopathy, but nerve biopsy is often less informative. Nevertheless, enlarged mitochondria containing distorted or amputated cristae are highly suggestive, particularly when located in the Schwann cell cytoplasm. Also noticeable are clusters of regenerating myelinated fibers surrounded by concentric Schwann cell processes, and such onion bulb-like formations are frequently observed in neuropathies caused by GDAP1 mutations. PMID:23147504

  14. Diabetic Neuropathy: Mechanisms to Management

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, James L.; Vincent, Andrea; Cheng, Thomas; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathy is the most common and debilitating complication of diabetes and results in pain, decreased motility, and amputation. Diabetic neuropathy encompasses a variety of forms whose impact ranges from discomfort to death. Hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in diabetic neurons and results in activation of multiple biochemical pathways. These activated pathways are a major source of damage and are potential therapeutic targets in diabetic neuropathy. Though therapies are available to alleviate the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy, few options are available to eliminate the root causes. The immense physical, psychological, and economic cost of diabetic neuropathy underscores the need for causally targeted therapies. This review covers the pathology, epidemiology, biochemical pathways, and prevention of diabetic neuropathy, as well as discusses current symptomatic and causal therapies and novel approaches to identify therapeutic targets. PMID:18616962

  15. Genetics Home Reference: ataxia neuropathy spectrum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions ataxia neuropathy spectrum ataxia neuropathy spectrum Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ataxia neuropathy spectrum is part of a group of conditions ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: small fiber neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions small fiber neuropathy small fiber neuropathy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Small fiber neuropathy is a condition characterized by severe pain attacks ...

  17. Sodium Channels, Mitochondria, and Axonal Degeneration in Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Persson, Anna-Karin; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Estacion, Mark; Black, Joel A; Waxman, Stephen G

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral neuropathy results from damage to peripheral nerves and is often accompanied by pain in affected limbs. Treatment represents an unmet medical need and a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying axonal injury is needed. Longer nerve fibers tend to degenerate first (length-dependence), and patients carrying pathogenic mutations throughout life usually become symptomatic in mid- or late-life (time-dependence). The activity of voltage-gated sodium channels can contribute to axonal injury and sodium channel gain-of-function mutations have been linked to peripheral neuropathy. Recent studies have implicated sodium channel activity, mitochondrial compromise, and reverse-mode Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange in time- and length-dependent axonal injury. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms underlying axonal injury in peripheral neuropathy may provide new therapeutic strategies for this painful and debilitating condition.

  18. Arsenical peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Liberty; Vale, Allister; Adcock, Jane E

    2010-02-01

    A 49-year-old white man returned urgently to the UK after spending 3 months in Goa. He had a several week history of vomiting, weight loss, a widespread desquamating skin rash, and symptoms and signs of a progressive painful sensorimotor neuropathy. He had a mild normocytic anaemia and lymphopenia. Nerve conduction studies revealed a severe predominantly axonal large fibre sensorimotor neuropathy, confirmed on subsequent sural nerve biopsy. Once he had left Goa most of his symptoms started to rapidly settle although the neuropathic symptoms remained severe. Arsenic poisoning was suspected. A spot urine arsenic concentration was 300 microg/l, confirming the diagnosis. He was treated with chelation therapy. Deliberate arsenic poisoning was highly likely.

  19. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Clarke, B F; Ewing, D J; Campbell, I W

    1979-10-01

    This review attempts to outline the present understanding of diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The clinical features have been increasinly recognised but knowledge of the localization and morphology of the lesions and their pathogenesis remains fragmentary. A metabolic causation as postulated in somatic nerves accords best with clinical observations. Most bodily systems, particularly the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and urogenital, are involved with added disturbances of thermoregulatory function and pupillary reflexes. Possible effects on neuroendocrine and peptidergic secretion and respiratory control await definition. Current interest centres around the development of a new generation of tests of autonomic nerve function that are simple, non-invasive, reproducible and allow precision in diagnosis and accurate quantitation. Most are based on cardiovascular reflexes and abnormality in them is assumed to reflect autonomic damage elsewhere. Probably no single test suffices and a battery of tests reflecting both parasympathetic and sympathetic function is preferable. Little is known of the natural history. The prevalence may be greater than previously suspected and although symptoms are mild in the majority, a few develop florid features. The relation of control and duration of diabetes to the onset and progression of autonomic neuropathy is not clearly established. Once tests of autonomic function become abnormal they usually remain abnormal. Symptomatic autonomic neuropathy carries a greatly increased mortality rate possibly due to indirect mechanisms such as renal failure and direct mechanisms such as cardio-resiratory arrest. Improved treatment of some of the more disabling symptoms has been possible in recent years. PMID:387501

  20. An early diagnostic tool for diabetic peripheral neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Kambiz, Shoista; van Neck, Johan W; Cosgun, Saniye G; van Velzen, Marit H N; Janssen, Joop A M J L; Avazverdi, Naim; Hovius, Steven E R; Walbeehm, Erik T

    2015-01-01

    The skin's rewarming rate of diabetic patients is used as a diagnostic tool for early diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy. At present, the relationship between microvascular changes in the skin and diabetic neuropathy is unclear in streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the skin rewarming rate in diabetic rats is related to microvascular changes and whether this is accompanied by changes observed in classical diagnostic methods for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Computer-assisted infrared thermography was used to assess the rewarming rate after cold exposure on the plantar skin of STZ diabetic rats' hind paws. Peripheral neuropathy was determined by the density of intra-epidermal nerve fibers (IENFs), mechanical sensitivity, and electrophysiological recordings. Data were obtained in diabetic rats at four, six, and eight weeks after the induction of diabetes and in controls. Four weeks after the induction of diabetes, a delayed rewarming rate, decreased skin blood flow and decreased density of IENFs were observed. However, the mechanical hyposensitivity and decreased motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) developed 6 and 8 weeks after the induction of diabetes. Our study shows that the skin rewarming rate is related to microvascular changes in diabetic rats. Moreover, the skin rewarming rate is a non-invasive method that provides more information for an earlier diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy than the classical monofilament test and MNCV in STZ induced diabetic rats.

  1. An Early Diagnostic Tool for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kambiz, Shoista; van Neck, Johan W.; Cosgun, Saniye G.; van Velzen, Marit H. N.; Janssen, Joop A. M. J. L.; Avazverdi, Naim; Hovius, Steven E. R.; Walbeehm, Erik T.

    2015-01-01

    The skin’s rewarming rate of diabetic patients is used as a diagnostic tool for early diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy. At present, the relationship between microvascular changes in the skin and diabetic neuropathy is unclear in streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the skin rewarming rate in diabetic rats is related to microvascular changes and whether this is accompanied by changes observed in classical diagnostic methods for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Computer-assisted infrared thermography was used to assess the rewarming rate after cold exposure on the plantar skin of STZ diabetic rats’ hind paws. Peripheral neuropathy was determined by the density of intra-epidermal nerve fibers (IENFs), mechanical sensitivity, and electrophysiological recordings. Data were obtained in diabetic rats at four, six, and eight weeks after the induction of diabetes and in controls. Four weeks after the induction of diabetes, a delayed rewarming rate, decreased skin blood flow and decreased density of IENFs were observed. However, the mechanical hyposensitivity and decreased motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) developed 6 and 8 weeks after the induction of diabetes. Our study shows that the skin rewarming rate is related to microvascular changes in diabetic rats. Moreover, the skin rewarming rate is a non-invasive method that provides more information for an earlier diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy than the classical monofilament test and MNCV in STZ induced diabetic rats. PMID:25984949

  2. [Atypical neuropathies associated with diabetes].

    PubMed

    Lozeron, P

    2014-12-01

    Diabetes is the leading cause of neuropathy worldwide and, due to the epidemic progression of the affection, prevalence of diabetic neuropathies will increase in the near future. Beside the typical diabetic neuropathy pattern and the common entrapment neuropathies, several unusual clinical forms have been described with either a symmetrical or an asymmetrical pattern. Treatment-induced neuropathy is an acute sensory affection most commonly related to acute glycemic control. Pain is debilitating and associated with vegetative dysfunction. Prevention is important, as resolution is often incomplete. Several patterns or asymmetrical neuropathies of inflammatory and ischemic origin were described long ago in the lower limb. They are debilitating, most often painful and require steroid treatment. Other patterns affecting the thoracolumbar region or the upper limbs or involving a painless motor deficit must be identified as specific treatments are sometimes needed. An association between diabetes and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy has not been demonstrated but diagnosis may be suggested due to the misleading low conduction velocities seen in classical diabetic neuropathy. Like any other patient, the diabetic patient may present a neuropathy unrelated to diabetes. To facilitate patient care, neurologists should be aware of such clinical entities. PMID:25459114

  3. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Niamh

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy often goes unrecognized. We present a case of a 22-year-old man with multiple manifestations of this disease, including weakness, dizziness, fatigue, tachycardia, abnormal QTc, and orthostasis, which occurred 2 years after his type 1 diabetes diagnosis. He exhibited parasympathetic denervation with resting tachycardia and exercise intolerance but also had evidence of orthostatic hypotension, which suggests sympathetic denervation. He did not have complete cardiovascular autonomic reflex testing, which would have been helpful, but improved with aggressive diabetes treatment and the increase of beta-blockade. It is important to identify these patients to understand their signs and symptoms and consider appropriate therapies. PMID:27034552

  4. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Niamh; Silverman, Barry

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy often goes unrecognized. We present a case of a 22-year-old man with multiple manifestations of this disease, including weakness, dizziness, fatigue, tachycardia, abnormal QTc, and orthostasis, which occurred 2 years after his type 1 diabetes diagnosis. He exhibited parasympathetic denervation with resting tachycardia and exercise intolerance but also had evidence of orthostatic hypotension, which suggests sympathetic denervation. He did not have complete cardiovascular autonomic reflex testing, which would have been helpful, but improved with aggressive diabetes treatment and the increase of beta-blockade. It is important to identify these patients to understand their signs and symptoms and consider appropriate therapies. PMID:27034552

  5. The coexistence of mitochondrial ND6 T14484C and 12S rRNA A1555G mutations in a Chinese family with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Qiping; Zhou Xiangtian; Yang Li; Sun Yanhong; Zhou Jian; Li Guang; Jiang, Robert; Lu Fan; Qu Jia . E-mail: jqu@wzmc.net; Guan Minxin . E-mail: min-xin.guan@cchmc.org

    2007-06-15

    We report here the clinical, genetic and molecular characterization of one three-generation Han Chinese family with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and hearing loss. Four of 14 matrilineal relatives exhibited the moderate central vision loss at the average age of 12.5 years. Of these, one subject exhibited both LHON and mild hearing impairment. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in the pedigree showed the presence of homoplasmic LHON-associated ND6 T14484C mutation, deafness-associated 12S rRNA A1555 mutation and 47 other variants belonging to Eastern Asian haplogroup H2. None of other mitochondrial variants was evolutionarily conserved and functional significance. Therefore, the coexistence of the A1555G mutation and T14484C mutations in this Chinese family indicate that the A1555G mutation may play a synergistic role in the phenotypic manifestation of LHON associated ND6 T14484C mutation. However, the incomplete penetrance of vision and hearing loss suggests the involvement of nuclear modifier genes and environmental factors in the phenotypic expression of these mtDNA mutations.

  6. Auditory Neuropathy/Dyssynchrony in Biotinidase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yaghini, Omid

    2016-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is a disorder inherited autosomal recessively showing evidence of hearing loss and optic atrophy in addition to seizures, hypotonia, and ataxia. In the present study, a 2-year-old boy with Biotinidase deficiency is presented in which clinical symptoms have been reported with auditory neuropathy/auditory dyssynchrony (AN/AD). In this case, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions showed bilaterally normal responses representing normal function of outer hair cells. In contrast, acoustic reflex test showed absent reflexes bilaterally, and visual reinforcement audiometry and auditory brainstem responses indicated severe to profound hearing loss in both ears. These results suggest AN/AD in patients with Biotinidase deficiency. PMID:27144235

  7. Diabetic corneal neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, R O; Peters, M A; Sobocinski, K; Nassif, K; Schultz, K J

    1983-01-01

    Corneal epithelial lesions can be found in approximately one-half of asymptomatic patients with diabetes mellitus. These lesions are transient and clinically resemble the keratopathy seen in staphylococcal keratoconjunctivitis. Staphylococcal organisms, however, can be isolated in equal percentages from diabetic patients without keratopathy. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy was found to be related to the presence of diabetic keratopathy after adjusting for age with analysis of covariance. The strongest predictor of both keratopathy and corneal fluorescein staining was vibration perception threshold in the toes (P less than 0.01); and the severity of keratopathy was directly related to the degree of diminution of peripheral sensation. Other predictors of keratopathy were: reduced tear breakup time (P less than 0.03), type of diabetes (P less than 0.01), and metabolic status as indicated by c-peptide fasting (P less than 0.01). No significant relationships were found between the presence of keratopathy and tear glucose levels, endothelial cell densities, corneal thickness measurements, the presence of S epidermidis, or with duration of disease. It is our conclusion that asymptomatic epithelial lesions in the nontraumatized diabetic cornea can occur as a manifestation of generalized polyneuropathy and probably represent a specific form of corneal neuropathy. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:6676964

  8. Diagnostic approach to peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Usha Kant; Kalita, Jayantee; Nair, Pradeep P.

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy refers to disorders of the peripheral nervous system. They have numerous causes and diverse presentations; hence, a systematic and logical approach is needed for cost-effective diagnosis, especially of treatable neuropathies. A detailed history of symptoms, family and occupational history should be obtained. General and systemic examinations provide valuable clues. Neurological examinations investigating sensory, motor and autonomic signs help to define the topography and nature of neuropathy. Large fiber neuropathy manifests with the loss of joint position and vibration sense and sensory ataxia, whereas small fiber neuropathy manifests with the impairment of pain, temperature and autonomic functions. Electrodiagnostic (EDx) tests include sensory, motor nerve conduction, F response, H reflex and needle electromyography (EMG). EDx helps in documenting the extent of sensory motor deficits, categorizing demyelinating (prolonged terminal latency, slowing of nerve conduction velocity, dispersion and conduction block) and axonal (marginal slowing of nerve conduction and small compound muscle or sensory action potential and dennervation on EMG). Uniform demyelinating features are suggestive of hereditary demyelination, whereas difference between nerves and segments of the same nerve favor acquired demyelination. Finally, neuropathy is classified into mononeuropathy commonly due to entrapment or trauma; mononeuropathy multiplex commonly due to leprosy and vasculitis; and polyneuropathy due to systemic, metabolic or toxic etiology. Laboratory investigations are carried out as indicated and specialized tests such as biochemical, immunological, genetic studies, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination and nerve biopsy are carried out in selected patients. Approximately 20% patients with neuropathy remain undiagnosed but the prognosis is not bad in them. PMID:19893645

  9. Suprascapular neuropathy in pitchers.

    PubMed

    Ringel, S P; Treihaft, M; Carry, M; Fisher, R; Jacobs, P

    1990-01-01

    The clinical features and preoperative and postoperative electrodiagnostic studies were reviewed in two professional pitchers with a suprascapular neuropathy. These studies demonstrate that denervation of the infraspinatus and/or supraspinatus muscle is not always due to entrapment of the nerve at the suprascapular or spinoglenoid notches, as is often proposed. Similar studies in healthy pitchers during spring training and again at midseason demonstrate that slowing of suprascapular nerve conduction is detectable in some cases as the season progresses. Sagittal sections of a cadaver with the arm fixed in the acceleration phase of the pitching motion demonstrate five possible sites of trauma to the suprascapular nerve. Mechanisms proposed to explain these progressive, but potentially reversible, changes include consideration of biomechanical factors as well as anatomical features. An alternative hypothesis to nerve trauma that explains this symptom complex is intimal damage to the axillary or suprascapular artery and subsequent production of microemboli which become trapped in the suprascapular nerve vasa nervorum.

  10. Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... registry health exam . Research on peripheral neuropathy and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (HMD) (formally known ... acute or subacute onset may be associated with herbicide exposure. Based on this evidence, VA presumed an ...

  11. Use of transmitochondrial cybrids to assign a complex I defect to the mitochondrial DNA-encoded NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 gene mutation at nucleotide pair 14459 that causes Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dystonia.

    PubMed Central

    Jun, A S; Trounce, I A; Brown, M D; Shoffner, J M; Wallace, D C

    1996-01-01

    A heteroplasmic G-to-A transition at nucleotide pair (np) 14459 within the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) gene has been identified as the cause of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and/or pediatric-onset dystonia in three unrelated families. This ND6 np 14459 mutation changes a moderately conserved alanine to a valine at amino acid position 72 of the ND6 protein. Enzymologic analysis of mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase (complex I) with submitochondrial particles isolated from Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblasts revealed a 60% reduction (P < 0.005) of complex I-specific activity in patient cell lines compared with controls, with no differences in enzymatic activity for complexes II plus III, III and IV. This biochemical defect was assigned to the ND6 np 14459 mutation by using transmitochondrial cybrids in which patient Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblast cell lines were enucleated and the cytoplasts were fused to a mtDNA-deficient (p 0) lymphoblastoid recipient cell line. Cybrids harboring the np 14459 mutation exhibited a 39% reduction (p < 0.02) in complex I-specific activity relative to wild-type cybrid lines but normal activity for the other complexes. Kinetic analysis of the np 14459 mutant complex I revealed that the Vmax of the enzyme was reduced while the Km remained the same as that of wild type. Furthermore, specific activity was inhibited by increasing concentrations of the reduced coenzyme Q analog decylubiquinol. These observations suggest that the np 14459 mutation may alter the coenzyme Q-binding site of complex I. PMID:8622678

  12. Profiling the mitochondrial proteome of Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) in Thailand: down-regulation of bioenergetics and mitochondrial protein quality control pathways in fibroblasts with the 11778G>A mutation.

    PubMed

    Tun, Aung Win; Chaiyarit, Sakdithep; Kaewsutthi, Supannee; Katanyoo, Wanphen; Chuenkongkaew, Wanicha; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Peerapittayamongkol, Chayanon; Thongboonkerd, Visith; Lertrit, Patcharee

    2014-01-01

    Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) is one of the commonest mitochondrial diseases. It causes total blindness, and predominantly affects young males. For the disease to develop, it is necessary for an individual to carry one of the primary mtDNA mutations 11778G>A, 14484T>C or 3460G>A. However these mutations are not sufficient to cause disease, and they do not explain the characteristic features of LHON such as the higher prevalence in males, incomplete penetrance, and relatively later age of onset. In order to explore the roles of nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins in development of LHON, we applied a proteomic approach to samples from affected and unaffected individuals from 3 pedigrees and from 5 unrelated controls. Two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by MS/MS analysis in the mitochondrial lysate identified 17 proteins which were differentially expressed between LHON cases and unrelated controls, and 24 proteins which were differentially expressed between unaffected relatives and unrelated controls. The proteomic data were successfully validated by western blot analysis of 3 selected proteins. All of the proteins identified in the study were mitochondrial proteins and most of them were down regulated in 11778G>A mutant fibroblasts. These proteins included: subunits of OXPHOS enzyme complexes, proteins involved in intermediary metabolic processes, nucleoid related proteins, chaperones, cristae remodelling proteins and an anti-oxidant enzyme. The protein profiles of both the affected and unaffected 11778G>A carriers shared many features which differed from those of unrelated control group, revealing similar proteomic responses to 11778G>A mutation in both affected and unaffected individuals. Differentially expressed proteins revealed two broad groups: a cluster of bioenergetic pathway proteins and a cluster involved in protein quality control system. Defects in these systems are likely to impede the function of retinal ganglion cells, and may lead

  13. Disruptive SCYL1 Mutations Underlie a Syndrome Characterized by Recurrent Episodes of Liver Failure, Peripheral Neuropathy, Cerebellar Atrophy, and Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Wolfgang M.; Rutledge, S. Lane; Schüle, Rebecca; Mayerhofer, Benjamin; Züchner, Stephan; Boltshauser, Eugen; Bittner, Reginald E.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary ataxias comprise a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by clinically variable cerebellar dysfunction and accompanied by involvement of other organ systems. The molecular underpinnings for many of these diseases are widely unknown. Previously, we discovered the disruption of Scyl1 as the molecular basis of the mouse mutant mdf, which is affected by neurogenic muscular atrophy, progressive gait ataxia with tremor, cerebellar vermis atrophy, and optic-nerve thinning. Here, we report on three human individuals, from two unrelated families, who presented with recurrent episodes of acute liver failure in early infancy and are affected by cerebellar vermis atrophy, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. By whole-exome sequencing, compound-heterozygous mutations within SCYL1 were identified in all affected individuals. We further show that in SCYL1-deficient human fibroblasts, the Golgi apparatus is massively enlarged, which is in line with the concept that SCYL1 regulates Golgi integrity. Thus, our findings define SCYL1 mutations as the genetic cause of a human hepatocerebellar neuropathy syndrome. PMID:26581903

  14. Crucifixion and median neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Jacqueline M; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Watson, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    Crucifixion as a means of torture and execution was first developed in the 6th century B.C. and remained popular for over 1000 years. Details of the practice, which claimed hundreds of thousands of lives, have intrigued scholars as historical records and archaeological findings from the era are limited. As a result, various aspects of crucifixion, including the type of crosses used, methods of securing victims to crosses, the length of time victims survived on the cross, and the exact mechanisms of death, remain topics of debate. One aspect of crucifixion not previously explored in detail is the characteristic hand posture often depicted in artistic renditions of crucifixion. In this posture, the hand is clenched in a peculiar and characteristic fashion: there is complete failure of flexion of the thumb and index finger with partial failure of flexion of the middle finger. Such a “crucified clench” is depicted across different cultures and from different eras. A review of crucifixion history and techniques, median nerve anatomy and function, and the historical artistic depiction of crucifixion was performed to support the hypothesis that the “crucified clench” results from proximal median neuropathy due to positioning on the cross, rather than from direct trauma of impalement of the hand or wrist. PMID:23785656

  15. Physical examination of upper extremity compressive neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Popinchalk, Samuel P; Schaffer, Alyssa A

    2012-10-01

    A thorough history and physical examination are vital to the assessment of upper extremity compressive neuropathies. This article summarizes relevant anatomy and physical examination findings associated with upper extremity compressive neuropathies.

  16. Mixed or immune complex cryoglobulinaemia and neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Cream, J. J.; Hern, J. E. C.; Hughes, R. A. C.; Mackenzie, I. C. K.

    1974-01-01

    Three patients with peripheral neuropathy and mixed or immune complex cryoglobulinaemia are reported. The significance of mixed cryoglobulinaemia and the pathogenesis of the peripheral neuropathy are discussed. Images PMID:4360402

  17. Molecular basis of hereditary neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Chance, P F

    2001-05-01

    Inherited disorders of peripheral nerves represent a common group of neurologic diseases. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 1 (CMT1) is a genetically heterogeneous group of chronic demyelinating polyneuropathies with loci mapping to chromosome 17 (CMT1A), chromosome 1 (CMT1B) and to another unknown autosome (CMT1C). CMT1A is most often associated with a tandem 1.5-megabase (Mb) duplication in chromosome 17p11.2-12, or in rare patients may result from a point mutation in the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene. CMT1B is associated with point mutations in the myelin protein zero (P0 or MPZ) gene. The molecular defect in CMT1C is unknown. X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMTX), which has clinical features similar to CMT1, is associated with mutations in the connexin32 gene. Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy type 2 (CMT2) is an axonal neuropathy, also of undetermined cause. Forms of CMT2 map to chromosome 1p36 (CMT2A), chromosome 3p (CMT2B), chromosome 7p (CMT2D), and to chromosome 8p21 (CMT2E). Dejerine-Sottas disease (DSD), also called hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type III (HMSNIII), is a severe, infantile-onset, demyelinating polyneuropathy syndrome that may be associated with point mutations in either the PMP22 gene or the P0 gene and shares considerable clinical and pathologic features with CMT1. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder that results in a recurrent, episodic demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP is associated with a 1.5-Mb deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-12 and results from reduced expression of the PMP22 gene. CMT1A and HNPP are reciprocal duplication/deletion syndromes originating from unequal crossover during germ cell meiosis. Other rare forms of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies map to chromosomes 8q, 10q, and 11q. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (familial brachial plexus neuropathy) is an autosomal dominant disorder causing painful, recurrent brachial plexopathies

  18. Peripheral neuropathy: the importance of rare subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Brian C.; Price, Ray S.; Chen, Kevin S.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Peripheral neuropathy is a prevalent condition that usually warrants a thorough history and examination, but limited diagnostic evaluation. Rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy, however, often require more extensive diagnostic testing and different treatments. Objective To describe rare localizations of peripheral neuropathy, including the appropriate diagnostic evaluation and available treatments. Evidence Review References were identified from PubMed searches with an emphasis on systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials. Articles were also identified through the use of the author's own files. Search terms included common rare neuropathy localizations and their causes, as well as epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Findings Diffuse, non-length dependent neuropathies, multiple mononeuropathies, polyradiculopathies, plexopathies, and radiculoplexus neuropathies are rare peripheral neuropathy localizations that often require extensive diagnostic testing. Atypical neuropathy features, such as acute/subacute onset, asymmetry, and/or motor predominant signs, are frequently present. The most common diffuse, non-length dependent neuropathies are Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Effective disease modifying therapies exist for many diffuse, non-length dependent neuropathies including GBS, CIDP, MMN, and some paraprotein-associated demyelinating neuropathies. Vasculitic neuropathy (multiple mononeuropathy) also has efficacious treatment options, but definitive evidence of a treatment effect for IgM anti-MAG neuropathy and diabetic amyoptrophy (radiculoplexus neuropathy) is lacking. Conclusions and Relevance Recognition of rare localizations of periperhal neuropathy is essential given the implications for diagnostic testing and treatment. Electrodiagnostic studies are an important early step in the

  19. Vascular Steal Syndrome, Optic Neuropathy, and Foreign Body Granuloma Reaction to Onyx-18 Embolization for Congenital Orbito-Facial Vascular Malformation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Catherine Y; Yonkers, Marc A; Liu, Tiffany S; Minckler, Don S; Tao, Jeremiah P

    2016-04-01

    A 34-year-old patient presented with a right orbito-facial mass since childhood, consistent with a congenital arteriovenous (AV) malformation. Prior to presentation, she had multiple incomplete surgical resections and embolizations with N-butyl acetyl acrylate and Onyx-18. The patient reported gradual, progressive vision loss shortly after Onyx-18 embolization. Five months after embolization, she presented with decreased vision, disfigurement and mechanical ptosis relating to a large subcutaneous mass affecting the medial right upper eyelid and forehead. Significant exam findings included a visual acuity of 20/400 (20/60 prior to embolization), an afferent pupillary defect, and optic disc pallor. MRI and angiography revealed a persistent AV malformation with feeders from the ophthalmic artery and an absent choroidal flush to the right eye. Pathology from surgical resection showed a significant foreign body giant cell reaction to the embolization material adjacent to the vessels. We suggest that an incomplete embolization with Onyx-18 may have caused vascular steal syndrome from the ophthalmic artery.

