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Sample records for optic-linear array detection

  1. Selective and sensitive speciation analysis of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) in water samples by fiber optic-linear array detection spectrophotometry after ion pair based-surfactant assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Seyedeh Mahboobeh; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2013-06-15

    A simple ion pair based-surfactant assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (IP-SA-DLLME) was evaluated for extraction and preconcentration of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) in aqueous samples. In this method, which was used for the first time for chromium speciation analysis, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used as both ion-pairing and disperser agent. Cr(VI) ions were converted into their cationic complex with 1,5-diphenylcarbazide (DPC) and then extracted into 1-octanol dispersed in aqueous solution. Cr(III) ion also can be determined by this procedure after oxidation to Cr(VI). After extraction and phase separation, upper organic phase was transferred to a micro cell of a fiber optic-linear array detection spectrophotometry (FO-LADS). The effects of various parameters on the extraction recovery were investigated. Under the optimized conditions and preconcentration of 10 mL of sample, the enrichment factor of 159 and the detection limit of 0.05 μgL(-1) were obtained. Validation of the method was performed by spiking-recovery method and comparison of results with those obtained by ET-AAS method.

  2. Solid phase microextraction of diclofenac using molecularly imprinted polymer sorbent in hollow fiber combined with fiber optic-linear array spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pebdani, Arezou Amiri; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Khodadoust, Saeid

    2015-08-01

    A simple solid phase microextraction method based on molecularly imprinted polymer sorbent in the hollow fiber (MIP-HF-SPME) combined with fiber optic-linear array spectrophotometer has been applied for the extraction and determination of diclofenac in environmental and biological samples. The effects of different parameters such as pH, times of extraction, type and volume of the organic solvent, stirring rate and donor phase volume on the extraction efficiency of the diclofenac were investigated and optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the calibration graph was linear (r2 = 0.998) in the range of 3.0-85.0 μg L-1 with a detection limit of 0.7 μg L-1 for preconcentration of 25.0 mL of the sample and the relative standard deviation (n = 6) less than 5%. This method was applied successfully for the extraction and determination of diclofenac in different matrices (water, urine and plasma) and accuracy was examined through the recovery experiments.

  3. Solid phase microextraction of diclofenac using molecularly imprinted polymer sorbent in hollow fiber combined with fiber optic-linear array spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Pebdani, Arezou Amiri; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Khodadoust, Saeid

    2015-08-05

    A simple solid phase microextraction method based on molecularly imprinted polymer sorbent in the hollow fiber (MIP-HF-SPME) combined with fiber optic-linear array spectrophotometer has been applied for the extraction and determination of diclofenac in environmental and biological samples. The effects of different parameters such as pH, times of extraction, type and volume of the organic solvent, stirring rate and donor phase volume on the extraction efficiency of the diclofenac were investigated and optimized. Under the optimal conditions, the calibration graph was linear (r(2)=0.998) in the range of 3.0-85.0 μg L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.7 μg L(-1) for preconcentration of 25.0 mL of the sample and the relative standard deviation (n=6) less than 5%. This method was applied successfully for the extraction and determination of diclofenac in different matrices (water, urine and plasma) and accuracy was examined through the recovery experiments.

  4. Array for detecting microbes

    DOEpatents

    Andersen, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd D.

    2014-07-08

    The present embodiments relate to an array system for detecting and identifying biomolecules and organisms. More specifically, the present embodiments relate to an array system comprising a microarray configured to simultaneously detect a plurality of organisms in a sample at a high confidence level.

  5. Sensor arrays for detecting microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); Freund, Michael S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A sensor array for detecting a microorganism comprising first and second sensors electrically connected to an electrical measuring apparatus, wherein the sensors comprise a region of nonconducting organic material and a region of conducting material compositionally that is different than the nonconducting organic material and an electrical path through the regions of nonconducting organic material and the conducting material. A system for identifying microorganisms using the sensor array, a computer and a pattern recognition algorithm, such as a neural net are also disclosed.

  6. Delamination Detection Using Guided Wave Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Yu, Lingyu; Leckey, Cara

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method for detecting multiple delaminations in composite laminates using non-contact phased arrays. The phased arrays are implemented with a non-contact scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV). The array imaging algorithm is performed in the frequency domain where both the guided wave dispersion effect and direction dependent wave properties are considered. By using the non-contact SLDV array with a frequency domain imaging algorithm, an intensity image of the composite plate can be generated for delamination detection. For the proof of concept, a laboratory test is performed using a non-contact phased array to detect two delaminations (created through quasi-static impact test) at different locations in a composite plate. Using the non-contact phased array and frequency domain imaging, the two impact-induced delaminations are successfully detected. This study shows that the non-contact phased array method is a potentially effective method for rapid delamination inspection in large composite structures.

  7. Noise limitations in optical linear algebra processors.

    PubMed

    Batsell, S G; Jong, T L; Walkup, J F; Krile, T F

    1990-05-10

    A general statistical noise model is presented for optical linear algebra processors. A statistical analysis which includes device noise, the multiplication process, and the addition operation is undertaken. We focus on those processes which are architecturally independent. Finally, experimental results which verify the analytical predictions are also presented.

  8. Development of a novel mixed hemimicelles dispersive micro solid phase extraction using 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide coated magnetic graphene for the separation and preconcentration of fluoxetine in different matrices before its determination by fiber optic linear array spectrophotometry and mode-mismatched thermal lens spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Elahe; Haji Shabani, Ali Mohammad; Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Abbasi, Amir; Rashidian Vaziri, Mohammad Reza; Behjat, Abbas

    2016-01-28

    This study aims at developing a novel, sensitive, fast, simple and convenient method for separation and preconcentration of trace amounts of fluoxetine before its spectrophotometric determination. The method is based on combination of magnetic mixed hemimicelles solid phase extraction and dispersive micro solid phase extraction using 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide coated magnetic graphene as a sorbent. The magnetic graphene was synthesized by a simple coprecipitation method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The retained analyte was eluted using a 100 μL mixture of methanol/acetic acid (9:1) and converted into fluoxetine-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex. The analyte was then quantified by fiber optic linear array spectrophotometry as well as mode-mismatched thermal lens spectroscopy (TLS). The factors affecting the separation, preconcentration and determination of fluoxetine were investigated and optimized. With a 50 mL sample and under optimized conditions using the spectrophotometry technique, the method exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.4-60.0 μg L(-1), a detection limit of 0.21 μg L(-1), an enrichment factor of 167, and a relative standard deviation of 2.1% and 3.8% (n = 6) at 60 μg L(-1) level of fluoxetine for intra- and inter-day analyses, respectively. However, with thermal lens spectrometry and a sample volume of 10 mL, the method exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.05-300 μg L(-1), a detection limit of 0.016 μg L(-1) and a relative standard deviation of 3.8% and 5.6% (n = 6) at 60 μg L(-1) level of fluoxetine for intra- and inter-day analyses, respectively. The method was successfully applied to determine fluoxetine in pharmaceutical formulation, human urine and environmental water samples.

  9. Carbon Nanotube Array for Infrared Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-28

    REPORT Carbon Nanotube Array for Infrared Detection 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The core effort of this project has been the electrical...transport and infrared photoresponse properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) systems. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13-06-2012 13...DATES COVERED (From - To) 1-Jul-2008 Standard Form 298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - 30-Jun-2011 Carbon Nanotube Array for Infrared

  10. Optical linear algebra processors - Architectures and algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, David

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to the component design and optical configuration features of a generic optical linear algebra processor (OLAP) architecture, as well as the large number of OLAP architectures, number representations, algorithms and applications encountered in current literature. Number-representation issues associated with bipolar and complex-valued data representations, high-accuracy (including floating point) performance, and the base or radix to be employed, are discussed, together with case studies on a space-integrating frequency-multiplexed architecture and a hybrid space-integrating and time-integrating multichannel architecture.

  11. Array biosensor for detection of toxins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ligler, Frances S.; Taitt, Chris Rowe; Shriver-Lake, Lisa C.; Sapsford, Kim E.; Shubin, Yura; Golden, Joel P.

    2003-01-01

    The array biosensor is capable of detecting multiple targets rapidly and simultaneously on the surface of a single waveguide. Sandwich and competitive fluoroimmunoassays have been developed to detect high and low molecular weight toxins, respectively, in complex samples. Recognition molecules (usually antibodies) were first immobilized in specific locations on the waveguide and the resultant patterned array was used to interrogate up to 12 different samples for the presence of multiple different analytes. Upon binding of a fluorescent analyte or fluorescent immunocomplex, the pattern of fluorescent spots was detected using a CCD camera. Automated image analysis was used to determine a mean fluorescence value for each assay spot and to subtract the local background signal. The location of the spot and its mean fluorescence value were used to determine the toxin identity and concentration. Toxins were measured in clinical fluids, environmental samples and foods, with minimal sample preparation. Results are shown for rapid analyses of staphylococcal enterotoxin B, ricin, cholera toxin, botulinum toxoids, trinitrotoluene, and the mycotoxin fumonisin. Toxins were detected at levels as low as 0.5 ng mL(-1).

  12. The Giant Radio Array for Neutrino Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martineau-Huynh, Olivier; Bustamante, Mauricio; Carvalho, Washington; Charrier, Didier; De Jong, Sijbrand; de Vries, Krijn D.; Fang, Ke; Feng, Zhaoyang; Finley, Chad; Gou, Quanbu; Gu, Junhua; Hu, Hongbo; Kotera, Kumiko; Le Coz, Sandra; Medina, Clementina; Murase, Kohta; Niess, Valentin; Oikonomou, Foteini; Timmermans, Charles; Wang, Zhen; Wu, Xiangping; Zhang, Yi

    2017-03-01

    The Giant Radio Array for Neutrino Detection (GRAND) is a planned array of 2·105 radio antennas deployed over 200 000 km2 in a mountainous site. It aims primarly at detecting high-energy neutrinos via the observation of extensive air showers induced by the decay in the atmosphere of taus produced by the interaction of cosmic neutrinos under the Earth surface. GRAND aims at reaching a neutrino sensitivity of 5 · 10-11 E-2 GeV-1 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 above 3 · 1016 eV. This ensures the detection of cosmogenic neutrinos in the most pessimistic source models, and 50 events per year are expected for the standard models. The instrument will also detect UHECRs and possibly FRBs. Here we show how our preliminary design should enable us to reach our sensitivity goals, and discuss the steps to be taken to achieve GRAND, while the compelling science case for GRAND is discussed in more details in [1].

  13. Combination of solid phase extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for separation/preconcentration of ultra trace amounts of uranium prior to its fiber optic-linear array spectrophotometry determination.

    PubMed

    Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji; Shakerian, Farid; Shiralian Esfahani, Golnaz

    2013-12-15

    A simple and sensitive method for the separation and preconcentration of the ultra trace amounts of uranium and its determination by spectrophotometry was developed. The method is based on the combination of solid phase extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. Thus, by passing the sample through the basic alumina column, the uranyl ion and some cations are separated from the sample matrix. The retained uranyl ion along with the cations are eluted with 5 mL of nitric acid (2 mol L(-1)) and after neutralization of the eluent, the extracted uranyl ion is converted to its anionic benzoate complex and is separated from other cations by extraction of its ion pair with malachite green into small volume of chloroform using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. The amount of uranium is then determined by the absorption measurement of the extracted ion pair at 621 nm using flow injection spectrophotometry. Under the optimum conditions, with 500 mL of the sample, a preconcentration factor of 1980, a detection limit of 40 ng L(-1), and a relative standard deviation of 4.1% (n=6) at 400 ng L(-1) were obtained. The method was successfully applied to the determination of uranium in mineral water, river water, well water, spring water and sea water samples.

  14. Parallel microfluidic arrays for SPRi detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouellet, Eric; Lausted, Christopher; Lin, Tao; Yang, Cheng-Wei; Hood, Leroy; Lagally, Eric T.

    2010-04-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) is a label-free technique for the quantitation of binding affinities and concentrations for a wide variety of target molecules. Although SPRi is capable of determining binding constants for multiple ligands in parallel, current commercial instruments are limited to a single analyte stream and a limited number of ligand spots. Measurement of target concentration also requires the serial introduction of different target concentrations; such repeated experiments are conducted manually and are therefore time-intensive. Likewise, the equilibrium determination of concentration for known binding affinity requires long times due to diffusion-limited kinetics to a surface-immobilized ligand. We have developed an integrated microfluidic array using soft lithography techniques for SPRi-based detection and determination of binding affinities for DNA aptamers against human alphathrombin. The device consists of 264 element-addressable chambers of 700 pL each isolated by microvalves. The device also contains a dilution network for simultaneous interrogation of up to six different target concentrations, further speeding detection times. The element-addressable design of the array allows interrogation of multiple ligands against multiple targets, and analytes from individual chambers may be collected for downstream analysis.

  15. Parallel microfluidic arrays for SPRi detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouellet, Eric; Lausted, Christopher; Hood, Leroy; Lagally, Eric T.

    2008-08-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) is a label-free technique for the quantitation of binding affinities and concentrations for a wide variety of target molecules. Although SPRi is capable of determining binding constants for multiple ligands in parallel, current commercial instruments are limited to a single analyte stream and a limited number of ligand spots. Measurement of target concentration also requires the serial introduction of different target concentrations; such repeated experiments are conducted manually and are therefore time-intensive. Likewise, the equilibrium determination of concentration for known binding affinity requires long times due to diffusion-limited kinetics to a surface-immobilized ligand. We have developed an integrated microfluidic array using soft lithography techniques for SPRi-based detection and determination of binding affinities for DNA aptamers against human alphathrombin. The device consists of 264 element-addressable chambers isolated by microvalves. The resulting 700 pL volumes surrounding each ligand spot promise to decrease measurement time through reaction rate-limited kinetics. The device also contains a dilution network for simultaneous interrogation of up to six different target concentrations, further speeding detection times. Finally, the element-addressable design of the array allows interrogation of multiple ligands against multiple targets.

  16. Sensor arrays for detecting analytes in fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); Freund, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Chemical sensors for detecting analytes in fluids comprise first and second conductive elements (e.g. electrical leads) electrically coupled to and separated by a chemically sensitive resistor which provides an electrical path between the conductive elements. The resistor comprises a plurality of alternating nonconductive regions (comprising a nonconductive organic polymer) and conductive regions (comprising a conductive material) transverse to the electrical path. The resistor provides a difference in resistance between the conductive elements when contacted with a fluid comprising a chemical analyte at a first concentration, than when contacted with a fluid comprising the chemical analyte at a second different concentration. Arrays of such sensors are constructed with at least two sensors having different chemically sensitive resistors providing dissimilar such differences in resistance. Variability in chemical sensitivity from sensor to sensor is provided by qualitatively or quantitatively varying the composition of the conductive and/or nonconductive regions. An electronic nose for detecting an analyte in a fluid may be constructed by using such arrays in conjunction with an electrical measuring device electrically connected to the conductive elements of each sensor.

  17. Sensor array for toxic gas detection

    DOEpatents

    Stetter, Joseph R.; Zaromb, Solomon; Penrose, William R.

    1987-01-01

    A portable instrument for use in the field in detecting and identifying a hazardous component in air or other gas including an array of small sensors which upon exposure to the gas from a pattern of electrical responses, a source of standard response patterns characteristic of various components, and microprocessor means for comparing the sensor-formed response pattern with one or more standard patterns to thereby identify the component on a display. The number of responses may be increased beyond the number of sensors by changing the operating voltage, temperature or other condition associated with one or more sensors to provide a plurality of responses from each of one or more of the sensors. In one embodiment, the instrument is capable of identifying anyone of over 50-100 hazardous components.

  18. Magnetic markers detection using PCB fluxgate array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janosek, M.; Ripka, P.; Platil, A.

    2009-04-01

    We used an array of race-track fluxgate sensors, manufactured with printed circuit board (PCB) technology, forming a sensor head for detection of ferromagnetic and paramagnetic markers. The sensors were arranged perpendicularly to the measuring plane and we measured the difference of their output, giving us the horizontal gradient of normal component of the measured field. Due to the close match of the sensor's parameters, subtraction of the fluxgate output signals could be done directly at the input of a lock-in amplifier, increasing the signal-to-noise ratio for small gradients. When moving the sensor head, we were able to map field gradients smaller than 6 nT/mm, which was verified while measuring the magnetic markers on a dollar bill, while suppressing the background field by a factor of 5. In a line-scanning mode, we scanned a marker formed by a 0.2 mm diameter Permalloy wire in a distance of up to 10 mm. With the help of perpendicular ac excitation at 30 Hz, we were able to detect a 0.1 ml Endorem iron-oxide superparamagnetic marker at 2 mm; volume of 0.6 ml was detectable at 10 mm.

  19. Sensor arrays for detecting analytes in fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); Freund, Michael S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A sensor array for detecting an analyte in a fluid, comprising at least first and second chemically sensitive resistors electrically connected to an electrical measuring apparatus, wherein each of the chemically sensitive resistors comprises a mixture of nonconductive material and a conductive material. Each resistor provides an electrical path through the mixture of nonconductive material and the conductive material. The resistors also provide a difference in resistance between the conductive elements when contacted with a fluid comprising an analyte at a first concentration, than when contacted with an analyte at a second different concentration. A broad range of analytes can be detected using the sensors of the present invention. Examples of such analytes include, but are not limited to, alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, dienes, alicyclic hydrocarbons, arenes, alcohols, ethers, ketones, aldehydes, carbonyls, carbanions, polynuclear aromatics, organic derivatives, biomolecules, sugars, isoprenes, isoprenoids and fatty acids. Moreover, applications for the sensors of the present invention include, but are not limited to, environmental toxicology, remediation, biomedicine, material quality control, food monitoring and agricultural monitoring.

  20. Graphene microelectrode arrays for neural activity detection.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaowei; Wu, Lei; Cheng, Ji; Huang, Shanluo; Cai, Qi; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate a method to fabricate graphene microelectrode arrays (MEAs) using a simple and inexpensive method to solve the problem of opaque electrode positions in traditional MEAs, while keeping good biocompatibility. To study the interface differences between graphene-electrolyte and gold-electrolyte, graphene and gold electrodes with a large area were fabricated. According to the simulation results of electrochemical impedances, the gold-electrolyte interface can be described as a classical double-layer structure, while the graphene-electrolyte interface can be explained by a modified double-layer theory. Furthermore, using graphene MEAs, we detected the neural activities of neurons dissociated from Wistar rats (embryonic day 18). The signal-to-noise ratio of the detected signal was 10.31 ± 1.2, which is comparable to those of MEAs made with other materials. The long-term stability of the MEAs is demonstrated by comparing differences in Bode diagrams taken before and after cell culturing.

  1. Novel design for suspension array detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guoxiong; Shi, Yan; Ni, Xuxiang; Lu, Zukang

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for establishing a two-dimensional laminar fluidic suspension array which is analyzed by using time delay integration (TDI) CCD imaging technology in parallel. The method will make suspension array technology (SAT) bear high throughput as well as its flexibility. Basically, bioassays are conducted on the surface of fluorescent-dyed beads. With each bead set (i.e., multiple beads with the same fluorescent signature) having a slightly different fluorescent signature, probes are first attached to a particular bead set and then hybridized with labeled samples or targets. Two different kinds of encoding dyes are excited by red laser (635 nm, 20mw), their emission wave length are 660nm, 720nm, respectively. Fluorescent dye of reporter molecules was excited by green laser (532nm, 20mw), emitted at 580 nm. The liquid sample was pumped into micro-reservoir by a linear motor. As the velocity of liquid sample is so slow (10mm/s) it is easy to form a laminar fluidic field in the middle of the micro-reservoir. In the direction of laser propagation the size of reservoir is 0.1mm so the laminar liquid can be treated as a two-dimensional fluidic plane. The size of detection area depends on size of micro-sphere and CCD imaging area. The three kinds of fluorescence signals were focused by a lens and then split by mirrors. Fluorescence pass through three band-pass filters (+/-20nm) before collected by three TDI-CCDs respectively. With these high-quality filters the cross-talk between signals was diminished significantly. The analysis speed is about 2x103 micro-spheres per second, which is much higher than that obtained from currently cytometry method (about 102 micro-spheres to the same size micro-spheres).

  2. Aptamer-based cantilever array sensors for oxytetracycline detection.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hui; Bai, Xiaojing; Xing, Chunyan; Gu, Ningyu; Zhang, Bailin; Tang, Jilin

    2013-02-19

    We present a new method for specific detection of oxytetracycline (OTC) at nanomolar concentrations based on a microfabricated cantilever array. The sensing cantilevers in the array are functionalized with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of OTC-specific aptamer, which acts as a recognition molecule for OTC. While the reference cantilevers in the array are functionalized with 6-mercapto-1-hexanol SAMs to eliminate the influence of environmental disturbances. The cantilever sensor shows a good linear relationship between the deflection amplitude and the OTC concentration in the range of 1.0-100 nM. The detection limit of the cantilever array sensor is as low as 0.2 nM, which is comparable to some traditional methods. Other antibiotics such as doxycycline and tetracycline do not cause significant deflection of the cantilevers. It is demonstrated that the cantilever array sensors can be used as a powerful tool to detect drugs with high sensitivity and selectivity.

  3. Fiber optic linear smoke fire detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulakov, Sergei V.; Moskaletz, Oleg D.; Preslenev, Leonid N.; Shabardin, Alexander N.

    2001-11-01

    A global and versatile problem of fire and environmental safety is formulated. It is pointed out that one of the main ways to solve this problem is the development of equipment for early fire detection. The results of the development and study of a smoke fiber optic fire detector are presented. Such detector is absolutely explosion-safe and immune to increased radiation level and aggressive chemical environment.

  4. Detecting and correcting hard errors in a memory array

    DOEpatents

    Kalamatianos, John; John, Johnsy Kanjirapallil; Gelinas, Robert; Sridharan, Vilas K.; Nevius, Phillip E.

    2015-11-19

    Hard errors in the memory array can be detected and corrected in real-time using reusable entries in an error status buffer. Data may be rewritten to a portion of a memory array and a register in response to a first error in data read from the portion of the memory array. The rewritten data may then be written from the register to an entry of an error status buffer in response to the rewritten data read from the register differing from the rewritten data read from the portion of the memory array.

  5. Microfabrication of encoded microparticle array for multiplexed DNA hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Zheng-Liang; Morita, Yasutaka; Yamamura, Shouhei; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2005-05-21

    A strategy for the high-sensitivity, high-selectivity, and multiplexed detection of oligonucleotide hybridizations has been developed with an encoded Ni microparticle random array that was manufactured by a "top-down" approach using micromachining and microfabrication techniques.

  6. Small Arrays for Seismic Intruder Detections: A Simulation Based Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitarka, A.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic sensors such as geophones and fiber optic have been increasingly recognized as promising technologies for intelligence surveillance, including intruder detection and perimeter defense systems. Geophone arrays have the capability to provide cost effective intruder detection in protecting assets with large perimeters. A seismic intruder detection system uses one or multiple arrays of geophones design to record seismic signals from footsteps and ground vehicles. Using a series of real-time signal processing algorithms the system detects, classify and monitors the intruder's movement. We have carried out numerical experiments to demonstrate the capability of a seismic array to detect moving targets that generate seismic signals. The seismic source is modeled as a vertical force acting on the ground that generates continuous impulsive seismic signals with different predominant frequencies. Frequency-wave number analysis of the synthetic array data was used to demonstrate the array's capability at accurately determining intruder's movement direction. The performance of the array was also analyzed in detecting two or more objects moving at the same time. One of the drawbacks of using a single array system is its inefficiency at detecting seismic signals deflected by large underground objects. We will show simulation results of the effect of an underground concrete block at shielding the seismic signal coming from an intruder. Based on simulations we found that multiple small arrays can greatly improve the system's detection capability in the presence of underground structures. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344

  7. Optical linear algebra processors - Noise and error-source modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, D.; Ghosh, A.

    1985-01-01

    The modeling of system and component noise and error sources in optical linear algebra processors (OLAPs) are considered, with attention to the frequency-multiplexed OLAP. General expressions are obtained for the output produced as a function of various component errors and noise. A digital simulator for this model is discussed.

  8. Optical linear algebra processors: noise and error-source modeling.

    PubMed

    Casasent, D; Ghosh, A

    1985-06-01

    The modeling of system and component noise and error sources in optical linear algebra processors (OLAP's) are considered, with attention to the frequency-multiplexed OLAP. General expressions are obtained for the output produced as a function of various component errors and noise. A digital simulator for this model is discussed.

  9. McDONALD OBSERVATORY ARCHIVE OF OPTICAL LINEAR POLARIZATION MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wills, Beverley J.; Wills, D.; Breger, M.

    2011-06-01

    We present 990 previously unpublished optical linear polarization measurements of quasars, active galactic nuclei, and some stars observed for interstellar polarization. The observations, covering the period 1981-2000, were made with McDonald Observatory's 2.1 m Struve reflector and the Breger photopolarimeter.

  10. Integrated Seismic Event Detection and Location by Advanced Array Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kvaerna, T; Gibbons, S J; Ringdal, F; Harris, D B

    2007-02-09

    The principal objective of this two-year study is to develop and test a new advanced, automatic approach to seismic detection/location using array processing. We address a strategy to obtain significantly improved precision in the location of low-magnitude events compared with current fully-automatic approaches, combined with a low false alarm rate. We have developed and evaluated a prototype automatic system which uses as a basis regional array processing with fixed, carefully calibrated, site-specific parameters in conjuction with improved automatic phase onset time estimation. We have in parallel developed tools for Matched Field Processing for optimized detection and source-region identification of seismic signals. This narrow-band procedure aims to mitigate some of the causes of difficulty encountered using the standard array processing system, specifically complicated source-time histories of seismic events and shortcomings in the plane-wave approximation for seismic phase arrivals at regional arrays.

  11. DETECTION OF FAST TRANSIENTS WITH RADIO INTERFEROMETRIC ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, N. D. R.; Chengalur, J. N.; Gupta, Y.; Prasad, J.; Roy, J.; Kudale, S. S.; Cox, P. J.; Bailes, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Van Straten, W.

    2013-05-01

    Next-generation radio arrays, including the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and its pathfinders, will open up new avenues for exciting transient science at radio wavelengths. Their innovative designs, comprising a large number of small elements, pose several challenges in digital processing and optimal observing strategies. The Giant Metre-wave Radio Telescope (GMRT) presents an excellent test-bed for developing and validating suitable observing modes and strategies for transient experiments with future arrays. Here we describe the first phase of the ongoing development of a transient detection system for GMRT that is planned to eventually function in a commensal mode with other observing programs. It capitalizes on the GMRT's interferometric and sub-array capabilities, and the versatility of a new software backend. We outline considerations in the plan and design of transient exploration programs with interferometric arrays, and describe a pilot survey that was undertaken to aid in the development of algorithms and associated analysis software. This survey was conducted at 325 and 610 MHz, and covered 360 deg{sup 2} of the sky with short dwell times. It provides large volumes of real data that can be used to test the efficacies of various algorithms and observing strategies applicable for transient detection. We present examples that illustrate the methodologies of detecting short-duration transients, including the use of sub-arrays for higher resilience to spurious events of terrestrial origin, localization of candidate events via imaging, and the use of a phased array for improved signal detection and confirmation. In addition to demonstrating applications of interferometric arrays for fast transient exploration, our efforts mark important steps in the roadmap toward SKA-era science.

  12. Detection of Fast Transients with Radio Interferometric Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, N. D. R.; Chengalur, J. N.; Cox, P. J.; Gupta, Y.; Prasad, J.; Roy, J.; Bailes, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Kudale, S. S.; van Straten, W.

    2013-05-01

    Next-generation radio arrays, including the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and its pathfinders, will open up new avenues for exciting transient science at radio wavelengths. Their innovative designs, comprising a large number of small elements, pose several challenges in digital processing and optimal observing strategies. The Giant Metre-wave Radio Telescope (GMRT) presents an excellent test-bed for developing and validating suitable observing modes and strategies for transient experiments with future arrays. Here we describe the first phase of the ongoing development of a transient detection system for GMRT that is planned to eventually function in a commensal mode with other observing programs. It capitalizes on the GMRT's interferometric and sub-array capabilities, and the versatility of a new software backend. We outline considerations in the plan and design of transient exploration programs with interferometric arrays, and describe a pilot survey that was undertaken to aid in the development of algorithms and associated analysis software. This survey was conducted at 325 and 610 MHz, and covered 360 deg2 of the sky with short dwell times. It provides large volumes of real data that can be used to test the efficacies of various algorithms and observing strategies applicable for transient detection. We present examples that illustrate the methodologies of detecting short-duration transients, including the use of sub-arrays for higher resilience to spurious events of terrestrial origin, localization of candidate events via imaging, and the use of a phased array for improved signal detection and confirmation. In addition to demonstrating applications of interferometric arrays for fast transient exploration, our efforts mark important steps in the roadmap toward SKA-era science.

  13. A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements

    SciTech Connect

    Jaing, C

    2007-11-01

    We report our development of the first of a series of microarrays designed to detect pathogens with known mechanisms of virulence and antibiotic resistance. By targeting virulence gene families as well as genes unique to specific biothreat agents, these arrays will provide important data about the pathogenic potential and drug resistance profiles of unknown organisms in environmental samples. To validate our approach, we developed a first generation array targeting genes from Escherichia coli strains K12 and CFT073, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. We determined optimal probe design parameters for microorganism detection and discrimination, measured the required target concentration, and assessed tolerance for mismatches between probe and target sequences. Mismatch tolerance is a priority for this application, due to DNA sequence variability among members of gene families. Arrays were created using the NimbleGen Maskless Array Synthesizer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Purified genomic DNA from combinations of one or more of the four target organisms, pure cultures of four related organisms, and environmental aerosol samples with spiked-in genomic DNA were hybridized to the arrays. Based on the success of this prototype, we plan to design further arrays in this series, with the goal of detecting all known virulence and antibiotic resistance gene families in a greatly expanded set of organisms.

  14. Robust detection of defects in imaging arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudas, Jozsef; Jung, Cory; Chapman, Glenn H.; Koren, Zahava; Koren, Israel

    2006-01-01

    As digital imagers continue to increase in size and pixel density, the detection of faults in the field becomes critical to delivering high quality output. Traditional schemes for defect detection utilize specialized hardware at the time of manufacture and are impractical for use in the field, while previously proposed software-based approaches tend to lead to quality-degrading false positive diagnoses. This paper presents an algorithm that utilizes statistical information extracted from a sequence of normally captured images to identify the location and type of defective pixels. Building on previous research, this algorithm utilizes data local to each pixel and Bayesian statistics to more accurately infer the likelihood of each defect, which successfully improves the detection time. Several defect types are considered, including pixels with one-half of the typical sensitivity and permanently stuck pixels. Monte Carlo simulations have shown that for defect densities of up to 0.5%, 50 ordinary images are sufficient to accurately identify all faults without falsely diagnosing good pixels as faulty. Testing also indicates that the algorithm can be extended to higher resolution imagers and to those with noisy stuck pixels, with only minimal cost to performance.

  15. DETECTING MASSIVE GRAVITONS USING PULSAR TIMING ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kejia; Kramer, Michael; Jenet, Fredrick A.; Price, Richard H.; Wex, Norbert

    2010-10-20

    At the limit of weak static fields, general relativity becomes Newtonian gravity with a potential field that falls off as inverse distance rather than a theory of Yukawa-type fields with a finite range. General relativity also predicts that the speed of disturbances of its waves is c, the vacuum light speed, and is non-dispersive. For these reasons, the graviton, the boson for general relativity, can be considered to be massless. Massive gravitons, however, are features of some alternatives to general relativity. This has motivated experiments and observations that, so far, have been consistent with the zero-mass graviton of general relativity, but further tests will be valuable. A basis for new tests may be the high sensitivity gravitational wave (GW) experiments that are now being performed and the higher sensitivity experiments that are being planned. In these experiments, it should be feasible to detect low levels of dispersion due to non-zero graviton mass. One of the most promising techniques for such a detection may be the pulsar timing program that is sensitive to nano-Hertz GWs. Here, we present some details of such a detection scheme. The pulsar timing response to a GW background with the massive graviton is calculated, and the algorithm to detect the massive graviton is presented. We conclude that, with 90% probability, massless gravitons can be distinguished from gravitons heavier than 3 x 10{sup -22} eV (Compton wavelength {lambda}{sub g} = 4.1 x 10{sup 12} km), if bi-weekly observation of 60 pulsars is performed for 5 years with a pulsar rms timing accuracy of 100 ns. If 60 pulsars are observed for 10 years with the same accuracy, the detectable graviton mass is reduced to 5 x 10{sup -23} eV ({lambda}{sub g} = 2.5 x 10{sup 13} km); for 5 year observations of 100 or 300 pulsars, the sensitivity is respectively 2.5 x 10{sup -22} ({lambda}{sub g} = 5.0 x 10{sup 12} km) and 10{sup -22} eV ({lambda}{sub g} = 1.2 x 10{sup 13} km). Finally, a 10 year

  16. Engineering plasmonic nanorod arrays for colon cancer marker detection.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Stephanie L; Cao, Cuong; Zaribafzadeh, Hamed; Li, Shuzhou; Xiong, Qihua

    2015-01-15

    Engineering plasmonic nanomaterials or nanostructures towards ultrasensitive biosensing for disease markers or pathogens is of high importance. Here we demonstrate a systematic approach to tailor effective plasmonic nanorod arrays by combining both comprehensive numerical discrete dipole approximations (DDA) simulation and transmission spectroscopy experiments. The results indicate that 200×50 nm nanorod arrays with 300×500 nm period provide the highest figure of merit (FOM) of 2.4 and a sensitivity of 310 nm/RIU. Furthermore, we demonstrate the use of nanorod arrays for the detection of single nucleotide polymorphism in codon 12 of the K-ras gene that are frequently occurring in early stages of colon cancer, with a sensitivity down to 10 nM in the presence of 100-fold higher concentration of the homozygous genotypes. Our work shows significant potential of nanorod arrays towards point-of-care applications in diagnosis and clinical studies.

  17. Spatially resolved single photon detection with a quantum sensor array

    PubMed Central

    Zagoskin, A. M.; Wilson, R. D.; Everitt, M.; Savel'ev, S.; Gulevich, D. R.; Allen, J.; Dubrovich, V. K.; Il'ichev, E.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a method of resolving a spatially coherent signal, which contains on average just a single photon, against the background of local noise at the same frequency. The method is based on detecting the signal simultaneously in several points more than a wavelength apart through the entangling interaction of the incoming photon with the quantum metamaterial sensor array. The interaction produces the spatially correlated quantum state of the sensor array, characterised by a collective observable (e.g., total magnetic moment), which is read out using a quantum nondemolition measurement. We show that the effects of local noise (e.g., fluctuations affecting the elements of the array) are suppressed relative to the signal from the spatially coherent field of the incoming photon as , where N is the number of array elements. The realisation of this approach in the microwave range would be especially useful and is within the reach of current experimental techniques. PMID:24322568

  18. A colorimetric sensor array for detection of triacetone triperoxide vapor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hengwei; Suslick, Kenneth S

    2010-11-10

    Triacetone triperoxide (TATP), one of the most dangerous primary explosives, has emerged as an explosive of choice for terrorists in recent years. Owing to the lack of UV absorbance, fluorescence, or facile ionization, TATP is extremely difficult to detect directly. Techniques that are able to detect generally require expensive instrumentation, need extensive sample preparation, or cannot detect TATP in the gas phase. Here we report a simple and highly sensitive colorimetric sensor for the detection of TATP vapor with semiquantitative analysis from 50 ppb to 10 ppm. By using a solid acid catalyst to pretreat a gas stream, we have discovered that a colorimetric sensor array of redox sensitive dyes can detect even very low levels of TATP vapor from its acid decomposition products (e.g., H(2)O(2)) with limits of detection (LOD) below 2 ppb (i.e., <0.02% of its saturation vapor pressure). Common potential interferences (e.g., humidity, personal hygiene products, perfume, laundry supplies, volatile organic compounds, etc.) do not generate an array response, and the array can also differentiate TATP from other chemical oxidants (e.g., hydrogen peroxide, bleach, tert-butylhydroperoxide, peracetic acid).

  19. EMAT phased array: A feasibility study of surface crack detection.

    PubMed

    Isla, J; Cegla, F

    2017-02-14

    Electromagnetic-acoustic transducers (EMATs) consist of a magnet and a coil. They are advantageous in some non-destructive evaluation (NDE) applications because no direct contact with the specimen is needed to send and receive ultrasonic waves. However, EMATs commonly require excitation peak powers greater than 1kW and therefore the driving electronics and the EMAT coils have to be bulky. This has hindered the development of EMAT phased arrays with characteristics similar to those of conventional piezoelectric phased arrays. Phased arrays are widely used in NDE because they offer superior defect characterization in comparison to single-element transducers. In this paper, we report a series of novel techniques and design elements that make it possible to construct an EMAT phased array that performs similarly to conventional piezoelectric arrays used in NDE. One of the key enabling features is the use of coded excitation to reduce the excitation peak power to less than 4.8W (24 Vpp and 200mA) so that racetrack coils with dimensions 3.2×18mm(2) can be employed. Moreover, these racetrack coils are laid out along their shortest dimension so that 1/3 of their area is overlapped. This helps to reduce the crosstalk between the coils, i.e., the array elements, to less than -15dB. We show that an 8-element EMAT phased array operating at a central frequency of 1MHz can be used to detect defects which have a width and a depth of 0.2 and 0.8mm respectively and are located on the surface opposite to the array.

  20. Array biosensor for simultaneous detection of multiple analytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligler, Frances S.; Golden, Joel P.; Rowe-Taitt, Chris A.; Dodson, James P.

    2001-05-01

    The array biosensor has been developed for simultaneous analysis of multiple samples for multiple analytes. A patterned array of capture antibodies is immobilized on the surface of a planar waveguide and a sandwich immunoassay conducted using a cocktail of fluorescent tracer antibodies. Upon excitation of the fluorescent label using a 635 nm diode laser, a CCD camera detects the pattern of fluorescent antigen:antibody complexes on the sensor surface. Image analysis software correlates the position of fluorescent signals with the identity of the analyte. The assays are fast, sensitive, and specific.

  1. Self-assembled nanoparticle arrays for multiphase trace analyte detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchini, Michael P.; Turek, Vladimir A.; Paget, Jack; Kornyshev, Alexei A.; Edel, Joshua B.

    2013-02-01

    Nanoplasmonic structures designed for trace analyte detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy typically require sophisticated nanofabrication techniques. An alternative to fabricating such substrates is to rely on self-assembly of nanoparticles into close-packed arrays at liquid/liquid or liquid/air interfaces. The density of the arrays can be controlled by modifying the nanoparticle functionality, pH of the solution and salt concentration. Importantly, these arrays are robust, self-healing, reproducible and extremely easy to handle. Here, we report on the use of such platforms formed by Au nanoparticles for the detection of multi-analytes from the aqueous, organic or air phases. The interfacial area of the Au array in our system is ≈25 mm2 and can be made smaller, making this platform ideal for small-volume samples, low concentrations and trace analytes. Importantly, the ease of assembly and rapid detection make this platform ideal for in-the-field sample testing of toxins, explosives, narcotics or other hazardous chemicals.

  2. Nine-analyte detection using an array-based biosensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taitt, Chris Rowe; Anderson, George P.; Lingerfelt, Brian M.; Feldstein, s. Mark. J.; Ligler, Frances S.

    2002-01-01

    A fluorescence-based multianalyte immunosensor has been developed for simultaneous analysis of multiple samples. While the standard 6 x 6 format of the array sensor has been used to analyze six samples for six different analytes, this same format has the potential to allow a single sample to be tested for 36 different agents. The method described herein demonstrates proof of principle that the number of analytes detectable using a single array can be increased simply by using complementary mixtures of capture and tracer antibodies. Mixtures were optimized to allow detection of closely related analytes without significant cross-reactivity. Following this facile modification of patterning and assay procedures, the following nine targets could be detected in a single 3 x 3 array: Staphylococcal enterotoxin B, ricin, cholera toxin, Bacillus anthracis Sterne, Bacillus globigii, Francisella tularensis LVS, Yersiniapestis F1 antigen, MS2 coliphage, and Salmonella typhimurium. This work maximizes the efficiency and utility of the described array technology, increasing only reagent usage and cost; production and fabrication costs are not affected.

  3. Highly tunable plasmonic nanoring arrays for nanoparticle manipulation and detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergides, M.; Truong, V. G.; Chormaic, S. Nic

    2016-09-01

    The advancement of trapping and detection of nano-objects at very low laser powers in the near-infra-red region (NIR) is crucial for many applications. Singular visible-light nano-optics based on abrupt phase changes have recently demonstrated a significant improvement in molecule detection. Here, we propose and demonstrate tunable plasmonic nanodevices, which can improve both the trapping field enhancement and detection of nano-objects using singular phase drops in the NIR range. The plasmonic nanostructures, which consist of gaps with dimensions 50 nm × 50 nm connecting nanorings in arrays is discussed. These gaps act as individual detection and trapping sites. The tunability of the system is evident from extinction and reflection spectra while increasing the aperture size in the arrays. Additionally, in the region where the plasmonic nano-array exhibits topologically-protected, near-zero reflection behaviour, the phase displays a rapid change. Our experimental data predict that, using this abrupt phase changes, one can improve the detection sensitivity by 10 times compared to the extinction spectra method. We finally report experimental evidence of 100 nm polystyrene beads trapping using low incident power on these devices. The overall design demonstrates strong capability as an optical, label-free, non-destructive tool for single molecule manipulation where low trapping intensity, minimal photo bleaching and high sensitivity is required.

  4. Biomimetic MEMS sensor array for navigation and water detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futterknecht, Oliver; Macqueen, Mark O.; Karman, Salmah; Diah, S. Zaleha M.; Gebeshuber, Ille C.

    2013-05-01

    The focus of this study is biomimetic concept development for a MEMS sensor array for navigation and water detection. The MEMS sensor array is inspired by abstractions of the respective biological functions: polarized skylight-based navigation sensors in honeybees (Apis mellifera) and the ability of African elephants (Loxodonta africana) to detect water. The focus lies on how to navigate to and how to detect water sources in desert-like or remote areas. The goal is to develop a sensor that can provide both, navigation clues and help in detecting nearby water sources. We basically use the information provided by the natural polarization pattern produced by the sunbeams scattered within the atmosphere combined with the capability of the honeybee's compound eye to extrapolate the navigation information. The detection device uses light beam reactive MEMS, which are capable to detect the skylight polarization based on the Rayleigh sky model. For water detection we present various possible approaches to realize the sensor. In the first approach, polarization is used: moisture saturated areas near ground have a small but distinctively different effect on scattering and polarizing light than less moist ones. Modified skylight polarization sensors (Karman, Diah and Gebeshuber, 2012) are used to visualize this small change in scattering. The second approach is inspired by the ability of elephants to detect infrasound produced by underground water reservoirs, and shall be used to determine the location of underground rivers and visualize their exact routes.

  5. Matrix preconditioning: a robust operation for optical linear algebra processors.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A; Paparao, P

    1987-07-15

    Analog electrooptical processors are best suited for applications demanding high computational throughput with tolerance for inaccuracies. Matrix preconditioning is one such application. Matrix preconditioning is a preprocessing step for reducing the condition number of a matrix and is used extensively with gradient algorithms for increasing the rate of convergence and improving the accuracy of the solution. In this paper, we describe a simple parallel algorithm for matrix preconditioning, which can be implemented efficiently on a pipelined optical linear algebra processor. From the results of our numerical experiments we show that the efficacy of the preconditioning algorithm is affected very little by the errors of the optical system.

  6. Negative base encoding in optical linear algebra processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlee, C.; Casasent, D.

    1986-01-01

    In the digital multiplication by analog convolution algorithm, the bits of two encoded numbers are convolved to form the product of the two numbers in mixed binary representation; this output can be easily converted to binary. Attention is presently given to negative base encoding, treating base -2 initially, and then showing that the negative base system can be readily extended to any radix. In general, negative base encoding in optical linear algebra processors represents a more efficient technique than either sign magnitude or 2's complement encoding, when the additions of digitally encoded products are performed in parallel.

  7. Object detection with a multistatic array using singular value decomposition

    DOEpatents

    Hallquist, Aaron T.; Chambers, David H.

    2014-07-01

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across a surface and that travels down the surface. The detection system converts the return signals from a time domain to a frequency domain, resulting in frequency return signals. The detection system then performs a singular value decomposition for each frequency to identify singular values for each frequency. The detection system then detects the presence of a subsurface object based on a comparison of the identified singular values to expected singular values when no subsurface object is present.

  8. Pulsar timing arrays: the promise of gravitational wave detection.

    PubMed

    Lommen, Andrea N

    2015-12-01

    We describe the history, methods, tools, and challenges of using pulsars to detect gravitational waves. Pulsars act as celestial clocks detecting gravitational perturbations in space-time at wavelengths of light-years. The field is poised to make its first detection of nanohertz gravitational waves in the next 10 years. Controversies remain over how far we can reduce the noise in the pulsars, how many pulsars should be in the array, what kind of source we will detect first, and how we can best accommodate our large bandwidth systems. We conclude by considering the important question of how to plan for a post-detection era, beyond the first detection of gravitational waves.

  9. Carbon Nanotube Nanoelectrode Array for Ultrasensitive DNA Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun; Koehne, Jessica; Chen, Hua; Cassell, Alan; Ng, Hou Tee; Fan, Wendy; Ye, Qi; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.

    2003-01-01

    A reliable nanoelectrode array based on vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) embedded in SiO2 is used for ultrasensitive DNA detection. Characteristic nanoelectrode behavior is observed using low-density MWNT arrays for measuring both bulk and surface immobilized redox species such as K4Fe(CN)6. The open-end of MWNTs present similar properties as graphite edge-plane electrodes with wide potential window, flexible chemical functionalities, and good biocompatibility. Oligonucleotide probes are selectively functionalized at the open ends cf the nanotube array and specifically hybridized with oligonucleotide targets. The guanine groups are employed as the signal moieties in the electrochemical measurements. Ru(bpy)3(2+) mediator is used to further amplify the guanine oxidation signal. The hybridization of subattomoles of PCR amplified DNA targets is detected electrochemically by combining the MWNT nanoelectrode array with the Ru(bpy)32' amplification mechanism. This system provides a general platform of molecular diagnostics for applications requiring ultrahigh sensitivity, high-degree of miniaturization, and simple sample preparations.

  10. Passive Detection of Narrowband Sources Using a Sensor Array

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D H; Candy, J V; Guidry, B L

    2007-10-24

    In this report we derive a model for a highly scattering medium, implemented as a set of MATLAB functions. This model is used to analyze an approach for using time-reversal to enhance the detection of a single frequency source in a highly scattering medium. The basic approach is to apply the singular value decomposition to the multistatic response matrix for a time-reversal array system. We then use the array in a purely passive mode, measuring the response to the presence of a source. The measured response is projected onto the singular vectors, creating a time-reversal pseudo-spectrum. We can then apply standard detection techniques to the pseudo-spectrum to determine the presence of a source. If the source is close to a particular scatterer in the medium, then we would expect an enhancement of the inner product between the array response to the source with the singular vector associated with that scatterer. In this note we begin by deriving the Foldy-Lax model of a highly scattering medium, calculate both the field emitted by the source and the multistatic response matrix of a time-reversal array system in the medium, then describe the initial analysis approach.

  11. Pattern Recognition for Selective Odor Detection with Gas Sensor Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eungyeong; Lee, Seok; Kim, Jae Hun; Kim, Chulki; Byun, Young Tae; Kim, Hyung Seok; Lee, Taikjin

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new pattern recognition approach for enhancing the selectivity of gas sensor arrays for clustering intelligent odor detection. The aim of this approach was to accurately classify an odor using pattern recognition in order to enhance the selectivity of gas sensor arrays. This was achieved using an odor monitoring system with a newly developed neural-genetic classification algorithm (NGCA). The system shows the enhancement in the sensitivity of the detected gas. Experiments showed that the proposed NGCA delivered better performance than the previous genetic algorithm (GA) and artificial neural networks (ANN) methods. We also used PCA for data visualization. Our proposed system can enhance the reproducibility, reliability, and selectivity of odor sensor output, so it is expected to be applicable to diverse environmental problems including air pollution, and monitor the air quality of clean-air required buildings such as a kindergartens and hospitals. PMID:23443378

  12. Efficient calculation of optical linear response of large silicon clusters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Gefei; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2005-03-01

    Nanoscale silicon clusters have potential applications as light-emitting devices and bio-sensors. Ab initio calculations of the optical linear response of small-size nanoparticles have been performed via time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT)^1 and by solving many-body Bethe-Salpeter equations (MBSE)^2,3. We show that the ab initio calculations can be made much more efficient when the nanocluster possess high point group symmetry and symmetrized basis functions are used. This allows us to extend the ab initio calculation to much larger Si clusters (up to a few hundred Si atoms) on a personal computer. The optical linear response of Si nanocluster (passivated with hydrogen) as a function of cluster size is examined. The effect of phosphorus doping of Si nanocluster on its optical properties is also studied.1. Ogũt,S., J. R. Chelikowsky, and S. G. Louie, PRL 80, 3162(1998); Marques, M., A. Castro, and A. Rubio, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 3006(2001). 2. Rohlfing, M., and S. G. Louie, PRL 80, 3320(1998);PRB 62, 4927(2000). 3. Grossman, J. C., M. Rohlfing, L. Mitas, S. G. Louie, and M. L. Cohen,PRL 86, 472(2001).

  13. Array-based electrical detection of DNA with nanoparticle probes.

    PubMed

    Park, So-Jung; Taton, T Andrew; Mirkin, Chad A

    2002-02-22

    A DNA array detection method is reported in which the binding of oligonucleotides functionalized with gold nanoparticles leads to conductivity changes associated with target-probe binding events. The binding events localize gold nanoparticles in an electrode gap; silver deposition facilitated by these nanoparticles bridges the gap and leads to readily measurable conductivity changes. An unusual salt concentration-dependent hybridization behavior associated with these nanoparticle probes was exploited to achieve selectivity without a thermal-stringency wash. Using this method, we have detected target DNA at concentrations as low as 500 femtomolar with a point mutation selectivity factor of approximately 100,000:1.

  14. Towards robust gravitational wave detection with pulsar timing arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornish, Neil J.; Sampson, Laura

    2016-05-01

    Precision timing of highly stable millisecond pulsars is a promising technique for the detection of very low frequency sources of gravitational waves. In any single pulsar, a stochastic gravitational wave signal appears as an additional source of timing noise that can be absorbed by the noise model, and so it is only by considering the coherent response across a network of pulsars that the signal can be distinguished from other sources of noise. In the limit where there are many gravitational wave sources in the sky, or many pulsars in the array, the signals produce a unique tensor correlation pattern that depends only on the angular separation between each pulsar pair. It is this distinct fingerprint that is used to search for gravitational waves using pulsar timing arrays. Here we consider how the prospects for detection are diminished when the statistical isotropy of the timing array or the gravitational wave signal is broken by having a finite number of pulsars and a finite number of sources. We find the standard tensor-correlation analysis to be remarkably robust, with a mild impact on detectability compared to the isotropic limit. Only when there are very few sources and very few pulsars does the standard analysis begin to fail. Having established that the tensor correlations are a robust signature for detection, we study the use of "sky scrambles" to break the correlations as a way to increase confidence in a detection. This approach is analogous to the use of "time slides" in the analysis of data from ground-based interferometric detectors.

  15. Heterodyne detection with mismatch correction based on array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hongzhou; Li, Guoqiang; Yang, Ruofu; Yang, Chunping; Ao, Mingwu

    2016-07-01

    Based on an array detector, a new heterodyne detection system, which can correct the mismatches of amplitude and phase between signal and local oscillation (LO) beams, is presented in this paper. In the light of the fact that, for a heterodyne signal, there is a certain phase difference between the adjacent two samples of analog-to-digital converter (ADC), we propose to correct the spatial phase mismatch by use of the time-domain phase difference. The corrections can be realized by shifting the output sequences acquired from the detector elements in the array, and the steps of the shifting depend on the quantity of spatial phase mismatch. Numerical calculations of heterodyne efficiency are conducted to confirm the excellent performance of our system. Being different from previous works, our system needs not extra optical devices, so it provides probably an effective means to ease the problem resulted from the mismatches.

  16. Heterodyne detection with mismatch correction base on array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongzhou, Dong; Guoqiang, Li; Ruofu, Yang; Chunping, Yang; Mingwu, Ao

    2016-07-01

    Based on an array detector, a new heterodyne detection system, which can correct the mismatches of amplitude and phase between signal and local oscillation (LO) beams, is presented in this paper. In the light of the fact that, for a heterodyne signal, there is a certain phase difference between the adjacent two samples of analog-to-digital converter (ADC), we propose to correct the spatial phase mismatch by use of the time-domain phase difference. The corrections can be realized by shifting the output sequences acquired from the detector elements in the array, and the steps of the shifting depend on the quantity of spatial phase mismatch. Numerical calculations of heterodyne efficiency are conducted to confirm the excellent performance of our system. Being different from previous works, our system needs not extra optical devices, so it provides probably an effective means to ease the problem resulted from the mismatches.

  17. Real-time threat detection using magnetometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prouty, Mark D.; Tchernychev, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we present a discussion of using an array of atomic magnetometers to locate the presence of ferrous materials, such as concealed weapons, in real time. Ferrous materials create magnetic field anomalies. In order to determine the location of such objects, readings from many positions must be analyzed. This field inversion is typically done in post processing, once readings over a survey area or region of interest have been gathered. With the recent development of small and low power sensors, the dozen or so sensors required to provide information for magnetic field inversion may be deployed. We have built such an array and present here the results of using a realtime inversion algorithm. The inversion algorithm accurately determines target properties at a rate of 10 times per second as objects move past the array. Accuracies are as good as those obtained with target inversion methods used in analyzing data for unexploded ordnance detection. While those methods are typically applied in post processing, we show here those methods work even better when applied in real-time. We further present some analyses of the predicted performance of arrays in various geometries to address issues in security, such as crowd or perimeter monitoring. Target inversion methods may be accurately simulated, allowing for the development and testing of algorithms in an efficient manner. Additional processing may be done using the time history of the inversion results to remove false alarms and enhance detection. The key step is to start with an inversion method, utilizing the mathematical properties of magnetic fields and the known geometry of the measurements.

  18. Multiplex detection of disease marker proteins with arrayed imaging reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Amrita; Sriram, Rashmi; Miller, Benjamin L.

    2010-02-01

    Arrayed Imaging Reflectometry, or "AIR", is a new label-free optical technique for detecting proteins. AIR relies on binding-induced changes in the response of an antireflective coating on the surface of a silicon chip. Thus far, we have demonstrated the use of AIR for the detection of pathogenic E. coli, and for multiplex detection of a broad range of proteins in human serum. Creation of the near-perfect antireflective coating on the surface of silicon requires careful control over preparation of the chip surface prior to probe molecule immobilization. We present methods for highly reproducible, solution-phase silanization and glutaraldehyde functionalization of silicon chips carrying a layer of thermal oxide. Following functionalization with antibodies and passivation of remaining reactive groups, these surfaces provide exceptional performance in the AIR assay.

  19. Lightning Mapping Array flash detection performance with variable receiver thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmielewski, Vanna C.; Bruning, Eric C.

    2016-07-01

    This study characterizes Lightning Mapping Array performance for networks that participated in the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry field program using new Monte Carlo and curvature matrix model simulations. These open-source simulation tools are readily adapted to real-time operations or detailed studies of performance. Each simulation accounted for receiver threshold and location, as well as a reference distribution of source powers and flash sizes based on thunderstorm observations and the mechanics of station triggering. Source and flash detection efficiency were combined with solution bias and variability to predict flash area distortion at long ranges. Location errors and detection efficiency were highly dependent on the station configuration and thresholds, especially at longer ranges, such that performance varied more than expected across different networks and with azimuth within networks. Error characteristics matched prior studies, which led to an increase in flash distortion with range. Predicted flash detection efficiency exceeded 95% within 100 km of all networks.

  20. Lightning Mapping Array flash detection performance with variable receiver thresholds.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Vanna C; Bruning, Eric C

    2016-07-27

    This study characterizes Lightning Mapping Array performance for networks that participated in the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry field program using new Monte Carlo and curvature matrix model simulations. These open-source simulation tools are readily adapted to real-time operations or detailed studies of performance. Each simulation accounted for receiver threshold and location, as well as a reference distribution of source powers and flash sizes based on thunderstorm observations and the mechanics of station triggering. Source and flash detection efficiency were combined with solution bias and variability to predict flash area distortion at long ranges. Location errors and detection efficiency were highly dependent on the station configuration and thresholds, especially at longer ranges, such that performance varied more than expected across different networks and with azimuth within networks. Error characteristics matched prior studies, which led to an increase in flash distortion with range. Predicted flash detection efficiency exceeded 95% within 100 km of all networks.

  1. Acetylcholinesterase biosensor for carbaryl detection based on interdigitated array microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhili; Guo, Yemin; Sun, Xia; Cao, Yaoyao; Wang, Xiangyou

    2014-10-01

    In this study, an acetylcholinesterase (AChE) biosensor with superior accuracy and sensitivity was successfully developed based on interdigitated array microelectrodes (IAMs). IAMs have a series of parallel microband electrodes with alternating microbands connected together. Chitosan was used as the enzyme immobilization material, and AChE was used as the model enzyme for carbaryl detection to fabricate AChE biosensor. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used in conjunction with the fabricated biosensor to detect pesticide residues. Based on the inhibition of pesticides on the AChE activity, using carbaryl as model compounds, the biosensor exhibited a wide range, low detection limit, and high stability. Moreover, the biosensor can also be used as a new promising tool for pesticide residue analysis.

  2. Fluorescence detection in capillary arrays based on galvanometer step scanning.

    PubMed

    Xue, G; Yeung, E S

    2001-10-01

    A computer-controlled galvanometer scanner is adapted for scanning a focused laser beam across a 96-capillary array for laser-induced fluorescence detection. The signal at a single photomultiplier tube is temporally sorted to distinguish among the capillaries. The limit of detection for fluoresceins is 3 x 10(-11) M (S/N = 3) for 5 mW of total laser power scanned at 4 Hz. The observed cross-talk among capillaries is 0.2%. Advantages include the efficient utilization of light due to the high duty-cycle of step scan, good detection performance due to the reduction of stray light, ruggedness due to the small mass of the galvanometer mirror, low cost due to the simplicity of components, and flexibility due to the independent paths for excitation and emission.

  3. Vertically aligned carbon nanofiber electrode arrays for nucleic acid detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arumugam, Prabhu U.; Yu, Edmond; Riviere, Roger; Meyyappan, M.

    2010-10-01

    We present electrochemical detection of DNA targets that corresponds to Escherichia coli O157:H7 16S rRNA gene using a nanoelectrode array consisting of vertically aligned carbon nanofiber (VACNF) electrodes. Parylene C is used as gap filling 'matrix' material to avoid high temperature processing in electrode construction. This easy to deposit film of several micron heights provides a conformal coating between the high aspect ratio VACNFs with negligible pin-holes. The low background currents show the potential of this approach for ultra-sensitive detection. Consistent and reproducible electrochemical-signals are achieved using a simple electrode preparation. This simple, reliable and low-cost approach is a forward step in developing practical sensors for applications like pathogen detection, early cancer diagnosis and environmental monitoring.

  4. Neutron detection and applications using a BC454/BGO array

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.C.; Biddle, R.S.; Bourret, S.C.

    1998-12-01

    Neutron detection and multiplicity counting has been investigated using a boron-loaded plastic scintillator (BC454)/bismuth germanate (BGO) phoswich detector array. Boron-loaded plastic combines neutron moderation (H) and detection ({sup 10}B) at the molecular level, thereby physically coupling increasing detection efficiency and decreasing die-away time with detector volume. Separation of the phoswich response into its plastic scintillator and bismuth germanate components was accomplished on an event-by-event basis using custom integrator and timing circuits, enabling a prompt coincidence requirement between the BC454 and BGO to be used to identify neutron captures. In addition, a custom time-tag module was used to provide a time for each detector event. Time-correlation analysis was subsequently performed on the filtered event stream to obtain shift-register-type singles and doubles count rates.

  5. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Cavoto, G; Cirillo, E N M; Cocina, F; Ferretti, J; Polosa, A D

    2016-01-01

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs ([Formula: see text] GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with respect to CNT directions. New constraints are obtained on how to devise the CNT arrays to maximize the target channeling efficiency.

  6. Signal processing for damage detection using two different array transducers.

    PubMed

    El Youbi, F; Grondel, S; Assaad, J

    2004-04-01

    This work describes an investigation into the development of a new health monitoring system for aeronautical applications. The health monitoring system is based on the emission and reception of Lamb waves by multi-element piezoelectric transducers (i.e., arrays) bonded to the structure. The emitter array consists of three different elementary bar transducers. These transducers have the same thickness and length but different widths. The receiver array has 32 same elements. This system offers the possibility to understand the nature of the generated waves and to determine the sensitivity of each mode to possible damage. It presents two principal advantages: Firstly, by exciting all elements in phase, it is possible to generate several Lamb modes in the same time. Secondly, the two-dimensional fourier transform (2D-FT) of the received signal can be easily computed. Experimental results concerning an aluminum plate with different hole sizes will be shown. The A0-, S0-, A1-, S1- and S2-modes are generated at the same time. This study shows that the A0 mode seems particularly interesting to detect flaws of this geometrical type.

  7. Wake Vortex Detection: Phased Microphone vs. Linear Infrasonic Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Sullivan, Nicholas T.; Knight, Howard K.

    2014-01-01

    Sensor technologies can make a significant impact on the detection of aircraft-generated vortices in an air space of interest, typically in the approach or departure corridor. Current state-of-the art sensor technologies do not provide three-dimensional measurements needed for an operational system or even for wake vortex modeling to advance the understanding of vortex behavior. Most wake vortex sensor systems used today have been developed only for research applications and lack the reliability needed for continuous operation. The main challenges for the development of an operational sensor system are reliability, all-weather operation, and spatial coverage. Such a sensor has been sought for a period of last forty years. Acoustic sensors were first proposed and tested by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) early in 1970s for tracking wake vortices but these acoustic sensors suffered from high levels of ambient noise. Over a period of the last fifteen years, there has been renewed interest in studying noise generated by aircraft wake vortices, both numerically and experimentally. The German Aerospace Center (DLR) was the first to propose the application of a phased microphone array for the investigation of the noise sources of wake vortices. The concept was first demonstrated at Berlins Airport Schoenefeld in 2000. A second test was conducted in Tarbes, France, in 2002, where phased microphone arrays were applied to study the wake vortex noise of an Airbus 340. Similarly, microphone phased arrays and other opto-acoustic microphones were evaluated in a field test at the Denver International Airport in 2003. For the Tarbes and Denver tests, the wake trajectories of phased microphone arrays and lidar were compared as these were installed side by side. Due to a built-in pressure equalization vent these microphones were not suitable for capturing acoustic noise below 20 Hz. Our group at NASA Langley Research Center developed and installed an

  8. Magnetic wire trap arrays for biomarker-based molecular detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Gregory; Mahajan, Kalpesh; Ruan, Gang; Winter, Jessica; Sooryakumar, R.

    2012-02-01

    Submicrometer-scale magnetic devices built on chip-based platforms have recently been shown to present opportunities for new particle trapping and manipulation technologies. Meanwhile, advances in nanoparticle fabrication allow for the building of custom-made particles with precise control of their size, composition, and other properties such as magnetism, fluorescence, and surface biomarker characteristics. In particular, carefully tailored surface biomarkers facilitate precise binding to targeted molecules, self-actuated construction of hybrid structures, and fluorescence-based detection schemes. Based on these progresses, we present an on-chip detection mechanism for molecules with known surface markers. Hybrid nanostructures consisting of micelle nanoparticles, fluorescent quantum dots, and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are used to detect proteins or DNA molecules. The target is detected by the magnetic and fluorescent functionalities of the composite nanostructure, whereas in the absence of the target these signals are not present. Underlying this approach is the simultaneous manipulation via ferromagnetic zigzag nanowire arrays and imaging via quantum dot excitation. This chip-based detection technique could provide a powerful, low cost tool for ultrasensitive molecule detection with ramifications in healthcare diagnostics and small-scale chemical synthesis.

  9. Hydrogel micro-arrays for multi-analyte detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rounds, Rebecca M.; Lee, Seungjoon; Jeffords, Sarah; Ibey, Bennett L.; Pishko, Michael V.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2007-02-01

    Fluorescent microarrays have the ability to detect and monitor multiple analytes simultaneously and noninvasively, following initial placement. This versatility is advantageous for several biological applications including drug discovery, biohazard detection, transplant organ preservation and cell culture monitoring. In this work, poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel microarrays are described that can be used to measure multiple analytes, including H+ and dissolved oxygen. The array elements are created by filling micro-channels with a hydrogel precursor solution containing analyte specific fluorescent sensors. A photomask is used to create the microarray through UV polymerization of the PEG precursor solution. A compact imaging system composed of a CCD camera, high powered LED, and two optical filters is used to measure the change in fluorescence emission corresponding to analyte concentration. The proposed system was tested in aqueous solution by altering relevant analyte concentrations across their biological ranges.

  10. Lenslet array to further suppress starlight for direct exoplanet detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Qian; McElwain, Michael; Shiri, Ron

    2016-07-01

    Direct imaging plays a key role in the detection and characterization of exoplanets orbiting within its host star's habitable zone. Many innovative ideas for starlight suppression and wavefront control have been proposed and developed over the past decade. However, several technological challenges still lie ahead to achieve the required contrast, including controlling the observatory pointing performance, fabricating occulting masks with tight optical tolerances, developing wavefront control algorithms, controlling stray light, advancing single photon detecting detectors, and integrated system-level issues. This paper explores how a lenslet array and pinhole mask may be implemented to further suppress uncorrected starlight that leaks through the occulting mask. An external occulter, or star shade, is simulated to demonstrate this concept, although this approach can be implemented for internal coronagraphs as well. We describe how to use simple relay optics to control the scene near the inner working angle and the level of the suppression expected. Furthermore, if the lenslet array is the input to an integral field spectrograph, as planned for the WFIRST mission, the spectral content of the exoplanet atmospheres can be obtained to determine if the observed planet is habitable and ultimately, if it is inhabited.

  11. Nanoscale optofluidic sensor arrays for Dengue virus detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Sudeep; Akhmechet, Roman; Chen, Likun; Nugen, Sam; Baeumner, Antje; Erickson, David

    2007-09-01

    Here we present our work towards the development of Nanoscale Optofluidic Sensor Arrays (NOSA), which is an optofluidic architecture for performing label free, highly parallel, detections of biomolecular interactions. The approach is based on the use of optically resonant devices whose resonant wavelength is shifted due to a local change in refractive index caused by a positive binding event between a surface bound molecule and it solution phase target. A special two stage micro-/nanofluidics architecture is used to first functionalize the devices and then to deliver the targets. Two variants of the NOSA will be presented here. The first approach utilizes a 1D resonant cavity in a 1D silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide with a unique differential size functionalization approach. This approach allows binding events at one or at a combination of the many sensing sites which causes a unique shift in the output resonator spectrum. The latter approach consists of a SOI waveguide evanescently coupled to multiple 1-D photonic crystal resonators of different sizes along the length, each of which is functionalized with a different oligonucleotide probe. These devices have an extremely low limit of detection and are compatible with aqueous environments. The primary advantage of these devices over existing technology is that it combines the sensitivity (limit of detection) of nanosensor technology with the parallelism of the microarray type format. Our initial application is in the detection of viral RNA of Dengue virus.

  12. Interdigitated array microelectrode capacitive sensor for detection of paraffinophilic mycobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampson, Andrew M.; Peterson, Erik T. K.; Papautsky, Ian

    2008-02-01

    Mycobacterium Avium Complex (MAC) is an opportunistic pathogen that threatens public health and has high clinical relevance. While culture-based and molecular biology techniques for identification are available, these methods are prone to error and require weeks to perform. There is a critical need for improved portable lab-on-a-chip sensor technology which will enable accurate and rapid point-of-care detection of these microorganisms. In this work, a new capacitive sensing strategy is explored utilizing interdigitated array (IDA) microelectrodes and exploiting the paraffinophilic nature of MAC. In this approach, paraffin wax is deposited over IDA microelectrodes to selectively extract these microorganisms from samples. As bacteria consume the dielectric paraffin layer, the charging current of the IDA capacitor changes to facilitate detection. Several IDA geometries were designed and simulated using CFD-ACE+ modeling software and compared with mathematical models. Capacitance of fabricated devices was determined using a charge-based capacitance measurement (CBCM) technique. Modeling and experimental results were in good agreement. Detection of femto-Farad changes in capacitance is possible, making this a feasible technique for sensing small changes in the paraffin for detection of paraffinophilic MAC.

