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Sample records for optical atomic magnetometry

  1. Optical Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budker, Dmitry; Kimball, Derek F. Jackson

    2013-03-01

    Part I. Principles and Techniques: 1. General principles and characteristics of optical magnetometers D. F. Jackson Kimball, E. B. Alexandrov and D. Budker; 2. Quantum noise in atomic magnetometers M. V. Romalis; 3. Quantum noise, squeezing, and entanglement in radio-frequency optical magnetometers K. Jensen and E. S. Polzik; 4. Mx and Mz magnetometers E. B. Alexandrov and A. K. Vershovskiy; 5. Spin-exchange-relaxation-free (serf) magnetometers I. Savukov and S. J. Seltzer; 6. Optical magnetometry with modulated light D. F. Jackson Kimball, S. Pustelny, V. V. Yashchuk and D. Budker; 7. Microfabricated atomic magnetometers S. Knappe and J. Kitching; 8. Optical magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond V. M. Acosta, D. Budker, P. R. Hemmer, J. R. Maze and R. L. Walsworth; 9. Magnetometry with cold atoms W. Gawlik and J. M. Higbie; 10. Helium magnetometers R. E. Slocum, D. D. McGregor and A. W. Brown; 11. Surface coatings for atomic magnetometry S. J. Seltzer, M.-A. Bouchiat and M. V. Balabas; 12. Magnetic shielding V. V. Yashchuk, S.-K. Lee and E. Paperno; Part II. Applications: 13. Remote detection magnetometry S. M. Rochester, J. M. Higbie, B. Patton, D. Budker, R. Holzlöhner and D. Bonaccini Calia; 14. Detection of nuclear magnetic resonance with atomic magnetometers M. P. Ledbetter, I. Savukov, S. J. Seltzer and D. Budker; 15. Space magnetometry B. Patton, A. W. Brown, R. E. Slocum and E. J. Smith; 16. Detection of biomagnetic fields A. Ben-Amar Baranga, T. G. Walker and R. T. Wakai; 17. Geophysical applications M. D. Prouty, R. Johnson, I. Hrvoic and A. K. Vershovskiy; Part III. Broader Impact: 18. Tests of fundamental physics with optical magnetometers D. F. Jackson Kimball, S. K. Lamoreaux and T. E. Chupp; 19. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscopes E. A. Donley and J. Kitching; 20. Commercial magnetometers and their application D. C. Hovde, M. D. Prouty, I. Hrvoic and R. E. Slocum; Index.

  2. Optical atomic magnetometry for magnetic induction tomography of the heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deans, Cameron; Marmugi, Luca; Hussain, Sarah; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-04-01

    We report on the use of radio-frequency optical atomic magnetometers for magnetic induction tomography measurements. We demonstrate the imaging of dummy targets of varying conductivities placed in the proximity of the sensor, in an unshielded environment at room-temperature and without background subtraction. The images produced by the system accurately reproduce the characteristics of the actual objects. Furthermore, we perform finite element simulations in order to assess the potential for measuring low-conductivity biological tissues with our system. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of an instrument based on optical atomic magnetometers for magnetic induction tomography imaging of biological samples, in particular for mapping anomalous conductivity in the heart.

  3. Hyperpolarized Xenon Nuclear Spins Detected by Optical Atomic Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashchuk, V. V.; Granwehr, J.; Kimball, D. F.; Rochester, S. M.; Trabesinger, A. H.; Urban, J. T.; Budker, D.; Pines, A.

    2004-10-01

    We report the use of an atomic magnetometer based on nonlinear magneto-optical rotation with frequency-modulated light to detect nuclear magnetization of xenon gas. The magnetization of a spin-exchange-polarized xenon sample (1.7 c m3 at a pressure of 5bars, natural isotopic abundance, polarization 1% ), prepared remotely to the detection apparatus, is measured with an atomic sensor. An average magnetic field of ˜10 nG induced by the xenon sample on the 10cm diameter atomic sensor is detected with signal-to-noise ratio ˜10 , limited by residual noise in the magnetic environment. The possibility of using modern atomic magnetometers as detectors of nuclear magnetic resonance and in magnetic resonance imaging is discussed. Atomic magnetometers appear to be ideally suited for emerging low-field and remote-detection magnetic resonance applications.

  4. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-10-20

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  5. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    PubMed Central

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations. PMID:26481853

  6. The Saga of Light-Matter Interaction and Magneto-optical Effects Applications to Atomic Magnetometry, Laser-cooled Atoms, Atomic Clocks, Geomagnetism, and Plant Bio-magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsini, Eric P.

    The quest to expand the limited sensorial domain, in particular to bridge the inability to gauge magnetic fields near and far, has driven the fabrication of remedial tools. The interaction of ferromagnetic material with a magnetic field had been the only available technique to gauge that field for several millennium. The advent of electricity and associated classical phenomena captured in the four Maxwell equations, were a step forward. In the early 1900s, the model of quantum mechanics provided a two-way leap forward. One came from the newly understood interaction of light and matter, and more specifically the three-way coupling of photons, atoms' angular momenta, and magnetic field, which are the foundations of atomic magnetometry. The other came from magnetically sensitive quantum effects in a fabricated energy-ladder form of matter cooled to a temperature below that of the energy steps; these quantum effects gave rise to the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Research using atomic magnetometers and SQUIDs has resulted in thousands of publications, text books, and conferences. The current status in each field is well described in Refs. [48,49,38,42] and all references therein. In this work we develop and investigate techniques and applications pertaining to atomic magnetometry. [Full text: eric.corsini gmail.com].

  7. Atomic Magnetometry for fetal Magnetocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulai, Ibrahim; Walker, Thad; Wakai, Ronald

    2013-05-01

    We present results of using an array of atomic magnetometers in detecting fetal Magnetocardiograms(fMCG). The array consists of four 87-Rb atomic magnetometers operating in the spin exchange relaxation free (SERF) regime. They have a demonstrated sensitivity of 5 - 10 fT /√{ Hz } -limited by the Johnson noise of the magnetic shielding. We report measurements of fMCG on gestational ages as small as 21 weeks and describe the technical challenges and design features that make the measurements possible. We present a method for minimizing the impact of AC Stark Shifts on the magnetometer array performance by relying on diffusion to transport polarized atoms from a pumping region to an AC Stark shift free active region. This work was supported by the NIH.

  8. Remote Atmospheric Nonlinear Optical Magnetometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-28

    considered in the magnetometry model are shown in Fig. 4. The ground state is split by the Zeeman effect into three levels 1 , 2 , and 3 and the...wakefield polarization rotation and, ii) polarization changes in resonance fluorescence emission (Hanle effect ). The major challenges for these...the atmospheric oxygen transitions and the strength of the effective magnetic dipole interaction

  9. Characterizing and imaging magnetic nanoparticles by optical magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, A.; Colombo, S.; Dolgovskiy, V.; Grujić, Z. D.; Lebedev, V.; Zhang, J.

    2017-01-01

    We review our ongoing work on deploying optical (atomic) magnetometry for measuring the magnetic response of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) samples, yielding MNP size distributions, and other sample parameters like Néel relaxation time τ, saturation magnetisation Ms , anisotropy constant K and magnetic susceptibility χ. We address magnetorelaxation (MRX) signals, in which the decaying magnetisation M(t) following a magnetising pulse is recorded by a single atomic magnetometer or by a novel magnetic source imaging camera (MSIC) allowing spatially resolved MRX studies of distributed MNP samples. We further show that optical magnetometers can be used for a direct measurement of the M(H) and dM/dH(H) dependencies of MNP samples, the latter forming the basis for an optical magnetometer implementation of the MPI (Magnetic Particle Imaging) method. All experiments are in view of developing biomedical imaging modalities.

  10. Subfemtotesla scalar atomic magnetometry using multipass cells.

    PubMed

    Sheng, D; Li, S; Dural, N; Romalis, M V

    2013-04-19

    Scalar atomic magnetometers have many attractive features but their sensitivity has been relatively poor. We describe a Rb scalar gradiometer using two multipass optical cells. We use a pump-probe measurement scheme to suppress spin-exchange relaxation and two probe pulses to find the spin precession zero crossing times with a resolution of 1 psec. We realize a magnetic field sensitivity of 0.54 fT/Hz(1/2), which improves by an order of magnitude the best scalar magnetometer sensitivity and exceeds, for example, the quantum limit set by the spin-exchange collisions for a scalar magnetometer with the same measurement volume operating in a continuous regime.

  11. Atomic-Scale Magnetometry of Dynamic Magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bree, J.; Flatté, M. E.

    2017-02-01

    The spatial resolution of imaging magnetometers has benefited from scanning probe techniques. The requirement that the sample perturbs the scanning probe through a magnetic field external to its volume limits magnetometry to samples with pre-existing magnetization. We propose a magnetometer in which the perturbation is reversed: the probe's magnetic field generates a response of the sample, which acts back on the probe and changes its energy. For an NV- spin center in diamond this perturbation changes the fine-structure splitting of the spin ground state. Sensitive measurement techniques using coherent detection schemes then permit detection of the magnetic response of paramagnetic and diamagnetic materials. This technique can measure the thickness of magnetically dead layers with better than 0.1 Å accuracy.

  12. Application of atomic magnetometry in magnetic particledetection

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shoujun; Donaldson, Marcus H.; Pines, Alexander; Rochester,Simon M.; Budker, Dmitry; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2006-09-17

    We demonstrate the detection of magnetic particles carriedby water in a continuous flow using an atomic magnetic gradiometer.Studies on three types of magnetic particles are presented: a singlecobalt particle (diameter ~;150 mum, multi-domain), a suspension ofsuperparamagnetic magnetite particles (diameter ~;1 mum), andferromagnetic cobalt nanoparticles (diameter ~;10 nm, 120 kA/mmagnetization). Estimated detection limits are 20 mum diameter for asingle cobalt particle at a water flow rate 30 ml/min, 5x103 magnetiteparticles at 160 ml/min, and 50 pl for the specific ferromagnetic fluidat 130 ml/min. Possible applications of our method arediscussed.

  13. Nonlinear optical magnetometry with accessible in situ optical squeezing

    SciTech Connect

    Otterstrom, N.; Pooser, R. C.; Lawrie, B. J.

    2014-11-14

    In this paper, we demonstrate compact and accessible squeezed-light magnetometry using four-wave mixing in a single hot rubidium vapor cell. The strong intrinsic coherence of the four-wave mixing process results in nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (NMOR) on each mode of a two-mode relative-intensity squeezed state. Finally, this framework enables 4.7 dB of quantum noise reduction while the opposing polarization rotation signals of the probe and conjugate fields add to increase the total signal to noise ratio.

  14. Nonlinear optical magnetometry with accessible in situ optical squeezing

    DOE PAGES

    Otterstrom, N.; Pooser, R. C.; Lawrie, B. J.

    2014-11-14

    In this paper, we demonstrate compact and accessible squeezed-light magnetometry using four-wave mixing in a single hot rubidium vapor cell. The strong intrinsic coherence of the four-wave mixing process results in nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (NMOR) on each mode of a two-mode relative-intensity squeezed state. Finally, this framework enables 4.7 dB of quantum noise reduction while the opposing polarization rotation signals of the probe and conjugate fields add to increase the total signal to noise ratio.

  15. Optical Magnetometry for Detecting Underwater Objects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-21

    underwater object. The two mechanisms responsible for the polarization rotation are the Surface Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect ( SMOKE ) and the Faraday effect...due to an underwater object will result in variations in the polarization rotation of the laser light reflected off the water’s surface ( SMOKE ) and off...Washington, DC 20375-5320 October 2014 – August 2015 NRL *University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-4111 Faraday SMOKE 67-4374-C4 1 Optical

  16. Orientational effects on the amplitude and phase of polarimeter signals in double-resonance atomic magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingleby, Stuart J.; O'Dwyer, Carolyn; Griffin, Paul F.; Arnold, Aidan S.; Riis, Erling

    2017-07-01

    Double-resonance optically pumped magnetometry can be used to measure static magnetic fields with high sensitivity by detecting a resonant atomic spin response to a small oscillating field perturbation. Determination of the resonant frequency yields a scalar measurement of static field (B0) magnitude. We present calculations and experimental data showing that the on-resonance polarimeter signal of light transmitted through an atomic vapor in arbitrarily oriented B0 may be modeled by considering the evolution of alignment terms in atomic polarization. We observe that the amplitude and phase of the magnetometer signal are highly dependent upon B0 orientation and present precise measurements of the distribution of these parameters over the full 4 π solid angle.

  17. Atomic Magnetometry in the Lab, in the Field, and in the Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, B.; Versolato, O.; Hovde, C.; Rochester, S.; Higbie, J.; Budker, D.

    2012-12-01

    Atomic magnetometers [1] have played an important role in geophysical research ever since their advent more than fifty years ago. They have been used in near-surface magnetic surveys, aboard ionospheric sounding rockets, and have been critical in satellite missions dedicated to precise geophysical field mapping [2]. Over the past decade, renewed interest in atomic magnetometers has led to dramatically improved sensitivity in laboratory devices. The best alkali-vapor magnetometers, operating in magnetically shielded low-field environments, can now achieve sensitivities better than 1 femtotesla in a one-second measurement [3]. The precision of atomic magnetometers operating at Earth's field, on the other hand, has lagged in comparison. We will review recent efforts to achieve better sensitivity and accuracy in all-optical alkali-vapor magnetometers operating in geophysical field ranges. Advances in laser technology, antirelaxation vapor-cell coatings [4], and optical pumping techniques have resulted in better fundamental precision and dramatically reduced systematic error in these devices. The result is a new generation of compact, low-cost, and low-power sensors which are well suited for geophysical research. In addition to these developments, we will also discuss the potential for fully remote atom-based magnetic measurements [5]. This includes a proposed scheme to measure the magnetic field within the mesospheric sodium layer using existing laser guide star technology [6]. This technique would allow magnetic surveying at length and time scales heretofore inaccessible, and would yield data relevant to magnetic anomaly mapping, ionospheric physics, ocean circulation models, and lithospheric magnetization studies. [1] Budker, D., and M. Romalis (2007), Optical magnetometry, Nat. Phys., 3(4), 227-234. [2] Ravat, D., et al. (1995), Global vector and scalar Magsat magnetic anomaly maps, J. Geophys. Res.-Solid Earth, 100(B10), 20111-20136. [3] Dang, H. B., et al. (2010

  18. Subpicotesla atomic magnetometry with a microfabricated vapour cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Vishal; Knappe, Svenja; Schwindt, Peter D. D.; Kitching, John

    2007-11-01

    Highly sensitive magnetometers capable of measuring magnetic fields below 1 pT have an impact on areas as diverse as geophysical surveying, the detection of unexploded ordinance, space science, nuclear magnetic resonance, health care and perimeter and remote monitoring. Recently, it has been shown that laboratory optical magnetometers, based on the precession of the spins of alkali atoms in the vapour phase, could achieve sensitivities in the femtotesla range, comparable to, or even exceeding, those of superconducting quantum interference devices. We demonstrate here an atomic magnetometer based on a millimetre-scale microfabricated alkali vapour cell with sensitivity below 70 fT Hz-1/2. Additionally, we use a simplified optical configuration that requires only a single low-power laser. This result suggests that millimetre-scale, low-power femtotesla magnetometers are feasible, and we support this proposition with a simple sensitivity scaling analysis. Such an instrument would greatly expand the range of applications in which atomic magnetometers could be used.

  19. Differential atomic magnetometry based on a diverging laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hodby, E.; Donley, E. A.; Kitching, J.

    2007-07-02

    The authors demonstrate a novel atomic magnetometer that uses differential detection of the spatially diverging components of a light field to monitor the Larmor precession frequency of atoms in a thermal vapor. The design is implemented in compact form with a micromachined alkali vapor cell and a naturally divergent light field emitted by a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser. Operating the magnetometer in differential mode cancels common-mode noise and improves the sensitivity by a factor of 26 over single-channel operation. They also suggest ways in which the current sensitivity of 28 pT/{radical}Hz may be improved further without sacrificing size or simplicity.

  20. Femtotesla atomic magnetometry in a microfabricated vapor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, W. Clark; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John

    2010-03-01

    Chip-scale atomic magnetometers developed at NIST are based around microfabricated vapor cells, consisting of an etched hole in a silicon wafer and anodically bonded pyrex windows. The vapor cells typically contain ^87Rb atoms and several atmospheres of nitrogen buffer gas. Using a 3x2x1 mm vapor cell we have demonstrated a magnetometer with sensitivity better than 5 fT/Hz^1/2. The magnetometer is operated in the spin-exchange relaxation free (SERF) regime and uses two perpendicular light beams: a circularly polarized pump beam and an off-resonant linearly polarized probe beam. Magnetic fields are detected by analyzing the polarization direction of the probe beam. The measurement volume for this result is 1 mm^3, defined by the overlap of the pump and probe beams, giving a magnetic field energy resolution of V B^2 / 2 μ0= 95 , within about a factor of two of the best result for an atomic magnetometerootnotetextH. B. Dang, A. C. Maloof, and M. V. Romalis, arXiv:0910.2206. Achieving this sensitivity level in a millimeter scale vapor cell compared to larger cells requires special consideration of thermal magnetic noise due to the electrical conductivity of the silicon cell body and condensed alkali atoms on the cell walls.

  1. Magneto-optical magnetometry of individual 30 nm cobalt nanowires grown by electron beam induced deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Nikulina, E.; Idigoras, O.; Berger, A.; Vavassori, P.; Chuvilin, A.

    2012-04-02

    We show that magnetometry measurements based upon the magneto-optical Kerr effect and high resolution optical microscopy can be used as a noninvasive probe of magnetization reversal for individual nano-structures. Our measurements demonstrate single pass hysteresis loop measurements for sample sizes down to 30 nm width. A quantitative signal-to-noise ratio evaluation shows that our approach achieves an at least 3-fold improvement in sensitivity if compared to focused laser based nano-magnetometry. An analysis of the physical limits of our detection scheme enables us to estimate that measurements for structures with single digit nm widths and magnetic moments of 10{sup -16} Am{sup 2} are feasible.

  2. Optical atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludlow, Andrew D.; Boyd, Martin M.; Ye, Jun; Peik, E.; Schmidt, P. O.

    2015-04-01

    Optical atomic clocks represent the state of the art in the frontier of modern measurement science. In this article a detailed review on the development of optical atomic clocks that are based on trapped single ions and many neutral atoms is provided. Important technical ingredients for optical clocks are discussed and measurement precision and systematic uncertainty associated with some of the best clocks to date are presented. An outlook on the exciting prospect for clock applications is given in conclusion.

  3. Optical atomic magnetometer

    DOEpatents

    Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P

    2013-11-19

    An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

  4. Resonant nonlinear magneto-optical effects in atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budker, D.; Gawlik, W.; Kimball, D. F.; Rochester, S. M.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Weis, A.

    2002-11-01

    The authors review the history, current status, physical mechanisms, experimental methods, and applications of nonlinear magneto-optical effects in atomic vapors. They begin by describing the pioneering work of Macaluso and Corbino over a century ago on linear magneto-optical effects (in which the properties of the medium do not depend on the light power) in the vicinity of atomic resonances. These effects are then contrasted with various nonlinear magneto-optical phenomena that have been studied both theoretically and experimentally since the late 1960s. In recent years, the field of nonlinear magneto-optics has experienced a revival of interest that has led to a number of developments, including the observation of ultranarrow (1-Hz) magneto-optical resonances, applications in sensitive magnetometry, nonlinear magneto-optical tomography, and the possibility of a search for parity- and time-reversal-invariance violation in atoms.

  5. All-optical magnetometry for NMR detection in a micro-Tesla field and unshielded environment.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, G; Biancalana, V; Dancheva, Y; Moi, L

    2009-12-01

    An all-optical atomic magnetometer is used to detect a proton free-precession signal from a water sample polarized in a 0.7 T field and remotely analyzed in a 4 microT field. Nuclear spins are manipulated either by pi/2 pulses or by non-adiabatic rotation. The magnetometer operates at room temperature, in an unshielded environment and has a dual-channel sensor for differential measurements.

  6. All-optical magnetometry for NMR detection in a micro-Tesla field and unshielded environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevilacqua, G.; Biancalana, V.; Dancheva, Y.; Moi, L.

    2009-12-01

    An all-optical atomic magnetometer is used to detect a proton free-precession signal from a water sample polarized in a 0.7 T field and remotely analyzed in a 4 μT field. Nuclear spins are manipulated either by π/2 pulses or by non-adiabatic rotation. The magnetometer operates at room temperature, in an unshielded environment and has a dual-channel sensor for differential measurements.

  7. Optical atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, N.; Oates, C. W.; Gill, P.; Tino, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    In the last ten years extraordinary results in time and frequency metrology have been demonstrated. Frequency-stabilization techniques for continuous-wave lasers and femtosecond optical frequency combs have enabled a rapid development of frequency standards based on optical transitions in ultra-cold neutral atoms and trapped ions. As a result, today's best performing atomic clocks tick at an optical rate and allow scientists to perform high-resolution measurements with a precision approaching a few parts in 1018. This paper reviews the history and the state of the art in optical-clock research and addresses the implementation of optical clocks in a possible future redefinition of the SI second as well as in tests of fundamental physics.

  8. Dead-zone-free atomic magnetometry with simultaneous excitation of orientation and alignment resonances.

    PubMed

    Ben-Kish, A; Romalis, M V

    2010-11-05

    Atomic magnetometers have very high absolute precision and sensitivity to magnetic fields but suffer from a fundamental problem: the vectorial or tensorial interaction of light with atoms leads to "dead zones," certain orientations of the magnetic field where the magnetometer loses its sensitivity. We demonstrate a simple polarization modulation scheme that simultaneously creates coherent population trapping (CPT) in orientation and alignment, thereby eliminating dead zones. Using 87Rb in a 10 Torr buffer gas cell we measure narrow, high-contrast CPT transparency peaks for all orientations and also show the absence of systematic effects associated with nonlinear Zeeman splitting.

  9. NONLINEAR ATOM OPTICS

    SciTech Connect

    T. MILONNI; G. CSANAK; ET AL

    1999-07-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objectives were to explore theoretically various aspects of nonlinear atom optics effects in cold-atom waves and traps. During the project a major development occurred the observation, by as many as a dozen experimental groups, of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in cold-atom traps. This stimulated us to focus our attention on those aspects of nonlinear atom optics relating to BEC, in addition to continuing our work on a nonequilibrium formalism for dealing with the interaction of an electromagnetic field with multi-level atomic systems, allowing for macroscopic coherence effects such as BEC. Studies of several problems in BEC physics have been completed or are near completion, including the suggested use of external electric fields to modify the nature of the interatomic interaction in cold-atom traps; properties of two-phase condensates; and molecular loss processes associated with BEC experiments involving a so-called Feshbach resonance.

  10. Optical pumping of rubidium atoms in a parahydrogen matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, Jonathan; Arnott, W. Patrick; Christy, Tim; Hartzell, Chase; Kanagin, Andrew; Momose, Takamasa; Patterson, David; Upadhyay, Sunil

    2016-05-01

    Building on prior work with rubidium atoms in a cryogenic argon matrix, we have grown solid parahydrogen crystals doped with rubidium atoms. Typical rubidium densities are on the order of 1017 cm-3. We have demonstrated optical pumping of the atomic spin of the implanted rubidium atoms; the measured spin polarization signals are roughly one order of magnitude larger than what was achieved in argon matrices. The combination of high atomic densities and optical addressability make this a promising experimental platform for applications such as magnetometry and fundamental physics measurements. Spin lifetimes (T1) on the order of 1 second have been observed. Progress towards measuring coherence times (T2) will be discussed. This material is based on work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY 1265905.

  11. High-sensitivity optical Faraday magnetometry with intracavity electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiaolin; Sun, Hui; Fan, Shuangli; Guo, Hong

    2016-12-01

    We suggest a multiatom cavity quantum electrodynamics system for the detection of a weak magnetic field, based on Faraday rotation with intracavity electromagnetically induced transparency. Our study demonstrates that the collective coupling between the cavity modes and the atomic ensemble can be used to improve the sensitivity. With single-probe photon input, the sensitivity is inversely proportional to the number of atoms, and a sensitivity of 2.45 nT Hz-1/2 could be attained. With multiphoton measurement, our numerical calculations show that the magnetic field sensitivity can be improved to 105.6 aT Hz-1/2 with realistic experimental conditions.

  12. Nonlinear and quantum atom optics.

    PubMed

    Rolston, S L; Phillips, W D

    2002-03-14

    Coherent matter waves in the form of Bose-Einstein condensates have led to the development of nonlinear and quantum atom optics - the de Broglie wave analogues of nonlinear and quantum optics with light. In nonlinear atom optics, four-wave mixing of matter waves and mixing of combinations of light and matter waves have been observed; such progress culminated in the demonstration of phase-coherent matter-wave amplification. Solitons represent another active area in nonlinear atom optics: these non-dispersing propagating modes of the equation that governs Bose-Einstein condensates have been created experimentally, and observed subsequently to break up into vortices. Quantum atom optics is concerned with the statistical properties and correlations of matter-wave fields. A first step in this area is the measurement of reduced number fluctuations in a Bose-Einstein condensate partitioned into a series of optical potential wells.

  13. ORAL ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL "USPEKHI FIZICHESKIKH NAUK": Modern radio-optical methods in quantum magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, Evgenii B.; Vershovskii, Anton K.

    2009-06-01

    This paper is an extension of a part of the talk delivered under the more general title "Narrow spectral lines in fundamental metrology: state of the art, prospects, and problems"' at the session of the 90th anniversary of Physics-Uspekhi. The talk reviewed past developments and the current status of the metrology of length, frequency/time, and magnetic fields. The measurement of these quantities currently relies on the high stability of energies of standard transitions between metastable atomic states. Because of space restrictions in the journal, all metrology topics other than the title one were omitted in the present review.

  14. Magnetometry of single ferromagnetic nanoparticles using magneto-optical indicator films with spatial amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Balk, Andrew L.; Hangarter, Carlos; Stavis, Samuel M.; Unguris, John

    2015-03-16

    We present a magneto-optical technique to spatially amplify and image fringe fields from single ferromagnetic nanorods. The fringe fields nucleate magnetic domains in a low-coercivity, perpendicularly magnetized indicator film, which are expanded by an applied out-of-plane field from the nanoscale to the microscale for measurement with polar Kerr microscopy. The nucleation location and therefore magnetic orientation of the sample nanorod are detected as spatially dependent field biases in locally measured hysteresis loops of the indicator film. We first discuss our method to fabricate the high-sensitivity indicator film with low energy argon ion irradiation. We then present a map of the amplified signal produced from a single nanorod as measured by the indicator film and compare it with a simultaneously obtained, unamplified fringe field map. The comparison demonstrates the advantage of the amplification mechanism and the capability of the technique to be performed with single-spot magneto-optical Kerr effect magnetometers. Our signal-to-noise ratio determines a minimum measureable particle diameter of tens of nanometers for typical transition metals. We finally use our method to obtain hysteresis loops from multiple nanorods in parallel. Our technique is unperturbed by applied in-plane fields for magnetic manipulation of nanoparticles, is robust against many common noise sources, and is applicable in a variety of test environments. We conclude with a discussion of the future optimization and application of our indicator film technique.

  15. All-Optical dc Nanotesla Magnetometry Using Silicon Vacancy Fine Structure in Isotopically Purified Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simin, D.; Soltamov, V. A.; Poshakinskiy, A. V.; Anisimov, A. N.; Babunts, R. A.; Tolmachev, D. O.; Mokhov, E. N.; Trupke, M.; Tarasenko, S. A.; Sperlich, A.; Baranov, P. G.; Dyakonov, V.; Astakhov, G. V.

    2016-07-01

    We uncover the fine structure of a silicon vacancy in isotopically purified silicon carbide (4H-28SiC) and reveal not yet considered terms in the spin Hamiltonian, originated from the trigonal pyramidal symmetry of this spin-3 /2 color center. These terms give rise to additional spin transitions, which would be otherwise forbidden, and lead to a level anticrossing in an external magnetic field. We observe a sharp variation of the photoluminescence intensity in the vicinity of this level anticrossing, which can be used for a purely all-optical sensing of the magnetic field. We achieve dc magnetic field sensitivity better than 100 nT /√{Hz } within a volume of 3 ×10-7m m3 at room temperature and demonstrate that this contactless method is robust at high temperatures up to at least 500 K. As our approach does not require application of radio-frequency fields, it is scalable to much larger volumes. For an optimized light-trapping waveguide of 3 mm3 , the projection noise limit is below 100 fT /√{Hz } .

  16. Optical nanofibres and neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieddu, Thomas; Gokhroo, Vandna; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2016-05-01

    Optical nanofibres are increasingly being used in cold atom experiments due to their versatility and the clear advantages they have when developing all-fibred systems for quantum technologies. They provide researchers with a method of overcoming the Rayleigh range for achieving high intensities in a focussed beam over a relatively long distance, and can act as a noninvasive tool for probing cold atoms. In this review article, we will briefly introduce the theory of mode propagation in an ultrathin optical fibre and highlight some of the more significant theoretical and experimental progresses to date, including the early work on atom probing, manipulation and trapping, the study of atom-dielectric surface interactions, and the more recent observation of nanofibre-mediated nonlinear optics phenomena in atomic media. The functionality of optical nanofibres in relation to the realisation of atom-photon hybrid quantum systems is also becoming more evident as some of the earlier technical challenges are surpassed and, recently, several schemes to implement optical memories have been proposed. We also discuss some possible directions where this research field may head, in particular, in relation to the use of optical nanofibres that can support higher-order modes with an associated orbital angular momentum.

  17. Optical angular momentum and atoms.

    PubMed

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-28

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  18. Optical angular momentum and atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-01

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging with an optical atomic magnetometer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shoujun; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Donaldson, Marcus H.; Rochester, Simon M.; Budker, Dmitry; Pines, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    We report an approach for the detection of magnetic resonance imaging without superconducting magnets and cryogenics: optical atomic magnetometry. This technique possesses a high sensitivity independent of the strength of the static magnetic field, extending the applicability of magnetic resonance imaging to low magnetic fields and eliminating imaging artifacts associated with high fields. By coupling with a remote-detection scheme, thereby improving the filling factor of the sample, we obtained time-resolved flow images of water with a temporal resolution of 0.1 s and spatial resolutions of 1.6 mm perpendicular to the flow and 4.5 mm along the flow. Potentially inexpensive, compact, and mobile, our technique provides a viable alternative for MRI detection with substantially enhanced sensitivity and time resolution for various situations where traditional MRI is not optimal. PMID:16885210

  20. Trapping ions and atoms optically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaetz, Tobias

    2017-05-01

    Isolating neutral and charged particles from the environment is essential in precision experiments. For decades, this has been achieved by trapping ions with radio-frequency (RF) fields and neutral particles with optical fields. Recently, the trapping of ions by interaction with light has been demonstrated. This might permit the advantages of optical trapping and ions to be combined. For example, we would benefit from superimposing optical traps to investigate ensembles of ions and atoms in the absence of any RF fields and from the versatile and scalable trapping geometries featured by optical lattices. In particular, ions provide individual addressability, and electronic and motional degrees of freedom that can be coherently controlled and detected via high-fidelity, state-dependent operations. Their long-range Coulomb interaction is significantly larger compared to those of neutral atoms and molecules. This enables ultra-cold interaction and the chemistry of trapped ions and atoms to be studied, as well as providing a novel platform for higher-dimensional experimental quantum simulations. The aim of this topical review is to present the current state of the art and to discuss the current challenges and prospects of the emerging field.

  1. Differences in elasticity of vinculin-deficient F9 cells measured by magnetometry and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldmann, W. H.; Galneder, R.; Ludwig, M.; Xu, W.; Adamson, E. D.; Wang, N.; Ezzell, R. M.; Ingber, D. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated a mouse F9 embryonic carcinoma cell line, in which both vinculin genes were inactivated by homologous recombination, that exhibits defective adhesion and spreading [Coll et al. (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 9161-9165]. Using a magnetometer and RGD-coated magnetic microbeads, we measured the local effect of loss and replacement of vinculin on mechanical force transfer across integrins. Vinculin-deficient F9Vin(-/-) cells showed a 21% difference in relative stiffness compared to wild-type cells. This was restored to near wild-type levels after transfection and constitutive expression of increasing amounts of vinculin into F9Vin(-/-) cells. In contrast, the transfection of vinculin constructs deficient in amino acids 1-288 (containing the talin- and alpha-actinin-binding site) or substituting tyrosine for phenylalanine (phosphorylation site, amino acid 822) in F9Vin(-/-) cells resulted in partial restoration of stiffness. Using atomic force microscopy to map the relative elasticity of entire F9 cells by 128 x 128 (n = 16,384) force scans, we observed a correlation with magnetometer measurements. These findings suggest that vinculin may promote cell adhesions and spreading by stabilizing focal adhesions and transferring mechanical stresses that drive cytoskeletal remodeling, thereby affecting the elastic properties of the cell.

  2. Differences in elasticity of vinculin-deficient F9 cells measured by magnetometry and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldmann, W. H.; Galneder, R.; Ludwig, M.; Xu, W.; Adamson, E. D.; Wang, N.; Ezzell, R. M.; Ingber, D. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated a mouse F9 embryonic carcinoma cell line, in which both vinculin genes were inactivated by homologous recombination, that exhibits defective adhesion and spreading [Coll et al. (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 9161-9165]. Using a magnetometer and RGD-coated magnetic microbeads, we measured the local effect of loss and replacement of vinculin on mechanical force transfer across integrins. Vinculin-deficient F9Vin(-/-) cells showed a 21% difference in relative stiffness compared to wild-type cells. This was restored to near wild-type levels after transfection and constitutive expression of increasing amounts of vinculin into F9Vin(-/-) cells. In contrast, the transfection of vinculin constructs deficient in amino acids 1-288 (containing the talin- and alpha-actinin-binding site) or substituting tyrosine for phenylalanine (phosphorylation site, amino acid 822) in F9Vin(-/-) cells resulted in partial restoration of stiffness. Using atomic force microscopy to map the relative elasticity of entire F9 cells by 128 x 128 (n = 16,384) force scans, we observed a correlation with magnetometer measurements. These findings suggest that vinculin may promote cell adhesions and spreading by stabilizing focal adhesions and transferring mechanical stresses that drive cytoskeletal remodeling, thereby affecting the elastic properties of the cell.

  3. Optics and interferometry with atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, Alexander D.; Schmiedmayer, Joerg; Pritchard, David E.

    2009-07-15

    Interference with atomic and molecular matter waves is a rich branch of atomic physics and quantum optics. It started with atom diffraction from crystal surfaces and the separated oscillatory fields technique used in atomic clocks. Atom interferometry is now reaching maturity as a powerful art with many applications in modern science. In this review the basic tools for coherent atom optics are described including diffraction by nanostructures and laser light, three-grating interferometers, and double wells on atom chips. Scientific advances in a broad range of fields that have resulted from the application of atom interferometers are reviewed. These are grouped in three categories: (i) fundamental quantum science, (ii) precision metrology, and (iii) atomic and molecular physics. Although some experiments with Bose-Einstein condensates are included, the focus of the review is on linear matter wave optics, i.e., phenomena where each single atom interferes with itself.

  4. Optical physics: Ultrashort light pulses shake atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Taec

    2016-02-01

    The response of electrons in atoms to ultrashort optical light pulses has been probed by measuring the ultraviolet light emitted by the atoms. This reveals that a finite time delay occurs before the response. See Letter p.66

  5. Optical lattice on an atom chip.

    PubMed

    Gallego, D; Hofferberth, S; Schumm, T; Krüger, P; Schmiedmayer, J

    2009-11-15

    Optical dipole traps and atom chips are two very powerful tools for the quantum manipulation of neutral atoms. We demonstrate that both methods can be combined by creating an optical lattice potential on an atom chip. A red-detuned laser beam is retroreflected using the atom chip surface as a high-quality mirror, generating a vertical array of purely optical oblate traps. We transfer thermal atoms from the chip into the lattice and observe cooling into the two-dimensional regime. Using a chip-generated Bose-Einstein condensate, we demonstrate coherent Bloch oscillations in the lattice.

  6. Quantum memory with optically trapped atoms.

    PubMed

    Chuu, Chih-Sung; Strassel, Thorsten; Zhao, Bo; Koch, Markus; Chen, Yu-Ao; Chen, Shuai; Yuan, Zhen-Sheng; Schmiedmayer, Jörg; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2008-09-19

    We report the experimental demonstration of quantum memory for collective atomic states in a far-detuned optical dipole trap. Generation of the collective atomic state is heralded by the detection of a Raman scattered photon and accompanied by storage in the ensemble of atoms. The optical dipole trap provides confinement for the atoms during the quantum storage while retaining the atomic coherence. We probe the quantum storage by cross correlation of the photon pair arising from the Raman scattering and the retrieval of the atomic state stored in the memory. Nonclassical correlations are observed for storage times up to 60 mus.

  7. Magneto-optical cooling of atoms.

    PubMed

    Raizen, Mark G; Budker, Dmitry; Rochester, Simon M; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2014-08-01

    We propose an alternative method to laser cooling. Our approach utilizes the extreme brightness of a supersonic atomic beam, and the adiabatic atomic coilgun to slow atoms in the beam or to bring them to rest. We show how internal-state optical pumping and stimulated optical transitions, combined with magnetic forces, can be used to cool the translational motion of atoms. This approach does not rely on momentum transfer from photons to atoms, as in laser cooling. We predict that our method can surpass laser cooling in terms of flux of ultracold atoms and phase-space density, with lower required laser power.

  8. Optical tweezer manipulation for atom tetris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyosub; Lee, Woojun; Ahn, Jaewook

    2017-04-01

    Atoms can be individually captured and guided by light through optical dipole-trapping. However, applying this to many atoms simultaneously has been difficult due to the low inertia of atoms. Recently dynamically-controlled laser beams achieved such demonstrations, enabling a bottom-up approach to form arbitrary atom lattices, deterministic atom loading, atom-sorting, and even single-atom-level machinery. Here we report the latest improvements of the single-atom-level dynamic holographic optical tweezers. With the hardware and software upgrades to be explained in the text, the overall performance has improved to form arbitrary 2D lattices of a size about N=20, with success probability exceeding 50%.

  9. Anticrossing Spin Dynamics of Diamond Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers and All-Optical Low-Frequency Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadway, David A.; Wood, James D. A.; Hall, Liam T.; Stacey, Alastair; Markham, Matthew; Simpson, David A.; Tetienne, Jean-Philippe; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the photoinduced spin dynamics of single nitrogen-vacancy (N -V ) centers in diamond near the electronic ground-state level anticrossing (GSLAC), which occurs at an axial magnetic field around 1024 G. Using optically detected magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we first find that the electron-spin transition frequency can be tuned down to 100 kHz for the 14N-V center, while, for the 15N-V center, the transition strength vanishes for frequencies below about 2 MHz owing to the GSLAC structure. Using optical pulses to prepare and read out the spin state, we observe coherent spin oscillations at 1024 G for the 14N-V center which originate from spin mixing induced by residual transverse magnetic fields. This effect is responsible for limiting the smallest observable transition frequency, which can span 2 orders of magnitude ranging from 100 kHz to tens of megahertz, depending on the local magnetic noise. A similar feature is observed for the 15N-V center at 1024 G. As an application of these findings, we demonstrate all-optical detection and spectroscopy of externally generated fluctuating magnetic fields at frequencies ranging from 8 MHz down to 500 kHz using a 14N-V center. Since the Larmor frequency of most nuclear-spin species lies within this frequency range near the GSLAC, these results pave the way towards all-optical, nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, using longitudinal spin cross-relaxation.

  10. Precision magnetometry using NV centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Sage, David; Pham, Linh My; Bar-Gill, Nir; Belthangady, Chinmay; Arai, Keigo; Walsworth, Ronald

    2012-06-01

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color center in diamond promises to be an extremely useful tool for precise optical magnetometry. Individual NV centers can function as atomic-scale magnetometers, for high spatial-resolution measurements, with close proximity between the field source and sensor. Improved sensitivities may be achieved by averaging the signal from many NV centers, with a resulting trade-off between sensitivity and spatial resolution. Here, we report the best magnetic field sensitivity that has thus far been achieved using a large ensemble of NV centers. These results take advantage of many recent developments, including a technique to dramatically improve the fluorescence photon collection efficiency, dynamical decoupling of the NV spins from their spin-bath environment, and improved diamond engineering to reduce magnetic impurities and increase the density of NV centers. These ongoing efforts suggest that, with additional improvements, NV magnetometers may achieve comparable sensitivities to the best magnetometers that presently exist, with the added practical benefits associated with being a robust, solid-state, room-temperature device.

  11. Trapping Rydberg Atoms in an Optical Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Sarah E.

    2012-06-01

    Optical lattice traps for Rydberg atoms are of interest in advanced science and in practical applications. After a brief discussion of these areas of interest, I will review some basics of optical Rydberg-atom trapping. The trapping potential experienced by a Rydberg atom in an optical lattice is given by the spatial average of the free-electron ponderomotive energy weighted by the Rydberg electron's probability distribution. I will then present experimental results on the trapping of ^85Rb Rydberg atoms in a one-dimensional ponderomotive optical lattice (wavelength 1064 nm). The principal methods employed to study the lattice performance are microwave spectroscopy, which is used to measure the lattice's trapping efficiency, and photo-ionization, which is used to measure the dwell time of the atoms in the lattice. I have achieved a 90% trapping efficiency for ^85Rb 50S atoms by inverting the lattice immediately after laser excitation of ground-state atoms into Rydberg states. I have characterized the dwell time of the atoms in the lattice using photo-ionization of 50D5/2 atoms. In continued work, I have explored the dependence of the Rydberg-atom trapping potential on the angular portion of the atomic wavefunction. Distinct angular states exhibit different trapping behavior in the optical lattice, depending on how their wavefunctions are oriented relative to the lattice planes. Specifically, I have measured the lattice potential depth of sublevels of ^85Rb nD atoms (50<=n<=65) in a one-dimensional optical lattice with a transverse DC electric field. The trapping behavior varies substantially for the various angular sublevels, in agreement with theory. The talk will conclude with an outlook into planned experiments.

  12. High-speed optical three-axis vector magnetometry based on nonlinear Hanle effect in rubidium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizbekyan, Hrayr; Shmavonyan, Svetlana; Khanbekyan, Aleksandr; Movsisyan, Marina; Papoyan, Aram

    2017-07-01

    The magnetic-field-compensation optical vector magnetometer based on the nonlinear Hanle effect in alkali metal vapor allowing two-axis measurement operation has been further elaborated for three-axis performance, along with significant reduction of measurement time. The upgrade was achieved by implementing a two-beam resonant excitation configuration and a fast maximum searching algorithm. Results of the proof-of-concept experiments, demonstrating 1 μT B-field resolution, are presented. The applied interest and capability of the proposed technique is analyzed.

  13. Magneto-optical trap for thulium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sukachev, D.; Sokolov, A.; Chebakov, K.; Akimov, A.; Kanorsky, S.; Kolachevsky, N.; Sorokin, V.

    2010-07-15

    Thulium atoms are trapped in a magneto-optical trap using a strong transition at 410 nm with a small branching ratio. We trap up to 7x10{sup 4} atoms at a temperature of 0.8(2) mK after deceleration in a 40-cm-long Zeeman slower. Optical leaks from the cooling cycle influence the lifetime of atoms in the magneto-optical trap which varies between 0.3 and 1.5 s in our experiments. The lower limit for the leaking rate from the upper cooling level is measured to be 22(6) s{sup -1}. The repumping laser transferring the atomic population out of the F=3 hyperfine ground-state sublevel gives a 30% increase for the lifetime and the number of atoms in the trap.

  14. Optical clock with ultracold neutral atoms.

    PubMed

    Wilpers, G; Binnewies, T; Degenhardt, C; Sterr, U; Helmcke, J; Riehle, F

    2002-12-02

    We demonstrate how to realize an optical clock with neutral atoms that is competitive to the currently best single ion optical clocks in accuracy and superior in stability. Using ultracold atoms in a Ca optical frequency standard, we show how to reduce the relative uncertainty to below 10(-15). We observed atom interferences for stabilization of the laser to the clock transition with a visibility of 0.36, which is 70% of the ultimate limit achievable with atoms at rest. A novel scheme was applied to detect these atom interferences with the prospect to reach the quantum projection noise limit at an exceptional low instability of 4 x 10(-17) in 1 s.

  15. Laser controlled atom source for optical clocks.

    PubMed

    Kock, Ole; He, Wei; Świerad, Dariusz; Smith, Lyndsie; Hughes, Joshua; Bongs, Kai; Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-11-18

    Precision timekeeping has been a driving force in innovation, from defining agricultural seasons to atomic clocks enabling satellite navigation, broadband communication and high-speed trading. We are on the verge of a revolution in atomic timekeeping, where optical clocks promise an over thousand-fold improvement in stability and accuracy. However, complex setups and sensitivity to thermal radiation pose limitations to progress. Here we report on an atom source for a strontium optical lattice clock which circumvents these limitations. We demonstrate fast (sub 100 ms), cold and controlled emission of strontium atomic vapours from bulk strontium oxide irradiated by a simple low power diode laser. Our results demonstrate that millions of strontium atoms from the vapour can be captured in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Our method enables over an order of magnitude reduction in scale of the apparatus. Future applications range from satellite clocks testing general relativity to portable clocks for inertial navigation systems and relativistic geodesy.

  16. Laser controlled atom source for optical clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kock, Ole; He, Wei; Świerad, Dariusz; Smith, Lyndsie; Hughes, Joshua; Bongs, Kai; Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-11-01

    Precision timekeeping has been a driving force in innovation, from defining agricultural seasons to atomic clocks enabling satellite navigation, broadband communication and high-speed trading. We are on the verge of a revolution in atomic timekeeping, where optical clocks promise an over thousand-fold improvement in stability and accuracy. However, complex setups and sensitivity to thermal radiation pose limitations to progress. Here we report on an atom source for a strontium optical lattice clock which circumvents these limitations. We demonstrate fast (sub 100 ms), cold and controlled emission of strontium atomic vapours from bulk strontium oxide irradiated by a simple low power diode laser. Our results demonstrate that millions of strontium atoms from the vapour can be captured in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Our method enables over an order of magnitude reduction in scale of the apparatus. Future applications range from satellite clocks testing general relativity to portable clocks for inertial navigation systems and relativistic geodesy.

  17. Delocalized entanglement of atoms in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Vollbrecht, K G H; Cirac, J I

    2007-05-11

    We show how to detect and quantify entanglement of atoms in optical lattices in terms of correlation functions of the momentum distribution. These distributions can be measured directly in the experiments. We introduce two kinds of entanglement measures related to the position and the spin of the atoms.

  18. Coherent Atom Optics with fast metastable rare gas atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Grucker, J.; Baudon, J.; Karam, J.-C.; Perales, F.; Vassilev, G.; Ducloy, M.; Bocvarski, V.

    2006-12-01

    Coherent atom optics experiments making use of an ultra-narrow beam of fast metastable atoms generated by metastability exchange are reported. The transverse coherence of the beam (coherence radius of 1.7 {mu}m for He*, 1.2 {mu}m for Ne*, 0.87 {mu}m for Ar*) is demonstrated via the atomic diffraction by a non-magnetic 2{mu}m-period reflection grating. The combination of the non-scalar van der Waals (vdW) interaction with the Zeeman interaction generated by a static magnetic field gives rise to ''vdW-Zeeman'' transitions among Zeeman sub-levels. Exo-energetic transitions of this type are observed with Ne*(3P2) atoms traversing a copper micro-slit grating. They can be used as a tunable beam splitter in an inelastic Fresnel bi-prism atom interferometer.

  19. ''Atomic Optics'': Nonimaging Optics on the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Roland Winston Joseph O'Gallagher

    2005-01-15

    This is the final report for a one year close out extension of our basic research program that was established at the University of Chicago more than sixteen years ago to explore and develop the optical sub-discipline that has come to be known as ''nonimaging optics''. This program has been extremely fruitful, having both broadened the range of formalism available for workers in this field and led to the discovery of many new families of optical devices. These devices and techniques have applications wherever the efficient transport and transformation of light distributions are important, in particular in illumination, fiber optics, collection and concentration of sunlight, and the detection of faint light signals in physics and astrophysics. Over the past thirty years, Nonimaging Optics (Welford and Winston, 1989) has brought a fresh approach to the analysis of many problems in classical macro-scale optics. Through the application of phase-space concepts, statistical methods, thermodynamic arguments, etc., many previously established performance limits were able to be broken and many technical surprises with exciting practical applications were discovered. The most recent three-year phase of our long-term continuing program ended in late 2002 and emphasized extending our work in geometrical optics and expanding it to include some interesting questions in physical optics as well as in the new field of statistical optics. This report presents a survey of the basic history and concepts of nonimaging optics and reviews highlights and significant accomplishments over the past fifteen years. This is followed by a more detailed summary of recent research directions and accomplishments during the last three years. This most recent phase was marked by the broadening in scope to include a separate project involving a collaboration with an industrial partner, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). This effort was proposed and approved in 1998 and was

  20. Mx Magnetometry Optimisation in Unshielded Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingleby, Stuart; Griffin, Paul; Arnold, Aidan; Riis, Erling; Hunter, Dominic

    2016-05-01

    Optically pumped magnetometry in unshielded environments is potentially of great advantage in a wide range of surveying and security applications. Optimisation of OPM modulation schemes and feedback in the Mx scheme offers enhanced sensitivity through noise cancellation and decoherence suppression. The work presented demonstrates capability for software-controlled optimisation of OPM performance in ambient fields in the 0 . 5 G range. Effects on magnetometer bandwidth and sensitivity are discussed. Supported by UK National Quantum Technologies Programme.

  1. Asymmetric NMR lineshapes and precision magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Brian

    1996-04-01

    In an inhomogeneous magnetic field of asymmetric distribution the observed NMR precession frequency of a liquid will vary with time. We show that the initial frequency corresponds to the mean of the absorption spectrum whereas the final precession frequency corresponds to the peak of the spectrum. Precision magnetometry requires knowledge of the mean so that reliable extrapolation to the zero-time value of the frequency is required. We demonstrate that, as with the narrowing of NMR lines, the effect of atomic motion is to cause the precession frequency to relax in an exponential manner. The importance of these results is discussed in the comparison of proton magnetic resonance in water and NMR in gaseous 0957-0233/7/4/028/img1 for precision magnetometry.

  2. Supercooling of Atoms in an Optical Resonator.

    PubMed

    Xu, Minghui; Jäger, Simon B; Schütz, S; Cooper, J; Morigi, Giovanna; Holland, M J

    2016-04-15

    We investigate laser cooling of an ensemble of atoms in an optical cavity. We demonstrate that when atomic dipoles are synchronized in the regime of steady-state superradiance, the motion of the atoms may be subject to a giant frictional force leading to potentially very low temperatures. The ultimate temperature limits are determined by a modified atomic linewidth, which can be orders of magnitude smaller than the cavity linewidth. The cooling rate is enhanced by the superradiant emission into the cavity mode allowing reasonable cooling rates even for dipolar transitions with ultranarrow linewidth.

  3. Ultracold Atoms in Optical Lattices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-15

    total atoms in a Bell state 1, 1+ − . The process has been shifted into resonance by using a “AC- Zeeman ” effect, which allows a control of the two-body...Illustration of the number statistics measurement. Spin changing collisions turn atom pairs initially in the Zeeman substate m = 0 (blue) to pairs in m = ±1...properties: Age and composition effects. Science 171, 567–571 (1971). 5. Moroz, L. V., Fisenko, A. V., Semjonova, L. F., Pieters , C. M. & Korotaeva

  4. Atoms in non-dissipative optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamini, Silvia

    Optical lattices induced by light detuned far from the frequency of any atomic resonance transition are ideal systems in which to develop techniques for the coherent control of atomic motional and internal states. Decoherence arising from spontaneous emission can be eliminated to an arbitrary degree by varying the detuning of the optical field. The atoms trapped in these lattices are to a large extent isolated from environmental disturbances and from each other. The first step towards the coherent control of atoms in a far-detuned lattice is their preparation in a single motional state. In this thesis the preparation of atoms in the ground vibrational state of a two-dimensional far-detuned optical lattice via resolved-sideband Raman cooling is presented. This sideband-cooling scheme involves stimulated Raman transitions between bound vibrational states of a pair of magnetic ground state sublevels, followed by an irreversible step due to optical pumping, resulting in a net loss of one quantum of vibrational energy per cooling cycle. This process provides efficient cooling in two-dimensions and leads to the accumulation of a large fraction of atoms in the 2-D ground vibrational state of a potential well associated with a single Zeeman substate. Experiments aimed at improving and monitoring the characteristics of the lar-detuned lattice and the sideband-Raman cooling efficiency are also described. Parametric excitation experiments and modelling are employed to investigate the degree of anharmonicity of the optical potential and the importance of heating induced by laser intensity noise, whilst Zeeman-state analysis of the sample is performed for monitoring the distribution of atoms over different magnetic sub- states. Finally, spin-polarization experiments are carried out in order to study the paramagnetic properties of the lattice and lead to an evaluation of a spin-temperature for the sample.