  20. Vascular Steal Syndrome, Optic Neuropathy, and Foreign Body Granuloma Reaction to Onyx-18 Embolization for Congenital Orbito-Facial Vascular Malformation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Catherine Y; Yonkers, Marc A; Liu, Tiffany S; Minckler, Don S; Tao, Jeremiah P

    2016-04-01

    A 34-year-old patient presented with a right orbito-facial mass since childhood, consistent with a congenital arteriovenous (AV) malformation. Prior to presentation, she had multiple incomplete surgical resections and embolizations with N-butyl acetyl acrylate and Onyx-18. The patient reported gradual, progressive vision loss shortly after Onyx-18 embolization. Five months after embolization, she presented with decreased vision, disfigurement and mechanical ptosis relating to a large subcutaneous mass affecting the medial right upper eyelid and forehead. Significant exam findings included a visual acuity of 20/400 (20/60 prior to embolization), an afferent pupillary defect, and optic disc pallor. MRI and angiography revealed a persistent AV malformation with feeders from the ophthalmic artery and an absent choroidal flush to the right eye. Pathology from surgical resection showed a significant foreign body giant cell reaction to the embolization material adjacent to the vessels. We suggest that an incomplete embolization with Onyx-18 may have caused vascular steal syndrome from the ophthalmic artery. PMID:27239463

  1. Vascular Steal Syndrome, Optic Neuropathy, and Foreign Body Granuloma Reaction to Onyx-18 Embolization for Congenital Orbito-Facial Vascular Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Catherine Y.; Yonkers, Marc A.; Liu, Tiffany S.; Minckler, Don S.; Tao, Jeremiah P.

    2016-01-01

    A 34-year-old patient presented with a right orbito-facial mass since childhood, consistent with a congenital arteriovenous (AV) malformation. Prior to presentation, she had multiple incomplete surgical resections and embolizations with N-butyl acetyl acrylate and Onyx-18. The patient reported gradual, progressive vision loss shortly after Onyx-18 embolization. Five months after embolization, she presented with decreased vision, disfigurement and mechanical ptosis relating to a large subcutaneous mass affecting the medial right upper eyelid and forehead. Significant exam findings included a visual acuity of 20/400 (20/60 prior to embolization), an afferent pupillary defect, and optic disc pallor. MRI and angiography revealed a persistent AV malformation with feeders from the ophthalmic artery and an absent choroidal flush to the right eye. Pathology from surgical resection showed a significant foreign body giant cell reaction to the embolization material adjacent to the vessels. We suggest that an incomplete embolization with Onyx-18 may have caused vascular steal syndrome from the ophthalmic artery. PMID:27239463

  2. Entrapment neuropathies in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Eugenia; Morelli, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) with a wide clinical spectrum that encompasses generalized to focal and multifocal forms. Entrapment neuropathies (EN), which are focal forms, are so frequent at any stage of the diabetic disease, that they may be considered a neurophysiological hallmark of peripheral nerve involvement in DM. Indeed, EN may be the earliest neurophysiological abnormalities in DM, particularly in the upper limbs, even in the absence of a generalized polyneuropathy, or it may be superimposed on a generalized diabetic neuropathy. This remarkable frequency of EN in diabetes is underlain by a peculiar pathophysiological background. Due to the metabolic alterations consequent to abnormal glucose metabolism, the peripheral nerves show both functional impairment and structural changes, even in the preclinical stage, making them more prone to entrapment in anatomically constrained channels. This review discusses the most common and relevant EN encountered in diabetic patient in their epidemiological, pathophysiological and diagnostic features.

  3. Paraproteinemic neuropathy: a practical review.

    PubMed

    Rison, Richard A; Beydoun, Said R

    2016-01-01

    The term paraproteinemic neuropathy describes a heterogeneous set of neuropathies characterized by the presence of homogeneous immunoglobulin in the serum. An abnormal clonal proliferation of B-lymphocytes or plasma cells, which may or may not occur in the context of a hematologic malignancy, produces the immunoglobulins in excess. If malignancy is identified, treatment should be targeted to the neoplasm. Most cases, however, occur as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. Few prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are available to inform the management of paraproteinemic neuropathies. Clinical experience combined with data from smaller, uncontrolled studies provide a basis for recommendations, which depend on the specific clinical setting in which the paraprotein occurs. In this review, we provide a clinically practical approach to diagnosis and management of such patients. PMID:26821540

  4. Entrapment neuropathies in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Eugenia; Morelli, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) with a wide clinical spectrum that encompasses generalized to focal and multifocal forms. Entrapment neuropathies (EN), which are focal forms, are so frequent at any stage of the diabetic disease, that they may be considered a neurophysiological hallmark of peripheral nerve involvement in DM. Indeed, EN may be the earliest neurophysiological abnormalities in DM, particularly in the upper limbs, even in the absence of a generalized polyneuropathy, or it may be superimposed on a generalized diabetic neuropathy. This remarkable frequency of EN in diabetes is underlain by a peculiar pathophysiological background. Due to the metabolic alterations consequent to abnormal glucose metabolism, the peripheral nerves show both functional impairment and structural changes, even in the preclinical stage, making them more prone to entrapment in anatomically constrained channels. This review discusses the most common and relevant EN encountered in diabetic patient in their epidemiological, pathophysiological and diagnostic features. PMID:27660694

  5. Entrapment neuropathies in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rota, Eugenia; Morelli, Nicola

    2016-09-15

    Neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) with a wide clinical spectrum that encompasses generalized to focal and multifocal forms. Entrapment neuropathies (EN), which are focal forms, are so frequent at any stage of the diabetic disease, that they may be considered a neurophysiological hallmark of peripheral nerve involvement in DM. Indeed, EN may be the earliest neurophysiological abnormalities in DM, particularly in the upper limbs, even in the absence of a generalized polyneuropathy, or it may be superimposed on a generalized diabetic neuropathy. This remarkable frequency of EN in diabetes is underlain by a peculiar pathophysiological background. Due to the metabolic alterations consequent to abnormal glucose metabolism, the peripheral nerves show both functional impairment and structural changes, even in the preclinical stage, making them more prone to entrapment in anatomically constrained channels. This review discusses the most common and relevant EN encountered in diabetic patient in their epidemiological, pathophysiological and diagnostic features.

  6. Entrapment neuropathies in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rota, Eugenia; Morelli, Nicola

    2016-09-15

    Neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) with a wide clinical spectrum that encompasses generalized to focal and multifocal forms. Entrapment neuropathies (EN), which are focal forms, are so frequent at any stage of the diabetic disease, that they may be considered a neurophysiological hallmark of peripheral nerve involvement in DM. Indeed, EN may be the earliest neurophysiological abnormalities in DM, particularly in the upper limbs, even in the absence of a generalized polyneuropathy, or it may be superimposed on a generalized diabetic neuropathy. This remarkable frequency of EN in diabetes is underlain by a peculiar pathophysiological background. Due to the metabolic alterations consequent to abnormal glucose metabolism, the peripheral nerves show both functional impairment and structural changes, even in the preclinical stage, making them more prone to entrapment in anatomically constrained channels. This review discusses the most common and relevant EN encountered in diabetic patient in their epidemiological, pathophysiological and diagnostic features. PMID:27660694

  7. Peripheral neuropathy and antiretroviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, M C

    2001-03-01

    Patients treated with nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) develop a varying degree of myopathy or neuropathy after long-term therapy. Zidovudine (AZT) causes myopathy; zalcitabine (ddC), didanosine (ddl) and lamuvidine (3TC) cause neuropathy; stavudine (d4T) and fialuridine (FIAU) cause neuropathy or myopathy and lactic acidosis. The tissue distribution of phosphorylases responsible for phosphorylation of NRTIs relates to their selective tissue toxicity. The myopathy is characterized by muscle wasting, myalgia, fatigue, weakness and elevation of CK. The neuropathy is painful, sensory and axonal. In vitro, NRTIs inhibit the gamma-DNA polymerase, responsible for replication of mtDNA, and cause mtDNA dysfunction. In vivo, patients treated with AZT, the best studied NRTI, develop a mitochondrial myopathy with mtDNA depletion, deficiency of COX (complex IV), intracellular fat accumulation, high lactate production and marked phosphocreatine depletion, as determined with in vivo MRS spectroscopy, due to impaired oxidative phosphorylation. Animals or cultured cells treated with NRTIs develop neuropathy, myopathy, or cell destruction with similar changes in the mitochondria. There is evidence that the NRTI-related neuropathy is also due to mitochondrial toxicity. The NRTIs (AZT, ddC, ddl, d4T, 3TC) contain azido groups that compete with natural thymidine triphosphate as substrates of DNA pol-gamma and terminate mtDNA synthesis. In contrast, FIAU that contains 3'-OH groups serves as an alternate substrate for thymidine triphosphate with DNA pol-gamma and is incorporated into the DNA causing permanent mtDNA dysfunction. The NRTI-induced mitochondrial dysfunction has an influence on the clinical application of these agents, especially at high doses and when combined. They have produced in humans a new category of acquired mitochondrial toxins that cause clinical manifestations resembling the genetic mitochondrial disorders.

  8. Peripheral neuropathy caused by methaqualone.

    PubMed

    Marks, P; Sloggem, J

    1976-01-01

    Three patients are described who each received methaqualone and developed signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. The subsequent improvement after cessation of methaqualone was highly suggestive or a direct toxic action of the drug or one of its metabolites. In one patient methaqualone was recommended with reappearance of signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. Again cessation of the drug caused disappearance of these signs. There was no evidence whatsoever of any electrolyte or metabolic disturbance or any other pathology which might have given rise to this symptom complex. In addition, no other drugs were prescribed besides methaqualone.

  9. The exome sequencing identified the mutation in YARS2 encoding the mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase as a nuclear modifier for the phenotypic manifestation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pingping; Jin, Xiaofen; Peng, Yanyan; Wang, Meng; Liu, Hao; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhang, Zengjun; Ji, Yanchun; Zhang, Juanjuan; Liang, Min; Zhao, Fuxin; Sun, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Minglian; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Ye; Mo, Jun Qin; Huang, Taosheng; Qu, Jia; Guan, Min-Xin

    2016-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is the most common mitochondrial disorder. Nuclear modifier genes are proposed to modify the phenotypic expression of LHON-associated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. By using an exome sequencing approach, we identified a LHON susceptibility allele (c.572G>T, p.191Gly>Val) in YARS2 gene encoding mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, which interacts with m.11778G>A mutation to cause visual failure. We performed functional assays by using lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from members of Chinese families (asymptomatic individuals carrying m.11778G>A mutation, or both m.11778G>A and heterozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations and symptomatic subjects harboring m.11778G>A and homozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations) and controls lacking these mutations. The 191Gly>Val mutation reduced the YARS2 protein level in the mutant cells. The aminoacylated efficiency and steady-state level of tRNA(Tyr) were markedly decreased in the cell lines derived from patients both carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The failure in tRNA(Tyr) metabolism impaired mitochondrial translation, especially for polypeptides with high content of tyrosine codon such as ND4, ND5, ND6 and COX2 in cells lines carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The YARS2 p.191Gly>Val mutation worsened the respiratory phenotypes associated with m.11778G>A mutation, especially reducing activities of complexes I and IV. The respiratory deficiency altered the efficiency of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Thus, mutated YARS2 aggravates mitochondrial dysfunctions associated with the m.11778G>A mutation, exceeding the threshold for the expression of blindness phenotype. Our findings provided new insights into the pathophysiology of LHON that were manifested by interaction between mtDNA mutation and mutated nuclear-modifier YARS2.

  10. Inflammation: therapeutic targets for diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiyin; Zhou, Shiwen

    2014-02-01

    There are still no approved treatments for the prevention or of cure of diabetic neuropathy, and only symptomatic pain therapies of variable efficacy are available. Inflammation is a cardinal pathogenic mechanism of diabetic neuropathy. The relationships between inflammation and the development of diabetic neuropathy involve complex molecular networks and processes. Herein, we review the key inflammatory molecules (inflammatory cytokines, adhesion molecules, chemokines) and pathways (nuclear factor kappa B, JUN N-terminal kinase) implicated in the development and progression of diabetic neuropathy. Advances in the understanding of the roles of these key inflammatory molecules and pathways in diabetic neuropathy will facilitate the discovery of the potential of anti-inflammatory approaches for the inhibition of the development of neuropathy. Specifically, many anti-inflammatory drugs significantly inhibit the development of different aspects of diabetic neuropathy in animal models and clinical trials.

  11. Electrophysiological profile in arsenic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Oh, S J

    1991-12-01

    Comprehensive electrophysiological studies were performed on 13 patients with arsenic neuropathy. The most prominent finding was a marked abnormality in sensory nerve conduction in the presence of moderate abnormalities in motor nerve conduction. The motor nerve conduction studies and needle EMG were typical of those seen in axonal degeneration which was confirmed by sural nerve biopsy.

  12. Phrenic neuropathy in arsenic poisoning.

    PubMed

    Bansal, S K; Haldar, N; Dhand, U K; Chopra, J S

    1991-09-01

    A patient presented with acute arsenic neuropathy with asymmetric bilateral phrenic nerve involvement. The clinical and roentgenographic observations of phrenic nerve dysfunction were confirmed by prolonged phrenic nerve conduction time. The patient made a significant recovery with d-penicillamine therapy.

  13. DNA testing in hereditary neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sinéad M; Laurá, Matilde; Reilly, Mary M

    2013-01-01

    The inherited neuropathies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders in which there have been rapid advances in the last two decades. Molecular genetic testing is now an integral part of the evaluation of patients with inherited neuropathies. In this chapter we describe the genes responsible for the primary inherited neuropathies. We briefly discuss the clinical phenotype of each of the known inherited neuropathy subgroups, describe algorithms for molecular genetic testing of affected patients and discuss genetic counseling. The basic principles of careful phenotyping, documenting an accurate family history, and testing the available genes in an appropriate manner should identify the vast majority of individuals with CMT1 and many of those with CMT2. In this chapter we also describe the current methods of genetic testing. As advances are made in molecular genetic technologies and improvements are made in bioinformatics, it is likely that the current time-consuming methods of DNA sequencing will give way to quicker and more efficient high-throughput methods, which are briefly discussed here.

  14. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is common in patients receiving anticancer treatment and can affect survivability and long-term quality of life of the patient following treatment. The symptoms of CIPN primarily include abnormal sensory discrimination of touch, vibration, thermal information, and pain. There is currently a paucity of pharmacological agents to prevent or treat CIPN. The lack of efficacious therapeutics is due, at least in part, to an incomplete understanding of the mechanisms by which chemotherapies alter the sensitivity of sensory neurons. Although the clinical presentation of CIPN can be similar with the various classes of chemotherapeutic agents, there are subtle differences, suggesting that each class of drugs might induce neuropathy via different mechanisms. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to underlie the development and maintenance of neuropathy; however, most pharmacological agents generated from preclinical experiments have failed to alleviate the symptoms of CIPN in the clinic. Further research is necessary to identify the specific mechanisms by which each class of chemotherapeutics induces neuropathy.

  15. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    PubMed Central

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I) is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances) are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7) identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra neuropathy, or decaying skin

  16. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I.

    PubMed

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I) is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances) are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7) identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra neuropathy, or decaying skin

  17. Early onset (childhood) monogenic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Landrieu, Pierre; Baets, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathies (HN) with onset in childhood are categorized according to clinical presentation, pathogenic mechanism based on electrophysiology, genetic transmission and, in selected cases, pathological findings. Especially relevant to pediatrics are the items "secondary" versus "primary" neuropathy, "syndromic versus nonsyndromic," and "period of life." Different combinations of these parameters frequently point toward specific monogenic disorders. Ruling out a neuropathy secondary to a generalized metabolic disorder remains the first concern in pediatrics. As a rule, metabolic diseases include additional, orienting symptoms or signs, and their biochemical diagnosis is based on logical algorithms. Primary, motor sensory are the most frequent HN and are dominated by demyelinating autosomal dominant (AD) forms (CMT1). Other forms include demyelinating autosomal recessive (AR) forms, axonal AD/AR forms, and forms with "intermediate" electrophysiological phenotype. Peripheral motor neuron disorders are dominated by AR SMN-linked spinal muscular atrophies. (Distal) hereditary motor neuropathies represent <10% of HN but exhibit large clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Sensory/dysautonomic HN involves five classic subtypes, each one related to specific genes. However, genetic heterogeneity is larger than initially suspected. Syndromic HN distinguish "purely neurological syndromes", which are multisystemic, such as spinocerebellar atrophies +, spastic paraplegias +, etc. Peripheral neuropathy is possibly the presenting feature, including in childhood. Autosomal recessive forms, on average, start more frequently in childhood. "Multiorgan syndromes", on the other hand, are more specific to Pediatrics. AR forms, which are clearly degenerative, prompt the investigation of a large set of pleiotropic genes. Other syndromes expressed in the perinatal period are mainly developmental disorders, and can sometimes be related to specific transcription factors. Systematic

  18. [Acquired inflammatory neuropathies in children and their therapy].

    PubMed

    Kaciński, M

    2001-01-01

    Neuropathies where there is an association with acquired peripheral nerves dysfunction and inflammation include inflammatory neuropathies (IN), as well as sequelae of vaccinations involving peripheral nerves. In a small portion of these diseases central nervous system is involved. In the years 1996-2000, among 22 children with acute flaccid paresis who were hospitalized in the Kraków Department of Paediatric Neurology, there were 16 patients with IN, including 13 with Guillain-Barré syndrome, single cases of Miller-Fisher syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy involving central nervous system and neuroborreliosis. Additionally, four children were hospitalized for optic neuritis. The author presents data on aetiology, electrophysiology and follow-up of these patients, as well as describes the management and outcome. Apart from their cognitive and practical value, these data significantly correspond with the currently implemented program of poliomyelitis eradication.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies

    MedlinePlus

    ... hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies Enable Javascript to ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies is a disorder ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II

    MedlinePlus

    ... hereditary motor neuropathy, type II distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type II is a progressive disorder that affects ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V

    MedlinePlus

    ... hereditary motor neuropathy, type V distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V is a progressive disorder that affects ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... PDF Open All Close All Description Hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA is a condition characterized by nerve ...

  3. [Automated imaging of the optic nerve and optic nerve fibers is essential to daily clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Lachkar, Y

    2004-06-01

    Chronic open-angle glaucoma is a progressive optical neuropathy. Automated imaging of the optic disc and optic nerve fibers provides reliable analysis of the optic nerve as well as long-term follow-up of neuropathy patients. HRT, GDX-VCC, and OCT, which analyze the optic disc and optical fibers, provide indisputable assistance in improving screening techniques and the follow-up of progressive glaucoma. PMID:15319758

  4. Neuromuscular ultrasound in common entrapment neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Michael S; Walker, Francis O

    2013-11-01

    Neuromuscular ultrasound involves the use of high-resolution ultrasound to image the peripheral nervous system of patients with suspected neuromuscular diseases. It complements electrodiagnostic studies well by providing anatomic information regarding nerves, muscles, vessels, tendons, ligaments, bones, and other structures that cannot be obtained with nerve conduction studies and electromyography. Neuromuscular ultrasound has been studied extensively over the past 10 years and has been used most often in the assessment of entrapment neuropathies. This review focuses on the use of neuromuscular ultrasound in 4 of the most common entrapment neuropathies: carpal tunnel syndrome, ulnar neuropathy at the elbow and wrist, and fibular neuropathy at the knee.

  5. Peripheral neuropathy in arsenic smelter workers.

    PubMed

    Feldman, R G; Niles, C A; Kelly-Hayes, M; Sax, D S; Dixon, W J; Thompson, D J; Landau, E

    1979-07-01

    We conducted a double-blind controlled study of individuals exposed to arsenic trioxide in a copper-smelting factory. Subjects fell into three categories of peripheral neuropathy: none, subclinical, and clinical. The subclinical group had no symptoms or signs of numbness or reduced reflexes, but did have reduced nerve conduction velocity and amplitude measurements. Clinical neuropathy groups had signs and symptoms of neuropathy and electrophysiologic abnormalities. The clinical and subclinical groups correlated with increased content of arsenic in urine, hair and nails. The incidence of subclinical and clinical neuropathy was greater in arsenic workers than in unexposed controls.

  6. Alternative Quantitative Tools in the Assessment of Diabetic Peripheral and Autonomic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vinik, A I; Casellini, C; Névoret, M-L

    2016-01-01

    Here we review some seldom-discussed presentations of diabetic neuropathy, including large fiber dysfunction and peripheral autonomic dysfunction, emphasizing the impact of sympathetic/parasympathetic imbalance. Diabetic neuropathy is the most common complication of diabetes and contributes additional risks in the aging adult. Loss of sensory perception, loss of muscle strength, and ataxia or incoordination lead to a risk of falling that is 17-fold greater in the older diabetic compared to their young nondiabetic counterparts. A fall is accompanied by lacerations, tears, fractures, and worst of all, traumatic brain injury, from which more than 60% do not recover. Autonomic neuropathy has been hailed as the "Prophet of Doom" for good reason. It is conducive to increased risk of myocardial infarction and sudden death. An imbalance in the autonomic nervous system occurs early in the evolution of diabetes, at a stage when active intervention can abrogate the otherwise relentless progression. In addition to hypotension, many newly recognized syndromes can be attributed to cardiac autonomic neuropathy such as orthostatic tachycardia and bradycardia. Ultimately, this constellation of features of neuropathy conspire to impede activities of daily living, especially in the patient with pain, anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders. The resulting reduction in quality of life may worsen prognosis and should be routinely evaluated and addressed. Early neuropathy detection can only be achieved by assessment of both large and small- nerve fibers. New noninvasive sudomotor function technologies may play an increasing role in identifying early peripheral and autonomic neuropathy, allowing rapid intervention and potentially reversal of small-fiber loss.