  13. Lightning Detection at the Telescope Array Cosmic Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takai, Helio; Belz, John; Thomson, Gordon; Hanlon, William; Rison, Bill; Thomas, Ron; Krehbiel, Paul; Okuda, Takeshi

    2014-03-01

    It is known that the electric fields measured in lightning clouds are an order of magnitude too small than the critical electric field required for dielectric breakdown of air, there are therefore unknown mechanisms at work which initiate lightning. One theory is that cosmic ray air showers can initiate lightning via a runaway breakdown process. To study this problem, 10 VHF lightning monitoring stations built by New Mexico Tech were deployed at the Telescope Array site on September 2013. If cosmic rays act as lightning initiators, then the TA surface detectors may be able to detect high energy particles from the associated air shower while the NMT lightning detectors simultaneously measure VHF radio pulses of the lightning discharges themselves. The Telescope Array is the largest cosmic ray observatory in the Northern hemisphere. Located in Millard County, Utah, it covers an area of 750 km2. The VHF monitoring stations can be used to produce 3D images of the lightning strikes. Using both setups we hope to be able to investigate in detail the role of cosmic rays in lightning, or if there is any gamma ray production from lightning activity. We will discuss how a collaboration between TA, NMT and BNL can help in understanding of a long standing mysteries about lightning formation. Results of data analysis for events that were observed in coincidence between our detectors will be presented.

  14. High Density Nano-Electrode Array for Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Mano Misra

    2010-05-07

    Bulk single crystals of Cd1-xZnxTe (x=0.04 to x=0.2) compound semiconductor is used for room temperature radiation detection. The production of large volume of Cd1-xZnxTe with low defect density is expensive. As a result there is a growing research interest in the production of nanostructured compound semiconductors such as Cd1-xZnxTe in an electrochemical route. In this investigation, Cd1-xZnxTe ternary compound semiconductor, referred as CZT, was electrodeposited in the form of nanowires onto a TiO2 nanotubular template from propylene carbonate as the non-aqueous electrolyte, using a pulse-reverse electrodeposition process at 130 ºC. The template acted as a support in growing ordered nanowire of CZT which acts as a one dimensional conductor. Cyclic Voltammogram (CV) studies were conducted in determining the potentials for the growth of nanowires of uniform stoichiometry. The morphologies and composition of CZT were characterized by using SEM, TEM and XRD. The STEM mapping carried out on the nanowires showed the uniform distribution of Cd, Zn and Te elements. TEM image showed that the nanowires were polycrystalline in nature. The Mott-Schottky analysis carried on the nanowires showed that the nanowires were a p-type semiconductor. The carrier density, band gap and resistivity of the Cd0.9Zn0.1Te nanowires were 4.29x1013 cm-3, 1.56 eV and 2.76x1011Ω-cm respectively. The high resistivity was attributed to the presence of deep defect states such as cadmium vacancies or Te antisites which were created by the anodic cycle of the pulse-reverse electrodeposition process. Stacks of series connected CZT nanowire arrays were tested with different bias potentials. The background current was in the order of tens of picoamperes. When exposed to radiation source Amerecium-241 (60 KeV, 4 μCi), the stacked CZT nanowires arrays showed sensing behavior. The sensitivity of the nanowire arrays increased as the number of stacks increased. The preliminary results indicate that the

  15. Application of HPLC with diode array detection in tribology

    SciTech Connect

    Lehotay, J.; Oktavec, D. . Dept. of Analytical Chemistry)

    1994-01-01

    A strategy for the analysis of engine oils is described based on the correlation between previously developed methods and HPLC. The areas of some chromatographic peaks of oil samples were linearly correlated to: covered kilometers, the kinematic viscosity, the amount of insoluble compounds in heptane, Conradson's carbonized residue, the number of alkalinity and the carbonyl number. The detection is performed by a diode array detector, simultaneously providing structural information and quantitative data. The results are compared with other analytical methods, which are used for the evaluation of the oil quality. The main aim of this work was to investigate a number of parameters to find correlation between HPLC results and another parameters that characterized the properties of oil wear.

  16. Spatio-temporal change detection from multidimensional arrays: Detecting deforestation from MODIS time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Meng; Pebesma, Edzer; Sanchez, Alber; Verbesselt, Jan

    2016-07-01

    Growing availability of long-term satellite imagery enables change modeling with advanced spatio-temporal statistical methods. Multidimensional arrays naturally match the structure of spatio-temporal satellite data and can provide a clean modeling process for complex spatio-temporal analysis over large datasets. Our study case illustrates the detection of breakpoints in MODIS imagery time series for land cover change in the Brazilian Amazon using the BFAST (Breaks For Additive Season and Trend) change detection framework. BFAST includes an Empirical Fluctuation Process (EFP) to alarm the change and a change point time locating process. We extend the EFP to account for the spatial autocorrelation between spatial neighbors and assess the effects of spatial correlation when applying BFAST on satellite image time series. In addition, we evaluate how sensitive EFP is to the assumption that its time series residuals are temporally uncorrelated, by modeling it as an autoregressive process. We use arrays as a unified data structure for the modeling process, R to execute the analysis, and an array database management system to scale computation. Our results point to BFAST as a robust approach against mild temporal and spatial correlation, to the use of arrays to ease the modeling process of spatio-temporal change, and towards communicable and scalable analysis.

  17. Damage Detection in Composite Structures with Wavenumber Array Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara; Yu, Lingyu

    2013-01-01

    Guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) have the potential to be an efficient and cost-effective method for rapid damage detection and quantification of large structures. Attractive features include sensitivity to a variety of damage types and the capability of traveling relatively long distances. They have proven to be an efficient approach for crack detection and localization in isotropic materials. However, techniques must be pushed beyond isotropic materials in order to be valid for composite aircraft components. This paper presents our study on GUW propagation and interaction with delamination damage in composite structures using wavenumber array data processing, together with advanced wave propagation simulations. Parallel elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) is used for the example simulations. Multi-dimensional Fourier transform is used to convert time-space wavefield data into frequency-wavenumber domain. Wave propagation in the wavenumber-frequency domain shows clear distinction among the guided wave modes that are present. This allows for extracting a guided wave mode through filtering and reconstruction techniques. Presence of delamination causes spectral change accordingly. Results from 3D CFRP guided wave simulations with delamination damage in flat-plate specimens are used for wave interaction with structural defect study.

  18. Bounds on achievable accuracy in analog optical linear-algebra processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batsell, Stephen G.; Walkup, John F.; Krile, Thomas F.

    1990-07-01

    Upper arid lower bounds on the number of bits of accuracy achievable are determined by applying a seconth-ortler statistical model to the linear algebra processor. The use of bounds was found necessary due to the strong signal-dependence of the noise at the output of the optical linear algebra processor (OLAP). 1 1. ACCURACY BOUNDS One of the limiting factors in applying OLAPs to real world problems has been the poor achievable accuracy of these processors. Little previous research has been done on determining noise sources from a systems perspective which would include noise generated in the multiplication ard addition operations spatial variations across arrays and crosstalk. We have previously examined these noise sources and determined a general model for the output noise mean and variance. The model demonstrates a strony signaldependency in the noise at the output of the processor which has been confirmed by our experiments. 1 We define accuracy similar to its definition for an analog signal input to an analog-to-digital (ND) converter. The number of bits of accuracy achievable is related to the log (base 2) of the number of separable levels at the P/D converter output. The number of separable levels is fouri by dividing the dynamic range by m times the standard deviation of the signal a. 2 Here m determines the error rate in the P/D conversion. The dynamic range can be expressed as the

  19. Acoustic Detection and Tracking of a Class I UAS with a Small Tetrahedral Microphone Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Acoustic Detection and Tracking of a Class I UAS with a Small Tetrahedral Microphone Array by Minas Benyamin and Geoffrey H Goldman ARL...20783-1138 ARL-TR-7086 September 2014 Acoustic Detection and Tracking of a Class I UAS with a Small Tetrahedral Microphone Array Minas...with a Small Tetrahedral Microphone Array 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Minas Benyamin and

  20. Deep diode arrays for X-ray detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zemel, J. N.

    1984-01-01

    Temperature gradient zone melting process was used to form p-n junctions in bulk of high purity silicon wafers. These diodes were patterned to form arrays for X-ray spectrometers. The whole fabrication processes for these X-ray detectors are reviewed in detail. The p-n junctions were evaluated by (1) the dark diode I-V measurements, (2) the diode C sub I - V measurements, and (3) the MOS C-V measurements. The results showed that these junctions were linearly graded in charge distribution with low reverse bias leakage current flowing through them (few nA at -10 volts). The X-ray detection experiments showed that an FWHM of 500 eV was obtained from these diodes with a small bias of just -5 volts (for X-ray source Fe55). A theoretical model was proposed to explain the extra peaks found in the energy spectra and a very interesting point - cross talk effect was pointed out. This might be a solution to the problem of making really high resolution X-ray spectrometers.

  1. Defects detection in thin components using two-dimensional ultrasonic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velichko, A.; Wilcox, P. D.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2013-01-01

    The use of 2D ultrasonic arrays provides great flexibility, as one array probe allows a given defect to be illuminated from a wide range of angles. However there are a number of challenges in the application of 2D arrays to detection and characterization of 3D defects. In the current paper the problem of finding the optimal array configuration for defects detection in thin sections is investigated. The efficient FE scattering model is used to simulate an ultrasonic array response for different 3D defects. The data provided by this model is then used to analyze the influence of different parameters on the array performance (signal to noise ratio, sensitivity, resolution). Finally, experimental results are shown that illustrate the imaging performance of optimal 2D array configuration.

  2. Detection of wheel rim by immersion scan of phased array ultrasonic flaw testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yi-He; Guo, Jian-qiang; Wang, Ze-yong; Gao, Xiao-rong; Jiang, Xiang-dong; Li, Xi

    2015-02-01

    In order to achieve the in-service detection to high speed train wheel rims, this article analyzed the effects of the number of array elements to image focusing and image quality using water immersion ultrasonic phased array technology. Also, the effects of the depth of water to detecting technique had been researched. According to the results of the experiments, the number of optimal array elements, the corresponding thickness of immersion layer, and the optimal range of water's depth had been obtained. Thus, appropriate references had been provided to water immersion ultrasonic phased array testing.

  3. Interdigitated microelectrode array-coupled bipolar semiconductor photodiode array (IMEA-PDA) microchip for on-chip electrochemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sukdeb; Kim, Min Jung; Tak, Yu Kyung; Kwon, Ho Taik; Song, Joon Myong

    2009-10-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication and testing of a microchip wherein interdigitated microelectrode arrays (IMEA) were integrated with bipolar semiconductor photodiode array (PDA) chip to fabricate a highly compact embodiment for on-chip handling of solutions and electrochemiluminescence (ECL) detection. A 12 x 12 micro array of photodiodes, each coupled with an interdigitated microelectrode array (IMEA), an array of current amplifiers, and a photodiode element-addressing circuit were integrated into a single 2 x 2 cm² IC chip. Each photodiode had dimensions of 300 x 300 μm² and the photodiode-to-photodiode distance was 100 μm. The chip was successfully applied to the on-chip quantification of electro-chemiluminescing probe-labeled single stranded oligonucleotides. The minimum detectable limit at signal/noise ≥ 3 was found to be 5 x 10⁻¹⁴ moles of oligonucleotides with a sample volume as low as 5 microl (i.e., 10 fmole/μl). The attractive features of the developed IMEA-PDA microchip are that a plurality of samples can be analyzed simultaneously using a chip and that for a given sample the data can be averaged from values obtained from multiple, individually addressed pixels. These in turn bring in speed and statistical confidence in analysis. The IMEA-PDA microchip system has the potential to be used as a versatile and highly compact chemical analysis tool for chemical sensing and metrology applications.

  4. An Intelligent Fault Detection and Isolation Architecture for Antenna Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahnamai, K.; Arabshahi, P.; Yan, T.-Y.; Pham, T.; Finley, S. G.

    1997-10-01

    This article describes a general architecture for fault modeling, diagnosis, and isolation of the DSN antenna array based on computationally intelligent techniques(neural networks and fuzzy logic). It encompasses a suite of intelligent test and diagnosis algorithms in software. By continuously monitoring the health of the highly complex and nonlinear array observables, the automated diagnosis software will be able to identify and isolate the most likely causes of system failure in cases of faulty operation. Furthermore, it will be able to recommend a series of corresponding corrective actions and effectively act as an automated real-time and interactive system supervisor. In so doing, it will enhance the array capability by reducing the operational workload, increasing science information availability, reducing the overall cost of operation by reducing system downtimes, improving risk management, and making mission planning much more reliable. Operation of this architecture is illustrated using examples from observables available from the 34-meter arraying task.

  5. SERS based immuno-microwell arrays for multiplexed detection of foodborne pathogenic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian; Hankus, Mikella E.; Cullum, Brian M.

    2009-05-01

    A novel surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based immuno-microwell array has been developed for multiplexed detection of foodborne pathogenic bacteria. The immuno-microwell array was prepared by immobilizing the optical addressable immunomagnetic beads (IMB) into the microwell array on one end of a fiber optic bundle. The IMBs, magnetic beads coated with specific antibody to specific bacteria, were used for immunomagnetic separation (IMS) of corresponding bacteria. The magnetic separation by the homemade magnetic separation system was evaluated in terms of the influences of several important parameters including the beads concentration, the sample volume and the separation time. IMS separation efficiency of the model bacteria E.coli O157:H7 was 63% in 3 minutes. The microwell array was fabricated on hydrofluoric acid etched end of a fiber optic bundle containing 30,000 fiber elements. After being coated with silver, the microwell array was used as a uniform SERS substrate with the relative standard deviation of the SERS enhancement across the microwell array < 2% and the enhancement factor as high as 2.18 x 107. The antibody modified microwell array was prepared for bacteria immobilization into the microwell array, which was characterized by a sandwich immunoassay. To demonstrate the potential of multiplexed SERS detection with the immuno-microwell array, the SERS spectra of different Raman dye labeled magnetic beads as well as mixtures were measured on the mircrowell array. In bead mixture, different beads were identified by the characteristic SERS bands of the corresponding Raman label.

  6. Pyroelectric sensor arrays for detection and thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Anthony J.

    2013-06-01

    Penetration of uncooled (room temperature operation) thermal detector arrays into high volume commercial products depends on very low cost technology linked to high volume production. A series of innovative and revolutionary developments is now allowing arrays based on bulk pyroelectric ceramic material to enter the consumer marketplace providing everything from sophisticated security and people monitoring devices to hand held thermal imagers and visual IR thermometers for preventative maintenance and building inspection. Although uncooled resistive microbolometer detector technology has captured market share in higher cost thermal imager products we describe a pyroelectric ceramic technology which does not need micro electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology and vacuum packaging to give good performance. This is a breakthrough for very low cost sensors and imagers. Recent developments in a variety of products based on pyroelectric ceramic arrays are described and their performance and applicability compared and contrasted with competing technologies.

  7. Array-Based Detection of Persistent Organic Pollutants via Cyclodextrin Promoted Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Serio, Nicole; Moyano, Daniel F.; Rotello, Vincent M.; Levine, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    We report herein the selective array-based detection of 30 persistent organic pollutants via cyclodextrin-promoted energy transfer. The use of three fluorophores enabled the development of an array that classified 30 analytes with 100% accuracy and identified unknown analytes with 96% accuracy, as well as identifying 92% of analytes in urine. PMID:26096542

  8. Synthetic Array Heterodyne Detection: Developments within the Caliope CO{sub 2} DIAL Program

    SciTech Connect

    Rehse, S.J.; Strauss, E.M.

    1995-09-01

    A new technique, Synthetic Array Heterodyne Detection, offers a wider field of view and improved signal to noise for coherent DIAL systems by reducing speckle interference. We have implemented a synthetic multi-pixel array using a CO{sub 2} laser on a single element HgCdTe photodiode.

  9. Ultrasensitive molecular absorption detection using metal slot antenna arrays.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Kwang Jun; Bahk, Young-Mi; Kim, Dai-Sik; Kyoung, Jisoo; Rotermund, Fabian

    2015-07-27

    We theoretically study the transmission reduction of light passing through absorptive molecules embedded in a periodic metal slot array in a near infrared wavelength regime. From the analytically solved transmitted light, we present a simple relation given by the attenuation length of light at the resonance wavelength of the slot antennas with respect to the spectral width of the resonant transmission peak. This relation clearly explains that the control of the transmission reduction even with very low absorptive materials is possible. We investigate also the transmission reduction by absorptive molecules in a real metallic slot antenna array on a dielectric substrate and compare the results with finite difference time domain calculations. In numerical calculations, we demonstrate that the same amount of transmission reduction by a bulk absorptive material can be achieved only with one-hundredth thickness of the same material when it is embedded in an optimized Fano-resonant slot antenna array. Our relation presented in this study can contribute to label-free chemical and biological sensing as an efficient design and performance criterion for periodic slot antenna arrays.

  10. Static corrections for enhanced signal detection at IMS seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Neil; Wookey, James; Selby, Neil

    2016-04-01

    Seismic monitoring forms an important part of the International Monitoring System (IMS) for verifying the Comprehensive nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Analysis of seismic data can be used to discriminate between nuclear explosions and the tens of thousands of natural earthquakes of similar magnitude that occur every year. This is known as "forensic seismology", and techniques include measuring the P-to-S wave amplitude ratio, the body-to-surface wave magnitude ratio (mb/Ms), and source depth. Measurement of these seismic discriminants requires very high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) data, and this has led to the development and deployment of seismic arrays as part of the IMS. Array processing methodologies such as stacking can be used, but optimum SNR improvement needs an accurate estimate of the arrival time of the particular seismic phase. To enhance the imaging capability of IMS arrays, we aim to develop site-specific static corrections to the arrival time as a function of frequency, slowness and backazimuth. Here, we present initial results for the IMS TORD array in Niger. Vespagrams are calculated for various events using the F-statistic to clearly identify seismic phases and measure their arrival times. Observed arrival times are compared with those predicted by 1D and 3D velocity models, and residuals are calculated for a range of backazimuths and slownesses. Finally, we demonstrate the improvement in signal fidelity provided by these corrections.

  11. Membrane-based oligonucleotide array developed from multiple markers for the detection of many Phytophthora species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many Phytophthora species are destructive plant pathogens imposing severe threats to both natural and agricultural vegetation. Effective monitoring and accurate early detection are important means of preventing potential epidemics and outbreaks of such diseases. DNA array hybridization technique is ...

  12. Density Detection of Aligned Nanowire Arrays Using Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Wenfeng; Wang, Xin; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, JiaQi; Zhao, Kun

    2016-12-01

    A rapid technique is necessary to quantitatively detect the density of nanowire (NW) and nanotube arrays in one-dimensional devices which have been identified as useful building blocks for nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, biomedical devices, etc. Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy was employed in this research to detect the density of aligned Ni NW arrays. The transmitted amplitude of THz peaks and optical thickness of NW arrays was found to be the effective parameters to analyze the density change of NW arrays. Owing to the low multiple scattering and high order of Ni NW arrays, a linear relationship was observed for the transmitted amplitude and optical thickness regarding NW density, respectively. Therefore, THz technique may be used as a promising tool to characterize the density of one-dimensional structures in the large-scale integrated nanodevice fabrication.

  13. Ancient pathogen DNA in archaeological samples detected with a Microbial Detection Array.

    PubMed

    Devault, Alison M; McLoughlin, Kevin; Jaing, Crystal; Gardner, Shea; Porter, Teresita M; Enk, Jacob M; Thissen, James; Allen, Jonathan; Borucki, Monica; DeWitte, Sharon N; Dhody, Anna N; Poinar, Hendrik N

    2014-03-06

    Ancient human remains of paleopathological interest typically contain highly degraded DNA in which pathogenic taxa are often minority components, making sequence-based metagenomic characterization costly. Microarrays may hold a potential solution to these challenges, offering a rapid, affordable, and highly informative snapshot of microbial diversity in complex samples without the lengthy analysis and/or high cost associated with high-throughput sequencing. Their versatility is well established for modern clinical specimens, but they have yet to be applied to ancient remains. Here we report bacterial profiles of archaeological and historical human remains using the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array (LLMDA). The array successfully identified previously-verified bacterial human pathogens, including Vibrio cholerae (cholera) in a 19th century intestinal specimen and Yersinia pestis ("Black Death" plague) in a medieval tooth, which represented only minute fractions (0.03% and 0.08% alignable high-throughput shotgun sequencing reads) of their respective DNA content. This demonstrates that the LLMDA can identify primary and/or co-infecting bacterial pathogens in ancient samples, thereby serving as a rapid and inexpensive paleopathological screening tool to study health across both space and time.

  14. Ancient pathogen DNA in archaeological samples detected with a Microbial Detection Array

    PubMed Central

    Devault, Alison M.; McLoughlin, Kevin; Jaing, Crystal; Gardner, Shea; Porter, Teresita M.; Enk, Jacob M.; Thissen, James; Allen, Jonathan; Borucki, Monica; DeWitte, Sharon N.; Dhody, Anna N.; Poinar, Hendrik N.

    2014-01-01

    Ancient human remains of paleopathological interest typically contain highly degraded DNA in which pathogenic taxa are often minority components, making sequence-based metagenomic characterization costly. Microarrays may hold a potential solution to these challenges, offering a rapid, affordable, and highly informative snapshot of microbial diversity in complex samples without the lengthy analysis and/or high cost associated with high-throughput sequencing. Their versatility is well established for modern clinical specimens, but they have yet to be applied to ancient remains. Here we report bacterial profiles of archaeological and historical human remains using the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array (LLMDA). The array successfully identified previously-verified bacterial human pathogens, including Vibrio cholerae (cholera) in a 19th century intestinal specimen and Yersinia pestis (“Black Death” plague) in a medieval tooth, which represented only minute fractions (0.03% and 0.08% alignable high-throughput shotgun sequencing reads) of their respective DNA content. This demonstrates that the LLMDA can identify primary and/or co-infecting bacterial pathogens in ancient samples, thereby serving as a rapid and inexpensive paleopathological screening tool to study health across both space and time. PMID:24603850

  15. Precise annealing of focal plane arrays for optical detection

    DOEpatents

    Bender, Daniel A.

    2015-09-22

    Precise annealing of identified defective regions of a Focal Plane Array ("FPA") (e.g., exclusive of non-defective regions of the FPA) facilitates removal of defects from an FPA that has been hybridized and/or packaged with readout electronics. Radiation is optionally applied under operating conditions, such as under cryogenic temperatures, such that performance of an FPA can be evaluated before, during, and after annealing without requiring thermal cycling.

  16. A microfluidic paper-based electrochemical biosensor array for multiplexed detection of metabolic biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chen; Thuo, Martin M.; Liu, Xinyu

    2013-10-01

    Paper-based microfluidic devices have emerged as simple yet powerful platforms for performing low-cost analytical tests. This paper reports a microfluidic paper-based electrochemical biosensor array for multiplexed detection of physiologically relevant metabolic biomarkers. Different from existing paper-based electrochemical devices, our device includes an array of eight electrochemical sensors and utilizes a handheld custom-made electrochemical reader (potentiostat) for signal readout. The biosensor array can detect several analytes in a sample solution and produce multiple measurements for each analyte from a single run. Using the device, we demonstrate simultaneous detection of glucose, lactate and uric acid in urine, with analytical performance comparable to that of the existing commercial and paper-based platforms. The paper-based biosensor array and its electrochemical reader will enable the acquisition of high-density, statistically meaningful diagnostic information at the point of care in a rapid and cost-efficient way.

  17. A microfluidic paper-based electrochemical biosensor array for multiplexed detection of metabolic biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chen; Thuo, Martin M; Liu, Xinyu

    2013-01-01

    Paper-based microfluidic devices have emerged as simple yet powerful platforms for performing low-cost analytical tests. This paper reports a microfluidic paper-based electrochemical biosensor array for multiplexed detection of physiologically relevant metabolic biomarkers. Different from existing paper-based electrochemical devices, our device includes an array of eight electrochemical sensors and utilizes a handheld custom-made electrochemical reader (potentiostat) for signal readout. The biosensor array can detect several analytes in a sample solution and produce multiple measurements for each analyte from a single run. Using the device, we demonstrate simultaneous detection of glucose, lactate and uric acid in urine, with analytical performance comparable to that of the existing commercial and paper-based platforms. The paper-based biosensor array and its electrochemical reader will enable the acquisition of high-density, statistically meaningful diagnostic information at the point of care in a rapid and cost-efficient way. PMID:27877606

  18. Detection of biological warfare agents with fiber-optic microsphere-based DNA arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Linan; Walt, David R.

    2005-11-01

    Biological warfare agents (BWAs) pose significant threats to both military forces and civilian populations. The increased concern about bioterrorism has promoted the development of rapid, sensitive, and reliable detection systems to provide an early warning for detecting the release of BWAs. We have developed a high-density DNA array to detect BWAs in real environmental samples with fast response times and high sensitivity. An optical fiber bundle containing approximately 50,000 individual 3.1 μm diameter fibers was chemically etched to yield an array of microwells and used as the substrate for the array. 50-mer single-stranded DNA probes designed to be specific for target BWAs were covalently attached to 3.1-μm microspheres, and the microspheres were distributed into the microwells to form a randomized high-density DNA array. We demonstrated the applicability of this DNA array for the identification of Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki, a BWA simulant, in real samples. PCR was used to amplify the sequences, introduce fluorescent labels into the target molecules, and provide a second level of specificity. After hybridization of test solutions to the array, analysis was performed by evaluating the specific responses of individual probes on the array.

  19. A bead-based suspension array for the multiplexed detection of begomoviruses and their whitefly vectors.

    PubMed

    van Brunschot, S L; Bergervoet, J H W; Pagendam, D E; de Weerdt, M; Geering, A D W; Drenth, A; van der Vlugt, R A A

    2014-03-01

    Bead-based suspension array systems enable simultaneous fluorescence-based identification of multiple nucleic acid targets in a single reaction. This study describes the development of a novel approach to plant virus and vector diagnostics, a multiplexed 7-plex array that comprises a hierarchical set of assays for the simultaneous detection of begomoviruses and Bemisia tabaci, from both plant and whitefly samples. The multiplexed array incorporates genus, species and strain-specific assays, offering a unique approach for identifying both known and unknown viruses and B. tabaci species. When tested against a large panel of sequence-characterized begomovirus and whitefly samples, the array was shown to be 100% specific to the homologous target. Additionally, the multiplexed array was highly sensitive, efficiently and concurrently determining both virus and whitefly identity from single viruliferous whitefly samples. The detection limit for one assay within the multiplexed array that specifically detects Tomato yellow leaf curl virus-Israel (TYLCV-IL) was quantified as 200fg of TYLCV-IL DNA, directly equivalent to that of TYLCV-specific qPCR. Highly reproducible results were obtained over multiple tests. The flexible multiplexed array described in this study has great potential for use in plant quarantine, biosecurity and disease management programs worldwide.

  20. A Novel Method for Anti-HLA Antibody Detection Using Personalized Peptide Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pan; Souma, Tomokazu; Wei, Andrew Zu-Sern; Xie, Xueying; Luo, Xunrong; Jin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background HLA mismatches are the primary cause of alloantibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in organ transplantation. To delineate antigenic and immunogenic potentials among individual HLA mismatches, information regarding antibody specificity at the epitope level, instead of the allelic level, is needed. Methods This study explores a direct screening method for HLA linear epitopes in kidney transplant patients. We custom synthesized a large panel of 15-residue HLA peptides in an array format and measured alloantibody reactivity to these peptides from the sera of post and/or pretransplant patients. Two design concepts for the arrays were followed: a standard array of a fixed panel of peptides or personalized arrays. The standard array contains 420 peptides derived from a predetermined set of HLA-DQ allelic antigens based on templates also used in the single-antigen beads assay. Results The array detected distinct antiserum patterns among transplant subjects and revealed epitope levels of specificity largely in accordance with the single-antigen results. Two personalized arrays that each included donor-derived peptides of HLA-A, -B, -C, -DQ, and -DR sequences were separately designed for 2 transplant subjects. The personalized arrays detected de novo antibodies following transplantation. The new method also showed superior sensitivity to a single-antigen assay in one of the cases whose pathological diagnosis of AMR occurred before single-antigen assay could detect antibodies. Conclusions This pilot study proved the feasibility of using personalized peptide arrays to achieve detection of alloantibodies for linear HLA epitopes associated with distinct donor-recipient mismatches. Single or multiple reactive epitopes may occur on an individual HLA molecule, and donor-specific HLA-DQ-reactivity among 5 kidney transplant subjects revealed patterns of shared epitopes. PMID:27826602

  1. Boron doped diamond microelectrodes arrays for electrochemical detection in HPLC.

    PubMed

    Mahé, Eric; Devilliers, Didier; Dardoize, François

    2015-01-01

    Boron doped diamond microelectrodes arrays (MEA) have been prepared in order to be used as new amperometric sensors in electrochemical cells for HPLC detectors. The following parameters were studied: number and diameter (15-40 µm) of the electrodes, distance between them (50-240 µm), and effect of the flow rate (0.1-3 mL/min). It was thus possible to find the optimum value of the parameters which give a good signal/noise ratio in the chronoamperometric responses, with a size of the electrochemical sensors as small as possible.

  2. Nanowire sensors and arrays for chemical/biomolecule detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Minhee; Lee, Choonsup; Vasquez, Richard P.; Ramanathan, K.; Bangar, M. A.; Chen, W.; Mulchandan, A.; Myung, N. V.

    2005-01-01

    We report electrochemical growth of single nanowire based sensors using e-beam patterned electrolyte channels, potentially enabling the controlled fabrication of individually addressable high density arrays. The electrodeposition technique results in nanowires with controlled dimensions, positions, alignments, and chemical compositions. Using this technique, we have fabricated single palladium nanowires with diameters ranging between 75 nm and 300 nm and conducting polymer nanowires (polypyrrole and polyaniline) with diameters between 100 nm and 200 nm. Using these single nanowires, we have successfully demonstrated gas sensing with Pd nanowires and pH sensing with polypirrole nanowires.

  3. Periodically Porous Top Electrodes on Vertical Nanowire Arrays for Highly Sensitive Gas Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    highly sensitive detection to both nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ammonia (NH3) in humidified air. NO2 detection down to 10 parts per billion (ppb) is... humidified air. NO2 detection down to 10 parts per billion (ppb) is demonstrated and an order-of-magnitude improvement in sensor response time is shown in...controllable size and distribution. Fast and highly sensitive detection of ammonia and nitrogen dioxide in humidified air using the PTE nanowire array sensor

  4. Membrane based thermoelectric sensor array for space debris detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haenschke, Frank; Kessler, Ernst; Ihring, Andreas; Bunte, Karl Dietrich; Herbst, Christian; Mohaupt, Matthias; Fichna, Torsten; Hagedorn, Daniel; Meyer, Hans-Georg

    2014-06-01

    As manmade space debris in the low earth orbit becomes an increasing risk to space missions, which could even result in total mission loss, it has become even more critical to have detailed knowledge of the properties of these particles like the mass, the velocity and the trajectory. In this paper, we present a newly designed, highly sensitive impact detector array with 16 pixels for space debris analysis. The thermopile sensor array, which was developed in the project, consists of 16 miniaturized multi-junction thermopile sensors made by modern thin-film technology on Si wafers. Each thermopile sensor consists of 100 radially arranged junction pairs formed from evaporated antimony and bismuth thin films. The centrally located active (hot) junctions comprise the active area of 1 mm². The output e.m.f. of the sensor is proportional to the temperature difference between the active and the reference junctions. The thermopile requires no cooling and no bias voltage or current for operation. It generates no 1/f noise but only the thermal resistance (Nyquist) noise. The sensor can be used for DC and low frequency AC measurements. The impact energy of micro sized particles is measured by a calorimetric principle. This means that the kinetic energy of the particle is converted into heat by hitting the absorbing foil, which is glued on the surface of the membrane area. This setup in combination with a preceded velocity detector allows the measurement of the most interesting particle quantities mass, velocity and trajectory.

  5. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection using microelectrode biochip array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong-Sung; Lee, Kyung-Sup; Park, Dae-Hee

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, a microelectrode array DNA chip was fabricated on a glass slide using photolithography technology. Several probe DNAs with mercaptohexyl moiety at their 5' end were immobilized on the gold electrodes by a DNA arrayer utilizing the affinity between gold and sulfur. Then target DNAs were hybridized and reacted with Hoechst 33258, which is a DNA minor groove binder and electrochemically active dye. Cyclic voltammetry in a 5 mM ferricyanide/ferrocyanide solution at 100 mV s-1 confirmed the immobilization of probe DNA on the gold electrodes. Linear sweep voltammetry or cyclic voltammetry showed a difference between target DNA and control DNA in the anodic peak current values. This was derived from Hoechst 33258 concentrated at the electrode surface through association with formed hybrids. It is suggested that this DNA chip could recognize sequence specific genes. It is also suggested that a multichannel electrochemical DNA microarray is useful to develop a portable device for a clinical gene diagnostic system.

  6. Microfluidic array for simultaneous detection of DNA oxidation and DNA-adduct damage.

    PubMed

    Song, Boya; Shen, Min; Jiang, Di; Malla, Spundana; Mosa, Islam M; Choudhary, Dharamainder; Rusling, James F

    2016-10-21

    Exposure to chemical pollutants and pharmaceuticals may cause health issues caused by metabolite-related toxicity. This paper reports a new microfluidic electrochemical sensor array with the ability to simultaneously detect common types of DNA damage including oxidation and nucleobase adduct formation. Sensors in the 8-electrode screen-printed carbon array were coated with thin films of metallopolymers osmium or ruthenium bipyridyl-poly(vinylpyridine) chloride (OsPVP, RuPVP) along with DNA and metabolic enzymes by layer-by-layer electrostatic assembly. After a reaction step in which test chemicals and other necessary reagents flow over the array, OsPVP selectively detects oxidized guanines on the DNA strands, and RuPVP detects DNA adduction by metabolites on nucleobases. We demonstrate array performance for test chemicals including 17β-estradiol (E2), its metabolites 4-hydroxyestradiol (4-OHE2), 2-hydroxyestradiol (2-OHE2), catechol, 2-nitrosotoluene (2-NO-T), 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), and 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF). Results revealed DNA-adduct and oxidation damage in a single run to provide a metabolic-genotoxic chemistry screen. The array measures damage directly in unhydrolyzed DNA, and is less expensive, faster, and simpler than conventional methods to detect DNA damage. The detection limit for oxidation is 672 8-oxodG per 10(6) bases. Each sensor requires only 22 ng of DNA, so the mass detection limit is 15 pg (∼10 pmol) 8-oxodG.

  7. Simulating the DESCANT Neutron Detection Array with the Geant4 Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turko, Joseph; Bildstein, Vinzenz; Rand, Evan; Maclean, Andrew; Garrett, Paul; Griffin Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The DEuterated SCintillator Array for Neutron Tagging (DESCANT) is a newly developed high-efficiency neutron detection array composed of 70 hexagonal deuterated scintillators. Due to the anisotropic nature of elastic (n,d) scattering, the pulse-height spectra of a deuterated scintillator contains a forward-peaked structure that can be used to determine the energy of the incident neutron without using traditional time-of-flight methods. Simulations of the array are crucial in order to interpret the DESCANT pulse heights, determine the efficiencies of the array, and examine its capabilities for conducting various nuclear decay experiments. To achieve this, we plan: (i) a verification of the low-energy hadronic physics packages in Geant4, (ii) a comparison of simulated spectra with data from a simple cylindrical ``test can'' detector geometry, (iii) expanding the simulated light response to a prototype DESCANT detector, and (iv) simulating the entire DESCANT array. NSERC, CFI.

  8. Multifunctional ZnO/Ag nanorod array as highly sensitive substrate for surface enhanced Raman detection.

    PubMed

    Shan, Guiye; Zheng, Shujing; Chen, Shaopeng; Chen, Yanwei; Liu, Yichun

    2012-06-01

    A multifunctional ZnO/Ag nanorod arrays has been prepared to construct SERS-active and photocatalytic substrate by a hydrothermal method. The morphology, microstructure and optical properties of ZnO/Ag nanorod arrays are characterized by X-ray diffraction spectra, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption and photoluminescence measurement to confirm the successful Ag deposition on the ZnO nanorod arrays. Such arrays exhibit strong and reproducible SERS signals of the Raman probe molecules. The mechanism of SERS enhancement was discussed due to the formation of interfacial electric field between ZnO nanorods and Ag. Furthermore, ZnO/Ag nanorod arrays also show catalytic properties by photocatalytic degradation of target molecules adsorbed to the substrate, which provides promising application for detecting and eliminating organic pollutant.

  9. Detecting changes of a distant gas source with an array of MOX gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Pashami, Sepideh; Lilienthal, Achim J; Trincavelli, Marco

    2012-11-27

    We address the problem of detecting changes in the activity of a distant gas source from the response of an array of metal oxide (MOX) gas sensors deployed in an open sampling system. The main challenge is the turbulent nature of gas dispersion and the response dynamics of the sensors. We propose a change point detection approach and evaluate it on individual gas sensors in an experimental setup where a gas source changes in intensity, compound, or mixture ratio. We also introduce an efficient sensor selection algorithm and evaluate the change point detection approach with the selected sensor array subsets.

  10. Hough-transform-based circle detection using an array of multimode optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yao; Eichmann, George

    1987-02-01

    The generation of an optical Hough transform (OHT) to detect a circle is proposed. The method is based on the use of a 2D multimode step-index optical fiber array. Both the position and radius of a circle can be detected. Some of the OHT performance parameters are also discussed.

  11. A mobile ferromagnetic shape detection sensor using a Hall sensor array and magnetic imaging.

    PubMed

    Misron, Norhisam; Shin, Ng Wei; Shafie, Suhaidi; Marhaban, Mohd Hamiruce; Mailah, Nashiren Farzilah

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a mobile Hall sensor array system for the shape detection of ferromagnetic materials that are embedded in walls or floors. The operation of the mobile Hall sensor array system is based on the principle of magnetic flux leakage to describe the shape of the ferromagnetic material. Two permanent magnets are used to generate the magnetic flux flow. The distribution of magnetic flux is perturbed as the ferromagnetic material is brought near the permanent magnets and the changes in magnetic flux distribution are detected by the 1-D array of the Hall sensor array setup. The process for magnetic imaging of the magnetic flux distribution is done by a signal processing unit before it displays the real time images using a netbook. A signal processing application software is developed for the 1-D Hall sensor array signal acquisition and processing to construct a 2-D array matrix. The processed 1-D Hall sensor array signals are later used to construct the magnetic image of ferromagnetic material based on the voltage signal and the magnetic flux distribution. The experimental results illustrate how the shape of specimens such as square, round and triangle shapes is determined through magnetic images based on the voltage signal and magnetic flux distribution of the specimen. In addition, the magnetic images of actual ferromagnetic objects are also illustrated to prove the functionality of mobile Hall sensor array system for actual shape detection. The results prove that the mobile Hall sensor array system is able to perform magnetic imaging in identifying various ferromagnetic materials.

  12. Space and frequency-multiplexed optical linear algebra processor - Fabrication and initial tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, D.; Jackson, J.

    1986-01-01

    A new optical linear algebra processor architecture is described. Space and frequency-multiplexing are used to accommodate bipolar and complex-valued data. A fabricated laboratory version of this processor is described, the electronic support system used is discussed, and initial test data obtained on it are presented.

  13. Visual electrochemiluminescence detection of cancer biomarkers on a closed bipolar electrode array chip.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mei-Sheng; Liu, Zhen; Shi, Hai-Wei; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Xu, Jing-Juan

    2015-01-06

    This paper describes a novel electrochemiluminescence (ECL) imaging platform for simultaneous detection of cancer biomarkers based on a closed bipolar electrode (BPE) array. It consists of two separated channel arrays: detection channel array and sensing channel array, which are connected by a group of parallel ITO BPEs on a glass substrate. Besides, two parallel ITO strips are fabricated at the two sides of BPE array and employed as driving electrodes. After Au films are electrochemically deposited on the cathodes of the BPE array, nanobioprobes including biorecognition elements (aptamer or antibody) and a novel electrochemical tag, which is synthesized by doping thionine in silica nanoparticles (Th@SiO2 NPs), are introduced into the cathodes by immunoreaction or DNA hybridization. The Th@SiO2 coupled nanobioprobes as both recognition probes and signal amplification indicators could mediate the ECL signals of Ru(bpy)3(2+)/tripropylamine (TPA) on the anodes of BPE array through faradaic reaction due to the charge neutrality of BPE. Thus, multiplex detection of cancer biomarkers (adenosine triphosphate (ATP), prostate-specific antigen (PSA), α-fetoprotein (AFP) and thrombin) is realized by forming specific sensing interfaces onto the cathodic poles of BPEs in different sensing channels and reported by the ECL images of the Ru(bpy)3(2+)/TPA system on the anodic poles of BPEs in detection channels. The results demonstrate that this visual ECL platform enables sensitive detection with excellent reproducibility, which may open a new door toward the development of simple, sensitive, cost-effective, and high throughput detection methods on biochips.

  14. Detecting Large Copy Number Variants Using Exome Genotyping Arrays In a Large Swedish Schizophrenia Sample

    PubMed Central

    Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Neale, Benjamin M.; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Fromer, Menachem; Goldstein, Jacqueline I.; Moran, Jennifer L.; Chambert, Kimberly; Kähler, Anna; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Hultman, Christina M.; Sklar, Pamela; Purcell, Shaun; McCarroll, Steven A.; Sullivan, Patrick F.

    2014-01-01

    Although copy number variants (CNVs) are important in genomic medicine, CNVs have not been systematically assessed for many complex traits. Several large rare CNVs increase risk for schizophrenia (SCZ) and autism and often demonstrate pleiotropic effects; however, their frequencies in the general population and other complex traits are unknown. Genotyping large numbers of samples is essential for progress. Large cohorts from many different diseases are being genotyped using exome-focused arrays designed to detect uncommon or rare protein-altering sequence variation. Although these arrays were not designed for CNV detection, the hybridization intensity data generated in each experiment could, in principle, be used for gene-focused CNV analysis. Our goal was to evaluate the extent to which CNVs can be detected using data from one particular exome array (the Illumina Human Exome Bead Chip). We genotyped 9, 100 Swedish subjects (3, 962 cases with SCZ and 5, 138 controls) using both standard GWAS arrays and exome arrays. In comparison to CNVs detected using GWAS arrays, we observed high sensitivity and specificity for detecting genic CNVs ≥400 kb including known pathogentic CNVs along with replicating the literature finding that cases with SCZ had greater enrichment for genic CNVs. Our data confirm the association of SCZ with 16p11.2 duplications and 22q11.2 deletions and suggest a novel association with deletions at 11q12.2. Our results suggest the utility of exome focused arrays in surveying large genic CNVs in very large samples; and thereby open the door for new opportunities such as conducting well-powered CNV assessment and comparisons between different diseases. The use of a single platform also minimizes potential confounding factors that could impact accurate detection. PMID:23938935

  15. Fiber-optic microsphere-based arrays for multiplexed biological warfare agent detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Linan; Ahn, Soohyoun; Walt, David R

    2006-02-15

    We report a multiplexed high-density DNA array capable of rapid, sensitive, and reliable identification of potential biological warfare agents. An optical fiber bundle containing 6000 individual 3.1-mum-diameter fibers was chemically etched to yield microwells and used as the substrate for the array. Eighteen different 50-mer single-stranded DNA probes were covalently attached to 3.1-mum microspheres. Probe sequences were designed for Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Francisella tularensis, Brucella melitensis, Clostridium botulinum, Vaccinia virus, and one biological warfare agent (BWA) simulant, Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki. The microspheres were distributed into the microwells to form a randomized multiplexed high-density DNA array. A detection limit of 10 fM in a 50-microL sample volume was achieved within 30 min of hybridization for B. anthracis, Y. pestis, Vaccinia virus, and B. thuringiensis kurstaki. We used both specific responses of probes upon hybridization to complementary targets as well as response patterns of the multiplexed array to identify BWAs with high accuracy. We demonstrated the application of this multiplexed high-density DNA array for parallel identification of target BWAs in spiked sewage samples after PCR amplification. The array's miniaturized feature size, fabrication flexibility, reusability, and high reproducibility may enable this array platform to be integrated into a highly sensitive, specific, and reliable portable instrument for in situ BWA detection.

  16. Detection of inflammatory cytokines using a fiber optic microsphere immunoassay array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blicharz, Timothy M.; Walt, David R.

    2006-10-01

    A multiplexed fiber optic microsphere-based immunoassay array capable of simultaneously measuring five inflammatory cytokines has been developed. Five groups of amine-functionalized 3.1 micron microspheres were internally encoded with five distinct concentrations of a europium dye and converted to cytokine probes by covalently coupling monoclonal capture antibodies specific for human VEGF, IFN-gamma, RANTES, IP-10, and Eotaxin-3 to the microspheres via glutaraldehyde chemistry. The microspheres were pooled and loaded into a 1 mm diameter fiber optic bundle containing ~50,000 individual etched microwells, producing the multiplexed cytokine immunoassay array. Multiple arrays can be created from a single microsphere pool for high throughput sample analysis. Sandwich fluoroimmunoassays were performed by incubating the probe array in a sample, followed by incubation in a mixture of biotin-labeled detection antibodies that are complementary to the five cytokines. Finally, universal detection of each protein was performed using a fluorescence imaging system after briefly immersing the array in a solution of fluorophore-labeled streptavidin. The multiplexed cytokine array has been shown to respond selectively to VEGF, IFNgamma, RANTES, IP-10, and Eotaxin-3, permitting multiplexed quantitative analysis. Ultimately, the multiplexed cytokine array will be utilized to evaluate the potential of using saliva as a noninvasive diagnostic fluid for pulmonary inflammatory diseases such as asthma.

  17. Suspension arrays based on nanoparticle-encoded microspheres for high-throughput multiplexed detection

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Yuankui

    2017-01-01

    Spectrometrically or optically encoded microsphere based suspension array technology (SAT) is applicable to the high-throughput, simultaneous detection of multiple analytes within a small, single sample volume. Thanks to the rapid development of nanotechnology, tremendous progress has been made in the multiplexed detecting capability, sensitivity, and photostability of suspension arrays. In this review, we first focus on the current stock of nanoparticle-based barcodes as well as the manufacturing technologies required for their production. We then move on to discuss all existing barcode-based bioanalysis patterns, including the various labels used in suspension arrays, label-free platforms, signal amplification methods, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based platforms. We then introduce automatic platforms for suspension arrays that use superparamagnetic nanoparticle-based microspheres. Finally, we summarize the current challenges and their proposed solutions, which are centered on improving encoding capacities, alternative probe possibilities, nonspecificity suppression, directional immobilization, and “point of care” platforms. Throughout this review, we aim to provide a comprehensive guide for the design of suspension arrays, with the goal of improving their performance in areas such as multiplexing capacity, throughput, sensitivity, and cost effectiveness. We hope that our summary on the state-of-the-art development of these arrays, our commentary on future challenges, and some proposed avenues for further advances will help drive the development of suspension array technology and its related fields. PMID:26021602

  18. Ultrasonic array for obstacle detection based on CDMA with Kasami codes.

    PubMed

    Diego, Cristina; Hernández, Alvaro; Jiménez, Ana; Alvarez, Fernando J; Sanz, Rebeca; Aparicio, Joaquín

    2011-01-01

    This paper raises the design of an ultrasonic array for obstacle detection based on Phased Array (PA) techniques, which steers the acoustic beam through the environment by electronics rather than mechanical means. The transmission of every element in the array has been encoded, according to Code Division for Multiple Access (CDMA), which allows multiple beams to be transmitted simultaneously. All these features together enable a parallel scanning system which does not only improve the image rate but also achieves longer inspection distances in comparison with conventional PA techniques.

  19. Simulation of Eddy-Current Corrosion Detection Using a Sensor Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katyal, V.; Bowler, J. R.

    2003-03-01

    A computer simulation has been developed to evaluate eddy-current probes containing magnetic field sensor arrays for the detection and evaluation of hidden corrosion. The simulation is used to assess probes that incorporate magneto-resistive or Hall devices in a closely-spaced, linear array. These probes will allow rapid data acquisition over a track width determined by the length of the array. The benefit of the simulation is that adjustments to the virtual probe parameters are easily made allowing improvements in sensitivity, imaging capability and resolution. A number of probe designs have been studied in this way including the "racetrack" probe.

  20. Enhancement of concentration range of chromatographically detectable components with array detector mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Enke, Christie

    2013-02-19

    Methods and instruments for high dynamic range analysis of sample components are described. A sample is subjected to time-dependent separation, ionized, and the ions dispersed with a constant integration time across an array of detectors according to the ions m/z values. Each of the detectors in the array has a dynamically adjustable gain or a logarithmic response function, producing an instrument capable of detecting a ratio of responses or 4 or more orders of magnitude.

  1. Detection of impulsive sources from an aerostat-based acoustic array data collection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, Wayne E.; Clark, Robert C.; Strickland, Joshua; Frazier, Wm. Garth; Singleton, Jere

    2009-05-01

    An aerostat based acoustic array data collection system was deployed at the NATO TG-53 "Acoustic Detection of Weapon Firing" Joint Field Experiment conducted in Bourges, France during the final two weeks of June 2008. A variety of impulsive sources including mortar, artillery, gunfire, RPG, and explosive devices were fired during the test. Results from the aerostat acoustic array will be presented against the entire range of sources.

  2. Single molecule detection using charge-coupled device array technology

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, M.B.

    1992-07-29

    A technique for the detection of single fluorescent chromophores in a flowing stream is under development. This capability is an integral facet of a rapid DNA sequencing scheme currently being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. In previous investigations, the detection sensitivity was limited by the background Raman emission from the water solvent. A detection scheme based on a novel mode of operating a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) is being developed which should greatly enhance the discrimination between fluorescence from a single molecule and the background Raman scattering from the solvent. Register shifts between rows in the CCD are synchronized with the sample flow velocity so that fluorescence from a single molecule is collected in a single moving charge packet occupying an area approaching that of a single pixel while the background is spread evenly among a large number of pixels. Feasibility calculations indicate that single molecule detection should be achieved with an excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  3. Detection of Multiple Waterborne Pathogens Using Microsequencing Arrays

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: A microarray was developed to simultaneously detect Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium hominis, Enterococcus faecium, Bacillus anthracis and Francisella tularensis in water. Methods and Results: A DNA microarray was designed to contain probes that specifically dete...

  4. Detection of Clinically Relevant Exonic Copy-Number Changes by Array CGH

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Shaw, Chad A.; Eng, Patricia A.; Hixson, Patricia M.; Pursley, Amber N.; Kang, Sung-Hae L.; Yang, Yaping; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Nowakowska, Beata A.; Gaudio, Daniela del; Xia, Zhilian; Simpson-Patel, Gayle; Immken, LaDonna L.; Gibson, James B.; Tsai, Anne C.-H.; Bowers, Jennifer A.; Reimschisel, Tyler E.; Schaaf, Christian P.; Potocki, Lorraine; Scaglia, Fernando; Gambin, Tomasz; Sykulski, Maciej; Bartnik, Magdalena; Derwinska, Katarzyna; Wisniowiecka-Kowalnik, Barbara; Lalani, Seema R.; Probst, Frank J.; Bi, Weimin; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Patel, Ankita; Lupski, James R.; Cheung, Sau Wai; Stankiewicz, Pawel

    2011-01-01

    Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is a powerful tool for the molecular elucidation and diagnosis of disorders resulting from genomic copy-number variation (CNV). However, intragenic deletions or duplications—those including genomic intervals of a size smaller than a gene—have remained beyond the detection limit of most clinical aCGH analyses. Increasing array probe number improves genomic resolution, although higher cost may limit implementation, and enhanced detection of benign CNV can confound clinical interpretation. We designed an array with exonic coverage of selected disease and candidate genes and used it clinically to identify losses or gains throughout the genome involving at least one exon and as small as several hundred base pairs in size. In some patients, the detected copy-number change occurs within a gene known to be causative of the observed clinical phenotype, demonstrating the ability of this array to detect clinically relevant CNVs with subkilobase resolution. In summary, we demonstrate the utility of a custom-designed, exon-targeted oligonucleotide array to detect intragenic copy-number changes in patients with various clinical phenotypes. PMID:20848651

  5. CRSP, numerical results for an electrical resistivity array to detect underground cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Amin; Ramazi, Hamidreza

    2017-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the application of the Combined Resistivity Sounding and Profiling electrode configuration (CRSP) to detect underground cavities. Electrical resistivity surveying is among the most favorite geophysical methods due to its nondestructive and economical properties in a wide range of geosciences. Several types of the electrode arrays are applied to detect different certain objectives. In one hand, the electrode array plays an important role in determination of output resolution and depth of investigations in all resistivity surveys. On the other hand, they have their own merits and demerits in terms of depth of investigations, signal strength, and sensitivity to resistivity variations. In this article several synthetic models, simulating different conditions of cavity occurrence, were used to examine the responses of some conventional electrode arrays and also CRSP array. The results showed that CRSP electrode configuration can detect the desired objectives with a higher resolution rather than some other types of arrays. Also a field case study was discussed in which electrical resistivity approach was conducted in Abshenasan expressway (Tehran, Iran) U-turn bridge site for detecting potential cavities and/or filling loose materials. The results led to detect an aqueduct tunnel passing beneath the study area.

  6. Single mode fiber array for planet detection using a visible nulling interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Duncan; Levine, B. Martin; Shao, Michael; Aguayo, Franciso

    2005-01-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and testing of a coherent large mode field diameter fiber array to be used as a spatial filter in a planet finding visible nulling interferometer. The array is a key component of a space instrument for visible-light detection and spectroscopy of Earth like extrasolar planets. In this concept, a nulling interferometer is synthesized from a pupil image of a single aperture which is then spatially filtered by a coherent array of single mode fibers to suppress the residual scattered star light. The use of the fiber array preserves spatial information between the star and planet. The fiber array uses a custom commercial large mode field or low NA step-index single mode fiber to relax alignment tolerances. A matching custom micro lens array is used to couple light into the fibers, and to recollimate the light out of the fiber array. The use of large mode field diameter fiber makes the fabrication of a large spatial filter array with 300 to 1000 elements feasible.

  7. Highly ordered graphene-isolated silver nanodot arrays as SERS substrate for detection of urinary nucleosides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shicai; Jiang, Shouzhen; Hu, Guodong; Wei, Jie; Wang, Li; Zhang, Junye; Li, Qiuju

    2015-11-01

    An efficient surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate has been developed based on highly ordered arrays of graphene-isolated Ag nanodot (G/AgND) arrays. By combining the plasmonic activity of AgND arrays and unique physical/chemical properties of graphene, the G/AgND arrays show high performance in terms of sensitivity, signal-to-noise ratio and reproducibility. The SERS signals of R6G are clearly detected even at very low concentration of 10-11M. The maximum deviations of SERS intensities from 20 positions of the SERS substrate are less than 5%. The G/AgND arrays were employed for detection of human urinary nucleosides. The diagnostic algorithms based on principal component analysis achieved a diagnostic sensitivity of 91.1% and specificity of 93.3% for separating cancer from normal samples. This work demonstrates that G/AgND arrays used in Raman spectroscopy could be developed as a smart and promising system for detection and screening of cancers.

  8. Development of immune-affinity 96 spots monolith array for multiple mycotoxins detection in food samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Xia, Li-Ru; Zhao, Yong-Fu; Wang, He-Ye

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a novel highly sensitive chemiluminescence immune-affinity 96 spots monolith array was developed to detect deoxynivalenol (DON), zearalenone (ZEN), T-2 toxin (T-2), and fumonisin B1 (FB1) in corn samples. Firstly, the monolith array was prepared through on suit UV-initiated copolymerization using polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) as cross-linker, glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) as functional monomer and polyethylene glycol 200 (PEG 200) as the porogen. Subsequently, the four mycotoxins immune-affinity monolith array was prepared by immobilization of DON, ZEN, T-2, and FB1 antibody. The mole ratio of PEGDA/GMA, UV exposure time, and the volume ratio of PEG 200/PEGDA were optimized to improve the performances of the immune-affinity monolith array. For the mycotoxins immune-affinity monolith array based on chemiluminescence detection, the limit of detection was 0.0036ng/mL (DON), 0.0048ng/mL (ZEN), 0.0039ng/mL (T-2), and 0.0017ng/mL (FB1), respectively. The linear response in the range of 0.01-0.1ng/mL (R(2)=0.98). The results showed that the proposed four mycotoxins immune-affinity monolith array was a stable, accurate, and highly sensitive method to determine levels of DON, ZEN, T-2, and FB1 in real samples.

  9. Application of oligonucleotide array technology for the rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria of foodborne infections.

    PubMed

    Hong, Bang-Xing; Jiang, Li-Fang; Hu, Yu-Shan; Fang, Dan-Yun; Guo, Hui-Yu

    2004-09-01

    A rapid and accurate method for detection for common pathogenic bacteria in foodborne infections was established by using oligonucleotide array technology. Nylon membrane was used as the array support. A mutation region of the 23S rRNA gene was selected as the discrimination target from 14 species (genera) of bacteria causing foodborne infections and two unrelated bacterial species. A pair of universal primers was designed for PCR amplification of the 23S rRNA gene. Twenty-one species (genera)-specific oligonucleotide detection probes were synthesized and spotted onto the nylon membranes. The 23S rRNA gene amplification products of 14 species of pathogenic bacteria were hybridized to the oligonucleotide array. Hybridization results were analyzed with digoxigenin-linked enzyme reaction. Results indicated that nine species of pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli, Campylobacter jejuni, Shigella dysenteriae, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes and Clostridium botulinum) showed high sensitivity and specificity for the oligonucleotide array. Two other species (Salmonella enterica and Yersinia enterocolitica) gave weak cross-reaction with E. coli, but the reaction did not affect their detection. After redesigning the probes, positive hybridization results were obtained with Staphylococcus aureus, but not with Clostridium perfringens and Streptococcus pyogenes. The oligonucleotide array can also be applied to samples collected in clinical settings of foodborne infections. The superiority of oligonucleotide array over other tests lies on its rapidity, accuracy and efficiency in the diagnosis, treatment and control of foodborne infections.

  10. DETECTION, LOCALIZATION, AND CHARACTERIZATION OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVE BURSTS IN A PULSAR TIMING ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, Lee Samuel; Lommen, Andrea N.

    2010-08-01

    Efforts to detect gravitational waves by timing an array of pulsars have traditionally focused on stationary gravitational waves, e.g., stochastic or periodic signals. Gravitational wave bursts-signals whose duration is much shorter than the observation period-will also arise in the pulsar timing array waveband. Sources that give rise to detectable bursts include the formation or coalescence of supermassive black holes (SMBHs), the periapsis passage of compact objects in highly elliptic or unbound orbits about an SMBH, or cusps on cosmic strings. Here, we describe how pulsar timing array data may be analyzed to detect and characterize these bursts. Our analysis addresses, in a mutually consistent manner, a hierarchy of three questions. (1) What are the odds that a data set includes the signal from a gravitational wave burst? (2) Assuming the presence of a burst, what is the direction to its source? (3) Assuming the burst propagation direction, what is the burst waveform's time dependence in each of its polarization states? Applying our analysis to synthetic data sets, we find that we can detect gravitational waves even when the radiation is too weak to either localize the source or infer the waveform, and detect and localize sources even when the radiation amplitude is too weak to permit the waveform to be determined. While the context of our discussion is gravitational wave detection via pulsar timing arrays, the analysis itself is directly applicable to gravitational wave detection using either ground- or space-based detector data.

  11. Standoff photoacoustic detections with high-sensitivity microphones and acoustic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choa, Fow-Sen; Wang, Chen-Chia; Khurgin, Jacob; Samuels, Alan; Trivedi, Sudhir; Gupta, Deepa

    2016-05-01

    Standoff detection of dangerous chemicals like explosives, nerve gases, and harmful aerosols has continuously been an important subject due to the serious concern about terrorist threats to both overseas and homeland lives and facility. Compared with other currently available standoff optical detection techniques, like Raman, photo-thermal, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy,...etc., photoacoustic (PA) sensing has the advantages of background free and very high detection sensitivity, no need of back reflection surfaces, and 1/R instead of 1/R2 signal decay distance dependence. Furthermore, there is still a great room for PA sensitivity improvement by using different PA techniques, including lockin amplifier, employing new microphones, and microphone array techniques. Recently, we have demonstrated standoff PA detection of isopropanol vapor, solid phase TNT and RDX at a standoff distance. To further calibrate the detection sensitivity, we use nerve gas simulants that were generated and calibrated by a commercial vapor generator. For field operations, array of microphones and microphone-reflector pairs can be utilized to achieve noise rejection and signal enhancement. We have experimentally demonstrated signal enhancement and noise reduction using an array of 4 microphone/4 reflector system as well as an array of 16-microphone/1 reflector. In this work we will review and compare different standoff techniques and discuss the advantages of using different photoacoustic techniques. We will also discuss new advancement of using new types of microphone and the performance comparison of using different structure of microphone arrays and combining lock-in amplifier with acoustic arrays. Demonstration of out-door real-time operations with high power mid-IR laser and microphone array will be presented.

  12. Fault detection, isolation, and diagnosis of status self-validating gas sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yin-Sheng; Xu, Yong-Hui; Yang, Jing-Li; Shi, Zhen; Jiang, Shou-da; Wang, Qi

    2016-04-01

    The traditional gas sensor array has been viewed as a simple apparatus for information acquisition in chemosensory systems. Gas sensor arrays frequently undergo impairments in the form of sensor failures that cause significant deterioration of the performance of previously trained pattern recognition models. Reliability monitoring of gas sensor arrays is a challenging and critical issue in the chemosensory system. Because of its importance, we design and implement a status self-validating gas sensor array prototype to enhance the reliability of its measurements. A novel fault detection, isolation, and diagnosis (FDID) strategy is presented in this paper. The principal component analysis-based multivariate statistical process monitoring model can effectively perform fault detection by using the squared prediction error statistic and can locate the faulty sensor in the gas sensor array by using the variables contribution plot. The signal features of gas sensor arrays for different fault modes are extracted by using ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) coupled with sample entropy (SampEn). The EEMD is applied to adaptively decompose the original gas sensor signals into a finite number of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) and a residual. The SampEn values of each IMF and the residual are calculated to reveal the multi-scale intrinsic characteristics of the faulty sensor signals. Sparse representation-based classification is introduced to identify the sensor fault type for the purpose of diagnosing deterioration in the gas sensor array. The performance of the proposed strategy is compared with other different diagnostic approaches, and it is fully evaluated in a real status self-validating gas sensor array experimental system. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed strategy provides an excellent solution to the FDID of status self-validating gas sensor arrays.

  13. Fault detection, isolation, and diagnosis of status self-validating gas sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yin-sheng; Xu, Yong-hui; Yang, Jing-li; Shi, Zhen; Jiang, Shou-da; Wang, Qi

    2016-04-01

    The traditional gas sensor array has been viewed as a simple apparatus for information acquisition in chemosensory systems. Gas sensor arrays frequently undergo impairments in the form of sensor failures that cause significant deterioration of the performance of previously trained pattern recognition models. Reliability monitoring of gas sensor arrays is a challenging and critical issue in the chemosensory system. Because of its importance, we design and implement a status self-validating gas sensor array prototype to enhance the reliability of its measurements. A novel fault detection, isolation, and diagnosis (FDID) strategy is presented in this paper. The principal component analysis-based multivariate statistical process monitoring model can effectively perform fault detection by using the squared prediction error statistic and can locate the faulty sensor in the gas sensor array by using the variables contribution plot. The signal features of gas sensor arrays for different fault modes are extracted by using ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) coupled with sample entropy (SampEn). The EEMD is applied to adaptively decompose the original gas sensor signals into a finite number of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) and a residual. The SampEn values of each IMF and the residual are calculated to reveal the multi-scale intrinsic characteristics of the faulty sensor signals. Sparse representation-based classification is introduced to identify the sensor fault type for the purpose of diagnosing deterioration in the gas sensor array. The performance of the proposed strategy is compared with other different diagnostic approaches, and it is fully evaluated in a real status self-validating gas sensor array experimental system. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed strategy provides an excellent solution to the FDID of status self-validating gas sensor arrays.

  14. Laser tailored nanoparticle arrays to detect molecules at dilute concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchi, Chiara; Lucotti, Andrea; Tommasini, Matteo; Trusso, Sebastiano; de Grazia, Ugo; Ciusani, Emilio; Ossi, Paolo M.

    2017-02-01

    By nanosecond pulsed laser ablation in an ambient gas gold nanoparticles (NPs) were produced that self-assemble on a substrate resulting in increasingly elaborated architectures of growing thickness, from isolated NP arrays up to percolated films. NPs nucleate and grow in the plasma plume propagating through the gas. Process parameters including laser wavelength, laser energy density, target to substrate distance, nature and pressure of the gas affect plasma expansion, thus asymptotic NP size and kinetic energy. NP size, energy and mobility at landing determine film growth and morphology that affect the physico-chemical properties of the film. Keeping fixed the other process parameters, we discuss the sensitive dependence of film surface nanostructure on Ar pressure and on laser pulse number. The initial plume velocity and average ablated mass per pulse allow predicting the asymptotic NP size. The control of growth parameters favors fine-tuning of NP aggregation, relevant to plasmonics to get optimized substrates for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Their behavior is discussed for testing conditions of interest for clinical application. Both in aqueous and in biological solutions we obtained good sensitivity and reproducibility of the SERS signals for the anti-Parkinson drug apomorphine, and for the anti-epilepsy drug carbamazepine.

  15. High-sensitivity high-throughput chip based biosensor array for multiplexed detection of heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Hai; Tang, Naimei; Jairo, Grace A.; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Blake, Diane A.; Chen, Ray T.

    2016-03-01

    Heavy metal ions released into the environment from industrial processes lead to various health hazards. We propose an on-chip label-free detection approach that allows high-sensitivity and high-throughput detection of heavy metals. The sensing device consists of 2-dimensional photonic crystal microcavities that are combined by multimode interferometer to form a sensor array. We experimentally demonstrate the detection of cadmium-chelate conjugate with concentration as low as 5 parts-per-billion (ppb).

  16. Graphene quantum dots modified silicon nanowire array for ultrasensitive detection in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T. Y.; Duan, C. Y.; Zhu, Y. X.; Chen, Y. F.; Wang, Y.

    2017-03-01

    Si nanostructure-based gas detectors have attracted much attention due to their huge surface areas, relatively high carrier mobility, maneuverability for surface functionalization and compatibility to modern electronic industry. However, the unstable surface of Si, especially for the nanostructures in a corrosive atmosphere, hinders their sensitivity and reproducibility when used for detection in the gas phase. In this study, we proposed a novel strategy to fabricate a Si-based gas detector by using the vertically aligned Si nanowire (SiNW) array as a skeleton and platform, and decorated chemically inert graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to protect the SiNWs from oxidation and promote the carriers’ interaction with the analytes. The radial core–shell structures of the GQDs/SiNW array were then assembled into a resistor-based gas detection system and evaluated by using nitrogen dioxide (NO2) as the model analyte. Compared to the bare SiNW array, our novel sensor exhibited ultrahigh sensitivity for detecting trace amounts of NO2 with the concentration as low as 10 ppm in room temperature and an immensely reduced recovery time, which is of significant importance for their practical application. Meanwhile, strikingly, reproducibility and stability could also be achieved by showing no sensitivity decline after storing the GQDs/SiNW array in air for two weeks. Our results demonstrate that protecting the surface of the SiNW array with chemically inert GQDs is a feasible strategy to realize ultrasensitive detection in the gas phase.

  17. Detection of Crosstalk Faults in Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, N.; Roy, P.; Rahaman, H.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, a Built-in-Self-Test (BIST) technique has been proposed to detect crosstalk faults in FPGA and run time congestion and to provide the crosstalk aware router for FPGA. The proposed BIST circuits require less overhead as compared to earlier techniques. The proposed detector can detect any logic hazard or delay due to crosstalk. A technique has also been proposed to avoid the crosstalk by routing the path in such a way that no interference occurs between the interconnects. The proposed router has achieved better utilization of routing resource to determine the net as compared to the earlier works. The proposed scheme is simulated in MATLAB and verified using Xilinx ISE tools and Modelsim 6.0. The router is implemented by using class provided by JBits for Xilinx, Vertex-II FPGA. It has been found that the results are quite encouraging.