  5. Atomic, molecular and optical physics at Bethel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyt, Chad; Klemme, Dan

    2012-02-01

    An example of the close connection between research and advanced labs at Bethel University is the recent realization of cold lithium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Several aspects of the cooling and trapping research took root in the laboratory components of the Optics and Lasers upper-level courses. These included a wavelength meter with sub-picometer accuracy and precision, stabilized laser diodes and molecular and atomic spectroscopy. Work on the MOT began in 2008 and has involved students (a total of 12, including several post-General Physics sophomores) working during summers, course projects and senior research. Lithium MOTs offer challenges (e.g. low vapor pressure) and advantages in an undergraduate lab with respect to the more common rubidium systems. Lasers for lithium are at 671 nm, a more practical red color that can still take advantage of inexpensive laser diodes and broadband optical coatings. Its relatively simple atomic structure makes lithium amenable for stringent comparisons between theory and experiment. Recent high precision absolute frequency measurements using an atomic beam disagree. Cold-atom spectroscopy of lithium could help resolve questions about the atomic structure of lithium.

  6. Committee on Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, James

    2015-06-30

    The Committee on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences (CAMOS) is a standing activity of the National Research Council (NRC) that operates under the auspices of the Board on Physics and Astronomy. CAMOS is one of five standing committees of the BPA that are charged with assisting it in achieving its goals—monitoring the health of physics and astronomy, identifying important new developments at the scientific forefronts, fostering interactions with other fields, strengthening connections to technology, facilitating effective service to the nation, and enhancing education in physics. CAMOS provides these capabilities for the atomic, molecular and optical (AMO) sciences.

  7. Ultracold Atoms in Optical Lattices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-11

    a Bell state 1, 1+ − . The process has been shifted into resonance by using a “AC- Zeeman ” effect, which allows a control of the two-body process...number statistics measurement. Spin changing collisions turn atom pairs initially in the Zeeman substate m = 0 (blue) to pairs in m = ±1 states (red and...Age and composition effects. Science 171, 567–571 (1971). 5. Moroz, L. V., Fisenko, A. V., Semjonova, L. F., Pieters , C. M. & Korotaeva, N. N

  8. Pancharatnam phase: A tool for atom optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Décamps, B.; Gauguet, A.; Vigué, J.; Büchner, M.

    2017-07-01

    The Pancharatnam phase belongs to the family of geometric Berry phases. We use this optical phase to control the phase of our atom interferometer, which involves diffraction of the atom wave by laser standing waves in the Bragg regime. The Pancharatnam phase of the reflected beam of one standing wave controls the phase imprinted on the atom wave by the diffraction process. In addition to the expected phase shift, the experimental data exhibits the signature of several defects which are described and quantified. From this analysis, we estimate that a Pancharatnam phase shifter can be reliably used to control the phase of an atom interferometer in the sub-mrad regime. Moreover, as the geometric nature of the Pancharatnam phase renders this phase achromatic, its use in multispecies atom interferometers may be of great interest.

  9. Atomically thin nonreciprocal optical isolation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiao; Wang, Zuojia; Gao, Fei; Zhang, Baile; Chen, Hongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Optical isolators will play a critical role in next-generation photonic circuits, but their on-chip integration requires miniaturization with suitable nonreciprocal photonic materials. Here, we theoretically demonstrate the thinnest possible and polarization-selective nonreciprocal isolation for circularly polarized waves by using graphene monolayer under an external magnetic field. The underlying mechanism is that graphene electron velocity can be largely different for the incident wave propagating in opposite directions at cyclotron frequency, making graphene highly conductive and reflective in one propagation direction while transparent in the opposite propagation direction under an external magnetic field. When some practical loss is introduced, nonreciprocal isolation with graphene monolayer still possesses good performance in a broad bandwidth. Our work shows the first study on the extreme limit of thickness for optical isolation and provides theoretical guidance in future practical applications. PMID:24569672

  10. Laser controlled atom source for optical clocks

    PubMed Central

    Kock, Ole; He, Wei; Świerad, Dariusz; Smith, Lyndsie; Hughes, Joshua; Bongs, Kai; Singh, Yeshpal

    2016-01-01

    Precision timekeeping has been a driving force in innovation, from defining agricultural seasons to atomic clocks enabling satellite navigation, broadband communication and high-speed trading. We are on the verge of a revolution in atomic timekeeping, where optical clocks promise an over thousand-fold improvement in stability and accuracy. However, complex setups and sensitivity to thermal radiation pose limitations to progress. Here we report on an atom source for a strontium optical lattice clock which circumvents these limitations. We demonstrate fast (sub 100 ms), cold and controlled emission of strontium atomic vapours from bulk strontium oxide irradiated by a simple low power diode laser. Our results demonstrate that millions of strontium atoms from the vapour can be captured in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Our method enables over an order of magnitude reduction in scale of the apparatus. Future applications range from satellite clocks testing general relativity to portable clocks for inertial navigation systems and relativistic geodesy. PMID:27857214

  11. Ultra-Cold Atoms on Optical Lattices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Parag

    2009-01-01

    The field of ultra-cold atoms, since the achievement of Bose-Einstein Condensation (Anderson et al., 1995; Davis et al., 1995; Bradley et al., 1995), have seen an immensely growing interest over the past decade. With the creation of optical lattices, new possibilities of studying some of the widely used models in condensed matter have opened up.…

  12. Atomic Current across an Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomarev, Alexey V.; Kolovsky, Andrey R.; Madronero, Javier; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2006-02-10

    We devise a microscopic model for the emergence of a collision-induced, fermionic atomic current across a tilted optical lattice. Tuning the--experimentally controllable--parameters of the microscopic dynamics allows us to switch from Ohmic to negative differential conductance.

  13. Ultra-Cold Atoms on Optical Lattices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Parag

    2009-01-01

    The field of ultra-cold atoms, since the achievement of Bose-Einstein Condensation (Anderson et al., 1995; Davis et al., 1995; Bradley et al., 1995), have seen an immensely growing interest over the past decade. With the creation of optical lattices, new possibilities of studying some of the widely used models in condensed matter have opened up.…

  14. Atom interferometry in an optical cavity.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Paul; Jaffe, Matt; Brown, Justin M; Maisenbacher, Lothar; Estey, Brian; Müller, Holger

    2015-03-13

    We propose and demonstrate a new scheme for atom interferometry, using light pulses inside an optical cavity as matter wave beam splitters. The cavity provides power enhancement, spatial filtering, and a precise beam geometry, enabling new techniques such as low power beam splitters (<100  μW), large momentum transfer beam splitters with modest power, or new self-aligned interferometer geometries utilizing the transverse modes of the optical cavity. As a first demonstration, we obtain Ramsey-Raman fringes with >75% contrast and measure the acceleration due to gravity, g, to 60  μg/sqrt[Hz] resolution in a Mach-Zehnder geometry. We use >10(7) cesium atoms in the compact mode volume (600  μm 1/e(2) waist) of the cavity and show trapping of atoms in higher transverse modes. This work paves the way toward compact, high sensitivity, multiaxis interferometry.

  15. Atom Interferometry in an Optical Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Paul; Jaffe, Matt; Brown, Justin M.; Maisenbacher, Lothar; Estey, Brian; Müller, Holger

    2015-03-01

    We propose and demonstrate a new scheme for atom interferometry, using light pulses inside an optical cavity as matter wave beam splitters. The cavity provides power enhancement, spatial filtering, and a precise beam geometry, enabling new techniques such as low power beam splitters (<100 μ W ), large momentum transfer beam splitters with modest power, or new self-aligned interferometer geometries utilizing the transverse modes of the optical cavity. As a first demonstration, we obtain Ramsey-Raman fringes with >75 % contrast and measure the acceleration due to gravity, g , to 60 μ g /√{Hz } resolution in a Mach-Zehnder geometry. We use >107 cesium atoms in the compact mode volume (600 μ m 1 /e2 waist) of the cavity and show trapping of atoms in higher transverse modes. This work paves the way toward compact, high sensitivity, multiaxis interferometry.

  16. Steerable optical tweezers for ultracold atom studies.

    PubMed

    Roberts, K O; McKellar, T; Fekete, J; Rakonjac, A; Deb, A B; Kjærgaard, N

    2014-04-01

    We report on the implementation of an optical tweezer system for controlled transport of ultracold atoms along a narrow, static confinement channel. The tweezer system is based on high-efficiency acousto-optic deflectors and offers two-dimensional control over beam position. This opens up the possibility for tracking the transport channel when shuttling atomic clouds along it, forestalling atom spilling. Multiple clouds can be tracked independently by time-shared tweezer beams addressing individual sites in the channel. The deflectors are controlled using a multichannel direct digital synthesizer, which receives instructions on a submicrosecond time scale from a field-programmable gate array. Using the tweezer system, we demonstrate sequential binary splitting of an ultracold 87Rb cloud into 2(5) clouds.

  17. Singular Atom Optics with Spinor BECs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Justin T.; Hansen, Azure; Bigelow, Nicholas P.

    2015-05-01

    We create and study singular spin textures in pseudo-spin-1/2 BECs. A series of two-photon Raman interactions allows us to not only engineer the spinor wavefunction but also perform the equivalent of atomic polarimetry on the BEC. Adapting techniques from optical polarimetry, we can image two-dimensional maps of the atomic Stokes parameters, thereby fully reconstructing the atomic wavefunction. In a spin-1/2 system, we can represent the local spin superposition with ellipses in a Cartesian basis. The patterns that emerge from the major axes of the ellipses provide fingerprints of the singularities that enable us to classify them as lemons, stars, saddles, or spirals similar to classification schemes for singularities in singular optics, condensed matter, and liquid crystals. These techniques may facilitate the study of geometric Gouy phases in matter waves as well as provide an avenue for utilizing topological structures as quantum gates.

  18. Cold atoms in a rotating optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foot, Christopher J.

    2009-05-01

    We have demonstrated a novel experimental arrangement which can rotate a two-dimensional optical lattice at frequencies up to several kilohertz. Our arrangement also allows the periodicity of the optical lattice to be varied dynamically, producing a 2D ``accordion lattice'' [1]. The angles of the laser beams are controlled by acousto-optic deflectors and this allows smooth changes with little heating of the trapped cold (rubidium) atoms. We have loaded a BEC into lattices with periodicities ranging from 1.8μm to 18μm, observing the collapse and revival of the diffraction orders of the condensate over a large range of lattice parameters as recently reported by a group in NIST [2]. We have also imaged atoms in situ in a 2D lattice over a range of lattice periodicities. Ultracold atoms in a rotating lattice can be used for the direct quantum simulation of strongly correlated systems under large effective magnetic fields, i.e. the Hamiltonian of the atoms in the rotating frame resembles that of a charged particle in a strong magnetic field. In the future, we plan to use this to investigate a range of phenomena such as the analogue of the fractional quantum Hall effect. [4pt] [1] R. A. Williams, J. D. Pillet, S. Al-Assam, B. Fletcher, M. Shotter, and C. J. Foot, ``Dynamic optical lattices: two-dimensional rotating and accordion lattices for ultracold atoms,'' Opt. Express 16, 16977-16983 (2008) [0pt] [2] J. H. Huckans, I. B. Spielman, B. Laburthe Tolra, W. D. Phillips, and J. V. Porto, Quantum and Classical Dynamics of a BEC in a Large-Period Optical Lattice, arXiv:0901.1386v1

  19. Optical method of atomic ordering estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Prutskij, T.; Attolini, G.

    2013-12-04

    It is well known that within metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) grown semiconductor III-V ternary alloys atomically ordered regions are spontaneously formed during the epitaxial growth. This ordering leads to bandgap reduction and to valence bands splitting, and therefore to anisotropy of the photoluminescence (PL) emission polarization. The same phenomenon occurs within quaternary semiconductor alloys. While the ordering in ternary alloys is widely studied, for quaternaries there have been only a few detailed experimental studies of it, probably because of the absence of appropriate methods of its detection. Here we propose an optical method to reveal atomic ordering within quaternary alloys by measuring the PL emission polarization.

  20. Localization of atomic beams using standing wave optical quenching: Atom lithography and atomic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kent Sherwood

    1998-11-01

    We have developed a novel technique for imaging the spatial distribution of metastable atoms hitting a surface and have used this technique to image Heisenberg- limited localization of atoms produced by an optical standing wave. This thesis reports the first direct nanometer-scale imaging of an atomic state distribution created by an optical pumping process. The spatially dependent de-excitation of a beam of metastable atoms, traveling through an optical standing wave, produced a periodic array of localized metastable atoms with position and momentum spreads approaching the limit stated by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. Silicon and silicon dioxide substrates placed in the path of the atomic beam were patterned by the metastable atoms: the de-excitation of metastable atoms upon collision with the surface promoted the deposition of a carbonaceous film from a vapor-phase hydrocarbon precursor. The resulting patterns were imaged both directly and after chemical etching, thus demonstrating the first use of a quantum mechanical steady state distribution for sub-100- nanometer lithography.

  1. On-chip optical detection of laser cooled atoms.

    PubMed

    Quinto-Su, P; Tscherneck, M; Holmes, M; Bigelow, N

    2004-10-18

    We have used an optical fiber based system to implement optical detection of atoms trapped on a reflective "atom-chip". A fiber pair forms an emitter-detector setup that is bonded to the atom-chip surface to optically detect and probe laser cooled atoms trapped in a surface magneto-optical trap. We demonstrate the utility of this scheme by measuring the linewidth of the Cs D2 line at different laser intensities.

  2. On-chip optical detection of laser cooled atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinto-Su, P. A.; Tscherneck, M.; Holmes, M.; Bigelow, N. P.

    2004-10-01

    We have used an optical fiber based system to implement optical detection of atoms trapped on a reflective "atom-chip". A fiber pair forms an emitter-detector setup that is bonded to the atom-chip surface to optically detect and probe laser cooled atoms trapped in a surface magneto-optical trap. We demonstrate the utility of this scheme by measuring the linewidth of the Cs D2 line at different laser intensities.

  3. A High Bandwidth Optically Pumped Atomic Magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Martinez, Ricardo; Griffith, Clark W.; Knappe, Svenja; Kitching, John

    2009-10-01

    The measurement of magnetic fields has proved to be relevant in many realms of basic and applied science. Among the different techniques to measure magnetic fields, that of optically pumped atomic magnetometers has experienced considerable attention recently. This interest stems from the development of atomic magnetometers that achieve sensitivities in the sub-femto Tesla range, and the development of techniques that enable highly miniaturized, compact, with low-power consumption magnetometers. The sensitivity and bandwidth of atomic magnetometers is set by their spin coherence time, which in most magnetometers is limited by atomic collisions. Better sensitivities are achieved by suppressing the spin decoherence introduced by atomic collisions, but at a cost of lower bandwidth. For certain applications, a magnetometer with a high bandwidth is useful. Here we present a technique to achieve high bandwidth while preserving high sensitivity. We support the technique with table-top measurements showing that a bandwidth of 10 KHz and sensitivity of 10 pTrms/(Hz)^1/2 can be achieved in a compact device. We also highlight the current development of a miniature atomic magnetometer based on this technique.

  4. Optical atomic phase reference and timing.

    PubMed

    Hollberg, L; Cornell, E H; Abdelrahmann, A

    2017-08-06

    Atomic clocks based on laser-cooled atoms have made tremendous advances in both accuracy and stability. However, advanced clocks have not found their way into widespread use because there has been little need for such high performance in real-world/commercial applications. The drive in the commercial world favours smaller, lower-power, more robust compact atomic clocks that function well in real-world non-laboratory environments. Although the high-performance atomic frequency references are useful to test Einstein's special relativity more precisely, there are not compelling scientific arguments to expect a breakdown in special relativity. On the other hand, the dynamics of gravity, evidenced by the recent spectacular results in experimental detection of gravity waves by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, shows dramatically that there is new physics to be seen and understood in space-time science. Those systems require strain measurements at less than or equal to 10(-20) As we discuss here, cold atom optical frequency references are still many orders of magnitude away from the frequency stability that should be achievable with narrow-linewidth quantum transitions and large numbers of very cold atoms, and they may be able to achieve levels of phase stability, ΔΦ/Φtotal ≤ 10(-20), that could make an important impact in gravity wave science.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. Optical atomic phase reference and timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollberg, L.; Cornell, E. H.; Abdelrahmann, A.

    2017-06-01

    Atomic clocks based on laser-cooled atoms have made tremendous advances in both accuracy and stability. However, advanced clocks have not found their way into widespread use because there has been little need for such high performance in real-world/commercial applications. The drive in the commercial world favours smaller, lower-power, more robust compact atomic clocks that function well in real-world non-laboratory environments. Although the high-performance atomic frequency references are useful to test Einstein's special relativity more precisely, there are not compelling scientific arguments to expect a breakdown in special relativity. On the other hand, the dynamics of gravity, evidenced by the recent spectacular results in experimental detection of gravity waves by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, shows dramatically that there is new physics to be seen and understood in space-time science. Those systems require strain measurements at less than or equal to 10-20. As we discuss here, cold atom optical frequency references are still many orders of magnitude away from the frequency stability that should be achievable with narrow-linewidth quantum transitions and large numbers of very cold atoms, and they may be able to achieve levels of phase stability, ΔΦ/Φtotal ≤ 10-20, that could make an important impact in gravity wave science. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'.

  6. Fast dynamics for atoms in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Łącki, Mateusz; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2013-02-08

    Cold atoms in optical lattices allow for accurate studies of many body dynamics. Rapid time-dependent modifications of optical lattice potentials may result in significant excitations in atomic systems. The dynamics in such a case is frequently quite incompletely described by standard applications of tight-binding models (such as, e.g., Bose-Hubbard model or its extensions) that typically neglect the effect of the dynamics on the transformation between the real space and the tight-binding basis. We illustrate the importance of a proper quantum mechanical description using a multiband extended Bose-Hubbard model with time-dependent Wannier functions. We apply it to situations directly related to experiments.

  7. Optical probing of cold trapped atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, R. W.; Gilbert, S. L.; Hollberg, L.; Marquardt, J. H.; Robinson, H. G.

    1993-01-01

    Transitions between excited states of laser-cooled and laser-trapped rubidium and cesium atoms are probed by use of fiber and diode lasers. High-resolution Doppler-free spectra are detected by observation of the absorption and fluorescence of light from the intermediate level of two-step cascade systems. The optical double-resonance spectra show Autler-Townes splitting in the weak probe limit and more complicated spectra for a strongly coupled three-level system.

  8. Quantum Optics with Single Atoms and Photons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Computation 2, 1 (2002). 2. “ Quantum teleportation of light beams,” T. C. Zhang, K. W. Goh, C. W. Chou, P. Lodahl, and H. J. Kimble, Phys. Rev. A67, 033802...code) Final Technical Report ONR Grant Number N00014-02-1-0828 Quantum Optics with Single Atoms and Photons Submitted to Office of Naval Research...exploit recently discovered pos- sibilities in the microscopic realm of quantum mechanics to accomplish tasks that would otherwise be impossible by

  9. Blackbody radiation shifts in optical atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Safronova, Marianna; Kozlov, Mikhail; Clark, Charles

    2012-03-01

    A review of recent theoretical calculations of blackbody radiation (BBR) shifts in optical atomic clocks is presented. We summarize previous results for monovalent ions that were obtained by a relativistic all-order single-double method, where all single and double excitations of the Dirac- Fock wave function are included to all orders of perturbation theory. A recently developed method for accurate calculations of BBR shifts in divalent atoms is then presented. This approach combines the relativistic all-order method and the configuration interaction method, which provides for accurate treatment of correlation corrections in atoms with two valence electrons. Calculations of the BBR shifts in B+, Al+, and In+ have enabled us to reduce the present fractional uncertainties in the frequencies of their clock transitions as measured at room temperature: to 4 × 10-19 for Al+ and 10-18 for B+ and In+. These uncertainties approach recent estimates of the limits of precision of currently proposed optical atomic clocks. We discuss directions of future theoretical developments for reducing clock uncertainties resulting from blackbody radiation shifts.

  10. Atom interferometry in an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Paul; Jaffe, Matt; Brown, Justin; Maisenbacher, Lothar; Estey, Brian; Müller, Holger

    2014-05-01

    We have demonstrated the first light pulse atom interferometer using an in-vacuum optical cavity to generate the matter wave beamsplitters. An optical cavity allows for a compact setup with several advantages over traditional atom interferometers. Even with modest laser power, large intracavity intensity should enable high order multiphoton beamsplitters which increase the sensitivity of an interferometer. Clean wavefronts from spatial mode filtering can reduce contrast loss for both light pulse interferometers as well as optical lattice based interferometers. In addition, well-defined spatial modes allow many useful properties such as the beam size, waist position, and divergence to be determined with high accuracy. Finally, the use of high order transverse spatial modes gives multiple self-aligned beams useful in applications such as Sagnac interferometry for rotation sensing. We discuss our recent investigations into novel beamsplitters and interferometer geometries in the optical cavity and the implications for a compact inertial sensor as well as measurements of the gravitational Aharanov-Bohm effect and Newton's gravitational constant.

  11. Light-induced atomic elevator in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prants, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    It is shown how an atomic elevator that can elevate falling cold atoms in a vertical optical lattice can be created. The effect appears near resonance owing to the nonlinear interaction between the electronic and mechanical degrees of freedom of an atom, which is responsible for its random walk in rigid optical lattices without any modulation and additional action. Numerical experiments involving spontaneous emission demonstrate that random walk of atoms and light-induced atomic elevator can be observed in a real experiment.

  12. Quasiperiodic structures via atom-optical nanofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurdik, E.; Myszkiewicz, G.; Hohlfeld, J.; Tsukamoto, A.; Toonen, A. J.; van Etteger, A. F.; Gerritsen, J.; Hermsen, J.; Goldbach-Aschemann, S.; Meerts, W. L.; van Kempen, H.; Rasing, Th.

    2004-05-01

    We deposit a laser-collimated chromium beam onto a substrate through a quasiperiodic laser standing-wave (SW) tuned above the atomic resonance at the 52Cr transition 7S3→7Po4 at 425.55 nm. This SW is created by interference of five laser beams crossing in one point at mutual angles of 72°. The resulting chromium pattern on the substrate surface mimics the geometry of the SW and it is thus itself quasiperiodic. On a surface area of 0.2×0.2 mm2 the spatial Fourier spectrum of the measured patterns is decagonal. Besides being of fundamental interest, this quasiperiodic nanofabrication via atom optics can find its applications in photonics.

  13. Magnetometry with mesospheric sodium

    PubMed Central

    Higbie, James M.; Rochester, Simon M.; Patton, Brian; Holzlöhner, Ronald; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Budker, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of magnetic fields on the few 100-km length scale is significant for many geophysical applications including mapping of crustal magnetism and ocean circulation measurements, yet available techniques for such measurements are very expensive or of limited accuracy. We propose a method for remote detection of magnetic fields using the naturally occurring atomic sodium-rich layer in the mesosphere and existing high-power lasers developed for laser guide star applications. The proposed method offers a dramatic reduction in cost and opens the way to large-scale, parallel magnetic mapping and monitoring for atmospheric science, navigation, and geophysics. PMID:21321235

  14. Single spin magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, Nicholas Edward Kennedy

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond is a solid-state point defect with an electronic spin that has accessible quantum mechanical properties. At room temperature, the electronic ground state sub-levels of the NV center can be initialized and read out using optical pumping, as well as coherently controlled using microwave frequency fields. This thesis focuses on using the spin state of the NV center for highly-sensitive magnetometry under ambient conditions. In particular, when the diamond surface is properly prepared, we demonstrate that NV centers can be used to measure the magnetic fluctuations stemming from individual molecules and ions attached or adsorbed to the surface. This thesis begins by introducing the physical and electronic structure of the NV center at room temperature, followed by the fundamental measurements that allow us to use the NV center as a sensitive magnetometer. Combining our sensitive NV center magnetometer with techniques from chemistry and atomic force microscopy (AFM), we demonstrate the all-optical detection of a single-molecule electron spin at room temperature. Finally, we discuss the time-resolved detection of individual electron spins adsorbing onto the surface of nano-diamonds. By extending our techniques to nano-diamonds, we move closer towards textit{in vitro} magnetic field sensing that could be pivotal for better disease diagnosis and drug development.

  15. Probing Atomic Dynamics and Structures Using Optical Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittberger, Bonnie L.; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2015-05-01

    Pattern formation is a widely studied phenomenon that can provide fundamental insights into nonlinear systems. Emergent patterns in cold atoms are of particular interest in condensed matter physics and quantum information science because one can relate optical patterns to spatial structures in the atoms. In our experimental system, we study multimode optical patterns generated from a sample of cold, thermal atoms. We observe this nonlinear optical phenomenon at record low input powers due to the highly nonlinear nature of the spatial bunching of atoms in an optical lattice. We present a detailed study of the dynamics of these bunched atoms during optical pattern formation. We show how small changes in the atomic density distribution affect the symmetry of the generated patterns as well as the nature of the nonlinearity that describes the light-atom interaction. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the National Science Foundation through Grant #PHY-1206040.

  16. Resolved Atomic Interaction Sidebands in an Optical Clock Transition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-24

    Resolved Atomic Interaction Sidebands in an Optical Clock Transition M. Bishof,1 Y. Lin,1 M.D. Swallows,1 A.V. Gorshkov,2 J. Ye,1 and A.M. Rey1 1JILA...Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA (Received 4 February 2011; published 22 June 2011) We report the observation of resolved atomic ...interaction sidebands (ISB) in the 87Sr optical clock transition when atoms at microkelvin temperatures are confined in a two-dimensional optical lattice

  17. Nanoscale "Dark State" Optical Potentials for Cold Atoms.

    PubMed

    Łącki, M; Baranov, M A; Pichler, H; Zoller, P

    2016-12-02

    We discuss the generation of subwavelength optical barriers on the scale of tens of nanometers, as conservative optical potentials for cold atoms. These arise from nonadiabatic corrections to Born-Oppenheimer potentials from dressed "dark states" in atomic Λ configurations. We illustrate the concepts with a double layer potential for atoms obtained from inserting an optical subwavelength barrier into a well generated by an off-resonant optical lattice, and discuss bound states of pairs of atoms interacting via magnetic dipolar interactions. The subwavelength optical barriers represent an optical "Kronig-Penney" potential. We present a detailed study of the band structure in optical Kronig-Penney potentials, including decoherence from spontaneous emission and atom loss to open "bright" channels.

  18. Laser threshold magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeske, Jan; Cole, Jared H.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new type of sensor, which uses diamond containing the optically active nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centres as a laser medium. The magnetometer can be operated at room-temperature and generates light that can be readily fibre coupled, thereby permitting use in industrial applications and remote sensing. By combining laser pumping with a radio-frequency Rabi-drive field, an external magnetic field changes the fluorescence of the NV- centres. We use this change in fluorescence level to push the laser above threshold, turning it on with an intensity controlled by the external magnetic field, which provides a coherent amplification of the readout signal with very high contrast. This mechanism is qualitatively different from conventional NV--based magnetometers which use fluorescence measurements, based on incoherent photon emission. We term our approach laser threshold magnetometer (LTM). We predict that an NV--based LTM with a volume of 1 mm3 can achieve shot-noise limited dc sensitivity of 1.86 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}} and ac sensitivity of 3.97 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}}.

  19. Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits.

    PubMed

    You, J Q; Nori, Franco

    2011-06-29

    Superconducting circuits based on Josephson junctions exhibit macroscopic quantum coherence and can behave like artificial atoms. Recent technological advances have made it possible to implement atomic-physics and quantum-optics experiments on a chip using these artificial atoms. This Review presents a brief overview of the progress achieved so far in this rapidly advancing field. We not only discuss phenomena analogous to those in atomic physics and quantum optics with natural atoms, but also highlight those not occurring in natural atoms. In addition, we summarize several prospective directions in this emerging interdisciplinary field.

  20. High-sensitivity single NV magnetometry by spin-to-charge state mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskula, Jean-Christophe; Shields, Brendan; Bauch, Erik; Lukin, Mikhail; Walsworth, Ronald; Trifonov, Alexei

    2015-05-01

    Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond are atom-like quantum system in a solid state matrix whom its structure allows optical readout of the electronic spin. However, the optimal duration of optical readout is limited by a singlet state lifetime making single shot spin readout out of reach. On the other side, the NV center charge state readout can be extremely efficient (up to 99% fidelity) by using excitation at 594 nm. We will present a new method of spin readout utilizing a spin-depending photoionization process to map the electronic spin state of the NV onto the its charge state. Moreover, pre-selection on the charged state allows to minimize data acquisition time. This scheme improves single NV AC magnetometry by a factor of 5 and will benefit other single NV center experiments as well.

  1. Optical investigation of electromagnetic fuel atomizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suciu, Cornel; Beniuga, Marius

    2016-12-01

    The devices that ensure atomization of fluids (injectors and atomizers) are largely employed in contemporary technology. Injectors play a very important part in the functioning of various systems based on combustion of liquid fuels, such as internal combustion engines and turbines, jet engines, furnaces etc. During operation, these devices are subjected to important pressures and need to work within very strict parameters. It is therefore important to have very precise active surfaces. The present work aimed to investigate such devices after certain degrees of usage in order to verify the evolution of surface micro-characteristics and their influence upon operating parameters. In order to achieve the abovementioned purpose, an optical evaluation of the surface was conducted using laser profilometry. Surface measurements were conducted on several injectors, after various degrees of usage, by aid of a laser profilometer equipped with a confocal sensor that has a vertical working range of 13mm and a resolution of 1μm1. After the surface micro-topography was measured, 3D and 2D representations, as well as individual profiles of the active surfaces, were analyzed and the significant parameters were determined. Surface wear and presence of combustion residues was analyzed in terms of its influence upon operating conditions.

  2. Isotropically sensitive optical filter employing atomic resonance transitions

    DOEpatents

    Marling, John B.

    1981-01-01

    An ultra-high Q isotropically sensitive optical filter or optical detector employing atomic resonance transitions. More specifically, atomic resonance transitions utilized in conjunction with two optical bandpass filters provide an optical detector having a wide field of view (.about.2.pi. steradians) and very narrow acceptance bandwidth approaching 0.01 A. A light signal to be detected is transmitted through an outer bandpass filter into a resonantly absorbing atomic vapor, the excited atomic vapor then providing a fluorescence signal at a different wavelength which is transmitted through an inner bandpass filter. The outer and inner bandpass filters have no common transmission band, thereby resulting in complete blockage of all optical signals that are not resonantly shifted in wavelength by the intervening atomic vapor. Two embodiments are disclosed, one in which the light signal raises atoms contained in the atomic vapor from the ground state to an excited state from which fluorescence occurs, and the other in which a pump laser is used to raise the atoms in the ground state to a first excited state from which the light signal then is resonantly absorbed, thereby raising the atoms to a second excited state from which fluorescence occurs. A specific application is described in which an optical detector according to the present invention can be used as an underwater detector for light from an optical transmitter which could be located in an orbiting satellite.

  3. Torque magnetometry in unconventional superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lu

    This thesis describes torque magnetometry studies on unconventional superconductors. Torque magnetometry measures the anisotropic magnetization of samples by recording their torque signals in a tilted magnetic field. Applied to superconductors, this method provides a reliable way to measure the field dependence of magnetization with high resolution under extreme conditions: DC magnetic fields from zero to 45.2 T, and temperature from 300 mK to 300K. The results can be used to determine many important parameters, such as the upper critical field H c2, the superconducting condensation energy, the onset temperature of diamagnetic signals, and so on. We carried out the torque magnetometry measurements on unconventional superconductors---high Tc superconductors and the p-wave superconductor Sr2RuO4---and uncovered new features that do not exist in conventional BCS superconductors. In high Tc superconductors, our torque magnetometry studies focus on the properties of the vortex liquid state. First, by comparing the observed magnetization curves with the Nernst effect results in Bi 2Sr2CaCu2O8+delta, we confirm that the unusually large Nernst effect signals originate from the surviving vortex liquid state above Tc. Second, the M-H curves near the critical temperature Tc suggest that the nature of the transition is the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. Near Tc, the magnetization response at low field is strongly nonlinear, and the T dependence of the magnetic susceptibility in the low-field limit approaches the predicted curve from the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. Third, the measurements in intense magnetic field up to 45 T reveal the unusual, weak T-dependence of Hc2. These observations strongly support the existence of the vortex liquid state above Tc. The superconducting state is destroyed by the phase fluctuation of the pair condensate, while the pair condensate keeps its amplitude above T c. Further studies in single-layered high Tc superconductors reveal more

  4. Stochastic electrodynamics simulations for collective atom response in optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Mark D.; Jenkins, Stewart D.; Bronstein, Yael; Ruostekoski, Janne

    2017-08-01

    We study the collective optical response of an atomic ensemble confined within a single-mode optical cavity by stochastic electrodynamics simulations that include the effects of atomic position correlations, internal level structure, and spatial variations in cavity coupling strength and atom density. In the limit of low light intensity, the simulations exactly reproduce the full quantum field-theoretical description for cold stationary atoms and at higher light intensities we introduce semiclassical approximations to atomic saturation that we compare with the exact solution in the case of two atoms. We find that collective subradiant modes of the atoms, with very narrow linewidths, can be coupled to the cavity field by spatial variation of the atomic transition frequency and resolved at low intensities, and show that they can be specifically driven by tailored transverse pumping beams. We show that the cavity optical response, in particular both the subradiant mode profile and the resonance shift of the cavity mode, can be used as a diagnostic tool for the position correlations of the atoms and hence the atomic quantum many-body phase. The quantum effects are found to be most prominent close to the narrow subradiant mode resonances at high light intensities. Although an optical cavity can generally strongly enhance quantum fluctuations via light confinement, we show that the semiclassical approximation to the stochastic electrodynamics model provides at least a qualitative agreement with the exact optical response outside the subradiant mode resonances even in the presence of significant saturation of the atoms.

  5. An Optical Lattice Clock with Spin 1/2 Atoms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    89 4.4 Vector Stark shift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90...ytterbium atoms The first proposal for an optical lattice clock called for spectroscopy of a narrow optical tran- sition in ultracold strontium atoms [40...Since then, experimental groups have begun researching not only strontium (Sr) [70, 71, 72, 73, 74], but also ytterbium (Yb) [75, 76, 77, 78, 79] and

  6. Narrow-line magneto-optical trap for dysprosium atoms.

    PubMed

    Maier, T; Kadau, H; Schmitt, M; Griesmaier, A; Pfau, T

    2014-06-01

    We present our technique to create a magneto-optical trap (MOT) for dysprosium atoms using the narrow-line cooling transition at 626 nm to achieve suitable conditions for direct loading into an optical dipole trap. The MOT is loaded from an atomic beam via a Zeeman slower using the strongest atomic transition at 421 nm. With this combination of two cooling transitions we can trap up to 2.0·10(8) atoms at temperatures down to 6 μK. This cooling approach is simpler than present work with ultracold dysprosium and provides similar starting conditions for a transfer to an optical dipole trap.

  7. On-chip optical trapping for atomic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Maximillian A.; Salim, Evan; Farkas, Daniel; Duggan, Janet; Ivory, Megan; Anderson, Dana

    2014-09-01

    To simplify applications that rely on optical trapping of cold and ultracold atoms, ColdQuanta is developing techniques to incorporate miniature optical components onto in-vacuum atom chips. The result is a hybrid atom chip that combines an in-vacuum micro-optical bench for optical control with an atom chip for magnetic control. Placing optical components on a chip inside of the vacuum system produces a compact system that can be targeted to specific experiments, in this case the generation of optical lattices. Applications that can benefit from this technology include timekeeping, inertial sensing, gravimetry, quantum information, and emulation of quantum many-body systems. ColdQuanta's GlasSi atom chip technology incorporates glass windows in the plane of a silicon atom chip. In conjunction with the in-vacuum micro-optical bench, optical lattices can be generated within a few hundred microns of an atom chip window through which single atomic lattice sites can be imaged with sub-micron spatial resolution. The result is a quantum gas microscope that allows optical lattices to be studied at the level of single lattice sites. Similar to what ColdQuanta has achieved with magneto-optical traps (MOTs) in its miniMOT system and with Bose- Einstein condensates (BECs) in its RuBECi(R) system, ColdQuanta seeks to apply the on-chip optical bench technology to studies of optical lattices in a commercially available, turnkey system. These techniques are currently being considered for lattice experiments in NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) slated for flight on the International Space Station.

  8. Control and manipulation of cold atoms in optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muldoon, Cecilia; Brandt, Lukas; Dong, Jian; Stuart, Dustin; Brainis, Edouard; Himsworth, Matthew; Kuhn, Axel

    2012-07-01

    Neutral atoms trapped by laser light are among the most promising candidates for storing and processing information in a quantum computer or simulator. The application certainly calls for a scalable and flexible scheme for addressing and manipulating the atoms. We have now made this a reality by implementing a fast and versatile method to dynamically control the position of neutral atoms trapped in optical tweezers. The tweezers result from a spatial light modulator (SLM) controlling and shaping a large number of optical dipole-force traps. Trapped atoms adapt to any change in the potential landscape, such that one can rearrange and randomly access individual sites within atom-trap arrays.

  9. Optical pumping of rubidium atoms frozen in solid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagin, Andrew N.; Regmi, Sameer K.; Pathak, Pawan; Weinstein, Jonathan D.

    2013-12-01

    We have grown crystals of solid argon doped with rubidium atoms. The spectrum of the implanted atoms depends on the crystal-growth temperature and annealing history. We have used optical pumping to polarize the spin state of the implanted atoms and polarization spectroscopy to detect the spin state and measure the spin-relaxation time. In addition to the desired optical pumping, we also observed modification of the absorption spectrum of the rubidium due to the applied light.

  10. Isotropically sensitive optical filter employing atomic resonance transitions

    DOEpatents

    Marling, J.B.

    An ultra-high Q isotropically sensitive optical filter or optical detector is disclosed employing atomic resonance transitions. More specifically, atomic resonance transitions utilized in conjunction with two optical bandpass filters provide an optical detector having a wide field of view (approx. 2 ..pi.. steradians) and very narrow acceptance bandwidth approaching 0.01A. A light signal to be detected is transmitted through an outer bandpass filter into a resonantly absorbing atomic vapor, the excited atomic vapor than providing a fluorescence signal at a different wavelength which is transmitted through an inner bandpass filters have no common transmission band, therby resulting in complete blockage of all optical signals that are not resonantly shifted in wavelength by the intervening atomic vapor. Two embodiments are disclosed, one in which the light signal raises atoms contained in the atomic vapor from the ground state to an excited state from which fluorescence occurs, and the other in which a pump laser is used to raise the atoms in the ground state to a first excited state from which the light signal then is resonantly absorbed, thereby raising the atoms to a second excited state from which fluorescence occurs. A specific application is described in which an optical detector according to the present invention can be located in an orbiting satellite.

  11. Suspension of Atoms Using Optical Pulses, and Application to Gravimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, K. J.; Burke, J. H. T.; Sackett, C. A.

    2009-04-17

    Atoms from a {sup 87}Rb condensate are suspended against gravity using repeated reflections from a pulsed optical standing wave. Up to 100 reflections are observed, yielding suspension times of over 100 ms. The local gravitational acceleration can be determined from the pulse rate required to achieve suspension. Further, a gravitationally sensitive atom interferometer was implemented using the suspended atoms. This technique could potentially provide a precision measurement of gravity without requiring the atoms to fall a large distance.

  12. Magnetoencephalography with Optically Pumped Atomic Magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwindt, Peter; Colombo, Anthony; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Carter, Tony; Berry, Christopher; Young, Amber; McKay, Jim; Weisend, Michael

    2015-05-01

    We are working to develop a 36-channel array of optically pumped atomic magnetometers (AMs) to perform magnetoencephalography (MEG) with the goal of localizing magnetic sources within the human brain. The 36-channel array will consist of nine 4-channel sensor modules where the channels within each sensor will be spaced by 18 mm and each sensor will cover a 40 mm by 40 mm area of the head. In a previous 4-channel AM prototype, we demonstrated the measurement of evoked responses in both the auditory and somatosensory cortexes. This prototype had a 5 fT/Hz1/2 sensitivity. In the current version of the AM under development we are maintaining the previous sensitivity while implementing several improvements, including increasing the bandwidth from 20 Hz to more than 100 Hz, reducing the separation of the active volume of the AM from exterior of the sensor from 25 mm to 10 mm or less, and reducing the active sensor volume by a factor >10 to ~15 mm3. We will present results on the performance of our most recent AM prototype and progress toward developing a complete MEG system including a person-sized magnetic shield to provide a low-noise magnetic environment for MEG measurements.

  13. Physics through the 1990s: Atomic, molecular and optical physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The volume presents a program of research initiatives in atomic, molecular, and optical physics. The current state of atomic, molecular, and optical physics in the US is examined with respect to demographics, education patterns, applications, and the US economy. Recommendations are made for each field, with discussions of their histories and the relevance of the research to government agencies. The section on atomic physics includes atomic theory, structure, and dynamics; accelerator-based atomic physics; and large facilities. The section on molecular physics includes spectroscopy, scattering theory and experiment, and the dynamics of chemical reactions. The section on optical physics discusses lasers, laser spectroscopy, and quantum optics and coherence. A section elucidates interfaces between the three fields and astrophysics, condensed matter physics, surface science, plasma physics, atmospheric physics, and nuclear physics. Another section shows applications of the three fields in ultra-precise measurements, fusion, national security, materials, medicine, and other topics.

  14. Strong coupling and high-contrast all-optical modulation in atomic cladding waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Liron; Desiatov, Boris; Mazurski, Noa; Levy, Uriel

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, there has been marked increase in research aimed to introduce alkali vapours into guided-wave configurations. Owing to the significant reduction in device dimensions, the increase in density of states, the interaction with surfaces and primarily the high intensities carried along the structure, a plethora of light–vapour interactions can be studied. Moreover, such platform may exhibit new functionalities such as low-power nonlinear light–matter interactions. One immense challenge is to study the effects of quantum coherence and shifts in nanoscale waveguides, characterized by ultra-small mode areas and fast dynamics. Here, we construct a highly compact 17 mm long serpentine silicon-nitride atomic vapour cladding waveguide. Fascinating and important phenomena such as van-der-Waals shifts, dynamical stark shifts and coherent effects such as strong coupling (in the form of Autler–Townes splitting) are observed. Some of these effects may play an important role in applications such as all-optical switching, frequency referencing and magnetometry. PMID:28181510

  15. Strong coupling and high-contrast all-optical modulation in atomic cladding waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Liron; Desiatov, Boris; Mazurski, Noa; Levy, Uriel

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, there has been marked increase in research aimed to introduce alkali vapours into guided-wave configurations. Owing to the significant reduction in device dimensions, the increase in density of states, the interaction with surfaces and primarily the high intensities carried along the structure, a plethora of light-vapour interactions can be studied. Moreover, such platform may exhibit new functionalities such as low-power nonlinear light-matter interactions. One immense challenge is to study the effects of quantum coherence and shifts in nanoscale waveguides, characterized by ultra-small mode areas and fast dynamics. Here, we construct a highly compact 17 mm long serpentine silicon-nitride atomic vapour cladding waveguide. Fascinating and important phenomena such as van-der-Waals shifts, dynamical stark shifts and coherent effects such as strong coupling (in the form of Autler-Townes splitting) are observed. Some of these effects may play an important role in applications such as all-optical switching, frequency referencing and magnetometry.

  16. Cold atom dynamics in a quantum optical lattice potential.

    PubMed

    Maschler, Christoph; Ritsch, Helmut

    2005-12-31

    We study a generalized cold atom Bose-Hubbard model, where the periodic optical potential is formed by a cavity field with quantum properties. On the one hand, the common coupling of all atoms to the same mode introduces cavity-mediated long-range atom-atom interactions, and, on the other hand, atomic backaction on the field introduces atom-field entanglement. This modifies the properties of the associated quantum phase transitions and allows for new correlated atom-field states, including superposition of different atomic quantum phases. After deriving an approximative Hamiltonian including the new long-range interaction terms, we exhibit central physical phenomena at generic configurations of few atoms in few wells. We find strong modifications of population fluctuations and next-nearest-neighbor correlations near the phase transition point.

  17. Multiphoton Raman Atom Optics with Frequency-Swept Adiabatic Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotru, Krish; Butts, David; Kinast, Joseph; Stoner, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Light-pulse atom interferometry is a promising candidate for future inertial navigators, gravitational wave detectors, and measurements of fundamental physical constants. The sensitivity of this technique, however, is often limited by the small momentum separations created between interfering atom wave packets (typically ~ 2 ℏk) . We address this issue using light-pulse atom optics derived from stimulated Raman transitions and frequency-swept adiabatic rapid passage (ARP). In experiments, these Raman ARP atom optics have generated up to 30 ℏk photon recoil momenta in an acceleration-sensitive atom interferometer, thereby enhancing the phase shift per unit acceleration by a factor of 15. Since this approach forgoes evaporative cooling and velocity selection, it could enable large-area atom interferometry at higher data rates, while also lowering the atom shot-noise-limited measurement uncertainty.

  18. Compact optical system for cesium atomic fountain clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiang; Ruan, Jun; Shi, Junru; Yu, Fengxiang; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Xinliang; Zhang, Shougang

    2016-09-01

    The optical system plays a significant role to cesium atomic fountain clocks, which manipulates and detects population of cesium atoms. This paper presents a compact optical system for cesium atomic fountain clocks. The optical system provides two beams with 32mW separately for cooling atoms and six beams of 12mW respectively for trapping atoms with the frequency tuning from 80MHz to 220MHz. The relative intensity noise of the detect laser beam reduces from 1.33×10-6 Hz to 1.52×10-10 Hz at 1Hz by the laser power stabilization system. The optical system operates continuously for 30 days with the fluctuation of optical power less than 3% approximately. And the frequency stability is 3×10-15 at 1000s. The results show the optical system satisfies with the needs of our cesium atomic fountain clock developed and establishes the foundation for cesium atomic fountain continuous operation.

  19. Detecting magnetically guided atoms with an optical cavity.

    PubMed

    Haase, Albrecht; Hessmo, Björn; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2006-01-15

    We show that a low-finesse cavity can be efficient for detecting neutral atoms. The low finesse can be compensated for by decreasing the mode waist of the cavity. We have used a near-concentric resonator with a beam waist of 12 microm and a finesse of only 1100 to detect magnetically guided Rb atoms with a detection sensitivity of 0.1 atom in the mode volume. For future experiments on single-atom detection and cavity QED applications, it should be beneficial to use miniaturized optical resonators integrated on atom chips.

  20. Cold Atom Source Containing Multiple Magneto-Optical Traps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Kohel, James; Kellogg, James; Lim, Lawrence; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    An apparatus that serves as a source of a cold beam of atoms contains multiple two-dimensional (2D) magneto-optical traps (MOTs). (Cold beams of atoms are used in atomic clocks and in diverse scientific experiments and applications.) The multiple-2D-MOT design of this cold atom source stands in contrast to single-2D-MOT designs of prior cold atom sources of the same type. The advantages afforded by the present design are that this apparatus is smaller than prior designs.

  1. Atomic-scale confinement of resonant optical fields.

    PubMed

    Kern, Johannes; Grossmann, Swen; Tarakina, Nadezda V; Häckel, Tim; Emmerling, Monika; Kamp, Martin; Huang, Jer-Shing; Biagioni, Paolo; Prangsma, Jord C; Hecht, Bert

    2012-11-14

    In the presence of matter, there is no fundamental limit preventing confinement of visible light even down to atomic scales. Achieving such confinement and the corresponding resonant intensity enhancement inevitably requires simultaneous control over atomic-scale details of material structures and over the optical modes that such structures support. By means of self-assembly we have obtained side-by-side aligned gold nanorod dimers with robust atomically defined gaps reaching below 0.5 nm. The existence of atomically confined light fields in these gaps is demonstrated by observing extreme Coulomb splitting of corresponding symmetric and antisymmetric dimer eigenmodes of more than 800 meV in white-light scattering experiments. Our results open new perspectives for atomically resolved spectroscopic imaging, deeply nonlinear optics, ultrasensing, cavity optomechanics, as well as for the realization of novel quantum-optical devices.

  2. Veselago lensing with ultracold atoms in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leder, Martin; Grossert, Christopher; Weitz, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Veselago pointed out that electromagnetic theory allows for materials with a negative index of refraction, in which most known optical phenomena are reversed. A slab of such a material can focus light by negative refraction, an imaging technique strikingly different from conventional positive refractive index optics, where curved surfaces bend the rays to form an image of an object. Here we demonstrate Veselago lensing for matter waves, using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. A relativistic, i.e. photon-like, dispersion relation for rubidium atoms is realized with a bichromatic optical lattice potential. A Raman pi-pulse technique serves to transfer atoms between two different branches of the dispersion relation, and the relativistic lensing occurs by a backwards propagation of atomic wavepackets on an energetically mirrored branch of the dispersion relation. We observe negative refraction and Veselago lensing both in a one-dimensional geometry and perform a ray-tracing simulation of a two-dimensional Veselago lens.

  3. Dynamics of an all-optical atomic spin gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wan, Shuangai; Yuan, Heng

    2013-10-20

    We present the transfer function of an all-optical atomic spin gyroscope through a series of differential equations and validate the transfer function by experimental test. A transfer function is the basis for further control system design. We build the differential equations based on a complete set of Bloch equations describing the all-optical atomic spin gyroscope, and obtain the transfer function through application of the Laplace transformation to these differential equations. Moreover, we experimentally validate the transfer function in an all-optical Cs-Xe129 atomic spin gyroscope through a series of step responses. This transfer function is convenient for analysis of the form of control system required. Furthermore, it is available for the design of the control system specifically to improve the performance of all-optical atomic spin gyroscopes.

  4. Quantum optics with cold atoms--nonlinear spectroscopy and road toward single-atom trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhen

    Investigations of optical processes for laser cooled and trapped atoms are described. Fluorescence from Cs atoms in a magneto-optical trap is detected under conditions of very low atomic density. Discrete steps are observed in the fluorescent signal versus time and are associated with the arrival and departure of individual trapped atoms. Histograms of the frequency of occurrence of a given level of fluorescence exhibit a series of uniformly spaced peaks that are attributed to the presence of N = 0, 1, 2 atoms in the trap.In addition, numerical absorption and emission spectra for three-level [...], [...], and V systems under intense radiations are calculated. Absorption spectra for a [...] system is used to explain the probe-wave amplification and absorption spectra recorded for Cs atoms cooled and confined in a magneto-optical trap, in which novel spectral features of narrow frequency widths with single-pass gain exceeding 20% are observed. The consequence of the optical gain is demonstrated to lead to negative radiation pressure, which is investigated together with other mechanical forces in the trap. Various alternative trapping schemes in three-level and two-level atoms are proposed as possible means to compress an atomic sample and demonstrated for a two-level magneto-optical trap.

  5. An efficient magneto-optical trap of metastable krypton atoms.

    PubMed

    Cheng, C-F; Jiang, W; Yang, G-M; Sun, Y-R; Pan, H; Gao, Y; Liu, A-W; Hu, S-M

    2010-12-01

    We report a magneto-optical trap of metastable krypton atoms with a trap loading rate of 3×10(11) atoms/s and a trap capture efficiency of 3×10(-5). The system starts with an atomic beam of metastable krypton produced in a liquid-nitrogen cooled, radio-frequency driven discharge. The metastable beam flux emerging from the discharge is 1.5×10(14) atoms/s/sr. The flux in the forward direction is enhanced by a factor of 156 with transverse laser cooling. The atoms are then slowed inside a Zeeman slower before captured by a magneto-optic trap. The trap efficiency can be further improved, possibly to the 10(-2) level, by gas recirculation. Such an atom trap is useful in trace analysis applications where available sample size is limited.

  6. Novel Superfluidity of Trapped Fermi Atoms Loaded on Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Masahiko; Yamada, Susumu

    2005-03-01

    We investigate a possibility of superfluidity in a trapped gas of Fermi atoms with a repulsive interaction in the presence of an optical lattice. Applying the exact diagonalization method to a one-dimensional Hubbard model including the trap potential, we find that, when the strength of the repulsive interaction exceeds a critical value, the binding energy of two Fermi atoms becomes negative below the half-filling case, indicating that an attractive interaction effectively works between Fermi atoms. In this case, a "Mott insulating core" appears in the center of the trap, where each site is occupied by one atom. The Cooper-pair correlation strongly develops between atoms in the left and right hand sides of this core. Furthermore, we show a ground-state phase diagram including the superfluidity on the trapped Fermi atoms loaded on optical lattices.

  7. Rotating optical tubes for vertical transport of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Rsheed, Anwar; Lyras, Andreas; Aldossary, Omar M.; Lembessis, Vassilis E.

    2016-12-01

    The classical dynamics of a cold atom trapped inside a vertical rotating helical optical tube (HOT) is investigated by taking also into account the gravitational field. The resulting equations of motion are solved numerically. The rotation of the HOT induces a vertical motion for an atom initially at rest. The motion is a result of the action of two inertial forces, namely, the centrifugal force and the Coriolis force. Both inertial forces force the atom to rotate in a direction opposite to that of the angular velocity of the HOT. The frequency and the turning points of the atom's global oscillation can be controlled by the value and the direction of the angular velocity of the HOT. However, at large values of the angular velocity of the HOT the atom can escape from the global oscillation and be transported along the axis of the HOT. In this case, the rotating HOT operates as an optical Archimedes' screw for atoms.

  8. An efficient magneto-optical trap of metastable krypton atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C.-F.; Jiang, W.; Yang, G.-M.; Sun, Y.-R.; Pan, H.; Gao, Y.; Liu, A.-W.; Hu, S.-M.

    2010-12-01

    We report a magneto-optical trap of metastable krypton atoms with a trap loading rate of 3× 10^{11} atoms/s and a trap capture efficiency of 3× 10^{-5}. The system starts with an atomic beam of metastable krypton produced in a liquid-nitrogen cooled, radio-frequency driven discharge. The metastable beam flux emerging from the discharge is 1.5× 10^{14} atoms/s/sr. The flux in the forward direction is enhanced by a factor of 156 with transverse laser cooling. The atoms are then slowed inside a Zeeman slower before captured by a magneto-optic trap. The trap efficiency can be further improved, possibly to the 10^{-2} level, by gas recirculation. Such an atom trap is useful in trace analysis applications where available sample size is limited.

