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Sample records for optical activity laser

  1. Active polarimeter optical system laser hazard analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2005-07-01

    A laser hazard analysis was performed for the SNL Active Polarimeter Optical System based on the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers and the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The Active Polarimeter Optical System (APOS) uses a pulsed, near-infrared, chromium doped lithium strontium aluminum fluoride (Cr:LiSAF) crystal laser in conjunction with a holographic diffuser and lens to illuminate a scene of interest. The APOS is intended for outdoor operations. The system is mounted on a height adjustable platform (6 feet to 40 feet) and sits atop a tripod that points the beam downward. The beam can be pointed from nadir to as much as 60 degrees off of nadir producing an illuminating spot geometry that can vary from circular (at nadir) to elliptical in shape (off of nadir). The JP Innovations crystal Cr:LiSAF laser parameters are presented in section II. The illuminating laser spot size is variable and can be adjusted by adjusting the separation distance between the lens and the holographic diffuser. The system is adjusted while platform is at the lowest level. The laser spot is adjusted for a particular spot size at a particular distance (elevation) from the laser by adjusting the separation distance (d{sub diffuser}) to predetermined values. The downward pointing angle is also adjusted before the platform is raised to the selected operation elevation.

  2. Optical Properties of Active Regions in Terahertz Quantum Cascade Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyksik, M.; Motyka, M.; Rudno-Rudziński, W.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Pucicki, D.; Kosiel, K.; Sankowska, I.; Kubacka-Traczyk, J.; Bugajski, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, AlGaAs/GaAs superlattice, with layers' sequence and compositions imitating the active and injector regions of a quantum cascade laser designed for emission in the terahertz spectral range, was investigated. Three independent absorption-like optical spectroscopy techniques were employed in order to study the band structure of the minibands formed within the conduction band. Photoreflectance measurements provided information about interband transitions in the investigated system. Common transmission spectra revealed, in the target range of intraband transitions, mainly a number of lines associated with the phonon-related processes, including two-phonon absorption. In contrast, differential transmittance realized by means of Fourier-transform spectroscopy was utilized to probe the confined states of the conduction band. The obtained energy separation between the second and third confined electron levels, expected to be predominantly contributing to the lasing, was found to be ~9 meV. The optical spectroscopy measurements were supported by numerical calculations performed in the effective mass approximation and XRD measurements for layers' width verification. The calculated energy spacings are in a good agreement with the experimental values.

  3. Active mode-locked lasers and other photonic devices using electro-optic whispering gallery mode resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey B. (Inventor); Ilchenko, Vladimir (Inventor); Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Techniques and devices using whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonators, where the optical materials of the WGM resonators exhibit an electro-optical effect to perform optical modulation. Examples of actively mode-locked lasers and other devices are described.

  4. Actively mode-locked fiber laser using acousto-optic modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikodem, Michal P.; Sergeant, Hendrik; Kaczmarek, Pawel; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2008-12-01

    In recent years we have observed growing interest in mode-locked fiber lasers. Development of erbium doped fiber (EDF) amplifiers and WDM technique made 3rd telecommunication window extremely interesting region for ultrafast optics. The main advantages of fiber lasers i.e. narrow linewidth and wide gain bandwidth make them very attractive sources in various applications. In this paper we present an actively mode-locked erbium doped fiber ring laser. Modelocking is obtained using an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) coupled into the laser cavity. The impact of different parameters (e.g. light polarization, modulation frequency) is investigated. We study mechanisms of controlling the wavelength of the laser.

  5. Laser optical disk position encoder with active heads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Eric P.

    1991-01-01

    An angular position encoder that minimizes the effects of eccentricity and other misalignments between the disk and the read stations by employing heads with beam steering optics that actively track the disk in directions along the disk radius and normal to its surface is discussed. The device adapts features prevalent in optical disk technology to the application of angular position sensing.

  6. Complex Active Optical Networks as a New Laser Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepri, Stefano; Trono, Cosimo; Giacomelli, Giovanni

    2017-03-01

    Complex optical networks containing one or more gain sections are investigated, and the evidence of lasing action is reported; the emission spectrum reflects the topological disorder induced by the connections. A theoretical description compares well with the measurements, mapping the networks to directed graphs and showing the analogies with the problem of quantum chaos on graphs. We show that the interplay of chaotic diffusion and amplification leads to an emission statistic with characteristic heavy tails: for different topologies, an unprecedented experimental demonstration of Lévy statistics expected for random lasers is here provided for a continuous-wave pumped system. This result is also supported by a Monte Carlo simulation based on the ray random walk on the graph.

  7. Efficient high repetition rate electro-optic Q-switched laser with an optically active langasite crystal

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shihui; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Han, Xuekun; Lu, Qingming; Ma, Changqin; Boughton, Robert I.; Wang, Jiyang

    2016-01-01

    With an optically active langasite (LGS) crystal as the electro-optic Q-switch, we demonstrate an efficient Q-switched laser with a repetition rate of 200 kHz. Based on the theoretical analysis of the interaction between optical activity and electro-optic property, the optical activity of the crystal has no influence on the birefringence during Q-switching if the quarter wave plate used was rotated to align with the polarization direction. With a Nd:LuVO4 crystal possessing a large emission cross-section and a short fluorescence lifetime as the gain medium, a stable LGS Q-switched laser was designed with average output power of 4.39 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 29.4% and with a minimum pulse width of 5.1 ns. This work represents the highest repetition rate achieved so far in a LGS Q-switched laser and it can provide a practical Q-switched laser with a tunable high repetition rates for many applications, such as materials processing, laser ranging, medicine, military applications, biomacromolecule materials, remote sensing, etc. PMID:27461819

  8. Some results in laser optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timus, Clementina A.; Medianu, Rares V.; Georgescu, Claudian; Georgescu, Geo

    1996-05-01

    The experience in laser optics in the Laser Department of the Institute of Atomic Physics began with the development of the first He-Ne laser in Romania in 1962 (2 years later than the world's first). Optical polishing and optical coating technology have been developed primarily for the visible and IR ranges, with a continual effort to improve them to increase the quality of optical components and the implicit reliability of the lasers. Ever-increasing attention has had to be paid to the investigation, by optical and nonoptical methods, to characterize optical coatings. The correlation of coating characteristics with the deposition technologies could enable the improvement of the technology parameters. Since all the lasers and the applications are equipped with optical components realized in our laboratory, the observations of the users have been important in the activity of improving the quality of optics.

  9. Active lamp pulse driver circuit. [optical pumping of laser media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, K. E. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A flashlamp drive circuit is described which uses an unsaturated transistor as a current mode switch to periodically subject a partially ionized gaseous laser excitation flashlamp to a stable, rectangular pulse of current from an incomplete discharge of an energy storage capacitor. A monostable multivibrator sets the pulse interval, initiating the pulse in response to a flash command by providing a reference voltage to a non-inverting terminal of a base drive amplifier; a tap on an emitter resistor provides a feedback signal sensitive to the current amplitude to an inverting terminal of amplifier, thereby controlling the pulse amplitude. The circuit drives the flashlamp to provide a squarewave current flashlamp discharge.

  10. Active eye-tracking for an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, Christy K; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Sabesan, Ramkumar; Roorda, Austin

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate a system that combines a tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO) and an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) system resulting in both optical (hardware) and digital (software) eye-tracking capabilities. The hybrid system employs the TSLO for active eye-tracking at a rate up to 960 Hz for real-time stabilization of the AOSLO system. AOSLO videos with active eye-tracking signals showed, at most, an amplitude of motion of 0.20 arcminutes for horizontal motion and 0.14 arcminutes for vertical motion. Subsequent real-time digital stabilization limited residual motion to an average of only 0.06 arcminutes (a 95% reduction). By correcting for high amplitude, low frequency drifts of the eye, the active TSLO eye-tracking system enabled the AOSLO system to capture high-resolution retinal images over a larger range of motion than previously possible with just the AOSLO imaging system alone.

  11. Active eye-tracking for an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Christy K.; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Sabesan, Ramkumar; Roorda, Austin

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a system that combines a tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO) and an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) system resulting in both optical (hardware) and digital (software) eye-tracking capabilities. The hybrid system employs the TSLO for active eye-tracking at a rate up to 960 Hz for real-time stabilization of the AOSLO system. AOSLO videos with active eye-tracking signals showed, at most, an amplitude of motion of 0.20 arcminutes for horizontal motion and 0.14 arcminutes for vertical motion. Subsequent real-time digital stabilization limited residual motion to an average of only 0.06 arcminutes (a 95% reduction). By correcting for high amplitude, low frequency drifts of the eye, the active TSLO eye-tracking system enabled the AOSLO system to capture high-resolution retinal images over a larger range of motion than previously possible with just the AOSLO imaging system alone. PMID:26203370

  12. Actively mode-locked fiber ring laser by intermodal acousto-optic modulation.

    PubMed

    Bello-Jiménez, M; Cuadrado-Laborde, C; Sáez-Rodríguez, D; Diez, A; Cruz, J L; Andrés, M V

    2010-11-15

    We report an actively mode-locked fiber ring laser. A simple and low-insertion-loss acousto-optic modulator driven by standing flexural waves, which couples core-to-cladding modes in a standard single-mode optical fiber, is used as an active mechanism for mode locking. Among the remarkable features of the modulator, we mention its high modulation depth (72%), broad bandwidth (187 GHz), easy tunability in the optical wavelength, and low insertion losses (0.7 dB). The narrowest optical pulses obtained were of 95 ps time width, 21 mW peak power, repetition rate of 4.758 MHz, and 110 mW of pump power.

  13. Short cavity active mode locking fiber laser for optical sensing and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwi Don; Han, Ga Hee; Jeong, Syung Won; Jeong, Myung Yung; Kim, Chang-Seok; Shin, Jun Geun; Lee, Byeong Ha; Eom, Tae Joong

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate a highly linear wavenumber- swept active mode locking (AML) fiber laser for optical sensing and imaging without any wavenumber-space resampling process. In this all-electric AML wavenumber-swept mechanism, a conventional wavelength selection filter is eliminated and, instead, the suitable programmed electric modulation signal is directly applied to the gain medium. Various types of wavenumber (or wavelength) tunings can be implemented because of the filter-less cavity configuration. Therefore, we successfully demonstrate a linearly wavenumber-swept AML fiber laser with 26.5 mW of output power to obtain an in-vivo OCT image at the 100 kHz swept rate.

  14. Active optics: variable curvature mirrors for ELT laser guide star refocusing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challita, Zalpha; Hugot, Emmanuel; Madec, Fabrice; Ferrari, Marc; Le Mignant, David; Vivès, Sébastien; Cuby, Jean-Gabriel

    2011-10-01

    The future generation of Extremely Large Telescopes will require a complex combination of technologies for adaptive optics (AO) systems assisted by laser guide stars (LGS). In this context, the distance from the LGS spot to the telescope pupil ranges from about 80 to 200 km, depending on the Sodium layer altitude and the elevation of the telescope. This variation leads to a defocusing effect on the LGS wave-front sensor which needs to be compensated. We propose an active mirror able to compensate for this variation, based on an original optical design including this active optics component. This LGS Variable Curvature Mirror (LGS-VCM) is a 120 mm spherical active mirror able to achieve 820 μm deflection sag with an optical quality better than 150 nm RMS, allowing the radius of curvature variation from F/12 to F/2. Based on elasticity theory, the deformation of the metallic mirror is provided by an air pressure applied on a thin meniscus with a variable thickness distribution. In this article, we detail the analytical development leading to the specific geometry of the active component, the results of finite element analysis and the expected performances in terms of surface error versus the range of refocalisation. Three prototypes have been manufactured to compare the real behavior of the mirror and the simulations data. Results obtained on the prototypes are detailed, showing that the deformation of the VCM is very close to the simulation, and leads to a realistic active concept.

  15. Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator

    SciTech Connect

    Deri, R. J.

    2015-10-13

    The Gigashot Optical Laser Demonstrator (GOLD) project has demonstrated a novel optical amplifier for high energy pulsed lasers operating at high repetition rates. The amplifier stores enough pump energy to support >10 J of laser output, and employs conduction cooling for thermal management to avoid the need for expensive and bulky high-pressure helium subsystems. A prototype amplifier was fabricated, pumped with diode light at 885 nm, and characterized. Experimental results show that the amplifier provides sufficient small-signal gain and sufficiently low wavefront and birefringence impairments to prove useful in laser systems, at repetition rates up to 60 Hz.

  16. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  17. Optical characterization of femtosecond laser induced active channel waveguides in lithium fluoride crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiamenti, I.; Bonfigli, F.; Gomes, A. S. L.; Michelotti, F.; Montereali, R. M.; Kalinowski, H. J.

    2014-01-01

    We successfully realized broad-band light-emitting color center waveguides buried in LiF crystals by using femtosecond laser pulses. The characterization of the waveguides was performed by optical microscopy, photoluminescence spectra, loss measurements and near-field profiling. The experimental results show that the direct-writing fabrication process induces low-index contrast active channel waveguides: their wavelength-dependent refractive index changes, estimated from 10-3 to 10-4 depending on the writing conditions, allow supporting few modes at visible and near-infrared wavelengths.

  18. Optical characterization of femtosecond laser induced active channel waveguides in lithium fluoride crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chiamenti, I.; Kalinowski, H. J.; Bonfigli, F.; Montereali, R. M.; Gomes, A. S. L.; Michelotti, F.

    2014-01-14

    We successfully realized broad-band light-emitting color center waveguides buried in LiF crystals by using femtosecond laser pulses. The characterization of the waveguides was performed by optical microscopy, photoluminescence spectra, loss measurements and near-field profiling. The experimental results show that the direct-writing fabrication process induces low-index contrast active channel waveguides: their wavelength-dependent refractive index changes, estimated from 10{sup −3} to 10{sup −4} depending on the writing conditions, allow supporting few modes at visible and near-infrared wavelengths.

  19. Intracavity optical parametric oscillator pumped by an actively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. J.; Wang, Q. P.; Zhang, X. Y.; Liu, Z. J.; Wang, H.; Chang, J.; Fan, S. Z.; Ma, F. S.; Jin, G. F.

    2008-03-01

    A non-critically phase-matched KTiOPO4 optical parametric oscillator (OPO) intracavity pumped by a laser diode end-pumped acousto-optically Q-switchedNd:YAG laser is experimentally demonstrated. The highest average power is obtained at the pulse repetition rate (PRR) of around 15 kHz, which is different from the widely reported Nd:YVO4 laser pumped OPO in which the highest average power is obtained at a very high PRR, e.g. 80 kHz. With an incident laser diode power of 6.93 W and a pulse repetition rate of 15 kHz, an average signal power of 0.72 W is obtained with a peak power of 7.7 kW and an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 10.4%.

  20. Characterization of wavelength-swept active mode locking fiber laser based on reflective semiconductor optical amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hwi Don; Lee, Ju Han; Yung Jeong, Myung; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2011-07-01

    The static and dynamic characteristics of a wavelength-swept active mode locking (AML) fiber laser are presented in both the time-region and wavelength-region. This paper shows experimentally that the linewidth of a laser spectrum and the bandwidth of the sweeping wavelength are dependent directly on the length and dispersion of the fiber cavity as well as the modulation frequency and sweeping rate under the mode-locking condition. To achieve a narrower linewidth, a longer length and higher dispersion of the fiber cavity as well as a higher order mode locking condition are required simultaneously. For a broader bandwidth, a lower order of the mode locking condition is required using a lower modulation frequency. The dynamic sweeping performance is also analyzed experimentally to determine its applicability to optical coherence tomography imaging. It is shown that the maximum sweeping rate can be improved by the increased free spectral range from the shorter length of the fiber cavity. A reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) was used to enhance the modulation and dispersion efficiency. Overall a triangular electrical signal can be used instead of the sinusoidal signal to sweep the lasing wavelength at a high sweeping rate due to the lack of mechanical restrictions in the wavelength sweeping mechanism.

  1. Lasers for bio-optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sona, Alberto

    1992-03-01

    Lasers are being increasingly used in bioptics and in life sciences in general, especially for medical applications for therapy and diagnostics. Lasers are also broadly used in environment sciences to monitor atmospheric parameters and concentrations of molecular species of natural origin or coming from human activities such as the various kind of pollutants. The peculiar features of lasers exploited in these areas are mainly the capability of developing an action or performing a measurement without physical contact with the target and, if required, from a remote position with the assistance of suitable beam delivery systems such as telescopes, microscopes, or optical fibers. These features are directly related to the space and time coherence of the laser light and to the energy storage capability of the laser material which allow an extremely effective concentration of the beam energy in space, direction frequency, or time. A short description of the principle of operation and relevant properties of lasers are given and the most significant properties of the laser emission are briefly reviewed. Lasers for medical applications (mainly for therapy) will be mentioned, pointing out the specific property exploited for the various applications. Finally, examples of laser applications to the environmental sciences will be reported. A summary of the properties exploited in the various bio-optical applications is shown.

  2. Soliton generation from an actively mode-locked fiber laser incorporating an electro-optic fiber modulator.

    PubMed

    Malmström, Mikael; Margulis, Walter; Tarasenko, Oleksandr; Pasiskevicius, Valdas; Laurell, Fredrik

    2012-01-30

    This work demonstrates an actively mode-locked fiber laser operating in soliton regime and employing an all-fiber electro-optic modulator. Nonlinear polarization rotation is utilized for femtosecond pulse generation. Stable operation of the all-fiber ring laser is readily achieved at a fundamental repetition rate of 2.6 MHz and produces 460 fs pulses with a spectral bandwidth of 5.3 nm.

  3. Optical and infrared lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javan, A.

    1978-01-01

    Quantum mechanical predictions for the gain of an optically pumped CW FIR laser are presented for cases in which one or both of the pump and FIR transitions are pressure or Doppler broadened. The results are compared to those based on the rate equation model. Some of the quantum mechanical predictions are verified in CH3OH.

  4. Optical fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hakimi, F.; Po, H.; Snitzer, E.

    1987-07-14

    An optical fiber laser is described comprising: a gain cavity including a single mode optical fiber of given length having a core with a given index of refraction and a cladding surrounding the core and having an index of refraction lower than that of the core. The core comprises a host glass having incorporated a laser gain material with a fluorescence spectrum having at least one broadband region in which there is at least one peak emission line; filter means optically coupled to one end of the gain cavity and reflective to radiation emitted from the gain material over a predetermined wavelength interval about the peak emission line to provide feedback in the gain cavity; an etalon filter section butt coupled to the remaining end of the gain cavity optical fiber, the etalon filter section comprising a pair of filters spaced apart in parallel by a predetermined length of material transparent to any radiation emitted from the gain cavity. The predetermined length of the transparent material is such that the etalon filter section is no longer than the distance over which the wave train energy from the fiber core remains substantially planar so that the etalon filter section is inside the divergent region to enhance feedback in the gain cavity; and means for pumping energy into the gain cavity to raise the interval energy level such that only a small part of the ion population, corresponding to a predetermined bandwidth about the peak emission line, is raised above laser threshold. The laser emits radiation only over narrow lines over a narrow wavelength interval centered about the peak emission line.

  5. Multiphysics modeling of non-linear laser-matter interactions for optically active semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraczek, Brent; Kanp, Jaroslaw

    Development of photonic devices for sensors and communications devices has been significantly enhanced by computational modeling. We present a new computational method for modelling laser propagation in optically-active semiconductors within the paraxial wave approximation (PWA). Light propagation is modeled using the Streamline-upwind/Petrov-Galerkin finite element method (FEM). Material response enters through the non-linear polarization, which serves as the right-hand side of the FEM calculation. Maxwell's equations for classical light propagation within the PWA can be written solely in terms of the electric field, producing a wave equation that is a form of the advection-diffusion-reaction equations (ADREs). This allows adaptation of the computational machinery developed for solving ADREs in fluid dynamics to light-propagation modeling. The non-linear polarization is incorporated using a flexible framework to enable the use of multiple methods for carrier-carrier interactions (e.g. relaxation-time-based or Monte Carlo) to enter through the non-linear polarization, as appropriate to the material type. We demonstrate using a simple carrier-carrier model approximating the response of GaN. Supported by ARL Materials Enterprise.

  6. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Study of the spectral width of intermode beats and optical spectrum of an actively mode-locked three-mirror semiconductor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharyash, Valerii F.; Kashirsky, Aleksandr V.; Klementyev, Vasilii M.; Kuznetsov, Sergei A.; Pivtsov, V. S.

    2005-09-01

    Various oscillation regimes of an actively mode-locked semiconductor laser are studied experimentally. Two types of regimes are found in which the minimal spectral width (~3.5 kHz) of intermode beats is achieved. The width of the optical spectrum of modes is studied as a function of their locking and the feedback coefficients. The maximum width of the spectrum is ~3.7 THz.

  7. Interferometric ring lasers and optical devices

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, J.P.; Craft, D.C.

    1995-03-14

    Two ring diode lasers are optically coupled together to produce tunable, stable output through a Y-junction output coupler which may also be a laser diode or can be an active waveguide. These devices demonstrate a sharp peak in light output with an excellent side-mode-rejection ratio. The rings can also be made of passive or active waveguide material. With additional rings the device is a tunable optical multiplexer/demultiplexer. 11 figs.

  8. Interferometric ring lasers and optical devices

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, John P.; Craft, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Two ring diode lasers are optically coupled together to produce tunable, stable output through a Y-junction output coupler which may also be a laser diode or can be an active waveguide. These devices demonstrate a sharp peak in light output with an excellent side-mode-rejection ratio. The rings can also be made of passive or active waveguide material. With additional rings the device is a tunable optical multiplexer/demultiplexer.

  9. Optics and lasers: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A number of innovative devices and techniques in optics and related fields were presented. The following areas were covered: advances in laser and holography technology, articles on spectroscopy and general optics, new information in the area of photography.

  10. Space simulators for laser optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Frank H.

    1988-01-01

    Different approaches that are being utilized to test laser optical systems are described. One of the most crucial areas in the testing phase is the stability of the laser optics mounted inside the space simulator. The thermal vacuum system, the refrigeration system, and the space simulator are discussed.

  11. Optical characterization of InGaN/GaN quantum well active region of green laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Aiqin; Liu, Jianping; Zhang, Liqun; Ikeda, Masao; Fan, Xiaowang; Zhang, Shuming; Li, Deyao; Zhang, Feng; Wen, Pengyan; Cheng, Yang; Yang, Hui

    2017-01-01

    We performed the optical characterization of InGaN/GaN quantum well (QW) active regions of green laser diodes (LDs) with different threshold current densities by temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) analysis. The internal quantum efficiency (IQE) was evaluated to be 39 and 59% for green LDs with threshold current densities of 8.50 and 1.85 kA cm-2, respectively. Additional nonradiative recombination centers with an activation energy of 10 meV were found in the sample with the lower IQE, which is attributed to defects located at the interface of InGaN/GaN QWs.

  12. Laser optical displacement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starritt, Larry W.; Matthews, Larryl K.

    1995-04-01

    The current quality of our nations bridges is on a decline. There are roughly half a million highway bridges in the United States and out of the half a million more than 200,000 are deficient. With catastrophic failure of bridges causing the loss of life and property, the need for bridge inspection and maintenance is evident. When the Silver Bridge that crossed the Ohio River collapsed in December 1967, 46 people were killed. The failure to prevent the disaster was attributed to the poor inspection techniques used by the bridge inspectors. Current inspection techniques depend on humans being able to recognize structural imperfections without the aid of instrumentation. The Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1968 mandated both national bridge inspection standards and training for bridge inspectors. This act has encouraged the development of instruments that would allow inspectors to perform more complete inspections of bridges. To improve the quality of inspection and data, there is a great need for proven methods and instruments used to acquire data. The Laser Optical Displacement System (L.O.D.S.) developed at New Mexico State University by the Optical and Materials Science Lab is such a device. The L.O.D.S. has been tested and proven in both laboratory situations and in the field. This paper describes some of the methods that are now being used to measure deflections in bridges. Then, a description of the development and application of the L.O.D.S. unit is given.

  13. Laser peening with fiber optic delivery

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Herbert W.; Ault, Earl R.; Scheibner, Karl F.

    2004-11-16

    A system for processing a workpiece using a laser. The laser produces at least one laser pulse. A laser processing unit is used to process the workpiece using the at least one laser pulse. A fiber optic cable is used for transmitting the at least one laser pulse from the laser to the laser processing unit.

  14. Optically pumped rare-gas lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheyev, P A

    2015-08-31

    The modern state of the research of a new promising optically pumped laser system with an active medium formed by metastable rare-gas atoms is briefly reviewed. The kinetics of these media is similar to that of laser media based on alkali metal vapour; however, the gas medium is inert. Metastable atoms can be produced in an electric discharge. As in alkali lasers, the specific laser power output under atmospheric pressure can be several hundreds of watts per 1 cm{sup 3}. The lasing wavelengths lie in the near-IR range and fall in the transparency window of the terrestrial atmosphere. This new concept makes it possible to develop a closed-cycle cw laser with megawatt power levels and high beam quality. (lasers)

  15. Optics assembly for high power laser tools

    DOEpatents

    Fraze, Jason D.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2016-06-07

    There is provided a high power laser rotational optical assembly for use with, or in high power laser tools for performing high power laser operations. In particular, the optical assembly finds applications in performing high power laser operations on, and in, remote and difficult to access locations. The optical assembly has rotational seals and bearing configurations to avoid contamination of the laser beam path and optics.

  16. Optically pumped far-infrared lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Button, K. J.; Inguscio, M.; Strumia, F.

    A handbook of far-infrared (submillimeter) laser technology is presented. Among the specific laser systems described are: 12CH3F and 13CH3F lasers; submillimeter lasers in dueuterated methyl fluoride CD3F; and far-infrared laser lines obtained by optical pumping. Consideration is given to other far-infrared laser media, including: methyl iodide; CH3OH; D2O; and fluorocarbon 12, CF2C12. Additional topics discussed include: an optically pumped PH3 laser operating in the region 83-223 microns; an optically pumped formic acid laser; and optically pumped infrared lasing in propyne.

  17. Functional evaluation of hemodynamic response during neural activation using optical microangiography integrated with dual-wavelength laser speckle imaging

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jia; Shi, Lei; Wang, Hequn; Reif, Roberto; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Evaluation of spatiotemporal hemodynamic and metabolic responses during neural activation is crucial in studying brain function. We explore the use of a noninvasive multifunctional optical imaging system to measure these responses in a mouse brain upon electrically stimulated neural activation, with the cranium left intact. The system is developed by integrating an optical microangiography (OMAG) imaging system with a dual-wavelength laser speckle imaging (DW-LSI) system. The DW-LSI, running at an image acquisition speed of ∼100  Hz, is used to extract the large-scale two-dimensional map, revealing the localized response of blood flow, hemoglobin concentration, and metabolic rate of oxygen change. Guided by DW-LSI, the OMAG is, however, used to image the response of individual blood vessels with its unique depth-resolved capability. We show that the integrated system is capable of investigating neural activation, thus is potentially valuable in the preclinical study of the mechanism of neurovascular coupling. PMID:24549439

  18. Initial alignment method for free space optics laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Yuta; Tashiro, Yuki; Izumi, Kiyotaka; Yoshida, Koichi; Tsujimura, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    The authors have newly proposed and constructed an active free space optics transmission system. It is equipped with a motor driven laser emitting mechanism and positioning photodiodes, and it transmits a collimated thin laser beam and accurately steers the laser beam direction. It is necessary to introduce the laser beam within sensible range of the receiver in advance of laser beam tracking control. This paper studies an estimation method of laser reaching point for initial laser beam alignment. Distributed photodiodes detect laser luminescence at respective position, and the optical axis of laser beam is analytically presumed based on the Gaussian beam optics. Computer simulation evaluates the accuracy of the proposed estimation methods, and results disclose that the methods help us to guide the laser beam to a distant receiver.

  19. Lasers and Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-05

    PCI Measurements in YAG Al2O3 single crystal (Standard 1) Fused silica (Standard 2) Reactive Sintered Ceramics Non-Reactive Sintered ...AFRL:! ... J ,, 4 DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. • High Average Power Solid-State Lasers • Ceramic Solid...DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. • Ceramic Solid-State Laser Materials • Spatially Varying Index and Doping

  20. Long-cavity all-fiber ring laser actively mode locked with an in-fiber bandpass acousto-optic modulator.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado-Laborde, C; Bello-Jiménez, M; Díez, A; Cruz, J L; Andrés, M V

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate low-frequency active mode locking of an erbium-doped all-fiber ring laser. As the mode locker, we used a new in-fiber bandpass acousto-optic modulator showing 74% modulation depth, 3.7 dB power insertion losses, 4.5 nm of optical bandwidth, and 20 dB of nonresonant light suppression. The laser generates 330 ps mode-locked pulses over a 10 ns pedestal, at a 1.538 MHz frequency, with 130 mW of pump power.

  1. Optical pulse generation using fiber lasers and integrated optics

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, R.B.; Browning, D.F.; Burkhart, S.C.; VanWonterghem, B.W.

    1995-03-27

    We have demonstrated an optical pulse forming system using fiber and integrated optics, and have designed a multiple-output system for a proposed fusion laser facility. Our approach is an advancement over previous designs for fusion lasers, and an unusual application of fiber lasers and integrated optics.

  2. Electro-Optic Diffraction Grating Tuned Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The patent concerns an electro - optic diffraction grating tuned laser comprising a laser medium, output mirror, retro-reflective grating and an electro - optic diffraction grating beam deflector positioned between the laser medium and the reflective diffraction grating. An optional angle multiplier may be used between the electro - optic diffraction grating and the reflective grating.

  3. Optical resonator and laser applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taghavi-Larigani, Shervin (Inventor); Vanzyl, Jakob J. (Inventor); Yariv, Amnon (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention discloses a semi-ring Fabry-Perot (SRFP) optical resonator structure comprising a medium including an edge forming a reflective facet and a waveguide within the medium, the waveguide having opposing ends formed by the reflective facet. The performance of the SRFP resonator can be further enhanced by including a Mach-Zehnder interferometer in the waveguide on one side of the gain medium. The optical resonator can be employed in a variety of optical devices. Laser structures using at least one SRFP resonator are disclosed where the resonators are disposed on opposite sides of a gain medium. Other laser structures employing one or more resonators on one side of a gain region are also disclosed.

  4. Laser beam modeling in optical storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treptau, J. P.; Milster, T. D.; Flagello, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    A computer model has been developed that simulates light propagating through an optical data storage system. A model of a laser beam that originates at a laser diode, propagates through an optical system, interacts with a optical disk, reflects back from the optical disk into the system, and propagates to data and servo detectors is discussed.

  5. Output optics for laser velocimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, Dana H. (Inventor); Gunter, William D. (Inventor); Mcalister, Kenneth W. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Space savings are effected in the optical output system of a laser velocimeter. The output system is comprised of pairs of optical fibers having output ends from which a beam of laser light emerges, a transfer lens for each light beam, and at least one final (LV) lens for receiving the light passing through the transfer lenses and for focussing that light at a common crossing point or area. In order to closely couple the transfer lenses to the final lens, each transfer lens is positioned relative to the final lens receiving light therefrom such that the output waist of the corresponding beam received by the final lens from the transfer lens is a virtual waist located before the transfer lens.

  6. Optical materials for space based laser systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.; Armagan, G.; Byvik, C. E.; Albin, S.

    1989-01-01

    The design features and performance characteristics of a sensitized holmium laser applicable to differential lidar and Doppler windshear measurements are presented, giving attention to the optimal choice of sensitizing/activating dopant ions. This development of a 2-micron region eye-safe laser, where holmium is sensitized by either hulium or erbium, has called for interionic energy transfer processes whose rate will not result in gain-switched pulses that are excessively long for atmospheric lidar and Doppler windshear detection. The application of diamond films for optical component hardening is noted.

  7. Compact active mirror laser (CAMIL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrovec, John

    2002-03-01

    This work presents concept and scaling considerations for a solid-state laser with a gain medium disk operating in the active mirror mode. The disk is of composite construction formed by bonding undoped optical medium to the peripheral edges of a gain medium disk. Pump diode arrays are placed around the perimeter of the composite disk and pump light is injected into the undoped edge. With proper choice of lasant doping, diode placement and diode divergence, a uniform laser gain can be achieved across large portions of the disk. To mitigate thermal deformations, the gain medium disk is pressure-clamped to a rigid, cooled substrate. Effective reduction of thermo-optical distortions makes this laser suitable for operation at high-average power.

  8. Laser And Nonlinear Optical Materials For Laser Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    2005-01-01

    NASA remote sensing missions involving laser systems and their economic impact are outlined. Potential remote sensing missions include: green house gasses, tropospheric winds, ozone, water vapor, and ice cap thickness. Systems to perform these measurements use lanthanide series lasers and nonlinear devices including second harmonic generators and parametric oscillators. Demands these missions place on the laser and nonlinear optical materials are discussed from a materials point of view. Methods of designing new laser and nonlinear optical materials to meet these demands are presented.

  9. Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communications Program (AVLOC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The design, development, and operation of airborne and ground-based laser communications and laser radar hardware is described in support of the Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communication program. The major emphasis is placed on the development of a highly flexible test bed for the evaluation of laser communications systems techniques and components in an operational environment.

  10. Utilizing laser interference lithography to fabricate hierarchical optical active nanostructures inspired by the blue Morpho butterfly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddique, Radwanul H.; Faisal, Abrar; Hünig, Ruben; Bartels, Carolin; Wacker, Irene; Lemmer, Uli; Hoelscher, Hendrik

    2014-09-01

    The famous non-iridescent blue of the Morpho butter by is caused by a `Christmas tree' like nanostructure which is a challenge for common fabrication techniques. Here, we introduce a method to fabricate this complex morphology utilizing dual beam interference lithography. We add a reflective coating below the photoresist to create a second interference pattern in vertical direction by exploiting the back reflection from the substrate. This vertical pattern exposes the lamella structure into the photosensitive polymer while the horizontal interference pattern determines the distance of the ridges. The photosensitive polymer is chosen accordingly to create the Christmas tree' like tapered shape. The resulting artificial Morpho replica shows brilliant non-iridescent blue up to an incident angle of 40. Its optical properties are close to the original Morpho structure because the refractive index of the polymer is close to chitin. Moreover, the biomimetic surface is water repellent with a contact angle of 110.

  11. Semiconductor ring lasers as optical neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coomans, W.; Gelens, L.; Mashal, L.; Beri, S.; Van der Sande, G.; Danckaert, J.; Verschaffelt, G.

    2012-06-01

    Semiconductor Ring Lasers (SRLs) are a modern class of semiconductor lasers whose active cavity is characterized by a circular geometry. This enables the laser to support two counterpropagating modes, referred to as the clockwise (CW) and the counterclockwise (CCW) mode. Semiconductor ring lasers have been shown to have a regime of operation in which they are excitable, when the linear coupling between the counterpropagating modes is asymmetric. This can be achieved by increasing the reflection of, for example, the CW mode into the CCW mode. This will stabilize lasing in the CCW mode. In the excitable regime, the SRL will fire optical pulses (spikes) in the CW mode as a response to noise perturbations. In this contribution we experimentally and theoretically characterize these spikes. Our experiments reveal a statistical distribution of the characteristics of the optical pulses that is not observed in regular excitable systems. In particular, an inverse correlation exists between the pulse amplitude and duration. Numerical simulations and an interpretation in an asymptotic phase space confirm and explain these experimentally observed pulse characteristics [L. Gelens et al., Phys. Rev. A 82 063841, 2010]. We will also theoretically consider asymmetric SRLs coupled through a single bus waveguide. This is a first step towards an integrated optical neural network using semiconductor ring lasers as building blocks. We will show that for weak coupling, excitatory excursions still persist due to the similar phase space structure. Moreover, the coupled SRLs can excite pulses in each other and can thus function as communicating neurons [W. Coomans et al., Phys. Rev. E 84 036209, 2011]. This type of neural network can be fully integrated on chip and does not suffer from the drawback of needing extra-cavity measures, such as optical injection or saturable absorbers.

  12. Precision optical metrology without lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Ralf B.; Burke, Jan; Falldorf, Claas

    2015-07-01

    Optical metrology is a key technique when it comes to precise and fast measurement with a resolution down to the micrometer or even nanometer regime. The choice of a particular optical metrology technique and the quality of results depends on sample parameters such as size, geometry and surface roughness as well as user requirements such as resolution, measurement time and robustness. Interferometry-based techniques are well known for their low measurement uncertainty in the nm range, but usually require careful isolation against vibration and a laser source that often needs shielding for reasons of eye-safety. In this paper, we concentrate on high precision optical metrology without lasers by using the gradient based measurement technique of deflectometry and the finite difference based technique of shear interferometry. Careful calibration of deflectometry systems allows one to investigate virtually all kinds of reflecting surfaces including aspheres or free-form surfaces with measurement uncertainties below the μm level. Computational Shear Interferometry (CoSI) allows us to combine interferometric accuracy and the possibility to use cheap and eye-safe low-brilliance light sources such as e.g. fiber coupled LEDs or even liquid crystal displays. We use CoSI e.g. for quantitative phase contrast imaging in microscopy. We highlight the advantages of both methods, discuss their transfer functions and present results on the precision of both techniques.

  13. Optical isolator for semiconductor lasers.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, H

    1980-01-15

    An optical isolator for semiconductor lasers, consisting of a polarizer and a quarterwave plate, was investigated experimentally. It was assembled in a compact laser-to-fiber coupling module. Experiment showed forward loss of 1.15 dB, backward loss of 24.8 dB, and rotative tolerance of 2.4 deg for 1 dB down. The length of the module is 43.2 mm. The coupling efficiency to a graded-index multimode fiber is 37.5%. The extinction ratio is improved by 6.75 dB. The suppression effect on the influence of reflected light was investigated, using the assembled module.

  14. Optically (solar) pumped oxygen-iodine lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, O. B.; Zhevlakov, A. P.; Yur'ev, M. S.

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of theoretical and experimental studies demonstrating the possibility of developing an oxygen-iodine laser (OIL) with direct optical pumping of molecular oxygen involving inter-molecular interaction with charge transfer from donor molecule (buffer gas) to acceptor molecule (oxygen). This interaction lifts degeneracy of the lower energy states of molecular oxygen and increases its absorption cross section in the visible spectral region and the UV Herzberg band, where high quantum yield of singlet oxygen is achieved (QY ˜ 1 and QY ˜ 2, respectively) at the same time. A pulse-periodic optical pump sources with pulse energy of ˜50 kJ, pulse duration of ˜25 μs, and repetition rate of ˜10 Hz, which are synchronized with the mechanism of singlet oxygen generation, are developed. This allows implementation of a pulse-periodic oxygen-iodine laser with an efficiency of ˜25%, optical efficiency of ˜40%, and parameter L/ T ˜ 1/1.5, where T is the thermal energy released in the laser active medium upon generation of energy L. It is demonstrated that, under direct solar pumping of molecular oxygen, the efficiency parameter of the OIL can reach L/ T ˜ 1/0.8 in a wide range of scaling factors.

  15. Fiber laser coupled optical spark delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Yalin, Azer; Willson, Bryan; Defoort, Morgan; Joshi, Sachin; Reynolds, Adam

    2008-03-04

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

  16. Fiber optic applications for laser polarized targets

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, W.J.; Kowalczyk, R.S.

    1997-10-01

    For the past two years, the laser polarized target group at Argonne has been used multi-mode fiber optic patch cords for a variety of applications. In this paper, the authors describe the design for transporting high power laser beams with optical fibers currently in use at IUCF.

  17. Stark effect in optically pumped molecular submillimeter lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rak, V. G.; Dyubko, S. F.

    1980-06-01

    A theoretical analysis is made of the effects which take place in optically pumped lasers whose active medium is subjected to a dc electric Geld. The possibilities are discussed of tuning the frequency and modulating the intensity of the radiation emitted by a laser. The gain characteristics of an active medium in an electric field are calculated for a CH3F laser operating on a wavelength of 496 μ. It is shown that the frequency tuning limits of the output radiation of such a laser can reach 3 GHz, if the active medium allows electric fields of up to 30 kV/cm to be applied.

  18. Active optical zoom system

    DOEpatents

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  19. Self-referencing Mach-Zehnder interferometer as a laser system diagnostic: Active and adaptive optical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, M.; Mockler, D.J.; English, R.E. Jr.; Byrd, J.L.; Salmon, J.T.

    1991-02-01

    We are incorporating a novel self-referencing Mach-Zehnder interferometer into a large scale laser system as a real time, interactive diagnostic tool for wavefront measurement. The instrument is capable of absolute wavefront measurements accurate to better than {lambda}/10 pv over a wavelength range > 300 nm without readjustment of the optical components. This performance is achieved through the design of both refractive optics and catadioptric collimator to achromatize the Mach-Zehnder reference arm. Other features include polarization insensitivity through the use of low angles of incidence on all beamsplitters as well as an equal path length configuration that allows measurement of either broad-band or closely spaced laser-line sources. Instrument accuracy is periodically monitored in place by means of a thermally and mechanically stable wavefront reference source that is calibrated off-line with a phase conjugate interferometer. Video interferograms are analyzed using Fourier transform techniques on a computer that includes dedicated array processor. Computer and video networks maintain distributed interferometers under the control of a single analysis computer with multiple user access. 7 refs., 11 figs.

  20. Applications of lasers and electro-optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, B. C.; Low, K. S.; Chen, Y. H.; Ahmad, Harith; Tou, T. Y.

    Supported by the IRPA Programme on Laser Technology and Applications, many types of lasers have been designed, constructed and applied in various areas of science, medicine and industries. Amongst these lasers constructed were high power carbon dioxide lasers, rare gas halide excimer lasers, solid state Neodymium-YAG lasers, nitrogen lasers, flashlamp pumped dye lasers and nitrogen and excimer laser pumped dye lasers. These lasers and the associated electro-optics system, some with computer controlled, are designed and developed for the following areas of applications: (1) industrial applications of high power carbon dioxide lasers for making of i.c. components and other materials processing purposes -- prototype operational systems have been developed; (2) Medical applications of lasers for cancer treatment using the technique of photodynamic therapy -- a new and more effective treatment protocol has been proposed; (3) agricultural applications of lasers in palm oil and palm fruit-fluorescence diagnostic studies -- fruit ripeness signature has been developed and palm oil oxidation level were investigated; (4) development of atmospheric pollution monitoring systems using laser lidar techniques -- laboratory scale systems were developed; and (5) other applications of lasers including laser holographic and interferometric methods for the non destructive testing of materials.

  1. Laser & Fiber Optics: Instructional Manual. The North Dakota High Technology Mobile Laboratory Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eickhoff, Luvern R.

    This instructional manual contains 20 learning activity packets for use in a workshop on lasers and fiber optics. The lessons cover the following topics: what a laser; coherent light; setting up the laser; characteristics of the laser beam; scattering of light; laser beam divergence, intensity, color, ophthalmology, and reflections; directivity of…

  2. Extreme nonlinear optics and laser damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldutis, Evaldas

    2010-11-01

    The study of laser induced damage threshold caused by series of identical laser pulses (LID-T-N) on gamma radiation resistant glasses and their analogs is performed applying know-how ultra stable laser radiation. The presented results and analysis of earlier received results show that nonlinear optical phenomena in extreme conditions of interaction are different from the traditional nonlinear optical processes, because they depend not only on intensity of electromagnetic field of laser radiation, but also on the pulse number in series of identical laser pulses. This range of laser intensities is not wide; it is different for each material and determines the range of Extreme Nonlinear Optics. The dependence of LID-T-N on pulse number N for different kinds of high quality transparent glasses was observed. The study of dynamics of these processes (i.e. the study of dependence on N) at different intensities in series of incident laser pulses provides new information about properties of the materials useful for studying laser damage fundamentals and their application. The expectation that gamma radiation resistant glasses could give useful information for technology of resistant optics for high power lasers has not proved. The received results well correspond with the earlier proposed model of laser damage.

  3. Optically pumped microplasma rare gas laser.

    PubMed

    Rawlins, W T; Galbally-Kinney, K L; Davis, S J; Hoskinson, A R; Hopwood, J A; Heaven, M C

    2015-02-23

    The optically pumped rare-gas metastable laser is a chemically inert analogue to three-state optically pumped alkali laser systems. The concept requires efficient generation of electronically excited metastable atoms in a continuous-wave (CW) electric discharge in flowing gas mixtures near atmospheric pressure. We have observed CW optical gain and laser oscillation at 912.3 nm using a linear micro-discharge array to generate metastable Ar(4s, 1s(5)) atoms at atmospheric pressure. We observed the optical excitation of the 1s(5) → 2p(9) transition at 811.5 nm and the corresponding fluorescence, optical gain and laser oscillation on the 2p(10) ↔ 1s(5) transition at 912.3 nm, following 2p(9)→2p(10) collisional energy transfer. A steady-state kinetics model indicates efficient collisional coupling within the Ar(4s) manifold.

  4. Subwavelength metal-optic semiconductor nanopatch lasers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kyoungsik; Lakhani, Amit; Wu, Ming C

    2010-04-26

    We report on near infrared semiconductor nanopatch lasers with subwavelength-scale physical dimensions (0.019 cubic wavelengths) and effective mode volumes (0.0017 cubic wavelengths). We observe lasing in the two most fundamental optical modes which resemble oscillating electrical and magnetic dipoles. The ultra-small laser volume is achieved with the presence of nanoscale metal patches which suppress electromagnetic radiation into free-space and convert a leaky cavity into a highly-confined subwavelength optical resonator. Such ultra-small lasers with metallodielectric cavities will enable broad applications in data storage, biological sensing, and on-chip optical communication.

  5. Plasma optical modulators for intense lasers

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lu-Le; Zhao, Yao; Qian, Lie-Jia; Chen, Min; Weng, Su-Ming; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Mori, W. B.; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Optical modulators can have high modulation speed and broad bandwidth, while being compact. However, these optical modulators usually work for low-intensity light beams. Here we present an ultrafast, plasma-based optical modulator, which can directly modulate high-power lasers with intensity up to 1016 W cm−2 to produce an extremely broad spectrum with a fractional bandwidth over 100%, extending to the mid-infrared regime in the low-frequency side. This concept relies on two co-propagating laser pulses in a sub-millimetre-scale underdense plasma, where a drive laser pulse first excites an electron plasma wave in its wake while a following carrier laser pulse is modulated by the plasma wave. The laser and plasma parameters suitable for the modulator to work are based on numerical simulations. PMID:27283369

  6. REVIEW: Optical frequency standards and femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baklanov, E. V.; Pokasov, P. V.

    2003-05-01

    A review is presented of the state of the art in a new direction in quantum electronics based on the use of femtosecond lasers for precision frequency measurements and the development of optical frequency and time standards.

  7. Ultraintense lasers: relativistic nonlinear optics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourou, Gérard A.

    Traditional optics and nonlinear optics are related to laser-matter interaction with eV characteristic energy. Recent progresses in ultrahigh intensity makes it possible to drive electrons with relativistic energy opening up the field of relativistic nonlinear optics. In the last decade, lasers have undergone orders-of-magnitude jumps in peak power, with the invention of the technique of chirped pulse amplification (CPA) and the refinements of femtosecond techniques. Modern CPA lasers can produce intensities greater than 10 21 W/cm 2, one million times greater than previously possible. These ultraintense lasers give researchers a tool to produce unprecedented pressures (terabars), magnetic fields (gigagauss), temperatures (10 10 K), and accelerations (10 25 g) with applications in fusion energy, nuclear physics (fast ignition), high-energy physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. They promote the optics field from the eV to the GeV.

  8. Optical and Kinetic Processes in Excimer Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    investigations of the spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of XeF and XeCl lasers using theoretical techniques , synchrotron radiation excitation, and laser... technique for characterizing potential SBS media. Our work is described in Appendices N and 0. 3 OTHER TOPICS IN LASERS AND NONLINEAR OPTICS The SRS and... technique described above for several fluorine and chlorine donors are shown in Table 1. The quanitities in parentheses indicate where the yields have

  9. Laser fiber optics ordnance initiation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    Recent progress on system development in the laser initiation of explosive devices is summarized. The topics included are: development of compact free-running mode and Q-switched lasers, development of low-loss fiber optic bundles and connectors, study of nuclear radiation effects on the system, characterization of laser initiation sensitivities of insensitive high explosives, and the design methods used to achieve attractive system weight and cost savings. Direction for future work is discussed.

  10. Semiconductor laser gyro with optical frequency dithering

    SciTech Connect

    Prokof'eva, L P; Sakharov, V K; Shcherbakov, V V

    2014-04-28

    The semiconductor laser gyro is described, in which the optical frequency dithering implemented by intracavity phase modulation suppresses the frequency lock-in and provides the interference of multimode radiation. The sensitivity of the device amounted to 10–20 deg h{sup -1}. (laser gyroscopes)

  11. Electro-optics and lasers in Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Zwaren, Joesph

    1992-05-01

    With over 3,000 scientists, engineers, and technicians spread out in some 86 companies, and in 10 universities and research institutes, all within less than a 2 hour drive from one another, Israel has no doubt one of the largest concentrations of researchers and skilled manpower in electro-optics and lasers in the world. This report presents an up-to-date picture of the field in Israel, covering the industry, academia and education. The recent wave of Russian immigration is bringing thousands of scientists and tens of thousands of engineers and is expected to make an impact on the field of electro-optics and lasers. A million immigrants from Russia are expected to come between 1990 and 1995. There were 3,700 scientists and 2,800 engineers among the first 200,000 Soviet immigrants. As most of this qualified manpower can not be expected to be absorbed by the existing industry, the Israeli government is actively encouraging local and foreign investors and local and multinational companies to help develop new and expanded high-tech enterprises in Israel. The Ministry of Industry and Trade has embarked upon a broad ranged program for industrial growth and immigrant absorption with the goal of doubling technology-based exports in the next four years. The Ministry of Science and Technology has started a program supporting R&D projects at the different universities for immigrant scientists with the goal of capitalizing on the talents of the newcomers to strengthen academia.

  12. Mobile fiber-optic laser Doppler anemometer.

    PubMed

    Stieglmeier, M; Tropea, C

    1992-07-20

    A laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) has been developed that combines the compactness and low power consumption of laser diodes and avalanche photodiodes with the flexibility and possibility of miniaturization by using fiber-optic probes. The system has been named DFLDA for laser diode fiber LDA and is especially suited for mobile applications, for example, in trains, airplanes, or automobiles. Optimization considerations of fiber-optic probes are put forward and several probe examples are described in detail. Measurement results from three typical applications are given to illustrate the use of the DFLDA. Finally, a number of future configurations of the DFLDA concept are discussed.

  13. Optically pumped molecular bromine laser. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, J.W.

    1990-12-01

    An optically pumped molecular bromine laser was studied to investigate the quenching kinetics state of Br2. This included characterization of the pressure dependence of the laser output power. The approach was to excite molecular bromine in a sealed cell with a Nd:YAG pumped dye laser. Unresolved side fluorescence and amplified stimulated emission (ASE) spectra were recorded. ASE offered the advantage of a simpler optical system with no externally induced wavelength dependencies. Stimulated emission as a signal monitor offered greater resolution than side fluorescence spectra and facilitated spectroscopic assignment. (JS)

  14. Optical wavelength modulation in free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mabe, R.M.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    An attribute of the free electron laser (FEL) is the continuous tunability of the optical wavelength by modulation of the electron beam energy. The variation of the wavelength and power of the optical beam is studied as a function of FEL operating parameters. These results will be applied to the Stanford SCA FEL and Boeing FEL.

  15. Laser-optic instruments improve machinery alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, H.P.

    1987-10-12

    Laser-optic alignment systems are fast becoming cost-effective devices that improve the accuracy and speed of machinery shaft alignment. Because of the difficulty, if not impossibility, of aligning operating machinery, cold alignment specifications must be determined to compensate for thermal growth so that the shaft alignment remains within tolerances when the machine reaches normal operating temperature. Some methods for accomplishing this are reviewed here. Three years' field experience with laser-optic alignment systems shows that many of these limitations can be eliminated, resulting in a more accurate alignment in less time. Some actual field alignments are given as examples of the improvement achieved by the use of laser equipment, and a procedure is given that shows how the laser-optic system may be used to determine running alignment changes caused by thermal growth.

  16. Optical communication with laser diode arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, F.

    1984-01-01

    The performance of a direct-detection optical communication system in which the laser transmitter sends short optical pulses of selected nonoverlapping center frequencies is analysed. This modulation format, in which a single light pulse is sent in one of M time slots at one of N optical center frequencies, is referred to as color coded optical pulse position modulation (CCPPM). The optimum energy-efficiency of this system, as measured by the channel capacity in nats per photon, exceeds that of ordinary optical pulse position modulation which uses a pulsed laser of fixed optical frequency. Reliable communication at optimal energy efficiency is easily achieved through the use of modest block length Reed-Solomon codes with the code words represented as CCPPM symbols.