  7. Diabetic Neuropathy: One disease or two?

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Brian C.; Hur, Junguk; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To compare and contrast the evidence for the effect of glucose control on the prevention of neuropathy in type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 (T2DM) diabetes mellitus. Recent findings In T1DM, multiple clinical trials have demonstrated a large benefit from enhanced glucose control, whereas the benefit in T2DM is much more modest. Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence exists to support factors other than hyperglycemia in the development of neuropathy including obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, inflammation, and insulin resistance. Summary T1DM neuropathy and T2DM neuropathy are fundamentally different. In T1DM, glucose control has a large effect on the prevention of neuropathy; therefore future efforts should continue to concentrate on this avenue of treatment. In contrast, in T2DM, glucose control has a small effect on the prevention of neuropathy; as a result, more research is needed to define the underlying mechanisms for the development of neuropathy. Understanding these mechanisms may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to prevent or treat diabetic neuropathy. PMID:22892951

  8. Animal models of HIV peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Burdo, Tricia H; Miller, Andrew D

    2014-01-01

    The use of animal models in the study of HIV and AIDS has advanced our understanding of the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of infection. Of the multitude of HIV disease manifestations, peripheral neuropathy remains one of the most common long-term side effects. Several of the most important causes of peripheral neuropathy in AIDS patients include direct association with HIV infection with or without antiretroviral medication and infection with opportunistic agents. Because the pathogeneses of these diseases are difficult to study in human patients, animal models have allowed for significant advancement in the understanding of the role of viral infection and the immune system in disease genesis. This review focuses on rodent, rabbit, feline and rhesus models used to study HIV-associated peripheral neuropathies, focusing specifically on sensory neuropathy and antiretroviral-associated neuropathies. PMID:25214880

  9. Suprascapular neuropathy in volleyball players

    PubMed Central

    Witvrouw, E; Cools, A; Lysens, R; Cambier, D; Vanderstraeten, G; Victor, J; Sneyers, C; Walravens, M

    2000-01-01

    Background—Suprascapular nerve entrapment with isolated paralysis of the infraspinatus muscle is uncommon. However, this pathology has been reported in volleyball players. Despite a lack of scientific evidence, excessive strain on the nerve is often cited as a possible cause of this syndrome. Previous research has shown a close association between shoulder range of motion and strain on the suprascapular nerve. No clinical studies have so far been designed to examine the association between excessive shoulder mobility and the presence of this pathology. Aim—To study the possible association between the range of motion of the shoulder joint and the presence of suprascapular neuropathy by clinically examining the Belgian male volleyball team with respect to several parameters. Methods—An electromyographic investigation, a clinical shoulder examination, shoulder range of motion measurements, and an isokinetic concentric peak torque shoulder internal/external rotation strength test were performed in 16 professional players. Results—The electrodiagnostic study showed a severe suprascapular neuropathy in four players which affected only the infraspinatus muscle. In each of these four players, suprascapular nerve entrapment was present on the dominant side. Except for the hypotrophy of the infraspinatus muscle, no significant differences between the affected and non-affected players were observed on clinical examination. Significant differences between the affected and non-affected players were found for range of motion measurements of external rotation, horizontal flexion and forward flexion, and for flexion of the shoulder girdle (protraction); all were found to be higher in the affected players than the non-affected players. Conclusions—This study suggests an association between increased range of motion of the shoulder joint and the presence of isolated paralysis of the infraspinatus muscle in volleyball players. However, the small number of patients in this

  10. Autonomic Neuropathy in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Verrotti, Alberto; Prezioso, Giovanni; Scattoni, Raffaella; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) is a serious and common complication of diabetes, often overlooked and misdiagnosed. It is a systemic-wide disorder that may be asymptomatic in the early stages. The most studied and clinically important form of DAN is cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy defined as the impairment of autonomic control of the cardiovascular system in patients with diabetes after exclusion of other causes. The reported prevalence of DAN varies widely depending on inconsistent definition, different diagnostic method, different patient cohorts studied. The pathogenesis is still unclear and probably multifactorial. Once DAN becomes clinically evident, no form of therapy has been identified, which can effectively stop or reverse it. Prevention strategies are based on strict glycemic control with intensive insulin treatment, multifactorial intervention, and lifestyle modification including control of hypertension, dyslipidemia, stop smoking, weight loss, and adequate physical exercise. The present review summarizes the latest knowledge regarding clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and management of DAN, with some mention to childhood and adolescent population. PMID:25520703

  11. Peroneal neuropathy after weight loss.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Martinez, A; Arpa, J; Palau, F

    2000-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the clinical and electrophysiological findings in peroneal mononeuropathies following a weight-reduction diet. Thirty patients with acute peroneal palsy and weight loss were studied. Complete nerve conduction studies (NCS) were performed in upper and lower limbs. NCS showed conduction block (CB) of the peroneal nerve at the fibular head that recovered in 29 patients within 3 weeks to 3 months. Severity of CB was correlated with clinical weakness. Three patients had abnormalities consistent with polyneuropathy (PNP). NCS in asymptomatic relatives confirmed familial neuropathy. Nerve biopsy and molecular study were consistent with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). One of these peroneal palsies (6 months) recovered after neurolysis. Weight loss might be a risk factor in peroneal mononeuropathies. NCS is a tool in the diagnosis of the site and severity of the nerve injury. Testing should be considered for relatives of patients with PNP because peroneal mononeuropathies may be the first expression of HNPP.

  12. Curcumin ameliorated diabetic neuropathy partially by inhibition of NADPH oxidase mediating oxidative stress in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-Cheng; Zhang, Bin; Liao, Mei-Juan; Zhang, Wen-Xuan; He, Wan-You; Wang, Han-Bing; Yang, Cheng-Xiang

    2014-02-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases are the main enzymes that produce oxidative stress, which plays an important role in painful diabetic neuropathy. Curcumin has been reported to exert an antinociceptive effect in a rat model of diabetic neuropathy by suppressing oxidative stress in the spinal cord. However, it remains unknown whether the mechanism by which curcumin ameliorates diabetic neuropathy can be attributed to spinal NADPH oxidases. This study was designed to determine the effect of curcumin on diabetic neuropathy and to investigate its precise mechanism in relation to NADPH oxidase-mediating oxidative stress in the spinal cord. Diabetic neuropathy was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by intraperitoneal injection with 1% streptozotocin (STZ; 60 mg/kg). After the onset of diabetic neuropathy, a subset of the diabetic rats received daily intragastric administrations of curcumin (200mg/kg) or intraperitoneal injections of apocynin (2.5mg/kg) for 14 consecutive days, whereas other diabetic rats received equivalent volumes of normal saline (NS). STZ resulted in diabetic neuropathy with hyperglycemia and a lower paw withdrawal threshold (PWT), accompanied by elevations in the expression of the NADPH oxidase subunits p47(phox) and gp91(phox) and in the levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA) and a reduction in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity (P<0.05) in the spinal cord. Both curcumin and apocynin ameliorated diabetic neuropathy. In conclusion, curcumin attenuated neuropathic pain in diabetic rats, at least partly by inhibiting NADPH oxidase-mediating oxidative stress in the spinal cord.

  13. Drugs for the treatment of peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, Paola; Cavaletti, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are frequent in association with systemic diseases as well as isolated disorders. Recent advances in the therapy of specific neuropathies led to the approval of new drugs/treatments. This review selected those peripheral neuropathies where the most recent approvals were provided and revised the potential future developments in diabetic and toxic-induced neuropathies, although they do not have a currently available causal therapy in view of their epidemiological and social relevance. Data have been extracted from the most important published trials and from clinical experience. In addition, data from the Food and Drug Administration and European Medicine Agency indications on the treatment of the selected peripheral neuropathies and from recently updated international guidelines have also been included. The website of the U.S. National Institutes of Health www.clinicaltrials.gov registry has been used as the reference database for phase III clinical trials not yet published or ongoing. This review gives a general overview of the most recent advances in the treatment of amyloid, inflammatory, and paraproteinemic peripheral neuropathies. Moreover, it briefly describes the unmet medical need in disabling and frequent conditions, such as diabetic and chemotherapy-induced neuropathy, highlighting the most promising therapeutic approaches to their treatment. PMID:26567516

  14. Drugs for the treatment of peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, Paola; Cavaletti, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are frequent in association with systemic diseases as well as isolated disorders. Recent advances in the therapy of specific neuropathies led to the approval of new drugs/treatments. This review selected those peripheral neuropathies where the most recent approvals were provided and revised the potential future developments in diabetic and toxic-induced neuropathies, although they do not have a currently available causal therapy in view of their epidemiological and social relevance. Data have been extracted from the most important published trials and from clinical experience. In addition, data from the Food and Drug Administration and European Medicine Agency indications on the treatment of the selected peripheral neuropathies and from recently updated international guidelines have also been included. The website of the U.S. National Institutes of Health www.clinicaltrials.gov registry has been used as the reference database for phase III clinical trials not yet published or ongoing. This review gives a general overview of the most recent advances in the treatment of amyloid, inflammatory, and paraproteinemic peripheral neuropathies. Moreover, it briefly describes the unmet medical need in disabling and frequent conditions, such as diabetic and chemotherapy-induced neuropathy, highlighting the most promising therapeutic approaches to their treatment.

  15. Electrodiagnostic testing in diabetic neuropathy: Which limb?

    PubMed

    Rota, E; Cocito, D

    2015-10-01

    Electrodiagnosis of subclinical diabetic neuropathies by nerve conduction studies remains challenging. The question arises about which nerves should be tested and what the best electrodiagnostic protocol to make an early diagnosis of diabetic neuropathies would be. On the basis of our findings and other evidence, which highlighted the remarkable prevalence of electrophysiological abnormalities in nerve conduction studies of the upper limbs, often in the presence of normal lower limb conduction parameters, we suggest that both ulnar and median nerves, in their motor and sensitive component, should be the two target nerves for electrodiagnostic protocols in diabetic neuropathies.

  16. Novel MPZ mutations and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Hugh J.; Santagata, Sandro; Shapiro, Frederic; Batish, Sat Dev; Couchon, Libby; Donnelly, Stephen; Kang, Peter B.

    2010-01-01

    We report two new MPZ mutations causing congenital hypomyelinating neuropathies; c.368_382delGCACGTTCACTTGTG (in-frame deletion of five amino acids) and c.392A>G, Asn131Ser. Each child had clinical and electrodiagnostic features consistent with an inherited neuropathy, confirmed by sural nerve biopsy. The cases illustrate the clinically heterogeneity that exists even within early-onset forms of this disease. They also lend additional support to the emerging clinical and laboratory evidence that impaired intracellular protein trafficking may represent the cause of some congenital hypomyelinating neuropathies. PMID:20621479

  17. Evaluation of peripheral neuropathy. Part III: vasculitic, infectious, inherited, and idiopathic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John J

    2005-01-01

    In this, the third of a 3-part series on peripheral neuropathy, the syndromes of vasculitic, infectious, inherited, and idiopathic neuropathy are discussed. Vasculitis is a frequent cause of neuropathy in the setting of a connective tissue disease. The infectious neuropathies most likely to be encountered in the United States are those due to varicella-zoster virus, human immunodeficiency virus, Lyme disease, hepatitis C virus, and, most recently, West Nile virus. Inherited neuropathies are divided into 2 main types: predominant motor or predominant sensory. The former are generally classed as the Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases and the latter as the hereditary sensory neuropathies. Each category has a number of different subtypes. If the results of routine screening tests are negative, the clinician must consider special testing for unusual disorders, including evaluations for underlying autoimmune or malignant disorders, genetic tests for inherited neuropathies, and other unusual or selectively ordered tests. These tests are very expensive and should be ordered only after the common causes of neuropathy are excluded. Unless the neuropathy can be substantially alleviated or cured, symptomatic treatment (most often for pain) plays a significant role for these patients.

  18. The neuropathy of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bleustein, C B; Arezzo, J C; Eckholdt, H; Melman, A

    2002-12-01

    These studies were intended to explore the relationship between autonomic neuropathy and erectile dysfunction (ED). Sensory thresholds reflecting the integrity of both large diameter, myelinated neurons (ie pressure, touch, vibration) and small diameter axons (ie hot and cold thermal sensation) were determined on the penis and finger. Data were compared across subjects with and without ED, controlling for age, hypertension and diabetes. The correlation of specific thresholds scores and IIEF values were also examined. Seventy-three patients who visited the academic urology clinics at Montefiore hospital were evaluated. All patients were required to complete the erectile function domain of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire: 20 subjects had no complaints of ED and scored within the 'normal' range on the IIEF. Patients were subsequently tested on their index finger and glans penis for vibration (Biothesiometer), pressure (Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments), spatial perception (Tactile Circumferential Discriminator), and warm and cold thermal thresholds (Physitemp NTE-2). Sensation of the glans penis, as defined by the examined sensory thresholds, was significantly diminished in patients with ED and these differences remained significant when controlling for age, diabetes and hypertension. In contrast, thresholds on the index finger were equivalent in the ED and non-ED groups. Threshold and IIEF scores were highly correlated, consistent with an association between diminished sensation and decreasing IIEF score (worse erectile functioning). These relations also remained significant when controlling for age, diabetes and hypertension. The findings demonstrate dysfunction of large and small diameter nerve fibers in patients with ED of all etiologies. Further, the neurophysiologic measures validate the use of the IIEF as an index of ED, as objective findings of sensory neuropathy were highly correlated with worse IIEF scores. The sensory

  19. Peripheral Neuropathy in Mouse Models of Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jolivalt, Corinne G; Frizzi, Katie E; Guernsey, Lucie; Marquez, Alex; Ochoa, Joseline; Rodriguez, Maria; Calcutt, Nigel A

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a frequent complication of chronic diabetes that most commonly presents as a distal degenerative polyneuropathy with sensory loss. Around 20% to 30% of such patients may also experience neuropathic pain. The underlying pathogenic mechanisms are uncertain, and therapeutic options are limited. Rodent models of diabetes have been used for more than 40 years to study neuropathy and evaluate potential therapies. For much of this period, streptozotocin-diabetic rats were the model of choice. The emergence of new technologies that allow relatively cheap and routine manipulations of the mouse genome has prompted increased use of mouse models of diabetes to study neuropathy. In this article, we describe the commonly used mouse models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and provide protocols to phenotype the structural, functional, and behavioral indices of peripheral neuropathy, with a particular emphasis on assays pertinent to the human condition. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584552

  20. INHERITED NEUROPATHIES: CLINICAL OVERVIEW AND UPDATE

    PubMed Central

    KLEIN, CHRISTOPHER J.; DUAN, XIAOHUI; SHY, MICHAEL E.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited neuropathy is a group of common neurologic disorders with heterogeneous clinical presentations and genetic causes. Detailed neuromuscular evaluations, including nerve conduction studies, laboratory testing, and histopathologic examination, can assist in identification of the inherited component beyond family history. Genetic testing increasingly enables definitive diagnosis of specific inherited neuropathies. Diagnosis, however, is often complex, and neurologic disability may have both genetic and acquired components in individual patients. The decision of which genetic test to order or whether to order genetic tests is often complicated, and the strategies to maximize the value of testing are evolving. Apart from rare inherited metabolic neuropathies, treatment approaches remain largely supportive. We provide a clinical update of the various types of inherited neuropathies, their differential diagnoses, and distinguishing clinical features (where available). A framework is provided for clinical evaluations, including the inheritance assessment, electrophysiologic examinations, and specific genetic tests. PMID:23801417

  1. Vitamin B supplementation for diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Jayabalan, Bhavani; Low, Lian Leng

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency has been associated with significant neurological pathology, especially peripheral neuropathy. This review aims to examine the existing evidence on the effectiveness of vitamin B12 supplementation for the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. A search of PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for all relevant randomised controlled trials was conducted in December 2014. Any type of therapy using vitamin B12 or its coenzyme forms was assessed for efficacy and safety in diabetics with peripheral neuropathy. Changes in vibration perception thresholds, neuropathic symptoms and nerve conduction velocities, as well as the adverse effects of vitamin B12 therapy, were assessed. Four studies comprising 363 patients met the inclusion criteria. This review found no evidence that the use of oral vitamin B12 supplements is associated with improvement in the clinical symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. Furthermore, the majority of studies reported no improvement in the electrophysiological markers of nerve conduction. PMID:26892473

  2. [Auditory synaptopathy/neuropathy: clinical findings and diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Walger, M; Foerst, A; Beutner, D; Streicher, B; Stürmer, K; Lang-Roth, R

    2011-05-01

    Auditory synaptopathy/neuropathy (AS/AN) is a special subtype of sensorineural hearing disorders with heterogeneous phenotypes and underestimated incidence. AS/AN generally develops in infancy, occasionally in adulthood. Symptoms include fluctuating, mostly bilateral hearing loss and abnormally reduced speech comprehension, especially in noisy environments. Within audiological assessments, patients with AS/AN present otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE; DPOAE) and cochlear microphonics (CM), absence of stapedius reflexes (SR) as well as absent or pathologically altered auditory evoked brainstem potentials (ABR). Children with AS/AN cannot be identified within OAE-based newborn hearing screening programs. Clinical findings, transtympanic electrocochleography (ECoG) and further diagnostic tools permit further identification of individual characteristics. In individual cases conventional amplification and the use of FM systems may improve hearing and communication skills. If these interventions, accompanied by intensive hearing, speech and language therapy are unsuccessful, cochlear implants (CI) or alternative forms of communication may be useful options for rehabilitation. PMID:21505928

  3. [Peripheral neuropathy caused by acute arsenic poisoning].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Campos, J; Ramos-Peek, J; Martínez-Barros, M; Zamora-Peralta, M; Martínez-Cerrato, J

    1998-01-01

    Although peripheral neuropathy is a fairly common finding in chronic arsenic poisoning, little is known about the acute effects of this metal on peripheral nerves. This report shows clinical and electrophysiological findings in a patient who developed peripheral neuropathy only three days after a high-dose ingestion of this metal due to a failed suicide attempt. We speculate that peripheral nerves and some cranial nerves can show not only clinical but also subclinical involvement that can only be detected by neurophysiological studies.

  4. Multiple cranial neuropathies following etanercept administration.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Jacob B; Rivas, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    There have been recent reports of sarcoid-like granulomatosis development following the administration of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. To date, only four cases of neurosarcoidosis have been reported in association with TNF inhibitors, two of which were attributed to etanercept. We present the first case of etanercept-induced neurosarcoidosis involving multiple cranial neuropathies, including the trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerves, while also highlighting the differential diagnoses of multiple cranial neuropathies and the association of TNF inhibitors and neurosarcoidosis. PMID:27178520

  5. Diabetic neuropathy part 1: overview and symmetric phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M; Kluding, Patricia; Barohn, Richard J

    2013-05-01

    Diabetes is the most common cause of neuropathy in United States and neuropathies are the most common complication of diabetes mellitus, affecting up to 50% of patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Symptoms usually include numbness, tingling, pain, and weakness. Dizziness with postural changes can be seen with autonomic neuropathy. Metabolic, vascular, and immune theories have been proposed for the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. Axonal damage and segmental demyelination can be seen with diabetic neuropathies. Management of diabetic neuropathy should begin at the initial diagnosis of diabetes and mainly requires tight and stable glycemic control.

  6. [Wernicke encephalopathy accompanying linitis plastica].

    PubMed

    Soós, Zsuzsanna; Salamon, Mónika; Oláh, Roland; Czégeni, Anna; Salamon, Ferenc; Folyovich, András; Winkler, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (or Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy) is a rarely diagnosed neurological disorder, which is caused by vitamin B1 deficiency. In the classical form it is characterized by a typical triad (confusion, oculomotor disturbance and ataxia), however, in the majority of the cases only confusion is present. It can be frequently observed in subjects with chronic alcohol consumption, but it may accompany different pathological states of which end stage malignant diseases are the most importants, where confusion may have different backgrounds. The authors present the case of an old male patient with advanced gastric cancer recognised and treated vitamin B1 deficiency, and they draw attention to difficulties of the diagnosis of Wernicke's disease. PMID:24379094

  7. Mouse Models of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kelli A.; Hayes, John M.; Wiggin, Timothy D.; Backus, Carey; Oh, Sang Su; Lentz, Stephen I.; Brosius, Frank; Feldman, Eva L.

    2007-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a debilitating complication of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Rodent models of DN do not fully replicate the pathology observed in human patients. We examined DN in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced [B6] and spontaneous type 1 diabetes [B6Ins2Akita] and spontaneous type 2 diabetes [B6-db/db, BKS-db/db]. DN was defined using the criteria of the Animal Models of Diabetic Complications Consortium (http://www.amdcc.org). Despite persistent hyperglycemia, the STZ-treated B6 and B6Ins2Akita mice were resistant to the development of DN. In contrast, DN developed in both type 2 diabetes models: the B6-db/db and BKS-db/db mice. The persistence of hyperglycemia and development of DN in the B6-db/db mice required an increased fat diet while the BKS-db/db mice developed severe DN and remained hyperglycemic on standard mouse chow. Our data support the hypothesis that genetic background and diet influence the development of DN and should be considered when developing new models of DN. PMID:17804249

  8. Mouse Models of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Phillipe D.; Sakowski, Stacey A.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is the most common complication of diabetes and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. DPN is characterized by progressive, distal-to-proximal degeneration of peripheral nerves that leads to pain, weakness, and eventual loss of sensation. The mechanisms underlying DPN pathogenesis are uncertain, and other than tight glycemic control in type 1 patients, there is no effective treatment. Mouse models of type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are critical to improving our understanding of DPN pathophysiology and developing novel treatment strategies. In this review, we discuss the most widely used T1DM and T2DM mouse models for DPN research, with emphasis on the main neurologic phenotype of each model. We also discuss important considerations for selecting appropriate models for T1DM and T2DM DPN studies and describe the promise of novel emerging diabetic mouse models for DPN research. The development, characterization, and comprehensive neurologic phenotyping of clinically relevant mouse models for T1DM and T2DM will provide valuable resources for future studies examining DPN pathogenesis and novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:24615439

  9. Suprascapular neuropathy in volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Dramis, Asterios; Pimpalnerkar, Ashvin

    2005-06-01

    Entrapment neuropathy of the suprascapular nerve (SNE), although a recognised clinical entity, is a relatively rare cause of shoulder pain and subjective weakness in the athlete involved in overhead sports like volleyball and badminton. This study deals with the presentation and management of four unusual cases of suprascapular nerve entrapment in volleyball players. Four male volleyball players presented to our department with intractable shoulder pain and subjective sensation of shoulder weakness. They all had visible wasting of both supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles, together with weakness of abduction and external rotation of the arm. They all responded temporarily to a diagnostic injection of local anaesthetic. MR imaging was useful in diagnosing space occupying lesions in three cases and the presence of a hypertrophic suprascapular ligament in one case. Due to failure of non- operative treatment, which included activity modification, rest, analgesics and rehabilitation programme over 6 months, surgery was then required to decompress the suprascapular nerve. All patients were symptom free at 6 months postoperatively and after an intensive rehabilitation programme, they were able to return to their normal level of activity including sport.

  10. Delayed neuropathy after organophosphorus insecticide (Dipterex) poisoning: a clinical, electrophysiological and nerve biopsy study.

    PubMed

    Vasilescu, C; Alexianu, M; Dan, A

    1984-05-01

    Clinical, electrophysiological and histological findings in four patients accidentally poisoned with the organophosphorus insecticide Dipterex are reported. Three to five weeks after insecticide ingestion signs of a distal sensorimotor (preponderantly motor) neuropathy occurred. The patients complained of paraesthesia in the lower limbs, and two of them of very disagreeable pricking sensation in the soles of the feet, responsive to carbamazepine. They showed distal weakness mainly of the legs, footdrop , difficult gait and muscle hypotonia. Ankle jerk was abolished while other tendon reflexes persisted. Two months or even later after poisoning, knee jerks in all the patients were very brisk and more and less accompanied by other pyramidal signs (patellar clonus, abolishment of abdominal cutaneous reflexes, Babinski's sign). Clinical, electrophysiological and nerve biopsy data revealed a "dying-back" neuropathy in our patients. Distal muscle fatigue was confirmed by failure of neuromuscular transmission on repetitive nerve stimulation. PMID:6736986

  11. Optical Coherence Tomography in Glaucoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berisha, Fatmire; Hoffmann, Esther M.; Pfeiffer, Norbert

    Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thinning and optic nerve head cupping are key diagnostic features of glaucomatous optic neuropathy. The higher resolution of the recently introduced SD-OCT offers enhanced visualization and improved segmentation of the retinal layers, providing a higher accuracy in identification of subtle changes of the optic disc and RNFL thinning associated with glaucoma.