  9. Experimental constraint on dark matter detection with optical atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wcisło, P.; Morzyński, P.; Bober, M.; Cygan, A.; Lisak, D.; Ciuryło, R.; Zawada, M.

    2016-12-01

    The total mass density of the Universe appears to be dominated by dark matter. However, beyond its gravitational interactions at the galactic scale, little is known about its nature1. Several proposals have been advanced in recent years for the detection of dark matter2-4. In particular, a network of atomic clocks could be used to search for transient indicators of hypothetical dark matter5 in the form of stable topological defects; for example, monopoles, strings or domain walls6. The clocks become desynchronized when a dark-matter object sweeps through the network. This pioneering approach5 requires a comparison between at least two distant optical atomic clocks7-9. Here, by exploiting differences in the susceptibilities of the atoms and the cavity to the fine-structure constant10,11, we show that a single optical atomic clock12 is already sensitive to dark-matter events. This implies that existing optical atomic clocks13,14 can serve as a global topological-defect dark-matter observatory, without any further developments in experimental apparatus or the need for long phase-noise-compensated optical-fibre links15. Using optical atomic clocks, we explored a new dimension of astrophysical observations by constraining the strength of atomic coupling to hypothetical dark-matter cosmic objects. Under the conditions of our experiments, the degree of constraint was found to exceed the previously reported limits16 by more than three orders of magnitude.

  10. Multiphoton adiabatic passage for atom optics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Demeter, Gabor; Djotyan, Gagik P.

    2009-04-15

    We study the force exerted on two-level atoms by short, counterpropagating laser pulses. When the counterpropagating pulses overlap each other partially, multiphoton adiabatic processes are possible in several configurations, which amplify the force exerted on the atoms. We investigate the practical usefulness of such multiphoton adiabatic transitions for the manipulation of the atoms' mechanical state. In particular, we compare the efficiency of a pair of constant frequency, oppositely detuned laser pulses and that of a pair of frequency-chirped pulses. We also consider the case of prolonged exposure to a sequence of laser pulses for a duration that is comparable to or much larger than the spontaneous lifetime of the atoms. We use numerical methods to calculate the reduction of the force and the heating of the atomic ensemble when spontaneous emission cannot be neglected during the interaction. In addition, we derive simple approximate formulas for the force and the heating, and compare them to the numerical results.

  11. Wide-dynamic-range cantilever magnetometry using a fiber-optic interferometer and its application to high-frequency electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Okamoto, Tsubasa; Ohmichi, Eiji; Ohta, Hitoshi

    2016-12-01

    We present a method of broadening the dynamic range of optical interferometric detection of cantilever displacement. The key idea of this method is the use of a wavelength-tunable laser source. The wavelength is subject to proportional-integral control, which is used to keep the cavity detuning constant. Under this control, the change in wavelength is proportional to the cantilever displacement. Using this technique, we can measure large displacements (>1 µm) without degrading the sensitivity. We apply this technique to high-frequency electron spin resonance spectroscopy and succeed in removing an irregular background signal that arises from the constantly varying sensitivity of the interferometer.

  12. Compact Magneto-optical Trap for Rubidium Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Chapovsky, P.L.

    2005-05-01

    The characteristics of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) using small-diameter cooling laser beams are considered. Trapping and cooling of Rb atoms from the surrounding gas of warm atoms takes place in the trap. A compact (140 {mu}m) and stable atomic cloud is obtained with a density of 7 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}, which is three orders of magnitude higher than the density of the surrounding gas.

  13. Transmission spectrum of an optical cavity containing N atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie, Sabrina; Shenvi, Neil; Brown, Kenneth R.; Whaley, K. Birgitta; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M.

    2004-04-01

    The transmission spectrum of a high-finesse optical cavity containing an arbitrary number of trapped atoms is presented in the zero-temperature, low saturation limit. We take spatial and motional effects into account and show that in the limit of strong coupling, the important spectral features can be determined for an arbitrary number of atoms, N. We also show that these results have important ramifications in limiting our ability to determine the number of atoms in the cavity.

  14. Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative on Ultracold Atom Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-09

    Atom Michelson Interferometer on a Chip Using a Bose-Einstein Condensate," Phys.Rev.Lett. 94, 090405 (2005) "Efficient Loading of a Magnetic Waveguide...Optics, Department of Physics Colloquium, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, May 2004 BEC Waveguide Michelson Interferometer on a Chip...DARPA Atomtronics Kickoff, Boulder, CO, September 2004 An Atom Michelson Interferometer on a Chip, DAMOP, Lincoln, NE, May 2005 An Atom Michelson

  15. Resolved Atomic Interaction Sidebands in an Optical Clock Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Bishof, M.; Lin, Y.; Swallows, M. D.; Ye, J.; Rey, A. M.; Gorshkov, A. V.

    2011-06-24

    We report the observation of resolved atomic interaction sidebands (ISB) in the {sup 87}Sr optical clock transition when atoms at microkelvin temperatures are confined in a two-dimensional optical lattice. The ISB are a manifestation of the strong interactions that occur between atoms confined in a quasi-one-dimensional geometry and disappear when the confinement is relaxed along one dimension. The emergence of ISB is linked to the recently observed suppression of collisional frequency shifts. At the current temperatures, the ISB can be resolved but are broad. At lower temperatures, ISB are predicted to be substantially narrower and useful spectroscopic tools in strongly interacting alkaline-earth gases.

  16. Optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy of Rare Earth Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiatlowski, Jerlyn; Palm, Christopher; Joshi, Trinity; Montcrieffe, Caitlin; Jackson Kimball, Derek

    2013-05-01

    We discuss progress in our experimental program to employ optical-frequency-comb-based spectroscopy to understand the complex spectra of rare-earth atoms. We plan to carry out systematic measurements of atomic transitions in rare-earth atoms to elucidate the energy level structure and term assignment and determine presently unknown atomic state parameters. This spectroscopic information is important in view of the increasing interest in rare-earth atoms for atomic frequency standards, in astrophysical investigations of chemically peculiar stars, and in tests of fundamental physics (tests of parity and time-reversal invariance, searches for time variation of fundamental constants, etc.). We are presently studying the use of hollow cathode lamps as atomic sources for two-photon frequency comb spectroscopy. Supported by the National Science Foundation under grant PHY-0958749.

  17. Guiding of atoms in helical optical potential structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rsheed, Anwar Al; Lyras, Andreas; Lembessis, Vassilis E.; Aldossary, Omar M.

    2016-06-01

    The classical dynamics of a cold atom trapped inside a static helical optical potential is investigated based on the Lagrangian formalism, which takes into account both the optical light field and the gravitational field. The resulting equations of motion are solved numerically and analytically. The topology of the helical optical potential, which drives the trapped cold atom, is responsible for two different types of oscillations, namely: the local oscillations, whereby the atomic motion is confined in a region smaller than the light field wavelength (z\\lt λ ) and the global oscillations, when the atomic motion is extended to larger regions comparable to the beam Rayleigh range (z\\lt {z}{{R}}). Local oscillations guide the atom along the helical structure of the optical potential. The global oscillations, which constitute the main topic of our paper, define the atomic motion along the z-axis as an oscillation between two turning points. For typical values of the beam waist {w}{{o}} the turning points are symmetrical around the origin. For large values of the beam waist {w}{{o}}, the global oscillations become asymmetric because the optical dipole potential weakens and the gravitational potential contributes to the determination of the turning points. For sufficiently large values of the beam waist {w}{{o}}, there are no global oscillations and only one upper turning point defines the atom’s global motion.

  18. Optically guided linear Mach-Zehnder atom interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, G. D.; Keal, H.; Altin, P. A.; Debs, J. E.; Bennetts, S.; Kuhn, C. C. N.; Hardman, K. S.; Johnsson, M. T.; Close, J. D.; Robins, N. P.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a horizontal, linearly guided Mach-Zehnder atom interferometer in an optical waveguide. Intended as a proof-of-principle experiment, the interferometer utilizes a Bose-Einstein condensate in the magnetically insensitive F=1,mF=0 state of 87Rb as an acceleration-sensitive test mass. We achieve a modest sensitivity to acceleration of Δa=7×10-4 m/s2. Our fringe visibility is as high as 38% in this optically guided atom interferometer. We observe a time of flight in the waveguide of over 0.5 s, demonstrating the utility of our optical guide for future sensors.

  19. Studies of Ultracold Strontium Atoms in an Optical Dipole Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traverso, A. J.; Martinez de Escobar, Y. N.; Mickelson, P. G.; Killian, T. C.

    2008-05-01

    We survey recent experiments with ultracold strontium performed in our group. Trapping and cooling occurs in three stages: successive magneto-optical traps (MOTs) operating on 461 nm and 689 nm transitions of strontium, respectively, are loaded to cool atoms to a temperature of 1 μK. Finally, atoms are loaded into a far-off-resonance optical dipole trap (ODT). We examine the loading characteristics, thermalization, and lifetime of atoms held within the ODT. We also perform spectroscopy of atoms held within the ODT. During laser cooling, we are able to manipulate the energy levels of the atoms and shelve them into metastable states using 707 nm and 3 μm lasers. These experiments reveal interesting physics of ultracold strontium.

  20. Enhanced quadrupole effects for atoms in optical vortices.

    PubMed

    Lembessis, V E; Babiker, M

    2013-02-22

    We show that the normally weak optical quadrupole interaction in atoms is enhanced significantly when the atom interacts at near resonance with an optical vortex. In particular, the forces and torque acting on the atom are shown here to scale up with the square of the winding number l of the vortex. Because the integer l can be arranged to be large, this property allows for processes involving dipole-forbidden, but quadrupole-allowed, transitions in atoms, such as cesium and oxygen, to come into play. We show that the mechanical effects of vortex light on atoms involving translational and rotational motion as well as trapping should be significantly enhanced for quadrupole transitions and present novel features with useful implications for the emerging field of atomtronics.

  1. Veselago lensing with ultracold atoms in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leder, Martin; Grossert, Christopher; Weitz, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Veselago pointed out that electromagnetic wave theory allows for materials with a negative index of refraction, in which most known optical phenomena would be reversed. A slab of such a material can focus light by negative refraction, an imaging technique strikingly different from conventional positive refractive index optics, where curved surfaces bend the rays to form an image of an object. Here we demonstrate Veselago lensing for matter waves, using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. A relativistic, that is, photon-like, dispersion relation for rubidium atoms is realized with a bichromatic optical lattice potential. We rely on a Raman π-pulse technique to transfer atoms between two different branches of the dispersion relation, resulting in a focusing that is completely analogous to the effect described by Veselago for light waves. Future prospects of the demonstrated effects include novel sub-de Broglie wavelength imaging applications.

  2. Veselago lensing with ultracold atoms in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Leder, Martin; Grossert, Christopher; Weitz, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Veselago pointed out that electromagnetic wave theory allows for materials with a negative index of refraction, in which most known optical phenomena would be reversed. A slab of such a material can focus light by negative refraction, an imaging technique strikingly different from conventional positive refractive index optics, where curved surfaces bend the rays to form an image of an object. Here we demonstrate Veselago lensing for matter waves, using ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. A relativistic, that is, photon-like, dispersion relation for rubidium atoms is realized with a bichromatic optical lattice potential. We rely on a Raman π-pulse technique to transfer atoms between two different branches of the dispersion relation, resulting in a focusing that is completely analogous to the effect described by Veselago for light waves. Future prospects of the demonstrated effects include novel sub-de Broglie wavelength imaging applications.

  3. Spin-velocity correlations of optically pumped atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsland, R., III; McGuyer, B. H.; Olsen, B. A.; Happer, W.

    2012-08-01

    We present efficient theoretical tools for describing the optical pumping of atoms by light propagating at arbitrary directions with respect to an external magnetic field, at buffer-gas pressures that are small enough for velocity-selective optical pumping (VSOP) but large enough to cause substantial collisional relaxation of the velocities and the spin. These are the conditions for the sodium atoms at an altitude of about 100 km that are used as guidestars for adaptive optics in modern ground-based telescopes to correct for aberrations due to atmospheric turbulence. We use spin and velocity relaxation modes to describe the distribution of atoms in spin space (including both populations and coherences) and velocity space. Cusp kernels are used to describe velocity-changing collisions. Optical pumping operators are represented as a sum of poles in the complex velocity plane. Signals simulated with these methods are in excellent agreement with previous experiments and with preliminary experiments in our laboratory.

  4. Editorial: Focus on Atom Optics and its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Pfau, T.; Schmelcher, P.; Schleich, W.

    2010-06-01

    Atom optics employs the modern techniques of quantum optics and laser cooling to enable applications which often outperform current standard technologies. Atomic matter wave interferometers allow for ultra-precise sensors; metrology and clocks are pushed to an extraordinary accuracy of 17 digits using single atoms. Miniaturization and integration are driven forward for both atomic clocks and atom optical circuits. With the miniaturization of information-storage and -processing devices, the scale of single atoms is approached in solid state devices, where the laws of quantum physics lead to novel, advantageous features and functionalities. An upcoming branch of atom optics is the control of single atoms, potentially allowing solid state devices to be built atom by atom; some of which would be applicable in future quantum information processing devices. Selective manipulation of individual atoms also enables trace analysis of extremely rare isotopes. Additionally, sources of neutral atoms with high brightness are being developed and, if combined with photo ionization, even novel focused ion beam sources are within reach. Ultracold chemistry is fertilized by atomic techniques, when reactions of chemical constituents are investigated between ions, atoms, molecules, trapped or aligned in designed fields and cooled to ultra-low temperatures such that the reaction kinetics can be studied in a completely state-resolved manner. Focus on Atom Optics and its Applications Contents Sensitive gravity-gradiometry with atom interferometry: progress towards an improved determination of the gravitational constant F Sorrentino, Y-H Lien, G Rosi, L Cacciapuoti, M Prevedelli and G M Tino A single-atom detector integrated on an atom chip: fabrication, characterization and application D Heine, W Rohringer, D Fischer, M Wilzbach, T Raub, S Loziczky, XiYuan Liu, S Groth, B Hessmo and J Schmiedmayer Interaction of a propagating guided matter wave with a localized potential G L Gattobigio, A

  5. REVIEW ARTICLE: Magnetic atom optics: mirrors, guides, traps, and chips for atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinds, E. A.; Hughes, I. G.

    1999-09-01

    For the last decade it has been possible to cool atoms to microkelvin temperatures (~1 cm s-1) using a variety of optical techniques. Light beams provide the very strong frictional forces required to slow atoms from room temperature (~500 m s-1). However, once the atoms are cold, the relatively weak conservative forces of static electric and magnetic fields play an important role. In our group we have been studying the interaction of cold rubidium atoms with periodically magnetized data storage media. Here we review the underlying principles of the forces acting on atoms above a suitably magnetized substrate or near current-carrying wires. We also summarize the status of experiments. These structures can be used as smooth or corrugated reflectors for controlling the trajectories of cold atoms. Alternatively, they may be used to confine atoms to a plane, a line, or a dot and in some cases to reach the quantum limit of confinement. Atoms levitated above a magnetized surface can be guided electrostatically by wires deposited on the surface. The flow and interaction of atoms in such a structure may form the basis of a new technology, `integrated atom optics' which might ultimately be capable of realizing a quantum computer.

  6. Single atom emission in an optical resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, J.J.; An, K.; Dasari, R.R.

    1994-12-31

    A single atom coupled to a single mode of a radiation field is a fundamental system for studying the interaction of radiation with matter. The study of such systems has come to be called cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). Atoms coupled to a single mode of a resonator have been studied experimentally and theoretically in several interesting regimes since this basic system was first considered theoretically by Janes and Cummings. The objective of the present chapter is to provide a theoretical framework and present a unifying picture of the various phenomena which can occur in such a system. 35 refs., 11 figs.

  7. Geometric-phase atom optics and interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zygelman, B.

    2015-10-01

    We illustrate how geometric gauge forces and topological phase effects emerge in atomic and molecular systems without employing assumptions that rely on adiabaticity. We show how geometric magnetism may be harnessed to engineer novel quantum devices including a velocity sieve, a component in mass spectrometers, for neutral atoms. We introduce and outline a possible experimental setup that demonstrates topological interferometry for neutral spin-1/2 systems. For that two-level system, we study the transition from Abelian to non-Abelian behavior and explore its relation to the molecular Aharonov-Bohm effect.

  8. Focusing Light Beams To Improve Atomic-Vapor Optical Buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry; Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy

    2010-01-01

    Specially designed focusing of light beams has been proposed as a means of improving the performances of optical buffers based on cells containing hot atomic vapors (e.g., rubidium vapor). There is also a companion proposal to improve performance by use of incoherent optical pumping under suitable conditions. Regarding the proposal to use focusing: The utility of atomic-vapor optical buffers as optical storage and processing devices has been severely limited by nonuniform spatial distributions of intensity in optical beams, arising from absorption of the beams as they propagate in atomic-vapor cells. Such nonuniformity makes it impossible to optimize the physical conditions throughout a cell, thereby making it impossible to optimize the performance of the cell as an optical buffer. In practical terms simplified for the sake of brevity, "to optimize" as used here means to design the cell so as to maximize the group delay of an optical pulse while keeping the absorption and distortion of the pulse reasonably small. Regarding the proposal to use incoherent optical pumping: For reasons too complex to describe here, residual absorption of light is one of the main impediments to achievement of desirably long group delays in hot atomic vapors. The present proposal is directed toward suppressing residual absorption of light. The idea of improving the performance of slow-light optical buffers by use of incoherent pumping overlaps somewhat with the basic idea of Raman-based slow-light systems. However, prior studies of those systems did not quantitatively answer the question of whether the performance of an atomic vapor or other medium that exhibits electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) with Raman gain is superior to that of a medium that exhibits EIT without Raman gain.

  9. Ultrastable optical clock with two cold-atom ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schioppo, M.; Brown, R. C.; McGrew, W. F.; Hinkley, N.; Fasano, R. J.; Beloy, K.; Yoon, T. H.; Milani, G.; Nicolodi, D.; Sherman, J. A.; Phillips, N. B.; Oates, C. W.; Ludlow, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Atomic clocks based on optical transitions are the most stable, and therefore precise, timekeepers available. These clocks operate by alternating intervals of atomic interrogation with the 'dead' time required for quantum state preparation and readout. This non-continuous interrogation of the atom system results in the Dick effect, an aliasing of frequency noise from the laser interrogating the atomic transition. Despite recent advances in optical clock stability that have been achieved by improving laser coherence, the Dick effect has continually limited the performance of optical clocks. Here we implement a robust solution to overcome this limitation: a zero-dead-time optical clock that is based on the interleaved interrogation of two cold-atom ensembles. This clock exhibits vanishingly small Dick noise, thereby achieving an unprecedented fractional frequency instability assessed to be for an averaging time τ in seconds. We also consider alternate dual-atom-ensemble schemes to extend laser coherence and reduce the standard quantum limit of clock stability, achieving a spectroscopy line quality factor of Q > 4 × 1015.

  10. A dynamic magneto-optical trap for atom chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushton, Jo; Roy, Ritayan; Bateman, James; Himsworth, Matt

    2016-11-01

    We describe a dynamic magneto-optical trap (MOT) suitable for the use with vacuum systems in which optical access is limited to a single window. This technique facilitates the long-standing desire of producing integrated atom chips, many of which are likely to have severely restricted optical access compared with conventional vacuum chambers. This ‘switching-MOT’ relies on the synchronized pulsing of optical and magnetic fields at audio frequencies. The trap’s beam geometry is obtained using a planar mirror surface, and does not require a patterned substrate or bulky optics inside the vacuum chamber. Central to the design is a novel magnetic field geometry that requires no external quadrupole or bias coils which leads toward a very compact system. We have implemented the trap for 85Rb and shown that it is capable of capturing 2 million atoms and directly cooling below the Doppler temperature.

  11. All-optical vector atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Patton, B; Zhivun, E; Hovde, D C; Budker, D

    2014-07-04

    We demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer capable of measuring the magnitude and direction of a magnetic field using nonlinear magneto-optical rotation in cesium vapor. Vector capability is added by effective modulation of the field along orthogonal axes and subsequent demodulation of the magnetic-resonance frequency. This modulation is provided by the ac Stark shift induced by circularly polarized laser beams. The sensor exhibits a demonstrated rms noise floor of ∼65  fT/√[Hz] in measurement of the field magnitude and 0.5  mrad/√[Hz] in the field direction; elimination of technical noise would improve these sensitivities to 12  fT/√[Hz] and 10  μrad/√[Hz], respectively. Applications for this all-optical vector magnetometer would include magnetically sensitive fundamental physics experiments, such as the search for a permanent electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  12. Optical Devices for Cold Atoms and Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Gaaloul, Naceur; Jaouadi, Amine; Telmini, Mourad; Pruvost, Laurence; Charron, Eric

    2007-09-19

    The manipulation of cold atoms with optical fields is a very promising technique for a variety of applications ranging from laser cooling and trapping to coherent atom transport and matter wave interferometry. Optical fields have also been proposed as interesting tools for quantum information processing with cold atoms. In this paper, we present a theoretical study of the dynamics of a cold {sup 87}Rb atomic cloud falling in the gravity field in the presence of two crossing dipole guides. The cloud is either deflected or split between the two branches of this guide. We explore the possibilities of optimization of this device and present preliminary results obtained in the case of zero-temperature dilute Bose-Einstein condensates.

  13. Quantum optical circulator controlled by a single chirally coupled atom.

    PubMed

    Scheucher, Michael; Hilico, Adèle; Will, Elisa; Volz, Jürgen; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2016-12-23

    Integrated nonreciprocal optical components, which have an inherent asymmetry between their forward and backward propagation direction, are key for routing signals in photonic circuits. Here, we demonstrate a fiber-integrated quantum optical circulator operated by a single atom. Its nonreciprocal behavior arises from the chiral interaction between the atom and the transversally confined light. We demonstrate that the internal quantum state of the atom controls the operation direction of the circulator and that it features a strongly nonlinear response at the single-photon level. This enables, for example, photon number-dependent routing and novel quantum simulation protocols. Furthermore, such a circulator can in principle be prepared in a coherent superposition of its operational states and may become a key element for quantum information processing in scalable integrated optical circuits. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Optical Atomic Clocks for Ground and Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riehle, Fritz

    Optical atomic clocks on ground have now matured to a status where they compete favourably with the best caesium atomic clocks that realize the unit of time in the International System of Units (SI). Optical clocks can have orders of magnitude better short term stability than their radio-frequency counterparts. Even though optical clocks cannot realize the second in the SI better than the best caesium clocks (as long as the definition of the SI second is based on the caesium transition) they can realize the unperturbed center of a quantum transition with much better accuracy and stability. Optical atomic clocks now represent the most accurate measuring devices for applications in technology and basic science. Three alternative routes are followed by optical atomic clocks: In the first approach -the single ion clock -a single quantum absorber is trapped in a field-free region for virtually unlimited time. In neutral atom clocks a large number of atoms trapped in a light field can interrogated in parallel which allows for unprecedented high short-term stability. A very promising third avenue relies on ions where the quantum transition is read out by means of quantum logic techniques. This approach allows to use nearly ideal transitions that are otherwise not accessible. In the first part of this presentation the principles and status of the different types of clocks will be outlined using examples of the PTB's Y b+ single ion clock and the Sr neutral atom lattice clock. Particular emphasis is given to the application of such clocks for advanced applications in science and technology. A number of proposals has been made to utilize the superior properties of optical clocks also for novel science and applications in space and several attempts are under way to realize optical clocks for space applications. Thus, the second part of this contribution will deal with the special requirements for optical clocks in space and the associated similarities and differences of

  15. Damped Bloch oscillations of cold atoms in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Kolovsky, A.R.; Ponomarev, A.V.; Korsch, H.J.

    2002-11-01

    The paper studies Bloch oscillations of cold neutral atoms in the optical lattice. The effect of spontaneous emission on the dynamics of the system is analyzed both analytically and numerically. The spontaneous emission is shown to cause (i) the decay of Bloch oscillations with the decrement given by the rate of spontaneous emission and (ii) the diffusive spreading of the atoms with a diffusion coefficient depending on both the rate of spontaneous emission and the Bloch frequency.

  16. A magneto-optical trap for radioactive atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariotti, E.; Khanbekyan, K.; Marinelli, C.; Marmugi, L.; Moi, L.; Corradi, L.; Dainelli, A.; Calabrese, R.; Mazzocca, G.; Tomassetti, L.; Minguzzi, P.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents the recent results of the TrapRad/Francium collaboration whose final aim is the measurement of the Atomic Parity Non-Conservation effect (APNC) in Francium atoms stored in a Magneto - Optical Trap (MOT) built at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) of the National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN). Current developments and new strategies to enhance the trapping efficiency of Francium isotopes and to detect new spectroscopic features are reported.

  17. Progress Towards Optical Single Atom Detection for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jaideep; Wenzl, Jennifer; Frisbie, Dustin; Parzuchowski, Kristen; Johnson, Maegan

    2016-09-01

    We are developing the technique of optically detecting individual atoms embedded in thin films of cryogenically frozen solids. Noble gas solids such as frozen neon are an attractive medium because they are optically transparent and provide efficient, pure, stable, & chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of atomic and molecular species. We propose to couple this new detection technique to a recoil separator with the goal of measuring rare nuclear reactions relevant for nuclear astrophysics. Because of the additional selectivity provided by the atomic transitions of the captured atom, this detection scheme would help loosen the often demanding beam rejection requirements imposed on recoil separators. Our initial focus is the 22Ne(α, n)25Mg reaction, which is an important source of neutrons for the s-process. We will describe our measurements of the atomic & optical parameters needed to optimize the optical layout as well as a promising design for a prototype detector. This work is generously supported by Michigan State University.

  18. Prospects of Optical Single Atom Detection for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jaideep

    2015-10-01

    We will discuss the prospects of optically detecting single atoms captured in a cryogenic thin film of a noble gas such as neon. This proposed detection scheme, when coupled with a recoil separator, could be used to measure rare nuclear reactions relevant for nuclear astrophysics. In particular, we will focus on the 22Ne(α, n)25Mg reaction, which is an important source of neutrons for the s-process. Noble gas solids are an attractive medium because they are optically transparent and provide efficient, pure, stable, & chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of atomic and molecular species. Atoms embedded inside of noble gas solids have a fluorescence spectrum that is often significantly shifted from its absorption spectrum. This makes possible the detection of individual fluorescence photons against a background of intense excitation light, which can be suppressed using the appropriate optical filters. We will report on our efforts to optically detect single Yb atoms in solid Ne. Yb is an ideal candidate for initial studies because it emits a strong green fluorescence when excited by blue light and it has an atomic structure that very closely resembles that of Mg. This work is supported by funds from Michigan State University.

  19. Clock Shifts of Optical Transitions in Ultracold Atomic Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Zhenhua; Pethick, C. J.

    2010-01-08

    We calculate the shift, due to interatomic interactions, of an optical transition in an atomic Fermi gas trapped in an optical lattice, as in recent experiments of Campbell et al.[Science 324, 360 (2009)]. Using a pseudospin formalism to describe the density matrix of atoms, we derive a Bloch equation which incorporates both spatial inhomogeneity of the probe laser field and interatomic interactions. Expressions are given for the frequency shift as a function of pulse duration, detuning of the probe laser, and the spatial dependence of the electric field of the probe beam. In the low temperature semiclassical regime, we find that the magnitude of the shift is proportional to the temperature.

  20. Localisation of atomic populations in the optical radiation field

    SciTech Connect

    Efremova, E A; Gordeev, M Yu; Rozhdestvensky, Yu V

    2014-10-31

    The possibility of two-dimensional spatial localisation of atomic populations under the influence of the travelling wave fields in the tripod-configuration of quantum states is studied for the first time. Three travelling waves propagating in the same plane at an angle of 120° to each other form a system of standing waves under the influence of which atomic populations are localised. The size of the region of spatial localisation of the populations, in principle, can be hundredths of a wavelength of optical radiation. (quantum optics)

  1. Generating and probing entangled states for optical atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletic, Vladan

    2016-05-01

    The precision of quantum measurements is inherently limited by projection noise caused by the measurement process itself. Spin squeezing and more complex forms of entanglement have been proposed as ways of surpassing this limitation. In our system, a high-finesse asymmetric micromirror-based optical cavity can mediate the atom-atom interaction necessary for generating entanglement in an 171 Yb optical lattice clock. I will discuss approaches for creating, characterizing, and optimally utilizing these nonclassical states for precision measurement, as well as recent progress toward their realization. This research is supported by DARPA QuASAR, NSF, and NSERC.

  2. Evaluation of atomic constants for optical radiation, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kylstra, C. D.; Schneider, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Atomic constants for optical radiation are discussed which include transition probabilities, line strengths, and oscillator strengths for both dipole and quadrupole transitions, as well as the associated matrix elements needed for line broadening calculations. Atomic constants were computed for a wide selection of elements and lines. An existing computer program was used, with modifications to include, in an approximate manner, the effect of equivalent electrons, and to enable reordering and restructuring of the output for publication. This program is suitable for fast, low cost computation of the optical constants, using the Coulomb approximation formalism for LS coupling.

  3. Optically pumped semiconductor lasers for atomic and molecular physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burd, S.; Leibfried, D.; Wilson, A. C.; Wineland, D. J.

    2015-03-01

    Experiments in atomic, molecular and optical (AMO) physics rely on lasers at many different wavelengths and with varying requirements on spectral linewidth, power and intensity stability. Optically pumped semiconductor lasers (OPSLs), when combined with nonlinear frequency conversion, can potentially replace many of the laser systems currently in use. We are developing a source for laser cooling and spectroscopy of Mg+ ions at 280 nm, based on a frequency quadrupled OPSL with the gain chip fabricated at the ORC at Tampere Univ. of Technology, Finland. This OPSL system could serve as a prototype for many other sources used in atomic and molecular physics.

  4. An optical frequency standard based on ultracold magnesium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, A. N.; Bonert, A. E.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Prudnikov, O. N.; Tropnikov, M. A.; Kuznetsov, S. A.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Bagayev, S. N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the recent experimental results on development of an optical frequency standard based on ultra cold magnesium atoms with relative frequency uncertainty and long term stability at the level of Δv/v <10‑16. We stabilized the frequency of our clock laser system at 655 THz to narrow Ramsey fringes in a time separated laser fields interacting with cooled Mg atoms localized in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). The intercombination line 1S0→3P1 was used as the reference for frequency stabilization. The results of stabilization were studied with femtosecond comb based on Ti:Sa laser.

  5. Super-resolution microscopy of single atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Andrea; Robens, Carsten; Alt, Wolfgang; Brakhane, Stefan; Karski, Michał; Reimann, René; Widera, Artur; Meschede, Dieter

    2016-05-01

    We report on image processing techniques and experimental procedures to determine the lattice-site positions of single atoms in an optical lattice with high reliability, even for limited acquisition time or optical resolution. Determining the positions of atoms beyond the diffraction limit relies on parametric deconvolution in close analogy to methods employed in super-resolution microscopy. We develop a deconvolution method that makes effective use of the prior knowledge of the optical transfer function, noise properties, and discreteness of the optical lattice. We show that accurate knowledge of the image formation process enables a dramatic improvement on the localization reliability. This allows us to demonstrate super-resolution of the atoms’ position in closely packed ensembles where the separation between particles cannot be directly optically resolved. Furthermore, we demonstrate experimental methods to precisely reconstruct the point spread function with sub-pixel resolution from fluorescence images of single atoms, and we give a mathematical foundation thereof. We also discuss discretized image sampling in pixel detectors and provide a quantitative model of noise sources in electron multiplying CCD cameras. The techniques developed here are not only beneficial to neutral atom experiments, but could also be employed to improve the localization precision of trapped ions for ultra precise force sensing.

  6. Optical response of alkali metal atoms confined in nanoporous glass

    SciTech Connect

    Burchianti, A; Marinelli, C; Mariotti, E; Bogi, A; Marmugi, L; Giomi, S; Maccari, M; Veronesi, S; Moi, L

    2014-03-28

    We study the influence of optical radiation on adsorption and desorption processes of alkali metal atoms confined in nanoporous glass matrices. Exposure of the sample to near-IR or visible light changes the atomic distribution inside the glass nanopores, forcing the entire system to evolve towards a different state. This effect, due to both atomic photodesorption and confinement, causes the growth and evaporation of metastable nanoparticles. It is shown that, by a proper choice of light characteristics and pore size, these processes can be controlled and tailored, thus opening new perspectives for fabrication of nanostructured surfaces. (nanoobjects)

  7. Quantum atom optics with fermions from molecular dissociation.

    PubMed

    Kheruntsyan, K V

    2006-03-24

    We study a fermionic atom optics counterpart of parametric down-conversion with photons. This can be realized through dissociation of a Bose-Einstein condensate of molecular dimers consisting of fermionic atoms. We present a theoretical model describing the quantum dynamics of dissociation and find analytic solutions for mode occupancies and atomic pair correlations, valid in the short time limit. The solutions are used to identify upper bounds for the correlation functions, which are applicable to any fermionic system and correspond to ideal particle number-difference squeezing.

  8. Coherent transport of single atoms in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Merkel, Wolfgang; Mack, Holger; Freyberger, Matthias; Kozlov, Victor V.; Schleich, Wolfgang P.; Shore, Bruce W.

    2007-03-15

    We describe a technique for transferring a two-level atom between two adjacent potential wells of an optical lattice, using pairs of pump and Stokes pulses, each resonantly coupling the same pair of internal atomic states to form a Raman transition. Starting from a vibrational eigenstate of one well the atom slowly moves under the action of the pulse pair, to the vibrational eigenstate with the same quantum number in the neighboring well. The transfer takes place in two stages: A conventional stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) technique, in which Stokes precedes pump pulse, is followed by a pulse sequence where pump precedes Stokes and with an inverted sign of the Stokes envelope. In the first step the atom is accelerated toward the adjacent well and in the second step decelerated to the initial vibrational energy. The STIRAP technique avoids the introduction of stochastic motion caused by spontaneous emission from the excited internal atomic state.

  9. Pyramidal Magneto-Optical Atom Traps on a Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Samuel; Cotter, Joseph; Laliotis, Athanasios; Ramirez-Martinez, Fernando; Trupke, Michael; Hinds, Ed

    2009-05-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication and development of scalable arrays of pyramidal magneto-optical micro-traps in silicon as an elegant and simple way of capturing atoms from a thermal vapour directly on the surface of atom chips. The integration of these devices offers good prospects for reducing the cost and complexity of atom-chip experiments. Potential applications range from using an array of small cold atom clouds to map local magnetic field variations or sensing inertial forces. The micropyramids could also serve as single-atom sources for loading integrated optical cavities, allowing for production of single photons on demand for applications in QIP. We form the pyramids using an anisotropic etching process, preferentially etching the 100 plane to produce hollow pyramids in the surface of the wafer. Further processes have been developed to effectively smooth the rough mirror surfaces resulting from the anisotropic etch whilst maintaining the planar structure. We have recently demonstrated that these microfabricated pyramids can trap atoms from a thermal vapour. We present experimental data and associated theoretical models to describe the capture and loss processes of the MOT, as well as the properties of the cold atomic sample in the sub-mm^3 trapping region of the micropyramids.

  10. Cold Rydberg atoms in a CO2 optical dipole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Luis; Kondo, Jorge; Cabral, Jader; Marcassa, Luis

    2012-06-01

    There has been increasing interest in cold Rydberg atoms over the last several years. The primary reason for this attention is that interactions between Rydberg atoms are strong and lead to many interesting and useful phenomena, which require high atomic density samples. In this work, we have built an experimental setup to investigate cold Rydberg atom collision in a CO2 optical dipole trap. Briefly, we have loaded a Rb standard magneto-optical trap from an atomic vapor provided by a dispenser. Then we turn on 100W CO2 dipole trap and we apply a loading phase, in which the repumper light intensity is reduced and the trapping frequency is detuned to the red. After this phase, the trapping and repumper laser beams are turned off and we wait 100ms for the atoms, that were not trapped, to fall off the dipole trap region due to gravity. Finally, we turn off the dipole trap and excite the Rydberg state using a two photon transition. The Rydberg atoms are detected using pulsed field ionization technique. During the presentation we shall present preliminary results involving collisions between nD states.

  11. Triangular and honeycomb lattices of cold atoms in optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safaei, Shabnam; Miniatura, Christian; Grémaud, Benoît.

    2015-10-01

    We consider a two-dimensional homogeneous ensemble of cold bosonic atoms loaded inside two optical cavities and pumped by a far-detuned external laser field. We examine the conditions for these atoms to self-organize into triangular and honeycomb lattices as a result of superradiance. By collectively scattering the pump photons, the atoms feed the initially empty cavity modes. As a result, the superposition of the pump and cavity fields creates a space-periodic light-shift external potential and atoms self-organize into the potential wells of this optical lattice. Depending on the phase of the cavity fields with respect to the pump laser, these minima can either form a triangular or a hexagonal lattice. By numerically solving the dynamical equations of the coupled atom-cavity system, we have shown that the two stable atomic structures at long times are the triangular lattice and the honeycomb lattice with equally populated sites. We have also studied how to drive atoms from one lattice structure to another by dynamically changing the phase of the cavity fields with respect to the pump laser.

  12. Experiments in Cold Atom Optics at ARL I: Introduction to Atom Chip Set-up

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    optics. A pair of coils in an anti- Helmholtz configuration generate the quadrapole trapping fields. While two pairs of coils in Helmhotz configuration...order to trap the atoms an inhomogeneous magnetic field is applied via a pair of coils in an anti- Helmholtz configuration. Atoms that drift away...in an anti- Helmholtz configuration. The current is adjusted in these coils until the overlap between the laser beams and the magnetic field minimum

  13. Atomic processes in optically thin plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaastra, Jelle S.; Gu, Liyi; Mao, Junjie; Mehdipour, Missagh; Raassen, Ton; Urdampilleta, Igone

    2016-10-01

    The Universe contains a broad range of plasmas with quite different properties depending on distinct physical processes. In this contribution we give an overview of recent developments in modeling such plasmas with a focus on X-ray emission and absorption. Despite the fact that such plasmas have been investigated already for decades, and that overall there is a good understanding of the basic processes, there are still areas, where improvements have to be made that are important for the analysis of astrophysical plasmas. We present recent work on the update of atomic parameters in the codes that describe the emission from collisional plasmas, where older approximations are being replaced now by more accurate data. Further we discuss the development of models for photo-ionised plasmas in the context of outflows around supermassive black holes and models for charge transfer that are needed for analyzing the data from the upcoming ASTRO-H satellite.

  14. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) for optical nanofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maula, Jarmo

    2010-02-01

    ALD is currently one of the most rapidly developing fields of thin film technology. Presentation gives an overview of ALD technology for optical film deposition, highlighting benefits, drawbacks and peculiarities of the ALD, especially compared to PVD. Viewpoint is practical, based on experience gained from tens of different applications over the last few decades. ALD is not competing, but enabling technology to provide coatings, which are difficult for traditional technologies. Examples of such cases are films inside of tubes; double side deposition on the substrate; large area accurate coatings; decorative coating for 3D parts; conformal coatings on high aspect ratio surfaces or inside porous structures. Novel materials can be easily engineered by making modifications on molecular level. ALD coats large surfaces effectively and fast. Opposite to common view, it actually provides high throughput (coated area/time), when used properly with a batch and/or in-line tools. It is possible to use ALD for many micrometers thick films or even produce thin parts with competitive cost. Besides optical films ALD provides large variety of features for nanofabrication. For example pin hole free films for passivation and barrier applications and best available films for conformal coatings like planarization or to improve surface smoothness. High deposition repeatability even with subnanometer film structures helps fabrication. ALD enters to production mostly through new products, not yet existing on the market and so the application IP field is reasonably open. ALD is an enabling, mature technology to fabricate novel optical materials and to open pathways for new applications.

  15. Detecting atoms trapped in an optical lattice using a tapered optical nanofiber.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, T; Busch, Th

    2014-12-29

    Optical detection of structures with dimensions smaller than an optical wavelength requires devices that work on scales beyond the diffraction limit. Here we present the possibility of using a tapered optical nanofiber as a detector to resolve individual atoms trapped in an optical lattice in the Mott insulator phase. We show that the small size of the fiber combined with an enhanced photon collection rate can allow for the attainment of large and reliable measurement signals.

  16. An Optically Excited Metastable Krypton Atomic Beam Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastroianni, Michael; Orzel, Chad

    2006-05-01

    We report the construction of an optically excited metastable krypton atomic beam source. Ground-state Kr atoms are excited to the 5s[3/2]1 state by a 123 nm photon from a krypton resonance line lamp, then to the 5p[5/2]2 state by an 819 nm photon from a diode laser. From the 5p[3/2]2 state, they spontaneously decay into the 5s[3/2]2 (^3P2) metastable state with 77% probability. We characterize the source using both resonant fluorescence at 811 nm and a surface ionization detector. The source will be used to load a Kr* magneto-optical trap for Kr background evaluation by Atom Trap Trace Analysis.

  17. Compact magneto-optical sources of slow atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Yuri B.

    2005-05-01

    Three different configurations of compact magneto-optical sources of slow 87Rb atoms (LVIS, 2D+-MOT and 2D-MOT) were compared with each other at fixed geometry of cooling laser beams. A precise control of the intensity balances between the four separate transverse cooling laser beams provided a total continuous flux of cold atoms from the LVIS and 2D+-MOT sources about 8 × 109 atoms/s at total laser power of 60 mW. The flux was measured directly from the loading rate of a 3D-MOT, placed 34 cm downstream from the sources. Average velocities of the cooled atomic beam for the LVIS and 2D+-MOT sources were about 8.5 and 11 m/s, respectively. An essential advantage of the compact magneto-optical sources is that their background flux of thermal atoms is two to three orders of the magnitude smaller than the flux of slow atoms.

  18. Design and Finite Temperature Aspects of Atoms in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakie, Peter

    2003-05-01

    The control and manipulation of Bose-Einstein condensates with optical lattices is a major current interest in cold atom research, and is an important component in proposals for quantum computing with neutral atoms. A condensate loaded into an optical lattice can be described by a Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian and presents a unique opportunity for investigating aspects of many-body physics in a controlled manner, as typified by a recent experimental investigation where the quantum phase transition of atoms from a superfluid to Mott-insulating state was observed [1]. In this talk we consider the interference of three co-planar equal frequency light fields, which are far detuned from atomic resonance. Atoms within the region of the light field overlap will experience a periodic light shift potential that forms a two-dimensional optical lattice. We demonstrate the range of possible geometries for this type of lattice, obtainable by varying the propagation directions of the light fields. From band structure calculations we show how the tunneling rates can be manipulated to control the effective number of nearest neighbors. We discuss possible applications of this work to cold atom research. In the second part of this talk we consider recent experiments done in collaboration with Morsch et al. [2] investigating the non-adiabatic loading of a condensate into an optical lattice. We discuss the dephasing mechanisms and preliminary results in developing a model for the long time dynamically behavior. [1] M. Greiner, O. Mandel, T.Esslinger, T.W. Hansch and I. Bloch, Nature 415, 2002. [2] O. Morsch, J.H. Müller, D. Ciampini, M. Cristiani, P.B. Blakie, C.J. Williams, P.S. Julienne and E. Arimondo. Cond-mat/0208162 (to appear in Phys. Rev. A)

  19. Gain and lasing of optically pumped metastable rare gas atoms.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiande; Heaven, Michael C

    2012-06-01

    Optically pumped alkali vapor lasers are currently being developed in several laboratories. The objective is to construct high-powered lasers that also exhibit excellent beam quality. Considerable progress has been made, but there are technical challenges associated with the reactivity of the metal atoms. Rare gas atoms (Rg) excited to the np(5)(n+1)s (3)P(2) configuration are metastable and have spectral properties that are closely similar to those of the alkali metals. In principle, optically pumped lasers could be constructed using excitation of the np(5)(n+1)p←np(5)(n+1)s transitions. We have demonstrated this potential by observing gain and lasing for optically pumped Ar(*), Kr(*) and Xe(*). Three-level lasing schemes were used, with He or Ar as the collisional energy transfer agent that established the population inversion. These laser systems have the advantage of using inert reagents that are gases at room temperature.

  20. Optical Frequency Standards Based on Neutral Atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riehle, Fritz; Helmcke, Juergen

    The current status and prospects of optical frequency standards based on neutral atomic and molecular absorbers are reviewed. Special attention is given to an optical frequency standard based on cold Ca atoms which are interrogated with a pulsed excitation scheme leading to resolved line structures with a quality factor Q > 10^12. The optical frequency was measured by comparison with PTB's primary clock to be νCa = 455 986 240 494.13 kHz with a total relative uncertainty of 2.5 x10^-13. After a recent recommendation of the International Committee of Weights and Measures (CIPM), this frequency standard now represents one of the most accurate realizations of the length unit.

  1. Dynamics of matter waves in tailored optical and atomic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Jeremy; Gadway, Bryce; Krinner, Ludwig; Pertot, Daniel; Vogt, Matthias; Schneble, Dominik

    2012-06-01

    We report experimental results on the dynamics of atomic matter waves in temporally and spatially modulated lattices. In a first experiment, we investigated the effects of disorder on dynamical localization in a periodically-pulsed optical lattice in the framework of a kicked-rotor model. A second experiment explored the interplay between disorder and interactions in the damping of Bloch oscillations in a tilted disordered lattice. In a third experiment, we examined the diffraction of atomic matter waves from 1D ``crystal'' arrays of lattice-trapped atoms with respect to the temporal dynamics of matter-wave scattering. We also demonstrated the use of matter waves to detect forced antiferromagnetic ordering in an atomic spin-mixture.

  2. Counting atoms using interaction blockade in an optical superlattice.

    PubMed

    Cheinet, P; Trotzky, S; Feld, M; Schnorrberger, U; Moreno-Cardoner, M; Fölling, S; Bloch, I

    2008-08-29

    We report on the observation of an interaction blockade effect for ultracold atoms in optical lattices, analogous to the Coulomb blockade observed in mesoscopic solid state systems. When the lattice sites are converted into biased double wells, we detect a discrete set of steps in the well population for increasing bias potentials. These correspond to tunneling resonances where the atom number on each side of the barrier changes one by one. This allows us to count and control the number of atoms within a given well. By evaluating the amplitude of the different plateaus, we can fully determine the number distribution of the atoms in the lattice, which we demonstrate for the case of a superfluid and Mott insulating regime of 87Rb.

  3. Magic-wavelength optical traps for Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.; Saffman, M.; Robicheaux, F.

    2011-10-15

    We propose blue-detuned optical traps that are suitable for trapping of both ground-state and Rydberg excited atoms. The addition of a background compensation field or a suitable choice of the trap geometry provides a magic trapping condition for ground-state and Rydberg atoms at the trap center. Deviations from the magic condition at finite temperature are calculated. Designs that achieve less than 200-kHz differential trap shift between Cs ground states and 125s Rydberg states for 10 {mu}K Cs atoms are presented. Consideration of the trapping potential and photoionization rates suggests that these traps will be useful for quantum-information experiments with atomic qubits.

  4. Coupling a single trapped atom to a nanoscale optical cavity.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J D; Tiecke, T G; de Leon, N P; Feist, J; Akimov, A V; Gullans, M; Zibrov, A S; Vuletić, V; Lukin, M D

    2013-06-07

    Hybrid quantum devices, in which dissimilar quantum systems are combined in order to attain qualities not available with either system alone, may enable far-reaching control in quantum measurement, sensing, and information processing. A paradigmatic example is trapped ultracold atoms, which offer excellent quantum coherent properties, coupled to nanoscale solid-state systems, which allow for strong interactions. We demonstrate a deterministic interface between a single trapped rubidium atom and a nanoscale photonic crystal cavity. Precise control over the atom's position allows us to probe the cavity near-field with a resolution below the diffraction limit and to observe large atom-photon coupling. This approach may enable the realization of integrated, strongly coupled quantum nano-optical circuits.

  5. Dynamical phase interferometry of cold atoms in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    London, Uri; Gat, Omri

    2011-12-15

    We study the propagation of cold-atom wave packets in an interferometer with a Mach-Zehnder topology based on the dynamical phase of Bloch oscillation in a weakly forced optical lattice with a narrow potential barrier that functions as a cold-atom wave-packet splitter. We calculate analytically the atomic wave function, and show that the expected number of atoms in the two outputs of the interferometer oscillates rapidly as a function of the angle between the potential barrier and the forcing direction with period proportional to the external potential difference across a lattice spacing divided by the lattice band energy scale. The interferometer can be used as a high-precision force probe whose principle of operation is different from current interferometers based on the overall position of Bloch oscillating wave packets.

  6. Electrical and optical characterization of atomically thin WS₂.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Thanasis; Yang, Huafeng; Jalil, Rashid; Chapman, James; Novoselov, Kostya S; Mishchenko, Artem

    2014-07-21

    Atomically thin layers of materials, which are just a few atoms in thickness, present an attractive option for future electronic devices. Herein we characterize, optically and electronically, atomically thin tungsten disulphide (WS2), a layered semiconductor. We provide the distinctive Raman and photoluminescence signatures for single layers, and prepare field-effect transistors where atomically thin WS2 serves as the conductive channel. The transistors present mobilities μ = 10 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and exhibit ON/OFF ratios exceeding 100,000. Our results show that WS2 is an attractive option for applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices and pave the way for further studies in this two-dimensional material.

  7. Committee on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences (CAMOS)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Committee on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences is a standing committee under the auspices of the Board on Physics and Astronomy, Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications of the National Academy of Sciences -- National Research Council. The atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) sciences represent a broad and diverse field in which much of the research is carried out by small groups. These groups generally have not operated in concert with each other and, prior to the establishment of CAMOS, there was no single committee or organization that accepted the responsibility of monitoring the continuing development and assessing the general public health of the field as a whole. CAMOS has accepted this responsibility and currently provides a focus for the AMO community that is unique and essential. The membership of CAMOS is drawn from research laboratories in universities, industry, and government. Areas of expertise on the committee include atomic physics, molecular science, and optics. A special effort has been made to include a balanced representation from the three subfields. (A roster is attached.) CAMOS has conducted a number of studies related to the health of atomic and molecular science and is well prepared to response to requests for studies on specific issues. This report brief reviews the committee work of progress.

  8. Atomic and molecular data for optical stellar spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiter, U.; Lind, K.; Asplund, M.; Barklem, P. S.; Bergemann, M.; Magrini, L.; Masseron, T.; Mikolaitis, Š.; Pickering, J. C.; Ruffoni, M. P.

    2015-05-01

    High-precision spectroscopy of large stellar samples plays a crucial role for several topical issues in astrophysics. Examples include studying the chemical structure and evolution of the Milky Way Galaxy, tracing the origin of chemical elements, and characterizing planetary host stars. Data are accumulating from instruments that obtain high-quality spectra of stars in the ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelength regions on a routine basis. These instruments are located at ground-based 2-10 m class telescopes around the world, in addition to the spectrographs with unique capabilities available at the Hubble Space Telescope. The interpretation of these spectra requires high-quality transition data for numerous species, in particular neutral and singly ionized atoms, and di- or triatomic molecules. We rely heavily on the continuous efforts of laboratory astrophysics groups that produce and improve the relevant experimental and theoretical atomic and molecular data. The compilation of the best available data is facilitated by databases and electronic infrastructures such as the NIST Atomic Spectra Database, the VALD database, or the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre. We illustrate the current status of atomic data for optical stellar spectra with the example of the Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey. Data sources for 35 chemical elements were reviewed in an effort to construct a line list for a homogeneous abundance analysis of up to 105 stars.

  9. Photoassociation of Rb atoms in an optical dipole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegatti, Carlos; Marangoni, Bruno; Bouloufa, Nadia; Dulieu, Olivier; Marcassa, Luis

    2012-06-01

    Laser cooling and trapping techniques are nowadays routinely used to produce atomic samples at temperatures around 1 mK or below. An old ambition in this research field is the direct application of such techniques to molecules, however due to the absence of closed optical transitions in molecules this is not straightforward. Nevertheless, cold and dense atomic trapped samples can be used to produce cold molecules trough photoassociation. In our experiment, we have trapped Rb atoms in a crossed broadband optical dipole trap. Our crossed beam configuration uses 25 W of power (at 1064 n, bandwidth of 2 nm) in each beam with about 50 micron waist radius at the focus and a depth of about 700 μK. In the typical condition, we have about 3 x 10^6 trapped atoms at a density of 3 x 10^12 cm-3. We have observed that the Rb atom population presents a non-exponential decay in such a trap. We believe that such observation suggests that the sample is been photoassociated by the 1064 nm laser, forming an excited state Rb2 molecule, which further decays forming Rb2 in the ground state. The results are compared with a theoretical model.

  10. Weak Interaction Measurements with Optically Trapped Radioactive Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, D.J.; Crane, S.G.; Guckert, R.; Zhao, X.; Brice, S.J.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hime, A.; Tupa, D.

    1999-07-16

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this project is to apply the latest in magneto-optical and pure magnetic trapping technology to concentrate, cool, confine, and polarize radioactive atoms for precise electroweak interaction measurements. In particular, the authors have concentrated their efforts on the trapping of {sup 82}Rb for a parity-violating, beta-asymmetry measurement. Progress has been made in successfully trapping of up to 6 million {sup 82}Rb(t{sub 1/2}=75s) atoms in a magneto-optical trap coupled to a mass separator. This represents a two order of magnitude improvement in the number trapped radioactive atoms over all previous work. They have also measured the atomic hyperfine structure of {sup 82}Rb and demonstrated the MOT-to-MOT transfer and accumulation of atoms in a second trap. Finally, they have constructed and tested a time-orbiting-potential magnetic trap that will serve as a rotating beacon of spin-polarized nuclei and a beta-telescope detection system. Prototype experiments are now underway with the initial goal of making a 1% measurements of the beta-asymmetry parameter A which would match the world's best measurements.