  17. Optical contact approach to laser rod support.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurski, T. R.

    1972-01-01

    The successful application of an optical contact is described between a ruby laser rod that has no mechanical support and a sapphire rod. The contact is found to be durable in the environmental conditions associated with a high-power pulsed ruby laser. The described contact technique makes it possible to construct a laser oscillator using an ellipsoidal pump mirror that does not employ dielectric coatings in the cavity. Another advantage consists in that the ruby laser is not shaded from the pump light by mounting jigs at its ends.

  18. Third order mode optically pumped semiconductor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rossi, A.; Semaltianos, N.; Chirlias, E.; Vinter, B.; Ortiz, V.; Berger, V.

    2002-06-01

    Lasing action on a third order waveguide mode is demonstrated at room temperature under optical pumping, in a specifically designed quantum well laser structure. The AlGaAs heterostructure involves barriers which ensure that the third order waveguide mode has a higher overlap with the single quantum well emitter than the fundamental mode. Third order mode operation of a laser structure opens the way to modal phase matched parametric down conversion inside the semiconductor laser itself. It is a first step towards the realization of semiconductor twin photon laser sources, needed for quantum information experiments.

  19. Modeling the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Pedersen, Trace R.; McNamara, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Creating an optical model of the Laser Interferometer Space antenna which can be used to predict optical sensitivities and set tolerances sufficiently well such that picometer level displacements can be reliably seen poses certain challenges. In part, because the distances between key optical elements, the proof masses, are constantly changing, at speeds of meters/second, the separation between them is about 5 million kilometers and a contributing factor to optical jitter is the self-gravity of the spacecraft. A discussion of the current state and future approach(s) to the creation of such an optical model will be presented.

  20. Beam shaping for laser initiated optical primers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd E.

    2008-08-01

    Remington was one of the first firearm manufacturing companies to file a patent for laser initiated firearms, in 1969. Nearly 40 years later, the development of laser initiated firearms has not become a mainstream technology in the civilian market. Requiring a battery is definitely a short coming, so it is easy to see how such a concept would be problematic. Having a firearm operate reliably and the delivery of laser energy in an efficient manner to ignite the shock-sensitive explosive primer mixtures is a tall task indeed. There has been considerable research on optical element based methods of transferring or compressing laser energy to ignite primer charges, including windows, laser chip primers and various lens shaped windows to focus the laser energy. The focusing of laser light needs to achieve igniting temperatures upwards of >400°C. Many of the patent filings covering this type of technology discuss simple approaches where a single point of light might be sufficient to perform this task. Alternatively a multi-point method might provide better performance, especially for mission critical applications, such as precision military firearms. This paper covers initial design and performance test of the laser beam shaping optics to create simultaneous multiple point ignition locations and a circumferential intense ring for igniting primer charge compounds. A simple initial test of the ring beam shaping technique was evaluated on a standard large caliber primer to determine its effectiveness on igniting the primer material. Several tests were conducted to gauge the feasibility of laser beam shaping, including optic fabrication and mounting on a cartridge, optic durability and functional ignition performance. Initial data will be presented, including testing of optically elements and empirical primer ignition / burn analysis.

  1. Optically pumped isotopic ammonia laser system

    DOEpatents

    Buchwald, Melvin I.; Jones, Claude R.; Nelson, Leonard Y.

    1982-01-01

    An optically pumped isotopic ammonia laser system which is capable of producing a plurality of frequencies in the middle infrared spectral region. Two optical pumping mechanisms are disclosed, i.e., pumping on R(J) and lasing on P(J) in response to enhancement of rotational cascade lasing including stimulated Raman effects, and, pumping on R(J) and lasing on P(J+2). The disclosed apparatus for optical pumping include a hole coupled cavity and a grating coupled cavity.

  2. Laser with optically driven Q-switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An optically driven interactive Q-switch, i.e., a Q-switch that responds to a short pulse of light, for example, from external light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or diode lasers, is provided for producing an output laser pulse from electronic energy stored in a laser medium. Q-switching is thus achieved on demand by electrically pulsing the light source to produce a pulse of light directed onto a Q-switch medium in the laser cavity. Electronic control of the light pulse from the external source will thus provide not only efficient Q-switching frequency but also independent control of output laser pulse width with a fast rise time for each output laser pulse.

  3. Laser with optically driven Q-switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An optically driven interactive Q-switch, i.e., a Q-switch that responds to a short pulse of light, for example, from external light-emitting diodes (LED's) or diode lasers, is provided for producing an output laser pulse from electronic energy stored in a laser medium. Q-switching is thus achieved on demand by electrically pulsing the light source to produce a pulse of light directed onto a Q-switch medium in the laser cavity. Electronic control of the light pulse from the external source will thus provide not only efficient Q-switching frequency but also independent control of output laser pulse width with a fast rise time for each output laser pulse.

  4. Space Optical Communications Using Laser Beam Amplification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Govind

    2015-01-01

    The Space Optical Communications Using Laser Beam Amplification (SOCLBA) project will provide a capability to amplify a laser beam that is received in a modulating retro-reflector (MRR) located in a satellite in low Earth orbit. It will also improve the pointing procedure between Earth and spacecraft terminals. The technology uses laser arrays to strengthen the reflected laser beam from the spacecraft. The results of first year's work (2014) show amplification factors of 60 times the power of the signal beam. MMRs are mirrors that reflect light beams back to the source. In space optical communications, a high-powered laser interrogator beam is directed from the ground to a satellite. Within the satellite, the beam is redirected back to ground using the MMR. In the MMR, the beam passes through modulators, which encode a data signal onto the returning beam. MMRs can be used in small spacecraft for optical communications. The SOCLBA project is significant to NASA and small spacecraft due to its application to CubeSats for optical data transmission to ground stations, as well as possible application to spacecraft for optical data transmission.

  5. Optical complexity in external cavity semiconductor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondoni, Lamberto; Ariffin, M. R. K.; Varatharajoo, Renuganth; Mukherjee, Sayan; Palit, Sanjay K.; Banerjee, Santo

    2017-03-01

    In this article, the window based complexity and output modulation of a time delayed chaotic semiconductor laser (SL) model has been investigated. The window based optical complexity (OC), is measured by introducing the recurrence sample entropy (SampEn). The analysis has been done without and in the presence of external noise. The significant changes in the dynamics can be observed under induced noise with weak strength. It has also been found that there is a strong positive correlation between the output power and the complexity of the system with various sets of parameters. The laser intensity, as well as the OC can be increased with the incremental noise strength and the associated system parameters. Thus, optical complexity quantifies the system dynamics and its instabilities, since is strongly correlated with the laser outputs. This analysis can be applied to measure the laser instabilities and modulation of output power.

  6. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3d vision system

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, R.L.; Clark, R.B.; Simonson, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    Recent advances in fiber optic component technology and digital processing components have enabled the development of a new 3D vision system based upon a fiber optic FMCW coherent laser radar. The approach includes a compact scanner with no moving parts capable of randomly addressing all pixels. The system maintains the immunity to lighting and surface shading conditions which is characteristic of coherent laser radar. The random pixel addressability allows concentration of scanning and processing on the active areas of a scene, as is done by the human eye-brain system.

  7. Laser Electro-Optic Technology. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of South Florida, Tampa. Dept. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This program guide identifies primary considerations in the organization, operation, and evaluation of a laser electro-optic technology program. An occupational description and program content are presented. A curriculum framework specifies the exact course title, course number, levels of instruction, major course content, laboratory activities,…

  8. Adaptive Optics Imaging in Laser Pointer Maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Sheyman, Alan T; Nesper, Peter L; Fawzi, Amani A; Jampol, Lee M

    2016-08-01

    The authors report multimodal imaging including adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) (Apaeros retinal image system AOSLO prototype; Boston Micromachines Corporation, Boston, MA) in a case of previously diagnosed unilateral acute idiopathic maculopathy (UAIM) that demonstrated features of laser pointer maculopathy. The authors also show the adaptive optics images of a laser pointer maculopathy case previously reported. A 15-year-old girl was referred for the evaluation of a maculopathy suspected to be UAIM. The authors reviewed the patient's history and obtained fluorescein angiography, autofluorescence, optical coherence tomography, infrared reflectance, and AOSLO. The time course of disease and clinical examination did not fit with UAIM, but the linear pattern of lesions was suspicious for self-inflicted laser pointer injury. This was confirmed on subsequent questioning of the patient. The presence of linear lesions in the macula that are best highlighted with multimodal imaging techniques should alert the physician to the possibility of laser pointer injury. AOSLO further characterizes photoreceptor damage in this condition. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:782-785.].

  9. Laser and Optical Fiber Metrology in Romania

    SciTech Connect

    Sporea, Dan; Sporea, Adelina

    2008-04-15

    The Romanian government established in the last five years a National Program for the improvement of country's infrastructure of metrology. The set goal was to develop and accredit testing and calibration laboratories, as well as certification bodies, according to the ISO 17025:2005 norm. Our Institute benefited from this policy, and developed a laboratory for laser and optical fibers metrology in order to provide testing and calibration services for the certification of laser-based industrial, medical and communication products. The paper will present the laboratory accredited facilities and some of the results obtained in the evaluation of irradiation effects of optical and optoelectronic parts, tests run under the EU's Fusion Program.

  10. Laser and Optical Fiber Metrology in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sporea, Dan; Sporea, Adelina

    2008-04-01

    The Romanian government established in the last five years a National Program for the improvement of country's infrastructure of metrology. The set goal was to develop and accredit testing and calibration laboratories, as well as certification bodies, according to the ISO 17025:2005 norm. Our Institute benefited from this policy, and developed a laboratory for laser and optical fibers metrology in order to provide testing and calibration services for the certification of laser-based industrial, medical and communication products. The paper will present the laboratory accredited facilities and some of the results obtained in the evaluation of irradiation effects of optical and optoelectronic parts, tests run under the EU's Fusion Program.

  11. Optical communication with semiconductor laser diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Frederic; Sun, X.

    1989-01-01

    This interim report describes the progress in the construction of a 220 Mbps Q=4 PPM optical communication system that uses a semiconductor laser as the optical transmitter and an avalanche photodiode (APD) as the photodetector. The transmitter electronics have been completed and contain both GaAs and ECL III IC's. The circuit was able to operate at a source binary data rate from 75 Mbps to 290 Mbps with pulse rise and fall times of 400 ps. The pulse shapes of the laser diode and the response from the APD/preamplifier module were also measured.

  12. Nonlinear optical protection against frequency agile lasers

    SciTech Connect

    McDowell, V.P.

    1988-08-04

    An eye-protection or equipment-filter device for protection from laser energy is disclosed. The device may be in the form of a telescope, binoculars, goggles, constructed as part of equipment such as image intensifiers or range designators. Optical elements focus the waist of the beam within a nonlinear frequency-doubling crystal or nonlinear optical element or fiber. The nonlinear elements produce a harmonic outside the visible spectrum in the case of crystals, or absorb the laser energy in the case of nonlinear fibers. Embodiments include protectors for the human eye as well as filters for sensitive machinery such as TV cameras, FLIR systems or other imaging equipment.

  13. Optical Path Difference Evaluation of Laser-Soldered Optical Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhardt, T.; Hornaff, M.; Burkhardt, D.; Beckert, E.

    2015-12-01

    We present Solderjet Bumping, a laser-based soldering process, as an all inorganic joining technique for optical materials and mechanical support structures. The adhesive-free bonding process enables the low-stress assembly of fragile and sensitive components for advanced optical systems. Our process addresses high demanding applications, e.g. under high energetic radiation (short wavelengths of 280 nm and below and/or high intensities), for vacuum operation, and for harsh environmental conditions. Laser-based soldering allows the low stress assembly of aligned sub-cells as key components for high quality optical systems. The evaluation of the optical path difference in fused silica and the radiation resistant LAK9G15 glass components after soldering and environmental testing shows the potential of the technique.

  14. Optical eye simulator for laser dazzle events.

    PubMed

    Coelho, João M P; Freitas, José; Williamson, Craig A

    2016-03-20

    An optical simulator of the human eye and its application to laser dazzle events are presented. The simulator combines optical design software (ZEMAX) with a scientific programming language (MATLAB) and allows the user to implement and analyze a dazzle scenario using practical, real-world parameters. Contrary to conventional analytical glare analysis, this work uses ray tracing and the scattering model and parameters for each optical element of the eye. The theoretical background of each such element is presented in relation to the model. The overall simulator's calibration, validation, and performance analysis are achieved by comparison with a simpler model based uponCIE disability glare data. Results demonstrate that this kind of advanced optical eye simulation can be used to represent laser dazzle and has the potential to extend the range of applicability of analytical models.

  15. Simplified Optics and Controls for Laser Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Hemmati, Hamid

    2006-01-01

    A document discusses an architecture of a spaceborne laser communication system that provides for a simplified control subsystem that stabilizes the line of sight in a desired direction. Heretofore, a typical design for a spaceborne laser communication system has called for a high-bandwidth control loop, a steering mirror and associated optics, and a fast steering-mirror actuator to stabilize the line of sight in the presence of vibrations. In the present architecture, the need for this fast steering-mirror subsystem is eliminated by mounting the laser-communication optics on a disturbance-free platform (DFP) that suppresses coupling of vibrations to the optics by 60 dB. Taking advantage of microgravitation, in the DFP, the optical assembly is free-flying relative to the rest of the spacecraft, and a low-spring-constant pointing control subsystem exerts small forces to regulate the position and orientation of the optics via voice coils. All steering is effected via the DFP, which can be controlled in all six degrees of freedom relative to the spacecraft. A second control loop, closed around a position sensor and the spacecraft attitude-control system, moves the spacecraft as needed to prevent mechanical contact with the optical assembly.

  16. High Stability Optical Mount for Space Laser Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosciarello, P.; Di Carmine, E.

    2014-06-01

    In the frame of Atmospheric Lidar (ATLID) project, one of the active instruments foreseen to be boarded on the EarthCARE satellite, a high stability optical mount has been designed, developed and tested in order to fulfil the tight program requirements.A description of the design solution developed, manufactured and qualified for the most critical optical mount inside the PLH, located on the Laser Master Oscillator Plate (the laser resonance cavity), is presented. In order to minimize optical mount mass and envelope, the developed solution foresees a glued interface (I/F) between the mechanical support and the mirror.A collection of stability results obtained on the optical mount breadboards is also presented, including a description of environmental tests performed and the way to assess the mirror stability after each environmental test, as well as the acceptance criteria derived in order to establish the flight worthiness of the manufactured and assembled hardware.

  17. Optical turbulence in fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Wabnitz, Stefan

    2014-03-15

    We analyze the nonlinear stage of modulation instability in passively mode-locked fiber lasers leading to chaotic or noise-like emission. We present the phase-transition diagram among different regimes of chaotic emission in terms of the key cavity parameters: amplitude or phase turbulence, and spatio-temporal intermittency.

  18. Electro-Optical Laser Technology. Curriculum Utilization. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nawn, John H.

    This report describes a program to prepare students for employment as laser technicians and laser operators and to ensure that they have the necessary skills required by the industry. The objectives are to prepare a curriculum and syllabus for an associate degree program in Electro-Optical Laser Technology. The 2-year Electro-Optical Laser program…

  19. Exploratory Development on Laser and Optical Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Judd-Ofelt theory, Quantum efficiencies); Laser materials evaluation; Studies of rare-earth doped CdF2, SrF2 , and BaF2 -- (Electroluminescence of semiconducting CdF2, Analyses of the optical spectra of Gd(3+) and Ce(3+)).

  20. Airborne Visible Laser Optical Communications (AVLOC) experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A series of optical communication experiments between a high altitude aircraft at 18.3 km (60,000 ft) and a ground station were conducted by NASA from summer 1972 through winter 1973. The basic system was an optical tracker and transmitter located in each terminal. The aircraft transceiver consisted of a 5-mW HeNe laser transmitter with a 30-megabit modulator. The ground station beacon was an argon laser operating at 488 nm. A separate pulsed laser radar was used for initial acquisition. The objective of the experiment was to obtain engineering data on the precision tracking and communication system performance at both terminals. Atmospheric effects on the system performance was also an experiment objective. The system description, engineering analysis, testing, and flight results are discussed.

  1. Nanosecond pulsed laser texturing of optical diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqurashi, Tawfiq; Sabouri, Aydin; Yetisen, Ali K.; Butt, Haider

    2017-02-01

    High-quality optical glass diffusers have applications in aerospace, displays, imaging systems, medical devices, and optical sensors. The development of rapid and accurate fabrication techniques is highly desirable for their production. Here, a micropatterning method for the fast fabrication of optical diffusers by means of nanosecond pulsed laser ablation is demonstrated (λ=1064 nm, power=7.02, 9.36 and 11.7 W and scanning speed=200 and 800 mm s-1). The experiments were carried out by point-to-point texturing of a glass surface in spiral shape. The laser machining parameters, the number of pulses and their power had significant effect on surface features. The optical characteristics of the diffusers were characterized at different scattering angles. The features of the microscale structures influenced average roughness from 0.8 μm to 1.97 μm. The glass diffusers scattered light at angles up to 20° and their transmission efficiency were measured up to ˜97% across the visible spectrum. The produced optical devices diffuse light less but do so with less scattering and energy losses as compared to opal diffusing glass. The presented fabrication method can be applied to any other transparent material to create optical diffusers. It is anticipated that the optical diffusers presented in this work will have applications in the production of LED spotlights and imaging devices.

  2. Laser-driven polyplanar optic display

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.; Biscardi, C.; Brewster, C.; DeSanto, L.; Beiser, L.

    1998-01-01

    The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. This display screen is 2 inches thick and has a matte-black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. The new display uses a 200 milliwatt green solid-state laser (532 nm) as its optical source. In order to produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments, Inc. A variable astigmatic focusing system is used to produce a stigmatic image on the viewing face of the POD. In addition to the optical design, the authors discuss the DLP chip, the optomechanical design and viewing angle characteristics.

  3. High Average Power Laser Gain Medium With Low Optical Distortion Using A Transverse Flowing Liquid Host

    DOEpatents

    Comaskey, Brian J.; Ault, Earl R.; Kuklo, Thomas C.

    2005-07-05

    A high average power, low optical distortion laser gain media is based on a flowing liquid media. A diode laser pumping device with tailored irradiance excites the laser active atom, ion or molecule within the liquid media. A laser active component of the liquid media exhibits energy storage times longer than or comparable to the thermal optical response time of the liquid. A circulation system that provides a closed loop for mixing and circulating the lasing liquid into and out of the optical cavity includes a pump, a diffuser, and a heat exchanger. A liquid flow gain cell includes flow straighteners and flow channel compression.

  4. Gamma-Radiation-Induced Degradation of Actively Pumped Single-Mode Ytterbium-Doped Optical Laser - Postprint

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    discussed. Keywords: Radiation effects, radiation-induced absorption, gamma irradiation, rare- earth doped fibers, rare- earth doped fiber amplifiers...passive optical fibers have identified that the major mechanism of performance degradation is the creation of absorbing species in the fiber, which in...turn inhibit the transmission of light at certain wavelengths1,2,3,4. In recent years, the use of rare- earth (RE) doped optical fibers has expanded

  5. Laser-optic Measurements of Velocity of Particles in the Powder Stream at Coaxial Laser Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergachev, D. V.; Mikhal'chenko, A. A.; Kovalev, O. B.; Kuz'min, V. I.; Grachev, G. N.; Pinaev, P. A.

    The problems of particle velocity and temperature measurement can be solved with commonly-known methods of registration based on spectrometry and a complex of laser and optical means. The diagnostic technique combines two independent methods of particle velocity measurement, namely the passive way which is based on the intrinsic radiation of the heated particles in a gas flow, and the active one which utilizes the effect of the laser beam scattering. It is demonstrated that the laser radiation can affect significantly the particles velocity at the laser cladding. Presented bar charts of statistical distributions of the particles velocities illustrate two modes of the coaxial nozzle performance, with and without СО2-laser radiation. Different types of powders (Al2O3, Mo, Ni, Al) were used in tests, the particle size distributions were typical for the laser cladding; air, nitrogen, argon were used as working gases, continuous radiation of the СО2 laser reached 3 kW. It is shown that in the laser-radiation field, the powder particles undergo extra acceleration due to the laser evaporation and reactive force occurrence resulting from the recoil pressure vapors from the beamed part of particles' surfaces. The observed effect of particles acceleration depends on the particles concentration in the powder flow. Due to the laser acceleration, the velocities of individual particles may reach the values of about 80 - 100 m/s. The trichromatic pyrometry method was utilized to measure the particles temperature in the powder flow.

  6. A non-critically phase matched KTA optical parametric oscillator intracavity pumped by an actively Q-switched Nd:GYSGG laser with dual signal wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Kai; Guo, Shibei; Wang, Maorong; Mei, Jialin; Xu, Degang; Yao, Jianquan

    2015-06-01

    A non-critically phase matched eye-safe KTA optical parametric oscillator intracavity pumped by a dual-wavelength acousto-optically Q-switched Nd:GYSGG laser is demonstrated. Simultaneous dual signal wavelength at 1525.1 nm/1531.2 nm can be realized using only one laser crystal and one nonlinear crystal. When the absorbed diode pump power at 808 nm is 7.48 W, the maximum output power, single pulse energy and peak power are 296 mW, 2.96 μJ and 6.4 kW, respectively. As the signal wavelengths exactly locates at the absorption band of C2H2, such an Nd:GYSGG/KTA eye-safe laser has good application prospects in differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for C2H2 detection and difference frequency generation for terahertz waves at 0.77 THz.

  7. Adaptive optics and laser guide stars at Lick observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Brase, J.M.

    1994-11-15

    For the past several years LLNL has been developing adaptive optics systems for correction of both atmospheric turbulence effects and thermal distortions in optics for high-power lasers. Our early work focused on adaptive optics for beam control in laser isotope separation and ground-based free electron lasers. We are currently developing innovative adaptive optics and laser systems for sodium laser guide star applications at the University of California`s Lick and Keck Observeratories. This talk will describe our adaptive optics technology and some of its applications in high-resolution imaging and beam control.

  8. Development of Optical Pickup for Digital Versatile Disc Using Two-Wavelength-Integrated Laser Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Mineharu; Ebihara, Takeshi; Omi, Kunio; Kitano, Hisashi; Hoshino, Isao; Mori, Kazushige

    2000-03-01

    A digital versatile disc (DVD)-and compact disc (CD)-compatible optical pickup using a two-wavelength-integrated laser diode (TWIN-LD) has been developed. The TWIN-LD has two emission points in one chip, one for the red laser beam to read out signals from DVDs and the other for the IR laser beam to read out signals from CDs that are arranged along the active layer. With the application of a TWIN-LD to the optical pickup, the necessity for four optical components, namely, a laser diode, photodetector, holographic optical element and dichroic prism, is avoided in comparison with conventional optical pickups. This paper discusses some key points for designing an optical system using a TWIN-LD, and the results of the experiments appling the optical system to an optical pickup 7.3 mm in height.

  9. Catadioptric Optics for laser Doppler velocimeter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.

    1989-01-01

    In the design of a laser velocimeter system, attention must be given to the performance of the optical elements in their two principal tasks: focusing laser radiation into the probe volume, and collecting the scattered light. For large aperture applications, custom lens design and fabrication costs, long optical path requirements, and chromatic aberration (for two color operation) can be problematic. The adaptation of low cost Schmidt-Cassegrain astronomical telescopes to perform these laser beam manipulation and scattered light collection tasks is examined. A generic telescope design is analyzed using ray tracing and Gaussian beam propagation theory, and a simple modification procedure for converting from infinite to near unity conjugate ratio operation with image quality near the diffraction limit was identified. Modification requirements and performance are predicted for a range of geometries. Finally, a 200-mm-aperture telescope was modified for f/10 operation; performance data for this modified optic for both laser beam focusing and scattered light collection tasks agree well with predictions.

  10. Optical bending sensor using distributed feedback solid state dye lasers on optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Hiroyuki; Oomi, Soichiro; Yoshioka, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Oki, Yuji

    2012-07-02

    Novel type of optical fiber sensor was proposed and demonstrated. The print-like fabrication technique fabricates multiple distributed feedback solid state dye lasers on a polymeric optical fiber (POF) with tapered coupling. This multi-active-sidecore structure was easily fabricated and provides multiple functions. Mounting the lasers on the same point of a multimode POF demonstrated a bending radius sensitivity of 20 m without any supports. Two axis directional sensing without cross talk was also confirmed. A more complicated mounting formation can demonstrate a twisted POF. The temperature property of the sensor was also studied, and elimination of the temperature influence was experimentally attained.

  11. Laser action by optically depumping lower states

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, William F.

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus for obtaining laser action between an upper energy level and a lower energy level of a gaseous medium, which comprises populating the upper energy level to some degree (short of achieving a conventional inverted population) by any suitable pumping means, and thereafter establishing an inverted population by transiently and selectively depumping the lower energy level such as by exposing the medium to an intense source of radiation which selectively causes the transformation of the lower energy level species to some other energy level. Thus, a thermally pumped/optically depumped gas laser system is produced.

  12. Laser action by optically depumping lower states

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, W.F.

    1975-11-26

    A method and apparatus are described for obtaining laser action between an upper energy level and a lower energy level of a gaseous medium. The upper energy level is populated to some degree (short of achieving a conventional inverted population) by any suitable pumping means, and an inverted population is established by transiently and selectively depumping the lower energy level. The depumping may be done by exposing the medium to an intense source of radiation which selectively causes the transformation of the lower energy level species to some other energy level. Thus, a thermally pumped/optically depumped gas laser system is produced.

  13. Terahertz graphene lasers: Injection versus optical pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhii, Victor; Otsuji, Taiichi; Ryzhii, Maxim; Mitin, Vladimir

    2013-12-04

    We analyze the formation of nonequilibrium states in optically pumped graphene layers and in forward-biased graphene structures with lateral p-i-n junctions and consider the conditions of population inversion and lasing. The model used accounts for intraband and interband relaxation processes as well as deviation of the optical phonon system from equilibrium. As shown, optical pumping suffers from a significant heating of both the electron-hole plasma and the optical phonon system, which can suppress the formation of population inversion. In the graphene structures with p-i-n junction, the injected electrons and holes have relatively low energies, so that the effect of cooling can be rather pronounced, providing a significant advantage of the injection pumping in realization of graphene terahertz lasers.

  14. Integrated optic chip for laser threat identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAulay, Alastair D.

    2010-04-01

    In this conference last year, we proposed free-space gratings, Fizeau interferometers and wavefront estimation for detecting the different lasers deployed in the battlefield for range finding, target designation, communications, dazzle, location of targets, munitions guidance, and destruction. Since last year, advanced laser weapons of the electron cyclotron type, are in development, such as the free-electron laser, that are tunable and can, unlike conventional bound-electron state lasers, be used at any wavelength from microwaves to soft X-rays. We list the characteristics of the nine dominant laser weapons because we assume that the free-electron lasers will initially use one of the current threat wavelengths because of availability of components and instrumentation. In this paper we replace the free-space grating with a higher performing array waveguide grating integrated optic chip, similar to that used in telecommunications, because integrated circuits are more robust and less expensive. It consists of a star coupler that fans out amongst waveguides of different length followed by a star coupler that focuses different wavelengths to different outputs in order to separate them. Design equations are derived to cover a range of frequencies at specific frequency spacing relevant to this application.

  15. Femtosecond laser polishing of optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lauren L.; Qiao, Jun; Qiao, Jie

    2015-10-01

    Technologies including magnetorheological finishing and CNC polishing are commonly used to finish optical elements, but these methods are often expensive, generate waste through the use of fluids or abrasives, and may not be suited for specific freeform substrates due to the size and shape of finishing tools. Pulsed laser polishing has been demonstrated as a technique capable of achieving nanoscale roughness while offering waste-free fabrication, material-specific processing through direct tuning of laser radiation, and access to freeform shapes using refined beam delivery and focusing techniques. Nanosecond and microsecond pulse duration radiation has been used to perform successful melting-based polishing of a variety of different materials, but this approach leads to extensive heat accumulation resulting in subsurface damage. We have experimentally investigated the ability of femtosecond laser radiation to ablate silicon carbide and silicon. By substituting ultrafast laser radiation, polishing can be performed by direct evaporation of unwanted surface asperities with minimal heating and melting, potentially offering damage-free finishing of materials. Under unoptimized laser processing conditions, thermal effects can occur leading to material oxidation. To investigate these thermal effects, simulation of the heat accumulation mechanism in ultrafast laser ablation was performed. Simulations have been extended to investigate the optimum scanning speed and pulse energy required for processing various substrates. Modeling methodologies and simulation results will be presented.

  16. Active optical zoom system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Wang, Qiong-Hua; Shen, Chuan; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Chun-Mei

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we propose an active optical zoom system. The zoom module of the system is formed by a liquid lens and a spatial light modulator (SLM). By controlling the focal lengths of the liquid lens and the encoded digital lens on the SLM panel, we can change the magnification of an image without mechanical moving parts and keep the output plane stationary. The magnification can change from 1/3 to 3/2 as the focal length of the encoded lens on the SLM changes from infinity to 24 cm. The proposed active zoom system is simple and flexible, and has widespread application in optical communications, imaging systems, and displays.

  17. Lens based adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope.

    PubMed

    Felberer, Franz; Kroisamer, Julia-Sophie; Hitzenberger, Christoph K; Pircher, Michael

    2012-07-30

    We present an alternative approach for an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO). In contrast to other commonly used AO-SLO instruments, the imaging optics consist of lenses. Images of the fovea region of 5 healthy volunteers are recorded. The system is capable to resolve human foveal cones in 3 out of 5 healthy volunteers. Additionally, we investigated the capability of the system to support larger scanning angles (up to 5°) on the retina. Finally, in order to demonstrate the performance of the instrument images of rod photoreceptors are presented.

  18. Resonant activation in bistable semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Lepri, Stefano; Giacomelli, Giovanni

    2007-08-15

    We theoretically investigate the possibility of observing resonant activation in the hopping dynamics of two-mode semiconductor lasers. We present a series of simulations of a rate-equation model under random and periodic modulation of the bias current. In both cases, for an optimal choice of the modulation time scale, the hopping times between the stable lasing modes attain a minimum. The simulation data are understood by means of an effective one-dimensional Langevin equation with multiplicative fluctuations. Our conclusions apply to both edge-emitting and vertical cavity lasers, thus opening the way to several experimental tests in such optical systems.

  19. Guide star lasers for adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, William Thomas, Jr.

    Exploitation of the imaging capabilities of the new generation of ground-based astronomical telescopes relies heavily on Adaptive Optics (AO). Current AO system designs call for sodium guide star lasers capable of producing at least eight Watts of power tuned to the peak of the sodium D2 line, with a high duty cycle to avoid saturation, and with 0.5-1.0 GHz spectral broadening. This work comprises development and testing of six candidate laser systems and materials which may afford a path to achieving these goals. An end-pumped CW dye laser producing 4.0 Watts of tuned output power was developed and used to obtain the first accurate measurement of sodium layer scattering efficiency. Methods of optimizing the laser output through improving pump overlap efficiency and reducing the number of intracavity scattering surfaces are covered. The 1181 nm fluorescence peak of Mn5+ ion in Ba5 (PO4)3Cl could be tuned and doubled to reach 589 nm. While efforts to grow this crystal were under way, the Mn5+ ion in natural apatite (Ca5(PO4)3F) was studied as a potential laser material. Fluorescence saturation measurements and transmission saturation are presented, as well as efforts to obtain CW lasing in natural apatite. A Q-switched laser color-center laser in LiF : F-2 was developed and successfully tuned and doubled to the sodium D 2 line. Broad-band lasing of 80 mW and tuned narrow-band lasing of 35 mW at 1178 nm were obtained with 275 mW of input pump power at 1064 nm. The measured thermal properties of this material indicate its potential for scaling to much higher power. A Q-switched intracavity Raman laser was developed in which CaWO 4 was used to shift a Nd:YAG laser, the frequency-doubled output of which was centered at 589.3 nm. To obtain light at 589.0 nm, a compositionally tuned pump laser of Nd : Y3Ga1.1Al3.9O 12 was produced which generated the desired shift, but was inhomogeneous broadened, limiting the tunable power of the material. Finally, temperature tuning of

  20. Optical polymers for laser medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultanova, Nina G.; Kasarova, Stefka N.; Nikolov, Ivan D.

    2016-01-01

    In medicine, optical polymers are used not only in ophthalmology but in many laser surgical, diagnostic and therapeutic systems. The application in lens design is determined by their refractive and dispersive properties in the considered spectral region. We have used different measuring techniques to obtain precise refractometric data in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. Dispersive, thermal and other important optical characteristics of polymers have been studied. Design of a plastic achromatic objective, used in a surgical stereo-microscope at 1064 nm laser wavelength, is accomplished. Geometrical and wavefront aberrations are calculated. Another example of application of polymers is the designed all-mirror apochromatic micro-lens, intended for superluminescent diode fiber coupling in medical systems.

  1. Optically injected quantum-dot lasers.

    PubMed

    Erneux, T; Viktorov, E A; Kelleher, B; Goulding, D; Hegarty, S P; Huyet, G

    2010-04-01

    The response of an optically injected quantum-dot semiconductor laser (SL) is studied both experimentally and theoretically. In particular, the nature of the locking boundaries is investigated, revealing features more commonly associated with Class A lasers rather than conventional Class B SLs. Experimentally, two features stand out; the first is an absence of instabilities resulting from relaxation oscillations, and the second is the observation of a region of bistability between two locked solutions. Using rate equations appropriate for quantum-dot lasers, we analytically determine the stability diagram in terms of the injection rate and frequency detuning. Of particular interest are the Hopf and saddle-node locking boundaries that explain how the experimentally observed phenomena appear.

  2. Actively coupled optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeeva, N. V.; Barashenkov, I. V.; Rayanov, K.; Flach, S.

    2014-01-01

    We consider light propagation through a pair of nonlinear optical waveguides with absorption, placed in a medium with power gain. The active medium boosts the in-phase component of the overlapping evanescent fields of the guides, while the nonlinearity of the guides couples it to the damped out-of-phase component creating a feedback loop. As a result, the structure exhibits stable stationary and oscillatory regimes in a wide range of gain-loss ratios. We show that the pair of actively coupled (AC) waveguides can act as a stationary or integrate-and-fire comparator sensitive to tiny differences in their input powers.

  3. Use laser-optics for machinery alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, H.P.

    1987-10-01

    Many sources attribute most bearing overload and destructive vibration in industrial machinery to shaft misalignment. There is considerable disagreement as to the alignment quality required. There is also little agreement on suitable calculation methods and achievable accuracy for anticipated thermal growth of machinery (necessary if running alignment is to remain acceptable). This article examines existing alignment quality guidelines for relevance and consistency, and reviews the application of laser-optic alignment systems based on three years of field experience.

  4. Optic cavitation with CW lasers: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Martinez, J. P.; Berrospe-Rodriguez, C.; Aguilar, G.; Ramirez-San-Juan, J. C.; Ramos-Garcia, R.

    2014-12-01

    The most common method to generate optic cavitation involves the focusing of short-pulsed lasers in a transparent liquid media. In this work, we review a novel method of optic cavitation that uses low power CW lasers incident in highly absorbing liquids. This novel method of cavitation is called thermocavitation. Light absorbed heats up the liquid beyond its boiling temperature (spinodal limit) in a time span of microseconds to milliseconds (depending on the optical intensity). Once the liquid is heated up to its spinodal limit (˜300 °C for pure water), the superheated water becomes unstable to random density fluctuations and an explosive phase transition to vapor takes place producing a fast-expanding vapor bubble. Eventually, the bubble collapses emitting a strong shock-wave. The bubble is always attached to the surface taking a semi-spherical shape, in contrast to that produced by pulsed lasers in transparent liquids, where the bubble is produced at the focal point. Using high speed video (105 frames/s), we study the bubble's dynamic behavior. Finally, we show that heat diffusion determines the water superheated volume and, therefore, the amplitude of the shock wave. A full experimental characterization of thermocavitation is described.

  5. LDEF active optical system components experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary report on the Active Optical System Components Experiment is presented. This experiment contained 136 components in a six inch deep tray including lasers, infrared detectors and arrays, ultraviolet light detectors, light-emitting diodes, a light modulator, flash lamps, optical filters, glasses, and samples of surface finishes. Thermal, mechanical, and structural considerations leading to the design of the tray hardware are discussed. In general, changes in the retested component characteristics appear as much related to the passage of time as to the effects of the space environment, but organic materials, multilayer optical interference filters, and extreme-infrared reflectivity of black paints show unexpected changes.

  6. Ring gas lasers with magneto-optical control for laser gyroscopy (invited paper)

    SciTech Connect

    Azarova, V V; Golyaev, Yu D; Dmitriev, Valentin G

    2000-02-28

    The main physical principles of the operation of ring gas lasers in the laser-gyroscope regime are examined. The influence of nonreciprocal effects on the operational parameters of ring gas lasers and the methods of controlling, with the aid of the nonreciprocal magneto-optical Zeeman effect, the parameters of these lasers used in gyroscopes are discussed. (laser gyroscopes)

  7. Optical autofocus for high resolution laser photoplotting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Jose; Crespo, Daniel; Jimenez, Isidoro; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2005-07-01

    An all optical autofocus has been designed and tested for tight line width control in a high NA laser photoplotter system. The laser system is based in a GaN semiconductor laser with power 30 mW and wavelength 405 nm. The advantage of using this laser, despite the relatively long wavenlength, is compactness and easy for high frequency modulation. The autofocus system is based in a secondary 635 nm GaAlAs laser without need for wavelength, neither power stabilization. The two beams are delivered coaxially through the focusing lens by means of a dichroic beamsplitter. Focusing lens need no correction for chromatic aberration, as this is compensed by appropriate autofocus beam divergence. After reflection in the sample, the autofocus beam is separated from the returning writing beam and then guided to a collimation sensor, in which defocus of about 1/20 of the Rayleigh range of the writing beam can be detected and compensated by an analogue PID electronic control. Stable linewidth within 5% is achieved with different numerical aperture focusing lenses.

  8. Nanosecond laser damage of optical multimode fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Guido; Krüger, Jörg

    2016-07-01

    For pulse laser materials processing often optical step index and gradient index multimode fibers with core diameters ranging from 100 to 600 μm are used. The design of a high power fiber transmission system must take into account limitations resulting from both surface and volume damage effects. Especially, breakdown at the fiber end faces and selffocusing in the fiber volume critically influence the fiber performance. At least operation charts are desirable to select the appropriate fiber type for given laser parameters. In industry-relevant studies the influence of fiber core diameter and end face preparation on laser-induced (surface) damage thresholds (LIDT) was investigated for frequently used all-silica fiber types (manufacturer LEONI). Experiments on preform material (initial fiber material) and compact specimens (models of the cladding and coating material) accompanied the tests performed in accordance with the relevant LIDT standards ISO 21254-1 and ISO 21254-2 for 1-on-1 and S-on-1 irradiation conditions, respectively. The relation beam diameter vs. LIDT was investigated for fused silica fibers. Additionally, laser-induced (bulk) damage thresholds of fused silica preform material F300 (manufacturer Heraeus) in dependence on external mechanical stress simulating fiber bending were measured. All experiments were performed with 10-ns laser pulses at 1064 and 532 nm wavelength with a Gaussian beam profile.

  9. Stabilization of class-B broad-area laser emission by external optical injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakhomov, A. V.; Arkhipov, R. M.; Molevich, N. E.

    2017-04-01

    We theoretically examine the effect of external optical injection on the spatio-temporal dynamics of class-B broad-area lasers. We demonstrate that optical injection can efficiently stabilize the intrinsic transverse instabilities in such lasers associated with both the boundaries of the pumping area and with the bulk nonlinearities of the active medium. Stabilizing action of optical injection is shown to be closely related to the suppression of inherent relaxation oscillations behavior.

  10. Laser controlled atom source for optical clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kock, Ole; He, Wei; Świerad, Dariusz; Smith, Lyndsie; Hughes, Joshua; Bongs, Kai; Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-11-01

    Precision timekeeping has been a driving force in innovation, from defining agricultural seasons to atomic clocks enabling satellite navigation, broadband communication and high-speed trading. We are on the verge of a revolution in atomic timekeeping, where optical clocks promise an over thousand-fold improvement in stability and accuracy. However, complex setups and sensitivity to thermal radiation pose limitations to progress. Here we report on an atom source for a strontium optical lattice clock which circumvents these limitations. We demonstrate fast (sub 100 ms), cold and controlled emission of strontium atomic vapours from bulk strontium oxide irradiated by a simple low power diode laser. Our results demonstrate that millions of strontium atoms from the vapour can be captured in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Our method enables over an order of magnitude reduction in scale of the apparatus. Future applications range from satellite clocks testing general relativity to portable clocks for inertial navigation systems and relativistic geodesy.

  11. Laser controlled atom source for optical clocks.

    PubMed

    Kock, Ole; He, Wei; Świerad, Dariusz; Smith, Lyndsie; Hughes, Joshua; Bongs, Kai; Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-11-18

    Precision timekeeping has been a driving force in innovation, from defining agricultural seasons to atomic clocks enabling satellite navigation, broadband communication and high-speed trading. We are on the verge of a revolution in atomic timekeeping, where optical clocks promise an over thousand-fold improvement in stability and accuracy. However, complex setups and sensitivity to thermal radiation pose limitations to progress. Here we report on an atom source for a strontium optical lattice clock which circumvents these limitations. We demonstrate fast (sub 100 ms), cold and controlled emission of strontium atomic vapours from bulk strontium oxide irradiated by a simple low power diode laser. Our results demonstrate that millions of strontium atoms from the vapour can be captured in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Our method enables over an order of magnitude reduction in scale of the apparatus. Future applications range from satellite clocks testing general relativity to portable clocks for inertial navigation systems and relativistic geodesy.

  12. Even Illumination from Fiber-Optic-Coupled Laser Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T.

    2006-01-01

    A method of equipping fiber-optic-coupled laser diodes to evenly illuminate specified fields of view has been proposed. The essence of the method is to shape the tips of the optical fibers into suitably designed diffractive optical elements. One of the main benefits afforded by the method would be more nearly complete utilization of the available light. Diffractive optics is a relatively new field of optics in which laser beams are shaped by use of diffraction instead of refraction.

  13. Optics detection and laser countermeasures on a combat vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöqvist, Lars; Allard, Lars; Pettersson, Magnus; Börjesson, Per; Lindskog, Nils; Bodin, Johan; Widén, Anders; Persson, Hâkan; Fredriksson, Jan; Edström, Sten

    2016-10-01

    Magnifying optical assemblies used for weapon guidance or rifle scopes may possess a threat for a combat vehicle and its personnel. Detection and localisation of optical threats is consequently of interest in military applications. Typically a laser system is used in optics detection, or optical augmentation, to interrogate a scene of interest to localise retroreflected laser radiation. One interesting approach for implementing optics detection on a combat vehicle is to use a continuous scanning scheme. In addition, optics detection can be combined with laser countermeasures, or a laser dazzling function, to efficiently counter an optical threat. An optics detection laser sensor demonstrator has been implemented on a combat vehicle. The sensor consists of a stabilised gimbal and was integrated together with a LEMUR remote electro-optical sight. A narrow laser slit is continuously scanned around the horizon to detect and locate optical threats. Detected threats are presented for the operator within the LEMUR presentation system, and by cueing a countermeasure laser installed in the LEMUR sensor housing threats can be defeated. Results obtained during a field demonstration of the optics detection sensor and the countermeasure laser will be presented. In addition, results obtained using a dual-channel optics detection system designed for false alarm reduction are also discussed.

  14. Packaging considerations of fiber-optic laser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkinen, Veli; Tukkiniemi, Kari; Vaehaekangas, Jouko; Hannula, Tapio

    1991-12-01

    The continuous progress in material and component technology has generated new laser-based applications that require special packaging techniques. Hybrid integration offers a flexible method to accomplish custom design needs. This paper discusses several aspects in fiber optic packaging including optical, thermal, and mechanical issues. Special emphasis is on optical coupling between a laser diode and a single-mode fiber.

  15. Thermo-optic nonlinearity of the laser dye LDS 867 under low power CW laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mary, K. A. Ann; Mary, E. J. Sonia; Vidyadharan, Viji; Philip, Reji; Unnikrishnan, N. V.

    2015-02-01

    Thermally induced optical nonlinearity of the laser dye LDS 867 is studied in ethanol solution using the self phase modulation and closed aperture z-scan techniques, employing a continuous wave low power He-Ne laser beam for excitation. The nonlinear optical (NLO) coefficients are obtained by analyzing the z-scan curve on the basis of the thermal lens model. The dye exhibits a negative thermal nonlinearity which can be inferred from the occurrence of a pre-focal peak followed by a post-focal valley in the z-scan. The large nonlinear refractive index (n2) measured at the excitation wavelength of 633nm reveals that the material is NLO active even at low excitation powers of less than 1 mW. Results indicate that LDS 867 is a promising material for optical power limiting applications.

  16. ARTICLES: Coumarin 6 as the active medium of a dye vapor laser with wide-band optical pumping and specific characteristics of such lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusov, K. K.

    1982-11-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the efficiency of conversion of flashlamp pump radiation to fluorescence of coumarin 6 at a buffer gas pressure of 0-1 MPa. The lasing dynamics of the flashlamppumped vapor of this compound was also studied. It was found that the fluorescence quantum efficiency averaged over the absorption spectrum, which characterized the pump conversion efficiency, was langηrang<=0.3 at a buffer gas pressure of 0-1 MPa. Dependences of langηrang and the rate constant for optical bleaching of the dye on the buffer gas pressure were determined. A comparative analysis of the lasing dynamics of coumarin 6 in vapors and in an ether solution showed that the gas phase had a higher lasing threshold (18-20 times higher) and a larger increment of loss growth in the spectral range of lasing (four times higher). It also had a shorter maximum lasing duration (tmaxapprox500 nsec).

  17. Grating THz laser with optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, Jed; Haji-saeed, Bahareh; Woods, Charles; Kierstead, John

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we present a design for a widely tunable solid-state optically and electrically pumped THz laser based on the Smith-Purcell free-electron laser. In the free-electron laser, an energetic electron beam pumps a metallic grating to generate surface plasmons. Our solid-state optically pumped design consists of a thin layer of dielectic, such as SiNx, sandwiched between a corrugated structure and a thin metal or semiconductor layer. The lower layer is for current streaming, and replaces the electron beam in the original design. The upper layer consists of one micro-grating for coupling the electromagnetic field in, another for coupling out, and a nano-grating for coupling with the current in the lower layer for electromagnetic field generation. The surface plasmon waves generated from the upper layer by an external electromagnetic field, and the lower layer by the applied current, are coupled. Emission enhancement occurs when the plasmonic waves in both layers are resonantly coupled.

  18. Laser guide star adaptive optics: Present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S.S.; Max, C.E.

    1993-03-01

    Feasibility demonstrations using one to two meter telescopes have confirmed the utility of laser beacons as wavefront references for adaptive optics systems. Laser beacon architectures suitable for the new generation of eight and ten meter telescopes are presently under study. This paper reviews the concept of laser guide star adaptive optics and the progress that has been made by groups around the world implementing such systems. A description of the laser guide star program at LLNL and some experimental results is also presented.

  19. Actively mode-locked Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuezong; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Huawei; Fan, Tingwei; Feng, Yan

    2015-07-27

    Active mode-locking of Raman fiber laser is experimentally investigated for the first time. An all fiber connected and polarization maintaining loop cavity of ~500 m long is pumped by a linearly polarized 1120 nm Yb fiber laser and modulated by an acousto-optic modulator. Stable 2 ns width pulse train at 1178 nm is obtained with modulator opening time of > 50 ns. At higher power, pulses become longer, and second order Raman Stokes could take place, which however can be suppressed by adjusting the open time and modulation frequency. Transient pulse evolution measurement confirms the absence of relaxation oscillation in Raman fiber laser. Tuning of repetition rate from 392 kHz to 31.37 MHz is obtained with harmonic mode locking.

  20. Optical Phase Locking of Modelocked Lasers for Particle Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Plettner, T.; Sinha, S.; Wisdom, J.; Colby, E.R.; /SLAC

    2006-02-17

    Particle accelerators require precise phase control of the electric field through the entire accelerator structure. Thus a future laser driven particle accelerator will require optical synchronism between the high-peak power laser sources that power the accelerator. The precise laser architecture for a laser driven particle accelerator is not determined yet, however it is clear that the ability to phase-lock independent modelocked oscillators will be of crucial importance. We report the present status on our work to demonstrate long term phaselocking between two modelocked lasers to within one degree of optical phase and describe the optical synchronization techniques that we employ.

  1. Applications of Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Roorda, Austin

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) describes a set of tools to correct or control aberrations in any optical system. In the eye, AO allows for precise control of the ocular aberrations. If used to correct aberrations over a large pupil, for example, cellular level resolution in retinal images can be achieved. AO systems have been demonstrated for advanced ophthalmoscopy as well as for testing and/or improving vision. In fact, AO can be integrated to any ophthalmic instrument where the optics of the eye is involved, with a scope of applications ranging from phoropters to optical coherence tomography systems. In this paper, I discuss the applications and advantages of using AO in a specific system, the adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope, or AOSLO. Since the Borish award was, in part, awarded to me because of this effort, I felt it appropriate to select this as the topic for this paper. Furthermore, users of AOSLO continue to appreciate the benefits of the technology, some of which were not anticipated at the time of development, and so it is time to revisit this topic and summarize them in a single paper. PMID:20160657

  2. Coumarin 6 as the active medium of a dye vapor laser with wide-band optical pumping and specific characteristics of such lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Trusov, K.K.

    1982-11-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the efficiency of conversion of flashlamp pump radiation to fluorescence of coumarin 6 at a buffer gas pressure of 0--1 MPa. The lasing dynamics of the flashlamp-pumped vapor of this compound was also studied. It was found that the fluorescence quantum efficiency averaged over the absorption spectrum, which characterized the pump conversion efficiency, was < or =0.3 at a buffer gas pressure of 0--1 MPa. Dependences of and the rate constant for optical bleaching of the dye on the buffer gas pressure were determined. A comparative analysis of the lasing dynamics of coumarin 6 in vapors and in an ether solution showed that the gas phase had a higher lasing threshold (18--20 times higher) and a larger increment of loss growth in the spectral range of lasing (four times higher). It also had a shorter maximum lasing duration (t/sub max/roughly-equal500 nsec).

  3. Unstable behavior of lasers and other optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narducci, L. N.; Tredicce, J. R.; Yuan, J. M.; Abraham, N. B.

    1987-11-01

    This final report summarizes the theoretical and experimental activities carried out jointly by the Qauntum Optics Group at Drexel University and the Nonlinear Dynamics and Laser Physics Group at Bryn Mawr College during the period October 15, 1985 to August 31, 1987. The report includes detailed reviews of our major findings in the study of laser dynamics, especially theoretically, but also experimentally, and summaries of other parallel studies on Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) and nonlinear dynamics. Our emphasis has been on the formulation of a generalized version of the Maxwell-Bloch equations for the laser to include transverse degrees of freedom. We have succeeded in developing this model and have investigated in detail its steady state and linear stability properties. Our main result is the discovery of low threshold unstable behaviors and the identification of their physical origin.

  4. Statistical optics applied to high-power glass lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Manes, K.R.; Simmons, W.W.

    1985-04-01

    Multiterawatt laser systems, particularly the Novette system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, are simulated using statistical-optics techniques. The results are compared with experimental observations.

  5. Precision Spectroscopy, Diode Lasers, and Optical Frequency Measurement Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollberg, Leo (Editor); Fox, Richard (Editor); Waltman, Steve (Editor); Robinson, Hugh

    1998-01-01

    This compilation is a selected set of reprints from the Optical Frequency Measurement Group of the Time and Frequency Division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and consists of work published between 1987 and 1997. The two main programs represented here are (1) development of tunable diode-laser technology for scientific applications and precision measurements, and (2) research toward the goal of realizing optical-frequency measurements and synthesis. The papers are organized chronologically in five, somewhat arbitrarily chosen categories: Diode Laser Technology, Tunable Laser Systems, Laser Spectroscopy, Optical Synthesis and Extended Wavelength Coverage, and Multi-Photon Interactions and Optical Coherences.

  6. Optical reprogramming with ultrashort femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans G.; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    The use of sub-15 femtosecond laser pulses in stem cell research is explored with particular emphasis on the optical reprogramming of somatic cells. The reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be evoked through the ectopic expression of defined transcription factors. Conventional approaches utilize retro/lenti-viruses to deliver genes/transcription factors as well as to facilitate the integration of transcription factors into that of the host genome. However, the use of viruses may result in insertional mutations caused by the random integration of genes and as a result, this may limit the use within clinical applications due to the risk of the formation of cancer. In this study, a new approach is demonstrated in realizing non-viral reprogramming through the use of ultrashort laser pulses, to introduce transcription factors into the cell so as to generate iPS cells.