  12. Abnormal calcium homeostasis in peripheral neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Fernyhough, Paul; Calcutt, Nigel A.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal neuronal calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis has been implicated in numerous diseases of the nervous system. The pathogenesis of two increasingly common disorders of the peripheral nervous system, namely neuropathic pain and diabetic polyneuropathy, has been associated with aberrant Ca2+ channel expression and function. Here we review the current state of knowledge regarding the role of Ca2+ dyshomeostasis and associated mitochondrial dysfunction in painful and diabetic neuropathies. The central impact of both alterations of Ca2+ signalling at the plasma membrane and also intracellular Ca2+ handling on sensory neuron function is discussed and related to abnormal endoplasmic reticulum performance. We also present new data highlighting sub-optimal axonal Ca 2+ signalling in diabetic neuropathy and discuss the putative role for this abnormality in the induction of axonal degeneration in peripheral neuropathies. The accumulating evidence implicating Ca2+ dysregulation with both painful and degenerative neuropathies, along with recent advances in understanding of regional variations in Ca2+ channel and pump structures, makes modulation of neuronal Ca2+ handling an increasingly viable approach for therapeutic interventions against the painful and degenerative aspects of many peripheral neuropathies. PMID:20034667

  13. Pathogenesis of immune-mediated neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2015-04-01

    Autoimmune neuropathies occur when immunologic tolerance to myelin or axonal antigens is lost. Even though the triggering factors and the underling immunopathology have not been fully elucidated in all neuropathy subsets, immunological studies on the patients' nerves, transfer experiments with the patients' serum or intraneural injections, and molecular fingerprinting on circulating autoantibodies or autoreactive T cells, indicate that cellular and humoral factors, either independently or in concert with each other, play a fundamental role in their cause. The review is focused on the main subtypes of autoimmune neuropathies, mainly the Guillain-Barré syndrome(s), the Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP), the Multifocal Motor Neuropathy (MMN), and the IgM anti-MAG-antibody mediated neuropathy. It addresses the factors associated with breaking tolerance, examines the T cell activation process including co-stimulatory molecules and key cytokines, and discusses the role of antibodies against peripheral nerve glycolipids or glycoproteins. Special attention is given to the newly identified proteins in the nodal, paranodal and juxtaparanodal regions as potential antigenic targets that could best explain conduction failure and rapid recovery. New biological agents against T cells, cytokines, B cells, transmigration and transduction molecules involved in their immunopathologic network, are discussed as future therapeutic options in difficult cases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis.

  14. Rheumatoid neuropathy: a histological and electrophysiological study

    PubMed Central

    Weller, R. O.; Bruckner, F. E.; Chamberlain, M. Anne

    1970-01-01

    Peripheral nerves in five patients with rheumatoid neuropathy were examined electrophysiologically and by sural nerve biopsy. There was close correlation between the clinical severity of the disease and the degree of nerve damage found histologically and by EMG. Group 1 patients with a mild distal sensory neuropathy showed varying degrees of axonal degeneration in the large myelinated fibres and some segmental demyelination. Group 2 patients with a severe, rapidly progressive sensori-motor neuropathy had extensive loss of myelinated fibres. In one case all the large fibres had degenerated. The second case had lost both large and small myelinated fibres together with many of the non-myelinated axons. The major nerve damage in both groups appeared to be axonal degeneration but some segmental demyelination was detected. Occlusive vascular disease in the vasa nervorum was considered to be the major cause of the nerve damage. Images PMID:4320255

  15. Pupillary signs in diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, S E; Smith, S A; Brown, P M; Fox, C; Sönksen, P H

    1978-01-01

    Pupillary function was investigated in 36 insulin-dependent diabetics and 36 controls matched for age and sex. About half of the diabetics had evidence of peripheral somatic or autonomic neuropathy, or both. The diabetic patients had abnormally small pupil diameters in the dark and less fluctuation in pupil size (hippus) during continuous illumination than the controls. They also had reduced reflex responses to light flashes of an intensity adjusted for individual retinal sensitivities. The pupillary findings were compared with results of five tests of cardiovascular function and five tests of peripheral sensory and motor nerve function. Almost all the patients with autonomic neuropathy had pupillary signs, which we therefore conclude are a common manifestation of diabetic autonomic neuropathy. PMID:709128

  16. Can Diabetic Neuropathy Be Modeled In Vitro?

    PubMed

    Gardiner, N J; Freeman, O J

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a common secondary complication of diabetes that impacts on patient's health and well-being. Distal axon degeneration is a key feature of diabetic neuropathy, but the pathological changes which underlie axonal die-back are incompletely understood; despite decades of research a treatment has not yet been identified. Basic research must focus on understanding the complex mechanisms underlying changes that occur in the nervous system during diabetes. To this end, tissue culture techniques are invaluable as they enable researchers to examine the intricate mechanistic responses of cells to high glucose or other factors in order to better understand the pathogenesis of nerve dysfunction. This chapter describes the use of in vitro models to study a wide range of specific cellular effects pertaining to diabetic neuropathy including apoptosis, neurite outgrowth, neurodegeneration, activity, and bioenergetics. We consider problems associated with in vitro modeling and future refinement such as use of induced pluripotent stem cells and microfluidic technology. PMID:27133145

  17. Early Electrophysiological Abnormalities and Clinical Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hyllienmark, Lars; Alstrand, Nils; Jonsson, Björn; Ludvigsson, Johnny; Cooray, Gerald; Wahlberg-Topp, Jeanette

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to elucidate whether subclinical nerve dysfunction as reflected by neurophysiological testing predicts the development of clinical neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Fifty-nine patients were studied twice with neurophysiological measurements at baseline and at follow-up. At baseline, patients were 15.5 ± 3.22 years (range 7–22 years) of age, and duration of diabetes was 6.8 ± 3.3 years. At follow-up, patients were 20–35 years of age, and disease duration was 20 ± 5.3 years (range 10–31 years). RESULTS At baseline, patients showed modestly reduced nerve conduction velocities and amplitudes compared with healthy subjects, but all were free of clinical neuropathy. At follow-up, clinical neuropathy was present in nine (15%) patients. These patients had a more pronounced reduction in peroneal motor nerve conduction velocity (MCV), median MCV, and sural sensory nerve action potential at baseline (P < 0.010–0.003). In simple logistic regression analyses, the predictor with the strongest association with clinical neuropathy was baseline HbA1c (R2 = 48%, odds ratio 7.9, P < 0.002) followed by peroneal MCV at baseline (R2 = 38%, odds ratio 0.6, P < 0.006). With the use of a stepwise forward analysis that included all predictors, first baseline HbA1c and then only peroneal MCV at baseline entered significantly (R2 = 61%). Neuropathy impairment assessment showed a stronger correlation with baseline HbA1c (ρ = 0.40, P < 0.002) than with follow-up HbA1c (ρ = 0.034, P < 0.007). CONCLUSIONS Early defects in nerve conduction velocity predict the development of diabetic neuropathy. However, the strongest predictor was HbA1c during the first years of the disease. PMID:23723354

  18. Subacute arsenic neuropathy: clinical and electrophysiological observations.

    PubMed

    Murphy, M J; Lyon, L W; Taylor, J W

    1981-10-01

    Two patients with subacute arsenic neuropathy are described and the results of serial conduction velocity determinations from the very early stages of the illness to partial recovery are reported. Sensory and motor deficits were maximal within four weeks of the estimated time of exposure. Recovery was slow, with only partial improvement of the neurological deficits two years after onset of the illness. Progressive slowing of motor conduction velocity was observed in the first three months followed by a gradual increase in velocity thereafter. The possible mechanisms underlying the temporal profile of the electrophysiological changes are considered. The need for initiating chelation therapy before the development of the neuropathy is emphasised.

  19. 19 CFR 148.4 - Accompanying articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Accompanying articles. 148.4 Section 148.4 Customs... (CONTINUED) PERSONAL DECLARATIONS AND EXEMPTIONS General Provisions § 148.4 Accompanying articles. (a) Generally. Articles shall be considered as accompanying a passenger or brought in by him if the...

  20. 19 CFR 148.4 - Accompanying articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Accompanying articles. 148.4 Section 148.4 Customs... (CONTINUED) PERSONAL DECLARATIONS AND EXEMPTIONS General Provisions § 148.4 Accompanying articles. (a) Generally. Articles shall be considered as accompanying a passenger or brought in by him if the...

  1. 19 CFR 148.4 - Accompanying articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Accompanying articles. 148.4 Section 148.4 Customs... (CONTINUED) PERSONAL DECLARATIONS AND EXEMPTIONS General Provisions § 148.4 Accompanying articles. (a) Generally. Articles shall be considered as accompanying a passenger or brought in by him if the...

  2. 19 CFR 148.4 - Accompanying articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Accompanying articles. 148.4 Section 148.4 Customs... (CONTINUED) PERSONAL DECLARATIONS AND EXEMPTIONS General Provisions § 148.4 Accompanying articles. (a) Generally. Articles shall be considered as accompanying a passenger or brought in by him if the...

  3. 19 CFR 148.4 - Accompanying articles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Accompanying articles. 148.4 Section 148.4 Customs... (CONTINUED) PERSONAL DECLARATIONS AND EXEMPTIONS General Provisions § 148.4 Accompanying articles. (a) Generally. Articles shall be considered as accompanying a passenger or brought in by him if the...

  4. Optical energy storage and reemission based weak localization of light and accompanying random lasing action in disordered Nd{sup 3+} doped (Pb, La)(Zr, Ti)O{sub 3} ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Long; Zhao, Hua; Xu, Caixia; Zhang, Siqi; Zhang, Jingwen

    2014-08-14

    Multi-mode random lasing action and weak localization of light were evidenced and studied in normally transparent but disordered Nd{sup 3+} doped (Pb,La)(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} ceramics. Noticeable localized zone and multi-photon process were observed under strong pumping power. A tentative phenomenological physical picture was proposed by taking account of diffusive process, photo-induced scattering, and optical energy storage process as dominant factors in elucidating the weak localization of light observed. Both the decreased transmittance (increased reflectivity) of light and the observed long lasting fading-off phenomenon supported the physical picture proposed by us.

  5. Curcumin treatment abrogates endoplasmic reticulum retention and aggregation-induced apoptosis associated with neuropathy-causing myelin protein zero-truncating mutants.

    PubMed

    Khajavi, Mehrdad; Inoue, Ken; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Ohyama, Tomoko; Snipes, G Jackson; Lupski, James R

    2005-11-01

    Mutations in MPZ, the gene encoding myelin protein zero (MPZ), the major protein constituent of peripheral myelin, can cause the adult-onset, inherited neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, as well as the more severe, childhood-onset Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy. Most MPZ-truncating mutations associated with severe forms of peripheral neuropathy result in premature termination codons within the terminal or penultimate exons that are not subject to nonsense-mediated decay and are stably translated into mutant proteins with potential dominant-negative activity. However, some truncating mutations at the 3' end of MPZ escape the nonsense-mediated decay pathway and cause a mild peripheral neuropathy phenotype. We examined the functional properties of MPZ-truncating proteins that escaped nonsense-mediated decay, and we found that frameshift mutations associated with severe disease cause an intracellular accumulation of mutant proteins, primarily within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which induces apoptosis. Curcumin, a chemical compound derived from the curry spice tumeric, releases the ER-retained MPZ mutants into the cytoplasm accompanied by a lower number of apoptotic cells. Our findings suggest that curcumin treatment is sufficient to relieve the toxic effect of mutant aggregation-induced apoptosis and may potentially have a therapeutic role in treating selected forms of inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:16252242

  6. Diagnosis and therapeutic options for peripheral vasculitic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Vasculitis can affect the peripheral nervous system alone (nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy) or can be a part of primary or secondary systemic vasculitis. In cases of pre-existing systemic vasculitis, the diagnosis can easily be made, whereas suspected vasculitic neuropathy as initial or only manifestation of vasculitis requires careful clinical, neurophysiological, laboratory and histopathological workout. The typical clinical syndrome is mononeuropathia multiplex or asymmetric neuropathy, but distal-symmetric neuropathy can frequently be seen. Standard treatments include steroids, azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclophosphamide. More recently the B-cell antibody rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulins have shown to be effective in some vasculitic neuropathy types. PMID:25829955

  7. DIABETIC NEUROPATHY PART 2: PROXIMAL AND ASSYMMETRIC PHENOTYPES

    PubMed Central

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathies consist of a variety of syndromes resulting from different types of damage to peripheral or cranial nerves. Although distal symmetric polyneuropathy is most common type of diabetic neuropathy, there are many other subtypes of diabetic neuropathies which have been defined since the 1800’s. Included in these descriptions are patients with proximal diabetic, truncal, cranial, median, and ulnar neuropathies. Various theories have been proposed for the pathogenesis of these neuropathies. The treatment of most of these requires tight and stable glycemic control. Spontaneous recovery is seen in most of these conditions with diabetic control Immunotherapies have been tried in some of these conditions but are quite controversial. PMID:23642718

  8. Diagnosis and therapeutic options for peripheral vasculitic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Blaes, Franz

    2015-04-01

    Vasculitis can affect the peripheral nervous system alone (nonsystemic vasculitic neuropathy) or can be a part of primary or secondary systemic vasculitis. In cases of pre-existing systemic vasculitis, the diagnosis can easily be made, whereas suspected vasculitic neuropathy as initial or only manifestation of vasculitis requires careful clinical, neurophysiological, laboratory and histopathological workout. The typical clinical syndrome is mononeuropathia multiplex or asymmetric neuropathy, but distal-symmetric neuropathy can frequently be seen. Standard treatments include steroids, azathioprine, methotrexate and cyclophosphamide. More recently the B-cell antibody rituximab and intravenous immunoglobulins have shown to be effective in some vasculitic neuropathy types.

  9. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies presenting with sciatic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Topakian, Raffi; Wimmer, Sibylle; Pischinger, Barbara; Pichler, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal-dominant disorder associated with recurrent mononeuropathies following compression or trivial trauma. Reports on sciatic neuropathy as the presenting manifestation of HNPP are very scarce. We report on a 21-year-old previously healthy man who was admitted with sensorimotor deficits in his left leg. He had no history of preceding transient episodes of weakness or sensory loss. Clinical and electrophysiological examinations were consistent with sciatic neuropathy. Cerebrospinal fluid investigation and MRI of the nerve roots, plexus, and sciatic nerve did not indicate the underlying aetiology. When extended electrophysiological tests revealed multiple subclinical compression neuropathies in the upper limbs, HNPP was contemplated and eventually confirmed by genetic testing. PMID:25326571

  10. DIABETIC NEUROPATHY PART 1: OVERVIEW AND SYMMETRIC PHENOTYPES

    PubMed Central

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Kluding, Patricia; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is the most common cause of neuropathy in US and neuropathies are the most common complication of diabetes mellitus affecting up to 50% of patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Various types of neuropathies can be associated with diabetes mellitus.1 Symptoms usually include numbness, tingling, pain and weakness. Dizziness with postural changes can be seen with autonomic neuropathy. Metabolic, vascular and immune theories have been proposed for the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. Pathologically axonal damage and segmental demyelination can be seen with diabetic neuropathies. Management of diabetic neuropathy should begin at the initial diagnosis of diabetes and mainly requires tight and stable glycemic control. Many medications are available for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:23642717

  11. Painful peripheral neuropathy and sodium channel mutations.

    PubMed

    Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-06-01

    Peripheral neuropathy can lead to neuropathic pain in a subset of patients. Painful peripheral neuropathy is a debilitating disorder, reflected by a reduced quality of life. Therapeutic strategies are limited and often disappointing, as in most cases targeted treatment is not available. Elucidating pathogenetic factors for pain might provide a target for optimal treatment. Voltage-gated sodium channels NaV1.7-NaV1.9 are expressed in the small-diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons and their axons. By a targeted gene approach, missense gain-of-function mutations of NaV1.7-NaV1.9 have been demonstrated in painful peripheral neuropathy. Functional analyses have shown that these mutations produce a spectrum of pro-excitatory changes in channel biophysics, with the shared outcome at the cellular level of dorsal root ganglion hyperexcitability. Reduced neurite outgrowth may be another consequence of sodium channel mutations, and possible therapeutic strategies include blockade of sodium channels or block of reverse operation of the sodium-calcium exchanger. Increased understanding of the pathophysiology of painful peripheral neuropathy offers new targets that may provide a basis for more effective treatment.

  12. Speech Perception in Individuals with Auditory Neuropathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Liu, Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Speech perception in participants with auditory neuropathy (AN) was systematically studied to answer the following 2 questions: Does noise present a particular problem for people with AN: Can clear speech and cochlear implants alleviate this problem? Method: The researchers evaluated the advantage in intelligibility of clear speech over…

  13. Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norrix, Linda W.; Velenovsky, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Auditory neuropathy spectrum disorder, or ANSD, can be a confusing diagnosis to physicians, clinicians, those diagnosed, and parents of children diagnosed with the condition. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with an understanding of the disorder, the limitations in current tools to determine site(s) of lesion, and…

  14. Ozone partially prevents diabetic neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Erken, H A; Genç, O; Erken, G; Ayada, C; Gündoğdu, G; Doğan, H

    2015-02-01

    Neuropathy is one of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus. Although the beneficial effects of good blood glucose control on diabetic neuropathy are known, this control cannot completely prevent the occurrence and progression of diabetic neuropathy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ozone prevents diabetic neuropathy. 36 adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=6): control (C), ozone (O), diabetic (D), ozone-treated diabetic (DO), insulin-treated diabetic (DI), and ozone- and insulin-treated diabetic (DOI). Diabetes was induced by a single injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg, intraperitoneal [i.p.]), after which insulin was administered (3 IU, i.p.) to the DI and DOI groups for 28 days, and 1.1 mg/kg (50 µg/ml) ozone was given to the O, DO, and DOI groups for 15 days. 4 weeks after the induction of diabetes, the nerve conduction velocity (NCV), amplitude of the compound action potential (CAP), total oxidant status (TOS), and total antioxidant status (TAS) were measured, and the oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated. The NCV, amplitude of CAP, and TAS of the DI and DOI groups were higher than those of the D group; the amplitudes of CAP and TAS of the DO group were higher than those of the D group; and the TOS and OSI of the DO, DI, and DOI groups were lower than those of the D group. These findings indicate that ozone partially prevents diabetic neuropathy in rats. It appears that the preventive effects of ozone are mediated through oxidant/antioxidant mechanisms.

  15. The Rehabilitation of Oncological Patients Presenting Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    MICU, ELENA CLAUDIA; IRSAY, LASZLO

    2014-01-01

    The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP 2011) defines neuropathic pain as “the pain caused by an injury or disease of the somatosensory portion of the nervous system”. The central neuropathic pain is defined as “the pain caused by an injury or disease of the central somatosensory central nervous system”, whereas the peripheral neuropathic pain is defined as “the pain caused by an injury or disease of the peripheral somatosensory nervous system” [1]. The peripheral neuropathy describes any affection of the peripheral nervous system. The etiology is vast, there being a number of over 100 possible causes, which causes the global morbidity rate to reach approximately 2.4%. The chronic nature of the pain superposes the everyday routine and leads to the high intake of medication for pain alleviation. The number of cases of neuroplasia has always increased today. This disturbing diagnosis which can potentiate the signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy as well as reduce and limit the treatment options associated with neuropathies. The treatment presupposes a multidisciplinary approach, while the solution to prevent complications involves the control of risk factors and pathophysiological treatment. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CPIN) is a significant disabling symptom that is tightly connected to the administration of neurotoxic cytostatic agents used for the treatment of neoplasia. CPIN compromises the quality of life and produces pain or discomfort [2]. I have sought to produce a presentation of the medicated and physical-kinetic treatment options that have proved their effectiveness during clinical studies or random trials and can be applied to cancer patients presenting with symptoms associated with peripheral neuropathy, namely with neuropathic pain, and support it with arguments. PMID:26528000

  16. Axonopathy in peripheral neuropathies: Mechanisms and therapeutic approaches for regeneration.

    PubMed

    Landowski, Lila M; Dyck, P James B; Engelstad, JaNean; Taylor, Bruce V

    2016-10-01

    Peripheral neuropathies (PNs) are injuries or diseases of the nerves which arise from varied aetiology, including metabolic disease, trauma and drug toxicity. The clinical presentation depends on the type of neuropathy, and may include the loss of motor, sensory and autonomic functions, or development of debilitating neuropathic pain distal to the injury site. It can be challenging to identify the aetiology of PNs, as the clinical syndromes are often indistinct. However, the mechanisms that underlie pathological changes in peripheral neuropathy are fundamentally different, depending on the trigger. This review focuses on the axonopathy observed in two frequently encountered forms of peripheral neuropathy, diabetic neuropathy and chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A key manifestation of axonopathy in PN is the degeneration of terminal arbors of peripheral nerves, resulting in a loss of epidermal nerve fibres and inappropriate termination of nerve endings. Many symptoms of PN arise from aberrant termination of nerve endings, and the underlying axonopathy may be non-reversible, as nerve regeneration after injury and disease is often poor, absent, or aberrant. Directed guidance of terminal arbors back into the epidermis is therefore a suggested approach to treat peripheral neuropathy. This review will outline potential strategies to enhance and guide axonal regeneration and reinnervation in the skin. Using diabetic neuropathy and chemotherapy-induced neuropathy as specific examples, this review examines the setbacks encountered with the translation of growth factors into therapeutics for human neuropathy, and suggests a number of approaches for topical drug delivery.

  17. Novel insights on diagnosis, cause and treatment of diabetic neuropathy: focus on painful diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Mitra; Asghar, Omar; Alam, Uazman; Petropoulos, Ioannis N.; Fadavi, Hassan; Malik, Rayaz A.

    2010-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is common, under or misdiagnosed, and causes substantial morbidity with increased mortality. Defining and developing sensitive diagnostic tests for diabetic neuropathy is not only key to implementing earlier interventions but also to ensure that the most appropriate endpoints are employed in clinical intervention trials. This is critical as many potentially effective therapies may never progress to the clinic, not due to a lack of therapeutic effect, but because the endpoints were not sufficiently sensitive or robust to identify benefit. Apart from improving glycaemic control, there is no licensed treatment for diabetic neuropathy, however, a number of pathogenetic pathways remain under active study. Painful diabetic neuropathy is a cause of considerable morbidity and whilst many pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions are currently used, only two are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. We address the important issue of the ‘placebo effect’ and also consider potential new pharmacological therapies as well as nonpharmacological interventions in the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. PMID:23148152

  18. Suprascapular neuropathy in a collegiate pitcher.

    PubMed

    Smith, A N

    1995-03-01

    A healthy, 20-year-old, highly competitive collegiate baseball pitcher developed vague pain and soreness in the dominant posterior shoulder with live pitching. The symptoms intensified, and, after a particularly poor starting performance, the athlete presented for physical examination. Examination revealed visible atrophy of the infraspinatus muscle and decreased strength in external rotation and abduction. Magnetic Resonance Imaging was inconclusive. Electromyographic examination revealed decreased suprascapular nerve conduction to the infraspinatus muscle. Our diagnosis was entrapment neuropathy from traction on the suprascapular nerve at the spinoglenoid notch, causing delayed conduction to the infraspinatus muscle. We took a conservative approach of shoulder rehabilitation and activity modification, which resulted in the athlete returning to a highly competitive level without further problems, despite the remaining atrophy and muscle weakness. Examination of injuries to the shoulder complex, especially in athletes involved in repetitive overhead motions, should take suprascapular neuropathy into consideration.

  19. Arsenical neuropathy: residual effects following acute industrial exposure.

    PubMed

    Garb, L G; Hine, C H

    1977-08-01

    A case report is presented describing a worker who was splashed with arsenic acid in an industrial accident and subsequently developed symptoms of systemic arsenicalism and peripheral neuropathy. This is the only report, to the authors' knowledge, of a single episode of cutaneous absorption of arsenic resulting in peripheral neuropathy. Previous reports of arsenical neuropathy and rationale for BAL therapy early in the treatment of systemic arsenicalism are discussed.

  20. North America and South America (NA-SA) neuropathy project.

    PubMed

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M; Trivedi, Jaya; Wolfe, Gil I; Nations, Sharon; Herbelin, Laura; de Freitas, M G; Quintanilha, Giseli; Khan, Saud; Dimachkie, Mazen; Barohn, Richard

    2013-08-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common neurological disorder. There may be important differences and similarities in the diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy between North America (NA) and South America (SA). Neuromuscular databases were searched for neuropathy diagnosis at two North American sites, University of Kansas Medical Center and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and one South American site, Federal Fluminense University in Brazil. All patients were included into one of the six major categories: immune-mediated, diabetic, hereditary, infectious/inflammatory, systemic/metabolic/toxic (not diabetic) and cryptogenic. A comparison of the number of patients in each category was made between North America and South America databases. Total number of cases in North America was 1090 and in South America was 1034 [immune-mediated: NA 215 (19.7%), SA 191 (18%); diabetic: NA 148 (13.5%), SA 236 (23%); hereditary: NA 292 (26.7%), SA 103 (10%); infectious/inflammatory: NA 53 (4.8%), SA 141 (14%); systemic/metabolic/toxic: NA 71 (6.5%), SA 124 (12%); cryptogenic: NA 311 (28.5%), SA 239 (23%)]. Some specific neuropathy comparisons were hereditary neuropathies [Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) cases] in NA 246/292 (84.2%) and SA 60/103 (58%); familial amyloid neuropathy in SA 31/103 (30%) and none in NA. Among infectious neuropathies, cases of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) neuropathy in SA were 36/141(25%), Chagas disease in SA were 13/141(9%) and none for either in NA; cases of neuropathy due to leprosy in NA were 26/53 (49%) and in SA were 39/141(28%). South American tertiary care centers are more likely to see patients with infectious, diabetic and hereditary disorders such as familial amyloid neuropathies. North American tertiary centers are more likely to see patients with CMT. Immune neuropathies and cryptogenic neuropathies were seen equally in North America and South America.