  11. Optical force on atoms with periodic adiabatic rapid passage sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Xiyue

    Adiabatic Rapid Passage (ARP) is a long-existing method to invert the population of a two-level nuclear spin system. Its extension to the optical domain necessitates a frequency chirped light pulse to interact with a two-level atom through dipole interaction. In this dissertation ARP processes for various pulse schemes and pulse parameters have been studied theoretically and experimentally. The non-adiabatic transition probability of ARP was quantified to characterize the efficiency of ARP for population transfer. Unanticipated regularities were found in the pulse parameter space. ARP sequences in periodic phase coherent counter-propagating light pulses can be used to produce large optical forces on atoms. The magnitude of the force is proportional to the pulse repetition rate. So the force can be much larger than the usual radiative force if the pulse repetition rate is much higher than the spontaneous emission rate. The behavior of the atoms in such periodic ARP fields without spontaneous emission is well described by a periodic Hamiltonian. By investigating the evolution of the Bloch vector on the Bloch sphere, we related the average optical force on atoms to the non-adiabatic transition probability of a single pulse. Syncopation time has to be introduced in the pulsing scheme to produce a directional force in the presence of spontaneous emission. Experimentally, we observed the force on He* atoms by the deflection of the atomic beam with periodic chirped pulses from counter-propagating pulse trains. The chirped pulse train was realized by synchronized phase and amplitude modulation of the light from a cw diode laser. The Fourier spectrum of the modulated light was monitored to guarantee the quality of the chirped pulses. The measured ARP forces are about half of the theoretical predictions. Not only have we shown that such forces are huge and robust, but we have also been able to map the forces in the two dimensional pulse parameter space. The force

  12. Laser and Optical Subsystem for NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohel, James; Kellogg, James; Elliott, Ethan; Krutzik, Markus; Aveline, David; Thompson, Robert

    2016-05-01

    We describe the design and validation of the laser and optics subsystem for NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL), a multi-user facility being developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory for studies of ultra-cold quantum gases in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station. Ultra-cold atoms will be generated in CAL by employing a combination of laser cooling techniques and evaporative cooling in a microchip-based magnetic trap. Laser cooling and absorption imaging detection of bosonic mixtures of 87 Rb and 39 K or 41 K will be accomplished using a high-power (up to 500 mW ex-fiber), frequency-agile dual wavelength (767 nm and 780 nm) laser and optical subsystem. The CAL laser and optical subsystem also includes the capability to generate high-power multi-frequency optical pulses at 784.87 nm to realize a dual-species Bragg atom interferometer. Currently at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.

  13. Strongly Interacting Atom Lasers in Three-Dimensional Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Hen, Itay; Rigol, Marcos

    2010-10-29

    We show that the dynamical melting of a Mott insulator in a three-dimensional lattice leads to condensation at nonzero momenta, a phenomenon that can be used to generate strongly interacting atom lasers in optical lattices. For infinite on-site repulsion, the case considered here, the momenta at which bosons condense are determined analytically and found to have a simple dependence on the hopping amplitudes. The occupation of the condensates is shown to scale linearly with the total number of atoms in the initial Mott insulator. Our results are obtained by using a Gutzwiller-type mean-field approach, gauged against exact-diagonalization solutions of small systems.

  14. Noninvasive determination of optical lever sensitivity in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, M.J.; Proksch, R.; Sader, J.E.; Polcik, M.; Mc Endoo, S.; Cleveland, J.P.; Jarvis, S.P.

    2006-01-15

    Atomic force microscopes typically require knowledge of the cantilever spring constant and optical lever sensitivity in order to accurately determine the force from the cantilever deflection. In this study, we investigate a technique to calibrate the optical lever sensitivity of rectangular cantilevers that does not require contact to be made with a surface. This noncontact approach utilizes the method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] to calibrate the spring constant of the cantilever in combination with the equipartition theorem [J. L. Hutter and J. Bechhoefer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 1868 (1993)] to determine the optical lever sensitivity. A comparison is presented between sensitivity values obtained from conventional static mode force curves and those derived using this noncontact approach for a range of different cantilevers in air and liquid. These measurements indicate that the method offers a quick, alternative approach for the calibration of the optical lever sensitivity.

  15. Anti-parity-time-symmetry optics in an atomic vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Peng; Cao, Wanxia; Wen, Jianming; Jiang, Liang; Xiao, Yanhong

    2015-05-01

    Recently, there has been growing interest to create optical systems with parity-time (PT) symmetry for manipulation of light. A new addition to this line of research is the study of anti-PT-symmetry optics. Unlike a PT symmetry system which requires balanced gain and loss and equal refractive index, the anti-PT symmetry system requires balanced positive and negative refractive index but with the same gain or loss. As in PT-symmetry systems, anti-PT symmetry systems can also display spontaneous phase transition. We have experimentally demonstrated an anti-PT symmetry optical system using a warm atomic vapor cell containing 87Rb. Coupling of two optical modes under Electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT) is realized by coherent diffusion of atomic coherence. Our theory predicts that, in a PT-symmetry system, coupling of the two optical channels would increase the gap between their initially separated EIT peaks, but in an anti-PT symmetry system, it would do the opposite. Especially, when the coupling is large enough, the gap vanishes, which indicates that the system is under phase transition. We will report experiment observation of these predictions.

  16. Four-channel optically pumped atomic magnetometer for magnetoencephalography

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Anthony P.; Carter, Tony R.; Borna, Amir; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Johnson, Cort N.; Dagel, Amber L.; Schwindt, Peter D. D.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a four-channel optically pumped atomic magnetometer for magnetoencephalography (MEG) that incorporates a passive diffractive optical element (DOE). The DOE allows us to achieve a long, 18-mm gradiometer baseline in a compact footprint on the head. Using gradiometry, the sensitivities of the channels are < 5 fT/Hz1/2, and the 3-dB bandwidths are approximately 90 Hz, which are both sufficient to perform MEG. Additionally, the channels are highly uniform, which offers the possibility of employing standard MEG post-processing techniques. This module will serve as a building block of an array for magnetic source localization. PMID:27410816

  17. Four-channel optically pumped atomic magnetometer for magnetoencephalography.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Anthony P; Carter, Tony R; Borna, Amir; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Johnson, Cort N; Dagel, Amber L; Schwindt, Peter D D

    2016-07-11

    We have developed a four-channel optically pumped atomic magnetometer for magnetoencephalography (MEG) that incorporates a passive diffractive optical element (DOE). The DOE allows us to achieve a long, 18-mm gradiometer baseline in a compact footprint on the head. Using gradiometry, the sensitivities of the channels are < 5 fT/Hz1/2, and the 3-dB bandwidths are approximately 90 Hz, which are both sufficient to perform MEG. Additionally, the channels are highly uniform, which offers the possibility of employing standard MEG post-processing techniques. This module will serve as a building block of an array for magnetic source localization.

  18. Quantum theory of cold bosonic atoms in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Tilahun, Dagim; Duine, R. A.; MacDonald, A. H.

    2011-09-15

    Ultracold atoms in optical lattices undergo a quantum phase transition from a superfluid to a Mott insulator as the lattice potential depth is increased. We describe an approximate theory of interacting bosons in optical lattices which provides a qualitative description of both superfluid and insulator states. The theory is based on a change of variables in which the boson coherent state amplitude is replaced by an effective potential which promotes phase coherence between different number states on each lattice site. It is illustrated here by applying it to uniform and fully frustrated lattice cases but is simple enough that it can be applied to spatially inhomogeneous lattice systems.

  19. Cold Atomic Gases in Optical Lattices with Disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, T.; Drenkelforth, S.; Kruse, J.; Ertmer, W.; Arlt, J. J.; Kantian, A.; Santos, L. Sanchez-Palencia L.; Sanpera, A.; Sacha, K.; Zoller, P.; Lewenstein, M.; Zakrzewski, J.

    2007-01-01

    Cold atomic gases placed in optical lattices enable studies of simple condensed matter theory models with parameters that may be tuned relatively easily. When the optical potential is randomized (e.g. using laser speckle to create a random intensity distribution) one may be able to observe Anderson localization of matter waves for non-interacting bosons, the so-called Bose glass in the presence of interactions, as well as the Fermi glass or quantum spin glass for mixtures of fermions and bosons.

  20. Four-channel optically pumped atomic magnetometer for magnetoencephalography

    DOE PAGES

    Colombo, Anthony P.; Carter, Tony R.; Borna, Amir; ...

    2016-06-29

    We have developed a four-channel optically pumped atomic magnetometer for magnetoencephalography (MEG) that incorporates a passive diffractive optical element (DOE). The DOE allows us to achieve a long, 18-mm gradiometer baseline in a compact footprint on the head. Using gradiometry, the sensitivities of the channels are < 5 fT/Hz1/2, and the 3-dB bandwidths are approximately 90 Hz, which are both sufficient to perform MEG. Additionally, the channels are highly uniform, which offers the possibility of employing standard MEG post-processing techniques. As a result, this module will serve as a building block of an array for magnetic source localization.

  1. Four-channel optically pumped atomic magnetometer for magnetoencephalography

    DOE PAGES

    Colombo, Anthony P.; Carter, Tony R.; Borna, Amir; ...

    2016-06-29

    We have developed a four-channel optically pumped atomic magnetometer for magnetoencephalography (MEG) that incorporates a passive diffractive optical element (DOE). The DOE allows us to achieve a long, 18-mm gradiometer baseline in a compact footprint on the head. Using gradiometry, the sensitivities of the channels are < 5 fT/Hz1/2, and the 3-dB bandwidths are approximately 90 Hz, which are both sufficient to perform MEG. Additionally, the channels are highly uniform, which offers the possibility of employing standard MEG post-processing techniques. As a result, this module will serve as a building block of an array for magnetic source localization.

  2. Atomic force microscopy combined with optical microscopy for cells investigation.

    PubMed

    Cascione, Mariafrancesca; de Matteis, Valeria; Rinaldi, Rosaria; Leporatti, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    This review reports on the combined use of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and several type of optical/fluorescence/laser scanning microscopy for investigating cells. It is shown that the hybrid systems of AFM with optical-derived microscopies enable to study in detail cell surface properties (such as topography), their mechanical properties (e.g., Young's modulus) mechanotransduction phenomena and allow to gain insight into biological-related pathways and mechanisms in the complex nanoworld of cells. Microsc. Res. Tech. 80:109-123, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Four-channel optically pumped atomic magnetometer for magnetoencephalography

    SciTech Connect

    Colombo, Anthony P.; Carter, Tony R.; Borna, Amir; Jau, Yuan -Yu; Johnson, Cort N.; Dagel, Amber L.; Schwindt, Peter D. D.

    2016-06-29

    We have developed a four-channel optically pumped atomic magnetometer for magnetoencephalography (MEG) that incorporates a passive diffractive optical element (DOE). The DOE allows us to achieve a long, 18-mm gradiometer baseline in a compact footprint on the head. Using gradiometry, the sensitivities of the channels are < 5 fT/Hz1/2, and the 3-dB bandwidths are approximately 90 Hz, which are both sufficient to perform MEG. Additionally, the channels are highly uniform, which offers the possibility of employing standard MEG post-processing techniques. As a result, this module will serve as a building block of an array for magnetic source localization.

  4. Optics in the Multipole Approximation: From Atomic Systems to Solids

    SciTech Connect

    CHOW, WENG W.; KNORR, ANDREAS; KOCH, STEPHAN W.

    1999-09-13

    Starting from the microscopic light-matter interaction in form of the minimal coupling Hamiltonian, the multipole approximation for the optical response of localized electrons in atomic systems is extended to delocalized electrons in solids. A spatial averaging procedure is used to derive the electromagnetic sources for macroscopic Maxwell's equations as well as the corresponding many particle Hamiltonian on a coarse grained length scale. The results are illustrated for semiconductor bulk material up to quadruple moments for the interband transitions, where gauge invariant equations of motion for the optical response are obtained.

  5. Incomplete optical shielding in cold sodium atom traps

    SciTech Connect

    Yurovsky, Vladimir; Ben-Reuven, Abraham

    1997-01-05

    A simple two-channel model, based on the semiclassical Landau-Zener (LZ) approximation, with averaging over angle-dependent exponents, is proposed as a fast means for accounting for the incomplete optical shielding of collisions, as observed in recent experiments conducted by Weiner and co-workers on ultracold sodium-atom traps, and its dependence on the laser polarization. The model yields a reasonably good agreement with the recent quantum close-coupling calculations of Julienne and co-workers. The remaining discrepancy between both theories and the data is qualitatively attributed to a partial overlap of the collision ranges at which loss processes and optical shielding occur.

  6. Collisional shifts in optical-lattice atom clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Band, Y. B.; Vardi, A.

    2006-09-15

    We theoretically study the effects of elastic collisions on the determination of frequency standards via Ramsey-fringe spectroscopy in optical-lattice atom clocks. Interparticle interactions of bosonic atoms in multiply occupied lattice sites can cause a linear frequency shift, as well as generate asymmetric Ramsey-fringe patterns and reduce fringe visibility due to interparticle entanglement. We propose a method of reducing these collisional effects in an optical lattice by introducing a phase difference of {pi} between the Ramsey driving fields in adjacent sites. This configuration suppresses site-to-site hopping due to interference of two tunneling pathways, without degrading fringe visibility. Consequently, the probability of double occupancy is reduced, leading to cancellation of collisional shifts.

  7. Accurate Optical Lattice Clock with {sup 87}Sr Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Le Targat, Rodolphe; Baillard, Xavier; Fouche, Mathilde; Brusch, Anders; Tcherbakoff, Olivier; Rovera, Giovanni D.; Lemonde, Pierre

    2006-09-29

    We report a frequency measurement of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0} transition of {sup 87}Sr atoms in an optical lattice clock. The frequency is determined to be 429 228 004 229 879(5) Hz with a fractional uncertainty that is comparable to state-of-the-art optical clocks with neutral atoms in free fall. The two previous measurements of this transition were found to disagree by about 2x10{sup -13}, i.e., almost 4 times the combined error bar and 4 to 5 orders of magnitude larger than the claimed ultimate accuracy of this new type of clocks. Our measurement is in agreement with one of these two values and essentially resolves this discrepancy.

  8. SLAC All Access: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, John

    2013-11-05

    John Bozek, a staff scientist at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser who manages the LCLS Soft X-ray Department, takes us behind the scenes at the Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science (AMO) instrument, the first of six experimental stations now operating at LCLS. Samples used in AMO experiments include atoms, molecules, clusters, and nanoscale objects such as protein crystals or viruses. Science performed at AMO includes fundamental studies of light-matter interactions in the extreme X-ray intensity of the LCLS pules, time-resolved studies of increasingly charged states of atoms and molecules, X-ray diffraction imaging of nanocrystals, and single-shot imaging of a variety of objects.

  9. Quantum simulations with ultracold atoms in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Gross, Christian; Bloch, Immanuel

    2017-09-08

    Quantum simulation, a subdiscipline of quantum computation, can provide valuable insight into difficult quantum problems in physics or chemistry. Ultracold atoms in optical lattices represent an ideal platform for simulations of quantum many-body problems. Within this setting, quantum gas microscopes enable single atom observation and manipulation in large samples. Ultracold atom-based quantum simulators have already been used to probe quantum magnetism, to realize and detect topological quantum matter, and to study quantum systems with controlled long-range interactions. Experiments on many-body systems out of equilibrium have also provided results in regimes unavailable to the most advanced supercomputers. We review recent experimental progress in this field and comment on future directions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  10. SLAC All Access: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science Instrument

    ScienceCinema

    Bozek, John

    2016-07-12

    John Bozek, a staff scientist at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser who manages the LCLS Soft X-ray Department, takes us behind the scenes at the Atomic, Molecular and Optical Science (AMO) instrument, the first of six experimental stations now operating at LCLS. Samples used in AMO experiments include atoms, molecules, clusters, and nanoscale objects such as protein crystals or viruses. Science performed at AMO includes fundamental studies of light-matter interactions in the extreme X-ray intensity of the LCLS pules, time-resolved studies of increasingly charged states of atoms and molecules, X-ray diffraction imaging of nanocrystals, and single-shot imaging of a variety of objects.

  11. Dynamical entanglement purification using chains of atoms and optical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Gonta, Denis; Loock, Peter van

    2011-10-15

    In the framework of cavity QED, we propose a practical scheme to purify dynamically a bipartite entangled state using short chains of atoms coupled to high-finesse optical cavities. In contrast to conventional entanglement purification protocols, we avoid controlled-not gates, thus reducing complicated pulse sequences and superfluous qubit operations. Our interaction scheme works in a deterministic way and, together with entanglement distribution and swapping, opens a route toward efficient quantum repeaters for long-distance quantum communication.

  12. Optical microcavity: sensing down to single molecules and atoms.

    PubMed

    Yoshie, Tomoyuki; Tang, Lingling; Su, Shu-Yu

    2011-01-01

    This review article discusses fundamentals of dielectric, low-loss, optical micro-resonator sensing, including figures of merit and a variety of microcavity designs, and future perspectives in microcavity-based optical sensing. Resonance frequency and quality (Q) factor are altered as a means of detecting a small system perturbation, resulting in realization of optical sensing of a small amount of sample materials, down to even single molecules. Sensitivity, Q factor, minimum detectable index change, noises (in sensor system components and microcavity system including environments), microcavity size, and mode volume are essential parameters to be considered for optical sensing applications. Whispering gallery mode, photonic crystal, and slot-type microcavities typically provide compact, high-quality optical resonance modes for optical sensing applications. Surface Bloch modes induced on photonic crystals are shown to be a promising candidate thanks to large field overlap with a sample and ultra-high-Q resonances. Quantum optics effects based on microcavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) would provide novel single-photo-level detection of even single atoms and molecules via detection of doublet vacuum Rabi splitting peaks in strong coupling.

  13. Optical Microcavity: Sensing down to Single Molecules and Atoms

    PubMed Central

    Yoshie, Tomoyuki; Tang, Lingling; Su, Shu-Yu

    2011-01-01

    This review article discusses fundamentals of dielectric, low-loss, optical micro-resonator sensing, including figures of merit and a variety of microcavity designs, and future perspectives in microcavity-based optical sensing. Resonance frequency and quality (Q) factor are altered as a means of detecting a small system perturbation, resulting in realization of optical sensing of a small amount of sample materials, down to even single molecules. Sensitivity, Q factor, minimum detectable index change, noises (in sensor system components and microcavity system including environments), microcavity size, and mode volume are essential parameters to be considered for optical sensing applications. Whispering gallery mode, photonic crystal, and slot-type microcavities typically provide compact, high-quality optical resonance modes for optical sensing applications. Surface Bloch modes induced on photonic crystals are shown to be a promising candidate thanks to large field overlap with a sample and ultra-high-Q resonances. Quantum optics effects based on microcavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) would provide novel single-photo-level detection of even single atoms and molecules via detection of doublet vacuum Rabi splitting peaks in strong coupling. PMID:22319393

  14. Editorial . Quantum fluctuations and coherence in optical and atomic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eschner, Jürgen; Gatti, Alessandra; Maître, Agnès; Morigi, Giovanna

    2003-03-01

    From simple interference fringes, over molecular wave packets, to nonlinear optical patterns - the fundamental interaction between light and matter leads to the formation of structures in many areas of atomic and optical physics. Sophisticated technology in experimental quantum optics, as well as modern computational tools available to theorists, have led to spectacular achievements in the investigation of quantum structures. This special issue is dedicated to recent developments in this area. It presents a selection of examples where quantum dynamics, fluctuations, and coherence generate structures in time or in space or where such structures are observed experimentally. The examples range from coherence phenomena in condensed matter, over atoms in optical structures, entanglement in light and matter, to quantum patterns in nonlinear optics and quantum imaging. The combination of such seemingly diverse subjects formed the basis of a successful European TMR network, "Quantum Structures" (visit http://cnqo.phys.strath.ac.uk/~gianluca/QSTRUCT/). This special issue partly re.ects the results and collaborations of the network, going however well beyond its scope by including contributions from a global community and from many related topics which were not addressed directly in the network. The aim of this issue is to present side by side these di.erent topics, all of which are loosely summarized under quantum structures, to highlight their common aspects, their di.erences, and the progress which resulted from the mutual exchange of results, methods, and knowledge. To guide the reader, we have organized the articles into subsections which follow a rough division into structures in material systems and structures in optical .elds. Nevertheless, in the following introduction we point out connections between the contributions which go beyond these usual criteria, thus highlighting the truly interdisciplinary nature of quantum structures. Much of the progress in atom optics

  15. Quantum Computation with Neutral Atoms at Addressable Optical Lattice Sites and Atoms in Confined Geometries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-13

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We have performed a set of experiments using arrays of 1D Bose gases in various configurations. Uncoupled 1D gases have been...used to study the limits of statistical mechanics near integrable points. We have shown that nearly integrable gases thermalize at an even slower...NAME(S) AND ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 ultracold atoms, optical lattices, 1D gases

  16. Gravitational wave detection with optical lattice atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkowitz, S.; Pikovski, I.; Langellier, N.; Lukin, M. D.; Walsworth, R. L.; Ye, J.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a space-based gravitational wave (GW) detector consisting of two spatially separated, drag-free satellites sharing ultrastable optical laser light over a single baseline. Each satellite contains an optical lattice atomic clock, which serves as a sensitive, narrowband detector of the local frequency of the shared laser light. A synchronized two-clock comparison between the satellites will be sensitive to the effective Doppler shifts induced by incident GWs at a level competitive with other proposed space-based GW detectors, while providing complementary features. The detected signal is a differential frequency shift of the shared laser light due to the relative velocity of the satellites, and the detection window can be tuned through the control sequence applied to the atoms' internal states. This scheme enables the detection of GWs from continuous, spectrally narrow sources, such as compact binary inspirals, with frequencies ranging from ˜3 mHz - 10 Hz without loss of sensitivity, thereby bridging the detection gap between space-based and terrestrial optical interferometric GW detectors. Our proposed GW detector employs just two satellites, is compatible with integration with an optical interferometric detector, and requires only realistic improvements to existing ground-based clock and laser technologies.

  17. Nonperturbative atom-photon interactions in an optical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, H.J.; Tian, L.; Ren, W.

    1994-12-31

    One of the principal developments in cavity quantum electrodynamics in the last few years has been the extension of the ideas originally applied to systems of Rydberg atoms in microwave cavities to optical frequencies. As a corollary of this, more attention is being paid to quantum fluctuations and photon statistics. Another development, still in its infancy, is a move toward experiments using slowed or trapped atoms, or velocity selected beams; these methods are needed to enter the nonperturbative (strong dipole coupling) regime for one atom where there are experiments on subtle quantum-statistical effects go carry out. In this chapter we solve a number of theoretical problems related to these themes. Although the focus of the work is on optical systems, most of what we do is also relevant at microwave frequencies. We emphasize quantum fluctuations and photon statistics, and we try always to separate the quantum physics from those aspects of the physics that are understandable in classical terms. On the whole we only pay attention to the nonperturbative regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics where the dipole coupling strength is larger than the dissipation rates. 59 refs., 14 figs.

  18. Coherent Magnetic Response at Optical Frequencies Using Atomic Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Nicholas R.; Buckholtz, Zachary N.; Simmons, Zachary J.; Mueller, Eli A.; Yavuz, Deniz D.

    2017-01-01

    In optics, the interaction of atoms with the magnetic field of light is almost always ignored since its strength is many orders of magnitude weaker compared to the interaction with the electric field. In this article, by using a magnetic-dipole transition within the 4 f shell of europium ions, we show a strong interaction between a green laser and an ensemble of atomic ions. The electrons move coherently between the ground and excited ionic levels (Rabi flopping) by interacting with the magnetic field of the laser. By measuring the Rabi flopping frequency as the laser intensity is varied, we report the first direct measurement of a magnetic-dipole matrix element in the optical region of the spectrum. Using density-matrix simulations of the ensemble, we infer the generation of coherent magnetization with magnitude 5.5 ×10-3 A /m , which is capable of generating left-handed electromagnetic waves of intensity 1 nW /cm2 . These results open up the prospect of constructing left-handed materials using sharp transitions of atoms.

  19. New Optical Absorption Bands in Atomic Layer Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckstein, James

    2011-03-01

    Using atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy, atomic layer superlattices can be constructed that exhibit new electronic, optical and lattice effects not present in the individual components. In particular, new optical transitions giving rise to sharp absorption peaks can be created by placing a layer of a material with occupied source states next to a layer of another material with unoccupied destination states. We combine atomic layers of SrTi O3 and LaMn O3 into superlattice structures with component layers as thin as single monolayer and find a new absorption band due to a transition from manganese- to titanium-derived states. The energy of the new transition depends on how the bands line up at the interface. Furthermore, a substantial shift of spectral weight occurs as well, while retaining a constant sum rule. This work was supported by the Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences at the Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana. This work was done in collaboration with Xiaofang Zhai, Mao Zheng, Amish Shah, Chandra Mohapatra, and Jian-Min Zuo. This work was supported by the Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences at the Fredrick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana.

  20. Remote atomic clock synchronization via satellites and optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piester, D.; Rost, M.; Fujieda, M.; Feldmann, T.; Bauch, A.

    2011-07-01

    In the global network of institutions engaged with the realization of International Atomic Time (TAI), atomic clocks and time scales are compared by means of the Global Positioning System (GPS) and by employing telecommunication satellites for two-way satellite time and frequency transfer (TWSTFT). The frequencies of the state-of-the-art primary caesium fountain clocks can be compared at the level of 10-15 (relative, 1 day averaging) and time scales can be synchronized with an uncertainty of one nanosecond. Future improvements of worldwide clock comparisons will require also an improvement of the local signal distribution systems. For example, the future ACES (atomic clock ensemble in space) mission shall demonstrate remote time scale comparisons at the uncertainty level of 100 ps. To ensure that the ACES ground instrument will be synchronized to the local time scale at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) without a significant uncertainty contribution, we have developed a means for calibrated clock comparisons through optical fibers. An uncertainty below 40 ps over a distance of 2 km has been demonstrated on the campus of PTB. This technology is thus in general a promising candidate for synchronization of enhanced time transfer equipment with the local realizations of Coordinated Universal Time UTC. Based on these experiments we estimate the uncertainty level for calibrated time transfer through optical fibers over longer distances. These findings are compared with the current status and developments of satellite based time transfer systems, with a focus on the calibration techniques for operational systems.

  1. Nonlinear optical and optical limiting properties of polymeric carboxyl phthalocyanine coordinated with rare earth atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Peng; Wang, Zonghua; Chen, Jishi; Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Fushi

    2017-04-01

    The nonlinear optical properties of the polymeric carboxyl phthalocyanine with lanthanum (LaPPc.COOH), holmium (HoPPc.COOH) and ytterbium (YbPPc.COOH) as centric atom, were investigated by the Z-scan method using a picosecond 532 nm laser. The synthesized phthalocyanines had steric polymeric structure and dissolved well in aqueous solution. The nonlinear optical response of them was attributed to the reverse saturable absorption and self-focus refraction. The nonlinear absorption properties decreased with the centric atoms changing from La, Ho to Yb. The largest second-order hyperpolarizability and optical limiting response threshold of LaPPc.COOH were 3.89 × 10-29 esu and 0.32 J/cm2, respectively. The reverse saturable absorption was explained by a three level mode of singlet excited state under the picosecond irradiation. The result indicates the steric structure presented additive stability of these polymeric phthalocyanines for their application as potential optical limiting materials.

  2. The atom in an intense optical field (2nd revised and enlarged edition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delone, N. B.; Krainov, V. P.

    The basic features characterizing multiphoton processes are examined, and descriptions are given of such phenomena as the multiphoton ionization of atoms, multiphoton resonance, and the perturbation of the bound-state spectrum in atoms in an optical field. The design of an experiment for measuring the interaction of laser radiation with atoms is proposed. Particular attention is given to nonlinear atomic susceptibilities, the effect of multifrequency laser radiation, and the behavior of highly excited atoms in an intense optical field.

  3. Deterministic quantum nonlinear optics with single atoms and virtual photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kockum, Anton Frisk; Miranowicz, Adam; Macrı, Vincenzo; Savasta, Salvatore; Nori, Franco

    2017-06-01

    We show how analogs of a large number of well-known nonlinear-optics phenomena can be realized with one or more two-level atoms coupled to one or more resonator modes. Through higher-order processes, where virtual photons are created and annihilated, an effective deterministic coupling between two states of such a system can be created. In this way, analogs of three-wave mixing, four-wave mixing, higher-harmonic and -subharmonic generation (i.e., up- and down-conversion), multiphoton absorption, parametric amplification, Raman and hyper-Raman scattering, the Kerr effect, and other nonlinear processes can be realized. In contrast to most conventional implementations of nonlinear optics, these analogs can reach unit efficiency, only use a minimal number of photons (they do not require any strong external drive), and do not require more than two atomic levels. The strength of the effective coupling in our proposed setups becomes weaker the more intermediate transition steps are needed. However, given the recent experimental progress in ultrastrong light-matter coupling and improvement of coherence times for engineered quantum systems, especially in the field of circuit quantum electrodynamics, we estimate that many of these nonlinear-optics analogs can be realized with currently available technology.

  4. Nonlinear optical properties of atomic vapor and semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Doseok

    1997-05-01

    This thesis contains the study of highly forbidden resonant second harmonic generation (SHG) in atomic potassium vapor using tunable picosecond pulses. Various output characteristics of vapor SHG have been investigated including the input intensity dependence, potassium vapor density dependence, buffer gas pressure dependence, and spatial profile. Recently, the discovery of new nonlinear optical crystals such as barium borate (β-BaB2O4, BBO) and lithium borate (LiB3O5, LBO) has greatly improved the performance of a tunable coherent optical devices based on optical parametric generation and amplification. In the second part of this thesis, a homebuilt picosecond optical parametric generator/amplifier (OPG/OPA) system is described in detail, including its construction details and output characteristics. This laser device has found many useful applications in spectroscopic studies including surface nonlinear optical spectroscopy via sum-frequency generation (SFG). The last part of this thesis reports studies on multiphoton-excited photoluminescence from porous silicon and GaN. Multiphoton excitation and photoluminescence can give numerous complementary information about semiconductors not obtainable with one-photon, above-bandgap excitation.

  5. Studying non-linear dynamics with atom-optics billiards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Nir

    2002-05-01

    The dynamics of particles moving with constant speed in a bounded region and undergoing elastic collisions at the region's boundary (a "billiard") has been extensively investigated both classically and quantum mechanically, since this very simple system exhibits a rich variety of non-linear dynamics phenomena, and is often used as a paradigm for studying the foundations of statistical mechanics. Recently, an "atom-optics billiard" was realized, using a tightly focused laser beam far detuned above the atomic resonance, and rapidly scanning along the desired trap shape(V. Milner, J. L. Hanssen, W. C. Campbell, and M. G. Raizen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86), 1514 (2001)^,(N. Friedman, A. Kaplan, D. Carasso, and N. Davidson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86), 1518 (2001). The beam generates a time-averaged potential wall whose shape is varied to create different dynamics of the trapped atoms. Using this system, we demonstrate regular, chaotic and mixed motion, where stickiness close to KAM islands embedded in a chaotic sea yealds Levy flights. We study different mechanisms that affect phase-space structure, e.g. scattering^3, wall softness(A. Kaplan, N. Friedman, M. Andersen, and N. Davidson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87), 274101 (2001). and external forces(M. Andersen, A. Kaplan, N. Friedman, and N. Davidson, submitted to J. Phys. B (2002).). Exploiting the long atomic coherence times achievable in the billiards, our experimental system also sheds new light on the interplay between dynamics and coherence.

  6. Characteristics of integrated magneto-optical traps for atom chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, S.; Cotter, J. P.; Laliotis, A.; Ramirez-Martinez, F.; Hinds, E. A.

    2011-04-01

    We investigate the operation of pyramidal magneto-optical traps (MOTs) microfabricated in silicon. Measurements of the loading and loss rates give insights into the role of the nearby surface in the MOT dynamics. Studies of the fluorescence versus laser frequency and intensity allow us to develop a simple theory of operation. The number of 85Rb atoms trapped in the pyramid is approximately L6, where Llsim6 is the size of the pyramid opening in mm. This follows quite naturally from the relation between capture velocity and size and differs from the L3.6 often used for describing larger MOTs. Our results represent substantial progress towards fully integrated atomic physics experiments and devices.

  7. Single atom visibility in STEM optical depth sectioning

    DOE PAGES

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Lupini, Andrew R.; ...

    2016-10-19

    The continuing development of aberration correctors for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) offers the possibility of locating single atoms in crystals in 3D via optical depth sectioning. The main factors that determine the feasibility of such an approach are visibility and dose requirements. In this paper, we show how Poisson's statistics can be quantitatively incorporated into STEM image simulations and demonstrate that the 3D location of single cerium atoms in wurtzite-type aluminum nitride is indeed feasible under large-angle illumination conditions with a relatively low dose. We also show that chromatic aberration does not presently represent a limitation provided amore » cold field emission source is used. Finally, these results suggest efforts into improved aberration corrector designs for larger illumination angles that offer significant potential for 3D structure determination of materials.« less

  8. Single atom visibility in STEM optical depth sectioning

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Findlay, Scott D.; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-10-19

    The continuing development of aberration correctors for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) offers the possibility of locating single atoms in crystals in 3D via optical depth sectioning. The main factors that determine the feasibility of such an approach are visibility and dose requirements. In this paper, we show how Poisson's statistics can be quantitatively incorporated into STEM image simulations and demonstrate that the 3D location of single cerium atoms in wurtzite-type aluminum nitride is indeed feasible under large-angle illumination conditions with a relatively low dose. We also show that chromatic aberration does not presently represent a limitation provided a cold field emission source is used. Finally, these results suggest efforts into improved aberration corrector designs for larger illumination angles that offer significant potential for 3D structure determination of materials.

  9. Extraction dynamics of electrons from magneto-optically trapped atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedchenko, Olena; Chernov, Sergii; McCulloch, Andrew; Vielle-Grosjean, Mélissa; Comparat, Daniel; Schönhense, Gerd

    2017-07-01

    Pulsed photoionization of laser-cooled atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) has the potential to create cold electron beams of few meV bandwidths and few ps pulse lengths. Such a source would be highly attractive for the study of fast low-energy processes like coherent phonon excitation. To study the suitability of MOT-based sources for the production of simultaneously cold and fast electrons, we study the photoionization dynamics of trapped Cs atoms. A momentum-microscope-like setup with a delay-line detector allows for the simultaneous measurement of spatial and temporal electron distributions. The measured patterns are complex, due to the Lorentz force inducing spiral trajectories. Ray-tracing simulations reproduce the main features. We find that the production of electron bunches with bandwidths of a few meV is straightforward; however, pulses in the ps-range are more demanding and require beam blanking or partial blocking.

  10. Single atom visibility in STEM optical depth sectioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Ryo; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Findlay, Scott D.; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-10-01

    The continuing development of aberration correctors for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) offers the possibility of locating single atoms in crystals in 3D via optical depth sectioning. The main factors that determine the feasibility of such an approach are visibility and dose requirements. Here, we show how Poisson's statistics can be quantitatively incorporated into STEM image simulations and demonstrate that the 3D location of single cerium atoms in wurtzite-type aluminum nitride is indeed feasible under large-angle illumination conditions with a relatively low dose. We also show that chromatic aberration does not presently represent a limitation provided a cold field emission source is used. These results suggest efforts into improved aberration corrector designs for larger illumination angles that offer significant potential for 3D structure determination of materials.

  11. Spectroscopy, manipulation and trapping of neutral atoms, molecules, and other particles using optical nanofibers: a review.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Michael J; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-08-13

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications.

  12. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, Michael J.; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications. PMID:23945738

  13. Effective Dirac dynamics of ultracold atoms in bichromatic optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Witthaut, D.; Salger, T.; Kling, S.; Grossert, C.; Weitz, M.

    2011-09-15

    We study the dynamics of ultracold atoms in tailored bichromatic optical lattices. By tuning the lattice parameters, one can readily engineer the band structure and realize a Dirac point, i.e., a true crossing of two Bloch bands. The dynamics in the vicinity of such a crossing is described by the one-dimensional Dirac equation, which is rigorously shown beyond the tight-binding approximation. Within this framework we analyze the effects of an external potential and demonstrate numerically that it is possible to demonstrate Klein tunneling with current experimental setups.

  14. Cooperative Effects and Intrinsic Optical Bistability in Collections of Atoms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    Sov . Phys . JETP 38, 1100 (1974). 17. Il.J. Carmichael and D.F. Walls, J. Phys . B: Atom. Molec. Phys ...268 ( 1985 ). 8. D.A.B. Miller, A.G. Gossard and W. Wiegmann, Optics Lett . 9. 162 (1984). 9. F. Hennenberger and fl. Rossmann, Phys . Stat. Solidi B121...Hollberg, 3. Yurke, J.C. Mertz and J.F. Valey, Phys . Rev. Lett . 55, 2409 ( 1985 ). 28. L.A. Wu, H.J. Kimble, J.L. Hall and H. Wu, Phys . Rev. Lett .

  15. Metastable superfluidity of repulsive fermionic atoms in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Rosch, Achim; Rasch, David; Binz, Benedikt; Vojta, Matthias

    2008-12-31

    In the fermionic Hubbard model, doubly occupied states have an exponentially large lifetime for strong repulsive interactions U. We show that this property can be used to prepare a metastable s-wave superfluid state for fermionic atoms in optical lattices described by a large-U Hubbard model. When an initial band-insulating state is expanded, the doubly occupied sites Bose condense. A mapping to the ferromagnetic Heisenberg model in an external field allows for a reliable solution of the problem. Nearest-neighbor repulsion and pair hopping are important in stabilizing superfluidity.

  16. Controlling dipole-dipole frequency shifts in a lattice-based optical atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, D.E.; Lukin, M.D.; Ye Jun

    2004-02-01

    Motivated by the ideas of using cold alkaline-earth atoms trapped in an optical lattice for realization of optical atomic clocks, we investigate theoretically the perturbative effects of atom-atom interactions on a clock transition frequency. These interactions are mediated by the dipole fields associated with the optically excited atoms. We predict resonancelike features in the frequency shifts when constructive interference among atomic dipoles occur. We theoretically demonstrate that by fine tuning the coherent dipole-dipole couplings in appropriately designed lattice geometries, the undesirable frequency shifts can be greatly suppressed.

  17. Layer selective magnetometry in ultrathin magnetic structures by polarised neutron reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland, J. A. C.; Lee, J.; Hope, S.; Lauhoff, G.; Penfold, J.; Bucknall, D.

    1997-06-01

    We discuss the application of polarised neutron reflection to layer selective vector magnetometry measurements in thin magnetic films. To illustrate the application of PNR, we review recent measurements of the absolute moment in X/Fe/Ag(001) structures with X = Pd, Ag, Au and Cu and compare the results with the predictions based on theoretical calculations which take into account the measured interface roughness. For the case of strained fct Ni/Cu(001) structures we illustrate the use of PNR as a self-calibrating magnetometric technique in determining both the magnetic layer thickness and total sample moment for which a reduced moment per Ni atom is observed. Finally we present measurements of the layer dependent moments in FeNi/Cu/Co spin valve structures. We show that by comparing the PNR measurements with SQUID magnetometry measurements of the total sample moment we are able to determine the interface moments on an atomic scale.

  18. Layer selective magnetometry in ultrathin magnetic structures by polarised neutron reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland, J. A. C.; Lee, J.; Hope, S.; Lauhoff, G.; Penfold, J.; Bucknall, D.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the application of polarised neutron reflection to layer selective vector magnetometry measurements in thin magnetic films. To illustrate the application of PNR, we review recent measurements of the absolute moment in X/Fe/Ag(001) structures with X = Pd, Ag, Au and Cu and compare the results with the predictions based on theoretical calculations which take into account the measured interface roughness. For the case of strained fct Ni/Cu(001) structures we illustrate the use of PNR as a self-calibrating magnetometric technique in determining both the magnetic layer thickness and total sample moment for which a reduced moment per Ni atom is observed. Finally we present measurements of the layer dependent moments in FeNi/Cu/Co spin valve structures. We show that by comparing the PNR measurements with SQUID magnetometry measurements of the total sample moment we are able to determine the interface moments on an atomic scale.

  19. Progress in the Correlative Atomic Force Microscopy and Optical Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lulu; Cai, Mingjun; Tong, Ti; Wang, Hongda

    2017-04-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has evolved from the originally morphological imaging technique to a powerful and multifunctional technique for manipulating and detecting the interactions between molecules at nanometer resolution. However, AFM cannot provide the precise information of synchronized molecular groups and has many shortcomings in the aspects of determining the mechanism of the interactions and the elaborate structure due to the limitations of the technology, itself, such as non-specificity and low imaging speed. To overcome the technical limitations, it is necessary to combine AFM with other complementary techniques, such as fluorescence microscopy. The combination of several complementary techniques in one instrument has increasingly become a vital approach to investigate the details of the interactions among molecules and molecular dynamics. In this review, we reported the principles of AFM and optical microscopy, such as confocal microscopy and single-molecule localization microscopy, and focused on the development and use of correlative AFM and optical microscopy.

  20. Rapid characterization of fuel atomizers using an optical patternator

    SciTech Connect

    Sankar, S.V.; Maher, K.E.; Robart, D.M.; Bachalo, W.D.

    1999-07-01

    Planar laser scattering (PLS) and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) techniques are currently being used for rapid characterization of fuel sprays associated with gas turbine atomizers, diesel injectors, and automotive fuel injectors. These techniques can be used for qualitative, quantitative, and rapid measurement of fuel mass, spray geometry, and Sauter mean diameters in various sprays. The spatial distribution of the fuel mass can be inferred directly from the PLIF image, and the Sauter mean diameter can be measured by simultaneously recording the PLIF and PLS images and then rationing the two. A spray characterization system incorporating the PLS and/or PLIF techniques has been loosely termed an optical patternator, and in this study, it has been used to characterize both steady and pulsed sprays. The results obtained with the optical patternator have been directly validated using a phase Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA).

  1. Single-Atom Optical Clock with High Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Oskay, W. H.; Diddams, S. A.; Donley, E. A.; Fortier, T. M.; Heavner, T. P.; Hollberg, L.; Itano, W. M.; Jefferts, S. R.; Delaney, M. J.; Kim, K.; Levi, F.; Parker, T. E.; Bergquist, J. C.

    2006-07-14

    For the past 50 years, atomic standards based on the frequency of the cesium ground-state hyperfine transition have been the most accurate time pieces in the world. We now report a comparison between the cesium fountain standard NIST-F1, which has been evaluated with an inaccuracy of about 4x10{sup -16}, and an optical frequency standard based on an ultraviolet transition in a single, laser-cooled mercury ion for which the fractional systematic frequency uncertainty was below 7.2x10{sup -17}. The absolute frequency of the transition was measured versus cesium to be 1 064 721 609 899 144.94 (97) Hz, with a statistically limited total fractional uncertainty of 9.1x10{sup -16}, the most accurate absolute measurement of an optical frequency to date.

  2. Progress in the Correlative Atomic Force Microscopy and Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lulu; Cai, Mingjun; Tong, Ti; Wang, Hongda

    2017-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has evolved from the originally morphological imaging technique to a powerful and multifunctional technique for manipulating and detecting the interactions between molecules at nanometer resolution. However, AFM cannot provide the precise information of synchronized molecular groups and has many shortcomings in the aspects of determining the mechanism of the interactions and the elaborate structure due to the limitations of the technology, itself, such as non-specificity and low imaging speed. To overcome the technical limitations, it is necessary to combine AFM with other complementary techniques, such as fluorescence microscopy. The combination of several complementary techniques in one instrument has increasingly become a vital approach to investigate the details of the interactions among molecules and molecular dynamics. In this review, we reported the principles of AFM and optical microscopy, such as confocal microscopy and single-molecule localization microscopy, and focused on the development and use of correlative AFM and optical microscopy. PMID:28441775

  3. Single crystal optic elements for helium atom microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaren, D. A.; Allison, W.; Holst, B.

    2000-07-01

    Focusing characteristics of asymmetrically bent single crystal mirrors are discussed in the context of fabricating an optic element for an helium atom microscope. We demonstrate the principle that deforming a clamped, elliptical, single crystal under electrostatic pressure can produce submicron focusing of an helium beam. We present a systematic procedure that may be used to fabricate high precision mirrors close to the Cartesian ideal of any chosen optical configuration. In particular, imaging systems with asymmetric mirror profiles are discussed. Results are independent of crystal characteristics and can be adapted to fit a range of experimental geometries. The calculations indicate that mirror-induced aberrations can be eliminated to fourth order by use of a single actuation electrode in an ideal system.

  4. Optical lattice polarization effects on hyperpolarizability of atomic clock transitions.

    PubMed

    Taichenachev, A V; Yudin, V I; Ovsiannikov, V D; Pal'chikov, V G

    2006-10-27

    The light-induced frequency shift due to hyperpolarizability (i.e., terms of second-order in intensity) is studied for a forbidden optical transition, J = 0 --> J = 0. A simple universal dependence on the field ellipticity is obtained. This result allows minimization of the second-order light shift with respect to the field polarization for optical lattices operating at a magic wavelength (at which the first-order shift vanishes). We show the possibility for the existence of a magic elliptical polarization, for which the second-order frequency shift vanishes. The optimal polarization of the lattice field can be either linear, circular, or magic elliptical. The obtained results could improve the accuracy of lattice-based atomic clocks.

  5. Raman q-plates for Singular Atom Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Justin T.; Hansen, Azure; Murphree, Joseph D.; Jayaseelan, Maitreyi; Bigelow, Nicholas P.

    2016-05-01

    We use a coherent two-photon Raman interaction as the atom-optic equivalent of a birefringent optical q-plate to facilitate spin-to-orbital angular momentum conversion in a pseudo-spin-1/2 BEC. A q-plate is a waveplate with a fixed retardance but a spatially varying fast axis orientation angle. We derive the time evolution operator for the system and compare it to a Jones matrix for an optical waveplate to show that in our Raman q-plate, the equivalent orientation of the fast axis is described by the relative phase of the Raman beams and the retardance is determined by the pulse area. The charge of the Raman q-plate is determined by the orbital angular momentum of the Raman beams, and the beams contain umbilic C-point polarization singularities which are imprinted into the condensate as spin singularities: lemons, stars, spirals, and saddles. By tuning the optical beam parameters, we can create a full-Bloch BEC, which is a coreless vortex that contains every possible superposition of two spin states, that is, it covers the Bloch sphere.

  6. Optimizing phase-estimation algorithms for diamond spin magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusran, N. M.; Dutt, M. V. Gurudev

    2014-07-01

    We present a detailed theoretical and numerical study discussing the application and optimization of phase-estimation algorithms (PEAs) to diamond spin magnetometry. We compare standard Ramsey magnetometry, the nonadaptive PEA (NAPEA), and quantum PEA (QPEA) incorporating error checking. Our results show that the NAPEA requires lower measurement fidelity, has better dynamic range, and greater consistency in sensitivity. We elucidate the importance of dynamic range to Ramsey magnetic imaging with diamond spins, and introduce the application of PEAs to time-dependent magnetometry.

  7. Deterministic Loading of Individual Atoms to a High-Finesse Optical Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Fortier, Kevin M.; Kim, Soo Y.; Gibbons, Michael J.; Ahmadi, Peyman; Chapman, Michael S.

    2007-06-08

    Individual laser-cooled atoms are delivered on demand from a single atom magneto-optic trap to a high-finesse optical cavity using an atom conveyor. Strong coupling of the atom with the cavity field allows simultaneous cooling and detection of individual atoms for time scales exceeding 15 s. The single atom scatter rate is studied as a function of probe-cavity detuning and probe Rabi frequency, and the experimental results are in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions. We demonstrate the ability to manipulate the position of a single atom relative to the cavity mode with excellent control and reproducibility.

  8. Theory of optical shielding in cold atom beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurovsky, Vladimir A.; Ben-Reuven, Abraham

    1999-04-01

    Experiments were conducted recently (by Weiner and co-workers) on the optical shielding (suppression) of atomic collisions in cold-atom beams, and its variation with the angle between the polarization direction of the shielding light and the direction of approach of the beam. This case is shown here to be a typical example of an optical collision in which quantum interference may persevere between two incident collision partial waves leading to the same output state. This effect depends on the relative collisional phaseshift of the two interfering channels, as well as on the angle of approach, and will vanish when averaging over the latter (as with collisions in the bulk). The extent of variation of this interference effect with the relative phaseshift is quite broad, and may lead, under favorable conditions, to almost complete shielding at a finite value of the shielding-laser power. The latter observation leaves open the possibility of exerting coherent control over the interference effect in order to optimize the shielding.

  9. Coherent control of atomic transport in spinor optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Mischuck, Brian; Deutsch, Ivan H.; Jessen, Poul S.

    2010-02-15

    Coherent transport of atoms trapped in an optical lattice can be controlled by microwave-induced spin flips that correlate with site-to-site hopping. We study the controllability of homogeneous one-dimensional systems of noninteracting atoms in the absence of site addressability. Given these restrictions, we construct a deterministic protocol to map an initially localized Wannier state to a wave packet that is coherently distributed over n sites. As an example, we consider a one dimensional quantum walk in the presence of both realistic photon scattering and inhomogeneous broadening of the microwave transition due to the optical lattice. Using composite pulses to suppress errors, fidelities of over 95% can be achieved for a 25-step walk. We extend the protocol for state preparation to analytic solutions for arbitrary unitary maps given homogeneous systems and in the presence of time-dependent uniform forces. Such control is important for applications in quantum information processing, such as quantum computing and quantum simulations of condensed matter phenomena.

  10. Two-photon resonant optical processes in atomic potassium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.-L.; Schawlow, A. L.

    1984-12-01

    Two-photon resonant four-wave and six-wave optical processes in ns 2S(1/2) (n = 7-20) states of K atoms are investigated experimentally, using 0.1-3-mJ 20-pm-linewidth 575-665-nm pulses from a dye laser pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser to excite K vapor at (0.47-3.55) x 10 to the 16th/cu cm in a steel heat-pipe oven at 300-380 C. The UV-range coherent lines are detected by a 1-m spectrometer, photomultiplier tube, and boxcar; and the results are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in terms of a theoretical model of wave-mixing processes and parametric oscillations, based on the wave equation, atomic polarization, and phase-match conditions. About 100 lines are detected, of which 70 are identified with six-wave processes and 15 with four-wave processes. The strongest lines are found near the mP-4S transitions anad have components frequency shifted relative to the atomic transitions; these lines are attributed to parametric oscillation.

  11. Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics Workshop Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Jr., Lloyd

    1997-09-21

    This document contains the final reports from the five panels that comprised a Workshop held to explore future directions, scientific impacts and technological connections of research in Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics. This workshop was sponsored by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences Division and was held at the Westfields International Conference Center in Chantilly, Virginia on September 21-24, 1997. The workshop was chaired by Lloyd Armstrong, Jr., University of Southern California and the five panels focused on the following topics: Panel A: Interactions of Atoms and Molecules with Photons - Low Field Daniel Kleppner (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), chair Panel B: Interactions of Atoms and Molecules with Photons - High Field Phil Bucksbaum (University of Michigan), chair Panel C: Surface Interactions with Photons, Electrons, Ions, Atoms and Molecules J. Wayne Rabalais (University of Houston), chair Panel D: Theory of Structure and Dynamics Chris Greene (University of Colorado), chair Panel E: Nano- and Mesocopic Structures Paul Alivisatos (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory), chair The choice of focus areas reflects areas of significant interest to DOE/BES but is clearly not intended to span all fields encompassed by the designation of atomic, molecular and optical physics, nor even all areas that would be considered for review and funding under DOE’s AMOP program. In a similar vein, not all research that might be suggested under these topics in this report would be appropriate for consideration by DOE’s AMOP program. The workshop format included overview presentations from each of the panel chairs, followed by an intensive series of panel discussion sessions held over a two-day period. The panels were comprised of scientists from the U. S. and abroad, many of whom are not supported by DOE’s AMOP Program. This workshop was held in lieu of the customary “Contractors Meeting” held annually for

  12. Fast figuring of large optics by reactive atom plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Marco; Jourdain, Renaud; Morantz, Paul; Shore, Paul

    2012-09-01

    The next generation of ground-based astronomical observatories will require fabrication and maintenance of extremely large segmented mirrors tens of meters in diameter. At present, the large production of segments required by projects like E-ELT and TMT poses time frames and costs feasibility questions. This is principally due to a bottleneck stage in the optical fabrication chain: the final figuring step. State-of-the-art figure correction techniques, so far, have failed to meet the needs of the astronomical community for mass production of large, ultra-precise optical surfaces. In this context, Reactive Atom Plasma (RAP) is proposed as a candidate figuring process that combines nanometer level accuracy with high material removal rates. RAP is a form of plasma enhanced chemical etching at atmospheric pressure based on Inductively Coupled Plasma technology. The rapid figuring capability of the RAP process has already been proven on medium sized optical surfaces made of silicon based materials. In this paper, the figure correction of a 3 meters radius of curvature, 400 mm diameter spherical ULE mirror is presented. This work demonstrates the large scale figuring capability of the Reactive Atom Plasma process. The figuring is carried out by applying an in-house developed procedure that promotes rapid convergence. A 2.3 μm p-v initial figure error is removed within three iterations, for a total processing time of 2.5 hours. The same surface is then re-polished and the residual error corrected again down to λ/20 nm rms. These results highlight the possibility of figuring a metre-class mirror in about ten hours.