  7. Open-ended projects in undergraduate optics and lasers courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyt, Chad

    This talk will describe the format and experience of undergraduate Lasers and Optics courses at Bethel University. The courses, which include a rigorous lecture portion, are built on open-ended research projects that have a novel aspect. They begin with four weeks of small student groups rotating between several standard laser and optics laboratory exercises. These may include, for example, alignment and characterization of a helium neon laser and measurements with a Michelson interferometer or a scanning Fabry-Pérot optical cavity. During the following seven weeks of the course, student groups (2-4 people) choose and pursue research questions in the lab. Their work culminates in a group manuscript typeset in and a twenty-minute presentation to the class. Projects in the spring, 2014 Optics course included experiments with ultracold lithium atoms in a magneto-optical trap, optical tweezers, digital holography and adaptive optics. Projects in the spring, 2015 Lasers course included ultrafast optics with a mode-locked erbium fiber laser, quantum optics, surface plasmon lasers (led by Nathan Lindquist) and a low-cost, near-infrared spectrometer. Several of these projects are related to larger scale, funded research in the physics department. The format and experience in Lasers and Optics is representative of other upper-level courses at Bethel, including Fluid Mechanics and Computer Methods. A physics education research group from the University of Colorado evaluated the spring, 2015 Lasers course. They focused on student experimental attitudes and measurements of student project ownership.

  8. Optical penetration sensor for pulsed laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Essien, Marcelino; Keicher, David M.; Schlienger, M. Eric; Jellison, James L.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining the penetration of the weld pool created from pulsed laser welding and more particularly to an apparatus and method of utilizing an optical technique to monitor the weld vaporization plume velocity to determine the depth of penetration. A light source directs a beam through a vaporization plume above a weld pool, wherein the plume changes the intensity of the beam, allowing determination of the velocity of the plume. From the velocity of the plume, the depth of the weld is determined.

  9. Optically active quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerard, Valerie; Govan, Joseph; Loudon, Alexander; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Gun'ko, Yurii K.

    2015-10-01

    The main goal of our research is to develop new types of technologically important optically active quantum dot (QD) based materials, study their properties and explore their biological applications. For the first time chiral II-VI QDs have been prepared by us using microwave induced heating with the racemic (Rac), D- and L-enantiomeric forms of penicillamine as stabilisers. Circular dichroism (CD) studies of these QDs have shown that D- and L-penicillamine stabilised particles produced mirror image CD spectra, while the particles prepared with a Rac mixture showed only a weak signal. It was also demonstrated that these QDs show very broad emission bands between 400 and 700 nm due to defects or trap states on the surfaces of the nanocrystals. These QDs have demonstrated highly specific chiral recognition of various biological species including aminoacids. The utilisation of chiral stabilisers also allowed the preparation of new water soluble white emitting CdS nano-tetrapods, which demonstrated circular dichroism in the band-edge region of the spectrum. Biological testing of chiral CdS nanotetrapods displayed a chiral bias for an uptake of the D- penicillamine stabilised nano-tetrapods by cancer cells. It is expected that this research will open new horizons in the chemistry of chiral nanomaterials and their application in nanobiotechnology, medicine and optical chemo- and bio-sensing.

  10. HIGH-EFFICIENCY AUTONOMOUS LASER ADAPTIVE OPTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Hogstrom, Kristina; Bui, Khanh; Dekany, Richard; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Law, Nicholas M.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Burse, Mahesh; Chordia, Pravin; Das, Hillol; Punnadi, Sujit

    2014-07-20

    As new large-scale astronomical surveys greatly increase the number of objects targeted and discoveries made, the requirement for efficient follow-up observations is crucial. Adaptive optics imaging, which compensates for the image-blurring effects of Earth's turbulent atmosphere, is essential for these surveys, but the scarcity, complexity and high demand of current systems limit their availability for following up large numbers of targets. To address this need, we have engineered and implemented Robo-AO, a fully autonomous laser adaptive optics and imaging system that routinely images over 200 objects per night with an acuity 10 times sharper at visible wavelengths than typically possible from the ground. By greatly improving the angular resolution, sensitivity, and efficiency of 1-3 m class telescopes, we have eliminated a major obstacle in the follow-up of the discoveries from current and future large astronomical surveys.

  11. High-efficiency Autonomous Laser Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas M.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Hogstrom, Kristina; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh; Chordia, Pravin; Das, Hillol; Dekany, Richard; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Punnadi, Sujit

    2014-07-01

    As new large-scale astronomical surveys greatly increase the number of objects targeted and discoveries made, the requirement for efficient follow-up observations is crucial. Adaptive optics imaging, which compensates for the image-blurring effects of Earth's turbulent atmosphere, is essential for these surveys, but the scarcity, complexity and high demand of current systems limit their availability for following up large numbers of targets. To address this need, we have engineered and implemented Robo-AO, a fully autonomous laser adaptive optics and imaging system that routinely images over 200 objects per night with an acuity 10 times sharper at visible wavelengths than typically possible from the ground. By greatly improving the angular resolution, sensitivity, and efficiency of 1-3 m class telescopes, we have eliminated a major obstacle in the follow-up of the discoveries from current and future large astronomical surveys.

  12. CO2 laser and plasma microjet process for improving laser optics

    DOEpatents

    Brusasco, Raymond M.; Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Butler, James A.; Grundler, Walter; Governo, George K.

    2003-09-16

    A optic is produced for operation at the fundamental Nd:YAG laser wavelength of 1.06 micrometers through the tripled Nd:YAG laser wavelength of 355 nanometers by the method of reducing or eliminating the growth of laser damage sites in the optics by processing the optics to stop damage in the optics from growing to a predetermined critical size. A system is provided of mitigating the growth of laser-induced damage in optics by virtue of very localized removal of glass and absorbing material.

  13. Feedback and Acousto Optic Isolation Effects on Laser Stability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-03-01

    This paper analyzes the effect of optical feedback on laser frequency stability and the acousto optic isolator concept, which was demonstrated...nonlinearity such as saturation in the laser medium. The analysis mathematically corroborates the initial acousto optic isolator concept and the...limited experimental data available. In the study of the acousto optic isolator, it was determined that an acceptable analytic expression for the

  14. Performance of laser based optical imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Dhrupesh S.; Banerjee, Arup; Vora, Anup; Biswas, Amiya; Patel, Naimesh; Kurulkar, Amit; Dutt, Ashutosh

    2016-05-01

    Day night imaging application requires high dynamic range optical imaging system to detect targets of interest covering mid-day (>32000 Lux)[1], and moonless night ( 1mLux)[1] under clear sky- (visibility of >10km, atmospheric loss of <1dB/km) and hazy (visibility of >500m, atmospheric loss of >15dB/Km) conditions. Major governing factors for development of such camera systems are (i) covert imaging with ability to identify the target, (ii) imaging irrespective to the scene background, (iii) reliable operation , (iv) imaging capabilities in inclement weather conditions, (v) resource requirement vs availability power & mass, (vi) real-time data processing, (vii) self-calibration, and (viii) cost. Identification of optimum spectral band of interest is most important to meet these requirements. Conventional detection systems sensing in MWIR and LWIR band has certain draw backs in terms of target detection capabilities, susceptibility to background and huge thermo-mechanical resource requirement. Alternatively, range gated imaging camera system sensing in NIR/SWIR spectrum has shown significant potential to detect wide dynamic range targets. ToF Camera configured in NIR band has certain advantages in terms of Focal Plane Assembly (FPA) development with large format detectors and thermo-mechanical resource requirement compared to SWIR band camera configuration. In past, ToF camera systems were successfully configured in NIR spectrum using silicon based Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD), Intensifier CCD (ICCD) along with Gating device and pulsed laser source having emission in between 800nm to 900nm. However, these systems have a very low dynamic range and not suitable for clear sky mid-day conditions. Recently silicon based scientific grade CMOS image sensors have shown significant improvement in terms of high NIR responsivity and available in bigger formats (5MP or more), adequate Full well capacity for day time imaging (>30Ke), very low readout noise (<2e) required for

  15. Detection and laser ranging of orbital objects using optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, P.; Hampf, D.; Sproll, F.; Hasenohr, T.; Humbert, L.; Rodmann, J.; Riede, W.

    2016-09-01

    Laser ranging to satellites (SLR) in earth orbit is an established technology used for geodesy, fundamental science and precise orbit determination. A combined active and passive optical measurement system using a single telescope mount is presented which performs precise ranging measurements of retro reflector equipped objects in low earth orbit (LEO). The German Aerospace Center (DLR) runs an observatory in Stuttgart where a system has been assembled completely from commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components. The visible light directed to the tracking camera is used to perform angular measurements of objects under investigation. This is done astrometrically by comparing the apparent target position with cataloged star positions. First successful satellite laser ranging was demonstrated recently using an optical fiber directing laser pulses onto the astronomical mount. The transmitter operates at a wavelength of 1064 nm with a repetition rate of 3 kHz and pulse energy of 25 μJ. A motorized tip/tilt mount allows beam steering of the collimated beam with μrad accuracy. The returning photons reflected from the object in space are captured with the tracking telescope. A special low aberration beam splitter unit was designed to separate the infrared from visible light. This allows passive optical closed loop tracking and operation of a single photon detector for time of flight measurements at a single telescope simultaneously. The presented innovative design yields to a compact and cost effective but very precise ranging system which allows orbit determination.

  16. Free-standing membrane polymer laser on the end of an optical fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Tianrui E-mail: zhangxinping@bjut.edu.cn; Li, Songtao; Hu, Yujie; Wang, Yimeng; Wang, Li; Zhang, Xinping E-mail: zhangxinping@bjut.edu.cn; Chen, Li

    2016-01-25

    One- and two-dimensional distributed feedback cavities were constructed on free-standing polymer membranes using spin-coating and lift-off techniques. Low threshold lasing was generated through feedback amplification when the 290-nm membrane device was optically pumped, which was attributed to the strong confinement mechanism provided by the active waveguide layer without a substrate. The free-standing membrane polymer laser is flexible and can be transplanted. Single- and dual-wavelength fiber lasers were achieved by directly attaching the membrane polymer laser on the optical fiber end face. This technique provides potential to fabricate polymer lasers on surfaces with arbitrary shapes.

  17. LDEF active optical system components experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary report on the Active Optical System Components Experiment is presented. This experiment contained 136 components in a six-inch deep tray including lasers, infrared detectors and arrays, ultraviolet light detectors, light-emitting diodes, a light modulator, flash lamps, optical filters, glasses, and samples of surface finishes. The experimental results for those component characteristics appear as much related to the passage of time as to the effects of the space environment, but organic materials and extreme-infrared reflectivity of black paints show unexpected changes.

  18. Optical diagnostics integrated with laser spark delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Yalin, Azer; Willson, Bryan; Defoort, Morgan; Joshi, Sachin; Reynolds, Adam

    2008-09-02

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

  19. Scanning Optics Enabled Possibilities and Challenges in Laser Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekkarinen, Joonas

    Laser cladding using a scanned beam is quite a similar process than laser cladding using static optics (e.g. lens or mirror optics). The main difference comes from the manipulation of the laser beam. In laser cladding with scanning optics the laser beam is manipulated with a scanner so that the laser's area of influence can be shaped numerically. This increases cladding process flexibility. Scanning optics enable laser beam modification considerably versatile way than normal static optics can. This is due to possibility of numerical adjustment of scanning amplitude, laser power and scanning frequency. By modifying these parameters clad beads geometry can by modified quite freely. However scanned laser beam in surface modification process creates some restricting factors to the process. Mainly limitations for the process parameter values come from the dual characteristics of the energy input. This paper treats usability of scanning optics in laser cladding process in general level. In this paper is discussed how scanned beam can be used to increase the flexibility but also maters that limit the usage of scanned beam in cladding process. Process possibilities and limitations are presented in trough experimental data and examples.

  20. Optical System Design and Integration of the Mercury Laser Altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Scott, V. Stanley, III; Schmidt, Stephen; Britt, Jamie; Mamakos, William; Trunzo, Raymond; Cavanaugh, John; Miller, Roger

    2005-01-01

    The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA). developed for the 2004 MESSENGER mission to Mercury, is designed to measure the planet's topography via laser ranging. A description of the MLA optical system and its measured optical performance during instrument-level and spacecraft-level integration and testing are presented.

  1. CO.sub.2 optically pumped distributed feedback diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Rockwood, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    A diode laser optically pumped by a CO.sub.2 coherent source. Interference fringes generated by feeding the optical pumping beam against a second beam, periodically alter the reflectivity of the diode medium allowing frequency variation of the output signal by varying the impingent angle of the CO.sub.2 laser beams.

  2. Demonstration of cascaded optical inverse free-electron laser accelerator.

    PubMed

    Dunning, M; Hemsing, E; Hast, C; Raubenheimer, T O; Weathersby, S; Xiang, D; Fu, F

    2013-06-14

    We report on a proof-of-principle demonstration of a two-stage cascaded optical inverse free-electron laser (IFEL) accelerator in which an electron beam is accelerated by a strong laser pulse after being packed into optical microbunches by a weaker initial laser pulse. We show experimentally that injection of precisely prepared optical microbunches into an IFEL allows net acceleration or deceleration of the beam, depending on the relative phase of the two laser pulses. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with simulation. The demonstrated technique holds great promise to significantly improve the beam quality of IFELs and may have a strong impact on emerging laser accelerators driven by high-power optical lasers.

  3. The Laser Level as an Optics Laboratory Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutzner, Mickey

    2013-01-01

    For decades now, the laser has been used as a handy device for performing ray traces in geometrical optics demonstrations and laboratories. For many ray- trace applications, I have found the laser level 3 to be even more visually compelling and easy for student use than the laser pointer.

  4. Fiber Optic Laser Delivery For Endarterectomy Of Experimental Atheromas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugene, John; Pollock, Marc E.; McColgan, Stephen J.; Hammer-Wilson, Marie; Berns, Michael W.

    1986-08-01

    Fiber optic delivery of argon ion laser energy and Nd-YAG laser energy were compared by the performance of open laser endarterectomy in the rabbit arteriosclerosis model. In Group I, 6 open laser endarterectomies were performed with an argon ion laser (488 nm and 514.5 nm) with the laser beam directed through a 400 pm quartz fiber optic. In Group II, 6 open laser endarterectomies were performed with a Nd-YAG laser (1.06 pm) with the laser beam directed through a 600 pm quartz fiber optic. Gross and light microscopic examination revealed smooth endarterectomy surfaces with tapered end points in Group I. In Group II, the endarterectomy surfaces were uneven and perforation occurred at 5/6 end points. Although energy could be precisely delivered with each laser by fiber optics, satisfactory results could only be achieved with the argon ion laser because argon ion energy was well absorbed by atheromas. Successful intravascular laser use requires a strong interaction between wavelength and atheroma as well as a precise delivery system.

  5. Permanent laser conditioning of thin film optical materials

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, C.R.; Kozlowski, M.R.; Campbell, J.H.; Staggs, M.; Rainer, F.

    1995-12-05

    The invention comprises a method for producing optical thin films with a high laser damage threshold and the resulting thin films. The laser damage threshold of the thin films is permanently increased by irradiating the thin films with a fluence below an unconditioned laser damage threshold. 9 figs.

  6. Permanent laser conditioning of thin film optical materials

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, C. Robert; Kozlowski, Mark R.; Campbell, John H.; Staggs, Michael; Rainer, Frank

    1995-01-01

    The invention comprises a method for producing optical thin films with a high laser damage threshold and the resulting thin films. The laser damage threshold of the thin films is permanently increased by irradiating the thin films with a fluence below an unconditioned laser damage threshold.

  7. The Laser Level as an Optics Laboratory Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutzner, Mickey

    2013-12-01

    For decades now, the laser has been used as a handy device for performing ray traces in geometrical optics demonstrations and laboratories. , 2 For many ray- trace applications, I have found the laser level3 to be even more visually compelling and easy for student use than the laser pointer.

  8. Laser controlled atom source for optical clocks

    PubMed Central

    Kock, Ole; He, Wei; Świerad, Dariusz; Smith, Lyndsie; Hughes, Joshua; Bongs, Kai; Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-01-01

    Precision timekeeping has been a driving force in innovation, from defining agricultural seasons to atomic clocks enabling satellite navigation, broadband communication and high-speed trading. We are on the verge of a revolution in atomic timekeeping, where optical clocks promise an over thousand-fold improvement in stability and accuracy. However, complex setups and sensitivity to thermal radiation pose limitations to progress. Here we report on an atom source for a strontium optical lattice clock which circumvents these limitations. We demonstrate fast (sub 100 ms), cold and controlled emission of strontium atomic vapours from bulk strontium oxide irradiated by a simple low power diode laser. Our results demonstrate that millions of strontium atoms from the vapour can be captured in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Our method enables over an order of magnitude reduction in scale of the apparatus. Future applications range from satellite clocks testing general relativity to portable clocks for inertial navigation systems and relativistic geodesy. PMID:27857214

  9. Robotic visible-light laser adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh; Chordia, Pravin; Das, Hillol; Dekany, Richard; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Punnadi, Sujit

    2013-12-01

    Robo-AO is the first autonomous laser adaptive optics system and science instrument operating on sky. With minimal human oversight, the system robotically executes large scale surveys, monitors long-term astrophysical dynamics and characterizes newly discovered transients, all at the visible diffraction limit. The adaptive optics setup time, from the end of the telescope slew to the beginning of an observation, is a mere ~50-60 s, enabling over 200 observations per night. The first of many envisioned systems has finished 58 nights of science observing at the Palomar Observatory 60-inch (1.5 m) telescope, with over 6,400 robotic observations executed thus far. The system will be augmented in late 2013 with a low-noise wide field infrared camera, which doubles as a tip-tilt sensor, to widen the spectral bandwidth of observations and increase available sky coverage while also enabling deeper visible imaging using adaptive-optics sharpened infrared tip-tilt guide sources. Techniques applicable to larger telescope systems will also be tested: the infrared camera will be used to demonstrate advanced multiple region-of-interest tip-tilt guiding methods, and a visitor instrument port will be used for evaluation of other instrumentation, e.g. single-mode and photonic fibers to feed compact spectrographs.

  10. Predicting threshold and location of laser damage on optical surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Siekhaus, Wigbert

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus useful in the prediction of the damage threshold of various optical devices, the location of weak spots on such devices and the location, identification, and elimination of optical surface impurities comprising, a focused and pulsed laser, an photo electric detector/imaging means, and a timer. The weak spots emit photoelectrons when subjected to laser intensities that are less than the intensity actually required to produce the damage. The weak spots may be eliminated by sustained exposure to the laser beam.

  11. Optically-Based Diagnostics for Gas-Phase Laser Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Phase Laser Development Acknowledgement of Support and Disclaimer This material is based upon work supported by Air Force Office of Scientific...00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Optically-Based Diagnostics for Gas-Phase Laser Development 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...Sciences Inc. Role of Optical Diagnostics in High Energy Gas Laser Development  Chemically rich, energetic, reacting flow with competing phenomena

  12. Continued Optical Sensor Operations in a Laser Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    Power (W) Aperture (mm) Intensity at target (W/m2) Gain of laser to desired signal handheld 532 0.5 1.5 1120 @ 25 km 5.6 × 1024 Industrial diode ...AIR UNIVERSITY AIR WAR COLLEGE Continued Optical Sensor Operations in a Laser Environment WILLIAM J. DIEHL Commander, USN...COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Continued Optical Sensor Operations in a Laser Environment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  13. Short Pulse Nd: YAG Laser for Optical Fuze Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    guidance systems or optical communications links. The primary concern of this work was optical proximity fuze systems, so the Nd:YAG laser system has been...AD-A099 042 HARRY DIAMOND LASS AOELPMI MO F/6 19/1 SHORT PULSE NO: YAG LASER FOR OPTICAL FUZE APPLICATIONS.(U) FEB 81 R WELLMAN, 4 NEMARICH...Subtitle) S TYPE OF I IPoRT & PERIOD COVERED Short Pulse Nd:YAG Laser for Optical Fuze Applications& _Technical t .,-Itp -PERFORMING OR;5. REPO*T NIUBER

  14. Use of optical skin phantoms for calibration of dermatological lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, M. S.; Sekowska, A.; Marchwiński, M.; Galla, S.; Cenian, A.

    2016-09-01

    A wide range of dermatological diseases can be efficiently treated using laser heating. Nevertheless, before the new laser is introduced into clinical practice, its parameters and ability to interact with human skin have to be carefully examined. In order to do that optical skin phantoms can be used. Such phantoms closely imitate the scattering and absorption properties of real human skin tissue along with its thermal properties, such as capacitance and conductivity specific heat. We have fabricated a range of optical tissue phantoms based on polyvinylchloride-plastisol PVC-P with varying optical properties, including the absorption, scattering and density of the matrix material. We have utilized a pre-clinical dermatological laser system with a 975 nm diode laser module. A range of laser settings were tested, such as laser pulse duration, laser power and number of pulses. We have studied laser irradiation efficiency on fabricated optical tissue phantoms. Measurements of the temporal and spatial temperature distribution on the phantoms' surface were performed using thermographic imaging. The comparison of results between tissues' and phantoms' optical and thermal response prove that they can be used for approximate evaluation of laser heating efficiency. This study presents a viable approach for calibration of dermatological lasers which can be utilized in practice.

  15. Advances in lasers and optical micro-nano-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurell, F.; Fazio, E.

    2010-09-01

    Lasers represent a well consolidated technology: nevertheless, research in this field remains very active and productive, in both basic and applied directions. At the moment significant attention is given to those sources that bring together high power and compactness. Such high power lasers find important applications for material treatments and such applications are presented by Ehsani et al and Saiedeh Saghafi et al, in the treatment of dielectric thin films (Alteration of optical and morphological properties of polycarbonate illuminated by visible/IR laser beams) or of biological tissues like pistachio seeds (Investigating the effects of laser beams (532 and 660 nm) in annihilation of pistachio mould fungus using spectrophotometry analysis). In particular the latter paper show how laser sources can find very important applications in new domains, preserving goods and food without the need for preservatives or pesticides by simply sterilizing them using light. Optical Micro and Nano Systems presents a new domain for exploration. In this framework this special issue is very attractive, because it assembles papers reporting new results in three directions: new techniques for monitoring integrated micro- and nano-systems, new integrated systems and novel high performance metamaterial configurations. Integrated micro-components can be monitored and controlled using reflectance measurements as presented by Piombini et al (Toward the reflectance measurement of micro components). Speckle formation during laser beam reflection can also be a very sophisticated tool for detecting ultra-precise displacements, as presented by Filter et al (High resolution displacement detection with speckles : accuracy limits in linear displacement speckle metrology). Three dimensional integrated optical structures is indeed a big challenge and a peculiarity of photonics, they can be formed through traditional holography or using more sophisticated and novel ! technologies. Thus, special

  16. Influence of laser beam characteristics and focusing optics on optical laser-induced breakdown detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, C.; Hauser, W.

    2009-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD) is a well established technique for measuring size and concentration of inorganic colloids in liquids. However, most applications of LIBD are restricted to the measurement of mean sizes, which is problematic in cases of wide colloid size distributions (PSD) as typically is the case in natural systems. Evaluation of PSDs from LIBD is possible but requires detailed control of the power density within the laser focus. In the present work we describe the mathematical treatment how to calculate this power density from the beam characteristics of the light source and the optical properties of the focusing optics. The results are compared to measured spatial distributions of breakdown events of three LIBD setups.

  17. Laser-Induced Heating in Optical Traps

    PubMed Central

    Peterman, Erwin J. G.; Gittes, Frederick; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2003-01-01

    In an optical tweezers experiment intense laser light is tightly focused to intensities of MW/cm2 in order to apply forces to submicron particles or to measure mechanical properties of macromolecules. It is important to quantify potentially harmful or misleading heating effects due to the high light intensities in biophysical experiments. We present a model that incorporates the geometry of the experiment in a physically correct manner, including heat generation by light absorption in the neighborhood of the focus, balanced by outward heat flow, and heat sinking by the glass surfaces of the sample chamber. This is in contrast to the earlier simple models assuming heat generation in the trapped particle only. We find that in the most common experimental circumstances, using micron-sized polystyrene or silica beads, absorption of the laser light in the solvent around the trapped particle, not in the particle itself, is the most important contribution to heating. To validate our model we measured the spectrum of the Brownian motion of trapped beads in water and in glycerol as a function of the trapping laser intensity. Heating both increases the thermal motion of the bead and decreases the viscosity of the medium. We measured that the temperature in the focus increased by 34.2 ± 0.1 K/W with 1064-nm laser light for 2200-nm-diameter polystyrene beads in glycerol, 43.8 ± 2.2 K/W for 840-nm polystyrene beads in glycerol, 41.1 ± 0.7 K/W for 502-nm polystyrene beads in glycerol, and 7.7 ± 1.2 K/W for 500-nm silica beads and 8.1 ± 2.1 K/W for 444-nm silica beads in water. Furthermore, we observed that in glycerol the heating effect increased when the bead was trapped further away from the cover glass/glycerol interface as predicted by the model. We show that even though the heating effect in water is rather small it can have non-negligible effects on trap calibration in typical biophysical experimental circumstances and should be taken into consideration when laser

  18. Advanced Laser Chemical Processing For Microelectronics and Integrated Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-15

    Barbara, CA (June 25-27, 1990). 15. R.M. Osgood, Jr., " Laser - Fabrication for Integrated Electronics and Optics," OITDA Conference, Tokyo, Japan, (July 5...Society Meeting, Boston, MA, November 26 - December 3, 1990. 20. R.M. Osgood, Jr., "Advances in Laser Fabrication for Solid-State Electronics and...Thin, Excimer Laser-Deposited Cd Interlayers," J. Elec. Mat. 12, 1239 (July, 1990). 14. R.M. Osgood, Jr., " Laser - Fabrication for Solid State

  19. Nonlinear optics with coherent free electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bencivenga, F.; Capotondi, F.; Mincigrucci, R.; Cucini, R.; Manfredda, M.; Pedersoli, E.; Principi, E.; Simoncig, A.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2016-12-01

    We interpreted the recent construction of free electron laser (FELs) facilities worldwide as an unprecedented opportunity to bring concepts and methods from the scientific community working with optical lasers into the domain of x-ray science. This motivated our efforts towards the realization of FEL-based wave-mixing applications. In this article we present new extreme ultraviolet transient grating (X-TG) data from vitreous SiO2, collected using two crossed FEL pulses (photon frequency 38 eV) to generate the X-TG and a phase matched optical probing pulse (photon frequency 3.1 eV). This experiment extends our previous investigation, which was carried out on a nominally identical sample using a different FEL photon frequency (45 eV) to excite the X-TG. The present data are featured by a peak intensity of the X-TG signal substantially larger than that previously reported and by slower modulations of the X-TG signal at positive delays. These differences could be ascribed to the different FEL photon energy used in the two experiments or to differences in the sample properties. A systematic X-TG study on the same sample as a function of the FEL wavelength is needed to draw a consistent conclusion. We also discuss how the advances in the performance of the FELs, in terms of generation of fully coherent photon pulses and multi-color FEL emission, may push the development of original experimental strategies to study matter at the femtosecond-nanometer time-length scales, with the unique option of element and chemical state specificity. This would allow the development of advanced experimental tools based on wave-mixing processes, which may have a tremendous impact in the study of a large array of phenomena, ranging from nano-dynamics in complex materials to charge and energy transfer processes.

  20. Temporal laser pulse manipulation using multiple optical ring-cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet (Inventor); Kojima, Jun (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An optical pulse stretcher and a mathematical algorithm for the detailed calculation of its design and performance is disclosed. The optical pulse stretcher has a plurality of optical cavities, having multiple optical reflectors such that an optical path length in each of the optical cavities is different. The optical pulse stretcher also has a plurality of beam splitters, each of which intercepts a portion of an input optical beam and diverts the portion into one of the plurality of optical cavities. The input optical beam is stretched and a power of an output beam is reduced after passing through the optical pulse stretcher and the placement of the plurality of optical cavities and beam splitters is optimized through a model that takes into account optical beam divergence and alignment in the pluralities of the optical cavities. The optical pulse stretcher system can also function as a high-repetition-rate (MHz) laser pulse generator, making it suitable for use as a stroboscopic light source for high speed ballistic projectile imaging studies, or it can be used for high speed flow diagnostics using a laser light sheet with digital particle imaging velocimetry. The optical pulse stretcher system can also be implemented using fiber optic components to realize a rugged and compact optical system that is alignment free and easy to use.

  1. Single cell induced optical confinement in biological lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, M.; Dietrich, C. P.; Schubert, M.; Samuel, I. D. W.; Turnbull, G. A.; Gather, M. C.

    2017-03-01

    Biological single cell lasers have shown great potential for fundamental research and next generation sensing applications. In this study, the potential of fluorescent biological cells as refractive index landscapes and active optical elements is investigated using a combined Fourier- and hyperspectral imaging technique. We show that the refractive index contrast between cell and surrounding leads to 3D confinement of photons inside living cells. The Fourier- and real-space emission characteristics of these biological lasers are closely related and can be predicted from one another. Investigations of the lasing threshold for different energy and momentum position in Fourier-space give insight into the fundamental creation of longitudinal and transverse lasing modes within the cell. These findings corroborate the potential of living biological materials for precision engineering of photonic structures and may pave the way towards low threshold polariton lasing from single cells.

  2. Optical multiaccess free-space laser communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lun; Zhang, Li-Zhong; Wang, Chao; An, Yan; Hu, Yuan

    2016-08-01

    With urgent demand for an integrated information network and development of free-space laser communication technology, research on high-rate laser communication networking technology is vital. This study analyzed the technical difficulties related to space laser communication networking and proposed a laser communication networking solution. A wide-angle beam expander and dual-rotating prism group were incorporated into a multiaccess optical laser communication antenna. The wide-angle beam expander collects signal light from different directions; the dual-rotating prism group tracks different targets simultaneously. This paper presents an overall scheme allowing multiaccess free-space laser communications based on the optical antenna described and the associated relay optics and transceiver subsystems.

  3. Analysis of adaptive laser scanning optical system with focus-tunable components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorný, P.; Mikš, A.; Novák, J.; Novák, P.

    2015-05-01

    This work presents a primary analysis of an adaptive laser scanner based on two-mirror beam-steering device and focustunable components (lenses with tunable focal length). It is proposed an optical scheme of an adaptive laser scanner, which can focus the laser beam in a continuous way to a required spatial position using the lens with tunable focal length. This work focuses on a detailed analysis of the active optical or opto-mechanical components (e.g. focus-tunable lenses) mounted in the optical systems of laser scanners. The algebraic formulas are derived for ray tracing through different configurations of the scanning optical system and one can calculate angles of scanner mirrors and required focal length of the tunable-focus component provided that the position of the focused beam in 3D space is given with a required tolerance. Computer simulations of the proposed system are performed using MATLAB.

  4. Large aperture adaptive optics for intense lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneuville, François; Ropert, Laurent; Sauvageot, Paul; Theis, Sébastien

    2015-05-01

    ISP SYSTEM has developed a range of large aperture electro-mechanical deformable mirrors (DM) suitable for ultra short pulsed intense lasers. The design of the MD-AME deformable mirror is based on force application on numerous locations thanks to electromechanical actuators driven by stepper motors. DM design and assembly method have been adapted to large aperture beams and the performances were evaluated on a first application for a beam with a diameter of 250mm at 45° angle of incidence. A Strehl ratio above 0.9 was reached for this application. Simulations were correlated with measurements on optical bench and the design has been validated by calculation for very large aperture (up to Ø550mm). Optical aberrations up to Zernike order 5 can be corrected with a very low residual error as for actual MD-AME mirror. Amplitude can reach up to several hundreds of μm for low order corrections. Hysteresis is lower than 0.1% and linearity better than 99%. Contrary to piezo-electric actuators, the μ-AME actuators avoid print-through effects and they permit to keep the mirror shape stable even unpowered, providing a high resistance to electro-magnetic pulses. The MD-AME mirrors can be adapted to circular, square or elliptical beams and they are compatible with all dielectric or metallic coatings.

  5. Remote chemical sensing by laser optical pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, C.G.; Magnotta, F.

    1996-08-01

    We are exploring a new approach to remote chemical identification that promises higher precision than can be achieved by conventional DIAL approaches. This technique also addresses and potentially solves the problem of detecting a target gas in the presence of an interfering gas or gases. This new approach utilizes an eye-safe infrared optical pumping pulse to deplete the population of a specific rotational level(s) and then sends probe pulses at the same or different wavelengths to interrogate the bleaching of the absorption. We have experimentally measured optical saturation fluence level at atmospheric pressure for HCl, and find this level to be {approximately}1 mJ/cm{sup 2}, significantly below eye-safe limits in agreement with calculations. Calculations have been performed on other molecules of interest with similar results. In the laboratory, using time-delay-replicated pulses at a single frequency we have made absorption measurements with precision levels routinely approaching 0.1% after averaging 200 laser pulses. These results as well as those of two other pulse experiments will be presented. 5 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Enhanced Performance of Large 3(omega) Optics Using UV and IR Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, R R; Bruere, J; Peterson, J; Halpin, J; Borden, M; Hackel, R P

    2003-11-01

    We have developed techniques using small-beam raster scanning to laser-condition fused silica optics to increase their damage threshold. Further, we showed that CO{sub 2} lasers could be used to mitigate and stabilize damage sites while still on the order of a few tens of microns in size, thereby greatly increasing the lifetime of an optic. We recently activated the Phoenix pre-production facility to condition and mitigate optics as large as 43 cm x 43 cm. Several full-scale optics have been processed in Phoenix. The optics were first photographed using a damage mapping system to identify scratches, digs, or other potential sites for initiation of laser damage. We then condition the optic, raster scanning with the excimer laser. The first scan is performed at a low fluence. A damage map is then acquired and any new damage sites or any sites that have grown in size are mitigated using the CO{sub 2} laser. The process is repeated at successively higher fluences until a factor of 1.7 above the nominal operating fluence is reached. After conditioning, optics were tested in a large beam 3{omega} laser and showed no damage at fluences of 8 J/cm{sup 2} average.

  7. Integrated semiconductor twin-microdisk laser under mutually optical injection

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Ling-Xiu; Liu, Bo-Wen; Lv, Xiao-Meng; Yang, Yue-De; Xiao, Jin-Long; Huang, Yong-Zhen

    2015-05-11

    We experimentally study the characteristics of an integrated semiconductor twin-microdisk laser under mutually optical injection through a connected optical waveguide. Based on the lasing spectra, four-wave mixing, injection locking, and period-two oscillation states are observed due to the mutually optical injection by adjusting the injected currents applied to the two microdisks. The enhanced 3 dB bandwidth is realized for the microdisk laser at the injection locking state, and photonic microwave is obtained from the electrode of the microdisk laser under the period-two oscillation state. The plentifully dynamical states similar as semiconductor lasers subject to external optical injection are realized due to strong optical interaction between the two microdisks.

  8. Advances in laser and tissue interactions: laser microbeams and optical trapping (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, Alexander A.; Makropoulou, Mersini; Papadopoulos, Dimitris; Papagiakoumou, Eirini; Pietreanu, D.

    2005-04-01

    The increasing use of lasers in biomedical research and clinical praxis leads to the development and application of new, non-invasive, therapeutic, surgical and diagnostic techniques. In laser surgery, the theory of ablation dictates that pulsed mid-infrared laser beams exhibit strong absorption by soft and hard tissues, restricting residual thermal damage to a minimum zone. Therefore, the development of high quality 3 μm lasers is considered to be an alternative for precise laser ablation of tissue. Among them are the high quality oscillator-two stages amplifier lasers developed, which will be described in this article. The beam quality delivered by these lasers to the biological tissue is of great importance in cutting and ablating operations. As the precision of the ablation is increased, the cutting laser interventions could well move to the microsurgery field. Recently, the combination of a laser scalpel with an optical trapping device, under microscopy control, is becoming increasingly important. Optical manipulation of microscopic particles by focused laser beams, is now widely used as a powerful tool for 'non-contact' micromanipulation of cells and organelles. Several laser sources are employed for trapping and varying laser powers are used in a broad range of applications of optical tweezers. For most of the lasers used, the focal spot of the trapping beam is of the order of a micron. As the trapped objects can vary in size from hundreds of nanometres to hundreds of microns, the technique has recently invaded in to the nanocosomos of genes and molecules. However, the use of optical trapping for quantitative research into biophysical processes requires accurate calculation of the optical forces and torques acting within the trap. The research and development efforts towards a mid-IR microbeam laser system, the design and realization efforts towards a visible laser trapping system and the first results obtained using a relatively new calibration method to

  9. Active materials for integrated optic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, Joseph S.; Funk, David S.; Veasey, David L.; Peters, Philip M.; Sanford, Norman A.

    1999-11-01

    The ability to engineer glass properties through the selection and adjustment of chemical composition continues to make glass a leading material in both active and passive applications. The development of optimal glass compositions for integrated optical applications requires a number of considerations that are often at variance with one another. Of critical importance is that the glass offers compatibility with standard ion exchange technologies, allowing fabrication of guided wave structures. In addition, for application as an active material, the resultant structures must be characterized by absence of inclusions and low absorption at the lasing wavelength, putting demands on both the selection and identity of the raw materials used to prepare the glass. We report on the development of an optimized glass composition for integrated optic applications that combines good laser properties with good chemical durability allowing for a wide range of chemical processing steps to be employed without substrate deterioration. In addition, care was taken during the development of this glass to insure that the selected composition was consistent with manufacturing technology for producing high optical quality glass. We present the properties of the resultant glasses, including results of detailed chemical and laser properties, for use in the design and modeling of active waveguides prepared with these glasses.

  10. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE PAGES

    Minitti, Michael P.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Coffee, Ryan N.; ...

    2015-04-22

    Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump–probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump–probe experiments to be performed at LCLS.

  11. Active Faraday optical frequency standard.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2014-11-01

    We propose the mechanism of an active Faraday optical clock, and experimentally demonstrate an active Faraday optical frequency standard based on narrow bandwidth Faraday atomic filter by the method of velocity-selective optical pumping of cesium vapor. The center frequency of the active Faraday optical frequency standard is determined by the cesium 6 (2)S(1/2) F=4 to 6 (2)P(3/2) F'=4 and 5 crossover transition line. The optical heterodyne beat between two similar independent setups shows that the frequency linewidth reaches 281(23) Hz, which is 1.9×10(4) times smaller than the natural linewidth of the cesium 852-nm transition line. The maximum emitted light power reaches 75 μW. The active Faraday optical frequency standard reported here has advantages of narrow linewidth and reduced cavity pulling, which can readily be extended to other atomic transition lines of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms trapped in optical lattices at magic wavelengths, making it useful for new generation of optical atomic clocks.

  12. Continued Optical Sensor Operations in a Laser Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-16

    NOTE AIR WAR COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY CONTINUED OPTICAL SENSOR OPERATIONS IN A LASER ENVIRONMENT by William J. Diehl, CDR, USN A Research...1 Optical Region of the Electromagnetic Spectrum….………..……………………….….…2 Introduction to Lasers ...Optical Sensor Vulnerabilities to Lasers …………………………………….12 Recommendations………………………….……………………………………….……20 Conclusion

  13. Pulse laser assist optical tweezers (PLAT) with long-duration pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Saki; Sugiura, Tadao; Minato, Kotaro

    2011-07-01

    Optical tweezers is a technique to trap and to manipulate micron sized objects under a microscope by radiation pressure force exerted by a laser beam. Optical tweezers has been utilized for single-molecular measurements of force exerted by molecular interactions and for cell palpation. To extend applications of optical tweezers we have developed a novel optical tweezers system combined with a pulse laser. We utilize a pulse laser (Q-switched Nd: YAG laser, wavelength of 1064 nm) to assist manipulations by conventional optical tweezers with a continuous wave (CW) laser. The pulse laser beam is introduced into the same optics for conventional optical tweezers. In principle, instantaneous radiation force is proportional to instantaneous power of laser beam. As a result, pulse laser beam generates strong instantaneous force on an object to be manipulated. If the radiation force becomes strong enough to get over an obstacle structure and/or to be released from adhesion, the object will be free from these difficulties. We investigate the effect of pulse laser assistance with changing pulse duration of the laser. We report optimum pulse duration of 100 ns to 200 ns deduced from motion analysis of a particle in a beam spot. Our goal is to realize in-vivo manipulation and operation of a cell. For this purpose we need to reduce light energy of pulse laser beam and to avoid laser induced breakdown caused by strong light field. So we have developed a pulse laser with 160-ns pulse duration and have confirmed that availability on manipulation of living cells.

  14. Reliability of high power laser diodes with external optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonsendorf, Dennis; Schneider, Stephan; Meinschien, Jens; Tomm, Jens W.

    2016-03-01

    Direct diode laser systems gain importance in the fields of material processing and solid-state laser pumping. With increased output power, also the influence of strong optical feedback has to be considered. Uncontrolled optical feedback is known for its spectral and power fluctuation effects, as well as potential emitter damage. We found that even intended feedback by use of volume Bragg gratings (VBG) for spectral stabilization may result in emitter lifetime reduction. To provide stable and reliable laser systems design, guidelines and maximum feedback ratings have to be found. We present a model to estimate the optical feedback power coupled back into the laser diode waveguide. It includes several origins of optical feedback and wide range of optical elements. The failure thresholds of InGaAs and AlGaAs bars have been determined not only at standard operation mode but at various working points. The influence of several feedback levels to laser diode lifetime is investigated up to 4000h. The analysis of the semiconductor itself leads to a better understanding of the degradation process by defect spread. Facet microscopy, LBIC- and electroluminescence measurements deliver detailed information about semiconductor defects before and after aging tests. Laser diode protection systems can monitor optical feedback. With this improved understanding, the emergency shutdown threshold can be set low enough to ensure laser diode reliability but also high enough to provide better machine usability avoiding false alarms.

  15. Laser Safety Method For Duplex Open Loop Parallel Optical Link

    DOEpatents

    Baumgartner, Steven John; Hedin, Daniel Scott; Paschal, Matthew James

    2003-12-02

    A method and apparatus are provided to ensure that laser optical power does not exceed a "safe" level in an open loop parallel optical link in the event that a fiber optic ribbon cable is broken or otherwise severed. A duplex parallel optical link includes a transmitter and receiver pair and a fiber optic ribbon that includes a designated number of channels that cannot be split. The duplex transceiver includes a corresponding transmitter and receiver that are physically attached to each other and cannot be detached therefrom, so as to ensure safe, laser optical power in the event that the fiber optic ribbon cable is broken or severed. Safe optical power is ensured by redundant current and voltage safety checks.

  16. Label-free optical activation of astrocyte in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Myunghwan; Yoon, Jonghee; Ku, Taeyun; Choi, Kyungsun; Choi, Chulhee

    2011-07-01

    As the most abundant cell type in the central nervous system, astrocyte has been one of main research topics in neuroscience. Although various tools have been developed, at present, there is no tool that allows noninvasive activation of astrocyte in vivo without genetic or pharmacological perturbation. Here we report a noninvasive label-free optical method for physiological astrocyte activation in vivo using a femtosecond pulsed laser. We showed the laser stimulation robustly induced astrocytic calcium activation in vivo and further verified physiological relevance of the calcium increase by demonstrating astrocyte mediated vasodilation in the brain. This novel optical method will facilitate noninvasive physiological study on astrocyte function.

  17. Laser-Induced Damage Threshold and Certification Procedures for Optical Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This document provides instructions for performing laser-induced-damage-threshold tests and pass-fail certification tests on optical materials used in pulsed-laser systems. The optical materials to which these procedures apply include coated and uncoated optical substrates, laser crystals, Q-switches, polarizers, and other optical components employed in pulsed-laser systems.

  18. Laser-Based Acousto-Optic Uplink Communications Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-18

    An apparatus for enabling acousto - optic communication comprising an in-water platform comprising means for emitting an acoustic signal to an acousto ...portion of the first interrogation beam and a second laser beam formed from the reflection of the first interrogation beam off of the acousto - optic interaction... optic interaction zone, an in-air platform comprising the ability for transmitting a first optical interrogation beam, the ability for receiving a

  19. Optics and photonics research in the Lasers, Optics and Remote Sensing Department at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons-Potter, K.; Meister, D.C.

    1997-04-01

    Photonic system and device technologies have claimed a significant share of the current high-tech market. In particular, laser systems and optical devices impact a broad range of technological areas including telecommunications, optical computing, optical data storage, integrated photonics, remote environmental sensing and biomedical applications. Below we present an overview of photonics research being conducted within the Lasers, Optics and Remote Sensing department of the Physical and Chemical Sciences Center at Sandia National Laboratories. Recent results in the fields of photosensitive materials and devices, binary optics device applications, wavelength generation using optical parametric oscillators, and remote sensing are highlighted. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Binary Arithmetic Using Optical Symbolic Substitution and Cascadable Surface-Emitting Laser Logic Devices,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    LOGIC DEVICES, *OPTICAL CIRCUITS, *OPTICAL SWITCHING, HETEROJUNCTIONS, PHOTOTRANSISTORS, ELECTROOPTICS, LASER CAVITIES, OPTICAL PROCESSING, PARALLEL PROCESSING, BISTABLE DEVICES, GATES(CIRCUITS), VOLTAGE, BINARY ARITHMETIC .

  1. Method and apparatus for efficient operation of optically pumped laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sipes, Jr., Donald L. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    An optically pumped single mode laser, e.g., Nd:YAG crystal (20) with planoconcave mirrors is increased in efficiency by an order of magnitude to about 8% by optics (25, 27) for focusing the high power multimode output of laser diode arrays (21, 22) into the mode volume (20') of the laser medium (20). A plurality of these optically pumped single mode lasers (1-4) may be cascaded in a ring with dichroic mirrors (M.sub.1 -M.sub.4) at the corners for coupling in the laser diode arrays, each having its own means for spatially tailoring its beam to concentrate pump distribution inside the lasing mode volume of the medium. An InGaAlAs pump diode (30) with its wavelength the same as the lasing medium makes the ring unidirectional.

  2. Optically pumped Cs vapor lasers: pump-to-laser beam overlap optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auslender, Ilya; Cohen, Tom; Lebiush, Eyal; Barmashenko, Boris D.; Rosenwaks, Salman

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of an experimental study of Ti:Sapphire pumped Cs laser and theoretical modeling of these results, where we focused on the influence of the pump-to-laser beam overlap, a crucial parameter for optimizing the output laser power. The dependence of the output laser power on the incident pump power was found for varying pump beam cross-section widths and for a constant laser beam. Maximum laser power > 370 mW with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 43% and slope efficiency 55% was obtained. Non monotonic dependence of the laser power and threshold power on the pump beam radius (at a given pump power) was observed with a maximum laser power and minimum threshold power achieved at the ratio 0.7 between the optimal pump beam and laser beam radius. A simple optical model of the laser, where Gaussian spatial shapes of the pump and laser intensities in any cross section of the beams were assumed, was compared to the experiments. Good agreement was obtained between the measured and calculated dependence of the laser power on the incident pump power at different pump beam radii and of the laser power, threshold power and optimal temperature on the pump beam radius. The model does not use empirical parameters such as mode overlap efficiency but rather the pump and laser beam spatial shapes as input parameters. This model can be applied to different optically pumped alkali lasers with arbitrary spatial distributions of the pump and laser beam widths.

  3. Laser beaming demonstrations at the Starfire Optical Range

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, R.J.; Meister, D.C.; Tucker, S.; Leatherman, P.; Fugate, R.Q.; Maes, C.; Lange, W.J.; Cowan, W.

    1995-03-01

    The ability to acquire, track, and accurately direct a laser beam to a satellite is crucial for power-beaming and laser-communications. To assess the state of the art in this area, a team consisting of Air Force Phillips Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and COMSAT Corporation personnel performed some laser beaming demonstrations to various satellites. A ruby laser and a frequency-doubled YAG laser were used with the Phillips Lab Starfire Optical Range (SOR) beam director for this activity. The ruby laser projected 20 J in 6 ms out the telescope with a beam divergence that increased from 1.4 to 4 times the diffraction limit during that time. The doubled YAG projected 0.09 J in 10 ns at 20 Hz. The SOR team demonstrated the ability to move rapidly to a satellite, center it in the telescope, then lock onto it with the tracker, and establish illumination. Several low-earth-orbit satellites with corner-cube retro-reflectors were illuminated at ranges from 1000 to 6000 km with a beam divergence estimated to be about 20 {mu}radians. The return signal from the ruby laser was collected in a 15-cm telescope, detected by a photomultiplier tube, and recorded at 400 kHz. Rapid variations in intensity (as short at 15 {mu}s) were noted, which may be due to speckles caused by phase interference from light reflected from different retro-reflectors on the satellite. The return light from the YAG was collected by a 35-cm telescope and detected by an intensified CCD camera. The satellite brightened by about a factor of 30 in the sunlight when the laser was turned on, and dimmed back to normal when the 50-{mu}radian point-ahead was turned off. The satellite was illuminated at 1 Hz as it entered the earth`s shadow and followed for about 10 seconds in the shadow. In another demonstration, four neighboring GEO satellites were located and centered in succession with a 3.5-m telescope at a rate of about 16 seconds per satellite.

  4. Optical ordance system for use in explosive ordnance disposal activities

    SciTech Connect

    Merson, J.A.; Salas, F.J.; Helsel, F.M.

    1994-01-01

    A portable hand-held solid state rod laser system and an optically-ignited detonator have been developed for use in explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) activities. Laser prototypes from Whittaker Ordnance and Universal Propulsion have been tested and evaluated. The optical detonator contains 2-(5 cyanotetrazolato) pentaamine cobalt III perchlorate (CP) as the DDT column and the explosive Octahydro 1, 3, 5, 7 -- tetranitro -- 1, 3, 5, 7 -- tetrazocine (HMX) as the output charge. The laser is designed to have an output of 150 mJ in a 500 microsecond pulse. This output allows firing through 2000 meters of optical fiber. The detonator can also be ignited with a portable laser diode source through a shorter length of fiber.

  5. Optical ordnance system for use in explosive ordnance disposal activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merson, J. A.; Salas, F. J.; Helsel, F.M.

    1994-01-01

    A portable hand-held solid state rod laser system and an optically-ignited detonator have been developed for use in explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) activities. Laser prototypes from Whittaker Ordnance and Universal Propulsion have been tested and evaluated. The optical detonator contains 2-(5 cyanotetrazolato) pentaamine cobalt(III) perchlorate (CP) as the DDT column and the explosive Octahydro- 1,3,5,7 - tetrazocine (HMX) as the output charge. The laser is designed to have an output of 150 mJ in a 500 microsecond pulse. This output allows firing through 2000 meters of optical fiber. The detonator can also be ignited with a portable laser diode source through a shorter length of fiber.

  6. Diffractive-optics-based beam combination of a phase-locked fiber laser array.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Eric C; Ho, James G; Goodno, Gregory D; Rice, Robert R; Rothenberg, Josh; Thielen, Peter; Weber, Mark; Wickham, Michael

    2008-02-15

    A diffractive optical element (DOE) is used as a beam combiner for an actively phase-locked array of fiber lasers. Use of a DOE eliminates the far-field sidelobes and the accompanying loss of beam quality typically observed in tiled coherent laser arrays. Using this technique, we demonstrated coherent combination of five fiber lasers with 91% efficiency and M2=1.04. Combination efficiency and phase locking is robust even with large amplitude and phase fluctuations on the input laser array elements. Calculations and power handling measurements suggest that this approach can scale to both high channel counts and high powers.

  7. Integrated Electro-optical Laser-Beam Scanners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boord, Warren T.

    1990-01-01

    Scanners using solid-state devices compact, consume little power, and have no moving parts. Integrated electro-optical laser scanner, in conjunction with external lens, points outgoing beam of light in any number of different directions, depending on number of upper electrodes. Offers beam-deflection angles larger than those of acousto-optic scanners. Proposed for such diverse applications as nonimpact laser printing, color imaging, ranging, barcode reading, and robotic vision.