  1. Nerve Growth Factor and Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Vinik, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    Neuropathy is one of the most debilitating complications of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with estimates of prevalence between 50–90% depending on the means of detection. Diabetic neuropathies are heterogeneous and there is variable involvement of large myelinated fibers and small, thinly myelinated fibers. Many of the neuronal abnormalities in diabetes can be duplicated by experimental depletion of specific neurotrophic factors, their receptors or their binding proteins. In experimental models of diabetes there is a reduction in the availability of these growth factors, which may be a consequence of metabolic abnormalities, or may be independent of glycemic control. These neurotrophic factors are required for the maintenance of the neurons, the ability to resist apoptosis and regenerative capacity. The best studied of the neurotrophic factors is nerve growth factor (NGF) and the related members of the neurotrophin family of peptides. There is increasing evidence that there is a deficiency of NGF in diabetes, as well as the dependent neuropeptides substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) that may also contribute to the clinical symptoms resulting from small fiber dysfunction. Similarly, NT3 appears to be important for large fiber and IGFs for autonomic neuropathy. Whether the observed growth factor deficiencies are due to decreased synthesis, or functional, e.g. an inability to bind to their receptor, and/or abnormalities in nerve transport and processing, remains to be established. Although early studies in humans on the role of neurotrophic factors as a therapy for diabetic neuropathy have been unsuccessful, newer agents and the possibilities uncovered by further studies should fuel clinical trials for several generations. It seems reasonable to anticipate that neurotrophic factor therapy, specifically targeted at different nerve fiber populations, might enter the therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:14668049

  2. Neuropathic pain in hereditary peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Na Young; Shin, Youn Ho; Jung, Junyang

    2013-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is the most common inherited motor and sensory neuropathy. Previous studies have shown that neuropathic pain is an occasional symptom of CMT referred by CMT patients. However, neuropathic pain is not considered a significant symptom in CMT patient and no researchers have studied profoundly the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain in CMT. Here, we highlight the relationship between CMT disease and neuropathic pain via previous several studies. PMID:24278891

  3. Diabetes, Peripheral Neuropathy, and Lower Extremity Function

    PubMed Central

    Chiles, Nancy S.; Phillips, Caroline L.; Volpato, Stefano; Bandinelli, Stefania; Ferrucci, Luigi; Guralnik, Jack M.; Patel, Kushang V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Diabetes among older adults causes many complications, including decreased lower extremity function and physical disability. Diabetes can cause peripheral nerve dysfunction, which might be one pathway through which diabetes leads to decreased physical function. The study aims were to determine: (1) whether diabetes and impaired fasting glucose are associated with objective measures of physical function in older adults, (2) which peripheral nerve function (PNF) tests are associated with diabetes, and (3) whether PNF mediates the diabetes-physical function relationship. Research Design and Methods This study included 983 participants, age 65 and older from the InCHIANTI Study. Diabetes was diagnosed by clinical guidelines. Physical performance was assessed using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), scored from 0-12 (higher values, better physical function) and usual walking speed (m/s). PNF was assessed via standard surface electroneurographic study of right peroneal nerve conduction velocity, vibration and touch sensitivity. Clinical cut-points of PNF tests were used to create a neuropathy score from 0-5 (higher values, greater neuropathy). Multiple linear regression models were used to test associations. Results and Conclusion 12.8% (n=126) of participants had diabetes. Adjusting for age, sex, education, and other confounders, diabetic participants had decreased SPPB (β= −0.99; p< 0.01), decreased walking speed (β= −0.1m/s; p< 0.01), decreased nerve conduction velocity (β= −1.7m/s; p< 0.01), and increased neuropathy (β= 0.25; p< 0.01) compared to non-diabetic participants. Adjusting for nerve conduction velocity and neuropathy score decreased the effect of diabetes on SPPB by 20%, suggesting partial mediation through decreased PNF. PMID:24120281

  4. [Vasculitic Peripheral Neuropathies: Clinical Features and Diagnostic Laboratory Tests].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Katsuhisa

    2016-03-01

    Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy (VPN) occurs due to ischemic changes of peripheral nerves, resulting from a deficit of vascular blood supply due to damaged vasa nervorum leading to vasculitis. VPN usually manifests as sensorimotor or sensory disturbances accompanied by pain, presenting as a type of multiple mononeuropathy, with a scattered distribution in distal limbs. VPN may also present as a mononeuropathy, distal symmetric polyneuropathy, plexopathy, or radiculopathy. The rapidity of VPN is variable, ranging from days to months, with symptoms occasionally changing with the appearance of new lesions. Careful history taking and neurological examination provides an exact diagnosis. The most common cause of VPN is primary vasculitis predominantly affecting small vessels, including vasa nervorum, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and polyarteritis nodosa. Similar vasculitic processes can also result from a systemic collagen disorder or secondary vasculitis. Electrophysiological studies and pathological investigation of biopsied peripheral nerves and muscles are important for diagnosis of vasculitis. Serological tests, including ANCA, are useful for diagnosis of vasculitis. Accurate neurological examinations are essential for diagnosis and evaluation of clinical course.

  5. [Vasculitic Peripheral Neuropathies: Clinical Features and Diagnostic Laboratory Tests].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Katsuhisa

    2016-03-01

    Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy (VPN) occurs due to ischemic changes of peripheral nerves, resulting from a deficit of vascular blood supply due to damaged vasa nervorum leading to vasculitis. VPN usually manifests as sensorimotor or sensory disturbances accompanied by pain, presenting as a type of multiple mononeuropathy, with a scattered distribution in distal limbs. VPN may also present as a mononeuropathy, distal symmetric polyneuropathy, plexopathy, or radiculopathy. The rapidity of VPN is variable, ranging from days to months, with symptoms occasionally changing with the appearance of new lesions. Careful history taking and neurological examination provides an exact diagnosis. The most common cause of VPN is primary vasculitis predominantly affecting small vessels, including vasa nervorum, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and polyarteritis nodosa. Similar vasculitic processes can also result from a systemic collagen disorder or secondary vasculitis. Electrophysiological studies and pathological investigation of biopsied peripheral nerves and muscles are important for diagnosis of vasculitis. Serological tests, including ANCA, are useful for diagnosis of vasculitis. Accurate neurological examinations are essential for diagnosis and evaluation of clinical course. PMID:27001769

  6. PMP22 related congenital hypomyelination neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fabrizi, G M; Simonati, A; Taioli, F; Cavallaro, T; Ferrarini, M; Rigatelli, F; Pini, A; Mostacciuolo, M L; Rizzuto, N

    2001-01-01

    The peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) is a tetraspan membrane protein which is localised in the compact myelin of the peripheral nerves. In fibroblasts, where it was originally identified as growth arrest related factor 3 (Gas3), PMP22 has been shown to modulate cell proliferation; in the peripheral nervous system its roles are still debated. The duplication of PMP22 is the most common cause of the demyelinating form of the autosomal dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMT1A); rarer missense mutations of PMP22 also cause CMT1A or severe dehypomyelinating neuropathies of infancy grouped under the heading of Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS). Here, a sporadic patient affected with DSS is described; nerve biopsy disclosed a picture of hypomyelination/amyelination with basal laminae onion bulbs and no florid demyelination and it was consistent with congenital hypomyelination neuropathy (CHN); molecular analysis disclosed a novel point mutation of PMP22 that causes a non-conservative arginine for cysteine substitution at codon 109, in the third transmembrane domain. CHN is the rarest and severest form of DSS and it is thought to reflect dysmyelination rather than demyelination. The reported case suggests that missense point mutations may alter a putative role of PMP22 in modulating Schwann cell growth and differentiation. PMID:11118262

  7. Inherited peripheral neuropathies due to mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Cassereau, J; Codron, P; Funalot, B

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are frequently responsible for neuropathies with variable severity. Mitochondrial diseases causing peripheral neuropathies (PNP) may be due to mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), as is the case in MERRF and MELAS syndromes, or to mutations of nuclear genes. Secondary abnormalities of mtDNA (such as multiple deletions of muscle mtDNA) may result from mitochondrial disorders due to mutations in nuclear genes involved in mtDNA maintenance. This is the case in several syndromes caused by impaired mtDNA maintenance, such as Sensory Ataxic Neuropathy, Dysarthria and Ophthalmoplegia (SANDO) due to recessive mutations in the POLG gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of mtDNA polymerase (DNA polymerase gamma), or Mitochondrial Neuro-Gastro-Intestinal Encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), due to recessive mutations in the TYMP gene, which encodes thymidine phosphorylase. The last years have seen a growing list of evidence demonstrating that mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamics might be dysfunctional in axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2), and these mechanisms might present a common link between dissimilar CMT2-causing genes.

  8. Arsenic intoxication presenting with macrocytosis and peripheral neuropathy, without anemia.

    PubMed

    Heaven, R; Duncan, M; Vukelja, S J

    1994-01-01

    A case of arsenic intoxication associated with macrocytosis and neuropathy, without anemia, is presented. Evaluation of a 68-year-old man with a long history of peripheral neuropathy and persistent macrocytosis revealed exposure to an insecticide. Analysis of urine and hair revealed elevated levels of arsenic. A short course of d-penicillamine failed to promote urinary excretion of arsenic. Removal of the insecticide resulted in resolution of macrocytosis and slight improvement of neuropathy. This case emphasizes that arsenic intoxication should be considered in patients with macrocytosis with peripheral neuropathy, even in the absence of anemia.

  9. Validity of the neurological examination in diagnosing diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Höliner, Isabella; Haslinger, Vera; Lütschg, Jürg; Müller, Guido; Barbarini, Daniela Seick; Fussenegger, Jörg; Zanier, Ulrike; Saely, Christoph H; Drexel, Heinz; Simma, Burkhard

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus and examine whether the neurological examination validly diagnoses diabetic peripheral neuropathy as compared with the gold standard of nerve conduction velocity in these patients. Nerve conduction velocity was measured in an unselected consecutive series of patients aged 8-18 years who had been suffering from type 1 diabetes mellitus for at least 1 year. For the neurological examination, neuropathy disability scores and neuropathy sign scores were used. Of the 39 patients, six (15%) had clinically evident diabetic peripheral neuropathy, whereas nerve conduction velocity testing revealed diabetic peripheral neuropathy in 15 (38%) patients. Sensitivity and specificity of the neurological examination for the diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy were 40% and 100%, respectively. The corresponding positive and negative predictive values were 100% and 72.7%, respectively. This conclusions from this study are that in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus, diabetic peripheral neuropathy is highly prevalent, but in the majority of patients it is subclinical. Sensitivity and negative predictive values of the neurological examination are low. Therefore, routine nerve conduction velocity measurement for the assessment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy appears to be warranted in these patients.

  10. Diabetic neuropathy part 2: proximal and asymmetric phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Dimachkie, Mazen M; Barohn, Richard J

    2013-05-01

    Diabetic neuropathies consist of a variety of syndromes resulting from different types of damage to peripheral or cranial nerves. Although distal symmetric polyneuropathy is the most common type of diabetic neuropathy, many other subtypes have been defined since the 1800s, including proximal diabetic, truncal, cranial, median, and ulnar neuropathies. Various theories have been proposed for the pathogenesis of these neuropathies. The treatment of most requires tight and stable glycemic control. Spontaneous recovery is seen in most of these conditions with diabetic control. Immunotherapies have been tried in some of these conditions however are controversial.

  11. Abnormal Nutritional Factors in Patients Evaluated at a Neuropathy Center.

    PubMed

    Latov, Norman; Vo, Mary L; Chin, Russell L; Carey, Bridget T; Langsdorf, Jennifer A; Feuer, Naomi T

    2016-06-01

    Abnormal concentrations of nutritional factors were found in 24.1% of 187 patients with neuropathy who were newly seen at our academic neuropathy referral center over a 1-year period. All patients presented with sensory axonal or small fiber neuropathy. In 7.3%, they were present in association with at least one other identifiable cause for neuropathy. Elevated levels of pyridoxal phosphate or mercury occurred more frequently than deficiencies in vitamins B1, B12, or B6. The nutritional abnormalities are amenable to correction by dietary intervention. PMID:27224436

  12. Lithium-Induced Motor Neuropathy: An Unusual Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Satyakam; Sahoo, Manas Ranjan; Rath, Neelmadhav

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy secondary to lithium is under-recognized. Most cases of polyneuropathy were reported with lithium intoxication. However, very few cases were reported without lithium toxicity. We present a case of motor neuropathy due to the use of lithium in a 26-year-old male with a therapeutic lithium level. PMID:27335523

  13. Isolated musculocutaneous neuropathy caused by a proximal humeral exostosis.

    PubMed

    Juel, V C; Kiely, J M; Leone, K V; Morgan, R F; Smith, T; Phillips, L H

    2000-01-25

    We report an isolated musculocutaneous neuropathy caused by a proximal humeral osteochondroma that became symptomatic after the patient played recreational basketball. Lesion resection resulted in complete deficit resolution. Mass lesions involving the musculocutaneous nerve should be considered in patients with atraumatic, isolated musculocutaneous neuropathies that are recurrent or fail to recover, even in the setting of strenuous exercise.

  14. Recommendations to enable drug development for inherited neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth and Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sames, Lori; Moore, Allison; Arnold, Renee; Ekins, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 1 in 2500 Americans suffer from Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. The underlying disease mechanisms are unique in most forms of CMT, with many point mutations on various genes causing a toxic accumulation of misfolded proteins. Symptoms of the disease often present within the first two decades of life, with CMT1A patients having reduced compound muscle and sensory action potentials, slow nerve conduction velocities, sensory loss, progressive distal weakness, foot and hand deformities, decreased reflexes, bilateral foot drop and about 5% become wheelchair bound. In contrast, the ultra-rare disease Giant Axonal Neuropathy (GAN) is frequently described as a recessively inherited condition that results in progressive nerve death. GAN usually appears in early childhood and progresses slowly as neuronal injury becomes more severe and leads to death in the second or third decade. There are currently no treatments for any of the forms of CMTs or GAN. We suggest that further clinical studies should analyse electrical impedance myography as an outcome measure for CMT. Further, additional quality of life (QoL) assessments for these CMTs are required, and we need to identify GAN biomarkers as well as develop new genetic testing panels for both diseases. We propose that using the Global Registry of Inherited Neuropathy (GRIN) could be useful for many of these studies. Patient advocacy groups and professional organizations (such as the Hereditary Neuropathy Foundation (HNF), Hannah's Hope Fund (HHF), The Neuropathy Association (TNA) and the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM) can play a central role in educating clinicians and patients. Undertaking these studies will assist in the correct diagnosis of disease recruiting patients for clinical studies, and will ultimately improve the endpoints for clinical trials. By addressing obstacles that prevent industry investment in various forms of inherited neuropathies, we can

  15. Diagnosis and Treatment of Pain in Small Fiber Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hovaguimian, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Small fiber neuropathy manifests in a variety of different diseases and often results in symptoms of burning pain, shooting pain, allodynia, and hyperesthesia. Diagnosis of small fiber neuropathy is determined primarily by the history and physical exam, but functional neurophysiologic testing and skin biopsy evaluation of intraepidermal nerve fiber density can provide diagnostic confirmation. Management of small fiber neuropathy depends on the underlying etiology with concurrent treatment of associated neuropathic pain. A variety of recent guidelines propose the use of antidepressants, anticonvulsants, opioids, topical therapies, and nonpharmacologic treatments as part of the overall management of neuropathic pain. Unfortunately, little data about the treatment of pain specifically in small fiber neuropathy exist because most studies combine mixed neuropathic pain syndromes in the analysis. Additional studies targeting the treatment of pain in small fiber neuropathy are needed to guide decision making. PMID:21286866

  16. Peripheral Neuropathy Due to Vitamin Deficiency, Toxins, and Medications

    PubMed Central

    Staff, Nathan P.; Windebank, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Peripheral neuropathies secondary to vitamin deficiencies, medications, or toxins are frequently considered but can be difficult to definitively diagnose. Accurate diagnosis is important since these conditions are often treatable and preventable. This article reviews the key features of different types of neuropathies caused by these etiologies and provides a comprehensive list of specific agents that must be kept in mind. Recent Findings: While most agents that cause peripheral neuropathy have been known for years, newly developed medications that cause peripheral neuropathy are discussed. Summary: Peripheral nerves are susceptible to damage by a wide array of toxins, medications, and vitamin deficiencies. It is important to consider these etiologies when approaching patients with a variety of neuropathic presentations; additionally, etiologic clues may be provided by other systemic symptoms. While length-dependent sensorimotor axonal peripheral neuropathy is the most common presentation, several examples present in a subacute severe fashion, mimicking Guillain-Barré syndrome. PMID:25299283

  17. Clinical features and electrodiagnosis of ulnar neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Landau, Mark E; Campbell, William W

    2013-02-01

    In this review, we delineate clinical, electrodiagnostic, and radiographic features of ulnar mononeuropathies. Ulnar neuropathy at the elbow (UNE) is most commonly due to lesions at the level of the retroepicondylar groove (RTC), with approximately 25% at the humeroulnar arcade (HUA). The term 'cubital tunnel syndrome' should be reserved for the latter. The diagnostic accuracy of nerve conduction studies is limited by biological (e.g. low elbow temperature) and technical factors. Across-elbow distance measurements greater than 10 cm improve diagnostic specificity at the expense of decreased sensitivity. Short-segment incremental studies can differentiate lesions at the HUA from those at the RTC.

  18. Acute Toxic Neuropathy Mimicking Guillain Barre Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jalal, Muhammed Jasim Abdul; Fernandez, Shirley Joan; Menon, Murali Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Case: A 30 year old male presented with numbness of palms and soles followed by weakness of upper limbs and lower limbs of 5 days duration, which was ascending and progressive. Three months back he was treated for oral and genital ulcers with oral steroids. His ulcers improved and shifted to indigenous medication. His clinical examination showed polyneuropathy. CSF study did not show albuminocytological dissociation. Nerve conduction study showed demyelinating polyneuropathy. His blood samples and the ayurvedic drug samples were sent for toxicological analysis. Inference: Acute toxic neuropathy - Arsenic PMID:25811007

  19. Computer aided diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekh, Viktor; Soliz, Peter; McGrew, Elizabeth; Barriga, Simon; Burge, Mark; Luan, Shuang

    2014-03-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) refers to the nerve damage that can occur in diabetes patients. It most often affects the extremities, such as the feet, and can lead to peripheral vascular disease, deformity, infection, ulceration, and even amputation. The key to managing diabetic foot is prevention and early detection. Unfortunately, current existing diagnostic techniques are mostly based on patient sensations and exhibit significant inter- and intra-observer differences. We have developed a computer aided diagnostic (CAD) system for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The thermal response of the feet of diabetic patients following cold stimulus is captured using an infrared camera. The plantar foot in the images from a thermal video are segmented and registered for tracking points or specific regions. The temperature recovery of each point on the plantar foot is extracted using our bio-thermal model and analyzed. The regions that exhibit abnormal ability to recover are automatically identified to aid the physicians to recognize problematic areas. The key to our CAD system is the segmentation of infrared video. The main challenges for segmenting infrared video compared to normal digital video are (1) as the foot warms up, it also warms up the surrounding, creating an ever changing contrast; and (2) there may be significant motion during imaging. To overcome this, a hybrid segmentation algorithm was developed based on a number of techniques such as continuous max-flow, model based segmentation, shape preservation, convex hull, and temperature normalization. Verifications of the automatic segmentation and registration using manual segmentation and markers show good agreement.

  20. Treating Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: An Update.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Matthew J; Gibbs, Lawrence M; Lindsay, Tammy J

    2016-08-01

    Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy occurs in approximately 25% of patients with diabetes mellitus who are treated in the office setting and significantly affects quality of life. It typically causes burning pain, paresthesias, and numbness in a stocking-glove pattern that progresses proximally from the feet and hands. Clinicians should carefully consider the patient's goals and functional status and potential adverse effects of medication when choosing a treatment for painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Pregabalin and duloxetine are the only medications approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating this disorder. Based on current practice guidelines, these medications, with gabapentin and amitriptyline, should be considered for the initial treatment. Second-line therapy includes opioid-like medications (tramadol and tapentadol), venlafaxine, desvenlafaxine, and topical agents (lidocaine patches and capsaicin cream). Isosorbide dinitrate spray and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation may provide relief in some patients and can be considered at any point during therapy. Opioids and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are optional third-line medications. Acupuncture, traditional Chinese medicine, alpha lipoic acid, acetyl-l-carnitine, primrose oil, and electromagnetic field application lack high-quality evidence to support their use. PMID:27479625

  1. Molecular genetics of hereditary sensory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Mauko, Barbara; Auer-Grumbach, Piet; Pieber, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN), also known as hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. They are caused by neuronal atrophy and degeneration, predominantly affecting peripheral sensory and autonomic neurons. Both congenital and juvenile to adulthood onset is possible. Currently, the classification of the HSN depends on the mode of inheritance, age at onset, and clinical presentation. Hallmark features are progressive sensory loss, chronic skin ulcers, and other skin abnormalities. Spontaneous fractures and neuropathic arthropathy are frequent complications and often necessitate amputations. Autonomic features vary between different subgroups. Distal muscle weakness and wasting may be present and is sometimes so prominent that it becomes difficult to distinguish HSN from Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome. Recent major advances in molecular genetics have led to the identification of seven gene loci and six-disease causing genes for autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive HSN. These genes have been shown to play roles in lipid metabolism and the regulation of intracellular vesicular transport, but also a presumptive transcriptional regulator, a nerve growth factor receptor, and a nerve growth factor have been described among the causative genes in HSN. Nevertheless, it remains unclear how mutations in the known genes lead to the phenotype of HSN. In this review, we summarize the recent progress of the molecular genetics of the HSN and the implicated genes. PMID:16775373

  2. Congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy: a reversible case.

    PubMed

    Ghamdi, M; Armstrong, D L; Miller, G

    1997-01-01

    A boy was born at 39 weeks gestation with severe weakness and hypotonia, fractured femurs, poor suck and swallow, and absent deep tendon reflexes. Electrodiagnostic studies revealed marked slowing of motor nerve conduction velocities and normal muscle electrical activity with no evidence of acute denervation. Muscle biopsy showed mild type 2 fiber predominance, and sural nerve biopsy revealed large axons without myelin, and axons with insufficient amount of myelin for their diameter. There was no evidence of inflammation or demyelination. Gradual clinical improvement in tone and strength occurred in a cephalocaudal direction. By 4 months, motor nerve conduction velocities and clinical examination were normal apart from absent deep tendon reflexes. On review at 19 months, motor development and neurological examination were completely normal. Pathogenesis of this reversible pathologically documented case of congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy is unclear. No evidence was found for an inflammatory, toxic, metabolic, or demyelinating cause. Abnormal expression of a developmental gene, as in reversible cytochrome oxidase deficiency, may be a cause of this neuropathy.

  3. Symptoms: Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Bryan P; Hershman, Dawn L; Loprinzi, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a problematic, treatment-induced toxicity that has the potential to impact quality of life and limit the doses of curative intent therapy. This therapy-induced side effect is one of the most troublesome in oncology clinical practices, considering the morbidity, the frequency, and the potential irreversibility of this problem. Patients with breast cancer are particularly impacted by this side effect as multiple agents commonly used for this disease can cause neuropathy. In this chapter, we provide an overview of CIPN, including: clinical predictors, frequency, and its impact on quality of life. Further, we highlight the pathophysiology and review the literature to date for agents designed to prevent or treat CIPN. We also highlight the most important ongoing clinical and translational research questions that hope to help better predict and prevent this toxicity. This includes optimizing the methods of assessment, using host specific factors (Race and genetics) to predict those more likely to experience CIPN, and determining how CIPN might impact clinical decisions toward therapy.