  18. Biomimetic Nanosensor Arrays for Selective Small Molecule Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-21

    bacteria is genetically engineered to display a peptide sequence on the coat protein or flagella of the cell membrane protein, respectively. A large... bacteria (E. coli). Finally, individual clones are sequenced to extract the amino acid sequence of the polypeptides binding to the target substrate...Tao, J. D. Clayton, A. Sengupta, D. L. Kaplan, R. R. Naik, N. Verma, F. G. Omenetto, M. C. McAlpine. “Graphene-Based Wireless Bacteria Detection on

  19. Biological Agent Detection in Food With an Array Biosensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    Salmonella 8 CAMPYLOBACTER DETECTION ASSAY Due to concerns about the stability of Campylobacter jejuni solutions prepared and stored prior to se...Time studies were carried out. Fresh Campylobacter jejuni solutions were prepared, at each oncentration, on day 1 of the study in PBSTB or PBSTB + 10...a positive control at 60 µg/mL Campylobacter jejuni , repared on the day of the assay, was also run in one of the channels. Campylobacter jejuni oncentrations

  20. Development of Highly Sensitive Bulk Acoustic Wave Device Biosensor Arrays for Screening and Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic Wave Device Biosensor Arrays for Screening and Early Detection of Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Anthony J. Dickherber, Ph.D...Arrays for Screening and Early Detection of Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-07-1-0099 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...of developing a cost-effective, highly sensitive and highly selective sensor array for the detection of early cancer proliferation. First I report

  1. Referencing cross-reactivity of detection antibodies for protein array experiments

    PubMed Central

    Lemass, Darragh; O'Kennedy, Richard; Kijanka, Gregor S.

    2016-01-01

    Protein arrays are frequently used to profile antibody repertoires in humans and animals. High-throughput protein array characterisation of complex antibody repertoires requires a platform-dependent, lot-to-lot validation of secondary detection antibodies. This article details the validation of an affinity-isolated anti-chicken IgY antibody produced in rabbit and a goat anti-rabbit IgG antibody conjugated with alkaline phosphatase using protein arrays consisting of 7,390 distinct human proteins. Probing protein arrays with secondary antibodies in absence of chicken serum revealed non-specific binding to 61 distinct human proteins. The cross-reactivity of the tested secondary detection antibodies points towards the necessity of platform-specific antibody characterisation studies for all secondary immunoreagents. Secondary antibody characterisation using protein arrays enables generation of reference lists of cross-reactive proteins, which can be then excluded from analysis in follow-up experiments. Furthermore, making such cross-reactivity lists accessible to the wider research community may help to interpret data generated by the same antibodies in applications not related to protein arrays such as immunoprecipitation, Western blots or other immunoassays. PMID:27335636

  2. Applications of Flexible Ultrasonic Transducer Array for Defect Detection at 150 °C

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Jeanne-Louise; Wu, Kuo-Ting; Jen, Cheng-Kuei; Chiu, Chun-Hsiung; Tzeng, Jing-Chi; Liaw, Jiunn-Woei

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the feasibility of using a one dimensional 16-element flexible ultrasonic transducer (FUT) array for nondestructive testing at 150 °C is demonstrated. The FUT arrays were made by a sol-gel sprayed piezoelectric film technology; a PZT composite film was sprayed on a titanium foil of 75 μm thickness. Since the FUT array is flexible, it was attached to a steel pipe with an outer diameter of 89 mm and a wall thickness of 6.5 mm at 150 °C. Using the ultrasonic pulse-echo mode, pipe thickness measurements could be performed. Moreover, using the ultrasonic pulse-echo and pitch-catch modes of each element of FUT array, the defect detection was performed on an Al alloy block of 30 mm thickness with a side-drilled hole (SDH) of ϕ3 mm at 150 °C. In addition, a post-processing algorithm based on the total focusing method was used to process the full matrix of these A-scan signals of each single transmitter and multi-receivers, and then the phase-array image was obtained to indicate this defect- SDH. Both results show the capability of FUT array being operated at 150 °C for the corrosion and defect detections. PMID:23322101

  3. Optical antenna arrays on a fiber facet for in situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Smythe, Elizabeth J; Dickey, Michael D; Bao, Jiming; Whitesides, George M; Capasso, Federico

    2009-03-01

    This paper reports a bidirectional fiber optic probe for the detection of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). One facet of the probe features an array of gold optical antennas designed to enhance Raman signals, while the other facet of the fiber is used for the input and collection of light. Simultaneous detection of benzenethiol and 2-[(E)-2-pyridin-4-ylethenyl]pyridine is demonstrated through a 35 cm long fiber. The array of nanoscale optical antennas was first defined by electron-beam lithography on a silicon wafer. The array was subsequently stripped from the wafer and then transferred to the facet of a fiber. Lithographic definition of the antennas provides a method for producing two-dimensional arrays with well-defined geometry, which allows (i) the optical response of the probe to be tuned and (ii) the density of "hot spots" generating the enhanced Raman signal to be controlled. It is difficult to determine the Raman signal enhancement factor (EF) of most fiber optic Raman sensors featuring hot spots because the geometry of the Raman enhancing nanostructures is poorly defined. The ability to control the size and spacing of the antennas enables the EF of the transferred array to be estimated. EF values estimated after focusing a laser directly onto the transferred array ranged from 2.6 x 10(5) to 5.1 x 10(5).

  4. Quantitative, multiplexed detection of Salmonella and other pathogens by Luminex xMAP suspension array.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Sherry A; Jacobson, James W

    2007-01-01

    We describe a suspension array hybridization assay for rapid detection and identification of Salmonella and other bacterial pathogens using Luminex xMAP technology. The Luminex xMAP system allows simultaneous detection of up to 100 different targets in a single multiplexed reaction. Included in the method are the procedures for (1) design of species-specific oligonucleotide capture probes and PCR amplification primers, (2) coupling oligonucleotide capture probes to carboxylated microspheres, (3) hybridization of coupled microspheres to oligonucleotide targets, (4) production of targets from DNA samples by PCR amplification, and (5) detection of PCR-amplified targets by direct hybridization to probe-coupled microspheres. The Luminex xMAP suspension array hybridization assay is rapid, requires few sample manipulations, and provides adequate sensitivity and specificity to detect and differentiate Salmonella and nine other test organisms through direct detection of species-specific DNA sequences.

  5. Spatiotemporal and geometric optimization of sensor arrays for detecting analytes in fluids

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Nathan S.; Freund, Michael S.; Briglin, Shawn S.; Tokumaru, Phillip; Martin, Charles R.; Mitchell, David

    2009-09-29

    Sensor arrays and sensor array systems for detecting analytes in fluids. Sensors configured to generate a response upon introduction of a fluid containing one or more analytes can be located on one or more surfaces relative to one or more fluid channels in an array. Fluid channels can take the form of pores or holes in a substrate material. Fluid channels can be formed between one or more substrate plates. Sensor can be fabricated with substantially optimized sensor volumes to generate a response having a substantially maximized signal to noise ratio upon introduction of a fluid containing one or more target analytes. Methods of fabricating and using such sensor arrays and systems are also disclosed.

  6. Spatiotemporal and geometric optimization of sensor arrays for detecting analytes fluids

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Nathan S.; Freund, Michael S.; Briglin, Shawn M.; Tokumaru, Phil; Martin, Charles R.; Mitchell, David T.

    2006-10-17

    Sensor arrays and sensor array systems for detecting analytes in fluids. Sensors configured to generate a response upon introduction of a fluid containing one or more analytes can be located on one or more surfaces relative to one or more fluid channels in an array. Fluid channels can take the form of pores or holes in a substrate material. Fluid channels can be formed between one or more substrate plates. Sensor can be fabricated with substantially optimized sensor volumes to generate a response having a substantially maximized signal to noise ratio upon introduction of a fluid containing one or more target analytes. Methods of fabricating and using such sensor arrays and systems are also disclosed.

  7. Radio detection of high-energy cosmic rays with the Auger Engineering Radio Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Frank G.

    2016-07-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) is an enhancement of the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina. Covering about 17km2, AERA is the world-largest antenna array for cosmic-ray observation. It consists of more than 150 antenna stations detecting the radio signal emitted by air showers, i.e., cascades of secondary particles caused by primary cosmic rays hitting the atmosphere. At the beginning, technical goals had been in focus: first of all, the successful demonstration that a large-scale antenna array consisting of autonomous stations is feasible. Moreover, techniques for calibration of the antennas and time calibration of the array have been developed, as well as special software for the data analysis. Meanwhile physics goals come into focus. At the Pierre Auger Observatory air showers are simultaneously detected by several detector systems, in particular water-Cherenkov detectors at the surface, underground muon detectors, and fluorescence telescopes, which enables cross-calibration of different detection techniques. For the direction and energy of air showers, the precision achieved by AERA is already competitive; for the type of primary particle, several methods are tested and optimized. By combining AERA with the particle detectors we aim for a better understanding of cosmic rays in the energy range from approximately 0.3 to 10 EeV, i.e., significantly higher energies than preceding radio arrays.

  8. Patterned Array of Poly(ethylene glycol) Silane Monolayer for Label-Free Detection of Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Rosly, Nor Zida; Ahmad, Shahrul Ainliah Alang; Abdullah, Jaafar; Yusof, Nor Azah

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the construction of arrays on silicon for naked-eye detection of DNA dengue was demonstrated. The array was created by exposing a polyethylene glycol (PEG) silane monolayer to 254 nm ultraviolet (UV) light through a photomask. Formation of the PEG silane monolayer and photomodifed surface properties was thoroughly characterized by using atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and contact angle measurements. The results of XPS confirmed that irradiation of ultraviolet (UV) light generates an aldehyde functional group that offers conjugation sites of amino DNA probe for detection of a specific dengue virus target DNA. Employing a gold enhancement process after inducing the electrostatic interaction between positively charged gold nanoparticles and the negatively charged target DNA hybridized to the DNA capture probe allowed to visualize the array with naked eye. The developed arrays demonstrated excellent performance in diagnosis of dengue with a detection limit as low as 10 pM. The selectivity of DNA arrays was also examined using a single base mismatch and noncomplementary target DNA. PMID:27571080

  9. Detection/classification/quantification of chemical agents using an array of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, G. Martin

    2005-05-01

    ChemSentry is a portable system used to detect, identify, and quantify chemical warfare (CW) agents. Electro chemical (EC) cell sensor technology is used for blood agents and an array of surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors is used for nerve and blister agents. The combination of the EC cell and the SAW array provides sufficient sensor information to detect, classify and quantify all CW agents of concern using smaller, lighter, lower cost units. Initial development of the SAW array and processing was a key challenge for ChemSentry requiring several years of fundamental testing of polymers and coating methods to finalize the sensor array design in 2001. Following the finalization of the SAW array, nearly three (3) years of intensive testing in both laboratory and field environments were required in order to gather sufficient data to fully understand the response characteristics. Virtually unbounded permutations of agent characteristics and environmental characteristics must be considered in order to operate against all agents and all environments of interest to the U.S. military and other potential users of ChemSentry. The resulting signal processing design matched to this extensive body of measured data (over 8,000 agent challenges and 10,000 hours of ambient data) is considered to be a significant advance in state-of-the-art for CW agent detection.

  10. Using Seismic Arrays to Detect Triggered and Ambient Tremor in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W.; Peng, Z.; Lin, C.; Chao, K.

    2013-12-01

    Deep tectonic tremor triggered by teleseismic surface waves have been recently observed in the southern Central Range in Taiwan, an arc-continental type collision environment. Aiming to capture more tremor events, we installed two dense 36-element, small-aperture seismic arrays in 2011 around the Liouguei and Lidao areas, which are located about 20 km in southwest and northeast to the tremor sources. In each array, short-period, vertical-channel GS-11D sensors with 4.5Hz natural frequency seismometers were laid out on the relatively flat parts of the mountain areas with a spacing of approximately 100 by 80 meters. We had successfully recorded continuously for a total of 4,034 hours in 2011. As expected, the two arrays recorded tremor bursts triggered by the great Tohoku earthquake (Mw=9.0) on March 11, 2011. We apply the broadband frequency wavenumber (BBFK) beamforming method to measure the back-azimuth and incident angles for each tremor burst and through the whole data set. Our initial results show that obtained array parameters closely match those predicted from locations using tremor envelope cross-correlations (WECC) and we detect more tremor duration by BBFK than WECC. We further use a moving-window grid-search (MWGS) method to detect regular earthquakes. Our result indicates the southwestern array provides more stable results than the northeastern array. Our next step is to apply the same MWGS procedure to detect ambient tremor recorded by the southwestern array. Our systematic analysis of deep tremor in Taiwan could help to better understand critical conditions related to tremor occurrence and fault mechanics at the bottom of the seismogenic layer.

  11. TiO2 nanotube array sensor for detecting the SF6 decomposition product SO2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Jinbin; Jia, Yichao; Xiao, Peng; Tang, Ju

    2012-01-01

    The detection of partial discharge through analysis of SF(6) gas components in gas-insulated switchgear, is significant for the diagnosis and assessment of the operating state of power equipment. The present study proposes the use of a TiO(2) nanotube array sensor for detecting the SF(6) decomposition product SO(2), and the application of the anodic oxidation method for the directional growth of highly ordered TiO(2) nanotube arrays. The sensor response of 10-50 ppm SO(2) gas is tested, and the sensitive response mechanism is discussed. The test results show that the TiO(2) nanotube sensor array has good response to SO(2) gas, and by ultraviolet radiation, the sensor can remove attached components very efficiently, shorten recovery time, reduce chemical poisoning, and prolong the life of the components.

  12. Capillary array electrophoresis using laser-excited confocal fluorescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X.C.; Quesada, M.A.; Mathies, R.A.

    1992-04-15

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has found widespread application in analytical and biomedical research, and the scope and sophistication of CE is still rapidly advancing. Gel-filled capillaries have been employed for the rapid separation and analysis of synthetic polynucleotides, DNA sequencing fragments, and DNA restriction fragments. Open-tube capillary electrophoresis has attained subattomole detection levels in amino acid separations 14 and proven its utility for the separation of proteins, viruses, and bacteria. Separation of the optical isomers of dansyl amino acids has also been successfully demonstrated. Micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography, isoelectric focusing, and on-column derivatization can all be performed on CE columns, demonstrating the utility of capillary electrophoresis as an analytical and micropreparative tool. 29 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Tropical cyclone waves detected with infrasound sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-02-01

    The strong winds of a tropical cyclone whip up the sea surface, driving ocean waves a dozen meters high. When one such ocean wave runs into another wave that has an equal period but is traveling in the opposite direction, the interaction produces low-frequency sound waves that can be detected thousands of kilometers away. The infrasound signals produced by interacting ocean surface waves—known as microbarom—have typical frequencies around 0.2 hertz. Researchers previously determined that as a hurricane travels along its track, early waves generated by the storm will interact with those generated later on, producing a strong microbarom signal in the storm's wake. Researchers also found, however, that microbarom signals are produced by regular surface ocean behavior, including swell, surface waves, and nontropical cyclone storms.

  14. Periodically porous top electrodes on vertical nanowire arrays for highly sensitive gas detection.

    PubMed

    In, Hyun Jin; Field, Christopher R; Pehrsson, Pehr E

    2011-09-02

    Nanowires of various materials and configurations have been shown to be highly effective in the detection of chemical and biological species. In this paper, we report a novel, nanosphere-enabled approach to fabricating highly sensitive gas sensors based on ordered arrays of vertically aligned silicon nanowires topped with a periodically porous top electrode. The vertical array configuration helps to greatly increase the sensitivity of the sensor while the pores in the top electrode layer significantly improve sensing response times by allowing analyte gases to pass through freely. Herein, we show highly sensitive detection to both nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) and ammonia (NH(3)) in humidified air. NO(2) detection down to 10 parts per billion (ppb) is demonstrated and an order-of-magnitude improvement in sensor response time is shown in the detection of NH(3).

  15. Multi-focus parallel detection of fluorescent molecules at picomolar concentration with photonic nanojets arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghenuche, Petru; de Torres, Juan; Ferrand, Patrick; Wenger, Jérôme

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence sensing and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) are powerful methods to detect and characterize single molecules; yet, their use has been restricted by expensive and complex optical apparatus. Here, we present a simple integrated design using a self-assembled bi-dimensional array of microspheres to realize multi-focus parallel detection scheme for FCS. We simultaneously illuminate and collect the fluorescence from several tens of microspheres, which all generate their own photonic nanojet to efficiently excite the molecules and collect the fluorescence emission. Each photonic nanojet contributes to the global detection volume, reaching FCS detection volumes of several tens of femtoliters while preserving the fluorescence excitation and collection efficiencies. The microspheres photonic nanojets array enables FCS experiments at low picomolar concentrations with a drastic reduction in apparatus cost and alignment constraints, ideal for microfluidic chip integration.

  16. Multi-focus parallel detection of fluorescent molecules at picomolar concentration with photonic nanojets arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Ghenuche, Petru; Torres, Juan de; Ferrand, Patrick; Wenger, Jérôme

    2014-09-29

    Fluorescence sensing and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) are powerful methods to detect and characterize single molecules; yet, their use has been restricted by expensive and complex optical apparatus. Here, we present a simple integrated design using a self-assembled bi-dimensional array of microspheres to realize multi-focus parallel detection scheme for FCS. We simultaneously illuminate and collect the fluorescence from several tens of microspheres, which all generate their own photonic nanojet to efficiently excite the molecules and collect the fluorescence emission. Each photonic nanojet contributes to the global detection volume, reaching FCS detection volumes of several tens of femtoliters while preserving the fluorescence excitation and collection efficiencies. The microspheres photonic nanojets array enables FCS experiments at low picomolar concentrations with a drastic reduction in apparatus cost and alignment constraints, ideal for microfluidic chip integration.

  17. Systems and methods for detecting a failure event in a field programmable gate array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Tak-Kwong (Inventor); Herath, Jeffrey A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An embodiment generally relates to a method of self-detecting an error in a field programmable gate array (FPGA). The method includes writing a signature value into a signature memory in the FPGA and determining a conclusion of a configuration refresh operation in the FPGA. The method also includes reading an outcome value from the signature memory.

  18. Carbon Nanotube Nanoelectrode Array as an Electronic Chip for Ultrasensitive Label-free DNA Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun; Koehne, Jessica; Chen, Hua; Cassell, Alan; Ng, Hou Tee; Fan, Wendy; Ye, Qi; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.

    2003-01-01

    A reliable nanoelectrode array based on vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) embedded in SiO2 is used for ultrasensitive DNA detection. Characteristic nanoelectrode behavior is observed using low-density MWNT arrays for measuring both bulk and surface immobilized redox species such as K4Fe(CN)6 and ferrocene derivatives. The open-end of MWNTs are found to present similar properties as graphite edge-plane electrodes with wide potential window, flexible chemical functionalities, and good biocompatibility. BRCA1 related oligonucleotide probes with 18 bp are selectively functionalized at the open ends of the nanotube array and specifically hybridized with oligonucleotide targets incorporated with a polyG tag. The guanine groups are employed as the signal moieties in the electrochemical measurements. R(bpy)(sup 2+, sub 3) mediator is used to further amplify the guanine oxidation signal. The hybridization of sub-attomoles of DNA targets is detected electrochemically by combining the MWNT nanoelectrode array with the R(bpy)(sup 2+, sub 3) amplification mechanism. This technique was employed for direct electrochemical detection of label-free PCR amplicon from a healthy donor through specific hybridization with the BRCA1 probe. The detection limit is estimated to be less than 1000 DNA molecules since abundant guanine bases in the PCR amplicon provides a large signal. This system provides a general platform for rapid molecular diagnostics in applications requiring ultrahigh sensitivity, high-degree of miniaturization, and simple sample preparation, and low-cost operation.

  19. Detection of Regional Infrasound Signals Using Array Data - Testing, Tuning, and Physical Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Stump, B. W.; Hayward, C.; Arrowsmith, S.; Che, I. Y.; Drob, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    In order to understand the impact environmental conditions have on infrasound detection, an automated detector that accounts for both correlated and uncorrelated noise is run on data from a number of infrasonic arrays, all in a regional context. Data from six seismo-acoustic arrays in South Korea (BRDAR, CHNAR, KMPAR, KSGAR, TJIAR, and YPDAR), which are cooperatively operated by Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) and Southern Methodist University (SMU), were used. An adaptive F-detector (AFD) (Arrowsmith et al., 2009) is applied that utilizes the F-statistic (Blandford, 1974) with an adaptive procedure that assesses variations in coherent noise in order to reduce false alarms. The adaptive procedure is characterized by the time dependent C-value that is found to depend on the weather conditions and local site effects. Arrays located on islands or near the coast produce noise power densities that are higher, consistent with both higher wind speeds as well as ocean wave contributions that vary seasonally. These results suggest that optimal detection processing requires careful characterization of background noise level and its relationship to enviornmental measures at individual arrays. This study also documents significant seasonal variations in infrasound detections including daily time of occurrence, total number of detections, and phase velocity/azimuth estimates. These time-dependent effects in most part explained by atmospheric models across the Korean peninsula as described by Drob et al. (2003).

  20. Patterned arrays for the efficient detection of whole cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Troy A.

    2006-10-01

    Surface-Enhanced-Raman-Spectroscopy (SERS) is potentially a very sensitive technique for the detection of biological agents (i.e., proteins, viruses or whole cell bacteria). However, since initial reports, its utility has not been realized. Its limited acceptance as a routine analysis technique for both chemical and biological agents is largely due to the lack of reproducible SERS-active substrates. Most established SERS substrate fabrication schemes are based on selfassembly of the metallic (typically, Au, Ag, Pt, Pd or Cu) surfaces responsible for enhancement. Further, these protocols do not lend themselves to the stringent control over the enhancing feature shape, size, and placement on a nanometer scale. SERS can be made a more robust and attractive spectroscopic technique for biological agents by developing quantifiable, highly sensitive, and highly selective SERS-active substrates. Recently, novel SERS-active substrates, fabricated from nano-patterned Si and Au have been commercialized and are easily obtained in the marketplace. Commercialized Au SERS-active substrates fabricated using semiconductor manipulation and routine metal vapor deposition techniques used for the spectral analysis of intact bacterial cells. This talk will focus on the substrate characterization (microscopic and spectral) and application towards whole cells.

  1. DNA detection on transistor arrays following mutation-specific enzymatic amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouthas, F.; Gentil, C.; Côte, D.; Bockelmann, U.

    2004-03-01

    An integrated array of silicon field-effect transistor structures is used for electronic detection of label-free DNA. Measurements of the dc current-voltage characteristics of the transistors gives us access to reproducible detection of single- and double-stranded DNA, locally adsorbed on the surface of the device. We combine this approach with allele-specific polymerase chain reaction, to test for the 35delG mutation, a frequent mutation related to prelingual nonsyndromic deafness.

  2. Detection of beta-amyloid (1-42) on protein array based on electrical detection technique using scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Woo; Islam, A T M Kamrul; Lee, Jin-Ho; Song, Joon Myong; Oh, Byung-Keun

    2011-05-01

    In this study an immuno-array for Abeta42 based on scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) was developed using conjugated gold nanoparticle (Au-NP) and antibody (Ab) complex. Fragmented monoclonal Ab against Abeta42 was allowed to immobilize on the Au-dot arrays followed by its target protein Abeta42 and Au NP and Ab complex. The surface structure of Au-NP and Ab complex on Au-dots was investigated with Atomic Force Microscopy and the current profile of fabricated immunosensing element was investigated with STM. The power spectrum derived from the current profile was found to be increasing with higher concentrations of Abeta42 having a detection limit of 100 fg/ml. The proposed technique can be a promising method to construct the highly sensitive and efficient protein chip of immunosensors arrays.

  3. Fault Detection Using the Clustering-kNN Rule for Gas Sensor Arrays.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingli; Sun, Zhen; Chen, Yinsheng

    2016-12-06

    The k-nearest neighbour (kNN) rule, which naturally handles the possible non-linearity of data, is introduced to solve the fault detection problem of gas sensor arrays. In traditional fault detection methods based on the kNN rule, the detection process of each new test sample involves all samples in the entire training sample set. Therefore, these methods can be computation intensive in monitoring processes with a large volume of variables and training samples and may be impossible for real-time monitoring. To address this problem, a novel clustering-kNN rule is presented. The landmark-based spectral clustering (LSC) algorithm, which has low computational complexity, is employed to divide the entire training sample set into several clusters. Further, the kNN rule is only conducted in the cluster that is nearest to the test sample; thus, the efficiency of the fault detection methods can be enhanced by reducing the number of training samples involved in the detection process of each test sample. The performance of the proposed clustering-kNN rule is fully verified in numerical simulations with both linear and non-linear models and a real gas sensor array experimental system with different kinds of faults. The results of simulations and experiments demonstrate that the clustering-kNN rule can greatly enhance both the accuracy and efficiency of fault detection methods and provide an excellent solution to reliable and real-time monitoring of gas sensor arrays.

  4. Fault Detection Using the Clustering-kNN Rule for Gas Sensor Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingli; Sun, Zhen; Chen, Yinsheng

    2016-01-01

    The k-nearest neighbour (kNN) rule, which naturally handles the possible non-linearity of data, is introduced to solve the fault detection problem of gas sensor arrays. In traditional fault detection methods based on the kNN rule, the detection process of each new test sample involves all samples in the entire training sample set. Therefore, these methods can be computation intensive in monitoring processes with a large volume of variables and training samples and may be impossible for real-time monitoring. To address this problem, a novel clustering-kNN rule is presented. The landmark-based spectral clustering (LSC) algorithm, which has low computational complexity, is employed to divide the entire training sample set into several clusters. Further, the kNN rule is only conducted in the cluster that is nearest to the test sample; thus, the efficiency of the fault detection methods can be enhanced by reducing the number of training samples involved in the detection process of each test sample. The performance of the proposed clustering-kNN rule is fully verified in numerical simulations with both linear and non-linear models and a real gas sensor array experimental system with different kinds of faults. The results of simulations and experiments demonstrate that the clustering-kNN rule can greatly enhance both the accuracy and efficiency of fault detection methods and provide an excellent solution to reliable and real-time monitoring of gas sensor arrays. PMID:27929412

  5. Imaging, object detection, and change detection with a polarized multistatic GPR array

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, N. Reginald; Paglieroni, David W.

    2015-07-21

    A polarized detection system performs imaging, object detection, and change detection factoring in the orientation of an object relative to the orientation of transceivers. The polarized detection system may operate on one of several modes of operation based on whether the imaging, object detection, or change detection is performed separately for each transceiver orientation. In combined change mode, the polarized detection system performs imaging, object detection, and change detection separately for each transceiver orientation, and then combines changes across polarizations. In combined object mode, the polarized detection system performs imaging and object detection separately for each transceiver orientation, and then combines objects across polarizations and performs change detection on the result. In combined image mode, the polarized detection system performs imaging separately for each transceiver orientation, and then combines images across polarizations and performs object detection followed by change detection on the result.

  6. Label-free capacitive biosensor for sensitive detection of multiple biomarkers using gold interdigitated capacitor arrays.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Anjum; Niazi, Javed H; Kallempudi, Saravan; Gurbuz, Yasar

    2010-06-15

    In this study, a highly sensitive and label-free multianalyte capacitive immunosensor was developed based on gold interdigitated electrodes (GID) capacitor arrays to detect a panel of disease biomarkers. C-reactive protein (CRP), TNFalpha, and IL6 have strong and consistent relationships between markers of inflammation and future cardiovascular risk (CVR) events. Early detection of a panel of biomarkers for a disease could enable accurate prediction of a disease risk. The detection of protein biomarkers was based on relative change in capacitive/dielectric properties. Two different lab-on-a-chip formats were employed for multiple biomarker detection on GID-capacitors. In format I, capacitor arrays were immobilized with pure forms of anti-CRP, -TNFalpha, and -IL6 antibodies in which each capacitor array contained a different immobilized antibody. Here, the CRP and IL6 were detected in the range 25 pg/ml to 25 ng/ml and 25 pg/ml to 1 ng/ml for TNFalpha in format I. Sensitive detection was achieved with chips co-immobilized (diluted) with equimolar mixtures of anti-CRP, -IL6, and -TNFalpha antibodies (format II) in which all capacitors in an array were identical and tested for biomarkers with sequential incubation. The resulting response to CRP, IL6, and TNFalpha in format II for all biomarkers was found to be within 25 pg/ml to 25 ng/ml range. The capacitive biosensor for panels of inflammation and CVR markers show significant clinical value and provide great potential for detection of biomarker panel in suspected subjects for early diagnosis.

  7. Detecting the DPRK nuclear test explosion on 25 May 2009 using array-based waveform correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, Steven J.; Ringdal, Frode

    2010-05-01

    The Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) announced on 25 May 2009 that it had conducted its second nuclear test, the first one having taken place on 9 October 2006. As was the case with the first test, the second test was detected and reported by the IDC. We have carried out an experiment taking the 9 October 2006 test as a starting point and running a continuous waveform correlation scheme in order to a) assess the potential for automatically detecting the second nuclear test and b) monitoring the false alarm rate associated with such a detection scheme. Using only data from the Matsushiro array (MJAR), and applying the array-based procedure developed by Gibbons and Ringdal (2006) with a waveform template from the first nuclear test, we found that the second test was readily detected without a single false alarm during the entire three year period. Moreover, by a scaling procedure, we argue that an explosion many times smaller than the second test would have been detected automatically, with no false alarms, had it taken place at the same site as the second test. We note that this remarkable performance is achieved even though the MJAR array is known to be difficult to process using conventional methods, because of signal incoherency. An important element of the detection procedure for the automatic elimination of false alarms is a post-processing system which performs slowness analysis on the single-channel cross-correlation traces. It is well known that successful correlation detection requires the two sources to be closely spaced (i.e. the detector has a narrow "footprint"), but there is evidence that array-based correlation covers a larger footprint than the 1/4 wavelength estimated by Geller and Mueller (1980) for single-station correlation. This could be important for a more general application of the method described here, and needs further study.

  8. Detection and localization of particle-emitting sources with compound-eye inspired detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi

    2007-08-01

    We develop methods to detect and localize particle-emitting sources using detector arrays that are inspired by biological compound eyes. The sources of interest may be optical, nuclear, or cosmic; they emit particles such as visible photons, neutrons, protons, or charged particles. Our results may have wide applications to artificial vision, which can be important in robotics (robot vision) or medicine (e.g., artificial eyes for the blind); security, where the detection of nuclear materials is needed; or astronomy. This dissertation consists of three parts. First, we detect a far-field particle source using two directional detector arrays: cubic and spherical. We propose a mean-difference test (MDT) detector, analyze its statistical performance, and show that the MDT has a number of advantages over the generalized likelihood- ratio test (GLRT). Second, we localize the source by proposing a novel biologically inspired detector array, whose configuration generalizes the compound eye of insects. This array combines the advantages of compound eyes (e.g., large field-of-view) and human eyes (e.g., high angular resolution). Based on a statistical model of the array measurements, we analyze the array performance by computing the Cramérao bound (CRB) on the error in estimating the source direction. We also derive lower bounds on the mean-square angular error (MSAE) of the source localization and investigate the MSAE of two source- direction estimators. Numerical examples, including the optimal array design, are presented to further illustrate the array performance. Third, we derive a statistical angular resolution limit (ARL) on resolving two closely spaced point sources in a three-dimensional frame, which is applicable to various measurement models (e.g., radar, sonar, or astronomy). Using the asymptotic analysis of the GLRT, we derive the ARL with constraints on the probabilities of false alarm and detection. Our results give explicit analytical expression for the ARL

  9. Real-time system for imaging and object detection with a multistatic GPR array

    DOEpatents

    Paglieroni, David W; Beer, N Reginald; Bond, Steven W; Top, Philip L; Chambers, David H; Mast, Jeffrey E; Donetti, John G; Mason, Blake C; Jones, Steven M

    2014-10-07

    A method and system for detecting the presence of subsurface objects within a medium is provided. In some embodiments, the imaging and detection system operates in a multistatic mode to collect radar return signals generated by an array of transceiver antenna pairs that is positioned across the surface and that travels down the surface. The imaging and detection system pre-processes the return signal to suppress certain undesirable effects. The imaging and detection system then generates synthetic aperture radar images from real aperture radar images generated from the pre-processed return signal. The imaging and detection system then post-processes the synthetic aperture radar images to improve detection of subsurface objects. The imaging and detection system identifies peaks in the energy levels of the post-processed image frame, which indicates the presence of a subsurface object.

  10. Acoustic detection and tracking of abyssopelagic animals: description of an autonomous split-beam acoustic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. L.; Alexandrou, D.; Edelman, J. L.

    1989-09-01

    Importance of pelagic animals in transport of organic matter at abyssal depths has been suggested based on vertical distribution and gut content analysis. We developed an autonomous acoustic instrument to detect individual pelagic animals, measure their target strength, and track their movements across specific depth boundaries in the deep sea. This instrument consists of a split-beam line array with a beam pattern narrow in the vertical and omnidirectional in the horizontal. Animals (acoustic targets) ⩾2 cm in length can be detected in an insonified radius of 100 m around the array with a position resolution of ca 42 cm. The velocity of a target animal can be resolved using a closely spaced ping sequence. The line array is deployed as a bottom-moored free vehicle with controller electronics, preamplifier, and a battery source for deployments up to several weeks at depths to 6 km. A deployment in the central North Pacific at 100 m altitude above the bottom (5762 m total depth) for 25 h recorded four targets moving through the acoustic field. Estimated size of the targets, based on initial target strength analyses, suggests that two are crustaceans and one is a grenadier fish. The fourth target is indicative of an animal larger than any we have observed in video camera deployments or caugh with baited traps and hooks at this station. Our initial measurements show that abyssopelagic fauna can be detected and their target strengths and movements measured with the acoustic array.

  11. Novel Wearable Device for Blood Leakage Detection during Hemodialysis Using an Array Sensing Patch.

    PubMed

    Du, Yi-Chun; Lim, Bee-Yen; Ciou, Wei-Siang; Wu, Ming-Jui

    2016-06-09

    Hemodialysis (HD) is a clinical treatment that requires the puncturing of the body surface. However, needle dislodgement can cause a high risk of blood leakage and can be fatal to patients. Previous studies proposed several devices for blood leakage detection using optical or electrical techniques. Nonetheless, these methods used single-point detection and the design was not suitable for multi-bed monitoring. This study proposed a novel wearable device for blood leakage monitoring during HD using an array sensing patch. The array sensing patch combined with a mapping circuit and a wireless module could measure and transmit risk levels. The different risk levels could improve the working process of healthcare workers, and enhance their work efficiency and reduce inconvenience due to false alarms. Experimental results showed that each point of the sensing array could detect up to 0.1 mL of blood leakage and the array sensing patch supports a risk level monitoring system up to 8 h to alert healthcare personnel of pertinent danger to the patients.

  12. Comparison of two suspension arrays for simultaneous detection of five biothreat bacterial in powder samples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Wang, Jing; Wen, Haiyan; Liu, Hengchuan

    2012-01-01

    We have developed novel Bio-Plex assays for simultaneous detection of Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Brucella spp., Francisella tularensis, and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Universal primers were used to amplify highly conserved region located within the 16S rRNA amplicon, followed by hybridized to pathogen-specific probes for identification of these five organisms. The other assay is based on multiplex PCR to simultaneously amplify five species-specific pathogen identification-targeted regions unique to individual pathogen. Both of the two arrays are validated to be flexible and sensitive for simultaneous detection of bioterrorism bacteria. However, universal primer PCR-based array could not identify Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Brucella spp. at the species level because of the high conservation of 16S rDNA of the same genus. The two suspension arrays can be utilized to detect Bacillus anthracis sterne spore and Yersinia pestis EV76 from mimic "write powder" samples, they also proved that the suspension array system will be valuable tools for diagnosis of bacterial biothreat agents in environmental samples.

  13. Comparison of Two Suspension Arrays for Simultaneous Detection of Five Biothreat Bacterial in Powder Samples

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu; Wang, Jing; Wen, Haiyan; Liu, Hengchuan

    2012-01-01

    We have developed novel Bio-Plex assays for simultaneous detection of Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Brucella spp., Francisella tularensis, and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Universal primers were used to amplify highly conserved region located within the 16S rRNA amplicon, followed by hybridized to pathogen-specific probes for identification of these five organisms. The other assay is based on multiplex PCR to simultaneously amplify five species-specific pathogen identification-targeted regions unique to individual pathogen. Both of the two arrays are validated to be flexible and sensitive for simultaneous detection of bioterrorism bacteria. However, universal primer PCR-based array could not identify Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Brucella spp. at the species level because of the high conservation of 16S rDNA of the same genus. The two suspension arrays can be utilized to detect Bacillus anthracis sterne spore and Yersinia pestis EV76 from mimic “write powder” samples, they also proved that the suspension array system will be valuable tools for diagnosis of bacterial biothreat agents in environmental samples. PMID:22690123

  14. Array of Love-wave sensors based on quartz/Novolac to detect CWA simulants.

    PubMed

    Matatagui, D; Fontecha, J; Fernández, M J; Aleixandre, M; Gràcia, I; Cané, C; Horrillo, M C

    2011-09-15

    An array of Love-wave sensors based on quartz and Novolac has been developed to detect chemical warfare agents (CWAs). These weapons are a risk for human health due to their efficiency and high lethality; therefore an early and clear detection is of enormous importance for the people safety. Love-wave devices realized on quartz as piezoelectric substrate and Novolac as guiding layer have been used to make up an array of six sensors, which have been coated with specific polymers by spin coating. The CWAs are very dangerous and for safety reasons their well known simulants have been used: dimethylmethyl phosphonate (DMMP), dipropyleneglycol methyl ether (DPGME), dimethylmethyl acetamide (DMA), dichloroethane (DCE), dichloromethane (DCM) and dichloropentane (DCP). The array has been exposed to these CWA simulants detecting very low concentrations, such as 25 ppb of DMMP, a simulant of nerve agent sarin. Finally, principal component analysis (PCA) as data pre-processing and discrimination technique, and probabilistic neural networks (PNN) as patterns classification technique have been applied. The performance of the sensor array has shown stability, accuracy, high sensitivity and good selectivity to these simulants.

  15. Multiplexed protein detection using antibody-conjugated microbead arrays in a microfabricated electrophoretic device

    PubMed Central

    Barbee, Kristopher D.; Hsiao, Alexander P.; Roller, Eric E.; Huang, Xiaohua

    2011-01-01

    We report the development of a microfabricated electrophoretic device for assembling high-density arrays of antibody-conjugated microbeads for chip-based protein detection. The device consists of a flow cell formed between a gold-coated silicon chip with an array of microwells etched in a silicon dioxide film and a glass coverslip with a series of thin gold counter electrode lines. We have demonstrated that 0.4 and 1 μm beads conjugated with antibodies can be rapidly assembled into the microwells by applying a pulsed electric field across the chamber. By assembling step-wise a mixture of fluorescently labeled antibody-conjugated microbeads, we incorporated both spatial and fluorescence encoding strategies to demonstrate significant multiplexing capabilities. We have shown that these antibody-conjugated microbead arrays can be used to perform on-chip sandwich immunoassays to detect test antigens at concentrations as low as 40 pM (6 ng/mL). A finite element model was also developed to examine the electric field distribution within the device for different counter electrode configurations over a range of line pitches and chamber heights. This device will be useful for assembling high-density, encoded antibody arrays for multiplexed detection of proteins and other types of protein-conjugated microbeads for applications such as the analysis of protein-protein interactions. PMID:20820631

  16. Novel Wearable Device for Blood Leakage Detection during Hemodialysis Using an Array Sensing Patch

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yi-Chun; Lim, Bee-Yen; Ciou, Wei-Siang; Wu, Ming-Jui

    2016-01-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) is a clinical treatment that requires the puncturing of the body surface. However, needle dislodgement can cause a high risk of blood leakage and can be fatal to patients. Previous studies proposed several devices for blood leakage detection using optical or electrical techniques. Nonetheless, these methods used single-point detection and the design was not suitable for multi-bed monitoring. This study proposed a novel wearable device for blood leakage monitoring during HD using an array sensing patch. The array sensing patch combined with a mapping circuit and a wireless module could measure and transmit risk levels. The different risk levels could improve the working process of healthcare workers, and enhance their work efficiency and reduce inconvenience due to false alarms. Experimental results showed that each point of the sensing array could detect up to 0.1 mL of blood leakage and the array sensing patch supports a risk level monitoring system up to 8 h to alert healthcare personnel of pertinent danger to the patients. PMID:27294927

  17. Detection of multiple cytokines by protein arrays from cell lysate and tissue lysate.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying; Huang, Ruochun; Cao, Xuan; Wang, Shen-Ming; Shi, Qing; Huang, Ruo-Pan

    2003-02-01

    Previously we demonstrated that multiple cytokines could be simultaneously detected using an antibody-based protein array system with high sensitivity and specificity from conditioned medium and serum. Here, we created a higher density array system to simultaneously detect 35 cytokines from cell lysates and tissue lysates. This assay combines the advantages of the specificity of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), sensitivity of enhanced chemiluminescence (ECL), and high-throughput of microspot. In this system, capture antibodies dissolved in methanol were spotted onto polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membranes. The membranes were then incubated with tissue lysates or cell lysates. After removing unbound proteins by extensive washing, the membranes were exposed to horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated antibody(ies). The signals were visualized with an ECL system. High specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy of this approach were demonstrated. This approach can be used in any general laboratory setting without any sophisticated equipment. It should be feasible to extend this concept to develop a high-throughput protein array system. Combining nitrocellulose membrane-based and PVDF membrane-based approaches, the human cytokine array system can be applied to detect multiple cytokine expression from cell lysate, tissue lysate, serum, plasma, and conditioned medium. Future applications of this new approach include direct protein expression profiling, immunological disease diagnostics, and discovery of new biomarkers.

  18. A 16 × 16 CMOS Capacitive Biosensor Array Towards Detection of Single Bacterial Cell.

    PubMed

    Couniot, Numa; Francis, Laurent A; Flandre, Denis

    2016-04-01

    We present a 16 × 16 CMOS biosensor array aiming at impedance detection of whole-cell bacteria. Each 14 μm × 16 μm pixel comprises high-sensitive passivated microelectrodes connected to an innovative readout interface based on charge sharing principle for capacitance-to-voltage conversion and subthreshold gain stage to boost the sensitivity. Fabricated in a 0.25 μm CMOS process, the capacitive array was experimentally shown to perform accurate dielectric measurements of the electrolyte up to electrical conductivities of 0.05 S/m, with maximal sensitivity of 55 mV/fF and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 37 dB. As biosensing proof of concept, real-time detection of Staphylococcus epidermidis binding events was experimentally demonstrated and provides detection limit of ca. 7 bacteria per pixel and sensitivity of 2.18 mV per bacterial cell. Models and simulations show good matching with experimental results and provide a comprehensive analysis of the sensor and circuit system. Advantages, challenges and limits of the proposed capacitive biosensor array are finally described with regards to literature. With its small area and low power consumption, the present capacitive array is particularly suitable for portable point-of-care (PoC) diagnosis tools and lab-on-chip (LoC) systems.

  19. Rapid and specific detection of Lassa virus by reverse transcription-PCR coupled with oligonucleotide array hybridization.

    PubMed

    Olschläger, Stephan; Günther, Stephan

    2012-07-01

    To facilitate sequence-specific detection of DNA amplified in a diagnostic reverse transcription (RT)-PCR for Lassa virus, we developed an array featuring 47 oligonucleotide probes for post-PCR hybridization of the amplicons. The array procedure may be performed with low-tech equipment and does not take longer than agarose gel detection.

  20. Periodic Application of Concurrent Error Detection in Processor Array Architectures. PhD. Thesis -

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Paul Peichuan

    1993-01-01

    Processor arrays can provide an attractive architecture for some applications. Featuring modularity, regular interconnection and high parallelism, such arrays are well-suited for VLSI/WSI implementations, and applications with high computational requirements, such as real-time signal processing. Preserving the integrity of results can be of paramount importance for certain applications. In these cases, fault tolerance should be used to ensure reliable delivery of a system's service. One aspect of fault tolerance is the detection of errors caused by faults. Concurrent error detection (CED) techniques offer the advantage that transient and intermittent faults may be detected with greater probability than with off-line diagnostic tests. Applying time-redundant CED techniques can reduce hardware redundancy costs. However, most time-redundant CED techniques degrade a system's performance.

  1. Patterned polymer nanowire arrays as an effective protein immobilizer for biosensing and HIV detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yue; Liu, Yingyi; Zhu, Guang; Fang, Hao; Huang, Yunhui; Jiang, Xingyu; Wang, Zhong L.

    2012-12-01

    We report an array of polymeric nanowires for effectively immobilizing biomolecules on biochips owing to the large surface area. The nanowires were fabricated in predesigned patterns using an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching process. Microfluidic biochips integrated using the substrates with arrays of nanowires and polydimethylsiloxane channels have been demonstrated to be effective for detecting antigens, and a detection limit of antigens at 0.2 μg mL-1 has been achieved, which is improved by a factor of 50 compared to that based on flat substrates without the nanowires. In addition, the high sensitivity for clinical detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody has also been demonstrated, showing a 20 times enhancement in fluorescent signal intensity between the samples with positive and negative HIV.

  2. Status of AlGaN based focal plane arrays for UV solar blind detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reverchon, Jean-Luc; Mazzeo, Giovanni; Dussaigne, Amélie; Duboz, Jean-Yves

    2005-10-01

    The fast development of nitrides has given the opportunity to investigate AlGaN as a material for ultraviolet solar blind detection in competition with technologies based on photocathodes, MCP intensifiers, back thinned CCD or hybrid CMOS focal plane arrays. All of the them must be associated to UV blocking filters. These new detectors present both an intrinsic spectral selectivity and an extremely low dark current at room temperature. First we will present the ultimate properties of the AlGaN based devices. These spectral properties are analysed in regards to the sharp cut off required for solar blind detection around 280nm, and we will quantify how the stringent difficulties to achieve solar blind filters can be reduced. We also investigated the electrical capabilities of Schottky diodes or Metal-Semiconductor-Metal (MSM) technologies to detect extremely low UV signal. We will especially present results from a linear array based on a CCD readout multiplexor.

  3. Indirect voltammetric detection of fluoride ions in toothpaste on a comb-shaped interdigitated microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Cernanská, Monika; Tomcík, Peter; Jánosíková, Zuzana; Rievaj, Miroslav; Bustin, Dusan

    2011-02-15

    A novel technique based on dynamic electrochemistry for the detection of fluoride ions was developed. It is based on its strong complexation with ferric ion. Formed fluoroferric complex is cathodically inactive at the potential of the reduction of free ferric aquo ion. The voltammetric and amperometric response of platinum comb-shaped interdigitated microelectrode array is decreased after fluoride addition. This decrease serves for the quantification of fluoride ions added to the solution. The detection limit of 4.5×10(-5) mol dm(-3) was achieved when one of the segments of interdigitated microelectrode array (IDA) was used as an indicating electrode. The detection limit is about one order of magnitude lower than in the case of conventional platinum macroelectrode. In comparison with ISE electrodes this method is faster and also avoiding large error resulting from the antilogarithmization of ISE Nerstian response. The method was applied to the analysis of toothpaste.

  4. An armored-cable-based fiber Bragg grating sensor array for perimeter fence intrusion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jianzhong; Dong, Bo; Varghese, Paulose; Phua, Jiliang; Foo, Siang Fook

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, an armored-cable-based optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor array, for perimeter fence intrusion detection, is demonstrated and some of the field trial results are reported. The field trial was conducted at a critical local installation in Singapore in December 2010. The sensor array was put through a series of both simulated and live intrusion scenarios to test the stability and suitability of operation in the local environmental conditions and to determine its capabilities in detecting and reporting these intrusions accurately to the control station. Such a sensor array can provide perimeter intrusion detection with fine granularity and preset pin-pointing accuracy. The various types of intrusions included aided or unaided climbs, tampering and cutting of the fence, etc. The unique sensor packaging structure provides high sensitivity, crush resistance and protection against rodents. It is also capable of resolving nuisance events such as rain, birds sitting on the fence or seismic vibrations. These sensors are extremely sensitive with a response time of a few seconds. They can be customized for a desired spatial resolution and pre-determined sensitivity. Furthermore, it is easy to cascade a series of such sensors to monitor and detect intrusion events over a long stretch of fence line. Such sensors can be applied to real-time intrusion detection for perimeter security, pipeline security and communications link security.

  5. An armored-cable-based fiber Bragg grating sensor array for perimeter fence intrusion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jianzhong; Dong, Bo; Varghese, Paulose; Phua, Jiliang; Foo, Siang Fook

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an armored-cable-based optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor array, for perimeter fence intrusion detection, is demonstrated and some of the field trial results are reported. The field trial was conducted at a critical local installation in Singapore in December 2010. The sensor array was put through a series of both simulated and live intrusion scenarios to test the stability and suitability of operation in the local environmental conditions and to determine its capabilities in detecting and reporting these intrusions accurately to the control station. Such a sensor array can provide perimeter intrusion detection with fine granularity and preset pin-pointing accuracy. The various types of intrusions included aided or unaided climbs, tampering and cutting of the fence, etc. The unique sensor packaging structure provides high sensitivity, crush resistance and protection against rodents. It is also capable of resolving nuisance events such as rain, birds sitting on the fence or seismic vibrations. These sensors are extremely sensitive with a response time of a few seconds. They can be customized for a desired spatial resolution and pre-determined sensitivity. Furthermore, it is easy to cascade a series of such sensors to monitor and detect intrusion events over a long stretch of fence line. Such sensors can be applied to real-time intrusion detection for perimeter security, pipeline security and communications link security.

  6. Motorcycle detection and counting using stereo camera, IR camera, and microphone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Bo; Gibson, David R. P.; Middleton, Dan

    2013-03-01

    Detection, classification, and characterization are the key to enhancing motorcycle safety, motorcycle operations and motorcycle travel estimation. Average motorcycle fatalities per Vehicle Mile Traveled (VMT) are currently estimated at 30 times those of auto fatalities. Although it has been an active research area for many years, motorcycle detection still remains a challenging task. Working with FHWA, we have developed a hybrid motorcycle detection and counting system using a suite of sensors including stereo camera, thermal IR camera and unidirectional microphone array. The IR thermal camera can capture the unique thermal signatures associated with the motorcycle's exhaust pipes that often show bright elongated blobs in IR images. The stereo camera in the system is used to detect the motorcyclist who can be easily windowed out in the stereo disparity map. If the motorcyclist is detected through his or her 3D body recognition, motorcycle is detected. Microphones are used to detect motorcycles that often produce low frequency acoustic signals. All three microphones in the microphone array are placed in strategic locations on the sensor platform to minimize the interferences of background noises from sources such as rain and wind. Field test results show that this hybrid motorcycle detection and counting system has an excellent performance.

  7. Microfluidic linear hydrogel array for multiplexed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yun Kyung; Kim, Jungkyu; Mathies, Richard A

    2015-03-17

    A PDMS-based microfluidic linear hydrogel array is developed for multiplexed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection. A sequence of three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel plugs containing the desired DNA probes is prepared by UV polymerization within a PDMS microchannel system. The fluorescently labeled target DNA is then electrophoresed through the sequence of hydrogel plugs for hybridization. Continued electrophoresis provides an electrophoretic wash that removes nonspecific binders. The capture gel array is imaged after washing at various temperatures (temperature gradient electrophoresis) to further distinguish perfect matches from mismatches. The ability of this microdevice to perform multiplex SNP genotyping is demonstrated by analyzing a mixture of model E. coli bacterial targets. This microfluidic hydrogel array is ∼1000 times more sensitive than planar microarrays due to the 3D gel capture, the hybridization time is much shorter due to electrophoretic control of the transport properties, and the stringent wash with temperature gradient electrophoresis enables analysis of single nucleotide mismatches with high specificity.

  8. Seismic detections of the 15 February 2013 Chelyabinsk meteor from the dense ChinArray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lu; Wang, Baoshan; Peng, Zhigang; Wang, Weitao

    2016-08-01

    ChinArray is a dense portable broadband seismic network to cover the entire continental China, and the Phase I is deployed along the north-south seismic belt in southwest China. In this study, we analyze seismic data recorded on the ChinArray following the February 15, 2013 Chelyabinsk (Russia) meteor. This was the largest known object entering the Earth's atmosphere since the 1908 Tunguska meteor. The seismic energy radiated from this event was recorded by seismic stations worldwide including the dense ChinArray that are more than 4000 km away. The weak signal from the meteor event was contaminated by a magnitude 5.8 Tonga earthquake occurred ~20 min earlier. To test the feasibility of detecting the weak seismic signals from the meteor event, we compute vespagram and perform F-K analysis to the surface-wave data. We identify a seismic phase with back azimuth (BAZ) of 329.7° and slowness of 34.73 s/deg, corresponding to the surface wave from the Russian meteor event (BAZ ~325.97°). The surface magnitude ( M S) of the meteor event is 3.94 ± 0.18. We also perform similar analysis on the data from the broadband array F-net in Japan, and find the BAZ of the surface waves to be 316.61°. With the different BAZs of ChinArray and F-net, we locate the Russian meteor event at 58.80°N, 58.72°E. The relatively large mislocation (~438 km as compared with 55.15°N, 61.41°E by others) may be a result of the bending propagation path of surface waves, which deviates from the great circle path. Our results suggest that the dense ChinArray and its subarrays could be used to detect weak signals at teleseismic distances.

  9. Development of bacteria identification array to detect lactobacilli in Thai fermented sausage.

    PubMed

    Rungrassamee, Wanilada; Tosukhowong, Amonlaya; Klanchui, Amornpan; Maibunkaew, Sawarot; Plengvidhya, Vethachai; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara

    2012-12-01

    To improve the quality and safety of food products, there is a need in the food industry for a reliable method for simultaneously monitoring multiple bacterial strains. Microarray technology is a high-throughput screening approach that can provide an alternative for bacteria detection. A total of 164 bacteria-specific probes were designed from 16S rRNA gene sequences to target 12 bacteria species, including lactic acid bacteria and selected food pathogens. After fabrication onto aminosilane-coated slides, hybridization conditions of the array were optimized for high specificity and signal intensities. The array was applied to detect 12 bacteria individually and was specific to all (Lactobacillus plantarum group, L. fermentum, L. brevis, L. delbrueckii, L. casei, L. sakei, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus luteus and Listeria monocytogenes) except L. animalis. Multiplex detection using mixed bacteria populations was evaluated and accurate detection was obtained. The feasibility of using the array to detect the target bacteria in food was evaluated with Thai fermented sausages (Nham). Meat samples were collected on days 2, 3 and 7 after natural fermentation, L. plantarum-inoculated fermentation and L. brevis-inoculated fermentation before applying to the array. The naturally-fermented Nham contained L. sakei, L. delbrueckii, L. plantarum and L. fermentum. The L. plantarum-inoculated Nham showed a similar lactic acid bacteria population but the positive signal level for L. plantarum was higher than with natural fermentation. The L. brevis-inoculated Nham contained L. brevis, L. plantarum, L. delbrueckii and L. fermentum. The array was used to monitor bacteria population dynamics during the fermentation process. The naturally-fermented and L. brevis-inoculated samples showed lower positive signal levels of L. plantarum on day 2, but signals gradually increased on days 3 and 7 of the fermentation. In contrast, the L. plantarum-started fermentation

  10. Design of a detection system of highlight LED arrays' effect on the human organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuwang; Shi, Guiju; Xue, Tongze; Liu, Yanming

    2009-05-01

    LED (Light Emitting Diode) has many advantages in the intensity, wavelength, practicality and price, so it is feasible to apply in biomedicine engineering. A system for the research on the effect of highlight LED arrays to human organization is designed. The temperature of skin surface can rise if skin and organization are in irradiation by highlight LED arrays. The metabolism and blood circulation of corresponding position will be quicker than those not in the shine, so the surface temperature will vary in different position of skin. The structure of LED source arrays system is presented and a measure system for studying LED's influence on human organization is designed. The temperature values of shining point are detected by infrared temperature detector. Temperature change is different according to LED parameters, such as the number, irradiation time and luminous intensity of LED. Experimental device is designed as an LED arrays pen. The LED arrays device is used to shine the points of human body, then it may effect on personal organization as well as the acupuncture. The system is applied in curing a certain skin disease, such as age pigment, skin cancer and fleck.

  11. Simulations of lesion detection using a combined phased array LHMI-technique.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Janne; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2008-11-01

    Ultrasound based elasticity imaging techniques have been developed during the past decades. Some of these techniques are based on an internal radiation force stimulation in which a transient or dynamic radiation force is produced by using a single or dual-frequency sonication. In addition, sonication and data acquisition can be implemented using combined or separate transducers. In this simulation study of lesion detection using localized harmonic motion imaging (LHMI), we used a combined phased array designed for simultaneous thermal ablation and lesion detection. In the sonication mode, a focused single-frequency amplitude-modulated sonication is used to induce harmonic motion and in the tracking mode, some of the array elements are used for pulse-echo tracking of the induced displacements. The results showed that the size of the lesion affected the induced displacement around the sonication point. The displacement tracking simulations demonstrated that these changes in the displacement distributions can be detected using only a few of the array elements in the tracking mode but the exact size of the lesion can not be detected accurately. The simulations also showed that two lesions having the radius of 2.5mm can be distinguished if distance between these lesions is at least 2.5mm.

  12. Detecting super-Nyquist-frequency gravitational waves using a pulsar timing array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Shu-Xu; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2016-08-01

    The maximum frequency of gravitational waves (GWs) detectable with traditional pulsar timing methods is set by the Nyquist frequency ( f Ny) of the observation. Beyond this frequency, GWs leave no temporal-correlated signals; instead, they appear as white noise in the timing residuals. The variance of the GW-induced white noise is a function of the position of the pulsars relative to the GW source. By observing this unique functional form in the timing data, we propose that we can detect GWs of frequency > f Ny (super-Nyquist frequency GWs; SNFGWs). We demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method with simulated timing data. Using a selected dataset from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array data release 1 and the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves publicly available datasets, we try to detect the signals from single SNFGW sources. The result is consistent with no GW detection with 65.5% probability. An all-sky map of the sensitivity of the selected pulsar timing array to single SNFGW sources is generated, and the position of the GW source where the selected pulsar timing array is most sensitive to is λs = -0.82, βs = -1.03 (rad); the corresponding minimum GW strain is h = 6.31 × 10-11 at f = 1 × 10-5 Hz.

  13. ZnO nano-array-based EGFET biosensor for glucose detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Junjie; Zhang, Huihui; Ji, Zhaoxia; Xu, Minxuan; Zhang, Yue

    2015-06-01

    Electrochemical biosensors are normally based on enzymatic catalysis of a reaction that produces or consumes electrons and the sensing membranes dominate the performance. In this work, ZnO nano-array-based EGFETs were fabricated for pH and glucose detection. The ZnO nano-arrays prepared via low-temperature hydrothermal method were well-aligned, with an average length of 2 μm and diameter of 100-150 nm, and have a typical hexagonal wurtzite structure. The sensor performed with a sensitivity of 45 mV/pH and response time of about 6-7 s from pH = 4-12. UV irradiation can improve the Vref response as a result of the formation of a depletion region at the surface of ZnO nanomaterials. Due to its high specific surface area, the ZnO nano-array EGFET sensor showed a sensitivity of -0.395 mV/μM to the glucose detection in a concentration range between 20 and 100 μM. These EGFET glucose biosensors demonstrate a low detectable concentration (20 μM) with good linearity, therefore may be used to detect glucose in saliva and tears at much lower concentrations than that in blood.

  14. Trapping and Detection of Nanoparticles and Cells Using a Parallel Photonic Nanojet Array.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuchao; Xin, Hongbao; Liu, Xiaoshuai; Zhang, Yao; Lei, Hongxiang; Li, Baojun

    2016-06-28

    In advanced nanoscience, there is a strong desire to trap and detect nanoscale objects with high-throughput, single-nanoparticle resolution and high selectivity. Although emerging optical methods have enabled the selective trapping and detection of multiple micrometer-sized objects, it remains a great challenge to extend this functionality to the nanoscale. Here, we report an approach to trap and detect nanoparticles and subwavelength cells at low optical power using a parallel photonic nanojet array produced by assembling microlenses on an optical fiber probe. Benefiting from the subwavelength confinement of the photonic nanojets, tens to hundreds of nanotraps were formed in three dimensions. Backscattering signals were detected in real time with single-nanoparticle resolution and enhancement factors of 10(3)-10(4). Selective trapping of nanoparticles and cells from a particle mixture or human blood solution was demonstrated using the nanojet array. The developed nanojet array is potentially a powerful tool for nanoparticle assembly, biosensing, single-cell analysis, and optical sorting.

  15. Charged-particle detection efficiencies of close-packed CsI arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfouace, P.; Lynch, W. G.; Tsang, M. B.

    2017-03-01

    Detector efficiency determination is essential to correct the measured yields and extract reliable cross sections of particles emitted in nuclear reactions. We investigate the efficiencies for measuring the full energies of light charged particle in arrays of CsI crystals employed in particle detection arrays such as HiRA, LASSA and MUST2. We perform these simulations with a GEANT4 Monte Carlo transport code implemented in the NPTool framework. Both Coulomb multiple scattering and nuclear reactions within the crystal can significantly reduce the efficiency of detecting the full energy of high energy particles. The calculated efficiencies decrease exponentially as a function of the range of the particle and are quite similar for both the hydrogen (p , d , t) and helium (3He, α) isotopes. The use of a close-packed array introduces significant position dependent efficiency losses at the interior boundaries between crystals that need to be considered in the design of an array and in the efficiency corrections of measured energy spectra.

  16. New background correction method for liquid chromatography with diode array detection, infrared spectroscopic detection and Raman spectroscopic detection.

    PubMed

    Boelens, Hans F M; Dijkstra, Reyer J; Eilers, Paul H C; Fitzpatrick, Fiona; Westerhuis, Johan A

    2004-11-19

    A new method to eliminate the background spectrum (EBS) during analyte elution in column liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to spectroscopic techniques is proposed. This method takes into account the shape and also intensity differences of the background eluent spectrum. This allows the EBS method to make a better estimation of the background eluent spectrum during analyte elution. This is an advantage for quantification as well as for identification of analytes. The EBS method uses a two-step procedure. First, the baseline spectra are modeled using a limited number of principal components (PCs). Subsequently, an asymmetric least squares (asLS) regression method is applied using these principal components to correct the measured spectra during elution for the background contribution. The asymmetric least squares regression needs one parameter, the asymmetry factor p. This asymmetry factor determines relative weight of positive and negative residuals. Simulations are performed to test the EBS method in well-defined situations. The effect of spectral noise on the performance and the sensitivity of the EBS method for the value of the asymmetry factorp is tested. Two applications of the EBS method are discussed. In the first application, the goal is to extract the analyte spectrum from an LC-Raman analysis. In this case, the EBS method facilitates easy identification of unknown analytes using spectral libraries. In a second application, the EBS method is used for baseline correction in LC-diode array detection (DAD) analysis of polymeric standards during a gradient elution separation. It is shown that the EBS method yields a good baseline correction, without the need to perform a blank chromatographic run.

  17. Application of Ultrasonic Phased Array Technology to the Detection of Defect in Composite Stiffened-structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuan-Qi; Zhan, Li-Hua

    2016-05-01

    Composite stiffened-structure consists of the skin and stringer has been widely used in aircraft fuselage and wings. The main purpose of the article is to detect the composite material reinforced structure accurately and explore the relationship between defect formation and structural elements or curing process. Based on ultrasonic phased array inspection technology, the regularity of defects in the manufacture of composite materials are obtained, the correlation model between actual defects and nondestructive testing are established. The article find that the forming quality of deltoid area in T-stiffened structure is obviously improved by pre-curing, the defects of hat-stiffened structure are affected by the mandrel. The results show that the ultrasonic phased array inspection technology can be an effectively way for the detection of composite stiffened-structures, which become an important means to control the defects of composite and improve the quality of the product.

  18. Operation and performance of the EEE network array for the detection of cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbrescia, M.; Avanzini, C.; Baldini, L.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Batignani, G.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossini, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cicalò, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Coccia, E.; Corvaglia, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Pasquale, S.; Di Giovanni, A.; D'Incecco, M.; Dreucci, M.; Fabbri, F. L.; Fattibene, E.; Ferraro, A.; Frolov, V.; Galeotti, P.; Garbini, M.; Gemme, G.; Gnesi, I.; Grazzi, S.; Gustavino, C.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; La Rocca, P.; Licciulli, F.; Maggiora, A.; Maragoto Rodriguez, O.; Maron, G.; Martelli, B.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Miozzi, S.; Nania, R.; Noferini, F.; Nozzoli, F.; Panareo, M.; Panetta, M. P.; Paoletti, R.; Park, W.; Perasso, L.; Pilo, F.; Piragino, G.; Riggi, F.; Righini, G. C.; Sartorelli, G.; Scapparone, E.; Schioppa, M.; Scribano, A.; Selvi, M.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Squarcia, S.; Stori, L.; Taiuti, M.; Terreni, G.; Visnyei, O. B.; Vistoli, M. C.; Votano, L.; Williams, M. C. S.; Zani, S.; Zichichi, A.; Zuyeuski, R.

    2017-02-01

    The EEE (Extreme Energy Events) Project is an experiment for the detection of cosmic ray muons by means of a sparse array of telescopes, each made of three Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPC), distributed over all the Italian territory and at CERN. The main scientific goals of the Project are the investigation of the properties of the local muon flux, the detection of Extensive Air Showers (EAS) and the search for long-distance correlations between far telescopes. The Project is also characterized by a strong educational and outreach aspect since the telescopes are managed by teams of students and teachers who had previously constructed them at CERN. In this paper an overall description of the experiment is given, including the design, construction and performance of the telescopes. The operation of the whole array, which currently consists of more than 50 telescopes, is also presented by showing the most recent physics results.

  19. Prospects for Gamma-Ray Burst detection by the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bissaldi, E.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Pierro, F.; Gasparetto, T.; Longo, F.; Vallania, P.; Vigorito, C.

    2017-03-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite is expected to publish a catalogue with more than 100 Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) detected above 100 MeV thanks to a new detection algorithm and a new event reconstruction. This work aims at revising the prospects for GRB alerts with the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) based on the new LAT results. We start considering the simulation of the observations with the full CTA of two extremely bright events, the long GRB 130427A and the short GRB 090510, then we investigate how these GRBs would be observed by a particular configuration of the array with the telescopes pointing to different directions in what is called the "coupled divergent mode".

  20. Report on demonstration project: imaging detection of unexploded ordinance using giant magnetoresistive sensor arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Chaiken, A., LLNL

    1996-09-01

    The goal of the project was to demonstrate the feasibility of the detection of buried unexploded ordnance (UXO) using giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor arrays. 3x3 and 5x5 arrays of off-the-shelf GMR sensors were purchased from Nonvolatile Electronics (NVE) and were interfaced with a data acquisition card and a personal computer. Magnetic images were obtained from a number of ferrous objects, such as threadstock, bolts, and rebar. These images can be interpreted in terms of the remanent magnetic state of the objects. The ability of the GMR sensor approach to discriminate among magnetic objects is assessed and the design of a more realistic UXO detection system is discussed.

  1. Atomic Magnetometer Multisensor Array for rf Interference Mitigation and Unshielded Detection of Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Robert J.; Prescott, David W.; Matz, Peter; Sauer, Karen L.; Dural, Nezih; Romalis, Michael V.; Foley, Elizabeth L.; Kornack, Thomas W.; Monti, Mark; Okamitsu, Jeffrey

    2016-12-01

    An array of four 87Rb vector magnetometers is used to detect nuclear quadrupole resonance signals in an unshielded environment at 1 MHz. With a baseline of 25 cm, the length of the array, radio-frequency interference mitigation is also demonstrated; a radio-station signal is suppressed by a factor of 20 without degradation to the signal of interest. With these compact sensors, in which the probe beam passes through twice, the fundamental limit to detection sensitivity is found to be photon-shot noise. More passes of the probe beam overcome this limitation. With a sensor of similar effective volume, 0.25 cm3 , but 25 × more passes, the sensitivity is improved by an order of magnitude to 1.7 ±0.2 fT /√{Hz } .