  8. Erbium Doped GaN Lasers by Optical Pumping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-13

    P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Er doped GaN, gain medium, high energy laser, optical pump REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR...Nanophotonics Center, Texas Tech University Lubbock, TX 79409-3102 jingyu.lin@ttu.edu; hx.jiang@ttu.edu I. Summary of Progress High energy and...emerging technologies. The optical gain medium is the heart of a high energy laser (HEL) system. Comparing with the presently dominant gain material

  9. Green laser light activates the inner ear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Gentiana I.; Balster, Sven; Zhang, Kaiyin; Lim, Hubert H.; Reich, Uta; Massow, Ole; Lubatschowski, Holger; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Lenarz, Thomas; Reuter, Guenter

    2009-07-01

    The hearing performance with conventional hearing aids and cochlear implants is dramatically reduced in noisy environments and for sounds more complex than speech (e. g. music), partially due to the lack of localized sensorineural activation across different frequency regions with these devices. Laser light can be focused in a controlled manner and may provide more localized activation of the inner ear, the cochlea. We sought to assess whether visible light with parameters that could induce an optoacoustic effect (532 nm, 10-ns pulses) would activate the cochlea. Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were recorded preoperatively in anesthetized guinea pigs to confirm normal hearing. After opening the bulla, a 50-μm core-diameter optical fiber was positioned in the round window niche and directed toward the basilar membrane. Optically induced ABRs (OABRs), similar in shape to those of acoustic stimulation, were elicited with single pulses. The OABR peaks increased with energy level (0.6 to 23 μJ/pulse) and remained consistent even after 30 minutes of continuous stimulation at 13 μJ, indicating minimal or no stimulation-induced damage within the cochlea. Our findings demonstrate that visible light can effectively and reliably activate the cochlea without any apparent damage. Further studies are in progress to investigate the frequency-specific nature and mechanism of green light cochlear activation.

  10. Combination of a 2-D acousto-optic deflector with laser amplifier for efficient scanning of a Q-switched ND:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maák, P.; Jakab, L.; Richter, P. I.; Brignon, A.; Huignard, J.-P.

    2000-03-01

    A two-dimensional acousto-optic deflector has been combined with a large angular acceptance, laser diode-pumped Nd:YAG optical amplifier in order to obtain a scanning system with high angular resolution and with high and uniform optical transmission. Experiments have been carried out in order to optimize the set-up for intensity distribution and optical losses. The combination of newly developed nonlinear and active optical elements provides a relatively uniform intensity distribution over the scanned region corresponding to 300×300 discrete points in the back focal plane of a Fourier lens, at laser pulse energy levels of 1-5 mJ.

  11. Optical communication with semiconductor laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, F.

    1988-01-01

    Slot timing recovery in a direct detection optical PPM communication system can be achieved by processing the photodetector waveform with a nonlinear device whose output forms the input to a phase lock group. The choice of a simple transition detector as the nonlinearity is shown to give satisfactory synchronization performance. The rms phase error of the recovered slot clock and the effect of slot timing jitter on the bit error probability were directly measured. The experimental system consisted of an AlGaAs laser diode (lambda = 834 nm) and a silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) photodetector and used Q=4 PPM signaling operated at a source data rate of 25 megabits/second. The mathematical model developed to characterize system performance is shown to be in good agreement with actual performance measurements. The use of the recovered slot clock in the receiver resulted in no degradation in receiver sensitivity compared to a system with perfect slot timing. The system achieved a bit error probability of 10 to the minus 6 power at received signal energies corresponding to an average of less than 60 detected photons per information bit.

  12. Optical communication with semiconductor laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, F.

    1987-01-01

    A 25 megabit/sec direct detection optical communication system that used Q=4 PPM signalling was constructed and its performance measured under laboratory conditions. The system used a single-mode AlGaAs laser diode transmitter and low noise silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) photodetector. Comparison of measured performance with the theoretical revealed that modeling the APD output as a Gaussian process under conditions of negligible background radiation and low (less than 10 to the -12 power A) APD bulk leakage currents leads to substantial underestimates of optimal APD gain to use and overestimates of system bit error probability. A procedure is given to numerically compute system performance which uses the more accurate Webb's Approximation of the exact Conradi distribution for the APD ouput signal that does not require excessive amounts of computer time (a few minutes of VAX 8600 CPU time per system operating point). Examples are given which illustrate the breakdown of the Gaussian approximation in assessing system performance. This system achieved a bit error probability of 10 to the -6 power at a received signal energy corresponding to an average of 60 absorbed photons/bit and optimal APD gain of 700.

  13. Review of antireflective surface structures on laser optics and windows.

    PubMed

    Busse, Lynda E; Frantz, Jesse A; Shaw, L Brandon; Aggarwal, Ishwar D; Sanghera, Jasbinder S

    2015-11-01

    We present recent advancements in structured, antireflective surfaces on optics, including crystals for high-energy lasers as well as windows for the infrared wavelength region. These structured surfaces have been characterized and show high transmission and laser damage thresholds, making them attractive for these applications. We also present successful tests of windows with antireflective surfaces that were exposed to simulated harsh environments for the application of these laser systems.

  14. Laser guide stars and adaptive optics for astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Max, C.E.

    1992-07-15

    Five papers are included: feasibility experiment for sodium-alyer laser guide stars at LLNL; system design for a high power sodium beacon laser; sodium guide star adaptive optics system for astronomical imaging in the visible and near-infrared; high frame-rate, large field wavefront sensor; and resolution limits for ground-based astronomical imaging. Figs, tabs, refs.

  15. Machining of optical microstructures with 157 nm laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temme, Thorsten; Ostendorf, Andreas; Kulik, Christian J.

    2003-11-01

    The precision machining of glass by laser ablation has been expanded with the short wavelength of the 157 nm of the F2 excimer laser. The high absorption of this wavelength in any optical glass, especially in UV-grade fused silica, offers a new approach to generate high quality surfaces, addressing also micro-optical components. In this paper, the machining of basic diffractive and refractive optical components and the required machining and process technology is presented. Applications that are addressed are cylindrical and rotational symmetrical micro lenses and diffractive optics like phase transmission grating and diffractive optical elements (DOEs). These optical surfaces have been machined into bulk material as well as on fiber end surfaces, to achieve compact (electro) -- optical elements with high functionality and packaging density. The short wavelength of 157 nm used in the investigations require either vacuum or high purity inert gas environments. The influence of different ambient conditions is presented.

  16. Optical properties of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) during nanosecond laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankova, N. E.; Atanasov, P. A.; Nikov, Ru. G.; Nikov, R. G.; Nedyalkov, N. N.; Stoyanchov, T. R.; Fukata, N.; Kolev, K. N.; Valova, E. I.; Georgieva, J. S.; Armyanov, St. A.

    2016-06-01

    This article presents experimental investigations of effects of the process parameters on the medical grade polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer processed by laser source with irradiation at UV (266 and 355 nm), VIS (532 nm) and NIR (1064 nm). Systematic experiments are done to characterize how the laser beam parameters (wavelength, fluence, and number of pulses) affect the optical properties and the chemical composition in the laser treated areas. Remarkable changes of the optical properties and the chemical composition are observed. Despite the low optical absorption of the native PDMS for UV, VIS and NIR wavelengths, successful laser treatment is accomplished due to the incubation process occurring below the polymer surface. With increasing of the fluence and the number of the pulses chemical transformations are revealed in the entire laser treated area and hence decreasing of the optical transmittance is observed. The incubation gets saturation after a certain number of pulses and the laser ablation of the material begins efficiently. At the UV and VIS wavelengths the number of the initial pulses, at which the optical transmittance begins to reduce, decreases from 16 up to 8 with increasing of the laser fluence up to 1.0, 2.5 and 10 J cm-2 for 266, 355 and 532 nm, respectively. In the case of 1064 nm the optical transmittance begins to reduce at 11th pulse incident at a fluence of 13 J cm-2 and the number of the pulses decreases to 8 when the fluence reaches value of 16 J cm-2. The threshold laser fluence needed to induce incubation process after certain number of pulses of 8 is different for every wavelength irradiation as the values increase from 1.0 for 266 nm up to 16 J cm-2 for 1064 nm. The incubation and the ablation processes occur in the PDMS elastomer material during its pulsed laser treatment are a complex function of the wavelength, fluence, number of pulses and the material properties as well.

  17. Characterization of the Los Alamos IPG YLR-6000 fiber laser using multiple optical paths and laser focusing optics

    SciTech Connect

    Milewski, John O; Bernal, John E

    2009-01-01

    Fiber laser technology has been identified as the replacement power source for the existing Los Alamos TA-55 production laser welding system. An IPG YLR-6000 fiber laser was purchased, installed at SM-66 R3, and accepted in February 2008. No characterization of the laser and no welding was performed in the Feb 2008 to May 2009 interval. T. Lienert and J. Bernal (Ref. 1, July 2009) determined the existing 200 mm Rofin collimator and focus heads used with the Rofin diode pumped lasers were inadequate for use with the IPG laser due to clipping of the IPG laser beam. Further efforts in testing of the IPG laser with Optoskand fiber delivery optics and a Rofin 120 mm collimator proved problematic due to optical fiber damage. As a result, IPG design optical fibers were purchased as replacements for subsequent testing. Within the same interval, an IPG fiber-to-fiber (F2F) connector, custom built for LANL, (J. Milewski, S. Gravener, Ref.2) was demonstrated and accepted at IPG Oxford, MA in August 2009. An IPG service person was contracted to come to LANL to assist in the installation, training, troubleshooting and characterization of the multiple beam paths and help perform laser head optics characterization. The statement of work is provided below: In summary the laser system, optical fibers, F2F connector, Precitec head, and a modified Rofin type (w/120mm Optoskand collimator) IWindowIBoot system focus head (Figure 1) were shown to perform well at powers up to 6 kW CW. Power measurements, laser spot size measurements, and other characterization data and lessons learned are contained within this report. In addition, a number of issues were identified that will require future resolution.

  18. Active Stand-off Detection of Gas Leaks Using a Short Range Hard-target Backscatter Differential Optical Absorption System Based on a Quantum Cascade Laser Transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Adrian; Thomas, Benjamin; Castillo, Paulo; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2016-06-01

    Fugitive gas emissions from agricultural or industrial plants and gas pipelines are an important environmental concern as they can contribute to the global increase of greenhouse gas concentration. Moreover, they are also a security and safety concern because of possible risk of fire/explosion or toxicity. This study presents gas concentration measurements using a quantum cascade laser open path system (QCLOPS). The system retrieves the pathaveraged concentration of N2O and CH4 by collecting the backscattered light from a scattering target. The gas concentration measurements have a high temporal resolution (68 ms) and are achieved at sufficient range (up to 40 m, ~ 130 feet) with a detection limit of 2.6 ppm CH4 and 0.4 ppm for N2O. Given these characteristics, this system is promising for mobile/multidirectional remote detection and evaluation of gas leaks. The instrument is monostatic with a tunable QCL emitting at ~ 7.7 μm wavelength range. The backscattered radiation is collected by a Newtonian telescope and focused on an infrared light detector. Puffs of N2O and CH4 are released along the optical path to simulate a gas leak. The measured absorption spectrum is obtained using the thermal intra-pulse frequency chirped DFB QCL and is analyzed to obtain path averaged gas concentrations.

  19. Skin optical clearing for improvement of laser tattoo removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkatov, A. N.; Genina, E. A.; Tuchin, V. V.; Altshuler, G. B.

    2009-06-01

    The possibility of improvement of laser tattoo removal due to the optical clearing of human skin is investigated. It is shown experimentally that previously perforation of skin stratum corneum allows increasing tattoo image contrast at topical administration of immersion agent in contrast with non-perforated skin. Computer Monte Carlo simulation shows that at the optical clearing of upper skin layers the tattoo image contrast and the photon fraction absorbed in the tattoo area at the depths of 0.5 or 1.0 mm increase, that allows significant decreasing of the power of laser radiation used at laser thermolysis.

  20. The Adaptive Optics Summer School Laboratory Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammons, S. M.; Severson, S.; Armstrong, J. D.; Crossfield, I.; Do, T.; Fitzgerald, M.; Harrington, D.; Hickenbotham, A.; Hunter, J.; Johnson, J.; Johnson, L.; Li, K.; Lu, J.; Maness, H.; Morzinski, K.; Norton, A.; Putnam, N.; Roorda, A.; Rossi, E.; Yelda, S.

    2010-12-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) is a new and rapidly expanding field of instrumentation, yet astronomers, vision scientists, and general AO practitioners are largely unfamiliar with the root technologies crucial to AO systems. The AO Summer School (AOSS), sponsored by the Center for Adaptive Optics, is a week-long course for training graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in the underlying theory, design, and use of AO systems. AOSS participants include astronomers who expect to utilize AO data, vision scientists who will use AO instruments to conduct research, opticians and engineers who design AO systems, and users of high-bandwidth laser communication systems. In this article we describe new AOSS laboratory sessions implemented in 2006-2009 for nearly 250 students. The activity goals include boosting familiarity with AO technologies, reinforcing knowledge of optical alignment techniques and the design of optical systems, and encouraging inquiry into critical scientific questions in vision science using AO systems as a research tool. The activities are divided into three stations: Vision Science, Fourier Optics, and the AO Demonstrator. We briefly overview these activities, which are described fully in other articles in these conference proceedings (Putnam et al., Do et al., and Harrington et al., respectively). We devote attention to the unique challenges encountered in the design of these activities, including the marriage of inquiry-like investigation techniques with complex content and the need to tune depth to a graduate- and PhD-level audience. According to before-after surveys conducted in 2008, the vast majority of participants found that all activities were valuable to their careers, although direct experience with integrated, functional AO systems was particularly beneficial.

  1. Optical bistability and multistability in an active interferometer.

    PubMed

    Ohtsubo, J; Liu, Y

    1990-07-01

    Optoelectronic hybrid bistability and multistability in an active interferometer using a laser diode are demonstrated experimentally. The active laser-diode interferometer is composed of a Twyman-Green interferometer with an electronic feedback circuit. By feeding back the interferometer output together with an external light input through a detector to control thelaser-diode injection current, the optical bistable and multistable states of the output power from the laser diode are observed. Bistable operation does not require cutoff or saturation in the amplifier. The theoretical background of the phenomena is discussed.

  2. Laser Measurement of Optical Errors of the Eye

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colicchia, Giuseppe; Wiesner, Hartmut

    2006-01-01

    One way to motivate students' interest in physics is to teach it in the context of medicine. Optics, for example, can be taught with examples from the eye. For many years simple optics of lenses has been taught using a model of the eye. However, recent advances in using lasers for ophthalmological (ocular) examinations can be used to increase…

  3. Optical logic and signal processing using a semiconductor laser diode-based optical bistability device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuancheng; Song, Qian; He, Shaowei

    1995-02-01

    Using an optical fibre-coupled semiconductor laser diode OBD with output feedback pumping operation in 5 modes (differential gain, bistability, zero-bias, inverted differential gain, and inverted bistability) has been realized respectively, and 5 elementary optical logic functions (AND, OR, NOT, NAND, and NOR) and some optical signal processing such as limiting, reshaping, and triggering have been implemented.

  4. Acousto-optical imaging using a powerful long pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Guy; Blouin, Alain; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre

    2008-06-01

    Acousto-optical imaging is an emerging biodiagnostic technique which provides an optical spectroscopic signature and a spatial localization of an optically absorbing target embedded in a strongly scattering medium. The transverse resolution of the technique is determined by the lateral extent of ultrasound beam focal zone while the axial resolution is obtained by using short ultrasound pulses. Although very promising for medical diagnostic, the practical application of this technique is presently limited by its poor sensitivity. Moreover, any method to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio must obviously satisfy the in vivo safety limits regarding the acceptable power level of both the ultrasonic pressure wave and the laser beam. In this paper, we propose to improve the sensitivity by using a pulsed single-frequency laser source to raise the optical peak power applied to the scattering medium and to collect more ultrasonically tagged photons. Such a laser source also allows illuminating the tissues mainly during the transit time of the ultrasonic wave to maintain the average optical power below the maximum permissible exposure. In our experiment, a single-frequency Nd:YAG laser emitting 500-μs pulses with a peak power superior to 100 W was used. Photons were tagged in few-cm thick optical phantoms with tone bursts generated by an ultrasonic transducer. Tagged photons were detected with a GaAs photorefractive interferometer characterized by a large optical etendue to process simultaneously a large number of speckle grains. When pumped by high intensity laser pulses, such an interferometer also provides the fast response time essential to obtain an apparatus insensitive to the speckle decorrelation due to mechanical vibrations or tissues movements. The use of a powerful long pulse laser appears promising to enhance the signal level in ultrasound modulated optical imaging. When combined with a photorefractive interferometer of large optical etendue, such a source could

  5. Laser based analysis using a passively Q-switched laser employing analysis electronics and a means for detecting atomic optical emission of the laser media

    DOEpatents

    Woodruff, Steven D.; Mcintyre, Dustin L.

    2016-03-29

    A device for Laser based Analysis using a Passively Q-Switched Laser comprising an optical pumping source optically connected to a laser media. The laser media and a Q-switch are positioned between and optically connected to a high reflectivity mirror (HR) and an output coupler (OC) along an optical axis. The output coupler (OC) is optically connected to the output lens along the optical axis. A means for detecting atomic optical emission comprises a filter and a light detector. The optical filter is optically connected to the laser media and the optical detector. A control system is connected to the optical detector and the analysis electronics. The analysis electronics are optically connected to the output lens. The detection of the large scale laser output production triggers the control system to initiate the precise timing and data collection from the detector and analysis.

  6. Optical response in a laser-driven quantum pseudodot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, D. Gul; Sakiroglu, S.; Ungan, F.; Yesilgul, U.; Kasapoglu, E.; Sari, H.; Sokmen, I.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate theoretically the intense laser-induced optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in a two-dimensional quantum pseudodot system under an uniform magnetic field. The effects of non-resonant, monochromatic intense laser field upon the system are treated within the framework of high-frequency Floquet approach in which the system is supposed to be governed by a laser-dressed potential. Linear and nonlinear absorption coefficients and relative changes in the refractive index are obtained by means of the compact-density matrix approach and iterative method. The results of numerical calculations for a typical GaAs quantum dot reveal that the optical response depends strongly on the magnitude of external magnetic field and characteristic parameters of the confinement potential. Moreover, we have demonstrated that the intense laser field modifies the confinement and thereby causes remarkable changes in the linear and nonlinear optical properties of the system.

  7. CO2 laser beam propagation with ZnSe optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, K. H.; Liu, Yi; Holdridge, D. J.

    Beam propagation characteristics of ZnSe optics used in kiloWatt power CO2 laser aided material processing applications are determined using the Prometec Laser Beam Analyzer. The laser used was a Rofin Sinar RS6000 CO2 laser with mode aperturing. Beam power varied from 500W to 6300W and beam modes used were TEM(sub 00), TEM(sub 01), TEM(sub 10), and TEM(sub 20). Both transmissive and reflective optics were examined. The ZnSe lenses tested included meniscus, diffractive, and cylindrical lenses of 5 in. focal length and a 10 in. focal length integrating lens. Reflective optics included an integrator and a 5 in. focal length parabolic mirror for welding. Parameters obtained included beam propagation profiles, intensity profiles, depth of focus, spot size, and back focal length. A subset of the data obtained is presented here. Details of the work will appear in a full length paper.

  8. A Large Aperture, High Energy Laser System for Optics and Optical Component Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Nostrand, M C; Weiland, T L; Luthi, R L; Vickers, J L; Sell, W D; Stanley, J A; Honig, J; Auerbach, J; Hackel, R P; Wegner, P J

    2003-11-01

    A large aperture, kJ-class, multi-wavelength Nd-glass laser system has been constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Lab which has unique capabilities for studying a wide variety of optical phenomena. The master-oscillator, power-amplifier (MOPA) configuration of this ''Optical Sciences Laser'' (OSL) produces 1053 nm radiation with shaped pulse lengths which are variable from 0.1-100 ns. The output can be frequency doubled or tripled with high conversion efficiency with a resultant 100 cm{sup 2} high quality output beam. This facility can accommodate prototype hardware for large-scale inertial confinement fusion lasers allowing for investigation of integrated system issues such as optical lifetime at high fluence, optics contamination, compatibility of non-optical materials, and laser diagnostics.

  9. Laser transmitter assembly for the Optical Communication Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmati, Hamid; Copeland, David J.

    1994-08-01

    A modulated fiber-coupled diode laser assembly has been developed. This module will serve as the laser transmitter assembly for the Optical Communication Demonstrator (OCD) system. The laser is capable of greater than 20 mW of output at 100 Mbps Q-PPM modulation. It consists of a high-speed driver, a controller to maintain output amplitude under varying duty cycles, and a temperature controller to control output wavelength. The driver provides over 280 mA of peak modulation current with an optical pulse risetime of approximately 1 ns. The switching speed is limited by the inductance of the laser mount and the cable connecting the driver to the mount. The laser is coupled to a single-mode polarization preserving fiber that can feed directly into the telescope assembly of OCD.

  10. Automatic Laser Glare Suppression in Electro-Optical Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Ritt, Gunnar; Eberle, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Progress in laser technology has led to very compact but nevertheless powerful laser sources. In the visible and near infrared spectral region, lasers of any wavelength can be purchased. Continuous wave laser sources pose an especially serious threat to the human eye and electro-optical sensors due to their high proliferation and easy availability. The manifold of available wavelengths cannot be covered by conventional safety measures like absorption or interference filters. We present a protection concept for electro-optical sensors to suppress dazzling in the visible spectral region. The key element of the concept is the use of a digital micromirror device (DMD) in combination with wavelength multiplexing. This approach allows selective spectral filtering in defined regions of interest in the scene. The system offers the possibility of automatic attenuation of dazzling laser radiation. PMID:25569754

  11. Propagation of Complex Laser Pulses in Optically Dense Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetterman, M. R.; Davis, J. C.; Goswami, D.; Yang, W.; Warren, W. S.

    1999-05-01

    Ultrafast laser pulses with complex envelopes (amplitude and frequency modulated) are used to excite an optically dense column of rubidium vapor. Pulse reshaping, stimulated emission dynamics, and residual electronic excitation in the Rb vapor are all shown to depend strongly on the laser pulse shape. Pulses that produce adiabatic passage in the optically thin limit exhibit more complex behavior in optically thick samples, including an unexpected dependence on the sign of the frequency sweep. Numerical solutions of the Maxwell-Bloch equations are shown to account for our results.

  12. Calculations of laser cavity dumping for optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. L.; Rayman, M. D.

    1988-01-01

    For deep-space pulse-position modulation (PPM) optical communication links using Nd:YAG lasers, two types of laser transmitter modulation techniques are available for efficiently producing laser pulses over a broad range of repetition rates: Q-switching and cavity dumping. The desired modulation scheme is dependent on the required pulse repetition frequency and link parameters. These two techniques are discussed, theoretical and numerical calculations of the internal energy of the laser cavity in cavity dumping are described, and an example of cavity dumping is applied to a link for a proposed experiment package on Cassini.

  13. Nd-doped phosphate glass microstructured optical fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Luo, F. F.; Liu, X. F.; Dong, G. P.; Zhang, Q.; Lin, G.; Zhou, Q. L.; Qiu, J. R.; Hu, L. L.; Chen, D. P.

    2010-06-01

    We experimentally demonstrated a single-mode laser at 1056 nm with Nd-doped phosphate glass microstructured optical fiber (MOF), which was fabricated with conventional stack-and-draw method. The laser action was observed from a Fabry-Perot cavity formed by placing two dichroic mirrors of ˜100 and 85% reflectivity, to the two end facets of MOF. Pumped by CW laser diodes (LDs) at 808 nm, the MOF laser yielded a maximum output power of 8.5 mW and a slope efficiency of 2%.

  14. Experimental classification of dynamical regimes in optically injected lasers.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, D; Osborne, S; Blackbeard, N; Goulding, D; Kelleher, B; Amann, A

    2014-09-08

    We present a reliable and fast technique to experimentally categorise the dynamical state of optically injected two mode and single mode lasers. Based on the experimentally obtained time-traces locked, unlocked and chaotic states are distinguished for varying injection strength and detuning. For the two mode laser, the resulting experimental stability diagram provides a map of the various single mode and two mode regimes and the transitions between them. This stability diagram is in strong agreement with the theoretical predictions from low-dimensional dynamical models for two mode lasers. We also apply our method to the single mode laser and retain the close agreement between theory and experiment.

  15. High energy laser optics manufacturing: a preliminary study

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, E.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report presents concepts and methods, major conclusions, and major recommendations concerning the fabrication of high energy laser optics (HELO) that are to be machined by the Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine (LODTM) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Detailed discussions of concepts and methods proposed for metrological operations, polishing of reflective surfaces, mounting of optical components, construction of mirror substrates, and applications of coatings are included.

  16. Theoretical model for a background noise limited laser-excited optical filter for doubled Nd lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, Thomas M.; Garcia, Daniel F.

    1990-06-01

    A simple theoretical model for the calculation of the dependence of filter quantum efficiency versus laser pump power in an atomic Rb vapor laser-excited optical filter is reported. Calculations for Rb filter transitions that can be used to detect the practical and important frequency-doubled Nd lasers are presented. The results of these calculations show the filter's quantum efficiency versus the laser pump power. The required laser pump powers required range from 2.4 to 60 mW/sq cm of filter aperture.

  17. Theoretical model for a background noise limited laser-excited optical filter for doubled Nd lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, Thomas M.; Garcia, Daniel F.

    1990-01-01

    A simple theoretical model for the calculation of the dependence of filter quantum efficiency versus laser pump power in an atomic Rb vapor laser-excited optical filter is reported. Calculations for Rb filter transitions that can be used to detect the practical and important frequency-doubled Nd lasers are presented. The results of these calculations show the filter's quantum efficiency versus the laser pump power. The required laser pump powers required range from 2.4 to 60 mW/sq cm of filter aperture.

  18. Integrated modeling of the GMT laser tomography adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatrou, Piotr

    2014-08-01

    Laser Tomography Adaptive Optics (LTAO) is one of adaptive optics systems planned for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). End-to-end simulation tools that are able to cope with the complexity and computational burden of the AO systems to be installed on the extremely large telescopes such as GMT prove to be an integral part of the GMT LTAO system development endeavors. SL95, the Fortran 95 Simulation Library, is one of the software tools successfully used for the LTAO system end-to-end simulations. The goal of SL95 project is to provide a complete set of generic, richly parameterized mathematical models for key elements of the segmented telescope wavefront control systems including both active and adaptive optics as well as the models for atmospheric turbulence, extended light sources like Laser Guide Stars (LGS), light propagation engines and closed-loop controllers. The library is implemented as a hierarchical collection of classes capable of mutual interaction, which allows one to assemble complex wavefront control system configurations with multiple interacting control channels. In this paper we demonstrate the SL95 capabilities by building an integrated end-to-end model of the GMT LTAO system with 7 control channels: LGS tomography with Adaptive Secondary and on-instrument deformable mirrors, tip-tilt and vibration control, LGS stabilization, LGS focus control, truth sensor-based dynamic noncommon path aberration rejection, pupil position control, SLODAR-like embedded turbulence profiler. The rich parameterization of the SL95 classes allows to build detailed error budgets propagating through the system multiple errors and perturbations such as turbulence-, telescope-, telescope misalignment-, segment phasing error-, non-common path-induced aberrations, sensor noises, deformable mirror-to-sensor mis-registration, vibration, temporal errors, etc. We will present a short description of the SL95 architecture, as well as the sample GMT LTAO system simulation

  19. New, Efficient Optically Pumped Solid State Lasers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-10

    Alexander J. Pertica , now at Lawrence Livermore National Lab., University of California, Livermore, CA 94550, "Laser Material Characteristics of Ti:Al...0 803 806 809 812 PUMP DIODE WAVELENGTH (nm) Laser Material Characteristics of Ti:AI0 3 Milton Bimbaum Alexander J. Pertica Center for Laser Studies...intrinsic material losses and to aid In the attempts to produce homogeneous and low loss Ti:AIO,. Bimbaum and Pertica -"Laowr... Characteristics of TI:A1230

  20. Optical feedback-induced light modulation for fiber-based laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun Wook

    2014-11-01

    Optical fibers have been used as a minimally invasive tool in various medical fields. However, due to excessive heat accumulation, the distal end of a fiber often suffers from severe melting or devitrification, leading to the eventual fiber failure during laser treatment. In order to minimize thermal damage at the fiber tip, an optical feedback sensor was developed and tested ex vivo. Porcine kidney tissue was used to evaluate the feasibility of optical feedback in terms of signal activation, ablation performance, and light transmission. Testing various signal thresholds demonstrated that 3 V was relatively appropriate to trigger the feedback sensor and to prevent the fiber deterioration during kidney tissue ablation. Based upon the development of temporal signal signatures, full contact mode rapidly activated the optical feedback sensor possibly due to heat accumulation. Modulated light delivery induced by optical feedback diminished ablation efficiency by 30% in comparison with no feedback case. However, long-term transmission results validated that laser ablation assisted with optical feedback was able to almost consistently sustain light delivery to the tissue as well as ablation efficiency. Therefore, an optical feedback sensor can be a feasible tool to protect optical fiber tips by minimizing debris contamination and delaying thermal damage process and to ensure more efficient and safer laser-induced tissue ablation.

  1. Effect of Laser Irradiation on Enzyme Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Satoshi; Kashii, Masafumi; Kitano, Hiroshi; Adachi, Hiroaki; Takano, Kazufumi; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Doi, Masaaki; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Sasaki, Takatomo

    2005-11-01

    We previously developed a protein crystallization technique using a femtosecond laser and protein crystal processing and detaching techniques using a pulsed UV laser. In this study, we examine the effect of laser irradiation on protein integrity. After several kinds of laser were irradiated on part of a solution of glycerol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides, we measured the enzyme activity. Femtosecond and deep-UV laser irradiations have little influence on the whole enzyme activity, whereas the enzyme lost its activity upon high-power near-infrared laser irradiation at a wavelength of 1547 nm. These results suggest that suitable laser irradiation has no remarkable destructive influence on protein crystallization or crystal processing.

  2. Femtosecond laser microhole drilling inside a fused silica optical fiber with optical inner surface quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Masahiko; Goya, Kenji; Nishiyama, Michiko; Kubodera, Shoichi; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    We have demonstrated femtosecond laser microhole drilling inside a fused silica optical fiber with optical inner surface quality. An optical quality microhole with a diameter of 3 μ m and a length of approximately 35 μ m was produced inside an optical fiber of a cladding diameter of 125 μ m. The microhole drilling inside an optical fiber was caused as a result of plasma filamentation of focused femtosecond laser irradiation at a wavelength of 400 nm. The size of the microhole was reproduced with a ray trace of the focused laser beam with consideration of self-focusing. The optical quality of the microhole was verified by measuring the transmittance of 94 % of infrared diode emission.

  3. Actively Q-switched Raman fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, A. G.; Podivilov, E. V.; Babin, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    A new scheme providing actively Q-switched operation of a Raman fiber laser (RFL) has been proposed and tested. The RFL consists of a 1 km single-mode fiber with a switchable loop mirror at one end and an angled cleaved output end. An 1080 nm pulse with microsecond duration is generated at the output by means of acousto-optic switching of the mirror at ~30 kHz in the presence of 6 W backward pumping at 1030 nm. In the proposed scheme, the generated pulse energy is defined by the pump energy distributed along the passive fiber, which amounts to 30 μJ in our case. The available pump energy may be increased by means of fiber lengthening. Pulse shortening is also expected.

  4. Optically pumped oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagidullin, Marsel V.; Malyshev, Mikhail S.

    2017-01-01

    A novel optical pumping scheme considering a two-step irradiation by light at wavelengths near 500 nm and 1315 nm is proposed in this work. Radiation at 500 nm is used to dissociate about 1% of iodine molecules. The radiation at 1315 nm excites atomic iodine to the 2P1/2 state. Singlet oxygen molecules are produced via the energy exchange process I(2P1/2)+O2(X3Σ)-> I(2P3/2)+O2(a1Δ), while I(2P1/2)+O2(a1Δ) energy pooling produces b1Σ oxygen. I(2P3/2) and O2(1Σ) then accelerate the dissociation of I2. After gas dynamic cooling in supersonic nozzle, active medium may reach 100 W cm-2 and small signal gain of 0.01 cm-1.

  5. Beam shaping for laser-based adaptive optics in astronomy.

    PubMed

    Béchet, Clémentine; Guesalaga, Andrés; Neichel, Benoit; Fesquet, Vincent; González-Núñez, Héctor; Zúñiga, Sebastián; Escarate, Pedro; Guzman, Dani

    2014-06-02

    The availability and performance of laser-based adaptive optics (AO) systems are strongly dependent on the power and quality of the laser beam before being projected to the sky. Frequent and time-consuming alignment procedures are usually required in the laser systems with free-space optics to optimize the beam. Despite these procedures, significant distortions of the laser beam have been observed during the first two years of operation of the Gemini South multi-conjugate adaptive optics system (GeMS). A beam shaping concept with two deformable mirrors is investigated in order to provide automated optimization of the laser quality for astronomical AO. This study aims at demonstrating the correction of quasi-static aberrations of the laser, in both amplitude and phase, testing a prototype of this two-deformable mirror concept on GeMS. The paper presents the results of the preparatory study before the experimental phase. An algorithm to control amplitude and phase correction, based on phase retrieval techniques, is presented with a novel unwrapping method. Its performance is assessed via numerical simulations, using aberrations measured at GeMS as reference. The results predict effective amplitude and phase correction of the laser distortions with about 120 actuators per mirror and a separation of 1.4 m between the mirrors. The spot size is estimated to be reduced by up to 15% thanks to the correction. In terms of AO noise level, this has the same benefit as increasing the photon flux by 40%.

  6. Test results from LAGEOS-2 optical characterization using pulsed lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varghese, Thomas K.; Selden, Michael; Oldham, Thomas; Clarke, Christopher; Zagwodzki, Thomas

    1993-01-01

    The Laser Geodynamic Satellite-2 (LAGEOS-2) has undergone extensive optical testing at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center during 1989. The techniques included measuring the far field diffraction pattern using cw and pulsed lasers. In the pulsed measurement technique, response of the satellite was studied by measuring the far-field diffraction pattern (FFDP) as a function of pulsewidth, wavelength, polarization, position in the FFDP, detector/processing techniques, and satellite orientation. The purpose of the pulsed laser testing was two-fold: (1) to characterize the satellite optical response with the detector and signal processing electronics currently used in most SLR stations using the portable laser ranging standard, and (2) to characterize the satellite response for various conditions using the highest bandwidth optical detector (streak camera) available for the next generation of satellite laser ranging (SLR) technology. The portable ranging standard employed multiple measurement devices and an optical calibration scheme to eliminate range-dependent and amplitude-dependent systematics. These precautions were taken to eliminate/minimize instrumental errors and provide maximum accuracy. For LAGEOS orbit (6000 Km), ground stations are located 34 to 38 Mu radians off the axis of the return signal from the satellite; therefore, an optical mask was used to restrict the field of view (FOV) of detection to this annular region of the FFDP. The two measurement techniques were implemented using an aperture sharing scheme and complemented each other by providing mutual verification.

  7. Holographic optical system for aberration corrections in laser Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, R. C.; Case, S. K.; Schock, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    An optical system containing multifaceted holographic optical elements (HOEs) has been developed to correct for aberrations introduced by nonflat windows in laser Doppler velocimetry. The multifacet aberration correction approach makes it possible to record on one plate many sets of adjacent HOEs that address different measurement volume locations. By using 5-mm-diameter facets, it is practical to place 10-20 sets of holograms on one 10 x 12.5-cm plate, so that the procedure of moving the entire optical system to examine different locations may not be necessary. The holograms are recorded in dichromated gelatin and therefore are nonabsorptive and suitable for use with high-power argon laser beams. Low f-number optics coupled with a 90-percent efficient distortion-correcting hologram in the collection side of the system yield high optical efficiency.

  8. Measurements and simulations of the optical gain and anti-reflection coating modal reflectivity in quantum cascade lasers with multiple active region stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Bidaux, Y.; Terazzi, R.; Bismuto, A.; Gresch, T.; Blaser, S.; Muller, A.; Faist, J.

    2015-09-07

    We report spectrally resolved gain measurements and simulations for quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) composed of multiple heterogeneous stacks designed for broadband emission in the mid-infrared. The measurement method is first demonstrated on a reference single active region QCL based on a double-phonon resonance design emitting at 7.8 μm. It is then extended to a three-stack active region based on bound-to-continuum designs with a broadband emission range from 7.5 to 10.5 μm. A tight agreement is found with simulations based on a density matrix model. The latter implements exhaustive microscopic scattering and dephasing sources with virtually no fitting parameters. The quantitative agreement is furthermore assessed by measuring gain coefficients obtained by studying the threshold current dependence with the cavity length. These results are particularly relevant to understand fundamental gain mechanisms in complex semiconductor heterostructure QCLs and to move towards efficient gain engineering. Finally, the method is extended to the measurement of the modal reflectivity of an anti-reflection coating deposited on the front facet of the broadband QCL.

  9. Laser beam shaping optical system design methods and their application in edge-emitting semiconductor laser-based LIDAR systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkan, Mert

    LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) systems are employed for numerous applications such as remote sensing, military applications, optical data storage, display technology, and material processing. Furthermore, they are superior to other active remote sensing tools such as RADAR systems, considering their higher accuracy and more precise resolution due to their much shorter wavelengths and narrower beamwidth. Several types of lasers can be utilized as the radiation source of several LIDAR systems. Semiconductor laser-based LIDAR systems have several advantages such as low cost, compactness, broad range of wavelengths, and high PRFs (Pulse Repetition Frequency). However, semiconductor lasers have different origins and angles of divergence in the two transverse directions, resulting in the inherent astigmatism and elliptical beam shape. Specifically, elliptical beam shape is not desirable for several laser-based applications including LIDAR systems specifically designed to operate in the far-field region. In this dissertation, two mirror-based and two lens-based beam shapers are designed to circularize, collimate, and expand an edge-emitting semiconductor laser beam to a desired beam diameter for possible application in LIDAR systems. Additionally, most laser beams including semiconductor laser beams have Gaussian irradiance distribution. For applications that require uniform illumination of an extended target area, Gaussian irradiance distribution is undesirable. Therefore, a specific beam shaper is designed to transform the irradiance distribution from Gaussian to uniform in addition to circularizing, collimating, and expanding the semiconductor laser beam. For the design of beam shapers, aperture sizes of the surfaces are preset for desired power transmission and allowed diffraction level, surface parameters of the optical components and the distances between these surfaces are determined. Design equations specific to these beam shaping optical systems are

  10. Active learning in optics and photonics: Fraunhofer diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalila, H.; Ben Lakhdar, Z.; Lahmar, S.; Dhouaidi, Z.; Majdi, Y.

    2014-07-01

    "Active Learning in Optics and Photonics" (ALOP), funded by UNESCO within its Physics Program framework with the support of ICTP (Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics) and SPIE (Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers), aimed to helps and promotes a friendly and interactive method in teaching optics using simple and inexpensive equipment. Many workshops were organized since 2005 the year when Z. BenLakhdar, whom is part of the creators of ALOP, proposed this project to STO (Société Tunisienne d'Optique). These workshops address several issues in optics, covering geometrical optics, wave optics, optical communication and they are dedicated to both teachers and students. We focus this lecture on Fraunhofer diffraction emphasizing the facility to achieve this mechanism in classroom, using small laser and operating a slit in a sheet of paper. We accompany this demonstration using mobile phone and numerical modeling to assist in the analysis of the diffraction pattern figure.

  11. Electro-optic and Acousto-optic Laser Beam Scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Römer, G. R. B. E.; Bechtold, P.

    Optical solid state deflectors rely on the electro-optical or acousto-optic effect. These Electro-Optical Deflectors (EODs) and Acousto-Optical Deflectors (AODs) do not contain moving parts and therefore exhibit high deflection velocities and are free of drawbacks associated with mechanical scanners. A description of the principles of operation of EODs and AODs is presented. In addition, characteristics, properties and the (dis)advantages of EODs and AODs, when compared to mirror based mechanical deflectors, is discussed. Deflection angles, speed and accuracy are discussed in terms of resolvable spots and related quantities. Also, response time, damage threshold, efficiency and the type and magnitude of beam distortions is addressed. Optical deflectors are characterized by high angular deflection velocities, but small deflection angles. Whereas mechanical mechanical scanners are characterized by relatively small deflection velocities, but large deflection angles. Arranging an optical deflector and a mechanical scanner in series allows to take advantage of the best of both worlds.

  12. Chemical Bond Activation Observed with an X-ray Laser.

    PubMed

    Beye, Martin; Öberg, Henrik; Xin, Hongliang; Dakovski, Georgi L; Dell'Angela, Martina; Föhlisch, Alexander; Gladh, Jörgen; Hantschmann, Markus; Hieke, Florian; Kaya, Sarp; Kühn, Danilo; LaRue, Jerry; Mercurio, Giuseppe; Minitti, Michael P; Mitra, Ankush; Moeller, Stefan P; Ng, May Ling; Nilsson, Anders; Nordlund, Dennis; Nørskov, Jens; Öström, Henrik; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Persson, Mats; Schlotter, William F; Sellberg, Jonas A; Wolf, Martin; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Pettersson, Lars G M; Wurth, Wilfried

    2016-09-15

    The concept of bonding and antibonding orbitals is fundamental in chemistry. The population of those orbitals and the energetic difference between the two reflect the strength of the bonding interaction. Weakening the bond is expected to reduce this energetic splitting, but the transient character of bond-activation has so far prohibited direct experimental access. Here we apply time-resolved soft X-ray spectroscopy at a free-electron laser to directly observe the decreased bonding-antibonding splitting following bond-activation using an ultrashort optical laser pulse.

  13. UV laser with an acousto-optic intra-cavity control for GaN-sapphire cut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradoboev, Yury G.; Kazaryan, Mishik A.; Mokrushin, Yury M.; Shakin, Oleg V.

    2012-09-01

    A copper vapor laser is proposed as the basic component of the installation for processing of sapphire substrates with a GaN-coating. Laser radiation is transformed to UV range by optical frequency doubling. Powerful UV lasers are prospective tools for crystal cutting, photolithography and recording of the fiber Bragg gratings. The proposed approach is more promising in comparison with the use of excimer radiation because of instabilities of excimer laser generation and low coherence of its radiation, which makes difficult precise focusing and using interference pattern of UV radiation for exposing materials. UV laser based on second harmonic radiation of copper vapors laser has been designed. The UV laser system of high operation stability has been developed with output power 1 W at wavelengths 255.5 nm, 271.1 nm, 289.1 nm and coherence length radiation about 4 cm. The original intra-cavity acousto-optic control of output radiation is developed. It is allows adjusting frequency and on-off time ratio of output laser pulses with high accuracy. The stable heat regime was achieved for an active element of copper vapor laser̤ The laser system allows to select an optimum mode of ultra-violet radiation exposition for production of different optical elements. Intra-cavity acousto-optic cell was used for controlling of single pulse amplitude and number of pulses without any power supply tuning providing the stable operation of the laser system.

  14. New, Efficient Optically Pumped Solid State Lasers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-21

    Lasers", during the contract period from 15 August 1984 thru 11 November 1988 (AFOSR-88-0378) has led to some notable advances. This effort h,.s focused...lower laser states of both Er and 1Ho. This work has led to the inves t igation of the Nd,Er ion-ion interactions in other crystals such as Nd,Er:YALO...backed pyrex reflector. While the laser may work in a gold-plated cavity, the many visible, blue and near uv pump bands suggest better efficiency is

  15. ARGOS - the Laser Star Adaptive Optics for LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabien, S.; Barl, L.; Beckmann, U.; Blümchen, T.; Bonaglia, M.; Borelli, J. L.; Brynnel, J.; Busoni, L.; Carbonaro, L.; Conot, C.; Davies, R.; Deysenroth, M.; Durney, O.; Elberich, M.; Esposito, S.; Gasho, V.; Gässler, W.; Gemperlein, H.; Genzel, R.; Green, R.; Haug, M.; Lloyd Hart, M.; Hubbard, P.; Kanneganti, S.; Kulas, M.; Noenickx, J.; Peter, D.; Quirrenbach, A.; Rademacher, M.; Rix, H. W.; Salinari, P.; Schwab, C.; Storm, J.; Strüder, L.; Thiel, M.; Weigelt, G.; Ziegleder, J.; de Xivry, G. Orban

    2011-09-01

    We will present the design and status of ARGOS - the Laser Guide Star adaptive optics facility for the Large Binocular Telescope. By projecting a constellation of multiple laser guide stars above each of the 8.4m primary mirrors of the LBT, ARGOS in its ground layer mode will enable a wide field adaptive optics correction for multi object spectroscopy. ARGOS implements high power pulsed green lasers and makes use of Rayleigh scattering for the guide star creation. The geometric relations of this setup in guide star height vs. primary diameter are quite comparable to an ELT with sodium guide stars. The use of LBT's adaptive secondary mirror, gated wavefront sensors, a prime focus calibration system and the laser constellation shows several aspects that may be used as pathfinding technology for the planned ELTs. In already planned upgrade steps with a hybrid Sodium-Rayleigh combination ARGOS will enable MCAO and MOAO implementations at LBT allowing unique astronomical observations.

  16. Acousto-optic laser projection systems for displaying TV information

    SciTech Connect

    Gulyaev, Yu V; Kazaryan, M A; Mokrushin, Yu M; Shakin, O V

    2015-04-30

    This review addresses various approaches to television projection imaging on large screens using lasers. Results are presented of theoretical and experimental studies of an acousto-optic projection system operating on the principle of projecting an image of an entire amplitude-modulated television line in a single laser pulse. We consider characteristic features of image formation in such a system and the requirements for its individual components. Particular attention is paid to nonlinear distortions of the image signal, which show up most severely at low modulation signal frequencies. We discuss the feasibility of improving the process efficiency and image quality using acousto-optic modulators and pulsed lasers. Real-time projectors with pulsed line imaging can be used for controlling high-intensity laser radiation. (review)

  17. Laser Pulse-Stretching Using Multiple Optical Ring-Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, Jun; Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Lee, Chi-Ming (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We describe a simple and passive nanosecond-long (ns-long) laser 'pulse-stretcher' using multiple optical ring-cavities. We present a model of the pulse-stretching process for an arbitrary number of optical ring-cavities. Using the model, we optimize the design of a pulse-stretcher for use in a spontaneous Raman scattering excitation system that avoids laser-induced plasma spark problems. From the optimized design, we then experimentally demonstrate and verify the model with a 3-cavity pulse-stretcher system that converts a 1000 mJ, 8.4 ns-long input laser pulse into an approximately 75 ns-long (FWHM) output laser pulse with a peak power reduction of 0.10X, and an 83% efficiency.

  18. Fiber optics interface for a dye laser oscillator and method

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, S.A.; Seppala, L.G.

    1984-06-13

    A dye laser oscillator in which one light beam is used to pump a continuous stream of dye within a cooperating dye chamber for producing a second, different beam is generally disclosed herein along with a specific arrangement including an optical fiber and a fiber optics interface for directing the pumping beam into the dye chamber. The specific fiber optics interface illustrated includes three cooperating lenses which together image one particular dimension of the pumping beam into the dye chamber from the output end of the optical fiber in order to insure that the dye chamber is properly illuminated by the pumping beam.

  19. Fiber optics interface for a dye laser oscillator and method

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Steve A.; Seppala, Lynn G.

    1986-01-01

    A dye laser oscillator in which one light beam is used to pump a continuous tream of dye within a cooperating dye chamber for producing a second, different beam is generally disclosed herein along with a specific arrangement including an optical fiber and a fiber optics interface for directing the pumping beam into the dye chamber. The specific fiber optics interface illustrated includes three cooperating lenses which together image one particular dimension of the pumping beam into the dye chamber from the output end of the optical fiber in order to insure that the dye chamber is properly illuminated by the pumping beam.

  20. Computer optics and photonics for students of laser engineering disciplines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. P.

    2005-10-01

    The concept of teaching in optics and photonics for undergraduate and post-graduate students of laser engineering disciplines are discussed. The designed curriculum include as fundamental knowledge on modern mathematics, physics and computer methods as up-to-date industrial optical engineering software training. Distributed Web-server technology with Alpha cluster station background allow to support real-time training and teaching with a set of computer optical laboratories, which are used as a framework for most university special courses. Remote access to facilities of Russian Academy of Science make it possible to accumulate modern science achievements in optical education.

  1. Generation of Non-Uniform Pulses by an Eight Microstructured Optical Fiber Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennejah, Tarek; Bahloul, Faouzi; Attia, Rabah

    2011-06-01

    Mode locking mechanisms in fiber laser have been an active and rich research field in optical communication. In this paper we study the behaviour of an 8FL (eight fiber laser) totally made out of MOF (Microstructured Optical Fiber). We demonstrate that even output from a fiber laser is not necessarily uniform. Due to its ring cavity and NALM (Non linear Amplifying Loop Mirror) transmission properties, the laser generates randomly different non-uniform output pulses. It follows three states of operation: single, bound and multiple pulses were observed. We report the formation of bound pulses where side peaks are higher than the central one. We report also the formation of bound and multiple pulses which damage their bindings and alter their pulses width and separations.

  2. Multifunctional optical correlator for picosecond ultraviolet laser pulse measurement

    DOE PAGES

    Rakhman, Abdurahim; Wang, Yang; Garcia, Frances; ...

    2014-01-01

    A compact optical correlator system that measures both the autocorrelation between two infrared (IR) lights and the cross-correlation between an IR and an ultraviolet (UV) light using a single nonlinear optical crystal has been designed and experimentally demonstrated. The rapid scanning of optical delay line, switching between auto and cross-correlations, crystal angle tuning, and data acquisition and processing are all computer controlled. Pulse widths of an IR light from a mode-locked laser are measured by the correlator and the results are compared with a direct measurement using a high-speed photodetector system. The correlator has been used to study the parametermore » dependence of the pulse width of a macropulse UV laser designed for laser-assisted hydrogen ion (H-) beam stripping for the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.« less

  3. Multifunctional optical correlator for picosecond ultraviolet laser pulse measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhman, Abdurahim; Wang, Yang; Garcia, Frances; Long, Cary D.; Huang, Chunning; Takeda, Yasuhiro; Liu, Yun

    2014-01-01

    A compact optical correlator system that measures both the autocorrelation between two infrared (IR) lights and the cross-correlation between an IR and an ultraviolet (UV) light using a single nonlinear optical crystal has been designed and experimentally demonstrated. The rapid scanning of optical delay line, switching between auto and cross-correlations, crystal angle tuning, and data acquisition and processing are all computer controlled. Pulse widths of an IR light from a mode-locked laser are measured by the correlator and the results are compared with a direct measurement using a high-speed photodetector system. The correlator has been used to study the parameter dependence of the pulse width of a macropulse UV laser designed for laser-assisted hydrogen ion (H-) beam stripping for the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  4. Optical injection enables coherence resonance in quantum-dot lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemann, D.; Aust, R.; Lingnau, B.; Schöll, E.; Lüdge, K.

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate that optically injected semiconductor quantum-dot lasers operated in the frequency-locked regime exhibit the counterintuitive effect of coherence resonance, i.e., the regularity of noise-induced spiking is a non-monotonic function of the spontaneous emission noise, and it is optimally correlated at a non-zero value of the noise intensity. We uncover the mechanism of coherence resonance from a microscopically based model of the quantum-dot laser structure, and show that it is related to excitability under optical injection and to a saddle-node infinite period (SNIPER) bifurcation occurring for small injection strength at the border of the frequency locking regime. By a model reduction we argue that the phenomenon of coherence resonance is generic for a wide class of optically injected lasers.

  5. Improve power conversion efficiency of slab coupled optical waveguide lasers.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jiahua; Zhu, Lin; Dogan, Mehmet; Jacob, Jonah

    2014-07-28

    The slab coupled optical waveguide laser (SCOWL) is a promising candidate for high power, single mode emitter for a number of reasons, including its near diffraction limited optical quality, large modal size and near circular output pattern. Current SCOWL designs have limited electrical-optical power conversion efficiency (PCE) around 40%, which is lower than conventional RWG laser and broad area laser that are known to have much higher PCEs. To improve the SCOWL PCE, we theoretically optimize its structure by reducing Al content, increasing doping concentration and introducing a GRIN layer to prevent carrier leakage. Numerical simulations predict that an optimized SCOWL design has a maximum PCE of about 57% at room temperature.

  6. Optical Studies of Active Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David

    1998-01-01

    This grant was to support optical studies of comets close enough to the sun to be outgassing. The main focus of the observations was drawn to the two extraordinarily bright comets Hyakutake and Hale-Bopp, but other active comets were also studied in detail during the period of funding. Major findings (all fully published) under this grant include: (1) Combined optical and submillimeter observations of the comet/Centaur P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 were used to study the nature of mass loss from this object. The submillimeter observations show directly that the optically prominent dust coma is ejected by the sublimation of carbon monoxide. Simultaneous optical-submillimeter observations allowed us to test earlier determinations of the dust mass loss rate. (2) We modelled the rotation of cometary nuclei using time-resolved images of dust jets as the primary constraint. (3) We obtained broad-band optical images of several comets for which we subsequently attempted submillimeter observations, in order to test and update the cometary ephemerides. (4) Broad-band continuum images of a set of weakly active comets and, apparently, inactive asteroids were obtained in BVRI using the University of Hawaii 2.2-m telescope. These images were taken in support of a program to test the paradigm that many near-Earth asteroids might be dead or dormant comets. We measured coma vs. nucleus colors in active comets (finding that coma particle scattering is different from, and cannot be simply related to, nucleus color). We obtained spectroscopic observations of weakly active comets and other small bodies using the HIRES spectrograph on the Keck 10-m telescope. These observation place sensitive limits to outgassing from these bodies, aided by the high (40,000) spectral resolution of HIRES.