  13. Resonant and Soliton Transport of Ultracold Atoms on Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubbo, Chester Philipp

    In this thesis, we present a theoretical study of the dynamics of strongly interacting ultracold atoms in optical lattices. At ultracold temperatures, the dynamics cannot be described classically, but instead, must take into account quantum effects. Here, our focus is on transport and precision measurement. We use exact analysis of few-body systems and mean field analysis. For larger systems, we use a numerical approach called the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method which is considered an efficient computational tool for the quantum evolution of 1D systems. After introducing basic concepts, we treat the motional properties of particles in a tilted lattice in a regime where the inter-particle interactions are resonant with the linear potential. In this regime, the dynamics is described by an Ising model with a transverse field which is a basic system to study quantum magnetism and quantum phase transitions. We introduce analytical and numerical methods to draw a simple picture of the dynamics. This helps us to formulate a slinky-like transport scheme that provides full control of the motional direction of particles. After a study of transport on a tilted lattice, we treat the transport of nonlinear waves in strongly interacting systems. These nonlinear waves are called solitons, which are described as local perturbations of a medium that survive after collisions. We identify two species of classical soliton solutions in our system and study their stability under quantum evolution via DMRG. We shift focus from the dynamics related to transport and turn to precision measurements in optical lattice clocks. Here, we investigate one aspect of their limitations which is due to collisions of atoms loaded onto a single site. These collisions introduce a frequency shift in the clock measurement. We provide a microscopic description of the origin of this frequency shift. Our results have motivated improvement in the accuracy and precision of next generation

  14. Optical coatings in microscale channels by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Nicholas T; Talghader, Joseph J

    2010-03-10

    High-aspect-ratio channels may be coated using atomic layer deposition (ALD) due to the unique self-limiting nature of the process, and this has been often demonstrated using deep reactive-ion etched trenches in silicon. However, for optical and microfluidic applications, many channels are centimeters deep with diameters of tens to hundreds of micrometers, and the relatively large area exposes more difficult problems of temperature and gas flow uniformity. To quantify the uniformity of optical coatings deposited by ALD under those conditions, an air wedge has been created between two square wafers of silicon approximately 7 cm on a side, with the air gap varying linearly from 0-1560 microm. ALD aluminum oxide uniformity is astounding, while hafnium oxide shows a need for process optimization, but still exceeds the capability observed in other deposition techniques. A six-layer Fabry-Perot optical cavity with fixed 500 nm resonance was deposited inside a wedge, and the measured resonant wavelength closely matched predictions, except at the deepest regions of the wedge.

  15. Spectral features of atomic magneto-optical rotation spectroscopy (the atomic Faraday effect) and Zeeman splittings of various elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Kuniyuki; Aoi, Nobuyuki; Tsuge, Shin

    Spectral features of atomic magneto-optical rotation spectroscopy (AMORS) or the atomic Faraday effect of various elements are described. As a stable atomizer, an air-hydrogen flame is located between the pole pieces of the electromagnet. The dependence of the transmitted intensity on the magnetic field strength was recorded on an X-Y recorder by scanning the magnetic field. For most of the analytical lines of elements, the maximum energy was transmitted through the optical system in the Faraday configuration at magnetic field strengths of up to a few kilogauss. The theoretically calculated Zeeman splitting patterns are successfully related to the experimental results.

  16. Quantum repeaters based on atomic ensembles and linear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangouard, Nicolas; Simon, Christoph; de Riedmatten, Hugues; Gisin, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of quantum states over long distances is limited by photon loss. Straightforward amplification as in classical telecommunications is not an option in quantum communication because of the no-cloning theorem. This problem could be overcome by implementing quantum repeater protocols, which create long-distance entanglement from shorter-distance entanglement via entanglement swapping. Such protocols require the capacity to create entanglement in a heralded fashion, to store it in quantum memories, and to swap it. One attractive general strategy for realizing quantum repeaters is based on the use of atomic ensembles as quantum memories, in combination with linear optical techniques and photon counting to perform all required operations. Here the theoretical and experimental status quo of this very active field are reviewed. The potentials of different approaches are compared quantitatively, with a focus on the most immediate goal of outperforming the direct transmission of photons.

  17. Colloquium: Atomic quantum gases in periodically driven optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckardt, André

    2017-01-01

    Time-periodic forcing in the form of coherent radiation is a standard tool for the coherent manipulation of small quantum systems like single atoms. In the last years, periodic driving has more and more also been considered as a means for the coherent control of many-body systems. In particular, experiments with ultracold quantum gases in optical lattices subjected to periodic driving in the lower kilohertz regime have attracted much attention. Milestones include the observation of dynamic localization, the dynamic control of the quantum phase transition between a bosonic superfluid and a Mott insulator, as well as the dynamic creation of strong artificial magnetic fields and topological band structures. This Colloquium reviews these recent experiments and their theoretical description. Moreover, fundamental properties of periodically driven many-body systems are discussed within the framework of Floquet theory, including heating, relaxation dynamics, anomalous topological edge states, and the response to slow parameter variations.

  18. Mixtures of bosonic and fermionic atoms in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Albus, Alexander; Illuminati, Fabrizio; Eisert, Jens

    2003-08-01

    We discuss the theory of mixtures of bosonic and fermionic atoms in periodic potentials at zero temperature. We derive a general Bose-Fermi Hubbard Hamiltonian in a one-dimensional optical lattice with a superimposed harmonic trapping potential. We study the conditions for linear stability of the mixture and derive a mean-field criterion for the onset of a bosonic superfluid transition. We investigate the ground-state properties of the mixture in the Gutzwiller formulation of mean-field theory, and present numerical studies of finite systems. The bosonic and fermionic density distributions and the onset of quantum phase transitions to demixing and to a bosonic Mott-insulator are studied as a function of the lattice potential strength. The existence is predicted of a disordered phase for mixtures loaded in very deep lattices. Such a disordered phase possessing many degenerate or quasidegenerate ground states is related to a breaking of the mirror symmetry in the lattice.

  19. F-wave pairing of cold atoms in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wei-Cheng; Wu Congjun; Das Sarma, S.

    2010-11-15

    The tremendous development of cold atom physics has opened up a whole new opportunity to study novel states of matter which are not easily accessible in solid-state systems. Here we propose to realize the f-wave pairing superfluidity of spinless fermions in p{sub x,y}-orbital bands of two-dimensional honeycomb optical lattices. The nontrivial orbital band structure, rather than strong correlation effects, gives rise to the unconventional pairing with the nodal lines of the f-wave symmetry. With a confining harmonic trap, zero-energy Andreev bound states appear around the circular boundary with a sixfold symmetry. The experimental realization and detection of this novel pairing state are feasible.

  20. Atomically precise metal nanoclusters: stable sizes and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Rongchao

    2015-01-01

    Controlling nanoparticles with atomic precision has long been a major dream of nanochemists. Breakthroughs have been made in the case of gold nanoparticles, at least for nanoparticles smaller than ~3 nm in diameter. Such ultrasmall gold nanoparticles indeed exhibit fundamentally different properties from those of the plasmonic counterparts owing to the quantum size effects as well as the extremely high surface-to-volume ratio. These unique nanoparticles are often called nanoclusters to distinguish them from conventional plasmonic nanoparticles. Intense work carried out in the last few years has generated a library of stable sizes (or stable stoichiometries) of atomically precise gold nanoclusters, which are opening up new exciting opportunities for both fundamental research and technological applications. In this review, we have summarized the recent progress in the research of thiolate (SR)-protected gold nanoclusters with a focus on the reported stable sizes and their optical absorption spectra. The crystallization of nanoclusters still remains challenging; nevertheless, a few more structures have been achieved since the earlier successes in Au102(SR)44, Au25(SR)18 and Au38(SR)24 nanoclusters, and the newly reported structures include Au20(SR)16, Au24(SR)20, Au28(SR)20, Au30S(SR)18, and Au36(SR)24. Phosphine-protected gold and thiolate-protected silver nanoclusters are also briefly discussed in this review. The reported gold nanocluster sizes serve as the basis for investigating their size dependent properties as well as the development of applications in catalysis, sensing, biological labelling, optics, etc. Future efforts will continue to address what stable sizes are existent, and more importantly, what factors determine their stability. Structural determination and theoretical simulations will help to gain deep insight into the structure-property relationships.

  1. Atomically precise metal nanoclusters: stable sizes and optical properties.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rongchao

    2015-02-07

    Controlling nanoparticles with atomic precision has long been a major dream of nanochemists. Breakthroughs have been made in the case of gold nanoparticles, at least for nanoparticles smaller than ∼3 nm in diameter. Such ultrasmall gold nanoparticles indeed exhibit fundamentally different properties from those of the plasmonic counterparts owing to the quantum size effects as well as the extremely high surface-to-volume ratio. These unique nanoparticles are often called nanoclusters to distinguish them from conventional plasmonic nanoparticles. Intense work carried out in the last few years has generated a library of stable sizes (or stable stoichiometries) of atomically precise gold nanoclusters, which are opening up new exciting opportunities for both fundamental research and technological applications. In this review, we have summarized the recent progress in the research of thiolate (SR)-protected gold nanoclusters with a focus on the reported stable sizes and their optical absorption spectra. The crystallization of nanoclusters still remains challenging; nevertheless, a few more structures have been achieved since the earlier successes in Au102(SR)44, Au25(SR)18 and Au38(SR)24 nanoclusters, and the newly reported structures include Au20(SR)16, Au24(SR)20, Au28(SR)20, Au30S(SR)18, and Au36(SR)24. Phosphine-protected gold and thiolate-protected silver nanoclusters are also briefly discussed in this review. The reported gold nanocluster sizes serve as the basis for investigating their size dependent properties as well as the development of applications in catalysis, sensing, biological labelling, optics, etc. Future efforts will continue to address what stable sizes are existent, and more importantly, what factors determine their stability. Structural determination and theoretical simulations will help to gain deep insight into the structure-property relationships.

  2. Analysis of an Atom-Optical Architecture for Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devitt, Simon J.; Stephens, Ashley M.; Munro, William J.; Nemoto, Kae

    Quantum technology based on photons has emerged as one of the most promising platforms for quantum information processing, having already been used in proof-of-principle demonstrations of quantum communication and quantum computation. However, the scalability of this technology depends on the successful integration of experimentally feasible devices in an architecture that tolerates realistic errors and imperfections. Here, we analyse an atom-optical architecture for quantum computation designed to meet the requirements of scalability. The architecture is based on a modular atom-cavity device that provides an effective photon-photon interaction, allowing for the rapid, deterministic preparation of a large class of entangled states. We begin our analysis at the physical level, where we outline the experimental cavity quantum electrodynamics requirements of the basic device. Then, we describe how a scalable network of these devices can be used to prepare a three-dimensional topological cluster state, sufficient for universal fault-tolerant quantum computation. We conclude at the application level, where we estimate the system-level requirements of the architecture executing an algorithm compiled for compatibility with the topological cluster state.

  3. Nanomechanical electro-optical modulator based on atomic heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, P. A.; Marshall, O. P.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Auton, G. H.; Kravets, V. G.; Kundys, D.; Su, Y.; Grigorenko, A. N.

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional atomic heterostructures combined with metallic nanostructures allow one to realize strong light–matter interactions. Metallic nanostructures possess plasmonic resonances that can be modulated by graphene gating. In particular, spectrally narrow plasmon resonances potentially allow for very high graphene-enabled modulation depth. However, the modulation depths achieved with this approach have so far been low and the modulation wavelength range limited. Here we demonstrate a device in which a graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterostructure is suspended over a gold nanostripe array. A gate voltage across these devices alters the location of the two-dimensional crystals, creating strong optical modulation of its reflection spectra at multiple wavelengths: in ultraviolet Fabry–Perot resonances, in visible and near-infrared diffraction-coupled plasmonic resonances and in the mid-infrared range of hexagonal boron nitride's upper Reststrahlen band. Devices can be extremely subwavelength in thickness and exhibit compact and truly broadband modulation of optical signals using heterostructures of two-dimensional materials. PMID:27874003

  4. Mars, Moon, Mercury: Magnetometry Constrains Planetary Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, John E. P.

    2015-04-01

    We have long appreciated that magnetic measurements obtained about a magnetized planet are of great value in probing the deep interior. The existence of a substantial planetary magnetic field implies dynamo action requiring an electrically conducting, fluid core in convective motion and a source of energy to maintain it. Application of the well-known Lowe's spectrum may in some cases identify the dynamo outer radius; where secular variation can be measured, the outer radius can be estimated using the frozen flux approximation. Magnetic induction may be used to probe the electrical conductivity of the mantle and crust. These are useful constraints that together with gravity and/or other observables we may infer the state of the interior and gain insight into planetary evolution. But only recently has it become clear that space magnetometry can do much more, particularly about a planet that once sustained a dynamo that has since disappeared. Mars is the best example of this class: the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft globally mapped a remanent crustal field left behind after the demise of the dynamo. This map is a magnetic record of the planet's evolution. I will argue that this map may be interpreted to constrain the era of dynamo activity within Mars; to establish the reversal history of the Mars dynamo; to infer the magnetization intensity of Mars crustal rock and the depth of the magnetized crustal layer; and to establish that plate tectonics is not unique to planet Earth, as has so often been claimed. The Lunar magnetic record is in contrast one of weakly magnetized and scattered sources, not easily interpreted as yet in terms of the interior. Magnetometry about Mercury is more difficult to interpret owing to the relatively weak field and proximity to the sun, but MESSENGER (and ultimately Beppi Columbo) may yet map crustal anomalies (induced and/or remanent).

  5. Dynamics of trapped atoms around an optical nanofiber probed through polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Solano, Pablo; Fatemi, Fredrik K; Orozco, Luis A; Rolston, S L

    2017-06-15

    The evanescent field outside an optical nanofiber (ONF) can create optical traps for neutral atoms. We present a non-destructive method to characterize such trapping potentials. An off-resonance linearly polarized probe beam that propagates through the ONF experiences a slow axis of polarization produced by trapped atoms on opposite sides along the ONF. The transverse atomic motion is imprinted onto the probe polarization through the changing atomic index of refraction. By applying a transient impulse, we measure a time-dependent polarization rotation of the probe beam that provides both a rapid and non-destructive measurement of the optical trapping frequencies.

  6. Dynamics of trapped atoms around an optical nanofiber probed through polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, Pablo; Fatemi, Fredrik K.; Orozco, Luis A.; Rolston, S. L.

    2017-06-01

    The evanescent field outside an optical nanofiber (ONF) can create optical traps for neutral atoms. We present a non-destructive method to characterize such trapping potentials. An off-resonance linearly polarized probe beam that propagates through the ONF experiences a slow axis of polarization produced by trapped atoms on opposite sides along the ONF. The transverse atomic motion is imprinted onto the probe polarization through the changing atomic index of of refraction. By applying a transient impulse, we measure a time-dependent polarization rotation of the probe beam that provides both a rapid and non-destructive measurement of the optical trapping frequencies.

  7. High-Accuracy Measure of Atomic Polarizability in an Optical Lattice Clock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-11

    AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER High-Accuracy Measurement of Atomic Polarizability in an VV911~-11 - 1 -0202 Optical Lattice Clock Sb. GRANT NUMBER...modem optical atomic clock through blackbody radiation. By employing an ultracold, trapped atomic ensemble and high stability optical clock, we...1,U~ (1,’T, TI~ \\ 1\\ ( ,., ) Tl-.~ ~1 ~~1,1~ +.-~~+: ~~~ 1 ··~~~··+~:~+. • ...1 • • ~ +~ ··~~-~ 1S. SUBJECT TERMS atomic frequency standards

  8. Progress toward a spin squeezed optical atomic clock beyond the standard quantum limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletic, Vladan

    2015-05-01

    State of the art optical lattice atomic clocks have reached a relative inaccuracy level of 10-18, already making them the most stable time references in existence. One restriction on the precision of these clocks is the projection noise caused by the measurement of the atomic state. This limit, known as the standard quantum limit (SQL), can be overcome by entangling the atoms. By performing spin squeezing, it is possible to robustly generate such entanglement and therefore surpass the SQL of precision in optical atomic clocks. I will report on recent experimental progress toward realizing spin squeezing in an 171Yb optical lattice clock. A high-finesse micromirror-based optical cavity mediates the atom-atom interaction necessary for generating the entanglement. By exceeding the SQL in this state of the art system, we are aiming to advance precision time metrology, as well as expanding the boundaries of quantum control and measurement.

  9. Progress toward a spin squeezed optical atomic clock beyond the standard quantum limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletic, Vladan

    2014-05-01

    State of the art optical lattice atomic clocks have reached a relative inaccuracy level of 10-18, already making them the most stable time references in existence. One restriction on the precision of these clocks is the projection noise caused by the measurement of the atomic state. This limit, known as the standard quantum limit (SQL), can be overcome by entangling the atoms. By performing spin squeezing, we can robustly generate such entanglement and surpass the SQL of precision in optical atomic clocks. I will report on recent experimental progress toward realizing spin squeezing in an 171Yb optical lattice clock. A high-finesse micromirror-based optical cavity mediates the atom-atom interaction necessary for generating the entanglement. By exceeding the SQL in this state of the art system, we are aiming to advance precision time metrology, as well as expanding the boundaries of quantum control and measurement. Supported by DARPA QUASAR and NSERC.

  10. Deep cooling of optically trapped atoms implemented by magnetic levitation without transverse confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chen; Zhou, Tianwei; Zhai, Yueyang; Xiang, Jinggang; Luan, Tian; Huang, Qi; Yang, Shifeng; Xiong, Wei; Chen, Xuzong

    2017-05-01

    We report a setup for the deep cooling of atoms in an optical trap. The deep cooling is implemented by eliminating the influence of gravity using specially constructed magnetic coils. Compared to the conventional method of generating a magnetic levitating force, the lower trap frequency achieved in our setup provides a lower limit of temperature and more freedoms to Bose gases with a simpler solution. A final temperature as low as ˜ 6 nK is achieved in the optical trap, and the atomic density is decreased by nearly two orders of magnitude during the second stage of evaporative cooling. This deep cooling of optically trapped atoms holds promise for many applications, such as atomic interferometers, atomic gyroscopes, and magnetometers, as well as many basic scientific research directions, such as quantum simulations and atom optics.

  11. Deep cooling of optically trapped atoms implemented by magnetic levitation without transverse confinement.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Zhou, Tianwei; Zhai, Yueyang; Xiang, Jinggang; Luan, Tian; Huang, Qi; Yang, Shifeng; Xiong, Wei; Chen, Xuzong

    2017-05-01

    We report a setup for the deep cooling of atoms in an optical trap. The deep cooling is implemented by eliminating the influence of gravity using specially constructed magnetic coils. Compared to the conventional method of generating a magnetic levitating force, the lower trap frequency achieved in our setup provides a lower limit of temperature and more freedoms to Bose gases with a simpler solution. A final temperature as low as ∼6nK is achieved in the optical trap, and the atomic density is decreased by nearly two orders of magnitude during the second stage of evaporative cooling. This deep cooling of optically trapped atoms holds promise for many applications, such as atomic interferometers, atomic gyroscopes, and magnetometers, as well as many basic scientific research directions, such as quantum simulations and atom optics.

  12. Fiber-optic based in situ atomic spectroscopy for manufacturing of x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasoff, George; Metting, Christopher J.; von Bredow, Hasso

    2016-09-01

    The manufacturing of multilayer Laue (MLL) components for X-ray optics by physical vapor deposition (PVD) requires high precision and accuracy that presents a significant process control challenge. Currently, no process control system provides the accuracy, long-term stability and broad capability for adoption in the manufacturing of X-ray optics. In situ atomic absorption spectroscopy is a promising process control solution, capable of monitoring the deposition rate and chemical composition of extremely thin metal silicide films during deposition and overcoming many limitations of the traditional methods. A novel in situ PVD process control system for the manufacturing of high-precision thin films, based on combined atomic absorption/emission spectrometry in the vicinity of the deposited substrate, is described. By monitoring the atomic concentration in the plasma region independently from the film growth on the deposited substrate, the method allows deposition control of extremely thin films, compound thin films and complex multilayer structures. It provides deposition rate and film composition measurements that can be further utilized for dynamic feedback process control. The system comprises a reconfigurable hardware module located outside the deposition chamber with hollow cathode light sources and a fiber-optic-based frame installed inside the deposition chamber. Recent experimental results from in situ monitoring of Al and Si thin films deposited by DC and RF magnetron sputtering at a variety of plasma conditions and monitoring configurations are presented. The results validate the operation of the system in the deposition of compound thin films and provide a path forward for use in manufacturing of X-Ray optics.

  13. Magnetic induction measurements using an all-optical {sup 87}Rb atomic magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Wickenbrock, Arne; Tricot, François; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2013-12-09

    In this work we propose, and experimentally demonstrate, the use of a self-oscillating all-optical atomic magnetometer for magnetic induction measurements. Given the potential for miniaturization of atomic magnetometers, and their extreme sensitivity, the present work shows that atomic magnetometers may play a key role in the development of instrumentation for magnetic induction tomography.

  14. Nearest-neighbor detection of atoms in a 1D optical lattice by fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Karski, M; Förster, L; Choi, J M; Alt, W; Widera, A; Meschede, D

    2009-02-06

    We overcome the diffraction limit in fluorescence imaging of neutral atoms in a sparsely filled one-dimensional optical lattice. At a periodicity of 433 nm, we reliably infer the separation of two atoms down to nearest neighbors. We observe light induced losses of atoms occupying the same lattice site, while for atoms in adjacent lattice sites, no losses due to light induced interactions occur. Our method points towards characterization of correlated quantum states in optical lattice systems with filling factors of up to one atom per lattice site.

  15. Laser cooling of cesium atoms in far-detuned optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winoto, Sugiharto Lukman

    1999-11-01

    High-density cold Cesium atoms from a transiently compressed magneto-optical trap (MOT) are loaded into far red-detuned optical lattice traps. A subsequent independent laser cooling of the atoms in the trap is shown to be of the polarization gradient cooling (PGC) type. The PGC produces strong localization of atoms in the periodic anti-nodes of lattice sites corresponding to significant occupation of the lattice vibrational ground states. Adiabatic relaxation of the 3D optical lattice trap results in the highest phase-space density achievable for a large number of atoms through a purely optical method of cooling and trapping. The resulting atom cloud is to be loaded into a conservative optical dipole trap for an experimental search of Cesium Bose- Einstein condensation (BEC) through a method of evaporative cooling in the dipole trap.

  16. Ultracold collisions of mixed atoms in optical dipole trap loaded from a dark magneto-optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanting; Gong, Ting; Li, Zhonghao; Ji, Zhonghua; Zhang, Xiang; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2017-10-01

    We study the cold collisions of mixed atoms in an optical dipole trap (ODT), which are loaded from a dark magneto-optical trap (MOT). A comprehensive, phenomenological rate equation is presented to derive the ultracold homonuclear and heteronuclear collision rates in loading and holding procedures. Our results show that the cold atoms in the dark MOT can provide a much better stable, initial atomic sample than MOT. The dependence of the heteronuclear collision rate on the trap depth is attributed to the hyperfine-changing collision by the ODT laser with a broad linewidth. The processes of deriving the collision rate are also universal for other kinds of atoms or even molecules.

  17. He I VECTOR MAGNETOMETRY OF FIELD-ALIGNED SUPERPENUMBRAL FIBRILS

    SciTech Connect

    Schad, T. A.; Penn, M. J.; Lin, H.

    2013-05-10

    Atomic-level polarization and Zeeman effect diagnostics in the neutral helium triplet at 10830 A in principle allow full vector magnetometry of fine-scaled chromospheric fibrils. We present high-resolution spectropolarimetric observations of superpenumbral fibrils in the He I triplet with sufficient polarimetric sensitivity to infer their full magnetic field geometry. He I observations from the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter are paired with high-resolution observations of the H{alpha} 6563 A and Ca II 8542 A spectral lines from the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer from the Dunn Solar Telescope in New Mexico. Linear and circular polarization signatures in the He I triplet are measured and described, as well as analyzed with the advanced inversion capability of the ''Hanle and Zeeman Light'' modeling code. Our analysis provides direct evidence for the often assumed field alignment of fibril structures. The projected angle of the fibrils and the inferred magnetic field geometry align within an error of {+-}10 Degree-Sign . We describe changes in the inclination angle of these features that reflect their connectivity with the photospheric magnetic field. Evidence for an accelerated flow ({approx}40 m s{sup -2}) along an individual fibril anchored at its endpoints in the strong sunspot and weaker plage in part supports the magnetic siphon flow mechanism's role in the inverse Evershed effect. However, the connectivity of the outer endpoint of many of the fibrils cannot be established.

  18. Observation of Doppler-free electromagnetically induced transparency in atoms selected optically with specific velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hoon; Kim, Kwan Su; Kim, Jung Dong; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Jung Bog

    2011-11-15

    We observed an electromagnetically induced transparency signal in a four-level system with optically selected rubidium atoms at specific velocities in a room-temperature vaporized cell. Since the atoms behave like cold atoms in the selected atomic view, the observed signals coincide with a trapped atomic system. According to this result, we can observe Doppler-free signals, which correspond from 1.2 to 1.0 K in a Doppler-broadened medium. And the selected atoms have velocity components of {+-}(131 {+-} 3) MHz per wave number. Our experimental results can provide insight for research in cold media.

  19. Quantum annealing with ultracold atoms in a multimode optical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torggler, Valentin; Krämer, Sebastian; Ritsch, Helmut

    2017-03-01

    A dilutely filled N -site optical lattice near zero temperature within a high-Q multimode cavity can be mapped to a spin ensemble with tailorable interactions at all length scales. The effective full site to site interaction matrix can be dynamically controlled by the application of up to N (N +1 )/2 laser beams of suitable geometry, frequency, and power, which allows for the implementation of quantum annealing dynamics relying on the all-to-all effective spin coupling controllable in real time. Via an adiabatic sweep starting from a superfluid initial state one can find the lowest-energy stationary state of this system. As the cavity modes are lossy, errors can be amended and the ground state can still be reached even from a finite temperature state via ground-state cavity cooling. The physical properties of the final atomic state can be directly and almost nondestructively read off from the cavity output fields. As an example we simulate a quantum Hopfield associative memory scheme.

  20. Optical lattice polarization effects on magnetically induced optical atomic clock transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.; Oates, C. W.

    2007-08-15

    We derive the frequency shift for a forbidden optical transition J=0{yields}J{sup '}=0 caused by the simultaneous actions of an elliptically polarized lattice field and a static magnetic field. We find that a simple configuration of lattice and magnetic fields leads to a cancellation of this shift to first order in lattice intensity and magnetic field. In this geometry, the second-order lattice intensity shift can be minimized as well by use of optimal lattice polarization. Suppression of these shifts could considerably enhance the performance of the next generation of atomic clocks.

  1. Magnetometry and archaeological prospection in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba Pingarron, L.; Laboratorio de Prospeccion Arqueologica

    2013-05-01

    Luis Barba Laboratorio de Prospección Arqueológica Instituto de Investigaciones Antropológicas Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México The first magnetic survey in archaeological prospection was published in 1958 in the first number of Archaeometry, in Oxford. That article marked the beginning of this applications to archaeology. After that, magnetic field measurements have become one of the most important and popular prospection tools. Its most outstanding characteristic is the speed of survey that allows to cover large areas in short time. As a consequence, it is usually the first approach to study a buried archaeological site. The first attempts in Mexico were carried out in 196. Castillo and Urrutia, among other geophysical techniques, used a magnetometer to study the northern part of the main plaza, zocalo, in Mexico City to locate some stone Aztec sculptures. About the same time Morrison et al. in La Venta pyramid used a magnetometer to measure total magnetic field trying to find a substructure. Some years later Brainer and Coe made a magnetic survey to locate large stone Olmec heads in San Lorenzo Tenochtitlan, Veracruz. Technology development has provided everyday more portable and accurate instruments to measure the magnetic field. The first total magnetic field proton magnetometers were followed by differential magnetometers and more recently gradiometers. Presently, multiple sensor magnetometers are widely used in European archaeology. The trend has been to remove the environmental and modern interference and to make more sensitive the instruments to the superficial anomalies related to most of the archaeological sites. There is a close relationship between the geology of the region and the way magnetometry works in archaeological sites. Archaeological prospection in Europe usually needs very sensitive instruments to detect slight magnetic contrast of ditches in old sediments. In contrast, volcanic conditions in Mexico produce large magnetic contrast

  2. Loading of atoms into an optical trap with high initial phase-space density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kosuke; Yonekawa, Shota; Tojo, Satoshi

    2017-07-01

    We report a method for loading cold atoms into an optical trap with high initial phase-space density (PSD). When the trap beam is overlapped with atoms in optical molasses of optimized parameters including large cooling beam detuning compared with conventional detuning used for a magneto-optical trap (MOT), more than 3 ×106 rubidium atoms with an initial temperature less than 20 μ K are loaded into a single beam trap. The obtained maximum initial PSD is estimated to be 1.1 ×10-3 , which is one or two orders of magnitude greater than that achieved with the conventional loading into an optical trap from atoms in a MOT. The proposed method is promising for creating a quantum gas with a large number of atoms in a short evaporation time.

  3. Efficient extension of the trapping lifetime of single atoms in an optical tweezer by laser cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun; Yang, Baodong; Zhang, Tiancai; Wang, Junmin

    2011-08-01

    Optical tweezers have become powerful tools for the confinement and manipulation of neutral atoms, molecules, mesoscopic biological molecules and living cells. In our experiment, a single caesium atom was prepared in a large-magnetic-gradient magneto-optical trap (MOT). It was then efficiently transferred back and forth between the MOT and a 1064 nm microscopic optical tweezer. The atomic transfer between the MOT and the tweezer can be employed to measure the trapping lifetime and the energy distribution of the single atom in the tweezer. In order to extend the trapping lifetime, laser cooling is used to decrease the atom's kinetic energy. The trapping lifetime was extended from ~75 to ~130 s by applying a 10 ms laser cooling phase just after the single atom is transferred into the tweezer.

  4. Quantum optics of driven atoms in colored vacua

    SciTech Connect

    Mossberg, T.W.; Lewenstein, M.

    1994-12-31

    Atomic radiative decay behavior is frequently treated as if it were an inherent property of the atoms involved. Excited atomic states are ascribed specific exponential rates of decay to lower lying levels, and the dynamics of driven atoms are calculated assuming that radiative damping proceeds at the same invariant rate with or without excitation. The frequent assumption of fixed radiative decay properties is legitimized through it generally successful predictive power. 78 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Evolution of nonlinear optical properties: from gold atomic clusters to plasmonic nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Philip, Reji; Chantharasupawong, Panit; Qian, Huifeng; Jin, Rongchao; Thomas, Jayan

    2012-09-12

    Atomic clusters of metals are an emerging class of extremely interesting materials occupying the intermediate size regime between atoms and nanoparticles. Here we report the nonlinear optical (NLO) characteristics of ultrasmall, atomically precise clusters of gold, which are smaller than the critical size for electronic energy quantization (∼2 nm). Our studies reveal remarkable features of the distinct evolution of the optical nonlinearity as the clusters progress in size from the nonplasmonic regime to the plasmonic regime. We ascertain that the smallest atomic clusters do not show saturable absorption at the surface plasmon wavelength of larger gold nanocrystals (>2 nm). Consequently, the third-order optical nonlinearity in these ultrasmall gold clusters exhibits a significantly lower threshold for optical power limiting. This limiting efficiency, which is superior to that of plasmonic nanocrystals, is highly beneficial for optical limiting applications.

  6. FORWARD: A Toolset for Multiwavelength Coronal Magnetometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Sarah E.; Kucera, Therese A.; White, Stephen M.; Dove, James B.; Fan, Yuhong; Forland, Blake C.; Rachmeler, Laurel A.; Downs, Cooper; Reeves, Katharine K.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  7. FORWARD: A Toolset for Multiwavelength Coronal Magnetometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Sarah E.; Kucera, Therese A.; White, Stephen M.; Dove, James B.; Fan, Yuhong; Forland, Blake C.; Rachmeler, Laurel A.; Downs, Cooper; Reeves, Katharine K.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  8. FORWARD: A toolset for multiwavelength coronal magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Sarah; Kucera, Therese; White, Stephen; Dove, James; Fan, Yuhong; Forland, Blake; Rachmeler, Laurel; Downs, Cooper; Reeves, Katharine

    2016-03-01

    Determining the 3D coronal magnetic field is a critical, but extremely difficult problem to solve. Since different types of multiwavelength coronal data probe different aspects of the coronal magnetic field, ideally these data should be used together to validate and constrain specifications of that field. Such a task requires the ability to create observable quantities at a range of wavelengths from a distribution of magnetic field and associated plasma -- i.e., to perform forward calculations. In this paper we describe the capabilities of the FORWARD SolarSoft IDL package, a uniquely comprehensive toolset for coronal magnetometry. FORWARD is a community resource that may be used both to synthesize a broad range of coronal observables, and to access and compare synthetic observables to existing data. It enables forward fitting of specific observations, and helps to build intuition into how the physical properties of coronal magnetic structures translate to observable properties. FORWARD can also be used to generate synthetic test beds from MHD simulations in order to facilitate the development of coronal magnetometric inversion methods, and to prepare for the analysis of future large solar telescope data.

  9. Observation and measurement of interaction-induced dispersive optical nonlinearities in an ensemble of cold Rydberg atoms.

    PubMed

    Parigi, Valentina; Bimbard, Erwan; Stanojevic, Jovica; Hilliard, Andrew J; Nogrette, Florence; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa; Ourjoumtsev, Alexei; Grangier, Philippe

    2012-12-07

    We observe and measure dispersive optical nonlinearities in an ensemble of cold Rydberg atoms placed inside an optical cavity. The experimental results are in agreement with a simple model where the optical nonlinearities are due to the progressive appearance of a Rydberg blockaded volume within the medium. The measurements allow a direct estimation of the "blockaded fraction" of atoms within the atomic ensemble.

  10. Magnetometry with Ensembles of Nitrogen Vacancy Centers in Bulk Diamond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-23

    Magnetometry with Ensembles of Nitrogen Vacancy Centers in Bulk Diamond by Carson Teale Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and...Government. 2 Magnetometry with Ensembles of Nitrogen Vacancy Centers in Bulk Diamond by Carson Teale Submitted to the Department of Electrical...summarizes experiments conducted to develop a high sensitivity vector magnetometer using nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in a bulk diamond sample. This

  11. Magnetometry via spin-mechanical coupling in levitated optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pardeep; Bhattacharya, M.

    2017-08-01

    We analyze magnetometry using an optically levitated nanodiamond. We consider a configuration where a magnetic field gradient couples the mechanical oscillation of the diamond with its spin degree of freedom provided by a Nitrogen vacancy center. First, we investigate measurement of the position spectrum of the mechanical oscillator. We find that conditions of ultrahigh vacuum and feedback cooling allow a magnetic field gradient sensitivity of 1 $\\mu$Tm$^{-1}$/$\\sqrt{\\mbox{Hz}}$. At high pressure and room temperature, this sensitivity degrades and can attain a value of the order of 100 $m$Tm$^{-1}$/$\\sqrt{\\mbox{Hz}}$. Subsequently, we characterize the magnetic field gradient sensitivity obtainable by maneuvering the spin degrees of freedom using Ramsey interferometry. We find that this technique can offer photon-shot noise and spin-projection noise limited magnetic field gradient sensitivity of 100 $\\mu$Tm$^{-1}$/$\\sqrt{\\mbox{Hz}}$. We conclude that this hybrid levitated nanomechanical magnetometer provides a favorable and versatile platform for sensing applications.

  12. Vector magnetometry based on electromagnetically induced transparency in linearly polarized light

    SciTech Connect

    Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Dudin, Y. O.; Velichansky, V. L.; Zibrov, A. S.; Zibrov, S. A.

    2010-09-15

    We develop a generalized principle of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) vector magnetometry based on high-contrast EIT resonances and the symmetry of atom-light interaction in the linearly polarized bichromatic fields. Operation of such vector magnetometer on the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb has been demonstrated. The proposed compass-magnetometer has an increased immunity to shifts produced by quadratic Zeeman and ac-Stark effects, as well as by atom-buffer gas and atom-atom collisions. In our proof-of-principle experiment the detected angular sensitivity to magnetic field orientation is 10{sup -3} deg/Hz{sup 1/2}, which is limited by laser intensity fluctuations, light polarization quality, and magnitude of the magnetic field.

  13. Absolute metastable atom-atom collision cross section measurements using a magneto-optical trap.

    PubMed

    Matherson, K J; Glover, R D; Laban, D E; Sang, R T

    2007-07-01

    We present a new technique to measure absolute total collision cross sections from metastable neon atoms. The technique is based on the observation of the decay rate of trapped atoms as they collide with room temperature atoms. We present the first measurement of this kind using trapped neon atoms in the (3)P(2) metastable state colliding with thermal ground state argon. The measured cross section has a value of 556+/-26 A(2).

  14. An atomic spin precession detection method based on electro-optic modulation in an all-optical K-Rb hybrid atomic magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yanhui; Liu, Xuejing; Li, Yang; Yao, Han; Dai, Lingling; Yang, Biyao; Ding, Ming

    2017-07-01

    We present an ultrahigh-sensitivity electro-optic modulator (EOM) detection method for detecting the atomic Larmor precession in an all-optical K-Rb hybrid atomic magnetometer operating in the spin-exchange relaxation-free regime. A magnetic field sensitivity of ~10 f T Hz-1/2 has been achieved by optimizing the probe laser parameters and the EOM modulation conditions, which is comparable to that with the Faraday modulation method and has a better performance than the balanced polarimetry method in the low frequency range. The EOM detection method in the atomic magnetometer presents several advantages, such as simple structure, no extra magnetic noise, moderate thermal effect, high measurement sensitivity and reliable stability. It is demonstrated to be feasible for the improved compactness and simplicity of atomic magnetic field measurement devices in the future.

  15. Atomic and optical properties of warm dense copper.

    PubMed

    Miloshevsky, Gennady; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    The emission of x rays from warm dense matter is of great interest for both spectroscopic diagnostics and development of intense x-ray sources. We report the results from the collisional-radiative steady-state (CRSS) modeling of atomic and optical properties of copper plasmas at near-solid and solid-state density for a range of temperatures. The CRSS model is validated against the available data on the average charge state and shifts of energy levels in aluminum and the opacity and emissivity spectra of carbon and aluminum plasmas. The average charge states, number density of ion species, and free electrons as a function of temperature are investigated for the solid-density copper plasma. Due to the dense plasma environment the four outer electrons are found to be unbounded even in the low-temperature limit ∼1eV. As the temperature changes from 1 to 100 eV, the predominant species vary from fivefold- to twelvefold-ionized copper ions. The opacity and emissivity spectra of dense copper plasmas are studied using the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE approaches. It is found that the non-LTE effects are important in the spectral region of soft x rays emitted from the K shell. The emissivity in spectral lines is completely suppressed, indicating the importance of the energy-dissipating radiative processes in this soft x-ray region. Line broadening and redshifts of the K- and L-shell spectral lines toward higher wavelengths are observed with the increase of plasma density. These results have important implications for understanding the radiative properties of warm dense copper and can be useful for future experimental studies.

  16. Van der Waals enhancement of optical atom potentials via resonant coupling to surface polaritons.

    PubMed

    Kerckhoff, Joseph; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2009-08-17

    Contemporary experiments in cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) with gas-phase neutral atoms rely increasingly on laser cooling and optical, magneto-optical or magnetostatic trapping methods to provide atomic localization with sub-micron uncertainty. Difficult to achieve in free space, this goal is further frustrated by atom-surface interactions if the desired atomic placement approaches within several hundred nanometers of a solid surface, as can be the case in setups incorporating monolithic dielectric optical resonators such as microspheres, microtoroids, microdisks or photonic crystal defect cavities. Typically in such scenarios, the smallest atom-surface separation at which the van der Waals interaction can be neglected is taken to be the optimal localization point for associated trapping schemes, but this sort of conservative strategy generally compromises the achievable cavity QED coupling strength. Here we suggest a new approach to the design of optical dipole traps for atom confinement near surfaces that exploits strong surface interactions, rather than avoiding them, and present the results of a numerical study based on (39)K atoms and indium tin oxide (ITO). Our theoretical framework points to the possibility of utilizing nanopatterning methods to engineer novel modifications of atom-surface interactions. (c) 2009 Optical Society of America

  17. Generation of a Cold Atom Beam from a Pyramidal Magneto-Optical Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohel, J.; Thompson, R. J.; Seidel, D. J.; Klipstein, W. M.; Maleki, L.; Bliss, J.; Libbrecht, K. G.

    2000-01-01

    Techniques to generate cold atom beams are of great interest in a variety of applications, from atomic frequency standards and atom optics to experimental studies of Bose-Einstein condensation. Cold atom beams have been produced by slowing thermal atomic beams using the Zeeman-slowing technique or chirped lasers, or using laser-cooling techniques to extract a slow atomic beam from the background gas in a low-pressure vapor cell. These laser-cooling techniques include "atomic funnels" or two-dimensional magneto-optical traps, as well as a variation of the conventional vapor cell magneto-optical trap called the "low-velocity intense source" (LVIS). Variations of the LVIS have been realized with unique trap geometries such as conical or pyramidal mirror traps. The present work implements a simple and robust design based on the pyramidal trap geometry and allows use of a single large diameter (atoms from the background vapor. The four 45 deg mirrors are truncated just before the apex of the pyramid, and the 1 sq cm region at the center of the incident laser beam is retro-reflected by lambda /4 plate with a high-reflectance gold coating on the second surface. A small (1 mm diameter) hole in this retro-optic forms an extraction column for the atoms while maintaining a low conductance between the source region and an adjacent UHV chamber.

  18. Mesoscopic coherence in light scattering from cold, optically dense and disordered atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupriyanov, D. V.; Sokolov, I. M.; Havey, M. D.

    2017-02-01

    Coherent effects manifested in light scattering from cold, optically dense and disordered atomic systems are reviewed from a primarily theoretical point of view. Development of the basic theoretical tools is then elaborated through several physical atomic physics based processes which have been at least partly explored experimentally. These include illustrations drawn from the coherent backscattering effect, random lasing in atomic gases, quantum memories and light-atoms interface assisted by the light trapping mechanism. Current understanding and challenges associated with the transition to high atomic densities and cooperativity in the scattering process are also discussed in some detail.

  19. Measurement of the lifetime of rubidium atoms in a dark magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Permyakova, O I; Yakovlev, A V; Chapovskii, P L

    2008-09-30

    The lifetimes of rubidium atoms in a dark magneto-optical trap are measured at different populations of the 'bright' and 'dark' hyperfine states of captured atoms. It is found that the lifetime of atoms in the trap decreases if they spend more time in the bright state. A simple explanation of this effect is proposed which is based on the increase in the transport cross section for collisions of thermal rubidium atoms surrounding the trap with cold rubidium atoms upon their electronic excitation. (laser cooling)

  20. Coherent Addressing of Individual Neutral Atoms in a 3D Optical Lattice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Xianli; Corcovilos, Theodore A; Kumar, Aishwarya; Weiss, David S

    2015-07-24

    We demonstrate arbitrary coherent addressing of individual neutral atoms in a 5×5×5 array formed by an optical lattice. Addressing is accomplished using rapidly reconfigurable crossed laser beams to selectively ac Stark shift target atoms, so that only target atoms are resonant with state-changing microwaves. The effect of these targeted single qubit gates on the quantum information stored in nontargeted atoms is smaller than 3×10^{-3} in state fidelity. This is an important step along the path of converting the scalability promise of neutral atoms into reality.

  1. High precision deflection measurement of microcantilever in an optical pickup head based atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Heon

    2012-11-15

    This paper presents the methodology to measure the precise deflection of microcantilever in an optical pickup head based atomic force microscopy. In this paper, three types of calibration methods have been proposed: full linearization, sectioned linearization, and the method based on astigmatism. In addition, the probe heads for easy calibration of optical pickup head and fast replacement of optical pickup head have been developed. The performances of each method have been compared through a set of experiments and constant height mode operation which was not possible in the optical pickup head based atomic force microscopy has been carried out successfully.

  2. On the possibility of observing chaotic motion of cold atoms in rigid optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prants, S. V.; Kon'kov, L. E.

    2017-06-01

    The possibility of experimental observation of chaotic motion of cold atoms in a one-dimensional rigid optical lattice without any modulation of its parameters and additional impact is demonstrated theoretically and numerically. This effect of deterministic chaos arises near the optical resonance due to the nonlinear coupling of electronic and mechanical degrees of freedom in the atom. In a certain range of resonance detunings, at each crossing of the lattice-forming standing wave node by the atom, the atomic dipole moment changes pseudorandomly in a step-like manner, accompanied by an appropriate change in the atom momentum. This leads to the effect of chaotic wandering of atoms, possessing the properties of the classical deterministic chaos, namely, to the exponential sensitivity of atomic trajectories to small variations of the initial conditions and/or the control parameters. With time, part of atoms from the initial cloud changes the direction of their motion to the opposite one, which can be detected in a real experiment. Numerical experiments with lithium atoms with the spontaneous emission taken into account show that by varying the laser radiation intensity (normalised detuning of resonance) in the rigid optical lattice, one can implement the transition from the regular regime of the atomic motion to the chaotic wandering in a real experiment.

  3. Optical-bistability-enabled control of resonant light transmission for an atom-cavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, Rahul; Rangwala, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The control of light transmission through a standing-wave Fabry-Pérot cavity containing atoms is theoretically and numerically investigated, when the cavity mode beam and an intersecting control beam are both close to specific atomic resonances. A four-level atomic system is considered and its interaction with the cavity mode is studied by solving for the cavity field and atomic state populations. The conditions for optical bistability of the atom-cavity system are obtained. The response of the intracavity intensity to an intersecting beam on atomic resonance is understood in the presence of stationary atoms (closed system) and nonstatic atoms (open system) in the cavity. The nonstatic system of atoms is modelled by adjusting the atomic state populations to represent the exchange of atoms in the cavity mode, which corresponds to a thermal environment where atoms are moving in and out of the cavity mode volume. The control behavior with three- and two-level atomic systems is also studied, and the rich physics arising out of these systems for closed and open atomic systems is discussed. The solutions to the models are used to interpret the steady-state and transient behavior observed by Sharma et al. [Phys. Rev. A 91, 043824 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.043824.

  4. Atom optics and space physics: A summary of an 'Enrico Fermi' summer school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimondo, Ennio; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M.; Schleich, Wolfgang P.

    2008-03-01

    We describe the scientific content of the International School of Physics 'Enrico Fermi' on atom optics and space physics, organized by the Italian Physical Society in Varenna at Lake Como, Italy, 2-13 July 2007.

  5. Observation of Landau-Zener tunneling through atomic current in the optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Jieyun; Duan Suqing; Zhang Wei; Zhao Xiangeng

    2009-05-15

    The atomic current in the Fourier-synthesized optical lattices under a constant external force is investigated theoretically. Based on a two-band model, the atomic current is derived by solving the Boltzmann equations. We find that the stationary atomic current changes with the probability of Landau-Zener tunneling, depending on the adjustable energy structure of the optical lattices. In contrast to the classical results of an electron in superlattices given by the Esaki-Tsu equations, the relation between the stationary atomic current and the strength of the external force in optical lattices is modified significantly. Both these characteristics can be taken as an effective way to observe the Landau-Zener tunneling in the optical lattices.

  6. Target parameter and error estimation using magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, S. J.; Witten, A. J.; Won, I. J.; Taylor, D.

    The problem of locating and identifying buried unexploded ordnance from magnetometry measurements is addressed within the context of maximum likelihood estimation. In this approach, the magnetostatic theory is used to develop data templates, which represent the modeled magnetic response of a buried ferrous object of arbitrary location, iron content, size, shape, and orientation. It is assumed that these objects are characterized both by a magnetic susceptibility representing their passive response to the earth's magnetic field and by a three-dimensional magnetization vector representing a permanent dipole magnetization. Analytical models were derived for four types of targets: spheres, spherical shells, ellipsoids, and ellipsoidal shells. The models can be used to quantify the Cramer-Rao (error) bounds on the parameter estimates. These bounds give the minimum variance in the estimated parameters as a function of measurement signal-to-noise ratio, spatial sampling, and target characteristics. For cases where analytic expressions for the Cramer-Rao bounds can be derived, these expressions prove quite useful in establishing optimal sampling strategies. Analytic expressions for various Cramer-Rao bounds have been developed for spherical- and spherical shell-type objects. An maximum likelihood estimation algorithm has been developed and tested on data acquired at the Magnetic Test Range at the Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal Tech Center in Indian Head, Maryland. This algorithm estimates seven target parameters. These parameters are the three Cartesian coordinates (x, y, z) identifying the buried ordnance's location, the three Cartesian components of the permanent dipole magnetization vector, and the equivalent radius of the ordnance assuming it is a passive solid iron sphere.

  7. Quantum controlled-phase-flip gate between a flying optical photon and a Rydberg atomic ensemble

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Y. M.; Lin, G. W.; Xia, Keyu; Lin, X. M.; Niu, Y. P.; Gong, S. Q.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum controlled-phase-flip (CPF) gate between a flying photon qubit and a stationary atomic qubit could allow the linking of distant computational nodes in a quantum network. Here we present a scheme to realize quantum CPF gate between a flying optical photon and an atomic ensemble based on cavity input-output process and Rydberg blockade. When a flying single-photon pulse is reflected off the cavity containing a Rydberg atomic ensemble, the dark resonance and Rydberg blockade induce a conditional phase shift for the photon pulse, thus we can achieve the CPF gate between the photon and the atomic ensemble. Assisted by Rydberg blockade interaction, our scheme works in the N-atoms strong-coupling regime and significantly relaxes the requirement of strong coupling of single atom to photon in the optical cavity. PMID:25966448

  8. Magnetic induction tomography using an all-optical ⁸⁷Rb atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Wickenbrock, Arne; Jurgilas, Sarunas; Dow, Albert; Marmugi, Luca; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2014-11-15

    We demonstrate magnetic induction tomography (MIT) with an all-optical atomic magnetometer. Our instrument creates a conductivity map of conductive objects. Both the shape and size of the imaged samples compare very well with the actual shape and size. Given the potential of all-optical atomic magnetometers for miniaturization and extreme sensitivity, the proof-of-principle presented in this Letter opens up promising avenues in the development of instrumentation for MIT.

  9. Atomic Landau-Zener tunneling and Wannier-Stark ladders in optical potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Q.; Zhao, X.; Georgakis, G.; Raizen, M.

    1996-06-01

    We calculate the quantum motion of ultracold atoms in an accelerating optical potential, and show how they may be used to observe Landau-Zener tunneling and Wannier-Stark ladders, two fundamental quantum effects in solid state physics. The optical potential is spatially periodic, yielding an energy spectrum of Bloch bands for the atoms. The acceleration provides an inertial force in the moving frame, emulating an electric force on Bloch electrons. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Optical Forces from Periodic Adiabatic Rapid Passage Sequences on Metastable Helium Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stack, Daniel Thomas

    Over the past 30 years, optical manipulation of neutral atoms has been primarily performed with a monochromatic laser beam. The simplest tool for the control of atomic motion is the radiative force exerted by a monochromatic laser on a two-level atom. The radiative force arises from absorption followed by spontaneous emission, and its magnitude is limited by the atom's excited state lifetime. The coherent momentum exchanges between light fields and atoms can be exploited to produce long-range optical forces much greater than the radiative force through the use of absorption-stimulated emission processes. Adiabatic Rapid Passage (ARP) is a long-existing method to invert the population of a two-level nuclear spin system. Its extension to the optical domain necessitates a frequency chirped light pulse to interact with a two-level atom via the dipole interaction. I will first present a numerical study of the properties of optical forces on moving atoms derived from purely stimulated processes produced by multiple ARP sequences. This will be followed by experimental observations of long-range ARP forces much larger than the radiative force in metastable helium. Sequences of properly timed laser pulses may be used for rapid deceleration of neutral atomic (or molecular) beams.

  11. Motion of Cesium Atoms in the One-Dimensional Magneto-Optical Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Yimin; Chen, Xuzong; Wang, Qingji; Wang, Yiqiu

    1996-01-01

    The force to which Cs atoms are subjected in the one-dimensional magneto-optical trap (lD-MOT) is calculated, and properties of this force are discussed. Several methods to increase the number of Cs atoms in the lD-MOT are presented on the basis of the analysis of the capture and escape of Cs atoms in the ID-MOT.

  12. Higher-order effects on uncertainties of clocks of Mg atoms in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsiannikov, V. D.; Marmo, S. I.; Mokhnenko, S. N.; Palchikov, V. G.

    2017-01-01

    Multipole, nonlinear and anharmonic effects on the optical-lattice-based clocks of Mg atoms are evaluated theoretically. Dipole polarizabilities, hyperpolarizabilities and multipolar polarizabilities for Mg atoms are calculated in the single-electron approximation with the use of analytical presentations for the wave and Green’s functions in the modified model-potential approach. For comparison, the data are also given for atoms of the group IIb elements (Zn, Cd, Hg).

  13. Polycrystalline silicon optical fibers with atomically smooth surfaces.

    PubMed

    Healy, Noel; Lagonigro, Laura; Sparks, Justin R; Boden, Stuart; Sazio, Pier J A; Badding, John V; Peacock, Anna C

    2011-07-01

    We investigate the surface roughness of polycrystalline silicon core optical fibers fabricated using a high-pressure chemical deposition technique. By measuring the optical transmission of two fibers with different core sizes, we will show that scattering from the core-cladding interface has a negligible effect on the losses. A Zemetrics ZeScope three-dimensional optical profiler has been used to directly measure the surface of the core material, confirming a roughness of only ~0.1 nm. The ability to fabricate low-loss polysilicon optical fibers with ultrasmooth cores scalable to submicrometer dimensions should establish their use in a range of nonlinear optical applications.