  2. DETECTION OF MULTIPLE BIPOLAR FLOWS IN NGC 7027 WITH SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Zhenyuan; Hasegawa, Tatsuhiko I.; Dinh-V-Trung; Kwok, Sun; Muller, Sebastien; Hirano, Naomi; Lim, Jeremy; Muthu Mariappan, C.; Lyo, Aran E-mail: hirano@asiaa.sinica.edu.t E-mail: trung@asiaa.sinica.edu.t E-mail: jlim@asiaa.sinica.edu.t E-mail: muthu@aries.ernet.i

    2010-10-10

    Highly collimated multiple bipolar flows are detected with a 3'' resolution in the HCO{sup +} (J = 3-2) and HCN (J = 3-2) lines in the young planetary nebula NGC 7027 with the Submillimeter Array. The HCO{sup +} and HCN flows coincide in location and velocity with compact and fast CO flows detected with {approx}6'' resolutions with other millimeter arrays. The equatorial molecular torus of NGC 7027 is captured in HCO{sup +} emission in the present observations. The HCO{sup +} emission also closely follows the H{sub 2} emission, indicating that the present observations probe the photon-dominated region of the molecular envelope of NGC 7027.

  3. Accuracy requirements of optical linear algebra processors in adaptive optics imaging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.; Goodman, Joseph W.

    1989-01-01

    The accuracy requirements of optical processors in adaptive optics systems are determined by estimating the required accuracy in a general optical linear algebra processor (OLAP) that results in a smaller average residual aberration than that achieved with a conventional electronic digital processor with some specific computation speed. Special attention is given to an error analysis of a general OLAP with regard to the residual aberration that is created in an adaptive mirror system by the inaccuracies of the processor, and to the effect of computational speed of an electronic processor on the correction. Results are presented on the ability of an OLAP to compete with a digital processor in various situations.

  4. Highly Sensitive Multi-Channel IDC Sensor Array for Low Concentration Taste Detection

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Md. Rajibur Rahaman; Kang, Shin-Won

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we designed and developed an interdigitated capacitor (IDC)-based taste sensor array to detect different taste substances. The designed taste sensing array has four IDC sensing elements. The four IDC taste sensing elements of the array are fabricated by incorporating four different types of lipids into the polymer, dioctyl phenylphosphonate (DOPP) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) to make the respective dielectric materials that are individually placed onto an interdigitated electrode (IDE) via spin coating. When the dielectric material of an IDC sensing element comes into contact with a taste substance, its dielectric properties change with the capacitance of the IDC sensing element; this, in turn, changes the voltage across the IDC, as well as the output voltage of each channel of the system. In order to assess the effectiveness of the sensing system, four taste substances, namely sourness (HCl), saltiness (NaCl), sweetness (glucose) and bitterness (quinine-HCl), were tested. The IDC taste sensor array had rapid response and recovery times of about 12.9 s and 13.39 s, respectively, with highly stable response properties. The response property of the proposed IDC taste sensor array was linear, and its correlation coefficient R2 was about 0.9958 over the dynamic range of the taste sensor array as the taste substance concentration was varied from 1 μM to 1 M. The proposed IDC taste sensor array has several other advantages, such as real-time monitoring capabilities, high sensitivity 45.78 mV/decade, good reproducibility with a standard deviation of about 0.029 and compactness, and the circuitry is based on readily available and inexpensive electronic components. The proposed IDC taste sensor array was compared with the potentiometric taste sensor with respect to sensitivity, dynamic range width, linearity and response time. We found that the proposed IDC sensor array has better performance. Finally, principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to

  5. A novel device based on a fluorescent cross-responsive sensor array for detecting pesticide residue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jing; Hou, Changjun; Lei, Jincan; Huo, Danqun; Luo, Xiaogang; Dong, Liang

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a novel, simple, rapid, and low-cost detection device for pesticide residue was constructed. A sensor array based on a cross-responsive mechanism was designed. The data collection and processing system was used to detect fluorescent signal of the sensor arrays, and to extract unique patterns of the tested pesticide residue. Four selected pesticides, carbendazim, diazine, fenvalerate, and pentachloronitrobenzene, were detected by the proposed device. Unsupervised pattern recognition methods, hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis, were used to analyze the data. The results showed that the methods could 100% discriminate the four pesticide residues. According to the standard regression linear curve of the fluorescence intensity and the concentration of pesticide, the quantitative value of the pesticide was detected, and the device obtained responses at concentrations below 8 ppb, and it has a good linear relationship in the range of 0.01-1 ppm. According to the results, the proposed detection device showed excellent selectivity and discrimination ability for the pesticide residues. However, our preliminary study demonstrated that the proposed detection device has excellent potential application for the safety inspection of food.

  6. Multiplexed detection of cardiac biomarkers in serum with nanowire arrays using readout ASIC.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Jun; Chai, Kevin Tshun Chuan; Luo, Henry Zhan Hong; Huang, Joon Min; Tay, Ignatius Guang Kai; Lim, Andy Eu-Jin; Je, Minkyu

    2012-05-15

    Early detection of cardiac biomarkers for diagnosis of heart attack is the key to saving lives. Conventional method of detection like the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is time consuming and low in sensitivity. Here, we present a label-free detection system consisting of an array of silicon nanowire sensors and an interface readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). This system provides a rapid solution that is highly sensitive and is able to perform direct simultaneous-multiplexed detection of cardiac biomarkers in serum. Nanowire sensor arrays were demonstrated to have the required selectivity and sensitivity to perform multiplexed detection of 100 fg/ml troponin T, creatine kinase MM, and creatine kinase MB in serum. A good correlation between measurements from a probe station and the readout ASIC was obtained. Our detection system is expected to address the existing limitations in cardiac health management that are currently imposed by the conventional testing platform, and opens up possibilities in the development of a miniaturized device for point-of-care diagnostic applications.

  7. Array microscopy technology and its application to digital detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCall, Brian P.

    Tuberculosis causes more deaths worldwide than any other curable infectious disease. This is the case despite tuberculosis appearing to be on the verge of eradication midway through the last century. Efforts at reversing the spread of tuberculosis have intensified since the early 1990s. Since then, microscopy has been the primary frontline diagnostic. In this dissertation, advances in clinical microscopy towards array microscopy for digital detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are presented. Digital array microscopy separates the tasks of microscope operation and pathogen detection and will reduce the specialization needed in order to operate the microscope. Distributing the work and reducing specialization will allow this technology to be deployed at the point of care, taking the front-line diagnostic for tuberculosis from the microscopy center to the community health center. By improving access to microscopy centers, hundreds of thousands of lives can be saved. For this dissertation, a lens was designed that can be manufactured as 4x6 array of microscopes. This lens design is diffraction limited, having less than 0.071 waves of aberration (root mean square) over the entire field of view. A total area imaged onto a full-frame digital image sensor is expected to be 3.94 mm2, which according to tuberculosis microscopy guidelines is more than sufficient for a sensitive diagnosis. The design is tolerant to single point diamond turning manufacturing errors, as found by tolerance analysis and by fabricating a prototype. Diamond micro-milling, a fabrication technique for lens array molds, was applied to plastic plano-concave and plano-convex lens arrays, and found to produce high quality optical surfaces. The micro-milling technique did not prove robust enough to produce bi-convex and meniscus lens arrays in a variety of lens shapes, however, and it required lengthy fabrication times. In order to rapidly prototype new lenses, a new diamond machining technique was

  8. Improved Detection and Location of Ocean Microseism Signals using Array Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reading, A. M.; Gal, M.; Koper, K. D.; Tkalcic, H.

    2015-12-01

    We present and evaluate a range of approaches that may be used to investigate ocean microseisms using seismic array data. At amplitudes below the dominant incoming signal, the ambient seismic energy (background noise) associated with microseisms arrives from multiple directions at any one time. Thus we address the challenge of detecting weaker signals from unpredictable directions in the presence of other strong signals. Our aim is to extract the most accurate information possible from such weaker signals in order to expand the capability of ocean storm studies, using seismology, including the ability to extract storm patterns from archive seismic array records. Detection of weaker microseism signals may be improved using algorithms widely used in astronomy. One example is the CLEAN algorithm which has wide usage in radio astronomy. This algorithm operates by finding the position and strength of point sources and iteratively deconvolving their contribution to the image. It may be combined to optimum effect with the previously published (Incoherently Averaged Signal) IAS Capon implementation for an accurate detection of weaker sources. Having detected weaker sources, they may be backprojected using a suitable Earth model, taking into account a correction for the mislocation due to slowness-azimuth station corrections. The microseism generation locations inferred in this manner are strongly frequency dependent, even within relatively restricted frequency ranges (0.325-0.725 Hz) for some arrays. Our advances in seismic array processing, with a focus on methods appropriate to weaker ambient noise signals, have led to insights, for example, regarding the generation of seismic noise. We find that secondary microseisms in the lower frequency band are generated mainly by ocean swell whereas higher frequency bands are generated by local wind conditions. These arrivals are investigated over a two-decade time frame for the Southern Ocean and west Pacific Ocean.

  9. The study of structural color filter based on periodic nanohole arrays for bio-detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seunguk; Shin, Jeonghee; Yoo, Seungjun; Kim, Samhwan; Jeon, Byoungok; Moon, Cheil; Jang, Jae-Eun

    2015-07-01

    A nanostructure which induces localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) can be utilized in visible light and near infrared (NIR) regions and it shows promising features as a bio-detector because LSPR state is changed easily by different bio-related materials. Owing to transparent property of many biomolecules as well as diluted states in base solutions, it is hard to distinguish each other by eye or microscope analysis. However, difference in molecular structure and composition makes difference in optical characteristics such as a refractive index or a dielectric constant. Therefore, our LSPR-based nanohole array structure which has high sensitivity to detect small changes in optical characteristics can be a great candidate for a bio detector. Here, we fabricated structural color filters (SCFs) to detect wavelength shifts for several biomolecules and optimized the nanohole array structures for high sensitivity. Periodic nanohole arrays were designed to present resonance peaks in visible light region for optical analysis and fabricated in Au or Al thin film layer. The spectral shifts were detected caused by biomolecules.

  10. Detection of regional infrasound signals using array data: Testing, tuning, and physical interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Junghyun; Stump, Brian W.; Hayward, Chris; Arrowsmith, Stephen J.; Che, Il-Young; Drob, Douglas P.

    2016-07-14

    This work quantifies the physical characteristics of infrasound signal and noise, assesses their temporal variations, and determines the degree to which these effects can be predicted by time-varying atmospheric models to estimate array and network performance. An automated detector that accounts for both correlated and uncorrelated noise is applied to infrasound data from three seismo-acoustic arrays in South Korea (BRDAR, CHNAR, and KSGAR), cooperatively operated by Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) and Southern Methodist University (SMU). Arrays located on an island and near the coast have higher noise power, consistent with both higher wind speeds and seasonably variable ocean wave contributions. On the basis of the adaptive F-detector quantification of time variable environmental effects, the time-dependent scaling variable is shown to be dependent on both weather conditions and local site effects. Significant seasonal variations in infrasound detections including daily time of occurrence, detection numbers, and phase velocity/azimuth estimates are documented. These time-dependent effects are strongly correlated with atmospheric winds and temperatures and are predicted by available atmospheric specifications. As a result, this suggests that commonly available atmospheric specifications can be used to predict both station and network detection performance, and an appropriate forward model improves location capabilities as a function of time.

  11. Detection of regional infrasound signals using array data: Testing, tuning, and physical interpretation

    DOE PAGES

    Park, Junghyun; Stump, Brian W.; Hayward, Chris; ...

    2016-07-14

    This work quantifies the physical characteristics of infrasound signal and noise, assesses their temporal variations, and determines the degree to which these effects can be predicted by time-varying atmospheric models to estimate array and network performance. An automated detector that accounts for both correlated and uncorrelated noise is applied to infrasound data from three seismo-acoustic arrays in South Korea (BRDAR, CHNAR, and KSGAR), cooperatively operated by Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) and Southern Methodist University (SMU). Arrays located on an island and near the coast have higher noise power, consistent with both higher wind speeds and seasonablymore » variable ocean wave contributions. On the basis of the adaptive F-detector quantification of time variable environmental effects, the time-dependent scaling variable is shown to be dependent on both weather conditions and local site effects. Significant seasonal variations in infrasound detections including daily time of occurrence, detection numbers, and phase velocity/azimuth estimates are documented. These time-dependent effects are strongly correlated with atmospheric winds and temperatures and are predicted by available atmospheric specifications. As a result, this suggests that commonly available atmospheric specifications can be used to predict both station and network detection performance, and an appropriate forward model improves location capabilities as a function of time.« less

  12. Sensor array and preconcentrator for the detection of explosives in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodka, Marc D.; Shpil, J. Cory; Schnee, Vincent P.; Polcha, J. Michael P.

    2012-06-01

    A sensor system has been constructed that is capable of detecting and discriminating between various explosives presented in ocean water with detection limits at the 10-100 parts per trillion level. The sensor discriminates between different compounds using a biologically-inspired fluorescent polymer sensor array, which responds with a unique fluorescence quenching pattern during exposure to different analytes. The sensor array was made from commercially available fluorescent polymers coated onto glass beads, and was demonstrated to discriminate between different electron-withdrawing analytes delivered in salt water solutions, including the explosives 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and tetryl, the explosive hydrolysis products 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene and 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene, as well as other explosive-related compounds and explosive simulants. Sensitivities of 10-100 parts per trillion were achieved by employing a preconcentrator (PC) upstream of the sensor inlet. The PC consists of the porous polymer Tenax, which captures explosives from contaminated water as it passes through the PC. As the concentration of explosives in water decreased, longer loading times were required to concentrate a detectable amount of explosives within the PC. Explosives accumulated within the PC were released to the sensor array by heating the PC to 190 C. This approach yielded preconcentration factors of up to 100-1000x, however this increased sensitivity towards lower concentrations of explosives was achieved at the expense of proportionally longer sampling times. Strategies for decreasing this sampling time are discussed.

  13. Detection of regional infrasound signals using array data: Testing, tuning, and physical interpretation.

    PubMed

    Park, Junghyun; Stump, Brian W; Hayward, Chris; Arrowsmith, Stephen J; Che, Il-Young; Drob, Douglas P

    2016-07-01

    This work quantifies the physical characteristics of infrasound signal and noise, assesses their temporal variations, and determines the degree to which these effects can be predicted by time-varying atmospheric models to estimate array and network performance. An automated detector that accounts for both correlated and uncorrelated noise is applied to infrasound data from three seismo-acoustic arrays in South Korea (BRDAR, CHNAR, and KSGAR), cooperatively operated by Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) and Southern Methodist University (SMU). Arrays located on an island and near the coast have higher noise power, consistent with both higher wind speeds and seasonably variable ocean wave contributions. On the basis of the adaptive F-detector quantification of time variable environmental effects, the time-dependent scaling variable is shown to be dependent on both weather conditions and local site effects. Significant seasonal variations in infrasound detections including daily time of occurrence, detection numbers, and phase velocity/azimuth estimates are documented. These time-dependent effects are strongly correlated with atmospheric winds and temperatures and are predicted by available atmospheric specifications. This suggests that commonly available atmospheric specifications can be used to predict both station and network detection performance, and an appropriate forward model improves location capabilities as a function of time.

  14. Metal enhanced fluorescence improved protein and DNA detection by zigzag Ag nanorod arrays.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaofan; Xiao, Chenyu; Lau, Wai-Fung; Li, Jianping; Fu, Junxue

    2016-08-15

    As metal nano-arrays show great potential on metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF) than random nanostructures, MEF of Ag zigzag nanorod (ZNR) arrays made by oblique angle deposition has been studied for biomolecule-protein interaction and DNA hybridization. By changing the folding number and the deposition substrate temperature, a 14-fold enhancement factor (EF) is obtained for biotin-neutravidin detection. The optimal folding number is decided as Z=7, owing to the high scattering intensity of Ag ZNRs. The substrate temperature T=25°C and 0°C slightly alters the morphology of Ag ZNRs but has no big difference in EF. Further, Ag ZNRs deposited on a layer of Ag film have been introduced to the DNA hybridization and a significant signal enhancement has been observed through the fluorescence microscope. Through a detailed quantitative EF analysis, which excludes the enhancing effect from the increased surface area of ZNRs and only considers the contribution of MEF, an EF of 28 is achieved for the hybridization of two single-stranded oligonucleotides with 33 bases. Furthermore, a limit of detection is determined as 0.01pM. We believe that the Ag ZNR arrays can serve as a universal and sensitive bio-detection platform.

  15. Simultaneous Detection of Fenitrothion and Chlorpyrifos-Methyl with a Photonic Suspension Array

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuan; Mu, Zhongde; Shangguan, Fengqi; Liu, Ran; Pu, Yuepu; Yin, Lihong

    2013-01-01

    A technique was developed for simultaneous detection of fenitrothion (FNT) and chlorpyrifos-methyl (CLT) using a photonic suspension array based on silica colloidal crystal beads (SCCBs). The SCCBs were encoded with the characteristic reflection peak originating from the stop-band of colloidal crystal. This approach avoids the bleaching, fading or potential interference seen when encoding by fluorescence. SCCBs with a nanopatterned surface had increased biomolecule binding capacity and improved stability. Under optimal conditions, the proposed suspension array allowed simultaneous detection of the selected pesticides in the ranges of 0.25 to 1024 ng/mL and 0.40 to 735.37 ng/mL, with the limits of detection (LODs) of 0.25 and 0.40 ng/mL, respectively. The suspension array was specific and had no significant cross-reactivity with other chemicals. The mean recoveries in tests in which samples were spiked with target standards were 82.35% to 109.90% with a standard deviation within 9.93% for CLT and 81.64% to 108.10% with a standard deviation within 8.82% for FNT. The proposed method shows a potentially powerful capability for fast quantitative analysis of pesticide residues. PMID:23805266

  16. Detection and Analysis of Low-Frequency Sperm Whale Vocalizations with a Towed Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, Alexander

    Sperm whale vocalizations recorded during a sea test and calibration experiment in the Gulf of Maine on a single towed, horizontal, densely sampled, low-frequency (< 2500 Hz), coherent hydrophone array system are detected and analyzed for signal energy level and other characteristics. The vocalizing individuals are localized in bearing, range, and depth. An algorithm is developed to achieve automatic detection of vocalizations. This analysis is shown to have potential utility despite restriction to only the low-frequency component of the vocalizations by sampling theory. In addition, transmission loss in the New England continental shelf and slope environment is accounted for with an ocean waveguide-acoustic propagation model. Multiple averaged realizations of this model are used to estimate transmission loss as a function of range and depth for transects between the receiver array and vocalizing whales. Comparison of the vocalizations and background noise levels and the estimated transmission loss suggests the sperm whale detection range after coherent array processing exceeds 60 km in low-to-moderate sea states. Low-frequency source levels of vocalizations are estimated using the received levels and the estimated transmission loss, and applications of both this estimate and the receiver-side statistics are discussed.

  17. Report for Development of a Census Array and Evaluation of the Array to Detect Biothreat Agents and Environmental Samples for DHS

    SciTech Connect

    Jaing, C; Jackson, P

    2011-04-14

    The objective of this project is to provide DHS a comprehensive evaluation of the current genomic technologies including genotyping, Taqman PCR, multiple locus variable tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), microarray and high-throughput DNA sequencing in the analysis of biothreat agents from complex environmental samples. This report focuses on the design, testing and results of samples on the Census Array. We designed a Census/Detection Array to detect all sequenced viruses (including phage), bacteria (eubacteria), and plasmids. Family-specific probes were selected for all sequenced viral and bacterial complete genomes, segments, and plasmids. Probes were designed to tolerate some sequence variation to enable detection of divergent species with homology to sequenced organisms, and to be unique relative to the human genome. A combination of 'detection' probes with high levels of conservation within a family plus 'census' probes targeting strain/isolate specific regions enabled detection and taxonomic classification from the level of family down to the strain. The array has wider coverage of bacterial and viral targets based on more recent sequence data and more probes per target than other microbial detection/discovery arrays in the literature. We tested the array with purified bacterial and viral DNA/RNA samples, artificial mixes of known bacterial/viral samples, spiked DNA against complex background including BW aerosol samples and soil samples, and environmental samples to evaluate the array's sensitivity and forensic capability. The data were analyzed using our novel maximum likelihood software. For most of the organisms tested, we have achieved at least species level discrimination.

  18. Development of array piezoelectric fingers towards in vivo breast tumor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xin; Chung, Youngsoo; Brooks, Ari D.; Shih, Wei-Heng; Shih, Wan Y.

    2016-12-01

    We have investigated the development of a handheld 4 × 1 piezoelectric finger (PEF) array breast tumor detector system towards in vivo patient testing, particularly, on how the duration of the DC applied voltage, the depression depth of the handheld unit, and breast density affect the PEF detection sensitivity on 40 patients. The tests were blinded and carried out in four phases: with DC voltage durations 5, 3, 2, to 0.8 s corresponding to scanning a quadrant, a half, a whole breast, and both breasts within 30 min, respectively. The results showed that PEF detection sensitivity was unaffected by shortening the applied voltage duration from 5 to 0.8 s nor was it affected by increasing the depression depth from 2 to 6 mm. Over the 40 patients, PEF detected 46 of the 48 lesions (46/48)—with the smallest lesion detected being 5 mm in size. Of 28 patients (some have more than one lesion) with mammography records, PEF detected 31/33 of all lesions (94%) and 14/15 of malignant lesions (93%), while mammography detected 30/33 of all lesions (91%) and 12/15 of malignant lesions (80%), indicating that PEF could detect malignant lesions not detectable by mammography without significantly increasing false positives. PEF's detection sensitivity is also shown to be independent of breast density, suggesting that PEF could be a potential tool for detecting breast cancer in young women and women with dense breasts.

  19. Vapor detection performance of vertically aligned, ordered arrays of silicon nanowires with a porous electrode.

    PubMed

    Field, Christopher R; In, Hyun Jin; Begue, Nathan J; Pehrsson, Pehr E

    2011-06-15

    Vertically aligned, ordered arrays of silicon nanowires capped with a porous top electrode are used to detect gas phase ammonia and nitrogen dioxide in humidified air. The sensors had very fast response times and large signal-to-noise ratios. Calibration curves were created using both an initial slope method and a fixed-time point method. The initial-slope method had a power law dependence that correlates well with concentration, demonstrating a viable alternative for eventual quantitative vapor detection and enabling shorter sampling and regeneration times.

  20. Functionalization of optical nanotip arrays with an electrochemical microcantilever for multiplexed DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Descamps, Emeline; Duroure, Nathalie; Deiss, Frédérique; Leichlé, Thierry; Adam, Catherine; Mailley, Pascal; Aït-Ikhlef, Ali; Livache, Thierry; Nicu, Liviu; Sojic, Neso

    2013-08-07

    Optical nanotip arrays fabricated on etched fiber bundles were functionalized with DNA spots. Such unconventional substrates (3D and non-planar) are difficult to pattern with standard microfabrication techniques but, using an electrochemical cantilever, up to 400 spots were electrodeposited on the nanostructured optical surface in 5 min. This approach allows each spot to be addressed individually and multiplexed fluorescence detection is demonstrated. Finally, remote fluorescence detection was performed by imaging through the optical fiber bundle itself after hybridisation with the complementary sequence.

  1. A Compact, Low-Power Cantilever-Based Sensor Array for Chemical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Loui, A; Ratto, T; Wilson, T; Mukerjee, E; Hu, Z; Sulchek, T; Hart, B

    2007-02-22

    A compact and low-power cantilever-based sensor array has been developed and used to detect various vapor analytes. This device employs sorptive polymers that are deposited onto piezoresistive cantilevers. We have successfully detected several organic vapors, representing a breadth of chemical properties and over a range of concentrations. Comparisons of the polymer/vapor partition coefficient to the cantilever deflection responses show that a simple linear relationship does not exist, emphasizing the need to develop an appropriate functional model to describe the chemical-to-mechanical transduction that is unique to this sensing modality.

  2. Addressable electrode array device with IDA electrodes for high-throughput detection.

    PubMed

    Ino, Kosuke; Saito, Wataru; Koide, Masahiro; Umemura, Taizo; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2011-02-07

    An electrochemical device is proposed for high-throughput electrochemical detection that consists of 32 row and 32 column electrodes on a single glass substrate. The row and column electrodes are connected to interdigitated array (IDA) electrodes to form 1024 (32 × 32) addressable sensor points in the device. Electrochemical responses from each of the 1024 sensors were successfully acquired on the device within 1 min using redox cycling at individual IDA electrodes, which ensures application of the device to comprehensive, high-throughput electrochemical detection for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), reporter gene assay for monitoring gene expressions, and DNA analysis.

  3. Towards the installation and use of an extended array for cosmic ray detection: The EEE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbrescia, M.; Alici, A.; An, S.; Antolini, R.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Blanco, F.; Bressan, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Chiri, C.; Cicalò, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Coccia, E.; Coccetti, F.; de Caro, A.; de Gruttola, D.; de Pasquale, S.; D'Incecco, M.; Fabbri, F. L.; Frolov, V.; Garbini, M.; Guarnaccia, C.; Gustavino, C.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Imponente, G.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M. M.; La Rocca, P.; Librizzi, F.; Maggiora, A.; Menghetti, H.; Miozzi, S.; Moro, R.; Noferini, F.; Pagano, P.; Panareo, M.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Petta, C.; Piragino, G.; Preghenella, R.; Riggi, F.; Romano, F.; Russo, G.; Sartorelli, G.; Sbarra, C.; Scioli, G.; Selvi, M.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Wenninger, H.; Williams, M. C. S.; Zampolli, C.; Zichichi, A.; Zuyeuski, R.

    2009-05-01

    The Extreme Energy Events (EEE) project started to use an array of cosmic ray telescopes for muon detection, distributed over the italian territory. The use of such telescopes, based on Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPC) allows the study of the local muon flux, the detection of cosmic ray showers and the search for correlations between distant showers. The project is also intended to involve high school teams in an advanced research work. The present status of the installation and the first physics results are discussed here.

  4. A high-accuracy optical linear algebra processor for finite element applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, D.; Taylor, B. K.

    1984-01-01

    Optical linear processors are computationally efficient computers for solving matrix-matrix and matrix-vector oriented problems. Optical system errors limit their dynamic range to 30-40 dB, which limits their accuray to 9-12 bits. Large problems, such as the finite element problem in structural mechanics (with tens or hundreds of thousands of variables) which can exploit the speed of optical processors, require the 32 bit accuracy obtainable from digital machines. To obtain this required 32 bit accuracy with an optical processor, the data can be digitally encoded, thereby reducing the dynamic range requirements of the optical system (i.e., decreasing the effect of optical errors on the data) while providing increased accuracy. This report describes a new digitally encoded optical linear algebra processor architecture for solving finite element and banded matrix-vector problems. A linear static plate bending case study is described which quantities the processor requirements. Multiplication by digital convolution is explained, and the digitally encoded optical processor architecture is advanced.

  5. Graphene nano-ink biosensor arrays on a microfluidic paper for multiplexed detection of metabolites.

    PubMed

    Labroo, Pratima; Cui, Yue

    2014-02-27

    The development of a miniaturized and low-cost platform for the highly sensitive, selective and rapid detection of multiplexed metabolites is of great interest for healthcare, pharmaceuticals, food science, and environmental monitoring. Graphene is a delicate single-layer, two-dimensional network of carbon atoms with extraordinary electrical sensing capability. Microfluidic paper with printing technique is a low cost matrix. Here, we demonstrated the development of graphene-ink based biosensor arrays on a microfluidic paper for the multiplexed detection of different metabolites, such as glucose, lactate, xanthine and cholesterol. Our results show that the graphene biosensor arrays can detect multiple metabolites on a microfluidic paper sensitively, rapidly and simultaneously. The device exhibits a fast measuring time of less than 2 min, a low detection limit of 0.3 μM, and a dynamic detection range of 0.3-15 μM. The process is simple and inexpensive to operate and requires a low consumption of sample volume. We anticipate that these results could open exciting opportunities for a variety of applications.

  6. Mode-shape-based mass detection scheme using mechanically diverse, indirectly coupled microresonator arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glean, Aldo A.; Judge, John A.; Vignola, Joseph F.; Ryan, Teresa J.

    2015-02-01

    We explore vibration localization in arrays of microresonators used for ultrasensitive mass detection and describe an algorithm for identifying the location and amount of added mass using measurements of a vibration mode of the system. For a set of sensing elements coupled through a common shuttle mass, the inter-element coupling is shown to be proportional to the ratio of the element masses to the shuttle mass and to vary with the frequency mistuning between any two sensing elements. When any two elements have sufficiently similar frequencies, mass adsorption on one element can result in measurable changes to multiple modes of the system. We describe the effects on system frequencies and mode shapes due to added mass, in terms of mass ratio and frequency spacing. In cases in which modes are not fully localized, frequency-shift-based mass detection methods may give ambiguous results. The mode-shape-based detection algorithm presented uses a single measured mode shape and corresponding natural frequency to identify the location and amount of added mass. Mass detection in the presence of measurement noise is numerically simulated using a ten element sensor array. The accuracy of the detection scheme is shown to depend on the amplitude with which each element vibrates in the chosen mode.

  7. Helmet-mounted acoustic array for hostile fire detection and localization in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Michael V.

    2008-04-01

    The detection and localization of hostile weapons firing has been demonstrated successfully with acoustic sensor arrays on unattended ground sensors (UGS), ground-vehicles, and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Some of the more mature systems have demonstrated significant capabilities and provide direct support to ongoing counter-sniper operations. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is conducting research and development for a helmet-mounted system to acoustically detect and localize small arms firing, or other events such as RPG, mortars, and explosions, as well as other non-transient signatures. Since today's soldier is quickly being asked to take on more and more reconnaissance, surveillance, & target acquisition (RSTA) functions, sensor augmentation enables him to become a mobile and networked sensor node on the complex and dynamic battlefield. Having a body-worn threat detection and localization capability for events that pose an immediate danger to the soldiers around him can significantly enhance their survivability and lethality, as well as enable him to provide and use situational awareness clues on the networked battlefield. This paper addresses some of the difficulties encountered by an acoustic system in an urban environment. Complex reverberation, multipath, diffraction, and signature masking by building structures makes this a very harsh environment for robust detection and classification of shockwaves and muzzle blasts. Multifunctional acoustic detection arrays can provide persistent surveillance and enhanced situational awareness for every soldier.

  8. Ultrasensitive DNA sequence detection using nanoscale ZnO sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nitin; Dorfman, Adam; Hahm, Jong-in

    2006-06-01

    We report that engineered nanoscale zinc oxide structures can be effectively used for the identification of the biothreat agent, Bacillus anthracis by successfully discriminating its DNA sequence from other genetically related species. We explore both covalent and non-covalent linking schemes in order to couple probe DNA strands to the zinc oxide nanostructures. Hybridization reactions are performed with various concentrations of target DNA strands whose sequence is unique to Bacillus anthracis. The use of zinc oxide nanomaterials greatly enhances the fluorescence signal collected after carrying out duplex formation reaction. Specifically, the covalent strategy allows detection of the target species at sample concentrations at a level as low as a few femtomolar as compared to the detection sensitivity in the tens of nanomolar range when using the non-covalent scheme. The presence of the underlying zinc oxide nanomaterials is critical in achieving increased fluorescence detection of hybridized DNA and, therefore, accomplishing rapid and extremely sensitive identification of the biothreat agent. We also demonstrate the easy integration potential of nanoscale zinc oxide into high density arrays by using various types of zinc oxide sensor prototypes in the DNA sequence detection. When combined with conventional automatic sample handling apparatus and computerized fluorescence detection equipment, our approach can greatly promote the use of zinc oxide nanomaterials as signal enhancing platforms for rapid, multiplexed, high-throughput, highly sensitive, DNA sensor arrays.

  9. Ultra-sensitive detection of adipocytokines with CMOS-compatible silicon nanowire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pui, Tze-Sian; Agarwal, Ajay; Ye, Feng; Tou, Zhi-Qiang; Huang, Yinxi; Chen, Peng

    2009-09-01

    Perfectly aligned arrays of single-crystalline silicon nanowires were fabricated using top-down CMOS-compatible techniques. We demonstrate that these nanowire devices are able to detect adipocytokines secreted by adipose cells with femtomolar sensitivity, high specificity, wide detection range, and ability for parallel monitoring. The nanowire sensors also provide a novel tool to reveal the poorly understood signaling mechanisms of these newly recognized signaling molecules, as well as their relevance in common diseases such as obesity and diabetes.Perfectly aligned arrays of single-crystalline silicon nanowires were fabricated using top-down CMOS-compatible techniques. We demonstrate that these nanowire devices are able to detect adipocytokines secreted by adipose cells with femtomolar sensitivity, high specificity, wide detection range, and ability for parallel monitoring. The nanowire sensors also provide a novel tool to reveal the poorly understood signaling mechanisms of these newly recognized signaling molecules, as well as their relevance in common diseases such as obesity and diabetes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Process diagram of nanowire fabrication; specificity of nanowire detection; induced differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells. See DOI: 10.1039/b9nr00092e

  10. Generation and detection of millimeter-wave optical signals for use in power-combining arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Andrew Charles

    1997-10-01

    Optical distribution of millimeter-wave signals is an attractive technology for a number of applications. The feeding of antenna arrays and the distribution of signals in wireless communication systems both stand to benefit from the low power loss, low weight and size, and immunity from electromagnetic interference and crosstalk provided by optical fiber. This thesis presents results for a 60-GHz power-combining array, and also describes photodetectors and an optical source suitable for delivering signals to the elements of such an array. Chapter 2 describes a 60-GHz quasi-optical power- combining array employing IMPATT diodes in a weakly coupled, hybrid, two by four arrangement. Arrays such as this are motivated by the need for radiated power levels which a single semiconductor device cannot provide. Typically, many solid-state oscillators, each feeding an antenna, are locked together and their powers combined in free space. The array presented in chapter 2 relies on weak inter-element coupling to achieve locking among the elements, and produces a total radiated power in excess of 2 W. Pulsed operation was investigated to determine how the transient current pulse affected the locking behavior. While this array is not optically fed, locking each element of such an array to an optically delivered signal is an attractive option. Photodetectors are a necessary part of an optical distribution system, and these are studied in chapters 3 and 4. Chapter 3 presents a new means of measuring the transient response of high-speed detectors, and chapter 4 describes metal-semiconductor-metal detectors fabricated on GaInAs with copper electrodes for detection at wavelengths of 1.3 μm and 1.55 μm. The copper contacts were found to produce an improved barrier compared to more traditional Schottky metals, a result which highlights the possibility of improving Schottky contacts by careful metal selection. Chapter 5 addresses the generation of low phase noise millimeter-wave optical

  11. Detection of Volatile Organics Using a Surface Acoustic Wave Array System

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON, LAWRENCE F.; BARTHOLOMEW, JOHN W.; CERNOSEK, RICHARD W.; COLBURN, CHRISTOPHER W.; CROOKS, R.M.; MARTINEZ, R.F.; OSBOURN, GORDON C.; RICCO, A.J.; STATON, ALAN W.; YELTON, WILLIAM G.

    1999-10-14

    A chemical sensing system based on arrays of surface acoustic wave (SAW) delay lines has been developed for identification and quantification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The individual SAW chemical sensors consist of interdigital transducers patterned on the surface of an ST-cut quartz substrate to launch and detect the acoustic waves and a thin film coating in the SAW propagation path to perturb the acoustic wave velocity and attenuation during analyte sorption. A diverse set of material coatings gives the sensor arrays a degree of chemical sensitivity and selectivity. Materials examined for sensor application include the alkanethiol-based self-assembled monolayer, plasma-processed films, custom-synthesized conventional polymers, dendrimeric polymers, molecular recognition materials, electroplated metal thin films, and porous metal oxides. All of these materials target a specific chemical fi.mctionality and the enhancement of accessible film surface area. Since no one coating provides absolute analyte specificity, the array responses are further analyzed using a visual-empirical region-of-influence (VERI) pattern recognition algorithm. The chemical sensing system consists of a seven-element SAW array with accompanying drive and control electronics, sensor signal acquisition electronics, environmental vapor sampling hardware, and a notebook computer. Based on data gathered for individual sensor responses, greater than 93%-accurate identification can be achieved for any single analyte from a group of 17 VOCs and water.

  12. Spectroscopic benzene detection using a broadband monolithic DFB-QCL array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewicki, Rafał; Witinski, Mark; Li, Biao; Wysocki, Gerard

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative laser spectroscopic measurements of complex molecules that have a broad absorption spectra require broadly tunable laser sources operating preferably in the mid-infrared molecular fingerprint region. In this paper a novel broadband mid-infrared laser source comprising of an array of single-mode distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers was used to target a broadband absorption feature of benzene (C6H6), a toxic and carcinogenic atmospheric pollutant. The DFB-QCL array is a monolithic semiconductor device with no opto-mechanical components, which eliminates issues with mechanical vibrations. The DFB-QCLs array used in this work provides spectral coverage from 1022.5 cm-1 to 1053.3 cm-1, which is sufficient to access the absorption feature of benzene at 1038 cm-1 (9.64 μm). A sensor prototype based on a 76 m multipass cell (AMAC-76LW, Aerodyne Research) and a dispersive DFB-QCL array beam combiner was developed and tested. The Allan deviation analysis of the retrieved benzene concentration data yields a short-term precision of 100 ppbv/Hz1/2 and a minimum detectable concentration of 12 ppbv for 200 s averaging time. The system was also tested by sampling atmospheric air as well as vapors of different chemical products that contained traces of benzene.

  13. Detection of genomic imbalances by array based comparative genomic hybridisation in fetuses with multiple malformations

    PubMed Central

    Le Caignec, C; Boceno, M; Saugier-Veber, P; Jacquemont, S; Joubert, M; David, A; Frebourg, T; Rival, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Malformations are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in full term infants and genomic imbalances are a significant component of their aetiology. However, the causes of defects in many patients with multiple congenital malformations remain unexplained despite thorough clinical examination and laboratory investigations. Methods: We used a commercially available array based comparative genomic hybridisation method (array CGH), able to screen all subtelomeric regions, main microdeletion syndromes, and 201 other regions covering the genome, to detect submicroscopic chromosomal imbalances in 49 fetuses with three or more significant anomalies and normal karyotype. Results: Array CGH identified eight genomic rearrangements (16.3%), all confirmed by quantitative multiplex PCR of short fluorescent fragments. Subtelomeric and interstitial deletions, submicroscopic duplications, and a complex genomic imbalance were identified. In four de novo cases (15qtel deletion, 16q23.1–q23.3 deletion, 22q11.2 deletion, and mosaicism for a rearranged chromosome 18), the genomic imbalance identified clearly underlay the pathological phenotype. In one case, the relationship between the genotype and phenotype was unclear, since a subtelomeric 6q deletion was detected in a mother and her two fetuses bearing multiple malformations. In three cases, a subtelomeric 10q duplication, probably a genomic polymorphism, was identified. Conclusions: The detection of 5/49 causative chromosomal imbalances (or 4/49 if the 6qtel deletion is not considered as causative) suggests wide genome screening when standard chromosome analysis is normal and confirms that array CGH will have a major impact on pre and postnatal diagnosis as well as providing information for more accurate genetic counselling. PMID:15689449

  14. Cetacean acoustic detections from free-floating vertical hydrophone arrays in the southern California Current.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Emily T; Barlow, Jay

    2016-11-01

    Drifting acoustic recorders were deployed in the southern California Current during Fall 2014. Two hydrophones configured as a 2-m vertical array at 100 m depth recorded using a 192 kHz sample rate on a 10% duty cycle (2 min/20 min). Beaked whales were detected in 33 of 8618 two-minute recordings. Sperm whales were detected in 185 recordings, and dolphins in 2291 recordings. Many beaked whales detected were over an abyssal plain and not associated with slope or seamount features. Results show the feasibility of using free-floating recording systems to detect a variety of cetacean species over periods of several months.

  15. Real-time face detection and lip feature extraction using field-programmable gate arrays.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duy; Halupka, David; Aarabi, Parham; Sheikholeslami, Ali

    2006-08-01

    This paper proposes a new technique for face detection and lip feature extraction. A real-time field-programmable gate array (FPGA) implementation of the two proposed techniques is also presented. Face detection is based on a naive Bayes classifier that classifies an edge-extracted representation of an image. Using edge representation significantly reduces the model's size to only 5184 B, which is 2417 times smaller than a comparable statistical modeling technique, while achieving an 86.6% correct detection rate under various lighting conditions. Lip feature extraction uses the contrast around the lip contour to extract the height and width of the mouth, metrics that are useful for speech filtering. The proposed FPGA system occupies only 15050 logic cells, or about six times less than a current comparable FPGA face detection system.

  16. Design of an Acoustic Target Intrusion Detection System Based on Small-Aperture Microphone Array.

    PubMed

    Zu, Xingshui; Guo, Feng; Huang, Jingchang; Zhao, Qin; Liu, Huawei; Li, Baoqing; Yuan, Xiaobing

    2017-03-04

    Automated surveillance of remote locations in a wireless sensor network is dominated by the detection algorithm because actual intrusions in such locations are a rare event. Therefore, a detection method with low power consumption is crucial for persistent surveillance to ensure longevity of the sensor networks. A simple and effective two-stage algorithm composed of energy detector (ED) and delay detector (DD) with all its operations in time-domain using small-aperture microphone array (SAMA) is proposed. The algorithm analyzes the quite different velocities between wind noise and sound waves to improve the detection capability of ED in the surveillance area. Experiments in four different fields with three types of vehicles show that the algorithm is robust to wind noise and the probability of detection and false alarm are 96.67% and 2.857%, respectively.

  17. Design of an Acoustic Target Intrusion Detection System Based on Small-Aperture Microphone Array

    PubMed Central

    Zu, Xingshui; Guo, Feng; Huang, Jingchang; Zhao, Qin; Liu, Huawei; Li, Baoqing; Yuan, Xiaobing

    2017-01-01

    Automated surveillance of remote locations in a wireless sensor network is dominated by the detection algorithm because actual intrusions in such locations are a rare event. Therefore, a detection method with low power consumption is crucial for persistent surveillance to ensure longevity of the sensor networks. A simple and effective two-stage algorithm composed of energy detector (ED) and delay detector (DD) with all its operations in time-domain using small-aperture microphone array (SAMA) is proposed. The algorithm analyzes the quite different velocities between wind noise and sound waves to improve the detection capability of ED in the surveillance area. Experiments in four different fields with three types of vehicles show that the algorithm is robust to wind noise and the probability of detection and false alarm are 96.67% and 2.857%, respectively. PMID:28273838

  18. Determination of diarylheptanoids from Alpinia officinarum (Lesser Galangal) by HPLC with photodiode array and electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihua; Sang, Shengmin; Hartman, Thomas G; Ho, Chi-Tang; Rosen, Robert T

    2005-01-01

    Normal-phase column chromatography followed by semi-preparative reversed-phase HPLC has been used to isolate, from the rhizomes of Alpinia officinarum, five diarylheptanoids identified as 5-hydroxy-7-(4"-hydroxy-3"-methoxyphenyl)-1-phenyl-3-heptanone, 5-methoxy-7-(4"-hydroxy-3"-methoxyphenyl)-1-phenyl-3-heptanone, 7-(4"-hydroxyphenyl)-1-phenylhept-4-en-3-one, 7-(4"-hydroxy-3"-methoxyphenyl)-1-phenyl-hept-4-en-3-one, 1,7-diphenylhept-4-en-3-one. The levels of these five diarylheptanoids in root material were determined quantitatively by HPLC with UV detection and the assay methods so developed were simple, rapid and accurate. Four of the diarylheptanoids could also be detected by HPLC with electrochemical detection (ECD) in the oxidative mode, and ECD was found to have a higher sensitivity than photodiode array detection.

  19. Microbubble Array Diffusion Assay for the Detection of Cell Secreting Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bobo, Bryan; Phalen, Dana; Rebhahn, Jonathan; Piepenbrink, Michael S.; Zheng, Bo; Mosmann, Tim R.; Kobie, James J.; DeLouise, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) makes them an ideal tool in both clinical and research applications due to their ability to recognize and bind specific epitopes with high affinity and selectivity. While mAbs offer significant therapeutic potential, their utility is overshadowed by the cost associated with their production, which often relies on the ability to identify minority antigen specific cells out of a heterogeneous population. To address concerns with suboptimal methods for screening cells, we have developed a cell sorting array comprised of nanoliter spherical cell culture compartments, termed microbubble (MB) wells. We demonstrate a proof-of-concept system for the detection of cell secreted factors from both immortalized cell lines and primary B cell samples. Exploiting the unique ability of the MB well architecture to accumulate cell secreted factors as well as affinity capture coatings, we demonstrate on chip detection and recovery of antibody secreting cells for sequencing of immunoglobin genes. Furthermore, rapid image capture and analysis capabilities were developed for the processing of large MB arrays, thus facilitating the ability to conduct high-throughput screening of heterogeneous cell samples faster and more efficiently than ever before. The proof-of-concept assays presented herein lay the groundwork for the progression of MB well arrays as an advanced on chip cell sorting technology. PMID:25079889

  20. Weapon detection using a wideband millimeter-wave linear array imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Collins, H. D.; Hall, Thomas E.

    1994-03-01

    A wideband millimeter-wave imaging technique has been developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the detection of concealed weapons carried by personnel through high- security areas, such as airports. A practical airport system based on this technique should be capable of real-time image frame rate of 10 to 30 frames per second. This technique, similar to an extremely high-resolution radar system, actively probes the target with millimeter-waves and reconstructs an image from the backscattered phase and amplitude data. The primary goal of the system is the detection of weapons and the placement of the detected weapon on the body. An important additional goal is the identification of detected items, which requires a high resolution imaging technique. An experimental system has been developed at PNL which has gathered millimeter wave imagery from clothed mannequins and human beings carrying concealed weapons. This system is capable of forming images in excess of 1 meter by 2 meters at resolutions on the order of 1 cm, and is capable of scanning in less than 5 seconds. This experimental system could be enhanced to function in real time by eliminating the relatively slow mechanical scan. A sequentially switched linear array of transceiver antennas would allow real-time gathering of the imaging information, since the data would be electronically scanned in the lateral direction and electronically swept in frequency. This allows formation of a 2D image from a 1D array of transceiver antennas.

  1. Surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence on Au nanohole array for prostate-specific antigen detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingwen; Wu, Lin; Wong, Ten It; Zhang, Jinling; Liu, Xiaohu; Zhou, Xiaodong; Bai, Ping; Liedberg, Bo; Wang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Localized surface plasmon (LSP) has been widely applied for the enhancement of fluorescence emission for biosensing owing to its potential for strong field enhancement. However, due to its small penetration depth, LSP offers limited fluorescence enhancement over a whole sensor chip and, therefore, insufficient sensitivity for the detection of biomolecules, especially large molecules. We demonstrate the simultaneous excitation of LSP and propagating surface plasmon (PSP) on an Au nanohole array under Kretschmann configuration for the detection of prostate-specific antigen with a sandwich immunoassay. The proposed method combines the advantages of high field enhancement by LSP and large surface area probed by PSP field. The simulated results indicated that a maximum enhancement of electric field intensity up to 1,600 times can be achieved under the simultaneous excitation of LSP and PSP modes. The sandwich assay of PSA carried out on gold nanohole array substrate showed a limit of detection of 140 fM supporting coexcitation of LSP and PSP modes. The limit of detection was approximately sevenfold lower than that when only LSP was resonantly excited on the same substrate. The results of this study demonstrate high fluorescence enhancement through the coexcitation of LSP and PSP modes and pave a way for its implementation as a highly sensitive bioassay. PMID:28392689

  2. Surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence on Au nanohole array for prostate-specific antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingwen; Wu, Lin; Wong, Ten It; Zhang, Jinling; Liu, Xiaohu; Zhou, Xiaodong; Bai, Ping; Liedberg, Bo; Wang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Localized surface plasmon (LSP) has been widely applied for the enhancement of fluorescence emission for biosensing owing to its potential for strong field enhancement. However, due to its small penetration depth, LSP offers limited fluorescence enhancement over a whole sensor chip and, therefore, insufficient sensitivity for the detection of biomolecules, especially large molecules. We demonstrate the simultaneous excitation of LSP and propagating surface plasmon (PSP) on an Au nanohole array under Kretschmann configuration for the detection of prostate-specific antigen with a sandwich immunoassay. The proposed method combines the advantages of high field enhancement by LSP and large surface area probed by PSP field. The simulated results indicated that a maximum enhancement of electric field intensity up to 1,600 times can be achieved under the simultaneous excitation of LSP and PSP modes. The sandwich assay of PSA carried out on gold nanohole array substrate showed a limit of detection of 140 fM supporting coexcitation of LSP and PSP modes. The limit of detection was approximately sevenfold lower than that when only LSP was resonantly excited on the same substrate. The results of this study demonstrate high fluorescence enhancement through the coexcitation of LSP and PSP modes and pave a way for its implementation as a highly sensitive bioassay.

  3. Controlled fabrication of silver nanoneedles array for SERS and their application in rapid detection of narcotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Yamaguchi, Kohei; Tanemura, Masaki; Huang, Zhengren; Jiang, Dongliang; Chen, Yuhui; Zhou, Fei; Nogami, Masayuki

    2012-03-01

    Novel surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates with high SERS-activity are ideal for novel SERS sensors, detectors to detect illicitly sold narcotics and explosives. The key to the wider application of SERS technique is to develop plasmon resonant structure with novel geometries to enhance Raman signals and to control the periodic ordering of these structures over a large area to obtain reproducible Raman enhancement. In this work, a simple Ar+-ion sputtering route has been developed to fabricate silver nanoneedles arrays on silicon substrates for SERS-active substrates to detect trace-level illicitly sold narcotics. These silver nanoneedles possess a very sharp apex with an apex diameter of 15 nm and an apex angle of 20°. The SERS enhancement factor of greater than 1010 was reproducibly achieved by the well-aligned nanoneedles arrays. Furthermore, ketamine hydrochloride molecules, one kind of illicitly sold narcotics, can be detected down to 27 ppb by using our SERS substrate within 3 s, indicating the sensitivity of our SERS substrates for trace amounts of narcotics and that SERS technology can become an important analytical technique in forensic laboratories because it can provide a rapid and nondestructive method for trace detection.

  4. Label-free detection of kanamycin using aptamer-based cantilever array sensor.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiaojing; Hou, Hui; Zhang, Bailin; Tang, Jilin

    2014-06-15

    A label-free detection method of kanamycin using aptamer-based cantilever array sensor was developed. The cantilever array was composed of sensing cantilevers and reference cantilevers. This configuration allowed direct detection of individual cantilever deflections and subsequent determination of differential deflection of sensing/reference cantilever pair. The sensing cantilevers were functionalized with kanamycin aptamer, which was used as receptor molecules while the reference cantilevers were modified with 6-mercapto-1-hexanol (MCH) to eliminate the influence of environmental disturbances. The kanamycin-aptamer interaction induced a change in cantilever surface stress, which caused a differential deflection between the sensing and reference cantilever pair. The surface stress change was linear with kanamycin concentration over the range of 100 μM-10mM with a correlation coefficient of 0.995. A detection limit of 50 μM was obtained, at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The sensor also showed good selectivity against other antibiotics such as neomycin, ribostamycin and chloramphenicol. The facile method for kanamycin detection may have great potential for investigating more other molecules.

  5. Electrochemical detection of methyl nicotinate biomarker using functionalized anodized titania nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Dhiman; Smith, York R.; Misra, Mano; Mohanty, Swomitra K.

    2015-02-01

    Sensing and detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from exhaled breath is a possible method for early diagnosis of several pulmonary diseases. The use of solid-state TiO2 nanotube array sensors for VOC sensing applications has been of great interest. In this study, titania nanotubular arrays (TNAs) were synthesized through electrochemical anodization and used for the electrochemical detection of methyl nicotinate biomarker vapor. Functionalization of the TNA with cobalt was found to be necessary for methyl nicotinate detection. Titanium dioxide films synthesized through high temperature oxidation and functionalized with cobalt were also compared with cobalt functionalized TNA. The ordered TNA demonstrated itself to be an effective substrate for cobalt deposition and subsequent biomarker detection over thin titanium dioxide films. Surface analysis of the cobalt functionalized TNA by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies observed cobalt deposits exist as cobalt hydroxide on the surface. Exposure of the sensor surface to methyl nicotinate vapor results in the reduction of cobalt hydroxide to cobalt metal on the surface. Two mechanisms have been proposed to describe the binding of the nicotinate biomarker to cobalt functionalized TNA consistent with the XPS studies and band theory.

  6. A Sensor Array for the Detection and Discrimination of Methane and Other Environmental Pollutant Gases

    PubMed Central

    Hannon, Ami; Lu, Yijiang; Li, Jing; Meyyappan, M.

    2016-01-01

    We address the sensitive detection and discrimination of gases impacting the environment, such as CH4, NH3, SO2, and CO, using a sensor array and aided by principal component analysis (PCA). A 32-element chemiresistive sensor array consisting of nine different sensor materials including seven types of modified single-walled carbon nanotubes and two types of polymers has been constructed. PCA results demonstrate excellent discriminating ability of the chemiresistor sensor chip in the 1–30 ppm concentration range. The accuracy of the sensor was verified against data collected using cavity ring down spectroscopy. The sensor chip has also been integrated with a smartphone and has been shown to reproduce the sensing performance obtained with the laboratory measurement system. PMID:27463716

  7. Laser radar range and detection performance for MEMS corner cube retroreflector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Robert J.; Odhner, Jefferson E.; Stewart, Hamilton; McDaniel, Robert V.

    2004-12-01

    BAE SYSTEMS reports on a program to characterize the performance of MEMS corner cube retroreflector arrays under laser illumination. These arrays have significant military and commercial application in the areas of: 1) target identification; 2) target tracking; 3) target location; 4) identification friend-or-foe (IFF); 5) parcel tracking, and; 6) search and rescue assistance. BAE SYSTEMS has theoretically determined the feasibility of these devices to learn if sufficient signal-to-noise performance exists to permit a cooperative laser radar sensor to be considered for device location and interrogation. Results indicate that modest power-apertures are required to achieve SNR performance consistent with high probability of detection and low false alarm rates.

  8. Laser radar range and detection performance for MEMS corner cube retroreflector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Robert J.; Jost, Steven R.; Smith, M. J.; McDaniel, Robert V.

    2004-01-01

    BAE SYSTEMS reports on a program to characterize the performance of MEMS corner cube retroreflector arrays under laser illumination. These arrays have significant military and commercial application in the areas of: (1) target identification; (2) target tracking; (3) target location; (4) identification friend-or-foe (IFF); (5) parcel tracking, and; (6) search and rescue assistance. BAE SYSTEMS has theoretically determined the feasibility of these devices to learn if sufficient signal-to-noise performance exists to permit a cooperative laser radar sensor to be considered for device location and interrogation. Results indicate that modest power-apertures are required to achieve SNR performance consistent with high probability of detection and low false alarm rates.

  9. SERS detection of low-concentration adenosine by silver nanoparticles on silicon nanoporous pyramid arrays structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Man, B. Y.; Jiang, S. Z.; Yang, C.; Liu, M.; Chen, C. S.; Xu, S. C.; Qiu, H. W.; Li, Z.

    2015-08-01

    A novel surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrate based on uniform silver nanoparticles/silicon nanoporous pyramid arrays (Ag/PS) is prepared and SERS behaviors to adenosine are discussed and compared. With a low concentration of 10-7 M, the characteristic Raman bands of adenosine demonstrate the significantly high SERS sensitivity of the prepared Ag/PS substrate. A reasonable linear correlation is obtained between the intensity of SERS signal and the adenosine concentration from 10-2 to 10-7M in log scale. These results imply that the Ag/PS with regular pyramids array might be an effective substrate for performing label-free sensitive SERS detections of biomolecule.

  10. Comprehensive GMO detection using real-time PCR array: single-laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Mano, Junichi; Harada, Mioko; Takabatake, Reona; Furui, Satoshi; Kitta, Kazumi; Nakamura, Kosuke; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Noritake, Hiromichi; Hatano, Shuko; Futo, Satoshi; Minegishi, Yasutaka; Iizuka, Tayoshi

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a real-time PCR array method to comprehensively detect genetically modified (GM) organisms. In the method, genomic DNA extracted from an agricultural product is analyzed using various qualitative real-time PCR assays on a 96-well PCR plate, targeting for individual GM events, recombinant DNA (r-DNA) segments, taxon-specific DNAs, and donor organisms of the respective r-DNAs. In this article, we report the single-laboratory validation of both DNA extraction methods and component PCR assays constituting the real-time PCR array. We selected some DNA extraction methods for specified plant matrixes, i.e., maize flour, soybean flour, and ground canola seeds, then evaluated the DNA quantity, DNA fragmentation, and PCR inhibition of the resultant DNA extracts. For the component PCR assays, we evaluated the specificity and LOD. All DNA extraction methods and component PCR assays satisfied the criteria set on the basis of previous reports.

  11. Compressive sensing based spinning mode detections by in-duct microphone arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wenjun; Huang, Xun

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a compressive sensing based experimental method for detecting spinning modes of sound waves propagating inside a cylindrical duct system. This method requires fewer dynamic pressure sensors than the number required by the Shannon-Nyquist sampling theorem so long as the incident waves are sparse in spinning modes. In this work, the proposed new method is firstly validated by preparing some of the numerical simulations with representative set-ups. Then, a duct acoustic testing rig with a spinning mode synthesiser and an in-duct microphone array is built to experimentally demonstrate the new approach. Both the numerical simulations and the experiment results are satisfactory, even when the practical issue of the background noise pollution is taken into account. The approach is beneficial for sensory array tests of silent aeroengines in particular and some other engineering systems with duct acoustics in general.

  12. A Sensor Array for the Detection and Discrimination of Methane and Other Environmental Pollutant Gases.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Ami; Lu, Yijiang; Li, Jing; Meyyappan, M

    2016-07-25

    We address the sensitive detection and discrimination of gases impacting the environment, such as CH₄, NH₃, SO₂, and CO, using a sensor array and aided by principal component analysis (PCA). A 32-element chemiresistive sensor array consisting of nine different sensor materials including seven types of modified single-walled carbon nanotubes and two types of polymers has been constructed. PCA results demonstrate excellent discriminating ability of the chemiresistor sensor chip in the 1-30 ppm concentration range. The accuracy of the sensor was verified against data collected using cavity ring down spectroscopy. The sensor chip has also been integrated with a smartphone and has been shown to reproduce the sensing performance obtained with the laboratory measurement system.

  13. Breath analysis system for early detection of lung diseases based on multi-sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jin-Young; Yu, Joon-Boo; Shin, Jeong-Suk; Byun, Hyung-Gi; Lim, Jeong-Ok

    2013-05-01

    Expiratory breath contains various VOCs(Volatile Organic Compounds) produced from the human. When a certain disease exists, the exhalation has specific VOCs which may be generated from diseases. Many researchers have been actively working to find different types of biomarkers which are characteristic for particular diseases. Research regarding the identification of specific diseases from exhalation is still in progress. The aim of this research is to implement early detection of lung disease such as lung cancer and COPD(Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease), which was nominated on the 6th of domestic death rate in 2010, based on multi-sensor array system. The system has been used to acquire sampled expiratory gases data and PCA(Principle Component Analysis) technique was applied to analyze signals from multi-sensor array. Throughout the experimental trials, a clearly distinguishable difference between lung disease patients and healthy controls was found from the measurement and analysis of their respective expiratory gases.

  14. Batch-processed semiconductor gas sensor array for the selective detection of NOx in automotive exhaust gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hani; Kim, Minki; Kim, Yongjun

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports on a semiconductor gas sensor array to detect nitrogen oxides (NOx) in automotive exhaust gas. The proposed semiconductor gas sensor array consisted of one common electrode and three individual electrodes to minimize the size of the sensor array, and three sensing layers [TiO2 + SnO2 (15 wt%), SnO2, and Ga2O3] were deposited using screen printing. In addition, sensing materials were sintered under the same conditions in order to take advantage of batch processing. The sensing properties of the proposed sensor array were verified by experimental measurements, and the selectivity improved by using pattern recognition.

  15. Flow-enhanced detection of biological pathogens using piezoelectric microcantilever arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGovern, John-Paul

    The piezoelectric microcantilever sensor (PEMS) is an all-electrical resonant oscillator biosensor system capable of in-situ and label-free detection. With various insulation and antibody immobilization schemes, it is well-suited for sensitive, specific pathogen detection applications with limits of detection on the order of relevant lethal infectious dosages. Initial PEMS implementation demonstrated biodetection of just 36 total Bacillus anthracis (BA) spores in 0.8 ml of liquid. However, concerns of cross reactivity between the antibody and closely related species of the target pathogens casts doubts on the usefulness of antibody-based assays in terms of the specificity of detection. The goal of this thesis is to develop the PEMS as a method for in-situ, label-free, pathogen detection with better limits of detection than current antibody-based methods as well as high sensitivity and specificity, by exploring PEMS array detection and engineered fluidics specificity augmentation. Experimentation in an 8 mm wide channel revealed that optimal discriminatory detection of BA spores among close cousins (B. cereus (BC), thuringiensis (BT) and subtilis (BS)) was achieved at 14 ml/min. At this flow rate, the detection signals of BC, BT, and BS all fell to within the noise level of the sensor, while that of BA was still nearly optimal. Thus, it was deduced that the interaction forces of BC, BT, and BS were 100 pN. Implementation of array sensing systems enabled real-time, redundant biosensor assays and concurrent background determination by a reference PEMS. Consequentially, successful real-time detection of 10 BA spores/ml was achieved, and single Cryptosporidium parvum (CP) oocyst detection at 0.1 oocysts/ml was accomplished with step-wise resonance frequency shifts of 290 Hz and signal to noise ratios (SNR) greater than 5. In a 19 mm wide flow channel, optimal single oocyst detection efficiency was achieved at 2 ml/min. Optimal discrimination of CP from C. muris (CM

  16. A Portable Array-Type Optical Fiber Sensing Instrument for Real-Time Gas Detection.

    PubMed

    Hung, San-Shan; Chang, Hsing-Cheng; Chang, I-Nan

    2016-12-08

    A novel optical fiber array-type of sensing instrument with temperature compensation for real-time detection was developed to measure oxygen, carbon dioxide, and ammonia simultaneously. The proposed instrument is multi-sensing array integrated with real-time measurement module for portable applications. The sensing optical fibers were etched and polished before coating to increase sensitivities. The ammonia and temperature sensors were each composed of a dye-coated single-mode fiber with constructing a fiber Bragg grating and a long-period filter grating for detecting light intensity. Both carbon dioxide and oxygen sensing structures use multimode fibers where 1-hydroxy-3,6,8-pyrene trisulfonic acid trisodium salt is coated for carbon dioxide sensing and Tris(2,2'-bipyridyl) dichlororuthenium(II) hexahydrate and Tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) chloride are coated for oxygen sensing. Gas-induced fluorescent light intensity variation was applied to detect gas concentration. The portable gas sensing array was set up by integrating with photo-electronic measurement modules and a human-machine interface to detect gases in real time. The measured data have been processed using piecewise-linear method. The sensitivity of the oxygen sensor were 1.54%/V and 9.62%/V for concentrations less than 1.5% and for concentrations between 1.5% and 6%, respectively. The sensitivity of the carbon dioxide sensor were 8.33%/V and 9.62%/V for concentrations less than 2% and for concentrations between 2% and 5%, respectively. For the ammonia sensor, the sensitivity was 27.78%/V, while ammonia concentration was less than 2%.

  17. A Portable Array-Type Optical Fiber Sensing Instrument for Real-Time Gas Detection

    PubMed Central

    Hung, San-Shan; Chang, Hsing-Cheng; Chang, I-Nan

    2016-01-01

    A novel optical fiber array-type of sensing instrument with temperature compensation for real-time detection was developed to measure oxygen, carbon dioxide, and ammonia simultaneously. The proposed instrument is multi-sensing array integrated with real-time measurement module for portable applications. The sensing optical fibers were etched and polished before coating to increase sensitivities. The ammonia and temperature sensors were each composed of a dye-coated single-mode fiber with constructing a fiber Bragg grating and a long-period filter grating for detecting light intensity. Both carbon dioxide and oxygen sensing structures use multimode fibers where 1-hydroxy-3,6,8-pyrene trisulfonic acid trisodium salt is coated for carbon dioxide sensing and Tris(2,2′-bipyridyl) dichlororuthenium(II) hexahydrate and Tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(II) chloride are coated for oxygen sensing. Gas-induced fluorescent light intensity variation was applied to detect gas concentration. The portable gas sensing array was set up by integrating with photo-electronic measurement modules and a human-machine interface to detect gases in real time. The measured data have been processed using piecewise-linear method. The sensitivity of the oxygen sensor were 1.54%/V and 9.62%/V for concentrations less than 1.5% and for concentrations between 1.5% and 6%, respectively. The sensitivity of the carbon dioxide sensor were 8.33%/V and 9.62%/V for concentrations less than 2% and for concentrations between 2% and 5%, respectively. For the ammonia sensor, the sensitivity was 27.78%/V, while ammonia concentration was less than 2%. PMID:27941636

  18. Robotic vehicle uses acoustic array for detection and localization in urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stuart H.; Scanlon, Michael V.

    2001-09-01

    Sophisticated robotic platforms with diverse sensor suites are quickly replacing the eyes and ears of soldiers on the complex battlefield. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) in Adelphi, Maryland has developed a robot-based acoustic detection system that will detect an impulsive noise event, such as a sniper's weapon firing or door slam, and activate a pan-tilt to orient a visible and infrared camera toward the detected sound. Once the cameras are cued to the target, onboard image processing can then track the target and/or transmit the imagery to a remote operator for navigation, situational awareness, and target detection. Such a vehicle can provide reconnaissance, surveillance, and target acquisition for soldiers, law enforcement, and rescue personnel, and remove these people from hazardous environments. ARL's primary robotic platforms contain 16-in. diameter, eight-element acoustic arrays. Additionally, a 9- in. array is being developed in support of DARPA's Tactical Mobile Robot program. The robots have been tested in both urban and open terrain. The current acoustic processing algorithm has been optimized to detect the muzzle blast from a sniper's weapon, and reject many interfering noise sources such as wind gusts, generators, and self-noise. However, other detection algorithms for speech and vehicle detection/tracking are being developed for implementation on this and smaller robotic platforms. The collaboration between two robots, both with known positions and orientations, can provide useful triangulation information for more precise localization of the acoustic events. These robots can be mobile sensor nodes in a larger, more expansive, sensor network that may include stationary ground sensors, UAVs, and other command and control assets. This report will document the performance of the robot's acoustic localization, describe the algorithm, and outline future work.

  19. Statistical Optimization of Evaporative Light Scattering Detection for Molten Sucrose Octaacetate and Comparison With Ultraviolet Diode Array Detection Validation Parameters Using Tandem HPLC Ultraviolet Diode Array Detection/Evaporative Light Scattering Detection-Specific Stability-Indicating Method.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Rudrangi; Ghanta, Ajay; Haware, Rahul V; Johnson, Paul R; Stagner, William C

    2016-12-01

    A sucrose octaacetate (SOA) gradient HPLC evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) and low-wavelength UV-diode array detection (UV-DAD)-specific stability-indicating method development and validation comparison is reported. A central composite response surface design and multicriteria optimization was used to maximize molten SOA area-under-the-curve response and signal-to-noise ratio. The ELSD data were also analyzed using multivariate principal component analysis, analysis of variance, and standard least squares effects modeling. The method suitability and validation parameters of both methods were compared. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report that validates an ELSD method using a molten analyte. SOA exhibited a low molar absorptivity of 439 absorption units/cm/M in water at 210 nm requiring low-wavelength UV-DAD detection. The low-wavelength UV-DAD method provided substantially better intraday and interday precision, intraday and interday goodness-of-fit, detection limit, and quantitation limit than ELSD. ELSD exhibited a 60-fold greater area-under-the-curve response, better resolution, and 58% more theoretical plates. On balance, the UV-DAD method was chosen for SOA chemical kinetic studies. This study illustrates that ELSD may not always be the best alternative to gradient HPLC low-wavelength UV detection.