  7. Femtosecond fibre laser stabilisation to an optical frequency standard using a KTP electro-optic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Nyushkov, B N; Pivtsov, V S; Koliada, N A; Kaplun, A B; Meshalkin, A B

    2015-05-31

    A miniature intracavity KTP-based electro-optic phase modulator has been developed which can be used for effective stabilisation of an optical frequency comb of a femtosecond erbiumdoped fibre laser to an optical frequency standard. The use of such an electro-optic modulator (EOM) has made it possible to extend the working frequency band of a phase-locked loop system for laser stabilisation to several hundred kilohertz. We demonstrate that the KTP-based EOM is sufficiently sensitive even at a small optical length, which allows it to be readily integrated into cavities of femtosecond fibre lasers with high mode frequency spacings (over 100 MHz). (extreme light fields and their applications)

  8. Stability and Tolerance to Optical Feedback of Quantum Dot Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Analytical approach to modulation properties of quantum dot lasers, K. Lüdge, E. Schöll, E. Viktorov, and T. Erneux, J. Appl. Physics , 109, 103112...Huyet, Optics Letters 35, 937- 939 (2010) 2. Analytical approach to modulation properties of quantum dot lasers, K. Lüdge, E. Schöll, E. Viktorov, and T...Erneux, J. Appl. Physics , 109, 103112 (2011) 3. Dimensional signature on noise-induced excitable statistics in an op- tically injected semiconductor

  9. Fiber Optically Coupled Eyesafe Laser Threat Warning System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-11

    WARNING SYSTEM 11 MAY 2000 MSS SPECIALTY GROUP ON INFRARED COUNTERMEASURES NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL, MONTEREY, CA PRESENTED BY: DR. AL TORRES...A Dates Covered (from... to) - Title and Subtitle Fiber Optically Coupled Eyesafe Laser Threat Warning System Contract Number Grant Number... WARNING SYSTEM (ESLTWS) PHASE II SBIR PROGRAM • CONCEPT: - TO DEVELOP A UNIQUE AND NOVEL EYE SAFE LASER THREAT WARNING RECEIVER SYSTEM. MUST BE

  10. Optically Pumped Far Infrared Molecular Lasers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    third and fifth order nonlinear processes can exceed first order laser processes. An experimental study of the generation of a 22.653 GHz signal (the...prime, practical sources. There are no counterparts in the far infrared of devices like IMPATTs, magnetrons, laser diodes, gyrotrons , etc. While in...1,000 GHz , the only proven, high spectral quality, modest technology, coherent source available to all researchers in the area, is the opti- cally

  11. Laser Induced Damage in Optical Materials: 1980.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    alloy formation and diffusion normalization of sensitized stainless steel of antimony in aluminum ,Nucl. Instrum. Methods by laser surface melting, J... properties of materials needed by industry, commerce, educational institutions, and Government: provides advisory and research services to other...129 N.C. Fernelius, D.V. Dempsey, D.A. Walsh, D.B. O’Quinn and W.L. Knecht Material Property Requirements for Laser

  12. Optical isolation in the LIGO gravitational wave laser detector in transient states

    SciTech Connect

    Soloviev, A A; Khazanov, Efim A

    2012-04-30

    This paper presents a numerical analysis of the degree of optical isolation of the laser source by the Faraday isolator in transient states of the laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory (LIGO) detector. This system may be in transient states where the power of the light reflected from the detector to the laser source can exceed many times the power of the source. The present results can be used to analyse the need for installing an additional active mechanical isolation of the source and to evaluate its response time.

  13. Gas laser for efficient sustaining a continuous optical discharge plasma in scientific and technological applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zimakov, V P; Kuznetsov, V A; Kedrov, A Yu; Solov'ev, N G; Shemyakin, A N; Yakimov, M Yu

    2009-09-30

    A stable high-power laser is developed for the study and technical applications of a continuous optical discharge (COD). The laser based on the technology of a combined discharge in a scheme with a fast axial gas flow emits 2.2 kW at 10.6 {mu}m per meter of the active medium in continuous and repetitively pulsed regimes with the electrooptical efficiency 20%. The sustaining of the COD plasma in argon and air is demonstrated at the atmospheric pressure. The emission properties of the COD plasma are studied and its possible applications are discussed. (lasers)

  14. Ultra-high sensitive and high resolution optical coherence tomography using a laser induced electromagnetic dipole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Hiroto; Baba, Motoyoshi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Yoneya, Shin

    2013-09-01

    Utilizing an optical coherence tomography measurement, we have developed a technique that actively uses a dielectric response due to an induced dipole moment caused by a mode-locked pulsed laser light source. Irradiated laser light in the material induces a photo-induced electric dipole resulting in a refractive index change for its strong electric field. Using this technique, we obtained a highly sensitive fundus retina tomogram of a human eye in vivo with a resolution of 1.3 μm by single scanning for 20 ms using 8 fs mode-locked pulse laser light with a 350 nm spread spectrum.

  15. Adaptive optics for ultra short pulsed lasers in UHV environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneuville, Francois; Ropert, Laurent; Sauvageot, Paul; Theis, Sébastien

    2015-02-01

    ISP SYSTEM has developed an electro-mechanical deformable mirror compatible with Ultra High Vacuum environment, suitable for ultra short pulsed lasers. The design of the MD-AME deformable mirror is based on force application on numerous locations. μ-AME actuators are driven by stepper motors, and their patented special design allows controlling the force with a very high accuracy. Materials and assembly method have been adapted to UHV constraints and the performances were evaluated on a first application for a beam with a diameter of 250mm. A Strehl ratio above 0.9 was reached for this application. Optical aberrations up to Zernike order 5 can be corrected with a very low residual error as for standard MD-AME mirror. Amplitude can reach up to several hundreds of μm for low order corrections. Hysteresis is lower than 0.1% and linearity better than 99%. Contrary to piezo-electric actuators, the μ-AME actuators avoid print-through effects and they permit to keep the mirror shape stable even unpowered, providing a high resistance to electro-magnetic pulses. The deformable mirror design allows changing easily an actuator or even the membrane if needed, in order to improve the facility availability. They are designed for circular, square or elliptical aperture from 30mm up to 500mm or more, with incidence angle from 0° to 45°. They can be equipped with passive or active cooling for high power lasers with high repetition rate.

  16. Application and the key technology on high power fiber-optic laser in laser weapon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhou; Li, Qiushi; Meng, Haihong; Sui, Xin; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhai, Xuhua

    2014-12-01

    The soft-killing laser weapon plays an important role in photoelectric defense technology. It can be used for photoelectric detection, search, blinding of photoelectric sensor and other devices on fire control and guidance devices, therefore it draws more and more attentions by many scholars. High power fiber-optic laser has many virtues such as small volume, simple structure, nimble handling, high efficiency, qualified light beam, easy thermal management, leading to blinding. Consequently, it may be used as the key device of soft-killing laser weapon. The present study introduced the development of high power fiber-optic laser and its main features. Meanwhile the key technology of large mode area (LMA) optical fiber design, the beam combination technology, double-clad fiber technology and pumping optical coupling technology was stated. The present study is aimed to design high doping LMA fiber, ensure single mode output by increasing core diameter and decrease NA. By means of reducing the spontaneous emission particle absorbed by fiber core and Increasing the power density in the optical fiber, the threshold power of nonlinear effect can increase, and the power of single fiber will be improved. Meantime, high power will be obtained by the beam combination technology. Application prospect of high power fiber laser in photoelectric defense technology was also set forth. Lastly, the present study explored the advantages of high power fiber laser in photoelectric defense technology.

  17. Optical properties of femtosecond laser-treated diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvani, P.; Bellucci, A.; Girolami, M.; Orlando, S.; Valentini, V.; Lettino, A.; Trucchi, D. M.

    2014-10-01

    A laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS) has been fabricated on polycrystalline diamond by an ultrashort Ti:Sapphire pulsed laser source ( λ = 800 nm, P = 3 mJ, 100 fs) in a high vacuum chamber (<10-7 mbar) in order to increase diamond absorption in the visible and infrared wavelength ranges. A horizontally polarized laser beam had been focussed perpendicularly to the diamond surface and diamond target had been moved by an automated X- Y translational stage along the two directions orthogonal to the optical axis. Scanning electron microscopy of samples reveals an LIPSS with a ripple period of about 170 nm, shorter than the laser wavelength. Raman spectra of processed sample do not point out any evident sp 2 content, and diamond peak presents a right shift, indicating a compressive stress. The investigation of optical properties of fs-laser surface textured diamond is reported. Spectral photometry in the range 200/2,000 nm wavelength shows a significant increase of visible and infrared absorption (more than 80 %) compared to untreated specimens (less than 40 %). The analysis of optical characterization data highlights a close relationship between fabricated LIPSS and absorption properties, confirming the optical effectiveness of such a treatment as a light-trapping structure for diamond: these properties, reported for the first time, open the path for new applications of CVD diamond.

  18. Optical design of a laser system for nuclear fusion research.

    PubMed

    de Metz, J

    1971-07-01

    High power laser improvements, high quality aspheric lenses, and sharp focusing on a solid deuterium target enable us to get numerous nuclear fusion reactions inside the deuterium plasma. Since Maiman successfully built the first light amplifier in 1960 [Nature 187, 493 (1960)] and Terhune performed air breakdown experiments in 1962 ["Optical Third Harmonic Generation," Comptes rendus de la 3ème Conférence Internationale d'Electronique Quantique, Paris, 11-15 février 1963, P. Grivet and N. Bloembergen, Eds. (Dunod, Paris, 1964), pp. 1559-15761, the laser has been thought of as a valuable energy source for fusion devices. Now a kind of race has started toward high temperature plasmas created by powerful lasers. However, the peak power of solid state laser is limited by glass damage, pump efficiences, and unwanted effects such as superradiance. So it is necessary to improve all the optical properties of the laser and the focusing of the lens on the target. In this paper, requirements for fusion implying a very high flux will be stated. Successive optical designs will be described together with measurement methods, and the contribution of optical improvements to the occurrence of nuclear fusion reaction in deuterium targets will be evaluated.

  19. Laser and Optical Subsystem for NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohel, James; Kellogg, James; Elliott, Ethan; Krutzik, Markus; Aveline, David; Thompson, Robert

    2016-05-01

    We describe the design and validation of the laser and optics subsystem for NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL), a multi-user facility being developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory for studies of ultra-cold quantum gases in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station. Ultra-cold atoms will be generated in CAL by employing a combination of laser cooling techniques and evaporative cooling in a microchip-based magnetic trap. Laser cooling and absorption imaging detection of bosonic mixtures of 87 Rb and 39 K or 41 K will be accomplished using a high-power (up to 500 mW ex-fiber), frequency-agile dual wavelength (767 nm and 780 nm) laser and optical subsystem. The CAL laser and optical subsystem also includes the capability to generate high-power multi-frequency optical pulses at 784.87 nm to realize a dual-species Bragg atom interferometer. Currently at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.

  20. Skin optical clearing for improvement of laser tattoo removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genina, Elina A.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Gavrilova, Anna A.; Pravdin, Alexander B.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Yaroslavsky, Ilya V.; Altshuler, Gregory B.

    2007-06-01

    The removal of tattoo pigments by laser energy is effected through a process of selective photothermolysis. Dehydration and optical immersion based on refractive index matching of scattering centers with that of surrounding matter through introduction of an exogenous index-matching agent can improve laser tattoo removal by providing increased efficiency of laser delivery to embedded ink particles and enabling the use of shorter wavelength visible lasers more effective on certain inks. Effectiveness of a method of accelerating penetration of the index-matching compounds by enhancing skin permeability through creating a lattice of micro-zones of limited thermal damage in the stratum corneum was studied. As optical clearing agents 100% and 88%-aqueous glycerol solutions were used. The effect of stratum corneum perforation on the rate of the immersion clearing of skin was studied. Dynamics of refractive index alteration of glycerol solution during its interaction with skin samples was monitored. Improvement of tattoo visualization was observed. The results of the experiments have shown that the lattice of island damage method the is effective for transepidermal delivery of optical clearing agents and could be used successfully in in vivo conditions for the enhancement of optical clearing of treated skin area and as enabling improvement of laser tattoo removal.

  1. Airborne molecular contamination: quality criterion for laser and optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Airborne molecular contaminations (AMCs) have been recognized as a major problem in semiconductor fabrication. Enormous technical and financial efforts are made to remove or at least reduce these contaminations in production environments to increase yield and process stability. It can be shown that AMCs from various sources in laser devices have a negative impact on quality and lifetime of lasers and optical systems. Outgassing of organic compounds, especially condensable compounds were identified as the main source for deterioration of optics. These compounds can lead to hazing on surfaces of optics, degradation of coating, reducing the signal transmission or the laser signal itself and can enhance the probability of laser failure and damage. Sources of organic outgassing can be molding materials, resins, seals, circuit boards, cable insulation, coatings, paints and others. Critical compounds are siloxanes, aromatic amines and high boiling aromatic hydrocarbons like phthalates which are used as softeners in plastic materials. Nowadays all sensitive assembly steps are performed in controlled cleanroom environments to reduce risks of contamination. We will demonstrate a high efficient air filter concept to remove AMCs for production environments with special AMC filters and methods for the qualification and monitoring of these environments. Additionally, we show modern techniques and examples for the pre-qualification of materials. For assembled components, we provide sampling concepts for a routine measurement for process, component and product qualification. A careful selection of previously tested and certified materials and components is essential to guarantee the quality of lasers and optical devices.

  2. DFB laser based electrical dynamic interrogation for optical fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, J. P.; Frazão, O.; Baptista, J. M.; Santos, J. L.; Barbero, A. P.

    2012-04-01

    An electrical dynamic interrogation technique previously reported by the authors for long-period grating sensors is now progressed by relying its operation exclusively on the modulation of a DFB Laser. The analysis of the detected first and second harmonic generated by the electrical modulation of the DFB Laser allows generating an optical signal proportional to the LPG spectral shift and resilient to optical power fluctuations along the system. This concept permits attenuating the effect of the 1/f noise of the photodetection, amplification and processing electronics on the sensing head resolution. This technique is employed in a multiplexing sensing scheme that measures refractive index variations.

  3. Deep ultraviolet laser micromachining of novel fibre optic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Dou, J.; Herman, P. R.; Fricke-Begemann, T.; Ihlemann, J.; Marowsky, G.

    2007-04-01

    A deep ultraviolet F2 laser, with output at 157-nm wavelength, has been adopted for micro-shaping the end facets of single and multi-mode silica optical fibres. The high energy 7.9-eV photons drive strong interactions in the wide-bandgap silica fibres to enable the fabrication of surface-relief microstructures with high spatial resolution and smooth surface morphology. Diffraction gratings, focusing lenses, and Mach-Zehnder interferometric structures have been micromachined onto the cleaved-fibre facets and optically characterized. F2-laser micromachining is shown to be a rapid and facile means for direct-writing of novel infibre photonic components.

  4. Sensitivity of quantum-dot semiconductor lasers to optical feedback.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, D; Hegarty, S P; Huyet, G; Uskov, A V

    2004-05-15

    The sensitivity of quantum-dot semiconductor lasers to optical feedback is analyzed with a Lang-Kobayashi approach applied to a standard quantum-dot laser model. The carriers are injected into a quantum well and are captured by, or escape from, the quantum dots through either carrier-carrier or phonon-carrier interaction. Because of Pauli blocking, the capture rate into the dots depends on the carrier occupancy level in the dots. Here we show that different carrier capture dynamics lead to a strong modification of the damping of the relaxation oscillations. Regions of increased damping display reduced sensitivity to optical feedback even for a relatively large alpha factor.

  5. Laser ablation plasmas for diagnostics of structured electronic and optical materials during or after laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Richard E.; Bol'shakov, Alexander A.; Yoo, Jong H.; González, Jhanis J.

    2012-03-01

    Laser induced plasma can be used for rapid optical diagnostics of electronic, optical, electro-optical, electromechanical and other structures. Plasma monitoring and diagnostics can be realized during laser processing in real time by means of measuring optical emission that originates from the pulsed laser-material interaction. In post-process applications, e.g., quality assurance and quality control, surface raster scanning and depth profiling can be realized with high spatial resolution (~10 nm in depth and ~3 μm lateral). Commercial instruments based on laser induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) are available for these purposes. Since only a laser beam comes in direct contact with the sample, such diagnostics are sterile and non-disruptive, and can be performed at a distance, e.g. through a window. The technique enables rapid micro-localized chemical analysis without a need for sample preparation, dissolution or evacuation of samples, thus it is particularly beneficial in fabrication of thin films and structures, such as electronic, photovoltaic and electro-optical devices or circuits of devices. Spectrum acquisition from a single laser shot provides detection limits for metal traces of ~10 μg/g, which can be further improved by accumulating signal from multiple laser pulses. LIBS detection limit for Br in polyethylene is 90 μg/g using 50-shot spectral accumulation (halogen detection is a requirement for semiconductor package materials). Three to four orders of magnitude lower detection limits can be obtained with a femtosecond laser ablation - inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (LA-ICP-MS), which is also provided on commercial basis. Laser repetition rate is currently up to 20 Hz in LIBS instruments and up to 100 kHz in LA-ICP-MS.

  6. Medical Applications Of CO2 Laser Fiber Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, R. C.

    1981-07-01

    In 1978, Hughes Laboratories reported development of fiber optics that were capable of transmitting CO2 laser energy. These fibers are now being tested for medical applications. Wide ranging medical investigation with CO2 lasers has occurred during the twelve years since the first observations of laser hemostasis. Specialists in ophthalmology, neurosurgery, urology, gynecology, otolaryngology, maxillo-facial/plastic surgery, dermatology, and oncology among others, have explored its use. In principle, all these specialists use CO2 laser radiation at 10.6 microns to thermally destroy diseased tissues. As such, CO2 lasers compare and compete with electrosurgical devices. The fundamental difference between these modalities lies in how they generate heat in treated tissue.

  7. High Speed 1.55 μm Lasers for Fiber Optic Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Paul A.

    This paper describes the essential elements for creating a practical wide bandwidth directly modulated laser source. This includes considerations of the intrinsic limitations of the laser structure, due to the resonant frequency and damping of the laser output, together with carrier transport issues to allow carriers in the device active region to be efficiently modulated at high speeds. The use of a P-doped compressively strained multiple-quantum well active region to provide high intrinsic speed and remove transport limitations is described, together with record setting results of 25 GHz modulation bandwidth for a 1.55 μm Fabry-Perot laser and 26 GHz bandwidth for a 1.55 μm DFB laser. The challenges of providing high bandwidth electrical connections to the laser on a suitable submount, together with fiber attachment and microwave packaging are discussed. Results of fully packaged 1.55 μm DFB lasers with 25 GHz modulation bandwidth are shown. Digital modulation of the packaged 1.55 μm DFB including impedance matching is described, and the transient wavelength chirp is presented. This low chirp is reduced further using an optical filter, to provide a 10 GBit/s source that can transmit error free over 38.5 km of standard optical fiber.

  8. Selection and amplification of a single optical frequency comb mode for laser cooling of the strontium atoms in an optical clock

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui; Yin, Mojuan; Kong, Dehuan; Xu, Qinfang; Zhang, Shougang; Chang, Hong

    2015-10-12

    In this paper, we report on the active filtering and amplification of a single mode from an optical femtosecond laser comb with mode spacing of 250 MHz by optical injection of two external-cavity diode lasers operating in cascade to build a narrow linewidth laser for laser cooling of the strontium atoms in an optical lattice clock. Despite the low injection of individual comb mode of approximately 50 nW, a single comb line at 689 nm could be filtered and amplified to reach as high as 10 mW with 37 dB side mode suppression and a linewidth of 240 Hz. This method could be applied over a broad spectral band to build narrow linewidth lasers for various applications.

  9. Optical cell cleaning with NIR femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans Georg; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    Femtosecond laser microscopes have been used as both micro and nanosurgery tools. The optical knock-out of undesired cells in multiplex cell clusters shall be further reported on in this study. Femtosecond laser-induced cell death is beneficial due to the reduced collateral side effects and therefore can be used to selectively destroy target cells within monolayers, as well as within 3D tissues, all the while preserving cells of interest. This is an important characteristic for the application in stem cell research and cancer treatment. Non-precise damage compromises the viability of neighboring cells by inducing side effects such as stress to the cells surrounding the target due to the changes in the microenvironment, resulting from both the laser and laser-exposed cells. In this study, optimum laser parameters for optical cleaning by isolating single cells and cell colonies are exploited through the use of automated software control. Physiological equilibrium and cellular responses to the laser induced damages are also investigated. Cell death dependence on laser focus, determination and selectivity of intensity/dosage, controllable damage and cell recovery mechanisms are discussed.

  10. Laser spot detection and characteristic analysis in space optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jin; Kong, Chuiliu; Jing, Wenbo; Zhang, Dan; Jiang, Huilin

    2007-11-01

    In the space laser communication, the link of communication is builded in atmospheric random channel. the laser transmission is affected by the atmospheric turbulence seriously. The communication laser is modulated to circular polarized light in order to reduce the influence of the atmospheric turbulence. A several experiments are designed to validate that the circular polarized laser is available to reduce the communication noise in the space optical communication. The methods of the laser spot detection and spot parameter analysis is put forward in this paper: Firstly the subtraction of the background is used in image preprocessing in order to eliminate the influence of static background, then a series of methods such as the local dynamic threshold segmentation, edge extraction are used to detect and recognize the spot. Finally the parameters of the spot are calculated such as spot's average brightness, background's average brightness and the contrast gradient, and the characteristic of the laser communication is analyzed. The experiment results show that the circular polarized laser can enhance the contrast and improve the communication quality in the spatial optical communication. This method satisfies the request of real-time processing in communication, and is also effective and practical. practical.

  11. Multiple Isotope Magneto Optical Trap from a single diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Eduardo; Valenzuela, Victor; Hamzeloui, Saeed; Gutierrez, Monica

    2013-05-01

    We present a simple design for a Dual Isotope Magneto Optical Trap. The system requires a single diode laser, a fiber modulator and a tapered amplifier to trap and completely control both 85Rb and 87Rb. We generate all the frequencies needed for trapping both species using the fiber intensity modulator. All the frequencies are amplified simultaneously with the tapered amplifier. The position and power of each frequency is now controlled independently on the RF rather than on the optical side. This introduces an enormous simplification for laser cooling that often requires an acousto-optic modulator for each frequency. The range of frequency changes is much bigger than what is available with acousto-optic modulators since in our case is determined by the modulator bandwidth (10 GHz). Additional isotopes can be simply added by including additional RF frequencies to the modulator and extra beams for other uses can be produced the same way. Support from CONACYT, PROMEP and UASLP.

  12. Different ways to active optical frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Duo; Xue, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiaogang; Chen, Jingbiao

    2016-06-01

    Active optical frequency standard, or active optical clock, is a new concept of optical frequency standard, where a weak feedback with phase coherence information in optical bad-cavity limitation is formed, and the continuous self-sustained coherent stimulated emission between two atomic transition levels with population inversion is realized. Through ten years of both theoretical and experimental exploration, the narrow linewidth and suppression of cavity pulling effect of active optical frequency standard have been initially proved. In this paper, after a simple review, we will mainly present the most recent experimental progresses of active optical frequency standards in Peking University, including 4-level cesium active optical frequency standards and active Faraday optical frequency standards. The future development of active optical frequency standards is also discussed.

  13. Novel fiber optic tip designs and devices for laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchens, Thomas Clifton

    Fiber optic delivery of laser energy has been used for years in various types of surgical procedures in the human body. Optical energy provides several benefits over electrical or mechanical surgery, including the ability to selectively target specific tissue types while preserving others. Specialty fiber optic tips have also been introduced to further customize delivery of laser energy to the tissue. Recent evolution in lasers and miniaturization has opened up opportunities for many novel surgical techniques. Currently, ophthalmic surgeons use relatively invasive mechanical tools to dissect retinal deposits which occur in proliferative diabetic retinopathy. By using the tight focusing properties of microspheres combined with the short optical penetration depth of the Erbium:YAG laser and mid-IR fiber delivery, a precise laser scalpel can be constructed as an alternative, less invasive and more precise approach to this surgery. Chains of microspheres may allow for a self limiting ablation depth of approximately 10 microm based on the defocusing of paraxial rays. The microsphere laser scalpel may also be integrated with other surgical instruments to reduce the total number of handpieces for the surgeon. In current clinical laser lithotripsy procedures, poor input coupling of the Holmium:YAG laser energy frequently damages and requires discarding of the optical fiber. However, recent stone ablation studies with the Thulium fiber laser have provided comparable results to the Ho:YAG laser. The improved spatial beam profile of the Thulium fiber laser can also be efficiently coupled into a fiber approximately one third the diameter and reduces the risk of damaging the fiber input. For this reason, the trunk optical fiber minus the distal fiber tip can be preserved between procedures. The distal fiber tip, which degrades during stone ablation, could be made detachable and disposable. A novel, low-profile, twist-locking, detachable distal fiber tip interface was designed

  14. Optical control of antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velema, Willem A.; van der Berg, Jan Pieter; Hansen, Mickel J.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial resistance is a major problem in the modern world, stemming in part from the build-up of antibiotics in the environment. Novel molecular approaches that enable an externally triggered increase in antibiotic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution and auto-inactivation are highly desirable. Here we report a responsive, broad-spectrum, antibacterial agent that can be temporally activated with light, whereupon it auto-inactivates on the scale of hours. The use of such a ‘smart’ antibiotic might prevent the build-up of active antimicrobial material in the environment. Reversible optical control over active drug concentration enables us to obtain pharmacodynamic information. Precisely localized control of activity is achieved, allowing the growth of bacteria to be confined to defined patterns, which has potential for the development of treatments that avoid interference with the endogenous microbial population in other parts of the organism.

  15. High density, optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, v-groove monolithic laser diode array

    DOEpatents

    Freitas, B.L.

    1998-10-27

    An optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser diode array achieves stacking pitches to 33 bars/cm by mounting laser diodes into V-shaped grooves. This design will deliver > 4kW/cm{sup 2} of directional pulsed laser power. This optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser is usable in all solid state laser systems which require efficient, directional, narrow bandwidth, high optical power density pump sources. 13 figs.

  16. High density, optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, v-groove monolithic laser diode array

    DOEpatents

    Freitas, Barry L.

    1998-01-01

    An optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser diode array achieves stacking pitches to 33 bars/cm by mounting laser diodes into V-shaped grooves. This design will deliver>4kW/cm2 of directional pulsed laser power. This optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser is usable in all solid state laser systems which require efficient, directional, narrow bandwidth, high optical power density pump sources.

  17. Compressive sensing optical coherence tomography using randomly accessible lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harfouche, Mark; Satyan, Naresh; Vasilyev, Arseny; Yariv, Amnon

    2014-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a novel a compressive sensing swept source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) system that enables high speed images to be taken while maintaining the high resolution offered from a large bandwidth sweep. Conventional SSOCT systems sweep the optical frequency of a laser ω(t) to determine the depth of the reflectors at a given lateral location. A scatterer located at delay τ appears as a sinusoid cos (ω(t)τ ) at the photodetector. The finite optical chirp rate and the speed of analog to digital and digital to analog converters limit the acquisition rate of an axial scan. The proposed acquisition modality enables much faster image acquisition rates by interrogating the beat signal at randomly selected optical frequencies while preserving resolution and depth of field. The system utilizes a randomly accessible laser, a modulated grating Y-branch laser, to sample the interference pattern from a scene at randomly selected optical frequencies over an optical bandwidth of 5 THz , corresponding to a resolution of 30 μm in air. The depth profile is then reconstructed using an l1 minimization algorithm with a LASSO constraint. Signal-dependent noise sources, shot noise and phase noise, are analyzed and taken into consideration during the recovery. Redundant dictionaries are used to improve the reconstruction of the depth profile. A compression by a factor of 10 for sparse targets up to a depth of 15 mm in noisy environments is shown.

  18. Stable passive optical clock generation in SOA-based fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Yun; Lin, Kuei-Huei; Chen, Hou-Ren

    2015-02-15

    Stable optical pulse trains are obtained from 1.3-μm and 1.5-μm semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA)-based fiber lasers using passive optical technology. The waveforms depend on SOA currents, and the repetition rates can be tuned by varying the relative length of sub-cavities. The output pulse trains of these SOA-based fiber lasers are stable against intracavity polarization adjustment and environmental perturbation. The optical clock generation is explained in terms of mode competition, self-synchronization, and SOA saturation. Without resorting to any active modulation circuits or devices, the technology used here is simple and may find various applications in the future.

  19. Femtosecond Laser Microfabrication of an Integrated Device for Optical Release and Sensing of Bioactive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ghezzi, Diego; Vazquez, Rebeca Martinez; Osellame, Roberto; Valtorta, Flavia; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Valle, Giuseppe Della; Ramponi, Roberta; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Cerullo, Giulio

    2008-01-01

    Flash photolysis of caged compounds is one of the most powerful approaches to investigate the dynamic response of living cells. Monolithically integrated devices suitable for optical uncaging are in great demand since they greatly simplify the experiments and allow their automation. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of an integrated bio-photonic device for the optical release of caged compounds. Such a device is fabricated using femtosecond laser micromachining of a glass substrate. More in detail, femtosecond lasers are used both to cut the substrate in order to create a pit for cell growth and to inscribe optical waveguides for spatially selective uncaging of the compounds present in the culture medium. The operation of this monolithic bio-photonic device is tested using both free and caged fluorescent compounds to probe its capability of multipoint release and optical sensing. Application of this device to the study of neuronal network activity can be envisaged. PMID:27873888

  20. Catadioptric optics for laser Doppler velocimeter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines the adaptation of low-cost Schmidt-Cassegrain astronomical telescopes to perform the laser-beam-focusing and scattered-light collection tasks associated with dual-beam laser Doppler velocimetry. A generic telescope design is analyzed using ray-tracing methods and Gaussian beam-propagation theory. A straightforward modification procedure to convert from infinite to near unity conjugate-ratio operation with very low residual aberration is identified and tested with a 200-mm-aperture telescope modified for f/10 operation. Performance data for this modified telescope configuration are near the diffraction limit and agree well with predictions.

  1. Zigzag laser with reduced optical distortion

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, Georg F.; Comaskey, Brian; Sutton, Steven B.

    1994-01-01

    The architecture of the present invention has been driven by the need to solve the beam quality problems inherent in Brewster's angle tipped slab lasers. The entrance and exit faces of a solid state slab laser are cut perpendicular with respect to the pump face, thus intrinsically eliminating distortion caused by the unpumped Brewster's angled faces. For a given zigzag angle, the residual distortions inherent in the remaining unpumped or lightly pumped ends may be reduced further by tailoring the pump intensity at these ends.

  2. Zigzag laser with reduced optical distortion

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, G.F.; Comaskey, B.; Sutton, S.B.

    1994-04-19

    The architecture of the present invention has been driven by the need to solve the beam quality problems inherent in Brewster's angle tipped slab lasers. The entrance and exit faces of a solid state slab laser are cut perpendicular with respect to the pump face, thus intrinsically eliminating distortion caused by the unpumped Brewster's angled faces. For a given zigzag angle, the residual distortions inherent in the remaining unpumped or lightly pumped ends may be reduced further by tailoring the pump intensity at these ends. 11 figures.

  3. Laser Damage in Thin Film Optical Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-01

    OTHER RELEVANT ISSUES The damage thresholds of refractory oxides used as AR coatings for alexandrite laser rods were determined and measured by...used and a limited number of TiO 2/SiO2 coatings were put on alexandrite substrates. Single layer AR coatings of MgF2 and NaAIF 6 were also tested for...measurements were made using an alexandrite laser at a wavelength of 790 nm. with a pulse duration of 200 nsec at 30Hz for 2 seconds. The near spot

  4. A Multiterawatt Laser Using a High-Contrast, Optical Parametric Chirped-Pulse Presamplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Bagnoud, V.; Puth, J.; Begishev, I.; Guardalben, M.; Zuegel, J.D.; Forget, N.; LeBlanc, C.

    2005-09-30

    A laser has been built that uses optical parametric chirped-pulse preamplification and a glass booster amplifier. We review the performance of the 5-Hz, multijoule OPCPA pump laser, the 370-mJ OPCPA, and the overall laser.

  5. Tetravalent chromium (Cr(4+)) as laser-active ion for tunable solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seas, A.; Petricevic, V.; Alfano, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    Generation of femtosecond pulses from a continuous-wave mode-locked chromium-doped forsterite (Cr(4+):Mg2SiO4) laser has been accomplished. The forsterite laser was actively mode-locked using an acousto-optic modulator operating at 78 MHz with two Brewster high-dispersion glass prisms for intra-cavity chirp compensation. Transform-limited sub-100-fs pulses were routinely generated in the TEM(sub 00) mode with 85 mW of continuous power (with 1 percent output coupler), tunable over 1230-1280 nm. The shortest pulses of 60-fs pulsewidth were measured.

  6. Post mortem results of laser-optical system packaged for use in harsh environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bright, Michelle R.

    2008-08-28

    In this study, the design and packaging of laser-optical system was tested to harsh environments outside lab conditions and post mortem activities will be discussed. Previously, custom mounts and bonded optical assemblies were environmentally tested to ensure their survivability. The results verified the sub-assemblies would enable the design of a laser-optical initiation system that could be fielded for use in extreme conditions. The design package, which utilized the proven opto-mechanical sub-assemblies, was then tested to the same levels as the sub-assemblies. The test regiment encompassed the harshest environments currently utilized. Temperature tests were performed ranging from a maximum of +75 degrees C to a minimum of -55 degrees C, allowing for two hour soak at each temperature set point. Vibration tests were performed to a maximum level of 15.5 grms for forty seconds in each of three critical axes. Shock tests were performed to a maximum impulse level of 5700 G's for the sub-assemblies with a 1.1 millisecond long pulse; whereas the packaged laser system maximum level reached was 3700 G's at 1.1 millisecond long pulse. The laser-optical assembly was visually inspected and functionally tested before and after each test to verify survival. As designed, the system covers were laser welded shut for hermetic seal. The only open port was the laser output for testing and verification of laser performance. No optical cables were utilized. Therefore the visual inspection of the interior was performed post mortem. Finally, the post mortem results will be discussed as will the potential of redesigns on future packaging strategies.

  7. Post mortem results of laser-optical system packaged for use in harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Michelle R.

    2008-08-01

    The design and packaging of laser-optical system was tested to harsh environments outside lab conditions and post mortem activities will be discussed. Previously, custom mounts and bonded optical assemblies were environmentally tested to ensure their survivability. The results verified the sub-assemblies would enable the design of a laser-optical initiation system that could be fielded for use in extreme conditions. The design package, which utilized the proven opto-mechanical sub-assemblies, was then tested to the same levels as the sub-assemblies. The test regiment encompassed the harshest environments currently utilized. Temperature tests were performed ranging from a maximum of +75 degrees C to a minimum of -55 degrees C, allowing for two hour soak at each temperature set point. Vibration tests were performed to a maximum level of 15.5 grms for forty seconds in each of three critical axes. Shock tests were performed to a maximum impulse level of 5700 G's for the sub-assemblies with a 1.1 millisecond long pulse; whereas the packaged laser system maximum level reached was 3700 G's at 1.1 millisecond long pulse. The laser-optical assembly was visually inspected and functionally tested before and after each test to verify survival. As designed, the system covers were laser welded shut for hermetic seal. The only open port was the laser output for testing and verification of laser performance. No optical cables were utilized. Therefore the visual inspection of the interior was performed post mortem. The post mortem results will be discussed as will the potential of redesigns on future packaging strategies.

  8. Optical booster for dielectric laser accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanuka, Adi; Cohen, Chen; Lyabock, Haggai; Schächter, Levi

    2017-03-01

    We present a study of adiabatic tapering of a dielectric laser accelerator and the dynamics of the trapping process. The characteristics of the trapped electrons were studied for different initial conditions. Space-charge effects on the longitudinal motion were considered as well.

  9. Catastrophic Optical Damage in High-Power, Broad-Area Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Aland K.; Bertaska, Rick K.

    Catastrophic optical damage (COD) is semiconductor material within the optical cavity of laser diodes that is thermally damaged by the laser light. COD results in the failure of laser diodes. The phenomena of COD in high-power, broad-area laser diodes are described along with methods to eliminate it.

  10. Performance of laser guide star adaptive optics at Lick Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S.S.; An, J.; Avicola, K.

    1995-07-19

    A sodium-layer laser guide star adaptive optics system has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for use on the 3-meter Shane telescope at Lick Observatory. The system is based on a 127-actuator continuous-surface deformable mirror, a Hartmann wavefront sensor equipped with a fast-framing low-noise CCD camera, and a pulsed solid-state-pumped dye laser tuned to the atomic sodium resonance line at 589 nm. The adaptive optics system has been tested on the Shane telescope using natural reference stars yielding up to a factor of 12 increase in image peak intensity and a factor of 6.5 reduction in image full width at half maximum (FWHM). The results are consistent with theoretical expectations. The laser guide star system has been installed and operated on the Shane telescope yielding a beam with 22 W average power at 589 nm. Based on experimental data, this laser should generate an 8th magnitude guide star at this site, and the integrated laser guide star adaptive optics system should produce images with Strehl ratios of 0.4 at 2.2 {mu}m in median seeing and 0.7 at 2.2 {mu}m in good seeing.

  11. Laser illuminator and optical system for disk patterning

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, C. Brent; Dixit, Shamasundar N.; Everett, Mathew; Honig, John

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic recording media are textured over areas designated for contact in order to minimize friction with data transducing heads. In fabricating a hard disk, an aluminum nickel-phosphorous substrate is polished to a specular finish. A mechanical means is then used to roughen an annular area intended to be the head contact band. An optical and mechanical system allows thousands of spots to be generated with each laser pulse, allowing the textured pattern to be rapidly generated with a low repetition rate laser and an uncomplicated mechanical system. The system uses a low power laser, a beam expander, a specially designed phase plate, a prism to deflect the beam, a lens to transmit the diffraction pattern to the far field, a mechanical means to rotate the pattern and a trigger system to fire the laser when sections of the pattern are precisely aligned. The system generates an annular segment of the desired pattern with which the total pattern is generated by rotating the optical system about its optic axis, sensing the rotational position and firing the laser as the annular segment rotates into the next appropriate position. This marking system can be integrated into a disk sputtering system for manufacturing magnetic disks, allowing for a very streamlined manufacturing process.

  12. Silicate-matrix active media for tunable solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, Rimma T; Mayer, G V; Manekina, Yu A; Tel'minov, E N; Arabei, S M; Pavich, T A; Solovyov, Konstantin N

    2007-08-31

    The lasing characteristics of solid active media based on laser dyes (rhodamines, coumarin 2, paraterphenyl) doped into silicate bulk matrices and thin films of different compositions are studied upon optical excitation. The lasing efficiency, photostability, and spectral parameters of laser media are investigated as functions of the excitation wavelength and intensity. Variations in these parameters due to the interaction of organic luminophores with a silicate matrix and radiation are discussed. (active media. lasers)

  13. Laser Electro-Optic Engineering Technology. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of South Florida, Tampa. Dept. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This program guide identifies particular considerations in the organization, operation, and evaluation of laser electro-optic engineering technology programs. Contents include an occupational description and information on the following: program content, including a curriculum framework that details major concepts and intended outcomes and a list…

  14. Optical superheterodyne receiver uses laser for local oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucy, R. F.

    1966-01-01

    Optical superheterodyne receiver uses a laser coupled to a frequency translator to supply both the incident signal and local oscillator signal and thus permit reception of amplitude modulated video bandwidth signals through the atmosphere. This receiver is useful in scientific propagation experiments, tracking experiments, and communication experiments.

  15. Laser beacon adaptive optics for power beaming applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fugate, R.Q.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the laser beam control system requirements for power beaming applications. Power beaming applications include electric and thermal engine propulsion for orbit transfer, station changing, and recharging batteries. Beam control includes satellite acquisition, high accuracy tracking, higher order atmospheric compensation using adaptive optics, and precision point-ahead. Beam control may also include local laser beam clean-up with a low order adaptive optics system. This paper also presents results of tracking and higher-order correction experiments on astronomical objects. The results were obtained with a laser beacon adaptive optics system at Phillips Laboratory`s Starfire Optical Range near Albuquerque, NM. At a wavelength of 0.85 {mu}m, the author has achieved Strehl ratios of {approximately}0.50 using laser beacons and {approximately}0.65 using natural stars for exposures longer than one minute on objects of {approximately}8{sup th} magnitude. The resulting point spread function has a full width half maximum (FWHM) of 0.13 arcsec.

  16. Toward laser welding of glasses without optical contacting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, S.; Zimmermann, F.; Eberhardt, R.; Tünnermann, A.; Nolte, S.

    2015-10-01

    The welding of transparent materials with ultrashort laser pulse at high repetition rates has attracted much attention due to its potential applications in fields such as optics, microfluidics, optofluidics and precision machinery. One demanding issue is the stable and reliable welding of different materials without the utilization of an intermediate layer or an optical contact. In this work, we maximized the size of the molten volume in order to generate a large pool of molten material which is able to fill an existing gap between the samples. To this end, we used bursts of ultrashort laser pulses with an individual pulse energy of up to . The laser-induced welding seams exhibit a base area with a size of up to . Using these large modifications, we are able to overcome the requirement of an optical contact and weld even gaps with a height of about . Bulging of the sample surface and ejection of molten material in the gap between the two samples allow to bridge the gap and enable successful welding. We also determined the breaking strength of laser-welded fused silica samples without an optical contact by a three-point bending test. The determined value of up to 73 MPa is equivalent to 85 % of stability of the pristine bulk material.

  17. Phase dynamics in a Doppler broadened optically-pumped laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldán, E.; de Valcárcel, G. J.; Vilaseca, R.; Silva, F.; Pujol, J.; Corbalán, R.; Laguarta, F.

    1989-11-01

    The dynamic behavior of the phase of the generated field in a Doppler-broadened optically-pumped far-infrared laser is theoretically investigated for the first time. The phase undergoes sudden jumps of approximately π radians, which allow to establish the actual symmetry of the main attractor in the phase space, explaining the heteroclynic character of the chaotic behavior observed in experiments.

  18. Resonant optical characteristics of an ultracold laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kosarev, N I; Shaparev, N Ya

    2009-12-31

    We report a computer simulation study of light absorption, scattering and emission at 397 nm in an ultracold calcium ion plasma under resonant excitation. The results point to spectral asymmetry of light scattering, nonlinear absorption, and emission in the plasma. An approach is proposed for ultracold plasma diagnostics using resonant optical characteristics. (laser plasma)

  19. Test Port for Fiber-Optic-Coupled Laser Altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos Izquierdo, Luis; Scott, V. Stanley; Rinis, Haris; Cavanaugh, John

    2011-01-01

    A test port designed as part of a fiber optic coupled laser altimeter receiver optical system allows for the back-illumination of the optical system for alignment verification, as well as illumination of the detector(s) for testing the receiver electronics and signal-processing algorithms. Measuring the optical alignment of a laser altimeter instrument is difficult after the instrument is fully assembled. The addition of a test port in the receiver aft-optics allows for the back-illumination of the receiver system such that its focal setting and boresight alignment can be easily verified. For a multiple-detector receiver system, the addition of the aft-optics test port offers the added advantage of being able to simultaneously test all the detectors with different signals that simulate the expected operational conditions. On a laser altimeter instrument (see figure), the aft-optics couple the light from the receiver telescope to the receiver detector(s). Incorporating a beam splitter in the aft-optics design allows for the addition of a test port to back-illuminate the receiver telescope and/or detectors. The aft-optics layout resembles a T with the detector on one leg, the receiver telescope input port on the second leg, and the test port on the third leg. The use of a custom beam splitter with 99-percent reflection, 1-percent transmission, and a mirrored roof can send the test port light to the receiver telescope leg as well as the detector leg, without unduly sacrificing the signal from the receiver telescope to the detector. The ability to test the receiver system alignment, as well as multiple detectors with different signals without the need to disassemble the instrument or connect and reconnect components, is a great advantage to the aft-optics test port. Another benefit is that the receiver telescope aperture is fully back-illuminated by the test port so the receiver telescope focal setting vs. pressure and or temperature can be accurately measured (as

  20. Optical glucose monitoring using vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi Fard, Sahba; Hofmann, Werner; Talebi Fard, Pouria; Kwok, Ezra; Amann, Markus-Christian; Chrostowski, Lukas

    2009-08-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is a common chronic disease that has become a public health issue. Continuous glucose monitoring improves patient health by stabilizing the glucose levels. Optical methods are one of the painless and promising methods that can be used for blood glucose predictions. However, having accuracies lower than what is acceptable clinically has been a major concern. Using lasers along with multivariate techniques such as Partial Least Square (PLS) can improve glucose predictions. This research involves investigations for developing a novel optical system for accurate glucose predictions, which leads to the development of a small, low power, implantable optical sensor for diabetes patients.

  1. Holograms for laser diode: Single mode optical fiber coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuhr, P. L.

    1982-01-01

    The low coupling efficiency of semiconductor laser emissions into a single mode optical fibers place a severe restriction on their use. Associated with these conventional optical coupling techniques are stringent alignment sensitivities. Using holographic elements, the coupling efficiency may be increased and the alignment sensitivity greatly reduced. Both conventional and computer methods used in the generation of the holographic couplers are described and diagrammed. The reconstruction geometries used are shown to be somewhat restrictive but substantially less rigid than their conventional optical counterparts. Single and double hologram techniques are examined concerning their respective ease of fabrication and relative merits.

  2. Femtosecond Laser Processing by Using Patterned Vector Optical Fields

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Kai; Qian, Sheng-Xia; Ren, Zhi-Cheng; Tu, Chenghou; Li, Yongnan; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2013-01-01

    We present and demonstrate an approach for femtosecond laser processing by using patterned vector optical fields (PVOFs) composed of multiple individual vector optical fields. The PVOFs can be flexibly engineered due to the diversity of individual vector optical fields in spatial arrangement and distribution of states of polarization, and it is easily created with the aid of a spatial light modulator. The focused PVOFs will certainly result in various interference patterns, which are then used to fabricate multi-microholes with various patterns on silicon. The present approach can be expanded to fabricate three-dimensional microstructures based on two-photon polymerization. PMID:23884360

  3. Integrated all-optical infrared switchable plasmonic quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Kohoutek, John; Bonakdar, Alireza; Gelfand, Ryan; Dey, Dibyendu; Nia, Iman Hassani; Fathipour, Vala; Memis, Omer Gokalp; Mohseni, Hooman

    2012-05-09

    We report a type of infrared switchable plasmonic quantum cascade laser, in which far field light in the midwave infrared (MWIR, 6.1 μm) is modulated by a near field interaction of light in the telecommunications wavelength (1.55 μm). To achieve this all-optical switch, we used cross-polarized bowtie antennas and a centrally located germanium nanoslab. The bowtie antenna squeezes the short wavelength light into the gap region, where the germanium is placed. The perturbation of refractive index of the germanium due to the free carrier absorption produced by short wavelength light changes the optical response of the antenna and the entire laser intensity at 6.1 μm significantly. This device shows a viable method to modulate the far field of a laser through a near field interaction.

  4. Q-switched Nd:YAG optical vortex lasers.

    PubMed

    Kim, D J; Kim, J W; Clarkson, W A

    2013-12-02

    Q-switched operation of a high-quality Nd:YAG optical vortex laser with the first order Laguerre-Gaussian mode and well-determined helical wavefronts using a fiber-based pump beam conditioning scheme is reported. A simple two-mirror resonator incorporating an acousto-optic Q-switch was employed, along with an etalon and a Brewster plate to enforce the particular helicity of the output. The laser yielded Q-switched pulses with ~250 μJ pulse energy and ~33 ns pulse duration (FWHM) at a 0.1 kHz repetition rate for 5.1 W of absorbed pump power. The handedness of the helical wavefronts was preserved regardless of the repetition rates. The prospects of further power scaling and improved laser performance are discussed.

  5. Optical monitoring of high power direct diode laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuang; Farahmand, Parisa; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2014-12-01

    Laser cladding is one of the most advanced surface modification techniques which can be used to build and repair high-value components. High power direct diode laser (HPDDL) offers unique quality and cost advantages over other lasers (CO2, Nd:YAG). Especially its rectangular laser beam with top-hat intensity distribution makes HPDDL an ideal tool for large area cladding. In order to utilize this technique successfully, the development of on-line monitoring and process control is necessary. In this study, an optical monitoring system consisting of a high-speed CCD camera, a pyrometer, and an infrared camera was used to analyze the mass- and heat-transfer in the cladding process. The particle transport in flight was viewed by a high-speed CCD camera; the interaction between powder flow and laser beam was observed by an infrared camera; and the thermal behavior of the molten pool was recorded by the pyrometer and the infrared camera. The effects of the processing parameters on the laser attenuation, particle heating and clad properties were investigated based on the obtained signals. The optical monitoring method improved the understanding about mutual interrelated phenomena in the cladding process.

  6. 1300 nm optically pumped quantum dot spin vertical external-cavity surface-emitting laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alharthi, S. S.; Orchard, J.; Clarke, E.; Henning, I. D.; Adams, M. J.

    2015-10-01

    We report a room temperature optically pumped Quantum Dot-based Spin-Vertical-External-Cavity Surface-Emitting laser (QD Spin-VECSEL) operating at the telecom wavelength of 1.3 μm. The active medium was composed of 5 × 3 QD layers; each threefold group was positioned at an antinode of the standing wave of the optical field. Circularly polarized lasing in the QD-VECSEL under Continuous-Wave optical pumping has been realized with a threshold pump power of 11 mW. We further demonstrate at room temperature control of the QD-VECSEL output polarization ellipticity via the pump polarization.

  7. Activation of cells using femtosecond laser beam (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batabyal, Subrata; Satpathy, Sarmishtha; Kim, Young-tae; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2016-03-01

    Study of communication in cellular systems requires precise activation of targeted cell(s) in the network. In contrast to chemical, electrical, thermal, mechanical stimulation, optical stimulation is non-invasive and is better suited for stimulation of targeted cells. As compared to visible lasers, the near infrared (NIR) microsecond/nanosecond pulsed laser beams are being used as preferred stimulation tool as they provide higher penetration depth in tissues. Femotosecond (FS) laser beams in NIR are also being used for direct and indirect (i.e. via two-photon optogenetics) stimulation of cells. Here, we present a comparative evaluation of efficacy of NIR FS laser beam for direct (no optogenetic sensitization) and 2ph optogenetic stimulation of cells. Further, for the first time, we demonstrate the use of blue (~450 nm, obtained by second harmonic generation) FS laser beam for stimulation of cells with and without Channelrhodopisn-2 (ChR2) expression. Comparative analysis of photocurrent generated by blue FS laser beam and continuous wave blue light for optogenetics stimulation of ChR2 transfected HEK cells will be presented. The use of ultrafast laser micro-beam for focal, non-contact, and repeated stimulation of single cells in a cellular circuitry allowed us to study the communication between different cell types.

  8. Horizontal Path Laser Communications Employing MEMS Adaptive Optics Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C A; Wilks, S C; Brase, J M; Young, R A; Johnson, G W; Ruggiero, A J

    2001-09-05

    Horizontal path laser communications are beginning to provide attractive alternatives for high-speed optical communications, In particular, companies are beginning to sell fiberless alternatives for intranet and sporting event video. These applications are primarily aimed at short distance applications (on the order of 1 km pathlength). There exists a potential need to extend this pathlength to distances much greater than a 1km. For cases of long distance optical propagation, atmospheric turbulence will ultimately limit the maximum achievable data rate. In this paper, we propose a method of improved signal quality through the use of adaptive optics. In particular, we show work in progress toward a high-speed, small footprint Adaptive Optics system for horizontal path laser communications. Such a system relies heavily on recent progress in Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) deformable mirrors as well as improved communication and computational components. In this paper we detail two Adaptive Optics approaches for improved through-put, the first is the compensated receiver (the traditional Adaptive Optics approach), the second is the compensated transmitter/receiver. The second approach allows for correction of the optical wavefront before transmission from the transmitter and prior to detection at the receiver.