  4. Oxidative stress in the development, maintenance and resolution of paclitaxel-induced painful neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Duggett, Natalie A; Griffiths, Lisa A; McKenna, Olivia E; de Santis, Vittorio; Yongsanguanchai, Nutcha; Mokori, Esther B; Flatters, Sarah J L

    2016-10-01

    Paclitaxel is a first-line chemotherapeutic with the major dose-limiting side effect of painful neuropathy. Previous preclinical studies indicate mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are associated with this disorder; however no direct assessment of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and antioxidant enzyme activity in sensory neurons following paclitaxel has been undertaken. As expected, repeated low doses of systemic paclitaxel in rats induced long-lasting pain behaviour with a delayed onset, akin to the clinical scenario. To elucidate the role of ROSinthe development and maintenance ofpaclitaxel-inducedpainful neuropathy, we have assessed ROS and antioxidant enzyme activity levels in the nociceptive system in vivo at three key behavioural time-points; prior to pain onset (day 7), peak pain severity and pain resolution. In isolated dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, ROS levels were unchanged following paclitaxel-exposure in vitro or in vivo. ROS levels were further assessed in DRG and spinal cord in vivo following intrathecal MitoTracker®RedCM-H2XRos administration in paclitaxel-/vehicle-treated rats. ROS levels were increased at day 7, specifically in non-peptidergic DRG neurons. In the spinal cord, neuronally-derived ROS was increased at day 7, yet ROS levels in microglia and astrocytes were unaltered. In DRG, CuZnSOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity were increased at day 7 and peak pain time-points, respectively. In peripheral sensory nerves, CuZnSOD activity was increased at day 7, and at peak pain, MnSOD, CuZnSOD and GPx activity were increased. Catalase activity was unaltered in DRG and saphenous nerves. These data suggest that neuronally-derived mitochondrial ROS, accompanied with an inadequate endogenous antioxidant enzyme response, are contributory factors in paclitaxel-induced painful neuropathy.

  5. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy: current perspective and future directions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Randhir; Kishore, Lalit; Kaur, Navpreet

    2014-02-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is a heterogeneous group of disorders with extremely complex pathophysiology and affects both somatic and autonomic components of the nervous system. Neuropathy is the most common chronic complication of diabetes mellitus. Metabolic disruptions in the peripheral nervous system, including altered protein kinase C activity, and increased polyol pathway activity in neurons and Schwann cells resulting from hyperglycemia plays a key role in the development of diabetic neuropathy. These pathways are related to the metabolic and/or redox state of the cell and are the major source of damage. Activation of these metabolic pathways leads to oxidative stress, which is a mediator of hyperglycemia induced cell injury and a unifying theme for all mechanisms of diabetic neuropathy. The therapeutic intervention of these metabolic pathways is capable of ameliorating diabetic neuropathy but therapeutics which target one particular mechanism may have a limited success. Available therapeutic approaches are based upon the agents that modulate pathogenetic mechanisms (glycemic control) and relieve the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. This review emphasizes the pathogenesis, presently available therapeutic approaches and future directions for the management of diabetic neuropathy.

  6. Wherefore Art Thou, O Treatment for Diabetic Neuropathy?

    PubMed

    Malik, R A

    2016-01-01

    As of March 2016, we continue to advocate the diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy using a simple foot examination or monofilament, which identifies only those with severe neuropathy and hence risk of foot ulceration. Given the fact that the 5-year mortality rate of diabetic patients with foot ulceration is worse than that of most common cancers, surely we should be identifying patients at an earlier stage of neuropathy to prevent its progression to a stage with such a high mortality? Of course, we lament that there is no licensed treatment for diabetic neuropathy. Who is to blame? As researchers and carers, we have a duty of care to our patients with diabetic neuropathy. So, we have to look forward not backwards, and move away from our firmly entrenched views on the design and conduct of clinical trials for diabetic neuropathy. Relevant organizations such as Neurodiab, the American Diabetes Association and the Peripheral Nerve Society have to acknowledge that they cannot continue to endorse a bankrupt strategy. The FDA needs an open and self-critical dialogue with these organizations, to give pharmaceutical companies at least a fighting chance to deliver effective new therapies for diabetic neuropathy.

  7. Identifying Common Genetic Risk Factors of Diabetic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Witzel, Ini-Isabée; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Khalaf, Kinda; Lee, Sungmun; Khandoker, Ahsan H.; Alsafar, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a global public health problem of epidemic proportions, with 60–70% of affected individuals suffering from associated neurovascular complications that act on multiple organ systems. The most common and clinically significant neuropathies of T2DM include uremic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, and cardiac autonomic neuropathy. These conditions seriously impact an individual’s quality of life and significantly increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. Although advances in gene sequencing technologies have identified several genetic variants that may regulate the development and progression of T2DM, little is known about whether or not the variants are involved in disease progression and how these genetic variants are associated with diabetic neuropathy specifically. Significant missing heritability data and complex disease etiologies remain to be explained. This article is the first to provide a review of the genetic risk variants implicated in the diabetic neuropathies and to highlight potential commonalities. We thereby aim to contribute to the creation of a genetic-metabolic model that will help to elucidate the cause of diabetic neuropathies, evaluate a patient’s risk profile, and ultimately facilitate preventative and targeted treatment for the individual. PMID:26074879

  8. Foot Pad Skin Biopsy in Mouse Models of Hereditary Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dacci, Patrizia; Dina, Giorgia; Cerri, Federica; Previtali, Stefano Carlo; Lopez, Ignazio Diego; Lauria, Giuseppe; Feltri, Maria Laura; Bolino, Alessandra; Comi, Giancarlo; Wrabetz, Lawrence; Quattrini, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    Numerous transgenic and knockout mouse models of human hereditary neuropathies have become available over the past decade. We describe a simple, reproducible, and safe biopsy of mouse skin for histopathological evaluation of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) in models of hereditary neuropathies. We compared the diagnostic outcome between sciatic nerve and dermal nerves found in skin biopsy (SB) from the hind foot. A total of five animal models of different Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies, and one model of congenital muscular dystrophy associated neuropathy were examined. In wild type mice, dermal nerve fibers were readily identified by immunohistochemistry, light, and electron microscopy and they appeared similar to myelinated fibers in sciatic nerve. In mutant mice, SB manifested myelin abnormalities similar to those observed in sciatic nerves, including hypomyelination, onion bulbs, myelin outfolding, redundant loops, and tomacula. In many strains, however, SB showed additional abnormalities—fiber loss, dense neurofilament packing with lower phosphorylation status, and axonal degeneration—undetected in sciatic nerve, possibly because SB samples distal nerves. SB, a reliable technique to investigate peripheral neuropathies in human beings, is also useful to investigate animal models of hereditary neuropathies. Our data indicate that SB may reveal distal axonal pathology in mouse models and permits sequential follow-up of the neuropathy in an individual mouse, thereby reducing the number of mice necessary to document pathology of the PNS. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20878767

  9. Ethical Inquiry: Instruction Manual to Accompany "Lisa."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipman, Matthew; And Others

    This instructional manual is designed to accompany "Lisa," a philosophy reader for 7th, 8th, and 9th grade students (ED 137 215). The aim of the course is to encourage children to consider and reflect upon their moral values. Concerned with ethics, "Lisa" is an attempt to understand moral conduct. Emphasis is on having the students learn to think…

  10. Optic Neuropathy in Thyroid Eye Disease: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Seng, Wong Hon; Isa, Hazlita Dato' Mohd

    2016-01-01

    In patients with thyroid disease, ocular involvement or thyroid ophthalmopathy is common, irrespective of their thyroid status. A common feature of thyroid eye disease is eyelid retraction, which leads to a classical starry gaze (Kocher sign). Treatment with radioactive iodine (RAI) is a known therapy for hyperthyroidism. However, this treatment may lead to or worsen thyroid ophthalmopathy. We report a case series of two patients with thyrotoxicosis, who presented with an atypical and subtle occurrence of thyroid eye disease (TED) soon after RAI therapy. One of the patients was initially diagnosed and treated for dry eyes; however, over a period of time, the patient's vision progressively deteriorated. Clinical and radiological investigations confirmed thyroid ophthalmopathy with low serum thyroid hormone levels. Both patients recovered well after immediate intensive intravenous steroid treatment. These cases highlight the importance of recognizing partial ptosis as one of the presenting signs of active TED among general practitioners and physicians. PMID:27274392

  11. Reversible isolated sensory axonal neuropathy due to cobalamin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Dalla Torre, Chiara; Lucchetta, Marta; Cacciavillani, Mario; Campagnolo, Marta; Manara, Renzo; Briani, Chiara

    2012-03-01

    Vitamin B(12) deficiency causes a wide range of hematological, gastrointestinal, and neurological manifestations. The most common neurological complication is subacute combined degeneration, sometimes associated with polyneuropathy. Isolated peripheral neuropathy due to cyanocobalamin deficiency is less frequent, and thus it may be overlooked. We describe 2 patients with isolated sensory axonal neuropathy secondary to vitamin B(12) deficiency who had complete clinical and electrophysiological recovery after cyanocobalamin replacement. Testing for serum vitamin B(12) and its metabolites should be done in any distal symmetric neuropathy.

  12. Pediatric peripheral neuropathy in proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Choi, M L; Wey, P D; Borah, G L

    1998-05-01

    Proteus syndrome is a rare congenital disorder comprised of subcutaneous and internal hamartomas, pigmented skin nevi, skull exostoses, hemihypertrophy, and macrodactyly of the hands and feet. A 5-year-old girl diagnosed with Proteus syndrome presented with distal median compression neuropathy with the primary complaint of severe pain involving the left hand. Surgical exploration of the hand revealed a lipofibromatous hamartoma of the median nerve. The transverse carpal ligament was released and epineurectomy of the median nerve was performed. The patient remains symptom free at the 9-month follow-up. This report is the first description of a hamartoma directly involving a peripheral nerve in Proteus syndrome. Decompression of the nerve with the removal of the fibrofatty neural sheath resulted in the resolution of the symptoms in this patient. The surgeon should consider this approach as a potential first line of treatment before a more radical resection of the nerve is contemplated. PMID:9600441

  13. Isoniazid induced motor-dominant neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Arsalan, Rabeeya; Sabzwari, Saniya

    2015-10-01

    Isoniazid though a very effective treatment for tuberculosis can cause severe motor-dominant neuropathy which can be reversible with pyridoxine supplementation. A 45-year-old female diagnosed with psoas abscess, culture positive for mycobacterium tuberculosis, was started on anti- tuberculous treatment with four drugs, including isoniazid at a dose of 5 mg/kg/day. Three months later she developed severe motor weakness of lower limbs with loss of ankle and knee reflexes. She was treated with vitamin B6 injections and isoniazid treatment was continued. Her motor weakness gradually improved in a few months, but mild sensory impairment persisted even after two years. There is need for vigilance regarding neurological effects of isoniazid in seemingly low-risk individuals in whom development of symptoms should raise the suspicion about slow acetylator status. Timely therapeutic intervention with high-dose vitamin B6 can reduce the long-term morbidity associated with this easily reversible condition. PMID:26440850

  14. Mechanical surface waves accompany action potential propagation.

    PubMed

    El Hady, Ahmed; Machta, Benjamin B

    2015-01-01

    Many diverse studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the action potential (AP). We present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model, these surface waves are driven by the travelling wave of electrical depolarization characterizing the AP, altering compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model allows us to estimate the shape of the AW that accompanies any travelling wave of voltage, making predictions that are in agreement with results from several experimental systems. Our model can serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs. PMID:25819404

  15. Mechanical surface waves accompany action potential propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hady, Ahmed; Machta, Benjamin B.

    2015-03-01

    Many diverse studies have shown that a mechanical displacement of the axonal membrane accompanies the electrical pulse defining the action potential (AP). We present a model for these mechanical displacements as arising from the driving of surface wave modes in which potential energy is stored in elastic properties of the neuronal membrane and cytoskeleton while kinetic energy is carried by the axoplasmic fluid. In our model, these surface waves are driven by the travelling wave of electrical depolarization characterizing the AP, altering compressive electrostatic forces across the membrane. This driving leads to co-propagating mechanical displacements, which we term Action Waves (AWs). Our model allows us to estimate the shape of the AW that accompanies any travelling wave of voltage, making predictions that are in agreement with results from several experimental systems. Our model can serve as a framework for understanding the physical origins and possible functional roles of these AWs.

  16. The debut of a rational treatment for an inherited neuropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Steven S.

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathies are common neurological conditions characterized by progressive loss of motor and/or sensory function. There are no effective treatments. Among the many causes of hereditary neuropathies are dominant mutations in serine palmitoyltransferase, long chain base subunit 1 (SPTLC1), which cause hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1). By incorporating l-alanine in place of l-serine, the mutant HSAN1–associated serine palmitoyltransferase generates deoxysphingolipids, which are thought to be neurotoxic. In this issue of the JCI, Garofalo and colleagues report that oral l-serine reverses the accumulation of deoxysphingolipids in humans with HSAN1 and in a transgenic mouse model. As oral l-serine reduces the severity of neuropathy in the mouse model of HSAN1, these data suggest a rational candidate therapy for this devastating condition. PMID:22045569

  17. Transcriptomic analyses of genes and tissues in inherited sensory neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Sapio, Matthew R; Goswami, Samridhi C; Gross, Jacklyn R; Mannes, Andrew J; Iadarola, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Inherited sensory neuropathies are caused by mutations in genes affecting either primary afferent neurons, or the Schwann cells that myelinate them. Using RNA-Seq, we analyzed the transcriptome of human and rat DRG and peripheral nerve, which contain sensory neurons and Schwann cells, respectively. We subdivide inherited sensory neuropathies based on expression of the mutated gene in these tissues, as well as in mouse TRPV1 lineage DRG nociceptive neurons, and across 32 human tissues from the Human Protein Atlas. We propose that this comprehensive approach to neuropathy gene expression leads to better understanding of the involved cell types in patients with these disorders. We also characterize the genetic "fingerprint" of both tissues, and present the highly tissue-specific genes in DRG and sciatic nerve that may aid in the development of gene panels to improve diagnostics for genetic neuropathies, and may represent specific drug targets for diseases of these tissues. PMID:27343803

  18. Familial Idiopathic Cranial Neuropathy in a Chinese Family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liang, Jianfeng; Yu, Yanbing

    2016-01-01

    Cranial neuropathy is usually idiopathic and familial cases are uncommon. We describe a family with 5 members with cranial neuropathy over 3 generations. All affected patients were women, indicating an X-linked dominant or an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Our cases and a review of the literature suggest that familial idiopathic cranial neuropathy is a rare condition which may be related to autosomal dominant vascular disorders (e.g. vascular tortuosity, sclerosis, elongation or extension), small posterior cranial fossas, anatomical variations of the posterior circulation, hypersensitivity of cranial nerves and other abnormalities. Moreover, microvascular decompression is the treatment of choice because vascular compression is the main factor in the pathogenesis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of familial cranial neuropathy in China. PMID:27161475

  19. Antioxidant Strategies in the Management of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Oyenihi, Ayodeji Babatunde; Ayeleso, Ademola Olabode; Masola, Bubuya

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hyperglycaemia (an abnormally high glucose concentration in the blood) resulting from defects in insulin secretion/action, or both, is the major hallmark of diabetes in which it is known to be involved in the progression of the condition to different complications that include diabetic neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy (diabetes-induced nerve damage) is the most common diabetic complication and can be devastating because it can lead to disability. There is an increasing body of evidence associating diabetic neuropathy with oxidative stress. Oxidative stress results from the production of oxygen free radicals in the body in excess of its ability to eliminate them by antioxidant activity. Antioxidants have different mechanisms and sites of actions by which they exert their biochemical effects and ameliorate nerve dysfunction in diabetes by acting directly against oxidative damage. This review will examine different strategies for managing diabetic neuropathy which rely on exogenous antioxidants. PMID:25821809

  20. The debut of a rational treatment for an inherited neuropathy?

    PubMed

    Scherer, Steven S

    2011-12-01

    Hereditary neuropathies are common neurological conditions characterized by progressive loss of motor and/or sensory function. There are no effective treatments. Among the many causes of hereditary neuropathies are dominant mutations in serine palmitoyltransferase, long chain base subunit 1 (SPTLC1), which cause hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1 (HSAN1). By incorporating L-alanine in place of L-serine, the mutant HSAN1–associated serine palmitoyltransferase generates deoxysphingolipids, which are thought to be neurotoxic. In this issue of the JCI, Garofalo and colleagues report that oral L-serine reverses the accumulation of deoxysphingolipids in humans with HSAN1 and in a transgenic mouse model. As oral L-serine reduces the severity of neuropathy in the mouse model of HSAN1, these data suggest a rational candidate therapy for this devastating condition. PMID:22045569

  1. African Mitochondrial DNA Subhaplogroups and Peripheral Neuropathy during Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Canter, Jeffrey A.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Selph, Doug; Clifford, David B.; Kallianpur, Asha R.; Shafer, Robert; Levy, Shawn; Murdock, Deborah G.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Haas, David W.; Hulgan, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Susceptibility to peripheral neuropathy during antiretroviral therapy with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) was previously associated with a European mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup among non-Hispanic white persons. To determine if NRTI-associated peripheral neuropathy was related to mtDNA variation in non-Hispanic black persons, we sequenced mtDNA of participants from AIDS Clinical Trials Group study 384. Of 156 non-Hispanic blacks with genomic data, 51 (33%) developed peripheral neuropathy. In a multivariate model, African mtDNA subhaplogroup L1c was an independent predictor of peripheral neuropathy (OR=3.7, 95% CI 1.1-12.0). An African mtDNA subhaplogroup is for the first time implicated in susceptibility to NRTI-associated toxicity. PMID:20402593

  2. Pathogenesis and treatment of immune-mediated neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Helmar C; Meyer Zu Horste, Gerd; Kieseier, Bernd C; Hartung, Hans-Peter

    2009-07-01

    Immune-mediated neuropathies represent a heterogeneous spectrum of peripheral nerve disorders that can be classified according to time course, predominant involvement of motor/sensory fibers, distribution of deficits and paraclinical parameters such as electrophysiology and serum antibodies. In the last few years, significant advances have been achieved in elucidating underlying pathomechanisms, which made it possible to identify potential therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the latest development in pathogenesis and treatment of immune-mediated neuropathies.

  3. Complications of Compressive Neuropathy: Prevention and Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Santosa, Katherine B.; Chung, Kevin C.; Waljee, Jennifer F.

    2016-01-01

    Compressive neuropathies of the upper extremity are common and can result in profound disability if left untreated. Nerve releases are frequently performed, but can be complicated by both iatrogenic events as well as progression of neuropathy. In this review, we will examine the management of post-operative complications following two common nerve compression release procedures: carpal tunnel release and cubital tunnel release. PMID:25934192

  4. Cycloserine Induced Late Onset Psychosis and Ethambutol Induced Peripheral Neuropathy Associated with MDR-TB Treatment in an Indian Patient- A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Holla, Sadhana; Bhandarypanambur, Rajeshkrishna; Kamalkishore, Meenakumari; Janardhanan, Manju

    2015-01-01

    Adverse reactions and toxicity inevitably accompany all treatment courses for drug-resistant TB. Our case underscores the importance of awareness regarding neuropsychiatric adverse reactions due to MDR-TB therapy and reversible nature of it. Cycloserine induced psychosis is most life threatening complication and sometimes could be fatal. A 42-year-old male on MDR-TB therapy got admitted for his persistent psychotic complaints like hallucinations, delusions and suicidal ideations, despite being treated with quetiapine/olanzapine. Eventually patient was rehabilitated, cycloserine was stopped and psychotic events regressed slowly. Other culprit drugs like ethambutol and levofloxacin causing psychosis was ruled out because there was no relapse of psychotic events despite being continued with these drugs. He also complained of tingling, numbness, swaying, pain and weakness. On examination, he had distal motor weakness in lower limbs, tandem gait positive, altered position sense, and tenderness over toes and positive Romberg’s sign with ataxia. He was diagnosed to have drug induced sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy. All these symptoms persisted after stopping cycloserine and patient continued to have neuropathy with ethambutol and ethionamide. Considering the nature of neuropathy which was mild, mixed sensorimotor and resolved completely after 2-3 weeks of stopping, it was more in favour of ethambutol. However, we could not rule out the possibility of ethionamide or (ethionamide + ethambutol) causing neuropathy or both could have accelerated the neurotoxic effects of cycloserine which remained elusive. PMID:25859468

  5. Morphologic Changes in Autonomic Nerves in Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Heung Yong; Baek, Hong Sun

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is one of the major complications of diabetes, and it increases morbidity and mortality in patients with both type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Because the autonomic nervous system, for example, parasympathetic axons, has a diffuse and wide distribution, we do not know the morphological changes that occur in autonomic neural control and their exact mechanisms in diabetic patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN). Although the prevalence of sympathetic and parasympathetic neuropathy is similar in T1DM versus T2DM patients, sympathetic nerve function correlates with parasympathetic neuropathy only in T1DM patients. The explanation for these discrepancies might be that parasympathetic nerve function was more severely affected among T2DM patients. As parasympathetic nerve damage seems to be more advanced than sympathetic nerve damage, it might be that parasympathetic neuropathy precedes sympathetic neuropathy in T2DM, which was Ewing's concept. This could be explained by the intrinsic morphologic difference. Therefore, the morphological changes in the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves of involved organs in T1DM and T2DM patients who have DAN should be evaluated. In this review, evaluation methods for morphological changes in the epidermal nerves of skin, and the intrinsic nerves of the stomach will be discussed. PMID:26706915

  6. Morphologic Changes in Autonomic Nerves in Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Heung Yong; Baek, Hong Sun; Park, Tae Sun

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is one of the major complications of diabetes, and it increases morbidity and mortality in patients with both type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Because the autonomic nervous system, for example, parasympathetic axons, has a diffuse and wide distribution, we do not know the morphological changes that occur in autonomic neural control and their exact mechanisms in diabetic patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN). Although the prevalence of sympathetic and parasympathetic neuropathy is similar in T1DM versus T2DM patients, sympathetic nerve function correlates with parasympathetic neuropathy only in T1DM patients. The explanation for these discrepancies might be that parasympathetic nerve function was more severely affected among T2DM patients. As parasympathetic nerve damage seems to be more advanced than sympathetic nerve damage, it might be that parasympathetic neuropathy precedes sympathetic neuropathy in T2DM, which was Ewing's concept. This could be explained by the intrinsic morphologic difference. Therefore, the morphological changes in the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves of involved organs in T1DM and T2DM patients who have DAN should be evaluated. In this review, evaluation methods for morphological changes in the epidermal nerves of skin, and the intrinsic nerves of the stomach will be discussed. PMID:26706915

  7. Epidemic neuropathy in Cuba: a plea to end the United States economic embargo on a humanitarian basis.

    PubMed

    Román, G C

    1994-10-01

    During 1992-1993, an epidemic of neurologic disease in Cuba affected 50,862 patients with optic neuropathy, sensorineural deafness, predominantly sensory peripheral neuropathy, and dorsolateral myelopathy. The clinical syndromes were identical to those of prisoners of war subjected to nutritional restriction in tropical prison camps during World War II (Strachan's disease). A dietary deficiency of group B vitamins and sulfur-containing amino acids appears to have been the primary cause of the epidemic. This was a consequence of economic and political events in Cuba linked to the collapse of the Soviet Union and socialist countries. The recently toughened 30-year-old US economic embargo on Cuba contributed to these problems and hampered the investigation, treatment, and prevention of the epidemic. A plea is made to the neurologic community to request the lifting of the trade blockade on a humanitarian basis. PMID:7936221

  8. Coincidental Optic Nerve Meningioma and Thyroid Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    Garg, Aakriti; Patel, Payal; Lignelli, Angela; Baron, Edward; Kazim, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity, and Graves disease presented with clinical evidence of thyroid eye disease (TED) and optic neuropathy. She was referred when a tapered dose of steroids prompted worsening of her TED. CT and MRI were consistent with TED and bilateral optic nerve meningioma. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of concurrent TED and unsuspected bilateral optic nerve meningioma. When investigating the etiology of TED-associated optic neuropathy, careful attention to orbital imaging is required because coexisting pathology may exist.

  9. The evaluation of peripheral neuropathy. Part II: Identifying common clinical syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John J

    2004-01-01

    The first of this 3-part series on the diagnosis and management of peripheral neuropathy focused on the recognition of neuropathy and its clinical and laboratory characterization as essential to determining etiology. This approach allows for the construction of a differential diagnosis that can be narrowed by subsequent diagnostic testing. This installment, along with the final one, will focus on recognition and management of common neuropathies likely to be seen by the average practitioner. Neuropathies covered in this second part include diabetic, autoimmune and inflammatory, toxic, neuropathies associated with plasma cell dyscrasias, and paraneoplastic neuropathies.