  20. Simultaneous and rapid detection of multiple pesticide and veterinary drug residues by suspension array technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nan; Gao, Zhixian; Ma, Hongwei; Su, Pu; Ma, Xinhua; Li, Xiaoli; Ou, Guorong

    2013-03-15

    Suspension array technology is proposed for the simultaneous quantitative determination of seven kinds of pesticide and veterinary drug residues, namely, atrazine, chloramphenicol, carbaryl, clenbuterol, 17-β-estradiol, imidacloprid, and tylosin. The assay is simple and can be accomplished within 2h without repeated pumping and washing steps unlike conventional suspension arrays. The hapten-protein conjugate-coated beads bind to their complementary biotinylated antibodies using a competitive immunoassay format. The coefficients of determination R(2) for six targets were greater than 0.992, whereas that for atrazine was 0.961, which indicate good logistic correlations. The dynamic ranges for the seven targets in the 7-plex assay ranged from 2 log units to 4 log units(1.60×10(0)-1.64×10(3), 5.12×10(-2)-1.60×10(2), 1.00×10(0)-3.13×10(3), 4.00×10(-1)-4.10×10(2), 4.00×10(-1)-4.10×10(2), 5.12×10(-2)-1.60×10(2), and 2.00×10(0)-4.00×10(2)ngmL(-1)). The minimum detection concentrations of chloramphenicol, carbaryl, clenbuterol and 17-β-estradiol in the suspension array (0.05, 1.00, 0.40 and 0.40 ng mL(-1)) were lower than the corresponding limits of detection (0.25, 6.60, 24.23 and 13.96 ng mL(-1)) of using an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Environmental scanning electron microscope was employed to characterize the bead surface, which directly confirmed the reactions on the beads. The suspension array is more flexible and feasible than ELISA for the fast quantitative analysis of pesticide and veterinary drug residues.

  1. Detection of chromothripsis‐like patterns with a custom array platform for chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Salaverria, Itziar; Martín‐Garcia, David; López, Cristina; Clot, Guillem; García‐Aragonés, Manel; Navarro, Alba; Delgado, Julio; Baumann, Tycho; Pinyol, Magda; Martin‐Guerrero, Idoia; Carrió, Ana; Costa, Dolors; Queirós, Ana C.; Jayne, Sandrine; Aymerich, Marta; Villamor, Neus; Colomer, Dolors; González, Marcos; López‐Guillermo, Armando; Campo, Elías; Dyer, Martin J. S.; Siebert, Reiner; Armengol, Lluís

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a common disease with highly variable clinical course. Several recurrent chromosomal alterations are associated with prognosis and may guide risk‐adapted therapy. We have developed a targeted genome‐wide array to provide a robust tool for ascertaining abnormalities in CLL and to overcome limitations of the 4‐marker fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). DNA from 180 CLL patients were hybridized to the qChip®Hemo array with a high density of probes covering commonly altered loci in CLL (11q22‐q23, 13q14, and 17p13), nine focal regions (2p15‐p16.1, 2p24.3, 2q13, 2q36.3‐q37.1, 3p21.31, 8q24.21, 9p21.3, 10q24.32, and 18q21.32‐q21.33) and two larger regions (6q14.1‐q22.31 and 7q31.33‐q33). Overall, 86% of the cases presented copy number alterations (CNA) by array. There was a high concordance of array findings with FISH (84% sensitivity, 100% specificity); all discrepancies corresponded to subclonal alterations detected only by FISH. A chromothripsis‐like pattern was detected in eight cases. Three showed concomitant shattered 5p with gain of TERT along with isochromosome 17q. Presence of 11q loss was associated with shorter time to first treatment (P = 0.003), whereas 17p loss, increased genomic complexity, and chromothripsis were associated with shorter overall survival (P < 0.001, P = 0.001, and P = 0.02, respectively). In conclusion, we have validated a targeted array for the diagnosis of CLL that accurately detects, in a single experiment, all relevant CNAs, genomic complexity, chromothripsis, copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity, and CNAs not covered by the FISH panel. This test may be used as a practical tool to stratify CLL patients for routine diagnostics or clinical trials. © 2015 The Authors. Genes, Chromosomes & Cancer Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26305789

  2. ZnO nanorods array based field-effect transistor biosensor for phosphate detection.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rafiq; Ahn, Min-Sang; Hahn, Yoon-Bong

    2017-03-18

    A promising field-effect transistor (FET) biosensor has been fabricated based on pyruvate oxidase (PyO) functionalized ZnO nanorods (ZnO NRs) array grown on seeded SiO2/Si substrate. The direct and vertically grown ZnO NRs on the seeded SiO2/Si substrate offers high surface area for enhanced PyO immobilization, which further helps to detect phosphate with higher specificity. Under optimum conditions, the fabricated FET biosensor provided a convenient method for phosphate detection with high sensitivity (80.57μAmM(-1)cm(-2)) in a wide-linear range (0.1µM-7.0mM). Additionally, it also showed very low effect of electroactive species, stability and good reproducibility. Encouraging results suggest that this approach presents a promising method to be used for field measurements to detect phosphate.

  3. Holographic method for site-resolved detection of a 2D array of ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Daniel Kai; Deissler, Benjamin; Limmer, Wolfgang; Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel approach to site-resolved detection of a 2D gas of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. A near-resonant laser beam is coherently scattered by the atomic array, and after passing a lens its interference pattern is holographically recorded by superimposing it with a reference laser beam on a CCD chip. Fourier transformation of the recorded intensity pattern reconstructs the atomic distribution in the lattice with single-site resolution. The holographic detection method requires only about two hundred scattered photons per atom in order to achieve a high reconstruction fidelity of 99.9 %. Therefore, additional cooling during detection might not be necessary even for light atomic elements such as lithium. Furthermore, first investigations suggest that small aberrations of the lens can be post-corrected in imaging processing.

  4. Detection and classification of multiple finger movements using a chronically implanted Utah Electrode Array.

    PubMed

    Egan, Joshua; Baker, Justin; House, Paul; Greger, Bradley

    2011-01-01

    The ability to detect and classify individual and combined finger movements from neural data is rapidly advancing. The work that has been done has demonstrated the feasibility of decoding finger movements from acutely recorded neurons. There is a need for a recording model that meets the chronic requirements of a neuroprosthetic application and to address this need we have developed an algorithm that can detect and classify individual and combined finger movements using neuronal data acquired from a chronically implanted Utah Electrode Array (UEA). The algorithm utilized the firing rates of individual neurons and performed with an average sensitivity and an average specificity that were both greater than 92% across all movement types. These results lend further support that a chronically implanted UEA is suitable for acquiring and decoding neuronal data and also demonstrate a decoding method that can detect and classify finger movements without any a priori knowledge of the data, task, or behavior.

  5. Colorimetric Sensor Arrays for the Detection and Identification of Chemical Weapons and Explosives

    PubMed Central

    Kangas, Michael J.; Burks, Raychelle M.; Atwater, Jordyn; Lukowicz, Rachel M.; Williams, Pat; Holmes, Andrea E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT There is a significant demand for devices that can rapidly detect chemical–biological–explosive (CBE) threats on-site and allow for immediate responders to mitigate spread, risk, and loss. The key to an effective reconnaissance mission is a unified detection technology that analyzes potential threats in real time. In addition to reviewing the current state of the art in the field, this review illustrates the practicality of colorimetric arrays composed of sensors that change colors in the presence of analytes. This review also describes an outlook toward future technologies, and describes how they could possibly be used in areas such as war zones to detect and identify hazardous substances. PMID:27636675

  6. An electrochemical immunosensor based on interdigitated array microelectrode for the detection of chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yaoyao; Sun, Xia; Guo, Yemin; Zhao, Wenping; Wang, Xiangyou

    2015-02-01

    An electrochemical immunosensor based on interdigitated array microelectrodes (IDAMs) was developed for sensitive, specific and rapid detection of chlorpyrifos. Anti-chlorpyrifos monoclonal antibodies were orientedly immobilized onto the gold microelectrode surface through protein A. Chlorpyrifos were then captured by the immobilized antibody, resulting in an impedance change in the IDAMs surface. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used in conjunction with the fabricated sensor to detect chlorpyrifos. Under optimum conditions, the impedance value change of chlorpyrifos was proportional to its concentrations in the range of 10(0)-10(5) ng/mL. The detection limit was found to be 0.014 ng/mL for chlorpyrifos. The proposed chlorpyrifos immunosensor could be used as a screening method in pesticide determination for the analysis of environmental, agricultural and pharmaceutical samples due to its rapidity, sensitivity and low cost.

  7. Development and characterization of a microheater array device for real-time DNA mutation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Layne; Okandan, Murat; Chagovetz, Alex; Blair, Steve

    2008-02-01

    DNA analysis, specifically single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection, is becoming increasingly important in rapid diagnostics and disease detection. Temperature is often controlled to help speed reaction rates and perform melting of hybridized oligonucleotides. The difference in melting temperatures, Tm, between wild-type and SNP sequences, respectively, to a given probe oligonucleotide, is indicative of the specificity of the reaction. We have characterized Tm's in solution and on a solid substrate of three sequences from known mutations associated with Cystic Fibrosis. Taking advantage of Tm differences, a microheater array device was designed to enable individual temperature control of up to 18 specific hybridization events. The device was fabricated at Sandia National Laboratories using surface micromachining techniques. The microheaters have been characterized using an IR camera at Sandia and show individual temperature control with minimal thermal cross talk. Development of the device as a real-time DNA detection platform, including surface chemistry and associated microfluidics, is described.

  8. Development and characterization of a microheater array device for real-time DNA mutation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Layne; Okandan, Murat; Chagovetz, Alex; Blair, Steve

    2008-04-01

    DNA analysis, specifically single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection, is becoming increasingly important in rapid diagnostics and disease detection. Temperature is often controlled to help speed reaction rates and perform melting of hybridized oligonucleotides. The difference in melting temperatures, Tm, between wild-type and SNP sequences, respectively, to a given probe oligonucleotide, is indicative of the specificity of the reaction. We have characterized Tm's in solution and on a solid substrate of three sequences from known mutations associated with Cystic Fibrosis. Taking advantage of Tm differences, a microheater array device was designed to enable individual temperature control of up to 18 specific hybridization events. The device was fabricated at Sandia National Laboratories using surface micromachining techniques. The microheaters have been characterized using an IR camera at Sandia and show individual temperature control with minimal thermal cross talk. Development of the device as a real-time DNA detection platform, including surface chemistry and associated microfluidics, is described.

  9. Sensitive and Selective Detection of HIV-1 RRE RNA Using Vertical Silicon Nanowire Electrode Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehyung; Hong, Min-Ho; Han, Sanghun; Na, Jukwan; Kim, Ilsoo; Kwon, Yong-Joon; Lim, Yong-beom; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2016-07-01

    In this study, HIV-1 Rev response element (RRE) RNA was detected via an Au-coated vertical silicon nanowire electrode array (VSNEA). The VSNEA was fabricated by combining bottom-up and top-down approaches and then immobilized by artificial peptides for the recognition of HIV-1 RRE. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) analysis was used to measure the electrochemical response of the peptide-immobilized VSNEA to the concentration and types of HIV-1 RRE RNA. DPV peaks showed linearity to the concentration of RNA with a detection limit down to 1.513 fM. It also showed the clear different peaks to the mutated HIV-1 RRE RNA. The high sensitivity and selectivity of VSNEA for the detection of HIV-1 RRE RNA may be attributed to the high surface-to-volume ratio and total overlap diffusion mode of ions of the one-dimensional nanowire electrodes.

  10. Detection Rates for Surveys for Fast Transients with Next Generation Radio Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macquart, Jean-Pierre

    2011-06-01

    We relate the underlying properties of a population of fast radio-emitting transient events to its expected detection rate in a survey of finite sensitivity. The distribution of the distances of the detected events is determined in terms of the population luminosity distribution and survey parameters, for both extragalactic and Galactic populations. The detection rate as a function of Galactic position is examined to identify regions that optimize survey efficiency in a survey whose field of view is limited. The impact of temporal smearing caused by scattering in the interstellar medium has a large and direction-dependent bearing on the detection of impulsive signals, and we present a model for the effects of scattering on the detection rate. We show that the detection rate scales as ΩS -3/2 + δ 0, where Ω is the field of view, S 0 is the minimum detectable flux density, and 0 < δ <= 3/2 for a survey of Galactic transients in which interstellar scattering or the finite volume of the Galaxy is important. We derive formal conditions on the optimal survey strategy to adopt under different circumstances for fast transient surveys on next generation large-element, wide-field arrays, such as ASKAP, LOFAR, the MWA, and the SKA, and show how interstellar scattering and the finite spatial extent of a Galactic population modify the choice of optimal strategy.

  11. The Microbial Detection Array for Detection of Emerging Viruses in Clinical Samples - A Useful Panmicrobial Diagnostic Tool

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstierne, Maiken W.; McLoughlin, Kevin S.; Olesen, Majken Lindholm; Papa, Anna; Gardner, Shea N.; Engler, Olivier; Plumet, Sebastien; Mirazimi, Ali; Weidmann, Manfred; Niedrig, Matthias; Fomsgaard, Anders; Erlandsson, Lena

    2014-01-01

    Emerging viruses are usually endemic to tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world, but increased global travel, climate change and changes in lifestyle are believed to contribute to the spread of these viruses into new regions. Many of these viruses cause similar disease symptoms as other emerging viruses or common infections, making these unexpected pathogens difficult to diagnose. Broad-spectrum pathogen detection microarrays containing probes for all sequenced viruses and bacteria can provide rapid identification of viruses, guiding decisions about treatment and appropriate case management. We report a modified Whole Transcriptome Amplification (WTA) method that increases unbiased amplification, particular of RNA viruses. Using this modified WTA method, we tested the specificity and sensitivity of the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array (LLMDA) against a wide range of emerging viruses present in both non-clinical and clinical samples using two different microarray data analysis methods. PMID:24963710

  12. Development of finger-motion capturing device based on optical linear encoder.

    PubMed

    Li, Kang; Chen, I-Ming; Yeo, Song Huat; Lim, Chee Kian

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the design and validation of a wearable glove-based multifinger-motion capture device (SmartGlove), specifically focusing on the development of a new optical linear encoder (OLE). The OLE specially designed for this project is compact and lightweight and has low-power consumption. The characterization tests showed that the OLE's digital out put has good linearity and is accurate. The first prototype of SmartGlove, which uses 10 OLEs to capture the flexion/extension motion of the 14 finger joints, was constructed based on the multipoint-sensing method. A user study evaluated the SmartGlove using a standard protocol and found high repeatability and reliability in both the gripped and flat-hand positions compared with four other evaluated data gloves using the same protocol.

  13. Realization of preconditioned Lanczos and conjugate gradient algorithms on optical linear algebra processors.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A

    1988-08-01

    Lanczos and conjugate gradient algorithms are important in computational linear algebra. In this paper, a parallel pipelined realization of these algorithms on a ring of optical linear algebra processors is described. The flow of data is designed to minimize the idle times of the optical multiprocessor and the redundancy of computations. The effects of optical round-off errors on the solutions obtained by the optical Lanczos and conjugate gradient algorithms are analyzed, and it is shown that optical preconditioning can improve the accuracy of these algorithms substantially. Algorithms for optical preconditioning and results of numerical experiments on solving linear systems of equations arising from partial differential equations are discussed. Since the Lanczos algorithm is used mostly with sparse matrices, a folded storage scheme to represent sparse matrices on spatial light modulators is also described.

  14. Spike Detection for Large Neural Populations Using High Density Multielectrode Arrays.

    PubMed

    Muthmann, Jens-Oliver; Amin, Hayder; Sernagor, Evelyne; Maccione, Alessandro; Panas, Dagmara; Berdondini, Luca; Bhalla, Upinder S; Hennig, Matthias H

    2015-01-01

    An emerging generation of high-density microelectrode arrays (MEAs) is now capable of recording spiking activity simultaneously from thousands of neurons with closely spaced electrodes. Reliable spike detection and analysis in such recordings is challenging due to the large amount of raw data and the dense sampling of spikes with closely spaced electrodes. Here, we present a highly efficient, online capable spike detection algorithm, and an offline method with improved detection rates, which enables estimation of spatial event locations at a resolution higher than that provided by the array by combining information from multiple electrodes. Data acquired with a 4096 channel MEA from neuronal cultures and the neonatal retina, as well as synthetic data, was used to test and validate these methods. We demonstrate that these algorithms outperform conventional methods due to a better noise estimate and an improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) through combining information from multiple electrodes. Finally, we present a new approach for analyzing population activity based on the characterization of the spatio-temporal event profile, which does not require the isolation of single units. Overall, we show how the improved spatial resolution provided by high density, large scale MEAs can be reliably exploited to characterize activity from large neural populations and brain circuits.

  15. Pattern-recognition analysis of sensor arrays for toxic vapor detection

    SciTech Connect

    Rose-Pehrsson, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    A portable device was developed by Argonne National Laboratory to detect, identify, and warn personnel of the presence of hazardous gases and vapors. The prototype device uses an array of four different electrochemical sensors, which can be operated in four different modes, yielding 16 channels of data for each chemical species detected. Pattern recognition was used to determine the uniqueness of the information obtained and classification capacity of each channel. Analysis of a 22 vapor data set indicates that 10 channels provide unique information. An array of surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices coated with selectively sorbent materials has been investigated as a monitor for personnel safety where detection of hazardous vapors is required at sub-part-per-million (sub-ppm) concentrations in ambient air that can contain interferences at much higher concentration. Two large data sets were generated and studied. Principal component analysis demonstrates good separation of the different classes of chemical vapors tested. Hierarchical clustering provides evidence of the correlations between solubility properties and the observed clustering. Pattern recognition methods show that three to four sensors can adequately separate individual vapors of interest from interference vapors. A prediction set generated to test the linear discriminant indicated that all of the vapors are correctly identified, except water. Supervised learning techniques are used to reduce to eight the number of sensors necessary to identify the hazardous vapors in the presence of mixtures.

  16. Bacteria detection based on its blockage effect on silicon nanopore array.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yanyan; Li, Zhen; Luo, Qiaohui; Liu, Jingqing; Wu, Jianmin

    2016-05-15

    Bacteria detection plays an important role in the guarantee of food and water safety. This work proposed a new sensing strategy for the rapid detection of bacteria based on its blockage effect on nanopore array, which was prepared from electrochemically etched silicon. With the assistance of microfluidic technology, the nanopore array attached with Escherichia coli antibody can selectively and rapidly capture E. coli bacteria, resulting in the decrease of pore accessibility. The signal of pore blockage can be measured by in-direct Fourier Transformed Reflectometric Interference Spectroscopy (FT-RIS). The pore blockage signal has a linear relationship with the logarithm of bacterial density in aqueous sample within the range from 10(3) to 10(7)cfuml(-1). Due to the specific interaction between the antibody and target bacteria, only the E. coli sample displayed significant pore blockage effect, whereas the non-target bacteria, Nox and P17, almost did not show any pore blockage effect. The strategy established in this work might be pervasively applied in the rapid detection of target bacteria and cell in a label-free manner.

  17. Spike Detection for Large Neural Populations Using High Density Multielectrode Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Muthmann, Jens-Oliver; Amin, Hayder; Sernagor, Evelyne; Maccione, Alessandro; Panas, Dagmara; Berdondini, Luca; Bhalla, Upinder S.; Hennig, Matthias H.

    2015-01-01

    An emerging generation of high-density microelectrode arrays (MEAs) is now capable of recording spiking activity simultaneously from thousands of neurons with closely spaced electrodes. Reliable spike detection and analysis in such recordings is challenging due to the large amount of raw data and the dense sampling of spikes with closely spaced electrodes. Here, we present a highly efficient, online capable spike detection algorithm, and an offline method with improved detection rates, which enables estimation of spatial event locations at a resolution higher than that provided by the array by combining information from multiple electrodes. Data acquired with a 4096 channel MEA from neuronal cultures and the neonatal retina, as well as synthetic data, was used to test and validate these methods. We demonstrate that these algorithms outperform conventional methods due to a better noise estimate and an improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) through combining information from multiple electrodes. Finally, we present a new approach for analyzing population activity based on the characterization of the spatio-temporal event profile, which does not require the isolation of single units. Overall, we show how the improved spatial resolution provided by high density, large scale MEAs can be reliably exploited to characterize activity from large neural populations and brain circuits. PMID:26733859

  18. Sniper detection using a helmet array: first tests in urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hengy, S.; Demezzo, S.; Hamery, P.

    2007-04-01

    The presence of snipers in modern conflicts leads to high insecurity for the soldiers. In order to improve the soldier's protection against this threat, the French German Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) and Rheinmetall Defence Electronics GmbH (RDE) work together under the hospice of the German MOD to develop a helmet integrated acoustic array for the detection and localization of snipers. This paper summarizes the results obtained during the collaboration between RDE and the ISL concerning the detection and the localization of the Mach and muzzle waves generated by rifle shots. It summarizes the technical choices that have been made and explains the algorithms that have been used in October 2006 in Lehnin (proving ground of the German MOD), where some measurements in an urban environment have been made. The estimation of the distance between the shooter and the arrays is made with one head equipment alone. In the first tests that have been made with the algorithms developed in ISL, more than 2000 shots have been detected and localized successfully in real-time in non-urban environment. No false alarms have been observed. This paper will present the first results that have been obtained in urban environment.

  19. Single domain antibodies for the detection of ricin using silicon photonic microring resonator arrays.

    PubMed

    Shia, Winnie W; Bailey, Ryan C

    2013-01-15

    Ricin is a lethal protein toxin derived from the castor bean plant. Given its notorious history as a biowarfare agent and homicidal weapon, ricin has been classified as a category B bioterrorism agent. Current ricin detection methods based on immunoassays lack the required sensitivity and specificity for many homeland security surveillance applications. Importantly, many conventional antibody-based methodologies are unable to distinguish ricin from RCA 120, a nontoxic protein also found in the castor bean plant. Single domain antibodies (sdAbs), which are recombinantly derived from immunized llamas, are known to have high affinities for ricin A or B chains and low cross-reactivity with RCA 120. Herein, we demonstrate the use of silicon photonic microring resonators for antibody affinity profiling and one-step ricin detection at concentrations down to 300 pM using a 15 min, label-free assay format. These sdAbs were also simultaneously compared with a commercial anti-RCA IgG antibody in a multicapture agent, single target immunoassay using arrays of microrings, which allowed direct comparison of sensitivity and specificity. A selected sdAb was also found to exhibit outstanding specificity against another biotoxin, saporin, which has mechanism of action similar to ricin. Given the rapidity, scalability, and multiplexing capability of this silicon-based technology, this work represents a step toward using microring resonator arrays for the sensitive and specific detection of biowarfare agents.

  20. Photonic nanojet array for fast detection of single nanoparticles in a flow.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Cornaglia, Matteo; Gijs, Martin A M

    2015-03-11

    We detect by optical microscopy Au and fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) during their motion in water-based medium, using an array of dielectric microspheres that are patterned in a microwell array template. The microspheres act as lenses focusing the light originating from a microscope objective into so-called photonic nanojets that expose the medium within a microfluidic channel. When a NP is randomly transported through a nanojet, its backscattered light (for a bare Au NP) or its fluorescent emission is instantaneously detected by video microscopy. Au NPs down to 50 nm in size, as well as fluorescent NPs down to 20 nm in size, are observed by using a low magnification/low numerical aperture microscope objective in bright-field or fluorescence mode, respectively. Compared to the NPs present outside of the photonic nanojets, the light scattering or fluorescence intensity of the NPs in the nanojets is typically enhanced by up to a factor of ∼40. The experimental intensity is found to be proportional to the area occupied by the NP in the nanojet. The technique is also used for immunodetection of biomolecules immobilized on Au NPs in buffer and, in future, it may develop into a versatile tool to detect nanometric objects of environmental or biological importance, such as NPs, viruses, or other biological agents.

  1. Detecting seismic activity with a covariance matrix analysis of data recorded on seismic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seydoux, L.; Shapiro, N. M.; de Rosny, J.; Brenguier, F.; Landès, M.

    2016-03-01

    Modern seismic networks are recording the ground motion continuously at the Earth's surface, providing dense spatial samples of the seismic wavefield. The aim of our study is to analyse these records with statistical array-based approaches to identify coherent time-series as a function of time and frequency. Using ideas mainly brought from the random matrix theory, we analyse the spatial coherence of the seismic wavefield from the width of the covariance matrix eigenvalue distribution. We propose a robust detection method that could be used for the analysis of weak and emergent signals embedded in background noise, such as the volcanic or tectonic tremors and local microseismicity, without any prior knowledge about the studied wavefields. We apply our algorithm to the records of the seismic monitoring network of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano located at La Réunion Island and composed of 21 receivers with an aperture of ˜15 km. This array recorded many teleseismic earthquakes as well as seismovolcanic events during the year 2010. We show that the analysis of the wavefield at frequencies smaller than ˜0.1 Hz results in detection of the majority of teleseismic events from the Global Centroid Moment Tensor database. The seismic activity related to the Piton de la Fournaise volcano is well detected at frequencies above 1 Hz.

  2. Low Frequency Phased Array Application for Crack Detection in Cast Austenitic Piping

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2006-10-01

    As part of a multi-year program funded by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) to address nondestructive examination (NDE) reliability of inservice inspection (ISI) programs, studies conducted at the Pacific N¬orthwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, have focused on assessing novel NDE approaches for the inspection of coarse-grained, cast stainless steel reactor components. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the US NRC on the utility, effec¬tiveness and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) as related to the ISI of primary piping components in US commercial nuclear power plants. This paper describes progress, recent developments and results from an assessment of a portion of the work relating to the ultrasonic low frequency phased array inspection technique. Westinghouse Owner’s Group (WOG) cast stainless steel pipe segments with thermal and mechanical fatigue cracks, PNNL samples containing thermal fatigue cracks and several blank vintage specimens having very coarse grains that are representative of early centrifugally cast piping installed in PWRs, were used for assessing the inspection method. The phased array approach was implemented using an R/D Tech Tomoscan III system operating at 1.0 MHz and 500 kHz, providing composite volumetric images of the samples. Several dual, transmit-receive, custom designed low-frequency arrays were employed in laboratory trials. Results from laboratory studies for assessing detection, localization and length sizing effectiveness are discussed.

  3. HIGH-RESOLUTION GENOMIC ARRAYS FACILITATE DETECTION OF NOVEL CRYPTIC CHROMOSOMAL LESIONS IN MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES

    PubMed Central

    O’Keefe, Christine L.; Tiu, Ramon; Gondek, Lukasz P.; Powers, Jennifer; Theil, Karl S.; Kalaycio, Matt; Lichtin, Alan; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Unbalanced chromosomal aberrations are common in myelodysplastic syndromes, and have prognostic implications. An increased frequency of cytogenetic changes may reflect an inherent chromosomal instability due to failure of DNA repair. Therefore, it is likely that chromosomal defects in myelodysplastic syndromes may be more frequent than predicted by metaphase cytogenetics and new cryptic lesions may be revealed by precise analysis methods. Methods We used a novel high-resolution karyotyping technique, array-based comparative genomic hybridization, to investigate the frequency of cryptic chromosomal lesions in a cohort of 38 well-characterized myelodysplastic syndromes patients; results were confirmed by microsatellite quantitative PCR or single nucleotide polymorphism analysis. Results As compared to metaphase karyotyping, chromosomal abnormalities detected by array-based analysis were encountered more frequently and in a higher proportion of patients. For example, chromosomal defects were found in patients with a normal karyotype by traditional cytogenetics. In addition to verifying common abnormalities, previously cryptic defects were found in new regions of the genome. Cryptic changes often overlapped chromosomes and regions frequently identified as abnormal by metaphase cytogenetics. Conclusion The results underscore the instability of the myelodysplastic syndromes genome and highlight the utility of array-based karyotyping to study cryptic chromosomal changes which may provide new diagnostic information. PMID:17258073

  4. A technique for detection of PeV neutrinos using a phased radio array

    SciTech Connect

    Vieregg, A.G.; Bechtol, K.; Romero-Wolf, A. E-mail: bechtol@kicp.uchicago.edu

    2016-02-01

    The detection of high energy neutrinos (10{sup 15}–10{sup 20} eV) is an important step toward understanding the most energetic cosmic accelerators and would enable tests of fundamental physics at energy scales that cannot easily be achieved on Earth. In this energy range, there are two expected populations of neutrinos: the astrophysical flux observed with IceCube at lower energies (∼1 PeV) and the predicted cosmogenic flux at higher energies (∼10{sup 18} eV) . Radio detector arrays such as RICE, ANITA, ARA, and ARIANNA exploit the Askaryan effect and the radio transparency of glacial ice, which together enable enormous volumes of ice to be monitored with sparse instrumentation. We describe here the design for a phased radio array that would lower the energy threshold of radio techniques to the PeV scale, allowing measurement of the astrophysical flux observed with IceCube over an extended energy range. Meaningful energy overlap with optical Cherenkov telescopes could be used for energy calibration. The phased radio array design would also provide more efficient coverage of the large effective volume required to discover cosmogenic neutrinos.

  5. Spirally oriented Au microelectrode array sensor for detection of Hg (II).

    PubMed

    Huan, Tran Ngoc; Hung, Le Quoc; Ha, Vu Thi Thu; Anh, Nguyen Hoang; Van Khai, Tran; Shim, Kwang Bo; Chung, Hoeil

    2012-05-30

    A simple and reproducible carbon microelectrode array (CMA), designed to eliminate diffusive interference among the microelectrodes, has been fabricated and used as a frame to build a gold (Au) microelectrode array (GMA) sensor. To prepare the CMA initially, rather than use an uncontrollable large number of carbon fibers, only 60 carbon fibers of regular size were used to ensure manageable and reproducible arrangement for array construction. In addition, for efficient spatial arrangement of the microelectrode and easy sensor preparation, carbon fibers were oriented in a spiral fashion by rolling around a Cu wire. The distance between carbon fibers was carefully determined to avoid overlap among individual diffusion layers, one of the important factors governing steady-state current response and sensor-to-sensor reproducibility. After the preparation of a spirally arranged CMA, Au was electrochemically deposited on the surface of individual carbon electrodes to build a final GMA sensor. Then, the GMA sensor was used to measure Hg(2+) in a low concentration range. Simultaneously, multiple GMA sensors were independently prepared to examine reproducibility in sensor fabrication as well as electrochemical measurement (sensor-to-sensor reproducibility). Overall, highly sensitive detection of Hg(2+) was possible using the proposed GMA sensor due to efficient arrangement of microelectrodes and the sensor-to-sensor reproducibility was superior owing to simplicity in sensor fabrication.

  6. Experimental characterization of mm-wave detection by a micro-array of Golay cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denison, Douglas R.; Knotts, Michael E.; McConney, Michael E.; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.

    2009-05-01

    We present experimental results for an uncooled imaging focal plane array technology that consists of a polymer/metal/polymer layered membrane suspended over a micro-fabricated array of cavities. The device operation is Golay-like (heating of air in the cavity causes a detectable deflection of the membrane proportional to incident EM power), but potentially offers both greater sensitivity and more read-out options (optical or electrical) than a traditional Golay cell through tailoring of the membrane properties. The membrane is formed from a layer-by-layer deposition of polymer with one or more monolayers of gold nanoparticles (or other metal) that help control the membrane's elasticity and deformation-dependent optical reflectivity/electrical conductivity. Baseline capabilities of the device have been established through optical measurements of membrane deflection due to incident mm-wave radiation modulated at 30 Hz (corresponding to a video refresh rate). The device demonstrates an NEP of 300 nW/√Hz at 105 GHz for a 19-layer membrane (9 poly/1 Au/9 poly) suspended over an array of 80 μm diameter cavities (depth = 100 μm) etched in a 500 μm thick substrate of Si. Calculations of membrane sensitivity show that this NEP could be reduced to ~ 100 pW/√Hz with enlarged cavity diameters on the order of 600 μm.

  7. Large-Scale Plasmonic nanoCones Array For Spectroscopy Detection.

    PubMed

    Das, Gobind; Battista, Edmondo; Manzo, Gianluigi; Causa, Filippo; Netti, Paolo Antonio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2015-10-28

    Advanced optical materials or interfaces are gaining attention for diagnostic applications. However, the achievement of large device interface as well as facile surface functionalization largely impairs their wide use. The present work is aimed to address different innovative aspects related to the fabrication of large-area 3D plasmonic arrays, their direct and easy functionalization with capture elements, and their spectroscopic verifications through enhanced Raman and enhanced fluorescence techniques. In detail, we have investigated the effect of a Au-based nanoCone array, fabricated by means of direct nanoimprint technique over large area (mm(2)), on protein capturing and on the enhancement in optical signal. A selective functionalization of gold surfaces was proposed by using a peptide (AuPi3) previously selected by phage display. In this regard, two different sequences, labeled with fluorescein and biotin, were chemisorbed on metallic surfaces. The presence of Au nanoCones array consents an enhancement in electric field on the apex of cone, enabling the detection of molecules. We have witnessed around 12-fold increase in fluorescence intensity and SERS enhancement factor around 1.75 × 10(5) with respect to the flat gold surface. Furthermore, a sharp decrease in fluorescence lifetime over nanoCones confirms the increase in radiative emission (i.e., an increase in photonics density at the apex of cones).

  8. Low frequency gravitational wave detection with ground-based atom interferometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaibi, W.; Geiger, R.; Canuel, B.; Bertoldi, A.; Landragin, A.; Bouyer, P.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new detection strategy for gravitational waves (GWs) below a few hertz based on a correlated array of atom interferometers (AIs). Our proposal allows us to reduce the Newtonian noise (NN), which limits all ground based GW detectors below a few hertz, including previous atom interferometry-based concepts. Using an array of long baseline AI gradiometers yields several estimations of the NN, whose effect can thus be reduced via statistical averaging. Considering the km baseline of current optical detectors, a NN rejection of a factor of 2 could be achieved and tested with existing AI array geometries. Exploiting the correlation properties of the gravity acceleration noise, we show that a tenfold or more NN rejection is possible with a dedicated configuration. Considering a conservative NN model and the current developments in cold atom technology, we show that strain sensitivities below 1 ×10-19/√{Hz } in the 0.3 -3 Hz frequency band can be within reach, with a peak sensitivity of 3 ×10-23/√{Hz } at 2 Hz . Our proposed configuration could extend the observation window of current detectors by a decade and fill the gap between ground-based and space-based instruments.

  9. Highly sensitive label-free dual sensor array for rapid detection of wound bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sheybani, Roya; Shukla, Anita

    2017-06-15

    Wound infections are a critical healthcare concern worldwide. Rapid and effective antibiotic treatments that can mitigate infection severity and prevent the spread of antibiotic resistance are contingent upon timely infection detection. In this work, dual electrochemical pH and cell-attachment sensor arrays were developed for the real-time spatial and temporal monitoring of potential wound infections. Biocompatible polymeric device coatings were integrated to stabilize the sensors and promote bacteria attachment while preventing non-specific cell and protein fouling. High sensitivity (bacteria concentration of 10(2) colony forming units (CFU)/mL and -88.1±6.3mV/pH over a pH range of 1-13) and stability over 14 days were achieved without the addition of biological recognition elements. The dual sensor array was demonstrated to successfully monitor the growth of both gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes) and gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli) over time through lag and log growth phases and following antibiotic administration and in simulated shallow wounds conditions. The versatile fabrication methods utilized in sensor development, superior sensitivity, prolonged stability, and lack of non-specific sensor fouling may enable long-term in situ sensor array operation in low resource settings.

  10. A technique for detection of PeV neutrinos using a phased radio array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieregg, A. G.; Bechtol, K.; Romero-Wolf, A.

    2016-02-01

    The detection of high energy neutrinos (1015-1020 eV) is an important step toward understanding the most energetic cosmic accelerators and would enable tests of fundamental physics at energy scales that cannot easily be achieved on Earth. In this energy range, there are two expected populations of neutrinos: the astrophysical flux observed with IceCube at lower energies (~1 PeV) and the predicted cosmogenic flux at higher energies (~1018 eV) . Radio detector arrays such as RICE, ANITA, ARA, and ARIANNA exploit the Askaryan effect and the radio transparency of glacial ice, which together enable enormous volumes of ice to be monitored with sparse instrumentation. We describe here the design for a phased radio array that would lower the energy threshold of radio techniques to the PeV scale, allowing measurement of the astrophysical flux observed with IceCube over an extended energy range. Meaningful energy overlap with optical Cherenkov telescopes could be used for energy calibration. The phased radio array design would also provide more efficient coverage of the large effective volume required to discover cosmogenic neutrinos.

  11. Development of a bead-based suspension array for the detection of pathogens in acute respiratory tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Ru; Zhang, Wei; Hua, Zhi-Dan; Lin, Xiao-Hong; Lin, Meng-Qing; Huang, Wen-Sen; Huang, Li-Ping; Yu, Xiao-Li; Xu, Neng-Luan; Lin, Ming; Xie, Bao-Song; Shen, Xiao-Na; Xie, Jian-Feng; Wang, Yi; Huang, Meng; Wu, Yan-An; Hu, Xin-Lan

    2016-01-01

    We developed a high-throughput bead-based suspension array for simultaneous detection of 20 respiratory tract pathogens in clinical specimens. Pathogen-specific genes were amplified and hybridized to probes coupled to carboxyl-encoded microspheres. Fluorescence intensities generated via the binding of phycoerythrin-conjugated streptavidin with biotin-labeled targets were measured by the Luminex 100 bead-based suspension array system. The bead-based suspension array detected bacteria in a significantly higher number of samples compared to the conventional culture. There was no significant difference in the detection rate of atypical pathogensatypical pathogens or viruses between the bead-based suspension array and real-time PCR. This technology can play a significant role in screening patients with pneumonia. PMID:27190247

  12. PROSPECTS FOR THE DETECTION OF FAST RADIO BURSTS WITH THE MURCHISON WIDEFIELD ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Trott, Cathryn M.; Tingay, Steven J.; Wayth, Randall B.

    2013-10-10

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are short timescale (<<1 s) astrophysical radio signals, presumed to be a signature of cataclysmic events of extragalactic origin. The discovery of six high-redshift events at ∼1400 MHz from the Parkes radio telescope suggests that FRBs may occur at a high rate across the sky. The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) operates at low radio frequencies (80-300 MHz) and is expected to detect FRBs due to its large collecting area (∼2500 m{sup 2}) and wide field-of-view (FOV, ∼ 1000 deg{sup 2} at ν = 200 MHz). We compute the expected number of FRB detections for the MWA assuming a source population consistent with the reported detections. Our formalism properly accounts for the frequency-dependence of the antenna primary beam, the MWA system temperature, and unknown spectral index of the source population, for three modes of FRB detection: coherent; incoherent; and fast imaging. We find that the MWA's sensitivity and large FOV combine to provide the expectation of multiple detectable events per week in all modes, potentially making it an excellent high time resolution science instrument. Deviations of the expected number of detections from actual results will provide a strong constraint on the assumptions made for the underlying source population and intervening plasma distribution.

  13. Use of a square-array direct-current resistivity method to detect fractures in crystalline bedrock in New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, J.W.; Haeni, F.P.; Watson, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    Azimuthal square-array direct-current (dc) resistivity soundings were used to detect fractures in bedrock in the Mirror Lake watershed in Grafton County, New Hampshire. Soundings were conducted at a site where crystalline bedrock underlies approximately 7 m (meters) of glacial drift. Measured apparent resistivities changed with the orientation of the array. Graphical interpretation of the square-array data indicates that a dominant fracture set and (or) foliation in the bedrock is oriented at 030° (degrees). Interpretation of crossed square-array data indicates an orientation of 027° and an anisotropy factor of 1.31. Assuming that anisotropy is due to fractures, the secondary porosity is estimated to range from 0.01 to 0.10.Interpretations of azimuthal square-array data are supported by other geophysical data, including azimuthal seismic-refraction surveys and azimuthal Schlumberger dc-resistivity soundings at the Camp Osceola well field. Dominant fracture trends indicated by these geophysical methods are 022° (seismic-refraction) and 037° (dc-resistivity). Fracture mapping of bedrock outcrops at a site within 250 m indicates that the maximum fracture-strike frequency is oriented at 030°.The square-array dc-resistivity sounding method is more sensitive to a given rock anisotropy than the more commonly used Schlumberger and Wenner arrays. An additional advantage of the square-array method is that it requires about 65 percent less surface area than an equivalent survey using a Schlumberger or Wenner array.

  14. Statistical Analysis of the Performance of MDL Enumeration for Multiple-Missed Detection in Array Processing.

    PubMed

    Du, Fei; Li, Yibo; Jin, Shijiu

    2015-08-18

    An accurate performance analysis on the MDL criterion for source enumeration in array processing is presented in this paper. The enumeration results of MDL can be predicted precisely by the proposed procedure via the statistical analysis of the sample eigenvalues, whose distributive properties are investigated with the consideration of their interactions. A novel approach is also developed for the performance evaluation when the source number is underestimated by a number greater than one, which is denoted as "multiple-missed detection", and the probability of a specific underestimated source number can be estimated by ratio distribution analysis. Simulation results are included to demonstrate the superiority of the presented method over available results and confirm the ability of the proposed approach to perform multiple-missed detection analysis.

  15. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis using capillary array electrophoresis for large-scale mutation detection.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Lars Allan; Jespersgaard, Cathrine; Andersen, Paal Skytt

    2007-01-01

    This protocol describes capillary array electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism (CAE-SSCP), a screening method for detection of unknown and previously identified mutations. The method detects 98% of mutations in a sample material and can be applied to any organism where the goal is to determine genetic variation. This protocol describes how to screen for mutations in 192 singleplex or up to 768 multiplex samples over 3 days. The protocol is based on the principle of sequence-specific mobility of single-stranded DNA in a native polymer, and covers all stages in the procedure, from initial DNA purification to final CAE-SSCP data analysis, as follows: DNA is purified, followed by PCR amplification using fluorescent primers. After PCR amplification, double-stranded DNA is heat-denatured to separate the strands and subsequently cooled on ice to avoid reannealing. Finally, samples are analyzed by capillary electrophoresis and appropriate analysis software.

  16. High Sensitivity Terahertz Detection through Large-Area Plasmonic Nano-Antenna Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yardimci, Nezih Tolga; Jarrahi, Mona

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonic photoconductive antennas have great promise for increasing responsivity and detection sensitivity of conventional photoconductive detectors in time-domain terahertz imaging and spectroscopy systems. However, operation bandwidth of previously demonstrated plasmonic photoconductive antennas has been limited by bandwidth constraints of their antennas and photoconductor parasitics. Here, we present a powerful technique for realizing broadband terahertz detectors through large-area plasmonic photoconductive nano-antenna arrays. A key novelty that makes the presented terahertz detector superior to the state-of-the art is a specific large-area device geometry that offers a strong interaction between the incident terahertz beam and optical pump at the nanoscale, while maintaining a broad operation bandwidth. The large device active area allows robust operation against optical and terahertz beam misalignments. We demonstrate broadband terahertz detection with signal-to-noise ratio levels as high as 107 dB. PMID:28205615

  17. Detection of meat-borne trimethylamine based on nanoporous colorimetric sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Xiao-wei, Huang; Zhi-hua, Li; Xiao-bo, Zou; Ji-yong, Shi; Han-ping, Mao; Jie-wen, Zhao; Li-min, Hao; Mel, Holmes

    2016-04-15

    Trimethylamine (TMA) is a key measurement indicator for meat spoilage. In order to develop simple, cheap, and sensitive sensors for TMA detection, a nanoporous colorimetric sensor array (NCSA) was developed. A sol-gel method has been used to obtain TiO2 nanoporous film as substrate material to improve the sensitivity and stability of the CSA. The sensor enabled the visual detection of TMA gas from the permissible exposure limits (PEL) 10 ppm to 60 ppb concentrations with significant response. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to characterize the functional relationship between the color difference data and TMA concentrations. Furthermore, the NCSA was used to predict the presence of TMA in Yao-meat. A partial least square (PLS) prediction model was obtained with the correlation coefficients of 0.896 and 0.837 in calibration and prediction sets, respectively. This research suggested that the NCSA offers a useful technology for quality evaluation of TMA in meat.

  18. High Sensitivity Terahertz Detection through Large-Area Plasmonic Nano-Antenna Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yardimci, Nezih Tolga; Jarrahi, Mona

    2017-02-01

    Plasmonic photoconductive antennas have great promise for increasing responsivity and detection sensitivity of conventional photoconductive detectors in time-domain terahertz imaging and spectroscopy systems. However, operation bandwidth of previously demonstrated plasmonic photoconductive antennas has been limited by bandwidth constraints of their antennas and photoconductor parasitics. Here, we present a powerful technique for realizing broadband terahertz detectors through large-area plasmonic photoconductive nano-antenna arrays. A key novelty that makes the presented terahertz detector superior to the state-of-the art is a specific large-area device geometry that offers a strong interaction between the incident terahertz beam and optical pump at the nanoscale, while maintaining a broad operation bandwidth. The large device active area allows robust operation against optical and terahertz beam misalignments. We demonstrate broadband terahertz detection with signal-to-noise ratio levels as high as 107 dB.

  19. Direct detection of a BRAF mutation in total RNA from melanoma cells using cantilever arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, F.; Lang, H. P.; Backmann, N.; Rimoldi, D.; Gerber, Ch.

    2013-02-01

    Malignant melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, is characterized by a predominant mutation in the BRAF gene. Drugs that target tumours carrying this mutation have recently entered the clinic. Accordingly, patients are routinely screened for mutations in this gene to determine whether they can benefit from this type of treatment. The current gold standard for mutation screening uses real-time polymerase chain reaction and sequencing methods. Here we show that an assay based on microcantilever arrays can detect the mutation nanomechanically without amplification in total RNA samples isolated from melanoma cells. The assay is based on a BRAF-specific oligonucleotide probe. We detected mutant BRAF at a concentration of 500 pM in a 50-fold excess of the wild-type sequence. The method was able to distinguish melanoma cells carrying the mutation from wild-type cells using as little as 20 ng µl-1 of RNA material, without prior PCR amplification and use of labels.

  20. A Multiplex PCR-coupled Liquid Bead Array for the Simultaneous Detection of Four Biothreat Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W J; Erler, A M; Nasarabadi, S L; Skowronski, E W; McCready, P M

    2004-02-04

    We have developed a 10-plexed PCR assay coupled to a 12-plexed liquid bead array to rapidly screen environmental samples for B. anthracis, Y. pestis, F. tularensis, and B. melitensis. Highly validated species -specific primer sets were used to simultaneously amplify multiple diagnostic regions unique to each individual pathogen. Resolution of the mix of amplified products was achieved by PCR product hybridization to corresponding probe sequences, attached to unique sets of fluorescent beads. The hybridized beads were processed through a flow cytometer, which detected presence and quantity of each PCR product. The assay was optimized to allow for maximum sensitivity in a multiplexed format. A high- throughput demonstration was performed where 384 simulated environmental samples were spiked with different amounts of B. thuringensis spores and pathogen DNA. The samples were robotically processed to extract DNA and arrayed for multiplexed PCR-liquid bead detection. The assay correctly identified the presence or absence of each pathogen and collected over 3,000 individual data points within a single 8-hour shift for approximately $1.20 per sample in a 10-plexed assay.

  1. LOW-FREQUENCY PHASED-ARRAY METHODS FOR CRACK DETECTION IN CAST AUSTENITIC PIPING COMPONENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Crawford, Susan L.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    Studies at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, are being conducted to evaluate nondestructive examination (NDE) approaches for inspecting coarse-grained, austenitic stainless steel reactor components. The work provides information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the utility, effectiveness, limitations, and reliability of advanced inspection techniques for application on safety-related components in commercial nuclear power plants. This paper describes results from recent assessments using a low-frequency phased-array methodology for detecting cracks in cast austenitic piping welds. Piping specimens that contain thermal and mechanical fatigue cracks located adjacent to welds were examined. The specimens have surface geometrical conditions and weld features that simulate portions of primary piping systems in many U.S. pressurized water reactors (PWRs). In addition, segments of vintage centrifugally cast piping were examined to assess inherent acoustic noise and scattering due to grain structures and determine consistency of ultrasonic (UT) responses from varied circumferential locations. The phased-array UT methods were applied from the outside surface of the specimens using automated scanning devices and water coupling, and employed a modified instrument operating between 500 kHz and 1.0 MHz. Composite volumetric images of the specimens were generated. Results from laboratory studies for assessing crack detection and sizing effectiveness are discussed, including acoustic parameters observed in centrifugally cast piping base materials.

  2. Pulsed arrays: A new method of flaw detection by generating a frequency dependent angle of propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, S. J.; Dixon, S. M.

    2012-05-01

    A new method of using an array of generation sources, pulsed simultaneously to generate a wavefront with a frequency dependant angle of propagation, has been developed. If pulsed arrays are used to generate a wave with a frequency dependent angle of propagation, the angle at which the wave was launched can be identified by measuring the frequency of the detected wave. In an isotropic material this means that it is possible use a second transducer to locate the position of the scatterer, whereas with a conventional single element generator method, it can only be located onto an ellipse. In addition to an increased scan speed, the resolution of detection should also be improved. A theoretical framework is put forward to explain how the wavefront is created from the superposition of the waves from the individual elements, and how the frequency varies along the wavefront. Finite element models and experimental measurements were also carried out, and both agreed with the analytic model. This method will have applications within NDE, but could also extend to sonar and radar techniques.

  3. Trace detection of dissolved hydrogen gas in oil using a palladium nanowire array.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Jung, Dongoh; Penner, Reginald M

    2011-12-15

    The electrical resistance, R, of an array of 30 palladium nanowires is used to detect the concentration of dissolved hydrogen gas (H(2)) in transformer oil over the temperature range from 21 to 70 °C. The palladium nanowire array (PdNWA), consisting of Pd nanowires ∼100 nm (width), ∼20 nm (height), and 100 μm (length), was prepared using the lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition (LPNE) method. The R of the PdNWA increased by up to 8% upon exposure to dissolved H(2) at concentrations above 1.0 ppm and up to 2940 ppm at 21 °C. The measured limit-of-detection for dissolved H(2) was 1.0 ppm at 21 °C and 1.6 ppm at 70 °C. The increase in resistance induced by exposure to H(2) was linear with [H(2)](oil)(1/2) across this concentration range. A PdNWA sensor operating in flowing transformer oil has functioned continuously for 150 days.

  4. Lenslet Array to Further Suppress Star Light for Direct Exoplanet Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Qian; McElwain, Michael; Shiri, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Direct imaging plays a key role in the detection and characterization of exoplanets orbiting within its host star's habitable zone. Many innovative ideas for starlight suppression and wavefront control have been proposed and developed over the past decade. However, several technological challenges still lie ahead to achieve the required contrast, including controlling the observatory pointing performance, fabricating occulting masks with tight optical tolerances, developing wavefront control algorithms, controlling stray light, advancing single photon detecting detectors, and integrated system-level issues. This paper explores how a lenslet array and pinhole mask may be implemented to further suppress uncorrected starlight that leaks through the occulting mask. An external occulter, or star shade, is simulated to demonstrate this concept, although this approach can be implemented for internal coronagraphs as well. We describe how to use simple relay optics to control the scene near the inner working angle and the level of the suppression expected. Furthermore, if the lenslet array is the input to an integral field spectrograph, as planned for the WFIRST mission, the spectral content of the exoplanet atmospheres can be obtained to determine if the observed planet is habitable and ultimately, if it is inhabited.

  5. A multiplexed PCR-coupled liquid bead array for the simultaneous detection of four biothreat agents.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Wendy J; Erler, Anne M; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L; Skowronski, Evan W; Imbro, Paula M

    2005-04-01

    We have developed a 10-plexed PCR assay coupled to a 12-plexed liquid bead array to rapidly screen environmental samples for B. anthracis, Y. pestis, F. tularensis, and B. melitensis. Highly validated species-specific primer sets were used to simultaneously amplify multiple diagnostic regions unique to each individual pathogen. Resolution of the mix of amplified products was achieved by PCR product hybridization to corresponding probe sequences, attached to unique sets of fluorescent beads. The hybridized beads were processed through a flow cytometer, which detected presence and quantity of each PCR product. The assay was optimized to allow for maximum sensitivity in a multiplexed format. A high-throughput demonstration was performed where 384 simulated environmental samples were spiked with different amounts of B. thuringensis spores and pathogen DNA. The samples were robotically processed to extract DNA and arrayed for multiplexed PCR-liquid bead detection. The assay correctly identified the presence or absence of each pathogen and collected over 3000 individual data points within a single 8-h shift for approximately $4.00 material costs per environmental sample in a 10-plexed assay.

  6. Implementing Silicon Nanoribbon Field-Effect Transistors as Arrays for Multiple Ion Detection.

    PubMed

    Stoop, Ralph L; Wipf, Mathias; Müller, Steffen; Bedner, Kristine; Wright, Iain A; Martin, Colin J; Constable, Edwin C; Fanget, Axel; Schönenberger, Christian; Calame, Michel

    2016-05-06

    Ionic gradients play a crucial role in the physiology of the human body, ranging from metabolism in cells to muscle contractions or brain activities. To monitor these ions, inexpensive, label-free chemical sensing devices are needed. Field-effect transistors (FETs) based on silicon (Si) nanowires or nanoribbons (NRs) have a great potential as future biochemical sensors as they allow for the integration in microscopic devices at low production costs. Integrating NRs in dense arrays on a single chip expands the field of applications to implantable electrodes or multifunctional chemical sensing platforms. Ideally, such a platform is capable of detecting numerous species in a complex analyte. Here, we demonstrate the basis for simultaneous sodium and fluoride ion detection with a single sensor chip consisting of arrays of gold-coated SiNR FETs. A microfluidic system with individual channels allows modifying the NR surfaces with self-assembled monolayers of two types of ion receptors sensitive to sodium and fluoride ions. The functionalization procedure results in a differential setup having active fluoride- and sodium-sensitive NRs together with bare gold control NRs on the same chip. Comparing functionalized NRs with control NRs allows the compensation of non-specific contributions from changes in the background electrolyte concentration and reveals the response to the targeted species.

  7. Simultaneous detection of lactate and glucose by integrated printed circuit board based array sensing chip.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuelian; Zang, Jianfeng; Liu, Yingshuai; Lu, Zhisong; Li, Qing; Li, Chang Ming

    2013-04-10

    An integrated printed circuit board (PCB) based array sensing chip was developed to simultaneously detect lactate and glucose in mouse serum. The novelty of the chip relies on a concept demonstration of inexpensive high-throughput electronic biochip, a chip design for high signal to noise ratio and high sensitivity by construction of positively charged chitosan/redox polymer Polyvinylimidazole-Os (PVI-Os)/carbon nanotube (CNT) composite sensing platform, in which the positively charged chitosan/PVI-Os is mediator and electrostatically immobilizes the negatively charged enzyme, while CNTs function as an essential cross-linker to network PVI-Os and chitosan due to its negative charged nature. Additional electrodes on the chip with the same sensing layer but without enzymes were prepared to correct the interferences for high specificity. Low detection limits of 0.6 μM and 5 μM were achieved for lactate and glucose, respectively. This work could be extended to inexpensive array sensing chips with high sensitivity, good specificity and high reproducibility for various sensor applications.

  8. High sensitive immunoassay for multiplex mycotoxin detection with photonic crystal microsphere suspension array.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guozhe; Xu, Kun; Sun, Yue; Chen, Yu; Zheng, Tiesong; Li, Jianlin

    2013-03-05

    A novel, sensitive, and high throughput competitive immunoassay for multiplex mycotoxins was established by immobilizing the artificial antigens (Ags) of mycotoxins on the surfaces of three kinds of silica photonic crystal microsphere (SPCM) suspension arrays. The SPCMs were encoded by their reflectance peak positions. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), fumonisin B1 (FB1), and citrinin (CIT) spiked in the cereals were extracted, and the fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled antibodies (Abs) of these mycotoxins were added into the centrifuge tube which contained the SPCMs of the modified artificial antigens (Ags). The fluorescence signal was collected by an array fluorescent scanner. The limit of detection (LOD) was as low as 0.5, 1, and 0.8 pg/mL for AFB1, FB1, and CIT, respectively. The new method provided a wide linear detection range from 0.001 to 10, 0.001 to 10, and 0.001 to 1 ng/mL for AFB1, FB1, and CIT, respectively. The mean recovery rates are in range of 74.7 ± 4.0% to 127.9 ± 4.4% for the three mycotoxins in corn, peanuts, and wheat. The developed method for mycotoxins was used to assay the AFB1, FB1, and CIT level in 10 naturally contaminated cereal samples, and the results of detection were in agreement with that of a classic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. This method saves a large amount of reagents (10 μL volume) and detection time (<3 h) for multiplex mycotoxin assay.

  9. Hybrid model prediction of guided wave array system detection sensitivity for the SHM of fatigue cracks in large structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromme, P.

    2011-04-01

    Localized and distributed guided ultrasonic wave array systems allow for the efficient structural health monitoring of large structures, such as aircraft, ship hulls, or oil storage tanks. Permanently attached sensor arrays have been applied for the detection of corrosion and fatigue damage. A hybrid model has been developed for the efficient prediction of the sensitivity of guided waves array systems to detect through thickness and part-through fatigue cracks at different locations in plate structures. Using a point transmitter and receiver model for the wave propagation along the structure, the distances between sensor elements and potential defect locations are taken into account. The influence of the orientation of the crack relative to the transducer elements has been predicted from localized 3D Finite Element simulations. The directivity pattern of the scattered guided wave field has been shown to depend on the defect orientation and on the ratio of the characteristic defect size and depth to wavelength, and has been verified from experimental measurements. Good agreement was found and the localized amplitude and directivity patterns provide the basis for the quantification of the detection sensitivity for fatigue cracks. Using a hybrid model, the relative amplitudes of received pulses for different sensor array layouts can be calculated. From a comparison with the signal to noise ratio of the array system, detection capabilities can be predicted for various defect sizes and orientation. This provides a rapid tool for the development and optimization of guided wave array SHM systems.

  10. The clinical application of array CGH for the detection of chromosomal defects in 20,126 unselected newborns

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) is a powerful tool for detecting unbalanced chromosomal alterations. To validate the usefulness of array CGH in newborn screening, we examined 20,126 unselected infants. In addition, the number of newborns analyzed with array CGH is the largest one ever reported. Findings A total of 20,126 unselected newborns were investigated with array CGH and cytogenetic analyses. The analyses revealed 87 cases with chromosome abnormalities. Of these, 53 cases had significant chromosome aneuploidies, including trisomy 13, trisomy 21, 47,XXY or 45,X, and the other 34 cases presented partial chromosomal deletions or duplications. Conclusions In this study, we show that array CGH is an appropriate tool for the screening of chromosomal abnormalities in newborns, especially for the infants without distinct clinical features. PMID:23725218

  11. Label-free detection and discrimination of poly-brominated diphenylethers using molecularly imprinted photonic cross-reactive sensor arrays.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dan; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Chen; Tian, Tian; Li, Jian; Lan, Yue; Zhang, Guanxin; Zhang, Deqing; Li, Guangtao

    2014-11-25

    Molecularly imprinted photonic polymers can serve as ideal sensing elements for efficiently creating cross-reactive sensor arrays. Based on this concept, a new method for sensitive and label-free detection of challenging PBDEs was developed, by which the direct detection and discrimination of trace levels of PBDEs against a high-background of interferents was achieved with 100% accuracy.

  12. Pyroelectric IR sensor arrays for fall detection in the older population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sixsmith, A.; Johnson, N.; Whatmore, R.

    2005-09-01

    Uncooled pyroelectric sensor arrays have been studied over many years for their uses in thermal imaging applications. These arrays will only detect changes in IR flux and so systems based upon them are very good at detecting movements of people in the scene without sensing the background, if they are used in staring mode. Relatively-low element count arrays (16 x 16) can be used for a variety of people sensing applications, including people counting (for safety applications), queue monitoring etc. With appropriate signal processing such systems can be also be used for the detection of particular events such as a person falling over. There is a considerable need for automatic fall detection amongst older people, but there are important limitations to some of the current and emerging technologies available for this. Simple sensors, such as 1 or 2 element pyroelectric infra-red sensors provide crude data that is difficult to interpret; the use of devices worn on the person, such as wrist communicator and motion detectors have potential, but are reliant on the person being able and willing to wear the device; video cameras may be seen as intrusive and require considerable human resources to monitor activity while machine-interpretation of camera images is complex and may be difficult in this application area. The use of a pyroelectric thermal array sensor was seen to have a number of potential benefits. The sensor is wall-mounted and does not require the user to wear a device. It enables detailed analysis of a subject's motion to be achieved locally, within the detector, using only a modest processor. This is possible due to the relative ease with which data from the sensor can be interpreted relative to the data generated by alternative sensors such as video devices. In addition to the cost-effectiveness of this solution, it was felt that the lack of detail in the low-level data, together with the elimination of the need to transmit data outside the detector

  13. A Pt-doped TiO2 nanotube arrays sensor for detecting SF6 decomposition products.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Tie, Jing; Zhang, Jinbin

    2013-10-30

    The detection of partial discharge and analysis of SF6 gas components in gas-insulated switchgear (GIS) is important for the diagnosis and operating state assessment of power equipment. The use of a Pt-doped TiO2 nanotube arrays sensor for detecting sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) decomposition products is proposed in this paper. The electrochemical pulse deposition method is employed to prepare the sensor array. The sensor's response to the main characteristic gaseous decomposition products of SF6 is evaluated. The gas sensing characteristic curves of the Pt-doped TiO2 nanotube sensor and intrinsic TiO2 nanotube arrays sensor are compared. The mechanism of the sensitive response is discussed. Test results showed that the Pt-doped nanoparticles not only change the gas sensing selectivity of the TiO2 nanotube arrays sensor with respect to the main characteristic SF6 decomposition products, but also reduce the operating temperature of the sensor.

  14. Bimetallic gold-silver nanoplate array as a highly active SERS substrate for detection of streptavidin/biotin assemblies.

    PubMed

    Bi, Liyan; Dong, Jian; Xie, Wei; Lu, Wenbo; Tong, Wei; Tao, Lin; Qian, Weiping

    2013-12-17

    The silver-modified gold nanoplate arrays as bimetallic surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates were optimized for the surface-enhanced Raman detection of streptavidin/biotin monolayer assemblies. The bimetallic gold-silver nanoplate arrays were fabricated by coating silver nanoparticles uniformly on the gold nanoplate arrays. Depending on silver nanoparticle coating, the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peak of the bimetallic gold-silver nanoplate arrays blue-shifted and broadened significantly. The common probe molecule, Niel Blue A sulfate (NBA) was used for testing the SERS activity of the bimetallic gold-silver nanoplate arrays. The SERS intensity increased with the silver nanoparticle coating, due to a large number of hot spots and nanoparticle interfaces. The platforms were tested against a monolayer of streptavidin functionalized over the bimetallic gold-silver nanoplate arrays showing that good quality spectra could be acquired with a short acquisition time. The supramolecular interaction between streptavidin (strep) and biotin showed subsequent modification of Raman spectra that implied a change of the secondary structure of the host biomolecule. And the detection concentration for biotin by this method was as low as 1.0 nM. The enhanced SERS performance of such bimetallic gold-silver nanoplate arrays could spur further interest in the integration of highly sensitive biosensors for rapid, nondestructive, and quantitative bioanalysis, particularly in microfluidics.

  15. Digital array gas radiometer (DAGR): a sensitive and reliable trace gas detection concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordley, Larry L.; McHugh, Martin J.; Marshall, B. T.; Thompson, Earl

    2009-05-01

    The Digital Array Gas Radiometer (DAGR) concept is based on traditional and reliable Gas Filter Correlation Radiometry (GFCR) for remote trace gas detection and monitoring. GFCR sensors have been successful in many infrared remote sensing applications. Historically however, solar backscatter measurements have not been as successful because instrument designs have been susceptible to natural variations in surface albedo, which induce clutter and degrade the sensitivity. DAGR overcomes this limitation with several key innovations. First, a pupil imaging system scrambles the received light, removing nearly all spatial clutter and permitting a small calibration source to be easily inserted. Then, by using focal plane arrays rather than single detectors to collect the light, dramatic advances in dynamic range can be achieved. Finally, when used with the calibration source, data processing approaches can further mitigate detector non-uniformity effects. DAGR sensors can be made as small as digital cameras and are well suited for downlooking detection of gases in the boundary layer, where solar backscatter measurements are needed to overcome the lack of thermal contrast in the IR. Easily integrated into a satellite platform, a space-based DAGR would provide near-global sensing of climatically important species such as such as CO, CH4, and N2O. Aircraft and UAV measurements with a DAGR could be used to monitor agricultural and industrial emissions. Ground-based or portable DAGRs could augment early warning systems for chemical weapons or toxic materials. Finally, planetary science applications include detection and mapping of biomarkers such as CH4 in the Martian atmosphere.

  16. Microfluidic Arrayed Lab-On-A-Chip for Electrochemical Capacitive Detection of DNA Hybridization Events.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Dykstra, Peter H; Bentley, William E; Ghodssi, Reza

    2017-01-01

    A microfluidic electrochemical lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device for DNA hybridization detection has been developed. The device comprises a 3 × 3 array of microelectrodes integrated with a dual layer microfluidic valved manipulation system that provides controlled and automated capabilities for high throughput analysis of microliter volume samples. The surface of the microelectrodes is functionalized with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probes which enable specific detection of complementary ssDNA targets. These targets are detected by a capacitive technique which measures dielectric variation at the microelectrode-electrolyte interface due to DNA hybridization events. A quantitative analysis of the hybridization events is carried out based on a sensing modeling that includes detailed analysis of energy storage and dissipation components. By calculating these components during hybridization events the device is able to demonstrate specific and dose response sensing characteristics. The developed microfluidic LOC for DNA hybridization detection offers a technology for real-time and label-free assessment of genetic markers outside of laboratory settings, such as at the point-of-care or in-field environmental monitoring.

  17. Luminex(®) multiplex bead suspension arrays for the detection and serotyping of Salmonella spp.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Sherry A; Ritchie, Vivette Brown; Hoffmeyer, Michaela R; Rana, Gunjot S; Zhang, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we describe two commercially available bead-based molecular assays for detection, identification and serotyping of Salmonella. The xTAG(®) Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel (GPP) is a qualitative multiplex test for the simultaneous detection of nucleic acids from Salmonella plus 14 other gastroenteritis-causing bacteria, viruses, and parasites from stool specimens. xTAG GPP uses the Luminex(®) xTAG universal array technology for the identification of specific target sequences combined with the xMAP(®) bead multiplexing platform for detection of the targets that were present in the starting sample. The xMAP Salmonella Serotyping Assay (SSA) is a multiplex nucleic acid-based direct hybridization assay for molecular identification of the serotype of Salmonella isolates. In xMAP SSA, target sequences amplified from cultured Salmonella isolates are captured by hybridization to sequence-specific capture probes which have been coupled to the multiplexed bead sets. Herein we provide detailed protocols for each of these assays and present data which describe their performance characteristics for detection and serotyping Salmonella.

  18. A high-throughput method for GMO multi-detection using a microfluidic dynamic array.

    PubMed

    Brod, Fábio Cristiano Angonesi; van Dijk, Jeroen P; Voorhuijzen, Marleen M; Dinon, Andréia Zilio; Guimarães, Luis Henrique S; Scholtens, Ingrid M J; Arisi, Ana Carolina Maisonnave; Kok, Esther J

    2014-02-01

    The ever-increasing production of genetically modified crops generates a demand for high-throughput DNA-based methods for the enforcement of genetically modified organisms (GMO) labelling requirements. The application of standard real-time PCR will become increasingly costly with the growth of the number of GMOs that is potentially present in an individual sample. The present work presents the results of an innovative approach in genetically modified crops analysis by DNA based methods, which is the use of a microfluidic dynamic array as a high throughput multi-detection system. In order to evaluate the system, six test samples with an increasing degree of complexity were prepared, preamplified and subsequently analysed in the Fluidigm system. Twenty-eight assays targeting different DNA elements, GM events and species-specific reference genes were used in the experiment. The large majority of the assays tested presented expected results. The power of low level detection was assessed and elements present at concentrations as low as 0.06 % were successfully detected. The approach proposed in this work presents the Fluidigm system as a suitable and promising platform for GMO multi-detection.

  19. Low-frequency phased-array 2D fluorescence localization in breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qian; Chen, Yu; Chance, Britton; Luo, Qingming

    2003-12-01

    A method for rapid, non-invasive 2D fluorescence localization of breast cancer using low frequency phased array near-infrared technique is presented in this article. In our study, we have developed a dual-channel fluorescence detection system to locate breast cancer. This system consists two pair of in-phase and out-of-phase light emitting diodes (LEDs) as the light sources and Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) as the detector. Two null planes generated by cancellation of diffusion photon density waves (DPDW) will indicate the 2D position of breast cancer with exogenous contrast agents. The fluorescent contrast agent used in this study is Indocyanine Green (ICG) and the minimum amount of ICG detected by our system is 0.5 μM. With the 2 cm separation of sources and detector, the maximum depth our system can detect is 10 mm. The whole system is in compact size and portable. Phantom experiments show that the system can provide real time detection and localization of small hidden absorbing-fluorescent objects inside the highly scattering medium with high accuracy of +/-3 mm. The potential application is that it is low-cost and can be used for breast cancer localization as operation aid and self-examination.