  14. Hyperparallel optical quantum computation assisted by atomic ensembles embedded in double-sided optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-08-01

    We propose an effective, scalable, hyperparallel photonic quantum computation scheme in which photonic qubits are hyperencoded both in the spatial degrees of freedom (DOF) and the polarization DOF of each photon. The deterministic hyper-controlled-not (hyper-cnot) gate on a two-photon system is attainable with our interesting interface between the polarized photon and the collective spin wave (magnon) of an atomic ensemble embedded in a double-sided optical cavity, and it doubles the operations in the conventional quantum cnot gate. Moreover, we present a compact hyper-cnotN gate on N +1 hyperencoded photons with only two auxiliary cavity-magnon systems, not more, and it can be faithfully constituted with current experimental techniques. Our proposal enables various applications with the hyperencoded photons in quantum computing and quantum networks.

  15. Scalable spin squeezing for quantum-enhanced magnetometry with Bose-Einstein condensates.

    PubMed

    Muessel, W; Strobel, H; Linnemann, D; Hume, D B; Oberthaler, M K

    2014-09-05

    A major challenge in quantum metrology is the generation of entangled states with a macroscopic atom number. Here, we demonstrate experimentally that atomic squeezing generated via nonlinear dynamics in Bose-Einstein condensates, combined with suitable trap geometries, allows scaling to large ensemble sizes. We achieve a suppression of fluctuations by 5.3(5) dB for 12,300 particles, from which we infer that similar squeezing can be obtained for more than 10(7)  atoms. With this resource, we demonstrate quantum-enhanced magnetometry by swapping the squeezed state to magnetically sensitive hyperfine levels that have negligible nonlinearity. We find a quantum-enhanced single-shot sensitivity of 310(47) pT for static magnetic fields in a probe volume as small as 90  μm3.

  16. Scalable Spin Squeezing for Quantum-Enhanced Magnetometry with Bose-Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muessel, W.; Strobel, H.; Linnemann, D.; Hume, D. B.; Oberthaler, M. K.

    2014-09-01

    A major challenge in quantum metrology is the generation of entangled states with a macroscopic atom number. Here, we demonstrate experimentally that atomic squeezing generated via nonlinear dynamics in Bose-Einstein condensates, combined with suitable trap geometries, allows scaling to large ensemble sizes. We achieve a suppression of fluctuations by 5.3(5) dB for 12 300 particles, from which we infer that similar squeezing can be obtained for more than 107 atoms. With this resource, we demonstrate quantum-enhanced magnetometry by swapping the squeezed state to magnetically sensitive hyperfine levels that have negligible nonlinearity. We find a quantum-enhanced single-shot sensitivity of 310(47) pT for static magnetic fields in a probe volume as small as 90 μm3.

  17. Optically Controlled Distributed Quantum Computing Using Atomic Ensembles As Qubits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-23

    alkali - metal atom such as 85Rb. After the π/2-dark- π/2 sequence, the system is in state |ψ〉 = WδT2π/2WδT20 WδT2π/2|1〉. Unlike in Sec. II, we here do...from a ytterbium fibre amplifier. 3. Rubidium quantum memory A neutral alkali atom held in a far-off-resonant trap (FORT) represents a potentially ideal...GEIT system using sublevels in alkali atoms such as Rb. However, current LIGO operates at the wavelength of FIG. 14 (color online). Schematic

  18. The Atomic and Nuclear Physics of Atomic EDMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupp, Timothy

    2016-09-01

    Atomic Electric-Dipole-Moment (EDM) measurements employ low-energy atomic and precision-measurement techniques to measure the effects of elementary particle forces that affect the distribution of charge and mass in the nucleus, which is probed by the atomic electrons. Experiments and their interpretation strongly overlap atomic and nuclear physics in the experimental and theoretical problems presented. On the experimental side, the atomic EDM couples to electric fields while the magnetic dipole moment couples to magnetic fields requiring exquisite control and characerization of the magnetic fields. Measuring the tiny frequency shifts requires clock-comparisons and a large signal-to-noise ratio for frequency resolution much smaller than the linewidths, which are lmitied by observation times. To address the experimental challenges, I will discuss systematic effects related to magnetic fields and techniques of magnetometry and co-magntometery as well as optical pumping and related techniques that enhance signal-to-noise. I will also address the interpretation of atomic EDMs in terms of a set of low-energy parameters that relate to effective-field-theory coefficients, and I will empshaize the need for improved calculations from both atomic-theory and nuclear theory.

  19. On-site monitoring of atomic density number for an all-optical atomic magnetometer based on atomic spin exchange relaxation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Zou, Sheng; Chen, Xiyuan; Ding, Ming; Shan, Guangcun; Hu, Zhaohui; Quan, Wei

    2016-07-25

    We present a method for monitoring the atomic density number on site based on atomic spin exchange relaxation. When the spin polarization P ≪ 1, the atomic density numbers could be estimated by measuring magnetic resonance linewidth in an applied DC magnetic field by using an all-optical atomic magnetometer. The density measurement results showed that the experimental results the theoretical predictions had a good consistency in the investigated temperature range from 413 K to 463 K, while, the experimental results were approximately 1.5 ∼ 2 times less than the theoretical predictions estimated from the saturated vapor pressure curve. These deviations were mainly induced by the radiative heat transfer efficiency, which inevitably leaded to a lower temperature in cell than the setting temperature.

  20. Progress towards spin entanglement of cold atoms in double optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jinwei; Hausmann, Marc; Vieira, David J.; Zhao, Xinxin

    2003-05-01

    Quantum entanglement of atoms is of fundamental interest in our understanding of quantum mechanics and it also plays a significant role in quantum information. One interesting candidate for achieving entanglement is cold neutral atoms in an optical lattice. Proposals to date include entangling atoms and realizing quantum logic gates via dipole-dipole interactions or cold collisions[1, 2, 3, 4]. At Los Alamos we have been setting up an optical lattice experiment to study m-state entanglement of ^87Rb atoms. We have pre-cooled the atoms in a MOT and setup a CO2-laser optical dipole trap. We plan to transfer the atoms into a 1D "storage lattice" formed by CO2 laser with a lattice constant of 5.3 μm and prepare the atoms into (F=2, m_F=1,2) states using optical pumping and Raman coupling. We will then adiabatically transfer the atoms to another shorter wavelength lattice with a much smaller lattice constant of ˜ 0.5 μm to entangle the atoms via the spin-spin interaction with an EPR entanglement rate of 0.2 Hz. After the entanglement, the atoms will be adiabatically transferred back to the "storage lattice" where they are readout using laser-induced fluorescence in the presence of a weak magnetic field gradient. We will present our latest progress towards the realization of neutral atom spin entanglement experiment. [1] G. K. Brennen, C. M. Caves, P. S. Jessen and I. H. Deutsch, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 1060 (1999). [2] D. Jaksch, H.-J. Briegel, J. I. Cirac, C. W. Gardiner and P. Zoller, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 1975 (1999). [3] D. Jaksch, J. I. Cirac, P. Zoller, S. L. Rolston, R. Cote and M. D. Lukin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2208 (2000). [4] L. You, and M. S. Chapman, Phys. Rev. A 62, 052302 (2000).

  1. Nonlinear optical response of a two-dimensional atomic crystal.

    PubMed

    Merano, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The theory of Bloembergen and Pershan for the light waves at the boundary of nonlinear media is extended to a nonlinear two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystal, i.e., a single planar atomic lattice, placed between linear bulk media. The crystal is treated as a zero-thickness interface, a real 2D system. Harmonic waves emanate from it. Generalization of the laws of reflection and refraction give the direction and the intensity of the harmonic waves. As a particular case that contains all the essential physical features, second-order harmonic generation is considered. The theory, due to its simplicity that stems from the special character of a single planar atomic lattice, is able to elucidate and explain the rich experimental details of harmonic generation from a 2D atomic crystal.

  2. Precision optical metrology with alkali-atom isoclinic points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Nathan; Driskell, Travis; Camparo, James

    2016-06-01

    Vapour-phase spectroscopy rarely involves transitions between well-isolated atomic states. Routinely, the spectra comprise overlapped Doppler/pressure-broadened resonances, which leads to a “pulling” of the spectral peaks from their true atomic resonance frequencies. This pulling gives the absorption resonances a temperature sensitivity, which limits their utility for precision spectroscopy when sub-Doppler techniques are not viable. Here, we discuss the use of alkali isoclinic points as a solution to this problem.

  3. Entanglement preparation and quantum communication with atoms in optical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Peng; Han Chao; Yu Bo; Lin Xiumin; Guo Guangcan

    2004-05-01

    We propose an experimentally feasible scheme to generate general entangled states between atoms in spatially separate cavities, and then show one of the applications--a secure communication allowing asymptotically key distribution and quasisecure direct communication. The scheme involves laser manipulation of atoms in a high-Q cavity, adjustable quarter- and half-wave plates, beam splitter, polarizing beam splitters, and single-photon detectors, and well fits the status of the current experimental technology.

  4. Interaction of laser-cooled 87Rb atoms with higher order modes of an optical nanofibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ravi; Gokhroo, Vandna; Deasy, Kieran; Maimaiti, Aili; Frawley, Mary C.; Phelan, Ciarán; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2015-01-01

    Optical nanofibres are used to confine light to sub-wavelength regions and are very promising tools for the development of optical fibre-based quantum networks using cold, neutral atoms. To date, experimental studies on atoms near nanofibres have focussed on fundamental fibre mode interactions. In this work, we demonstrate the integration of a few-mode optical nanofibre into a magneto-optical trap for 87Rb atoms. The nanofibre, with a waist diameter of ∼700 nm, supports both the fundamental and first group of higher order modes (HOMs) and is used for atomic fluorescence and absorption studies. In general, light propagating in higher order fibre modes has a greater evanescent field extension around the waist in comparison with the fundamental mode. By exploiting this behaviour, we demonstrate that the detected signal of fluorescent photons emitted from a cloud of cold atoms centred at the nanofibre waist is larger if HOMs are also included. In particular, the signal from HOMs appears to be about six times larger than that obtained for the fundamental mode. Absorption of on-resonance, HOM probe light by the laser-cooled atoms is also observed. These advances should facilitate the realization of atom trapping schemes based on HOM interference.

  5. Magnetic field-induced spectroscopy of forbidden optical transitions with application to lattice-based optical atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Taichenachev, A V; Yudin, V I; Oates, C W; Hoyt, C W; Barber, Z W; Hollberg, L

    2006-03-03

    We develop a method of spectroscopy that uses a weak static magnetic field to enable direct optical excitation of forbidden electric-dipole transitions that are otherwise prohibitively weak. The power of this scheme is demonstrated using the important application of optical atomic clocks based on neutral atoms confined to an optical lattice. The simple experimental implementation of this method--a single clock laser combined with a dc magnetic field--relaxes stringent requirements in current lattice-based clocks (e.g., magnetic field shielding and light polarization), and could therefore expedite the realization of the extraordinary performance level predicted for these clocks. We estimate that a clock using alkaline-earth-like atoms such as Yb could achieve a fractional frequency uncertainty of well below 10(-17) for the metrologically preferred even isotopes.

  6. Long distance transport of ultracold atoms using a 1D optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Stefan; Thalhammer, Gregor; Winkler, Klaus; Lang, Florian; Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2006-08-01

    We study the horizontal transport of ultracold atoms over macroscopic distances of up to 20 cm with a moving 1D optical lattice. By using an optical Bessel beam to form the optical lattice, we can achieve nearly homogeneous trapping conditions over the full transport length, which is crucial in order to hold the atoms against gravity for such a wide range. Fast transport velocities of up to 6 m s-1 (corresponding to about 1100 photon recoils) and accelerations of up to 2600 m s-2 are reached. Even at high velocities the momentum of the atoms is precisely defined with an uncertainty of less than one photon recoil. This allows for construction of an atom catapult with high kinetic energy resolution, which might have applications in novel collision experiments.

  7. Hexapole-compensated magneto-optical trap on a mesoscopic atom chip

    SciTech Connect

    Joellenbeck, S.; Mahnke, J.; Randoll, R.; Ertmer, W.; Klempt, C.; Arlt, J.

    2011-04-15

    Magneto-optical traps on atom chips are usually restricted to small atomic samples due to a limited capture volume caused primarily by distorted field configurations. Here we present a magneto-optical trap based on a millimeter-sized wire structure which generates a magnetic field with minimized distortions. Together with the loading from a high-flux two-dimensional magneto-optical trap, we achieve a loading rate of 8.4x10{sup 10} atoms/s and maximum number of 8.7x10{sup 9} captured atoms. The wire structure is placed outside of the vacuum to enable a further adaptation to new scientific objectives. Since all magnetic fields are applied locally without the need for external bias fields, the presented setup will facilitate parallel generation of Bose-Einstein condensates on a conveyor belt with a cycle rate above 1 Hz.

  8. Feasibility of a feedback control of atomic self-organization in an optical cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, D. A. Ivanova, T. Yu.

    2015-08-15

    Many interesting nonlinear effects are based on the strong interaction of motional degrees of freedom of atoms with an optical cavity field. Among them is the spatial self-organization of atoms in a pattern where the atoms group in either odd or even sites of the cavity-induced optical potential. An experimental observation of this effect can be simplified by using, along with the original cavity-induced feedback, an additional electronic feedback based on the detection of light leaking the cavity and the control of the optical potential for the atoms. Following our previous study, we show that this approach is more efficient from the laser power perspective than the original scheme without the electronic feedback.

  9. Feasibility of a feedback control of atomic self-organization in an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, D. A.; Ivanova, T. Yu.

    2015-08-01

    Many interesting nonlinear effects are based on the strong interaction of motional degrees of freedom of atoms with an optical cavity field. Among them is the spatial self-organization of atoms in a pattern where the atoms group in either odd or even sites of the cavity-induced optical potential. An experimental observation of this effect can be simplified by using, along with the original cavity-induced feedback, an additional electronic feedback based on the detection of light leaking the cavity and the control of the optical potential for the atoms. Following our previous study, we show that this approach is more efficient from the laser power perspective than the original scheme without the electronic feedback.

  10. 80ℏk momentum separation with Bloch oscillations in an optically guided atom interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, G. D.; Kuhn, C. C. N.; Bennetts, S.; Debs, J. E.; Hardman, K. S.; Johnsson, M.; Close, J. D.; Robins, N. P.

    2013-11-01

    We demonstrate phase sensitivity in a horizontally guided, acceleration-sensitive atom interferometer with a momentum separation of 80ℏk between its arms. A fringe visibility of 7% is observed. Our coherent pulse sequence accelerates the cold cloud in an optical waveguide, an inherently scalable route to large momentum separation and high sensitivity. We maintain coherence at high momentum separation due to both the transverse confinement provided by the guide and our use of optical δ-kick cooling on our cold-atom cloud. We also construct a horizontal interferometric gradiometer to measure the longitudinal curvature of our optical waveguide.

  11. Collimation of a thulium atomic beam by two-dimensional optical molasses

    SciTech Connect

    Sukachev, D D; Kalganova, E S; Sokolov, A V; Savchenkov, A V; Vishnyakova, G A; Golovizin, A A; Akimov, A V; Kolachevsky, Nikolai N; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2013-04-30

    The number of laser cooled and trapped thulium atoms in a magneto-optical trap is increased by a factor of 3 using a two-dimensional optical molasses which collimated the atomic beam before entering a Zeeman slower. A diode laser operating at 410.6 nm was employed to form optical molasses: The laser was heated to 70 Degree-Sign C by a two-step temperature stabilisation system. The laser system consisting of a master oscillator and an injection-locked amplifier emitted more than 100 mW at 410 nm and had a spectral linewidth of 0.6 MHz. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  12. Second-harmonic generation from atomic-scale ABC-type laminate optical metamaterials (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alloatti, Luca; Kieninger, Clemens M.; Frölich, Andreas M.; Lauermann, Matthias; Frenzel, Tobias; Köhnle, Kira; Freude, Wolfgang; Leuthold, Juerg; Koos, Christian; Wegener, Martin

    2015-09-01

    [invited] We introduce ABC laminate metamaterials composed of layers of three different dielectrics. Each layer has zero bulk second-order optical nonlinearity, yet centro-symmetry is broken locally at each inner interface. To achieve appreciable effective bulk metamaterial second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities, we densely pack many inner surfaces to a stack of atomically thin layers grown by conformal atomic-layer deposition. For the ABC stack, centro-symmetry is also broken macroscopically. Our experimental results for excitation at around 800 nm wavelength indicate interesting application perspectives for frequency conversion or electro-optic modulation in silicon photonics.

  13. Trapping of Neutral Mercury Atoms and Prospects for Optical Lattice Clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Hachisu, H.; Takamoto, M.; Katori, H.; Miyagishi, K.; Porsev, S. G.; Derevianko, A.; Ovsiannikov, V. D.; Pal'chikov, V. G.

    2008-02-08

    We report vapor-cell magneto-optical trapping of Hg isotopes on the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 1} intercombination transition. Six abundant isotopes, including four bosons and two fermions, were trapped. Hg is the heaviest nonradioactive atom trapped so far, which enables sensitive atomic searches for ''new physics'' beyond the standard model. We propose an accurate optical lattice clock based on Hg and evaluate its systematic accuracy to be better than 10{sup -18}. Highly accurate and stable Hg-based clocks will provide a new avenue for the research of optical lattice clocks and the time variation of the fine-structure constant.

  14. Trapping of neutral mercury atoms and prospects for optical lattice clocks.

    PubMed

    Hachisu, H; Miyagishi, K; Porsev, S G; Derevianko, A; Ovsiannikov, V D; Pal'chikov, V G; Takamoto, M; Katori, H

    2008-02-08

    We report vapor-cell magneto-optical trapping of Hg isotopes on the (1)S(0)-(3)P(1) intercombination transition. Six abundant isotopes, including four bosons and two fermions, were trapped. Hg is the heaviest nonradioactive atom trapped so far, which enables sensitive atomic searches for "new physics" beyond the standard model. We propose an accurate optical lattice clock based on Hg and evaluate its systematic accuracy to be better than 10;{-18}. Highly accurate and stable Hg-based clocks will provide a new avenue for the research of optical lattice clocks and the time variation of the fine-structure constant.

  15. Optical Pattern Formation in Spatially Bunched Atoms: A Self-Consistent Model and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittberger, Bonnie L.; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2014-05-01

    The nonlinear optics and optomechanical physics communities use different theoretical models to describe how optical fields interact with a sample of atoms. There does not yet exist a model that is valid for finite atomic temperatures but that also produces the zero temperature results that are generally assumed in optomechanical systems. We present a self-consistent model that is valid for all atomic temperatures and accounts for the back-action of the atoms on the optical fields. Our model provides new insights into the competing effects of the bunching-induced nonlinearity and the saturable nonlinearity. We show that it is crucial to keep the fifth and seventh-order nonlinearities that arise when there exists atomic bunching, even at very low optical field intensities. We go on to apply this model to the results of our experimental system where we observe spontaneous, multimode, transverse optical pattern formation at ultra-low light levels. We show that our model accurately predicts our experimentally observed threshold for optical pattern formation, which is the lowest threshold ever reported for pattern formation. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through Grant #PHY-1206040.

  16. Realization of All-Optical Multistate Switching in an Atomic Coherent Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Jiteng; Khadka, Utsab; Xiao, Min

    2012-11-01

    We have experimentally observed optical multistability (OM) in an optical ring cavity containing three-level Λ-type Doppler-broadened rubidium atoms. The shape of the OM curve can be significantly modified by changing the power of the control laser field. An all-optical multistate switching or coding element is realized and flexibly controlled by adding a pulse sequence to the input (probe) intensity.

  17. Nonlinear spectroscopy of cold atoms in a spontaneous-force optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabosa, J. W. R.; Chen, G.; Hu, Z.; Lee, R. B.; Kimble, H. J.

    1991-06-01

    Probe-wave amplification and absorption spectra are reported for cesium atoms cooled and confined in a Zeeman-shift spontaneous-force optical trap. Novel spectral features are observed with narrow frequency widths and with single-pass gain of 20 percent in some cases. Negative radiation pressure is demonstrated as the mechanical consequence of optical gain and is investigated as a possible means for optical implosion of a trapped sample.

  18. Theory of magic optical traps for Zeeman-insensitive clock transitions in alkali-metal atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Derevianko, Andrei

    2010-05-15

    Precision measurements and quantum-information processing with cold atoms may benefit from trapping atoms with specially engineered, 'magic' optical fields. At the magic trapping conditions, the relevant atomic properties remain immune to strong perturbations by the trapping fields. Here we develop a theoretical analysis of magic trapping for especially valuable Zeeman-insensitive clock transitions in alkali-metal atoms. The involved mechanism relies on applying a magic bias B field along a circularly polarized trapping laser field. We map out these B fields as a function of trapping laser wavelength for all commonly used alkalis. We also highlight a common error in evaluating Stark shifts of hyperfine manifolds.

  19. Cold-atom physics using ultrathin optical fibers: light-induced dipole forces and surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Sagué, G; Vetsch, E; Alt, W; Meschede, D; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2007-10-19

    The strong evanescent field around ultrathin unclad optical fibers bears a high potential for detecting, trapping, and manipulating cold atoms. Introducing such a fiber into a cold-atom cloud, we investigate the interaction of a small number of cold cesium atoms with the guided fiber mode and with the fiber surface. Using high resolution spectroscopy, we observe and analyze light-induced dipole forces, van der Waals interaction, and a significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate of the atoms. The latter can be assigned to the modification of the vacuum modes by the fiber.

  20. Optical excitation and decay dynamics of ytterbium atoms embedded in a solid neon matrix.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.-Y.; Hu, S.-M.; Singh, J.; Bailey, K.; Lu, Z.-T.; Mueller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.; Welp, U.

    2011-09-01

    Neutral ytterbium atoms embedded in solid neon qualitatively retain the structure of free atoms. Despite the atom-solid interaction, the 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0} level is found to remain metastable with its lifetimes determined to be in the range of ten to hundreds of seconds. The atomic population can be almost completely transferred between the ground level and the metastable level via optical excitation and spontaneous decay. The dynamics of this process is examined and is used to explicitly demonstrate that the transition broadening mechanism is homogeneous.

  1. Optical Excitation and Decay Dynamics of Ytterbium Atoms Embedded in a Solid Neon Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.-Y.; Lu, Z.-T.; Hu, S.-M.; Singh, J.; Bailey, K.; Mueller, P.; O'Connor, T. P.; Welp, U.

    2011-08-26

    Neutral ytterbium atoms embedded in solid neon qualitatively retain the structure of free atoms. Despite the atom-solid interaction, the 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0} level is found to remain metastable with its lifetimes determined to be in the range of ten to hundreds of seconds. The atomic population can be almost completely transferred between the ground level and the metastable level via optical excitation and spontaneous decay. The dynamics of this process is examined and is used to explicitly demonstrate that the transition broadening mechanism is homogeneous.

  2. Resonant optical control of the spin of a single Cr atom in a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafuente-Sampietro, A.; Utsumi, H.; Boukari, H.; Kuroda, S.; Besombes, L.

    2017-01-01

    A Cr atom in a semiconductor host carries a localized spin with an intrinsic large spin to strain coupling, which is particularly promising for the development of hybrid spin-mechanical systems and coherent mechanical spin driving. We demonstrate here that the spin of an individual Cr atom inserted in a semiconductor quantum dot can be controlled optically. We first show that a Cr spin can be prepared by resonant optical pumping. Monitoring the time dependence of the intensity of the resonant fluorescence of the quantum dot during this process permits us to probe the dynamics of the optical initialization of the Cr spin. Using this initialization and readout technique we measured a Cr spin relaxation time at T =5 K in the microsecond range. We finally demonstrate that, under a resonant single-mode laser field, the energy of any spin state of an individual Cr atom can be independently tuned by using the optical Stark effect.

  3. Longitudinal Spin Relaxation of Optically Pumped Rubidium Atoms in Solid Parahydrogen.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Sunil; Kanagin, Andrew N; Hartzell, Chase; Christy, Tim; Arnott, W Patrick; Momose, Takamasa; Patterson, David; Weinstein, Jonathan D

    2016-10-21

    We have grown crystals of solid parahydrogen using a single closed-cycle cryostat. We have doped the crystals with rubidium atoms at densities on the order of 10^{17}  cm^{-3} and used optical pumping to polarize the spin state of the implanted atoms. The optical spectrum of the rubidium atoms shows larger broadening than previous work in which the rubidium was implanted in solid argon or neon. However, the optical pumping behavior is significantly improved, with both a larger optical pumping signal and a longer longitudinal relaxation time. The spin relaxation time shows a strong dependence on orthohydrogen impurity levels in the crystal, as well as the applied magnetic field. Current performance is comparable to state-of-the-art solid state systems at comparable spin densities, with potential for improvement at higher parahydrogen purities.

  4. Longitudinal Spin Relaxation of Optically Pumped Rubidium Atoms in Solid Parahydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Sunil; Kanagin, Andrew N.; Hartzell, Chase; Christy, Tim; Arnott, W. Patrick; Momose, Takamasa; Patterson, David; Weinstein, Jonathan D.

    2016-10-01

    We have grown crystals of solid parahydrogen using a single closed-cycle cryostat. We have doped the crystals with rubidium atoms at densities on the order of 1017 cm-3 and used optical pumping to polarize the spin state of the implanted atoms. The optical spectrum of the rubidium atoms shows larger broadening than previous work in which the rubidium was implanted in solid argon or neon. However, the optical pumping behavior is significantly improved, with both a larger optical pumping signal and a longer longitudinal relaxation time. The spin relaxation time shows a strong dependence on orthohydrogen impurity levels in the crystal, as well as the applied magnetic field. Current performance is comparable to state-of-the-art solid state systems at comparable spin densities, with potential for improvement at higher parahydrogen purities.

  5. Magnetic-field-compensation optical vector magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Papoyan, Aram; Shmavonyan, Svetlana; Khanbekyan, Alen; Khanbekyan, Karen; Marinelli, Carmela; Mariotti, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    A concept for an optical magnetometer used for the measurement of magnitude and direction of a magnetic field (B-field) in two orthogonal directions is developed based on double scanning of a B-field to compensate the measured field to zero value, which is monitored by a resonant magneto-optical process in an unshielded atomic vapor cell. Implementation of the technique using the nonlinear Hanle effect on the D2 line of rubidium demonstrates viability and efficiency of the proposed concept. The ways to enhance characteristics of the suggested technique and optimize its performance, as well as the possible extension to three-axis magnetometry, are discussed.

  6. Accurate and agile digital control of optical phase, amplitude and frequency for coherent atomic manipulation of atomic systems.

    PubMed

    Thom, Joseph; Wilpers, Guido; Riis, Erling; Sinclair, Alastair G

    2013-08-12

    We demonstrate a system for fast and agile digital control of laser phase, amplitude and frequency for applications in coherent atomic systems. The full versatility of a direct digital synthesis radiofrequency source is faithfully transferred to laser radiation via acousto-optic modulation. Optical beatnotes are used to measure phase steps up to 2π, which are accurately implemented with a resolution of ≤ 10 mrad. By linearizing the optical modulation process, amplitude-shaped pulses of durations ranging from 500 ns to 500 ms, in excellent agreement with the programmed functional form, are demonstrated. Pulse durations are limited only by the 30 ns rise time of the modulation process, and a measured extinction ratio of > 5 × 10(11) is achieved. The system presented here was developed specifically for controlling the quantum state of trapped ions with sequences of multiple laser pulses, including composite and bichromatic pulses. The demonstrated techniques are widely applicable to other atomic systems ranging across quantum information processing, frequency metrology, atom interferometry, and single-photon generation.

  7. Magneto-optical trap in a vapor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arpornthip, Tanwa; Sackett, Charles; Hughes, Jeramy; Brown, Archie

    2014-05-01

    Since the development of laser cooling, numerous applications have been developed, including atom interferometry, magnetometry, atomic clocks, quantum information, and non-linear optics. Despite the promising performance of these technologies, cold atoms have seen essentially no commercial development. One reason is the large size and complexity of the apparatus required. We discuss the development of a novel vacuum system consisting of a simple glass cell pumped only by a non-evaporable getter, and with an alkali dispenser to serve as an atom source. We have maintained a Rb magneto-optical trap in such a cell over a time scale of months, and we have developed several in situ diagnostics to monitor vacuum pressure and alkali atom density. This data reveals a great deal about how the alkali atoms interact with the glass walls and the getter material, knowledge which is needed for informed cell design.

  8. Controlled exchange interaction between pairs of neutral atoms in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Anderlini, Marco; Lee, Patricia J; Brown, Benjamin L; Sebby-Strabley, Jennifer; Phillips, William D; Porto, J V

    2007-07-26

    Ultracold atoms trapped by light offer robust quantum coherence and controllability, providing an attractive system for quantum information processing and for the simulation of complex problems in condensed matter physics. Many quantum information processing schemes require the manipulation and deterministic entanglement of individual qubits; this would typically be accomplished using controlled, state-dependent, coherent interactions among qubits. Recent experiments have made progress towards this goal by demonstrating entanglement among an ensemble of atoms confined in an optical lattice. Until now, however, there has been no demonstration of a key operation: controlled entanglement between atoms in isolated pairs. Here we use an optical lattice of double-well potentials to isolate and manipulate arrays of paired (87)Rb atoms, inducing controlled entangling interactions within each pair. Our experiment realizes proposals to use controlled exchange coupling in a system of neutral atoms. Although 87Rb atoms have nearly state-independent interactions, when we force two atoms into the same physical location, the wavefunction exchange symmetry of these identical bosons leads to state-dependent dynamics. We observe repeated interchange of spin between atoms occupying different vibrational levels, with a coherence time of more than ten milliseconds. This observation demonstrates the essential component of a neutral atom quantum SWAP gate (which interchanges the state of two qubits). Its 'half-implementation', the root SWAP gate, is entangling, and together with single-qubit rotations it forms a set of universal gates for quantum computation.

  9. Highly reliable optical system for a rubidium space cold atom clock.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wei; Sun, Yanguang; Wang, Bin; Xia, Wenbing; Qu, Qiuzhi; Xiang, Jingfeng; Dong, Zuoren; Lü, Desheng; Liu, Liang

    2016-05-01

    We describe a highly reliable optical system designed for a rubidium space cold atom clock (SCAC), presenting its design, key technologies, and optical components. All of the optical and electronic components are integrated onto an optimized two-sided 300  mm×290  mm×30  mm optical bench. The compact optical structure and special thermal design ensure that the optical system can pass all of the space environmental qualification tests including both thermal vacuum and mechanical tests. To verify its performance, the optical system is carefully checked before and after each test. The results indicate that this optical system is suitably robust for the space applications for which the rubidium SCAC was built.

  10. Role of exchange interaction in nitrogen vacancy center based magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Cong Son; Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Chen, Zilong; Krivitsky, Leonid A.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a multilayer device comprising a thin-film-based ferromagnetic heterostructure (FMH) deposited on a diamond layer doped with nitrogen vacancy centers (NVC's). We find that when the NVC's are in close proximity (1-2 nm) to the FMH, the exchange energy is comparable to, and may even surpass, the magnetostatic interaction energy. This calls forth the need to consider and utilize both effects in magnetometry based on NVC's in diamond. As the distance between the FMH and NVC is decreased to the subnanometer scale, the exponential increase in the exchange energy suggests spintronic applications of NVC's beyond magnetometry, such as detection of spin Hall effect or spin currents.

  11. Towards a monolithic optical cavity for atom detection and manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleyzes, S.; El Amili, A.; Cornelussen, R. A.; Lalanne, P.; Westbrook, C. I.; Aspect, A.; Estève, J.; Moreau, G.; Martinez, A.; Lafosse, X.; Ferlazzo, L.; Harmand, J. C.; Mailly, D.; Ramdane, A.

    2009-05-01

    We study a Fabry-Perot cavity formed from a ridge waveguide on a AlGaAs substrate. We experimentally determined the propagation losses in the waveguide at 780 nm, the wavelength of Rb atoms. We have also made a numerical and analytical estimate of the losses induced by the presence of the gap which would allow the interaction of cold atoms with the cavity field. We found that the intrinsic finesse of the gapped cavity can be on the order of F˜30, which, when one takes into account the losses due to mirror transmission, corresponds to a cooperativity parameter for our system C˜1.

  12. Polarization gradient cooling of single atoms in optical dipole traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Yue-Sum; Steiner, Matthias; Kurtsiefer, Christian

    2017-09-01

    We experimentally investigate σ+-σ- polarization gradient cooling (PGC) of a single 87Rb atom in a tightly focused dipole trap and show that the cooling limit strongly depends on the polarization of the trapping field. For optimized cooling light power, the temperature of the atom reaches 10.4 (6 )μ K in a linearly polarized trap, approximately five times lower than in a circularly polarized trap. The inhibition of PGC is qualitatively explained by the fictitious magnetic fields induced by the trapping field. We further demonstrate that switching the trap polarization from linear to circular after PGC induces only minor heating.

  13. Interference and dynamics of light from a distance-controlled atom pair in an optical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuzner, A.; Körber, M.; Morin, O.; Ritter, S.; Rempe, G.

    2016-05-01

    Interference is central to quantum physics and occurs when indistinguishable paths exist, as in a double-slit experiment. Replacing the two slits with single atoms introduces optical nonlinearities for which non-trivial interference phenomena are predicted. Their observation, however, has been hampered by difficulties in preparing the required atomic distribution, controlling the optical phases and detecting the faint light. Here we overcome all of these experimental challenges by combining an optical lattice for atom localization, an imaging system with single-site resolution and an optical resonator for light steering. We observe resonator-induced saturation of resonance fluorescence for constructive interference and non-zero emission with huge photon bunching for destructive interference. The latter is explained by atomic saturation and photon-pair generation, similar to predictions for free-space atoms. Our experimental setting allows realization of the Tavis-Cummings model for any number of atoms and photons, exploration of fundamental aspects of light-matter interaction and implementation of new quantum information processing protocols.

  14. Holographic optical traps for atom-based topological Kondo devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccheri, F.; Bruce, G. D.; Trombettoni, A.; Cassettari, D.; Babujian, H.; Korepin, V. E.; Sodano, P.

    2016-07-01

    The topological Kondo (TK) model has been proposed in solid-state quantum devices as a way to realize non-Fermi liquid behaviors in a controllable setting. Another motivation behind the TK model proposal is the demand to demonstrate the quantum dynamical properties of Majorana fermions, which are at the heart of their potential use in topological quantum computation. Here we consider a junction of crossed Tonks-Girardeau gases arranged in a star-geometry (forming a Y-junction), and we perform a theoretical analysis of this system showing that it provides a physical realization of the TK model in the realm of cold atom systems. Using computer-generated holography, we experimentally implement a Y-junction suitable for atom trapping, with controllable and independent parameters. The junction and the transverse size of the atom waveguides are of the order of 5 μm, leading to favorable estimates for the Kondo temperature and for the coupling across the junction. Since our results show that all the required theoretical and experimental ingredients are available, this provides the demonstration of an ultracold atom device that may in principle exhibit the TK effect.

  15. Quantum Phonon Optics: Squeezing Quantum Noise in the Atomic Displacements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Nori, F.

    1996-03-01

    We have investigated(X. Hu and F. Nori, Physical Review B, in press; preprints.) coherent and squeezed quantum states of phonons. Squeezed states are interesting because they allow the possibility of modulating the quantum fluctuations of atomic displacements below the zero-point quantum noise level of phonon vacuum states. We have studiedfootnotemark[1] the possibility of squeezing quantum noise in the atomic displacement using a polariton-based approach and also a method based on the three-phonon anharmonic interaction. Our focus here is on the first approach. We have diagonalized the polariton Hamiltonian and calculated the corresponding expectation values and fluctuations of both the atomic displacement and the lattice amplitude operators (the later is the phonon analog of the electric field operator for photons). Our results shows that squeezing of quantum fluctuations in the atomic displacements can be achieved with appropriate initial states of both photon and phonon fields. The degree of squeezing is directly related to the crystal susceptibility, which is indicative of the interaction strength between the incident light and the crystal.

  16. Magnetic microtraps for cavity QED, Bose-Einstein condensates, and atom optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Benjamin L.

    The system comprised of an atom strongly coupled to photons, known as cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED), provides a rich experimental setting for quantum information processing, both in the implementation of quantum logic gates and in the development of quantum networks. Moreover, studies of cavity QED will help elucidate the dynamics of continuously observed open quantum systems with quantum-limited feedback. To achieve these goals in cavity QED, a neutral atom must be tightly confined inside a high-finesse cavity with small mode volume for long periods of time. Microfabricated wires on a substrate---known as an atom chip---can create a sufficiently high-curvature magnetic potential to trap atoms in the Lamb-Dicke regime. We have recently integrated an optical fiber Fabry-Perot cavity with such a device. The microwires allow the on-chip collection and laser cooling of neutral atoms, and allow the magnetic waveguiding of these atoms to an Ioffe trap inside the cavity mode. Magnetically trapped intracavity atoms have been detected with this cavity QED system. A similar experiment employing microdisks and photonic bandgap cavities is nearing completion. With these more exotic cavities, a robust and scalable atom-cavity chip system will deeply probe the strong coupling regime of cavity QED with magnetically trapped atoms. Atom chips have found great success in producing and manipulating Bose-Einstein condensates and in creating novel atom optical elements. An on-chip BEC has been attained in a miniaturized system incorporating an atom chip designed for atom interferometry and for studies of Josephson effects of a BEC in a double-well potential. Using similar microfabrication techniques, we created and demonstrated a specular magnetic atom mirror formed from a standard computer hard drive. This device, in conjunction with micron-sized charged circular pads, can produce a 1-D ring trap which may prove useful for studying Tonks gases in a ring geometry and for

  17. Atomic-scale imaging of dopant atoms and clusters in Yb-doped optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, H.; Pilz, S.; El Sayed, A.; Boas, J.; Kummer, D.; Romano, V.

    2016-04-01

    Fabrication of Ytterbium-doped active fibers with different designs, compositions and high Yb concentration has attracted an intense interest. For making highly Yb-doped fibers, co-dopants like phosphorous (P) and aluminum (Al) are also employed in order to modify refractive index and increase Yb solubility, avoiding clusters and phase segregations. Indeed, Yb-clustering results in quenching effects and increased propagation losses due to energy transfer between clustered ions. Therefore, the chemical composition and phase homogeneity of the fiber core have key influences on the performance of an active fiber. However, conventional fabrication techniques such as MCVD (modified chemical vapor deposition) and OVD (outside vapor deposition) are approaching the limit. In this contribution, we have developed an approach for fabrication of such active fibres based on granulated silica derived from the sol-gel process. The advantage of this method is the fabrication of active fibers with high dopant contents and homogeneity. Here, using high angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) in atomic scale, we report the direct, nano-scale and atomic-resolution observation of individual Yb dopant and co-dopant (i.e. Al, P) atoms for different fabricated fibers. The chemical mapping from STEM-EDX shows an extremely homogeneous distribution of the dopants and co-dopants in nano-scale for our fabrication protocol. However in atomic resolution, we also identified the possible Yb clusters in the range of 10 atoms within the core structure. The size, structure, and distribution of these clusters are determined with an Yb-atom detection efficiency of almost 100% by STEM.

  18. Chiral cavity ring down polarimetry: Chirality and magnetometry measurements using signal reversals.

    PubMed

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E; Spiliotis, Alexandros K; Tzallas, Paraskevas; Loppinet, Benoit; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2015-09-14

    We present the theory and experimental details for chiral-cavity-ring-down polarimetry and magnetometry, based on ring cavities supporting counterpropagating laser beams. The optical-rotation symmetry is broken by the presence of both chiral and Faraday birefringence, giving rise to signal reversals which allow rapid background subtractions. We present the measurement of the specific rotation at 800 nm of vapors of α-pinene, 2-butanol, and α-phellandrene, the measurement of optical rotation of sucrose solutions in a flow cell, the measurement of the Verdet constant of fused silica, and measurements and theoretical treatment of evanescent-wave optical rotation at a prism surface. Therefore, these signal-enhancing and signal-reversing methods open the way for ultrasensitive polarimetry measurements in gases, liquids and solids, and at surfaces.

  19. Chiral cavity ring down polarimetry: Chirality and magnetometry measurements using signal reversals

    SciTech Connect

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Katsoprinakis, Georgios E.; Spiliotis, Alexandros K.; Rakitzis, T. Peter; Tzallas, Paraskevas; Loppinet, Benoit

    2015-09-14

    We present the theory and experimental details for chiral-cavity-ring-down polarimetry and magnetometry, based on ring cavities supporting counterpropagating laser beams. The optical-rotation symmetry is broken by the presence of both chiral and Faraday birefringence, giving rise to signal reversals which allow rapid background subtractions. We present the measurement of the specific rotation at 800 nm of vapors of α-pinene, 2-butanol, and α-phellandrene, the measurement of optical rotation of sucrose solutions in a flow cell, the measurement of the Verdet constant of fused silica, and measurements and theoretical treatment of evanescent-wave optical rotation at a prism surface. Therefore, these signal-enhancing and signal-reversing methods open the way for ultrasensitive polarimetry measurements in gases, liquids and solids, and at surfaces.

  20. A hybrid quantum system of atoms trapped on ultrathin optical fibers coupled to superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolston, S. L.; Anderson, J. R.; Chukwu, U.; Grover, J.; Hertzberg, J. B.; Hoffman, J. E.; Kordell, P.; Lee, J.; Lobb, C. J.; Orozco, L. A.; Ravets, S.; Solano, P.; Voigt, K. D.; Wellstood, F. C.; Wong-Campos, J. D.; Beadie, G.; Fatemi, F. K.

    2013-09-01

    Hybrid quantum systems can be formed that combine the strengths of multiple platforms while avoiding the weaknesses. Here we report on progress toward a hybrid quantum system of neutral atom spins coupled to superconducting qubits. We trap laser-cooled rubidium atoms in the evanescent field of an ultrathin optical fiber, which will be suspended a few microns above a superconducting circuit that resonates at the hyperfine frequency of the Rb atoms, allowing magnetic coupling between the atoms and superconductor. As this will be done in a dilution refrigerator environment, the technical demands on the optical fiber is severe. We have developed and optimized a tapered fiber fabrication system, achieving optical transmission in excess of 99.95% , and fibers that can sustain 400 mW of optical power in a UHV environment. We have also optimized tapered fibers that can support higher order optical modes with high transmission (> 97%), which may be useful for different optical potential geometries. We have developed an in-situ tunable high-Q superconducting microwave resonator that can be tuned to within the resonator linewidth of the 6.8 GHz frequency of the Rb hyperfine transition.

  1. Computational challenges in atomic, molecular and optical physics.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kenneth T

    2002-06-15

    Six challenges are discussed. These are the laser-driven helium atom; the laser-driven hydrogen molecule and hydrogen molecular ion; electron scattering (with ionization) from one-electron atoms; the vibrational and rotational structure of molecules such as H(3)(+) and water at their dissociation limits; laser-heated clusters; and quantum degeneracy and Bose-Einstein condensation. The first four concern fundamental few-body systems where use of high-performance computing (HPC) is currently making possible accurate modelling from first principles. This leads to reliable predictions and support for laboratory experiment as well as true understanding of the dynamics. Important aspects of these challenges addressable only via a terascale facility are set out. Such a facility makes the last two challenges in the above list meaningfully accessible for the first time, and the scientific interest together with the prospective role for HPC in these is emphasized.

  2. Evaluation of atomic constants for optical radiation, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kylstra, C. D.; Schneider, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Various atomic constant for 23 elements from helium to mercury were computed and are presented in tables. The data given for each element start with the element name, its atomic number, its ionic state, and the designation and series limit for each parent configuration. This is followed by information on the energy level, parent configuration, and designation for each term available to the program. The matrix elements subtables are ordered by the sequence numbers, which represent the initial and final levels of the transitions. Each subtable gives the following: configuration of the core or parent, designation and energy level for the reference state, effective principal quantum number, energy of the series limit, value of the matrix element for the reference state interacting with itself, and sum of all of the dipole matrix elements listed in the subtable. Dipole and quadrupole interaction data are also given.

  3. Atom Optics for Bose-Einstein Condensates (BEC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-25

    fabricating small micrometer scale current carrying wires on an insulating substrate, commonly referred to as an atom chip. Current carrying wires on...use electrically insulating substrates that are thermally conductive. Beryllium oxide has the highest thermal conductivity (260 W/mC) of the...follow below. To promote mask adhesion, the DBC surface is first cleaned by scrubbing the surface with steel wool and then rinsing with acetone and

  4. Superradiance in a Large and Dilute Cloud of Cold Atoms in the Linear-Optics Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, Michelle O.; Krešić, Ivor; Kaiser, Robin; Guerin, William

    2016-08-01

    Superradiance has been extensively studied in the 1970s and 1980s in the regime of superfluorescence, where a large number of atoms are initially excited. Cooperative scattering in the linear-optics regime, or "single-photon superradiance," has been investigated much more recently, and superradiant decay has also been predicted, even for a spherical sample of large extent and low density, where the distance between atoms is much larger than the wavelength. Here, we demonstrate this effect experimentally by directly measuring the decay rate of the off-axis fluorescence of a large and dilute cloud of cold rubidium atoms after the sudden switch off of a low-intensity laser driving the atomic transition. We show that, at large detuning, the decay rate increases with the on-resonance optical depth. In contrast to forward scattering, the superradiant decay of off-axis fluorescence is suppressed near resonance due to attenuation and multiple-scattering effects.

  5. Preparation of a high concentration of lithium-7 atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Zelener, B. B. Saakyan, S. A.; Sautenkov, V. A.; Manykin, E. A.; Zelener, B. V.; Fortov, V. E.

    2014-11-15

    This study is aimed at obtaining high concentration of optically cooled lithium-7 atoms for preparing strongly interacting ultracold plasma and Rydberg matter. A special setup has been constructed, in which two high-power semiconductor lasers are used to cool lithium-7 atoms in a magneto-optical trap. At an optimum detuning of the cooling laser frequency and a magnetic field gradient of 35 G/cm, the concentration of ultracold lithium-7 atoms reaches about 10{sup 11} cm{sup −3}. Additional independent information about the concentration and number of ultracold lithium-7 atoms on different sublevels of the ground state was obtained by using of an additional probing laser.

  6. Semiclassical solitons in strongly correlated systems of ultracold bosonic atoms in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Demler, Eugene; Maltsev, Andrei

    2011-07-15

    Highlights: > Dynamics of their formation in strongly correlated systems of ultracold bosonic atoms in optical lattices. > Regime of very strong interactions between atoms, the so-called hard core bosons regime. > Character of soliton excitations is dramatically different from the usual Gross-Pitaevskii regime. - Abstract: We investigate theoretically soliton excitations and dynamics of their formation in strongly correlated systems of ultracold bosonic atoms in two and three dimensional optical lattices. We derive equations of nonlinear hydrodynamics in the regime of strong interactions and incommensurate fillings, when atoms can be treated as hard core bosons. When parameters change in one direction only we obtain Korteweg-de Vries type equation away from half-filling and modified KdV equation at half-filling. We apply this general analysis to a problem of the decay of the density step. We consider stability of one dimensional solutions to transverse fluctuations. Our results are also relevant for understanding nonequilibrium dynamics of lattice spin models.

  7. Precision spectroscopy of Mg atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A N; Brazhnikov, D V; Shilov, A M; Bagayev, S N; Bonert, A E

    2014-06-30

    We report the results of experimental investigations aimed at creation of the optical frequency standard based on magnesium atoms cooled and localised in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). An experimentally realised MOT for magnesium made it possible to obtain a cloud comprising ∼10{sup 6} – 10{sup 7} atoms at a temperature of 3 – 5 mK. The results of ultra-high resolution spectroscopy of intercombination {sup 1}S{sub 0} – {sup 3}P{sub 1} transition for Mg atom are presented, the resonances in time-domain separated optical fields with the half-width of Γ = 500 Hz are recorded, which corresponds to the Q-factor of the reference line Q = ν/Δν ∼ 1.3 × 10{sup 12}. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  8. Photonic nanojets as three-dimensional optical atom traps: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yannopapas, Vassilios

    2012-06-01

    We show that an efficient three-dimensional optical atom trap can be achieved by light scattered off a dielectric microsphere. Namely, under suitable conditions, a plane wave incident on a polymer sphere produces a focal point in the forward scattering direction known as photonic nanojet. The photonic nanojet is formed at a distance of a few micrometers away from the surface of the sphere wherein the Casimir-Polder interaction felt by an atom is negligible compared to the optical and gravitational potentials. When many polymer spheres are brought together so as to form a linear chain, a one-dimensional periodic optical lattice filled with cold atoms is possible since interference between the incident and scattered beams is minimal when the spheres are not too close.

  9. Probing interactions of thermal Sr Rydberg atoms using simultaneous optical and ion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, Ryan K.; Bounds, Alistair D.; Huillery, Paul; Keegan, Niamh C.; Faoro, Riccardo; Bridge, Elizabeth M.; Weatherill, Kevin J.; Jones, Matthew P. A.

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate a method for probing interaction effects in a thermal beam of strontium atoms using simultaneous measurements of Rydberg EIT and spontaneously created ions or electrons. We present a Doppler-averaged optical Bloch equation model that reproduces the optical signals and allows us to connect the optical coherences and the populations. We use this to determine that the spontaneous ionization process in our system occurs due to collisions between Rydberg and ground state atoms in the EIT regime. We measure the cross section of this process to be 0.6+/- 0.2 {σ }{geo}, where {σ }{geo} is the geometrical cross section of the Rydberg atom. This result adds complementary insight to a range of recent studies of interacting thermal Rydberg ensembles.

  10. Precision spectroscopy of Mg atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, A. N.; Bonert, A. E.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Shilov, A. M.; Bagayev, S. N.

    2014-06-01

    We report the results of experimental investigations aimed at creation of the optical frequency standard based on magnesium atoms cooled and localised in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). An experimentally realised MOT for magnesium made it possible to obtain a cloud comprising ~106 - 107 atoms at a temperature of 3 - 5 mK. The results of ultra-high resolution spectroscopy of intercombination 1S0 - 3P1 transition for Mg atom are presented, the resonances in time-domain separated optical fields with the half-width of Γ = 500 Hz are recorded, which corresponds to the Q-factor of the reference line Q = ν/Δν ~ 1.3 × 1012.

  11. Efficient loading of a single neutral atom into an optical microscopic tweezer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jun; Liu, Bei; Diao, Wen-Ting; Wang, Jie-Ying; Jin, Gang; Wang, Jun-Min

    2015-04-01

    A single atom in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) with trap size (hundreds of micrometers) can be transferred into an optical microscopic tweezer with a probability of ~ 100%. The ability to transfer a single atom into two traps back and forth allows us to study the loading process. The loading probability is found to be insensitive to the geometric overlap of the MOT and the tweezer. It is therefore possible to perform simultaneously loading of a single atom into all sites of the tweezer array for many qubits. In particular, we present a simulation of the one-dimensional and two-dimensional arrays of an optical microscopic tweezer. We find the same qualitative behavior for all of the trap parameters. Project supported by the National Major Scientific Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921601) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61205215, 11274213, and 61475091).

  12. Possibility of triple magic trapping of clock and Rydberg states of divalent atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topcu, T.; Derevianko, A.

    2016-07-01

    We predict the possibility of ‘triply magic’ optical lattice trapping of neutral divalent atoms. In such a lattice, the {}1{{{S}}}0 and {}3{{{P}}}0 clock states and an additional Rydberg state experience identical optical potentials, fully mitigating detrimental effects of the motional decoherence. In particular, we show that this triply magic trapping condition can be satisfied for Yb atom at optical wavelengths and for various other divalent systems (Ca, Mg, Hg and Sr) in the UV region. We assess the quality of triple magic trapping conditions by estimating the probability of excitation out of the motional ground state as a result of the excitations between the clock and the Rydberg states. We also calculate trapping laser-induced photoionization rates of divalent Rydberg atoms at magic frequencies. We find that such rates are below the radiative spontaneous-emission rates, due to the presence of Cooper minima in photoionization cross-sections.

  13. Mirror effects and optical meta-surfaces in 2d atomic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahmoon, Ephraim; Wild, Dominik; Lukin, Mikhail; Yelin, Susanne

    2016-05-01

    Strong optical response of natural and artificial (meta-) materials typically relies on the fact that the lattice constant that separates their constituent particles (atoms or electromagnetic resonators, respectively) is much smaller than the optical wavelength. Here we consider a single layer of a 2d atom array with a lattice constant on the order of an optical wavelength, which can be thought of as a highly dilute 2d metamaterial (meta-surface). Our theoretical analysis shows how strong scattering of resonant incoming light off the array can be controlled by choosing its lattice constant, e.g. allowing the array to operate as a perfect mirror or a retro-reflector for most incident angles of the incoming light. We discuss the prospects for quantum metasurfaces, i.e. the ability to shape the output quantum state of light by controlling the atomic states, and the possible generality of our results as a universal wave phenomena.

  14. Emergence of correlated optics in one-dimensional waveguides for classical and quantum atomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruostekoski, Janne; Javanainen, Juha

    2016-09-01

    We analyze the emergence of correlated optical phenomena in the transmission of light through a waveguide that confines classical or ultracold quantum degenerate atomic ensembles. The conditions of the correlated collective response are identified in terms of atom density, thermal broadening, and photon losses by using stochastic Monte Carlo simulations and transfer matrix methods of transport theory. We also calculate the "cooperative Lamb shift" for the waveguide transmission resonance, and discuss line shifts that are specific to effectively one-dimensional waveguide systems.