  10. Severe Hypoglycemia Accompanied with Thyroid Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Nakatani, Yuki; Monden, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Minoru; Domeki, Nozomi; Matsumura, Mihoko; Banba, Nobuyuki; Nakamoto, Takaaki

    2012-01-01

    We report a 32-year-old Japanese women with severe hypoglycemia accompanied with thyroid crisis. She complained of dyspnea, general fatigue, and leg edema. She was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism with congestive heart failure and liver dysfunction. Soon after admission, sudden cardiopulmonary arrest occurred. She was then transferred to the intensive care unit. Her serum glucose level was 7 mg/dl. Intravenous glucose, hydrocortisone, diuretics, and continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF) saved her. We considered that hypoglycemia occurred due to heart failure and liver dysfunction due to thyroid crisis. PMID:23198181

  11. Giant axonal neuropathy: a rare inherited neuropathy with simple clinical clues

    PubMed Central

    Kamate, Mahesh; Ramakrishna, Shashikala; Kambali, Shweta; Mahadevan, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare hereditary neurodegenerative disorder characterised by accumulation of excess neurofilaments in the axons of peripheral and central nervous systems, which hampers signal transmission. It usually manifests in infancy and early childhood and is slowly progressive. Those affected with GAN have characteristic curly kinky hair, everted feet and a crouched gait, which suggest the diagnosis in most cases. We describe twin children who presented with difficulty in walking and an abnormal gait since they began walking; clinical clues such as hair changes led us to the final diagnosis. PMID:25216920

  12. Alcohol consumption enhances antiretroviral painful peripheral neuropathy by mitochondrial mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Luiz F.; Levine, Jon D.

    2010-01-01

    A major dose-limiting side effect of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) chemotherapies, such as the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), is a small-fiber painful peripheral neuropathy, mediated by its mitochondrial toxicity. Co-morbid conditions may also contribute to this dose-limiting effect of HIV/AIDS treatment. Alcohol abuse, which alone also produces painful neuropathy, is one of the most important co-morbid risk factors for peripheral neuropathy in patients with HIV/AIDS. Despite the prevalence of this problem and its serious impact on the quality of life and continued therapy in HIV/AIDS patients, the mechanisms by which alcohol abuse exacerbates highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-induced neuropathic pain has not been demonstrated. In this study, performed in rats, we investigated the cellular mechanism by which consumed alcohol impacts antiretroviral-induced neuropathic pain. NRTI 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC) (50 mg/kg) neuropathy was mitochondrial dependent and PKCε independent, and alcohol-induced painful neuropathy, PKCε dependent and mitochondrial independent. At low doses, ddC (5 mg/kg) and alcohol (6.5% ethanol diet for one week), which alone do not affect nociception, together produce profound mechanical hyperalgesia. This hyperalgesia is mitochondrial dependent but PKCε independent. These experiments, which provide the first model for studying the impact of co-morbidity in painful neuropathy, support the clinical impression that alcohol consumption enhances HIV/AIDS therapy neuropathy, and provide evidence for a role of mitochondrial mechanisms underlying this interaction. PMID:20726883

  13. Functioning of patients with multifocal motor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Peter G; Lindeman, Eline; Cats, Elisabeth A; van den Berg, Leonard H

    2010-06-01

    Patients with multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) have slowly progressive, predominantly distal asymmetric limb weakness without sensory loss. While previous studies have investigated the impact of MMN on body functions and structures, relatively little is known about the impact of patients' weakness on daily functioning. The aim of the present cross-sectional study, involving 47 patients with MMN, was to evaluate determinants of patients' functioning. Most patients showed not only muscle weakness but also fatigue, limited dexterity, and limited walking ability. Regression models showed that age, hand aids, and muscle strength scores together explained 54% of the variance in dexterity scores, which in turn explained 8% of the variance in patients' scores for autonomy indoors. Age, the use of walking aids, and muscle strength scores together explained 58% of the variance in walking ability scores, which in turn explained 18% of the variance in patients' scores for autonomy indoors and 7% of the variance in patients' scores for autonomy outdoors. Assessment of determinants of patient functioning may make it possible to tailor interventions to address these aspects and thereby improve patients' functioning in daily life. PMID:20626774

  14. Chronic peripheral neuropathy responsive to rituximab.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John J

    2006-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was referred for evaluation of unsteady gait and numbness of the feet. His symptoms had progressed over the previous 3 years from numbness and tingling in his left lateral thigh to a gait imbalance severe enough to necessitate crutches for ambulation. After a thorough neurological work-up, including an electromyogram that was markedly abnormal, and extensive testing for anti-nerve antibodies, a diagnosis of neuropathy, secondary to monoclonal IgM antibodies against myelin-associated glycoprotein, was made. Aggressive treatment was deemed necessary; however, none of the standard options, including intravenous immunoglobulin, prednisone, and cytotoxic drugs, seemed suitable given his underlying health and the severity of his deficit. A course of rituximab 375 mg/m2 weekly for 4 weeks was recommended for the patient. Shortly after the treatment was completed, he began to notice a slow and steady improvement. Within 3 months his gait had improved to the point where he no longer required crutches or a cane and he was able to return to work.

  15. Micturition disturbance in acute idiopathic autonomic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, R; Uchiyama, T; Asahina, M; Suzuki, A; Yamanishi, T; Hattori, T

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To define the nature of micturition disturbance in patients with acute idiopathic autonomic neuropathy (AIAN). Methods: Micturitional symptoms were observed during hospital admissions and the in outpatient clinics in six patients with clinically definite AIAN (typical form in four, cholinergic variant in one, autonomic-sensory variant in one). Urodynamic studies included medium-fill water cystometry, external sphincter electromyography, and a bethanechol test. Results: Four patients had urinary retention and two had voiding difficulty as the initial presentation. Patients with retention became able to urinate within a week (two to seven days). The major symptoms at the time of urodynamic studies (three weeks to four months after disease onset in most cases) were voiding difficulty and nocturnal frequency. None had urinary incontinence. Complete recovery from the micturition disturbance took from three months to >18 years. The recovery period was shorter in a patient with cholinergic variant, and it was longer in two patients who had a longer duration of initial urinary retention. Micturition disturbance tended to improve earlier than orthostatic hypotension. The major urodynamic abnormalities were detrusor areflexia on voiding (5), denervation supersensitivity to bethanechol (3); low compliance detrusor (1); and impaired bladder sensation (2). None had neurogenic motor unit potentials of the external sphincter muscles. Conclusions: In patients with AIAN, urinary retention and voiding difficulty are common initial presentations. The underlying mechanisms seem to be pre- and postganglionic cholinergic dysfunction with preservation of somatic sphincter function. The bladder problems tend to improve earlier than orthostatic hypotension. PMID:14742606

  16. Phenotypic variability of TRPV4 related neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Teresinha; Bansagi, Boglarka; Pyle, Angela; Griffin, Helen; Douroudis, Konstantinos; Polvikoski, Tuomo; Antoniadi, Thalia; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Lochmüller, Hanns; Horvath, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) gene have been associated with autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasias and peripheral nervous system syndromes (PNSS). PNSS include Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease (CMT) type 2C, congenital spinal muscular atrophy and arthrogryposis and scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy. We report the clinical, electrophysiological and muscle biopsy findings in two unrelated patients with two novel heterozygous missense mutations in the TRPV4 gene. Whole exome sequencing was carried out on genomic DNA using Illumina TruseqTM 62Mb exome capture. Patient 1 harbours a de novo c.805C > T (p.Arg269Cys) mutation. Clinically, this patient shows signs of both scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy and skeletal dysplasia. Patient 2 harbours a novel c.184G > A (p.Asp62Asn) mutation. While the clinical phenotype is compatible with CMT type 2C with the patient's muscle harbours basophilic inclusions. Mutations in the TRPV4 gene have a broad phenotypic variability and disease severity and may share a similar pathogenic mechanism with Heat Shock Protein related neuropathies. PMID:25900305

  17. Diabetic Neuropathy and Oxidative Stress: Therapeutic Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Asieh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a widespread disabling disorder comprising peripheral nerves' damage. DN develops on a background of hyperglycemia and an entangled metabolic imbalance, mainly oxidative stress. The majority of related pathways like polyol, advanced glycation end products, poly-ADP-ribose polymerase, hexosamine, and protein kinase c all originated from initial oxidative stress. To date, no absolute cure for DN has been defined; although some drugs are conventionally used, much more can be found if all pathophysiological links with oxidative stress would be taken into account. In this paper, although current therapies for DN have been reviewed, we have mainly focused on the links between DN and oxidative stress and therapies on the horizon, such as inhibitors of protein kinase C, aldose reductase, and advanced glycation. With reference to oxidative stress and the related pathways, the following new drugs are under study such as taurine, acetyl-L-carnitine, alpha lipoic acid, protein kinase C inhibitor (ruboxistaurin), aldose reductase inhibitors (fidarestat, epalrestat, ranirestat), advanced glycation end product inhibitors (benfotiamine, aspirin, aminoguanidine), the hexosamine pathway inhibitor (benfotiamine), inhibitor of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (nicotinamide), and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (trandolapril). The development of modern drugs to treat DN is a real challenge and needs intensive long-term comparative trials. PMID:23738033

  18. Painful Diabetic Neuropathy: Prevention or Suppression?

    PubMed

    Todorovic, S M

    2016-01-01

    Pain-sensing sensory neurons (nociceptors) of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and dorsal horn (DH) can become sensitized (hyperexcitable) in response to pathological conditions such as diabetes, which in turn may lead to the development of painful peripheral diabetic neuropathy (PDN). Because of incomplete knowledge about the mechanisms underlying painful PDN, current treatment for painful PDN has been limited to somewhat nonspecific systemic drugs that have significant side effects or potential for abuse. Recent studies have established that several ion channels in DRG and DH neurons are dysregulated and make a previously unrecognized contribution to sensitization of pain responses by enhancing excitability of nociceptors in animal models of type 1 and type 2 PDN. Furthermore, it has been reported that targeting posttranslational modification of nociceptive ion channels such as glycosylation and methylglyoxal metabolism can completely reverse mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in diabetic animals with PDN in vivo. Understanding details of posttranslational regulation of nociceptive channel activity may facilitate development of novel therapies for treatment of painful PDN. We argue that pharmacological targeting of the specific pathogenic mechanism rather than of the channel per se may cause fewer side effects and reduce the potential for drug abuse in patients with diabetes. PMID:27133151

  19. Painless Ulcers and Fissures of Toes: Hereditary Sensory Neuropathy, Not Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Angoori Gnaneshwar

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathies (HSN) are rare genetically determined neuropathies. They often manifest as painless injuries in children. We present HSN in a 5-year-old boy who presented with recurrent fissuring and ulceration involving both great toes. PMID:26955138

  20. Myanmarese Neuropathy: Clinical Description of Acute Peripheral Neuropathy Detected among Myanmarese Refugees in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Fu Liong, Hiew; Santhi, Datuk Puvanarajah; Shanthi, Viswanathan; Mohd Hanip, Rafia

    2014-01-01

    Background. Since 2008, we have observed an increasing number of Myanmarese refugees in Malaysia being admitted for acute/subacute onset peripheral neuropathy. Most of them had a preceding history of starvation. Methods. We retrospectively studied the clinical features of all Myanmarese patients admitted with peripheral neuropathy from September 2008 to January 2014. Results. A total of 24 patients from the Chin, Rohingya, and Rakhine ethnicities (mean age, 23.8 years; male, 96%) had symmetrical, ascending areflexic weakness with at least one additional presenting symptom of fever, lower limb swelling, vomiting, abdominal pain, or difficulty in breathing. Twenty (83.3%) had sensory symptoms. Ten (41.6%) had cranial nerve involvement. Nineteen patients had cerebrospinal fluid examinations but none with evidence of albuminocytological dissociation. Neurophysiological assessment revealed axonal polyneuropathy, predominantly a motor-sensory subtype. Folate and vitamin B12 deficiencies were detected in 31.5% of them. These findings suggested the presence of a polyneuropathy related to nutrition against a backdrop of other possible environmental factors such as infections, metabolic disorders, or exposure to unknown toxin. Supportive treatment with appropriate vitamins supplementation improved functional outcome in most patients. Conclusion. We report a spectrum of acquired reversible neurological manifestations among Myanmarese refugees likely to be multifactorial with micronutrient deficiencies playing an important role in the pathogenesis. PMID:27350989

  1. Myanmarese Neuropathy: Clinical Description of Acute Peripheral Neuropathy Detected among Myanmarese Refugees in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Santhi, Datuk Puvanarajah; Mohd Hanip, Rafia

    2014-01-01

    Background. Since 2008, we have observed an increasing number of Myanmarese refugees in Malaysia being admitted for acute/subacute onset peripheral neuropathy. Most of them had a preceding history of starvation. Methods. We retrospectively studied the clinical features of all Myanmarese patients admitted with peripheral neuropathy from September 2008 to January 2014. Results. A total of 24 patients from the Chin, Rohingya, and Rakhine ethnicities (mean age, 23.8 years; male, 96%) had symmetrical, ascending areflexic weakness with at least one additional presenting symptom of fever, lower limb swelling, vomiting, abdominal pain, or difficulty in breathing. Twenty (83.3%) had sensory symptoms. Ten (41.6%) had cranial nerve involvement. Nineteen patients had cerebrospinal fluid examinations but none with evidence of albuminocytological dissociation. Neurophysiological assessment revealed axonal polyneuropathy, predominantly a motor-sensory subtype. Folate and vitamin B12 deficiencies were detected in 31.5% of them. These findings suggested the presence of a polyneuropathy related to nutrition against a backdrop of other possible environmental factors such as infections, metabolic disorders, or exposure to unknown toxin. Supportive treatment with appropriate vitamins supplementation improved functional outcome in most patients. Conclusion. We report a spectrum of acquired reversible neurological manifestations among Myanmarese refugees likely to be multifactorial with micronutrient deficiencies playing an important role in the pathogenesis. PMID:27350989

  2. The Mechanism of Atomization Accompanying Solid Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, R A , Jr

    1933-01-01

    A brief historical and descriptive account of solid injection is followed by a detailed review of the available theoretical and experimental data that seem to throw light on the mechanism of this form of atomization. It is concluded that this evidence indicates that (1) the atomization accompanying solid injection occurs at the surface of the liquid after it issues as a solid stream from the orifice; and (2) that such atomization has a mechanism physically identical with the atomization which takes place in an air stream, both being due merely to the formation, at the gas-liquid interface, of fine ligaments under the influence of the relative motion of gas and liquid, and to their collapse, under the influence of surface tension, to form the drops in the spray.

  3. Mutation in FAM134B causing severe hereditary sensory neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sinead M; Davidson, Gabrielle L; Brandner, Sebastian; Houlden, Henry; Reilly, Mary M

    2013-01-01

    The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) are rare inherited neuropathies presenting with sensory loss and complications, including ulcers, infections, osteomyelitis and amputations. Usually, sensory symptoms predominate although motor involvement can occur. Autonomic features may be minimal (then hereditary sensory neuropathy, HSN, is preferred). HSAN has been classified into five subtypes depending on clinical presentation.1 Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy II (HSANII or HSNII) is an early onset, autosomal recessive sensory neuropathy with ulcero-mutilating complications due to mutations in the HSN2 isoform of the WNK1 gene.2 Recently, a similar phenotype was described in a Saudi-Arabian family, and a homozygous nonsense mutation found in a new gene, FAM134B (family with sequence similarity 134, member B), encoding a newly identified Golgi protein. The index case in this family was initially thought to have leprosy. Three additional families (out of 75 patients) with similar phenotypes were found to have homozygous loss of function mutations in FAM134B.3 Here, we report the clinical and pathological findings in a further patient with HSNII due to a homozygous mutation in FAM134B. PMID:21115472

  4. Nicotinamide Riboside Opposes Type 2 Diabetes and Neuropathy in Mice.

    PubMed

    Trammell, Samuel A J; Weidemann, Benjamin J; Chadda, Ankita; Yorek, Matthew S; Holmes, Amey; Coppey, Lawrence J; Obrosov, Alexander; Kardon, Randy H; Yorek, Mark A; Brenner, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Male C57BL/6J mice raised on high fat diet (HFD) become prediabetic and develop insulin resistance and sensory neuropathy. The same mice given low doses of streptozotocin are a model of type 2 diabetes (T2D), developing hyperglycemia, severe insulin resistance and diabetic peripheral neuropathy involving sensory and motor neurons. Because of suggestions that increased NAD(+) metabolism might address glycemic control and be neuroprotective, we treated prediabetic and T2D mice with nicotinamide riboside (NR) added to HFD. NR improved glucose tolerance, reduced weight gain, liver damage and the development of hepatic steatosis in prediabetic mice while protecting against sensory neuropathy. In T2D mice, NR greatly reduced non-fasting and fasting blood glucose, weight gain and hepatic steatosis while protecting against diabetic neuropathy. The neuroprotective effect of NR could not be explained by glycemic control alone. Corneal confocal microscopy was the most sensitive measure of neurodegeneration. This assay allowed detection of the protective effect of NR on small nerve structures in living mice. Quantitative metabolomics established that hepatic NADP(+) and NADPH levels were significantly degraded in prediabetes and T2D but were largely protected when mice were supplemented with NR. The data justify testing of NR in human models of obesity, T2D and associated neuropathies. PMID:27230286

  5. Nicotinamide Riboside Opposes Type 2 Diabetes and Neuropathy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Trammell, Samuel A.J.; Weidemann, Benjamin J.; Chadda, Ankita; Yorek, Matthew S.; Holmes, Amey; Coppey, Lawrence J.; Obrosov, Alexander; Kardon, Randy H.; Yorek, Mark A.; Brenner, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Male C57BL/6J mice raised on high fat diet (HFD) become prediabetic and develop insulin resistance and sensory neuropathy. The same mice given low doses of streptozotocin are a model of type 2 diabetes (T2D), developing hyperglycemia, severe insulin resistance and diabetic peripheral neuropathy involving sensory and motor neurons. Because of suggestions that increased NAD+ metabolism might address glycemic control and be neuroprotective, we treated prediabetic and T2D mice with nicotinamide riboside (NR) added to HFD. NR improved glucose tolerance, reduced weight gain, liver damage and the development of hepatic steatosis in prediabetic mice while protecting against sensory neuropathy. In T2D mice, NR greatly reduced non-fasting and fasting blood glucose, weight gain and hepatic steatosis while protecting against diabetic neuropathy. The neuroprotective effect of NR could not be explained by glycemic control alone. Corneal confocal microscopy was the most sensitive measure of neurodegeneration. This assay allowed detection of the protective effect of NR on small nerve structures in living mice. Quantitative metabolomics established that hepatic NADP+ and NADPH levels were significantly degraded in prediabetes and T2D but were largely protected when mice were supplemented with NR. The data justify testing of NR in human models of obesity, T2D and associated neuropathies. PMID:27230286

  6. Peripheral neuropathy induced by combination chemotherapy of docetaxel and cisplatin.

    PubMed Central

    Hilkens, P. H.; Pronk, L. C.; Verweij, J.; Vecht, C. J.; van Putten, W. L.; van den Bent, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    Docetaxel, a new semisynthetic taxoid that has demonstrated promising activity as an antineoplastic agent, was administered in combination with cisplatin to 63 patients in a dose-escalating study. As both drugs were known to be potentially neurotoxic, peripheral neurotoxicity was prospectively assessed in detail. Neuropathy was evaluated by clinical sum-score for signs and symptoms and by measurement of the vibration perception threshold (VPT). The severity of neuropathy was graded according to the National Cancer Institute's 'Common Toxicity Criteria'. The docetaxel-cisplatin combination chemotherapy induced a predominantly sensory neuropathy in 29 (53%) out of 55 evaluable patients. At cumulative doses of both cisplatin and docetaxel above 200 mg m(-2), 26 (74%) out of 35 patients developed a neuropathy which was mild in 15, moderate in ten and severe in one patient. Significant correlations were present between both the cumulative dose of docetaxel and cisplatin and the post-treatment sum-score of neuropathy (P < 0.01) as well as the post-treatment VPT (P < 0.01). The neurotoxic effects of this combination were more severe than either cisplatin or docetaxel as single agent at similar doses. PMID:9020489

  7. 77 FR 59930 - Clinical Development Programs for Disease-Modifying Agents for Peripheral Neuropathy; Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... for Peripheral Neuropathy; Public Workshop; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration...-modifying agents for the treatment of peripheral neuropathy. Discussion will focus on possible therapeutic targets for these agents, the types of painful peripheral neuropathies amenable to treatment with...

  8. Phenotyping animal models of diabetic neuropathy: a consensus statement of the diabetic neuropathy study group of the EASD (Neurodiab).

    PubMed

    Biessels, G J; Bril, V; Calcutt, N A; Cameron, N E; Cotter, M A; Dobrowsky, R; Feldman, E L; Fernyhough, P; Jakobsen, J; Malik, R A; Mizisin, A P; Oates, P J; Obrosova, I G; Pop-Busui, R; Russell, J W; Sima, A A; Stevens, M J; Schmidt, R E; Tesfaye, S; Veves, A; Vinik, A I; Wright, D E; Yagihashi, S; Yorek, M A; Ziegler, D; Zochodne, D W

    2014-06-01

    NIDDK, JDRF, and the Diabetic Neuropathy Study Group of EASD sponsored a meeting to explore the current status of animal models of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The goal of the workshop was to develop a set of consensus criteria for the phenotyping of rodent models of diabetic neuropathy. The discussion was divided into five areas: (1) status of commonly used rodent models of diabetes, (2) nerve structure, (3) electrophysiological assessments of nerve function, (4) behavioral assessments of nerve function, and (5) the role of biomarkers in disease phenotyping. Participants discussed the current understanding of each area, gold standards (if applicable) for assessments of function, improvements of existing techniques, and utility of known and exploratory biomarkers. The research opportunities in each area were outlined, providing a possible roadmap for future studies. The meeting concluded with a discussion on the merits and limitations of a unified approach to phenotyping rodent models of diabetic neuropathy and a consensus formed on the definition of the minimum criteria required for establishing the presence of the disease. A neuropathy phenotype in rodents was defined as the presence of statistically different values between diabetic and control animals in 2 of 3 assessments (nocifensive behavior, nerve conduction velocities, or nerve structure). The participants propose that this framework would allow different research groups to compare and share data, with an emphasis on data targeted toward the therapeutic efficacy of drug interventions.

  9. Auditory Neuropathy/Dys-synchrony and Its Perceptual Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Rance, Gary

    2005-01-01

    Auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony is a form of hearing impairment in which cochlear outer hair cell function is spared but neural transmission in the auditory pathway is disordered. This condition, or group of conditions with a common physiologic profile, accounts for approximately 7% of permanent childhood hearing loss and a significant (but as yet undetermined) proportion of adult impairment. This paper presents an overview of the mechanisms underlying auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony-type hearing loss and the clinical profile for affected patients. In particular it examines the perceptual consequences of auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony, which are quite different from those associated with sensorineural hearing loss, and considers currently available, and future management options. PMID:15920648

  10. Image analysis software for following progression of peripheral neuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epplin-Zapf, Thomas; Miller, Clayton; Larkin, Sean; Hermesmeyer, Eduardo; Macy, Jenny; Pellegrini, Marco; Luccarelli, Saverio; Staurenghi, Giovanni; Holmes, Timothy

    2009-02-01

    A relationship has been reported by several research groups [1 - 4] between the density and shapes of nerve fibers in the cornea and the existence and severity of peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is a complication of several prevalent diseases or conditions, which include diabetes, HIV, prolonged alcohol overconsumption and aging. A common clinical technique for confirming the condition is intramuscular electromyography (EMG), which is invasive, so a noninvasive technique like the one proposed here carries important potential advantages for the physician and patient. A software program that automatically detects the nerve fibers, counts them and measures their shapes is being developed and tested. Tests were carried out with a database of subjects with levels of severity of diabetic neuropathy as determined by EMG testing. Results from this testing, that include a linear regression analysis are shown.