  20. Innovative optical power detection array system for relative positioning of inner-formation flying system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhendong; Wang, Zhaokui; Zhang, Yulin

    2016-09-01

    The Inner-formation flying system (IFFS) is conceived to feature a spherical proof mass falling freely within a large cavity for space gravity detection, of which first application focuses on the Earth's gravity field recovery. For the IFFS, it is the relative position of the proof mass to its surrounding cavity that is feedback into thrusters for tracking control, even as part of data to detect gravity. Since the demonstration and verification of demanding technologies using small satellite platforms is a very sensible choice prior to detection mission, an optical power detection array system (OPDAS) is proposed to measure the relative position with advantages of low cost and high adaptability. Besides that, its large dynamic range can reduce the requirement for satellite platform and releasing mechanism, which is also an attracting trait for small satellite application. The concept of the OPDAS is firstly presented, followed by the algorithm to position the proof mass. Then the radiation pressure caused by the measuring beam is modeled, and its disturbance on the proof mass is simulated. The experimental system to test the performance of a prototype of the OPDAS is established, and the preliminary results show that a precision of less than 0.4 mm across a dynamic range of several centimeters can be reached by the prototype of the OPDAS.

  1. Visual detection of multiple genetically modified organisms in a capillary array.

    PubMed

    Shao, Ning; Chen, Jianwei; Hu, Jiaying; Li, Rong; Zhang, Dabing; Guo, Shujuan; Hui, Junhou; Liu, Peng; Yang, Litao; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2017-01-31

    There is an urgent need for rapid, low-cost multiplex methodologies for the monitoring of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Here, we report a C[combining low line]apillary A[combining low line]rray-based L[combining low line]oop-mediated isothermal amplification for M[combining low line]ultiplex visual detection of nucleic acids (CALM) platform for the simple and rapid monitoring of GMOs. In CALM, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) primer sets are pre-fixed to the inner surface of capillaries. The surface of the capillary array is hydrophobic while the capillaries are hydrophilic, enabling the simultaneous loading and separation of the LAMP reaction mixtures into each capillary by capillary forces. LAMP reactions in the capillaries are then performed in parallel, and the results are visually detected by illumination with a hand-held UV device. Using CALM, we successfully detected seven frequently used transgenic genes/elements and five plant endogenous reference genes with high specificity and sensitivity. Moreover, we found that measurements of real-world blind samples by CALM are consistent with results obtained by independent real-time PCRs. Thus, with an ability to detect multiple nucleic acids in a single easy-to-operate test, we believe that CALM will become a widely applied technology in GMO monitoring.

  2. Can digital image forgery detection unevadable? A case study: color filter array interpolation statistical feature recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yizhen

    2005-07-01

    Digital image forgery detection is becoming increasing important. In recently 2 years, a new upsurge has been started to study direct detection methods, which utilize the hardware features of digital cameras. Such features may be weakened or lost once tampered, or they may not be consistent if synthesizing several images into a single one. This manuscript first clarifies the concept of trueness of digital images and summarizes these methods with their crack by a general model. The recently proposed EM algorithm plus Fourier transform that checks the Color Filter Array (CFA) interpolation statistical feature (ISF) is taken as a case study. We propose 3 methods to recover the CFA-ISF of a fake image: (1) artificial CFA interpolation (2) a linear CFA-ISF recovery model with optimal uniform measure (3) a quadratic CFA-ISF recovery model with least square measure. A software prototype CFA-ISF Indicator & Adjustor integrating the detection and anti-detection algorithms is developed and shown. Experiments under our product validate the effectiveness of our methods.

  3. Pupil and Glint Detection Using Wearable Camera Sensor and Near-Infrared LED Array

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianzhong; Zhang, Guangyue; Shi, Jiadong

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel pupil and glint detection method for gaze tracking system using a wearable camera sensor and near-infrared LED array. A novel circular ring rays location (CRRL) method is proposed for pupil boundary points detection. Firstly, improved Otsu optimal threshold binarization, opening-and-closing operation and projection of 3D gray-level histogram are utilized to estimate rough pupil center and radius. Secondly, a circular ring area including pupil edge inside is determined according to rough pupil center and radius. Thirdly, a series of rays are shot from inner to outer ring to collect pupil boundary points. Interference points are eliminated by calculating gradient amplitude. At last, an improved total least squares is proposed to fit collected pupil boundary points. In addition, the improved total least squares developed is utilized for the solution of Gaussian function deformation to calculate glint center. The experimental results show that the proposed method is more robust and accurate than conventional detection methods. When interference factors such as glints and natural light reflection are located on pupil contour, pupil boundary points and center can be detected accurately. The proposed method contributes to enhance stability, accuracy and real-time quality of gaze tracking system. PMID:26633416

  4. Pupil and Glint Detection Using Wearable Camera Sensor and Near-Infrared LED Array.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianzhong; Zhang, Guangyue; Shi, Jiadong

    2015-12-02

    This paper proposes a novel pupil and glint detection method for gaze tracking system using a wearable camera sensor and near-infrared LED array. A novel circular ring rays location (CRRL) method is proposed for pupil boundary points detection. Firstly, improved Otsu optimal threshold binarization, opening-and-closing operation and projection of 3D gray-level histogram are utilized to estimate rough pupil center and radius. Secondly, a circular ring area including pupil edge inside is determined according to rough pupil center and radius. Thirdly, a series of rays are shot from inner to outer ring to collect pupil boundary points. Interference points are eliminated by calculating gradient amplitude. At last, an improved total least squares is proposed to fit collected pupil boundary points. In addition, the improved total least squares developed is utilized for the solution of Gaussian function deformation to calculate glint center. The experimental results show that the proposed method is more robust and accurate than conventional detection methods. When interference factors such as glints and natural light reflection are located on pupil contour, pupil boundary points and center can be detected accurately. The proposed method contributes to enhance stability, accuracy and real-time quality of gaze tracking system.

  5. Using Low-Frequency Phased Arrays to Detect Cracks in Cast Austenitic Piping Components

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2005-12-30

    As part of a multi-year program funded by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) to address NDE reliability of inservice inspection (ISI) programs, recent studies conducted at the Pacific N¬orthwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, have focused on assessing novel NDE approaches for the inspection of coarse-grained, cast stainless steel reactor components. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the US NRC on the utility, effec¬tiveness and reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) and eddy current testing (ET) inspection techniques as related to the ISI of primary piping components in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This paper describes progress, recent developments and early results from an assessment of a portion of this work relating to the ultrasonic low frequency phased array inspection technique. Westinghouse Owner’s Group (WOG) cast stainless steel pipe segments with thermal and mechanical fatigue cracks, PNNL samples containing thermal fatigue cracks and several blank vintage specimens having very coarse grains that are representative of early centrifugally cast piping installed in PWRs, are being used for assessing the inspection method. The phased array approach was implemented using an R/D Tech Tomoscan III system operating at 1.0 MHz and 500 kHz, providing composite volumetric images of the samples. Several dual, transmit-receive, custom designed low-frequency arrays are employed in laboratory trials. Results from laboratory studies for assessing detection of thermal and mechanical fatigue cracks in cast stainless steel piping welds are discussed. This work was sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission under Contract DE-AC06-76RLO 1830; NRC JCN Y6604; Mr. Wallace Norris, Program Monitor.

  6. 6-Plex microsphere immunoassay with imaging planar array detection for mycotoxins in barley.

    PubMed

    Peters, Jeroen; Cardall, Alice; Haasnoot, Willem; Nielen, Michel W F

    2014-08-21

    Mycotoxins are produced by fungi as secondary metabolites. They often multi-contaminate food and feed commodities posing a health risk to humans and animals. A fast and easy to apply multiplex screening of these commodities could be useful to detect multi-contamination. For this, we developed a semi-quantitative 6-plex immunoassay using a suspension array of paramagnetic colour-coded microspheres combined with imaging planar array detection for the mycotoxins aflatoxin B1, ochratoxin A, zearalenone, deoxynivalenol, T2-toxin, HT-2 toxin and fumonisin B1. Mycotoxin specific monoclonal antibodies were coupled to different sets of microspheres and mycotoxins conjugated to the fluorescent protein R-phycoerythrin served as reporter molecules. Competition between free mycotoxins in the sample and mixed reporter molecules for antibody binding sites on mixed microspheres created a multiplex direct inhibition immunoassay. The reagents were selected for no or low cross-interactions between the assays and cross-reactions with metabolites and possible masked forms were determined. A within-laboratory validation was carried out using blank and spiked barley samples. Furthermore, the 6-plex was used to screen available barley, and malted barley, reference materials. The validation showed very high inter and intra-day precision for all samples with a maximum relative standard deviation value of 10%. The screening assay allows easy and rapid multiplex detection of the target mycotoxins in barley according to EU legislation. With a cut off factor of 50%, based on the EU maximum levels, we were able to screen at 2 μg kg(-1) for aflatoxin B1, 2.5 μg kg(-1) for ochratoxin A, 625 μg kg(-1) for deoxynivalenol, 50 μg kg(-1) for zearalenone, 1000 μg kg(-1) for fumonisin B1 and 25 μg kg(-1) for T-2 toxin. Thanks to the transportable planar array system, the developed 6-plex has potential for future on-site testing. Future implementation of this method as a pre-screening tool, prior to

  7. Giant magnetoresistive sensor array for sensitive and specific multiplexed food allergen detection.

    PubMed

    Ng, Elaine; Nadeau, Kari C; Wang, Shan X

    2016-06-15

    Current common allergen detection methods, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and dip-stick methods, do not provide adequate levels of sensitivity and specificity for at-risk allergic patients. A method for performing highly sensitive and specific detection of multiple food allergens is thus imperative as food allergies are becoming increasingly recognized as a major healthcare concern, affecting an estimated 4% of the total population. We demonstrate first instance of sensitive and specific multiplexed detection of major peanut allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, and wheat allergen Gliadin using giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor arrays. Commercialized ELISA kits for Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 report limits of detection (LODs) at 31.5 ng/mL and 0.2 ng/mL, respectively. In addition, the 96-well-based ELISA developed in-house for Gliadin was found to have a LOD of 40 ng/mL. Our multiplexed GMR-based assay demonstrates the ability to perform all three assays on the same chip specifically and with sensitivities at LODs about an order of magnitude lower than those of 96-well-based ELISAs. LODs of GMR-based assays developed for Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Gliadin were 7.0 ng/mL, 0.2 ng/mL, and 1.5 ng/mL, respectively, with little to no cross-reactivity. These LODs are clinically important as some patients could react strongly against such low allergen levels. Given the limitations of current industrial detection technology, multiplexed GMR-based assays provide a method for highly sensitive and specific simultaneous detection of any combination of food-product allergens, thus protecting allergic patients from life-threatening events, including anaphylaxis, by unintentional consumption.

  8. Low Frequency Phased Array Techniques for Crack Detection in Cast Austenitic Piping Welds: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    Studies conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington have focused on developing and evaluating the reliability of nondestructive testing (NDT) approaches for coarse-grained stainless steel reactor components. The objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the utility, effectiveness and limitation of NDT techniques as related to inservice testing of primary system piping components in pressurized water reactors. We examined cast stainless steel pipe specimens containing thermal and mechanical fatigue cracks located close to the weld roots and having inner and outer diameter surface geometrical conditions that simulate several water reactor primary piping configurations. In addition, segments of vintage centrifugally cast piping were examined to characterize the inherent acoustic noise and scattering caused by grain structures and to determine the consistency of ultrasonic responses when propagating through differing microstructures. Advanced ultrasonic phased array techniques were applied from the outside surface of these specimens using automated scanning devices and water coupling. The phased array approach was implemented with a modified instrument operating at low frequencies, and composite volumetric images of the specimens were generated. Results from laboratory studies for assessing crack detection effectiveness in cast stainless steel as a function of frequency are discussed in this paper.

  9. TARA: Forward-scattered radar detection of UHECR at the telescope array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belz, J.; Abu Bakr Othman, M.; Allen, C.; Barcikowski, E.; Besson, D.; Farhang-Boroujeny, B.; Ikeda, D.; Hanlon, W.; Kunwar, S.; Lundquist, J. P.; Kravchenko, I.; Larson, S.; Myers, I.; Nakamura, T.; Rankin, J. S.; Sagawa, H.; Sokolsky, P.; Takai, H.; Terasawa, T.; Thomson, G. B.

    2013-06-01

    Increased event statistics will be required to definitively answer the question of the origin(s) of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR). Using current technologies however, achieving the necessary statistics may be financially and practically impossible. We describe the status and plans of the TARA project, an effort to detect Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays by their forward scattered or "bistatic" radar signature. Bistatic radar holds promise as a new remote sensing technique for UHECR, without the duty cycle limitations of nitrogen fluorescence detectors. Such a technique could prove key in advancing the study of UHECR beyond the constraints of the current generation of cosmic ray observatories. TARA consists of a low-VHF television transmitter illuminating the air above the Telescope Array (TA), and a set of radio receivers on the far side of TA approximately 50 km distant from the transmitter. We have collected radar data since April 2011 using a 2 kW transmitter at 54.1 MHz. Recently, we received permission to increase our broadcast power to 40 kW and our effective radiated power (ERP) to 6 MW. On the receiver end, we are employing software-defined radio receivers and developing real-time trigger algorithms based on the expected air shower radar echo. In addition to presenting an overview of the project status and future plans, we will present the most recent results of searches for coincidences between radar echoes and Telescope Array air shower events.

  10. Murchison Widefield Array Observations of Anomalous Variability: A Serendipitous Night-time Detection of Interplanetary Scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, D. L.; Tingay, S. J.; Manoharan, P. K.; Macquart, J. P.; Hancock, P.; Morgan, J.; Mitchell, D. A.; Ekers, R. D.; Wayth, R. B.; Trott, C.; Murphy, T.; Oberoi, D.; Cairns, I. H.; Feng, L.; Kudryavtseva, N.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Deshpande, A. A.; Gaensler, B. M.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hurley Walker, N.; Hazelton, B. J.; Johnston Hollitt, M.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McWhirter, S. R.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Ord, S. M.; Prabu, T.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2015-08-01

    We present observations of high-amplitude rapid (2 s) variability toward two bright, compact extragalactic radio sources out of several hundred of the brightest radio sources in one of the 30^\\circ × 30^\\circ Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) Epoch of Reionization fields using the MWA at 155 MHz. After rejecting intrinsic, instrumental, and ionospheric origins we consider the most likely explanation for this variability to be interplanetary scintillation (IPS), likely the result of a large coronal mass ejection propagating from the Sun. This is confirmed by roughly contemporaneous observations with the Ooty Radio Telescope. We see evidence for structure on spatial scales ranging from <1000 to \\gt {10}6 km. The serendipitous night-time nature of these detections illustrates the new regime that the MWA has opened for IPS studies with sensitive night-time, wide-field, low-frequency observations. This regime complements traditional dedicated strategies for observing IPS and can be utilized in real-time to facilitate dedicated follow-up observations. At the same time, it allows large-scale surveys for compact (arcsec) structures in low-frequency radio sources despite the 2\\prime resolution of the array.

  11. A compact array calibrator to study the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardid, M.; Camarena, F.; Felis, I.; Herrero, A.; Llorens, C. D.; Martínez-Mora, J.; Saldaña, M.

    2016-04-01

    Underwater acoustic detection of ultra-high-energy neutrinos was proposed already in 1950s: when a neutrino interacts with a nucleus in water, the resulting particle cascade produces a pressure pulse that has a bipolar temporal structure and propagates within a flat disk-like volume. A telescope that consists of thousands of acoustic sensors deployed in the deep sea can monitor hundreds of cubic kilometres of water looking for these signals and discriminating them from acoustic noise. To study the feasibility of the technique it is critical to have a calibrator able to mimic the neutrino "signature" that can be operated from a vessel. Due to the axial-symmetry of the signal, their very directive short bipolar shape and the constraints of operating at sea, the development of such a calibrator is very challenging. Once the possibility of using the acoustic parametric technique for this aim was validated with the first compact array calibrator prototype, in this paper we describe the new design for such a calibrator composed of an array of piezo ceramic tube transducers emitting in axial direction.

  12. 4H-SiC Schottky diode arrays for X-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lioliou, G.; Chan, H. K.; Gohil, T.; Vassilevski, K. V.; Wright, N. G.; Horsfall, A. B.; Barnett, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Five SiC Schottky photodiodes for X-ray detection have been electrically characterized at room temperature. One representative diode was also electrically characterized over the temperature range 20°C to 140 °C. The performance at 30 °C of all five X-ray detectors, in both current mode and for photon counting X-ray spectroscopy was investigated. The diodes were fabricated in an array form such that they could be operated as either a 2×2 or 1×3 pixel array. Although the devices showed double barrier heights, high ideality factors and higher than expected leakage current at room temperature (12 nA/cm2 at an internal electric field of 105 kV/cm), they operated as spectroscopic photon counting soft X-ray detectors uncooled at 30 °C. The measured energy resolution (FWHM at 17.4 keV, Mo Kα) varied from 1.36 to 1.68 keV among different diodes.

  13. Linear arrays of uncoolded poly SiGe microbolometers for IR detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Moor, Piet; Sedky, Sherif; Sabuncuoglu, Deniz; Van Hoof, Chris A.

    1999-08-01

    In this work we demonstrate the advantages of using polycrystalline silicon germanium (poly SiGe) as a structural material for surface micromachined devices, and more specifically uncooled Infra-Red (IR) microbolometers. The low stress and the low thermal conductivity of poly SiGe enable the realization of IR microbolometers having an effective detectivity above 2 X 109 cm.Hz1/2/W. Currently, linear arrays of optimized devices included in an on-chip vacuum package are developed. The vapor HF sacrificial etching technique is used to release extremely thin microbolometers with high yield. Combined with the practical advantage of an uncooled system, a low-cost yet sensitive sensor system is the result. Possible applications include space based pushbroom earth sensing, spectral environmental monitoring and process control.

  14. Determination of acaricides in honey by high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection.

    PubMed

    Martel, Anne-Claire; Zeggane, Sarah

    2002-04-19

    Rapid analytical methods are described to control quality of honeys, concerning residues of acaricides applied in hives to prevent Varroa jacobsoni infestation. A liquid-liquid extraction with hexane-propanol-2-ammonia (60 ml:30 ml:0.28%) was used for the simultaneous analysis of coumaphos, bromopropylate, amitraz and fluvalinate. For thymol, one clean up on a solid-phase extraction C18 (500 mg, 6 ml) column was performed; for rotenone, a liquid extraction with dichloromethane was realised. Quantitative recoveries obtained with honey were satisfactory and were superior to 80%. All acaricides are identified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection. Quantification limits obtained were below maximal residue limits when these exist.

  15. Modification of Graphene on Ultramicroelectrode Array and Its Application in Detection of Dissolved Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinfen; Bian, Chao; Tong, Jianhua; Sun, Jizhou; Li, Yang; Hong, Wen; Xia, Shanhong

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigated two different modification methods of graphene (GN) on ultramicroelectrode array (UMEA) and applied the GN modified UMEA for the determination of dissolved oxygen (DO). The UMEAs were fabricated by Micro Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) technique and the radius of each ultramicroelectrode is 10 μm. GN-NH2 and GN-COOH were modified on UMEA by using self-assembling method. Compared with GN-NH2 modified UMEA, the GN-COOH modified UMEA showed better electrochemical reduction to DO, owing to better dispersing and more active sites. The GN-COOH on UMEA was electroreduced to reduced GN-COOH (rGN-COOH) to increase the conductivity and the catalysis performance. Finally, the palladium nanoparticles/rGN-COOH composite was incorporated into DO microsensor for the detection of DO. PMID:25549176

  16. Determination of phenolic compounds in Prunella L. by liquid chromatography-diode array detection.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Saliha; Demir, Cevdet; Malyer, Hulusi

    2011-07-15

    Four species of Prunella L. (Prunella vulgaris L., Prunella laciniata L., Prunella grandiflora L. and Prunella orientalis Bornm.) belong to the family of Lamiaceae and representing popular Western and Chinese herbal medicine were examined for the content of phenolic compounds. Phenolic acids (rosmarinic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, chlorogenic acid, protocatechuic acid), flavonoids (rutin, quercetin) in different quantitative proportions depending on extracts were determined by the rapid, selective and accurate method combining solvent/acid hydrolysis extraction and high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). Water, methanol, butanol, acetonitrile, ethyl acetate, hexane and their acidic solutions were used to examine the efficiency of different solvent systems for the extraction of phenolic compounds. Acid hydrolysis extraction was established as the most suitable extraction method for phenolic compounds.

  17. Statistical Analysis of the Performance of MDL Enumeration for Multiple-Missed Detection in Array Processing

    PubMed Central

    Du, Fei; Li, Yibo; Jin, Shijiu

    2015-01-01

    An accurate performance analysis on the MDL criterion for source enumeration in array processing is presented in this paper. The enumeration results of MDL can be predicted precisely by the proposed procedure via the statistical analysis of the sample eigenvalues, whose distributive properties are investigated with the consideration of their interactions. A novel approach is also developed for the performance evaluation when the source number is underestimated by a number greater than one, which is denoted as “multiple-missed detection”, and the probability of a specific underestimated source number can be estimated by ratio distribution analysis. Simulation results are included to demonstrate the superiority of the presented method over available results and confirm the ability of the proposed approach to perform multiple-missed detection analysis. PMID:26295232

  18. Self-referenced silicon nitride array microring biosensor for toxin detection using glycans at visible wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, Farshid; Eftekhar, Ali A.; Gottfried, David S.; Song, Xuezheng; Cummings, Richard D.; Adibi, Ali

    2013-02-01

    We report on application of on-chip referencing to improve the limit-of-detection (LOD) in compact silicon nitride (SiN) microring arrays. Microring resonators, fabricated by e-beam lithography and fluorine-based etching, are designed for visible wavelengths (656nm) and have a footprint of 20 x 20 μm. GM1 ganglioside is used as the specific ligand for recognition of Cholera Toxin Subunit B (CTB), with Ricinus Communis Agglutinin I (RCA I) as a negative control. Using micro-cantilever based printing less than 10 pL of glycan solution is consumed per microring. Real-time data on analyte binding is extracted from the shifts in resonance wavelengths of the microrings.

  19. Hybrid graphene-copper UWB array sensor for brain tumor detection via scattering parameters in microwave detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamlos, Mohd Aminudin; Ismail, Abdul Hafiizh; Jamlos, Mohd Faizal; Narbudowicz, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid graphene-copper ultra-wideband array sensor applied to microwave imaging technique is successfully used in detecting and visualizing tumor inside human brain. The sensor made of graphene coated film for the patch while copper for both the transmission line and parasitic element. The hybrid sensor performance is better than fully copper sensor. Hybrid sensor recorded wider bandwidth of 2.0-10.1 GHz compared with fully copper sensor operated from 2.5 to 10.1 GHz. Higher gain of 3.8-8.5 dB is presented by hybrid sensor, while fully copper sensor stated lower gain ranging from 2.6 to 6.7 dB. Both sensors recorded excellent total efficiency averaged at 97 and 94%, respectively. The sensor used for both transmits equivalent signal and receives backscattering signal from stratified human head model in detecting tumor. Difference in the data of the scattering parameters recorded from the head model with presence and absence of tumor is used as the main data to be further processed in confocal microwave imaging algorithm in generating image. MATLAB software is utilized to analyze S-parameter signals obtained from measurement. Tumor presence is indicated by lower S-parameter values compared to higher values recorded by tumor absence.

  20. A Single-Array-Based Method for Detecting Copy Number Variants Using Affymetrix High Density SNP Arrays and its Application to Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Wen, Yalu; Fu, Wenjiang

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative evidence has shown that structural variations, due to insertions, deletions, and inversions of DNA, may contribute considerably to the development of complex human diseases, such as breast cancer. High-throughput genotyping technologies, such as Affymetrix high density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays, have produced large amounts of genetic data for genome-wide SNP genotype calling and copy number estimation. Meanwhile, there is a great need for accurate and efficient statistical methods to detect copy number variants. In this article, we introduce a hidden-Markov-model (HMM)-based method, referred to as the PICR-CNV, for copy number inference. The proposed method first estimates copy number abundance for each single SNP on a single array based on the raw fluorescence values, and then standardizes the estimated copy number abundance to achieve equal footing among multiple arrays. This method requires no between-array normalization, and thus, maintains data integrity and independence of samples among individual subjects. In addition to our efforts to apply new statistical technology to raw fluorescence values, the HMM has been applied to the standardized copy number abundance in order to reduce experimental noise. Through simulations, we show our refined method is able to infer copy number variants accurately. Application of the proposed method to a breast cancer dataset helps to identify genomic regions significantly associated with the disease. PMID:26279618

  1. Disordered array of Au covered Silicon nanowires for SERS biosensing combined with electrochemical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Convertino, Annalisa; Mussi, Valentina; Maiolo, Luca

    2016-04-01

    We report on highly disordered array of Au coated silicon nanowires (Au/SiNWs) as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probe combined with electrochemical detection for biosensing applications. SiNWs, few microns long, were grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on common microscope slides and covered by Au evaporated film, 150 nm thick. The capability of the resulting composite structure to act as SERS biosensor was studied via the biotin-avidin interaction: the Raman signal obtained from this structure allowed to follow each surface modification step as well as to detect efficiently avidin molecules over a broad range of concentrations from micromolar down to the nanomolar values. The metallic coverage wrapping SiNWs was exploited also to obtain a dual detection of the same bioanalyte by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Indeed, the SERS signal and impedance modifications induced by the biomolecule perturbations on the metalized surface of the NWs were monitored on the very same three-electrode device with the Au/SiNWs acting as both working electrode and SERS probe.

  2. Detection and localization of single-source gravitational waves with pulsar timing arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.-J.; Wen, L.; Hobbs, G.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Madison, D. R.; Manchester, R. N.; Kerr, M.; Rosado, P. A.; Wang, J.-B.

    2015-05-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) can be used to search for very low frequency (10-9-10-7 Hz) gravitational waves (GWs). In this paper, we present a general method for the detection and localization of single-source GWs using PTAs. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this new method for three types of signals: monochromatic waves as expected from individual supermassive binary black holes in circular orbits, GWs from eccentric binaries and GW bursts. We also test its implementation in realistic data sets that include effects such as uneven sampling and heterogeneous data spans and measurement precision. It is shown that our method, which works in the frequency domain, performs as well as published time-domain methods. In particular, we find it equivalent to the Fe-statistic for monochromatic waves. We also discuss the construction of null streams - data streams that have null response to GWs, and the prospect of using null streams as a consistency check in the case of detected GW signals. Finally, we present sensitivities to individual supermassive binary black holes in eccentric orbits. We find that a monochromatic search that is designed for circular binaries can efficiently detect eccentric binaries with both high and low eccentricities, while a harmonic summing technique provides greater sensitivities only for binaries with moderate eccentricities.

  3. Trace gas detection and monitoring with the Digital Array Gas-correlation Radiometer (DAGR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordley, Larry L.; Hervig, Mark E.; Fish, Chad; McHugh, Martin J.

    2011-05-01

    We present the first results from a Digital Array Gas-correlation Radiometer (DAGR) prototype sensor, and discuss applications in remote sensing of trace gases. The sensor concept is based on traditional and reliable Gas Filter Correlation Radiometry (GFCR), but overcomes the limitations in solar backscatter applications. The DAGR sensor design can be scaled to the size of a digital camera and is ideal for downlooking detection of gases in the boundary layer, where solar backscatter measurements are needed to overcome the lack of thermal contrast in the IR. Ground-based portable DAGR sensors can monitor carbon sequestration sites or industrial facilities. Aircraft or UAV deployment can quickly survey large areas and are particularly well suited for gas leak detection or carbon monitoring. From space-based platforms, Doppler modulation can be exploited to produce an extremely fine spectral resolution with effective resolving power exceeding 100,000. Such space-based DAGR observations could provide near-global sensing of climatically important species such as such as CO2, CO, CH4, O3 and N2O. Planetary science applications include detection and mapping of biomarkers in the Martian atmosphere.

  4. Statistical methods for detecting genomic alterations through array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuedong; Guo, Sun-Wei

    2004-01-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (ABCGH) is an emerging high-resolution and high-throughput molecular genetic technique that allows genome-wide screening for chromosome alterations associated with tumorigenesis. Like the cDNA microarrays, ABCGH uses two differentially labeled test and reference DNAs which are cohybridized to cloned genomic fragments immobilized on glass slides. The hybridized DNAs are then detected in two different fluorochromes, and the significant deviation from unity in the ratios of the digitized intensity values is indicative of copy-number differences between the test and reference genomes. Proper statistical analyses need to account for many sources of variation besides genuine differences between the two genomes. In particular, spatial correlations, the variable nature of the ratio variance and non-Normal distribution call for careful statistical modeling. We propose two new statistics, the standard t-statistic and its modification with variances smoothed along the genome, and two tests for each statistic, the standard t-test and a test based on the hybrid adaptive spline (HAS). Simulations indicate that the smoothed t-statistic always improves the performance over the standard t-statistic. The t-tests are more powerful in detecting isolated alterations while those based on HAS are more powerful in detecting a cluster of alterations. We apply the proposed methods to the identification of genomic alterations in endometrium in women with endometriosis.

  5. Detecting Eccentric Supermassive Black Hole Binaries with Pulsar Timing Arrays: Resolvable Source Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. R.; Huerta, E. A.; Gair, J. R.; McWilliams, S. T.

    2016-01-01

    The couplings between supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) and their environments within galactic nuclei have been well studied as part of the search for solutions to the final parsec problem. The scattering of stars by the binary or the interaction with a circumbinary disk may efficiently drive the system to sub-parsec separations, allowing the binary to enter a regime where the emission of gravitational waves can drive it to merger within a Hubble time. However, these interactions can also affect the orbital parameters of the binary. In particular, they may drive an increase in binary eccentricity which survives until the system’s gravitational-wave (GW) signal enters the pulsar-timing array (PTA) band. Therefore, if we can measure the eccentricity from observed signals, we can potentially deduce some of the properties of the binary environment. To this end, we build on previous techniques to present a general Bayesian pipeline with which we can detect and estimate the parameters of an eccentric SMBHB system with PTAs. Additionally, we generalize the PTA {{ F }}{{e}}-statistic to eccentric systems, and show that both this statistic and the Bayesian pipeline are robust when studying circular or arbitrarily eccentric systems. We explore how eccentricity influences the detection prospects of single GW sources, as well as the detection penalty incurred by employing a circular waveform template to search for eccentric signals, and conclude by identifying important avenues for future study.

  6. A microfluidic platform with integrated arrays for immunologic assays for biological pathogen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemm, Richard; Becker, Holger; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Julich, Sandra; Miethe, Peter; Moche, Christian; Schattschneider, Sebastian; Tomaso, Herbert; Gärtner, Claudia

    2014-05-01

    The ability to integrate complete assays on a microfluidic chip helps to greatly simplify instrument requirements and allows the use of lab-on-a-chip technology in the field. A core application for such field-portable systems is the detection of pathogens in a CBRN scenario such as permanent monitoring of airborne pathogens, e.g. in subway stations or hospitals etc. An immunological assay was chosen as method for the pathogen identification. The conceptual approach was its realization as a lab-on-a-chip system, enabling an easy handling of the sample in an automated manner. The immunological detection takes place on an antibody array directly implemented in the microfluidic network. Different immobilization strategies will be presented showing the performance of the system. Central elements of the disposable microfluidic device like fluidic interface, turning valves, liquid introduction and waste storage, as well as the architecture of measurement and control fluidic network, will be introduced. Overall process times of about 30 minutes were achieved and assays for the detection of Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis are presented. An important feature of the integrated lab-on-a-chip approach is that all waste liquids remain on-chip and contamination risks can be avoided.

  7. Tunable and label-free virus enrichment for ultrasensitive virus detection using carbon nanotube arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Yin-Ting; Tang, Yi; Sebastian, Aswathy; Dasgupta, Archi; Perea-Lopez, Nestor; Albert, Istvan; Lu, Huaguang; Terrones, Mauricio; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Viral infectious diseases can erupt unpredictably, spread rapidly, and ravage mass populations. Although established methods, such as polymerase chain reaction, virus isolation, and next-generation sequencing have been used to detect viruses, field samples with low virus count pose major challenges in virus surveillance and discovery. We report a unique carbon nanotube size-tunable enrichment microdevice (CNT-STEM) that efficiently enriches and concentrates viruses collected from field samples. The channel sidewall in the microdevice was made by growing arrays of vertically aligned nitrogen-doped multiwalled CNTs, where the intertubular distance between CNTs could be engineered in the range of 17 to 325 nm to accurately match the size of different viruses. The CNT-STEM significantly improves detection limits and virus isolation rates by at least 100 times. Using this device, we successfully identified an emerging avian influenza virus strain [A/duck/PA/02099/2012(H11N9)] and a novel virus strain (IBDV/turkey/PA/00924/14). Our unique method demonstrates the early detection of emerging viruses and the discovery of new viruses directly from field samples, thus creating a universal platform for effectively remediating viral infectious diseases. PMID:27730213

  8. Detection and localization of continuous gravitational waves with pulsar timing arrays: the role of pulsar terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.-J.; Wen, L.; Xiong, J.; Xu, Y.; Wang, Y.; Mohanty, S. D.; Hobbs, G.; Manchester, R. N.

    2016-09-01

    A pulsar timing array is a Galactic-scale detector of nanohertz gravitational waves (GWs). Its target signals contain two components: the `Earth term' and the `pulsar term' corresponding to GWs incident on the Earth and pulsar, respectively. In this work we present a Frequentist method for the detection and localization of continuous waves that takes into account the pulsar term and is significantly faster than existing methods. We investigate the role of pulsar terms by comparing a full-signal search with an Earth-term-only search for non-evolving black hole binaries. By applying the method to synthetic data sets, we find that (i) a full-signal search can slightly improve the detection probability (by about five per cent); (ii) sky localization is biased if only Earth terms are searched for and the inclusion of pulsar terms is critical to remove such a bias; (iii) in the case of strong detections (with signal-to-noise ratio ≳30), it may be possible to improve pulsar distance estimation through GW measurements.

  9. Disordered array of Au covered Silicon nanowires for SERS biosensing combined with electrochemical detection

    PubMed Central

    Convertino, Annalisa; Mussi, Valentina; Maiolo, Luca

    2016-01-01

    We report on highly disordered array of Au coated silicon nanowires (Au/SiNWs) as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probe combined with electrochemical detection for biosensing applications. SiNWs, few microns long, were grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on common microscope slides and covered by Au evaporated film, 150 nm thick. The capability of the resulting composite structure to act as SERS biosensor was studied via the biotin-avidin interaction: the Raman signal obtained from this structure allowed to follow each surface modification step as well as to detect efficiently avidin molecules over a broad range of concentrations from micromolar down to the nanomolar values. The metallic coverage wrapping SiNWs was exploited also to obtain a dual detection of the same bioanalyte by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Indeed, the SERS signal and impedance modifications induced by the biomolecule perturbations on the metalized surface of the NWs were monitored on the very same three-electrode device with the Au/SiNWs acting as both working electrode and SERS probe. PMID:27112197

  10. Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization for the Genomewide Detection of Submicroscopic Chromosomal Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Vissers, Lisenka E. L. M. ; de Vries, Bert B. A. ; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo ; Janssen, Irene M. ; Feuth, Ton ; Choy, Chik On ; Straatman, Huub ; van der Vliet, Walter ; Huys, Erik H. L. P. G. ; van Rijk, Anke ; Smeets, Dominique ; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A. ; Knoers, Nine V. ; van der Burgt, Ineke ; de Jong, Pieter J. ; Brunner, Han G. ; van Kessel, Ad Geurts ; Schoenmakers, Eric F. P. M. ; Veltman, Joris A. 

    2003-01-01

    Microdeletions and microduplications, not visible by routine chromosome analysis, are a major cause of human malformation and mental retardation. Novel high-resolution, whole-genome technologies can improve the diagnostic detection rate of these small chromosomal abnormalities. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization allows such a high-resolution screening by hybridizing differentially labeled test and reference DNAs to arrays consisting of thousands of genomic clones. In this study, we tested the diagnostic capacity of this technology using ∼3,500 flourescent in situ hybridization–verified clones selected to cover the genome with an average of 1 clone per megabase (Mb). The sensitivity and specificity of the technology were tested in normal-versus-normal control experiments and through the screening of patients with known microdeletion syndromes. Subsequently, a series of 20 cytogenetically normal patients with mental retardation and dysmorphisms suggestive of a chromosomal abnormality were analyzed. In this series, three microdeletions and two microduplications were identified and validated. Two of these genomic changes were identified also in one of the parents, indicating that these are large-scale genomic polymorphisms. Deletions and duplications as small as 1 Mb could be reliably detected by our approach. The percentage of false-positive results was reduced to a minimum by use of a dye-swap-replicate analysis, all but eliminating the need for laborious validation experiments and facilitating implementation in a routine diagnostic setting. This high-resolution assay will facilitate the identification of novel genes involved in human mental retardation and/or malformation syndromes and will provide insight into the flexibility and plasticity of the human genome. PMID:14628292

  11. Design and realization of a contact-less interaction system based on infrared reflection photoelectric detection array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Lei, Bing; Feng, Ying

    2015-10-01

    Due to the good performance of high sensitivity, quick response and low cost, infrared reflection detection technology is widely used in various fields. In this work, we present a novel contact-less interaction system which is based on infrared reflection detection technology. The system is mainly composed of a Micro Controller Unit (MCU), upper computer and photoelectric detection module. The MCU is utilized to control the photoelectric detection module and to make sure that the sensing unit is lighted one by one in a given order. When the interactive object appears upon the infrared reflection photoelectric detection array, its position information will be ensured and sent to the upper computer through MCU. In this system, every sensing unit is lighted for 1ms, and the detection array includes 8×8 units. It means that the photoelectric detection array will scan 15.6 times per-second. The experimental research results indicate that the factors affecting the detection range including the working current of transmitting diode, modulation frequency, and the reflectivity of the interactive object. When the working current is 10mA, and the modulation frequency is 80 KHz, the system has a detection range of 20 cm. Moreover, efficient modulation and demodulation of optical signal is quite necessary to remove the influence of surrounding light.

  12. Final Scientific Report, Integrated Seismic Event Detection and Location by Advanced Array Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kvaerna, T.; Gibbons. S.J.; Ringdal, F; Harris, D.B.

    2007-01-30

    primarily the result of spurious identification and incorrect association of phases, and of excessive variability in estimates for the velocity and direction of incoming seismic phases. The mitigation of these causes has led to the development of two complimentary techniques for classifying seismic sources by testing detected signals under mutually exclusive event hypotheses. Both of these techniques require appropriate calibration data from the region to be monitored, and are therefore ideally suited to mining areas or other sites with recurring seismicity. The first such technique is a classification and location algorithm where a template is designed for each site being monitored which defines which phases should be observed, and at which times, for all available regional array stations. For each phase, the variability of measurements (primarily the azimuth and apparent velocity) from previous events is examined and it is determined which processing parameters (array configuration, data window length, frequency band) provide the most stable results. This allows us to define optimal diagnostic tests for subsequent occurrences of the phase in question. The calibration of templates for this project revealed significant results with major implications for seismic processing in both automatic and analyst reviewed contexts: • one or more fixed frequency bands should be chosen for each phase tested for. • the frequency band providing the most stable parameter estimates varies from site to site and a frequency band which provides optimal measurements for one site may give substantially worse measurements for a nearby site. • slowness corrections applied depend strongly on the frequency band chosen. • the frequency band providing the most stable estimates is often neither the band providing the greatest SNR nor the band providing the best array gain. For this reason, the automatic template location estimates provided here are frequently far better than those obtained by

  13. Possible gamma-ray burst radio detections by the Square Kilometre Array. New perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, Alan Cosimo; Capozziello, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    The next generation interferometric radio telescope, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which will be the most sensitive and largest radio telescope ever constructed, could greatly contribute to the detection, survey and characterization of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). By the SKA, it will be possible to perform the follow up of GRBs even for several months. This approach would be extremely useful to extend the Spectrum Energetic Distribution (SED) from the gamma to the to radio band and would increase the number of radio detectable GRBs. In principle, the SKA could help to understand the physics of GRBs by setting constraints on theoretical models. This goal could be achieved by taking into account multiple observations at different wavelengths in order to obtain a deeper insight of the sources. Here, we present an estimation of GRB radio detections, showing that the GRBs can really be observed by the SKA. The approach that we present consists in determining blind detection rates derived by a very large sample consisting of merging several GRB catalogues observed by current missions as Swift, Fermi, Agile and INTEGRAL and by previous missions as BeppoSAX, CGRO, GRANAT, HETE-2, Ulysses and Wind. The final catalogue counts 7516 distinct sources. We compute the fraction of GRBs that could be observed by the SKA at high and low frequencies, above its observable sky. Considering the planned SKA sensitivity and through an extrapolation based on previous works and observations, we deduce the minimum fluence in the range 15-150 keV. This is the energy interval where a GRB should emit to be detectable in the radio band by the SKA. Results seem consistent with observational capabilities.

  14. Multiband array detection and location of seismic sources recorded by dense seismic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poiata, Natalia; Satriano, Claudio; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre; Bernard, Pascal; Obara, Kazushige

    2016-06-01

    We present a new methodology for detection and space-time location of seismic sources based on multiscale, frequency-selective coherence of the wave field recorded by dense large-scale seismic networks and local antennas. The method is designed to enhance coherence of the signal statistical features across the array of sensors and consists of three steps: signal processing, space-time imaging, and detection and location. The first step provides, for each station, a simplified representation of seismic signal by extracting multiscale non-stationary statistical characteristics, through multiband higher-order statistics or envelopes. This signal processing scheme is designed to account for a priori unknown transients, potentially associated with a variety of sources (e.g. earthquakes, tremors), and to prepare data for a better performance in posterior steps. Following space-time imaging is carried through 3-D spatial mapping and summation of station-pair time-delay estimate functions. This step produces time-series of 3-D spatial images representing the likelihood that each pixel makes part of a source. Detection and location is performed in the final step by extracting the local maxima from the 3-D spatial images. We demonstrate the efficiency of the method in detecting and locating seismic sources associated with low signal-to-noise ratio on an example of the aftershock earthquake records from local stations of International Maule Aftershock Deployment in Central Chile. The performance and potential of the method to detect, locate and characterize the energy release associated with possibly mixed seismic radiation from earthquakes and low-frequency tectonic tremors is further tested on continuous data from southwestern Japan.

  15. HNA and ANA high-affinity arrays for detections of DNA and RNA single-base mismatches.

    PubMed

    Abramov, Mikhail; Schepers, Guy; Van Aerschot, Arthur; Van Hummelen, Paul; Herdewijn, Piet

    2008-06-15

    DNA microarrays and sensors have become essential tools in the functional analysis of sequence information. Recently we reported that chimeric hexitol (HNA) and altritol (ANA) nucleotide monomers with an anhydrohexitol sugar moiety are easily available and proved their chemistry to be compatible with DNA and RNA synthesis. In this communication we describe a novel analytical platform based on HNA and ANA units to be used as synthetic oligonucleotide arrays on a glass solid support for match/mismatch detection of DNA and RNA targets. Arrays were fabricated by immobilization of diene-modified oligonucleotides on maleimido-activated glass slides. To demonstrate the selectivity and sensitivity of the HNA/ANA arrays and to compare their properties with regular DNA arrays, sequences in the reverse transcriptase gene (codon 74) and the protease gene of HIV-1 (codon 10) were selected. Both, the relative intensity of the signal and match/mismatch discrimination increased up to fivefold for DNA targets and up to 3-3.5-fold for RNA targets applying HNA or ANA arrays (ANA>HNA>DNA). Certainly in the new field of miRNA detection, ANA arrays could prove very beneficial and their properties should be investigated in more detail.

  16. A new sparse design method on phased array-based acoustic emission sensor for partial discharge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Qing; Cheng, Shuyi; Lü, Fangcheng; Li, Yanqing

    2014-03-01

    The acoustic detecting performance of a partial discharge (PD) ultrasonic sensor array can be improved by increasing the number of array elements. However, it will increase the complexity and cost of the PD detection system. Therefore, a sparse sensor with an optimization design can be chosen to ensure good acoustic performance. In this paper, first, a quantitative method is proposed for evaluating the acoustic performance of a square PD ultrasonic array sensor. Second, a method of sparse design is presented to combine the evaluation method with the chaotic monkey algorithm. Third, an optimal sparse structure of a 3 × 3 square PD ultrasonic array sensor is deduced. It is found that, under different sparseness and sparse structure, the main beam width of the directivity function shows a small variation, while the sidelobe amplitude shows a bigger variation. For a specific sparseness, the acoustic performance under the optimal sparse structure is close to that using a full array. Finally, some simulations based on the above method show that, for certain sparseness, the sensor with the optimal sparse structure exhibits superior positioning accuracy compared to that with a stochastic one. The sensor array structure may be chosen according to the actual requirements for an actual engineering application.

  17. Development of a PCR/ligase detection reaction/nanogold-based universal array approach for the detection of low-abundant DNA point mutations.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ping; Lu, Weiping; Guo, Jianxin; Liu, Qiang; Chen, Zhuqin; Han, Jian; Li, Li

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of combining PCR and ligase detection reaction (LDR) with a novel nano-gold-based universal array for the detection of low abundance point mutations from fetal DNA in maternal plasma samples. The sequence with the target point mutation was first amplified by PCR and then used as a template for LDR in which the upstream specific primer contains a tag sequence at the 5'-end. After hybridization to the probes of a universal array containing anti-tag sequences, the ligated products were bound to streptavidin-labeled nano-gold particles and the hybridization signals were amplified by silver staining. The PCR/LDR/universal array was first tested for sensitivity with nano-gold-based detection, and then this system was applied to detect the low abundance specific mutation IVS2 654(C→T) of the β-globin gene in a model using maternal plasma samples. The nano-gold-based method unambiguously identified a single mutation at a sensitivity of 1:1000. This approach was applied to detect the paternally inherited IVS2 654(C→T) mutation from thirty maternal plasma samples. The results were consistent with those obtained by PCR/reverse dot blot of amniotic fluid cell DNA. The PCR/LDR/nano-gold-based universal array is able to detect low-abundance point mutations with high sensitivity.

  18. THE MINIMUM WIDTH OF THE ARRIVAL DIRECTION DISTRIBUTION OF ULTRA-HIGH-ENERGY COSMIC RAYS DETECTED WITH THE YAKUTSK ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. A.

    2015-05-10

    This paper presents the results of searches for anisotropy in the arrival directions of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (CRs) detected with the Yakutsk Array during the 1974–2008 observational period as well as searches in available data from other giant extensive air shower arrays working at present. A method of analysis based on a comparison of the minimum width of distributions in equatorial coordinates is used. As a result, a hypothesis of isotropy in arrival directions is rejected at the 99.5% significance level. The observed decrease in the minimum width of the distribution can be explained by the presence of CR sources in energy intervals and sky regions according to recent indications inferred from data of the Yakutsk Array and Telescope Array experiments.

  19. MagArray Biochips for Protein and DNA Detection with Magnetic Nanotags: Design, Experiment, and Signal-to-Noise Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterfeld, Sebastian J.; Wang, Shan X.

    MagArray™ chips contain arrays of magnetic sensors, which can be used to detect surface binding reactions of biological molecules that have been labeled with 10 to 100 nm sized magnetic particles. Although MagArray chips are in some ways similar to fluorescence-based DNA array chips, the use of magnetic labeling tags leads to many distinct advantages, such as better background rejection, no label bleaching, inexpensive chip readers, potentially higher sensitivity, ability to measure multiple binding reactions in homogeneous assays simultaneously and in real-time, and seamless integration with magnetic separation techniques. So far, the technology of MagArray chips has been successfully used to perform quantitative analytic bioassays of both protein and nucleic acid targets. The potential of this technology, especially for point-of-care testing (POCT) and portable molecular diagnostics, appears promising, and it is likely that this technology will see significant further performance gains in the near future.

  20. Array analysis methods for detection, classification and location of seismic sources: a first evaluation for aftershock analysis using dense temporary post-seismic array network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poiata, N.; Satriano, C.; Vilotte, J.; Bernard, P.

    2012-12-01

    Detection, separation, classification and location of distributed non stationary seismic sources in broadband noisy environment is an important problem in seismology, in particular for monitoring the high-level post-seismic activity following large subduction earthquakes, like the off-shore Maule (Mw 8.8, 2010) earthquake in Central Chile. Multiple seismic arrays, and local antenna, distributed over a region allow exploiting frequency selective coherence of the signals that arrive at widely-separated array stations, leading to improved detection, convolution blind source separation, and location of distributed non stationary sources. We present here first results on the investigation of time-frequency adaptive array analysis techniques for detection and location of broadband distributed seismic events recorded by the dense temporary seismic network (International Maule Aftershock Deployment, IMAD) installed for monitoring the high-level seismic activity following the 27 February 2010 Maule earthquake (Mw 8.8). This seismic network is characterized by a large aperture, with variable inter-station distances, corroborated with a high level of distributed near and far field seismic source activity and noise. For this study, we first extract from the post-seismic network a number of seismic arrays distributed over the region covered by this network. A first aspect is devoted to passive distributed seismic sources detection, classification and separation. We investigate a number of narrow and wide band signal analysis methods both in time and time-frequency domains for energy arrival detection and tracking, including time adaptive higher order statistics, e.g. like kurtosis, and multiband band-pass filtering, together with adaptive time-frequency transformation and extraction techniques. We demonstrate that these techniques provide superior resolution and robustness than classical STA/LTA techniques in particular in the case of distributed sources with potential signal

  1. OPTIMAL STRATEGIES FOR CONTINUOUS GRAVITATIONAL WAVE DETECTION IN PULSAR TIMING ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J. A.; Siemens, X.; Creighton, J. D. E.

    2012-09-10

    Supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are expected to emit a continuous gravitational wave signal in the pulsar timing array (PTA) frequency band (10{sup -9} to 10{sup -7} Hz). The development of data analysis techniques aimed at efficient detection and characterization of these signals is critical to the gravitational wave detection effort. In this paper, we leverage methods developed for LIGO continuous wave gravitational searches and explore the use of the F-statistic for such searches in pulsar timing data. Babak and Sesana have used this approach in the context of PTAs to show that one can resolve multiple SMBHB sources in the sky. Our work improves on several aspects of prior continuous wave search methods developed for PTA data analysis. The algorithm is implemented fully in the time domain, which naturally deals with the irregular sampling typical of PTA data and avoids spectral leakage problems associated with frequency domain methods. We take into account the fitting of the timing model and have generalized our approach to deal with both correlated and uncorrelated colored noise sources. We also develop an incoherent detection statistic that maximizes over all pulsar-dependent contributions to the likelihood. To test the effectiveness and sensitivity of our detection statistics, we perform a number of Monte Carlo simulations. We produce sensitivity curves for PTAs of various configurations and outline an implementation of a fully functional data analysis pipeline. Finally, we present a derivation of the likelihood maximized over the gravitational wave phases at the pulsar locations, which results in a vast reduction of the search parameter space.

  2. Detection and localization using an acoustic array on a small robotic platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stuart H.; Scanlon, Michael V.

    2003-09-01

    The future battlefield will require an unprecedented level of automation in which soldier-operated autonomous and semi-autonomous ground, air and sea platforms along with mounted and dismounted soldiers will function as a tightly coupled team. Sophisticated robotic platforms with diverse sensor suites will be an integral part of the Objective Force, and must be able to collaborate not only amongst themselves but also with their manned partners. The Army Research Laboratory has developed a robot-based acoustic detection system that will detect and localize on an impulsive noise event, such as a sniper's weapon firing. Additionally, acoustic sensor arrays worn on a soldier's helmet or equipment can enhance his situational awareness and RSTA capabilities. The Land Warrior or Objective Force Warrior body-worn computer can detect tactically significant impulsive signatures from bullets, mortars, artillery, and missiles or spectral signatures from tanks, helicopters, UAVs, and mobile robots. Time-difference-of-arrival techniques can determine a sound's direction of arrival, while head attitude sensors can instantly determine the helmet orientation at time of capture. With precision GPS location of the soldier, along with the locations of other soldiers, robots, or unattended ground sensors that heard the same event, triangulation techniques can produce an accurate location of the target. Data from C-4 explosions and 0.50-Caliber shots shows that both helmet and robot systems can localize on the same event. This provides an awesome capability - mobile robots and soldiers working together on an ever-changing battlespace to detect the enemy and improve the survivability, mobility, and lethality of our future warriors.

  3. High throughput and high yield nanofabrication of precisely designed gold nanohole arrays for fluorescence enhanced detection of biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ten It; Han, Shan; Wu, Lin; Wang, Yi; Deng, Jie; Tan, Christina Yuan Ling; Bai, Ping; Loke, Yee Chong; Yang, Xin Da; Tse, Man Siu; Ng, Sum Huan; Zhou, Xiaodong

    2013-06-21

    Fluorescence excitation enhancement by plasmonic nanostructures such as gold nanohole arrays has been a hot topic in biosensing and bioimaging in recent years. However, the high throughput and high yield fabrication of precisely designed metal nanostructures for optimized fluorescence excitation remains a challenge. Our work is the first report combining nanopattern nickel mould fabrication and UV imprinting for gold nanostructure mass fabrication in high yield. We report our successful gold nanohole array mass fabrication on a 4'' glass wafer, by first fabricating a high fidelity nickel mould, then using the mould for UV nanoimprinting on a polymer coated on the glass, evaporating the gold film on the glass wafer, and lifting off the polymer to obtain a gold nanohole array on the glass. Our optimized process for wafer fabrication can achieve almost 100% yield from nanoimprinting to gold lift-off, while the fabricated nickel mould has >70% defect-free area with the rest having a few scattered defects. In our work, the size and pitch of the gold nanohole array are designed to enhance the fluorescent dye Alexa 647. When the fabricated gold nanohole array is used for prostate specific antigen (PSA) detection by establishing a sandwiched fluorescence assay on the gold surface, a detection limit of 100 pg ml(-1) is achieved, while with a same thickness of gold film, only 1 ng ml(-1) is detected.

  4. A high density COX1 barcode oligonucleotide array for identification and detection of species of Penicillium subgenus Penicillium.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Seifert, K A; Lévesque, C A

    2009-05-01

    We developed a COX1 barcode oligonucleotide array based on 358 sequences, including 58 known and two new species of Penicillium subgenus Penicillium, and 12 allied species. The array was robotically spotted at near microarray density on membranes. Species and clade-specific oligonucleotides were selected using the computer programs SigOli and Array Designer. Robotic spotting allowed 768 spots with duplicate sets of perfect match and the corresponding mismatch and positive control oligonucleotides, to be printed on 2 × 6 cm(2) nylon membranes. The array was validated with hybridizations between the array and digoxigenin (DIG)-labelled COX1 polymerase chain reaction amplicons from 70 pure DNA samples, and directly from environmental samples (cheese and plants) without culturing. DNA hybridization conditions were optimized, but undesired cross-reactions were detected frequently, reflecting the relatively high sequence similarity of the COX1 gene among Penicillium species. Approximately 60% of the perfect match oligonucleotides were rejected because of low specificity and 76 delivered useful group-specific or species-specific reactions and could be used for detecting certain species of Penicillium in environmental samples. In practice, the presence of weak signals on arrays exposed to amplicons from environmental samples, which could have represented weak detections or weak cross reactions, made interpretation difficult for over half of the oligonucleotides. DNA regions with very few single nucleotide polymorphisms or lacking insertions/deletions among closely related species are not ideal for oligonucleotide-based diagnostics, and supplementing the COX1-based array with oligonucleotides derived from additional genes would result in a more robust hierarchical identification system.

  5. Detecting gravitational waves with pulsar-timing arrays: a case of astrophysical forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallisneri, Michele

    2016-03-01

    Pulsar-timing arrays have recently reached maturity as the ``third way'' to gravitational-wave (GW) detection, besides ground-based interferometers and future space-based observatories. PTA campaigns target the very-low-frequency band centered around 10- 8 Hz, so they will yield science complementary to the other two programs. For this speaker, much of the fascination with PTAs lies in the fact that they represent a grand experiment in precision measurement that was set up by Nature herself, so we have rather little control on it, and few knobs to turn. Improvements in sensitivity will come as much from ever more powerful radiotelescopes as from a better understanding of the ``detectors'' (neutron stars, their dynamics in binaries, the interstellar medium, ...), and from deeper, more probing analyses of the data we already have. A positive GW detection claim will require making a watertight case of astrophysical forensics, proving beyond any reasonable doubt that systematics are under control, and designing the complex inference chain that points to the presence GWs in its most unequivocal and defensible form. I discuss how these goals and concerns informed the development of recently published constraints on the astrophysical population of supermassive black-hole binaries.

  6. Chemically selective coated quartz-crystal-microbalance (QCM) array for detection of volatile organic chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Thomas W.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Martin, Stephen J.; Spates, James J.; Bohuszewicz, Teresa V.; Osbourn, Gordon C.; Bartholomew, John W.

    1998-12-01

    Liquid flow cells have been fabricated to prepare an array of QCMs operating simultaneously for detection and identification of VOCs in water. Two signals, a frequency response and a damping voltage response, were obtained per resonator. A blank QCM was used as a reference to account for changes in liquid density and viscosity. Nine different polymer coatings applied using a spin coat technique have been examined for VOC response under liquid flow conditions. A matrix of three classes of VOCs were examined for each coating with four chemicals in each class. The three classes of VOCs are polar, nonpolar and chlorinated. A pattern recognition technique, called visually empirical region of influence, was used to cluster the responses in n- dimensional space. Chemicals within a class varying by only one methyl group (e.g., toluene and xylene) are easily discriminated using only two different coatings with three different QCM responses. All chemicals were easily separated and detected with a total of 5 films and 6 responses with >99% accuracy.

  7. Electrochemical biosensor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA detection based on gold nanotubes array electrode platform.

    PubMed

    Torati, Sri Ramulu; Reddy, Venu; Yoon, Seok Soo; Kim, CheolGi

    2016-04-15

    The template assisted electrochemical deposition technique was used for the synthesis of gold nanotubes array (AuNTsA). The morphological structure of the synthesized AuNTsA was observed by scanning electron microscopy and found that the individual nanotubes are around 1.5 μm in length with a diameter of 200 nm. Nanotubes are vertically aligned to the Au thick film, which is formed during the synthesis process of nanotubes. The electrochemical performance of the AuNTsA was compared with the bare Au electrode and found that AuNTsA has better electron transfer surface than bare Au electrode which is due to the high surface area. Hence, the AuNTsA was used as an electrode for the fabrication of DNA hybridization biosensor for detection of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis DNA. The DNA hybridization biosensor constructed by AuNTsA electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry technique with Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) as an electrochemical redox indicator. The selectivity of the fabricated biosensor was illustrated by hybridization with complementary DNA and non-complementary DNA with probe DNA immobilized AuNTsA electrode using methylene blue as a hybridization indicator. The developed electrochemical DNA biosensor shows good linear range of complementary DNA concentration from 0.01 ng/μL to 100 ng/μL with high detection limit.

  8. Disposable electrochemical DNA-array for PCR amplified detection of hazelnut allergens in foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Bettazzi, Francesca; Lucarelli, Fausto; Palchetti, Ilaria; Berti, Francesca; Marrazza, Giovanna; Mascini, Marco

    2008-04-28

    An electrochemical low-density DNA-array has been designed and implemented to be used in combination with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in order to investigate the presence of hazelnut major allergens (Cor a 1.04, Cor a 1.03) in foodstuff. Unmodified PCR products were captured at the sensor interface via sandwich hybridization with surface-tethered probes and biotinylated signalling probes. The resulting biotinylated hybrids were coupled with a streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase conjugate and then exposed to a alpha-naphthyl phosphate solution. Differential pulse voltammetry was finally used to detect the alpha-naphthol signal. The detection limits for Cor a 1.03 and Cor a 1.04 were 0.3 and 0.1 nmol L(-1), respectively (R.S.D. 10%). The optimized conditions were used to test several commercially available foodstuffs, claiming to contain or not the targeted nuts. The results were compared with those obtained with classical ELISA tests.

  9. Triboelectric active sensor array for self-powered static and dynamic pressure detection and tactile imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Long; Xie, Yannan; Wang, Sihong; Wu, Wenzhuo; Niu, Simiao; Wen, Xiaonan; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-09-24

    We report an innovative, large-area, and self-powered pressure mapping approach based on the triboelectric effect, which converts the mechanical stimuli into electrical output signals. The working mechanism of the triboelectric active sensor (TEAS) was theoretically studied by both analytical method and numerical calculation to gain an intuitive understanding of the relationship between the applied pressure and the responsive signals. Relying on the unique pressure response characteristics of the open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current, we realize both static and dynamic pressure sensing on a single device for the first time. A series of comprehensive investigations were carried out to characterize the performance of the TEAS, and high sensitivity (0.31 kPa(-1)), ultrafast response time (<5 ms), long-term stability (30,000 cycles), as well as low detection limit (2.1 Pa) were achieved. The pressure measurement range of the TEAS was adjustable, which means both gentle pressure detection and large-scale pressure sensing were enabled. Through integrating multiple TEAS units into a sensor array, the as-fabricated TEAS matrix was capable of monitoring and mapping the local pressure distribution applied on the device with distinguishable spatial profiles. This work presents a technique for tactile imaging and progress toward practical applications of nanogenerators, providing potential solutions for accomplishment of artificial skin, human-electronic interfacing, and self-powered systems.

  10. Chemically Selective Coated Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) Array for Detection of Volatile Organic Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Bohuszewicz, T.V.; Frye-Mason, G.C.; Martin, S.J.; Osbourn, G.C. Bartholomew, J.W.; Schneider, T.W.; Spates, J.J.

    1998-11-04

    Liquid flow cells have been fabricated to prepare an array of QCMS operating simultaneously for detection and identification of VOCS in water. TWO signals, a tlequency response and a damping voltage response, were obtained per resonator. A blank QCM was used as a reference to account for changes in liquid density and viscosity. Nine different polymer coatings applied using a spin coat technique have been examined for VOC response under liquid flow conditions. A matrix of three classes of VOCS were examined for each coating with four chemicals in each class. The three classes of VOCS are polar, nonpolar and chlorinated. A pattern recognition technique, called visually empirical region of influence (VERI), was used to cluster the responses in n-dimensional space. Chemicals within a class varying by only one methyl group (e.g., toluene and xylene) are easily discriminated using only two different coatings with three different QCM responses. All chemicak were easily separated and detected with a total of 5 films and 6 responses with >99% accuracy.

  11. Detection of volatile compounds with mass-sensitive sensor arrays in the presence of variable ambient humidity.

    PubMed

    Dickert, F L; Hayden, O; Zenkel, M E

    1999-04-01

    Mass-sensitive sensor arrays were established for the detection of isomeric or highly analogue analyte mixtures, which show similar physical and morphological properties. Supramolecular host-guest chemistry and arrays of four mass-sensitive quartz crystal microbalances have been successfully combined with multivariate calibration techniques in the presence of variable air moisture. This system enabled even the separation of xylene isomers [Formula: see text] a task that might be crucial even by gas chromatography. The data of the sensor arrays were analyzed with partial least squares and artificial neural networks. The xylene isomers could be detected with an accuracy of ∼1% in the range of 0-200 ppm, nearly eliminating the residual water cross-sensitivity of the sensor coatings, which allows effective work place or environmental monitoring of toxic compounds with fast response levels.

  12. A RGB-Type Quantum Dot-based Sensor Array for Sensitive Visual Detection of Trace Formaldehyde in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hui; Hu, Jing; Tang, Jie; Xu, Kailai; Hou, Xiandeng; Wu, Peng

    2016-11-01

    A simple colorimetric sensor array based on red-emitting CdTe QDs and green-colored fluorescein that exhibited RGB-type color change was proposed for visual detection of trace formaldehyde. In the presence of formaldehyde, the red fluorescence from CdTe QDs was quenched while the green fluorescein was inert thus as a reference. Through harvesting the varied quenching efficiency of different ligand-capped CdTe QDs by formaldehyde, a simple sensor array can be constructed for both selective detection of formaldehyde with high sensitivity (LOD of 0.08 ppm) and identification of the existence of potential interference from acetaldehyde. The quenching mechanisms of formaldehyde toward different ligand capped CdTe QDs were studied with fluorescence lifetime, zeta potential, and also theoretical calculations. The results from theoretical calculations were in good agreement with the experimental results. The proposed sensor array was successfully explored for visual analysis of formaldehyde in indoor air samples.

  13. Detection of coffee flavour ageing by solid-phase microextraction/surface acoustic wave sensor array technique (SPME/SAW).

    PubMed

    Barié, Nicole; Bücking, Mark; Stahl, Ullrich; Rapp, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The use of polymer coated surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor arrays is a very promising technique for highly sensitive and selective detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). We present new developments to achieve a low cost sensor setup with a sampling method enabling the highly reproducible detection of volatiles even in the ppb range. Since the VOCs of coffee are well known by gas chromatography (GC) research studies, the new sensor array was tested for an easy assessable objective: coffee ageing during storage. As reference method these changes were traced with a standard GC/FID set-up, accompanied by sensory panellists. The evaluation of GC data showed a non-linear characteristic for single compound concentrations as well as for total peak area values, disabling prediction of the coffee age. In contrast, the new SAW sensor array demonstrates a linear dependency, i.e. being capable to show a dependency between volatile concentration and storage time.

  14. Impedance biosensor based on interdigitated electrode array for detection of E.coli O157:H7 in food products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh Dastider, Shibajyoti; Barizuddin, Syed; Dweik, Majed; Almasri, Mahmoud F.

    2012-05-01

    An impedance biosensor was designed, fabricated and tested for detection of viable Escherichia coli O157:H7 in food samples. This device consists of interdigitated microelectrode array (IDEA) fabricated using thin layer of sputtered gold, embedded under a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel. The array of electrodes is designed to detect viable EColi in different food products. The active surface area of the detection array was modified using goat anti-E.coli polyclonal IgG antibody. Contaminated food samples were tested by infusing the supernatant containing bacteria over the IDEA's, through the microchannel. Antibody-antigen binding on the electrodes results in impedance change. Four serial concentrations of E.coli contaminated food samples (3x102 CFUmL-1 to 3x105 CFUmL-1) were tested. The biosensor successfully detected the E.coli samples, with the lower detection limit being 3x103 CFUmL-1 (up to 3cells/μl). Comparing the test results with an IDEA impedance biosensor without microchannel (published elsewhere) indicates that this biosensor have two order of magnitude times higher sensitivity. The proposed biosensor provides qualitative and quantitative detection, and potentially could be used for detection of other type of bacteria by immobilizing the specific type of antibody.

  15. Experimental demonstration of a multi-target detection technique using an X-band optically steered phased array radar.

    PubMed

    Shi, Nuannuan; Li, Ming; Deng, Ye; Zhang, Lihong; Sun, Shuqian; Tang, Jian; Li, Wei; Zhu, Ninghua

    2016-06-27

    An X-band optically-steered phased array radar is developed to demonstrate high resolution multi-target detection. The beam forming is implemented based on wavelength-swept true time delay (TTD) technique. The beam forming system has a wide direction tuning range of ± 54 degree, low magnitude ripple of ± 0.5 dB and small delay error of 0.13 ps/nm. To further verify performance of the proposed optically-steered phased array radar, three experiments are then carried out to implement the single and multiple target detection. A linearly chirped X-band microwave signal is used as radar signal which is finally compressed at the receiver to improve the detection accuracy. The ranging resolution for multi-target detection is up to 2 cm within the measuring distance over 4 m and the azimuth angle error is less than 4 degree.