  15. From Cooper pairs to Luttinger liquids with bosonic atoms in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Paredes, B; Cirac, J I

    2003-04-18

    We propose a scheme to observe strongly correlated fermionic phenomena with bosonic atoms in optical lattices. For different values of the sign and strength of the scattering lengths, it is possible to reach either a "superconducting" regime, where the system exhibits atomic pairing, or a Luttinger liquid behavior. We identify the range of parameters where these phenomena appear, illustrate our predictions with numerical calculations, and show how to detect the presence of pairing.

  16. Nonlinear Sensing With Collective States of Ultracold Atoms in Optical Lattices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-02

    Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park , NC 27709-2211 Nonlinear quantum sensing, quantum metrology, ultracold atoms, optical lattices REPORT...not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. University of Maryland - College Park Research...Administration 3112 Lee Building College Park , MD 20742 -5141 31-Aug-2014 ABSTRACT Nonlinear Sensing With Collective States of Ultracold Atoms in

  17. Nonlinear interaction of meta-atoms through optical coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Slobozhanyuk, A. P.; Kapitanova, P. V.; Filonov, D. S.; Belov, P. A.; Powell, D. A.; Shadrivov, I. V.; Kivshar, Yu. S.; Lapine, M.; McPhedran, R. C.

    2014-01-06

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a multi-frequency nonlinear coupling mechanism between split-ring resonators. We engineer the coupling between two microwave resonators through optical interaction, whilst suppressing the direct electromagnetic coupling. This allows for a power-dependent interaction between the otherwise independent resonators, opening interesting opportunities to address applications in signal processing, filtering, directional coupling, and electromagnetic compatibility.

  18. Nonlinear optical effects manifested by electromagnetic induced transparency in cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiepeng

    2008-10-01

    This dissertation reports experimental studies of nonlinear optical effects manifested by electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in cold Rb atoms. The cold Rb atoms are confined in a magneto-optic trap (MOT) obtained with the standard laser cooling and trapping technique. Because of the near zero Doppler shift and a high phase density, the cold Rb sample is well suited for studies of atomic coherence and interference and related applications, and the experiments can be compared quantitatively with theoretical calculations. It is shown that with EIT induced in the multi-level Rb system by laser fields, the linear absorption is suppressed and the nonlinear susceptibility is enhanced, which enables studies of nonlinear optics in the cold atoms with slow photons and at low light intensities. Three independent experiments are described and the experimental results are presented. First, an experimental method that can produce simultaneously co-propagating slow and fast light pulses is discussed and the experimental demonstration is reported. Second, it is shown that in a three-level Rb system coupled by multi-color laser fields, the multi-channel two-photon Raman transitions can be manipulated by the relative phase and frequency of a control laser field. Third, a scheme for all-optical switching near single photon levels is developed. The scheme is based on the phase-dependent multi-photon interference in a coherently coupled four-level system. The phase dependent multi-photon interference is observed and switching of a single light pulse by a control pulse containing ˜20 photons is demonstrated. These experimental studies reveal new phenomena manifested by quantum coherence and interference in cold atoms, contribute to the advancement of fundamental quantum optics and nonlinear optics at ultra-low light intensities, and may lead to the development of new techniques to control quantum states of atoms and photons, which will be useful for applications in quantum

  19. Low-Entropy States of Neutral Atoms in Polarization-Synthesized Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robens, Carsten; Zopes, Jonathan; Alt, Wolfgang; Brakhane, Stefan; Meschede, Dieter; Alberti, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    We create low-entropy states of neutral atoms by utilizing a conceptually new optical-lattice technique that relies on a high-precision, high-bandwidth synthesis of light polarization. Polarization-synthesized optical lattices provide two fully controllable optical lattice potentials, each of them confining only atoms in either one of the two long-lived hyperfine states. By employing one lattice as the storage register and the other one as the shift register, we provide a proof of concept using four atoms that selected regions of the periodic potential can be filled with one particle per site. We expect that our results can be scaled up to thousands of atoms by employing an atom-sorting algorithm with logarithmic complexity, which is enabled by polarization-synthesized optical lattices. Vibrational entropy is subsequently removed by sideband cooling methods. Our results pave the way for a bottom-up approach to creating ultralow-entropy states of a many-body system.

  20. Low-Entropy States of Neutral Atoms in Polarization-Synthesized Optical Lattices.

    PubMed

    Robens, Carsten; Zopes, Jonathan; Alt, Wolfgang; Brakhane, Stefan; Meschede, Dieter; Alberti, Andrea

    2017-02-10

    We create low-entropy states of neutral atoms by utilizing a conceptually new optical-lattice technique that relies on a high-precision, high-bandwidth synthesis of light polarization. Polarization-synthesized optical lattices provide two fully controllable optical lattice potentials, each of them confining only atoms in either one of the two long-lived hyperfine states. By employing one lattice as the storage register and the other one as the shift register, we provide a proof of concept using four atoms that selected regions of the periodic potential can be filled with one particle per site. We expect that our results can be scaled up to thousands of atoms by employing an atom-sorting algorithm with logarithmic complexity, which is enabled by polarization-synthesized optical lattices. Vibrational entropy is subsequently removed by sideband cooling methods. Our results pave the way for a bottom-up approach to creating ultralow-entropy states of a many-body system.

  1. Observation of motion-dependent nonlinear dispersion with narrow-linewidth atoms in an optical cavity.

    PubMed

    Westergaard, Philip G; Christensen, Bjarke T R; Tieri, David; Matin, Rastin; Cooper, John; Holland, Murray; Ye, Jun; Thomsen, Jan W

    2015-03-06

    As an alternative to state-of-the-art laser frequency stabilization using ultrastable cavities, it has been proposed to exploit the nonlinear effects from coupling of atoms with a narrow transition to an optical cavity. Here, we have constructed such a system and observed nonlinear phase shifts of a narrow optical line by a strong coupling of a sample of strontium-88 atoms to an optical cavity. The sample temperature of a few mK provides a domain where the Doppler energy scale is several orders of magnitude larger than the narrow linewidth of the optical transition. This makes the system sensitive to velocity dependent multiphoton scattering events (Dopplerons) that affect the cavity field transmission and phase. By varying the number of atoms and the intracavity power, we systematically study this nonlinear phase signature which displays roughly the same features as for much lower temperature samples. This demonstration in a relatively simple system opens new possibilities for alternative routes to laser stabilization at the sub-100 mHz level and superradiant laser sources involving narrow-line atoms. The understanding of relevant motional effects obtained here has direct implications for other atomic clocks when used in relation to ultranarrow clock transitions.

  2. Detection of antiferromagnetic order by cooling atoms in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tsung-Lin; Teles, Rafael; Hazzard, Kaden; Hulet, Randall; Rice University Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We have realized the Fermi-Hubbard model with fermionic 6 Li atoms in a three-dimensional compensated optical lattice. The compensated optical lattice has provided low enough temperatures to produce short-range antiferromagnetic (AF) spin correlations, which we detect via Bragg scattering of light. Previously, we reached temperatures down to 1.4 times that of the AFM phase transition, more than a factor of 2 below temperatures obtained previously in 3D optical lattices with fermions. In order to further reduce the entropy in the compensated lattice, we implement an entropy conduit - which is a single blue detuned laser beam with a waist size smaller than the overall atomic sample size. This repulsive narrow potential provides a conductive metallic path between the low entropy core and the edges of the atomic sample where atoms may be evaporated. In addition, the entropy conduit may store entropy, thus further lowering the entropy in the core. We will report on the status of these efforts to further cool atoms in the optical lattice. Work supported by ARO MURI Grant, NSF and The Welch Foundation.

  3. Spectroscopy for cold atom gases in periodically modulated optical lattice potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuno, Akiyuki; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2011-03-01

    Cold atoms in optical lattices are vigorously studied experimentally and theoretically as one of the candidates for a quantum simulator. At the same time, further development of probes to microscopic structure of systems is needed. We propose a novel spectroscopy in cold atom experiments by use of periodic phase-modulation of optical lattice potentials. Corresponding to the statistics of atoms, we formulate the different observables: The energy absorption rate for bosonic atom gases, and the doublon production rate for fermionic atom gases. These observables are formulated within the linear response theory. Interestingly they are given by the imaginary part of the retarded current-current correlation function which is familiar as a quantity corresponding to an optical conductivity. As an example, we discuss one-dimensional Mott insulating state, and also compare our spectroscopy with another known spectroscopy by amplitude-modulation of an optical lattice. This work was supported in part by the Swiss SNF under MaNEP and division II.

  4. A quantum gas microscope for detecting single atoms in a Hubbard-regime optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Bakr, Waseem S; Gillen, Jonathon I; Peng, Amy; Fölling, Simon; Greiner, Markus

    2009-11-05

    Recent years have seen tremendous progress in creating complex atomic many-body quantum systems. One approach is to use macroscopic, effectively thermodynamic ensembles of ultracold atoms to create quantum gases and strongly correlated states of matter, and to analyse the bulk properties of the ensemble. For example, bosonic and fermionic atoms in a Hubbard-regime optical lattice can be used for quantum simulations of solid-state models. The opposite approach is to build up microscopic quantum systems atom-by-atom, with complete control over all degrees of freedom. The atoms or ions act as qubits and allow the realization of quantum gates, with the goal of creating highly controllable quantum information systems. Until now, the macroscopic and microscopic strategies have been fairly disconnected. Here we present a quantum gas 'microscope' that bridges the two approaches, realizing a system in which atoms of a macroscopic ensemble are detected individually and a complete set of degrees of freedom for each of them is determined through preparation and measurement. By implementing a high-resolution optical imaging system, single atoms are detected with near-unity fidelity on individual sites of a Hubbard-regime optical lattice. The lattice itself is generated by projecting a holographic mask through the imaging system. It has an arbitrary geometry, chosen to support both strong tunnel coupling between lattice sites and strong on-site confinement. Our approach can be used to directly detect strongly correlated states of matter; in the context of condensed matter simulation, this corresponds to the detection of individual electrons in the simulated crystal. Also, the quantum gas microscope may enable addressing and read-out of large-scale quantum information systems based on ultracold atoms.

  5. Growth of magnetic cobalt/chromium nano-arrays by atom-optical lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atoneche, F.; Malik, D.; Kirilyuk, A.; Toonen, A. J.; van Etteger, A. F.; Rasing, Th

    2011-07-01

    Arrays of magnetic cobalt/chromium (Co-Cr) nanolines are grown by depositing an atomic beam of Co-Cr alloy through a laser standing wave (SW) at λ/2 = 212.8 nm onto a substrate. During deposition, only the chromium atoms are resonantly affected by the optical potential created by the SW, causing a periodic modulation of the chromium concentration and consequently of the magnetic properties. Magnetic force microscopy and magneto-optical Kerr effect studies reveal a patterned magnetic structure on the substrate surface.

  6. Bloch oscillations of cold atoms in two-dimensional optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Kolovsky, A. R.; Korsch, H. J.

    2003-06-01

    Bloch oscillations of cold atoms in two-dimensional optical lattices are studied. The cases of separable and nonseparable potentials are compared by simulating the wave-packet dynamics. For these two classes of optical potential, the Bloch oscillations were found to be qualitatively the same in the case of a weak static field but fundamentally different in the case of a strong field. In addition, the dynamics of the atoms in a double-period potential (which can easily be realized in two dimensions) is studied for the regime of a weak static field.

  7. All-optical switching in an open V-type atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarzadeh, H.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the optical bistability (OB) and absorption properties of a weak probe field in an open V-type three-level atomic system have been investigated. We found that the OB threshold could be reduced via spontaneously generated coherence (SGC), coherent and incoherent pump fields, atomic injection, and exit rates. We also found that the threshold intensity of OB in an open system was less than that in the closed system. The all-optical switching due to the OB has also been discussed.

  8. Nonlinear Optical Studies of Rydberg Atoms Using Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    AD-Ai46 827 NONLINEAR OPTICAL STUDIES OF RYDBERG ATOMS USING 1/2 DEGENERATE FOUR -WAVE MIXING(U) HUGHES RESEARCH LABS MALIBU CA J F LAM ET AL. AUG 84...146 827 NONLINEAR OPTICAL STUDIES OF RYDBERG ATOMS USING DEGENERATE FOUR -WAVE MIXING J.F. Lam, R.A. McFarlane, and D.G. StMel Hughes Research...techniques were developed nearly degenerate four -wave mixing, polarization nearly degenerate four -wave mixing, fre- quency domain three-state

  9. Electronic and optical properties of BxNyCz monolayers with adsorption of hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leite, L.; Azevedo, S.; de Lima Bernardo, B.

    2017-03-01

    We apply first-principles calculations, using density functional theory, to analyze the electronic and optical properties of monolayers of graphene with a nanodomain of 2D hexagonal boron nitrite (h-BN). It also investigated the effects of the adsorption of hydrogen atoms in different atoms at the edge of the h-BN nanodomain. We calculate the electronic band structure, the complex dielectric function and the optical conductivity. For such systems, the calculations demonstrate that the compounds exhibit a prominent excitement in the visible and near-infrared regions. In this form, the present study provides physical basis for potential applications of the considered materials in optoelectronic devices at the nanoscale.

  10. Note: A four-pass acousto-optic modulator system for laser cooling of sodium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bo; Wang, Dajun

    2017-07-01

    We present a four-pass acousto-optic modulator (AOM) system for providing the repumping light for laser cooling of sodium atoms. With only one 400 MHz AOM, we achieve a tunable laser frequency shift around 1.6 GHz with total efficiency up to 30%. This setup provides an alternative over conventional methods to generate a sodium repumping light using more expensive high frequency AOMs or electro-optical modulators (EOMs) in the GHz domain. This compact and reliable setup can be easily adapted to other frequencies and may find applications in laser spectroscopy, laser cooling and trapping, and coherent manipulation of atomic quantum states.

  11. Note: A four-pass acousto-optic modulator system for laser cooling of sodium atoms.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bo; Wang, Dajun

    2017-07-01

    We present a four-pass acousto-optic modulator (AOM) system for providing the repumping light for laser cooling of sodium atoms. With only one 400 MHz AOM, we achieve a tunable laser frequency shift around 1.6 GHz with total efficiency up to 30%. This setup provides an alternative over conventional methods to generate a sodium repumping light using more expensive high frequency AOMs or electro-optical modulators (EOMs) in the GHz domain. This compact and reliable setup can be easily adapted to other frequencies and may find applications in laser spectroscopy, laser cooling and trapping, and coherent manipulation of atomic quantum states.

  12. Flat bands, Dirac cones, and atom dynamics in an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Apaja, V.; Hyrkaes, M.; Manninen, M.

    2010-10-15

    We study atoms trapped with a harmonic confinement in an optical lattice characterized by a flat band and Dirac cones. We show that such an optical lattice can be constructed which can be accurately described with the tight-binding or Hubbard models. In the case of fermions the release of the harmonic confinement removes fast atoms occupying the Dirac cones while those occupying the flat band remain immobile. Using exact diagonalization and dynamics we demonstrate that a similar strong occupation of the flat band does not happen in the bosonic case and furthermore that the mean-field model is not capable of describing the dynamics of the boson cloud.

  13. Atom-atom correlations in time-of-flight imaging of ultracold bosons in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Zaleski, T. A.; Kopec, T. K.

    2011-11-15

    We study the spatial correlations of strongly interacting bosons in a ground state, confined in a two-dimensional square and a three-dimensional cubic lattice. Using the combined Bogoliubov method and the quantum rotor approach, we map the Hamiltonian of strongly interacting bosons onto U(1) phase action in order to calculate the atom-atom correlations' decay along the principal axis and a diagonal of the lattice-plane direction as a function of distance. Lower tunneling rates lead to quicker decays of the correlations, whose character becomes exponential. Finally, correlation functions allow us to calculate quantities that are directly bound to experimental outcomes, namely time-of-flight absorption images and resulting visibility. Our results contain all the characteristic features present in experimental data (transition from Mott insulating blob to superfluid peaks, etc.), emphasizing the usability of the proposed approach.

  14. A controllable double-well magneto-optical trap for Rb and Cs atoms.

    PubMed

    Lin, C T; Chen, C R; Yang, I H; Yin, Jianping; Han, D J

    2008-04-28

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel scheme to simultaneously confine two atomic species of (87)Rb and (133)Cs with adjustable spatial separation by a controllable double-well magneto-optic trap. Using a single-loop wire and a magnetic bias field, the two clouds, each containing more than 1 x 10(6) atoms, are spatially separated above and below the wire center of the double-well MOT. The cloud interdistance can be controlled by independently varying the wire current and external bias field. This allows to load the double-well magnetic trap, and to study the dynamics of cold collisions between two-species atoms.

  15. Quantum Entanglement and Correlation of Two Qubit Atoms Interacting with the Coherent State Optical Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tang-Kun; Tao, Yu; Shan, Chuan-Jia; Liu, Ji-bing

    2017-10-01

    Using the three criterions of the concurrence, the negative eigenvalue and the geometric quantum discord, we investigate the quantum entanglement and quantum correlation dynamics of two two-level atoms interacting with the coherent state optical field. We discuss the influence of different photon number of the mean square fluctuations on the temporal evolution of the concurrence, the negative eigenvalue and the geometric quantum discord between two atoms when the two atoms are initially in specific three states. The results show that different photon number of the mean square fluctuations can lead to different effects of quantum entanglement and quantum correlation dynamics.

  16. Quantum phase transition of alkaline-earth fermionic atoms confined in an optical superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Valencia, J.; Franco, R.; Figueira, M. S.

    2013-03-01

    Using the density matrix renormalization group method, we evaluate the spin and charge gaps of alkaline-earth fermionic atoms in a periodic one-dimensional optical superlattice. The number of delocalized atoms is equal to the lattice size and we consider an antiferromagnetic coupling between delocalized and localized atoms. We found a quantum phase transition from a Kondo insulator spin liquid state without confining potential to a charge-gapped antiferromagnetic state with nonzero potential. For each on-site coupling, there is a critical potential point for which the spin gap vanishes and its value increases linearly with the local interaction.

  17. Effect of atomic flux reversal in a fluctuating moving optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, D. V.

    2017-06-01

    The dynamics of an ensemble of noninteracting cold atoms is considered in the field of a moving optical lattice subjected to random amplitude and phase fluctuations. The effect of the reversal of an atomic ensemble under the action of lattice fluctuations is demonstrated, in which the atoms begin to move in the direction opposite to that of the lattice motion. A kinetic model is constructed that reproduces this effect and makes it possible to relate its emergence to the asymmetry of the amplitudes of the interlevel transitions in a momentum space.

  18. Micromagic Clock: Microwave Clock Based on Atoms in an Engineered Optical Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Beloy, K.; Derevianko, A.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2009-03-27

    We propose a new class of atomic microwave clocks based on the hyperfine transitions in the ground state of aluminum or gallium atoms trapped in optical lattices. For such elements magic wavelengths exist at which both levels of the hyperfine doublet are shifted at the same rate by the lattice laser field, canceling its effect on the clock transition. A similar mechanism for the magic wavelengths may work in microwave hyperfine transitions in other atoms which have the fine-structure multiplets in the ground state.

  19. Azimuthal Sisyphus effect for atoms in a toroidal all-optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Lembessis, V. E.; Ellinas, D.; Babiker, M.

    2011-10-15

    It is shown that an optical arrangement in which two identical counterpropagating Laguerre-Gaussian doughnut beams LG(l,0) and LG(-l,0) with orthogonal linear polarizations e {sub x} and e {sub y} can lead to azimuthal polarization gradients and an as yet undiscovered azimuthal Sisyphus effect. It is demonstrated that this effect can be utilized in the creation and control of a persistent current of superfluid atoms circulating in a toroidal trap. Such a physical system has recently been highlighted as the basis for an atomic superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and ultimately for the realization of atom circuits.

  20. Spin-Exchange-Relaxation-Free Magnetometry with Cs Vapor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-13

    Larmor precession 6,7. In Ref. 5, sensitivity of 5 pG /Hz was achieved with the cell operating at 190 °C using potassium atoms. Estimates of the...cell containing a droplet of Cs metal, 600 Torr He buffer gas to reduce the rate at which atoms in the central part of the cell diffuse to the cell...broadening of Cs lines by helium 19, we extrapolate the FWHM of the D1 and D2 optical resonances to be =15.7 and 14.1 GHz, respectively. The cell was

  1. A Investigation of Spin Depolarization at Solid Surfaces Using Optically Pumped Sodium Atoms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Colman Francis

    The relaxation of spin-polarized sodium atoms on selected solid surfaces is examined. Non-Boltzmann hyperfine energy level population distributions were produced in the ground state of a supersonic beam of sodium atoms using hyperfine optical pumping. The ground state distribution was probed before and after scattering from an atomically clean surface using high resolution laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The surfaces studied were single crystal lithium fluoride cleaved in the (100) direction, single crystal silicon cleaved in the (111) direction, and polycrystalline tungsten. Spin relaxation of the sodium valence electron back down to its thermal ground state was monitored as a function of surface temperature and adsorbate coverage with the goal of developing an understanding of the surface properties which govern the relaxation, such as the residence time of the adsorbed atom, the local surface magnetic field strength, and the diffusion rate of the adsorbed atom across the surface.

  2. Optically promoted bipartite atomic entanglement in hybrid metallic carbon nanotube systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gelin, M. F.; Bondarev, I. V.; Meliksetyan, A. V.

    2014-02-14

    We study theoretically a pair of spatially separated extrinsic atomic type species (extrinsic atoms, ions, molecules, or semiconductor quantum dots) near a metallic carbon nanotube, that are coupled both directly via the inter-atomic dipole-dipole interactions and indirectly by means of the virtual exchange by resonance plasmon excitations on the nanotube surface. We analyze how the optical preparation of the system by using strong laser pulses affects the formation and evolution of the bipartite atomic entanglement. Despite a large number of possible excitation regimes and evolution pathways, we find a few generic scenarios for the bipartite entanglement evolution and formulate practical recommendations on how to optimize and control the robust bipartite atomic entanglement in hybrid carbon nanotube systems.

  3. Noise suppression in coherent population-trapping atomic clock by differential magneto-optic rotation detection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bozhong; Tian, Yuan; Lin, Huifang; Chen, Jiehua; Gu, Sihong

    2015-08-15

    We propose and investigate a scheme for differential detection of the magneto-optic rotation (MOR) effect, where a linearly polarized bichromatic laser field is coherent population-trapping (CPT)-resonant with alkali atoms, and discuss the application of this effect to CPT-based atomic clocks. The results of our study indicate that laser noise in a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser-based CPT atomic clock can be effectively suppressed by the proposed scheme. The proposed scheme promises to realize a packaged MOR-CPT atomic clock that has significantly better frequency stability coupled with similar power consumption, volume, and cost when compared with currently available packaged CPT atomic clocks.

  4. Enhanced Raman sideband cooling of caesium atoms in a vapour-loaded magneto-optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Wu, J.; Feng, G.; Nute, J.; Piano, S.; Hackermüller, L.; Ma, J.; Xiao, L.; Jia, S.

    2015-05-01

    We report enhanced three-dimensional degenerated Raman sideband cooling (3D DRSC) of caesium (Cs) atoms in a standard single-cell vapour-loaded magneto-optical trap. Our improved scheme involves using a separate repumping laser and optimized lattice detuning. We load 1.5 × 107 atoms into the Raman lattice with a detuning of -15.5 GHz (to the ground F = 3 state). Enhanced 3D DRSC is used to cool them from 60 µK to 1.7 µK within 12 ms and the number of obtained atoms is about 1.2 × 107. A theoretical model is proposed to simulate the measured number of trapped atoms. The result shows good agreement with the experimental data. The technique paves the way for loading a large number of ultracold Cs atoms into a crossed dipole trap and efficient evaporative cooling in a single-cell system.

  5. Optical Pattern Formation in Cold Atoms: Explaining the Red-Blue Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittberger, Bonnie; Gauthier, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    The study of pattern formation in atomic systems has provided new insight into fundamental many-body physics and low-light-level nonlinear optics. Pattern formation in cold atoms in particular is of great interest in condensed matter physics and quantum information science because atoms undergo self-organization at ultralow input powers. We recently reported the first observation of pattern formation in cold atoms but found that our results were not accurately described by any existing theoretical model of pattern formation. Previous models describing pattern formation in cold atoms predict that pattern formation should occur using both red and blue-detuned pump beams, favoring a lower threshold for blue detunings. This disagrees with our recent work, in which we only observed pattern formation with red-detuned pump beams. Previous models also assume a two-level atom, which cannot account for the cooling processes that arise when beams counterpropagate through a cold atomic vapor. We describe a new model for pattern formation that accounts for Sisyphus cooling in multi-level atoms, which gives rise to a new nonlinearity via spatial organization of the atoms. This spatial organization causes a sharp red-blue detuning asymmetry, which agrees well with our experimental observations. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through Grant #PHY-1206040.

  6. All-optical switching in a continuously operated and strongly coupled atom-cavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Sourav; Rangwala, S. A.

    2017-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate collective strong coupling, optical bi-stability (OB), and all-optical switching in a system consisting of ultracold 85Rb atoms, trapped in a dark magneto-optical trap (DMOT), and coupled to an optical Fabry-Perot cavity. The strong coupling is established by measuring the vacuum Rabi splitting (VRS) of a weak on-axis probe beam. The dependence of VRS on the probe beam power is measured, and bi-stability in the cavity transmission is observed. We demonstrate control over the transmission of the probe beam through the atom-cavity system using a free-space off-axis control beam and show that the cavity transmission can be switched on and off in micro-second timescales using micro-Watt control powers. The utility of the system as a tool for sensitive, in-situ and rapid measurements is envisaged.

  7. Experimental realization of three-color entanglement at optical fiber communication and atomic storage wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaojun; Yan, Zhihui; Duan, Zhiyuan; Su, Xiaolong; Wang, Hai; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi

    2012-12-21

    Entangled states of light including low-loss optical fiber transmission and atomic resonance frequencies are essential resources for future quantum information networks. We present the experimental achievement on the three-color entanglement generation at 852, 1550, and 1440 nm wavelengths for optical continuous variables. The entanglement generation system consists of two cascaded nondegenerated optical parametric oscillators (NOPOs). The flexible selectivity of nonlinear crystals in the two NOPOs and the tunable property of NOPO provide large freedom for the frequency selection of three entangled optical beams. The presented system will hopefully be developed as a practical entangled source to be used in quantum-information networks with atomic storage units and long fiber transmission lines.

  8. Optical coupling between atomically thin black phosphorus and a two dimensional photonic crystal nanocavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Yasutomo; Moriya, Rai; Yabuki, Naoto; Arai, Miho; Kakuda, Masahiro; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Machida, Tomoki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2017-05-01

    Atomically thin black phosphorus (BP) is an emerging two dimensional (2D) material exhibiting bright photoluminescence in the near infrared region. Coupling its radiation to photonic nanostructures will be an important step toward the realization of 2D material based nanophotonic devices that operate efficiently in the near infrared region, which includes the technologically important optical telecommunication wavelength bands. In this letter, we demonstrate the optical coupling between atomically thin BP and a 2D photonic crystal nanocavity. We employed a home-build dry transfer apparatus for placing a thin BP flake on the surface of the nanocavity. Their optical coupling was analyzed through measuring cavity mode emission under optical carrier injection at room temperature.

  9. Angular-resolved magnetometry beyond triclinic crystals part II: torque magnetometry of Cp*ErCOT single-molecule magnets.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, Mauro; Cucinotta, Giuseppe; Boulon, Marie-Emmanuelle; El Hallak, Fadi; Gao, Song; Sessoli, Roberta

    2014-10-20

    The experimental investigation of the molecular magnetic anisotropy in crystals in which the magnetic centers are symmetry related, but do not have a parallel orientation has been approached by using torque magnetometry. A single crystal of the orthorhombic organometallic Cp*ErCOT [Cp*=pentamethylcyclopentadiene anion (C5Me5(-)); COT=cyclooctatetraenedianion (C8H8(2-))] single-molecule magnet, characterized by the presence of two nonparallel families of molecules in the crystal, has been investigated above its blocking temperature. The results confirm an Ising-type anisotropy with the easy direction pointing along the pseudosymmetry axis of the complex, as previously suggested by out-of-equilibrium angular-resolved magnetometry. The use of torque magnetometry, not requiring the presence of magnetic hysteresis, proves to be even more powerful for these purposes than standard single-crystal magnetometry. Furthermore, exploiting the sensitivity and versatility of this technique, magnetic anisotropy has been investigated up to 150 K, providing additional information on the crystal-field splitting of the ground J multiplet of the Er(III) ion.

  10. Optically trapped atom interferometry using the clock transition of large 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altin, P. A.; McDonald, G.; Döring, D.; Debs, J. E.; Barter, T. H.; Close, J. D.; Robins, N. P.; Haine, S. A.; Hanna, T. M.; Anderson, R. P.

    2011-06-01

    We present a Ramsey-type atom interferometer operating with an optically trapped sample of 106 Bose-condensed 87Rb atoms. We investigate this interferometer experimentally and theoretically with an eye to the construction of future high precision atomic sensors. Our results indicate that, with further experimental refinements, it will be possible to produce and measure the output of a sub-shot-noise-limited, large atom number BEC-based interferometer. The optical trap allows us to couple the |F=1, mF=0rang→|F=2, mF=0rang clock states using a single photon 6.8 GHz microwave transition, while state selective readout is achieved with absorption imaging. We analyse the process of absorption imaging and show that it is possible to observe atom number variance directly, with a signal-to-noise ratio ten times better than the atomic projection noise limit on 106 condensate atoms. We discuss the technical and fundamental noise sources that limit our current system, and present theoretical and experimental results on interferometer contrast, de-phasing and miscibility.

  11. Nonlinear optical response of multiply ionized noble-gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarazkar(1, 3), Maryam; Romanov(2, 3), Dmitri; Levis(1, 3), Robert

    2016-05-01

    Calculation of dynamic polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities of ionized species using ab initio methods presents computational and conceptual difficulties, as these ionized species often have open-shell electronic system. We use multi-configurational self-consistent field (MCSCF) method with extended basis sets for calculating dynamic polarizability and second-order hyperpolarizabilities of atomic noble gases and their multiply charged cations in non-resonant regime. The calculations were performed at wavelengths ranging from about 100 nm to the red of the first multi-photon resonance all the way toward the static regime. The results were benchmarked to those of CCSD calculations for ions of even-number charge. The second-order hyperpolarizability coefficients were found to decrease when the electrons are progressively removed from the system. At higher ionization states, these coefficients become less dispersive as a function of wavelength. The values and even the signs of the γ (2) coefficients were found to depend on the spin of the ionic quantum state. Thus, for Ne+3 and Ne+4, in low-spin states (2 Pu, and 1 Sg, respectively) the sign of γ (2) is positive, whereas in high-spin states (4 Su, and 3 Pg) the sign is negative. The calculated hyperpolarizabilities of multiply ionized atoms relate to experiments on very bright high-order harmonic generation in multiply ionized plasmas.

  12. Stimulated emission in optically pumped atomic-copper vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Joong Kim; Nackchin Sung

    1987-11-01

    We have observed, for the first time to our knowledge, stimulated emission in atomic-copper vapor that is excited by a resonant tunable laser beam. One of the important and interesting results obtained in this experiment is that excitation of the /sup 2/P/sub 1/2/ level of the copper atoms generates strong amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) for both /sup 2/P/sub 1/2/--/sup 2/D/sub 3/2/ and /sup 2/P/sub 3/2/--/sup 2/D/sub 5/2/ transitions. This is the first reported direct experimental evidence observed for collisional mixing between the /sup 2/P/sub 1/2/ and /sup 2/P/sub 3/2/ levels in a copper-vapor laser. Excitation of the /sup 2/P/sub 3/2/ level induces substantially weaker ASE for the /sup 2/P/sub 1/2/--/sup 2/D/sub 3/2/ transition. In addition, we observed collision-induced ASE for both transitions over a wide range of detuning of the pump frequency. The preliminary results of the experiment are presented, and the implications of the results for high-pressure copper-vapor lasers are discussed.

  13. Optical magnetic resonance imaging of atomic diffusion and laser beam spatial profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalla, J.; Wäckerle, G.; Mehring, M.

    1997-02-01

    We apply the technique of optical magnetic resonance imaging (OMRI) to the spatially resolved measurement of atomic 85Rb gas-phase diffusion. The application of pulsed magnetic-field gradients allows for the direct observation of higher diffusional modes. An imaging of the laser-power density within the vapor cell is demonstrated after a spatially homogeneous spin distribution has been created by an optical pump pulse.

  14. Spin-1 atoms in optical superlattices: Single-atom tunneling and entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Andreas; Bruder, Christoph; Demler, Eugene

    2011-12-15

    We examine spinor Bose-Einstein condensates in optical superlattices theoretically using a Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian that takes spin effects into account. Assuming that a small number of spin-1 bosons is loaded in an optical potential, we study single-particle tunneling that occurs when one lattice site is ramped up relative to a neighboring site. Spin-dependent effects modify the tunneling events in a qualitative and quantitative way. Depending on the asymmetry of the double well, different types of magnetic order occur, making the system of spin-1 bosons in an optical superlattice a model for mesoscopic magnetism. We use a double-well potential as a unit cell for a one-dimensional superlattice. Homogeneous and inhomogeneous magnetic fields are applied, and the effects of the linear and the quadratic Zeeman shifts are examined. We also investigate the bipartite entanglement between the sites and construct states of maximal entanglement. The entanglement in our system is due to both orbital and spin degrees of freedom. We calculate the contribution of orbital and spin entanglements and show that the sum of these two terms gives a lower bound for the total entanglement.

  15. High numerical aperture diffractive optical elements for neutral atom quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, A. L.; Kemme, S. A.; Wendt, J. R.; Carter, T. R.; Samora, S.

    2013-03-01

    The viability of neutral atom based quantum computers is dependent upon scalability to large numbers of qubits. Diffractive optical elements (DOEs) offer the possibility to scale up to many qubit systems by enabling the manipulation of light to collect signal or deliver a tailored spatial trapping pattern. DOEs have an advantage over refractive microoptics since they do not have measurable surface sag, making significantly larger numerical apertures (NA) accessible with a smaller optical component. The smaller physical size of a DOE allows the micro-lenses to be placed in vacuum with the atoms, reducing aberration effects that would otherwise be introduced by the cell walls of the vacuum chamber. The larger collection angle accessible with DOEs enable faster quantum computation speeds. We have designed a set of DOEs for collecting the 852 nm fluorescence from the D2 transition in trapped cesium atoms, and compare these DOEs to several commercially available refractive micro-lenses. The largest DOE is able to collect over 20% of the atom's radiating sphere whereas the refractive micro-optic is able to collect just 8% of the atom's radiating sphere.

  16. New Active Optical Technique Developed for Measuring Low-Earth-Orbit Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Demko, Rikako

    2003-01-01

    Polymers such as polyimide Kapton (DuPont) and Teflon FEP (DuPont, fluorinated ethylene propylene) are commonly used spacecraft materials because of desirable properties such as flexibility, low density, and in the case of FEP, a low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. Polymers on the exterior of spacecraft in the low-Earth-orbit (LEO) environment are exposed to energetic atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen reaction with polymers causes erosion, which is a threat to spacecraft performance and durability. It is, therefore, important to understand the atomic oxygen erosion yield E (the volume loss per incident oxygen atom) of polymers being considered in spacecraft design. The most common technique for determining E is a passive technique based on mass-loss measurements of samples exposed to LEO atomic oxygen during a space flight experiment. There are certain disadvantages to this technique. First, because it is passive, data are not obtained until after the flight is completed. Also, obtaining the preflight and postflight mass measurements is complicated by the fact that many polymers absorb water and, therefore, the mass change due to water absorption can affect the E data. This is particularly true for experiments that receive low atomic oxygen exposures or for samples that have a very low E. An active atomic oxygen erosion technique based on optical measurements has been developed that has certain advantages over the mass-loss technique. This in situ technique can simultaneously provide the erosion yield data on orbit and the atomic oxygen exposure fluence, which is needed for erosion yield determination. In the optical technique, either sunlight or artificial light can be used to measure the erosion of semitransparent or opaque polymers as a result of atomic oxygen attack. The technique is simple and adaptable to a rather wide range of polymers, providing that they have a sufficiently high optical absorption coefficient. If one covers a photodiode with a

  17. Multiparticle Entanglement and Spatial Addressability of Ultracold Atoms in Optical Lattices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    Immanuel F. Bloch Stefan Kuhr Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz Institute Fuer Physik/Quantum Mainz, Germany 55099 EOARD GRANT 07-3090...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz Institute Fuer Physik/Quantum Mainz, Germany 55099 8...Entanglement and Spatial Addressability of Ultracold Atoms in Optical Lattices Prof. Dr. Immanuel Bloch Dr. Stefan Kuhr Johannes

  18. Essay: Fifty years of atomic, molecular and optical physics in Physical Review Letters.

    PubMed

    Haroche, Serge

    2008-10-17

    The fiftieth anniversary of Physical Review Letters is a good opportunity to review the extraordinary progress of atomic, molecular, and optical physics reported in this journal during the past half-century. As both a witness and an actor of this story, I recall personal experiences and reflect about the past, present, and possible future of my field of research.

  19. High resolution atomic coherent control via spectral phase manipulation of an optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Stowe, Matthew C; Cruz, Flavio C; Marian, Adela; Ye, Jun

    2006-04-21

    We demonstrate high resolution coherent control of cold atomic rubidium utilizing spectral phase manipulation of a femtosecond optical frequency comb. Transient coherent accumulation is directly manifested by the enhancement of signal amplitude and spectral resolution via the pulse number. The combination of frequency comb technology and spectral phase manipulation enables coherent control techniques to enter a new regime with natural linewidth resolution.

  20. High Resolution Atomic Coherent Control via Spectral Phase Manipulation of an Optical Frequency Comb

    SciTech Connect

    Stowe, Matthew C.; Cruz, Flavio C.; Marian, Adela; Ye Jun

    2006-04-21

    We demonstrate high resolution coherent control of cold atomic rubidium utilizing spectral phase manipulation of a femtosecond optical frequency comb. Transient coherent accumulation is directly manifested by the enhancement of signal amplitude and spectral resolution via the pulse number. The combination of frequency comb technology and spectral phase manipulation enables coherent control techniques to enter a new regime with natural linewidth resolution.

  1. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  2. Optical and magnetic properties of a transparent garnet film for atomic physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Mari; Tajima, Ryoichi; Kiyosawa, Ryota; Nagata, Yugo; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Ishibashi, Takayuki; Hatakeyama, Atsushi

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the optical and magnetic properties of a transparent magnetic garnet with a particular focus on its applications to atomic physics experiments. The garnet film used in this study was a magnetically soft material that was originally designed for a Faraday rotator at optical communication wavelengths in the near infrared region. The film had a thickness of 2.1 μm and a small optical loss at a wavelength of λ =780 nm resonant with Rb atoms. The Faraday effect was also small and, thus, barely affected the polarization of light at λ =780 nm. In contrast, large Faraday rotation angles at shorter wavelengths enabled us to visualize magnetic domains, which were perpendicularly magnetized in alternate directions with a period of 3.6 μm. We confirmed the generation of an evanescent wave on the garnet film, which can be used for the optical observation and manipulation of atoms on the surface of the film. Finally, we demonstrated a magnetic mirror for laser-cooled Rb atoms using the garnet film.

  3. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Keir C; Nagy, Attila

    2008-06-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. Here we describe these techniques and illustrate them with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations.

  4. Optical detection of potassium chloride vapor using collinear photofragmentation and atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sorvajärvi, Tapio; Saarela, Jaakko; Toivonen, Juha

    2012-10-01

    A sensitive and selective optical technique to detect potassium chloride (KCl) vapor is introduced. The technique is based on the photofragmentation of KCl molecules, using a pulsed UV laser, and optical probing of the temporarily increased amount of potassium atoms with a near-infrared laser. The two laser beams are aligned to go through the sample volume along the same optical path. The performance of the technique is demonstrated by detecting KCl concentrations from 25 ppb to 30 ppm in a temperature-controlled cell.

  5. Communication: atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-04-28

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ((3))) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ((2))).

  6. An ultracold, optically trapped mixture of 87Rb and metastable 4He atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Adonis Silva; Mishra, Hari Prasad; Vassen, Wim; Knoop, Steven

    2017-02-01

    We report on the realization of an ultracold (<25 μK) mixture of rubidium (87Rb) and metastable triplet helium (4He) in an optical dipole trap. Our scheme involves laser cooling in a dual-species magneto-optical trap, simultaneous MW- and RF-induced forced evaporative cooling in a quadrupole magnetic trap, and transfer to a single-beam optical dipole trap. We observe long trapping lifetimes for the doubly spin-stretched spin-state mixture and measure much shorter lifetimes for other spin-state combinations. We discuss prospects for realizing quantum degenerate mixtures of alkali-metal and metastable helium atoms.

  7. Communication: Atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Saurabh, Prasoon Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-04-28

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ{sup (3)}) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ{sup (2)})

  8. Light storage in a cold atomic ensemble with a high optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kwang-Kyoon; Chough, Young-Tak; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2017-06-01

    A quantum memory with a high storage efficiency and a long coherence time is an essential element in quantum information applications. Here, we report our recent development of an optical quantum memory with a rubidium-87 cold atom ensemble. By increasing the optical depth of the medium, we have achieved a storage efficiency of 65% and a coherence time of 51 μs for a weak laser pulse. The result of a numerical analysis based on the Maxwell-Bloch equations agrees well with the experimental results. Our result paves the way toward an efficient optical quantum memory and may find applications in photonic quantum information processing.

  9. Frequency-doubled telecom fiber laser for a cold atom interferometer using optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theron, Fabien; Bidel, Yannick; Dieu, Emily; Zahzam, Nassim; Cadoret, Malo; Bresson, Alexandre

    2017-06-01

    A compact and robust frequency-doubled telecom laser system at 780 nm is presented for a rubidium cold atom interferometer using optical lattices. Adopting an optical switch at 1.5 μm and a dual-wavelength second harmonic generation system, only one laser amplifier is required for the laser system. Our system delivers a 900 mW laser beam with a detuning of 110 GHz for the optical lattice and a 650 mW laser beam with an adjustable detuning between 0 and -1 GHz for the laser cooling, the detection and the Raman transitions.

  10. Preparation of an exponentially rising optical pulse for efficient excitation of single atoms in free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, Hoang Lan; Aljunid, Syed Abdullah; Maslennikov, Gleb; Kurtsiefer, Christian

    2012-08-01

    We report on a simple method to prepare optical pulses with exponentially rising envelope on the time scale of a few ns. The scheme is based on the exponential transfer function of a fast transistor, which generates an exponentially rising envelope that is transferred first on a radio frequency carrier, and then on a coherent cw laser beam with an electro-optical phase modulator. The temporally shaped sideband is then extracted with an optical resonator and can be used to efficiently excite a single 87Rb atom.

  11. Atomic Bloch-Zener oscillations and Stückelberg interferometry in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Kling, Sebastian; Salger, Tobias; Grossert, Christopher; Weitz, Martin

    2010-11-19

    We report on experiments investigating quantum transport and band interferometry of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical lattice with a two-band miniband structure, realized with a Fourier-synthesized optical lattice potential. Bloch-Zener oscillations, the coherent superposition of Bloch oscillations and Landau-Zener tunneling between the two bands, are observed. When the relative phase between paths in different bands is varied, an interference signal is observed, demonstrating the coherence of the dynamics in the miniband system. Measured fringe patterns of this Stückelberg interferometer allow us to interferometrically map out the band structure of the optical lattice over the full Brillouin zone.

  12. Atomic Bloch-Zener Oscillations and Stueckelberg Interferometry in Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Kling, Sebastian; Salger, Tobias; Grossert, Christopher; Weitz, Martin

    2010-11-19

    We report on experiments investigating quantum transport and band interferometry of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical lattice with a two-band miniband structure, realized with a Fourier-synthesized optical lattice potential. Bloch-Zener oscillations, the coherent superposition of Bloch oscillations and Landau-Zener tunneling between the two bands, are observed. When the relative phase between paths in different bands is varied, an interference signal is observed, demonstrating the coherence of the dynamics in the miniband system. Measured fringe patterns of this Stueckelberg interferometer allow us to interferometrically map out the band structure of the optical lattice over the full Brillouin zone.

  13. Is the time right for a redefinition of the second by optical atomic clocks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Given the dramatic rate of progress in optical atomic clocks over the last decade, this paper presents the current state of play, and considers the possibilities, implications and timescales for a potential redefinition of the SI second in terms of an optical reference transition. In particular, the question of choice of a future standard is addressed, together with the requirements to accurately compare realisations of such standards, both for clocks local to, and remote from each other. Current performances of various optical clock systems are examined and possibilities for moving beyond potential limitations by alternative strategies are outlined.

  14. Vector magnetometry of Fe/Cr/Fe trilayers with biquadratic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansell, R.; Petit, D.; Fernández-Pacheco, A.; Lee, J. H.; Chin, S.-L.; Lavrijsen, R.; Cowburn, R. P.

    2017-05-01

    The magnetic reversal of epitaxial Fe/Cr/Fe trilayer samples grown on GaAs is studied. In wedged samples both long and short period coupling oscillations associated with Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) coupling in Cr are seen in the easy axis saturation fields. By using vector vibrating sample magnetometry and both longitudinal and transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect magnetometry we are able to determine the exact reversal path of both the magnetic layers. Changes in the reversal behavior are seen with sub-monolayer changes of the thickness of the Cr interlayer. The two main reversal paths are described in terms of whether the reversal is dominated by bilinear RKKY coupling, which leads to an antiparallel state at remanence or by biquadratic coupling which leads to a 90 degree alignment of layers at remanence. The changing reversal behaviour is discussed with respect to the possibility of using such systems for multilayer memory applications and, in particular, the limits on the required accuracy of the sample growth.

  15. Optical Bragg, atomic Bragg and cavity QED detections of quantum phases and excitation spectra of ultracold atoms in bipartite and frustrated optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Jinwu; Zhang, K.Y.; Li, Yan; Chen, Yan; Zhang, W.P.

    2013-01-15

    Ultracold atoms loaded on optical lattices can provide unprecedented experimental systems for the quantum simulations and manipulations of many quantum phases and quantum phase transitions between these phases. However, so far, how to detect these quantum phases and phase transitions effectively remains an outstanding challenge. In this paper, we will develop a systematic and unified theory of using the optical Bragg scattering, atomic Bragg scattering or cavity QED to detect the ground state and the excitation spectrum of many quantum phases of interacting bosons loaded in bipartite and frustrated optical lattices. The physically measurable quantities of the three experiments are the light scattering cross sections, the atom scattered clouds and the cavity leaking photons respectively. We show that the two photon Raman transition processes in the three detection methods not only couple to the density order parameter, but also the valence bond order parameter due to the hopping of the bosons on the lattice. This valence bond order coupling is very sensitive to any superfluid order or any valence bond (VB) order in the quantum phases to be probed. These quantum phases include not only the well-known superfluid and Mott insulating phases, but also other important phases such as various kinds of charge density waves (CDW), valence bond solids (VBS), and CDW-VBS phases with both CDW and VBS orders unique to frustrated lattices, and also various kinds of supersolids. We analyze respectively the experimental conditions of the three detection methods to probe these various quantum phases and their corresponding excitation spectra. We also address the effects of a finite temperature and a harmonic trap. We contrast the three scattering methods with recent in situ measurements inside a harmonic trap and argue that the two kinds of measurements are complementary to each other. The combination of both kinds of detection methods could be used to match the combination of

  16. Optical meta-atom for localization of light with quantized energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lannebère, Sylvain; Silveirinha, Mário G.

    2015-10-01

    The capacity to confine light into a small region of space is of paramount importance in many areas of modern science. Here we suggest a mechanism to store a quantized `bit' of light--with a very precise amount of energy--in an open core-shell plasmonic structure (`meta-atom') with a nonlinear optical response. Notwithstanding the trapped light state is embedded in the radiation continuum, its lifetime is not limited by the radiation loss. Interestingly, it is shown that the interplay between the nonlinear response and volume plasmons enables breaking fundamental reciprocity restrictions, and coupling very efficiently an external light source to the meta-atom. The collision of an incident optical pulse with the meta-atom may be used to release the trapped light `bit'.

  17. Heterodimer of two distinguishable atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Odong, Otim; Sanders, Jerome C.; Javanainen, Juha

    2011-09-15

    Within the Bose-Hubbard model, we theoretically determine the stationary states of two distinguishable atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice and compare with the case of two identical bosons. A heterodimer has odd-parity dissociated states that do not depend on the interactions between the atoms, and the lattice momenta of the two atomic species may have different averages even for a bound state of the dimer. We discuss methods to detect the dimer. The different distributions of the quasimomenta of the two species may be observed in suitable time-of-flight experiments. Also, an asymmetry in the lineshape as a function of the modulation frequency may reveal the presence of the odd-parity dissociated states when a heterodimer is dissociated by modulating the depth of the optical lattice.

  18. Optical meta-atom for localization of light with quantized energy

    PubMed Central

    Lannebère, Sylvain; Silveirinha, Mário G.

    2015-01-01

    The capacity to confine light into a small region of space is of paramount importance in many areas of modern science. Here we suggest a mechanism to store a quantized ‘bit' of light—with a very precise amount of energy—in an open core-shell plasmonic structure (‘meta-atom') with a nonlinear optical response. Notwithstanding the trapped light state is embedded in the radiation continuum, its lifetime is not limited by the radiation loss. Interestingly, it is shown that the interplay between the nonlinear response and volume plasmons enables breaking fundamental reciprocity restrictions, and coupling very efficiently an external light source to the meta-atom. The collision of an incident optical pulse with the meta-atom may be used to release the trapped light ‘bit'. PMID:26515977

  19. Enhanced Reverse Saturable Absorption and Optical Limiting in Heavy-Atom Substituted Phthalocyanines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. W.; Mansour, K.; Marder, S. R.; Alvarez, D., Jr.; Perry, K. J.; Choong, I.

    1994-01-01

    The reverse saturable absorption and optical limiting response of metal phthalocyaninies can be enhanced by using the heavy-atom effect. Phthalocyanines containing heavy metal atoms, such as In, Sn, and Pb show nearly a factor of two enhancement in the ratio of effective excited-state to ground-state absorption cross sections compared to those containing lighter atoms, such as Al and Si. In an f/8 optical geometry, homogeneous solutions of heavy metal phthalocyanines, at 30% linear transmission, limit 8-ns, 532-nm laser pulses to less than or equal to 3 (micro)J (the energy for 50% probability of eye damage) for incident pulses up to 800 (micro)J.

  20. Harmonic detection of magnetic resonance for sensitivity improvement of optical atomic magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjbaran, M.; Tehranchi, M. M.; Hamidi, S. M.; Khalkhali, S. M. H.

    2017-02-01

    Highly sensitive atomic magnetometers use optically detected magnetic resonance of atomic spins to measure extremely weak magnetic field changes. The magnetometer sensitivity is directly proportional to the ratio of intensity to line-shape of the resonance signal. To obtain narrower resonance signal, we implemented harmonic detection of magnetic resonance method in Mx configuration. The nonlinear spin polarization dynamics in detection of the higher harmonics were employed in phenomenological Bloch equations. The measured and simulated harmonic components of the resonance signals in frequency domain yielded significantly narrower line-width accompanying much improved sensitivity. Our results confirm the sensitivity improvement by a factor of two in optical atomic magnetometer via second harmonic signal which can open a new insight in the weak magnetic field measurement system design.

  1. Enhanced Reverse Saturable Absorption and Optical Limiting in Heavy-Atom Substituted Phthalocyanines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. W.; Mansour, K.; Marder, S. R.; Alvarez, D., Jr.; Perry, K. J.; Choong, I.

    1994-01-01

    The reverse saturable absorption and optical limiting response of metal phthalocyaninies can be enhanced by using the heavy-atom effect. Phthalocyanines containing heavy metal atoms, such as In, Sn, and Pb show nearly a factor of two enhancement in the ratio of effective excited-state to ground-state absorption cross sections compared to those containing lighter atoms, such as Al and Si. In an f/8 optical geometry, homogeneous solutions of heavy metal phthalocyanines, at 30% linear transmission, limit 8-ns, 532-nm laser pulses to less than or equal to 3 (micro)J (the energy for 50% probability of eye damage) for incident pulses up to 800 (micro)J.

  2. Progress towards a permanent electron electric dipole moment search using cold atoms in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solmeyer, Neal E.; Zhu, Kunyan; Weiss, David S.

    2011-05-01

    Observation of a permanent electric dipole moment of the electron would imply CP violating effects not contained in the Standard Model. We present our progress towards measuring the electron EDM using laser-cooled cesium and rubidium atoms trapped in a one dimensional optical lattice. We have collected Cs atoms in a MOT and have launched them 90 cm vertically using two cavity-enhanced optical lattice guides. In that region, which is suitable for measurement, we re-cooled and re-trapped the atoms with an overall transfer efficiency from the MOT of 50%. The two 1D lattice traps thread through three specially-coated glass electric field plates. Very low frequency Ramsey-like spectroscopy will be sensitive to an EDM with an ultimate precision of 3 ×10-30 e-cm.

  3. Non-classical effects in photon-statistics of atomic optical bistability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erenso, Daniel; Vyas, Reeta; Singh, Surendra

    2000-10-01

    Homodyne statistics of light generated by an atomic system exhibiting optical bistability are analyzed. The dynamical equations for the homodyne field are derived using the results for a single-atom optical bistability in the good cavity limit [Wang and Vyas, Phys. Rev. A 54, 4453 (1996)]. We use positive-P representation to map operator quantum dynamics onto a set of c-number stochastic equations. It is shown that field radiated by the atomic system can be described in terms of two independent real Gaussian stochastic processes and a coherent component. By making Karhunen-Loeve expansion of the field variables we derive the generating function for the photoelectron statistics. From this generating function photoelectron counting distribution, factorial moments, and waiting time distribution are obtained analytically. These quantities are directly measurable in photon counting experiments. We show that the homodyne field can exhibit many interesting nonclassical features including novel nonclassical effects in higher order factorial moments.