  11. Periaxin mutations cause recessive Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Boerkoel, C F; Takashima, H; Stankiewicz, P; Garcia, C A; Leber, S M; Rhee-Morris, L; Lupski, J R

    2001-02-01

    The periaxin gene (PRX) encodes two PDZ-domain proteins, L- and S-periaxin, that are required for maintenance of peripheral nerve myelin. Prx(-/-) mice develop a severe demyelinating peripheral neuropathy, despite apparently normal initial formation of myelin sheaths. We hypothesized that mutations in PRX could cause human peripheral myelinopathies. In accordance with this, we identified three unrelated Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy patients with recessive PRX mutations-two with compound heterozygous nonsense and frameshift mutations, and one with a homozygous frameshift mutation. We mapped PRX to 19q13.13-13.2, a region recently associated with a severe autosomal recessive demyelinating neuropathy in a Lebanese family (Delague et al. 2000) and syntenic to the location of Prx on murine chromosome 7 (Gillespie et al. 1997). PMID:11133365

  12. Is there a relationship between oral health and diabetic neuropathy?

    PubMed

    Borgnakke, Wenche S; Anderson, Patricia F; Shannon, Carol; Jivanescu, Anca

    2015-11-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is the most common microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus with high morbidity and mortality, and low quality of life. It has a broad spectrum of clinical forms, although distal symmetrical polyneuropathy is the most prevalent. Several oral complications including burning mouth syndrome, dry mouth, and impairment of the senses taste and smell are less-known manifestations of diabetic neuropathy and often overlooked. Periodontitis, tooth loss, and temporomandibular joint dysfunction may be also present in these patients and are equally debilitating. Periodontitis was declared the sixth complication of diabetes in 1993 and may contribute to poor glucose control. Hence, periodontitis and diabetes mutually and adversely affect each other. This review summarizes the available body of scientific literature that discusses oral manifestations in patients with diabetic neuropathy and identifies important areas where more research is needed. PMID:26374570

  13. Towards a Diagnosis of Cochlear Neuropathy with Envelope Following Responses.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Luke A; Valero, Michelle D; Liberman, M Charles

    2015-12-01

    Listeners with normal audiometric thresholds can still have suprathreshold deficits, for example, in the ability to discriminate sounds in complex acoustic scenes. One likely source of these deficits is cochlear neuropathy, a loss of auditory nerve (AN) fibers without hair cell damage, which can occur due to both aging and moderate acoustic overexposure. Since neuropathy can affect up to 50 % of AN fibers, its impact on suprathreshold hearing is likely profound, but progress is hindered by lack of a robust non-invasive test of neuropathy in humans. Reduction of suprathreshold auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) can be used to quantify neuropathy in inbred mice. However, ABR amplitudes are highly variable in humans, and thus more challenging to use. Since noise-induced neuropathy is selective for AN fibers with high thresholds, and because phase locking to temporal envelopes is particularly strong in these fibers, the envelope following response (EFR) might be a more robust measure. We compared EFRs to sinusoidally amplitude-modulated tones and ABRs to tone-pips in mice following a neuropathic noise exposure. EFR amplitude, EFR phase-locking value, and ABR amplitude were all reduced in noise-exposed mice. However, the changes in EFRs were more robust: the variance was smaller, thus inter-group differences were clearer. Optimum detection of neuropathy was achieved with high modulation frequencies and moderate levels. Analysis of group delays was used to confirm that the AN population was dominating the responses at these high modulation frequencies. Application of these principles in clinical testing can improve the differential diagnosis of sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:26323349

  14. Role of A3 adenosine receptor in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Heng; Zhang, Enshui; Feng, Chang; Zhao, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Neuropathy is the most common diabetic complication. Although the A1 and A2A adenosine receptors are important pharmacological targets in alleviating diabetic neuropathy, the role of the A3 adenosine receptor remains unknown. Because the A3 adenosine receptor regulates pain induced by chronic constriction injury or chemotherapy, its stimulation might also attenuate diabetic neuropathy. This study examines the effects of systemic treatment with the A3 adenosine receptor agonist 1-deoxy-1-[6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-N-methyl-β-d-ribofuranuronamide (IB-MECA) on diabetic neuropathy and explores the putative mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects. We show that IB-MECA alleviated mechanical hyperalgesia and thermal hypoalgesia in mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after streptozocin (STZ) treatment. Furthermore, IB-MECA prevented the reduction in sciatic motor nerve conduction velocity and sensory nerve conduction velocity in diabetic mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. Similarly, IB-MECA inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-κB and decreased the generation of tumor necrosis factor-α in the spinal cord of mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. These phenomena were associated with reduction of A3 adenosine receptor expression in the spinal cord after long-term diabetes. Our results suggest that the A3 adenosine receptor plays a critical role in regulating diabetic neuropathy and that reduction in A3 adenosine receptor expression/function might contribute to the progression of diabetic neuropathy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Severe peripheral neuropathy after exposure to monosodium methyl arsonate.

    PubMed

    Hessl, S M; Berman, E

    1982-05-01

    A case of severe peripheral neuropathy after several days of exposure to a pesticide spray containing monosodium methyl arsonate (MSMA) is reported. The clinical manifestations of symmetrical peripheral neuropathy with stocking-glove sensory deficit, decreased position sense, decreased and absent deep tendon reflexes, and muscle wasting are consistent with those described in other cases of arsenic intoxication. The anemia, leukopenia, and bone marrow changes of dyserythropoiesis in this case are also similar to those previously described with arsenic intoxication. The authors discuss the possible contribution of toxicity from exposure to other pesticides.

  16. [Arsenous anhydride poisoning. Peripheral neuropathy and changes in cognitive functions].

    PubMed

    Danan, M; Conso, F; Dally, S; Bertaux, L; Chouraki, L; Balme, R

    1985-01-01

    The authors report the evolution over an 11 months period of a case of subacute intoxication with arsenic in a 30 years old woman. In addition to the classical peripheral neuropathy, we observed impairment of the superior neurological functions which improved together with the neuropathy. These malfunctions are rarely described in the literature although arsenic seems to cross the blood-brain barrier easily. There is no other explanation, and we believe arsenic to be responsible for these disturbances. We suggest systematic testing of the superior neurological functions in cases of arsenic intoxication.

  17. Ulnar Neuropathy After Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jae Seong; Chung, Sun G; Bang, Hyun; Lee, Hyuk Jin; Kim, Keewon

    2015-06-01

    Currently, extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) is widely used for treatment of various musculoskeletal disorders. We report a case of ulnar neuropathy secondary to the application of ESWT. A 48-year-old man was diagnosed with medial epicondylitis and underwent 2 sessions of ESWT. Immediately after the second session, he experienced paresthesia and weakness in the right hand. On physical examination, atrophy of the first dorsal interosseus and weakness of the abductor digiti minimi were observed. Electrophysiologic study demonstrated ulnar neuropathy at the elbow with severe partial axonotmesis. Our case report demonstrates that ESWT might cause or contribute to peripheral nerve injury at the site of application.

  18. Microvascular dysfunction in the context of diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Stirban, Alin

    2014-01-01

    Microvascular dysfunction in diabetes plays a crucial role in the development of diabetic complications. The skin, as one of the most accessible organs, serves as a model for the investigation of microvascular dysfunction. Several non-invasive, mostly laser-Doppler-based methods have been developed lately to assess microvascular function in the skin. Microvascular functional changes occur even in the prediabetic state and become more complex with overt diabetes, being exacerbated by the presence of peripheral and/or autonomic diabetic neuropathy. The present article aims at shedding light on the implication of endothelial and neurovascular dysfunction in microvascular changes in diabetes, highlighting the contribution of different forms of diabetic neuropathy.

  19. [Cardiac autonomic neuropathy. Current realities and future outlook].

    PubMed

    Bauduceau, B; Chanudet, X; Mayaudon, H; Chau, N P; Gaillard, J F; Larroque, P; Gautier, D

    1994-01-01

    Cardiac autonomic neuropathy frequently affects Type 1 and Type 2 diabetic patients. This disease is distinguished by visible clinical consequences which can be tragic. It can also worsen a number of degenerative complications. Therefore, cardiac autonomic neuropathy seems to play a deciding role in silent ischaemia and in dysregulations of blood pressure. Clinical explorations continue to be based on the tests validated by Ewing, but the development of simple and reliable techniques seems to be an objective the interest of which cannot escape any clinician.

  20. Autonomic Involvement in Subacute and Chronic Immune-Mediated Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Mazzeo, Anna; Stancanelli, Claudia; Vita, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic function can be impaired in many disorders in which sympathetic, parasympathetic, and enteric arms of the autonomic nervous system are affected. Signs and symptoms of autonomic involvement are related to impairment of cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, urogenital, thermoregulatory, sudomotor, and pupillomotor autonomic functions. Availability of noninvasive, sensitive, and reproducible tests can help to recognize these disorders and to better understand specific mechanisms of some, potentially treatable, immune-mediated autonomic neuropathies. This paper describes autonomic involvement in immune-mediated neuropathies with a subacute or chronic course. PMID:23853716

  1. Review: Regional land subsidence accompanying groundwater extraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galloway, Devin L.; Burbey, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    The extraction of groundwater can generate land subsidence by causing the compaction of susceptible aquifer systems, typically unconsolidated alluvial or basin-fill aquifer systems comprising aquifers and aquitards. Various ground-based and remotely sensed methods are used to measure and map subsidence. Many areas of subsidence caused by groundwater pumping have been identified and monitored, and corrective measures to slow or halt subsidence have been devised. Two principal means are used to mitigate subsidence caused by groundwater withdrawal—reduction of groundwater withdrawal, and artificial recharge. Analysis and simulation of aquifer-system compaction follow from the basic relations between head, stress, compressibility, and groundwater flow and are addressed primarily using two approaches—one based on conventional groundwater flow theory and one based on linear poroelasticity theory. Research and development to improve the assessment and analysis of aquifer-system compaction, the accompanying subsidence and potential ground ruptures are needed in the topic areas of the hydromechanical behavior of aquitards, the role of horizontal deformation, the application of differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry, and the regional-scale simulation of coupled groundwater flow and aquifer-system deformation to support resource management and hazard mitigation measures.

  2. Treatment of patients with multifocal motor neuropathy with immunoglobulins in clinical practice: the SIGNS registry

    PubMed Central

    Stangel, Martin; Gold, Ralf; Pittrow, David; Baumann, Ulrich; Borte, Michael; Fasshauer, Maria; Hensel, Manfred; Huscher, Dörte; Reiser, Marcel; Sommer, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The management of patients with multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) under everyday clinical conditions has been insufficiently studied. We therefore collected comprehensive observational data on patients with MMN who received intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SC) immunoglobulins (IGs) as maintenance therapy. Methods: This was a prospective, noninterventional study (registry) in neurological centres (hospitals and offices) throughout Germany. Results: As of 1 December 2015, 80 patients with MMN were included (mean age 55.4 ± 9.8 years, 67% males, mean disease duration 10.7 ± 10.2 years). The affected limb regions were predominantly distal muscle groups of the upper extremities. On the inflammatory neuropathy cause and treatment (INCAT) scale, 94% of the patients had some disability in the arms and 61% in the legs. At inclusion, 98.8% received IVIG and 1.3% SCIG. Substantial variation was observed between IVIG treatment intervals (every 0.7 to 17.3 weeks) and dosage (0.2–2.1 g/kg body weight received during a single administration; mean monthly dosage, 0.9 g/kg body weight). However, the mean monthly dosage was steady over time. At 1-year follow up, improvement was seen in muscle strength, INCAT and quality of life (QoL) scores (SF-36 questionnaire). Conclusions: The management of patients with MMN in everyday clinical practice demonstrates a wide range of absolute dosages and treatment intervals of IG, supporting the recommended practice of determining treatment dose on an individual patient basis. The improvements in muscle strength and reduction in disability, accompanied by increased QoL, strengthen the case for use of IG as a maintenance treatment for MMN. PMID:27134672

  3. Generalized peripheral neuropathy in a dental technician exposed to methyl methacrylate monomer

    SciTech Connect

    Donaghy, M.; Rushworth, G.; Jacobs, J.M. )

    1991-07-01

    A 58-year-old dental prosthetic technician developed generalized sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy. Neurophysiologic studies showed a generalized sensorimotor neuropathy of axonal degeneration type. Examination of a sural nerve biopsy showed a moderately severe axonal neuropathy with loss of large myelinated fibers and unmyelinated axons. There was evidence of slow ongoing degeneration and considerable fiber regeneration. Electron microscopy showed increased numbers of filaments in a few fibers. These findings show resemblances to the nerve changes caused by another acrylic resin, acrylamide. They suggest that the neuropathy may have been caused by 30 years of occupational cutaneous and inhalational exposure to methyl methacrylate monomer since they excluded other recognized causes of neuropathy.

  4. 16 CFR 1500.125 - Labeling requirements for accompanying literature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Labeling requirements for accompanying literature. 1500.125 Section 1500.125 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL... REGULATIONS § 1500.125 Labeling requirements for accompanying literature. When any accompanying...

  5. 16 CFR 1500.125 - Labeling requirements for accompanying literature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling requirements for accompanying literature. 1500.125 Section 1500.125 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL... REGULATIONS § 1500.125 Labeling requirements for accompanying literature. When any accompanying...

  6. 16 CFR 1500.125 - Labeling requirements for accompanying literature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Labeling requirements for accompanying literature. 1500.125 Section 1500.125 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL... REGULATIONS § 1500.125 Labeling requirements for accompanying literature. When any accompanying...

  7. 16 CFR 1500.125 - Labeling requirements for accompanying literature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Labeling requirements for accompanying literature. 1500.125 Section 1500.125 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL... REGULATIONS § 1500.125 Labeling requirements for accompanying literature. When any accompanying...

  8. 16 CFR 1500.125 - Labeling requirements for accompanying literature.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Labeling requirements for accompanying literature. 1500.125 Section 1500.125 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL... REGULATIONS § 1500.125 Labeling requirements for accompanying literature. When any accompanying...

  9. Angiogenin gene polymorphism: A risk factor for diabetic peripheral neuropathy in the northern Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongli; Fan, Dongsheng; Zhang, Yingshuang

    2013-12-25

    Angiogenin is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Here, we quenced the coding region of the angiogenin gene in genomic DNA from 207 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (129 diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients and 78 diabetic non-neuropathy patients) and 268 healthy controls. All subjects were from the Han population of northern China. No mutations were found. We then compared the genotype and allele frequencies of the angiogenin synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism rs11701 between the diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients and controls, and between the diabetic neuropathy and non-neuropathy patients, using a case-control design. We detected no statistically significant genetic associations. Angiogenin may not be associated with genetic susceptibility to diabetic peripheral neuropathy in the Han population of northern China.

  10. Prevention of paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy by lithium pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Mo, Michelle; Erdelyi, Ildiko; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Benbow, Jennifer H; Ehrlich, Barbara E

    2012-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a debilitating side effect that occurs in many patients undergoing chemotherapy. It is often irreversible and frequently leads to early termination of treatment. In this study, we have identified two compounds, lithium and ibudilast, that when administered as a single prophylactic injection prior to paclitaxel treatment, prevent the development of CIPN in mice at the sensory-motor and cellular level. The prevention of neuropathy was not observed in paclitaxel-treated mice that were only prophylactically treated with a vehicle injection. The coadministration of lithium with paclitaxel also allows for administration of higher doses of paclitaxel (survival increases by 60%), protects against paclitaxel-induced cardiac abnormalities, and, notably, does not interfere with the antitumor effects of paclitaxel. Moreover, we have determined a mechanism by which CIPN develops and have discovered that lithium and ibudilast inhibit development of peripheral neuropathy by disrupting the interaction between paclitaxel, neuronal calcium sensor 1 (NCS-1), and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP3R) to prevent treatment-induced decreases in intracellular calcium signaling. This study shows that lithium and ibudilast are candidate therapeutics for the prevention of paclitaxel-induced neuropathy and could enable patients to tolerate more aggressive treatment regimens.

  11. Blocking mitochondrial calcium release in Schwann cells prevents demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Sergio; Berthelot, Jade; Jiner, Jennifer; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Fernando, Ruani; Chrast, Roman; Lenaers, Guy; Tricaud, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    Schwann cells produce myelin sheath around peripheral nerve axons. Myelination is critical for rapid propagation of action potentials, as illustrated by the large number of acquired and hereditary peripheral neuropathies, such as diabetic neuropathy or Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases, that are commonly associated with a process of demyelination. However, the early molecular events that trigger the demyelination program in these diseases remain unknown. Here, we used virally delivered fluorescent probes and in vivo time-lapse imaging in a mouse model of demyelination to investigate the underlying mechanisms of the demyelination process. We demonstrated that mitochondrial calcium released by voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) after sciatic nerve injury triggers Schwann cell demyelination via ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and c-JUN activation. In diabetic mice, VDAC1 activity was altered, resulting in a mitochondrial calcium leak in Schwann cell cytoplasm, thereby priming the cell for demyelination. Moreover, reduction of mitochondrial calcium release, either by shRNA-mediated VDAC1 silencing or pharmacological inhibition, prevented demyelination, leading to nerve conduction and neuromuscular performance recovery in rodent models of diabetic neuropathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases. Therefore, this study identifies mitochondria as the early key factor in the molecular mechanism of peripheral demyelination and opens a potential opportunity for the treatment of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26878172

  12. Exercise as Therapy for Diabetic and Prediabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Singleton, J Robinson; Smith, A Gordon; Marcus, Robin L

    2015-12-01

    Length-dependent neuropathy is the most common and costly complication of diabetes and frequently causes injury primarily to small-diameter cutaneous nociceptive fibers. Not only persistent hyperglycemia but also metabolic, endocrine, and inflammatory effects of obesity and dyslipidemia appear to play an important role in the development of diabetic neuropathy. Rational therapies aimed at direct control of glucose or its increased entry into the polyol pathway, oxidative or nitrosative stress, advanced glycation end product formation or signaling, microvascular ischemia, or adipocyte-derived toxicity have each failed in human trials of diabetic neuropathy. Aerobic exercise produces salutary effects in many of these pathogenic pathways simultaneously and, in both animal models and human trials, has been shown to improve symptoms of neuropathy and promote re-growth of cutaneous small-diameter fibers. Behavioral reduction in periods of seated, awake inactivity produces multimodal metabolic benefits similar to exercise, and the two strategies when combined may offer sustained benefit to peripheral nerve function. PMID:26538074

  13. Diabetic Neuropathy: What is a Total Contact Cast?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Web version Diabetic Neuropathy | What is a Total Contact Cast? What is a total contact cast? A total contact cast is a cast used to treat ulcers ( ... foot--that's why it is called a total contact cast. The cast helps to protect the skin ...

  14. Recent advances in exploring the genetic susceptibility to diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Politi, Cristina; Ciccacci, Cinzia; D'Amato, Cinzia; Novelli, Giuseppe; Borgiani, Paola; Spallone, Vincenza

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic polyneuropathy and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy are common and disabling complications of diabetes. Although glycaemic control and cardiovascular risk factors are major contributory elements in its development, diabetic neuropathy recognizes a multifactorial influence and a multiplicity of pathogenetic mechanisms. Thus genetic and environmental factors may contribute to its susceptibility, each with a modest contribution, by targeting various metabolic and microvascular pathways whose alterations intervene in diabetic neuropathy pathogenesis. This review is aimed at describing major data from the available literature regarding genetic susceptibility to diabetic neuropathies. It provides an overview of the genes reported as associated with the development or progression of these complications, i.e. ACE, MTHFR, GST, GLO1, APOE, TCF7L2, VEGF, IL-4, GPX1, eNOS, ADRA2B, GFRA2, MIR146A, MIR128A. The identification of genetic susceptibility can help in both expanding the comprehension of the pathogenetic mechanisms of diabetic nerve damage and identifying biomarkers of risk prediction and response to therapeutic intervention.

  15. Clinicopathological and genetic study of early-onset demyelinating neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Parman, Yesim; Battaloglu, Esra; Baris, Ibrahim; Bilir, Birdal; Poyraz, Mürüvvet; Bissar-Tadmouri, Nisrine; Williams, Anna; Ammar, Nadia; Nelis, Eva; Timmerman, Vincent; De Jonghe, Peter; Najafov, Ayaz; Necefov, Ayaz; Deymeer, Feza; Serdaroglu, Piraye; Brophy, Peter J; Said, G

    2004-11-01

    Autosomal recessive demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT4), Dejerine-Sottas disease and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy are variants of hereditary demyelinating neuropathy of infancy, a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. To explore the spectrum of early-onset demyelinating neuropathies further, we studied the clinicopathological and genetic aspects of 20 patients born to unaffected parents. In 19 families out of 20, consanguinity between the parents or presence of an affected sib suggested autosomal recessive transmission. Screening of various genes known to be involved in CMT4 revealed six mutations of which five are novel. Four of these novel mutations occurred in the homozygous state and include: one in GDAP1, one in MTMR2, one in PRX and one in KIAA1985. One patient was heterozygous for a novel MTMR2 mutation and still another was homozygous for the founder mutation, R148X, in NDRG1. All patients tested negative for mutations in EGR2. Histopathological examination of nerve biopsy specimens showed a severe, chronic demyelinating neuropathy, with onion bulb formation, extensive demyelination of isolated fibres and axon loss. We did not discern a specific pattern of histopathology that could be correlated to mutations in a particular gene. PMID:15469949

  16. Periaxin mutations cause a broad spectrum of demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Hiroshi; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; De Jonghe, Peter; Ceuterick, Chantal; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Voit, Thomas; Schröder, J-Michael; Williams, Anna; Brophy, Peter J; Timmerman, Vincent; Lupski, James R

    2002-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that apparent loss-of-function mutations in the periaxin gene cause autosomal recessive Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy or severe demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In this report, we extend the associated phenotypes with the identification of two additional families with novel periaxin gene mutations (C715X and R82fsX96) and provide detailed neuropathology. Each patient had marked sensory involvement; two siblings with a homozygous C715X mutation had much worse sensory impairment than motor impairment. Despite early disease onset, these siblings with the C715X mutation had relatively slow disease progression and adult motor impairment typical of classic demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy. In contrast, a patient with the homozygous R82fsX96 mutation had a disease course consistent with Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy. The neuropathology of patients in both families was remarkable for demyelination, onion bulb and occasional tomacula formation with focal myelin thickening, abnormalities of the paranodal myelin loops, and focal absence of paranodal septate-like junctions between the terminal loops and axon. Our study indicates a prominent sensory neuropathy resulting from periaxin gene mutations and suggests a role for the carboxyl terminal domain of the periaxin protein. PMID:12112076

  17. SPTLC1 is mutated in hereditary sensory neuropathy, type 1.

    PubMed

    Bejaoui, K; Wu, C; Scheffler, M D; Haan, G; Ashby, P; Wu, L; de Jong, P; Brown, R H

    2001-03-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1 (HSN1, MIM 162400; ref. 1) genetically maps to human chromosome 9q22 (refs. 2-4). We report here that the gene encoding a subunit of serine palmitoyltransferase is located within the HSN1 locus, expressed in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and mutated in HSN1. PMID:11242106

  18. Neuropathological alterations in diabetic truncal neuropathy: evaluation by skin biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Lauria, G.; McArthur, J.; Hauer, P.; Griffin, J.; Cornblath, D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To describe the neuropathological features in skin biopsies from patients with diabetic truncal neuropathy.
METHODS—Three patients with diabetic truncal neuropathy underwent skin biopsies from both symptomatic and asymptomatic regions of the chest and trunk. After local anaesthesia, biopsies were performed using a 3 mm diameter punch device (Acupunch). Intraepidermal nerve fibres (IENFs), the most distal processes of small myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibres, were identified after staining with PGP 9.5 as previously described.
RESULTS—Diabetes was diagnosed at the time of the neurological presentation in two, and one was a known diabetic patient. All three had associated sensory-motor polyneuropathy. In all, skin biopsies showed a marked reduction of both epidermal and dermal nerve fibres in the symptomatic dermatomes, compared with skin from asymptomatic truncal areas. In one patient, a follow up skin biopsy when symptoms had improved showed a return of IENFs.
CONCLUSIONS—In diabetic truncal neuropathy, skin biopsies from symptomatic regions show a loss of IENFs. After clinical recovery, there is a return of the IENF population, suggesting that improvement occurs by nerve regeneration. These findings suggest that sensory nerve fibre injury in diabetic truncal neuropathy is distal to or within the sensory ganglia. Skin biopsy provides a possible tool for understanding the pathophysiology of the disease.

 PMID:9810952

  19. Testing nerves: an overview of investigations for neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hiew, Fu Liong; Douis, Hassan; Rajabally, Yusuf A

    2016-09-01

    This article reviews the main investigations available to assess and diagnose patients with neuropathy. It details the most commonly used as well as investigations now becoming routine in neuromuscular centres, and those which are less widely available. Current practice and recent developments are discussed. PMID:27640653

  20. Blocking mitochondrial calcium release in Schwann cells prevents demyelinating neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Berthelot, Jade; Jiner, Jennifer; Perrin-Tricaud, Claire; Fernando, Ruani; Chrast, Roman; Lenaers, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Schwann cells produce myelin sheath around peripheral nerve axons. Myelination is critical for rapid propagation of action potentials, as illustrated by the large number of acquired and hereditary peripheral neuropathies, such as diabetic neuropathy or Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases, that are commonly associated with a process of demyelination. However, the early molecular events that trigger the demyelination program in these diseases remain unknown. Here, we used virally delivered fluorescent probes and in vivo time-lapse imaging in a mouse model of demyelination to investigate the underlying mechanisms of the demyelination process. We demonstrated that mitochondrial calcium released by voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) after sciatic nerve injury triggers Schwann cell demyelination via ERK1/2, p38, JNK, and c-JUN activation. In diabetic mice, VDAC1 activity was altered, resulting in a mitochondrial calcium leak in Schwann cell cytoplasm, thereby priming the cell for demyelination. Moreover, reduction of mitochondrial calcium release, either by shRNA-mediated VDAC1 silencing or pharmacological inhibition, prevented demyelination, leading to nerve conduction and neuromuscular performance recovery in rodent models of diabetic neuropathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases. Therefore, this study identifies mitochondria as the early key factor in the molecular mechanism of peripheral demyelination and opens a potential opportunity for the treatment of demyelinating peripheral neuropathies. PMID:26878172