  16. Detection of Brominated By-Products Using a Sensor Array Based on Nanostructured Thin Films of Conducting Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Eduarda Regina; Filho, Nelson Consolin; Venancio, Everaldo Carlos; Osvaldo, N. O.; Mattoso, Luiz H. C.; Martin-Neto, Ladislau

    2007-01-01

    The detection of the carcinogenic trihalomethanes (THM) in public water supply systems using low-cost equipment has become an essential feature, since these compounds may be generated as by-products of water-treatment processes. Here we report on a sensor array that extends the concept of an “electronic tongue” to detect small amounts of bromoform, bromodichloromethane and dibromochloromethane, with detection limits as low as 0.02 mg L-1. The sensor array was made up of 10 sensing units, in which nanostructured films of conducting and natural polymers were deposited onto gold interdigitated electrodes. The principle of detection was impedance spectroscopy, with measurements carried out in the range between 1 Hz to 1 MHz. Using data at 1 kHz, at which the electrical response varied considerably by changing the analyte, we demonstrated with principal component analysis (PCA) that samples with the 3 brominated trihalomethanes can be distinguished from each other and for various concentrations.

  17. Comparison of simulated and experimental 3D laser images using a GmAPD array: application to long range detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyac, Antoine; Riviere, Nicolas; Hespel, Laurent; Briottet, Xavier

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we show the feasibility and the benefit to use a Geiger-mode Avalanche Photo-Diode (GmAPD) array for long range detection, up to several kilometers. A simulation of a Geiger detection sensor is described, which is a part of our end-to-end laser simulator, to generate simulated 3D laser images from synthetic scenes. Resulting 3D point clouds have been compared to experimental acquisitions, performed with our GmAPD 3D camera on similar scenarios. An operational case of long range detection is presented: a copper cable outstretched above the ground, 1 kilometer away the experimental system and with a horizontal line-of-sight (LOS). The detection of such a small object from long distance observation strongly suggests that GmAPD focal plane arrays could be easily used for real-time 3D mapping or surveillance applications from airborne platforms, with good spatial and temporal resolutions.

  18. Detection of Neisseria meningitidis from negative blood cultures and cerebrospinal fluid with the FilmArray blood culture identification panel.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Joe; Klinker, Kenneth P; Borgert, Samuel J; Butler, Brittany M; Rand, Kenneth H; Iovine, Nicole M

    2014-06-01

    The FilmArray blood culture identification (BCID) panel is a rapid molecular diagnostic test approved for use with positive blood culture material. We describe a fatal case of meningococcemia with central nervous system (CNS) involvement detected using the BCID test with culture-negative blood and cerebrospinal fluid.

  19. Temporal signatures of the Cherenkov light induced by extensive air showers of cosmic rays detected with the Yakutsk array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. A.; Timofeev, L. V.

    2016-05-01

    We analyze temporal characteristics of signals from the wide field-of-view (WFOV) Cherenkov telescope (CT) detecting extensive air showers (EAS) of cosmic rays (CRs) in coincidence with surface detectors of the Yakutsk array. Our aim is to reveal causal relationships between measured characteristics and physical properties of EAS.

  20. The Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO): A Change Detection Array in the Pacific Arctic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebmeier, J. M.; Moore, S. E.; Cooper, L. W.; Frey, K. E.; Pickart, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Pacific region of the Arctic Ocean is experiencing major reductions in seasonal sea ice extent and increases in sea surface temperatures. One of the key uncertainties in this region is how the marine ecosystem will respond to seasonal shifts in the timing of spring sea ice retreat and/or delays in fall sea ice formation. Climate changes are likely to result in shifts in species composition and abundance, northward range expansions, and changes in lower trophic level productivity that can directly cascade and affect the life cycles of higher trophic level organisms. The developing Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO) is composed of focused biological and oceanographic sampling at biological "hot spot" sites for lower and higher trophic organisms on a latitudinal S-to-N array. The DBO is being developed by an international consortium of scientists in the Pacific Arctic as a change detection array to systematically track the broad biological response to sea ice retreat and associated environmental change. Coordinated ship-based observations over various seasons, together with satellite and mooring data collections at the designated sites, can provide an early detection system for biological and ecosystem response to climate warming. The data documenting the importance of these ecosystem "hotspots" provide a growing marine time-series from the northern Bering Sea to Barrow Canyon at the boundary of the Chukchi and Beaufort seas. Results from these studies show spatial changes in carbon production and export to the sediments as indicated by infaunal community composition and biomass, shifts in sediment grain size on a S-to-N latitudinal gradient, and range extensions for lower trophic levels and further northward migration of higher trophic organisms, such as gray whales. There is also direct evidence of negative impacts on ice dependent species, such as walrus and polar bears. As a ramp up to a fully operational observatory, hydrographic transects and select

  1. A high performance three-phase enzyme electrode based on superhydrophobic mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays for glucose detection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenlong; Song, Zhiqian; Xiang, Qun; Jin, Jian; Feng, Xinjian

    2016-04-14

    We describe here a high performance oxygen-rich three-phase enzyme electrode based on superhydrophobic mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays for glucose detection. We demonstrate that its linear detection upper limit is 30 mM, more than 15 times higher than that can be obtained on the normal enzyme-electrode. Notably, the three-phase enzyme electrode output is insensitive to the significant oxygen level fluctuation in analyte solution.

  2. Development of a Multiplexed Bead-Based Suspension Array for the Detection and Discrimination of Pospiviroid Plant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    van Brunschot, Sharon L.; Bergervoet, Jan H. W.; Pagendam, Daniel E.; de Weerdt, Marjanne; Geering, Andrew D. W.; Drenth, André; van der Vlugt, René A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Efficient and reliable diagnostic tools for the routine indexing and certification of clean propagating material are essential for the management of pospiviroid diseases in horticultural crops. This study describes the development of a true multiplexed diagnostic method for the detection and identification of all nine currently recognized pospiviroid species in one assay using Luminex bead-based suspension array technology. In addition, a new data-driven, statistical method is presented for establishing thresholds for positivity for individual assays within multiplexed arrays. When applied to the multiplexed array data generated in this study, the new method was shown to have better control of false positives and false negative results than two other commonly used approaches for setting thresholds. The 11-plex Luminex MagPlex-TAG pospiviroid array described here has a unique hierarchical assay design, incorporating a near-universal assay in addition to nine species-specific assays, and a co-amplified plant internal control assay for quality assurance purposes. All assays of the multiplexed array were shown to be 100% specific, sensitive and reproducible. The multiplexed array described herein is robust, easy to use, displays unambiguous results and has strong potential for use in routine pospiviroid indexing to improve disease management strategies. PMID:24404188

  3. A novel device based on a fluorescent cross-responsive sensor array for detecting lung cancer related volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jin-can; Hou, Chang-jun; Huo, Dan-qun; Luo, Xiao-gang; Bao, Ming-ze; Li, Xian; Yang, Mei; Fa, Huan-bao

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a novel, simple, rapid, and low-cost detection device for lung cancer related Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) was constructed. For this task, a sensor array based on cross-responsive mechanism was designed. A special gas chamber was made to insure sensor array exposed to VOCs sufficiently and evenly, and FLUENT software was used to simulate the performance of the gas chamber. The data collection and processing system was used to detect fluorescent changes of the sensor arrays before and after reaction, and to extract unique patterns of the tested VOCs. Four selected VOCs, p-xylene, styrene, isoprene, and hexanal, were detected by the proposed device. Unsupervised pattern recognition methods, hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis, were used to analyze data. The results showed that the methods could 100% discriminate the four VOCs. What is more, combined with artificial neural network, the correct rate of quantitative detection was up to 100%, and the device obtained responses at concentrations below 50 ppb. In conclusion, the proposed detection device showed excellent selectivity and discrimination ability for the VOCs related to lung cancer. Furthermore, our preliminary study demonstrated that the proposed detection device has brilliant potential application for early clinical diagnosis of lung cancer.

  4. Design and characterisation of a thin-film electrode array with shared reference/counter electrodes for electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Uludag, Yildiz; Olcer, Zehra; Sagiroglu, Mahmut Samil

    2014-07-15

    In the current study, a novel electrode array and integrated microfluidics have been designed and characterised in order to create a sensor chip which is not only easy, rapid and cheaper to produce but also have a smaller imprint and good electrochemical sensing properties. The current study includes the assessment of the effects of an Au quasi-reference electrode and the use of shared reference/counter electrodes for the array, in order to obtain a small array that can be produced using a fine metal mask. In the study, it is found that when Au is used as the quasi-reference electrode, the arrays with shared reference and counter electrodes result in faster electron transfer kinetics and prevent the potential change with respect to scan rate, and hence is advantageous with respect to conventional electrodes. In addition, the resulting novel electrode array has been shown to result in higher current density (10.52 µA/cm(2); HRP detection assay) and measured diffusion coefficient (14.40×10(-12) cm(2)/s; calculated from the data of cyclic voltammetry with 1mM potassium ferricyanide) with respect to conventional electrodes tested in the study. Using the new electrode arrays, the detection limits obtained from horse radish peroxidase (HRP) and bisphenol A assays were 12.5 ng/ml (2.84×10(-10) M ) and 10 ng/ml (44×10(-9) M), respectively. Performing the HRP detection assay in a flow injection system using array integrated microfluidics provided 25 times lower detection limit (11.36×10(-12) M), although Ti has been used as electrode material instead of Au. In short, incorporation of this new electrode array to lab-on-a-chip or MEMs (micro-electro mechanic systems) technologies may pave the way for easy to use automated biosensing devices that could be used for a variety of applications from diagnostics to environmental monitoring, and studies will continue to move forward in this direction.

  5. Aircraft Aerodynamic Parameter Detection Using Micro Hot-Film Flow Sensor Array and BP Neural Network Identification

    PubMed Central

    Que, Ruiyi; Zhu, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Air speed, angle of sideslip and angle of attack are fundamental aerodynamic parameters for controlling most aircraft. For small aircraft for which conventional detecting devices are too bulky and heavy to be utilized, a novel and practical methodology by which the aerodynamic parameters are inferred using a micro hot-film flow sensor array mounted on the surface of the wing is proposed. A back-propagation neural network is used to model the coupling relationship between readings of the sensor array and aerodynamic parameters. Two different sensor arrangements are tested in wind tunnel experiments and dependence of the system performance on the sensor arrangement is analyzed. PMID:23112638

  6. Aircraft aerodynamic parameter detection using micro hot-film flow sensor array and BP neural network identification.

    PubMed

    Que, Ruiyi; Zhu, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Air speed, angle of sideslip and angle of attack are fundamental aerodynamic parameters for controlling most aircraft. For small aircraft for which conventional detecting devices are too bulky and heavy to be utilized, a novel and practical methodology by which the aerodynamic parameters are inferred using a micro hot-film flow sensor array mounted on the surface of the wing is proposed. A back-propagation neural network is used to model the coupling relationship between readings of the sensor array and aerodynamic parameters. Two different sensor arrangements are tested in wind tunnel experiments and dependence of the system performance on the sensor arrangement is analyzed.

  7. Very Large Array Detects Radio Emission from Gamma-Ray Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-05-01

    Astronomers have used the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope to make the first detection of radio emission from a cosmic gamma-ray burst. This sheds the first light on longstanding questions about the actual physics of these mysterious, tremendously energetic events. "The mere discovery of radio emission from this gamma-ray burst rules out some theoretical models," said Dale Frail of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico. "We are still observing it and each additional observation will help further discriminate among competing models." "This detection may finally tell us what these mysterious gamma-ray bursts are, helping to resolve one of the biggest mysteries in astrophysics," said Hugh Van Horn, Director of the NSF's Division of Astronomical Sciences. The VLA detection was made by some of the same scientists who announced yesterday that optical observations showed that gamma-ray bursts come from great distances. In addition to Frail, the VLA astronomers are: Shri Kulkarni of Caltech and the BeppoSAX Gamma-Ray Burst Team, consisting of Luciano Nicastro, Eliana Palazi, Enrico Costa, Marco Feroci, Luigi Piro, Fillipo Frontera, and John Heise. The burst of gamma rays was detected May 8 by the Italian-Dutch satellite BeppoSAX. Hundreds of such bursts have been recorded by satellites in the past 30 years, but last week's event already has become the most scientifically significant of them all. For years, the difficulty of precisely locating the bursts' position in the sky made it nearly impossible to study them with optical and radio instruments. In late 1996, this situation improved with the launch of BeppoSAX, which can pinpoint the bursts' location much more accurately than previous spacecraft. Following BeppoSAX discoveries, optical and radio astronomers have been able to make quick observations of the burst locations. The largest unanswered question about gamma-ray bursts has been their

  8. RNA-Seq mapping and detection of gene fusions with a suffix array algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sakarya, Onur; Breu, Heinz; Radovich, Milan; Chen, Yongzhi; Wang, Yulei N; Barbacioru, Catalin; Utiramerur, Sowmi; Whitley, Penn P; Brockman, Joel P; Vatta, Paolo; Zhang, Zheng; Popescu, Liviu; Muller, Matthew W; Kudlingar, Vidya; Garg, Nriti; Li, Chieh-Yuan; Kong, Benjamin S; Bodeau, John P; Nutter, Robert C; Gu, Jian; Bramlett, Kelli S; Ichikawa, Jeffrey K; Hyland, Fiona C; Siddiqui, Asim S

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput RNA sequencing enables quantification of transcripts (both known and novel), exon/exon junctions and fusions of exons from different genes. Discovery of gene fusions-particularly those expressed with low abundance- is a challenge with short- and medium-length sequencing reads. To address this challenge, we implemented an RNA-Seq mapping pipeline within the LifeScope software. We introduced new features including filter and junction mapping, annotation-aided pairing rescue and accurate mapping quality values. We combined this pipeline with a Suffix Array Spliced Read (SASR) aligner to detect chimeric transcripts. Performing paired-end RNA-Seq of the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 using the SOLiD system, we called 40 gene fusions among over 120,000 splicing junctions. We validated 36 of these 40 fusions with TaqMan assays, of which 25 were expressed in MCF-7 but not the Human Brain Reference. An intra-chromosomal gene fusion involving the estrogen receptor alpha gene ESR1, and another involving the RPS6KB1 (Ribosomal protein S6 kinase beta-1) were recurrently expressed in a number of breast tumor cell lines and a clinical tumor sample.

  9. Arrays of Ultrathin CdS Nanoflakes with High-Energy Surface for Efficient Gas Detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Hua; Yin, Peng-Fei; Kulinich, Sergei A; Zhou, Yu-Zhu; Mao, Jing; Ling, Tao; Du, Xi-Wen

    2017-01-11

    It is fascinating and challenging to endow conventional materials with unprecedented properties. For instance, cadmium sulfide (CdS) is an important semiconductor with excellent light response; however, its potential in gas-sensing was underestimated owing to relatively low chemical activity and poor electrical conductivity. Herein, we demonstrate that an ideal architecture, ultrathin nanoflake arrays (NFAs), can improve significantly gas-sensing properties of CdS material. The CdS NFAs are grown directly on the interdigitated electrode to expose large surface area. Their thickness is reduced below the double Debye length of CdS, permitting to achieve a full depletion of carriers. Particularly, the prepared CdS nanoflakes are enclosed with high-energy {0001} facets exposed, which provides more active sites for gas adsorption. Moreover, the NFAs exhibit the light-trapping effect, which further enhances their gas sensitivity. As a result, the as-prepared CdS NFAs demonstrate excellent gas-sensing and light-response properties, thus being capable of dual gas and light detection.

  10. Underpotential deposition-anodic stripping voltammetric detection of copper at gold nanoparticle-modified ultramicroelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Jahir; Fernández-Sánchez, César; Jiménez-Jorquera, Cecilia

    2008-07-01

    The sensitive detection of copper (II) at gold nanoparticle-modified ultramicroelectrode arrays (UMEAs) is reported. Gold nanoparticles were electrodeposited onto the UMEAs surface by applying a constant positive potential of 1.6 V for 20 min in a 20-nm gold nanoparticle solution. This process significantly increases the electrode area without losing the UMEAs analytical features. Underpotential deposition-anodic stripping voltammetry of copper (II) with such modified UMEAs was performed and showed a high increase in sensitivity (25.9 +/- 1.3 nC x micro-1) and a broader linear range of response (0-10 microM) compared with those values obtained using bare UMEAs (7.5 +/- 0.6 nC x microM(-1) and 0-2 microM, respectively). The copper content of acid extracts of contaminated soils was successfully determined with the modified UMEAs and results are in good agreement with those obtained using the ICP-AES standard method. Overall, this work shows an alternative easy-to-use novel miniaturized device for the rapid and reliable determination of copper in soil samples whose application could be readily extended to other heavy metals of environmental interest.

  11. [HPV genotypes prevalence in México and worldwide detected by Linear Array].

    PubMed

    Flores-Miramontes, María G; Torres-Reyes, Luis A; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Vallejo-Ruíz, Verónica; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia; Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main factor associated with the development of cervical cancer (CC). Knowing about the prevalence of HPVs at different stages in the development of CC is important for determining the HPV oncogenic risk, the development of screening strategies, the evaluation of prevention programs, and also for vaccine designing. This paper is a meta-analysis of HPV prevalence worldwide and in Mexico from studies using the Linear Array® HPV Genotyping Test as a diagnostic test (it is the commercial test that, up to date, identifies the largest number of HPV genotypes in a single sample) in DNA of cervical samples from women with normal cytology, with low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LGSIL), with high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HGSIL) and with CC. The most prevalent genotypes after HPV-16 and -18 in women with CC varies depending on geographic region, which supports the need to develop detection and prevention strategies according to the characteristics of the population.

  12. Controllable synthesis of branched hierarchical ZnO nanorod arrays for highly sensitive hydrazine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jie; Zhao, Zhenting; Sun, Yongjiao; Wang, Ying; Li, Pengwei; Zhang, Wendong; Lian, Kun

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, three different kinds of ZnO nanostructures were successfully synthesized on Au/Glass (Au/G) substrate by electrochemical deposition method. The morphology and crystalline structures of the obtained samples were characterized using SEM, XRD and HRTEM. Electrochemical responses of the as-prepared ZnO based sensors to hydrazine in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS, pH 7.4) were analyzed by cyclic voltammetry and single-potential amperometry. The results confirmed that the electrochemical performances of ZnO sensors are strongly dependent on the specific surface area. Especially, the branched hierarchical ZnO nanorod arrays shows the highest sensitivity of 5.35 μA μM-1 cm-2, a short response time of 3 s, a low detection limit of 0.08 μM with a linear hydrazine concentration response range from 0.8 μM to 101 μM, and it also exhibits excellent anti-interference, stability and reproducibility abilities, which provide great potential method of ZnO branched hierarchical structures in the development of high-performance electrochemical sensor.

  13. Visual detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotolune by molecularly imprinted colloidal array photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei; Asher, Sanford A; Meng, Zihui; Yan, Zequn; Xue, Min; Qiu, Lili; Yi, Da

    2016-10-05

    We developed a photonic crystal (PhC) sensor for the quantification of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in solution. Monodisperse (210nm in diameter) molecularly imprinted colloidal particles (MICs) for TNT were prepared by the emulsion polymerization of methyl methacrylate and acrylamide in the presence of TNT as a template. The MICs were then self-assembled into close-packed opal PhC films. The adsorption capacity of the MICs for TNT was 64mg TNT/g. The diffraction from the PhC depended on the TNT concentration in a methanol/water (3/2, v/v) potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer solution (pH=7.0, 30mM). The limit of detection (LOD) of the sensor was 1.03μg. The color of the molecularly imprinted colloidal array (MICA) changed from green to red with an 84nm diffraction red shift when the TNT concentration increased to 20mM. The sensor response time was 3min. The PhC sensor was selective for TNT compared to similar compounds such as 2,4,6-trinitrophenol, 2,4-dinitrotoluene, 2,6-dinitrotoluene, 2-nitromesitylene, 4-nitrotoluene, 2-nitrotoluene, 1,3-dinitrobenzene, methylbenzene, 4-nitrophenol, 2-nitroaniline, 3-aminophenol and 3-nitroaniline. The sensor showed high stability with little response change after three years storage. This sensor technology might be useful for the visual determination of TNT.

  14. TNT detection using llama antibodies and a two-step competitive fluid array immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Anderson, George P; Goldman, Ellen R

    2008-11-30

    Llamas possess unique subclasses of antibodies that lack light chains, and thus are made by the pairing of two heavy chains. IgG was purified from two llamas which had been immunized with trinitrobenzene-keyhole limpet hemocyanin. Conventional IgG1 and heavy chain IgG2 and IgG3 subclasses were fractionated using affinity chromatography. The effectiveness of heavy chain antibodies for the detection of trinitrotoluene (TNT) using a competitive fluid array immunoassay was evaluated and compared to both the llama IgG1 as well as a murine monoclonal anti-TNT antibody. It was found that heavy chain antibody bound TNT with selectivity similar to conventional antibodies, yet the heavy chain antibodies possessed greater thermal stability. The titer of the heavy chain antibodies however was found to be 10-fold lower than the IgG1; thus analytical assays were best demonstrated using the llama IgG1 conventional antibody. The TNT competitive immunoassay on the Luminex fluid analyzer had a dynamic range from approximately 100 ng/mL to 10 microg/mL. Utilizing the same two-step competitive assay format the dynamic range of the monoclonal antibody was found to have a broad range (1 ng/mL to 1 microg/mL). This method was demonstrated on TNT contaminated soil extracts using both the llama IgG1 and the mouse monoclonal validating the utility of method for analysis of field samples.

  15. Micromachined room-temperature microbolometer for millimeter-wave detection and focal-plane imaging arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Arifur; Duerr, Erik K.; de Lange, Gert; Hu, Qing

    1997-06-01

    We have combined silicon micromachining technology with planar circuits to fabricated room-temperature niobium microbolometers for millimeter-wave detection. In this type of detector, a thin niobium film, with a dimension much smaller than the wavelength, is fabricated on a 1-micrometers thick Si3N4 membrane of square and cross geometries. The Nb film acts both as a radiation absorber and temperature sensor. Incident radiation is coupled into the microbolometer by a 0.37 (lambda) dipole antenna with a center frequency of 95 GHz and a 3-db bandwidth of 15%, which is impedance matched with the Nb film. The dipole antennas is placed inside a micromachined pyramidal cavity formed by anisotropically etched Si wafers. To increase the Gaussian beam coupling efficiency, a machined square or circular horn is placed in front of the micromachined section. Circular horns interface more easily with die-based manufacturing processes; therefore, we have developed simulation tools that allow us to model circular machined horns. We have fabricated both single element receivers and 3 X 3 focal-plane arrays using uncooled Nb microbolometers. An electrical NEP level of 8.3 X 10-11 W/(root)Hz has been achieved for a single- element receiver. This NEP level is better than that of the commercial room-temperature pyroelectric millimeter-wave detectors. The frequency response of the microbolometer has a ln(1/f) dependence with frequency, and the roll-off frequency is approximately 35 kHz.

  16. Label-Free Detection of Cardiac Troponin-I Using Carbon Nanofiber Based Nanoelectrode Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Periyakaruppan, Adaikkappan; Koehne, Jessica Erin; Gandhiraman, Ram P.; Meyyappan, M.

    2013-01-01

    A sensor platform based on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (CNFs) has been developed. Their inherent nanometer scale, high conductivity, wide potential window, good biocompatibility and well-defined surface chemistry make them ideal candidates as biosensor electrodes. A carbon nanofiber (CNF) multiplexed array has been fabricated with 9 sensing pads, each containing 40,000 carbon nanofibers as nanoelectrodes. Here, we report the use of vertically aligned CNF nanoelectrodes for the detection of cardiac Troponin-I for the early diagnosis of myocardial infarction. Antibody, antitroponin, probe immobilization and subsequent binding to human cardiac troponin-I were characterized using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry techniques. Each step of the modification process resulted in changes in electrical capacitance or resistance to charge transfer due to the changes at the electrode surface upon antibody immobilization and binding to the specific antigen. This sensor demonstrates high sensitivity, down to 0.2 ng/mL, and good selectivity making this platform a good candidate for early stage diagnosis of myocardial infarction.

  17. Array high-sensitivity room temperature coil system for SNMR detection in shallow depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tingting; Xie, Kunyu; Zhang, Siyuan; Zhao, Jing; Lin, Jun

    2017-01-01

    The noninvasive method of surface nuclear magnetic resonance (SNMR) is a geophysical technique that is directly sensitive to hydrogen protons, besides it can exploit the NMR phenomenon for a quantitative determination of the subsurface groundwater distribution. Traditionally, SNMR utilizes large surface coils for both transmitting excitation pulses and recording the groundwater response. While, in recent research, a low Tc-SQUIDs is taken as a new sensor to replace the large receiving coil (Rx), which performing the best sensitivity for the shallow depth. Nevertheless, SQUID is with the problems of flux trapping and operational difficulties. In this paper, we introduce a room temperature coil system. A Cu coil with diameter of 1 m and a low noise preamplifier was systematically investigated and reached a sensitivity of 0.2fT/Hz1/2.Four preamplifiers are chosen for optimizing the pickup coils. The resolution studies for the array coil systems were performed, and the optimum distance between the adjacent pickup coils to achieve a better experimental results especially for the shallow depth. Our study enable the further use of the room temperature coil for SNMR shallow depth detections.

  18. 5×5 CMOS capacitive sensor array for detection of the neurotransmitter dopamine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Michael S-C; Chen, Yi-Chung; Huang, Po-Chiun

    2010-11-15

    This work presents miniaturized CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) capacitive sensors for detection of the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) down to the sub-fM range. Sensing resolution is significantly enhanced by monolithic sensor integration to reduce the parasitic effect and the use of sub-μm interdigitated microelectrodes as the sensing interface. The 5 × 5 sensor array contains five designs of different electrode sizes and each design has five sensors. The positive charges produced from protonation of boronate and amino group after immobilization of 4-carboxyphenylboronic acid (CPBA) result in an increase of the electrode-analyte capacitance. Then the negative charges produced after binding of CPBA and DA molecules decrease the electrode-analyte capacitance. Signal transduction is achieved through a CMOS readout circuit whose output frequency is inversely proportional to the capacitance. Experimental results showed the ratios of average percentage capacitance changes of the experiment groups over those of the control groups were all larger than one for the five designs at DA concentration of 0.1 fM. Selectivity against the non-analyte species, such as tyramine, has also been demonstrated.

  19. Velocity-resolved Hot Water Emission Detected toward HL Tau with the Submillimeter Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Lars E.; Brown, Joanna M.; Wilner, David; Salyk, Colette

    2016-05-01

    Using the Submillimeter Array (SMA) on Mauna Kea, the {{{H}}}216{{O}} {10}{2,9}-9{}{3,6} transition ({E}{{up}} = 1863 K) at 321.2 GHz has been detected toward the embedded low-mass protostar HL Tau. The line centroid is blueshifted by 20 km s-1 with respect to the source velocity, and it has a FWHM of 25 km s-1. The emission is tentatively resolved and extends ˜3″-4″ over the sky (˜2 beams), or ˜500 au at the distance of Taurus. The velocity offset, and to a lesser degree the spatial extent of the emission, show that the line originates in the protostellar jet or wind. This result suggests that at least some water emission observed with Herschel and Spitzer toward embedded sources, and perhaps also disk sources, contains a wind or jet component, which is crucial for interpreting these data. These pathfinder observations done with the SMA open a new window into studying the origin of water emission with e.g., ALMA, thus providing new insights into where water is in protostellar systems.

  20. Allelic genome structural variations in maize detected by array comparative genome hybridization.

    PubMed

    Beló, André; Beatty, Mary K; Hondred, David; Fengler, Kevin A; Li, Bailin; Rafalski, Antoni

    2010-01-01

    DNA polymorphisms such as insertion/deletions and duplications affecting genome segments larger than 1 kb are known as copy-number variations (CNVs) or structural variations (SVs). They have been recently studied in animals and humans by using array-comparative genome hybridization (aCGH), and have been associated with several human diseases. Their presence and phenotypic effects in plants have not been investigated on a genomic scale, although individual structural variations affecting traits have been described. We used aCGH to investigate the presence of CNVs in maize by comparing the genome of 13 maize inbred lines to B73. Analysis of hybridization signal ratios of 60,472 60-mer oligonucleotide probes between inbreds in relation to their location in the reference genome (B73) allowed us to identify clusters of probes that deviated from the ratio expected for equal copy-numbers. We found CNVs distributed along the maize genome in all chromosome arms. They occur with appreciable frequency in different germplasm subgroups, suggesting ancient origin. Validation of several CNV regions showed both insertion/deletions and copy-number differences. The nature of CNVs detected suggests CNVs might have a considerable impact on plant phenotypes, including disease response and heterosis.

  1. Multiplex detection of B-type natriuretic peptide, cardiac troponin I and C-reactive protein with photonic suspension array.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wenbin; Fu, Cong; Chen, Yong; Lu, Jun; Yao, Yuyu; Shen, Chengxing; Gu, Zhongze

    2012-01-01

    A novel photonic suspension array has been developed for multiplex immunoassay. The carriers of this array were silica colloidal crystal beads (SCCBs). The codes of these carriers have characteristic reflection peaks originating from their structural periodicity; therefore they do not suffer from fading, bleaching, quenching or chemical instability. In addition, the fluorescence background of SCCBs is negligible because no fluorescence materials or dyes are involved. With a sandwich method, the proposed suspension array was used for simultaneous multiplex detection of heart failure (HF) and coronary heart disease (CAD) biomarkers in one test tube. The results showed that the three biomarkers: cardiac troponin I (cTnI), C-reactive protein (CRP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) could be assayed in the ranges of 0.1-500 ng/ml, 1-500 mg/L and 0.02-50 ng/ml with detection limits of 0.01 ng/ml, 0.36 mg/L and 0.004 ng/ml at 3σ, respectively. There were no significant differences between the photonic suspension array and traditional parallel single-analyte test. This novel method demonstrated acceptable accuracy, high detection sensitivity and reproducibility and excellent storage stability. This technique provides a new strategy for low cost, automated, and simultaneous multiplex immunoassays of bio-markers.

  2. An ordered array of hierarchical spheres for surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of traces of pesticide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaoye; Zheng, Peng; Meng, Guowen; Huang, Qing; Zhu, Chuhong; Han, Fangming; Huang, Zhulin; Li, Zhongbo; Wang, Zhaoming; Wu, Nianqiang

    2016-09-01

    An ordered array of hierarchically-structured core-nanosphere@space-layer@shell-nanoparticles has been fabricated for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection. To fabricate this hierarchically-structured chip, a long-range ordered array of Au/Ag-nanospheres is first patterned in the nano-bowls on the planar surface of ordered nanoporous anodic titanium oxide template. A ultra-thin alumina middle space-layer is then conformally coated on the Au/Ag-nanospheres, and Ag-nanoparticles are finally deposited on the surface of the alumina space-layer to form an ordered array of Au/Ag-nanosphere@Al2O3-layer@Ag-nanoparticles. Finite-difference time-domain simulation shows that SERS hot spots are created between the neighboring Ag-nanoparticles. The ordered array of hierarchical nanostructures is used as the SERS-substrate for a trial detection of methyl parathion (a pesticide) in water and a limit of detection of 1 nM is reached, indicating its promising potential in rapid monitoring of organic pollutants in aquatic environment.

  3. Rapid detection of genomic imbalances using micro-arrays consisting of pooled BACs covering all human chromosome arms.

    PubMed

    Knijnenburg, Jeroen; van der Burg, Marja; Nilsson, Philomeen; Ploos van Amstel, Hans Kristian; Tanke, Hans; Szuhai, Károly

    2005-10-12

    A strategy is presented to select, pool and spot human BAC clones on an array in such a way that each spot contains five well performing BAC clones, covering one chromosome arm. A mini-array of 240 spots was prepared representing all human chromosome arms in a 5-fold as well as some controls, and used for comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) of 10 cell lines with aneusomies frequently found in clinical cytogenetics and oncology. Spot-to-spot variation within five replicates was below 6% and all expected abnormalities were detected 100% correctly. Sensitivity was such that replacing one BAC clone in a given spot of five by a BAC clone from another chromosome, thus resulting in a change in ratio of 20%, was reproducibly detected. Incubation time of the mini-array was varied and the fluorescently labelled target DNA was diluted. Typically, aneusomies could be detected using 30 ng of non-amplified random primed labelled DNA amounts in a 4 h hybridization reaction. Potential application of these mini-arrays for genomic profiling of disseminated tumour cells or of blastomeres for preimplantation genetic diagnosis, using specially designed DNA amplification methods, are discussed.

  4. Detection of Solar Wind Disturbances: Mexican Array Radio Telescope IPS Observations at 140 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Hernandez, E.; Gonzalez-Esparza, J. A.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Ontiveros-Hernandez, V.; Villanueva-Hernandez, P.

    2015-09-01

    The interplanetary scintillation (IPS) technique is a remote-sensing method for monitoring solar-wind perturbations. The Mexican Array Radio Telescope (MEXART) is a single-station instrument operating at 140 MHz, fully dedicated to performing solar-wind studies employing the IPS technique. We report MEXART solar-wind measurements (scintillation indices and solar-wind velocities) using data obtained during the 2013 and 2014 campaigns. These solar-wind measurements were calculated employing a new methodology based on the wavelet transform (WT) function. We report the variation of the scintillation indices versus the heliocentric distance for two IPS sources (3C48 and 3C147). We found different average conditions of the solar-wind density fluctuations in 2013 and 2014. We used the fittings of the radial dependence of the scintillation index to calculate g-indices. Based on the g-index value, we identified 17 events that could be associated with strong compression regions in the solar wind. We present the first ICME identifications in our data. We associated 14 IPS events with preceding CME counterparts by employing white-light observations from the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft. We found that most of the IPS events, detected during the solar maximum of Cycle 24 were associated with complex CME events. For the IPS events associated with single CME counterparts, we found a deceleration tendency of the CMEs as they propagate in the interplanetary medium. These results show that the instrument detects solar-wind disturbances, and the WT methodology provides solar-wind information with good accuracy. The MEXART observations will complement solar-wind IPS studies using other frequencies, and the tracking of solar-wind disturbances by other stations located at different longitudes.

  5. [Saliva cotinine determination using high-performance liquid chromatography with diode - array detection].

    PubMed

    Kulza, Maksymilian; Woźniak, Anna; Seńczuk-Przybyłowska, Monika; Czarnywojtek, Agata; Kurhańska-Flisykowska, Anna; Florek, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    The use of tobacco is a very serious threat to public health. Reducing the proportion of smokers easily leads to improved health of the general population. Smoking is a proven risk factor for respiratory disease, cardiovascular disease and cancer and complications during pregnancy. To verify the level of exposure to tobacco smoke in most patients used a simple test markers of exposure. The most commonly used marker in the evaluation of exposure to tobacco products is cotinine, which is a major metabolite of nicotine contained in tobacco smoke. Biological material most commonly used in this type of study is blood, urine and saliva. In the present study Sarstedt Salivette tubes were used to samples collection. In order to determine the concentration of cotinine in saliva samples analyzed with high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection after extraction of cotinine from saliva by solid phase extraction. The method was linear of 10 to 400 ng/ml. The limit of detection was the value of the signal-to-noise ratio S/N=3, it amounted to 6 ng/ml, the limit of quantification was 10 ng/ml. The intraday repeatability was 8% for lowconcentrations, for high concentrations - 3.7%. Reproducibility interdays for low concentrations was 2.4%, for high concentrations - 4.1%. We analyzed 18 samples of saliva derived from patients smoking volunteers from the Department of Conservative Dentistry and Periodontology, University of Medical Sciences. University of Medical Sciences and the Chair and Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Internal Medicine, University of Medical Sciences. University of Medical Sciences. Mean concentrations of cotinine in patients was 240.9 ng/ml of saliva. In this study we demonstrated the usefulness of the saliva cotinine determination method in the assessment of patient exposure to tobacco smoke.

  6. Resolution and signal-to-noise ratio improvement in confocal fluorescence microscopy using array detection and maximum-likelihood processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakade, Rohan; Walker, John G.; Phillips, Andrew J.

    2016-08-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) is widely used in biological sciences because of its enhanced 3D resolution that allows image sectioning and removal of out-of-focus blur. This is achieved by rejection of the light outside a detection pinhole in a plane confocal with the illuminated object. In this paper, an alternative detection arrangement is examined in which the entire detection/image plane is recorded using an array detector rather than a pinhole detector. Using this recorded data an attempt is then made to recover the object from the whole set of recorded photon array data; in this paper maximum-likelihood estimation has been applied. The recovered object estimates are shown (through computer simulation) to have good resolution, image sectioning and signal-to-noise ratio compared with conventional pinhole CFM images.

  7. Parallel detection of harmful algae using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction labeling coupled with membrane-based DNA array.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunyun; Chen, Guofu; Ma, Chaoshuai; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Baoyu; Wang, Guangce

    2014-03-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are a global problem, which can cause economic loss to aquaculture industry's and pose a potential threat to human health. More attention must be made on the development of effective detection methods for the causative microalgae. The traditional microscopic examination has many disadvantages, such as low efficiency, inaccuracy, and requires specialized skill in identification and especially is incompetent for parallel analysis of several morphologically similar microalgae to species level at one time. This study aimed at exploring the feasibility of using membrane-based DNA array for parallel detection of several microalgae by selecting five microaglae, including Heterosigma akashiwo, Chaetoceros debilis, Skeletonema costatum, Prorocentrum donghaiense, and Nitzschia closterium as test species. Five species-specific (taxonomic) probes were designed from variable regions of the large subunit ribosomal DNA (LSU rDNA) by visualizing the alignment of LSU rDNA of related species. The specificity of the probes was confirmed by dot blot hybridization. The membrane-based DNA array was prepared by spotting the tailed taxonomic probes onto positively charged nylon membrane. Digoxigenin (Dig) labeling of target molecules was performed by multiple PCR/RT-PCR using RNA/DNA mixture of five microalgae as template. The Dig-labeled amplification products were hybridized with the membrane-based DNA array to produce visible hybridization signal indicating the presence of target algae. Detection sensitivity comparison showed that RT-PCR labeling (RPL) coupled with hybridization was tenfold more sensitive than DNA-PCR-labeling-coupled with hybridization. Finally, the effectiveness of RPL coupled with membrane-based DNA array was validated by testing with simulated and natural water samples, respectively. All of these results indicated that RPL coupled with membrane-based DNA array is specific, simple, and sensitive for parallel detection of microalgae which

  8. Antibody array in a multiwell plate format for the sensitive and multiplexed detection of important plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Charlermroj, Ratthaphol; Himananto, Orawan; Seepiban, Channarong; Kumpoosiri, Mallika; Warin, Nuchnard; Gajanandana, Oraprapai; Elliott, Christopher T; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara

    2014-07-15

    The global seed market is considered to be an important industry with a total value of $10,543 million US dollars in 2012. Because plant pathogens such as bacteria and viruses cause a significant economic loss to both producers and exporters, the seed export industry urgently requires rapid, sensitive, and inexpensive testing for the pathogens to prevent disease spreading worldwide. This study developed an antibody array in a multiwell plate format to simultaneously detect four crucial plant pathogens, namely, a bacterial fruit blotch bacterium Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli (Aac), Chilli veinal mottle virus (ChiVMV, potyvirus), Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV, tospovirus serogroup IV), and Melon yellow spot virus (MYSV, tospovirus). The capture antibodies specific to the pathogens were immobilized on each well at preassigned positions by an automatic microarrayer. The antibodies on the arrays specifically captured the corresponding pathogens present in the sample extracts. The presence of pathogens bound on the capture antibodies was subsequently detected by a cocktail of fluorescently conjugated secondary antibodies. The limits of detection of the developed antibody array for the detection of Aac, ChiVMV, WSMoV, and MYSV were 5 × 10(5) CFU/mL, 30 ng/mL, 1000 ng/mL, and 160 ng/mL, respectively, which were very similar to those of the conventional ELISA method. The antibody array in a multiwell plate format accurately detected plant pathogens in single and multiple detections. Moreover, this format enables easy handling of the assay at a higher speed of operation.

  9. Detection of baleen whales on an ocean-bottom seismometer array in the Lau Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodie, D.; Dunn, R.

    2011-12-01

    Long-term deployment of ocean-bottom seismometer arrays provides a unique opportunity for identifying and tracking whales in a manner not usually possible in biological studies. Large baleen whales emit low frequency (>5Hz) sounds called 'calls' or 'songs' that can be detected on either the hydrophone or vertical channel of the instrument at distances in excess of 50 km. The calls are distinct to individual species and even geographical groups among species, and are thought to serve a variety of purposes. Distinct repeating calls can be automatically identified using matched-filter processing, and whales can be located in a manner similar to that of earthquakes. Many baleen whale species are endangered, and little is known about their geographic distribution, population dynamics, and basic behaviors. The Lau back-arc basin, a tectonically active, elongated basin bounded by volcanic shallows, lies in the southwestern Pacific Ocean between Fiji and Tonga. Although whales are known to exist around Fiji and Tonga, little is understood about the population dynamics and migration patterns throughout the basin. Twenty-nine broadband ocean-bottom seismometers deployed in the basin recorded data for approximately ten months during the years 2009-2010. To date, four species of whales have been identified in the data: Blue (one call type), Humpback (two call types, including long-lasting 'songs'), Bryde's (one call type), and Fin whales (three call types). Three as-yet-unknown call types have also been identified. After the calls were identified, idealized spectrograms of the known calls were matched against the entire data set using an auto-detection algorithm. The auto-detection output provides the number of calls and times of year when each call type was recorded. Based on the results, whales migrate seasonally through the basin with some overlapping of species. Initial results also indicate that different species of whales are more common in some parts of the basin than

  10. Detection of eccentric supermassive black hole binaries with pulsar timing arrays: Signal-to-noise ratio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, E. A.; McWilliams, Sean T.; Gair, Jonathan R.; Taylor, Stephen R.

    2015-09-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the expected signal-to-noise ratios of supermassive black hole binaries on eccentric orbits observed by pulsar timing arrays. We derive several analytical relations that extend the results of Peters and Mathews [Phys. Rev. D 131, 435 (1963)] to quantify the impact of eccentricity in the detection of single resolvable binaries in the pulsar timing array band. We present ready-to-use expressions to compute the increase/loss in signal-to-noise ratio of eccentric single resolvable sources whose dominant harmonic is located in the low/high frequency sensitivity regime of pulsar timing arrays. Building upon the work of Phinney (arXiv:astro-ph/0108028) and Enoki and Nagashima [Prog. Theor. Phys. 117, 241 (2007)], we present an analytical framework that enables the construction of rapid spectra for a stochastic gravitational-wave background generated by a cosmological population of eccentric sources. We confirm previous findings which indicate that, relative to a population of quasicircular binaries, the strain of a stochastic, isotropic gravitational-wave background generated by a cosmological population of eccentric binaries will be suppressed in the frequency band of pulsar timing arrays. We quantify this effect in terms of signal-to-noise ratios in a pulsar timing array.

  11. Colorimetric Sensor Array Allows Fast Detection and Simultaneous Identification of Sepsis-Causing Bacteria in Spiked Blood Culture

    PubMed Central

    Mix, Samantha; Xu, Zeyu; Taba, Brian; Budvytiene, Indre; Berliner, Anders N.; Queralto, Nuria; Churi, Yair S.; Huang, Richard S.; Eiden, Michael; Martino, Raymond A.; Rhodes, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a medical emergency demanding early diagnosis and tailored antimicrobial therapy. Every hour of delay in initiating effective therapy measurably increases patient mortality. Blood culture is currently the reference standard for detecting bloodstream infection, a multistep process which may take one to several days. Here, we report a novel paradigm for earlier detection and the simultaneous identification of pathogens in spiked blood cultures by means of a metabolomic “fingerprint” of the volatile mixture outgassed by the organisms. The colorimetric sensor array provided significantly faster detection of positive blood cultures than a conventional blood culture system (12.1 h versus 14.9 h, P < 0.001) while allowing for the identification of 18 bacterial species with 91.9% overall accuracy within 2 h of growth detection. The colorimetric sensor array also allowed for discrimination between unrelated strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, indicating that the metabolomic fingerprint has the potential to track nosocomial transmissions. Altogether, the colorimetric sensor array is a promising tool that offers a new paradigm for diagnosing bloodstream infections. PMID:24478493

  12. A reusable laser wrapped graphene-Ag array based SERS sensor for trace detection of genomic DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Lei; Hu, Yaowu; Zhu, Lihua; Cheng, Gary J; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2017-06-15

    Methylation is an important epigenetic DNA modification that governs gene expression. The genomic level of methylated DNA and its derivatives may serve as important indicators for the initiation and progression of cancers among other diseases. In this effort we propose a new laser wrapped graphene-Ag array as a highly sensitive Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) sensor for the detection of methylated DNA (5-methylcytosine, 5mC) and its oxidation derivatives namely 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC). Excellent sensitivity and reproducibility were achieved with the laser wrapped graphene-Ag array as a substrate, with the graphene layer acting as an enhancer of the SERS signal due to the effective coupling of the electromagnetic field. In summary, fast (less than 60min) and sensitive (at a limit of detection 0.2pgμL(-1), ie. 1.8pmolL(-1)) detection of methylated DNA and its derivatives was realized with the ability to distinguish methylation levels from a mixture at 0.1%. The sensitive and accurate detection in DNA extracted from cells was also accomplished. Furthermore our graphene wrapped approach circumvents the direct interaction between Ag array and the analytes, thus improving the reusability of the SERS substrate even after five cycles of use.

  13. Colorimetric sensor array allows fast detection and simultaneous identification of sepsis-causing bacteria in spiked blood culture.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sung H; Mix, Samantha; Xu, Zeyu; Taba, Brian; Budvytiene, Indre; Berliner, Anders N; Queralto, Nuria; Churi, Yair S; Huang, Richard S; Eiden, Michael; Martino, Raymond A; Rhodes, Paul; Banaei, Niaz

    2014-02-01

    Sepsis is a medical emergency demanding early diagnosis and tailored antimicrobial therapy. Every hour of delay in initiating effective therapy measurably increases patient mortality. Blood culture is currently the reference standard for detecting bloodstream infection, a multistep process which may take one to several days. Here, we report a novel paradigm for earlier detection and the simultaneous identification of pathogens in spiked blood cultures by means of a metabolomic "fingerprint" of the volatile mixture outgassed by the organisms. The colorimetric sensor array provided significantly faster detection of positive blood cultures than a conventional blood culture system (12.1 h versus 14.9 h, P < 0.001) while allowing for the identification of 18 bacterial species with 91.9% overall accuracy within 2 h of growth detection. The colorimetric sensor array also allowed for discrimination between unrelated strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, indicating that the metabolomic fingerprint has the potential to track nosocomial transmissions. Altogether, the colorimetric sensor array is a promising tool that offers a new paradigm for diagnosing bloodstream infections.

  14. High-sensitivity array analysis of gene expression for the early detection of disseminated breast tumor cells in peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Katherine J.; Graner, Edgard; Li, Yi; Price, Laura M.; Kritzman, Brian M.; Fournier, Marcia V.; Rhei, Esther; Pardee, Arthur B.

    2001-01-01

    Early detection is an effective means of reducing cancer mortality. Here, we describe a highly sensitive high-throughput screen that can identify panels of markers for the early detection of solid tumor cells disseminated in peripheral blood. The method is a two-step combination of differential display and high-sensitivity cDNA arrays. In a primary screen, differential display identified 170 candidate marker genes differentially expressed between breast tumor cells and normal breast epithelial cells. In a secondary screen, high-sensitivity arrays assessed expression levels of these genes in 48 blood samples, 22 from healthy volunteers and 26 from breast cancer patients. Cluster analysis identified a group of 12 genes that were elevated in the blood of cancer patients. Permutation analysis of individual genes defined five core genes (P ≤ 0.05, permax test). As a group, the 12 genes generally distinguished accurately between healthy volunteers and patients with breast cancer. Mean expression levels of the 12 genes were elevated in 77% (10 of 13) untreated invasive cancer patients, whereas cluster analysis correctly classified volunteers and patients (P = 0.0022, Fisher's exact test). Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed array results and indicated that the sensitivity of the assay (1:2 × 108 transcripts) was sufficient to detect disseminated solid tumor cells in blood. Expression-based blood assays developed with the screening approach described here have the potential to detect and classify solid tumor cells originating from virtually any primary site in the body. PMID:11226293

  15. Chemiluminescence lateral flow immunoassay cartridge with integrated amorphous silicon photosensors array for human serum albumin detection in urine samples.

    PubMed

    Zangheri, Martina; Di Nardo, Fabio; Mirasoli, Mara; Anfossi, Laura; Nascetti, Augusto; Caputo, Domenico; De Cesare, Giampiero; Guardigli, Massimo; Baggiani, Claudio; Roda, Aldo

    2016-12-01

    A novel and disposable cartridge for chemiluminescent (CL)-lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) with integrated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) photosensors array was developed and applied to quantitatively detect human serum albumin (HSA) in urine samples. The presented analytical method is based on an indirect competitive immunoassay using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a tracer, which is detected by adding the luminol/enhancer/hydrogen peroxide CL cocktail. The system comprises an array of a-Si:H photosensors deposited on a glass substrate, on which a PDMS cartridge that houses the LFIA strip and the reagents necessary for the CL immunoassay was optically coupled to obtain an integrated analytical device controlled by a portable read-out electronics. The method is simple and fast with a detection limit of 2.5 mg L(-1) for HSA in urine and a dynamic range up to 850 mg L(-1), which is suitable for measuring physiological levels of HSA in urine samples and their variation in different diseases (micro- and macroalbuminuria). The use of CL detection allowed accurate and objective analyte quantification in a dynamic range that extends from femtomoles to picomoles. The analytical performances of this integrated device were found to be comparable with those obtained using a charge-coupled device (CCD) as a reference off-chip detector. These results demonstrate that integrating the a-Si:H photosensors array with CL-LFIA technique provides compact, sensitive and low-cost systems for CL-based bioassays with a wide range of applications for in-field and point-of-care bioanalyses. Graphical Abstract A novel integrated portable device was developed for direct quantitative detection of human serum albumin (HSA) in urine samples, exploiting a chemiluminescence lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA). The device comprises a cartridge that holds the LFIA strip and all the reagents necessary for the analysis, an array of amorphous silicon photosensors, and a custom read-out electronics.

  16. Direct detection of transcription factors in cotyledons during seedling development using sensitive silicon-substrate photonic crystal protein arrays.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sarah I; Tan, Yafang; Shamimuzzaman, Md; George, Sherine; Cunningham, Brian T; Vodkin, Lila

    2015-03-01

    Transcription factors control important gene networks, altering the expression of a wide variety of genes, including those of agronomic importance, despite often being expressed at low levels. Detecting transcription factor proteins is difficult, because current high-throughput methods may not be sensitive enough. One-dimensional, silicon-substrate photonic crystal (PC) arrays provide an alternative substrate for printing multiplexed protein microarrays that have greater sensitivity through an increased signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescent signal compared with performing the same assay upon a traditional aminosilanized glass surface. As a model system to test proof of concept of the silicon-substrate PC arrays to directly detect rare proteins in crude plant extracts, we selected representatives of four different transcription factor families (zinc finger GATA, basic helix-loop-helix, BTF3/NAC [for basic transcription factor of the NAC family], and YABBY) that have increasing transcript levels during the stages of seedling cotyledon development. Antibodies to synthetic peptides representing the transcription factors were printed on both glass slides and silicon-substrate PC slides along with antibodies to abundant cotyledon proteins, seed lectin, and Kunitz trypsin inhibitor. The silicon-substrate PC arrays proved more sensitive than those performed on glass slides, detecting rare proteins that were below background on the glass slides. The zinc finger transcription factor was detected on the PC arrays in crude extracts of all stages of the seedling cotyledons, whereas YABBY seemed to be at the lower limit of their sensitivity. Interestingly, the basic helix-loop-helix and NAC proteins showed developmental profiles consistent with their transcript patterns, indicating proof of concept for detecting these low-abundance proteins in crude extracts.

  17. High-Precision Dispensing of Nanoliter Biofluids on Glass Pedestal Arrays for Ultrasensitive Biomolecule Detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Yang; Xu, QianFeng; Zhu, Jing; Poget, Sébastien F; Lyons, Alan M

    2016-05-04

    Precise dispensing of nanoliter droplets is necessary for the development of sensitive and accurate assays, especially when the availability of the source solution is limited. Conventional approaches are limited by imprecise positioning, large shear forces, surface tension effects, and high costs. To address the need for precise and economical dispensing of nanoliter volumes, we developed a new approach where the dispensed volume is dependent on the size and shape of defined surface features, thus freeing the dispensing process from pumps and fine-gauge needles requiring accurate positioning. The surface we fabricated, called a nanoliter droplet virtual well microplate (nVWP), achieves high-precision dispensing (better than ±0.5 nL or ±1.6% at 32 nL) of 20-40 nL droplets using a small source drop (3-10 μL) on isolated hydrophilic glass pedestals (500 μm on a side) bonded to arrays of polydimethylsiloxane conical posts. The sharp 90° edge of the glass pedestal pins the solid-liquid-vapor triple contact line (TCL), averting the wetting of the glass sidewalls while the fluid is prevented from receding from the edge. This edge creates a sufficiently large energy barrier such that microliter water droplets can be poised on the glass pedestals, exhibiting contact angles greater >150°. This approach relieves the stringent mechanical alignment tolerances required for conventional dispensing techniques, shifting the control of dispensed volume to the area circumscribed by the glass edge. The effects of glass surface chemistry and dispense velocity on droplet volume were studied using optical microscopy and high-speed video. Functionalization of the glass pedestal surface enabled the selective adsorption of specific peptides and proteins from synthetic and natural biomolecule mixtures, such as venom. We further demonstrate how the nVWP dispensing platform can be used for a variety of assays, including sensitive detection of proteins and peptides by fluorescence

  18. SERS detection of R6G based on a novel graphene oxide/silver nanoparticles/silicon pyramid arrays structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C; Jiang, S Z; Huo, Y Y; Liu, A H; Xu, S C; Liu, X Y; Sun, Z C; Xu, Y Y; Li, Z; Man, B Y

    2015-09-21

    We present a novel surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate based on graphene oxide/silver nanoparticles/silicon pyramid arrays structure (GO/Ag/PSi). The SERS behaviors are discussed and compared by the detection of R6G. Based on the contrast experiments with PSi, GO/PSi, Ag/PSi and GO/AgA/PSi as SERS substrate, the perfect bio-compatibility, good homogeneity and chemical stability were confirmed. We also calculated the electric field distributions using Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) analysis to further understand the GO/Ag/PSi structure as a perfect SERS platform. These experimental and theoretical results imply that the GO/Ag/PSi with regular pyramids array is expected to be an effective substrate for label-free sensitive SERS detections in areas of medicine, food safety and biotechnology.

  19. Automated detection and location of microseismicity at Mount St. Helens with a large-N geophone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Steven M.; Schmandt, Brandon

    2015-09-01

    In the summer of 2014 a dense array of 904 geophones was deployed at Mount St. Helens along the road and trail system within 15 km distance of the summit crater. The array recorded continuous data for approximately 2 weeks and presents an unprecedented seismic observation of an active volcano. A reverse-time imaging method is applied to short-term-average over long-term-average time series data to automatically detect and locate microseismicity. These efforts resulted in an order of magnitude increase in earthquake detections over the normal monitoring operations of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network. Earthquake locations resolve a narrow, ≤1 km wide, vertical lineament of seismicity which extends from the surface to 4 km depth directly beneath the summit crater. This feature is interpreted as a fracture network that acts as a conduit connecting an underlying magma chamber to the surface.

  20. Analysis of phytoestrogens and polyphenols in plasma, tissue, and urine using HPLC with coulometric array detection.

    PubMed

    Gamache, P H; Acworth, I N

    1998-03-01

    The study of phytoestrogens in food sources and their metabolism, effects, and mechanism of action in animals requires very selective and often sensitive analytical techniques. We have applied coulometric array detection, which uses a series of flow-through electrochemical sensors each providing 100% electrolytic efficiency, for measurement of a variety of phytochemicals in complex matrices. Recent work has involved the resolution of coumestrol (COM), daidzein (DE), daidzin (DI), diethylstilbestrol (DES), enterodiol (ED), enterolactone (EL), equol (EQ), estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), estrone (E), genistein (GE), and quercetin (QE). Binary gradient reversed-phase (C18) chromatography was used with a sodium acetate buffer (pH 4.8)-methanol-acetonitrile solvent system. Eight coulometric sensors were set at 260, 320, 380, 440, 500, 560, 620, and 680 mV (vs Pd reference). Compounds were resolved in 30 min via both their oxidation/reduction characteristics and chromatographic behavior. Respective maximal oxidation potentials (mV) were: COM = 380; DE = 500; DI = 620; DES = 440; ED = 620; EL = 620; EQ = 560; E2 = 560; E3 = 560; E1 = 560; GE = 500; and QE = 260 with limits of detection of 5-50 pg. Uterine tissue homogenates (30 mg/ml in Tris-EDTA) and plasma from Sprague-Dawley rats sacrificed 1 hr after sc injection with either vehicle, dimethylsulfoxide, 10 microg DES, or 1.0 mg EQ were analyzed before and after enzymatic hydrolysis with beta-glucuronidase/sulfatase. Urine samples from humans receiving a Boston-area diet with or without soy protein isolate supplements were also analyzed. Ethanol extracts were evaporated and reconstituted in 20% methanol before HPLC analysis. DE, ED, EL, EQ, and GE were determined in urine with less than 5% (R.S.D.) intraassay imprecision and 85%-102% recovery. Levels (ng/ml) of GE (1.8), QE (11.2), and EQ (1.7) were found in control plasma before hydrolysis and GE (293), QE (183), and EQ (22) after hydrolysis. Higher concentrations

  1. Nanotube antibody biosensor arrays for the detection of circulating breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Ning; Wickstrom, Eric; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2008-11-01

    Recent reports have shown that nanoscale electronic devices can be used to detect a change in electrical properties when receptor proteins bind to their corresponding antibodies functionalized on the surface of the device, in extracts from as few as ten lysed tumor cells. We hypothesized that nanotube-antibody devices could sensitively and specifically detect entire live cancer cells. We report for the first time a single nanotube field effect transistor array, functionalized with IGF1R-specific and Her2-specific antibodies, which exhibits highly sensitive and selective sensing of live, intact MCF7 and BT474 human breast cancer cells in human blood. Those two cell lines both overexpress IGF1R and Her2, at different levels. Single or small bundle of nanotube devices that were functionalized with IGF1R-specific or Her2-specific antibodies showed 60% decreases in conductivity upon interaction with BT474 or MCF7 breast cancer cells in two µl drops of blood. Control experiments with non-specific antibodies or with MCF10A control breast cells produced a less than 5% decrease in electrical conductivity, illustrating the high sensitivity for whole cell binding by these single nanotube-antibody devices. We postulate that the free energy change due to multiple simultaneous cell-antibody binding events exerted stress along the nanotube surface, decreasing its electrical conductivity due to an increase in band gap. Because the free energy change upon cell-antibody binding, the stress exerted on the nanotube, and the change in conductivity are specific to a specific antigen-antibody interaction; these properties might be used as a fingerprint for the molecular sensing of circulating cancer cells. From optical microscopy observations during sensing, it appears that the binding of a single cell to a single nanotube field effect transistor produced the change in electrical conductivity. Thus we report a nanoscale oncometer with single cell sensitivity with a diameter 1000 times

  2. Molecularly Imprinted Sol-Gel-Based QCM Sensor Arrays for the Detection and Recognition of Volatile Aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuanjun; Wyszynski, Bartosz; Yatabe, Rui; Hayashi, Kenshi; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2017-02-16

    The detection and recognition of metabolically derived aldehydes, which have been identified as important products of oxidative stress and biomarkers of cancers; are considered as an effective approach for early cancer detection as well as health status monitoring. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor arrays based on molecularly imprinted sol-gel (MISG) materials were developed in this work for highly sensitive detection and highly selective recognition of typical aldehyde vapors including hexanal (HAL); nonanal (NAL) and bezaldehyde (BAL). The MISGs were prepared by a sol-gel procedure using two matrix precursors: tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and tetrabutoxytitanium (TBOT). Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APT); diethylaminopropyltrimethoxysilane (EAP) and trimethoxy-phenylsilane (TMP) were added as functional monomers to adjust the imprinting effect of the matrix. Hexanoic acid (HA); nonanoic acid (NA) and benzoic acid (BA) were used as psuedotemplates in view of their analogous structure to the target molecules as well as the strong hydrogen-bonding interaction with the matrix. Totally 13 types of MISGs with different components were prepared and coated on QCM electrodes by spin coating. Their sensing characters towards the three aldehyde vapors with different concentrations were investigated qualitatively. The results demonstrated that the response of individual sensors to each target strongly depended on the matrix precursors; functional monomers and template molecules. An optimization of the 13 MISG materials was carried out based on statistical analysis such as principle component analysis (PCA); multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). The optimized sensor array consisting of five channels showed a high discrimination ability on the aldehyde vapors; which was confirmed by quantitative comparison with a randomly selected array. It was suggested that both the molecularly imprinting (MIP) effect and the matrix

  3. Molecularly Imprinted Sol-Gel-Based QCM Sensor Arrays for the Detection and Recognition of Volatile Aldehydes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chuanjun; Wyszynski, Bartosz; Yatabe, Rui; Hayashi, Kenshi; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    The detection and recognition of metabolically derived aldehydes, which have been identified as important products of oxidative stress and biomarkers of cancers; are considered as an effective approach for early cancer detection as well as health status monitoring. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor arrays based on molecularly imprinted sol-gel (MISG) materials were developed in this work for highly sensitive detection and highly selective recognition of typical aldehyde vapors including hexanal (HAL); nonanal (NAL) and bezaldehyde (BAL). The MISGs were prepared by a sol-gel procedure using two matrix precursors: tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and tetrabutoxytitanium (TBOT). Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APT); diethylaminopropyltrimethoxysilane (EAP) and trimethoxy-phenylsilane (TMP) were added as functional monomers to adjust the imprinting effect of the matrix. Hexanoic acid (HA); nonanoic acid (NA) and benzoic acid (BA) were used as psuedotemplates in view of their analogous structure to the target molecules as well as the strong hydrogen-bonding interaction with the matrix. Totally 13 types of MISGs with different components were prepared and coated on QCM electrodes by spin coating. Their sensing characters towards the three aldehyde vapors with different concentrations were investigated qualitatively. The results demonstrated that the response of individual sensors to each target strongly depended on the matrix precursors; functional monomers and template molecules. An optimization of the 13 MISG materials was carried out based on statistical analysis such as principle component analysis (PCA); multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). The optimized sensor array consisting of five channels showed a high discrimination ability on the aldehyde vapors; which was confirmed by quantitative comparison with a randomly selected array. It was suggested that both the molecularly imprinting (MIP) effect and the matrix

  4. Highly specific detection of thrombin using an aptamer-based suspension array and the interaction analysis via microscale thermophoresis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanan; Liu, Nan; Ma, Xinhua; Li, Xiaoli; Ma, Jia; Li, Ya; Zhou, Zhijiang; Gao, Zhixian

    2015-04-21

    A novel aptamer-based suspension array detection platform was designed for the sensitive, specific and rapid detection of human α-thrombin as a model. Thrombin was first recognized by a 29-mer biotinylated thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) in solution. Then 15-mer TBA modified magnetic beads (MBs) captured the former TBA-thrombin to form an aptamer-thrombin-aptamer sandwich complex. The median fluorescence intensity obtained via suspension array technology was positively correlated with the thrombin concentration. The interactions between TBAs and thrombin were analyzed using microscale thermophoresis (MST). The dissociation constants could be respectively achieved to be 44.2 ± 1.36 nM (TBA1-thrombin) and 15.5 ± 0.637 nM (TBA2-thrombin), which demonstrated the high affinities of TBA-thrombin and greatly coincided with previous reports. Interaction conditions such as temperature, reaction time, and coupling protocol were optimized. The dynamic quantitative working range of the aptamer-based suspension array was 18.37-554.31 nM, and the coefficients of determination R(2) were greater than 0.9975. The lowest detection limit of thrombin was 5.4 nM. This method was highly specific for thrombin without being affected by other analogs and interfering proteins. The recoveries of thrombin spiked in diluted human serum were in the range 82.6-114.2%. This innovative aptamer-based suspension array detection platform not only exhibits good sensitivity based on MBs facilitating highly efficient separation and amplification, but also suggests high specificity by the selective aptamer binding, thereby suggesting the expansive application prospects in research and clinical fields.

  5. ARE WE THERE YET? TIME TO DETECTION OF NANOHERTZ GRAVITATIONAL WAVES BASED ON PULSAR-TIMING ARRAY LIMITS

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S. R.; Vallisneri, M.; Ellis, J. A.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Haasteren, R. van

    2016-03-01

    Decade-long timing observations of arrays of millisecond pulsars have placed highly constraining upper limits on the amplitude of the nanohertz gravitational-wave stochastic signal from the mergers of supermassive black hole binaries (∼10{sup −15} strain at f = 1 yr{sup −1}). These limits suggest that binary merger rates have been overestimated, or that environmental influences from nuclear gas or stars accelerate orbital decay, reducing the gravitational-wave signal at the lowest, most sensitive frequencies. This prompts the question whether nanohertz gravitational waves (GWs) are likely to be detected in the near future. In this Letter, we answer this question quantitatively using simple statistical estimates, deriving the range of true signal amplitudes that are compatible with current upper limits, and computing expected detection probabilities as a function of observation time. We conclude that small arrays consisting of the pulsars with the least timing noise, which yield the tightest upper limits, have discouraging prospects of making a detection in the next two decades. By contrast, we find large arrays are crucial to detection because the quadrupolar spatial correlations induced by GWs can be well sampled by many pulsar pairs. Indeed, timing programs that monitor a large and expanding set of pulsars have an ∼80% probability of detecting GWs within the next 10 years, under assumptions on merger rates and environmental influences ranging from optimistic to conservative. Even in the extreme case where 90% of binaries stall before merger and environmental coupling effects diminish low-frequency gravitational-wave power, detection is delayed by at most a few years.

  6. Detecting Hidden Aftershocks of the 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha Earthquake Using Multiple Global Seismic Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.; LI, B.

    2015-12-01

    Spatio-temporal evolution of aftershocks is important for the study of rupture extent [McCann et al., 1979], stress transfer [King et al., 1994], postseismic deformation [Hsu et al., 2006; Sladen et al., 2010], hazard assessment and forecasting of future seismicity [e.g., Cocco et al., 2010]. However, many aftershocks remain undetected by the global network due to the limitation of the density and distribution of seismic instruments. In this study, we use the back-projection method with multiple global seismic arrays to detect the hidden earthquakes (not recorded by current standard global earthquake catalog) following the 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha earthquake. There are 140 aftershocks in the global catalog within 10 days since the mainshock. Using array methods, we are able to detect about twice as many events near the mainshock. According to the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) comprehensive earthquake catalog, the first aftershock happened 4 minutes after the mainshock. We detect aftershocks even before that event. This shows that back-projection can be used to detect early aftershocks in global scale, which usually remain undetected by the arrival of various seismic phases immediately following a large earthquake [Lengline et al., 2012]. Detection of these hidden aftershocks provides a more complete picture of the spatiotemporal distribution of aftershock activity and helps improve the completeness of the global standard aftershock catalog. Our improved aftershock catalog shows east-west aftershocks distribution (Figure 1), similar to the ANSS catalog. In addition, we detect significant number of aftershocks north, south, and within the coseismic rupture area. The improved aftershock catalog using existing global seismic arrays enables us to better study aftershocks dynamics, stress evolution and earthquake characteristics.

  7. Are We There Yet? Time to Detection of Nanohertz Gravitational Waves Based on Pulsar-timing Array Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. R.; Vallisneri, M.; Ellis, J. A.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Lazio, T. J. W.; van Haasteren, R.

    2016-03-01

    Decade-long timing observations of arrays of millisecond pulsars have placed highly constraining upper limits on the amplitude of the nanohertz gravitational-wave stochastic signal from the mergers of supermassive black hole binaries (˜10-15 strain at f = 1 yr-1). These limits suggest that binary merger rates have been overestimated, or that environmental influences from nuclear gas or stars accelerate orbital decay, reducing the gravitational-wave signal at the lowest, most sensitive frequencies. This prompts the question whether nanohertz gravitational waves (GWs) are likely to be detected in the near future. In this Letter, we answer this question quantitatively using simple statistical estimates, deriving the range of true signal amplitudes that are compatible with current upper limits, and computing expected detection probabilities as a function of observation time. We conclude that small arrays consisting of the pulsars with the least timing noise, which yield the tightest upper limits, have discouraging prospects of making a detection in the next two decades. By contrast, we find large arrays are crucial to detection because the quadrupolar spatial correlations induced by GWs can be well sampled by many pulsar pairs. Indeed, timing programs that monitor a large and expanding set of pulsars have an ˜80% probability of detecting GWs within the next 10 years, under assumptions on merger rates and environmental influences ranging from optimistic to conservative. Even in the extreme case where 90% of binaries stall before merger and environmental coupling effects diminish low-frequency gravitational-wave power, detection is delayed by at most a few years.