  4. Optical cooling and trapping of highly magnetic atoms: the benefits of a spontaneous spin polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreon, Davide; Sidorenkov, Leonid A.; Bouazza, Chayma; Maineult, Wilfried; Dalibard, Jean; Nascimbene, Sylvain

    2017-03-01

    From the study of long-range-interacting systems to the simulation of gauge fields, open-shell lanthanide atoms with their large magnetic moment and narrow optical transitions open novel directions in the field of ultracold quantum gases. As for other atomic species, the magneto-optical trap (MOT) is the working horse of experiments but its operation is challenging, due to the large electronic spin of the atoms. Here we present an experimental study of narrow-line dysprosium MOTs. We show that the combination of radiation pressure and gravitational forces leads to a spontaneous polarization of the electronic spin. The spin composition is measured using a Stern–Gerlach separation of spin levels, revealing that the gas becomes almost fully spin-polarized for large laser frequency detunings. In this regime, we reach the optimal operation of the MOT, with samples of typically 3× {10}8 atoms at a temperature of 15 μK. The spin polarization reduces the complexity of the radiative cooling description, which allows for a simple model accounting for our measurements. We also measure the rate of density-dependent atom losses, finding good agreement with a model based on light-induced Van der Waals forces. A minimal two-body loss rate β ∼ 2× {10}-11 cm3 s–1 is reached in the spin-polarized regime. Our results constitute a benchmark for the experimental study of ultracold gases of magnetic lanthanide atoms.

  5. Detection of a single lithium atom in a magneto-optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hyok Sang; Yoon, Seokchan; Cho, D.

    2015-06-01

    We report fluorescence detection of a single 7Li atom in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We use a double MOT system, which allows us to control the loading rate of the second MOT by simply turning on or off the first MOT and to use a modest magnetic field gradient of 46 G/cm. A single atom is trapped for longer than 100 s. The fluorescence from the trapped atoms is imaged onto an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device with a unit magnification factor by a pair of aspheric lenses. The numerical aperture of the objective lens is 0.22 with a collecting efficiency of 1.3%. Accumulated fluorescence is extracted by integrating the signal over a region of interest of 500×350 μm2. For a 200-ms exposure time, the fluorescence count from a single atom is 8.8×103 and the background count from scattered MOT beams is 6.8 × 104. We actively stabilize the trap beam power to reduce the noise and the measured noise is two times the statistical noise. Overall signal-to-noise ratio of the single-atom detection is 37/√ Hz. We also describe a modification of the system that is adapted to an experimental configuration for quantum manipulation of single atoms in a 1D optical lattice.

  6. Optical properties of an atomic ensemble coupled to a band edge of a photonic crystal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, Ewan; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Chang, Darrick E.

    2017-08-01

    We study the optical properties of an ensemble of two-level atoms coupled to a 1D photonic crystal waveguide (PCW), which mediates long-range coherent dipole-dipole interactions between the atoms. We show that the long-range interactions can dramatically alter the linear and nonlinear optical behavior, as compared to a typical atomic ensemble. In particular, in the linear regime, we find that the transmission spectrum contains multiple transmission dips, whose properties we characterize. Moreover, we show how the linear spectrum may be used to infer the number of atoms present in the system, constituting an important experimental tool in a regime where techniques for conventional ensembles break down. We also show that some of the transmission dips are associated with an effective ‘two-level’ resonance that forms due to the long-range interactions. In particular, under strong global driving and appropriate conditions, we find that the atomic ensemble is only capable of absorbing and emitting single collective excitations at a time. Our results are of direct relevance to atom-PCW experiments that should soon be realizable.

  7. Atomically referenced 1-GHz optical parametric oscillator frequency comb.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Richard A; Balskus, Karolis; Zhang, Zhaowei; Reid, Derryck T

    2015-06-15

    The visible to mid-infrared coverage of femtosecond optical parametric oscillator (OPO) frequency combs makes them attractive resources for high-resolution spectroscopy and astrophotonic spectrograph calibration. Such applications require absolute traceability and wide comb-tooth spacing, attributes which until now have remained unavailable from any single OPO frequency comb. Here, we report a 1-GHz Ti:sapphire pumped OPO comb whose repetition and offset frequencies are referenced to Rb-stabilised microwave and laser oscillators respectively. This technique simultaneously achieves fully stabilized combs from both the Ti:sapphire laser and the OPO with sub-MHz comb-tooth linewidths, multi-hour locking stability and without the need for super-continuum generation.

  8. Scheme for generating the singlet state of three atoms trapped in distant cavities coupled by optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dong-Yang; Wen, Jing-Ji; Bai, Cheng-Hua; Hu, Shi; Cui, Wen-Xue; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Shou

    2015-09-15

    An effective scheme is proposed to generate the singlet state with three four-level atoms trapped in three distant cavities connected with each other by three optical fibers, respectively. After a series of appropriate atom–cavity interactions, which can be arbitrarily controlled via the selective pairing of Raman transitions and corresponding optical switches, a three-atom singlet state can be successfully generated. The influence of atomic spontaneous decay, photon leakage of cavities and optical fibers on the fidelity of the state is numerically simulated showing that the three-atom singlet state can be generated with high fidelity by choosing the experimental parameters appropriately.

  9. Direct frequency comb optical frequency standard based on two-photon transitions of thermal atoms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, S. Y.; Wu, J. T.; Zhang, Y. L.; Leng, J. X.; Yang, W. P.; Zhang, Z. G.; Zhao, J. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Optical clocks have been the focus of science and technology research areas due to their capability to provide highest frequency accuracy and stability to date. Their superior frequency performance promises significant advances in the fields of fundamental research as well as practical applications including satellite-based navigation and ranging. In traditional optical clocks, ultrastable optical cavities, laser cooling and particle (atoms or a single ion) trapping techniques are employed to guarantee high stability and accuracy. However, on the other hand, they make optical clocks an entire optical tableful of equipment, and cannot work continuously for a long time; as a result, they restrict optical clocks used as very convenient and compact time-keeping clocks. In this article, we proposed, and experimentally demonstrated, a novel scheme of optical frequency standard based on comb-directly-excited atomic two-photon transitions. By taking advantage of the natural properties of the comb and two-photon transitions, this frequency standard achieves a simplified structure, high robustness as well as decent frequency stability, which promise widespread applications in various scenarios. PMID:26459877

  10. Direct frequency comb optical frequency standard based on two-photon transitions of thermal atoms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S Y; Wu, J T; Zhang, Y L; Leng, J X; Yang, W P; Zhang, Z G; Zhao, J Y

    2015-10-13

    Optical clocks have been the focus of science and technology research areas due to their capability to provide highest frequency accuracy and stability to date. Their superior frequency performance promises significant advances in the fields of fundamental research as well as practical applications including satellite-based navigation and ranging. In traditional optical clocks, ultrastable optical cavities, laser cooling and particle (atoms or a single ion) trapping techniques are employed to guarantee high stability and accuracy. However, on the other hand, they make optical clocks an entire optical tableful of equipment, and cannot work continuously for a long time; as a result, they restrict optical clocks used as very convenient and compact time-keeping clocks. In this article, we proposed, and experimentally demonstrated, a novel scheme of optical frequency standard based on comb-directly-excited atomic two-photon transitions. By taking advantage of the natural properties of the comb and two-photon transitions, this frequency standard achieves a simplified structure, high robustness as well as decent frequency stability, which promise widespread applications in various scenarios.

  11. Individual Optical Addressing of Atomic Clock Qubits With Stark Shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Aaron; Smith, Jacob; Richerme, Phillip; Neyenhuis, Brian; Hess, Paul; Zhang, Jiehang; Monroe, Chris

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, trapped ions have proven to be a versatile quantum information platform, enabled by their long lifetimes and high gate fidelities. Some of the most promising trapped ion systems take advantage of groundstate hyperfine ``clock'' qubits, which are insensitive to background fields to first order. This same insensitivity also makes σz manipulations of the qubit impractical, eliminating whole classes of operations. We prove there exists a fourth-order light shift, or four-photon Stark shift, of the clock states derived from two coherent laser beams whose beatnote is close to the qubit splitting. Using a mode-locked source generates a large light shift with only modest laser powers, making it a practical σz operation on a clock qubit. We experimentally verify and measure the four-photon Stark shift and demonstrate its use to coherently individually address qubits in a chain of 10 Yb 171 ions with low crosstalk. We use this individual addressing to prepare arbitrary product states with high fidelity and also to apply independent σz terms transverse to an Ising Hamiltonian. This work is supported by the ARO Atomic Physics Program, the AFOSR MURI on Quantum Measurement and Verification, and the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI.

  12. First Optical Hyperfine Structure Measurement in an Atomic Anion

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, A.; Canali, C.; Warring, U.; Kellerbauer, A.; Fritzsche, S.

    2010-02-19

    We have investigated the hyperfine structure of the transition between the 5d{sup 7}6s{sup 2} {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}{sup e} ground state and the 5d{sup 6}6s{sup 2}6p {sup 6}D{sub J}{sup o} excited state in the negative osmium ion by high-resolution collinear laser spectroscopy. This transition is unique because it is the only known electric-dipole transition in atomic anions and might be amenable to laser cooling. From the observed hyperfine structure in {sup 187}Os{sup -} and {sup 189}Os{sup -} the yet unknown total angular momentum of the bound excited state was found to be J=9/2. The hyperfine structure constants of the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}{sup e} ground state and the {sup 6}D{sub 9/2}{sup o} excited state were determined experimentally and compared to multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations. Using the knowledge of the ground and excited state angular momenta, the full energy level diagram of {sup 192}Os{sup -} in an external magnetic field was calculated, revealing possible laser cooling transitions.

  13. Evolution of microstructure and related optical properties of ZnO grown by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Abou Chaaya, Adib; Viter, Roman; Bechelany, Mikhael; Alute, Zanda; Erts, Donats; Zalesskaya, Anastasiya; Kovalevskis, Kristaps; Rouessac, Vincent; Smyntyna, Valentyn; Miele, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    A study of transmittance and photoluminescence spectra on the growth of oxygen-rich ultra-thin ZnO films prepared by atomic layer deposition is reported. The structural transition from an amorphous to a polycrystalline state is observed upon increasing the thickness. The unusual behavior of the energy gap with thickness reflected by optical properties is attributed to the improvement of the crystalline structure resulting from a decreasing concentration of point defects at the growth of grains. The spectra of UV and visible photoluminescence emissions correspond to transitions near the band-edge and defect-related transitions. Additional emissions were observed from band-tail states near the edge. A high oxygen ratio and variable optical properties could be attractive for an application of atomic layer deposition (ALD) deposited ultrathin ZnO films in optical sensors and biosensors.

  14. Electric and magnetic response in dielectric dark states for low loss subwavelength optical meta atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Aditya; Moitra, Parikshit; Koschny, Thomas; Valentine, Jason; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2015-07-14

    Artificially created surfaces or metasurfaces, composed of appropriately shaped subwavelength structures, namely, meta-atoms, control light at subwavelength scales. Historically, metasurfaces have used radiating metallic resonators as subwavelength inclusions. However, while resonant optical metasurfaces made from metal have been sufficiently subwavelength in the propagation direction, they are too lossy for many applications. Metasurfaces made out of radiating dielectric resonators have been proposed to solve the loss problem, but are marginally subwavelength at optical frequencies. We designed subwavelength resonators made out of nonradiating dielectrics. The resonators are decorated with appropriately placed scatterers, resulting in a meta-atom with an engineered electromagnetic response. A metasurface that yields an electric response is fabricated, experimentally characterized, and a method to obtain a magnetic response at optical frequencies is theoretically demonstrated. In conclusion, this design methodology paves the way for metasurfaces that are simultaneously subwavelength and low loss.

  15. Narrow-line magneto-optical cooling and trapping of strongly magnetic atoms.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Andrew J; Hanssen, James L; McClelland, Jabez J

    2008-03-21

    Laser cooling on weak transitions is a useful technique for reaching ultracold temperatures in atoms with multiple valence electrons. However, for strongly magnetic atoms a conventional narrow-line magneto-optical trap (MOT) is destabilized by competition between optical and magnetic forces. We overcome this difficulty in Er by developing an unusual narrow-line MOT that balances optical and magnetic forces using laser light tuned to the blue side of a narrow (8 kHz) transition. The trap population is spin polarized with temperatures reaching below 2 muK. Our results constitute an alternative method for laser cooling on weak transitions, applicable to rare-earth-metal and metastable alkaline earth elements.

  16. Evolution of microstructure and related optical properties of ZnO grown by atomic layer deposition

    PubMed Central

    Abou Chaaya, Adib; Alute, Zanda; Erts, Donats; Zalesskaya, Anastasiya; Kovalevskis, Kristaps; Rouessac, Vincent; Smyntyna, Valentyn; Miele, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Summary A study of transmittance and photoluminescence spectra on the growth of oxygen-rich ultra-thin ZnO films prepared by atomic layer deposition is reported. The structural transition from an amorphous to a polycrystalline state is observed upon increasing the thickness. The unusual behavior of the energy gap with thickness reflected by optical properties is attributed to the improvement of the crystalline structure resulting from a decreasing concentration of point defects at the growth of grains. The spectra of UV and visible photoluminescence emissions correspond to transitions near the band-edge and defect-related transitions. Additional emissions were observed from band-tail states near the edge. A high oxygen ratio and variable optical properties could be attractive for an application of atomic layer deposition (ALD) deposited ultrathin ZnO films in optical sensors and biosensors. PMID:24205465

  17. Real-time near-field terahertz imaging with atomic optical fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, C. G.; Šibalić, N.; de Melo, N. R.; Kondo, J. M.; Adams, C. S.; Weatherill, K. J.

    2017-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) near-field imaging is a flourishing discipline, with applications from fundamental studies of beam propagation to the characterization of metamaterials and waveguides. Beating the diffraction limit typically involves rastering structures or detectors with length scale shorter than the radiation wavelength; in the THz domain this has been achieved using a number of techniques including scattering tips and apertures. Alternatively, mapping THz fields onto an optical wavelength and imaging the visible light removes the requirement for scanning a local probe, speeding up image collection times. Here, we report THz-to-optical conversion using a gas of highly excited Rydberg atoms. By collecting THz-induced optical fluorescence we demonstrate a real-time image of a THz standing wave and use well-known atomic properties to calibrate the THz field strength.

  18. Electric and magnetic response in dielectric dark states for low loss subwavelength optical meta atoms

    DOE PAGES

    Jain, Aditya; Moitra, Parikshit; Koschny, Thomas; ...

    2015-07-14

    Artificially created surfaces or metasurfaces, composed of appropriately shaped subwavelength structures, namely, meta-atoms, control light at subwavelength scales. Historically, metasurfaces have used radiating metallic resonators as subwavelength inclusions. However, while resonant optical metasurfaces made from metal have been sufficiently subwavelength in the propagation direction, they are too lossy for many applications. Metasurfaces made out of radiating dielectric resonators have been proposed to solve the loss problem, but are marginally subwavelength at optical frequencies. We designed subwavelength resonators made out of nonradiating dielectrics. The resonators are decorated with appropriately placed scatterers, resulting in a meta-atom with an engineered electromagnetic response. Amore » metasurface that yields an electric response is fabricated, experimentally characterized, and a method to obtain a magnetic response at optical frequencies is theoretically demonstrated. In conclusion, this design methodology paves the way for metasurfaces that are simultaneously subwavelength and low loss.« less

  19. Noise reduction and signal-to-noise ratio improvement of atomic magnetometers with optical gradiometer configurations.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Keigo; Ito, Yosuke; Ichihara, Sunao; Mizutani, Natsuhiko; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2015-03-09

    In the field of biomagnetic measurement, optically-pumped atomic magnetometers (OPAMs) have attracted significant attention. With the improvement of signal response and the reduction of sensor noise, the sensitivity of OPAMs is limited mainly by environmental magnetic noise. To reduce this magnetic noise, we developed the optical gradiometer, in which the differential output of two distinct measurement areas inside a glass cell was obtained directly via the magneto-optical rotation of one probe beam. When operating in appropriate conditions, the sensitivity was improved by the differential measurement of the optical gradiometer. In addition, measurements of the pseudo-magnetic noise and signal showed the improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio. These results demonstrate the feasibility of our optical gradiometer as an efficient method for reducing the magnetic noise.

  20. A portable magneto-optical trap with prospects for atom interferometry in civil engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinton, A.; Perea-Ortiz, M.; Winch, J.; Briggs, J.; Freer, S.; Moustoukas, D.; Powell-Gill, S.; Squire, C.; Lamb, A.; Rammeloo, C.; Stray, B.; Voulazeris, G.; Zhu, L.; Kaushik, A.; Lien, Y.-H.; Niggebaum, A.; Rodgers, A.; Stabrawa, A.; Boddice, D.; Plant, S. R.; Tuckwell, G. W.; Bongs, K.; Metje, N.; Holynski, M.

    2017-06-01

    The high precision and scalable technology offered by atom interferometry has the opportunity to profoundly affect gravity surveys, enabling the detection of features of either smaller size or greater depth. While such systems are already starting to enter into the commercial market, significant reductions are required in order to reach the size, weight and power of conventional devices. In this article, the potential for atom interferometry based gravimetry is assessed, suggesting that the key opportunity resides within the development of gravity gradiometry sensors to enable drastic improvements in measurement time. To push forward in realizing more compact systems, techniques have been pursued to realize a highly portable magneto-optical trap system, which represents the core package of an atom interferometry system. This can create clouds of 107 atoms within a system package of 20 l and 10 kg, consuming 80 W of power. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'.

  1. Optical response of gas-phase atoms at less than λ/80 from a dielectric surface.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, K A; Keaveney, J; Hughes, I G; Sargsyan, A; Sarkisyan, D; Adams, C S

    2014-06-27

    We present experimental observations of atom-light interactions within tens of nanometers (down to 11 nm) of a sapphire surface. Using photon counting we detect the fluorescence from of order one thousand Rb or Cs atoms, confined in a vapor with thickness much less than the optical excitation wavelength. The asymmetry in the spectral line shape provides a direct readout of the atom-surface potential. A numerical fit indicates a power law -C(α)/r(α) with α = 3.02 ± 0.06 confirming that the van der Waals interaction dominates over other effects. The extreme sensitivity of our photon-counting technique may allow the search for atom-surface bound states.

  2. A Fiber Optic Catalytic Sensor for Neutral Atom Measurements in Oxygen Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Zaplotnik, Rok; Vesel, Alenka; Mozetic, Miran

    2012-01-01

    The presented sensor for neutral oxygen atom measurement in oxygen plasma is a catalytic probe which uses fiber optics and infrared detection system to measure the gray body radiation of the catalyst. The density of neutral atoms can be determined from the temperature curve of the probe, because the catalyst is heated predominantly by the dissipation of energy caused by the heterogeneous surface recombination of neutral atoms. The advantages of this sensor are that it is simple, reliable, easy to use, noninvasive, quantitative and can be used in plasma discharge regions. By using different catalyst materials the sensor can also be applied for detection of neutral atoms in other plasmas. Sensor design, operation, example measurements and new measurement procedure for systematic characterization are presented. PMID:22666005

  3. Coherence and Raman sideband cooling of a single atom in an optical tweezer.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J D; Tiecke, T G; Zibrov, A S; Vuletić, V; Lukin, M D

    2013-03-29

    We investigate quantum control of a single atom in a tightly focused optical tweezer trap. We show that inevitable spatially varying polarization gives rise to significant internal-state decoherence but that this effect can be mitigated by an appropriately chosen magnetic bias field. This enables Raman sideband cooling of a single atom close to its three-dimensional ground state (vibrational quantum numbers n(x)=n(y)=0.01, n(z)=8) even for a trap beam waist as small as w=900  nm. The small atomic wave packet with δx=δy=24  nm and δz=270  nm represents a promising starting point for future hybrid quantum systems where atoms are placed in close proximity to surfaces.

  4. Coherence and Raman Sideband Cooling of a Single Atom in an Optical Tweezer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, J. D.; Tiecke, T. G.; Zibrov, A. S.; Vuletić, V.; Lukin, M. D.

    2013-03-01

    We investigate quantum control of a single atom in a tightly focused optical tweezer trap. We show that inevitable spatially varying polarization gives rise to significant internal-state decoherence but that this effect can be mitigated by an appropriately chosen magnetic bias field. This enables Raman sideband cooling of a single atom close to its three-dimensional ground state (vibrational quantum numbers n¯x=n¯y=0.01, n¯z=8) even for a trap beam waist as small as w=900nm. The small atomic wave packet with δx=δy=24nm and δz=270nm represents a promising starting point for future hybrid quantum systems where atoms are placed in close proximity to surfaces.

  5. Finite coplanar waveguide width effects in pulsed inductive microwave magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.L.; Kos, A.B.; Silva, T.J.

    2004-07-12

    The effect of finite coplanar waveguide (CPW) width on the measurement of the resonance frequency in thin ferromagnetic films has been characterized for pulsed inductive microwave magnetometry. A shift in resonant frequency is a linear function of the ratio of sample thickness to CPW width. The proportionality constant is experimentally determined to be 0.74{+-}0.1 times the saturation magnetization of the film. The frequency shift may be modeled as arising from an effective magnetic-anisotropy field.

  6. Optical Lattice Induced Light Shifts in an Yb Atomic Clock

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, Z. W.; Stalnaker, J. E.; Lemke, N. D.; Poli, N.; Oates, C. W.; Fortier, T. M.; Diddams, S. A.; Hollberg, L.; Hoyt, C. W.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.

    2008-03-14

    We present an experimental study of the lattice-induced light shifts on the {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}{sup 3}P{sub 0} optical clock transition ({nu}{sub clock}{approx_equal}518 THz) in neutral ytterbium. The 'magic' frequency {nu}{sub magic} for the {sup 174}Yb isotope was determined to be 394 799 475(35) MHz, which leads to a first order light shift uncertainty of 0.38 Hz. We also investigated the hyperpolarizability shifts due to the nearby 6s6p{sup 3}P{sub 0}{yields}6s8p{sup 3}P{sub 0}, 6s8p{sup 3}P{sub 2}, and 6s5f{sup 3}F{sub 2} two-photon resonances at 759.708, 754.23, and 764.95 nm, respectively. By measuring the corresponding clock transition shifts near these two-photon resonances, the hyperpolarizability shift was estimated to be 170(33) mHz for a linear polarized, 50 {mu}K deep, lattice at the magic wavelength. These results indicate that the differential polarizability and hyperpolarizability frequency shift uncertainties in a Yb lattice clock could be held to well below 10{sup -17}.

  7. Three-dimensional rearrangement of single atoms using actively controlled optical microtraps.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woojun; Kim, Hyosub; Ahn, Jaewook

    2016-05-02

    We propose and demonstrate three-dimensional rearrangements of single atoms. In experiments performed with single 87Rb atoms in optical microtraps actively controlled by a spatial light modulator, we demonstrate various dynamic rearrangements of up to N = 9 atoms including rotation, 2D vacancy filling, guiding, compactification, and 3D shuffling. With the capability of a phase-only Fourier mask to generate arbitrary shapes of the holographic microtraps, it was possible to place single atoms at arbitrary geometries of a few μm size and even continuously reconfigure them by conveying each atom. For this purpose, we loaded a series of computer-generated phase masks in the full frame rate of 60 Hz of the spatial light modulator, so the animation of phase mask transformed the holographic microtraps in real time, driving each atom along the assigned trajectory. Possible applications of this method of transformation of single atoms include preparation of scalable quantum platforms for quantum computation, quantum simulation, and quantum many-body physics.

  8. Population transfer collisions involving nD Rydberg atoms in a CO2 optical dipole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Jorge M.; Goncalves, Luis F.; Tallant, Jonathan E.; Marcassa, Luis G.

    2014-05-01

    There has been an increasing interest in cold Rydberg atoms over the last several years. The primary reason for this attention is that interactions between Rydberg atoms are strong and lead to many interesting and useful phenomena, which require high atomic density samples. In this work, we have loaded Rb atoms into a CO2 optical dipole trap. After the loading, we turn off the dipole trap and excite the Rydberg state using a combination of two cw laser beams at 780 nm and 480 nm respectively. Finally, the Rydberg atoms are detected using pulsed field ionization technique. By analyzing the electrons signal, we can study the population transfer from the nD state to the (n + 2)P as a function of the atomic density for 37 <= n <= 45. As the atomic density increases, the excitation of the nD state saturates, suggesting the occurrence of dipole blockade. Nevertheless, the (n + 2)P is quadratically proportional to the nD population. We have also investigated the role of a dc electrical field in such process. This work was supported by Fapesp and INCT-IQ.

  9. Investigation of cold rubidium Rydberg atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Tretyakov, D. B.; Beterov, I. I.; Entin, V. M.; Ryabtsev, I. I. Chapovsky, P. L.

    2009-03-15

    This paper reports on the results of experiments with cold rubidium Rydberg atoms in a magneto-optical trap. The specific feature of the experiments is the excitation of Rydberg atoms in a small volume within a cloud of cold atoms and the sorting of measured signals and spectra according to the number of detected Rydberg atoms. The effective lifetime of the 37P Rydberg state and its polarizability in a weak electric field are measured. The results obtained are in good agreement with theoretical calculations. It is demonstrated that the localization of the excitation volume in the vicinity of the zero-magnetic-field point makes it possible to improve the spectral resolution and to obtain narrow microwave resonances in Rydberg atoms without switching off the quadrupole magnetic field of the trap. The dependence of the amplitude of dipole-dipole interaction resonances in Rydberg atoms on the number of atoms is measured. This dependence exhibits a linear behavior and agrees with the theory for a weak dipole-dipole interaction.

  10. Demonstration of a high-contrast optical switching in an atomic Delta system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Megha; Karigowda, Asha; Jayaraman, Ayyappan; Bretenaker, Fabien; Sanders, Barry C.; Narayanan, Andal

    2017-08-01

    We present an experimental study of a Δ system in a room temperature, dilute sample of 85Rb atoms. A Δ system in the D2 manifold of 85Rb is formed by connecting the two lower hyperfine energy levels of a Λ system by a microwave drive field at 3.0357 GHz. We show that when the Rabi frequency of a microwave drive field exceeds that of the optical probe field, a three-wave mixing nonlinear interaction is established. This nonlinear interaction changes the enhanced transmission of the optical probe to a deep absorption for a relative phase difference of π between all the three fields. We establish through our experiment and our numerical simulation, the phase-sensitive and nonlinear nature of the Δ system’s response to the applied microwave and optical fields. Using this feature, we demonstrate a high-contrast microwave phase controlled switch for the optical probe field. In comparison with intensity and phase switching demonstrated with all-optical fields so far, our experiment opens up the possibility of obtaining the highest contrast optical switching with room temperature atoms.

  11. Micromachined interferometric and atomic sensors enabled by integrated thin film optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Maximillian A.

    In this thesis, thin film optical techniques as applied to micromachined devices with optical detection are explored for the formation of high precision sensors. Specifically, two micromachined optical MEMS devices are introduced, fabricated, and characterized. The first is an accelerometer based on parallel plate Fabry-Perot interferometers. The second is a vapor cell for use in chip scale atomic MEMS sensor applications. Both devices are fabricated using bulk micromachining with integrated thin film reflectors. A single axis Fabry-Perot accelerometer with integrated thin film reflectors is designed, fabricated and demonstrated to have a resolution better than 1 mu g/ Hz at a frequency of 2 kHz. The effect of squeeze film constriction in such devices is characterized in similar devices and shown to be capable of extending the sensor bandwidth by as much as 48% over ideally vented designs. Two thin film reflector techniques are demonstrated to form wavelength dependant reflectors that allow the serialization of Fabry-Perot accelerometers into linear serial arrays based on the wavelength division multiplexing of the optical signals. A linear array of two optically multiplexed devices is demonstrated. Similar multilayer reflectors are integrated onto the angled interior sidewalls of an atomic MEMS vapor cell to improve the optical return performance by as much as seven times. The techniques is demonstrated to be compatible with the encapsulation of the 87Rb isotope. Advanced reflector designs are introduced to overcome the challenges of integrating multilayer reflectors into the micromachined cavities forming the vapor cells.

  12. Temperature Sensitivity of an Atomic Vapor Cell-Based Dispersion-Enhanced Optical Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myneni, K.; Smith, D. D.; Chang, H.; Luckay, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancement of the response of an optical cavity to a change in optical path length, through the use of an intracavity fast-light medium, has previously been demonstrated experimentally and described theoretically for an atomic vapor cell as the intracavity resonant absorber. This phenomenon may be used to enhance both the scale factor and sensitivity of an optical cavity mode to the change in path length, e.g. in gyroscopic applications. We study the temperature sensitivity of the on-resonant scale factor enhancement, S(sub o), due to the thermal sensitivity of the lower-level atom density in an atomic vapor cell, specifically for the case of the Rb-87 D(sub 2) transition. A semi-empirical model of the temperature-dependence of the absorption profile, characterized by two parameters, a(sub o)(T) and gamma(sub a)(T) allows the temperature-dependence of the cavity response, S(sub o)(T) and dS(sub o)/dT to be predicted over a range of temperature. We compare the predictions to experiment. Our model will be useful in determining the useful range for S(sub o), given the practical constraints on temperature stability for an atomic vapor cell.

  13. An integrated quantum repeater at telecom wavelength with single atoms in optical fiber cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uphoff, Manuel; Brekenfeld, Manuel; Rempe, Gerhard; Ritter, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    Quantum repeaters promise to enable quantum networks over global distances by circumventing the exponential decrease in success probability inherent in direct photon transmission. We propose a realistic, functionally integrated quantum-repeater implementation based on single atoms in optical cavities. Entanglement is directly generated between the single-atom quantum memory and a photon at telecom wavelength. The latter is collected with high efficiency and adjustable temporal and spectral properties into a spatially well-defined cavity mode. It is heralded by a near-infrared photon emitted from a second, orthogonal cavity. Entanglement between two remote quantum memories can be generated via an optical Bell-state measurement, while we propose entanglement swapping based on a highly efficient, cavity-assisted atom-atom gate. Our quantum-repeater scheme eliminates any requirement for wavelength conversion such that only a single system is needed at each node. We investigate a particular implementation with rubidium and realistic parameters for Fabry-Perot cavities based on hbox {CO}_2 laser-machined optical fibers. We show that the scheme enables the implementation of a rather simple quantum repeater that outperforms direct entanglement generation over large distances and does not require any improvements in technology beyond the state of the art.

  14. A high repetition rate experimental setup for quantum non-linear optics with cold Rydberg atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busche, Hannes; Ball, Simon W.; Huillery, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Using electromagnetically induced transparency and photon storage, the strong dipolar interactions between Rydberg atoms and the resulting dipole blockade can be mapped onto light fields to realise optical non-linearities and interactions at the single photon level. We report on the realisation of an experimental apparatus designed to study interactions between single photons stored as Rydberg excitations in optically trapped microscopic ensembles of ultracold 87Rb atoms. A pair of in-vacuum high numerical aperture lenses focus excitation and trapping beams down to 1 μm, well below the Rydberg blockade. Thanks to efficient magneto-optical trap (MOT) loading from an atomic beam generated by a 2D MOT and the ability to recycle the microscopic ensembles more than 20000 times without significant atom loss, we achieve effective repetition rates exceeding 110 kHz to obtain good photon counting statistics on reasonable time scales. To demonstrate the functionality of the setup, we present evidence of strong photon interactions including saturation of photon storage and the retrieval of non-classical light. Using in-vacuum antennae operating at up to 40 GHz, we perform microwave spectroscopy on photons stored as Rydberg excitations and observe an interaction induced change in lineshape depending on the number of stored photons.

  15. Rb atomic magnetometer toward EDM experiment with laser cooled francium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Takeshi; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takahiro; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Harada, Ken-Ichi; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Itoh, Masatoshi; Kato, Ko; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Sakamoto, Kosuke; Uchiyama, Aiko; Asahi, Koichiro; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-01

    A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle or an atom is a suited observable to test the physics beyond the standard model. We plan to search for the electron EDM by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom, since the Fr atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and the laser cooling techniques can suppress both statistical and systematic errors. In the EDM experiment, a fluctuation of the magnetic field is a main source of the errors. In order to achieve the high precision magnetometry, a magnetometer based on the nonlinear magneto-optical rotation effect of the Rb atom is under development. A long coherence time of Rb atom is the key issue for the highly sensitive detection of the field fluctuations. The coherence time is limited due both to collisions with an inner surface of a cell contained the Rb atom and to residual field in a magnetic shield. We prepared the cell coated with an anti-relaxation material and measured the relaxation time. A degauss of the shield was performed to eliminate the residual field. We will report the present status of the magnetometer. A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle or an atom is a suited observable to test the physics beyond the standard model. We plan to search for the electron EDM by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom, since the Fr atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and the laser cooling techniques can suppress both statistical and systematic errors. In the EDM experiment, a fluctuation of the magnetic field is a main source of the errors. In order to achieve the high precision magnetometry, a magnetometer based on the nonlinear magneto-optical rotation effect of the Rb atom is under development. A long coherence time of Rb atom is the key issue for the highly sensitive detection of the field fluctuations. The coherence time is limited due both to collisions with an inner surface of a cell contained the Rb atom and to residual field in a magnetic shield

  16. Cavity-based quantum networks with single atoms and optical photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiserer, Andreas; Rempe, Gerhard

    2015-10-01

    Distributed quantum networks will allow users to perform tasks and to interact in ways which are not possible with present-day technology. Their implementation is a key challenge for quantum science and requires the development of stationary quantum nodes that can send and receive as well as store and process quantum information locally. The nodes are connected by quantum channels for flying information carriers, i.e., photons. These channels serve both to directly exchange quantum information between nodes and to distribute entanglement over the whole network. In order to scale such networks to many particles and long distances, an efficient interface between the nodes and the channels is required. This article describes the cavity-based approach to this goal, with an emphasis on experimental systems in which single atoms are trapped in and coupled to optical resonators. Besides being conceptually appealing, this approach is promising for quantum networks on larger scales, as it gives access to long qubit coherence times and high light-matter coupling efficiencies. Thus, it allows one to generate entangled photons on the push of a button, to reversibly map the quantum state of a photon onto an atom, to transfer and teleport quantum states between remote atoms, to entangle distant atoms, to detect optical photons nondestructively, to perform entangling quantum gates between an atom and one or several photons, and even provides a route toward efficient heralded quantum memories for future repeaters. The presented general protocols and the identification of key parameters are applicable to other experimental systems.

  17. Zoo of Quantum Phases and Excitations of Cold Bosonic Atoms in Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Alon, Ofir E.; Streltsov, Alexej I.; Cederbaum, Lorenz S.

    2005-07-15

    Quantum phases and phase transitions of weakly to strongly interacting bosonic atoms in deep to shallow optical lattices are described by a single multiorbital mean-field approach in real space. For weakly interacting bosons in one dimension, the critical value of the superfluid to Mott insulator (MI) transition found is in excellent agreement with many-body treatments of the Bose-Hubbard model. For strongly interacting bosons (i) additional MI phases appear, for which two (or more) atoms residing in each site undergo a Tonks-Girardeau-like transition and localize, and (ii) on-site excitation becomes the excitation lowest in energy. Experimental implications are discussed.

  18. Lateral grating DFB AlGaInN laser diodes for optical communications and atomic clocks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najda, S. P.; Slight, T.; Perlin, P.; Odedina, O.; Suski, T.; Marona, L.; Stanczyk, S.; Leszczyński, M.; Wisniewski, P.; Czernecki, R.; Targowski, G.; E Kelly, A.

    2017-02-01

    AlGaInN laser diode technology is of considerable interest for telecom applications and next generation atomic optical clocks based on Sr (by using 422nm & 461nm) and Rb at 420.2nm.Very narrow linewidths (<1MHz) are required for such applications. We report lateral gratings on AlGaInN ridge waveguide laser diodes to achieve a single wavelength device with a good side mode suppression ratio (SMSR) that is suitable for atomic clock and telecom applications.

  19. Coherent-population-trapping resonances with linearly polarized light for all-optical miniature atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zibrov, Sergei A.; Velichansky, Vladimir L.; Novikova, Irina; Phillips, David F.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Zibrov, Alexander S.; Taichenachev, Alexey V.; Yudin, Valery I.

    2010-01-15

    We present a joint theoretical and experimental characterization of the coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance excited on the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb atoms by bichromatic linearly polarized laser light. We observe high-contrast transmission resonances (up to approx =25%), which makes this excitation scheme promising for miniature all-optical atomic clock applications. We also demonstrate cancellation of the first-order light shift by proper choice of the frequencies and relative intensities of the two laser-field components. Our theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  20. Three-photon-absorption resonance for all-optical atomic clocks

    SciTech Connect

    Zibrov, Sergei; Novikova, Irina; Phillips, David F.; Taichenachev, Aleksei V.; Yudin, Valeriy I.; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Zibrov, Alexander S.

    2005-07-15

    We report an experimental study of an all-optical three-photon-absorption resonance (known as an 'N resonance') and discuss its potential application as an alternative to atomic clocks based on coherent population trapping. We present measurements of the N-resonance contrast, width and light shift for the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb with varying buffer gases, and find good agreement with an analytical model of this resonance. The results suggest that N resonances are promising for atomic clock applications.

  1. Magic Wavelength to Make Optical Lattice Clocks Insensitive to Atomic Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Hidetoshi; Hashiguchi, Koji; Il'inova, E. Yu.; Ovsiannikov, V. D.

    2009-10-09

    In a standing wave of light, a difference in spatial distributions of multipolar atom-field interactions may introduce atomic-motion dependent clock uncertainties in optical lattice clocks. We show that the magic wavelength can be defined so as to eliminate the spatial mismatch in electric dipole, magnetic dipole, and electric quadrupole interactions for specific combinations of standing waves by allowing a spatially constant light shift arising from the latter two interactions. Experimental prospects of such lattices used with a blue magic wavelength are discussed.

  2. Magic wavelength to make optical lattice clocks insensitive to atomic motion.

    PubMed

    Katori, Hidetoshi; Hashiguchi, Koji; Il'inova, E Yu; Ovsiannikov, V D

    2009-10-09

    In a standing wave of light, a difference in spatial distributions of multipolar atom-field interactions may introduce atomic-motion dependent clock uncertainties in optical lattice clocks. We show that the magic wavelength can be defined so as to eliminate the spatial mismatch in electric dipole, magnetic dipole, and electric quadrupole interactions for specific combinations of standing waves by allowing a spatially constant light shift arising from the latter two interactions. Experimental prospects of such lattices used with a blue magic wavelength are discussed.

  3. High-precision optical measurement of the 2S hyperfine interval in atomic hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Kolachevsky, N; Fischer, M; Karshenboim, S G; Hänsch, T W

    2004-01-23

    We have applied an optical method to the measurement of the 2S hyperfine interval in atomic hydrogen. The interval has been measured by means of two-photon spectroscopy of the 1S-2S transition on a hydrogen atomic beam shielded from external magnetic fields. The measured value of the 2S hyperfine interval is equal to 177 556 860(16) Hz and represents the most precise measurement of this interval to date. The theoretical evaluation of the specific combination of 1S and 2S hyperfine intervals D21 is in fair agreement (within 1.4 sigma) with the value for D21 deduced from our measurement.

  4. Atomic Landau-Zener tunneling in Fourier-synthesized optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Salger, Tobias; Geckeler, Carsten; Kling, Sebastian; Weitz, Martin

    2007-11-09

    We report on an experimental study of quantum transport of atoms in variable periodic optical potentials. The band structure of both ratchet-type asymmetric and symmetric lattice potentials is explored. The variable atom potential is realized by superimposing a conventional standing wave potential of lambda/2 spatial periodicity with a fourth-order multiphoton potential of lambda/4 periodicity. We find that the Landau-Zener tunneling rate between the first and the second excited Bloch band depends critically on the relative phase between the two spatial lattice harmonics.

  5. Atomic Landau-Zener Tunneling in Fourier-Synthesized Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Salger, Tobias; Geckeler, Carsten; Kling, Sebastian; Weitz, Martin

    2007-11-09

    We report on an experimental study of quantum transport of atoms in variable periodic optical potentials. The band structure of both ratchet-type asymmetric and symmetric lattice potentials is explored. The variable atom potential is realized by superimposing a conventional standing wave potential of {lambda}/2 spatial periodicity with a fourth-order multiphoton potential of {lambda}/4 periodicity. We find that the Landau-Zener tunneling rate between the first and the second excited Bloch band depends critically on the relative phase between the two spatial lattice harmonics.

  6. Nonlinear Quantum Optics in a Waveguide: Distinct Single Photons Strongly Interacting at the Single Atom Level

    SciTech Connect

    Kolchin, Pavel; Oulton, Rupert F.; Zhang Xiang

    2011-03-18

    We propose a waveguide-QED system where two single photons of distinct frequency or polarization interact strongly. The system consists of a single ladder-type three level atom coupled to a waveguide. When both optical transitions are coupled strongly to the waveguide's mode, we show that a control photon tuned to the upper transition induces a {pi} phase shift and tunneling of a probe photon tuned to the otherwise reflective lower transition. Furthermore, the system exhibits single photon scattering by a classical control beam. Waveguide-QED schemes could be an alternative to high quality cavities or dense atomic ensembles in quantum information processing.

  7. Comparison of liposome entrapment parameters by optical and atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Yoss, N L; Popescu, O; Pop, V I; Porutiu, D; Kummerow, F A; Benga, G

    1985-01-01

    Methods for the complete characterization of liposomes prepared by ether-injection are described in detail. The validity of atomic absorption spectrophotometry for measuring markers of trapped volume was checked by comparative determinations of markers with established optical spectrophotometrical methods. The favorable results using atomic absorption spectrophotometry to quantitate the marker Mn2+ are of particular relevance as manganese ion is also the paramagnetic probe in n.m.r. measurements of water permeability of liposomes; our results indicate that in such measurements no other marker need be incorporated.

  8. Optical limiting using spatial self-phase modulation in hot atomic sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Cheng, Xuemei; Zhang, Ying; Yin, Xunli; Jiang, Man; Chen, Haowei; Bai, Jintao

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we characterized the performance of optical limiting by self-phase modulation (SPM) in hot atomic vapor cell. The results indicated that the performance of the optical limiter is closely related to the position of the sample cell, which is determined by the Rayleigh lenght of beam. The lowest limiting threshold and clamp output were obtained at the sample position at -10 mm from the coordinate origin (the beam waist). The phenomenon was explained well by the theory of SPM and z-scan, which are caused by both Kerr effect and the thermal optical nonlinear effect. This useful information obtained in the meaning of this work is determining the optimal position of the sample cell in the optical limiter and other applications of SPM.

  9. A quantitative study of optical mapping surfaces by atomic force microscopy and restriction endonuclease digestion assays.

    PubMed

    Reed, J; Singer, E; Kresbach, G; Schwartz, D C

    1998-05-15

    Many new techniques in biomolecular chemistry and genomic analysis require the immobilization of molecular reagents on specially prepared surfaces. However, the process of molecular fixation often interferes with or precludes the use of standard in vitro biochemical assays. Optical mapping is an emergent technology for genomic analysis which relies on the biochemical activity of DNA fixed to silanized glass surfaces. Optical mapping surfaces have been shown to be compatible with restriction endonucleases and a variety of DNA polymerases. The essential properties of biochemically active surfaces are poorly understood in most of the current technologies which utilize molecular fixation, including optical mapping. The purpose of this study is to use the powerful technique of atomic force microscopy, in combination with informative enzymatic assays, to correlate biochemical activity with microscopic surface structure. The results presented provide meaningful insight into the effect of surface preparation on the biochemical accessibility of surface-bound molecules. Novel analysis which may facilitate the automation of optical mapping is presented.

  10. Protective coating and hyperthermal atomic oxygen texturing of optical fibers used for blood glucose monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of producing cones and pillars on polymethylmethacralate (PMMA) optical fibers for glucose monitoring. The method, in one embodiment, consists of using electron beam evaporation to deposit a non-contiguous thin film of aluminum on the distal ends of the PMMA fibers. The partial coverage of aluminum on the fibers is randomly, but rather uniformly distributed across the end of the optical fibers. After the aluminum deposition, the ends of the fibers are then exposed to hyperthermal atomic oxygen, which oxidizes the areas that are not protected by aluminum. The resulting PMMA fibers have a greatly increased surface area and the cones or pillars are sufficiently close together that the cellular components in blood are excluded from passing into the valleys between the cones and pillars. The optical fibers are then coated with appropriated surface chemistry so that they can optically sense the glucose level in the blood sample than that with conventional glucose monitoring.

  11. Broadband magnetometry by infrared-absorption detection of nitrogen-vacancy ensembles in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, V. M.; Bauch, E.; Jarmola, A.; Zipp, L. J.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Budker, D.

    2010-10-25

    We demonstrate magnetometry by detection of the spin state of high-density nitrogen-vacancy ensembles in diamond using optical absorption at 1042 nm. With this technique, measurement contrast, and collection efficiency can approach unity, leading to an increase in magnetic sensitivity compared to the more common method of collecting red fluorescence. Working at 75 K with a sensor with effective volume 50x50x300 {mu}m{sup 3}, we project photon shot-noise limited sensitivity of 5 pT in one second of acquisition and bandwidth from dc to a few megahertz. Operation in a gradiometer configuration yields a noise floor of 7 nT{sub rms} at {approx}110 Hz in one second of acquisition.

  12. Statistical magnetometry on isolated NiCo nanowires and nanowire arrays: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergelius, Philip; Garcia Fernandez, Javier; Martens, Stefan; Zocher, Michael; Böhnert, Tim; Vega Martinez, Victor; de la Prida, Victor Manuel; Görlitz, Detlef; Nielsch, Kornelius

    2016-04-01

    The first-order reversal curve (FORC) method can be used to extract information about the interaction and switching field distribution of ferromagnetic nanowire arrays, yet it remains challenging to acquire reliable values. Within ordered pores of anodic alumina templates we electrochemically synthesize eight different Ni x Co1-x samples with x varying between 0.05 and 1. FORC diagrams are acquired using vibrating sample magnetometry. By dissolving the template and using the magneto-optical Kerr effect, we measure the hysteresis loops of up to 100 different and isolated nanowires for each sample to gain precise information about the intrinsic switching field distribution. Values of the interaction field are extracted from a deshearing of the major hysteresis loop. We present a comparative study between all methods in order to evaluate and reinforce current FORC theory with experimental findings.

  13. Inner-shell magnetic dipole transition in Tm atoms: A candidate for optical lattice clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukachev, D.; Fedorov, S.; Tolstikhina, I.; Tregubov, D.; Kalganova, E.; Vishnyakova, G.; Golovizin, A.; Kolachevsky, N.; Khabarova, K.; Sorokin, V.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a narrow magneto-dipole transition in the 169Tm atom at the wavelength of 1.14 μ m as a candidate for a two-dimensional-optical lattice clock. Calculating dynamic polarizabilities of the two clock levels [Xe] 4 f136 s2(J =7 /2 ) and [Xe] 4 f136 s2(J =5 /2 ) in the spectral range from 250 to 1200 nm, we find a "magic" wavelength for the optical lattice at 807 nm. Frequency shifts due to black-body radiation (BBR), the van der Waals interaction, the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction, and other effects which can perturb the transition frequency are calculated. The transition at 1.14 μ m demonstrates low sensitivity to the BBR shift corresponding to 8 ×10-17 in fractional units at room temperature which makes it an interesting candidate for high-performance optical clocks. The total estimated frequency uncertainty is less than 5 ×10-18 in fractional units. By direct excitation of the 1.14 μ m transition in Tm atoms loaded into an optical dipole trap, we set the lower limit for the lifetime of the upper clock level [Xe] 4 f136 s2(J =5 /2 ) of 112 ms which corresponds to a natural spectral linewidth narrower than 1.4 Hz. The polarizability of the Tm ground state was measured by the excitation of parametric resonances in the optical dipole trap at 532 nm.

  14. Controlling the double photoionization dynamics of Li atoms by optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, G.; Steinmann, J.; Schuricke, M.; Albrecht, J.; Dorn, A.; Colgant, J.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Zouros, T. J. M.; Ullrich, J.

    2009-11-01

    Double photoionization (DPI) of lithium atoms in a magneto-optical trap by 85 eV and 91 eV photons from the Hamburg Free Electron Laser (FLASH) is investigated using cold target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy. For ejection of a 1s and the optically excited 2p electron we demonstrate that the DPI cross section significantly depends on the alignment of the 2p valence orbital. Thus, the dynamical electron-electron correlation can be manipulated giving insight into the DPI mechanisms close to threshold.

  15. Mesoscale cavities in hollow-core waveguides for quantum optics with atomic ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haapamaki, C. M.; Flannery, J.; Bappi, G.; Al Maruf, R.; Bhaskara, S. V.; Alshehri, O.; Yoon, T.; Bajcsy, M.

    2016-08-01

    Single-mode hollow-core waveguides loaded with atomic ensembles offer an excellent platform for light-matter interactions and nonlinear optics at low photon levels. We review and discuss possible approaches for incorporating mirrors, cavities, and Bragg gratings into these waveguides without obstructing their hollow cores. With these additional features controlling the light propagation in the hollow-core waveguides, one could potentially achieve optical nonlinearities controllable by single photons in systems with small footprints that can be integrated on a chip. We propose possible applications such as single-photon transistors and superradiant lasers that could be implemented in these enhanced hollow-core waveguides.

  16. Thermodynamic output of single-atom quantum optical amplifiers and their phase-space fingerprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perl, Y.; Band, Y. B.; Boukobza, E.

    2017-05-01

    We analyze a resonant single-atom two-photon quantum optical amplifier both dynamically and thermodynamically. A detailed thermodynamic analysis shows that the nonlinear amplifier is thermodynamically equivalent to the linear amplifier. However, by calculating the Wigner quasiprobability distribution for various initial field states, we show that unique quantum features in optical phase space, absent in the linear amplifier, are retained for extended times, despite the fact that dissipation tends to wash out dynamical features observed at early evolution times. These features are related to the discrete nature of the two-photon matter-field interaction and fingerprint the initial field state at thermodynamic times.

  17. Effects on optical systems from interactions with oxygen atoms in low earth orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, P. N.; Swann, J. T.; Gregory, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Modifications of material surface properties due to interactions with ambient atomic oxygen have been observed on surfaces facing the orbital direction in low earth orbits. Some effects are very damaging to surface optical properties while some are more subtle and even beneficial. Most combustible materials are heavily etched, and some coatings, such as silver and osmium, are seriously degraded or removed as volatile oxides. The growth of oxide films on metals and semiconductors considered stable in dry air was measured. Material removal, surface roughness, reflectance, and optical densities are reported. Effects of temperature, contamination, and overcoatings are noted.

  18. Concentrating partially entangled W-class states on nonlocal atoms using low- Q optical cavity and linear optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Cong; Chen, Xi; Duan, YuWen; Fan, Ling; Zhang, Ru; Wang, TieJun; Wang, Chuan

    2016-10-01

    Entanglement plays an important role in quantum information science, especially in quantum communications. Here we present an efficient entanglement concentration protocol (ECP) for nonlocal atom systems in the partially entangled W-class states, using the single-photon input-output process regarding low- Q cavity and linear optical elements. Compared with previously published ECPs for the concentration of non-maximally entangled atomic states, our protocol is much simpler and more efficient as it employs the Faraday rotation in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) and the parameter-splitting method. The Faraday rotation requires the cavity with low- Q factor and weak coupling to the atom, which makes the requirement for entanglement concentration much less stringent than the previous methods, and achievable with current cavity QED techniques. The parameter-splitting method resorts to linear-optical elements only. This ECP has high efficiency and fidelity in realistic experiments, and some imperfections during the experiment can be avoided efficiently with currently available techniques.

  19. Towards optical detection of the Bloch-Siegert effect in atomic vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudyka, Julia; Pustelny, Szymon; Gawlik, Wojciech

    2016-12-01

    We describe our investigations aiming at the detection of the Bloch-Siegert effect (BSE) with nonlinear magneto- optical effects. Although theoretical aspects of the BSE were thoroughly investigated, there are still open questions concerning experimental demonstration of the effect. The most recent BSE experiment was performed in alkali-metal vapor, where atoms were pumped by electron collisions, but the results of those investigations were rather inconclusive. Here we propose to search for the BSE with optically pumped magnetometers (OPMs) and describe the preparation of a dedicated setup providing improved capabilities for observation of the effect in atomic vapor. As the main difficulty is the weakness of the effect and presence of other competing processes, we concentrate on identification and assessment of various systematic effects that may imitate and/or perturb the investigated effect.

  20. An open source digital servo for atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments

    PubMed Central

    Leibrandt, D. R.; Heidecker, J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a general purpose digital servo optimized for feedback control of lasers in atomic, molecular, and optical physics experiments. The servo is capable of feedback bandwidths up to roughly 1 MHz (limited by the 320 ns total latency); loop filter shapes up to fifth order; multiple-input, multiple-output control; and automatic lock acquisition. The configuration of the servo is controlled via a graphical user interface, which also provides a rudimentary software oscilloscope and tools for measurement of system transfer functions. We illustrate the functionality of the digital servo by describing its use in two example scenarios: frequency control of the laser used to probe the narrow clock transition of 27Al+ in an optical atomic clock, and length control of a cavity used for resonant frequency doubling of a laser. PMID:26724014