  9. Optical design and active optics methods in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaitre, Gerard R.

    2013-03-01

    Optical designs for astronomy involve implementation of active optics and adaptive optics from X-ray to the infrared. Developments and results of active optics methods for telescopes, spectrographs and coronagraph planet finders are presented. The high accuracy and remarkable smoothness of surfaces generated by active optics methods also allow elaborating new optical design types with high aspheric and/or non-axisymmetric surfaces. Depending on the goal and performance requested for a deformable optical surface analytical investigations are carried out with one of the various facets of elasticity theory: small deformation thin plate theory, large deformation thin plate theory, shallow spherical shell theory, weakly conical shell theory. The resulting thickness distribution and associated bending force boundaries can be refined further with finite element analysis.

  10. Insight in the Chemistry of Laser-Activated Dental Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    De Moor, Roeland Jozef Gentil; Meire, Maarten August; De Coster, Peter Jozef; Walsh, Laurence James

    2015-01-01

    The use of optical radiation for the activation of bleaching products has not yet been completely elucidated. Laser light is suggested to enhance the oxidizing effect of hydrogen peroxide. Different methods of enhancing hydrogen peroxide based bleaching are possible. They can be classified into six groups: alkaline pH environment, thermal enhancement and photothermal effect, photooxidation effect and direct photobleaching, photolysis effect and photodissociation, Fenton reaction and photocatalysis, and photodynamic effect. PMID:25874251

  11. Insight in the chemistry of laser-activated dental bleaching.

    PubMed

    De Moor, Roeland Jozef Gentil; Verheyen, Jeroen; Diachuk, Andrii; Verheyen, Peter; Meire, Maarten August; De Coster, Peter Jozef; Keulemans, Filip; De Bruyne, Mieke; Walsh, Laurence James

    2015-01-01

    The use of optical radiation for the activation of bleaching products has not yet been completely elucidated. Laser light is suggested to enhance the oxidizing effect of hydrogen peroxide. Different methods of enhancing hydrogen peroxide based bleaching are possible. They can be classified into six groups: alkaline pH environment, thermal enhancement and photothermal effect, photooxidation effect and direct photobleaching, photolysis effect and photodissociation, Fenton reaction and photocatalysis, and photodynamic effect.

  12. Optically Pumped Carbon Monoxide Cascade Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-30

    temperature, and R is the ideal gas constant [13]. Voigt Profile At low pressures, 1-5 Torr, the line shape of CO can be represented by using a Gaussian...pulse. The influence of CO pressure, cell length, pump pulse intensity, and the resonator Q-Factor on the CO laser pulse temporal profile and spectral ...20 Figure 2.5. Lorentzian, Gaussian, and Voigt profiles .. .........................................................32 Figure 2.6. Transverse

  13. Optically Pumped Carbon Monoxide Cascade Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    frequency, M is the molecular mass, T is the gas temperature, and R is the ideal gas constant [13]. Voigt Profile At low pressures, 1-5 Torr, the line ...lasing line spectral width, again allowing more axial modes to fit within the gain profile . The next series of experiments were designed to maximize the...resonator Q-Factor on the CO laser pulse temporal profile and spectral distribution were studied. A numerical model was developed, and the experimental

  14. High-power laser arrays for optical computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zucker, Erik P.; Craig, Richard R.; Mehuys, David G.; Nam, Derek W.; Welch, David F.; Scifres, Donald R.

    1991-12-01

    We demonstrate both common electrode and addressable arrays of single mode semiconductor lasers suitable for optical computing and optical data storage. In the common electrode geometry, eight lasers have been fabricated on a single chip which show excellent spectral and power uniformity. Total optical power obtained from this array has been in excess of 1.2 Watts CW. We have also fabricated two and nine element monolithic, individually addressable arrays with emitter spacings between 10 jim and 150 p m. Separately addressed, each element emits in a single spatial mode to greater than 0.1 Watts. For the nine element array, uniformity of better than 1.0 nanometer in wavelength and 1 milliamp in operating current across the array has been obtained. Results on crosstalk and reliability of the arrays are presented.

  15. Micromanipulation of sperm by a laser generated optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Tadir, Y.; Wright, W.H.; Vafa, O.; Ord, T.; Asch, R.H.; Berns, M.W. )

    1989-11-01

    The force generated by the radiation pressure of a low power laser beam induces an optical trap which may be used to manipulate sperm. We studied the effect of the optical trap on sperm motility. A Nd:YAG laser beam was coupled to a conventional microscope and focused into the viewing plane by the objective lens. Sperm were caught in the trap and manipulated by a joy stick controlled motorized stage. After different exposure periods, the velocity and patterns were analysed by a computerized image processor. There were minor changes in sperm velocity when exposed to the trap for 30 seconds or less. A gradual decrease in the mean linear velocity was observed after 45 seconds of exposure. This optical micromanipulator may also be useful for studying the force generated by a single spermatozoa and evaluating the influence of drugs on motility.

  16. Conformal optical elements for correcting wavefront distortions in YAG : Nd{sup 3+} active elements

    SciTech Connect

    Korolkov, V P; Nasyrov, R K; Poleshchuk, A G; Arapov, Yu D; Ivanov, A F

    2013-02-28

    Correction of the wavefront is studied for the light beam passing wide-aperture YAG : Nd3+ single-crystal rods, which are used as active elements in high-power solid-state lasers. A nonideal character of the crystal structure is responsible for the deformation of the wavefront of passing radiation. By using the halftone technology we have developed conformal aberration correctors capable of compensating rod nonuniformities and reducing the laser radiation divergence by an order of magnitude. The results obtained make it possible to employ optically nonuniform active elements in laser constructions. (laser optics 2012)

  17. Device For Trapping Laser Pulses In An Optical Delay Line

    DOEpatents

    Yu, David U. L.; Bullock, Donald L.

    1997-12-23

    A device for maintaining a high-energy laser pulse within a recirculating optical delay line for a period time to optimize the interaction of the pulse with an electron beam pulse train comprising closely spaced electron micropulses. The delay line allows a single optical pulse to interact with many of the electron micropulses in a single electron beam macropulse in sequence and for the introduction of additional optical pulses to interact with the micropulses of additional electron beam macropulses. The device comprises a polarization-sensitive beam splitter for admitting an optical pulse to and ejecting it from the delay line according to its polarization state, a Pockels cell to control the polarization of the pulse within the delay line for the purpose of maintaining it within the delay line or ejecting it from the delay line, a pair of focusing mirrors positioned so that a collimated incoming optical pulse is focused by one of them to a focal point where the pulse interacts with the electron beam and then afterwards the pulse is recollimated by the second focusing mirror, and a timing device which synchronizes the introduction of the laser pulse into the optical delay line with the arrival of the electron macropulse at the delay line to ensure the interaction of the laser pulse with a prescribed number of electron micropulses in sequence. In a first embodiment of the invention, the principal optical elements are mounted with their axes collinear. In a second embodiment, all principal optical elements are mounted in the configuration of a ring.

  18. Optical gene transfer by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konig, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Tirlapur, Uday K.

    2003-07-01

    Targeted transfection of cells is an important technique for gene therapy and related biomedical applications. We delineate how high-intensity (1012 W/cm2) near-infrared (NIR) 80 MHz nanojoule femtosecond laser pulses can create highly localised membrane perforations within a minute focal volume, enabling non-invasive direct transfection of mammalian cells with DNA. We suspended Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO), rat kangaroo kidney epithelial (PtK2) and rat fibroblast cells in 0.5 ml culture medium in a sterile miniaturized cell chamber (JenLab GmbH, Jena, Germany) containing 0.2 μg plasmid DNA vector pEGFP-N1 (4.7 kb), which codes for green fluorescent protein (GFP). The NIR laser beam was introduced into a femtosecond laser scanning microscope (JenLab GmbH, Jena, Germany; focussed on the edge of the cell membrane of a target cell for 16 ms. The integration and expression efficiency of EGFP were assessed in situ by two-photon fluorescence-lifetime imaging using time-correlated single photon counting. The unique capability to transfer foreign DNA safely and efficiently into specific cell types (including stem cells), circumventing mechanical, electrical or chemical means, will have many applications, such as targeted gene therapy and DNA vaccination.

  19. Amplitude Noise Reduction of Ion Lasers with Optical Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, Gregory C.

    2011-01-01

    A reduction in amplitude noise on the output of a multi-mode continuous-wave Ar-ion laser was previously demonstrated when a fraction of the output power was retroreflected back into the laser cavity. This result was reproduced in the present work and a Fabry-Perot etalon was used to monitor the longitudinal mode structure of the laser. A decrease in the number of operating longitudinal cavity modes was observed simultaneously with the introduction of the optical feedback and the onset of the amplitude noise reduction. The noise reduction is a result of a reduced number of lasing modes, resulting in less mode beating and amplitude fluctuations of the laser output power.

  20. The Lunar Laser OCTL Terminal (LLOT) Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. Thomas; Wright, Malcolm W.

    2013-01-01

    The Lunar Laser OCTL Terminal is an auxiliary ground station terminal for the Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration (LLCD). The LLOT optical systems exercise modulation and beam divergence control over six 10-watt fiber-based laser transmitters at 1568 nanometers, which act as beacons for pointing of the space-based terminal. The LLOT design transmits these beams from distinct sub-apertures of the F/76 OCTL telescope at divergences ranging from 110 microrad to 40 microrad. LLOT also uses the same telescope aperture to receive the downlink signal at 1550 nanometers from the spacecraft terminal. Characteristics and control of the beacon lasers, methods of establishing and maintaining beam alignment, beam zoom system design, co-registration of the transmitted beams and the receive field of view, transmit/receive isolation, and downlink signal manipulation and control are discussed.

  1. Monitoring changes of optical attenuation coefficients of acupuncture points during laser acupuncture by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Yang, Hongqin; Wang, Yuhua; Zheng, Liqin; Xie, Shusen

    2010-11-01

    The physical properties of acupuncture point were important to discover the mechanism of acupuncture meridian. In this paper, we used an optical coherence tomography to monitor in vivo the changes of optical attenuation coefficients of Hegu acupuncture point and non-acupuncture point during laser irradiation on Yangxi acupuncture point. The optical attenuation coefficients of Hegu acupuncture point and non-acupuncture point were obtained by fitting the raw data according to the Beer-Lambert's law. The experimental results showed that the optical attenuation coefficient of Hegu acupuncture point decreased during the laser acupuncture, in contrast to a barely changed result in that of non-acupuncture point. The significant change of optical attenuation coefficient of Hegu acupuncture point indicated that there was a correlation between Hegu and Yangxi acupuncture points to some extent.

  2. Pair annihilation in laser pulses: Optical versus x-ray free-electron laser regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Ilderton, Anton; Johansson, Petter; Marklund, Mattias

    2011-09-15

    We discuss the theory and phenomenology of pair annihilation, within an ultrashort laser pulse, to a single photon. The signature of this process is the unidirectional emission of single photons with a fixed energy. We show that the cross section is significantly larger than for two-photon pair annihilation in vacuum, with x-ray free-electron laser parameters admitting a much clearer signal than optical beams.

  3. Optimization of optical nonlinearities in quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Jing

    Nonlinearities in quantum cascade lasers (QCL's) have wide applications in wavelength tunability and ultra-short pulse generation. In this thesis, optical nonlinearities in InGaAs/AlInAs-based mid-infrared (MIR) QCL's with quadruple resonant levels are investigated. Design optimization for the second-harmonic generation (SHG) of the device is presented. Performance characteristics associated with the third-order nonlinearities are also analyzed. The design optimization for SHG efficiency is obtained utilizing techniques from supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSYQM) with both material-dependent effective mass and band nonparabolicity. Current flow and power output of the structure are analyzed by self-consistently solving rate equations for the carriers and photons. Nonunity pumping efficiency from one period of the QCL to the next is taken into account by including all relevant electron-electron (e-e) and longitudinal (LO) phonon scattering mechanisms between the injector/collector and active regions. Two-photon absorption processes are analyzed for the resonant cascading triple levels designed for enhancing SHG. Both sequential and simultaneous two-photon absorption processes are included in the rate-equation model. The current output characteristics for both the original and optimized structures are analyzed and compared. Stronger resonant tunneling in the optimized structure is manifested by enhanced negative differential resistance. Current-dependent linear optical output power is derived based on the steady-state photon populations in the active region. The second-harmonic (SH) power is derived from the Maxwell equations with the phase mismatch included. Due to stronger coupling between lasing levels, the optimized structure has both higher linear and nonlinear output powers. Phase mismatch effects are significant for both structures leading to a substantial reduction of the linear-to-nonlinear conversion efficiency. The optimized structure can be fabricated

  4. A new class of optical sensors: a random laser based device

    PubMed Central

    Ignesti, Emilio; Tommasi, Federico; Fini, Lorenzo; Martelli, Fabrizio; Azzali, Niccolò; Cavalieri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    In a random laser the optical feedback is provided by scattering rather than by an optical cavity. Then, since its emission characteristics are very susceptible to the scattering details, it is a natural candidate for making active sensors to use as a diagnostic tool for disordered media like biological samples. However, the methods reported up to now, requiring the injection of toxic substances in the sample, have the drawback of altering the physical-chemical composition of the medium and are not suitable for in-vivo measurements. Here we present a random laser based sensor that overcomes these problems by keeping gain and diffusion separated. We provide an experimental characterisation of the sensor by using a reference diffusive liquid phantom and we show that, compared to a passive method, this sensor takes advantage of the gain and spectral properties of the random laser principle. PMID:27725755

  5. A new class of optical sensors: a random laser based device.

    PubMed

    Ignesti, Emilio; Tommasi, Federico; Fini, Lorenzo; Martelli, Fabrizio; Azzali, Niccolò; Cavalieri, Stefano

    2016-10-11

    In a random laser the optical feedback is provided by scattering rather than by an optical cavity. Then, since its emission characteristics are very susceptible to the scattering details, it is a natural candidate for making active sensors to use as a diagnostic tool for disordered media like biological samples. However, the methods reported up to now, requiring the injection of toxic substances in the sample, have the drawback of altering the physical-chemical composition of the medium and are not suitable for in-vivo measurements. Here we present a random laser based sensor that overcomes these problems by keeping gain and diffusion separated. We provide an experimental characterisation of the sensor by using a reference diffusive liquid phantom and we show that, compared to a passive method, this sensor takes advantage of the gain and spectral properties of the random laser principle.

  6. A new class of optical sensors: a random laser based device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignesti, Emilio; Tommasi, Federico; Fini, Lorenzo; Martelli, Fabrizio; Azzali, Niccolò; Cavalieri, Stefano

    2016-10-01

    In a random laser the optical feedback is provided by scattering rather than by an optical cavity. Then, since its emission characteristics are very susceptible to the scattering details, it is a natural candidate for making active sensors to use as a diagnostic tool for disordered media like biological samples. However, the methods reported up to now, requiring the injection of toxic substances in the sample, have the drawback of altering the physical-chemical composition of the medium and are not suitable for in-vivo measurements. Here we present a random laser based sensor that overcomes these problems by keeping gain and diffusion separated. We provide an experimental characterisation of the sensor by using a reference diffusive liquid phantom and we show that, compared to a passive method, this sensor takes advantage of the gain and spectral properties of the random laser principle.

  7. High-power diode lasers for optical communications applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlin, D. B.; Goldstein, B.; Channin, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    High-power, single-mode, double-heterojunction AlGaAs diode lasers are being developed to meet source requirements for both fiber optic local area network and free space communications systems. An individual device, based on the channeled-substrate-planar (CSP) structure, has yielded single spatial and longitudinal mode outputs of up to 90 mW CW, and has maintained a single spatial mode to 150 mW CW. Phase-locked arrays of closely spaced index-guided lasers have been designed and fabricated with the aim of multiplying the outputs of the individual devices to even higher power levels in a stable, single-lobe, anastigmatic beam. The optical modes of the lasers in such arrays can couple together in such a way that they appear to be emanating from a single source, and can therefore be efficiently coupled into optical communications systems. This paper will review the state of high-power laser technology and discuss the communication system implications of these devices.

  8. Fabrication of optical cavities with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jintian; Song, Jiangxin; Tang, Jialei; Fang, Wei; Sugioka, Koji; Cheng, Ya

    2014-03-01

    We report on fabrication of three-dimensional (3D) high-quality (Q) whispering-gallery-mode microcavities by femtosecond laser micromachining. The main fabrication procedures include the formation of on-chip freestanding microdisk through selective material removal by femtosecond laser pulses, followed by surface smoothing processes (CO2 laser reflow for amorphous glass and focused ion beam (FIB) sidewall milling for crystalline materials) to improve the Q factors. Fused silica microcavities with 3D geometries are demonstrated with Q factors exceeding 106. A microcavity laser based on Nd:glass has been fabricated, showing a threshold as low as 69μW via free space continuous-wave optical excitation at the room temperature. CaF2 crystalline microcavities with Q factor of ~4.2×104 have also been demonstrated. This technique allows us to fabricate 3D high-Q microcavities in various transparent materials such as glass and crystals, which will benefit a broad spectrum of applications such as nonlinear optics, quantum optics, and bio-sensing.

  9. Vibrating Optical Fibers to Make Laser Speckle Disappear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, Matthew; Scott, V. Stanley

    2005-01-01

    In optical systems in which laser illumination is delivered via multimode optical fibers, laser speckle can be rendered incoherent by a simple but highly effective technique. The need to eliminate speckle arises because speckle can make it difficult to observe edges and other sharp features, thereby making it difficult to perform precision alignment of optical components. The basic ideas of the technique is to vibrate the optical fiber(s) to cause shifting of electromagnetic modes within the fiber(s) and consequent shifting of the speckle pattern in the light emerging from the fiber(s). If the frequency of vibration is high enough, a human eye cannot follow the shifting speckle pattern, so that instead of speckle, a human observer sees a smoothed pattern of light corresponding to a mixture of many electromagnetic modes. If necessary, the optical fiber(s) could be vibrated manually. However, in a typical laboratory situation, it would be more practical to attach a vibrating mechanism to the fiber(s) for routine use as part of the fiber-optic illuminator. In experiments, a commercially available small, gentle, quiet, variable- speed vibratory device was used in this way, with the result that the appearance of speckle was eliminated, as expected. Figures 1 and 2 illustrate the difference.

  10. Robust focusing optics for high-power laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, Blake

    2014-02-01

    As available power levels from both fiber and disc lasers rapidly increase, so does the need for more robust beam delivery solutions. Traditional transmissive optics for 1 micron lasers have proven to be problematic in the presence of higher power densities and are more susceptible to focal shift. A new, fully-reflective, optical solution has been developed using mirrors rather than lenses and windows to achieve the required stable focal spot, while still protecting the delicate fiber end. This patent-approved beam focusing solution, referred to as high power reflective focusing optic (HPRFO), involves specialty mirrors and a flowing gas orifice that prevents ingress of contaminants into the optically sensitive region of the assembly. These mirrors also provide a unique solution for increasing the distance between the sensitive optics and the contamination-filled region at the work, without sacrificing spot size. Longer focal lengths and lower power densities on large mass, water-cooled, copper mirrors deliver the robustness needed at increasingly high power levels. The HPRFO exhibits excellent beam quality and minimal focal shift at a fraction of commercially available optics, and has demonstrated consistent reliability on applications requiring 15 kW with prolonged beam-on times.

  11. Ultraprecision grinding of optical materials for high-power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namba, Yoshiharu; Yoshida, Kunio; Yoshida, Hidetsugu; Nakai, Sadao

    1998-04-01

    Grinding is considered to be a rough machining process in the field of optics; a polishing process must follow the grinding process for getting optical-quality surfaces. An ultraprecision surface grinder with hydrostatic oil bearings and a glass-ceramic spindle of extremely low thermal expansion was developed to get smooth optical surfaces without any polishing process. Various optical materials such as NbF1, BK7, LHG08 fused silica, KTP, KDP and CLBO were ground into optical surfaces after empirically determining the conditions required to attain ductile-mode grinding. An extremely smooth surface less than 0.1 nm rms was obtained on BK7 glass by the ultraprecision grinding process. The laser-induced damage threshold was measured on variously finished LHG-8 laser glass at (lambda) equals 1.053 micrometers and 1-ns pulse width. The damage threshold was measured at 22.2 J/cm2 on a ground surface with the polarization parallel to the grinding direction. This number is higher than that obtained by optical polish. The damage threshold of 293 J/cm2 was also obtained on a ground LHG-8 glass surface at (lambda) equals 1.053 micrometers and 30-ns pulse width.

  12. Optical design of the adaptive optics laser guide star system

    SciTech Connect

    Bissinger, H.

    1994-11-15

    The design of an adaptive optics package for the 3 meter Lick telescope is presented. This instrument package includes a 69 actuator deformable mirror and a Hartmann type wavefront sensor operating in the visible wavelength; a quadrant detector for the tip-tile sensor and a tip-tilt mirror to stabilize atmospheric first order tip-tile errors. A high speed computer drives the deformable mirror to achieve near diffraction limited imagery. The different optical components and their individual design constraints are described. motorized stages and diagnostics tools are used to operate and maintain alignment throughout observation time from a remote control room. The expected performance are summarized and actual results of astronomical sources are presented.

  13. Characterization of novel optical fibers for use in laser detonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, M. D.; Drake, R. C.; Singleton, C. A.

    2006-08-01

    A system for launching flyers using a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser has been developed for shock initiation of secondary explosives. Flyers have been launched at velocities approaching 6 km s -1. Optical fibers are used to transport the optical energy from the laser to the detonator. The launch of these flyers with sufficient velocity requires a fluence in the region of 35 J cm -2, significantly above the damage threshold of most optical fibers. This damage is typically caused by laser absorption at the input face due to imperfections in the surface polishing. A variety of optical fibers with high quality input faces have been tested at fluences up to 50 J cm -2, and their damage thresholds and beam profiles have been measured. The standard fiber used in this system is a low hydroxyl (-OH) content, 400μm diameter core silica fiber, with CO2 laser polished faces. In addition to this, fibers tapering down to 300μm and 200μm core diameter were investigated, as a means of increasing the efficiency of the system, along with mechanically polished fibers. The fiber currently enters the detonator body from the rear. Depending on the application, it may be required for the fiber to enter from the side. To facilitate this, fibers with a machined output face, designed to produce an output at approximately 90 degrees to the fiber axis were tested. Finally, a 2:1 fiber splitter was tested, as a first step to enable simultaneous firing of several detonators. Multiple initiation points are desirable for applications such as programmable initiation, and it is intended to study fiber splitters with a higher split ratio, such as 4:1 and 8:1. The results of these experiments are presented, and assessments made of suitability for transmission of high-power Qswitched Nd:YAG laser pulses.

  14. Laser Metrology for an Optical-Path-Length Modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gursel, Yekta

    2005-01-01

    Laser gauges have been developed to satisfy requirements specific to monitoring the amplitude of the motion of an optical-path-length modulator that is part of an astronomical interferometer. The modulator includes a corner-cube retroreflector driven by an electromagnetic actuator. During operation of the astronomical interferometer, the electromagnet is excited to produce linear reciprocating motion of the corner-cube retroreflector at an amplitude of 2 to 4 mm at a frequency of 250, 750, or 1,250 Hz. Attached to the corner-cube retroreflector is a small pick-off mirror. To suppress vibrations, a counterweight having a mass equal to that of the corner-cube retroreflector and pick-off mirror is mounted on another electromagnetic actuator that is excited in opposite phase. Each gauge is required to measure the amplitude of the motion of the pick-off mirror, assuming that the motions of the pick-off mirror and the corner-cube retroreflector are identical, so as to measure the amplitude of motion of the corner- cube retroreflector to within an error of the order of picometers at each excitation frequency. Each gauge is a polarization-insensitive heterodyne interferometer that includes matched collimators, beam separators, and photodiodes (see figure). The light needed for operation of the gauge comprises two pairs of laser beams, the beams in each pair being separated by a beat frequency of 80 kHz. The laser beams are generated by an apparatus, denoted the heterodyne plate, that includes stabilized helium-neon lasers, acousto-optical modulators, and associated optical and electronic subsystems. The laser beams are coupled from the heterodyne plate to the collimators via optical fibers.

  15. Controllable Dispersion in an Optical Laser Gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Owen; Du, Shuangli; Rochester, Simon; Budker, Dmitry; Novikova, Irina; Mikhailov, Eugeniy

    2016-05-01

    Optical gyroscopes use Sagnac interferometry to make precise measurements of angular velocity. Increased gyroscope sensitivity will allow for more accurate control of aerospace systems and allow for more precise measurements of the Earth's rotation. Severalfold improvements to optical gyroscope sensitivity were predicted for fast light regimes (ng < 1). We evaluated the feasibility of these improvements in the N-bar dual pump scheme in 87 Rb vapor. We were able to modify the stimulated gyroscope response via tuning the experimental parameters. Gyroscope sensitivity was shown to be dependent on several parameters including pump power, pump detunning, and vapor density. This work was supported by the NSF and Naval Air Warfare Center STTR program N68335-11-C-0428.

  16. The optical effect of a semiconductor laser on protecting wheat from UV-B radiation damage.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zong-Bo; Zhu, Xin-Jun; Li, Fang-Min; Liu, Xiao; Yue, Ming

    2007-07-01

    Lasers have been widely used in the field of biology along with the development of laser technology, but the mechanism of the bio-effect of lasers is not explicit. The objective of this paper was to test the optical effect of a laser on protecting wheat from UV-B damage. A patent instrument was employed to emit semiconductor laser (wavelength 650 nm) and incoherent red light, which was transformed from the semiconductor laser. The wavelength, power and lightfleck diameter of the incoherent red light are the same as those of the semiconductor laser. The semiconductor laser (wavelength 650 nm, power density 3.97 mW mm(-2)) and incoherent red light (wavelength 650 nm, power density 3.97 mW mm(-2)) directly irradiated the embryo of wheat seeds for 3 min respectively, and when the seedlings were 12-day-old they were irradiated by UV-B radiation (10.08 kJ m(-2)) for 12 h in the dark. Changes in the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), glutathione (GSH), ascorbate (AsA), carotenoids (CAR), the production rate of superoxide radical (O(2)(-)), the activities of peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the growth parameters of seedlings (plant height, leaf area and fresh weight) were measured to test the optical effect of the laser. The results showed that the incoherent red light treatment could not enhance the activities of SOD, POD and CAT and the concentration of AsA and CAR. When the plant cells were irradiated by UV-B, the incoherent red light treatment could not eliminate active oxygen and prevent lipid peroxidation in wheat. The results also clearly demonstrate that the plant DNA was damaged by UV-B radiation and semiconductor laser irradiance had the capability to protect plants from UV-B-induced DNA damage, while the incoherent red light could not. This is the first investigation reporting the optical effect of a semiconductor laser on protecting wheat from UV-B radiation damage.

  17. Dynamic Analysis of an Optical Laser Platform

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-10

    beam pointing is a critical topic in the study of Directed Energy Weapons Systems. One of the main operational concerns with optical beam pointing is...Rao [2] studied the vibration of a simply-supported rectangular plate carrying a concentrated mass and presents a closed-form solution for the...new class of admissible functions to study the vibration of elastically point supported plates. The basis function corresponded to a similarly

  18. Laser Window Materials and Optical Coating Science

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    10 Torr pressure , is presently the favored alternative RAP agent. Comparison studies of optical coatings prepared under conventional high...In principle , the uncoated surface heat also contributes to the first and second slopes but in practice, as discussed in the results in Sec. Ill...jim), CO (5.3 jim), and CO2 (9.27 and 10.6 fi.m). The window materials that are under investigation include selected alkali halides and

  19. A laser unequal path interferometer for the optical shop.

    PubMed

    Houston, J B; Buccini, C J; O'Neill, P K

    1967-07-01

    The application of laser technology has been extended to optical shop testing by incorporating a cw, helium-neon gas laser in a package that houses a modified Twyman-Green interferometer. This modification provides for optical testing over large path differences with an auxiliary set of lenses used in the long path and a small reference flat used in the short path of the interferometer. With this technique, f/0.7 spherical mirrors have been tested (at the center of curvature) to an accuracy of 1/10 wavelength at the surface, and various other optical systems have been tested in both double pass and single pass. Two of the advantages of this testing method are (1) the capability of testing spherical concave surfaces without physically contacting the surface and (2) the ability to use small reference surfaces for large optical components or systems. The device known as a laser unequal path interferometer can be used with a set of null lenses to qualify aspheric surfaces. The unit is portable and capable of testing in any orientation under various environmental conditions. Several applications of this device are presented to illustrate its versatility.

  20. Swept laser source based on acousto-optic tunable filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Minghui; Li, Hao; Chen, Rong

    2014-12-01

    The design and development of the swept laser for optical coherence tomography is presented. It is manifested by a semiconductor optical amplifier, a fiber coupler, two fiber isolators, a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) for frequency tuning within a unidirectional all-fiber ring cavity. Light output from the coupler is further amplified and spectral shaped by a booster SOA terminated at both ends with two isolators. The total loss in ring cavity is 8.2 dB. The gain SOA provides fiber-to-fiber small signal gain of 22.2 dB with saturation output power of 9.0 dBm. The developed laser source provides up to 100 kHz over a full-width wavelength tuning range of 140 nm at center wavelength of 1308 nm with an average power of 8 mW, yielding an axial resolution of 5.4 μm in air for OCT imaging. Theoretically, the measurement principle and the feasibility of the system are analyzed. Implementing the laser source in swept source based OCT (SS-OCT) system, real-time structural imaging of biological tissue is realized.

  1. Performance of a laser microsatellite network with an optical preamplifier.

    PubMed

    Arnon, Shlomi

    2005-04-01

    Laser satellite communication (LSC) uses free space as a propagation medium for various applications, such as intersatellite communication or satellite networking. An LSC system includes a laser transmitter and an optical receiver. For communication to occur, the line of sight of the transmitter and the receiver must be aligned. However, mechanical vibration and electronic noise in the control system reduce alignment between the transmitter laser beam and the receiver field of view (FOV), which results in pointing errors. The outcome of pointing errors is fading of the received signal, which leads to impaired link performance. An LSC system is considered in which the optical preamplifier is incorporated into the receiver, and a bit error probability (BEP) model is derived that takes into account the statistics of the pointing error as well as the optical amplifier and communication system parameters. The model and the numerical calculation results indicate that random pointing errors of sigma(chi)2G > 0.05 penalize communication performance dramatically for all combinations of optical amplifier gains and noise figures that were calculated.

  2. Novel mid-infrared lasers with compressively strained InAsSb active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, S.R.; Biefeld, R.M.; Allerman, A.A.

    1997-02-01

    Mid-infrared lasers grown by MOCVD with AlAsSb claddings and strained InAsSb active regions are reported. A 3.8--3.9 {micro}m injection laser with a pseudomorphic InAsSb multiple quantum well active region lased at 210 K under pulsed operation. A semi-metal layer acts as an internal electron source for the injection laser. An optically pumped laser with an InAsSb/InAsP strained-layer superlattice active region was demonstrated at 3.7 {micro}m, 240 K.

  3. Investigation of Microstructured Optical Fiber in Eight Fiber Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahloul, Faouzi; Ennejah, Tarek; Attia, Rabah

    2012-06-01

    In passively mode locked fiber laser, case of 8FL (Eight Fiber Laser), the management of length, linear and non linear parameters of the cavity plays a paramount role in the generation of stable ultra short pulses with high peak powers. In this work, we propose an 8FL consisted of MOF (Microstructured Optical Fiber). According to the various properties of the MOF, we studied the variation of the pulses peak power and width. We demonstrated that there are optimal parameters of the MOF for which the peak power is maximal and the width is minimal.

  4. Investigation of Microstructured Optical Fiber in Eight Fiber Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahloul, Faouzi; Ennejah, Tarek; Attia, Rabah

    2011-09-01

    In passively mode locked fiber laser, case of 8FL (Eight Fiber Laser), the management of length, linear and non linear parameters of the cavity plays a paramount role in the generation of stable ultra short pulses with high peak powers. In this work, we propose an 8FL consisted of MOF (Microstructured Optical Fiber). According to the various properties of the MOF, we studied the variation of the pulses peak power and width. We demonstrated that there are optimal parameters of the MOF for which the peak power is maximal and the width is minimal.

  5. Optical laue diffraction on photonic structures designed by laser lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samusev, K. B.; Rybin, M. V.; Lukashenko, S. Yu.; Limonov, M. F.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional photonic crystals with square symmetry C 4v were obtained using the laser lithography method. The structure of these samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Optical Laue diffraction for monochromatic light was studied experimentally depending on the incidence angle of laser beam and lattice constant. Interpretation of the observed diffraction patterns is given in the framework of the Laue diffraction mechanism for an one-dimensional chain of scattering elements. Red thresholds for different diffraction orders were determined experimentally and theoretically. The results of calculations are in an excellent agreement with experiment.

  6. Probing beyond the laser coherence time in optical clock comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hume, David B.; Leibrandt, David R.

    2016-03-01

    We develop differential measurement protocols that circumvent the laser noise limit in the stability of optical clock comparisons by synchronous probing of two clocks using phase-locked local oscillators. This allows for probe times longer than the laser coherence time, avoids the Dick effect, and supports Heisenberg-limited measurement precision. We present protocols for such frequency comparisons and develop numerical simulations of the protocols with realistic noise sources. These methods provide a route to reduce frequency ratio measurement durations by more than an order of magnitude.

  7. Laser activated diffuse discharge switch

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; Hunter, Scott R.

    1988-01-01

    The invention is a gas mixture for a diffuse discharge switch which is capable of changing from a conducting state to an insulating state in the presence of electrons upon the introduction of laser light. The mixture is composed of a buffer gas such as nitrogen or argon and an electron attaching gas such as C.sub.6 H.sub.5 SH, C.sub.6 H.sub.5 SCH.sub.3, CH.sub.3 CHO and CF.sub.3 CHO wherein the electron attachment is brought on by indirect excitation of molecules to long-lived states by exposure to laser light.

  8. Reduction of the time-to-full-brightness in solid-state lasers using intra-cavity adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Lubeigt, Walter; Griffith, Mike; Laycock, Leslie; Burns, David

    2009-07-06

    Several adaptive-optics techniques, based on the active modification of the optical properties of the laser cavity, were used to significantly reduce the time-to-full-brightness of solid-state lasers. Resonator re-configuration was achieved using a mechanical translation stage and both multi- and single-element deformable bimorph mirrors. Using these techniques the effects of thermally induced distortion in Nd:YLF and Nd:YAG lasers can be minimized and the warm-up time reduced by a factor of 3-6.

  9. Molecular Gas-Filled Hollow Optical Fiber Lasers in the Near Infrared

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-12

    HOLLOW OPTICAL FIBER LASERS IN THE NEAR F A9550-08-l-0344 INFRARED Sb. GRANT NUMBER Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd. PROJECT NUMBER...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We have demonstrated of a new class of optically pumped gas lasers inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fibers . Here, a...crystal fiber . These lasers are the first in a new class of infrared lasers based on the combination of hollow- fiber and optically pumped-gas

  10. Sol-gel technologies in thin film fabrication for integrated optics lasers and amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Rui M.; Vasconcelos, H. C.

    1997-07-01

    There is a strong need for the development of cheap component technologies for optical functions such as switching, demultiplexing and amplification. Silica-on- silicon integrated optics using sol-gel processing is probably the best technology for such low cost applications. This review focuses on the sol-gel based thin film fabrication technologies for integrated optics (IO) lasers and amplifiers, using Nd3+ and Er3+ as the active species. Special emphasis is given to the work performed under the European Union sponsored projects NODES (ESPRIT) and CAPITAL (ACTS), in particular to the processing and characterization of Nd3+ and Er3+-doped silica-titania planar waveguides for IO lasers and amplifiers.

  11. Fiber Optic Solutions for Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R; Dawson, J; Liao, Z; Jovanovic, I; Wattellier, B; Payne, S; Barty, C P

    2003-01-29

    For applications requiring high beam quality radiation from efficient, compact and rugged sources, diffraction limited fiber lasers are ideal, and to date have been demonstrated at average CW power levels exceeding 100 W with near diffraction limited: output. For conventional single-core step-index single-mode fibers, this power level represents the sealing limit because of nonlinear and laser damage considerations. Higher average powers would exceed nonlinear process thresholds such as the Raman and stimulated Brillouin scattering limit, or else damage the fiber due to the high intensity level in the fiber's core. The obvious way to increase the average power capability of fibers is to increase the area of their core. Simply expanding the core dimensions of the fiber allows a straightforward power sealing due to enhanced nonlinear and power handling characteristics that scale directly with the core area. Femtosecond, chirped-pulse, fiber lasers with pulse energies greater than 1mJ have been demonstrated in the literature [2] using this technique. This output energy was still limited by the onset of stimulated Raman scattering. We have pursued an alternative and complimentary approach which is to reduce the intensity of light propagating in the core by distributing it more evenly across the core area via careful design of the refractive index profile [3]. We have also sought to address the primary issue that results from scaling the core. The enhanced power handling capability comes at the expense of beam quality, as increasing the core diameter in standard step index fibers permits multiple transverse modes to lase simultaneously. Although this problem of multimode operation can be mitigated to some extent by appropriately designing the fiber's waveguide structure, limitations such as bend radius loss, sensitivity to thermally induced perturbations of the waveguide structure, and refractive index control, all become more stringent as the core diameter grows

  12. Measuring a Fiber-Optic Delay Line Using a Mode-Locked Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Meirong; McKee, Michael R.; Pak, Kyung S.; Yu, Nan

    2010-01-01

    The figure schematically depicts a laboratory setup for determining the optical length of a fiber-optic delay line at a precision greater than that obtainable by use of optical time-domain reflectometry or of mechanical measurement of length during the delay-line-winding process. In this setup, the delay line becomes part of the resonant optical cavity that governs the frequency of oscillation of a mode-locked laser. The length can then be determined from frequency-domain measurements, as described below. The laboratory setup is basically an all-fiber ring laser in which the delay line constitutes part of the ring. Another part of the ring - the laser gain medium - is an erbium-doped fiber amplifier pumped by a diode laser at a wavelength of 980 nm. The loop also includes an optical isolator, two polarization controllers, and a polarizing beam splitter. The optical isolator enforces unidirectional lasing. The polarization beam splitter allows light in only one polarization mode to pass through the ring; light in the orthogonal polarization mode is rejected from the ring and utilized as a diagnostic output, which is fed to an optical spectrum analyzer and a photodetector. The photodetector output is fed to a radio-frequency spectrum analyzer and an oscilloscope. The fiber ring laser can generate continuous-wave radiation in non-mode-locked operation or ultrashort optical pulses in mode-locked operation. The mode-locked operation exhibited by this ring is said to be passive in the sense that no electro-optical modulator or other active optical component is used to achieve it. Passive mode locking is achieved by exploiting optical nonlinearity of passive components in such a manner as to obtain ultra-short optical pulses. In this setup, the particular nonlinear optical property exploited to achieve passive mode locking is nonlinear polarization rotation. This or any ring laser can support oscillation in multiple modes as long as sufficient gain is present to overcome

  13. Novel multiple output and multiwavelength fiber ring-optical laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Shyh-Lin; Lin, Huang-Cuang

    2003-12-01

    The fiber ring structures optical signal processor with semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA's) have been developed [1]. The SOA's have been demonstrated the ability of direct signal processing combining the optical amplification with ether modulation, detection, or wavelength conversion [2,3]. Moreover, the fiber-optical processors have many advantages. In this paper, we purpose new design configurations of an 8x8 array waveguide grating (AWG) connected to an SOA to achieve a ring configuration and experimentally measure its characteristics. In this paper, we can get fourteen signal processing output simultaneously by using such a fiber ring construction. The multiwavelenght and multiple output rings signal processor can be implemented by connecting any pair of the 8x8 AWG to the SOA. This application can develop a multiple-input-multiple-output processing only optical amplifier. We will present various useful parameters of application this fiber optic processor. References [1] Goodman, J.W.; Moslehi, B, "Novel amplified fiber-optic recirculating delay line processor", J.Lightwave Technol., Vol. 10 Issue: 8, pp.1142-1147, 1992 [2] U. Koren, B. I. Miller, M. G. Yang, T. L. Koch, R. M. Jopson, A. Gnauck, D. Evankow, and M. Chien, "High frequency modulation of strained layer multiple quantum well optical amplifiers", Electron. Lett., vol. 27, pp.62-64, 1991. [3] M. Gustavsson, A. Karlsson, and L. Thylen, "Traveling wave semiconductor laser amplifiers detectors", J. Lightwave Technol., vol. 8, pp. 610-617, 1990.

  14. Detection of Laser Optic Defects Using Gradient Direction Matching

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B Y; Kegelmeyer, L M; Liebman, J A; Salmon, J T; Tzeng, J; Paglieroni, D W

    2005-12-14

    That National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will be the world's largest and most energetic laser. It has thousands of optics and depends heavily on the quality and performance of these optics. Over the past several years, we have developed the NIF Optics Inspection Analysis System that automatically finds defects in a specific optic by analyzing images taken of that optic. This paper describes a new and complementary approach for the automatic detection of defects based on detecting the diffraction ring patterns in downstream optic images caused by defects in upstream optics. Our approach applies a robust pattern matching algorithm for images called Gradient Direction Matching (GDM). GDM compares the gradient directions (the direction of flow from dark to light) of pixels in a test image to those of a specified model and identifies regions in the test image whose gradient directions are most in line with those of the specified model. For finding rings, we use luminance disk models whose pixels have gradient directions all pointing toward the center of the disk. After GDM identifies potential rings locations, we rank these rings by how well they fit the theoretical diffraction ring pattern equation. We perform false alarm mitigation by throwing out rings of low fit. A byproduct of this fitting procedure is an estimate of the size of the defect and its distance from the image plane. We demonstrate the potential effectiveness of this approach by showing examples of rings detected in real images of NIF optics.

  15. Modeling and optimization of actively Q-switched Nd-doped quasi-three-level laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Renpeng; Yu, Xin; Li, Xudong; Chen, Deying; Gao, Jing

    2013-09-01

    The energy transfer upconversion and the ground state absorption are considered in solving the rate equations for an active Q-switched quasi-three-level laser. The dependence of output pulse characters on the laser parameters is investigated by solving the rate equations. The influence of the energy transfer upconversion on the pulsed laser performance is illustrated and discussed. By this model, the optimal parameters could be achieved for arbitrary quasi-three-level Q-switched lasers. An acousto-optical Q-switched Nd:YAG 946 nm laser is constructed and the reliability of the theoretical model is demonstrated.

  16. Environmental stability of actively mode locked fibre lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Calum H.; Lee, Stephen T.; Reid, Derryck T.; Baili, Ghaya; Davies, John

    2016-10-01

    Lasers developed for defence related applications typically encounter issues with reliability and meeting desired specification when taken from the lab to the product line. In particular the harsh environmental conditions a laser has to endure can lead to difficulties. This paper examines a specific class of laser, namely actively mode-locked fibre lasers (AMLFLs), and discusses the impact of environmental perturbations. Theoretical and experimental results have assisted in developing techniques to improve the stability of a mode-locked pulse train for continuous operation. Many of the lessons learned in this research are applicable to a much broader category of lasers. The AMLFL consists of a fibre ring cavity containing a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), an isolator, an output coupler, a circulator, a bandpass filter and a modulator. The laser produces a train of 6-ps pulses at 800 nm with a repetition rate in the GHz regime and a low-noise profile. This performance is realisable in a laboratory environment. However, even small changes in temperature on the order of 0.1 °C can cause a collapse of mode-locked dynamics such that the required stability cannot be achieved without suitable feedback. Investigations into the root causes of this failure were performed by changing the temperature of components that constitute the laser resonator and observing their properties. Several different feedback mechanisms have been investigated to improve laser stability in an environment with dynamic temperature changes. Active cavity length control will be discussed along with DC bias control of the Mach-Zehnder modulator (MZM).

  17. Strong Optical Injection Locking of Edge-Emitting Lasers and Its Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-18

    laser is amplified by an EDFA and attenuated with an inline power meter/attenuator before injecting into the gain -lever DBR laser. The output of the...injection power from a master laser by an EDFA . Figure 4-20 shows the measured optical spectrum of the injection-locked gain -lever DBR laser under R...high-speed long-haul communication and have been widely used for various applications in photonics technology . Semiconductor lasers under optical

  18. Optically pumped room-temperature GaAs nanowire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Dhruv; Mokkapati, Sudha; Parkinson, Patrick; Jiang, Nian; Gao, Qiang; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-12-01

    Near-infrared lasers are important for optical data communication, spectroscopy and medical diagnosis. Semiconductor nanowires offer the possibility of reducing the footprint of devices for three-dimensional device integration and hence are being extensively studied in the context of optoelectronic devices. Although visible and ultraviolet nanowire lasers have been demonstrated widely, progress towards room-temperature infrared nanowire lasers has been limited because of material quality issues and Auger recombination. (Al)GaAs is an important material system for infrared lasers that is extensively used for conventional lasers. GaAs has a very large surface recombination velocity, which is a serious issue for nanowire devices because of their large surface-to-volume ratio. Here, we demonstrate room-temperature lasing in core-shell-cap GaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs nanowires by properly designing the Fabry-Pérot cavity, optimizing the material quality and minimizing surface recombination. Our demonstration is a major step towards incorporating (Al)GaAs nanowire lasers into the design of nanoscale optoelectronic devices operating at near-infrared wavelengths.

  19. Laser induced damage in optical materials: ninth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1978-08-01

    The Ninth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 4-6 October 1977. The symposium was under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy (formerly ERDA), and the Office of Naval Research. About 185 scientists attended, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Australia, Union of South Africa, and the Soviet Union. The Symposium was divided into sessions concerning Laser Windows and Materials, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Films, Laser Glass and Glass Lasers, and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for use from 10.6 microm to the uv region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength were also discussed. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons. The Tenth Annual Symposium is scheduled for 12-14 September 1978 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  20. Free space optical communication based on pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozd, Tadeusz; Mierczyk, Zygmunt; Zygmunt, Marek; Wojtanowski, Jacek

    2016-12-01

    Most of the current optical data transmission systems are based on continuous wave (cw) lasers. It results from the tendency to increase data transmission speed, and from the simplicity in implementation (straightforward modulation). Pulsed lasers, which find many applications in a variety of industrial, medical and military systems, in this field are not common. Depending on the type, pulsed lasers can generate instantaneous power which is many times greater when compared with cw lasers. As such, they seem to be very attractive to be used in data transmission technology, especially due to the potentially larger ranges of transmission, or in adverse atmospheric conditions where low power cw-lasersbased transmission is no longer feasible. It is also a very practical idea to implement data transmission capability in the pulsed laser devices that have been around and already used, increasing the functionality of this type of equipment. At the Institute of Optoelectronics at Military University of Technology, a unique method of data transmission based on pulsed laser radiation has been developed. This method is discussed in the paper in terms of both data transmission speed and transmission range. Additionally, in order to verify the theoretical assumptions, modules for voice and data transmission were developed and practically tested which is also reported, including the measurements of Bit Error Rate (BER) and performance vs. range analysis.

  1. The optical antenna system design research on earth integrative network laser link in the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xianzhu; Fu, Qiang; He, Jingyi

    2014-11-01

    Earth integrated information network can be real-time acquisition, transmission and processing the spatial information with the carrier based on space platforms, such as geostationary satellites or in low-orbit satellites, stratospheric balloons or unmanned and manned aircraft, etc. It is an essential infrastructure for China to constructed earth integrated information network. Earth integrated information network can not only support the highly dynamic and the real-time transmission of broadband down to earth observation, but the reliable transmission of the ultra remote and the large delay up to the deep space exploration, as well as provide services for the significant application of the ocean voyage, emergency rescue, navigation and positioning, air transportation, aerospace measurement or control and other fields.Thus the earth integrated information network can expand the human science, culture and productive activities to the space, ocean and even deep space, so it is the global research focus. The network of the laser communication link is an important component and the mean of communication in the earth integrated information network. Optimize the structure and design the system of the optical antenna is considered one of the difficulty key technologies for the space laser communication link network. Therefore, this paper presents an optical antenna system that it can be used in space laser communication link network.The antenna system was consisted by the plurality mirrors stitched with the rotational paraboloid as a substrate. The optical system structure of the multi-mirror stitched was simulated and emulated by the light tools software. Cassegrain form to be used in a relay optical system. The structural parameters of the relay optical system was optimized and designed by the optical design software of zemax. The results of the optimal design and simulation or emulation indicated that the antenna system had a good optical performance and a certain

  2. Optical Probes for Laser Induced Shocks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    kidney kinetic energy is transformed into the potential energy of stone fragmentation in urology [4] and photodisruption the cavitation. Subsequently...GNZUmlNY(ev bak .REOTOT 3 . REPORT TYPE AND OATES COVERED N - I Final Report 15 mar 90-14 mar 92 ___ lLE AND SU11TIT S. FUNDING NUMBERS I ! ~ Optical...addition, work initiated prior to the AFOSR grant by ADZ at the University of Berne, Switzerland, was completed [P- 3 , P-4, C- 3 , C-4, C-5]. That research

  3. Optical rogue wave statistics in laser filamentation.

    PubMed

    Kasparian, Jérôme; Béjot, Pierre; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Dudley, John M

    2009-07-06

    We experimentally observed optical rogue wave statistics during high power femtosecond pulse filamentation in air. We characterized wavelength-dependent intensity fluctuations across 300 nm broadband filament spectra generated by pulses with several times the critical power for filamentation. We show how the statistics vary from a near-Gaussian distribution in the vicinity of the pump to a long tailed "L-shaped" distribution at the short wavelength and long wavelength edges. The results are interpreted in terms of pump noise transfer via self-phase modulation.

  4. Influence of the pump-to-laser beam overlap on the performance of optically pumped cesium vapor laser.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Tom; Lebiush, Eyal; Auslender, Ilya; Barmashenko, Boris D; Rosenwaks, Salman

    2016-06-27

    Experimental and theoretical study of the influence of the pump-to-laser beam overlap, a crucial parameter for optimization of optically pumped alkali atom lasers, is reported for Ti:Sapphire pumped Cs laser. Maximum laser power > 370 mW with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 43% and slope efficiency ~55% was obtained. The dependence of the lasing power on the pump power was found for different pump beam radii at constant laser beam radius. Non monotonic dependence of the laser power (optimized over the temperature of the Cs cell) on the pump beam radius was observed with a maximum achieved at the ratio ~0.7 between the pump and laser beam radii. The optimal temperature decreased with increasing pump beam radius. A simple optical model of the laser, where Gaussian spatial shapes of the pump and laser intensities in any cross section of the beams were assumed, was compared to the experiments. Good agreement was obtained between the measured and calculated dependence of the laser power on the pump power at different pump beam radii and also of the laser power, threshold pump power and optimal temperature on the pump beam radius. The model does not use empirical parameters such as mode overlap efficiency and can be applied to different Ti:Sapphire and diode pumped alkali lasers with arbitrary spatial distributions of the pump and laser beam widths.

  5. Laser demonstration and performance characterization of optically pumped Alkali Laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulham, Clifford V.

    Diode Pumped Alkali Lasers (DPALs) offer a promising approach for high power lasers in military applications that will not suffer from the long logistical trails of chemical lasers or the thermal management issues of diode pumped solid state lasers. This research focuses on characterizing a DPAL-type system to gain a better understanding of using this type of laser as a directed energy weapon. A rubidium laser operating at 795 nm is optically pumped by a pulsed titanium sapphire laser to investigate the dynamics of DPALs at pump intensities between 1.3 and 45 kW/cm2. Linear scaling as high as 32 times threshold is observed, with no evidence of second order kinetics. Comparison of laser characteristics with a quasi-two level analytic model suggests performance near the ideal steady-state limit, disregarding the mode mis-match. Additionally, the peak power scales linearly as high as 1 kW, suggesting aperture scaling to a few cm2 is sufficient to achieve tactical level laser powers. The temporal dynamics of the 100 ns pump and rubidium laser pulses are presented, and the continually evolving laser efficiency provides insight into the bottlenecking of the rubidium atoms in the 2P3/2 state. Lastly, multiple excited states of rubidium and cesium were accessed through two photon absorption in the red, yielding a blue and an IR photon through amplified stimulated emission. Threshold is modest at 0.3 mJ/pulse, and slope efficiencies increase dramatically with alkali concentrations and peak at 0.4%, with considerable opportunity for improvement. This versatile system might find applications for IR countermeasures or underwater communications.

  6. Laser-optical blade tip clearance measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barranger, J. P.; Ford, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    A laser-optical measurement system was developed to measure single blade tip clearances and average blade tip clearances between a rotor and its gas path seal in rotating component rigs and complete engines. The system is applicable to fan, compressor and turbine blade tip clearance measurements. The engine mounted probe is particularly suitable for operation in the extreme turbine environment. The measurement system consists of an optical subsystem, an electronic subsystem and a computing and graphic terminal. Bench tests and environmental tests were conducted to confirm operation at temperatures, pressures, and vibration levels typically encountered in an operating gas turbine engine.