  8. Determination of quinolones in animal tissues and eggs by high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode-array detection.

    PubMed

    Gigosos, P G; Revesado, P R; Cadahía, O; Fente, C A; Vazquez, B I; Franco, C M; Cepeda, A

    2000-02-25

    A rapid, specific reversed-phase HPLC method is described, with solid-phase extraction, for assaying five quinolones (ciprofloxacin, difloxacin, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin and marbofloxacin) with confirmative diode-array detection in samples of bovine kidney, muscle and eggs. The least efficient extraction was marbofloxacin from kidney tissue (64%). The lower detection limit for each quinolone was: enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin, 1 ng; norfloxacin and difloxacin, 2 ng; marbofloxacin, 4 ng injected. The intra-day relative standard deviations were lower than 7.9% and lower than 8.6% for inter-day assays. These results indicate that the developed method had an acceptable precision.

  9. Real-time photoacoustic tomograpghy using linear array probe and detection of line structure using Hough transform.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung-Won; Park, Jaebyung; Shin, Dong Ho; Song, Chul-Gyu; Kim, Kyeong-Seop

    2015-01-01

    A real-time photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system is developed using a linear array probe and phantom images are acquired with a pattern of line structure. Moreover, it is attempted to detect line structures from the acquired images by Hough transform. This effort leads to the measurement of a process of magenta passing through a tube and acquisition of images at a speed of about 2 frame/sec. Besides, it is confirmed that the Hough transform applied on the acquired PAT images has the detection rate of about 50% for delineating a line structure.

  10. Portable e-Tongue based on Multi-channel LAPS Array with PVC Membrane for Rapid Environment Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, D.; Yu, H.; Hu, N.; Wu, C. X.; Zhou, J.; Kirsanov, Dmitry; Legin, Andrey; Wang, P.

    2011-09-01

    A new kind of portable e-Tongue based on multi-channel LAPS array with PVC membrane has been designed for the rapid detection of environment situation, especially the seawater. It has the great advantages of depositing membranes which are offered by Chemistry Department, Saint-Petersburg State University on the sensors artificially with convenience and efficiency. To detect various heavy metal ions (Pb2+, Cd2+, Zn2+) simultaneously, respective Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) membrane could be prepared on the surface of the silicon-based sensor in different channel.

  11. The Measurement of the Effects of Helmet Form on Sound Source Detection and Localization Using a Portable Four-Loudspeaker Test Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    The Measurement of the Effects of Helmet Form on Sound Source Detection and Localization Using a Portable Four- Loudspeaker Test Array by...Localization Using a Portable Four- Loudspeaker Test Array Angelique A. Scharine and Tomasz R. Letowski Human Research and Engineering... Loudspeaker Test Array 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Angelique A. Scharine and Tomasz R. Letowski

  12. Investigation of a solvent-cast organogel to form a liquid-gel microinterface array for electrochemical detection of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Felisilda, Bren Mark B; Alvarez de Eulate, Eva; Arrigan, Damien W M

    2015-09-17

    Ion transfer at aqueous-organogel interfaces enables the non-redox detection of ions and ionisable species by voltammetry. In this study, a non-thermal method for preparation of an organogel was employed and used for the detection of hen-egg-white-lysozyme (HEWL) via adsorptive stripping voltammetry at an array of aqueous-organogel microinterfaces. Tetrahydrofuran solvent casting was employed to prepare the organogel mixture, hence removing the need for heating of the solution to be gelled, as used in previous studies. Cyclic voltammetry of HEWL at the microinterface array revealed a broad adsorption process on the forward scan, at positive applied potentials, followed by a desorption peak at ca. 0.68 V, indicating the detection of HEWL in this region. Application of an adsorption step, where a constant optimized potential of 0.95 V was applied, followed by voltammetric detection provided for a linear response range of 0.02-0.84 μM and a detection limit of 0.030 μM for 300 s adsorption. The detection limit was further improved by utilizing differential pulse stripping voltammetry, resulting in detection limits of 0.017 μM, 0.014 μM, and 0.010 μM for adsorptive pre-concentration times of 60, 120 and 300 s, respectively, in unstirred solutions. These results are an improvement over other methods for the detection of HEWL at aqueous-organic interfaces and offers a basis for the label-free detection of protein.

  13. Clinical Validation of Integrated Nucleic Acid and Protein Detection on an Electrochemical Biosensor Array for Urinary Tract Infection Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Ruchika; Mach, Kathleen E.; Bercovici, Moran; Pan, Ying; Dhulipala, Lakshmi; Wong, Pak Kin; Liao, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common infection that poses a substantial healthcare burden, yet its definitive diagnosis can be challenging. There is a need for a rapid, sensitive and reliable analytical method that could allow early detection of UTI and reduce unnecessary antibiotics. Pathogen identification along with quantitative detection of lactoferrin, a measure of pyuria, may provide useful information towards the overall diagnosis of UTI. Here, we report an integrated biosensor platform capable of simultaneous pathogen identification and detection of urinary biomarker that could aid the effectiveness of the treatment and clinical management. Methodology/Principal Findings The integrated pathogen 16S rRNA and host lactoferrin detection using the biosensor array was performed on 113 clinical urine samples collected from patients at risk for complicated UTI. For pathogen detection, the biosensor used sandwich hybridization of capture and detector oligonucleotides to the target analyte, bacterial 16S rRNA. For detection of the protein biomarker, the biosensor used an analogous electrochemical sandwich assay based on capture and detector antibodies. For this assay, a set of oligonucleotide probes optimized for hybridization at 37°C to facilitate integration with the immunoassay was developed. This probe set targeted common uropathogens including E. coli, P. mirabilis, P. aeruginosa and Enterococcus spp. as well as less common uropathogens including Serratia, Providencia, Morganella and Staphylococcus spp. The biosensor assay for pathogen detection had a specificity of 97% and a sensitivity of 89%. A significant correlation was found between LTF concentration measured by the biosensor and WBC and leukocyte esterase (p<0.001 for both). Conclusion/Significance We successfully demonstrate simultaneous detection of nucleic acid and host immune marker on a single biosensor array in clinical samples. This platform can be used for multiplexed detection

  14. Real-time detection of DNA hybridization and melting on oligonucleotide arrays by using optical wave guides.

    PubMed Central

    Stimpson, D I; Hoijer, J V; Hsieh, W T; Jou, C; Gordon, J; Theriault, T; Gamble, R; Baldeschwieler, J D

    1995-01-01

    The challenge of the Human Genome Project is to increase the rate of DNA sequence acquisition by two orders of magnitude to complete sequencing of the human genome by the year 2000. The present work describes a rapid detection method using a two-dimensional optical wave guide that allows measurement of real-time binding or melting of a light-scattering label on a DNA array. A particulate label on the target DNA acts as a light-scattering source when illuminated by the evanescent wave of the wave guide and only the label bound to the surface generates a signal. Imaging/visual examination of the scattered light permits interrogation of the entire array simultaneously. Hybridization specificity is equivalent to that obtained with a conventional system using autoradiography. Wave guide melting curves are consistent with those obtained in the liquid phase and single-base discrimination is facile. Dilution experiments showed an apparent lower limit of detection at 0.4 nM oligonucleotide. This performance is comparable to the best currently known fluorescence-based systems. In addition, wave guide detection allows manipulation of hybridization stringency during detection and thereby reduces DNA chip complexity. It is anticipated that this methodology will provide a powerful tool for diagnostic applications that require rapid cost-effective detection of variations from known sequences. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7603999

  15. Noncoder: a web interface for exon array-based detection of long non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Gellert, Pascal; Ponomareva, Yuliya; Braun, Thomas; Uchida, Shizuka

    2013-01-01

    Due to recent technical developments, a high number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered in mammals. Although it has been shown that lncRNAs are regulated differently among tissues and disease statuses, functions of these transcripts are still unknown in most cases. GeneChip Exon 1.0 ST Arrays (exon arrays) from Affymetrix, Inc. have been used widely to profile genome-wide expression changes and alternative splicing of protein-coding genes. Here, we demonstrate that re-annotation of exon array probes can be used to profile expressions of tens of thousands of lncRNAs. With this annotation, a detailed inspection of lncRNAs and their isoforms is possible. To allow for a general usage to the research community, we developed a user-friendly web interface called ‘noncoder’. By uploading CEL files from exon arrays and with a few mouse clicks and parameter settings, exon array data will be normalized and analysed to identify differentially expressed lncRNAs. Noncoder provides the detailed annotation information of lncRNAs and is equipped with unique features to allow for an efficient search for interesting lncRNAs to be studied further. The web interface is available at http://noncoder.mpi-bn.mpg.de. PMID:23012263

  16. Quantum Dot and Polymer Composite Cross-Reactive Array for Chemical Vapor Detection.

    PubMed

    Bright, Collin J; Nallon, Eric C; Polcha, Michael P; Schnee, Vincent P

    2015-12-15

    A cross-reactive chemical sensing array was made from CdSe Quantum Dots (QDs) and five different organic polymers by inkjet printing to create segmented fluorescent composite regions on quartz substrates. The sensor array was challenged with exposures from two sets of analytes, including one set of 14 different functionalized benzenes and one set of 14 compounds related to security concerns, including the explosives trinitrotoluene (TNT) and ammonium nitrate. The array was broadly responsive to analytes with different chemical functionalities due to the multiple sensing mechanisms that altered the QDs' fluorescence. The sensor array displayed excellent discrimination between members within both sets. Classification accuracy of more than 93% was achieved, including the complete discrimination of very similar dinitrobenzene isomers and three halogenated, substituted benzene compounds. The simple fabrication, broad responsivity, and high discrimination capacity of this type of cross-reactive array are ideal qualities for the development of sensors with excellent sensitivity to chemical and explosive threats while maintaining low false alarm rates.

  17. High-resolution focal plane array IR detection modules and digital signal processing technologies at AIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanski, Wolfgang A.; Breiter, Rainer; Koch, R.; Mauk, Karl-Heinz; Rode, Werner; Ziegler, Johann; Eberhardt, Kurt; Oelmaier, Reinhard; Schneider, Harald; Walther, Martin

    2000-07-01

    Full video format focal plane array (FPA) modules with up to 640 X 512 pixels have been developed for high resolution imaging applications in either mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) mid wave (MWIR) infrared (IR) or platinum silicide (PtSi) and quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP) technology as low cost alternatives to MCT for high performance IR imaging in the MWIR or long wave spectral band (LWIR). For the QWIP's, a new photovoltaic technology was introduced for improved NETD performance and higher dynamic range. MCT units provide fast frame rates > 100 Hz together with state of the art thermal resolution NETD < 20 mK for short snapshot integration times of typically 2 ms. PtSi and QWIP modules are usually operated in a rolling frame integration mode with frame rates of 30 - 60 Hz and provide thermal resolutions of NETD < 80 mK for PtSi and NETD < 20 mK for QWIP, respectively. Due to the lower quantum efficiency compared to MCT, however, the integration time is typically chosen to be as long 10 - 20 ms. The heat load of the integrated detector cooler assemblies (IDCAs) could be reduced to an amount as low, that a 1 W split liner cooler provides sufficient cooling power to operate the modules -- including the QWIP with 60 K operation temperature -- at ambient temperatures up to 65 degrees Celsius. Miniaturized command/control electronics (CCE) available for all modules provide a standardized digital interface, with 14 bit analogue to digital conversion for state to the art correctability, access to highly dynamic scenes without any loss of information and simplified exchangeability of the units. New modular image processing hardware platforms and software for image visualization and nonuniformity correction including scene based self learning algorithms had to be developed to accomplish for the high data rates of up to 18 M pixels/s with 14-bit deep data, allowing to take into account nonlinear effects to access the full NETD by accurate reduction of residual

  18. The Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO)-A Change Detection Array in the Pacific Arctic Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebmeier, J. M.; Moore, S. E.; Cooper, L. W.; Frey, K. E.; Pickart, R. S.

    2011-12-01

    latitudinal gradient. Hydrographic transects occupied from spring to fall in 2010 and 2011 at two pilot sites in the SE Chukchi Sea and Barrow Canyon provide repeat collections of water parameters over the seasons that are unavailable from single cruises. This sampling indicates freshening and warming as Pacific seawater transits northward over the spring to fall seasons, with impacts on both plankton and benthic prey bases for larger marine mammals and seabirds. The intent of the DBO is to serve as a change detection array for the identification and consistent monitoring of biophysical responses. This network of spatially explicit DBOs is being organized through the Pacific Arctic Group (PAG), a collaborative network endorsed by the International Arctic Science Committee. Our presentation will provide new information to evaluate the status and developing trends of the marine biological system as it responds to the rapid environmental change.

  19. Automated Flaw Detection Scheme For Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Specimens Using Hilbert Huang Transform Of Ultrasonic Phased Array Data

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, T.; Majumdar, Shantanu; Udpa, L.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Crawford, Susan L.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop processing algorithms to detect and localize the flaws using NDE ultrasonic data. Data was collected using cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) weld specimens on-loan from the U.S. nuclear power industry’s Pressurized Water Reactor Owners Group (PWROG) specimen set. Each specimen consists of a centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS) pipe section welded to a statically cast (SCSS) or wrought (WRSS) section. The paper presents a novel automated flaw detection and localization scheme using low frequency ultrasonic phased array inspection signals in the weld and heat affected zone of the base materials. The major steps of the overall scheme are preprocessing and region of interest (ROI) detection followed by the Hilbert Huang transform (HHT) of A-scans in the detected ROIs. HHT offers time-frequency-energy distribution for each ROI. The accumulation of energy in a particular frequency band is used as a classification feature for the particular ROI.

  20. Microfluidic biosensor array with integrated poly(2,7-carbazole)/fullerene-based photodiodes for rapid multiplexed detection of pathogens.

    PubMed

    Matos Pires, Nuno Miguel; Dong, Tao

    2013-11-25

    A multiplexed microfluidic biosensor made of poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) was integrated into an array of organic blend heterojunction photodiodes (OPDs) for chemiluminescent detection of pathogens. Waterborne Escherichia coli O157:H7, Campylobacter jejuni and adenovirus were targeted in the PMMA chip, and detection of captured pathogens was conducted by poly(2,7-carbazole)/fullerene OPDs which showed a responsivity over 0.20 A/W at 425 nm. The limits of chemiluminescent detection were 5 × 10(5) cells/mL for E. coli, 1 × 10(5) cells/mL for C. jejuni, and 1 × 10(-8) mg/mL for adenovirus. Parallel analysis for all three analytes in less than 35 min was demonstrated. Further recovery tests illustrated the potential of the integrated biosensor for detecting bacteria in real water samples.

  1. Preparation of SiO2@ Au nanorod array as novel surface enhanced Raman substrate for trace pollutants detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Meng-Jing; Zhang, Xian; Cui, Xiao-Yang; Liu, Can; Li, Zheng-Cao; Zhang, Zheng-Jun

    2015-03-01

    An effective surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate is designed and fabricated by synthesis of SiO2 nanorods array via glancing angle deposition, followed by coating Au nanoparticles onto SiO2 surface in order to create numerous “hot spots”. The detecting sensitivity of such substrate could be optimized by simply adjusting the deposition time of Au. Thus, it can be used for detection of Rhodamine 6G at concentration as low as 10-9 M. Furthermore, our SERS substrate is applied to detect 5 μg/g polychlorinated biphenyls in soil sample, which proves its potential for trace environmental pollutants detection. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB934301), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 50931002), the Research Project of Chinese Ministry of Education (Grant No. 113007A), and the Initiative Scientific Research Program of Tsinghua University, China

  2. Adhesive defect detection in composite adhesive joints using phased array transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Baiyang; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2015-03-01

    Composite materials are widely used in aircraft structures due to their high specific stiffness and strength. The laminated nature of composite structures makes them subject to disbond and delamination. These types of defects will compromise the integrity of the structure and therefore need to be monitored. To monitor aircraft structures, light weight transducers capable of large area coverage are beneficial. Ultrasonic guided waves are able to travel long distance and are sensitive to localized defects. The multi-modal characteristic of propagating guided waves requires optimal mode selection and excitation. Phased array transducers provide good versatility for optimal mode excitation since they can excite different guided wave modes preferentially. Phased array transducers designed for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications are employed in this work to study the interaction between adhesive defects and guided wave modes. Amplitude ratios and wave packet composition are utilized as defect indicators that are uniquely available due to the phased array transducers.

  3. Characterizations of diffractive microlens in Nb5N6 microbolometers array for THz detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, X. C.; Pei, Y. F.; Xiao, P.; Jiang, C. T.; Wan, C.; Kang, L.; Chen, J.; Wu, P. H.

    2016-02-01

    Diffractive silicon microlens with ten staircases is designed and analyzed in this paper. The power distribution at the focal plane of the microlens is calculated and frequency dependence and focusing performance of the microlens is also evaluated by a FDTD method The simulation results show the diffractive lens has a good ability of focusing at 0.3 THz and around, and thus it can improve the coupling efficiency of the incident power into the Nb5N6 microbolometers. Development of a focal plane array (FPA) using such devices as detectors is favorable since diffractive microlens array has many advantages, such as light weight, low absorption loss, high resolution, and the most important point is that the microlens array can be easily integrated by ready mass production using standard micro-fabrication techniques.

  4. A 0.18-µm CMOS Array Sensor for Integrated Time-Resolved Fluorescence Detection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ta-chien D.; Sorgenfrei, Sebastian; Gong, Ping; Levicky, Rastislav; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the design of an active, integrated CMOS sensor array for fluorescence applications which enables time-gated, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The 64-by-64 array is sensitive to photon densities as low as 8.8 × 106 photons/cm2 with 64-point averaging and, through a differential pixel design, has a measured impulse response of better than 800 ps. Applications include both active microarrays and high-frame-rate imagers for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. PMID:20436922

  5. Detection of near-surface and surface-breaking defects using ultrasonic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velichko, A.; Wilcox, P. D.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2012-05-01

    An efficient Finite Element procedure for predicting the complete scattering behavior for an arbitrarily-shaped defect which is located near a free surface in an otherwise homogeneous isotropic half-space is presented. The data provided by this model is then used for simulating an ultrasonic array response for different near-surface and surface-breaking defects. Example results for 2D array (3D defects) are presented and compared with the experiment. Its practical application to the volumetric inspections of thin section is discussed.

  6. Portable, Easy-to-Operate, and Antifouling Microcapsule Array Chips Fabricated by 3D Ice Printing for Visual Target Detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Ze; Zhang, Fang-Ting; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Huang, Dong; Zhou, Ying-Lin; Li, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Xin-Xiang

    2015-06-16

    Herein, we proposed a portable, easy-to-operate, and antifouling microcapsule array chip for target detection. This prepackaged chip was fabricated by innovative and cost-effective 3D ice printing integrating with photopolymerization sealing which could eliminate complicated preparation of wet chemistry and effectively resist outside contaminants. Only a small volume of sample (2 μL for each microcapsule) was consumed to fulfill the assay. All the reagents required for the analysis were stored in ice form within the microcapsule before use, which guaranteed the long-term stability of microcapsule array chips. Nitrite and glucose were chosen as models for proof of concept to achieve an instant quantitative detection by naked eyes without the need of external sophisticated instruments. The simplicity, low cost, and small sample consumption endowed ice-printing microcapsule array chips with potential commercial value in the fields of on-site environmental monitoring, medical diagnostics, and rapid high-throughput point-of-care quantitative assay.

  7. A RGB-Type Quantum Dot-based Sensor Array for Sensitive Visual Detection of Trace Formaldehyde in Air

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hui; Hu, Jing; Tang, Jie; Xu, Kailai; Hou, Xiandeng; Wu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    A simple colorimetric sensor array based on red-emitting CdTe QDs and green-colored fluorescein that exhibited RGB-type color change was proposed for visual detection of trace formaldehyde. In the presence of formaldehyde, the red fluorescence from CdTe QDs was quenched while the green fluorescein was inert thus as a reference. Through harvesting the varied quenching efficiency of different ligand-capped CdTe QDs by formaldehyde, a simple sensor array can be constructed for both selective detection of formaldehyde with high sensitivity (LOD of 0.08 ppm) and identification of the existence of potential interference from acetaldehyde. The quenching mechanisms of formaldehyde toward different ligand capped CdTe QDs were studied with fluorescence lifetime, zeta potential, and also theoretical calculations. The results from theoretical calculations were in good agreement with the experimental results. The proposed sensor array was successfully explored for visual analysis of formaldehyde in indoor air samples. PMID:27830733

  8. Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds by Self-assembled Monolayer Coated Sensor Array with Concentration-independent Fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ye; Tang, Ning; Qu, Hemi; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Daihua; Zhang, Hao; Pang, Wei; Duan, Xuexin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have modeled and analyzed affinities and kinetics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) adsorption (and desorption) on various surface chemical groups using multiple self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) functionalized film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) array. The high-frequency and micro-scale resonator provides improved sensitivity in the detections of VOCs at trace levels. With the study of affinities and kinetics, three concentration-independent intrinsic parameters (monolayer adsorption capacity, adsorption energy constant and desorption rate) of gas-surface interactions are obtained to contribute to a multi-parameter fingerprint library of VOC analytes. Effects of functional group’s properties on gas-surface interactions are also discussed. The proposed sensor array with concentration-independent fingerprint library shows potential as a portable electronic nose (e-nose) system for VOCs discrimination and gas-sensitive materials selections. PMID:27045012

  9. Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds by Self-assembled Monolayer Coated Sensor Array with Concentration-independent Fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ye; Tang, Ning; Qu, Hemi; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Daihua; Zhang, Hao; Pang, Wei; Duan, Xuexin

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we have modeled and analyzed affinities and kinetics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) adsorption (and desorption) on various surface chemical groups using multiple self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) functionalized film bulk acoustic resonator (FBAR) array. The high-frequency and micro-scale resonator provides improved sensitivity in the detections of VOCs at trace levels. With the study of affinities and kinetics, three concentration-independent intrinsic parameters (monolayer adsorption capacity, adsorption energy constant and desorption rate) of gas-surface interactions are obtained to contribute to a multi-parameter fingerprint library of VOC analytes. Effects of functional group’s properties on gas-surface interactions are also discussed. The proposed sensor array with concentration-independent fingerprint library shows potential as a portable electronic nose (e-nose) system for VOCs discrimination and gas-sensitive materials selections.

  10. Cloth-based hybridization array system for the detection of Clostridium botulinum type A, B, E, and F neurotoxin genes.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, M; Cadieux, B; Austin, J W; Blais, B W

    2005-07-01

    A simple cloth-based hybridization array system was developed for the characterization of Clostridium botulinum isolates based on the botulinum neurotoxin serotype. Bacterial isolates were subjected to a multiplex PCR incorporating digoxigenin-dUTP and primers targeting the four botulinum neurotoxin gene serotypes (A, B, E, and F) predominantly involved in human illness, followed by hybridization of the amplicons with an array of toxin gene-specific oligonucleotide probes immobilized on polyester cloth and subsequent immunoenzymatic assay of the bound digoxigenin label. This system provided sensitive and specific detection of the different botulinum neurotoxin gene markers in a variety of C. botulinum strains, exhibiting the expected patterns of reactivity with a panel of target and nontarget organisms.

  11. A rapidly modulated multifocal detection scheme for parallel acquisition of Raman spectra from a 2-D focal array.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingbo; Chan, James

    2014-07-01

    We report the development of a rapidly modulated multifocal detection scheme that enables full Raman spectra (~500-2000 cm(-1)) from a 2-D focal array to be acquired simultaneously. A spatial light modulator splits a laser beam to generate an m × n multifocal array. Raman signals generated within each focus are projected simultaneously into a spectrometer and imaged onto a TE-cooled CCD camera. A shuttering system using different masks is constructed to collect the superimposed Raman spectra of different multifocal patterns. The individual Raman spectrum from each focus is then retrieved from the superimposed spectra with no crosstalk using a postacquisition data processing algorithm. This system is expected to significantly improve the speed of current Raman-based instruments such as laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy and hyperspectral Raman imaging.

  12. No Radio Flaring Detected from Cygnus X-3 at 3 GHz by Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. K. G.; Bower, G. C.; Tomsick, J. A.; Bodaghee, A.; Corbet, R. H. D.

    2011-01-01

    Following the announcement of a 98 GHz flare from the microquasar Cygnus X-3 (ATel #3130), we observed it with the Allen Telescope Array (Welch et al., 2009 Proc. IEEE 97 1438 for 2.5 hours beginning at 2011 January 28.848 UT (MJD 55589.848), about 4.0 hours after the 98 GHz observations concluded.

  13. Detection and validation of single feature polymorphisms using RNA expression data from a rice genome array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A large number of genetic variations have been identified in rice. Such variations must in many cases control phenotypic differences in abiotic stress tolerance and other traits. A single feature polymorphism (SFP) is an oligonucleotide array-based polymorphism which can be used for identification o...

  14. Protein Array-Based Detection of Proteins in Kidney Tissues from Patients with Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Fan, Meng

    2017-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease in which proteins related with plenty of biological processes play an important role. However, the role of these proteins in the pathogenesis of MN is still unclear. This study aimed to screen differential proteins in kidney tissue samples from MN patients by using protein arrays and determine the pathways involved in the pathogenesis of MN. This study first tested a quantitative protein array (QAH-INF-3) and two semiquantitative protein arrays (L-493 and L-507) with normal renal tissue and identified L-493 as the most appropriate assay to compare protein levels between MN tissues and normal control tissues. The L-493 array identified 66 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) that may be associated with MN. The gene oncology (GO) and protein-protein interaction (PPI) analyses revealed several processes potentially involved in MN, including extracellular matrix disassembly and organization, cell adhesion, cell-cell signaling, cellular protein metabolic process, and immune response (P < 0.05). We suggest that these different pathways work together via protein signaling and result in the pathogenesis and progression of MN. PMID:28337458

  15. Robust myoelectric signal detection based on stochastic resonance using multiple-surface-electrode array made of carbon nanotube composite paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirata, Kento; Inden, Yuki; Kasai, Seiya; Oya, Takahide; Hagiwara, Yosuke; Kaeriyama, Shunichi; Nakamura, Hideyuki

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the robust detection of surface electromyogram (EMG) signals based on the stochastic resonance (SR) phenomenon, in which the response to weak signals is optimized by adding noise, combined with multiple surface electrodes. Flexible carbon nanotube composite paper (CNT-cp) was applied to the surface electrode, which showed good performance that is comparable to that of conventional Ag/AgCl electrodes. The SR-based EMG signal system integrating an 8-Schmitt-trigger network and the multiple-CNT-cp-electrode array successfully detected weak EMG signals even when the subject’s body is in the motion, which was difficult to achieve using the conventional technique. The feasibility of the SR-based EMG detection technique was confirmed by demonstrating its applicability to robot hand control.

  16. Micro-flow Immunosensor Based on Thin-film Interdigitated Gold Array Microelectrodes for Cancer Biomarker Detection.

    PubMed

    Ravalli, Andrea; Lozzi, Luca; Marrazza, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we reported the development of a micro-flow label-free impedimetric biosensor based on the use of thin-film interdigitated gold array microelectrodes (IDA) for the detection of carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125). The immunosensor is developed through the electropolymerization of anthranilic acid (AA) on the surface of IDA electrodes followed by the covalent attachment of anti-CA125 monoclonal antibody. CA125 protein affinity reaction was then evaluated by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The sensor was characterized by electrochemical techniques and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Using the optimized experimental conditions, the developed immunosensor showed a good analytical performance for CA125 detection from 0 to 100 U/mL with estimated limit of detection (LOD = 3Sblank/Slope) of 7 U/mL.

  17. Evaluation of the FilmArray® system for detection of Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Seiner, Derrick R.; Colburn, Heather A.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Straub, Tim M.; Victry, Kristin D.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2013-04-29

    To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of the Idaho Technologies FilmArray® Biothreat Panel for the detection of Bacillus anthracis (Ba), Francisella tularensis (Ft), and Yersinia pestis (Yp) DNA, and demonstrate the detection of Ba spores. Methods and Results: DNA samples from Ba, Ft and Yp strains and near-neighbors, and live Ba spores were analyzed using the Biothreat Panel, a multiplexed PCR-based assay for 17 pathogens and toxins. Sensitivity studies with DNA suggest a limit of detection of 250 genome equivalents (GEs) per sample. Furthermore, the correct call of Ft, Yp or Bacillus species was made in 63 of 72 samples tested at 25 GE or less. With samples containing 25 Ba Sterne spores, at least one of the two possible Ba markers were identified in all samples tested. We observed no cross-reactivity with near-neighbor DNAs.

  18. Accelerating object detection via a visual-feature-directed search cascade: algorithm and field programmable gate array implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrkou, Christos; Theocharides, Theocharis

    2016-07-01

    Object detection is a major step in several computer vision applications and a requirement for most smart camera systems. Recent advances in hardware acceleration for real-time object detection feature extensive use of reconfigurable hardware [field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs)], and relevant research has produced quite fascinating results, in both the accuracy of the detection algorithms as well as the performance in terms of frames per second (fps) for use in embedded smart camera systems. Detecting objects in images, however, is a daunting task and often involves hardware-inefficient steps, both in terms of the datapath design and in terms of input/output and memory access patterns. We present how a visual-feature-directed search cascade composed of motion detection, depth computation, and edge detection, can have a significant impact in reducing the data that needs to be examined by the classification engine for the presence of an object of interest. Experimental results on a Spartan 6 FPGA platform for face detection indicate data search reduction of up to 95%, which results in the system being able to process up to 50 1024×768 pixels images per second with a significantly reduced number of false positives.

  19. Detection of hormone active chemicals using genetically engineered yeast cells and microfluidic devices with interdigitated array electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ino, Kosuke; Kitagawa, Yusuke; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Shiku, Hitoshi; Koide, Masahiro; Itayama, Tomoaki; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2009-10-01

    Endocrine disruptors that act like hormones in the endocrine system might have toxic effects. Therefore, it is important to develop a portable device that can detect hormone active chemicals in samples rapidly and easily. In this study, a microfluidic device was developed for the detection of hormone active chemicals using genetically engineered yeast cells. The yeast cells were used as biosensors since they were genetically engineered to respond to the presence of hormone active chemicals by synthesizing beta-galactosidase (beta-gal). For achieving further sensitivity, we incorporated interdigitated array (IDA) electrodes (width, 1.2 microm; gap, 0.8 microm) with 40 electrode fingers into the analytical chamber of the microfluidic device. The yeast cells precultured with a hormone active chemical, 17beta-estradiol (E2), were trapped from the main channel of the device to the analytical camber by electrophoresis. After trapping in the analytical chamber, we performed electrochemical detection of beta-gal induced in the yeast cells with the IDA electrodes. Actually, electrochemical detection was performed on p-aminophenol that was converted from p-aminophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside with beta-gal. The electrochemical signals from the yeast cells precultured with 17beta-estradiol were successfully detected with the device. Furthermore, the inhibitory effects of antagonists such as tamoxifen were also detected electrochemically by using the device. Thus, the present microfluidic device can be used for highly sensitive detection of hormone active chemicals.

  20. Electrochemiluminescence bipolar electrode array for the multiplexed detection of glucose, lactate and choline based on a versatile enzymatic approach.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yi; Xu, Linru; Qi, Lian-Wen

    2017-04-01

    A simple, efficient and versatile biosensing platform capable of the multiplexed detection for glucose, lactate and choline was developed by the integration of bipolar electrochemistry and electrochemiluminescence (ECL) imaging. The sensing bipolar electrodes (BPEs) were simply modified via a one-step method adaptable to different enzymes. The biorecognition event happening between the substrate and the corresponding enzyme could be directly reported by the ECL emitted on the same pole from luminol and in situ generated H2O2. Under optimized conditions, the BPEs array was successfully applied for the determination of glucose, lactate and choline in the ranges of 0.01-1mM, 0.01-1mM and 0.02-5mM, with the LOD of 7.57μM, 8.25μM and 43.19μM, respectively. Owing to the improved stability of in situ generated H2O2, a whole series of analytes testing could be completed in the same BPE biochip. Subsequently, an array chip consisting of nine BPEs enabled the concomitant detection of glucose, lactate and choline, demonstrating the capability for multifunctional detection of biomolecules. This versatile analytical system could be easily extended to sensitive screening in a miniaturized device and point of care testing.

  1. A coherent method for the detection and parameter estimation of continuous gravitational wave signals using a pulsar timing array

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yan; Mohanty, Soumya D.; Jenet, Fredrick A.

    2014-11-01

    The use of a high precision pulsar timing array is a promising approach to detecting gravitational waves in the very low frequency regime (10{sup –6}-10{sup –9} Hz) that is complementary to ground-based efforts (e.g., LIGO, Virgo) at high frequencies (∼10-10{sup 3} Hz) and space-based ones (e.g., LISA) at low frequencies (10{sup –4}-10{sup –1} Hz). One of the target sources for pulsar timing arrays is individual supermassive black hole binaries which are expected to form in galactic mergers. In this paper, a likelihood-based method for detection and parameter estimation is presented for a monochromatic continuous gravitational wave signal emitted by such a source. The so-called pulsar terms in the signal that arise due to the breakdown of the long-wavelength approximation are explicitly taken into account in this method. In addition, the method accounts for equality and inequality constraints involved in the semi-analytical maximization of the likelihood over a subset of the parameters. The remaining parameters are maximized over numerically using Particle Swarm Optimization. Thus, the method presented here solves the monochromatic continuous wave detection and parameter estimation problem without invoking some of the approximations that have been used in earlier studies.

  2. Monolithic and hybrid near infrared detection and imaging based on poly-Ge photodiode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masini, G.; Colace, L.; Petulla, F.; Assanto, G.; Cencelli, V.; DeNotaristefani, F.

    2005-02-01

    In recent years, several Ge-on-Si technologies for the fabrication of near infrared photodetectors on Si substrates were proposed. In particular, using a low temperature (300 °C) technique, we have demonstrated poly-Ge_on_Si detectors with high speed and good NIR responsivity. The low process temperature allows the monolithic integration of the detectors as a final step in the fabrication of Si CMOS integrated circuits. After an introduction on poly-Ge, we describe a novel integrated chip (NIRCAM-1) designed as a readout/control circuit for arrays of 64 (32) poly-Ge_on_Si photodetectors. The photodiodes, monolithically integrated (wire-bonded with a hybrid approach) on the IC, generate a photocurrent which is then ADC converted after subtraction of the dark component, thus allowing a convenient digital readout of the array. The extensive optoelectronic characterization of the IC is presented.

  3. Very Large Array Detection of the 36 GHz Zeeman Effect in DR21W Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momjian, Emmanuel; Sjouwerman, Loránt O.; Fish, Vincent L.

    2012-09-01

    We report on the observation of the 36 GHz methanol maser line in the star-forming region DR21W to accurately measure the Zeeman effect. The Zeeman signature reported by Fish et al. became suspicious after an instrumental effect was discovered in the early days of the commissioning of the Very Large Array Wide-band Digital Architecture correlator. We conclude that the previously reported magnetic field strength of 58 mG (1.7 Hz mG-1/z) is instrumental in nature and thus incorrect. With the improved performance of the array, we now deduce a 3σ limit of -4.7 to +0.4 mG (1.7 Hz mG-1/z) for the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field strength in DR21W.

  4. VERY LARGE ARRAY DETECTION OF THE 36 GHz ZEEMAN EFFECT IN DR21W REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Momjian, Emmanuel; Sjouwerman, Lorant O.; Fish, Vincent L.

    2012-09-20

    We report on the observation of the 36 GHz methanol maser line in the star-forming region DR21W to accurately measure the Zeeman effect. The Zeeman signature reported by Fish et al. became suspicious after an instrumental effect was discovered in the early days of the commissioning of the Very Large Array Wide-band Digital Architecture correlator. We conclude that the previously reported magnetic field strength of 58 mG (1.7 Hz mG{sup -1}/z) is instrumental in nature and thus incorrect. With the improved performance of the array, we now deduce a 3{sigma} limit of -4.7 to +0.4 mG (1.7 Hz mG{sup -1}/z) for the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field strength in DR21W.

  5. Vacuum photodiode detector array for broadband UV detection in a tokamak plasma.

    PubMed

    Zweben, S J; Menyuk, C R; Taylor, R J

    1979-08-01

    An array of vacuum photodiode detectors has been used to monitor discharge equilibrium, stability, and cleanliness in the Macrotor tokamak. These detectors use the photoelectric effect on small tungsten plates to measure UV emission in the band lambda approximately 200-1200 angstroms, and so are sensitive mainly to impurity line radiation in Macrotor. The response of this system to controlled impurity contamination experiments and to disruptions is described. The design, construction, and background problems associated with these detectors are discussed in detail.

  6. Tuning of Automatic Signal Detection Algorithms for IMS Style Infrasound Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    Virginia. The synthetic signals were implanted into conventional array channel data using an implant strategy that allowed the signal to noise ratio ( SNR ...of the signal to be specified in a fashion that accounts for the spectral composition of the background. SNR values ranging from 0.01 to 100 were used...of Signal to Noise Ratio ( SNR ). RESEARCH ACCOMPLISHED In meeting this objective it was determined that the following steps constitute a workable

  7. Detection of the Odor Signature of Ovarian Cancer using DNA-Decorated Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistor Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehayias, Christopher; Kybert, Nicholas; Yodh, Jeremy; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    Carbon nanotubes are low-dimensional materials that exhibit remarkable chemical and bio-sensing properties and have excellent compatibility with electronic systems. Here, we present a study that uses an electronic olfaction system based on a large array of DNA-carbon nanotube field effect transistors vapor sensors to analyze the VOCs of blood plasma samples collected from patients with malignant ovarian cancer, patients with benign ovarian lesions, and age-matched healthy subjects. Initial investigations involved coating each CNT sensor with single-stranded DNA of a particular base sequence. 10 distinct DNA oligomers were used to functionalize the carbon nanotube field effect transistors, providing a 10-dimensional sensor array output response. Upon performing a statistical analysis of the 10-dimensional sensor array responses, we showed that blood samples from patients with malignant cancer can be reliably differentiated from those of healthy control subjects with a p-value of 3 x 10-5. The results provide preliminary evidence that the blood of ovarian cancer patients contains a discernable volatile chemical signature that can be detected using DNA-CNT nanoelectronic vapor sensors, a first step towards a minimally invasive electronic diagnostic technology for ovarian cancer.

  8. The Network Strain Filter - A new tool for monitoring and detecting transient deformation signals in GPS arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, R.; Segall, P.; McGuire, J.

    2004-12-01

    Data from large-scale continuous GPS arrays have revealed transient signals caused by aseismic fault slip and magmatic intrusion. It is almost certain that more subtle signals due to smaller magnitude events exist, but have gone undetected. The huge amount of data from large GPS arrays makes it difficult to search for time varying processes by eye, and automated methods to detect transients are urgently required. We have developed a time-domain filtering method to detect spatially and temporally coherent signals in data from large GPS arrays, which we refer to as a Network Strain Filter (NSF). The position time series are expressed as a sum of tectonic motions, local benchmark motions, reference frame errors, and unmodeled errors. The tectonic displacements are expanded in a wavelet basis with time varying coefficients. The coefficients are modeled as integrated random walks, such that the velocities (and strain rates) follow a random walk. The wavelet coefficients, as well as the benchmark motion and reference frame errors, are estimated with Kalman filtering techniques. The variance of the integrated random walk, which controls temporal smoothing of the displacements, is also estimated simultaneously using an "extended" Kalman filtering algorithm. Orthogonal wavelets are used to form the basis, which enables us to carry out a multiresolution analysis (MRA). MRA expands a signal into a sum of translations and dilations of a unit "mother" wavelet and a sum of translations of one "father" wavelet whose scale corresponds to the spatial extent of the network. The smallest scale wavelet is chosen so that the wavelet covers some minimum number of stations, which ensures that time-varying deformation is separable from local benchmark motions. We determine the minimum scale such that the residual variance is consistent with the a priori errors of the data. We carried out simulations to test the performance of the filter using a variety of wavelets. Hypothetical time

  9. A six-channel pediatric coil array for detection of children spinal pathologies by MRI at 1.5 Tesla

    SciTech Connect

    López Terrones, Marcos Alonso; Solís-Nájera, Sergio Enrique

    2014-11-07

    Nowadays, magnetic resonance (MR) in Mexico has become a standard technique for clinical imaging. Although most of the times the MR systems contain only coils oriented for adults. Radiologists use these coils for children studies due to the non-availability of pediatric coils. Image quality is decreased due to the low signal to noise ratio delivered to the system. The development of RF coils is always focused towards increasing SNR and optimizing the RF penetration into the sample. Moreover, spinal pathologies in children, which are an important topic in pediatric care, cover congenital and neuromuscular disorders that occur in childhood. In this work, the design of a dedicated six-channel coil for detection of spinal pathologies at 1.5 Tesla is addressed. Numerical electromagnetic simulations were performed in order to evaluate their magnetic field performance at (63.6 MHz) 1.5 Tesla. The magnetic field uniformity as well as the RF penetration depth of the coil configurations was evaluated in order to find the best/optimized coil array configuration. The coil is comprised of three rows, one with 4 coil elements and two with only one coil element. Phantom and in vivo images were acquired with the six-channel pediatric coil array. The phantom images agree with the simulated data. In vivo images acquired with the 6-channel pediatric coil array have shown very good penetration depth and homogeneity, which allow better image quality throughout the whole FOV. In addition, the parallel imaging capabilities of the array allow the acceleration of the experiments avoiding possible motion artifacts.

  10. A six-channel pediatric coil array for detection of children spinal pathologies by MRI at 1.5 Tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Terrones, Marcos Alonso; Solís-Nájera, Sergio Enrique

    2014-11-01

    Nowadays, magnetic resonance (MR) in Mexico has become a standard technique for clinical imaging. Although most of the times the MR systems contain only coils oriented for adults. Radiologists use these coils for children studies due to the non-availability of pediatric coils. Image quality is decreased due to the low signal to noise ratio delivered to the system. The development of RF coils is always focused towards increasing SNR and optimizing the RF penetration into the sample. Moreover, spinal pathologies in children, which are an important topic in pediatric care, cover congenital and neuromuscular disorders that occur in childhood. In this work, the design of a dedicated six-channel coil for detection of spinal pathologies at 1.5 Tesla is addressed. Numerical electromagnetic simulations were performed in order to evaluate their magnetic field performance at (63.6 MHz) 1.5 Tesla. The magnetic field uniformity as well as the RF penetration depth of the coil configurations was evaluated in order to find the best/optimized coil array configuration. The coil is comprised of three rows, one with 4 coil elements and two with only one coil element. Phantom and in vivo images were acquired with the six-channel pediatric coil array. The phantom images agree with the simulated data. In vivo images acquired with the 6-channel pediatric coil array have shown very good penetration depth and homogeneity, which allow better image quality throughout the whole FOV. In addition, the parallel imaging capabilities of the array allow the acceleration of the experiments avoiding possible motion artifacts.

  11. A DNA expression array to detect toxic stress response in European flounder (Platichthys flesus).

    PubMed

    Williams, T D; Gensberg, K; Minchin, S D; Chipman, J K

    2003-10-29

    As a first stage in developing a DNA array-based approach to investigating the effects of pollutants on an environmentally relevant European fish species, we have constructed a 160-gene custom microarray for European flounder. Degenerate primers were used to amplify 110 different fragments of stress-related and other genes from European flounder cDNA and genomic DNA. Additionally, 22 fragments were obtained by suppressive subtractive hybridisation (SSH). These fragments were cloned and sequenced, then, with additional control genes, used to create a cDNA microarray for flounder. After optimisation of the arraying process, hepatic mRNA was isolated from flounder caught in the polluted Tyne and relatively unpolluted Alde estuaries. Fluorescent cDNA probes were synthesised from the mRNA and used in dual-colour hybridisations to the microarray. A number of transcripts were differentially expressed between Tyne and Alde female flounder but these changes were not significant, due to high inter-individual variation. However, in comparisons between Tyne and Alde male flounder, 11 transcripts were found to significantly differ in expression (P<0.05). Seven transcripts were more highly expressed in the Tyne male fish (CYP1A, UDPGT, alpha-2HS-glycoprotein, dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, Cu/Zn SOD, aldehyde dehydrogenase and paraoxonase). Four transcripts (Elongation factor 1 (EF1), EF2, Int-6 and complement component C3) were found to be significantly less abundant in the Tyne male fish. Selected genes were assayed by real-time PCR, then normalised to alpha-tubulin. These assays confirmed the significance of the array results for CYP1A, UDPGT and EF1, but not for Cu/Zn SOD. This study provides a link between traditional single-gene biomarker studies and the emerging field of eco-toxicogenomics, demonstrating the utility of microarray studies on environmentally sampled, non-model organisms.

  12. Trace analysis of tiamulin in honey by liquid chromatography-diode array-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Nozal, M J; Bernal, J L; Martín, M T; Jiménez, J J; Bernal, J; Higes, M

    2006-05-26

    A liquid chromatography with diode array or electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry detection (LC-DAD-ESI-MS) method for the determination of tiamulin residues in honey is presented. The procedure employs a solid-phase extraction (SPE) on polymeric cartridges for the isolation of tiamulin from honey samples diluted in aqueous solution of tartaric acid. Chromatographic separation of the tiamulin is performed, in isocratic mode, on a C18 column using methanol and ammonium carbonate 0.1% in water, in proportion (30:70, v/v). Average analyte recoveries were from 88 to 106% in replica sets of fortified honey samples. The LC-ESI-MS method detection limits differ from 0.5 microg kg(-1) for clear honeys to 1.2 microg kg(-1) for dark honeys. The developed method has been applied to the analysis of tiamulin residues in multifloral honey samples collected from veterinary treated beehives.

  13. First Detection of Thermal Radio Emission from Solar-type Stars with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villadsen, Jackie; Hallinan, Gregg; Bourke, Stephen; Güdel, Manuel; Rupen, Michael

    2014-06-01

    We present the first detections of thermal radio emission from the atmospheres of solar-type stars τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A. These stars all resemble the Sun in age and level of magnetic activity, as indicated by X-ray luminosity and chromospheric emission in Ca II H and K lines. We observed these stars with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array with sensitivities of a few μJy at combinations of 10.0, 15.0, and 34.5 GHz. τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A are all detected at 34.5 GHz with signal-to-noise ratios of 6.5, 5.2, and 4.5, respectively. 15.0 GHz upper limits imply a rising spectral index greater than 1.0 for τ Cet and 1.6 for η Cas A, at the 95% confidence level. The measured 34.5 GHz flux densities correspond to stellar disk-averaged brightness temperatures of roughly 10,000 K, similar to the solar brightness temperature at the same frequency. We explain this emission as optically thick thermal free-free emission from the chromosphere, with possible contributions from coronal gyroresonance emission above active regions and coronal free-free emission. These and similar quality data on other nearby solar-type stars, when combined with Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array observations, will enable the construction of temperature profiles of their chromospheres and lower transition regions.

  14. First detection of thermal radio emission from solar-type stars with the Karl G. Jansky very large array

    SciTech Connect

    Villadsen, Jackie; Hallinan, Gregg; Bourke, Stephen; Güdel, Manuel; Rupen, Michael

    2014-06-20

    We present the first detections of thermal radio emission from the atmospheres of solar-type stars τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A. These stars all resemble the Sun in age and level of magnetic activity, as indicated by X-ray luminosity and chromospheric emission in Ca II H and K lines. We observed these stars with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array with sensitivities of a few μJy at combinations of 10.0, 15.0, and 34.5 GHz. τ Cet, η Cas A, and 40 Eri A are all detected at 34.5 GHz with signal-to-noise ratios of 6.5, 5.2, and 4.5, respectively. 15.0 GHz upper limits imply a rising spectral index greater than 1.0 for τ Cet and 1.6 for η Cas A, at the 95% confidence level. The measured 34.5 GHz flux densities correspond to stellar disk-averaged brightness temperatures of roughly 10,000 K, similar to the solar brightness temperature at the same frequency. We explain this emission as optically thick thermal free-free emission from the chromosphere, with possible contributions from coronal gyroresonance emission above active regions and coronal free-free emission. These and similar quality data on other nearby solar-type stars, when combined with Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array observations, will enable the construction of temperature profiles of their chromospheres and lower transition regions.

  15. Gas sensitivity and sensing mechanism studies on Au-doped TiO₂ nanotube arrays for detecting SF₆ decomposed components.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Yu, Lei; Tie, Jing; Dong, Xingchen

    2014-10-17

    The analysis to SF6 decomposed component gases is an efficient diagnostic approach to detect the partial discharge in gas-insulated switchgear (GIS) for the purpose of accessing the operating state of power equipment. This paper applied the Au-doped TiO2 nanotube array sensor (Au-TiO2 NTAs) to detect SF6 decomposed components. The electrochemical constant potential method was adopted in the Au-TiO2 NTAs' fabrication, and a series of experiments were conducted to test the characteristic SF6 decomposed gases for a thorough investigation of sensing performances. The sensing characteristic curves of intrinsic and Au-doped TiO2 NTAs were compared to study the mechanism of the gas sensing response. The results indicated that the doped Au could change the TiO2 nanotube arrays' performances of gas sensing selectivity in SF6 decomposed components, as well as reducing the working temperature of TiO2 NTAs.

  16. Zoom-in array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to detect germline rearrangements in cancer susceptibility genes.

    PubMed

    Staaf, Johan; Borg, Ake

    2010-01-01

    Disease predisposing germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes may consist of large genomic rearrangements, including deletions or duplications that are challenging, to detect and characterize using standard PCR-based mutation screening methods. Such rearrangements range from single exons up to hundreds of kilobases of sequence in size. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) has evolved as a powerful technique to detect copy number alterations on a genome-wide scale. However, the conventional genome-wide approach of aCGH still provides only limited information about copy number status for individual exons. Custom-designed aCGH arrays focused on only a few target regions (zoom-in aCGH) may circumvent this drawback. Benefits of zoom-in aCGH include the possibility to target almost any region in the genome, and an unbiased coverage of exonic and intronic sequence facilitating convenient design of primers for sequence determination of the breakpoints. Furthermore, zoom-in aCGH can be streamlined for a particular application, for example, focusing on breast cancer susceptibility genes, with increased capacity using multiformat design.

  17. A library-screening approach for developing a fluorescence sensing array for the detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Smith, David G; Sajid, Naveed; Rehn, Simone; Chandramohan, Ramya; Carney, Isaac J; Khan, Misbahul A; New, Elizabeth J

    2016-08-07

    Detection of individual metal ions is of importance across a range of fields of chemistry including environmental monitoring, and health and disease. Fluorescence is a highly sensitive technique and small fluorescent molecules are widely used for the detection and quantification of metal ions in various applications. Achieving specificity for a single metal from a single sensor is always a challenge. An alternative to selective sensing is the use of a number of non-specific sensors, in an array, which together respond in a unique pattern to each analyte. Here we show that screening a library of compounds can give a small sensor set that can be used to identify a range of metal ions following PCA and LDA. We explore a method for screening the initial compounds to identify the best performing sensors. We then present our method for reducing the size of the sensor array, resulting in a four-membered system, which is capable of identifying nine distinct metal ion species in lake water.

  18. Accuracy requirements of optical linear algebra processors in adaptive optics imaging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downie, John D.

    1990-01-01

    A ground-based adaptive optics imaging telescope system attempts to improve image quality by detecting and correcting for atmospherically induced wavefront aberrations. The required control computations during each cycle will take a finite amount of time. Longer time delays result in larger values of residual wavefront error variance since the atmosphere continues to change during that time. Thus an optical processor may be well-suited for this task. This paper presents a study of the accuracy requirements in a general optical processor that will make it competitive with, or superior to, a conventional digital computer for the adaptive optics application. An optimization of the adaptive optics correction algorithm with respect to an optical processor's degree of accuracy is also briefly discussed.

  19. Ultrasensitive nanostructure sensor arrays on flexible substrates for multiplexed and simultaneous electrochemical detection of a panel of cardiac biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Radha Shanmugam, Nandhinee; Muthukumar, Sriram; Chaudhry, Shajee; Anguiano, Jonathan; Prasad, Shalini

    2017-03-15

    Multiplexed detection of protein biomarkers offers new opportunities for early diagnosis and efficient treatment of complex diseases. Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) has the highest mortality risk in USA and Europe with 15-20 million cases being reported annually. Cardiac Troponins (T and I) are well established protein biomarkers associated with heart muscle damage and point-of-care monitoring of both these two biomarkers has significant benefits on patient care. A flexible disposable electrochemical biosensor device comprising of vertically oriented zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures was developed for rapid and simultaneous screening of cardiac Troponin-I (cTnI) and cardiac-Troponin-T (cTnT) in a point-of-care sensor format. The biosensors were designed by selective hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanostructures onto the working electrodes of polyimide printed circuit board platforms, resulting in the generation of high density nanostructure ZnO arrays based electrodes. The size, density and surface terminations of the nanostructures were leveraged towards achieving surface confinement of the target cTnT and cTnI molecules on to the electrode surface. Multiplexing and simultaneous detection was achieved through sensor platform design comprising of arrays of Troponin functionalized ZnO nanostructure electrodes. The sensitivity and specificity of the biosensor was characterized using two types of electrochemical techniques; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Mott-Schottky analysis on the same sensor platform to demonstrate multi-configurable modes. Limit of detection of 1pg/mL in human serum was achieved for both cTnI and cTnT. Cross reactivity analysis showed the selectivity of detecting cTnT and cTnI in human serum with wide dynamic range.

  20. A novel quartz crystal microbalance sensor array based on molecular imprinted polymers for simultaneous detection of clenbuterol and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Feng, Fan; Zheng, Jianwu; Qin, Peng; Han, Tao; Zhao, Dayun

    2017-05-15

    For the rapid and robust detection of both parent clenbuterol (CLB) and its metabolites in swine urine samples, a novel quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor array for CLB detection based on molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) was developed in this investigation. At first, clenbuterol and the structural analogs of its metabolites, 4-Aminohippuric acid (AHA) and 4-hydroxymandelic acid (HMA), were chosen as molecular templates. Through computational molecular modeling, the optimum ratio between the functional monomer and molecular template was selected. The surface imprinting method was applied to modify QCM electrode surface to graft a thin MIP film. The grafting polymer was characterized by Fourier-transformed infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. After then, an array system composed of three sensors was employed to test the responses with different solutions and the principal component analysis (PCA) was adopted to analyze the corresponding data. As a result, for the designed sensor to clenbuterol, a linear equation y=100.07x-722.96 (R(2)=0.9928) was found between the sensor frequency shift ΔF and negative logarithm of clenbuterol concentration (-lgC). The limitation of detection (LOD) was 3.0ng/mL, which is lower than the Codex Alimentarius Commission regulations residue limit 10μg/L. The corresponding data of the three template solutions were analyzed by PCA, obtaining 100% recognition. The result demonstrated the feasibility that the developed method could be applied to detect whether the livestock was feed with CLB nutrient redistribution agent by checking the urine samples.

  1. Detection of Mutant NPM1 mRNA in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Using Custom Gene Expression Arrays

    PubMed Central

    van Vliet, Martin H.; Dumee, Belinda; Simons, Erik; Bullinger, Lars; Döhner, Konstanze; Döhner, Hartmut; Viëtor, Henk; Löwenberg, Bob; Valk, Peter J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding nucleophosmin (NPM1) carry a prognostic value for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Various techniques are currently being used to detect these mutations in routine molecular diagnostics. Incorporation of accurate NPM1 mutation detection on a gene expression platform would enable simultaneous detection with various other expression biomarkers. Here we present an array-based mutation detection using custom probes for NPM1 WT mRNA and NPM1 type A, B, and D mutant mRNA. This method was 100% accurate on a training cohort of 505 newly diagnosed unselected AML cases. Validation on an independent cohort of 143 normal-karyotype AML cases revealed no false-negative results, and one false positive (sensitivity 100.0% and specificity 98.7%). Based on this, we conclude that this method provides a reliable method for NPM1 mutation detection. The method can be applied to other genes/mutations as long as the mutant alleles are sufficiently highly expressed. PMID:23530539

  2. Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array: Detection Efficiency, Mapping Large Sets of Data, and the Beginning of a Total Lightning Climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array (OKLMA) has collected the time and location of very
high frequency (VHF) radiation sources produced by all types of lightning in central Oklahoma since the spring of 2003. The detection efficiency of the OKLMA decreases with distance from the center of the LMA, which causes a false maximum in sources over the network when working with very large data sets. Using five months worth of data and assuming a VHF source detection efficiency of 100% over the network, a map of detection efficiency at different ranges is presented. Two methods of eliminating the bias of source detection over the network are explored: a normalization method based on the decreasing VHF power of detected sources with range and a flash-sorting method. Although both methods yield similar results, the flash sorting method is chosen for future climatology studies because it is more readily understood and is already in use throughout the community in case studies and lightning jump algorithms. The first maps and time series of total lightning over central Oklahoma for a 10-year period are presented.

  3. Femtomolar Detection of Silver Nanoparticles by Flow-Enhanced Direct-Impact Voltammetry at a Microelectrode Array

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report the femtomolar detection of silver (Ag) nanoparticles by direct-impact voltammetry. This is achieved through the use of a random array of microelectrodes (RAM) integrated into a purpose-built flow cell, allowing combined diffusion and convection to the electrode surface. A coupled RAM-flow cell system is implemented and is shown to give reproducible wall-jet type flow characteristics, using potassium ferrocyanide as a molecular redox species. The calibrated flow system is then used to detect and quantitatively size Ag nanoparticles at femtomolar concentrations. Under flow conditions, it is found the nanoparticle impact frequency increases linearly with the volumetric flow rate. The resulting limit of detection is more than 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the previous detection limit for direct-impact voltammetry (900 fM) [J. Ellison et al. Sens. Actuators, B2014, 200, 47], and is more than 30 times smaller than the previous detection limit for mediated-impact voltammetry (83 fM) [T. M. Alligrant et al. Langmuir2014, 30, 13462]. PMID:27494652

  4. Structural characterization of plasma metabolites detected via LC-electrochemical coulometric array using LC-UV fractionation, MS, and NMR.

    PubMed

    Bird, Susan S; Sheldon, Diane P; Gathungu, Rose M; Vouros, Paul; Kautz, Roger; Matson, Wayne R; Kristal, Bruce S

    2012-11-20

    Liquid chromatography (LC) separation combined with electrochemical coulometric array detection (EC) is a sensitive, reproducible, and robust technique that can detect hundreds of redox-active metabolites down to the level of femtograms on column, making it ideal for metabolomics profiling. EC detection cannot, however, structurally characterize unknown metabolites that comprise these profiles. Several aspects of LC-EC methods prevent a direct transfer to other structurally informative analytical methods, such as LC-MS and NMR. These include system limits of detection, buffer requirements, and detection mechanisms. To address these limitations, we developed a workflow based on the concentration of plasma, metabolite extraction, and offline LC-UV fractionation. Pooled human plasma was used to provide sufficient material necessary for multiple sample concentrations and platform analyses. Offline parallel LC-EC and LC-MS methods were established that correlated standard metabolites between the LC-EC profiling method and the mass spectrometer. Peak retention times (RT) from the LC-MS and LC-EC system were linearly related (r(2) = 0.99); thus, LC-MS RTs could be directly predicted from the LC-EC signals. Subsequent offline microcoil-NMR analysis of these collected fractions was used to confirm LC-MS characterizations by providing complementary, structural data. This work provides a validated workflow that is transferrable across multiple platforms and provides the unambiguous structural identifications necessary to move primary mathematically driven LC-EC biomarker discovery into biological and clinical utility.

  5. Femtomolar Detection of Silver Nanoparticles by Flow-Enhanced Direct-Impact Voltammetry at a Microelectrode Array.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Stanislav V; Bartlett, Thomas R; Fair, Peter; Fletcher, Stephen; Compton, Richard G

    2016-09-06

    We report the femtomolar detection of silver (Ag) nanoparticles by direct-impact voltammetry. This is achieved through the use of a random array of microelectrodes (RAM) integrated into a purpose-built flow cell, allowing combined diffusion and convection to the electrode surface. A coupled RAM-flow cell system is implemented and is shown to give reproducible wall-jet type flow characteristics, using potassium ferrocyanide as a molecular redox species. The calibrated flow system is then used to detect and quantitatively size Ag nanoparticles at femtomolar concentrations. Under flow conditions, it is found the nanoparticle impact frequency increases linearly with the volumetric flow rate. The resulting limit of detection is more than 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the previous detection limit for direct-impact voltammetry (900 fM) [J. Ellison et al. Sens. Actuators, B 2014, 200, 47], and is more than 30 times smaller than the previous detection limit for mediated-impact voltammetry (83 fM) [T. M. Alligrant et al. Langmuir 2014, 30, 13462].

  6. Detection and Classification of Low Probability of Intercept Radar Signals Using Parallel Filter Arrays and Higher Order Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taboada, Fernando L.

    2002-09-01

    Low probability of intercept (LPI) is that property of an emitter that because of its low power, wide bandwidth, frequency variability, or other design attributes, makes it difficult to be detected or identified by means of passive intercept devices such as radar warning, electronic support and electronic intelligence receivers. In order to detect LPI radar waveforms new signal processing techniques are required. This thesis first develops a MATLAB toolbox to generate important types of LPI waveforms based on frequency and phase modulation. The power spectral density and the periodic ambiguity function are examined for each waveforms. These signals are then used to test a novel signal processing technique that detects the waveforms parameters and classifies the intercepted signal in various degrees of noise. The technique is based on the use of parallel filter (sub-band) arrays and higher order statistics (third-order cumulant estimator). Each sub-band signal is treated individually and is followed by the third-order estimator in order to suppress any symmetrical noise that might be present. The significance of this technique is that it separates the LPI waveforms in small frequency bands, providing a detailed time-frequency description of the unknown signal. Finally, the resulting output matrix is processed by a feature extraction routine to detect the waveforms parameters. Identification of the signal is based on the modulation parameters detected.

  7. Telescope array for extrasolar planet detection from the far side of the Moon.

    PubMed

    Galan, Maximilian; Strojnik, Marija; Garcia-Torales, Guillermo; Kirk, Maureen S

    2016-12-01

    We propose that an array of 4×4 small-diameter telescopes, possibly 1 m in radius, be placed on the far side of the Moon for continuous monitoring of nearby stars for the existence of a planetary companion, similar to the Earth, and feasible for human colonization. The advantages of this location include long intervals of darkness, availability of a rigid platform in the form of a moon body, and most importantly, the absence of the atmosphere that allows the complete transmission of radiation in the spectral range from UV to millimeter waves. The task is facilitated in that the telescopes would act as light "buckets" to collect photons during long integration periods. All other technology has already been demonstrated, as humans in person delivered optical elements to the Moon's surface during the Apollo era. The disadvantages are primarily operational, in terms of requiring the establishment of a human habitat on the Moon. Likewise, all aspects of constructing a large 75 m by 75 m mirror array on the Moon's surface will be challenging. Simultaneously, the decreased gravity requires less effort and less energy to perform the construction tasks. The absence of atmosphere permits the search to extend from less than 10 to 300 μm to find Earth-like or even much colder planets.

  8. A Supramolecular Sensor Array Using Lanthanide-Doped Nanoparticles for Sensitive Detection of Glyphosate and Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Ye, Hebo; You, Lei; Chen, Xueyuan

    2016-01-13

    Lanthanide (Ln(3+))-doped nanoparticles (NPs) are an intensive area of research in chemical and materials sciences. Herein a sensor array of Ln(3+)-doped NPs was developed for the first time toward sensitive molecular sensing based on a novel strategy of the hybridized time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) with the indicator displacement assay (IDA) concept (TR-FRET-IDA). The sensor platform was generated in situ by binding a series of negatively charged indicators on the surface of ligand-free LiYF4:Ce/Tb NPs. The TR-FRET between NPs and dyes resulted in indicator emission and was employed as a means of removing undesired short-lived background luminescence from the indicator effectively. Displacement of indicators from the NP/indicator ensembles by glyphosate, a common herbicide, led to turn-off of the indicator emission. The sensor array was able to successfully discriminate 11 biologically relevant anions with high accuracy and sensitivity in pure aqueous buffer both qualitatively and quantitatively. Furthermore, the differentiation of six model proteins in the nM range was achieved with 100% accuracy for the classification, thereby demonstrating the versatility of this simple sensor platform. The study of the mechanism of binding and signal modulation further verified TR-FRET-IDA as a reliable sensing paradigm.

  9. Flow integration transform: detecting shapes in matrix-array 3D ultrasound data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetten, George D.; Caines, Michael; von Ramm, Olaf T.

    1995-03-01

    Matrix-array ultrasound produces real-time 3D images of the heart, by employing a square array of transducers to steer the ultrasound beam in three dimensions electronically with no moving parts. Other 3D modalities such as MR, MUGA, and CT require the use of gated studies, which combine many cardiac cycles to produce a single average cycle. Three- dimensional ultrasound eliminates this restriction, in theory permitting the continuous measurement of cardiac ventricular volume, which we call the volumetricardiogram. Towards implementing the volumetricardiogram, we have developed the flow integration transform (FIT), which operates on a 2D slice within the volumetric ultrasound data. The 3D ultrasound machine's scan converter produces a set of such slices in real time, at any desired location and orientation, to which the FIT may then be applied. Although lacking rotational or scale invariance, the FIT is designed to operate in dedicated hardware where an entire transform could be completed within a few microseconds with present integrated circuit technology. This speed would permit the application of a large battery of test shapes, or the evolution of the test shape to converge on that of the actual target.

  10. Implications of Sea Ice on Southern Ocean Microseisms Detected by a Seismic Array in West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Martin J.; Wiens, Douglas A.; Winberry, J. Paul; Anandakrishnan, Sridhar; Euler, Garrett G.

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARYThe proximity of Southern Ocean storms coupled with seasonal variation in sea ice make Antarctica ideal for the study of microseism sources. We explore frequency-dependent beamforming results using a short-duration, 60 km aperture, broadband seismic <span class="hlt">array</span> located on the Whillans Ice Stream, West Antarctica. Locations of single-frequency microseism (13-16 s period) generation are in regions where the continental shelf is ice-free, consistent with previous studies, and show Rayleigh wave sources remaining at consistent back azimuths throughout the duration of the <span class="hlt">array</span>. Beamforming analysis of daily noise correlations shows that long-period double-frequency microseisms (9-11 s) consist predominantly of Rayleigh waves excited by storms in the Southern Ocean. Modelling of source locations based on wave-wave interaction provides a good fit to our data at these periods. We show that short-period double-frequency microseisms (5-7 s) in Antarctica consist of crustal phase Lg and body waves. Lg arrivals propagate through regions of continental crust and our data show that the Lg energy is generated when storm systems interact with the sea ice-free continental shelf during austral summers. Ultra-short-period (0.3-2 s) microseismic body waves back project to regions that correlate with oceanic storm systems in both the Southern and Northern Hemispheres.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JGRA..115.9314O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JGRA..115.9314O"><span>Ionospheric holes made by ballistic missiles from North Korea <span class="hlt">detected</span> with a Japanese dense GPS <span class="hlt">array</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ozeki, Masaru; Heki, Kosuke</p> <p>2010-09-01</p> <p>A dense <span class="hlt">array</span> of global positioning system (GPS) receivers is a useful tool to study ionospheric disturbances. Here we report observations by a Japanese GPS <span class="hlt">array</span> of ionospheric holes, i.e., localized electron depletion. They were made by neutral molecules in exhaust plumes (e.g., water) of ballistic missiles from North Korea, Taepodong-1 and -2, launched on 31 August, 1998, and 5 April, 2009, respectively. Negative anomaly of electron density emerged ˜6 min after the launches in the middle of the Japan Sea, and extended eastward along the missile tracks. By comparing the numerical simulation of electron depletion and the observed change in ionospheric total electron content, we suggest that the exhaust plumes from the Taepodong-2 second stage effused up to ˜1.5 × 1026 water molecules per second. The ionospheric hole signature was used to constrain the Taepodong-2 trajectory together with other information, e.g., coordinates of the launch pad, time and coordinates of the first stage splashdown, and height and time of the second stage passage over Japan. The Taepodong-2 is considered to have reached the ionospheric F region in ˜6 min, flown above northeastern Japan ˜7 min after the launch, and crashed to the Pacific Ocean without attaining the first astronautical velocity. The ionospheric hole