  7. Optical fiber sensing based on reflection laser spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Gianluca; Salza, Mario; Ferraro, Pietro; Chehura, Edmond; Tatam, Ralph P; Gangopadhyay, Tarun K; Ballard, Nicholas; Paz-Soldan, Daniel; Barnes, Jack A; Loock, Hans-Peter; Lam, Timothy T-Y; Chow, Jong H; De Natale, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    An overview on high-resolution and fast interrogation of optical-fiber sensors relying on laser reflection spectroscopy is given. Fiber Bragg-gratings (FBGs) and FBG resonators built in fibers of different types are used for strain, temperature and acceleration measurements using heterodyne-detection and optical frequency-locking techniques. Silica fiber-ring cavities are used for chemical sensing based on evanescent-wave spectroscopy. Various arrangements for signal recovery and noise reduction, as an extension of most typical spectroscopic techniques, are illustrated and results on detection performances are presented.

  8. Optical trapping and manipulation of neutral particles using lasers

    PubMed Central

    Ashkin, Arthur

    1997-01-01

    The techniques of optical trapping and manipulation of neutral particles by lasers provide unique means to control the dynamics of small particles. These new experimental methods have played a revolutionary role in areas of the physical and biological sciences. This paper reviews the early developments in the field leading to the demonstration of cooling and trapping of neutral atoms in atomic physics and to the first use of optical tweezers traps in biology. Some further major achievements of these rapidly developing methods also are considered. PMID:9144154

  9. Development of fluorides for high power laser optics

    SciTech Connect

    Ready, J.F.; Vora, H.

    1980-07-01

    The laser-assisted thermonuclear fusion program has significant needs for improved optical materials with high transmission in the ultraviolet, and with low values of nonlinear index of refraction. Lithium fluoride (LiF) possesses a combination of optical properties which are of potential use. Single-crystalline LiF is limited by low mechanical strength. In this program, we investigated the technique of press-forging to increase the mechanical strength. LiF single crystals were press-forged over the temperature range 300 to 600/sup 0/C to produce fine-grained polycrystalline material.

  10. Bidirectional optical bistability in a dual-pumped erbium doped fiber ring laser.

    PubMed

    Lai, W J; Shum, P; Binh, L

    2004-11-15

    We investigate bidirectional optical wave propagations in a dual-pumped erbium doped fiber ring laser without isolator, and observe optical bistability behaviors. Consequently, we propose and construct a NOLM-NALM fiber ring laser to demonstrate and exploit this bidirectional optical bistability phenomenon in optical switching by introducing two tunable variable ratio couplers in the system. Numerical analyses based on the proposed laser structure have also been demonstrated corroborated with the experimental results.

  11. Modeling of Laser Induced Damage in NIF UV Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M

    2001-02-21

    Controlling damage to nominally transparent optical elements such as lenses, windows and frequency conversion crystals on high power lasers is a continuing technical problem. Scientific understanding of the underlying mechanisms of laser energy absorption, material heating and vaporization and resultant mechanical damage is especially important for UV lasers with large apertures such as NIF. This LDRD project was a single year effort, in coordination with associated experimental projects, to initiate theoretical descriptions of several of the relevant processes. In understanding laser damage, we distinguish between damage initiation and the growth of existent damage upon subsequent laser irradiation. In general, the effect of damage could be ameliorated by either preventing its initiation or by mitigating its growth. The distinction comes about because initiation is generally due to extrinsic factors such as contaminants, which provide a means of local laser energy absorption. Thus, initiation tends to be local and stochastic in nature. On the other hand, the initial damaging event appears to modify the surrounding material in such a way that multiple pulse damage grows more or less regularly. More exactly, three ingredients are necessary for visible laser induced damage. These are adequate laser energy, a mechanism of laser energy absorption and mechanical weakness. For damage growth, the material surrounding a damage site is already mechanically weakened by cracks and probably chemically modified as well. The mechanical damage can also lead to electric field intensification due to interference effects, thus increasing the available laser energy density. In this project, we successfully accounted for the pulselength dependence of damage threshold in bulk DKDP crystals with the hypothesis of small absorbers with a distribution of sizes. We theoretically investigated expected scaling of damage initiation craters both to baseline detailed numerical simulations

  12. Ultrahigh-Resolution Optical Coherence Tomography Using Femtosecond Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, J. G.; Aguirre, A. D.; Chen, Y.; Herz, P. R.; Hsiung, P.-L.; Ko, T. H.; Nishizawa, N.; Kärtner, F. X.

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging optical imaging modality for biomedical research and clinical medicine. OCT can perform high resolution, cross-sectional tomographic imaging in materials and biological systems by measuring the echo time delay and magnitude of backreflected or backscattered light [1]. In medical applications, OCT has the advantage that imaging can be performed in situ and in real time, without the need to remove and process specimens as in conventional excisional biopsy and histopathology. OCT can achieve axial image resolutions of 1 to 15 μm; one to two orders of magnitude higher than standard ultrasound imaging. The image resolution in OCT is determined by the coherence length of the light source and is inversely proportional to its bandwidth. Femtosecond lasers can generate extremely broad bandwidths and have enabled major advances in ultrahigh-resolution OCT imaging. This chapter provides an overview of OCT technology and ultrahigh-resolution OCT imaging using femtosecond lasers.

  13. Numerical stability maps of an optically injected semiconductor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fordell, T.; Lindberg, Å. M.

    2004-12-01

    Detailed experimental mappings of the dynamics of a Fabry-Pérot type semiconductor laser subjected to external optical injection along with parameters describing the injected laser have been published by Eriksson and Lindberg [J. Opt. B: Quantum Semiclass. Opt. 4 (2002) 149] and by Eriksson [Opt. Commun. 210 (2002) 343]. This paper reports on a numerical investigation of the injection experiments. By computing the largest Lyapunov exponent, the chaotic islands, periodic windows and locking ranges are compared in detail with the experimental results for three different operating points of the laser. The numerical results are in good agreement with the experiment once the linewidth enhancement factor is increased from the earlier reported value of 3.9 ± 0.5 to about 6.7. The new value is confirmed by a re-measurement of the linewidth enhancement factor using a current modulation technique.

  14. Experiment of space laser communication based on adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Zhun; Ai, Yong; Chen, Jin; Chen, Erhu; Wu, Yunyun

    2011-11-01

    The adaptive optics(AO) technology is adopted in the demo experiment of indoor space laser communication system. In transmit terminal, 650nm beacon and 1550nm signal beam with OOK modulation propagate through atmosphere turbulence simulator which simulate the laser's propagation in real atmosphere conditions. The AO system corrects real time wave-front information. In received terminal, signal intensity is collected and the bit error rate(BER) is recorded. Experiment data is obtained in different status of the AO system. Combined with signal beam wave-front reconstructed and image quality of far-field laser spot, results show that the received average power of communication system increases when using the AO system to correct low-order aberration. Also it rejects signal fading and makes the BER lower.

  15. Experiment of space laser communication based on adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Zhun; Ai, Yong; Chen, Jin; Chen, Erhu; Wu, Yunyun

    2012-02-01

    The adaptive optics(AO) technology is adopted in the demo experiment of indoor space laser communication system. In transmit terminal, 650nm beacon and 1550nm signal beam with OOK modulation propagate through atmosphere turbulence simulator which simulate the laser's propagation in real atmosphere conditions. The AO system corrects real time wave-front information. In received terminal, signal intensity is collected and the bit error rate(BER) is recorded. Experiment data is obtained in different status of the AO system. Combined with signal beam wave-front reconstructed and image quality of far-field laser spot, results show that the received average power of communication system increases when using the AO system to correct low-order aberration. Also it rejects signal fading and makes the BER lower.

  16. Automated correlation dimension analysis of optically injected solid state lasers.

    PubMed

    Toomey, J P; Kane, D M; Valling, S; Lindberg, A M

    2009-04-27

    Nonlinear lasers are excellent systems from which to obtain high signal-to-noise experimental data of nonlinear dynamical variables to be used to develop and demonstrate robust nonlinear dynamics analysis techniques. Here we investigate the dynamical complexity of such a system: an optically injected Nd:YVO(4) solid state laser. We show that a map of the correlation dimension as a function of the injection strength and frequency detuning, extracted from the laser output power time-series data, is an excellent mirror of the dynamics map generated from a theoretical model of the system. An automated computational protocol has been designed and implemented to achieve this. The correlation dimension map is also contrasted with prior research that mapped the peak intensity of the output power as an experimentally accessible measurand reflecting the dynamical state of the system [Valling et al., Phys. Rev. A 72, 033810 (2005)].

  17. Picosecond laser welding of optical to metal components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Richard M.; Troughton, Michael; Chen, Jinanyong; Elder, Ian; Thomson, Robert R.; Lamb, Robert A.; Esser, M. J. Daniel; Hand, Duncan P.

    2016-03-01

    We report on practical, industrially relevant, welding of optical components to themselves and aluminum alloy components. Weld formation is achieved through the tight focusing of a 5.9ps, 400kHz Trumpf laser operating at 1030nm. By selecting suitable surface preparation, clamping and laser parameters, the plasma can be confined, even with comparatively rough surfaces, by exploiting the melt properties of the glass. The short interaction time allows for a permanent weld to form between the two materials with heating limited to a region ~300 µm across. Practical application of these weld structures is typically limited due to the induced stress within the glass and, critically, the issues surrounding post-weld thermal expansion. We report on the measured strength of the weld, with a particular emphasis on laser parameters and surface preparation.

  18. Excitability in a quantum dot semiconductor laser with optical injection.

    PubMed

    Goulding, D; Hegarty, S P; Rasskazov, O; Melnik, S; Hartnett, M; Greene, G; McInerney, J G; Rachinskii, D; Huyet, G

    2007-04-13

    We experimentally analyze the dynamics of a quantum dot semiconductor laser operating under optical injection. We observe the appearance of single- and double-pulse excitability at one boundary of the locking region. Theoretical considerations show that these pulses are related to a saddle-node bifurcation on a limit cycle as in the Adler equation. The double pulses are related to a period-doubling bifurcation and occur on the same homoclinic curve as the single pulses.

  19. Refractory period of an excitable semiconductor laser with optical injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbin, B.; Dolcemascolo, A.; Prati, F.; Javaloyes, J.; Tissoni, G.; Barland, S.

    2017-01-01

    Injection-locked semiconductor lasers can be brought to a neuronlike excitable regime when parameters are set close to the unlocking transition. Here we study experimentally the response of this system to repeated optical perturbations and observe the existence of a refractory period during which perturbations are not able to elicit an excitable response. The results are analyzed via simulations of a set of dynamical equations which reproduced adequately the experimental results.

  20. Optical feedback signal for ultrashort laser pulse ablation of tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.-M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Mammini, B.M.; Da Silva, L.B.

    1997-07-01

    An optical feedback system for controlled precise tissue ablation is discussed. Our setup includes an ultrashort pulse laser (USPL), and a diagnostic system using analysis of either tissue fluorescence or plasma emission luminescence. Current research is focused on discriminating hard and soft tissues such as bone and spinal cord during surgery using either technique. Our experimental observations exhibit considerable spectroscopic contrast between hard and soft tissue, and both techniques offer promise for a practical diagnostic system.

  1. Precision Targeting With a Tracking Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    galvanometers placed at appropriate conjugates within the path of the adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope. The input to the “master” control loop is...loop is the scaled position signals from the master galvanometers . The slave tracking mirrors are placed at conjugates to the center of rotation of the...slave systems), and analog-to-digital and digital-to- analog converters (ADC and DACs) to receive reflectometer signals and drive galvanometers . The

  2. Use laser optics for on-stream alignment verification

    SciTech Connect

    Block, H.P.

    1991-01-01

    One of the many significant factors influencing machinery reliability in process plants is alignment accuracy. When driven process machines operate in misaligned condition with respect to their drivers, equipment bearings are exposed to additional loads. Vibration severity may increase, bearings will be more highly loaded and equipment life expectancy will diminish. This paper reports on the use of laser optics for on-stream alignment verification.

  3. Multimode laser beam analyzer instrument using electrically programmable optics.

    PubMed

    Marraccini, Philip J; Riza, Nabeel A

    2011-12-01

    Presented is a novel design of a multimode laser beam analyzer using a digital micromirror device (DMD) and an electronically controlled variable focus lens (ECVFL) that serve as the digital and analog agile optics, respectively. The proposed analyzer is a broadband laser characterization instrument that uses the agile optics to smartly direct light to the required point photodetectors to enable beam measurements of minimum beam waist size, minimum waist location, divergence, and the beam propagation parameter M(2). Experimental results successfully demonstrate these measurements for a 500 mW multimode test laser beam with a wavelength of 532 nm. The minimum beam waist, divergence, and M(2) experimental results for the test laser are found to be 257.61 μm, 2.103 mrad, 1.600 and 326.67 μm, 2.682 mrad, 2.587 for the vertical and horizontal directions, respectively. These measurements are compared to a traditional scan method and the results of the beam waist are found to be within error tolerance of the demonstrated instrument.

  4. Optical spectroscopy using gas-phase femtosecond laser filamentation.

    PubMed

    Odhner, Johanan; Levis, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Femtosecond laser filamentation occurs as a dynamic balance between the self-focusing and plasma defocusing of a laser pulse to produce ultrashort radiation as brief as a few optical cycles. This unique source has many properties that make it attractive as a nonlinear optical tool for spectroscopy, such as propagation at high intensities over extended distances, self-shortening, white-light generation, and the formation of an underdense plasma. The plasma channel that constitutes a single filament and whose position in space can be controlled by its input parameters can span meters-long distances, whereas multifilamentation of a laser beam can be sustained up to hundreds of meters in the atmosphere. In this review, we briefly summarize the current understanding and use of laser filaments for spectroscopic investigations of molecules. A theoretical framework of filamentation is presented, along with recent experimental evidence supporting the established understanding of filamentation. Investigations carried out on vibrational and rotational spectroscopy, filament-induced breakdown, fluorescence spectroscopy, and backward lasing are discussed.

  5. Optical Shaping of X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinelli, A.; Coffee, R.; Vetter, S.; Hering, P.; West, G. N.; Gilevich, S.; Lutman, A. A.; Li, S.; Maxwell, T.; Galayda, J.; Fry, A.; Huang, Z.

    2016-06-01

    In this Letter we report the experimental demonstration of a new temporal shaping technique for x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs). This technique is based on the use of a spectrally shaped infrared (IR) laser and allows optical control of the x-ray generation process. By accurately manipulating the spectral amplitude and phase of the IR laser, we can selectively modify the electron bunch longitudinal emittance thus controlling the duration of the resulting x-ray pulse down to the femtosecond time scale. Unlike other methods currently in use, optical shaping is directly applicable to the next generation of high-average power x-ray FELs such as the Linac Coherent Light Source-II or the European X-FEL, and it enables pulse shaping of FELs at the highest repetition rates. Furthermore, this laser-shaping technique paves the way for flexible tailoring of complex multicolor FEL pulse patterns required for nonlinear multidimensional x-ray spectroscopy as well as novel multicolor diffraction imaging schemes.

  6. Optical Shaping of X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, A; Coffee, R; Vetter, S; Hering, P; West, G N; Gilevich, S; Lutman, A A; Li, S; Maxwell, T; Galayda, J; Fry, A; Huang, Z

    2016-06-24

    In this Letter we report the experimental demonstration of a new temporal shaping technique for x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs). This technique is based on the use of a spectrally shaped infrared (IR) laser and allows optical control of the x-ray generation process. By accurately manipulating the spectral amplitude and phase of the IR laser, we can selectively modify the electron bunch longitudinal emittance thus controlling the duration of the resulting x-ray pulse down to the femtosecond time scale. Unlike other methods currently in use, optical shaping is directly applicable to the next generation of high-average power x-ray FELs such as the Linac Coherent Light Source-II or the European X-FEL, and it enables pulse shaping of FELs at the highest repetition rates. Furthermore, this laser-shaping technique paves the way for flexible tailoring of complex multicolor FEL pulse patterns required for nonlinear multidimensional x-ray spectroscopy as well as novel multicolor diffraction imaging schemes.

  7. Single-crystal silicon optical fiber by direct laser crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Xiaoyu; Lei, Shiming; Yu, Shih -Ying; Cheng, Hiu Yan; Liu, Wenjun; Poilvert, Nicolas; Xiong, Yihuang; Dabo, Ismaila; Mohney, Suzanne E.; Badding, John V.; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2016-12-05

    Semiconductor core optical fibers with a silica cladding are of great interest in nonlinear photonics and optoelectronics applications. Laser crystallization has been recently demonstrated for crystallizing amorphous silicon fibers into crystalline form. Here we explore the underlying mechanism by which long single-crystal silicon fibers, which are novel platforms for silicon photonics, can be achieved by this process. Using finite element modeling, we construct a laser processing diagram that reveals a parameter space within which single crystals can be grown. Utilizing this diagram, we illustrate the creation of single-crystal silicon core fibers by laser crystallizing amorphous silicon deposited inside silica capillary fibers by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition. The single-crystal fibers, up to 5.1 mm long, have a very welldefined core/cladding interface and a chemically pure silicon core that leads to very low optical losses down to ~0.47-1dB/cm at the standard telecommunication wavelength (1550 nm). Furthermore, tt also exhibits a photosensitivity that is comparable to bulk silicon. Creating such laser processing diagrams can provide a general framework for developing single-crystal fibers in other materials of technological importance.

  8. Single-crystal silicon optical fiber by direct laser crystallization

    DOE PAGES

    Ji, Xiaoyu; Lei, Shiming; Yu, Shih -Ying; ...

    2016-12-05

    Semiconductor core optical fibers with a silica cladding are of great interest in nonlinear photonics and optoelectronics applications. Laser crystallization has been recently demonstrated for crystallizing amorphous silicon fibers into crystalline form. Here we explore the underlying mechanism by which long single-crystal silicon fibers, which are novel platforms for silicon photonics, can be achieved by this process. Using finite element modeling, we construct a laser processing diagram that reveals a parameter space within which single crystals can be grown. Utilizing this diagram, we illustrate the creation of single-crystal silicon core fibers by laser crystallizing amorphous silicon deposited inside silica capillarymore » fibers by high-pressure chemical vapor deposition. The single-crystal fibers, up to 5.1 mm long, have a very welldefined core/cladding interface and a chemically pure silicon core that leads to very low optical losses down to ~0.47-1dB/cm at the standard telecommunication wavelength (1550 nm). Furthermore, tt also exhibits a photosensitivity that is comparable to bulk silicon. Creating such laser processing diagrams can provide a general framework for developing single-crystal fibers in other materials of technological importance.« less

  9. Fiber optic laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy sensor for molten material analysis

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Hansheng; Rai, Awadesh K.; Singh, Jagdish P.; Yueh, Fang-Yu

    2004-07-13

    A fiber optic laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) sensor, including a laser light source, a harmonic separator for directing the laser light, a dichroic mirror for reflecting the laser light, a coupling lens for coupling the laser light at an input of a multimode optical fiber, a connector for coupling the laser light from an output of the multimode optical fiber to an input of a high temperature holder, such as a holder made of stainless steel, and a detector portion for receiving emission signal and analyzing LIBS intensities. In one variation, the multimode optical fiber has silica core and silica cladding. The holder includes optical lenses for collimating and focusing the laser light in a molten alloy to produce a plasma, and for collecting and transmitting an emission signal to the multimode optical fiber.

  10. Multiple-Zone Diffractive Optic Element for Laser Ranging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis A.

    2011-01-01

    A diffractive optic element (DOE) can be used as a beam splitter to generate multiple laser beams from a single input laser beam. This technology has been recently used in LRO s Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument to generate five laser beams that measure the lunar topography from a 50-km nominal mapping orbit (see figure). An extension of this approach is to use a multiple-zone DOE to allow a laser altimeter instrument to operate over a wider range of distances. In particular, a multiple-zone DOE could be used for applications that require both mapping and landing on a planetary body. In this case, the laser altimeter operating range would need to extend from several hundred kilometers down to a few meters. The innovator was recently involved in an investigation how to modify the LOLA instrument for the OSIRIS asteroid mapping and sample return mission. One approach is to replace the DOE in the LOLA laser beam expander assembly with a multiple-zone DOE that would allow for the simultaneous illumination of the asteroid with mapping and landing laser beams. The proposed OSIRIS multiple-zone DOE would generate the same LOLA five-beam output pattern for high-altitude topographic mapping, but would simultaneously generate a wide divergence angle beam using a small portion of the total laser energy for the approach and landing portion of the mission. Only a few percent of the total laser energy is required for approach and landing operations as the return signal increases as the inverse square of the ranging height. A wide divergence beam could be implemented by making the center of the DOE a diffractive or refractive negative lens. The beam energy and beam divergence characteristics of a multiple-zone DOE could be easily tailored to meet the requirements of other missions that require laser ranging data. Current single-zone DOE lithographic manufacturing techniques could also be used to fabricate a multiple-zone DOE by masking the different DOE zones during

  11. Laser absorption velocimetry using an optical vortex beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Ozawa, Naoya; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Morisaki, Tomohiro

    2016-09-01

    A plain-wave-like beam, or a Hermite-Gaussian mode, has been used for conventional laser spectroscopy. Since the Doppler shift in frequency of light absorbed by a moving atom is given by the dot product of the wave vector of the light beam and an atomic velocity, it is essentially a one-dimensional measurement. It has a merit that the interpretation of the result is clear and straightforward; however, it simultaneously poses a limitation that the measurable velocity component is confined to the projection along the wave vector. This limitation may be overcome by using an optical vortex beam, or a Laguerre-Gaussian mode, which has helical phase fronts associated with orbital angular momentum of light. Due to its three-dimensional phase structure, the Doppler shift for an atom moving in the optical vortex beam has three components. Therefore, the laser measurement method that has a sensitivity even for transverse motion across the beam is possible to be achieved. We have performed laser absorption measurements using optical vortex beams as a proof-of-principle experiment, where an additional frequency shift in the absorption spectra of metastable argon neutrals in a plasma has been observed. The details of experimental results will be discussed in the conference. This study was partially supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grand Numbers 15K05365 and 25287152.

  12. Lasers and electro-optic technology in natural resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Jerry D.

    1991-03-01

    As pressure on our limited land base continues to increase managers of public lands must have more accurate information within a shorter time to make logical defensible decisions which are acceptable to the public. Remote sensing technology provides many tools required to gather much of the information used by decision makers. Some of the most important remote sensing tools are based on laser and electro-optical technology. This paper provides an overview of some applications of laser and electro-optical devices by managers of natural resources. It is important for workers in other fields to be aware of the problems and needs of resource managers as it is important for resource managers to be knowledgeable about developments in technical areas. Sharing information will promote opportunities to develop new tools and improve the effectiveness and efficiency of management. Personal knowledge and literature searches provide examples. While the variety of uses in somewhat limited their importance is increasing as managers and analysts become more accustomed to using products of this technology. Lasers and electro-optical instruments will continue to be a very important part of our data collection process. 2. 0

  13. Applications of optical sensing for laser cutting and drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Mahlen D. T.; French, Paul; Peters, Chris; Hand, Duncan P.; Jones, Julian D. C.

    2002-08-01

    Any reliable automated production system must include process control and monitoring techniques. Two laser processing techniques potentially lending themselves to automation are percussion drilling and cutting. For drilling we investigate the performance of a modification of a nonintrusive optical focus control system we previously developed for laser welding, which exploits the chromatic aberrations of the processing optics to determine focal error. We further developed this focus control system for closed-loop control of laser cutting. We show that an extension of the technique can detect deterioration in cut quality, and we describe practical trials carried out on different materials using both oxygen and nitrogen assist gas. We base our techniques on monitoring the light generated by the process, captured nonintrusively by the effector optics and processed remotely from the workpiece. We describe the relationship between the temporal and the chromatic modulation of the detected light and process quality and show how the information can be used as the basis of a process control system.

  14. Applications of optical sensing for laser cutting and drilling.

    PubMed

    Fox, Mahlen D T; French, Paul; Peters, Chris; Hand, Duncan P; Jones, Julian D C

    2002-08-20

    Any reliable automated production system must include process control and monitoring techniques. Two laser processing techniques potentially lending themselves to automation are percussion drilling and cutting. For drilling we investigate the performance of a modification of a nonintrusive optical focus control system we previously developed for laser welding, which exploits the chromatic aberrations of the processing optics to determine focal error. We further developed this focus control system for closed-loop control of laser cutting. We show that an extension of the technique can detect deterioration in cut quality, and we describe practical trials carried out on different materials using both oxygen and nitrogen assist gas. We base our techniques on monitoring the light generated by the process, captured nonintrusively by the effector optics and processed remotely from the workpiece. We describe the relationship between the temporal and the chromatic modulation of the detected light and process quality and show how the information can be used as the basis of a process control system.

  15. Sol-gel optical coatings for lasers, 3

    SciTech Connect

    Floch, H.G.; Belleville, P.F.; Priotton, J.J.; Pegon, P.M.; Dijonneau, C.S.; Guerain, J.

    1995-12-01

    The planned megajoule-class neodymium-glass laser system will be the world`s largest. The proposed CEL-V design, based on the use of 240 beams, will use 50--150 times more optical material than did Phebus. Almost 10,000 m{sup 2} of coated area are required for optical coatings; this is a factor of almost 500 increase over Phebus. Lens, flashlamp, blastshield, harmonic converter, debris shield, window and cavity-end mirror coatings by the sol-gel process represent >96% of the entire coated area. The remaining <4% are high-rejection-ratio polarizers, pick-off cavity mirrors and transport mirrors. Cost estimates show that, for coating deposition, the sol-gel technique provides considerable saving compared to the more conventional e-beam deposition technique. Highly reflective and polarizing sol-gel-derived optical coatings have been prepared and tested for the proposed French megajoule neodymium-glass laser. Laser damage studies are reported here.

  16. Fully automated hybrid diode laser assembly using high precision active alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, Gunnar; Weber, Daniel; Scholz, Friedemann; Schröder, Henning; Schneider-Ramelow, Martin; Lang, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-03-01

    Fraunhofer IZM, Technische Universität Berlin and eagleyard Photonics present various implementations of current micro-optical assemblies for high quality free space laser beam forming and efficient fiber coupling. The laser modules shown are optimized for fast and automated assembly in small form factor packages via state-of-the-art active alignment machinery, using alignment and joining processes that have been developed and established in various industrial research projects. Operational wavelengths and optical powers ranging from 600 to 1600 nm and from 1 mW to several W respectively are addressed, for application in high-resolution laser spectroscopy, telecom and optical sensors, up to the optical powers needed in industrial and medical laser treatment.

  17. Tetravalent chromium (Cr(4+)) as laser-active ion for tunable solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seas, A.; Petricevic, V.; Alfano, Robert R.

    1993-01-01

    Major accomplishments under NASA grant NAG-1-1346 are summarized. (1) numerical modeling of the four mirror astigmatically compensated, Z-fold cavity was performed and several design parameters to be used for the construction of a femtosecond forsterite laser were revealed by simulation. (2) femtosecond pulses from a continuous wave mode-locked chromium doped forsterite laser were generated. The forsterite laser was actively mode-locked using an acousto-optic modulator operating at 78 MHz with two Brewster high dispersion glass prisms for intra-cavity chirp compensation. Transform-limited sub-100-fs pulses were routinely generated in the TEM(sub 00) mode with 85 mW of continuous power tunable over 1230-1280 nm. The shortest pulses of 60-fs pulsewidth were measured. (3) Self-mode-locked operation of the Cr:forsterite laser was achieved. Synchronous pumping was used to mode lock the forsterite laser resulting in picosecond pulses, which in turn provided the starting mechanism for self-mode-locking. The pulses generated had an FWHM of 105 fs and were tunable between 1230-1270 nm. (4) Numerical calculations indicated that the pair of SF 14 prisms used in the cavity compensated for quadratic phase but introduced a large cubic phase term. Further calculations of other optical glasses indicated that a pair of SFN 64 prisms can introduce the same amount of quadratic phase as SF 14 prisms but introduce a smaller cubic phase. When the SF 14 prisms were replaced by SFN 64 prisms the pulsewidth was reduced to 50 fs. Great improvement was observed in the stability of the self mode-locked forsterite laser and in the ease of achieving mode locking. Using the same experimental arrangement and a new forsterite crystal with improved FOM the pulse width was reduced to 36 fs.

  18. Optical coherence tomography-guided laser microsurgery for blood coagulation with continuous-wave laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Feng-Yu; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Wang, Zu-Yi; Chi, Chun-Kai; Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chan, Ming-Che; Lee, Ya-Ju

    2015-11-01

    Blood coagulation is the clotting and subsequent dissolution of the clot following repair to the damaged tissue. However, inducing blood coagulation is difficult for some patients with homeostasis dysfunction or during surgery. In this study, we proposed a method to develop an integrated system that combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser microsurgery for blood coagulation. Also, an algorithm for positioning of the treatment location from OCT images was developed. With OCT scanning, 2D/3D OCT images and angiography of tissue can be obtained simultaneously, enabling to noninvasively reconstruct the morphological and microvascular structures for real-time monitoring of changes in biological tissues during laser microsurgery. Instead of high-cost pulsed lasers, continuous-wave laser diodes (CW-LDs) with the central wavelengths of 450 nm and 532 nm are used for blood coagulation, corresponding to higher absorption coefficients of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. Experimental results showed that the location of laser exposure can be accurately controlled with the proposed approach of imaging-based feedback positioning. Moreover, blood coagulation can be efficiently induced by CW-LDs and the coagulation process can be monitored in real-time with OCT. This technology enables to potentially provide accurate positioning for laser microsurgery and control the laser exposure to avoid extra damage by real-time OCT imaging.

  19. Optical coherence tomography-guided laser microsurgery for blood coagulation with continuous-wave laser diode.

    PubMed

    Chang, Feng-Yu; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Wang, Zu-Yi; Chi, Chun-Kai; Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chan, Ming-Che; Lee, Ya-Ju

    2015-11-16

    Blood coagulation is the clotting and subsequent dissolution of the clot following repair to the damaged tissue. However, inducing blood coagulation is difficult for some patients with homeostasis dysfunction or during surgery. In this study, we proposed a method to develop an integrated system that combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser microsurgery for blood coagulation. Also, an algorithm for positioning of the treatment location from OCT images was developed. With OCT scanning, 2D/3D OCT images and angiography of tissue can be obtained simultaneously, enabling to noninvasively reconstruct the morphological and microvascular structures for real-time monitoring of changes in biological tissues during laser microsurgery. Instead of high-cost pulsed lasers, continuous-wave laser diodes (CW-LDs) with the central wavelengths of 450 nm and 532 nm are used for blood coagulation, corresponding to higher absorption coefficients of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. Experimental results showed that the location of laser exposure can be accurately controlled with the proposed approach of imaging-based feedback positioning. Moreover, blood coagulation can be efficiently induced by CW-LDs and the coagulation process can be monitored in real-time with OCT. This technology enables to potentially provide accurate positioning for laser microsurgery and control the laser exposure to avoid extra damage by real-time OCT imaging.

  20. Optical coherence tomography-guided laser microsurgery for blood coagulation with continuous-wave laser diode

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Feng-Yu; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Wang, Zu-Yi; Chi, Chun-Kai; Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chan, Ming-Che; Lee, Ya-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Blood coagulation is the clotting and subsequent dissolution of the clot following repair to the damaged tissue. However, inducing blood coagulation is difficult for some patients with homeostasis dysfunction or during surgery. In this study, we proposed a method to develop an integrated system that combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser microsurgery for blood coagulation. Also, an algorithm for positioning of the treatment location from OCT images was developed. With OCT scanning, 2D/3D OCT images and angiography of tissue can be obtained simultaneously, enabling to noninvasively reconstruct the morphological and microvascular structures for real-time monitoring of changes in biological tissues during laser microsurgery. Instead of high-cost pulsed lasers, continuous-wave laser diodes (CW-LDs) with the central wavelengths of 450 nm and 532 nm are used for blood coagulation, corresponding to higher absorption coefficients of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. Experimental results showed that the location of laser exposure can be accurately controlled with the proposed approach of imaging-based feedback positioning. Moreover, blood coagulation can be efficiently induced by CW-LDs and the coagulation process can be monitored in real-time with OCT. This technology enables to potentially provide accurate positioning for laser microsurgery and control the laser exposure to avoid extra damage by real-time OCT imaging. PMID:26568136

  1. Multipass laser amplification with near-field far-field optical separation

    DOEpatents

    Hagen, Wilhelm F.

    1979-01-01

    This invention discloses two classes of optical configurations for high power laser amplification, one allowing near-field and the other allowing far-field optical separation, for the multiple passage of laser pulses through one or more amplifiers over an open optical path. These configurations may reimage the amplifier or any other part of the cavity on itself so as to suppress laser beam intensity ripples that arise from diffraction and/or non-linear effects. The optical cavities combine the features of multiple passes, spatial filtering and optical reimaging and allow sufficient time for laser gain recovery.

  2. Overview of the laser activities at Rheinmetall Waffe Munition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludewigt, Klaus; Riesbeck, Thomas; Schünemann, B.; Graf, A.; Jung, Markus; Schreiber, Th.; Eberhardt, Ramona; Tünnermann, A.

    2012-11-01

    The paper will give an overview over the laser weapon activities at RWM (Rheinmetall Waffe Munition) over the last years. Starting from the actual scenarios for laser weapon applications as: CRAM (Counter Rocket Artillery Mortar), Air Defence and UXO (unexploded ordnance) clearing. The basic requirements of a future laser weapon as beam diameter, beam quality, tracking capability, adaptive optics were deduced. For the UXO scenario a mobile directed energy laser demonstrator for humanitarian mine and UXO clearing based on fiber lasers is presented. Based on the parameters the system concept including the cooling system, power supply and the integration into the armoured vehicle TM 170 are explained. The contribution show first experiments of UXO and IED clearing. Different technical approaches to achieve laser power in the 100 kW regime combined with very good beam quality are discussed to fulfil the requirements of the CRAM and Air Defence scenario. Spectral coupling and the beam superimposing both are performed by Rheinmetall Waffe Munition. At the spectral coupling the basic technology parameters for the fiber laser and the dielectric grating as the latest results were put into context with the power levels reached at other groups. For the beam super imposing technology the basic experiments regarding the tracking capability and compensation of the atmosphere on the test range at Unterlüß will be explained. A generic 10 kW Laser Weapon Demonstrator based on 2 Laser Weapon Modules (LWM) from RWM each 5 kW fiber Laser with beam forming and tracking integrate by the team of RWM and RAD (Rheinmetall Air Defense) into a Ground based Air Defend system consisting of Skyguard and Millenium turret are presented. The flight path of the UAV within the valley of the life firing range at Ochsenboden Switzerland is shown. Selected results of the successful tests against UAV's are presented. It shows the capability of the generic 10 kW Laser Weapon Demonstrator to track and

  3. Graphene active plasmonic metamaterials for new types of terahertz lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuji, Taiichi; Watanabe, Takayuki; Satou, Akira; Popov, Vyacheslav; Ryzhii, Victor

    2013-05-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in graphene active plasmonic metamaterials for new types of terahertz lasers. We theoretically discovered that when the population of Dirac Fermionic carriers in graphene are inverted by optical or electrical pumping the excitation of graphene plasmons by the THz photons results in propagating surface plasmon polaritons with giant gain in a wide THz range. Furthermore, when graphene is patterned in a micro- or nano-ribbon array by grating gate metallization, the structure acts as an active plasmonic metamaterial, providing a super-radiant plasmonic lasing with giant gain at the plasmon modes in a wide THz frequency range.

  4. Microfluidic cell counter with embedded optical fibers fabricated by femtosecond laser ablation and anodic bonding

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Dawn; Gibson, Emily A.; Salim, Evan A.; Palmer, Amy E.; Jimenez, Ralph; Squier, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    A simple fabrication technique to create all silicon/glass microfluidic devices is demonstrated using femtosecond laser ablation and anodic bonding. In a first application, we constructed a cell counting device based on small angle light scattering. The counter featured embedded optical fibers for multiangle excitation and detection of scattered light and/or fluorescence. The performance of the microfluidic cell counter was benchmarked against a commercial fluorescence-activated cell sorter. PMID:19365429

  5. Wavelength diversity in optically pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perram, Glen P.

    2017-01-01

    Alternative wavelengths for optically pumped alkali vapor lasers have been developed using single photon excitation of higher lying P-states, stimulated Raman processes, two-photon excitation of S and D states, and electric quadruple excitation on S-D transitions. Two photon excitation of Cs 72D leads to competing and cascade lasing producing red and infrared lasers operating on the D-P transitions, followed by ultraviolet, blue, the standard near infrared DPAL transitions operating on P-S transitions. The S-D pump transitions are fully bleached at pump intensities exceeding 1 MW/cm2, allowing for lasing transitions that terminate on the ground state. The kinetics of these systems are complex due to competition for population inversion among the many optical transitions. An optically pumped mid-infrared rubidium pulsed, mirrorless laser has also been demonstrated in a heat pipe along both the 62P3/2 - 62S1/2 transition at 2.73 μm and the 62P1/2 - 62S1/2 transition at 2.79 μm with a maximum energy of 100 nJ. Performance improves dramatically as the rubidium vapor density is increased, in direct contradiction with the prior work. No scaling limitations associated with energy pooling or ionization kinetics have been observed. Practical application for infrared counter measures depends on the further development of blue diode pump sources. Finally, stimulated electronic Raman scattering and hyper-Raman processes in potassium vapor near the D1 and D2 lines have been observed using a stable resonator and pulsed laser excitation. First and second order Stokes and anti-Stokes lines were observed simultaneously and independently for a pump laser tuning range exceeding 70 cm-1. When the pump is tuned between the K D1 and D2 lines, an efficient hyper-Raman process dominates with a slope efficiency that exceeds 10%. Raman shifted laser may be useful as a target illuminator or atmospheric compensation beacon for a high power diode pumped alkali laser.

  6. Scintillation fluctuations of optical communication lasers in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panich, Michael G.; Coffaro, Joseph T.; Belichki, Sara B.; Splitter, Landon J.; Phillips, Ronald L.; Andrews, Larry C.; Fountain, Wayne; Tucker, Frank M.

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this research is to evaluate scintillation fluctuations on optical communication lasers and evaluate potential system improvements to reduce scintillation effects. This research attempts to experimentally verify mathematical models developed by Andrews and Phillips [1] for scintillation fluctuations in atmospheric turbulence using two different transmitting wavelengths. Propagation range lengths and detector quantities were varied to confirm the theoretical scintillation curve. In order to confirm the range and wavelength dependent scintillation curve, intensity measurements were taken from a 904nm and 1550nm laser source for an assortment of path distances along the 1km laser range at the Townes Laser Institute. The refractive index structure parameter (Cn2) data was also taken at various ranges using two commercial scintillometers. This parameter is used to characterize the strength of atmospheric turbulence, which induces scintillation effects on the laser beam, and is a vital input parameter to the mathematical model. Data was taken and analyzed using a 4-detector board array. The material presented in this paper outlines the verification and validation of the theoretical scintillation model, and steps to improve the scintillation fluctuation effects on the laser beam through additional detectors and a longer transmitting wavelength. Experimental data was post processed and analyzed for scintillation fluctuations of the two transmitting wavelengths. The results demonstrate the benefit of additional detectors and validate a mathematical model that can be scaled for use in a variety of communications or defense applications. Scintillation is a problem faced by every free space laser communication system and the verification of an accurate mathematical model to simulate these effects has strong application across the industry.

  7. Quasi-optical active antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussessian, Alina

    Quasi-optical power combiners such as quasi-optical grids provide an efficient means of combining the output power of many solid-state devices in free space. Unlike traditional power combiners no transmission lines are used, therefore, high output powers with less loss can be achieved at higher frequencies. This thesis investigates four different active antenna grids. The first investigation is into X-band High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) grid amplifiers. Modelling and stability issues of these grids are discussed, and gain and power measurements are presented. A grid amplifier with a maximum efficiency of 22.5% at 10 GHz and a peak gain of 11dB is presented. The second grid is a varactor grid used as a positive feedback network for a grid amplifier to construct a tunable grid oscillator. Reflection measurements for the varactor grid show a tuning range of 1.2 GHz. The third grid is a self- complementary grid amplifier. The goal is to design a new amplifier with a unit cell structure that can be directly modelled using CAD tools. The properties of self- complementary structures are studied and used in the design of this new amplifier grid. The fourth grid is a 12 x 12 terahertz Schottky grid frequency doubler with a measured output power of 24 mW at 1 THz for 3.1-μs 500-GHz input pulses with a peak power of 47 W. A passive millimeter-wave travelling-wave antenna built on a dielectric substrate is also presented. Calculations indicate that the antenna has a gain of 15 dB with 3-dB beamwidths of 10o in the H-plane and 64o in the E-plane. Pattern measurements at 90 GHz support the theory. The antenna is expected to have an impedance in the range of 50/Omega to 80/Omega.

  8. Active/passive mode-locked laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Fountain, William D.; Johnson, Bertram C.

    1977-01-01

    A Q-switched/mode-locked Nd:YAG laser oscillator employing simultaneous active (electro-optic) and passive (saturable absorber) loss modulation within the optical cavity is described. This "dual modulation" oscillator can produce transform-limited pulses of duration ranging from about 30 psec to about 5 nsec with greatly improved stability compared to other mode-locked systems. The pulses produced by this system lack intrapulse frequency or amplitude modulation, and hence are idealy suited for amplification to high energies and for other applications where well-defined pulses are required. Also, the pulses of this system have excellent interpulse characteristics, wherein the optical noise between the individual pulses of the pulse train has a power level well below the power of the peak pulse of the train.

  9. Fiber optic coherent laser radar 3D vision system

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.B.; Gallman, P.G.; Slotwinski, A.R.; Wagner, K.; Weaver, S.; Xu, Jieping

    1996-12-31

    This CLVS will provide a substantial advance in high speed computer vision performance to support robotic Environmental Management (EM) operations. This 3D system employs a compact fiber optic based scanner and operator at a 128 x 128 pixel frame at one frame per second with a range resolution of 1 mm over its 1.5 meter working range. Using acousto-optic deflectors, the scanner is completely randomly addressable. This can provide live 3D monitoring for situations where it is necessary to update once per second. This can be used for decontamination and decommissioning operations in which robotic systems are altering the scene such as in waste removal, surface scarafacing, or equipment disassembly and removal. The fiber- optic coherent laser radar based system is immune to variations in lighting, color, or surface shading, which have plagued the reliability of existing 3D vision systems, while providing substantially superior range resolution.

  10. Sagittal laser optical tomography for imaging of rheumatoid finger joints.

    PubMed

    Hielscher, Andreas H; Klose, Alexander D; Scheel, Alexander K; Moa-Anderson, Bryte; Backhaus, Marina; Netz, Uwe; Beuthan, Jürgen

    2004-04-07

    We present a novel optical tomographic imaging system that was designed to determine two-dimensional spatial distribution of optical properties in a sagittal plane through finger joints. The system incorporates a single laser diode and a single silicon photodetector into a scanning device that records spatially resolved light intensities as they are transmitted through a finger. These data are input to a model-based iterative image reconstruction (MOBIIR) scheme, which uses the equation of radiative transfer (ERT) as a forward model for light propagation through tissue. We have used this system to obtain tomographic images of six proximal interphalangeal finger joints from two patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The optical images were compared to clinical symptoms and ultrasound images.

  11. Optical apparatus for laser scattering by objects having complex shapes

    DOEpatents

    Ellingson, William A.; Visher, Robert J.

    2006-11-14

    Apparatus for observing and measuring in realtime surface and subsurface characteristics of objects having complex shapes includes an optical fiber bundle having first and second opposed ends. The first end includes a linear array of fibers, where the ends of adjacent fibers are in contact and are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the object being studied. The second ends of some of the fibers are in the form of a polished ferrule forming a multi-fiber optical waveguide for receiving laser light. The second ends of the remaining fibers are formed into a linear array suitable for direct connection to a detector, such as a linear CMOS-based optical detector. The output data is analyzed using digital signal processing for the detection of anomalies such as cracks, voids, inclusions and other defects.

  12. An advanced optical system for laser ablation propulsion in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstue, Grant; Fork, Richard; Reardon, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel space-based ablation driven propulsion engine concept utilizing transmitted energy in the form of a series of ultra-short optical pulses. Key differences are generating the pulses at the transmitting spacecraft and the safe delivery of that energy to the receiving spacecraft for propulsion. By expanding the beam diameter during transmission in space, the energy can propagate at relatively low intensity and then be refocused and redistributed to create an array of ablation sites at the receiver. The ablation array strategy allows greater control over flight dynamics and eases thermal management. Research efforts for this transmission and reception of ultra-short optical pulses include: (1) optical system design; (2) electrical system requirements; (3) thermal management; (4) structured energy transmission safety. Research has also been focused on developing an optical switch concept for the multiplexing of the ultra-short pulses. This optical switch strategy implements multiple reflectors polished into a rotating momentum wheel device to combine the pulses from different laser sources. The optical system design must minimize the thermal load on any one optical element. Initial specifications and modeling for the optical system are being produced using geometrical ray-tracing software to give a better understanding of the optical requirements. In regards to safety, we have advanced the retro-reflective beam locking strategy to include look-ahead capabilities for long propagation distances. Additional applications and missions utilizing multiplexed pulse transmission are also presented. Because the research is in early development, it provides an opportunity for new and valuable advances in the area of transmitted energy for propulsion as well as encourages joint international efforts. Researchers from different countries can cooperate in order to find constructive and safe uses of ordered pulse transmission for propulsion in future space

  13. Aladin transmit-receive optics (TRO): the optical interface between laser, telescope and spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosebach, Herbert; Erhard, Markus; Camus, Fabrice

    2005-09-01

    This paper presents the design and key technologies of the Transmit-Receive Optics (TRO) for the Aladin lidar instrument. The TRO as the central optical interface on the Aladin instrument leading the optical signals from the laser source to the emitting/receiving telescope, and vice versa, the received back scattered signals from the telescope to the spectrometers for Doppler shift evaluation. Additionally, the TRO contains a calibration branch bypassing the telescope and aims at levelling out the received signals in terms of wavelength and signal height changes due to wavelength and intensity variations of the laser. The opto-mechanical concept of the TRO consists of afocal optical groups, which are connected by parallel beams. Extreme requirements have been defined for the TRO on the end-to-end transmission (>=73 %) with an associated effective bandwidth of less than 1 nm over the 200 - 1100 nm spectral range. The achieved solution is presented in this paper. A further feature of the TRO is the use of two so-called aberration generators on the emitting and calibration branch, with which an artificial astigmatism can be realised for eye safety reasons. Its effect on astigmatism is presented. This article also addresses the effort on stray light suppression, which is of extreme importance for the TRO. Special ion plated (IP) optical coatings have been used with superior performance for the TRO, particulary on laser energy resistance and air/vacuum stability. The development of special mounting technologies of optical elements to meet the stringent WFE, stability, and stray light requirements for the TRO are described. Key words : Aeolus Satellite, ALADIN instrument, Lidar, optical design, UV optics manufacturing technologies

  14. Binary arithmetic using optical symbolic substitution and integrated phototransistor surface-emitting laser logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Julian; Olbright, G. R.; Bryan, R. P.

    1991-10-01

    The architecture described in the paper supports binary addition by means of optical logic gates and symbolic substitution utilizing heterojunction phototransistors and lasers. The high-speed optical switches are compatible with surface-normal architecture, require low-input optical energies, and afford high optical gain. A highly compact binary half-adder is described to demonstrate the implementation of the binary arithmetic with heterojunction-phototransistor optical logic gates and surface emitting lasers.

  15. Combined advanced finishing and UV laser conditioning process for producing damage resistant optics

    DOEpatents

    Menapace, Joseph A.; Peterson, John E.; Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Miller, Philip E.; Parham, Thomas G.; Nichols, Michael A.

    2005-07-26

    A method for reducing the density of sites on the surface of fused silica optics that are prone to the initiation of laser-induced damage, resulting in optics which have far fewer catastrophic defects, and are better capable of resisting optical deterioration upon exposure to a high-power laser beam.

  16. Dispersion Compensation Requirements for Optical CDMA Using WDM Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez, A J; Hendandez, V J; Feng, H X C; Heritage, J P; Lennon, W J

    2001-12-10

    Optical code division multiple access (O-CDMA) uses very narrow transmission pulses and is thus susceptible to fiber optic link impairments. When the O-CDMA is implemented as wavelength/time (W/T) matrices which use wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) sources such as multi-frequency laser transmitters, the susceptibility may be higher due to: (a) the large bandwidth utilized and (b) the requirement that the various wavelength components of the codes be synchronized at the point of modulation and encoding as well as after (optical) correlation. A computer simulation based on the nonlinear Schroedinger equation, developed to study optical networking on the National Transparent Optical Network (NTON), was modified to characterize the impairments on the propagation and decoding of W/T matrix codes over a link of the NTON. Three critical link impairments were identified by the simulation: group velocity dispersion (GVD); the flatness of the optical amplifier gain; and the slope of the GVD. Subsequently, experiments were carried out on the NTON link to verify and refine the simulations as well as to suggest improvements in the W/T matrix signal processing design. The NTON link measurements quantified the O-CDMA dispersion compensation requirements. Dispersion compensation management is essential to assure the performance of W/T matrix codes.

  17. Optical methods for diagnostics and feedback control in laser-induced regeneration of spine disc and joint cartilages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobol, Emil; Sviridov, Alexander; Omeltchenko, Alexander; Baum, Olga; Baskov, Andrey; Borchshenko, Igor; Golubev, Vladimir; Baskov, Vladimir

    2011-03-01

    In 1999 we have introduced a new approach for treatment of spine diseases based on the mechanical effect of nondestructive laser radiation on the nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc. Laser reconstruction of spine discs (LRD) involves puncture of the disc and non-destructive laser irradiation of the nucleus pulposus to activate reparative processes in the disc tissues. In vivo animal study has shown that LRD allows activate the growth of hyaline type cartilage in laser affected zone. The paper considers physical processes and mechanisms of laser regeneration, presents results of investigations aimed to optimize laser settings and to develop feedback control system for laser reparation in cartilages of spine and joints. The results of laser reconstruction of intervertebral discs for 510 patients have shown substantial relief of back pain for 90% of patients. Laser technology has been experimentally tested for reparation of traumatic and degenerative diseases in joint cartilage of 20 minipigs. It is shown that laser regeneration of cartilage allows feeling large (more than 5 mm) defects which usually never repair on one's own. Optical techniques have been used to promote safety and efficacy of the laser procedures.

  18. Laser-assisted modification of polymers for microfluidic, micro-optics, and cell culture applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfleging, W.; Adamietz, R.; Brückner, H. J.; Bruns, M.; Welle, A.

    2007-02-01

    Laser-assisted patterning of polymers is investigated for the direct fabrication of polymeric lab-on-a-chip devices in microsystem technology for capillary electrophoresis chips in bio-analytical applications. In many cases the laser process induces a chemical, physical and topographical change in the laser treated surface. This material modification significantly influences the lab-on-a-chip-functionalities. We will present our current research results in laser-assisted modification of polystyrene (PS) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) with respect to applications in micro-optics, micro-fluidics and cell culture applications. For this purpose the refractive index change, the wettability and the adsorption of proteins and the adhesion of animal cells were investigated as function of laser- and processing parameters. The possible change of surface chemistry was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The local UV-laser-assisted formation of chemical structures suitable for improved cell adhesion was realized on two- and three-dimensional PS and polycarbonate (PC) surfaces. Above and below the laser ablation threshold two different mechanisms were detected. In one case the produced debris was responsible for improved cell adhesion, while in the other case a photolytical activation of the polymer surface including a subsequent oxidization in oxygen or ambient air leads to a highly localized alteration of protein adsorption from cell culture media and increased cell adhesion. The highly localized control of wettability on polymeric surfaces was investigated for PS and PMMA. In the case of PS the dynamic advancing contact angle could be adjusted between 2° and 150°. This was possible for a suitable exposure dose and an appropriate choice of processing gas (helium or oxygen). A similar but not so significant effect was observed for PMMA below the laser ablation threshold. For PMMA the dynamic advancing contact angle could be adjusted between nearly 50° and

  19. Laser activated nanothermolysis of leukemia cells monitored by photothermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotko, Dmitri; Lukianova, Ekaterina; Shnip, Alexander; Zheltov, George; Potapnev, Michail; Savitsky, Valeriy; Klimovich, Olga; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2005-04-01

    We are developing new diagnostic and therapeutic technologies for leukemia based on selective targeting of leukemia cells with gold nanoparticles and thermomechanical destruction of the tumor cells with laser-induced microbubbles. Clusters of spherical gold nanoparticles that have strong optical absorption of laser pulses at 532 nm served as nucleation sites of vapor microbubbles. The nanoparticles were targeted selectively to leukemia cells using leukemia-specific surface receptors and a set of two monoclonal antibodies. Application of a primary myeloid-specific antibody to tumor cells followed by targeting the cells with 30-nm nanoparticles conjugated with a secondary antibody (IgG) resulted in formation of nanoparticulate clusters due to aggregation of IgGs. Formation of clusters resulted in substantial decrease of the damage threshold for target cells. The results encourage development of Laser Activated Nanothermolysis as a Cell Elimination Therapy (LANCET) for leukemia. The proposed technology can be applied separately or in combination with chemotherapy for killing leukemia cells without damage to other blood cells. Potential applications include initial reduction of concentration of leukemia cells in blood prior to chemotherapy and treatment of residual tumor cells after the chemotherapy. Laser-induced bubbles in individual cells and cell damage were monitored by analyzing profile of photothermal response signals over the entire cell after irradiation with a single 10-ns long laser pulse. Photothermal microscopy was utilized for imaging formation of microbubbles around nanoparticulate clusters.

  20. Modeling of laser-induced damage and optic usage at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zhi M.; Nostrand, Mike; Carr, Wren; Bude, Jeff; Suratwala, Tayyab I.

    2016-07-01

    Modeling of laser-induced optics damage has been introduced to benchmark existing optic usage at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which includes the number of optics exchanged for damage repair. NIF has pioneered an optics recycle strategy to allow it to run the laser at capacity since fully commissioned in 2009 while keeping the cost of optics usage manageable. We will show how the damage model is being used to evaluate strategies to streamline our optics loop efficiency, as we strive to increase the laser shot rate without increasing operating costs.

  1. Measurement of optical activity of honey bee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Gutiérrez, Mauricio; Olivares-Pérez, Arturo; Salgado-Verduzco, Marco Antonio; Ibarra-Torres, Juan Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Optical activity of some substances, such as chiral molecules, often exhibits circular birefringence. Circular birefringence causes rotation of the vibration plane of the plane polarized light as it passes through the substance. In this work we present optical characterization of honey as function of the optical activity when it is placed in a polariscope that consists of a light source and properly arranged polarizing elements.

  2. Effect of laser irradiation of nanoparticles in aqueous uranium salt solutions on nuclide activity

    SciTech Connect

    Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A

    2011-07-31

    This paper presents an experimental study of the effect of laser irradiation of aqueous uranyl chloride solutions containing gold nanoparticles on the activity of the uranium series radionuclides {sup 234}Th, {sup 234m}Pa, and {sup 235}U. The solutions were exposed to femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulses and to the second or third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (150-ps pulses) at a peak intensity in the medium of {approx}10{sup 12} W cm{sup -2}. The activities of the radionuclides in the irradiated solutions were shown to differ markedly from their equilibrium values. The sign of the deviation depends on the laser wavelength. The measured activity deviations can be interpreted as evidence that laser exposure of nanoparticles accelerates the alpha and beta decays of the radionuclides. The observed effects are accounted for in terms of a mechanism that involves resonant enhancement of optical waves by metallic nanoparticles. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  3. Design of an Optically Controlled MR-Compatible Active Needle

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Seok Chang; Quek, Zhan Fan; Koh, Je-Sung; Renaud, Pierre; Black, Richard J.; Moslehi, Behzad; Daniel, Bruce L.; Cho, Kyu-Jin; Cutkosky, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    An active needle is proposed for the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided percutaneous procedures. The needle uses a low-transition-temperature shape memory alloy (LT SMA) wire actuator to produce bending in the distal section of the needle. Actuation is achieved with internal optical heating using laser light transported via optical fibers and side coupled to the LT SMA. A prototype, with a size equivalent to a standard 16-gauge biopsy needle, exhibits significant bending, with a tip deflection of more than 14° in air and 5° in hard tissue. A single-ended optical sensor with a gold-coated tip is developed to measure the curvature independently of temperature. The experimental results in tissue phantoms show that human tissue causes fast heat dissipation from the wire actuator; however, the active needle can compensate for typical targeting errors during prostate biopsy. PMID:26512231

  4. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN LASER TECHNOLOGY: Xenon and hydrogen gas mixtures as laser active media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuev, V. S.; Kanaev, A. V.; Mikheev, L. D.

    1988-08-01

    It is suggested that gaseous mixtures of xenon and molecular hydrogen may be used as active media of Xe2 (172 nm) and XeH ( ~ 250 nm) photochemical lasers. By adding more than 3 Torr of hydrogen to xenon, amplification can be achieved in the 172 nm range as a result of quenching of the 1u/0u- absorbing state under optical pumping conditions. The hydrogen atoms produced by the quenching process can be utilized to populate XeH* by three-body recombination with Xe* ( 3P1/2) atoms.

  5. Photonic-crystal lasers on silicon for chip-scale optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Koji; Fujii, Takuro; Shinya, Akihiko; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Notomi, Masaya; Hasebe, Koichi; Kakitsuka, Takaaki; Matsuo, Shinji

    2016-03-01

    Optical interconnects are expected to reduce the power consumption of ICT instruments. To realize chip-to-chip or chip-scale optical interconnects, it is essential to fabricate semiconductor lasers with a smaller energy cost. In this context, we are developing lambda-scale embedded active-region photonic-crystal (LEAP) lasers as light sources for chip-scale optical interconnects. We demonstrated the first continuous-wave (CW) operation of LEAP lasers in 2012 and reported a record low threshold current and energy cost of 4.8 μA and 4.4 fJ/bit at 10 Gbit/s in 2013. We have also integrated photonic crystal photodetectors on the same InP chip and demonstrated waveform transfer along 500-μm-long waveguides. Although LEAP lasers exhibit excellent performance, they have to be integrated on Si wafers for use as light sources for chip-scale optical interconnects. In this paper, we give a brief overview of our LEAP lasers on InP and report our recent progress in fabricating them on Si. We bonded the InP wafers with quantum-well gain layers directly on thermally oxidized Si wafers and performed all process steps on the Si wafer, including high-temperature regrowth. After this process modification, we again achieved CW operation and obtained a threshold current of 57 μA with a maximum output power of more than 3.5 μW at the output waveguides. An output light was successfully guided through 500 × 250-nm InP waveguides.

  6. Particle interaction measurements using laser tweezers optical trapping.

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Timothy P.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Grillet, Anne M.; Molecke, Ryan A.

    2008-08-01

    Laser tweezers optical trapping provides a unique noninvasive capability to trap and manipulate particles in solution at the focal point of a laser beam passed through a microscope objective. Additionally, combined with image analysis, interaction forces between colloidal particles can be quantitatively measured. By looking at the displacement of particles within the laser trap due to the presence of a neighboring particle or looking at the relative diffusion of two particles held near each other by optical traps, interparticle interaction forces ranging from pico- to femto-Newtons can be measured. Understanding interaction forces is critical for predicting the behavior of particle dispersions including dispersion stability and flow rheology. Using a new analysis method proposed by Sainis, Germain, and Dufresne, we can simultaneously calculate the interparticle velocity and particle diffusivity which allows direct calculation of the interparticle potential for the particles. By applying this versatile tool, we measure difference in interactions between various phospholipid bilayers that have been coated onto silica spheres as a new type of solid supported liposome. We measure bilayer interactions of several cell membrane lipids under various environmental conditions such as pH and ionic strength and compare the results with those obtained for empty liposomes. These results provide insight into the role of bilayer fluctuations in liposome fusion, which is of fundamental interest to liposome based drug delivery schemes.

  7. Laser-optical treatment for toothbrush bristles (nylon, synthetic, and polymeric materials, etc.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yangwu

    1994-08-01

    On the basis of the principle of laser radiation and materials interaction, a laser-optical treatment method for toothbrush bristles (nylon et al., synthetic and polymeric materials) is provided. In this process, laser irradiation is stopped during melting and followed by cooling, so the free end of each bristle of toothbrush is formed for a smooth globe. The toothbrush with laser-optical end-globed bristles have many remarkable functions.

  8. An active solid state ring laser gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Valle, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    The properties of an active, solid state ring laser gyroscope were investigated. Two laser diode pumped monolithic nonplanar ring oscillators (NPRO), forced to lase in opposite directions, formed the NPRO-Gyro. It was unique in being an active ring laser gyroscope with a homogeneously broadened gain medium. This work examined sources of technical and fundamental noise. Associated calculations accounted for aspects of the NPRO-Gyro performance, suggested design improvements, and outlined limitations. The work brought out the need to stabilize the NPRO environment in order to achieve performance goals. Two Nd:YAG NPROs were mounted within an environment short term stabilized to microdegrees Celsius. The Allan variance of the NPRO-Gyro beat note was 500 Hz for a one second time delay. Unequal treatment of the NPROs appeared as noise on the beat frequency, therefore reducing its rotation sensitivity. The sensitivity to rotation was limited by technical noise sources.

  9. Synchronous pumping of picosecond dye laser using high efficiency second harmonic generation from optical fibres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.; Bernardin, J. P.; Macdonald, R. L.; Demouchy, G.

    1991-01-01

    The stable operation of a mode-locked dye laser synchronously pumped by the second harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser produced in an Nd codoped germanosilicate optical fiber is reported. The optical fiber preparation technique, which results in a second harmonic conversion efficiency of 2 percent, is described. This optical fiber SHG conversion efficiency is the highest reported to date using a continuous-wave mode-locked laser.

  10. Selectively deuterated and optically active cyclic ethers

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakami, Y.; Asai, T.; Umeyama, K.; Yamashita, Y.

    1982-08-27

    The synthesis of selectively deuterated epihalohydrins (F, Cl, Br, I) and 3,3-bis(chloromethyl)-d/sub 2/)oxetane and some observations on the stereochemistry of each transformation are reported. Further, the synthesis of optically active epihalohydrins, especially the optically active epifluorohydrin, from (S)-glycerol 1,2-acetonide ((S)-2), using mainly KX-18-CR-6 (X = F, Br, I), is reported. This is the first report on the synthesis of optically active epifluorohydrin. The direct halogenation of the presynthesized optically active epichlorohydrin with the same reagents gave the racemized products. The selectively deuterated or optically active compounds reported herein are expected to find a variety of uses in organic chemistry.

  11. Measurement of optical path length change following pulsed laser irradiation using differential phase optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihoon; Oh, Junghwan; Milner, Thomas E

    2006-01-01

    Differential phase optical coherence tomography (DPOCT) is introduced to measure optical path length changes in response to pulsed laser irradiation (585 nm). An analytical equation that includes thermoelastic surface displacement and thermorefractive index change is derived to predict optical path length change in response to pulsed laser irradiation for both "confined surface" and "free surface" model systems. The derived equation is tested by comparing predicted values with data recorded from experiments using two model systems. Thermorefractive index change and the thermal expansion coefficient are deduced from differential phase change (dDeltaphi) and temperature increase (DeltaT0) measurements. The measured n(T0)beta(T0)+dndT[=1.7410(-4)+/-1.710(-6) (1K)] in the free surface experiment matches with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) data value [=1.7710(-4) (1K)]. Exclusion of lateral thermal expansion in the analytical model for the confined surface experiment causes difference between the measured dndT[=-2.310(-4)+/-7.310(-6)(1K)] and the NIST value [=-9.4510(-5) (1K)]. In spite of the difference in the confined surface experiment, results of our studies indicate DPOCT can detect dynamic optical path length change in response to pulsed laser irradiation with high sensitivity, and applications to tissue diagnostics may be possible.

  12. Mode locking of an all-fiber laser by acousto-optic superlattice modulation.

    PubMed

    Cuadrado-Laborde, C; Diez, A; Delgado-Pinar, M; Cruz, J L; Andrés, M V

    2009-04-01

    Active mode locking of an erbium-doped all-fiber laser with a Bragg-grating-based acousto-optic modulator is demonstrated. The fiber Bragg grating was acoustically modulated by a standing longitudinal elastic wave, which periodically modulates the sidebands at twice the acoustic frequency. The laser has a Fabry-Perot configuration in which cavity loss modulation is achieved by tuning the output fiber Bragg grating to one of the acoustically induced sidebands. Optical pulses at 9 MHz repetition rate, 120 mW peak power, and 780 ps temporal width were obtained. The output results to be stable and has a timing jitter below 40 ps. The measured linewidth, 2.8 pm, demonstrates that these pulses are transform limited.

  13. An optically pumped GaN/AlGaN quantum well intersubband terahertz laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Ai-Bing; Hao, Ming-Rui; Yang, Yao; Shen, Wen-Zhong; Liu, Hui-Chun

    2013-02-01

    We propose an optically pumped nonpolar GaN/AlGaN quantum well (QW) active region design for terahertz (THz) lasing in the wavelength range of 30 μm ~ 40 μm and operating at room temperature. The fast longitudinal optical (LO) phonon scattering in GaN/AlGaN QWs is used to depopulate the lower laser state, and more importantly, the large LO phonon energy is utilized to reduce the thermal population of the lasing states at high temperatures. The influences of temperature and pump intensity on gain and electron densities are investigated. Based on our simulations, we predict that with a sufficiently high pump intensity, a room temperature operated THz laser using a nonpolar GaN/AlGaN structure is realizable.

  14. Ex vivo laser lipolysis assisted with radially diffusing optical applicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jieun; Hau, Nguyen Trung; Park, Sung Yeon; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2016-05-01

    Laser-assisted lipolysis has been implemented to reduce body fat in light of thermal interactions with adipose tissue. However, using a flat fiber with high irradiance often needs rapid cannula movements and even undesirable thermal injury due to direct tissue contact. The aim of the current study was to explore the feasibility of a radially diffusing optical applicator to liquefy the adipose tissue for effective laser lipolysis. The proposed diffuser was evaluated with a flat fiber in terms of temperature elevation and tissue liquefaction after laser lipolysis with a 980-nm wavelength. Given the same power (20 W), the diffusing applicator generated a 30% slower temperature increase with a 25% lower maximum temperature (84±3.2°C in 1 min p<0.001) in the tissue, compared with the flat fiber. Under the equivalent temperature development, the diffuser induced up to fivefold larger area of the adipose liquefaction due to radial light emission than the flat fiber. Ex vivo tissue tests for 5-min irradiation demonstrated that the diffuser (1.24±0.15 g) liquefied 66% more adipose tissue than the flat fiber (0.75±0.05 g). The proposed diffusing applicator can be a feasible therapeutic device for laser lipolysis due to low temperature development and wide coverage of thermal treatment.

  15. Optical caries diagnostics: comparison of laser spectroscopic PNC method with method of laser integral fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masychev, Victor I.

    2000-11-01

    In this research we present the results of approbation of two methods of optical caries diagnostics: PNC-spectral diagnostics and caries detection by laser integral fluorescence. The research was conducted in a dental clinic. PNC-method analyses parameters of probing laser radiation and PNC-spectrums of stimulated secondary radiations: backscattering and endogenous fluorescence of caries-involved bacterias. He-Ne-laser ((lambda) =632,8 nm, 1-2mW) was used as a source of probing (stimulated) radiation. For registration of signals, received from intact and pathological teeth PDA-detector was applied. PNC-spectrums were processed by special algorithms, and were displayed on PC monitor. The method of laser integral fluorescence was used for comparison. In this case integral power of fluorescence of human teeth was measured. As a source of probing (stimulated) radiation diode lasers ((lambda) =655 nm, 0.1 mW and 630nm, 1mW) and He-Ne laser were applied. For registration of signals Si-photodetector was used. Integral power was shown in a digital indicator. Advantages and disadvantages of these methods are described in this research. It is disclosed that the method of laser integral power of fluorescence has the following characteristics: simplicity of construction and schema-technical decisions. However the method of PNC-spectral diagnostics are characterized by considerably more sensitivity in diagnostics of initial caries and capability to differentiate pathologies of various stages (for example, calculus/initial caries). Estimation of spectral characteristics of PNC-signals allows eliminating a number of drawbacks, which are character for detection by method of laser integral fluorescence (for instance, detection of fluorescent fillings, plagues, calculus, discolorations generally, amalgam, gold fillings as if it were caries.

  16. Active waveguides written by femtosecond laser irradiation in an erbium-doped phospho-tellurite glass.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, T Toney; Della Valle, G; Osellame, R; Jose, G; Chiodo, N; Jha, A; Laporta, P

    2008-09-15

    We report on fs-laser micromachining of active waveguides in a new erbium-doped phospho-tellurite glass by means of a compact cavity-dumped Yb-based writing system. The spectroscopic properties of the glass were investigated, and the fs-laser written waveguides were characterized in terms of passive as well as active performance. In particular, internal gain was demonstrated in the whole C+L band of optical communications (1530- 1610 nm).

  17. Limitations of synthetic aperture laser optical feedback imaging.

    PubMed

    Glastre, Wilfried; Jacquin, Olivier; Hugon, Olivier; Guillet de Chatellus, Hugues; Lacot, Eric

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we study the origin and the effect of amplitude and phase noise on laser optical feedback imaging associated with a synthetic aperture (SA) imaging system. Amplitude noise corresponds to photon noise and acts as an additive noise; it can be reduced by increasing the global measurement time. Phase noise can be divided in three families: random, sinusoidal, and drift phase noise; we show that it acts as a multiplicative noise. We explain how we can reduce phase noise by making oversampling or multiple measurements depending on its type. This work can easily be extended to all SA systems (radar, laser, or terahertz), especially when raw holograms are acquired point by point.

  18. Fiber-optic laser Doppler turbine tip clearance probe.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Lars; Pfister, Thorsten; Czarske, Jürgen

    2006-05-01

    A laser Doppler based method for in situ single blade tip clearance measurements of turbomachines with high precision is presented for what we believe is the first time. The sensor is based on two superposed fanlike interference fringe systems generated by two laser wavelengths from a fiber-coupled, passive, and therefore compact measurement head employing diffractive optics. Tip clearance measurements at a transonic centrifugal compressor performed during operation at 50,000 rpm (833 Hz, 586 m/s tip speed) are reported. At these speeds the measured uncertainty of the tip position was less than 20 microm, a factor of 2 more accurate than that of capacitive probes. The sensor offers great potential for in situ and online high-precision tip clearance measurements of metallic and nonmetallic turbine blades.

  19. Optical phase distortion due to compressible flow over laser turrets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuhs, A. E.; Fuhs, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    Analytical models for optical phase distortion due to compressible flow over a laser turret are developed. Phase distortion is calculated for both blunt and small perturbation turrets. For the blunt turret, the Janzen-Rayleigh technique is used to determine the flow field. Phase distortions of 2.2 wavelengths at 3.8 microns are calculated for the blunt turret. For small perturbation turrets, a versatile analytical model is developed for a turret on a fuselage with circular cross section. With a two dimensional Fourier series representation of the turret, any shape can be considered. Both subsonic and supersonic flows can be calculated. Phase distortions of 1.2 wavelengths at 3.8 microns are calculated for one turret at high subsonic Mach number. In addition to being of value for laser turrets, the methods are applicable to reconnaissance aircraft using photographic equipment and cruise missiles using celestial navigation.

  20. Absolute distance sensing by two laser optical interferometry.

    PubMed

    Thurner, Klaus; Braun, Pierre-François; Karrai, Khaled

    2013-11-01

    We have developed a method for absolute distance sensing by two laser optical interferometry. A particularity of this technique is that a target distance is determined in absolute and is no longer limited to within an ambiguity range affecting usually multiple wavelength interferometers. We implemented the technique in a low-finesse Fabry-Pérot miniature fiber based interferometer. We used two diode lasers, both operating in the 1550 nm wavelength range. The wavelength difference is chosen to create a 25 μm long periodic beating interferometric pattern allowing a nanometer precise position measurement but limited to within an ambiguity range of 25 μm. The ambiguity is then eliminated by scanning one of the wavelengths over a small range (3.4 nm). We measured absolute distances in the sub-meter range and this with just few nanometer repeatability.

  1. Submillimeter D2O-18 molecular laser with optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svich, V. A.; Pokormiakho, N. G.; Topkov, A. N.

    1980-11-01

    In the considered investigation, nine new emission lines of the D2O-18 molecule were observed over the wavelength range from 96 to 140 micrometers. In the experiments, a CO2 TEA laser was used for optical pumping. The TEA laser was operated at atmospheric pressure with an output energy up to 2 J and a pulse length of 100 ns. A gaseous mixture with a composition of CO2:N2:He = 1:1:4 was excited by means of a pulsed transverse discharge. A resonator with a length of 1 m was formed by a spherical mirror with a radius of curvature of 10 m, and a gold-plated echelette grating with 100 lines/mm. The submillimeter cell consisted of a glass tube with an inside diameter of 80 mm and a length of 1270 mm, and the spherical mirrors of the submillimeter resonator.

  2. Recycle Rate in a Pulsed, Optically Pumped Rubidium Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Wooddy S.; Sulham, Clifford V.; Holtgrave, Jeremy C.; Perram, Glen P.

    2010-10-08

    A pulsed, optically pumped rubidium laser operating in analogy to the diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL) system at pump intensities as high as 750 kW/cm{sup 2} has been demonstrated with output energies of up to 13 {mu}J/pulse. Output energy is dramatically limited by spin-orbit relaxation rates under these high intensity pump conditions. More than 250 photons are available for every rubidium atom in the pumped volume, requiring a high number of cycles per atom during the 2-8 ns duration of the pump pulse. At 550 Torr of ethane, the spin-orbit relaxation rate is too slow to effectively utilize all the incident pump photons. Indeed, a linear dependence of output energy on pump pulse duration for fixed pump energy is demonstrated.

  3. Prelaunch optical characterization of the Laser Geodynamic Satellite (LAGEOS 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minott, Peter O.; Zagwodzki, Thomas W.; Varghese, Thomas; Seldon, Michael

    1993-01-01

    The optical range correction (the distance between the apparent retroreflective skin of the satellite and the center of mass) of the LAGEOS 2 was determined using computer analysis of theoretical and experimentally measured far field diffraction patterns, and with short pulse lasers using both streak camera-based range receivers and more conventional PMT-based range receivers. The three measurement techniques yielded range correction values from 248 to 253 millimeters dependent on laser wavelength, pulsewidth, and polarization, location of the receiver in the far field diffraction pattern and detection technique (peak, half maximum, centroid, or constant fraction). The Lidar cross section of LAGEOS 2 was measured at 4 to 10 million square meters, comparable to the LAGEOS 1.

  4. Laser Demonstration and Performance Characterization of an Optically Pumped Alkali Laser System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    optically pumped by a pulsed titanium sapphire laser to investigate the dynamics of DPALs at pump intensities between 1.3 and 45 kW/cm2. Linear...section at line center compared to a single Lorentzian approximation by less than 15% for the current experimental conditions.[19] A comparison of... less than predicted by the Lorentzian profile in Figure 12. 36 Figure 20. Slope efficiency reinterpreted as absorbance for (○) 32% output

  5. Electro-optical detection probability of optical devices determined by bidirectional laser retro-reflection cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurenzis, Martin; Christnacher, Frank; Matwyschuk, Alexis; Schertzer, Stephane; Hengy, Sebastien

    2015-05-01

    A good measure for the probability to detect a sniper telescopic sight is the effective bi-directional laser retro-reflection cross section. This angular (bi-directional) property of an optical device can be measured and can be used for a fist estimation of its probability to be detected by an active imaging. In the present paper, the authors give examples for resolved and non-resolved sensing of a telescopic sight under mono-static and bi-static conditions. As a result of these measurements, the resolved sensing under mono-static conditions shows the highest signal response in a wide angular range.

  6. Laser induced damage in optical materials: tenth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1979-07-01

    The tenth annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 12-14 September 1978. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Office of Naval Research. About 175 scientists attended, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, West Germany, and the Soviet Union. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning the measurement of absorption characteristics, bulk material properties, mirrors and surfaces, thin film damage, coating materials and design, and breakdown phenomena. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for use from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was also discussed. In commemoration of the tenth symposium in this series, a number of comprehensive review papers were presented to assess the state of the art in various facets of laser induced damage in optical materials. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons. The eleventh annual symposium is scheduled for 30-31 October 1979 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.

  7. Laser diode fiber optic apparatus for acupuncture treatment by the Oriental method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Van Hoi; Phung, Huu A.; Bui, Huy; Hoang, Cao D.; Vu, Duc T.; Tran, Minh T.; Nguyen, Minh H.

    1998-08-01

    The laser acupuncture equipment using laser diodes of 850, 1300 nm and optical fibers as light needles is presented. The double-frequency modulation of laser beam gives the high efficiency treatment of the low-power laser therapy by the oriental acupuncture method. The laser spot from optical fiber of 50 microns is suitable for the irradiation into special points on body or auricular by the acupuncture treatment schema. The laser intensity in pulse regime of 5 - 40 W/cm2 and irradiation time of 5 - 15 minutes are optimum for treatment of neurosis symptoms and pain-relieving.

  8. A database for solid-state laser, optical, and nonlinear materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, P. L.; Filer, E. D.; Barnes, N. P.; Skolaut, M. W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The database contains the physical properties of laser, optical, and nonlinear materials used by the laser models of a laser-modeling software system. The database is subdivided into two parts: spectra and tabulated data. The spectra are ASCII files of laser-material's absorption and emission spectra, and laser-diode's emission spectra. The tabulated data contains physical properties of laser, optical, and nonlinear materials, including crystalline, thermal, and mechanical properties. A menu-driven interface allows the execution from a personal directory where the user can store files containing input parameters for a specific model or the results of model's calculations.

  9. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Optical breakdown of quartz glass by XeF laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amosov, A. V.; Barabanov, V. S.; Gerasimov, S. Yu; Morozov, Nikolai V.; Sergeev, P. B.; Stepanchuk, V. N.

    1994-04-01

    The bulk optical strengths of KU1 and KUVI quartz glasses were determined for pulses of 85 ns duration at the wavelength of 353 nm. The damage thresholds of these materials were the same and amounted to 280 GW cm-2. The optical breakdown thresholds of KU1 at λ = 248 nm and λ = 193 nm, obtained earlier for the same samples under otherwise identical conditions, were used together with the present results to plot the wavelength dependence of the damage threshold of this material. These results showed that nonlinear absorption is the main mechanism responsible for damage to quartz glass in high-intensity ultraviolet laser radiation fields.

  10. Transportable cavity-stabilized laser system for optical carrier frequency transmission experiments.

    PubMed

    Parker, B; Marra, G; Johnson, L A M; Margolis, H S; Webster, S A; Wright, L; Lea, S N; Gill, P; Bayvel, P

    2014-12-10

    We report the design and performance of a transportable laser system at 1543 nm, together with its application as the source for a demonstration of optical carrier frequency transmission over 118 km of an installed dark fiber network. The laser system is based around an optical reference cavity featuring an elastic mounting that bonds the cavity to its support, enabling the cavity to be transported without additional clamping. The cavity exhibits passive fractional frequency insensitivity to vibration along the optical axis of 2.0×10(-11)  m(-1) s(2). With active fiber noise cancellation, the optical carrier frequency transmission achieves a fractional frequency instability, measured at the user end, of 2.6×10(-16) at 1 s, averaging down to below 3×10(-18) after 20,000 s. The fractional frequency accuracy of the transfer is better than 3×10(-18). This level of performance is sufficient for comparison of state-of-the-art optical frequency standards and is achieved in an urban fiber environment.

  11. Temperature activated absorption during laser-induced damage: The evolution of laser-supported solid-state absorption fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C W; Bude, J D; Shen, N; Demange, P

    2010-10-26

    Previously we have shown that the size of laser induced damage sites in both KDP and SiO{sub 2} is largely governed by the duration of the laser pulse which creates them. Here we present a model based on experiment and simulation that accounts for this behavior. Specifically, we show that solid-state laser-supported absorption fronts are generated during a damage event and that these fronts propagate at constant velocities for laser intensities up to 4 GW/cm{sup 2}. It is the constant absorption front velocity that leads to the dependence of laser damage site size on pulse duration. We show that these absorption fronts are driven principally by the temperature-activated deep sub band-gap optical absorptivity, free electron transport, and thermal diffusion in defect-free silica for temperatures up to 15,000K and pressures < 15GPa. In addition to the practical application of selecting an optimal laser for pre-initiation of large aperture optics, this work serves as a platform for understanding general laser-matter interactions in dielectrics under a variety of conditions.

  12. Laser-activated shape memory polymer intravascular thrombectomy device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Ward, IV; Wilson, Thomas S.; Benett, William J.; Loge, Jeffrey M.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2005-10-01

    A blood clot (thrombus) that becomes lodged in the arterial network supplying the brain can cause an ischemic stroke, depriving the brain of oxygen and often resulting in permanent disability. As an alternative to conventional clot-dissolving drug treatment, we are developing an intravascular laser-activated therapeutic device using shape memory polymer (SMP) to mechanically retrieve the thrombus and restore blood flow to the brain. Thermal imaging and computer simulation were used to characterize the optical and photothermal behavior of the SMP microactuator. Deployment of the SMP device in an in vitro thrombotic vascular occlusion model demonstrated the clinical treatment concept.

  13. Strongly Interacting Atom Lasers in Three-Dimensional Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Hen, Itay; Rigol, Marcos

    2010-10-29

    We show that the dynamical melting of a Mott insulator in a three-dimensional lattice leads to condensation at nonzero momenta, a phenomenon that can be used to generate strongly interacting atom lasers in optical lattices. For infinite on-site repulsion, the case considered here, the momenta at which bosons condense are determined analytically and found to have a simple dependence on the hopping amplitudes. The occupation of the condensates is shown to scale linearly with the total number of atoms in the initial Mott insulator. Our results are obtained by using a Gutzwiller-type mean-field approach, gauged against exact-diagonalization solutions of small systems.

  14. Optics designs and system MTF for laser scanning displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urey, Hakan; Nestorovic, Ned; Ng, Baldwin S.; Gross, Abraham A.

    1999-07-01

    The Virtual Retinal DisplayTM (VRDTM) technology is a new display technology being developed at Microvision Inc. The displayed image is scanned onto the viewer's retina using low- power red, green, and blue light sources. Microvision's proprietary miniaturized scanner designs make VRD system very well suited for head-mounted displays. In this paper we discuss some of the advantages of the VRD technology, various ocular designs for HMD and other applications, and details of constructing a system MTF budget for laser scanning systems that includes electronics, modulators, scanners, and optics.

  15. All-optical noninvasive chaos control of a semiconductor laser.

    PubMed

    Schikora, S; Wünsche, H-J; Henneberger, F

    2008-08-01

    We demonstrate experimentally control of a chaotic system on time scales much shorter than in any previous study. Combining a multisection laser with an external Fabry-Perot etalon, the chaotic output transforms into a regular intensity self-pulsation with a frequency in the 10-GHz range. The control is noninvasive as the feedback from the etalon is minimum when the target state is reached. The optical phase is identified as a crucial control parameter. Numerical simulations agree well with the experimental data and uncover global control properties.

  16. Precision Targeting with a Tracking adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    in Figure 2) but drives two galvanometers placed at appropriate conjugates within the path of the adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope...reflectometer. The input to the "slave" control loop is the scaled position signals from the master galvanometers . The slave tracking mirrors are placed at...signals and drive galvanometers . The DSP has a loop rate of 62.5 kHz (compared to 16 kHz in the previously-used real-time processing board) for a

  17. Possible power source found for fiber optic lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Krupa, Tyler J.

    2000-05-01

    Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratory are researching ways to use a new semiconductor alloy, indium gallium arsenide nitride (InGaAsN), as as photovoltaic power source for lasers in fiber optics and space communication satellites. The efficiency of electricity-generating solar cells utilizing InGaAsN is predicted to be 40%-nearly twice the efficiency rate of a standard silicon solar cell. The use of InGaAsN in solar cells is a potential power source for satellites and other space systems. (AIP) (c)

  18. Characterization of a Pulsed HF Optical Resonance Transfer Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    AD-A 124 708 CHARACTERIZATION OF A PULSED HIE OPTICAL RESONANCE I TRANSFE R LASER(U ) AIR FORCE INST OF TECH WRIGHT -PATTERSON AFA O H SCHOOL OF...these valves failed and the third leaked and had to be replaced. All three needle valves were replaced by stainless steel which should function well...use in an HP environment). The He feed (see figure 7) to the reference cell is controlled by a stainless steel needle valve (N) and a brass bellows

  19. Synchronization of bandwidth-enhanced chaos in semiconductor lasers with optical feedback and injection.

    PubMed

    Someya, Hiroyuki; Oowada, Isao; Okumura, Haruka; Kida, Takahiko; Uchida, Atsushi

    2009-10-26

    We experimentally investigate the generation and synchronization of bandwidth-enhanced chaos in a semiconductor laser (drive laser) that is subject to optical injection from another chaotic semiconductor laser (injection laser) with optical feedback. Effective bandwidth enhancement is achieved over 12 GHz, under the condition in which the optical wavelength of the drive laser is positively detuned with respect to that of the injection laser, outside the injection locking range. The bandwidth-enhanced chaotic signal of the drive laser is injected into a third semiconductor laser (response laser) for synchronization. Synchronization of chaos with a bandwidth greater than 12 GHz is observed between the drive and response lasers, under the condition in which the optical wavelength of the response laser is negatively detuned with respect to that of the drive laser, satisfying the injection locking condition. High-quality chaos synchronization is observed within the injection locking range between the drive and response lasers and under the condition of a low relaxation oscillation frequency of the response laser.

  20. Solitary and coupled semiconductor ring lasers as optical spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Coomans, W; Gelens, L; Beri, S; Danckaert, J; Van der Sande, G

    2011-09-01

    We theoretically investigate the possibility of generating pulses in an excitable (asymmetric) semiconductor ring laser (SRL) using optical trigger pulses. We show that the phase difference between the injected field and the electric field inside the SRL determines the direction of the perturbation in phase space. Due to the folded shape of the excitability threshold, this has an important influence on the ability to cross it. A mechanism for exciting multiple consecutive pulses using a single trigger pulse (i.e., multipulse excitability) is revealed. We furthermore investigate the possibility of using asymmetric SRLs in a coupled configuration, which is a first step toward an all-optical neural network using SRLs as building blocks.

  1. Solitary and coupled semiconductor ring lasers as optical spiking neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coomans, W.; Gelens, L.; Beri, S.; Danckaert, J.; van der Sande, G.

    2011-09-01

    We theoretically investigate the possibility of generating pulses in an excitable (asymmetric) semiconductor ring laser (SRL) using optical trigger pulses. We show that the phase difference between the injected field and the electric field inside the SRL determines the direction of the perturbation in phase space. Due to the folded shape of the excitability threshold, this has an important influence on the ability to cross it. A mechanism for exciting multiple consecutive pulses using a single trigger pulse (i.e., multipulse excitability) is revealed. We furthermore investigate the possibility of using asymmetric SRLs in a coupled configuration, which is a first step toward an all-optical neural network using SRLs as building blocks.

  2. Laser-optical blade tip clearance measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barranger, J. P.; Ford, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    The need for blade tip clearance instrumentation has been intensified recently by advances in technology of gas turbine engines. A new laser-optical measurement system has been developed to measure single blade tip clearances and average blade tip clearances between a rotor and its gas path seal in rotating component rigs and complete engines. The system is applicable to fan, compressor and turbine blade tip clearance measurements. The engine mounted probe is particularly suitable for operation in the extreme turbine environment. The measurement system consists of an optical subsystem, an electronic subsystem and a computing and graphic terminal. Bench tests and environmental tests were conducted to confirm operation at temperatures, pressures, and vibration levels typically encountered in an operating gas turbine engine.

  3. Linear laser diode arrays for improvement in optical disk recording

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alphonse, G. A.; Carlin, D. B.; Connolly, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    The development of individually addressable laser diode arrays for multitrack magneto-optic recorders for space stations is discussed. Three multi-element channeled substrate planar (CSP) arrays with output power greater than 30 mW with linear light vs current characteristics and stable single mode spectra were delivered to NASA. These devices have been used to demonstrate for the first time the simultaneous recording of eight data tracks on a 14-inch magneto-optic erasable disk. The yield of these devices is low, mainly due to non-uniformities inherent to the LPE growth that was used to fabricate them. The authors have recently developed the inverted CSP, based on the much more uniform MOCVD growth techniques, and have made low threshold quantum well arrays requiring about three times less current than the CSP to deliver 30 mW CW in a single spatial mode. The inverted CSP is very promising for use in space flight recorder applications.

  4. Lasers for coherent optical satellite links with large dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chiodo, Nicola; Djerroud, Khelifa; Acef, Ouali; Clairon, André; Wolf, Peter

    2013-10-20

    We present the experimental realization of a laser system for ground-to-satellite optical Doppler ranging at the atmospheric turbulence limit. Such a system needs to display good frequency stability (a few parts in 10-14) while allowing large and well-controlled frequency sweeps of ±12  GHz at rates exceeding 100  MHz/s. Furthermore it needs to be sufficiently compact and robust for transportation to different astronomical observation sites, where it is to be interfaced with satellite ranging telescopes. We demonstrate that our system fulfills those requirements and should therefore allow operation of ground to low Earth orbit satellite coherent optical links limited only by atmospheric turbulence.

  5. Combined Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography and Laser Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jennifer K.; Tumlinson, Alexandre R.; Utzinger, Urs

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) are promising modalities for tissue characterization in human patients and animal models. OCT detects coherently backscattered light, whereas LIF detects fluorescence emission of endogenous biochemicals, such as reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), collagen, and fluorescent proteins, or exogenous substances such as cyanine dyes. Given the complementary mechanisms of contrast for OCT and LIF, the combination of the two modalities could potentially provide more sensitive and specific detection of disease than either modality alone. Sample probes for both OCT and LIF can be implemented using small diameter optical fibers, suggesting a particular synergy for endoscopic applications. In this chapter, the mechanisms of contrast and diagnostic capability for both OCT and LIF are briefly examined. Evidence of complementary capability is described. Example published combined OCT-LIF systems are reviewed, one successful commercial instrument is discussed, and example applications are provided.

  6. Nanopatterning by laser interference lithography: applications to optical devices.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jung-Hun; Park, Jung Ho; Kim, Seong-Il; Park, Bang Ju; Ma, Zhenqiang; Choi, Jinnil; Ju, Byeong-Kwon

    2014-02-01

    A systematic review, covering fabrication of nanoscale patterns by laser interference lithography (LIL) and their applications for optical devices is provided. LIL is a patterning method. It is a simple, quick process over a large area without using a mask. LIL is a powerful technique for the definition of large-area, nanometer-scale, periodically patterned structures. Patterns are recorded in a light-sensitive medium that responds nonlinearly to the intensity distribution associated with the interference of two or more coherent beams of light. The photoresist patterns produced with LIL are the platform for further fabrication of nanostructures and growth of functional materials used as the building blocks for devices. Demonstration of optical and photonic devices by LIL is reviewed such as directed nanophotonics and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) or large area membrane reflectors and anti-reflectors. Perspective on future directions for LIL and emerging applications in other fields are presented.

  7. Optical transmission through a polarization preserving single mode optical fiber at two Ar(+) laser wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedjojuwono, Ken K.; Hunter, William W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The transmission characteristics of two Ar(+) laser wavelengths through a twenty meter Panda type Polarization Preserving Single Mode Optical Fiber (PPSMOF) were measured. The measurements were done with both single and multi-longitudinal mode radiation. In the single longitudinal mode case, a degrading Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) is observed as a backward scattering loss. By choosing an optimum coupling system and manipulating the input polarization, the threshold of the SBS onset can be raised and the transmission efficiency can be increased.

  8. NONLINEAR OPTICAL PHENOMENA: Optical pumping of mixtures containing CO by multifrequency CO laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochetov, Igor'V.; Kurnosov, A. K.; Martin, J. P.; Napartovich, A. P.

    1995-07-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the optical pumping of a stream of a gas containing CO by cw CO laser radiation. An analysis and numerical modelling made it possible to reproduce the experimentally determined distribution of molecules between the vibrational levels. The experiments on pumping of pure CO could be explained only when the spatial distributions of the parameters along the gas stream were taken into account.

  9. Developments of pulse laser assist optical tweezers (PLAT) for in vivo manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Saki; Sugiura, Tadao; Minato, Kotaro

    2011-02-01

    Optical tweezers is a technique to trap and to manipulate micron sized objects under a microscope by radiation pressure force exerted by a laser beam. Optical tweezers has been utilized for single-molecular measurements of force exerted by molecular interactions and for cell palpation. To extend applications of optical tweezers we have developed a novel optical tweezers system combined with a pulse laser. We utilize a pulsed laser (Q-switched Nd: YAG laser, wavelength of 1064 nm) to assist manipulations by conventional optical tweezers achieved by a continuous wave (CW) laser. The pulsed laser beam is introduced into the same optics for conventional optical tweezers. In principle, instantaneous radiation force is proportional to instantaneous power of laser beam. As a result, pulsed laser beam generates strong instantaneous force on an object to be manipulated. If the radiation force becomes strong enough to get over an obstacle structure and/or to be released from adhesion, the object will be free from these difficulties. We have named this technique as Pulse Laser beam Assisted optical Tweezers (PLAT). We have successfully demonstrated to manipulate objects surface on a living cell for "in vivo manipulation."

  10. Methods for determining optical power, for power-normalizing laser measurements, and for stabilizing power of lasers via compliance voltage sensing

    DOEpatents

    Taubman, Matthew S; Phillips, Mark C

    2015-04-07

    A method is disclosed for power normalization of spectroscopic signatures obtained from laser based chemical sensors that employs the compliance voltage across a quantum cascade laser device within an external cavity laser. The method obviates the need for a dedicated optical detector used specifically for power normalization purposes. A method is also disclosed that employs the compliance voltage developed across the laser device within an external cavity semiconductor laser to power-stabilize the laser mode of the semiconductor laser by adjusting drive current to the laser such that the output optical power from the external cavity semiconductor laser remains constant.

  11. Fiber Lasers and all Optical Logic Gates for Header Processing in High-Bit Optical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Brandon Craig

    As information technologies push network capacities toward higher bit rates, fiber-optic communication networks will eventually be capable of transmitting data at a rate at which electronic switches cannot respond. A solution to this problem is to replace the electronics at the front and back ends of the transmission system where data enters and exists in optical format with all-optical header processors. In this thesis, I will describe how the header processor has been divided into all-optical switching modules, which will act as the basic building block for the header processing unit. Each module arises from the integration of an erbium -doped fiber laser and an all-optical logic gate. The erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) acts as a local power supply for the module. It restores the pulse shape, pulse amplitude, and timing of an incoming optical bit stream. The development of a short-pulse EDFL and a high-power EDFL for this application is described. The high-power EDFL employs a unique cavity design that eliminates multiple pulses when pumped with high powers. Data processing is performed within the module by all-optical logic gates, which switch due to the nonlinear interaction of one pulse of light with another in optical fiber. Therefore, these gates can work at the bit rate of the transmission system and avoid the bottlenecks inherent in electronic processors. The design and demonstration of a low-latency soliton-dragging gate and a low-birefringent nonlinear optical loop mirror (low-bi NOLM) logic gate are described. The two logic gates are optimized for energy contrast, switching energy, timing sensitivity, and cascadability. Logic functionality is also demonstrated. The thesis culminates in an experiment that integrates the laser and logic gate work by driving two cascaded low -bi NOLM's with an EDFL. It is shown that this experiment utilizes all the components necessary to read the header of a high-bit-rate data packet, bringing closure to the switching

  12. Microwave generation in an electro-absorption modulator integrated with a DFB laser subject to optical injection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ning Hua; Zhang, Hong Guang; Man, Jiang Wei; Zhu, Hong Liang; Ke, Jian Hong; Liu, Yu; Wang, Xin; Yuan, Hai Qing; Xie, Liang; Wang, Wei

    2009-11-23

    This paper presents a new technique to generate microwave signal using an electro-absorption modulator (EAM) integrated with a distributed feedback (DFB) laser subject to optical injection. Experiments show that the frequency of the generated microwave can be tuned by changing the wavelength of the external laser or adjusting the bias voltage of the EAM. The frequency response of the EAM is studied and found to be unsmooth due to packaging parasitic effects and four-wave mixing effect occurring in the active layer of the DFB laser. It is also demonstrated that an EA modulator integrated in between two DFB lasers can be used instead of the EML under optical injection. This integrated chip can be used to realize a monolithically integrated tunable microwave source.

  13. Application of femtosecond-laser induced nanostructures in optical memory.

    PubMed

    Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Sakakura, Masaaki; Miura, Kiyotaka; Qiu, Jiarong; Kazansky, Peter G; Fujita, Koji; Hirao, Kazuyuki

    2007-01-01

    The femtosecond laser induced micro- and nanostructures for the application to the three-dimensional optical data storage are investigated. We have observed the increase of refractive index due to local densification and atomic defect generation, and demonstrated the real time observation of photothermal effect after the femtosecond laser irradiation inside a glass by the transient lens (TrL) method. The TrL signal showed a damped oscillation with about an 800 ps period. The essential feature of the oscillation can be reproduced by the pressure wave creation and propagation to the outward direction from the irradiated region. The simulation based on elastodynamics has shown that a large thermoelastic stress is relaxed by the generation of the pressure wave. In the case of soda-lime glass, the velocity of the pressure wave is almost same as the longitudinal sound velocity at room temperature (5.8 microm/ns). We have also observed the localized photo-reduction of Sm3+ to Sm2+ inside a transparent and colorless Sm(3+)-doped borate glass. Photoluminescence spectra showed that some the Sm3+ ions in the focal spot within the glass sample were reduced to Sm2+ ions after femtosecond laser irradiation. A photo-reduction bit of 200 nm in three-dimensions can be recorded with a femtosecond laser and readout clearly by detecting the fluorescence excited by Ar+ laser (lambda = 488 nm). A photo-reduction bit can be also erased by photo-oxidation with a cw Ar+ laser (lambda = 514.5 nm). Since photo-reduction bits can be spaced 150 nm apart in a layer within glass, a memory capacity of as high as 1 Tbit can be achieved in a glass piece with dimensions of 10 mm x 10 mm x 1 mm. We have also demonstrated the first observation of the polarization-dependent periodic nanostructure formation by the interference between femtosecond laser light and electron acoustic waves. The observed nanostructures are the smallest embedded structures ever created by light. The period of self

  14. Optimization of a Fabry-Perot Q-switch fiber optic laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armas Rivera, Ivan; Beltrán Pérez, Georgina; Kuzin, Evgene; Castillo Mixcóatl, Juan; Muñoz Aguirre, Severino

    2013-11-01

    Optical fiber Q-Switch lasers have been used in a variety of application areas in science as well as in industry owing to their multiple characteristics. A possible application is that owing to their high output power they can be used as pumping sources for supercontinuum generation. Such source can be employed in optical coherence tomography (OCT) focused to dermatology. Therefore it is important to develop sources with emission wavelength that are not injurious to human skin. In the present work erbium doped fiber (EDF) was used owing that its emission wavelength (1550 nm) is adequate for this purpose. The most efficient way of achieving high power in a Q-Switch laser is optimizing all the parameters involved in the pulses generation, such as pumping power, active medium length and modulation frequency. The results show that using a fiber length of 7 meters is possible to get 10 μJ of energy, a peak power of 140 W, an average power of 27.5mW with temporal widths of 500 ns. The laser uses an acousto-optic device to modulate the internal loses inside the cavity. As highly reflecting mirrors, a Sagnac Interferometer and a Fiber Bragg Grating was employed.

  15. Acoustic monitoring method and system in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB)

    DOEpatents

    O'Donnell, Matthew; Ye, Jing Yong; Norris, Theodore B.; Baker, Jr., James R.; Balogh, Lajos P.; Milas, Susanne M.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.; Hollman, Kyle W.

    2008-05-06

    An acoustic monitoring method and system in laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB) provides information which characterize material which is broken down, microbubbles in the material, and/or the microenvironment of the microbubbles. In one embodiment of the invention, femtosecond laser pulses are focused just inside the surface of a volume of aqueous solution which may include dendrimer nanocomposite (DNC) particles. A tightly focused, high frequency, single-element ultrasonic transducer is positioned such that its focus coincides axially and laterally with this laser focus. When optical breakdown occurs, a microbubble forms and a shock or pressure wave is emitted (i.e., acoustic emission). In addition to this acoustic signal, the microbubble may be actively probed with pulse-echo measurements from the same transducer. After the microbubble forms, received pulse-echo signals have an extra pulse, describing the microbubble location and providing a measure of axial microbubble size. Wavefield plots of successive recordings illustrate the generation, growth, and collapse of microbubbles due to optical breakdown. These same plots can also be used to quantify LIOB thresholds.

  16. Test of spectral emission and absorption characteristics of active optical fibers by direct side pumping.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianzhong; Luo, Yanhua; Sathi, Zinat M; Azadpeyma, Nilram; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2012-08-27

    Emission and absorption are two main properties of active optical fibers that are important for fiber amplifiers and lasers. We propose a direct side pumping scheme for non-deconstructive evaluation of active optical fibers. This scheme enables a simple in situ test of both emission and absorption characteristics without cutting fiber and produces good accuracy with very low pumping background. A commercial Er-doped fiber and a home-made Bi/Er co-doped optical fiber have been tested to demonstrate that the scheme is a useful alternative technique for characterizing active optical fiber or waveguides.

  17. Research on laser protection: an overview of 20 years of activities at Fraunhofer IOSB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritt, G.; Walter, D.; Eberle, B.

    2013-10-01

    Since the advent of the laser in 1960, the protection of human eyes and sensors against intended or unintended damage by laser radiation is a hot research topic. As long as the parameters of a laser source such as the wavelength and the output power are known, adequate laser safety can be ensured simply by utilizing conventional laser protection filters which are based on absorption or interference effects. This is typically the case in cooperative environments like a laboratory or industrial facilities. A very different situation prevails in military defense or civil security. There, the parameters of encountering laser threats are usually unknown. Protection measures, helping against all types of laser threats, are the long desired objective of countless research activities. The biggest challenge in finding an effective measure arises from single laser pulses of unknown wavelength. The problem demands for a passive protection concept and may be based for example on intensity dependent effects. Moreover, the requested solutions shall comprise add-on possibilities like thin films to be put on existing optics, windshields or glasses. Unfortunately, such an all-embracing solution is still far out of reach. The Fraunhofer IOSB has been working on the evaluation and development of non-conventional laser protection methods for more than 20 years. An overview of the past and present research activities shall be presented, comprising protection measures against laser damaging and laser dazzling.

  18. Possibilities in optical monitoring of laser welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horník, Petr; Mrňa, Libor; Pavelka, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Laser welding is a modern, widely used but still not really common method of welding. With increasing demands on the quality of the welds, it is usual to apply automated machine welding and with on-line monitoring of the welding process. The resulting quality of the weld is largely affected by the behavior of keyhole. However, its direct observation during the welding process is practically impossible and it is necessary to use indirect methods. At ISI we have developed optical methods of monitoring the process. Most advanced is an analysis of radiation of laser-induced plasma plume forming in the keyhole where changes in the frequency of the plasma bursts are monitored and evaluated using Fourier and autocorrelation analysis. Another solution, robust and suitable for industry, is based on the observation of the keyhole inlet opening through a coaxial camera mounted in the welding head and the subsequent image processing by computer vision methods. A high-speed camera is used to understand the dynamics of the plasma plume. Through optical spectroscopy of the plume, we can study the excitation of elements in a material. It is also beneficial to monitor the gas flow of shielding gas using schlieren method.

  19. High-sensitive scanning laser magneto-optical imaging system.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Hironaru; Tonouchi, Masayoshi

    2010-01-01

    A high-sensitive scanning laser magneto-optical (MO) imaging system has been developed. The system is mainly composed of a laser source, galvano meters, and a high-sensitive differential optical-detector. Preliminary evaluation of system performance by using a Faraday indicator with a Faraday rotation coefficient of 3.47 x 10(-5) rad/microm Oe shows a magnetic sensitivity of about 5 microT, without any need for accumulation or averaging processing. Using the developed MO system we have succeeded in the fast and quantitative imaging of a rotationally symmetric magnetic field distribution around an YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-delta) (YBCO) strip line applied with dc-biased current, and also succeeded in the detection of quantized fine signals corresponding to magnetic flux quantum generation in a superconducting loop of an YBCO Josephson vortex flow transistor. Thus, the developed system enables us not only to do fast imaging and local signal detection but also to directly evaluate both the strength and direction of a magnetic signal.

  20. Laser induced damage in optical materials: 8th ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1977-05-01

    The Eighth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was hosted by the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, from 13 to 15 July 1976. The Symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and the Office of Naval Research. About 160 scientists attended the Symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, and Brazil. The Symposium was divided into five half-day sessions concerning Bulk Material Properties and Thermal Behavior, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Film Properties, Thin Film Damage, and Scaling Laws and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the Symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to new materials for use at 10.6 microm in mirror substrates, windo s, and coatings. New techniques in film deposition and advances in diamond-turning of optics were described. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength were discussed. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons of the Symposium. The Ninth Annual Symposium is scheduled for 4-6 October 1977 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado.