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Sample records for optical bioimaging probes

  1. PPV-Based Conjugated Polymer Nanoparticles as a Versatile Bioimaging Probe: A Closer Look at the Inherent Optical Properties and Nanoparticle-Cell Interactions.

    PubMed

    Peters, Martijn; Zaquen, Neomy; D'Olieslaeger, Lien; Bové, Hannelore; Vanderzande, Dirk; Hellings, Niels; Junkers, Thomas; Ethirajan, Anitha

    2016-08-08

    Conjugated polymers have attracted significant interest in the bioimaging field due to their excellent optical properties and biocompatibility. Tailor-made poly(p-phenylenevinylene) (PPV) conjugated polymer nanoparticles (NPs) are in here described. Two different nanoparticle systems using poly[2-methoxy-5-(3',7'-dimethoxyoctyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MDMO-PPV) and a functional statistical copolymer 2-(5'-methoxycarbonylpentyloxy)-5-methoxy-1,4-phenylenevinylene (CPM-MDMO-PPV), containing ester groups on the alkoxy side chains, were synthesized by combining miniemulsion and solvent evaporation processes. The hydrolysis of ester groups into carboxylic acid groups on the CPM-MDMO-PPV NPs surface allows for biomolecule conjugation. The NPs exhibited excellent optical properties with a high fluorescent brightness and photostability. The NPs were in vitro tested as potential fluorescent nanoprobes for studying cell populations within the central nervous system. The cell studies demonstrated biocompatibility and surface charge dependent cellular uptake of the NPs. This study highlights that PPV-derivative based particles are a promising bioimaging probe and can cater potential applications in the field of nanomedicine.

  2. Bioimaging system using acousto-optic tunable filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasili, Paul M.; Mobley, Joel; Cullum, Brian M.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2000-05-01

    The interaction of light with tissue has ben used to recognize disease since the mid-1800s. The recent developments of light sources, detectors, and fiber optic probes provide opportunities to measure these interactions, which yield information for tissue diagnosis at the biochemical, structural, or physiological level. In this paper, we describe a bioimaging system designed for biomedical applications and show laser-indued fluorescence (LIF) images mammalian brain tissue. The LIF imaging of tissue was carried out in vitro using two laser excitations: 488 nm and 514 nm. Images were recorded through an acousto- optic tunable filter over the range 500 nm-650 nm with a charged coupled device camera. Background subtracted images were generated across the fluorescent wavelength. Subtraction allowed a safe comparison to be made with well- contrasted images. Of the two tested excitation wavelengths, 488 nm excitation gave the more distinctive contrast.

  3. Carbon Nanoparticle-based Fluorescent Bioimaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Bhunia, Susanta Kumar; Saha, Arindam; Maity, Amit Ranjan; Ray, Sekhar C.; Jana, Nikhil R.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticle-based imaging probes have advanced current labelling technology and are expected to generate new medical diagnostic tools based on their superior brightness and photostability compared with conventional molecular probes. Although significant progress has been made in fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystal-based biological labelling and imaging, the presence of heavy metals and the toxicity issues associated with heavy metals have severely limited the application potential of these nanocrystals. Here, we report a fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based, alternative, nontoxic imaging probe that is suitable for biological staining and diagnostics. We have developed a chemical method to synthesise highly fluorescent carbon nanoparticles 1–10 nm in size; these particles exhibit size-dependent, tunable visible emission. These carbon nanoparticles have been transformed into various functionalised nanoprobes with hydrodynamic diameters of 5–15 nm and have been used as cell imaging probes. PMID:23502324

  4. Fluorescent probes for hydrogen sulfide detection and bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fabiao; Han, Xiaoyue; Chen, Lingxin

    2014-10-21

    In comparison with other biological detection technologies, fluorescence bioimaging technology has become a powerful supporting tool for intracellular detection, and can provide attractive facilities for investigating physiological and pathological processes of interest with high spatial and temporal resolution, less invasiveness, and a rapid response. Due to the versatile roles of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in cellular signal transduction and intracellular redox status regulation, fluorescent probes for the detection of this third signalling gasotransmitter have rapidly increased in number in recent years. These probes can offer powerful means to investigate the physiological actions of H2S in its native environments without disturbing its endogenous distribution. In this feature article, we address the synthesis and design strategies for the development of fluorescent probes for H2S based on the reaction type between H2S and the probes. Moreover, we also highlight fluorescent probes for other reactive sulfur species, such as sulfane sulfurs and SO2 derivatives.

  5. Optical probe

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth; Flower, William L.

    1999-01-01

    A compact optical probe is disclosed particularly useful for analysis of emissions in industrial environments. The instant invention provides a geometry for optically-based measurements that allows all optical components (source, detector, rely optics, etc.) to be located in proximity to one another. The geometry of the probe disclosed herein provides a means for making optical measurements in environments where it is difficult and/or expensive to gain access to the vicinity of a flow stream to be measured. Significantly, the lens geometry of the optical probe allows the analysis location within a flow stream being monitored to be moved while maintaining optical alignment of all components even when the optical probe is focused on a plurality of different analysis points within the flow stream.

  6. X-ray-Activated Near-Infrared Persistent Luminescent Probe for Deep-Tissue and Renewable in Vivo Bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhenluan; Li, Xiaolong; Li, Youbin; Jiang, Mingyang; Liu, Hongrong; Zeng, Songjun; Hao, Jianhua

    2017-07-12

    Near-infrared (NIR) persistent luminescence nanoparticles (PLNPs) are considered as new alternative optical probes due to being free of autofluorescence, benefited from the self-sustained emission after excitation and high signal-to-noise ratio. However, the NIR-emitted PLNPs always present a short decay time and require excitation by ultraviolet or visible light with a short penetrable depth, remarkably hindering their applications for in vivo long-term tracking and imaging. Therefore, it is important to develop NIR-emitted PLNPs with in vivo activation nature by new excitation sources with deeper penetrating depths. Here, we propose a new type of X-ray-activated ZnGa2O4:Cr PLNPs (X-PLNPs) with efficient NIR persistent emission and rechargeable activation features, in which both the excitation and emission possess a high penetrable nature in vivo. These X-PLNPs exhibit long-lasting, up to 6 h, NIR emission at 700 nm after the stoppage of the X-ray excitation source. More importantly, the designed X-PLNPs can be readily reactivated by a soft X-ray excitation source with low excitation power (45 kVp, 0.5 mA) to restore in vivo bioimaging signals even at 20 mm depth. Renewable in vivo whole-body bioimaging was also successfully achieved via intravenous injection/oral administration of X-PLNPs after in situ X-ray activation. This is the first time that NIR-emitted PLNPs have been demonstrated to be recharged by X-ray light for deep-tissue in vivo bioimaging, which paves the way for in vivo renewable bioimaging using PLNPs and makes the PLNPs more competitive in bioimaging area.

  7. Optically Modulated Fluorescence Bioimaging: Visualizing Obscured Fluorophores in High Background

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Fluorescence microscopy and detection have become indispensible for understanding organization and dynamics in biological systems. Novel fluorophores with improved brightness, photostability, and biocompatibility continue to fuel further advances but often rely on having minimal background. The visualization of interactions in very high biological background, especially for proteins or bound complexes at very low copy numbers, remains a primary challenge. Instead of focusing on molecular brightness of fluorophores, we have adapted the principles of high-sensitivity absorption spectroscopy to improve the sensitivity and signal discrimination in fluorescence bioimaging. Utilizing very long wavelength transient absorptions of kinetically trapped dark states, we employ molecular modulation schemes that do not simultaneously modulate the background fluorescence. This improves the sensitivity and ease of implementation over high-energy photoswitch-based recovery schemes, as no internal dye reference or nanoparticle-based fluorophores are needed to separate the desired signals from background. In this Account, we describe the selection process for and identification of fluorophores that enable optically modulated fluorescence to decrease obscuring background. Differing from thermally stable photoswitches using higher-energy secondary lasers, coillumination at very low energies depopulates transient dark states, dynamically altering the fluorescence and giving characteristic modulation time scales for each modulatable emitter. This process is termed synchronously amplified fluorescence image recovery (SAFIRe) microscopy. By understanding and optically controlling the dye photophysics, we selectively modulate desired fluorophore signals independent of all autofluorescent background. This shifts the fluorescence of interest to unique detection frequencies with nearly shot-noise-limited detection, as no background signals are collected. Although the fluorescence

  8. Azo-Based Fluorogenic Probes for Biosensing and Bioimaging: Recent Advances and Upcoming Challenges.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Arnaud; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Romieu, Anthony

    2017-08-17

    The use of nonfluorescent azo dyes as dark quenchers in activatable optical bioprobes based on the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) mechanism and designed to target a wide range of enzymes has been established for over two decades. The key value of the azo moiety (-N=N-) to act as an efficient "ON-OFF" switch of fluorescence once introduced within the core structure of conventional organic-based fluorophores (mainly fluorescent aniline derivatives) has recently been exploited in the development of alternative reaction-based small-molecule probes based on the "profluorescence" concept. These unprecedented "azobenzene-caged" fluorophores are valuable tools for the detection of a wide range of reactive (bio)analytes. This review highlights the most recent and relevant advances made in the design and biosensing/bioimaging applications of azo-based fluorogenic probes. Emphasis is also placed on relevant achievements in the synthesis of bioconjugatable/biocompatible azo dyes used as starting building blocks in the rational and rapid construction of these fluorescent chemodosimeters. Finally, a brief glimpse of possible future biomedical applications (theranostics) of these "smart" azobenzene-based molecular systems is presented. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Super-Resolution Optical Fluctuation Bio-Imaging with Dual-Color Carbon Nanodots.

    PubMed

    Chizhik, Anna M; Stein, Simon; Dekaliuk, Mariia O; Battle, Christopher; Li, Weixing; Huss, Anja; Platen, Mitja; Schaap, Iwan A T; Gregor, Ingo; Demchenko, Alexander P; Schmidt, Christoph F; Enderlein, Jörg; Chizhik, Alexey I

    2016-01-13

    Success in super-resolution imaging relies on a proper choice of fluorescent probes. Here, we suggest novel easily produced and biocompatible nanoparticles-carbon nanodots-for super-resolution optical fluctuation bioimaging (SOFI). The particles revealed an intrinsic dual-color fluorescence, which corresponds to two subpopulations of particles of different electric charges. The neutral nanoparticles localize to cellular nuclei suggesting their potential use as an inexpensive, easily produced nucleus-specific label. The single particle study revealed that the carbon nanodots possess a unique hybrid combination of fluorescence properties exhibiting characteristics of both dye molecules and semiconductor nanocrystals. The results suggest that charge trapping and redistribution on the surface of the particles triggers their transitions between emissive and dark states. These findings open up new possibilities for the utilization of carbon nanodots in the various super-resolution microscopy methods based on stochastic optical switching.

  10. ESIPT-Based Photoactivatable Fluorescent Probe for Ratiometric Spatiotemporal Bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaohong; Jiang, Yuren; Zhao, Xiongjie; Guo, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Photoactivatable fluorophores have become an important technique for the high spatiotemporal resolution of biological imaging. Here, we developed a novel photoactivatable probe (PHBT), which is based on 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole (HBT), a small organic fluorophore known for its classic luminescence mechanism through excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) with the keto form and the enol form. After photocleavage, PHBT released a ratiometric fluorophore HBT, which showed dual emission bands with more than 73-fold fluorescence enhancement at 512 nm in buffer and more than 69-fold enhancement at 452 nm in bovine serum. The probe displayed a high ratiometric imaging resolution and is believed to have a wide application in biological imaging. PMID:27754338

  11. New Dual Fluorescent Probe for Simultaneous Biothiol and Phosphate Bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Resa, Sandra; Orte, Angel; Miguel, Delia; Paredes, Jose M; Puente-Muñoz, Virginia; Salto, Rafael; Giron, Maria D; Ruedas-Rama, Maria J; Cuerva, Juan M; Alvarez-Pez, Jose M; Crovetto, Luis

    2015-10-12

    The simultaneous detection of relevant metabolites in living organisms by using one molecule introduces an approach to understanding the relationships between these metabolites in healthy and deregulated cells. Fluorescent probes of low toxicity are remarkable tools for this type of analysis of biological systems in vivo. As a proof of concept, different naturally occurring compounds, such as biothiols and phosphate anions, were the focus for this work. The 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfinate (DNBS) derivative of 9-[1-(4-tert-butyl-2-methoxyphenyl)]-6-hydroxy-3H-xanthen-3-one (Granada Green; GG) were designed and synthesized. This new sulfinyl xanthene derivative can act as a dual sensor for the aforementioned analytes simultaneously. The mechanism of action of this derivative implies thiolysis of the sulfinyl group of the weakly fluorescent DNBS-GG by biological thiols at near-neutral pH values, thus releasing the fluorescent GG moiety, which simultaneously responds to phosphate anions through its fluorescence-decay time. The new dual probe was tested in solution by using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence and intracellularly by using fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) in human epithelioid cervix carcinoma (HeLa) cells.

  12. Cyanines as new fluorescent probes for DNA detection and two-photon excited bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin Jiang; Wu, Po Lam; Bolze, Frédéric; Leung, Heidi W C; Li, King Fai; Mak, Nai Ki; Kwong, Daniel W J; Nicoud, Jean-François; Cheah, Kok Wai; Wong, Man Shing

    2010-05-21

    A series of cyanine fluorophores based on fused aromatics as an electron donor for DNA sensing and two-photon bioimaging were synthesized, among which the carbazole-based biscyanine exhibits high sensitivity and efficiency as a fluorescent light-up probe for dsDNA, which shows selective binding toward the AT-rich regions. The synergetic effect of the bischromophoric skeleton gives a several-fold enhancement in a two-photon absorption cross-section as well as a 25- to 100-fold enhancement in two-photon excited fluorescence upon dsDNA binding.

  13. Spatial-scanning hyperspectral imaging probe for bio-imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hoong-Ta; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-03-01

    The three common methods to perform hyperspectral imaging are the spatial-scanning, spectral-scanning, and snapshot methods. However, only the spectral-scanning and snapshot methods have been configured to a hyperspectral imaging probe as of today. This paper presents a spatial-scanning (pushbroom) hyperspectral imaging probe, which is realized by integrating a pushbroom hyperspectral imager with an imaging probe. The proposed hyperspectral imaging probe can also function as an endoscopic probe by integrating a custom fabricated image fiber bundle unit. The imaging probe is configured by incorporating a gradient-index lens at the end face of an image fiber bundle that consists of about 50 000 individual fiberlets. The necessary simulations, methodology, and detailed instrumentation aspects that are carried out are explained followed by assessing the developed probe's performance. Resolution test targets such as United States Air Force chart as well as bio-samples such as chicken breast tissue with blood clot are used as test samples for resolution analysis and for performance validation. This system is built on a pushbroom hyperspectral imaging system with a video camera and has the advantage of acquiring information from a large number of spectral bands with selectable region of interest. The advantages of this spatial-scanning hyperspectral imaging probe can be extended to test samples or tissues residing in regions that are difficult to access with potential diagnostic bio-imaging applications.

  14. Highly selective ratiometric fluorescent probe for Au3+ and its application to bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Young; Kim, Gun-Hee; Guo, Zhiqian; Lee, Hye Yeon; Swamy, K M K; Pai, Jaeyoung; Shin, Seunghoon; Shin, Injae; Yoon, Juyoung

    2013-11-15

    The 4-propargylamino-1,8-naphthalimide based fluorescent probe 1 has been explored as a sensor for selective detection of Au(3+). 4-Amino-1,8-naphthalimides, that possess typical intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) electronic characteristics, have been widely used as versatile platforms for fluorescent probes. The newly designed probe 1 contains a propargylamine moiety at C-4 of the naphthalimide chromophore that reacts with Au(3+) to generate a product that has distinctly different electronic properties from 1. Specifically, the probe undergoes a remarkable change in its absorption spectrum upon addition of Au(3+) that is associated with a distinct color change from yellow to light pink. In addition, a blue shift of ca. 56 nm also takes place in the emission spectra of the probe. Consequently, 1 serves as a reaction-based sensor or so called chemodosimeter for Au(3+). Importantly, surfactants enhance the rate of reaction of 1 with Au(3+), thus, enhancing its use as a real time sensor. Finally, the results of studies probing its application to bioimaging of Au(3+) in live cells show that the probe 1 has a unique ability to sense Au(3+) in cells and, in particular, in lipid droplets within cells. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Fluorescent probes and bioimaging: alkali metals, alkaline earth metals and pH.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Hu, Ying; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-07-21

    All living species and life forms have an absolute requirement for bio-functional metals and acid-base equilibrium chemistry owing to the critical roles they play in biological processes. Hence, a great need exists for efficient methods to detect and monitor biometals and acids. In the last few years, great attention has been paid to the development of organic molecule based fluorescent chemosensors. The availability of new synthetic fluorescent probes has made fluorescence microscopy an indispensable tool for tracing biologically important molecules and in the area of clinical diagnostics. This review highlights the recent advances that have been made in the design and bioimaging applications of fluorescent probes for alkali metals and alkaline earth metal cations, including lithium, sodium and potassium, magnesium and calcium, and for pH determination within biological systems.

  16. FRET-based small-molecule fluorescent probes: rational design and bioimaging applications.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lin; Lin, Weiying; Zheng, Kaibo; Zhu, Sasa

    2013-07-16

    Fluorescence imaging has emerged as a powerful tool for monitoring biomolecules within the context of living systems with high spatial and temporal resolution. Researchers have constructed a large number of synthetic intensity-based fluorescent probes for bio-imaging. However, intensity-based fluorescent probes have some limitations: variations in probe concentration, probe environment, and excitation intensity may influence the fluorescence intensity measurements. In principle, the use of ratiometric fluorescent probes can alleviate this shortcoming. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is one of the most widely used sensing mechanisms for ratiometric fluorescent probes. However, the development of synthetic FRET probes with favorable photophysical properties that are also suitable for biological imaging applications remains challenging. In this Account, we review the rational design and biological applications of synthetic FRET probes, focusing primarily on studies from our laboratory. To construct useful FRET probes, it is a pre-requisite to develop a FRET platform with favorable photophysical properties. The design criteria of a FRET platform include (1) well-resolved absorption spectra of the donor and acceptor, (2) well-separated emission spectra of the donor and acceptor, (3) donors and acceptors with comparable brightness, (4) rigid linkers, and (5) near-perfect efficiency in energy transfer. With an efficient FRET platform in hand, it is then necessary to modulate the donor-acceptor distance or spectral overlap integral in an analyte-dependent fashion for development of FRET probes. Herein, we emphasize our most recent progress on the development of FRET probes by spectral overlap integral, in particular by changing the molar absorption coefficient of the donor dyes such as rhodamine dyes, which undergo unique changes in the absorption profiles during the ring-opening and -closing processes. Although partial success has been obtained in design of

  17. Persistent Luminescence Nanophosphor Involved Near-Infrared Optical Bioimaging for Investigation of Foodborne Probiotics Biodistribution in Vivo: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaoyao; Liu, Jing-Min; Zhang, Dongdong; Ge, Kun; Wang, Peihua; Liu, Huilin; Fang, Guozhen; Wang, Shuo

    2017-09-20

    Probiotics has attracted great attention in food nutrition and safety research field, but thus far there are limited analytical techniques for visualized and real-time monitoring of the probiotics when they are ingested in vivo. Herein, the optical bioimaging technique has been introduced for investigation of foodborne probiotics biodistribution in vivo, employing the near-infrared (NIR) emitting persistent luminescence nanophosphors (PLNPs) of Cr(3+)-doped zinc gallogermanate (ZGGO) as the contrast nanoprobes. The ultrabrightness, super long afterglow, polydispersed size, low toxicity, and excellent photostability and biocompatibility of PLNPs were demonstrated to be qualified as a tracer for labeling probiotics via antibody (anti-Gram positive bacteria LTA antibody) recognition as well as contrast agent for long-term bioimaging the probiotics. In vivo optical bioimaging assay showed that the LTA antibody functionalized ZGGO nanoprobes that could be efficiently tagged to the probiobics were successfully applied for real-time monitoring and nondamaged probing of the biodistribution of probiotics inside the living body after oral administration. This work presents a proof-of-concept that exploited the bioimaging methodology for real-time and nondamaged researching the foodborne probiotics behaviors in vivo, which would open up a novel way of food safety detection and nutrition investigation.

  18. Molecular engineering of two-photon fluorescent probes for bioimaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong-Wen; Liu, Yongchao; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Xiao-Bing

    2017-03-01

    During the past two decades, two-photon microscopy (TPM), which utilizes two near-infrared photons as the excitation source, has emerged as a novel, attractive imaging tool for biological research. Compared with one-photon microscopy, TPM offers several advantages, such as lowering background fluorescence in living cells and tissues, reducing photodamage to biosamples, and a photobleaching phenomenon, offering better 3D spatial localization, and increasing penetration depth. Small-molecule-based two-photon fluorescent probes have been well developed for the detection and imaging of various analytes in biological systems. In this review, we will give a general introduction of molecular engineering of two-photon fluorescent probes based on different fluorescence response mechanisms for bioimaging applications during the past decade. Inspired by the desired advantages of small-molecule two-photon fluorescent probes in biological imaging applications, we expect that more attention will be devoted to the development of new two-photon fluorophores and applications of TPM in areas of bioanalysis and disease diagnosis.

  19. Molecular engineering of two-photon fluorescent probes for bioimaging applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Wen; Liu, Yongchao; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Xiao-Bing

    2017-03-22

    During the past two decades, two-photon microscopy (TPM), which utilizes two near-infrared photons as the excitation source, has emerged as a novel, attractive imaging tool for biological research. Compared with one-photon microscopy, TPM offers several advantages, such as lowering background fluorescence in living cells and tissues, reducing photodamage to biosamples, and a photobleaching phenomenon, offering better 3D spatial localization, and increasing penetration depth. Small-molecule-based two-photon fluorescent probes have been well developed for the detection and imaging of various analytes in biological systems. In this review, we will give a general introduction of molecular engineering of two-photon fluorescent probes based on different fluorescence response mechanisms for bioimaging applications during the past decade. Inspired by the desired advantages of small-molecule two-photon fluorescent probes in biological imaging applications, we expect that more attention will be devoted to the development of new two-photon fluorophores and applications of TPM in areas of bioanalysis and disease diagnosis.

  20. Through bond energy transfer: a convenient and universal strategy toward efficient ratiometric fluorescent probe for bioimaging applications.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Zhang, Cui-Cui; Luo, Ai-Li; Fu, Ting; Tan, Weihong; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2012-12-18

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) strategy has been widely applied in designing ratiometric probes for bioimaging applications. Unfortunately, for FRET systems, sufficiently large spectral overlap is necessary between the donor emission and the acceptor absorption, which would limit the resolution of double-channel images. The through-bond energy transfer (TBET) system does not need spectral overlap between donor and acceptor and could afford large wavelength difference between the two emissions with improved imaging resolution and higher energy transfer efficiency than that of the classical FRET system. It seems to be more favorable for designing ratiometric probes for bioimaging applications. In this paper, we have designed and synthesized a coumarin-rhodamine (CR) TBET system and demonstrated that TBET is a convenient strategy to design an efficient ratiometric fluorescent bioimaging probe for metal ions. Such TBET strategy is also universal, since no spectral overlap between the donor and the acceptor is necessary, and many more dye pairs than that of FRET could be chosen for probe design. As a proof-of-concept, Hg(2+) was chosen as a model metal ion. By combining TBET strategy with dual-switch design, the proposed sensing platform shows two well-separated emission peaks with a wavelength difference of 110 nm, high energy transfer efficiency, and a large signal-to-background ratio, which affords a high sensitivity for the probe with a detection limit of 7 nM for Hg(2+). Moreover, by employing an Hg(2+)-promoted desulfurization reaction as recognition unit, the probe also shows a high selectivity to Hg(2+). All these unique features make it particularly favorable for ratiometric Hg(2+) sensing and bioimaging applications. It has been preliminarily used for a ratiometric image of Hg(2+) in living cells and practical detection of Hg(2+) in river water samples with satisfying results.

  1. Chemically engineered persistent luminescence nanoprobes for bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Lécuyer, Thomas; Teston, Eliott; Ramirez-Garcia, Gonzalo; Maldiney, Thomas; Viana, Bruno; Seguin, Johanne; Mignet, Nathalie; Scherman, Daniel; Richard, Cyrille

    2016-01-01

    Imaging nanoprobes are a group of nanosized agents developed for providing improved contrast for bioimaging. Among various imaging probes, optical sensors capable of following biological events or progresses at the cellular and molecular levels are actually actively developed for early detection, accurate diagnosis, and monitoring of the treatment of diseases. The optical activities of nanoprobes can be tuned on demand by chemists by engineering their composition, size and surface nature. This review will focus on researches devoted to the conception of nanoprobes with particular optical properties, called persistent luminescence, and their use as new powerful bioimaging agents in preclinical assays. PMID:27877248

  2. Single-pulse CARS based multimodal nonlinear optical microscope for bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Kamali, Tschackad; Levitte, Jonathan M; Katz, Ori; Hermann, Boris; Werkmeister, Rene; Považay, Boris; Drexler, Wolfgang; Unterhuber, Angelika; Silberberg, Yaron

    2015-05-18

    Noninvasive label-free imaging of biological systems raises demand not only for high-speed three-dimensional prescreening of morphology over a wide-field of view but also it seeks to extract the microscopic functional and molecular details within. Capitalizing on the unique advantages brought out by different nonlinear optical effects, a multimodal nonlinear optical microscope can be a powerful tool for bioimaging. Bringing together the intensity-dependent contrast mechanisms via second harmonic generation, third harmonic generation and four-wave mixing for structural-sensitive imaging, and single-beam/single-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering technique for chemical sensitive imaging in the finger-print region, we have developed a simple and nearly alignment-free multimodal nonlinear optical microscope that is based on a single wide-band Ti:Sapphire femtosecond pulse laser source. Successful imaging tests have been realized on two exemplary biological samples, a canine femur bone and collagen fibrils harvested from a rat tail. Since the ultra-broad band-width femtosecond laser is a suitable source for performing high-resolution optical coherence tomography, a wide-field optical coherence tomography arm can be easily incorporated into the presented multimodal microscope making it a versatile optical imaging tool for noninvasive label-free bioimaging.

  3. Solution synthesis, optical properties, and bioimaging applications of silicon nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    McVey, Benjamin F P; Tilley, Richard D

    2014-10-21

    Understanding and unlocking the potential of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) is important for future applications ranging from biomedical imaging contrast agents to the next generation of solar cells and LEDs. Silicon NCs (Si NCs) have key advantages compared with other semiconductor NCs due to silicon's high natural abundance, low toxicity and strong biocompatibility, and unique size, and surface dependent optical properties. In this Account, we review and discuss the synthesis, surface modification, purification, optical properties, and applications of Si NCs. The synthetic methods used to make Si NCs have improved considerably in the last 5-10 years; highly monodisperse Si NCs can now be produced on the near gram scale. Scaled-up syntheses have allowed scientists to drive further toward the commercial utilization of Si NCs. The synthesis of doped Si NCs, through addition of a simple elemental precursor to a reaction mixture or by the production of a single source precursor, has shown great promise. Doped Si NCs have demonstrated unique or enhanced properties compared with pure Si NCs, for example, magnetism due to the presence of magnetic metals like Fe and Mn. Surface reactions have reached a new level of sophistication where organic (epoxidation and diol formation) and click (thiol based) chemical reactions can be carried out on attached surface molecules. This has led to a wide range of biocompatible functional groups as well as a degree of emission tuneability. The purification of Si NCs has been improved through the use of size separation columns and size selective precipitation. These purification approaches have yielded highly monodisperse and pure Si NCs previously unachieved. This has allowed scientists to study the size and surface dependent properties and toxicity and enabled the use of Si NCs in biomedical applications. The optical properties of Si NCs are complex. Using a combination of characterization techniques, researchers have explored the

  4. A new simple phthalimide-based fluorescent probe for highly selective cysteine and bioimaging for living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Youming; Zhang, Xiangyang; Zhang, Youyu; Zhang, Chunxiang; Jin, Junling; Li, Haitao

    2017-10-01

    A new turn-on phthalimide fluorescent probe has designed and synthesized for sensing cysteine (Cys) based on excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) process. It is consisted of a 3-hydroxyphthalimide derivative moiety as the fluorophore and an acrylic ester group as a recognition receptor. The acrylic ester acts as an ESIPT blocking agent. Upon addition of cystein, intermolecular nucleophilic attack of cysteine on acrylic ester releases the fluorescent 3-hydroxyphthalimide derivative, thereby enabling the ESIPT process and leading to enhancement of fluorescence. The probe displays high sensitivity, excellent selectivity and with large Stokes shift toward cysteine. The linear interval range of the fluorescence titration ranged from 0 to 1.0 × 10- 5 M and detection limit is low (6 × 10- 8 M). In addition, the probe could be used for bio-imaging in living cells.

  5. A new simple phthalimide-based fluorescent probe for highly selective cysteine and bioimaging for living cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Youming; Zhang, Xiangyang; Zhang, Youyu; Zhang, Chunxiang; Jin, Junling; Li, Haitao

    2017-10-05

    A new turn-on phthalimide fluorescent probe has designed and synthesized for sensing cysteine (Cys) based on excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) process. It is consisted of a 3-hydroxyphthalimide derivative moiety as the fluorophore and an acrylic ester group as a recognition receptor. The acrylic ester acts as an ESIPT blocking agent. Upon addition of cystein, intermolecular nucleophilic attack of cysteine on acrylic ester releases the fluorescent 3-hydroxyphthalimide derivative, thereby enabling the ESIPT process and leading to enhancement of fluorescence. The probe displays high sensitivity, excellent selectivity and with large Stokes shift toward cysteine. The linear interval range of the fluorescence titration ranged from 0 to 1.0×10(-5)M and detection limit is low (6×10(-8)M). In addition, the probe could be used for bio-imaging in living cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Silica-coated quantum dots and magnetic nanoparticles for bioimaging applications (Mini-Review).

    PubMed

    Selvan, Subramanian Tamil

    2010-09-01

    Fluorescent quantum dots (e.g., CdSe-ZnS) and magnetic nanoparticles (e.g., Fe(2)O(3) or Fe(3)O(4)) are two important candidate systems that have been emerging as potential probes for bioimaging applications. This review focuses on the development of silica-coated inorganic probes (optical and magnetic) that are originated mainly from the author's laboratory for bioimaging applications. The recent developments in the synthesis of rare earth nanoparticles for multimodality imaging are also delineated.

  7. Optical Properties of Plasmonic Nanostructures for Bio-Imaging and Bio-Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravets, Vira V.

    Kravets, Vira V. (Ph.D., Physics). Optical properties of plasmonic nanostructures for bio-imaging and bio-sensing applications. Dissertation directed by Associate Professor Anatoliy Pinchuk. ABSTRACT. This dissertation explores the physics of free electron excitations in gold nanoparticle chains, silver nanoparticle colloids, and thin gold films. Electron excitations in nanostructures (surface plasmons, SP) are responsible for unique optical properties, which are applied in bio-sensing and bio-imaging applications. For gold nanoparticle chains, the effect of SP on resonance light absorption was studied experimentally and theoretically. Mainly, how the spectral position of the absorption peak depends on inter-particle distances. This dependence is used in “molecular rulers”, providing spatial resolution below the Rayleigh limit. The underlying theory is based on particle interaction via scattered dipole fields. Often in literature only the near-field component of the scattered field is considered. Here, I show that middle and far fields should not be neglected for calculation of extinction by particle chains. In silver nanoparticles, SP excitations produce two independent effects: (a) the intrinsic fluorescence of the particles, and (b) the enhancement of a molecule’s fluorescence by a particle’s surface. The mechanism of (a) is deduced by studying how fluorescence depends on particle size. For (b), I show that fluorescence of a dye molecule on the surface of a nanoparticle is enhanced, when compared to that of the free-standing dye. I demonstrate that the dye’s fluorescent quantum yield is dependent on the particle’s size, making labeled silver nanoparticles attractive candidates as bio-imaging agents. Labeled nanoparticles are applied to cell imaging, and their bio-compatibility with two cell lines is evaluated here. Finally, in gold films under attenuated total internal reflection (ATR) conditions, the SP create a propagating wave (SP-polariton, SPP

  8. Rational design of fluorescent bioimaging probes by controlling the aggregation behavior of squaraines: a special effect of ionic liquid pendants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhai; Fu, Afu; Lan, Jingbo; Gao, Ge; You, Jingsong; Chen, Lijuan

    2010-05-03

    We herein present an effective strategy to create water-soluble fluorescent bioimaging dyes by introducing the imidazolium-based ionic liquid (IL) pendants into a fluorescent skeleton. A new type of water-soluble imidazolium-anchored squaraine dye was synthesized accordingly. The relationship between the aggregate of squaraines and their fluorescent cell imaging application was elucidated in detail. Firstly, the aggregation behavior of squaraines in water solutions could be suppressed by varying the alkyl chain attached to the imidazolium unit. Secondly, the capability of cellular uptake and staining of dyes was also dramatically enhanced upon increasing the length of the paraffinic chain. These squaraine dyes displayed an excellent photostability that could permit real-time fluorescence bioimaging experiments to be monitored over a long time period with constant sample irradiation. Additionally, we designed for the first time an Fe(II)-ion probe on the basis of an attack of the hydroxyl radical to the four-membered ring of squaraine. The results demonstrated that the imidazolium-anchored squaraines could perform "naked-eye" detection of the Fe(2+) ion over a wide range of other interfering metals in aqueous media. More surprisingly, this process showed a fluorescence "turn-off" and "-on" response through the regeneration of squaraines in cells.

  9. Surface chemistry manipulation of gold nanorods preserves optical properties for bio-imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polito, Anthony B.; Maurer-Gardner, Elizabeth I.; Hussain, Saber M.

    2015-12-01

    Due to their anisotropic shape, gold nanorods (GNRs) possess a number of advantages for biosystem use including, enhanced surface area and tunable optical properties within the near-infrared (NIR) region. However, cetyl trimethylammonium bromide-related cytotoxicity, overall poor cellular uptake following surface chemistry modifications, and loss of NIR optical properties due to material intracellular aggregation in combination remain as obstacles for nanobased biomedical GNR applications. In this article, we report that tannic acid-coated 11-mercaptoundecyl trimethylammonium bromide (MTAB) GNRs (MTAB-TA) show no significant decrease in either in vitro cell viability or stress activation after exposures to A549 human alveolar epithelial cells. In addition, MTAB-TA GNRs demonstrate a substantial level of cellular uptake while displaying a unique intracellular clustering pattern. This clustering pattern significantly reduces intracellular aggregation, preserving the GNRs NIR optical properties, vital for biomedical imaging applications. These results demonstrate how surface chemistry modifications enhance biocompatibility, allow for higher rate of internalization with low intracellular aggregation of MTAB-TA GNRs, and identify them as prime candidates for use in nanobased bio-imaging applications.

  10. Round Robin test on bio-imaging transfer standard for 3D optical profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolvi, A.; Viitala, T.; García Pérez, A.; Sandler, N.; Hæggström, E.; Bermudez, C.; Artigas, R.; Kassamakov, I.

    2017-02-01

    A stair case height Bio-Transfer-Standard (BTS), developed and produced at the University of Helsinki (UH), was measured in two laboratories. The Round Robin test aims to determine whether BTS works with different optical profilers in different laboratories. First the artefact was measured at UH using a custom-built Scanning White Light Interferometer. Then BTS was measured at Sensofar-Tech, S.L. using an S-neox-type interferometer working either in Phase Shifting Interferometry mode or in Imaging Confocal Microscopy mode. To remove the influence of system calibration, a method featuring sample shifting and measurement subtraction was used. The BTS features eight lipid bilayer steps that each are 4.6 +/- 0.1 nm tall on average. All 30 measurements done by four different operators at the two laboratories agree to within 0.1 nm which agrees with theoretical estimates and with measurements done using a surface plasmon resonance technique. The Round Robin results show the applicability of the newly developed bio-imaging transfer standard for calibrating 3D optical profilers.

  11. New Red-Emitting Conjugated Polyelectrolyte: Stabilization by Interaction with Biomolecules and Potential Use as Drug Carriers and Bioimaging Probes.

    PubMed

    Kahveci, Zehra; Vázquez-Guilló, Rebeca; Martínez-Tomé, Maria José; Mallavia, Ricardo; Mateo, C Reyes

    2016-01-27

    The design and development of fluorescent conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs) emitting in the red region of the visible spectrum is at present of great interest for bioimaging studies. However, despite the wide variety of CPEs available, stable bright red-emitters remain scarce due to their low solubility and instability in aqueous media, consequently limiting their applications. In this work, we have synthesized and characterized a new red-emitting cationic conjugated polyelectrolyte copoly-{[9,9-bis(6'-N,N,N-trimethylammonium)hexyl]-2,7-(fluorene)-alt-1,4-(naphtho[2,3c]-1,2,5-thiadiazole)} bromide (HTMA-PFNT), based on the incorporation of naphtha[2,3c][1,2,5] thiadiazole on fluorene backbone to increase the bathochromic emission, extending the conjugation length in the polymer backbone. Water stabilization was achieved by binding the polyelectrolyte to two different biological systems which are currently used as nanocarriers: human serum albumin (HSA) and lipid vesicles. Using both systems, stable nanostructures of different composition were obtained and their properties were characterized. The properties of the protein-based nanoparticles are consistent with polyelectrolyte aggregates covered with HSA molecules, while the liposome system is composed of lipid vesicles coated with polyelectrolyte chains partially inserted in the bilayer. Both protein and vesicle structural integrity were not affected after their interaction with HTMA-PFNT, as well as the carrier properties, allowing for the binding and transport of ligands. In addition, the nanoparticles displayed the ability of labeling the cell membrane of living cells. All these results extend the potential applications of these novel multifunctional nanoparticles as therapeutic carriers and bioimaging probes.

  12. Highly colloidally stable hyperbranched polyglycerol grafted red fluorescent silicon nanoparticle as bioimaging probe.

    PubMed

    Das, Pradip; Jana, Nikhil R

    2014-03-26

    Here we report a surface modification approach for fluorescent silicon nanoparticle that transforms hydrophobic nanoparticle into water-soluble nanoparticle of high colloidal stability. The approach involves ring-opening polymerization of glycidol at the hydroxyl-terminated nanoparticle surface that results in a hyperbranched polyglycerol grafted silicon nanoparticle (Si-HPG). The resultant Si-HPG has 25 nm hydrodynamic diameter, low surface charge, and broad emission in the range of 450-700 nm with a fluorescence quantum yield of 6-9%. The Si-HPG has been transformed into cyclic RGD peptide functionalized nanoprobe using the conventional bioconjugation chemistry and used for specific targeting to αvβ3 integrin overexpressed cervical cancer cells and glioblastoma cells. Result shows that a silicon nanoparticle-based red fluorescent nanoprobe can be developed for in vitro/in vivo bioimaging applications.

  13. Confocal bioimaging the living cornea with autofluorescence and specific fluorescent probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Barry R.; Paddock, Stephen W.

    1990-08-01

    Confocal bioimaging of the fine structure of the living rabbit cornea with both reflected light and fluorescent light has been demonstrated with a laser scanning confocal imaging system. Kalman averaging was used to reduce the noise in the images. Superficial epithelial, basal epithelial cells, stromal keratocytes, and endothelial cells were imaged. These cells and their subcellular structures were imaged in the two modes for comparison. The superficial epithelial cells were imaged by their autofluorescence (488/520 nm). This fluorescence signal may be due to the mitochondrial flavoproteins and can be used as a noninvasive indicator of cellular oxidative function. Thiazole orange was used to stain cell nuclei for fluorescence imaging. DiOC6 was used to stain the endoplasmic reticulum for fluorescence imaging. Fluorescein- conjugated phalloidin was used to stain actin for fluorescence imaging.

  14. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles derived from natural materials of mango fruit for bio-imaging probes.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Chan Jin; Roy, Arup Kumer; Kim, Sung Han; Lee, Jung-Eun; Jeong, Ji Hoon; In, Insik; Park, Sung Young

    2014-12-21

    Water soluble fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCP) obtained from a single natural source, mango fruit, were developed as unique materials for non-toxic bio-imaging with different colors and particle sizes. The prepared FCPs showed blue (FCP-B), green (FCP-G) and yellow (FCP-Y) fluorescence, derived by the controlled carbonization method. The FCPs demonstrated hydrodynamic diameters of 5-15 nm, holding great promise for clinical applications. The biocompatible FCPs demonstrated great potential in biological fields through the results of in vitro imaging and in vivo biodistribution. Using intravenously administered FCPs with different colored particles, we precisely defined the clearance and biodistribution, showing rapid and efficient urinary excretion for safe elimination from the body. These findings therefore suggest the promising possibility of using natural sources for producing fluorescent materials.

  15. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles derived from natural materials of mango fruit for bio-imaging probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Chan Jin; Roy, Arup Kumer; Kim, Sung Han; Lee, Jung-Eun; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Insik; Park, Sung Young

    2014-11-01

    Water soluble fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCP) obtained from a single natural source, mango fruit, were developed as unique materials for non-toxic bio-imaging with different colors and particle sizes. The prepared FCPs showed blue (FCP-B), green (FCP-G) and yellow (FCP-Y) fluorescence, derived by the controlled carbonization method. The FCPs demonstrated hydrodynamic diameters of 5-15 nm, holding great promise for clinical applications. The biocompatible FCPs demonstrated great potential in biological fields through the results of in vitro imaging and in vivo biodistribution. Using intravenously administered FCPs with different colored particles, we precisely defined the clearance and biodistribution, showing rapid and efficient urinary excretion for safe elimination from the body. These findings therefore suggest the promising possibility of using natural sources for producing fluorescent materials.Water soluble fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCP) obtained from a single natural source, mango fruit, were developed as unique materials for non-toxic bio-imaging with different colors and particle sizes. The prepared FCPs showed blue (FCP-B), green (FCP-G) and yellow (FCP-Y) fluorescence, derived by the controlled carbonization method. The FCPs demonstrated hydrodynamic diameters of 5-15 nm, holding great promise for clinical applications. The biocompatible FCPs demonstrated great potential in biological fields through the results of in vitro imaging and in vivo biodistribution. Using intravenously administered FCPs with different colored particles, we precisely defined the clearance and biodistribution, showing rapid and efficient urinary excretion for safe elimination from the body. These findings therefore suggest the promising possibility of using natural sources for producing fluorescent materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04805a

  16. Construction of magnetic-carbon-quantum-dots-probe-labeled apoferritin nanocages for bioimaging and targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hanchun; Su, Li; Zeng, Man; Cao, Li; Zhao, Weiwei; Chen, Chengqun; Du, Bin; Zhou, Jie

    Carbon dots (CDs) are one of the most highlighted carbon-based materials for biological applications, such as optical imaging nanoprobes, which are used for labeling cells in cancer treatment mainly due to their biocompatibility and unique optical properties. In this study, gadolinium (Gd)-complex-containing CDs were obtained through a one-step microwave method to develop multimodal nanoprobes integrating the advantages of optical and magnetic imaging. The obtained Gd-CDs exhibited highly fluorescent properties with excellent water solubility and biological compatibility. Natural apoferritin (AFn) nanocages, an excellent drug delivery carrier, are hollow in structure, with their pH-dependent, unfolding-refolding process at pH 2.0 and 7.4. The chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (DOX) can be highly effective and encapsulated into AFn cavity. A widely used tumor-targeting molecule, folic acid (FA), functionalized the surface of AFn to obtain an active tumor targeting effect on MCF-7 cells and malignant tumors in mice models. In this study, an AFn nanocarrier encapsulating high concentration of DOX labeled with magnetic and fluorescent Gd-CDs probe was developed. Gd-CDs exhibited a unique green photoluminescence and almost no toxicity compared with free GdCl3. Furthermore, Gd-doped CDs significantly increased the circulation time and decreased the toxicity of Gd(3+) in in vitro and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging, which demonstrated that the AFn nanocages labeled with Gd-CD compounds could serve as an excellent T1 contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. The self-assembling multifunctional Gd-CDs/AFn (DOX)/FA nanoparticles have a great potential for cancer theranostic applications.

  17. Construction of magnetic-carbon-quantum-dots-probe-labeled apoferritin nanocages for bioimaging and targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hanchun; Su, Li; Zeng, Man; Cao, Li; Zhao, Weiwei; Chen, Chengqun; Du, Bin; Zhou, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dots (CDs) are one of the most highlighted carbon-based materials for biological applications, such as optical imaging nanoprobes, which are used for labeling cells in cancer treatment mainly due to their biocompatibility and unique optical properties. In this study, gadolinium (Gd)-complex-containing CDs were obtained through a one-step microwave method to develop multimodal nanoprobes integrating the advantages of optical and magnetic imaging. The obtained Gd-CDs exhibited highly fluorescent properties with excellent water solubility and biological compatibility. Natural apoferritin (AFn) nanocages, an excellent drug delivery carrier, are hollow in structure, with their pH-dependent, unfolding–refolding process at pH 2.0 and 7.4. The chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (DOX) can be highly effective and encapsulated into AFn cavity. A widely used tumor-targeting molecule, folic acid (FA), functionalized the surface of AFn to obtain an active tumor targeting effect on MCF-7 cells and malignant tumors in mice models. In this study, an AFn nanocarrier encapsulating high concentration of DOX labeled with magnetic and fluorescent Gd-CDs probe was developed. Gd-CDs exhibited a unique green photoluminescence and almost no toxicity compared with free GdCl3. Furthermore, Gd-doped CDs significantly increased the circulation time and decreased the toxicity of Gd3+ in in vitro and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging, which demonstrated that the AFn nanocages labeled with Gd-CD compounds could serve as an excellent T1 contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. The self-assembling multifunctional Gd-CDs/AFn (DOX)/FA nanoparticles have a great potential for cancer theranostic applications. PMID:27660437

  18. Optic probe for semiconductor characterization

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L [Denver, CO; Hambarian, Artak [Yerevan, AM

    2008-09-02

    Described herein is an optical probe (120) for use in characterizing surface defects in wafers, such as semiconductor wafers. The optical probe (120) detects laser light reflected from the surface (124) of the wafer (106) within various ranges of angles. Characteristics of defects in the surface (124) of the wafer (106) are determined based on the amount of reflected laser light detected in each of the ranges of angles. Additionally, a wafer characterization system (100) is described that includes the described optical probe (120).

  19. Fluorescent pH-Sensing Probe Based on Biorefinery Wood Lignosulfonate and Its Application in Human Cancer Cell Bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yuyuan; Liang, Wanshan; Li, Yuan; Wu, Ying; Peng, Xinwen; Qiu, Xueqing; Liu, Jinbin; Sun, Runcang

    2016-12-28

    A water-soluble, ratiometric fluorescent pH probe, L-SRhB, was synthesized via grafting spirolactam Rhodamine B (SRhB) to lignosulfonate (LS). As the ring-opening product of L-SRhB, FL-SRhB was also prepared. The pH-response experiment indicated that L-SRhB showed a rapid response to pH changes from 4.60 to 6.20 with a pKa of 5.35, which indicated that L-SRhB has the potential for pH detection of acidic organelle. In addition, the two probes were internalized successfully by living cells through the endocytosis pathway and could distinguish normal cells from cancer cells by different cell staining rates. In addition, L-SRhB showed obvious cytotoxicity to cancer cells, whereas it was nontoxic to normal cells in the same condition. L-SRhB might have potential in cancer therapy. L-SRhB might be a promising ratiometric fluorescent pH sensor and bioimaging dye for the recognition of cancer cells. The results also provided a new perspective to the high-value utilization of lignin.

  20. Far-red and near infrared BODIPY dyes: synthesis and applications for fluorescent pH probes and bio-imaging.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yong; Wu, Jishan

    2014-06-21

    Far-red and near infrared (NIR) emissive dyes have advantages in the development of fluorescent probes and labelling for bio-imaging in living systems since fluorescence in the long-wavelength region would generate minimum photo-toxicity to biological components, deep tissue penetration and minimal background from auto-fluorescence by bio-molecules. BODIPY dyes are attractive due to their excellent photo-physical properties and potential for fluorescence-based sensing and bio-imaging applications. Thus, numerous research papers have emerged to develop BODIPY-based dyes with absorption and emission in the long-wavelength spectral region (650-900 nm). This review summarizes the general strategies to obtain far-red and NIR BODIPYs. Moreover, their applications for fluorescent pH probes and imaging or labelling in living systems are highlighted.

  1. A fast-responsive fluorescent probe for sulfite and its bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaoliang; Long, Liping; Xiao, Xiaoming

    2016-05-01

    A turn-on fluorescent probe Coumarin-SO2 based on a nucleophilic addition reaction was developed for the rapid detection of SO3(2-) in aqueous media. The probe Coumarin-SO2 displays excellent water solubility, fast response, highly sensitivity and highly selectivity over other biological related species. More importantly, living cell imaging experiments indicate the feasibility of using the probe for the detection of SO3(2-) in biological systems.

  2. Transpiration purged optical probe

    DOEpatents

    VanOsdol, John; Woodruff, Steven

    2004-01-06

    An optical apparatus for clearly viewing the interior of a containment vessel by applying a transpiration fluid to a volume directly in front of the external surface of the optical element of the optical apparatus. The fluid is provided by an external source and transported by means of an annular tube to a capped end region where the inner tube is perforated. The perforation allows the fluid to stream axially towards the center of the inner tube and then axially away from an optical element which is positioned in the inner tube just prior to the porous sleeve. This arrangement draws any contaminants away from the optical element keeping it free of contaminants. In one of several embodiments, the optical element can be a lens, a viewing port or a laser, and the external source can provide a transpiration fluid having either steady properties or time varying properties.

  3. Fluorescent probe based on heteroatom containing styrylcyanine: pH-sensitive properties and bioimaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodong; Gao, Ya; Huang, Zhibing; Chen, Xiaohui; Ke, Zhiyong; Zhao, Peiliang; Yan, Yichen; Liu, Ruiyuan; Qu, Jinqing

    2015-01-01

    A novel fluorescent probe based on heteroatom containing styrylcyanine is synthesized. The fluorescence of probe is bright green in basic and neutral media but dark orange in strong acidic environments, which could be reversibly switched. Such behavior enables it to work as a fluorescent pH sensor in the solution state and a chemosensor for detecting acidic and basic volatile organic compounds. Analyses by NMR spectroscopy confirm that the protonation or deprotonation of pyridinyl moiety is responsible for the sensing process. In addition, the fluorescent microscopic images of probe in live cells and zebrafish are achieved successfully, suggesting that the probe has good cell membrane permeability and low cytotoxicity.

  4. A cysteamine-selective two-photon fluorescent probe for ratiometric bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Avik R; Heo, Cheol Ho; Kim, Eunjin; Lee, Hyo Won; Singh, Hardev; Kim, Jeong Jin; Kang, Hyuk; Kang, Chulhun; Kim, Hwan Myung

    2015-02-11

    We report a two-photon fluorescent probe for ratiometric imaging of cysteamine in situ. This probe can detect the levels of endogenous cysteamine with statistical significance in live cells and brain hippocampal tissues, revealing that cysteamine is localized mainly in the perikaria of the pyramidal neurons and the granule cells.

  5. An organic dye with very large Stokes-shift and broad tunability of fluorescence: Potential two-photon probe for bioimaging and ultra-sensitive solid-state gas sensor

    SciTech Connect

    He, Tingchao; Tian, Xiaoqing; Lin, Xiaodong E-mail: hdsun@ntu.edu.sg; Wang, Yue; Zhao, Xin; Sun, Handong E-mail: hdsun@ntu.edu.sg; Gao, Yang; Grimsdale, Andrew C.

    2016-01-04

    Light-emitting nonlinear optical molecules, especially those with large Stokes shifts and broad tunability of their emission wavelength, have attracted considerable attention for various applications including biomedical imaging and fluorescent sensors. However, most fluorescent chromophores have only limited potential for such applications due to small Stokes shifts, narrow tunability of fluorescence emissions, and small optical nonlinearity in highly polar solvents. In this work, we demonstrate that a two-photon absorbing stilbene chromophore exhibits a large two-photon absorption action cross-section (ηδ = 320 GM) in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and shows broad fluorescence tunability (125 nm) by manipulating the polarity of the surrounding medium. Importantly, a very large Stokes shift of up to 227 nm is achieved in DMSO. Thanks to these features, this chromophore can be utilized as a two-photon probe for bioimaging applications and in an ultrasensitive solid-state gas detector.

  6. Reaction-based small-molecule fluorescent probes for chemoselective bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Jefferson; Dodani, Sheel C.; Chang, Christopher J.

    2012-12-01

    The dynamic chemical diversity of elements, ions and molecules that form the basis of life offers both a challenge and an opportunity for study. Small-molecule fluorescent probes can make use of selective, bioorthogonal chemistries to report on specific analytes in cells and in more complex biological specimens. These probes offer powerful reagents to interrogate the physiology and pathology of reactive chemical species in their native environments with minimal perturbation to living systems. This Review presents a survey of tools and tactics for using such probes to detect biologically important chemical analytes. We highlight design criteria for effective chemical tools for use in biological applications as well as gaps for future exploration.

  7. Dual-Emissive Cyclometalated Iridium(III) Polypyridine Complexes as Ratiometric Biological Probes and Organelle-Selective Bioimaging Reagents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kenneth Yin; Liu, Hua-Wei; Tang, Man-Chung; Choi, Alex Wing-Tat; Zhu, Nianyong; Wei, Xi-Guang; Lau, Kai-Chung; Lo, Kenneth Kam-Wing

    2015-07-06

    In this Article, we present a series of cyclometalated iridium(III) polypyridine complexes of the formula [Ir(N^C)2(N^N)](PF6) that showed dual emission under ambient conditions. The structures of the cyclometalating and diimine ligands were changed systematically to investigate the effects of the substituents on the dual-emission properties of the complexes. On the basis of the photophysical data, the high-energy (HE) and low-energy (LE) emission features of the complexes were assigned to triplet intraligand ((3)IL) and triplet charge-transfer ((3)CT) excited states, respectively. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations supported these assignments and indicated that the dual emission resulted from the interruption of the communication between the higher-lying (3)IL and the lower-lying (3)CT states by a triplet amine-to-ligand charge-transfer ((3)NLCT) state. Also, the avidin-binding properties of the biotin complexes were studied by emission titrations, and the results showed that the dual-emissive complexes can be utilized as ratiometric probes for avidin. Additionally, all the complexes exhibited efficient cellular uptake by live HeLa cells. The MTT and Annexin V assays confirmed that no cell death and early apoptosis occurred during the cell imaging experiments. Interestingly, laser-scanning confocal microscopy revealed that the complexes were selectively localized on the cell membrane, mitochondria, or both, depending on the nature of the substituents of the ligands. The results of this work will contribute to the future development of dual-emissive transition metal complexes as ratiometric probes and organelle-selective bioimaging reagents.

  8. Optical imaging probes in oncology.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Cristina; Lo Dico, Alessia; Diceglie, Cecilia; Lucignani, Giovanni; Ottobrini, Luisa

    2016-07-26

    Cancer is a complex disease, characterized by alteration of different physiological molecular processes and cellular features. Keeping this in mind, the possibility of early identification and detection of specific tumor biomarkers by non-invasive approaches could improve early diagnosis and patient management.Different molecular imaging procedures provide powerful tools for detection and non-invasive characterization of oncological lesions. Clinical studies are mainly based on the use of computed tomography, nuclear-based imaging techniques and magnetic resonance imaging. Preclinical imaging in small animal models entails the use of dedicated instruments, and beyond the already cited imaging techniques, it includes also optical imaging studies. Optical imaging strategies are based on the use of luminescent or fluorescent reporter genes or injectable fluorescent or luminescent probes that provide the possibility to study tumor features even by means of fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Currently, most of these probes are used only in animal models, but the possibility of applying some of them also in the clinics is under evaluation.The importance of tumor imaging, the ease of use of optical imaging instruments, the commercial availability of a wide range of probes as well as the continuous description of newly developed probes, demonstrate the significance of these applications. The aim of this review is providing a complete description of the possible optical imaging procedures available for the non-invasive assessment of tumor features in oncological murine models. In particular, the characteristics of both commercially available and newly developed probes will be outlined and discussed.

  9. Optical imaging probes in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, Cristina; Dico, Alessia Lo; Diceglie, Cecilia; Lucignani, Giovanni; Ottobrini, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease, characterized by alteration of different physiological molecular processes and cellular features. Keeping this in mind, the possibility of early identification and detection of specific tumor biomarkers by non-invasive approaches could improve early diagnosis and patient management. Different molecular imaging procedures provide powerful tools for detection and non-invasive characterization of oncological lesions. Clinical studies are mainly based on the use of computed tomography, nuclear-based imaging techniques and magnetic resonance imaging. Preclinical imaging in small animal models entails the use of dedicated instruments, and beyond the already cited imaging techniques, it includes also optical imaging studies. Optical imaging strategies are based on the use of luminescent or fluorescent reporter genes or injectable fluorescent or luminescent probes that provide the possibility to study tumor features even by means of fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Currently, most of these probes are used only in animal models, but the possibility of applying some of them also in the clinics is under evaluation. The importance of tumor imaging, the ease of use of optical imaging instruments, the commercial availability of a wide range of probes as well as the continuous description of newly developed probes, demonstrate the significance of these applications. The aim of this review is providing a complete description of the possible optical imaging procedures available for the non-invasive assessment of tumor features in oncological murine models. In particular, the characteristics of both commercially available and newly developed probes will be outlined and discussed. PMID:27145373

  10. Reaction-based small-molecule fluorescent probes for chemoselective bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jefferson; Dodani, Sheel C.; Chang, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic chemical diversity of elements, ions and molecules that form the basis of life offers both a challenge and an opportunity for study. Small-molecule fluorescent probes can make use of selective, bioorthogonal chemistries to report on specific analytes in cells and in more complex biological specimens. These probes offer powerful reagents to interrogate the physiology and pathology of reactive chemical species in their native environments with minimal perturbation to living systems. This Review presents a survey of tools and tactics for using such probes to detect biologically important chemical analytes. We highlight design criteria for effective chemical tools for use in biological applications as well as gaps for future exploration. PMID:23174976

  11. A benzothiazole-based fluorescent probe for distinguishing and bioimaging of Hg(2+) and Cu(2).

    PubMed

    Gu, Biao; Huang, Liyan; Su, Wei; Duan, Xiaoli; Li, Haitao; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2017-02-15

    A new benzothiazole-based fluorescent probe 2-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)-4-(1,3- dithian-2-yl)phenol (BT) with two different reaction sites, a thioacetal group (site 1 for Hg(2+)), and O and N atoms of the benzothiazole dye (site 2 for Cu(2+)), was designed and synthesized. The probe BT showed ratiometric fluorescent response to Hg(2+) and fluorescence quenching behavior to Cu(2+), which induces naked-eye fluorescent color changes from green to blue and colorless, respectively. Moreover, it displayed highly sensitivity and selectivity toward Hg(2+) and Cu(2+) without interference from other metal ions. The sensing mechanisms were also confirmed by (1)H NMR titration, mass spectrum and Job's plot analyses. Finally, probe BT was successfully used for fluorescent imaging of Hg(2+) and Cu(2+) in living cells, demonstrating its potential applications in biological science.

  12. A two-photon probe for Al(3+) in aqueous solution and its application in bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haihong; Wang, Bei; Shi, Zhaohua; Tang, Xiaoliang; Dou, Wei; Han, Qingxin; Zhang, Yange; Liu, Weisheng

    2015-03-15

    A salicylimine probe L with a simple structure has been researched more in-depth on fluorescence sensor properties based on two-photon (TP) absorption. L displays excellent selective turn-on fluorescence response for Al(3+) in hexamethylenetetramine-buffered (HMTA) aqueous solution (0.3M, pH=5.8) under one-photon (OP) excitation. With the help of OP fluorescence, TP fluorescence titration, UV-spectra titration and Job's plot, the stoichiometric ratio of L with Al(3+) was determined to be 1:1. The coordination sites and the coordination mechanism of L with Al(3+) were analyzed in detail through (1)H NMR data. Not only with a detection limit of 5.2×10(-9)M in vitro, but also the probe has been successfully used in the live cells and tissues for the imaging of Al(3+) with TP fluorescence microscopy due to the enlarged TP cross section, providing a novel testing method for measuring Al(3+) in solution or cell tissue with low autofluorescence and cytotoxicity.

  13. Tunable nanowire nonlinear optical probe

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Yuri; Pauzauskie, Peter J.; Radenovic, Aleksandra; Onorato, Robert M.; Saykally, Richard J.; Liphardt, Jan; Yang, Peidong

    2008-02-18

    One crucial challenge for subwavelength optics has been thedevelopment of a tunable source of coherent laser radiation for use inthe physical, information, and biological sciences that is stable at roomtemperature and physiological conditions. Current advanced near-fieldimaging techniques using fiber-optic scattering probes1,2 have alreadyachieved spatial resolution down to the 20-nm range. Recently reportedfar-field approaches for optical microscopy, including stimulatedemission depletion (STED)3, structured illumination4, and photoactivatedlocalization microscopy (PALM)5, have also enabled impressive,theoretically-unlimited spatial resolution of fluorescent biomolecularcomplexes. Previous work with laser tweezers6-8 has suggested the promiseof using optical traps to create novel spatial probes and sensors.Inorganic nanowires have diameters substantially below the wavelength ofvisible light and have unique electronic and optical properties9,10 thatmake them prime candidates for subwavelength laser and imagingtechnology. Here we report the development of an electrode-free,continuously-tunable coherent visible light source compatible withphysiological environments, from individual potassium niobate (KNbO3)nanowires. These wires exhibit efficient second harmonic generation(SHG), and act as frequency converters, allowing the local synthesis of awide range of colors via sum and difference frequency generation (SFG,DFG). We use this tunable nanometric light source to implement a novelform of subwavelength microscopy, in which an infrared (IR) laser is usedto optically trap and scan a nanowire over a sample, suggesting a widerange of potential applications in physics, chemistry, materials science,and biology.

  14. High pressure optical combustion probe

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, S.D.; Richards, G.A.

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center has developed a combustion probe for monitoring flame presence and heat release. The technology involved is a compact optical detector of the OH radical`s UV fluorescence. The OH Monitor/Probe is designed to determine the flame presence and provide a qualitative signal proportional to the flame intensity. The probe can be adjusted to monitor a specific volume in the combustion zone to track spatial fluctuations in the flame. The probe is capable of nanosecond time response and is usually slowed electronically to fit the flame characteristics. The probe is a sapphire rod in a stainless steel tube which may be inserted into the combustion chamber and pointed at the flame zone. The end of the sapphire rod is retracted into the SS tube to define a narrow optical collection cone. The collection cone may be adjusted to fit the experiment. The fluorescence signal is collected by the sapphire rod and transmitted through a UV transmitting, fused silica, fiber optic to the detector assembly. The detector is a side window photomultiplier (PMT) with a 310 run line filter. A Hamamatsu photomultiplier base combined with a integral high voltage power supply permits this to be a low voltage device. Electronic connections include: a power lead from a modular DC power supply for 15 VDC; a control lead for 0-1 volts to control the high voltage level (and therefore gain); and a lead out for the actual signal. All low voltage connections make this a safe and easy to use device while still delivering the sensitivity required.

  15. Modeling an optical micromachine probe

    SciTech Connect

    Mittas, A.; Dickey, F.M.; Holswade, S.C.

    1997-08-01

    Silicon micromachines are fabricated using Surface Micro-Machining (SMM) techniques. Silicon micromachines include engines that consist of orthogonally oriented linear comb drive actuators mechanically connected to a rotating gear. These gears are as small a 50-{micro}m in diameter and can be driven at rotation rates exceeding 300,000-rpm. Measuring and analyzing microengine performance is basic to micromachine development and system applications. Optical techniques offer the potential for measuring long term statistical performance data and transient responses needed to optimize designs and manufacturing techniques. The authors describe the modeling of an optical probe developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Experimental data will be compared with output from the model.

  16. Chiral-aminoquinoline-based fluorescent pH probe with large stokes shift for bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yong-Sheng; Zhang, Xin-Ling; Xie, Kun; Zhao, Yanmei; Wu, Huan; Yang, Jidong

    2017-05-01

    The aminoquinoline derivatives, (R)- and (S)-2-phenyl-2-(quinolin-6-ylamino)ethan-1-ol (R-PEO and S-PEO), were synthesized by a tandem one-pot three-step Csbnd N coupling method where Smiles rearrangement was the key procedure. The selected compound R-PEO showed a significant fluorescence enhancement with a turn-on ratio over 98-fold and enabled the real time determination of proton concentration in acidic solution. The fluorescence intensity of R-PEO exhibited strong pH-dependent performance with a large Stokes shift (115 nm) and responded linearly to minor pH change within the range of 3.8-6.0. With the help of 1H NMR spectrum, we also confirmed the protonation of the quinoline unit should be the proposed reaction. Compared with the conjugated acid of N-hexylquinolin-6-amine (NQA), the conjugated acid of R-PEO shows significant planar intramolecular charge transfer (PICT) character. Furthermore, biological imaging proved that R-PEO probe can be used to monitor the pH change of S. cerevisiae in vivo.

  17. Colorimetric and fluorometric dual-modal probes for cyanide detection based on the doubly activated Michael acceptor and their bioimaging applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongda; Chen, Tie; Jin, Longyi; Kan, Yuhe; Yin, Bingzhu

    2014-12-10

    In this study, we synthesized CTB and CB probes based on doubly activated Michael acceptors to selectively detect cyanide (CN(-)) anions through a one-step condensation reaction of coumarinyl acrylaldehyde with the corresponding derivatives of malonyl urea (thiourea). Through the conjugated addition of CN(-) to the β-site of the Michael acceptor, both probes displayed colorimetric and fluorometric dual-modal responses that were highly reactive and selective. CTB generates an active fluorescent response, whereas CB displays a ratiometric fluorescent response. The fluorescent signal of the probes reached its maximum given only 1 CN(-) equivalent and the signal change was linearly proportional to CN(-) concentrations ranging from 0 to 5 μM with the detection limits 18 and 23 nM, respectively. The reaction rate of the probes is highly dependent on the methylene acidity of malonyl urea derivatives. Thus, the response rate of CTB to CN(-) is 1.2-fold faster than that of CB, and the response rate of CB to CN(-) is 1.2-fold faster than that of the previously examined CM. We then verified the highly reactive nature of the β-site of the probes through density functional reactivity theory calculations. In addition, according to proof-of-concept experiments, these probes may be applied to analyze CN(-) contaminated water and biomimetic samples. Finally, cell cytotoxicity and bioimaging studies revealed that the probes were cell-permeable and could be used to detect CN(-) with low cytotoxicity.

  18. Serum-stable quantum dot--protein hybrid nanocapsules for optical bio-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong Yu; Nam, Dong Heon; Oh, Mi Hwa; Kim, Youngsun; Choi, Hyung Seok; Jeon, Duk Young; Beum Park, Chan; Nam, Yoon Sung

    2014-05-01

    We introduce shell cross-linked protein/quantum dot (QD) hybrid nanocapsules as a serum-stable systemic delivery nanocarrier for tumor-targeted in vivo bio-imaging applications. Highly luminescent, heavy-metal-free Cu0.3InS2/ZnS (CIS/ZnS) core-shell QDs are synthesized and mixed with amine-reactive six-armed poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) in dichloromethane. Emulsification in an aqueous solution containing human serum albumin (HSA) results in shell cross-linked nanocapsules incorporating CIS/ZnS QDs, exhibiting high luminescence and excellent dispersion stability in a serum-containing medium. Folic acid is introduced as a tumor-targeting ligand. The feasibility of tumor-targeted in vivo bio-imaging is demonstrated by measuring the fluorescence intensity of several major organs and tumor tissue after an intravenous tail vein injection of the nanocapsules into nude mice. The cytotoxicity of the QD-loaded HSA-PEG nanocapsules is also examined in several types of cells. Our results show that the cellular uptake of the QDs is critical for cytotoxicity. Moreover, a significantly lower level of cell death is observed in the CIS/ZnS QDs compared to nanocapsules loaded with cadmium-based QDs. This study suggests that the systemic tumor targeting of heavy-metal-free QDs using shell cross-linked HSA-PEG hybrid nanocapsules is a promising route for in vivo tumor diagnosis with reduced non-specific toxicity.

  19. Nanofabrication using near-field optical probes

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Nanofabrication using near-field optical probes is an established technique for rapid prototyping and automated maskless fabrication of nanostructured devices. In this review, we present the primary types of near-field probes and their physical processing mechanisms. Highlights of recent developments include improved resolution by optimizing the probe shape, incorporation of surface plasmonics in probe design, broader use in biological and magnetic storage applications, and increased throughput using probe arrays as well as high speed writing and patterning. PMID:22713756

  20. Mesoporous persistent nanophosphors for in vivo optical bioimaging and drug-delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldiney, Thomas; Ballet, Benoit; Bessodes, Michel; Scherman, Daniel; Richard, Cyrille

    2014-10-01

    Based upon the ambitious idea that one single particle could serve multiple purposes at the same time, the combination and simultaneous use of imaging and therapeutics has lately arisen as one of the most promising prospects among nanotechnologies directed toward biomedical applications. Intended for both therapeutics and diagnostics in vivo, highly complex nanostructures were specifically designed to simultaneously act as optical imaging probes and delivery vehicles. Yet, such multifunctional photonic nanoplatforms usually exploit fluorescence phenomena which require constant excitation light through biological tissues and thus significantly reduce the detection sensitivity due to the autofluorescence from living animals. In order to overcome this critical issue, the present article introduces a novel multifunctional agent based on persistent luminescence mesoporous nanoparticles. Being composed of a hybrid chromium-doped zinc gallate core/mesoporous silica shell architecture, we show that this nanotechnology can be used as an efficient doxorubicin-delivery vehicle presenting a higher cytotoxicity toward U87MG cells than its unloaded counterpart in vitro. In addition, we demonstrate that a persistent luminescence signal from these doxorubicin-loaded mesoporous nanophosphors opens a new way to highly sensitive detection in vivo, giving access to the real-time biodistribution of the carrier without any autofluorescence from the animal tissues. This new persistent luminescence-based hybrid nanotechnology can be easily applied to the delivery of any therapeutic agent, thus constituting a versatile and sensitive optical nanotool dedicated to both therapeutic and diagnostic applications in vivo.Based upon the ambitious idea that one single particle could serve multiple purposes at the same time, the combination and simultaneous use of imaging and therapeutics has lately arisen as one of the most promising prospects among nanotechnologies directed toward biomedical

  1. Synthesis, Optical Properties, and Multiplexed Raman Bio-Imaging of Surface Roughness-Controlled Nanobridged Nanogap Particles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Hoon; Oh, Jeong-Wook; Nam, Sang Hwan; Cha, Yeong Seok; Kim, Gyeong-Hwan; Rhim, Won-Kyu; Kim, Nam Hoon; Kim, Jongwoo; Han, Sang Woo; Suh, Yung Doug; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2016-09-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures are widely studied and used because of their useful size, shape, composition and assembled structure-based plasmonic properties. It is, however, highly challenging to precisely design, reproducibly synthesize and reliably utilize plasmonic nanostructures with enhanced optical properties. Here, we devise a facile synthetic method to generate Au surface roughness-controlled nanobridged nanogap particles (Au-RNNPs) with ultrasmall (≈1 nm) interior gap and tunable surface roughness in a highly controllable manner. Importantly, we found that particle surface roughness can be associated with and enhance the electromagnetic field inside the interior gap, and stronger nanogap-enhanced Raman scattering (NERS) signals can be generated from particles by increasing particle surface roughness. The finite-element method-based calculation results support and are matched well with the experimental results and suggest one needs to consider particle shape, nanogap and nanobridges simultaneously to understand and control the optical properties of this type of nanostructures. Finally, the potential of multiplexed Raman detection and imaging with RNNPs and the high-speed, high-resolution Raman bio-imaging of Au-RNNPs inside cells with a wide-field Raman imaging setup with liquid crystal tunable filter are demonstrated. Our results provide strategies and principles in designing and synthesizing plasmonically enhanced nanostructures and show potential for detecting and imaging Raman nanoprobes in a highly specific, sensitive and multiplexed manner. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Optical probe using eccentric optics for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Iwaya, Mitsuharu; Watanabe, Yuuki; Sato, Manabu

    2007-03-01

    We propose and demonstrate an OCT optical probe using eccentric optics. This probe enabled both forward imaging and side imaging by dividing a circular scanning area into two semicircular scanning areas using an external motor to rotate the flexible tube. The outer diameter of the probe was 2.6 mm, and its rigid portion length was 10 mm. The lateral resolution was 23 μm, and the eccentric radius was 1.1 mm. The circumferential length in scanning was 6.9 mm, and the working distance was 5 mm. OCT images of 1.5 mm × 6.9 mm (in tissue, axial × circumference), including forward image and side image, were measured with the axial resolution of 19 μm in air and a frame rate of one frame per second. The epidermis, dermis, and sweat gland of in vivo human ventral finger tips were observed.

  3. A novel fluorescent probe for Cr3 + based on rhodamine-crown ether conjugate and its application to drinking water examination and bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Quanping; Ma, Pinyi; Lv, Linlin; Li, Tiechun; Wang, Xinghua; Song, Daqian

    2016-03-01

    A trivalent chromium (Cr3 +) fluorescence probe (RhC) was designed and synthesized via Schiff base reaction based on rhodamine-crown ether conjugate. This probe displayed a favorable selectivity for Cr3 + over a range of other common metal ions in DMF/H2O (3:7, v/v; PBS buffer 50 mmol L- 1; pH = 6.8) solution, leading to prominent fluorescence "OFF-ON" switching of the rhodamine fluorophore. The limit of detection was calculated to be 1.5 μmol L- 1 (S/N = 3). The binding ratio of RhC-Cr3 + complex was determined to be 1:2 according to the Job's plot and HR-MS. The probe was successfully applied to examination of Cr3 + in drinking water spiked samples. The average recoveries ranged from 104.9% to 106.9% at spiked concentration level of 10.00 μmol L- 1, and the obtained results were consistent with those obtained using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Moreover, bioimaging experiments showed that RhC can sense the Cr3 + in living cells with a fluorescence enhancement signal.

  4. A novel fluorescent probe for Cr(3+) based on rhodamine-crown ether conjugate and its application to drinking water examination and bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Diao, Quanping; Ma, Pinyi; Lv, Linlin; Li, Tiechun; Wang, Xinghua; Song, Daqian

    2016-03-05

    A trivalent chromium (Cr(3+)) fluorescence probe (RhC) was designed and synthesized via Schiff base reaction based on rhodamine-crown ether conjugate. This probe displayed a favorable selectivity for Cr(3+) over a range of other common metal ions in DMF/H2O (3:7, v/v; PBS buffer 50 mmol L(-1); pH=6.8) solution, leading to prominent fluorescence "OFF-ON" switching of the rhodamine fluorophore. The limit of detection was calculated to be 1.5 μmol L(-1) (S/N=3). The binding ratio of RhC-Cr(3+) complex was determined to be 1:2 according to the Job's plot and HR-MS. The probe was successfully applied to examination of Cr(3+) in drinking water spiked samples. The average recoveries ranged from 104.9% to 106.9% at spiked concentration level of 10.00 μmol L(-1), and the obtained results were consistent with those obtained using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). Moreover, bioimaging experiments showed that RhC can sense the Cr(3+) in living cells with a fluorescence enhancement signal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Optical probe with light fluctuation protection

    DOEpatents

    Da Silva, Luiz B.; Chase, Charles L.

    2003-11-11

    An optical probe for tissue identification includes an elongated body. Optical fibers are located within the elongated body for transmitting light to and from the tissue. Light fluctuation protection is associated with the optical fibers. In one embodiment the light fluctuation protection includes a reflective coating on the optical fibers to reduce stray light. In another embodiment the light fluctuation protection includes a filler with very high absorption located within the elongated body between the optical fibers.

  6. Characterization of Fiber Optic CMM Probe System

    SciTech Connect

    K.W.Swallow

    2007-05-15

    This report documents a study completed on the fiber optic probe system that is a part of the Werth optical CMM. This study was necessary due to a lack of documentation from the vendor for the proper use and calibration of the fiber probe, and was performed in support of the Lithographie Galvanoformung Abformung (LIGA) development program at the FM&T. As a result of this study, a better understanding of the fiber optic probe has been developed, including guidelines for its proper use and calibration.

  7. Rugged fiber optic probe for raman measurement

    DOEpatents

    O'Rourke, Patrick E.; Toole, Jr., William R.; Nave, Stanley E.

    1998-01-01

    An optical probe for conducting light scattering analysis is disclosed. The probe comprises a hollow housing and a probe tip. A fiber assembly made up of a transmitting fiber and a receiving bundle is inserted in the tip. A filter assembly is inserted in the housing and connected to the fiber assembly. A signal line from the light source and to the spectrometer also is connected to the filter assembly and communicates with the fiber assembly. By using a spring-loaded assembly to hold the fiber connectors together with the in-line filters, complex and sensitive alignment procedures are avoided. The close proximity of the filter assembly to the probe tip eliminates or minimizes self-scattering generated by the optical fiber. Also, because the probe can contact the sample directly, sensitive optics can be eliminated.

  8. Optical contacting for gravity probe star tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, J. J.; Zissa, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    A star-tracker telescope, constructed entirely of fused silica elements optically contacted together, has been proposed to provide submilliarc-second pointing accuracy for Gravity Probe. A bibliography and discussion on optical contacting (the bonding of very flat, highly polished surfaces without the use of adhesives) are presented. Then results from preliminary experiments on the strength of optical contacts including a tensile strength test in liquid helium are discussed. Suggestions are made for further study to verify an optical contacting method for the Gravity Probe star-tracker telescope.

  9. Real-time optical fiber dosimeter probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croteau, André; Caron, Serge; Rink, Alexandra; Jaffray, David; Mermut, Ozzy

    2011-03-01

    There is a pressing need for a passive optical fiber dosimeter probe for use in real-time monitoring of radiation dose delivered to clinical radiation therapy patients. An optical fiber probe using radiochromic material has been designed and fabricated based on a thin film of the radiochromic material on a dielectric mirror. Measurements of the net optical density vs. time before, during, and after irradiation at a rate of 500cGy/minute to a total dose of 5 Gy were performed. Net optical densities increased from 0.2 to 2.0 for radiochromic thin film thicknesses of 2 to 20 μm, respectively.

  10. Probing plasmonic breathing modes optically

    SciTech Connect

    Krug, Markus K. Reisecker, Michael; Hohenau, Andreas; Ditlbacher, Harald; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich; Krenn, Joachim R.

    2014-10-27

    The confinement of surface plasmon modes in flat nanoparticles gives rise to plasmonic breathing modes. With a vanishing net dipole moment, breathing modes do not radiate, i.e., they are optically dark. Having thus escaped optical detection, breathing modes were only recently revealed in silver nanodisks with electron energy loss spectroscopy in an electron microscope. We show that for disk diameters >200 nm, retardation induced by oblique optical illumination relaxes the optically dark character. This makes breathing modes and thus the full plasmonic mode spectrum accessible to optical spectroscopy. The experimental spectroscopy data are in excellent agreement with numerical simulations.

  11. A novel ratiometric fluorescent probe based on 1, 8-naphthalimide for the detection of Ho3 + and its bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huifang; Liu, Tao; Yin, Caixia; Wen, Yin; Chao, Jianbin; Zhang, Yongbin; Huo, Fangjun

    2017-03-01

    A ratiometric fluorescent probe for the detection of Ho3 + in DMSO-aqueous medium was designed and synthesized based on 1, 8-naphthalimide. The probe displayed response to Ho3 + with a fluorescence decrease at 512 nm and enhancement at 480 nm, accompanying with a distinct fluorescence change from bright yellow-green to cyan. Besides, the probe exhibited a lower detection limit (6 × 10- 8 M) and could be used in intracellular fluorescence imaging. To the best of the knowledge, it was the first ratiometric fluorescent probe for Ho3 + detection. This probe was expected to be a useful tool for further elucidating the roles of Ho3 + in materials, biology and environment.

  12. Biocompatible Surface Chemistry Manipulation of Gold Nanorods Preserves Optical Properties for Bio-Imaging Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-18

    cells. In addition, MTAB-TA GNRs demonstrate a substantial level of cellular uptake while displaying a unique intracellular clustering pattern...This clustering pattern significantly reduces intracellular aggregation, preserving the GNRs NIR optical roperties, vital for biomedical imaging...cellular uptake while displaying a unique intracellular clustering pattern. This clustering pattern significantly reduces intracellular aggregation

  13. Graphene and graphene-like 2D materials for optical biosensing and bioimaging: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chengzhou; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2015-09-01

    The increasing demands of bioassay and biomedical applications have significantly promoted the rational design and fabrication of a wide range of functional nanomaterials. Coupling these advanced nanomaterials with biomolecule recognition events leads to novel sensing and diagnostic platforms. Because of their unique structures and multifunctionalities, two-dimensional nanomaterials, such as graphene and graphene-like materials (e.g., graphitic carbon nitride, transition metal dichalcogenides, boron nitride, and transition metal oxides), have stimulated great interest in the field of optical biosensors and imaging because of their innovative mechanical, physicochemical and optical properties. Depending on the different applications, the graphene and graphene-like nanomaterials can be tailored to form either fluorescent emitters or efficient fluorescence quenchers, making them powerful platforms for fabricating a series of optical biosensors to sensitively detect various targets including ions, small biomolecules, DNA/RNA and proteins. This review highlights the recent progress in optical biosensors based on graphene and graphene-like 2D materials and their imaging applications. Finally, the opportunities and some critical challenges in this field are also addressed.

  14. Facile synthesis of N-rich carbon quantum dots by spontaneous polymerization and incision of solvents as efficient bioimaging probes and advanced electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhouyue; Xu, Shengjie; Wan, Jiaxun; Wu, Peiyi

    2016-01-28

    In this study, uniform nitrogen-doped carbon quantum dots (N-CDs) were synthesized through a one-step solvothermal process of cyclic and nitrogen-rich solvents, such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethyl-imidazolidinone (DMEU), under mild conditions. The products exhibited strong light blue fluorescence, good cell permeability and low cytotoxicity. Moreover, after a facile post-thermal treatment, it developed a lotus seedpod surface-like structure of seed-like N-CDs decorating on the surface of carbon layers with a high proportion of quaternary nitrogen moieties that exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity and long-term durability towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The peak potential was -160 mV, which was comparable to or even lower than commercial Pt/C catalysts. Therefore, this study provides an alternative facile approach to the synthesis of versatile carbon quantum dots (CDs) with widespread commercial application prospects, not only as bioimaging probes but also as promising electrocatalysts for the metal-free ORR.

  15. Fast-Response Turn-on Fluorescent Probes Based on Thiolysis of NBD Amine for H2 S Bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Runyu; Li, Zhifei; Zhang, Changyu; Li, Yanyan; Xu, Guoce; Zhang, Qiang-Zhe; Li, Lu-Yuan; Yi, Long; Xi, Zhen

    2016-05-17

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) is an important endogenous signaling molecule with multiple biological functions. New selective fluorescent turn-on probes based on fast thiolyling of NBD (7-nitro-1,2,3-benzoxadiazole) amine were explored for sensing H2 S in aqueous buffer and in living cells. The syntheses of both probes are simple and quite straightforward. The probes are highly sensitive and selective toward H2 S over other biologically relevant species. The fluorescein-NBD-based probe showed 65-fold green fluorescent increase upon H2 S activation. The rhodamine-NBD-based probe reacted rapidly with H2 S (t1/2 ≈1 min) to give a 4.5-fold increase in red fluorescence. Moreover, both probes were successfully used for monitoring H2 S in living cells and in mice. Based on such probe-based tools, we could observe H2 O2 -induced H2 S biogenesis in a concentration-dependent and time-dependent fashion in living cells.

  16. Optical probe with reference fiber

    DOEpatents

    Da Silva, Luiz B.; Chase, Charles L.

    2006-03-14

    A system for characterizing tissue includes the steps of generating an emission signal, generating a reference signal, directing the emission signal to and from the tissue, directing the reference signal in a predetermined manner relative to the emission signal, and using the reference signal to compensate the emission signal. In one embodiment compensation is provided for fluctuations in light delivery to the tip of the probe due to cable motion.

  17. Optical probing of cold trapped atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, R. W.; Gilbert, S. L.; Hollberg, L.; Marquardt, J. H.; Robinson, H. G.

    1993-01-01

    Transitions between excited states of laser-cooled and laser-trapped rubidium and cesium atoms are probed by use of fiber and diode lasers. High-resolution Doppler-free spectra are detected by observation of the absorption and fluorescence of light from the intermediate level of two-step cascade systems. The optical double-resonance spectra show Autler-Townes splitting in the weak probe limit and more complicated spectra for a strongly coupled three-level system.

  18. Slope-sensitive optical probe for freeform optics metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echter, Michael A.; Keene, Andrew D.; Roll, Christopher D.; Ellis, Jonathan D.

    2013-09-01

    Freeform and conformal optics represent the next generation of optical systems where their utilization leads to more compact, lighter, and higher performance systems for solar collectors, consumer optics, and defense applications. Optical coordinate measuring machines present one option for accurate metrology of freeform components but have two limitations: metrology system errors and optical probe errors. In this work, we address the latter of the two by demonstrating a compact optical probe capable of fiber delivery and fiber detection to remove potential heats sources away from measured optic. A bench top demonstrator has yielded a displacement resolution below +/-10 nm and has a noise floor of approximately +/-18 μrad for surface slope in two orthogonal directions. In this Proceedings, we discuss our probe concept, operating principle, and preliminary measurements with a bench top proof-of-concept system. The goal of this work is to ultimately integrate this probe into OptiPro's UltraSurf, a 5-axis optical coordinate measuring machine for measuring freeform and conformal optics.

  19. Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements

    DOEpatents

    Nave, S.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is comprised of a fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman- scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

  20. Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements

    DOEpatents

    Nave, Stanley E.; Livingston, Ronald R.; Prather, William S.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman-scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

  1. Nonlinear Optical Properties of ZnO for BioimagingCell and Cell Destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Ben; Chakki, Samudyatha; Senthilkumar, Os; Senthilkumar, Kasilingam; Fujita, Yasuhisa; Neogi, Arup

    2011-03-01

    As of recent years nanotechnology has been at the forefront of scientific research. It promises to have a broad range of applications from turning unhealthy foods into health foods, making computers faster and curing cancer. We present results on using nonlinear optical processes of ZnO nano-crystals to detect, track and destroy cells. By incorporating ZnO into a hydrophobic nano-hydrogel matrix with trace amounts of H2 O2 , we can attach antibodies or microRNA for specific cell targeting and, using the heat generating properties of the third order nonlinear process, release H2 O2 in the cell causing instant cell death. Theoretically, with the appropriate sequence for microRNA or the appropriate antibodies, we could target cancer cells in the body and destroy them. This presentation gives our results until now.

  2. Ultrathin lensed fiber-optic probe for optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Y.; Wang, Y.; Belfield, K. D.; Liu, X.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated and validated a novel method to develop ultrathin lensed fiber-optic (LFO) probes for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. We made the LFO probe by attaching a segment of no core fiber (NCF) to the distal end of a single mode fiber (SMF) and generating a curved surface at the tip of the NCF using the electric arc of a fusion splicer. The novel fabrication approach enabled us to control the length of the NCF and the radius of the fiber lens independently. By strategically choosing these two parameters, the LFO probe could achieve a broad range of working distance and depth of focus for different OCT applications. A probe with 125μm diameter and lateral resolution up to 10μm was demonstrated. The low-cost, disposable and robust LFO probe is expected to have great potential for interstitial OCT imaging. PMID:27375934

  3. Ultrathin lensed fiber-optic probe for optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Y; Wang, Y; Belfield, K D; Liu, X

    2016-06-01

    We investigated and validated a novel method to develop ultrathin lensed fiber-optic (LFO) probes for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. We made the LFO probe by attaching a segment of no core fiber (NCF) to the distal end of a single mode fiber (SMF) and generating a curved surface at the tip of the NCF using the electric arc of a fusion splicer. The novel fabrication approach enabled us to control the length of the NCF and the radius of the fiber lens independently. By strategically choosing these two parameters, the LFO probe could achieve a broad range of working distance and depth of focus for different OCT applications. A probe with 125μm diameter and lateral resolution up to 10μm was demonstrated. The low-cost, disposable and robust LFO probe is expected to have great potential for interstitial OCT imaging.

  4. An optical probe for micromachine performance analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, F.M.; Holswade, S.C.; Smith, N.F.; Miller, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that impact the performance of Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) is essential to the development of optimized designs and fabrication processes, as well as the qualification of devices for commercial applications. Silicon micromachines include engines that consist of orthogonally oriented linear comb drive actuators mechanically connected to a rotating gear. These gears are as small as 50 {mu}m in diameter and can be driven at rotation rates exceeding 300,000 rpm. Optical techniques offer the potential for measuring long term statistical performance data and transient responses needed to optimize designs and manufacturing techniques. We describe the development of Micromachine Optical Probe (MOP) technology for the evaluation of micromachine performance. The MOP approach is based on the detection of optical signals scattered by the gear teeth or other physical structures. We present experimental results obtained with a prototype optical probe and micromachines developed at Sandia National Laboratories.

  5. A highly selective near-infrared fluorescent probe for carboxylesterase 2 and its bioimaging applications in living cells and animals.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiang; Feng, Lei; Wang, Dan-Dan; Wu, Jing-Jing; Hou, Jie; Dai, Zi-Ru; Sun, Shi-Guo; Wang, Jia-Yue; Ge, Guang-Bo; Cui, Jing-Nan; Yang, Ling

    2016-09-15

    A near-infrared fluorescent probe (DDAB) for highly selective and sensitive detection of carboxylesterase 2 (CE2) has been designed, synthesized, and systematically studied both in vitro and in vivo. Upon addition of CE2, the ester bond of DDAB could be rapidly cleaved and then release a near-infrared (NIR) fluorophore DDAO, which brings a remarkable yellow-to-blue color change and strong NIR fluorescence emission in physiological solutions. The newly developed probe exhibits excellent properties including good specificity, ultrahigh sensitivity and high imaging resolution. Moreover, DDAB has been applied to measure the real activities of CE2 in complex biological samples, as well as to screen CE2 inhibitors by using tissue preparations as the enzymes sources. The probe has also been successfully used to detect endogenous CE2 in living cells and in vivo for the first time, and the results demonstrate that such detection is highly reliable. All these prominent features of DDAB make it holds great promise for further investigation on CE2-associated biological process and for exploring the physiological functions of CE2 in living systems.

  6. Self-referencing remote optical probe

    DOEpatents

    O'Rourke, Patrick E.; Prather, William S.; Livingston, Ronald R.

    1991-01-01

    A probe for remote spectrometric measurements of fluid samples having a hollow probe body with a sliding reflective plug therein and a lens at one end, ports for admitting and expelling the fluid sample and a means for moving the reflector so that reference measurement can be made with the reflector in a first position near the lens and a sample measurement can be made with the reflector away from the lens and the fluid sample between the reflector and the lens. Comparison of the two measurements will yield the composition of the fluid sample. The probe is preferably used for remote measurements and light is carried to and from the probe via fiber optic cables.

  7. Optical Overlay Versus Electric Probe Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Keith Y.; Blachowicz, Betty A.

    1989-07-01

    The predominant method used in the past for the measurement of overlay has been manual reading of the "optical vernier." This method can be reasonably precise and has been sufficient for most semiconductor products made up until a few short years ago. The ever-increasing number of masking levels below 1.5-micron Minimum Feature Size (MFS) requires large statistical bases of overlay measurements with quick turnaround. No longer are 4 to 10 sites per wafer sufficient to accurately judge overlay, nor can we afford to wait 20 minutes for an operator to manually read these verniers. For years, Perkin-Elmer has used a unique and proprietary electrical probe system custom-built by Perkin-Elmer prior to the introduction of the Micralign Model 500. Capable of gathering large amounts of data and performing statistical analysis, it became a standard for overlay evaluation within Perkin-Elmer. An alternative to electrical probe is automated optical measurement. One such system is the Perkin-Elmer OMSTM. This system has the advantage of being "non destructive" and can be used to measure actual product wafers in process. This paper will provide a performance comparison of both techniques, optical and electrical. Using a mask with both optical and electrical probe patterns, a series of wafers was exposed. The evaluation compares accuracy, precision, speed, and statistical capabilities.

  8. Optical fiber photoacoustic-photothermal probe.

    PubMed

    Beard, P C; Pérennès, F; Draguioti, E; Mills, T N

    1998-08-01

    We describe the operation of an all-optical probe that provides an alternative means of implementing photoacoustic and photothermal investigative techniques, particularly those used in biomedical applications. The probe is based on a transparent, acoustically and thermally sensitive Fabry-Perot polymer film sensor mounted at the end of an optical fiber. We demonstrate the ability of the system to make photoacoustic and photothermal measurements simultaneously and evaluate its photothermal response, using a nonscattering liquid target of known and adjustable absorption coefficient. The acoustic and thermal noise floors were 2 kPa and 6 x 10(-3) degrees C , respectively, obtained over a 25-MHz measurement bandwidth and 30 signal averages.

  9. Optically guided large-nanostructure probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchman, Herschel M.; Wetsel, Grover C., Jr.

    1993-05-01

    A large-nanostructure probe with optically guided macroscopic scanning has been developed for high-resolution imaging and characterization of nanostructures. The novel optical viewing system allows placement of the imaging tip to within 1 μm of a desired site on the sample during coarse positioning. Fine positioning and imaging are accomplished with nanometer-scale resolution using a segmented-tube piezoelectric scanner. High-resolution images of identifiable quantum dots have been obtained to demonstrate the efficacy of the method.

  10. Single optical fiber probe for optogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Ryan; Habibi, Mohammad; Pashaie, Ramin

    2012-03-01

    With the advent of optogenetics, all optical control and visualization of the activity of specific cell types is possible. We have developed a fiber optic based probe to control/visualize neuronal activity deep in the brain of awake behaving animals. In this design a thin multimode optical fiber serves as the head of the probe to be inserted into the brain. This fiber is used to deliver excitation/stimulation optical pulses and guide a sample of the emission signal back to a detector. The major trade off in the design of such a system is to decrease the size of the fiber and intensity of input light to minimize physical damage and to avoid photobleaching/phototoxicity but to keep the S/N reasonably high. Here the excitation light, and the associated emission signal, are frequency modulated. Then the output of the detector is passed through a time-lens which compresses the distributed energy of the emission signal and maximizes the instantaneous S/N. By measuring the statistics of the noise, the structure of the time lens can be designed to achieve the global optimum of S/N. Theoretically, the temporal resolution of the system is only limited by the time lens diffraction limit. By adding a second detector, we eliminated the effect of input light fluctuations, imperfection of the optical filters, and back-reflection of the excitation light. We have also designed fibers and micro mechanical assemblies for distributed delivery and detection of light.

  11. Creating and Probing Graphene Electron Optics with Local Scanning Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroscio, Joseph

    Ballistic propagation and the light-like dispersion of graphene charge carriers make graphene an attractive platform for optics-inspired graphene electronics where gate tunable potentials can control electron refraction and transmission. In analogy to optical wave propagation in lenses, mirrors and metamaterials, gate potentials can be used to create a negative index of refraction for Veselago lensing and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In circular geometries, gate potentials can induce whispering gallery modes (WGM), similar to optical and acoustic whispering galleries albeit on a much smaller length scale. Klein scattering of Dirac carriers plays a central role in determining the coherent propagation of electron waves in these resonators. In this talk, I examine the probing of electron resonators in graphene confined by linear and circular gate potentials with the scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The tip in the STM tunnel junction serves both as a tunable local gate potential, and as a probe of the graphene states through tunneling spectroscopy. A combination of a back gate potential, Vg, and tip potential, Vb, creates and controls a circular pn junction that confines the WGM graphene states. The resonances are observed in two separate channels in the tunneling spectroscopy experiment: first, by directly tunneling into the state at the bias energy eVb, and, second, by tunneling from the resonance at the Fermi level as the state is gated by the tip potential. The second channel produces a fan-like set of WGM peaks, reminiscent of the fringes seen in planar geometries by transport measurements. The WGM resonances split in a small applied magnetic field, with a large energy splitting approaching the WGM spacing at 0.5 T. These results agree well with recent theory on Klein scattering in graphene electron resonators. This work is done in collaboration with Y. Zhao, J. Wyrick, F.D. Natterer, J. F. Rodriquez-Nieva, C. Lewandoswski, K. Watanabe, T. Taniguchi, N. B

  12. Fluorogenic squaraine dimers with polarity-sensitive folding as bright far-red probes for background-free bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Karpenko, Iuliia A; Collot, Mayeul; Richert, Ludovic; Valencia, Christel; Villa, Pascal; Mély, Yves; Hibert, Marcel; Bonnet, Dominique; Klymchenko, Andrey S

    2015-01-14

    Polarity-sensitive fluorogenic dyes raised considerable attention because they can turn on their fluorescence after binding to biological targets, allowing background-free imaging. However, their brightness is limited, and they do not operate in the far-red region. Here, we present a new concept of fluorogenic dye based on a squaraine dimer that unfolds on changing environment from aqueous to organic and thus turns on its fluorescence. In aqueous media, all three newly synthesized dimers displayed a short wavelength band characteristic of an H-aggregate that was practically nonfluorescent, whereas in organic media, they displayed a strong fluorescence similar to that of the squaraine monomer. For the best dimer, which contained a pegylated squaraine core, we obtained a very high turn-on response (organic vs aqueous) up to 82-fold. Time-resolved studies confirmed the presence of nonfluorescent intramolecular H-aggregates that increased with the water content. To apply these fluorogenic dimers for targeted imaging, we grafted them to carbetocin, a ligand of the oxytocin G protein-coupled receptor. A strong receptor-specific signal was observed for all three conjugates at nanomolar concentrations. The probe derived from the core-pegylated squaraine showed the highest specificity to the target receptor together with minimal nonspecific binding to serum and lipid membranes. The obtained dimers can be considered as the brightest polarity-sensitive fluorogenic molecules reported to date, having ∼660,000 M(-1) cm(-1) extinction coefficient and up to 40% quantum yield, whereas far-red operation region enables both in vitro and in vivo applications. The proposed concept can be extended to other dye families and other membrane receptors, opening the route to new ultrabright fluorogenic dyes.

  13. Cone penetrometer fiber optic raman spectroscopy probe assembly

    DOEpatents

    Kyle, Kevin R.; Brown, Steven B.

    2000-01-01

    A chemically and mechanically robust optical Raman spectroscopy probe assembly that can be incorporated in a cone penetrometer (CPT) for subsurface deployment. This assembly consists of an optical Raman probe and a penetrometer compatible optical probe housing. The probe is intended for in-situ chemical analysis of chemical constituents in the surrounding environment. The probe is optically linked via fiber optics to the light source and the detection system at the surface. A built-in broadband light source provides a strobe method for direct measurement of sample optical density. A mechanically stable sapphire window is sealed directly into the side-wall of the housing using a metallic, chemically resistant, hermetic seal design. This window permits transmission of the interrogation light beam and the resultant signal. The spectroscopy probe assembly is capable of accepting Raman, Laser induced Fluorescence, reflectance, and other optical probes with collimated output for CPT deployment.

  14. Probing the nano-bio interface with nanoplasmonic optical probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, X.; Wu, Linxi; Khanehzar, Ali; Feizpour, Amin; Xu, Fangda; Reinhard, Björn M.

    2014-08-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles have large cross-sections in both optical and electron microscopy and plasmon coupling between noble metal nanoparticles facilitate the characterization of subdiffraction limit separations through spectral analysis of the scattered light in Plasmon Coupling Microscopy (PCM). The size compatibility of noble metal nanoparticles together with the ability to encode specific functionality in a rational fashion by control of the nanoparticle surface makes noble metal nanoparticles unique probes for a broad range of biological processes. Recent applications of the technology include i.) characterization of cellular heterogeneity in nanomaterial uptake and processing through macrophages, ii.) testing the role of viral membrane lipids in mediating viral binding and trafficking, and iii.) characterizing the spatial organization of cancer biomarkers in plasma membranes. This paper reviews some of these applications and introduces the physical and material science principles underlying them. We will also introduce the use of membrane wrapped noble metal nanoparticles, which combine the superb photophysical properties of a nanoparticle core with the biological functionality of a membrane, as probes in PCM.

  15. A Computational Framework for Bioimaging Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Watabe, Masaki; Arjunan, Satya N. V.; Fukushima, Seiya; Iwamoto, Kazunari; Kozuka, Jun; Matsuoka, Satomi; Shindo, Yuki; Ueda, Masahiro; Takahashi, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Using bioimaging technology, biologists have attempted to identify and document analytical interpretations that underlie biological phenomena in biological cells. Theoretical biology aims at distilling those interpretations into knowledge in the mathematical form of biochemical reaction networks and understanding how higher level functions emerge from the combined action of biomolecules. However, there still remain formidable challenges in bridging the gap between bioimaging and mathematical modeling. Generally, measurements using fluorescence microscopy systems are influenced by systematic effects that arise from stochastic nature of biological cells, the imaging apparatus, and optical physics. Such systematic effects are always present in all bioimaging systems and hinder quantitative comparison between the cell model and bioimages. Computational tools for such a comparison are still unavailable. Thus, in this work, we present a computational framework for handling the parameters of the cell models and the optical physics governing bioimaging systems. Simulation using this framework can generate digital images of cell simulation results after accounting for the systematic effects. We then demonstrate that such a framework enables comparison at the level of photon-counting units. PMID:26147508

  16. Molecular Optical Imaging with Radioactive Probes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongguang; Ren, Gang; Miao, Zheng; Zhang, Xiaofen; Tang, Xiaodong; Han, Peizhen; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    Background Optical imaging (OI) techniques such as bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging have been widely used to track diseases in a non-invasive manner within living subjects. These techniques generally require bioluminescent and fluorescent probes. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using radioactive probes for in vivo molecular OI. Methodology/Principal Findings By taking the advantages of low energy window of light (1.2–3.1 eV, 400–1000 nm) resulting from radiation, radionuclides that emit charged particles such as β+ and β− can be successfully imaged with an OI instrument. In vivo optical images can be obtained for several radioactive probes including 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG), Na18F, Na131I, 90YCl3 and a 90Y labeled peptide that specifically target tumors. Conclusions/Significance These studies demonstrate generalizability of radioactive OI technique. It provides a new molecular imaging strategy and will likely have significant impact on both small animal and clinical imaging. PMID:20208993

  17. Luminescent probes for optical in vivo imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Texier, Isabelle; Josserand, Veronique; Garanger, Elisabeth; Razkin, Jesus; Jin, Zhaohui; Dumy, Pascal; Favrot, Marie; Boturyn, Didier; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2005-04-01

    Going along with instrumental development for small animal fluorescence in vivo imaging, we are developing molecular fluorescent probes, especially for tumor targeting. Several criteria have to be taken into account for the optimization of the luminescent label. It should be adapted to the in vivo imaging optical conditions : red-shifted absorption and emission, limited overlap between absorption and emission for a good signal filtering, optimized luminescence quantum yield, limited photo-bleaching. Moreover, the whole probe should fulfill the biological requirements for in vivo labeling : adapted blood-time circulation, biological conditions compatibility, low toxicity. We here demonstrate the ability of the imaging fluorescence set-up developed in LETI to image the bio-distribution of molecular probes on short times after injection. Targeting with Cy5 labeled holo-transferrin of subcutaneous TS/Apc (angiogenic murine breast carcinoma model) or IGROV1 (human ovarian cancer) tumors was achieved. Differences in the kinetics of the protein uptake by the tumors were evidenced. IGROV1 internal metastatic nodes implanted in the peritoneal cavity could be detected in nude mice. However, targeted metastatic nodes in lung cancer could only be imaged after dissection of the mouse. These results validate our fluorescence imaging set-up and the use of Cy5 as a luminescent label. New fluorescent probes based on this dye and a molecular delivery template (the RAFT molecule) can thus be envisioned.

  18. Portable optical fiber probe for in vivo brain temperature measurements.

    PubMed

    Musolino, Stefan; Schartner, Erik P; Tsiminis, Georgios; Salem, Abdallah; Monro, Tanya M; Hutchinson, Mark R

    2016-08-01

    This work reports on the development of an optical fiber based probe for in vivo measurements of brain temperature. By utilizing a thin layer of rare-earth doped tellurite glass on the tip of a conventional silica optical fiber a robust probe, suitable for long-term in vivo measurements of temperature can be fabricated. This probe can be interrogated using a portable optical measurement setup, allowing for measurements to be performed outside of standard optical laboratories.

  19. Portable optical fiber probe for in vivo brain temperature measurements

    PubMed Central

    Musolino, Stefan; Schartner, Erik P.; Tsiminis, Georgios; Salem, Abdallah; Monro, Tanya M.; Hutchinson, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    This work reports on the development of an optical fiber based probe for in vivo measurements of brain temperature. By utilizing a thin layer of rare-earth doped tellurite glass on the tip of a conventional silica optical fiber a robust probe, suitable for long-term in vivo measurements of temperature can be fabricated. This probe can be interrogated using a portable optical measurement setup, allowing for measurements to be performed outside of standard optical laboratories. PMID:27570698

  20. Facile Synthesis of Amine-Functionalized Eu3+-Doped La(OH)3 Nanophosphors for Bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report a straightforward synthesis process to produce colloidal Eu3+-activated nanophosphors (NPs) for use as bioimaging probes. In this procedure, poly(ethylene glycol) serves as a high-boiling point solvent allowing for nanoscale particle formation as well as a convenient medium for solvent exchange and subsequent surface modification. The La(OH)3:Eu3+ NPs produced by this process were ~3.5 nm in diameter as determined by transmission electron microscopy. The NP surface was coated with aminopropyltriethoxysilane to provide chemical functionality for attachment of biological ligands, improve chemical stability and prevent surface quenching of luminescent centers. Photoluminescence spectroscopy of the NPs displayed emission peaks at 597 and 615 nm (λex = 280 nm). The red emission, due to 5D0 → 7F1 and 5D0 → 7F2 transitions, was linear with concentration as observed by imaging with a conventional bioimaging system. To demonstrate the feasibility of these NPs to serve as optical probes in biological applications, an in vitro experiment was performed with HeLa cells. NP emission was observed in the cells by fluorescence microscopy. In addition, the NPs displayed no cytotoxicity over the course of a 48-h MTT cell viability assay. These results suggest that La(OH)3:Eu3+ NPs possess the potential to serve as a luminescent bioimaging probe. PMID:27502647

  1. Electro-optical Probing Of Terahertz Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Romanofsky, R.; Whitaker, J. F.; Valdmanis, J. A.; Mourou, G.; Jackson, T. A.

    1990-01-01

    Electro-optical probe developed to perform noncontact, nondestructive, and relatively noninvasive measurements of electric fields over broad spectrum at millimeter and shorter wavelengths in integrated circuits. Manipulated with conventional intregrated-circuit-wafer-probing equipment and operated without any special preparation of integrated circuits. Tip of probe small electro-optical crystal serving as proximity electric-field sensor.

  2. Impacts of quantum dots in molecular detection and bioimaging of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mashinchian, Omid; Johari-Ahar, Mohammad; Ghaemi, Behnaz; Rashidi, Mohammad; Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: A number of assays have so far been exploited for detection of cancer biomarkers in various malignancies. However, the expression of cancer biomarker(s) appears to be extremely low, therefore accurate detection demands sensitive optical imaging probes. While optical detection using conventional fluorophores often fail due to photobleaching problems, quantum dots (QDs) offer stable optical imaging in vitro and in vivo. Methods: In this review, we briefly overview the impacts of QDs in biology and its applications in bioimaging of malignancies. We will also delineate the existing obstacles for early detection of cancer and the intensifying use of QDs in advancement of diagnostic devices. Results: Of the QDs, unlike the II-VI type QDs (e.g., cadmium (Cd), selenium (Se) or tellurium (Te)) that possess inherent cytotoxicity, the I-III-VI 2 type QDs (e.g., AgInS2, CuInS2, ZnS-AgInS2) appear to be less toxic bioimaging agents with better control of band-gap energies. As highly-sensitive bioimaging probes, advanced hybrid QDs (e.g., QD-QD, fluorochrome-QD conjugates used for sensing through fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), quenching, and barcoding techniques) have also been harnessed for the detection of biomarkers and the monitoring of delivery of drugs/genes to the target sites. Antibody-QD (Ab-QD) and aptamer- QD (Ap-QD) bioconjugates, once target the relevant biomarker, can provide highly stable photoluminescence (PL) at the target sites. In addition to their potential as nanobiosensors, the bioconjugates of QDs with homing devices have successfully been used for the development of smart nanosystems (NSs) providing targeted bioimaging and photodynamic therapy (PDT). Conclusion: Having possessed great deal of photonic characteristics, QDs can be used for development of seamless multifunctional nanomedicines, theranostics and nanobiosensors. PMID:25337468

  3. Graphene-based nanomaterials for bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jing; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Huang, Peng

    2016-10-01

    Graphene-based nanomaterials, due to their unique physicochemical properties, versatile surface functionalization, ultra-high surface area, and good biocompatibility, have attracted considerable interest in biomedical applications such as biosensors, drug delivery, bioimaging, theranostics, and so on. In this review, we will summarize the current advances in bioimaging of graphene-based nanomaterials, including graphene, graphene oxide (GO), reduced graphene oxide (rGO), graphene quantum dots (GQDs), and their derivatives. There are two methods to synthesize graphene-based nanomaterials: in situ synthesis and binding method. We will highlight the molecular imaging modalities including optical imaging (fluorescence (FL), two-photon FL, and Raman imaging), PET/SPECT (positron emission tomography/single photon emission computed tomography), MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), PAI (photoacoustic imaging), CT (computed tomography), and multimodal imaging. In the end, we will elaborate on the prospects and challenges of their future bioimaging applications.

  4. Design considerations for miniaturized optical neural probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudmann, Linda; Ordonez, Juan S.; Stieglitz, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Neural probes are designed to selectively record from or stimulate nerve cells. In optogenetics it is desirable to build miniaturized and long-term stable optical neural probes, in which the light sources can be directly and chronically implanted into the animals to allow free movement and behavior. Because of the size and the beam shape of the available light sources, it is difficult to target single cells as well as spatially localized networks. We therefore investigated design considerations for packages, which encapsulate the light source hermetically and have integrated hemispherical lens structures that enable to focus the light onto the desired region, by optical simulations. Integration of a biconvex lens into the package lid (diameter = 300 μm, material: silicon carbide) increased the averaged absolute irradiance ηA by 298 % compared to a system without a lens and had a spot size of around 120 μm. Solely integrating a plano-convex lens (same diameter and material) results in an ηA of up to 227 %.

  5. Optical trapping force combining an optical fiber probe and an AFM metallic probe.

    PubMed

    Liu, Binghui; Yang, Lijun; Wang, Yang

    2011-02-14

    A high-resolution optical trapping and manipulating scheme combining an optical fiber probe and an AFM metallic probe is proposed. This scheme is based on the combination of evanescent illumination and light scattering at the metallic probe apex, which shapes the optical field into a localized, three-dimensional optical trap. Detailed simulations of the electromagnetic fields in composite area and the resulting forces are described the methods of Maxwell stress tensor and three-dimensional FDTD. Calculations show that the scheme is able to overcome the disturbance of other forces to trap a polystyrene particle of up to 10 nm in radius with lower laser intensity (~1040 W/mm2) than that required by conventional optical tweezers (~10(5) W/mm2). Based on the discussion of high manipulating efficiency dependent on system parameters and the implementing procedure, the scheme allowing for effective manipulation of nano-particles opens a way for research on single nano-particle area.

  6. Thiol-chromene click chemistry: a coumarin-based derivative and its use as regenerable thiol probe and in bioimaging applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yutao; Huo, Fangjun; Yin, Caixia; Zheng, Anmin; Chao, Jianbin; Li, Yingqi; Nie, Zongxiu; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón; Liu, Diansheng

    2013-09-15

    The synthesis and characterization of a coumarin-chromene (8, 9-dihydro-2H-cyclopenta[b]pyrano[2,3-f]chromene-2,10(7aH)-dione) (1) derivative and its use for thiol chemosensing in water was reported. Experimental details showed 1 acts as a probe for the detection of thiols including cysteine (Cys), homocysteine (Hcy) and glutathione (GSH), whereas amino acids which do not contain thiols induced no changes in UV-vis spectra and fluorescence emission properties of 1. A possible detection mechanism is a nucleophilic attack of thiols to the α,β-unsaturated ketone in 1 that resulted in a fluorescent coumarin derivative. Further studies showed that 1-thiol derivatives can be applied to the design of regenerative chemodosimeters for Cu(2+), Hg(2+) and Cd(2+) in water based on M(n+)-promoted desulfurization and recovery of 1. Furthermore, the optical properties of the probe and its Cys-addition product were theoretically studied. The ability of probe 1 to detect thiols in living cells (HepG2 cells) via an enhancement of the fluorescence was proved. Moreover, the applicability of 1 for the direct determination of biorelevant thiols in a complex matrix such as human plasma was also demonstrated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Design and synthesis of polymer-functionalized NIR fluorescent dyes--magnetic nanoparticles for bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Yen, Swee Kuan; Jańczewski, Dominik; Lakshmi, Jeeva Lavanya; Dolmanan, Surani Bin; Tripathy, Sudhiranjan; Ho, Vincent H B; Vijayaragavan, Vimalan; Hariharan, Anushya; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Bhakoo, Kishore K; Sudhaharan, Thankiah; Ahmed, Sohail; Zhang, Yong; Tamil Selvan, Subramanian

    2013-08-27

    The fluorescent probes having complete spectral separation between absorption and emission spectra (large Stokes shift) are highly useful for solar concentrators and bioimaging. In bioimaging application, NIR fluorescent dyes have a greater advantage in tissue penetration depth compared to visible-emitting organic dyes or inorganic quantum dots. Here we report the design, synthesis, and characterization of an amphiphilic polymer, poly(isobutylene-alt-maleic anhyride)-functionalized near-infrared (NIR) IR-820 dye and its conjugates with iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for optical and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Our results demonstrate that the Stokes shift of unmodified dye can be tuned (from ~106 to 208 nm) by the functionalization of the dye with polymer and MNPs. The fabrication of bimodal probes involves (i) the synthesis of NIR fluorescent dye (IR-820 cyanine) functionalized with ethylenediamine linker in high yield, >90%, (ii) polymer conjugation to the functionalized NIR fluorescent dye, and (iii) grafting the polymer-conjugated dyes on iron oxide MNPs. The resulting uniform, small-sized (ca. 6 nm) NIR fluorescent dye-magnetic hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit a wider emissive range (800-1000 nm) and minimal cytotoxicity. Our preliminary studies demonstrate the potential utility of these NPs in bioimaging by means of direct labeling of cancerous HeLa cells via NIR fluorescence microscopy and good negative contrast enhancement in T2-weighted MR imaging of a murine model.

  8. Synthesis and application of luminescent single CdS quantum dot encapsulated silica nanoparticles directed for precision optical bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Veeranarayanan, Srivani; Poulose, Aby Cheruvathoor; Mohamed, M Sheikh; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Iwai, Seiki; Nakagame, Yuya; Kashiwada, Shosaku; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Kumar, D Sakthi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the synthesis of aqueous cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots (QDs) and silica-encapsulated CdS QDs by reverse microemulsion method and utilized as targeted bio-optical probes. We report the role of CdS as an efficient cell tag with fluorescence on par with previously documented cadmium telluride and cadmium selenide QDs, which have been considered to impart high levels of toxicity. In this study, the toxicity of bare QDs was efficiently quenched by encapsulating them in a biocompatible coat of silica. The toxicity profile and uptake of bare CdS QDs and silica-coated QDs, along with the CD31-labeled, silica-coated CdS QDs on human umbilical vein endothelial cells and glioma cells, were investigated. The effect of size, along with the time-dependent cellular uptake of the nanomaterials, has also been emphasized. Enhanced, high-specificity imaging toward endothelial cell lines in comparison with glioma cells was achieved with CD31 antibody-conjugated nanoparticles. The silica-coated nanomaterials exhibited excellent biocompatibility and greater photostability inside live cells, in addition to possessing an extended shelf life. In vivo biocompatibility and localization study of silica-coated CdS QDs in medaka fish embryos, following direct nanoparticle exposure for 24 hours, authenticated the nanomaterials’ high potential for in vivo imaging, augmented with superior biocompatibility. As expected, CdS QD-treated embryos showed 100% mortality, whereas the silica-coated QD-treated embryos stayed viable and healthy throughout and after the experiments, devoid of any deformities. We provide highly cogent and convincing evidence for such silica-coated QDs as a model nanoparticle in practice, to achieve in vitro and in vivo precision targeted imaging. PMID:22888233

  9. Optical brush: Imaging through permuted probes

    PubMed Central

    Heshmat, Barmak; Lee, Ik Hyun; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    The combination of computational techniques and ultrafast imaging have enabled sensing through unconventional settings such as around corners, and through diffusive media. We exploit time of flight (ToF) measurements to enable a flexible interface for imaging through permuted set of fibers. The fibers are randomly distributed in the scene and are packed on the camera end, thus making a brush-like structure. The scene is illuminated by two off-axis optical pulses. Temporal signatures of fiber tips in the scene are used to localize each fiber. Finally, by combining the position and measured intensity of each fiber, the original input is reconstructed. Unlike conventional fiber bundles with packed set of fibers that are limited by a narrow field of view (FOV), lack of flexibility, and extended coaxial precalibration, the proposed optical brush is flexible and uses off-axis calibration method based on ToF. The enabled brush form can couple to other types of ToF imaging systems. This can impact probe-based applications such as, endoscopy, tomography, and industrial imaging and sensing. PMID:26868954

  10. Use of a fiber optic probe for organic species determination

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, Amy A.

    1996-01-01

    A fiber optic probe for remotely detecting the presence and concentration organic species in aqueous solutions. The probe includes a cylindrical housing with an organic species indicator, preferably diaminonaphthyl sulfonic acid adsorbed in a silica gel (DANS-modified gel), contained in the probe's distal end. The probe admits aqueous solutions to the probe interior for mixing within the DANS-modified gel. An optical fiber transmits light through the DANS-modified gel while the indicator reacts with organic species present in the solution, thereby shifting the location of the fluorescent peak. The altered light is reflected to a receiving fiber that carries the light to a spectrophotometer or other analysis device.

  11. Fiber Optic Biosensing Probes For Biomedically Important Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Mark A.

    1988-06-01

    Fiber optic biosensing probes for several bioanalytes of clinical and biomedical importance are described. The development of biosensors based on immobilization of a deaminating enzyme at the tip of a fiber optic ammonia sensor is illustrated with a biosensing probe for urea. In addition, biosensors based on the direct fluorometric detection of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) at the tip of an optical fiber device are presented. Probes for lactate and pyruvate illustrate this concept. Finally, preliminary results from an investigation to prepare NADH sensing probes based on immobilized bacterial luciferase are given.

  12. Upconverting NIR Photons for Bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhanjun; Zhang, Yuanwei; La, Hieu; Zhu, Richard; El-Banna, Ghida; Wei, Yuzou; Han, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Lanthanide-doped upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) possess unique anti-Stokes optical properties, in which low energy near-infrared (NIR) photons can be converted into high energy UV, visible, shorter NIR emission via multiphoton upconversion processes. Due to the rapid development of synthesis chemistry, lanthanide-doped UCNPs can be fabricated with narrow distribution and tunable multi-color optical properties. These unique attributes grant them unique NIR-driven imaging/drug delivery/therapeutic applications, especially in the cases of deep tissue environments. In this brief review, we introduce both the basic concepts of and recent progress with UCNPs in material engineering and theranostic applications in imaging, molecular delivery, and tumor therapeutics. The aim of this brief review is to address the most typical progress in basic mechanism, material design as bioimaging tools. PMID:28347113

  13. High efficiency upconversion nanophosphors for high-contrast bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkahtani, Masfer H.; Alghannam, Fahad S.; Sanchez, Carlos; Gomes, Carmen L.; Liang, Hong; Hemmer, Philip R.

    2016-12-01

    Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) are of interest because they allow suppression of tissue autofluorescence and are therefore visible deep inside biological tissue. Compared to upconversion dyes, UCNPs have a lower pump intensity threshold, better photostability, and less toxicity. Recently, YVO4: Er+3, Yb+3 nanoparticles were shown to exhibit strong up-conversion luminescence with a relatively low 10 kW cm-2 excitation intensity even in water, which makes them excellent bio-imaging candidates. Herein, we investigate their use as internal probes in insects by injecting YVO4 : Er+3, Yb+3 nanoparticles into fire ants as a biological model, and obtain 2D optical images with 980 nm illumination. High-contrast images with high signal-to-noise ratio are observed by detecting the up-conversion fluorescence as the excitation laser is scanned.

  14. High efficiency upconversion nanophosphors for high-contrast bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Alkahtani, Masfer H; Alghannam, Fahad S; Sanchez, Carlos; Gomes, Carmen L; Liang, Hong; Hemmer, Philip R

    2016-12-02

    Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) are of interest because they allow suppression of tissue autofluorescence and are therefore visible deep inside biological tissue. Compared to upconversion dyes, UCNPs have a lower pump intensity threshold, better photostability, and less toxicity. Recently, YVO4: Er(+3), Yb(+3) nanoparticles were shown to exhibit strong up-conversion luminescence with a relatively low 10 kW cm(-2) excitation intensity even in water, which makes them excellent bio-imaging candidates. Herein, we investigate their use as internal probes in insects by injecting YVO4 : Er(+3), Yb(+3) nanoparticles into fire ants as a biological model, and obtain 2D optical images with 980 nm illumination. High-contrast images with high signal-to-noise ratio are observed by detecting the up-conversion fluorescence as the excitation laser is scanned.

  15. Multimodal nanoparticulate bioimaging contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Parvesh; Singh, Amit; Brown, Scott C; Bengtsson, Niclas; Walter, Glenn A; Grobmyer, Stephen R; Iwakuma, Nobutaka; Santra, Swadeshmukul; Scott, Edward W; Moudgil, Brij M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of bioimaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound, computed X-ray tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography) are commonly employed for clinical diagnostics and scientific research. While all of these methods use a characteristic "energy-matter" interaction to provide specific details about biological processes, each modality differs from another in terms of spatial and temporal resolution, anatomical and molecular details, imaging depth, as well as the desirable material properties of contrast agents needed for augmented imaging. On many occasions, it is advantageous to apply multiple complimentary imaging modalities for faster and more accurate prognosis. Since most imaging modalities employ exogenous contrast agents to improve the signal-to-noise ratio, the development and use of multimodal contrast agents is considered to be highly advantageous for obtaining improved imagery from sought-after imaging modalities. Multimodal contrast agents offer improvements in patient care, and at the same time can reduce costs and enhance safety by limiting the number of contrast agent administrations required for imaging purposes. Herein, we describe the synthesis and characterization of nanoparticulate-based multimodal contrast agent for noninvasive bioimaging using MRI, optical, and photoacoustic tomography (PAT)-imaging modalities. The synthesis of these agents is described using microemulsions, which enable facile integration of the desired diversity of contrast agents and material components into a single entity.

  16. Multimode-Optical-Fiber Imaging Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Deborah

    1999-01-01

    Currently, endoscopic surgery uses single-mode fiber-bundles to obtain in vivo image information inside the orifices of the body. This limits their use to the larger natural orifices and to surgical procedures where there is plenty of room for manipulation. The knee joint, for example, can be easily viewed with a fiber optic viewer, but joints in the finger cannot. However, there are a host of smaller orifices where fiber endoscopy would play an important role if a cost effective fiber probe were developed with small enough dimensions (less than or equal to 250 microns). Examples of beneficiaries of micro-endoscopes are the treatment of the Eustatian tube of the middle ear, the breast ducts, tear ducts, coronary arteries, fallopian tubes, as well as the treatment of salivary duct parotid disease, and the neuro endoscopy of the ventricles and spinal canal. This work describes an approach for recovering images from tightly confined spaces using multimode. The concept draws upon earlier works that concentrated on image recovery after two-way transmission through a multimode fiber as well as work that demonstrated the recovery of images after one-way transmission through a multimode fiber. Both relied on generating a phase conjugated wavefront, which was predistorted with the characteristics of the fiber. The approach described here also relies on generating a phase conjugated wavefront, but utilizes two fibers to capture the image at some intermediate point (accessible by the fibers, but which is otherwise visually inaccessible).

  17. Fiber-optic probe design and optical property recovery algorithm for optical biopsy of brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Cappon, Derek J; Farrell, Thomas J; Fang, Qiyin; Hayward, Joseph E

    2013-10-01

    Optical biopsy techniques offer a minimally invasive, real-time alternative to traditional biopsy and pathology during tumor resection surgery. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is a commonly used technique in optical biopsy. Optical property recovery from spatially resolved DRS data allows quantification of the scattering and absorption properties of tissue. Monte Carlo simulation methods were used to evaluate a unique fiber-optic probe design for a DRS instrument to be used specifically for optical biopsy of the brain. The probe diameter was kept to a minimum to allow usage in small surgical cavities at least 1 cm in diameter. Simulations showed that the close proximity of fibers to the edge of the probe resulted in boundary effects due to reflection of photons from the surrounding air-tissue interface. A new algorithm for rapid optical property recovery was developed that accounts for this reflection and therefore overcomes these effects. The parameters of the algorithm were adjusted for use over the wide range of optical properties encountered in brain tissue, and its precision was evaluated by subjecting it to random noise. This algorithm can be adapted to work with any probe geometry to allow optical property recovery in small surgical cavities.

  18. All-optical photoacoustic imaging system using fiber ultrasound probe and hollow optical fiber bundle.

    PubMed

    Miida, Yusuke; Matsuura, Yuji

    2013-09-23

    An all-optical 3D photoacoustic imaging probe that consists of an optical fiber probe for ultrasound detection and a bundle of hollow optical fibers for excitation of photoacoustic waves was developed. The fiber probe for ultrasound is based on a single-mode optical fiber with a thin polymer film attached to the output end surface that works as a Fabry Perot etalon. The input end of the hollow fiber bundle is aligned so that each fiber in the bundle is sequentially excited. A thin and flexible probe can be obtained because the probe system does not have a scanning mechanism at the distal end.

  19. A miniature forward-imaging optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, Karen M.; Shen, Jin-Hui

    2012-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has had a tremendous global health impact upon the current ability to diagnose, treat, and monitor multiple eye diseases. We propose that a miniature forward-imaging OCT probe can be developed for real-time ocular imaging. A miniature 25-gauge forward-imaging probe was designed and developed to use with an 850 nm spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) system (Bioptigen, Inc. Durham, NC). Imaging parameters were determined. Ocular tissues were examined with the miniature OCT probe. A miniature SDOCT probe was developed with the scanning driver within the hand piece. The SDOCT fiber-scanning probe maximally transmitted power of 800 μW. The scanning range was 3 mm when the probe tip was held 3 to 5 mm from the tissue surface. The axial resolution was 6 μm and the lateral resolution was 30-35 μm. The 25-gauge forward-imaging probe was used to image cellophane tape, eyelid skin, cornea, conjunctiva, sclera, iris, anterior lens, anterior chamber angle, retina, retinal tear, retinal detachment, optic nerve head, and optic nerve sheath. Images obtained from the miniature probe appeared similar to images from a 3 mm scanning range of a commercial large handheld OCT probe (Bioptigen, Inc. Durham, NC).

  20. Innovations of wide-field optical-sectioning fluorescence microscopy: toward high-speed volumetric bio-imaging with simplicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiun-Yann

    Optical microscopy has become an indispensable tool for biological researches since its invention, mostly owing to its sub-cellular spatial resolutions, non-invasiveness, instrumental simplicity, and the intuitive observations it provides. Nonetheless, obtaining reliable, quantitative spatial information from conventional wide-field optical microscopy is not always intuitive as it appears to be. This is because in the acquired images of optical microscopy the information about out-of-focus regions is spatially blurred and mixed with in-focus information. In other words, conventional wide-field optical microscopy transforms the three-dimensional spatial information, or volumetric information about the objects into a two-dimensional form in each acquired image, and therefore distorts the spatial information about the object. Several fluorescence holography-based methods have demonstrated the ability to obtain three-dimensional information about the objects, but these methods generally rely on decomposing stereoscopic visualizations to extract volumetric information and are unable to resolve complex 3-dimensional structures such as a multi-layer sphere. The concept of optical-sectioning techniques, on the other hand, is to detect only two-dimensional information about an object at each acquisition. Specifically, each image obtained by optical-sectioning techniques contains mainly the information about an optically thin layer inside the object, as if only a thin histological section is being observed at a time. Using such a methodology, obtaining undistorted volumetric information about the object simply requires taking images of the object at sequential depths. Among existing methods of obtaining volumetric information, the practicability of optical sectioning has made it the most commonly used and most powerful one in biological science. However, when applied to imaging living biological systems, conventional single-point-scanning optical-sectioning techniques often

  1. Raman tags: Novel optical probes for intracellular sensing and imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuee; Wang, Zhong; Mu, Xijiao; Ma, Aning; Guo, Shu

    Optical labels are needed for probing specific target molecules in complex biological systems. As a newly emerging category of tags for molecular imaging in live cells, the Raman label attracts much attention because of the rich information obtained from targeted and untargeted molecules by detecting molecular vibrations. Here, we list three types of Raman probes based on different mechanisms: Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) probes, bioorthogonal Raman probes, and Resonance Raman (RR) probes. We review how these Raman probes work for detecting and imaging proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and other biomolecules in vitro, within cells, or in vivo. We also summarize recent noteworthy studies, expound on the construction of every type of Raman probe and operating principle, sum up in tables typically targeting molecules for specific binding, and provide merits, drawbacks, and future prospects for the three Raman probes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Multimode-Optical-Fiber Imaging Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Deborah

    2000-01-01

    Currently, endoscopic surgery uses single-mode fiber-bundles to obtain in vivo image information inside orifices of the body. This limits their use to the larger natural bodily orifices and to surgical procedures where there is plenty of room for manipulation. The knee joint, for example can be easily viewed with a fiber optic viewer, but joints in the finger cannot. However, there are a host of smaller orifices where fiber endoscopy would play an important role if a cost effective fiber probe were developed with small enough dimensions (< 250 microns). Examples of beneficiaries of micro-endoscopes are the treatment of the Eustatian tube of the middle ear, the breast ducts, tear ducts, coronary arteries, fallopian tubes, as well as the treatment of salivary duct parotid disease, and the neuro endoscopy of the ventricles and spinal canal. To solve this problem, this work describes an approach for recovering images from. tightly confined spaces using multimode fibers and analytically demonstrates that the concept is sound. The proof of concept draws upon earlier works that concentrated on image recovery after two-way transmission through a multimode fiber as well as work that demonstrated the recovery of images after one-way transmission through a multimode fiber. Both relied on generating a phase conjugated wavefront which was predistorted with the characteristics of the fiber. The described approach also relies on generating a phase conjugated wavefront, but utilizes two fibers to capture the image at some intermediate point (accessible by the fibers, but which is otherwise visually unaccessible).

  3. Multimode-Optical-Fiber Imaging Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Deborah

    2000-01-01

    Currently, endoscopic surgery uses single-mode fiber-bundles to obtain in vivo image information inside orifices of the body. This limits their use to the larger natural bodily orifices and to surgical procedures where there is plenty of room for manipulation. The knee joint, for example can be easily viewed with a fiber optic viewer, but joints in the finger cannot. However, there are a host of smaller orifices where fiber endoscopy would play an important role if a cost effective fiber probe were developed with small enough dimensions (< 250 microns). Examples of beneficiaries of micro-endoscopes are the treatment of the Eustatian tube of the middle ear, the breast ducts, tear ducts, coronary arteries, fallopian tubes, as well as the treatment of salivary duct parotid disease, and the neuro endoscopy of the ventricles and spinal canal. To solve this problem, this work describes an approach for recovering images from. tightly confined spaces using multimode fibers and analytically demonstrates that the concept is sound. The proof of concept draws upon earlier works that concentrated on image recovery after two-way transmission through a multimode fiber as well as work that demonstrated the recovery of images after one-way transmission through a multimode fiber. Both relied on generating a phase conjugated wavefront which was predistorted with the characteristics of the fiber. The described approach also relies on generating a phase conjugated wavefront, but utilizes two fibers to capture the image at some intermediate point (accessible by the fibers, but which is otherwise visually unaccessible).

  4. Use of a fiber optic probe for organic species determination

    DOEpatents

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-12-10

    A fiber optic probe is described for remotely detecting the presence and concentration organic species in aqueous solutions. The probe includes a cylindrical housing with an organic species indicator, preferably diaminonaphthyl sulfonic acid adsorbed in a silica gel (DANS-modified gel), contained in the probe`s distal end. The probe admits aqueous solutions to the probe interior for mixing within the DANS-modified gel. An optical fiber transmits light through the DANS-modified gel while the indicator reacts with organic species present in the solution, thereby shifting the location of the fluorescent peak. The altered light is reflected to a receiving fiber that carries the light to a spectrophotometer or other analysis device. 5 figs.

  5. Novel fibre-optic-based ionization radiation probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, David A.

    2004-06-01

    CsI ionization radiation probes interrogated via a fiber optic transceiver link for monitoring medical procedures such as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy, Brachytherapy and Nuclear Medicine are presented together with potential industrial, environmental and military applications.

  6. Near-Field Optical Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Pointed Probes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    metal nanostructure can be viewed as an optical antenna . Of course, the efficiency depends on the material composition and the geometry of the...nanostructure. A simple form of optical antenna is a single ellipsoidal particle. This particle ex- hibits a distinct resonance for which the field...Grober RD, Schoelkopf RJ, Prober DE. 1997. Optical antenna : towards a unity efficiency near-field optical probe. Appl. Phys. Lett. 70:1354 54. Farahani

  7. Reflective fiber optic probe for surface finish survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzyniuk, Leszek

    1995-06-01

    The Report relates to verification of the design of refractive fiber optic probes designed for checking surface finish condition and provides a description of tests on the models of such probes. Presented in the paper are the results of performance tests of a bifurcated probe to the concept of application of a non-random bundle of light guides for identification of surfaces representing different CLA values (0.32, 0.63, 1.25, 2.50 micrometers).

  8. Whispering Gallery Optical Resonator Spectroscopic Probe and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a spectroscopic probe comprising at least one whispering gallery mode optical resonator disposed on a support, the whispering gallery mode optical resonator comprising a continuous outer surface having a cross section comprising a first diameter and a second diameter, wherein the first diameter is greater than the second diameter. A method of measuring a Raman spectrum and an Infra-red spectrum of an analyte using the spectroscopic probe is also disclosed.

  9. Luminescent gold nanoparticles for bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chen

    Inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with tunable and diverse material properties hold great potential as contrast agents for better disease management. Over the past decades, luminescent gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with intrinsic emissions ranging from the visible to the near infrared have been synthesized and emerge as a new class of fluorophores for bioimaging. This dissertation aims to fundamentally understand the structure-property relationships in luminescent AuNPs and apply them as contrast agents to address some critical challenges in bioimaging at both the in vitro and in vivo level. In Chapter 2, we described the synthesized ~20 nm polycrystalline AuNPs (pAuNPs), which successfully integrated and enhanced plasmonic and fluorescence properties into a single AuNP through the grain size effect. The combination of these properties in one NP enabled AuNPs to serve as a multimodal contrast agent for in vitro optical microscopic imaging, making it possible to develop correlative microscopic imaging techniques. In Chapters 3-5, we proposed a feasible approach to optimize the in vivo kinetics and clearance profile of nanoprobes for multimodality in vivo bioimaging applications by using straightforward surface chemistry with luminescent AuNPs as a model. Luminescent glutathione-coated AuNPs of ~2 nm were synthesized. Investigation of the biodistribution showed that these glutathione-coated AuNPs (GS-AuNPs) exhibit stealthiness to the reticuloendothelial system (RES) organs and efficient renal clearance, with only 3.7+/-1.9% and 0.3+/-0.1% accumulating in the liver and spleen, and over 65% of the injection dose cleared out via the urine within the first 72 hours. In addition, ~2.5 nm NIR-emitting radioactive glutathione-coated [198Au]AuNPs (GS-[198Au]AuNPs) were synthesized for further evaluation of the pharmacokinetic profile of GS-AuNPs and potential multimodal imaging. The results showed that the GS-[198Au]AuNPs behave like small-molecule contrast agents in

  10. Magnetic field concentrator for probing optical magnetic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Wróbel, Piotr; Szoplik, Tomasz

    2010-12-06

    Development of all dielectric and plasmonic metamaterials with a tunable optical frequency magnetic response creates a need for new inspection techniques. We propose a method of measuring magnetic responses of such metamaterials within a wide range of optical frequencies with a single probe. A tapered fiber probe with a radially corrugated metal coating concentrates azimuthally polarized light in the near-field into a subwavelength spot the longitudinal magnetic field component which is much stronger than the perpendicular electric one. The active probe may be used in a future scanning near-field magnetic microscope for studies of magnetic responses of subwavelength elementary cells of metamaterials.

  11. An excited state intramolecular proton transfer dye based fluorescence turn-on probe for fast detection of thiols and its applications in bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yun; Xue, Yuanyuan; Li, Haoyang; Zhu, Ruitao; Ren, Yuehong; Shi, Qinghua; Wang, Song; Guo, Wei

    2017-03-01

    In this study, a new fluorescent probe 2-(2‧-hydroxy-5‧-N-maleimide phenyl)-benzothiazole (probe 1), was designed and synthesized by linking the excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) fluorophore to the maleimide group for selective detection of thiols in aqueous solution. The fluorescence of probe 1 is strongly quenched by maleimide group through the photo-induced electron transfer (PET) mechanism, but after reaction with thiol, the fluorescence of ESIPT fluorophore is restored, affording a large Stokes shifts. Upon addition of cysteine (Cys), probe 1 exhibited a fast response time (complete within 30 s) and a high signal-to-noise ratio (up to 23-fold). It showed a high selectivity and excellent sensitivity to thiols over other relevant biological species, with a detection limit of 3.78 × 10- 8 M (S/N = 3). Moreover, the probe was successfully applied to the imaging of thiols in living cells.

  12. Selenocysteine detection and bioimaging in living cells by a colorimetric and near-infrared fluorescent turn-on probe with a large stokes shift.

    PubMed

    Li, Meixing; Feng, Weiyong; Zhai, Qisong; Feng, Guoqiang

    2017-01-15

    Selenocysteine (Sec) has emerged as an important sensing target in recent years. In this paper, a colorimetric and near-infrared fluorescent turn-on probe for Sec was developed. This probe features a remarkable large Stokes shift (146nm) and shows a rapid, highly selective detection process for Sec with obvious colorimetric and near-infrared fluorescent (Em 706nm with Ex 560nm) turn-on responses. In addition, this probe can be used to quantitatively detect Sec with high sensitivity with a detection limit of 62nM over a wide linear range (0.2-80μM). Moreover, it was further demonstrated that this NIR fluorescent probe can be employed to image both exogenous and endogenous Sec in living cells, indicating that this probe has great potential for biological applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A Redox-Nucleophilic Dual-Reactable Probe for Highly Selective and Sensitive Detection of H2S: Synthesis, Spectra and Bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Changyu; Wang, Runyu; Cheng, Longhuai; Li, Bingjie; Xi, Zhen; Yi, Long

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an important signalling molecule with multiple biological functions. The reported H2S fluorescent probes are majorly based on redox or nucleophilic reactions. The combination usage of both redox and nucleophilic reactions could improve the probe’s selectivity, sensitivity and stability. Herein we report a new dual-reactable probe with yellow turn-on fluorescence for H2S detection. The sensing mechanism of the dual-reactable probe was based on thiolysis of NBD (7-nitro-1,2,3-benzoxadiazole) amine (a nucleophilic reaction) and reduction of azide to amine (a redox reaction). Compared with its corresponding single-reactable probes, the dual-reactable probe has higher selectivity and fluorescence turn-on fold with magnitude of multiplication from that of each single-reactable probe. The highly selective and sensitive properties enabled the dual-reactable probe as a useful tool for efficiently sensing H2S in aqueous buffer and in living cells.

  14. Optical frequency domain imaging with a rapidly swept laser in the 1300nm bio-imaging window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meleppat, Ratheesh Kumar; Vadakke Matham, Murukeshan; Seah, Leong Keey

    2015-07-01

    Optical frequency domain imaging system (OFDI) in the 1300nm biological imaging window is demonstrated by using a high speed frequency swept laser source. The output of the laser with central wave length of 1320nm is continuously tuned over a bandwidth of 100nm with a repetition rate of 16 KHz. The laser source has an instantaneous coherence length of 6mm and delivers an average power of 12mW. Axial resolution ~ 6μm in the biological tissue and peak sensitivity of 110dB are achieved. The experimentally determined values of the imaging parameters such as the axial resolution, sensitivity and depth range are found to be in good agreement with the theoretically estimated values. The developed system is capable of generating the images of size 512x1024 at a rate of 20 frames per second. High resolution and high contrast images of the finger nail and anterior chamber of a pig's eye acquired using the developed OFDI system are presented, which demonstrate the feasibility of the system for in-vivo biomedical imaging applications.

  15. Multi-function diamond film fiber optic probe and measuring system employing same

    DOEpatents

    Young, J.P.

    1998-11-24

    A fused fiber optic probe having a protective cover, a fiber optic probe system, and embodiments thereof for conducting electromagnetic spectral measurements are disclosed. The fused fiber optic probe comprises a probe tip having a specific geometrical configuration, an exciting optical fiber and at least one collection optical fiber fused within a housing, preferably silica, with a protective cover disposed over at least a portion of the probe tip. The specific geometrical configurations in which the probe tip can be shaped include a slanted probe tip with an angle greater than 0{degree}, an inverted cone-shaped probe tip, and a lens head. 9 figs.

  16. Enhancing Quantum Dots for Bioimaging using Advanced Surface Chemistry and Advanced Optical Microscopy: Application to Silicon Quantum Dots (SiQDs).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaoyu; Hinde, Elizabeth; Owen, Dylan M; Lowe, Stuart B; Reece, Peter J; Gaus, Katharina; Gooding, J Justin

    2015-10-28

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy is successfully demonstrated in both one- and two-photon cases with surface modified, nanocrystalline silicon quantum dots in the context of bioimaging. The technique is further demonstrated in combination with Förster resonance energy transfer studies where the color of the nanoparticles is tuned by using organic dye acceptors directly conjugated onto the nanoparticle surface. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Design of a fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy handheld probe

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuan; Sheng, Mingyu; Huang, Lin; Tang, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy (MPM) system with handheld probe using femtosecond fiber laser. Here we present the detailed optical design and analysis of the handheld probe. The optical systems using Lightpath 352140 and 352150 as objective lens were analyzed. A custom objective module that includes Lightpath 355392 and two customized corrective lenses was designed. Their performances were compared by wavefront error, field curvature, astigmatism, F-θ error, and tolerance in Zemax simulation. Tolerance analysis predicted the focal spot size to be 1.13, 1.19 and 0.83 µm, respectively. Lightpath 352140 and 352150 were implemented in experiment and the measured lateral resolution was 1.22 and 1.3 µm, respectively, which matched with the prediction. MPM imaging by the handheld probe were conducted on leaf, fish scale and rat tail tendon. The MPM resolution can potentially be improved by the custom objective module. PMID:27699109

  18. Hollow fiber optic probe for in vivo Raman measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katagiri, Takashi; Hattori, Yusuke; Komachi, Yuichi; Matsuura, Yuji; Tashiro, Hideo; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2006-10-01

    A hollow optical fiber Raman probe equipped with a ball lens is developed to study the stomach cancer. The probe generates little Raman scattering or fluorescence noise because the HOF confine light into the air core. In order to maximize the collection efficiency and the spatial resolution, material and size of the ball lens is optimized. The total diameter of the probe head is 0.64 mm. The probe is useful for measurement of layered sample by the contact mode because it has very short focal length and high depth resolution. In vivo experiments in a stomach of a living rat demonstrate the high viability of the probe for noninvasive diagnosis of the stomach cancer.

  19. Multiple-Fiber-Optic Probe For Light-Scattering Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans Singh; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1996-01-01

    Multiple-fiber-optical probe developed for use in measuring light scattered at various angles from specimens of materials. Designed for both static and dynamic light-scattering measurements of colloidal dispersions. Probe compact, rugged unit containing no moving parts and remains stationary during operation. Not restricted to operation in controlled, research-laboratory environment. Positioned inside or outside light-scattering chamber. Provides simultaneous measurements at small angular intervals over range of angles, made to include small scattering angles by orienting probe in appropriate direction.

  20. Raman imaging of biofilms using gold sputtered fiber optic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, Christina Grace Charlet; Manoharan, Hariharan; Subrahmanyam, Aryasomayajula; Sai, V. V. Raghavendra

    2016-12-01

    In this work we report characterization of bacterial biofilm using gold sputtered optical fiber probe as substrates for confocal Raman spectroscopy measurements. The chemical composition and the heterogeneity of biofilms in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) was evaluated. The spatial distribution of bacterial biofilm on the substrates during their growth phase was studied using Raman imaging. Further, the influence of substrate's surface on bacterial adhesion was investigated by studying growth of biofilms on surfaces with hydrophilic and hydrophobic coatings. This study validates the use of gold sputtered optical fiber probes as SERS substrates in confocal microscopic configuration to identify and characterize clinically relevant biofilms.

  1. All optical indentation probe for endoscopic diagnosis of ostheoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, G.; Jost, M.; Steinkopff, A.; Prein, C.; Aszodi, A.; Clausen-Schaumann, H.; Roths, J.

    2015-05-01

    A novel kind of miniaturized, all optical probe concept to measure the elasticity of biological tissues is here presented. The probe is based on fibre Bragg grating sensors (FBG) inscribed in optical fibres. The measurement procedure exploits the high strain sensitivity of Bragg gratings. A study on the reproducibility, reliability, and resolution of the sensor is presented and a first measurement on bovine cartilage tissue is reported. A linear elastic model of the cartilage has been used to analyse the data. The results indicate a good agreement with previous values given in the literature for micro-indentation.

  2. Optical Probes for Laser Induced Shocks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    waves generated by a laser -induced plasma were investigated using a pump - and-probe technique. Both 7-ns and 40-ps laser pulses at 1.06 gIm were employed...what follows, a TEM00 the time it takes to ablate a layer of thickness 60, i.e., the laser beam is assumed. To describe this I apply the results...Frauchiger and W. Liithy, Opt. Quantum Electron. 19, 231 (1987). transverse the irradiated spot during the laser pulse, as is ’It should read i 10(dv

  3. Probing exoplanet clouds with optical phase curves.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Antonio García; Isaak, Kate G

    2015-11-03

    Kepler-7b is to date the only exoplanet for which clouds have been inferred from the optical phase curve--from visible-wavelength whole-disk brightness measurements as a function of orbital phase. Added to this, the fact that the phase curve appears dominated by reflected starlight makes this close-in giant planet a unique study case. Here we investigate the information on coverage and optical properties of the planet clouds contained in the measured phase curve. We generate cloud maps of Kepler-7b and use a multiple-scattering approach to create synthetic phase curves, thus connecting postulated clouds with measurements. We show that optical phase curves can help constrain the composition and size of the cloud particles. Indeed, model fitting for Kepler-7b requires poorly absorbing particles that scatter with low-to-moderate anisotropic efficiency, conclusions consistent with condensates of silicates, perovskite, and silica of submicron radii. We also show that we are limited in our ability to pin down the extent and location of the clouds. These considerations are relevant to the interpretation of optical phase curves with general circulation models. Finally, we estimate that the spherical albedo of Kepler-7b over the Kepler passband is in the range 0.4-0.5.

  4. Probing exoplanet clouds with optical phase curves

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Antonio García; Isaak, Kate G.

    2015-01-01

    Kepler-7b is to date the only exoplanet for which clouds have been inferred from the optical phase curve—from visible-wavelength whole-disk brightness measurements as a function of orbital phase. Added to this, the fact that the phase curve appears dominated by reflected starlight makes this close-in giant planet a unique study case. Here we investigate the information on coverage and optical properties of the planet clouds contained in the measured phase curve. We generate cloud maps of Kepler-7b and use a multiple-scattering approach to create synthetic phase curves, thus connecting postulated clouds with measurements. We show that optical phase curves can help constrain the composition and size of the cloud particles. Indeed, model fitting for Kepler-7b requires poorly absorbing particles that scatter with low-to-moderate anisotropic efficiency, conclusions consistent with condensates of silicates, perovskite, and silica of submicron radii. We also show that we are limited in our ability to pin down the extent and location of the clouds. These considerations are relevant to the interpretation of optical phase curves with general circulation models. Finally, we estimate that the spherical albedo of Kepler-7b over the Kepler passband is in the range 0.4–0.5. PMID:26489652

  5. Development of a two-photon fluorescent turn-on probe with far-red emission for thiophenols and its bioimaging application in living tissues.

    PubMed

    Shang, Huiming; Chen, Hua; Tang, Yonghe; Ma, Yanyan; Lin, Weiying

    2017-09-15

    Thiophenol is a highly toxic compound which is essential in the field of organic synthesis and drug design. However, the accumulation of thiophenols in the environment may cause serious health problems for human bodies ultimately. Therefore, it is critical to develop efficient methods for visualization of thiophenol species in biological samples. In this work, an innovative two-photon fluorescent turn-on probe FR-TP with far-red emission for thiophenols based on FR-NH2 fluorophore and 2,4-dinitrophenylsulfonyl recognition site was reported. The new probe can be used for thiophenol detection with large far-red fluorescence enhancement (about 155-fold), rapid response (completed within 100s), excellent sensitivity (DL 0.363μM), high selectivity, and lower cellular auto-fluorescence interference. Importantly, the probe FR-TP can be successfully employed to visualize thiophenols not only in the living HeLa cells but also in living liver tissues. In addition, through two-photon tissue imaging, the probe was used to monitor and investigate biological thiophenol poisoning in the animal model of thiophenol inhalation for the first time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Naked-eye and near-infrared fluorescence probe for hydrazine and its applications in in vitro and in vivo bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianjian; Ning, Lulu; Liu, Jiting; Wang, Jianxi; Yu, Bianfei; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yao, Xiaojun; Zhang, Ziping; Zhang, Haixia

    2015-09-01

    Hydrazine has been applied diffusely in most of the chemical industry; however, it is a hazardous environmental pollutant and highly toxic to organisms. Selective, rapid, and sensitive detection of hydrazine thus becomes absolutely necessary in both biological and environmental sciences. Accordingly, fluorescence probes for hydrazine have been paid great attention in recent years. Disclosed here is the near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence probe with a turn-on fluorescent probe CyJ based on the structure-emission property relationships of the NIR dyes containing an acetyl group as the recognizing moiety. This new probe not only can be readily prepared, but also shows excellent sensing properties. First and most important of all, CyJ is highly selective for N2H4 over various anions, cations, and other amino compounds and has a low limit of detection (LOD) of hydrazine (5.4 ppb as fluorescence sensor and 6.1 ppb as UV sensor). Besides, CyJ exhibited a dramatic increase in fluorescence at λmax = 706 nm in the presence of N2H4, and it offers a rapid, colorimetric and vapor sensing detection process for N2H4 in both aqueous solution and diluted human serum. Furthermore, CyJ has good cell-membrane permeability and low cytotoxicity. In addition, we have successfully applied the CyJ to visualize N2H4 in live mouse and, for the first time, in tissues such as the liver, lung, kidney, heart, and spleen.

  7. AGP (Astrometric Gravitation Probe) optical design report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, Alberto; Gai, Mario; Landini, Federico; Lazzarini, Paolo; Gallieni, Daniele; Tintori, Matteo; Anselmi, Alberto; Cesare, Stefano; Busonero, Deborah; Lattanzi, Mario Gilberto; Vecchiato, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes the current opto-mechanical design of AGP, a mission designed for astrometric verification of General Relativity (GR) and competing gravitation theories by means of precise determination of light deflection on field stars, and of orbital parameters of selected Solar System objects. The optical concept includes a planar rear-view mirror for simultaneous imaging on the CCD mosaic detector of fields of view also from the direction opposite to the Sun, affected by negligible deflection, for the sake of real time calibration. The precision of astrometric measurements on individual stars will be of order of 1 mas, over two fields separated by few degrees around the Sun and observed simultaneously. We describe the optical design characteristics, with particular reference to manufacturing and tolerancing aspects, evidencing the preservation of very good imaging performance over the range of expected operating conditions.

  8. Effects of probe geometry on transscleral diffuse optical spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Svenmarker, Pontus; Xu, Can T.; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Krohn, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how the geometry of a fiber optic probe affects the transmission and reflection of light through the scleral eye wall. Two geometrical parameters of the fiber probe were investigated: the source-detector distance and the fiber protrusion, i.e. the length of the fiber extending from the flat surface of the fiber probe. For optimization of the fiber optic probe geometry, fluorescence stained choroidal tumor phantoms in ex vivo porcine eyes were measured with both diffuse reflectance- and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The strength of the fluorescence signal compared to the excitation signal was used as a measure for optimization. Intraocular pressure (IOP) and temperature were monitored to assess the impact of the probe on the eye. For visualizing any possible damage caused by the probe, the scleral surface was imaged with scanning electron microscopy after completion of the spectroscopic measurements. A source-detector distance of 5 mm with zero fiber protrusion was considered optimal in terms of spectroscopic contrast, however, a slight fiber protrusion of 0.5 mm is argued to be advantageous for clinical measurements. The study further indicates that transscleral spectroscopy can be safely performed in human eyes under in vivo conditions, without leading to an unacceptable IOP elevation, a significant rise in tissue temperature, or any visible damage to the scleral surface. PMID:22076267

  9. Demonstration of a Fiber Optic Regression Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korman, Valentin; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-01-01

    The capability to provide localized, real-time monitoring of material regression rates in various applications has the potential to provide a new stream of data for development testing of various components and systems, as well as serving as a monitoring tool in flight applications. These applications include, but are not limited to, the regression of a combusting solid fuel surface, the ablation of the throat in a chemical rocket or the heat shield of an aeroshell, and the monitoring of erosion in long-life plasma thrusters. The rate of regression in the first application is very fast, while the second and third are increasingly slower. A recent fundamental sensor development effort has led to a novel regression, erosion, and ablation sensor technology (REAST). The REAST sensor allows for measurement of real-time surface erosion rates at a discrete surface location. The sensor is optical, using two different, co-located fiber-optics to perform the regression measurement. The disparate optical transmission properties of the two fiber-optics makes it possible to measure the regression rate by monitoring the relative light attenuation through the fibers. As the fibers regress along with the parent material in which they are embedded, the relative light intensities through the two fibers changes, providing a measure of the regression rate. The optical nature of the system makes it relatively easy to use in a variety of harsh, high temperature environments, and it is also unaffected by the presence of electric and magnetic fields. In addition, the sensor could be used to perform optical spectroscopy on the light emitted by a process and collected by fibers, giving localized measurements of various properties. The capability to perform an in-situ measurement of material regression rates is useful in addressing a variety of physical issues in various applications. An in-situ measurement allows for real-time data regarding the erosion rates, providing a quick method for

  10. Endoscopic probe optics for spectrally encoded confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongkyun; Carruth, Robert W; Kim, Minkyu; Schlachter, Simon C; Shishkov, Milen; Woods, Kevin; Tabatabaei, Nima; Wu, Tao; Tearney, Guillermo J

    2013-01-01

    Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a form of reflectance confocal microscopy that can achieve high imaging speeds using relatively simple probe optics. Previously, the feasibility of conducting large-area SECM imaging of the esophagus in bench top setups has been demonstrated. Challenges remain, however, in translating SECM into a clinically-useable device; the tissue imaging performance should be improved, and the probe size needs to be significantly reduced so that it can fit into luminal organs of interest. In this paper, we report the development of new SECM endoscopic probe optics that addresses these challenges. A custom water-immersion aspheric singlet (NA = 0.5) was developed and used as the objective lens. The water-immersion condition was used to reduce the spherical aberrations and specular reflection from the tissue surface, which enables cellular imaging of the tissue deep below the surface. A custom collimation lens and a small-size grating were used along with the custom aspheric singlet to reduce the probe size. A dual-clad fiber was used to provide both the single- and multi- mode detection modes. The SECM probe optics was made to be 5.85 mm in diameter and 30 mm in length, which is small enough for safe and comfortable endoscopic imaging of the gastrointestinal tract. The lateral resolution was 1.8 and 2.3 µm for the single- and multi- mode detection modes, respectively, and the axial resolution 11 and 17 µm. SECM images of the swine esophageal tissue demonstrated the capability of this device to enable the visualization of characteristic cellular structural features, including basal cell nuclei and papillae, down to the imaging depth of 260 µm. These results suggest that the new SECM endoscopic probe optics will be useful for imaging large areas of the esophagus at the cellular scale in vivo.

  11. Endoscopic probe optics for spectrally encoded confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, DongKyun; Carruth, Robert W.; Kim, Minkyu; Schlachter, Simon C.; Shishkov, Milen; Woods, Kevin; Tabatabaei, Nima; Wu, Tao; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2013-01-01

    Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a form of reflectance confocal microscopy that can achieve high imaging speeds using relatively simple probe optics. Previously, the feasibility of conducting large-area SECM imaging of the esophagus in bench top setups has been demonstrated. Challenges remain, however, in translating SECM into a clinically-useable device; the tissue imaging performance should be improved, and the probe size needs to be significantly reduced so that it can fit into luminal organs of interest. In this paper, we report the development of new SECM endoscopic probe optics that addresses these challenges. A custom water-immersion aspheric singlet (NA = 0.5) was developed and used as the objective lens. The water-immersion condition was used to reduce the spherical aberrations and specular reflection from the tissue surface, which enables cellular imaging of the tissue deep below the surface. A custom collimation lens and a small-size grating were used along with the custom aspheric singlet to reduce the probe size. A dual-clad fiber was used to provide both the single- and multi- mode detection modes. The SECM probe optics was made to be 5.85 mm in diameter and 30 mm in length, which is small enough for safe and comfortable endoscopic imaging of the gastrointestinal tract. The lateral resolution was 1.8 and 2.3 µm for the single- and multi- mode detection modes, respectively, and the axial resolution 11 and 17 µm. SECM images of the swine esophageal tissue demonstrated the capability of this device to enable the visualization of characteristic cellular structural features, including basal cell nuclei and papillae, down to the imaging depth of 260 µm. These results suggest that the new SECM endoscopic probe optics will be useful for imaging large areas of the esophagus at the cellular scale in vivo. PMID:24156054

  12. Probing magnetic and electric optical responses of silicon nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Permyakov, Dmitry; Sinev, Ivan; Markovich, Dmitry; Samusev, Anton; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel; Valuckas, Vytautas; Kuznetsov, Arseniy I.; Luk'yanchuk, Boris S.; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Neshev, Dragomir N.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2015-04-27

    We study experimentally both magnetic and electric optically induced resonances of silicon nanoparticles by combining polarization-resolved dark-field spectroscopy and near-field scanning optical microscopy measurements. We reveal that the scattering spectra exhibit strong sensitivity of electric dipole response to the probing beam polarization and attribute the characteristic asymmetry of measured near-field patterns to the excitation of a magnetic dipole mode. The proposed experimental approach can serve as a powerful tool for the study of photonic nanostructures possessing both electric and magnetic optical responses.

  13. Developing fibre optic Raman probes for applications in clinical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Oliver; Iping Petterson, Ingeborg E; Day, John C C; Stone, Nick

    2016-04-07

    Raman spectroscopy has been shown by various groups over the last two decades to have significant capability in discriminating disease states in bodily fluids, cells and tissues. Recent development in instrumentation, optics and manufacturing approaches has facilitated the design and demonstration of various novel in vivo probes, which have applicability for myriad of applications. This review focusses on key considerations and recommendations for application specific clinical Raman probe design and construction. Raman probes can be utilised as clinical tools able to provide rapid, non-invasive, real-time molecular analysis of disease specific changes in tissues. Clearly the target tissue location, the significance of spectral changes with disease and the possible access routes to the region of interest will vary for each clinical application considered. This review provides insight into design and construction considerations, including suitable probe designs and manufacturing materials compatible with Raman spectroscopy.

  14. Evaluation of insertion characteristics of less invasive Si optoneural probe with embedded optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morikawa, Takumi; Harashima, Takuya; Kino, Hisashi; Fukushima, Takafumi; Tanaka, Tetsu

    2017-04-01

    A less invasive Si optoneural probe with an embedded optical fiber was proposed and successfully fabricated. The diameter of the optical fiber was completely controlled by hydrogen fluoride etching, and the thinned optical fiber can propagate light without any leakage. This optical fiber was embedded in a trench formed inside a probe shank, which causes less damage to tissues. In addition, it was confirmed that the optical fiber embedded in the probe shank successfully irradiated light to optically stimulate gene transfected neurons. The electrochemical impedance of the probe did not change despite the light irradiation. Furthermore, probe insertion characteristics were evaluated in detail and less invasive insertion was clearly indicated for the Si optoneural probe with the embedded optical fiber compared with conventional optical neural probes. This neural probe with the embedded optical fiber can be used as a simple and easy tool for optogenetics and brain science.

  15. Sensitivity improvement of optical fiber acoustic probe for all-optical photoacoustic imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Atsushi; Iwai, Katsumasa; Katagiri, Takashi; Matsuura, Yuji

    2017-07-01

    An acoustic probe based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer composed of a polymer film attached to the end of an optical fiber was designed and fabricated for an endoscopic, all-optical photoacoustic imaging system. The finesse of the interferometer was improved by forming a half-mirror at the end of the fiber and a partial reflection mirror on the outer surface of the polymer film. A photoacoustic imaging system was constructed by combining the fiber-optic acoustic probe with a bundle of hollow optical fibers used for the excitation of the photoacoustic wave, and an image of blood capillaries in a fish ovarian membrane was successfully obtained.

  16. Optically probing torsional superelasticity in spider silks

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Thakur, Ashish; Panda, Biswajit; Singh, Kamal P.

    2013-11-11

    We investigate torsion mechanics of various spider silks using a sensitive optical technique. We find that spider silks are torsionally superelastic in that they can reversibly withstand great torsion strains of over 10{sup 2−3} rotations per cm before failure. Among various silks from a spider, we find the failure twist-strain is greatest in the sticky capture silk followed by dragline and egg-case silk. Our in situ laser-diffraction measurements reveal that torsional strains on the silks induce a nano-scale transverse compression in its diameter that is linear and reversible. These unique torsional properties of the silks could find applications in silk-based materials and devices.

  17. Optically probing torsional superelasticity in spider silks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Thakur, Ashish; Panda, Biswajit; Singh, Kamal P.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate torsion mechanics of various spider silks using a sensitive optical technique. We find that spider silks are torsionally superelastic in that they can reversibly withstand great torsion strains of over 102-3 rotations per cm before failure. Among various silks from a spider, we find the failure twist-strain is greatest in the sticky capture silk followed by dragline and egg-case silk. Our in situ laser-diffraction measurements reveal that torsional strains on the silks induce a nano-scale transverse compression in its diameter that is linear and reversible. These unique torsional properties of the silks could find applications in silk-based materials and devices.

  18. Coumarin-Based Fluorescent Probes for Dual Recognition of Copper(II) and Iron(III) Ions and Their Application in Bio-Imaging

    PubMed Central

    García-Beltrán, Olimpo; Cassels, Bruce K.; Pérez, Claudio; Mena, Natalia; Núñez, Marco T.; Martínez, Natalia P.; Pavez, Paulina; Aliaga, Margarita E.

    2014-01-01

    Two new coumarin-based “turn-off” fluorescent probes, (E)-3-((3,4-dihydroxybenzylidene)amino)-7-hydroxy-2H-chromen-2-one (BS1) and (E)-3-((2,4-dihydroxybenzylidene)amino)-7-hydroxy-2H-chromen-2-one (BS2), were synthesized and their detection of copper(II) and iron(III) ions was studied. Results show that both compounds are highly selective for Cu2+ and Fe3+ ions over other metal ions. However, BS2 is detected directly, while detection of BS1 involves a hydrolysis reaction to regenerate 3-amino-7-hydroxycoumarin (3) and 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, of which 3 is able to react with copper(II) or iron(III) ions. The interaction between the tested compounds and copper or iron ions is associated with a large fluorescence decrease, showing detection limits of ca. 10−5 M. Preliminary studies employing epifluorescence microscopy demonstrate that Cu2+ and Fe3+ ions can be imaged in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells treated with the tested probes. PMID:24419164

  19. Miniature fibre optic probe for minimally invasive photoacoustic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Sunish J.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Desjardins, Adrien E.; Beard, Paul C.

    2016-03-01

    A miniature (175 μm) all-optical photoacoustic probe has been developed for minimally invasive sensing and imaging applications. The probe comprises a single optical fibre which delivers the excitation light and a broadband 50 MHz Fabry-Pérot (F-P) ultrasound sensor at the distal end for detecting the photoacoustic waves. A graded index lens proximal to the F-P sensor is used to reduce beam walk-off and thus increase sensitivity as well as confine the excitation beam in order to increase lateral spatial resolution. The probe was evaluated in non-scattering media and found to provide lateral and axial resolutions of < 100 μm and < 150 μm respectively for distances up to 1 cm from the tip of the probe. The ability of the probe to detect a blood vessel mimicking phantom at distances up to 7 mm from the tip was demonstrated in order to illustrate its potential suitability for needle guidance applications.

  20. Dynamic Force Sensing Using an Optically Trapped Probing System

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanan; Cheng, Peng; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design of an adaptive observer that is implemented to enable real-time dynamic force sensing and parameter estimation in an optically trapped probing system. According to the principle of separation of estimation and control, the design of this observer is independent of that of the feedback controller when operating within the linear range of the optical trap. Dynamic force sensing, probe steering/clamping, and Brownian motion control can, therefore, be developed separately and activated simultaneously. The adaptive observer utilizes the measured motion of the trapped probe and input control effort to recursively estimate the probe–sample interaction force in real time, along with the estimation of the probing system’s trapping bandwidth. This capability is very important to achieving accurate dynamic force sensing in a time-varying process, wherein the trapping dynamics is nonstationary due to local variations of the surrounding medium. The adaptive estimator utilizes the Kalman filter algorithm to compute the time-varying gain in real time and minimize the estimation error for force probing. A series of experiments are conducted to validate the design of and assess the performance of the adaptive observer. PMID:24382944

  1. Screening far red probes for use on optical biochip devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Njoh, Kerenza L.; Patterson, Laurence H.; Pors, Klaus; Zloh, Mire; Ameer-Beg, Simon; Summers, Huw; Matthews, Daniel; Errington, Rachel J.; Smith, Paul J.

    2006-02-01

    In situ spectral analysis can be used to understand the targeting and interaction of agents in cellular compartments. A range of novel red excitable fluorescent probes, related to the anthraquinone family of anti-cancer agents, were designed for their DNA affinic properties and their ability to enter and penetrate living cells. We report on the spectral features of these probes, both in solution and bound within intact cells, to identify unique fluorescent signatures that exploit their use in bioassays on optical biochip devices. The probes demonstrated red shifted emission spectra and increased 2 photon lifetime, with minimal fluorescent enhancement, upon binding to DNA. Spectral confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed complex emission profiles representing the bound (nuclear) and unbound (cytoplasmic) fractions of the DNA probes within live interphase, mitotic and apoptotic cells. Analysis of the emission peaks encoded the spectra to provide cell compartment recognition and profiles for cells in different cell states. Sampling the entire emission spectra of these probes for cell locating, even in the presence of unbound molecules, provides good signal-to-noise in biochip devices. Furthermore, by sampling the fluorescence output at specific spectral windows we can obtain high spatial information without imaging. The technological challenge is to integrate these fluorophores and appropriate detection capacity onto an optical biochip platform with microfluidic systems for cell handling.

  2. Handheld probes and galvanometer scanning for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duma, V.-F.; Dobre, G.; Demian, D.; Cernat, R.; Sinescu, C.; Topala, F. I.; Negrutiu, M. L.; Hutiu, Gh.; Bradu, A.; Rolland, J. P.; Podoleanu, A. G.

    2015-09-01

    As part of the ongoing effort of the biomedical imaging community to move Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) systems from the lab to the clinical environment and produce OCT systems appropriate for multiple types of investigations in a medical department, handheld probes equipped with different types of scanners need to be developed. These allow different areas of a patient's body to be investigated using OCT with the same system and even without changing the patient's position. This paper reviews first the state of the art regarding OCT handheld probes. Novel probes with a uni-dimensional (1D) galvanometer-based scanner (GS) developed in our groups are presented. Their advantages and limitations are discussed. Aspects regarding the use of galvoscanners with regard to Micro-Electro- Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are pointed out, in relationship with our studies on optimal scanning functions of galvanometer devices in OCT. These scanning functions are briefly discussed with regard to their main parameters: profile, theoretical duty cycle, scan frequency, and scan amplitude. The optical design of the galvoscanner and refractive optics combination in the probe head, optimized for various applications, is considered. Perspectives of the field are pointed out in the final part of the paper.

  3. Development of a noncontact diffuse optical spectroscopy probe for measuring tissue optical properties

    PubMed Central

    Bish, Sheldon F.; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Nichols, Brandon; Tunnell, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Optical reflectance probes are often used as tools to obtain optical spectra from superficial tissues and subsequently determine optical and physiological properties associated with early stage cancer. These probes, when placed directly on the tissue, are known to cause significant pressure-dependent changes in local optical properties. To address this, we fit the probe with an optical device that images the illumination and collection fibers onto the tissue surface, eliminating the influence of contact probe pressure on the sampling area. The noncontact probe addition addresses new optical conditions that may affect its performance such as tissue surface contour, and specular reflections by implementing an autofocusing mechanism and cross polarization. Extracted optical properties of tissue simulating phantoms yield errors of 3.46% in reduced scattering and 8.62% in absorbance. Autofocusing has extended the depth of field from 4 mm to throughout the 12 mm range of autofocus travel, while cross polarization has removed the incidence angle dependent specular reflection component from the collected signal. PMID:22191909

  4. Probing beyond the laser coherence time in optical clock comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hume, David B.; Leibrandt, David R.

    2016-03-01

    We develop differential measurement protocols that circumvent the laser noise limit in the stability of optical clock comparisons by synchronous probing of two clocks using phase-locked local oscillators. This allows for probe times longer than the laser coherence time, avoids the Dick effect, and supports Heisenberg-limited measurement precision. We present protocols for such frequency comparisons and develop numerical simulations of the protocols with realistic noise sources. These methods provide a route to reduce frequency ratio measurement durations by more than an order of magnitude.

  5. Optical probes of membrane potential in heart muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Morad, M; Salama, G

    1979-01-01

    1. The fluorescent dye Merocyanine-540 and the two weakly fluoresecnet dyes Merocyanine-rhodanine and Merocyanine-oxazolone are shown to respond as optical probes of membrane potential in heart muscle. 2. In frog hearts stained with Merocyanine-540, the absorption at 540 nm decreases by 0.1-1.0% and increase at 570 nm excitation wave-length, the fluorescence increases by 1-2%. The time course of all three optical measurements follows the kinetics of the action potential. 3. Merocyanine-rhodanine exhibits potential-dependent optical responses through a 0.5% decrease in absorption at 750 nm, and Merocyanine-oxazolone has a 1.0% decrease in absorption at 720 nm. Their optical responses have a signal-to-noise ratio of 100/1 and 500/1, respectively. 4. The action spectrum of Merocyanine-rhodanine is triphasic in frog heart with an increase in transmittance from 780 to 700, a decrease from 700 to 600, and increase from 600 to 450 nm. Merocyanine-oxazolone shows only increases in transmittance during membrane depolarization. 5. The optical responses of these probes are linear with respect to changes in membrane potential. 6. Pharmacological agents or ionic interventions do not alter the membrane potential sensitivity of Merocyanine-540. 7. Rapid spectrophotometric measurements at various phases of the action potential indicate that the potential dependent optical signals of Merocyanine-540 are produced by changes in amplitude of fluorescence and absorption bands. The lack of wave-length displacement as a function of membrane potential, i.e. electrochromism, is not the mechanism governing the voltage sensitivity of Merocyanine-540. 8. The data suggest that these Merocyanine dyes bind to the plasma membrane and serve as linear optical probes of membrane potential in heart muscle. PMID:314976

  6. Common path endoscopic probes for optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kanwarpal; Gardecki, Joseph A.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2017-02-01

    Background: Dispersion imbalance and polarization mismatch between the reference and sample arm signals can lead to image quality degradation in optical coherence tomography (OCT). One approach to reduce these image artifacts is to employ a common-path geometry in fiber-based probes. In this work, we report an 800 um diameter all-fiber common-path monolithic probe for coronary artery imaging where the reference signal is generated using an inline fiber partial reflector. Methods: Our common-path probe was designed for swept-source based Fourier domain OCT at 1310 nm wavelength. A face of a coreless fiber was coated with gold and spliced to a standard SMF-28 single mode fiber creating an inline partial reflector, which acted as a reference surface. The other face of the coreless fiber was shaped into a ball lens for focusing. The optical elements were assembled within a 560 µm diameter drive shaft, which was attached to a rotary junction. The drive shaft was placed inside a transparent sheath having an outer diameter of 800 µm. Results: With a source input power of 30mW, the inline common-path probe achieved a sensitivity of 104 dB. Images of human finger skin showed the characteristic layers of skin as well as features such as sweat ducts. Images of coronary arteries ex vivo obtained with this probe enabled visualization of the characteristic architectural morphology of the normal artery wall and known features of atherosclerotic plaque. Conclusion: In this work, we have demonstrated a common path OCT probe for cardiovascular imaging. The probe is easy to fabricate, will reduce system complexity and overall cost. We believe that this design will be helpful in endoscopic applications that require high resolution and a compact form factor.

  7. A Fiber Optic Probe for the Detection of Cataracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Dhadwal, Harbans S.

    1993-01-01

    A compact fiber optic probe developed for on-orbit science experiments was used to detect the onset of cataracts, a capability that could eliminate physicians' guesswork and result in new drugs to 'dissolve' or slow down the cataract formation before surgery is necessary. The probe is based upon dynamic light scattering (DLS) principles. It has no moving parts, no apertures, and requires no optical alignment. It is flexible and easy to use. Results are presented for excised but intact human eye lenses. In a clinical setting, the device can be easily incorporated into a slit-lamp apparatus (ophthalmoscope) for complete eye diagnostics. In this set-up, the integrated fiber optic probe, the size of a pencil, delivers a low power cone of laser light into the eye of a patient and guides the light which is backscattered by the protein molecules of the lens through a receiving optical fiber to a photo detector. The non-invasive DLS measurements provide rapid determination of protein crystalline size and its size distribution in the eye lens.

  8. The effect of triamcinolone acetonide on laser-induced choroidal neovascularization in mice using a hypoxia visualization bio-imaging probe

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Shinsuke; Masuda, Tomomi; Nakamura, Shinsuke; Kuchimaru, Takahiro; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Nagasawa, Hideko; kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Hara, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic stress is a risk factor of ocular neovascularization. Hypoxia visualization may provide clues regarding the underlying cause of angiogenesis. Recently, we developed a hypoxia-specific probe, protein transduction domain-oxygen-dependent degradation domain-HaloTag-Rhodamine (POH-Rhodamine). In this study, we observed the localization of HIF-1α proteins by immunohistochemistry and the fluorescence of POH-Rhodamine on RPE-choroid flat mounts. Moreover, we compared the localization of POH-Rhodamine with pimonidazole which is a standard reagent for detecting hypoxia. Next, we investigated the effects of triamcinolone acetonide (TAAC) against visual function that was evaluated by recording electroretinogram (ERG) and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) development. Mice were given laser-induced CNV using a diode laser and treated with intravitreal injection of TAAC. Finally, we investigated POH-Rhodamine on CNV treated with TAAC. In this study, the fluorescence of POH-Rhodamine and HIF-1α were co-localized in laser-irradiated sites, and both the POH-Rhodamine and pimonidazole fluorescent areas were almost the same. Intravitreal injection of TAAC restored the reduced ERG b-wave but not the a-wave and decreased the mean CNV area. Furthermore, the area of the POH-Rhodamine-positive cells decreased. These findings indicate that POH-Rhodamine is useful for evaluating tissue hypoxia in a laser-induced CNV model, suggesting that TAAC suppressed CNV through tissue hypoxia improvement. PMID:25927172

  9. The design of optical fiber vortex flowmeter's probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaolin; Wang, Yutian; Ni, Yang; Li, Jianxia

    2009-07-01

    The vortex flowmeter works in a poor environment, therefore the stability and accuracy of the online testing system have become the core question for getting high accuracy. The optical probe is the main part of the system which produces and obtains the vortex signal. This paper designs the vortex shedder according to the hydromechanics principle, and it is proposed to be ringlike structures, also gives the test results which prove the effectiveness of the shedder on vortex decomposition. A liquid flow online testing system is designed according to the vortex signal characteristics, and the optical fiber is chosen as the sense organ. Then it designed the probe's parameters and the necessary important circuits of the system to further increase its accuracy. It also assembles the sensor system which is designed to insure the rationality, reliability, stability of the structure. Finally it proposed the methods on the coefficient revision and the liquid condition parameter compensation to get higher accuracy.

  10. Optically Levitated Microspheres as a Probe for New Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rider, Alexander; Moore, David; Blakemore, Charles; Lu, Marie; Gratta, Giorgio

    2016-03-01

    We are developing novel techniques to probe new interactions at micron distances using optically levitated dielectric microspheres. Levitated microspheres are an ideal probe for short-range interactions because they are suspended using the radiation pressure at the focus of a laser beam, which means that the microspheres can be precisely manipulated and isolated from the surrounding environment at high vacuum. We have performed a search for unknown charged particles bound within the bulk of the microspheres. Currently, we are searching for the presence of a Chameleon field postulated to explain the presence of dark energy in the universe. In the future we plan to use optically levitated microspheres to search for micron length-scale gravity like interactions that could couple between a microsphere and another mass. We will present resent results from these experiments and plans for future searches for new interactions.

  11. Using optical clock to probe quantum many-body physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jun

    2016-05-01

    The progress of optical lattice clock has benefited greatly from the understanding of atomic interactions. At the same time, the precision of clock spectroscopy has been applied to explore many-body spin interactions including SU(N) symmetry. Our recent work on this combined front of quantum metrology and many-body physics includes the probe of spin-orbital physics in the lattice clock and the investigation of a Fermi degenerate gas of 105 87Sr atoms in a three-dimensional magic-wavelength optical lattice.

  12. Advancement of Miniature Optic Gas Sensor (MOGS) Probe Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda

    2015-01-01

    Advancement of Miniature Optic Gas Sensor (MOGS) Probe Technology" project will investigate newly developed optic gas sensors delivered from a Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Phase II effort. A ventilation test rig will be designed and fabricated to test the sensors while integrated with a Suited Manikin Test Apparatus (SMTA). Once the sensors are integrated, a series of test points will be completed to verify that the sensors can withstand Advanced Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) environments and associated human metabolic profiles for changes in pressure and levels of Oxygen (ppO2), carbon dioxide (ppCO2), and humidity (ppH2O).

  13. Local probing and stimulation of neuronal cells by optical manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cojoc, Dan

    2014-09-01

    During development and in the adult brain, neurons continuously explore the environment searching for guidance cues, leading to the appropriate connections. Elucidating these mechanisms represents a gold goal in neurobiology. Here, I discuss our recent achievements developing new approaches to locally probe the growth cones and stimulate neuronal cell compartments with high spatial and temporal resolution. Optical tweezers force spectroscopy applied in conjunction with metabolic inhibitors reveals new properties of the cytoskeleton dynamics. On the other hand, using optically manipulated microvectors as functionalized beads or filled liposomes, we demonstrate focal stimulation of neurons by small number of signaling molecules.

  14. Near field optical probe for critical dimension measurements

    DOEpatents

    Stallard, Brian R.; Kaushik, Sumanth

    1999-01-01

    A resonant planar optical waveguide probe for measuring critical dimensions on an object in the range of 100 nm and below. The optical waveguide includes a central resonant cavity flanked by Bragg reflector layers with input and output means at either end. Light is supplied by a narrow bandwidth laser source. Light resonating in the cavity creates an evanescent electrical field. The object with the structures to be measured is translated past the resonant cavity. The refractive index contrasts presented by the structures perturb the field and cause variations in the intensity of the light in the cavity. The topography of the structures is determined from these variations.

  15. Near field optical probe for critical dimension measurements

    DOEpatents

    Stallard, B.R.; Kaushik, S.

    1999-05-18

    A resonant planar optical waveguide probe for measuring critical dimensions on an object in the range of 100 nm and below is disclosed. The optical waveguide includes a central resonant cavity flanked by Bragg reflector layers with input and output means at either end. Light is supplied by a narrow bandwidth laser source. Light resonating in the cavity creates an evanescent electrical field. The object with the structures to be measured is translated past the resonant cavity. The refractive index contrasts presented by the structures perturb the field and cause variations in the intensity of the light in the cavity. The topography of the structures is determined from these variations. 8 figs.

  16. Lensed fiber probes designed as an alternative to bulk probes in optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seon Young; Choi, Hae Young; Na, Jihoon; Choi, Woo June; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2008-04-01

    We demonstrate a compact all-fiber sampling probe for an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. By forming a focusing lens directly on the tip of an optical fiber, a compact sampling probe could be implemented. To simultaneously achieve a sufficiently long working distance and a good lateral resolution, we employed a large-mode area photonic crystal fiber (PCF) and a coreless silica fiber (CSF) of the same diameters. A working distance of up to 1270 microm, a 3 dB distance range of 2210 microm, and a transverse resolution of 14.2 microm were achieved with the implemented PCF lensed fiber; these values are comparable to those obtainable with a conventional objective lens having an NA of 0.25 (10 x). The performance of the OCT system equipped with the proposed PCF lensed fiber is presented by showing the OCT images of a rat finger as a biological sample and a pearl as an in-depth sample.

  17. Compact piezoelectric transducer fiber scanning probe for optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Ahsen, Osman O; Liang, Kaicheng; Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Xue, Ping; Li, Xingde; Fujimoto, James G

    2014-01-15

    We developed a compact, optical fiber scanning piezoelectric transducer (PZT) probe for endoscopic and minimally invasive optical coherence tomography (OCT). Compared with previous forward-mount fiber designs, we present a reverse-mount design that achieves a shorter rigid length. The fiber was mounted at the proximal end of a quadruple PZT tube and scanned inside the hollow PZT tube to reduce the probe length. The fiber resonant frequency was 338 Hz using a 17-mm-long fiber. A 0.9 mm fiber deflection was achieved with a driving amplitude of 35 V. Using a GRIN lens-based optical design with a 1.3× magnification, a ∼6 μm spot was scanned over a 1.2 mm diameter field. The probe was encased in a metal hypodermic tube with a ∼25 mm rigid length and covered with a 3.2 mm outer diameter (OD) plastic sheath. Imaging was performed with a swept source OCT system based on a Fourier domain modelocked laser (FDML) light source at a 240 kHz axial scan rate and 8 μm axial resolution (in air). En face OCT imaging of skin in vivo and human colon ex vivo was demonstrated.

  18. Transurethral optical laser knife and probe director for lateral firing laser probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Reza S.

    1993-05-01

    Laser energy has been used by many for transurethral incision of small, obstructive prostates, vesical neck contractures, and urethral strictures. The customary techniques of moving the tip of the laser fiber through a cystoscope with a conventional laser guide, almost tangentially to the tissue to be incised, or drilling radially arranged holes in the scar, or both, have been cumbersome and imprecise. To provide exact control of the laser fiber and precise delivery of laser energy, a new guide was devised. It conducts the quartz fiber through the sheath and along the lens of an optical urethrotome. The tip of the quartz fiber contacts the tissue at an angle of 20 degree(s). KTP/532 laser energy is used to perform internal urethrotomy for urethral stricture, transurethral incision of postoperative contracture of the vesical neck, and transurethral incision of the small prostate under constant visual control. Recently, a straight version of this guide, called probe director, was devised to conduct the newly marketed lateral firing laser probes. This probe director allows precise control of such a probe within the prostatic urethral lumen and excellent maneuverability of the probe during transurethral laser prostatectomy.

  19. Bioimaging for quantitative phenotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiyang; Xia, Xian; Huang, Yi; Chen, Xingwei; Han, Jing-Dong J

    2016-06-01

    With the development of bio-imaging techniques, an increasing number of studies apply these techniques to generate a myriad of image data. Its applications range from quantification of cellular, tissue, organismal and behavioral phenotypes of model organisms, to human facial phenotypes. The bio-imaging approaches to automatically detect, quantify, and profile phenotypic changes related to specific biological questions open new doors to studying phenotype-genotype associations and to precisely evaluating molecular changes associated with quantitative phenotypes. Here, we review major applications of bioimage-based quantitative phenotype analysis. Specifically, we describe the biological questions and experimental needs addressable by these analyses, computational techniques and tools that are available in these contexts, and the new perspectives on phenotype-genotype association uncovered by such analyses.

  20. Optical injection probing of single ZnO tetrapod lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Szarko, Jodi M.; Song, Jae Kyu; Blackledge, Charles Wesley; Swart, Ingmar; Leone, Stephen R.; Li, Shihong; Zhao, Yiping

    2004-11-23

    The properties of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanotetrapod lasers are characterized by a novel ultrafast two-color pump/stimulated emission probe technique. Single legs of tetrapod species are isolated by a microscope objective, pumped by 267 nm pulses, and subjected to a time-delayed 400 nm optical injection pulse, which permits investigation of the ultrafast carrier dynamics in the nanosize materials. With the optical injection pulse included, a large increase in the stimulated emission at 400 nm occurs, which partially depletes the carriers at this wavelength and competes with the normal 390 nm lasing. At the 390 nm lasing wavelengths, the optical injection causes a decrease in the stimulated emission due to the energetic redistribution of the excited carrier depletion, which occurs considerably within the time scale of the subpicosecond duration of the injection pulse. The effects of the optical injection on the spectral gain are employed to probe the lasing dynamics, which shows that the full width at half maximum of the lasing time is 3 ps.

  1. Optical Probes For Continuous Fabry-Perot Velocimetry Inside Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Goosman, D; Wade, J; Garza, R; Avara, G; Crabtree, T; Rivera, A; Hare, D; Tolar, D; Bratton, B

    2004-08-11

    We have used velocimetry for many years at LLNL to measure velocity-time histories of surfaces in dynamic experiments. We have developed and now use special instrumentation to make continuous shock-velocity measurements inside of materials. The goal is to extend the field of velocimetry into a new area of application in shock physics. At the last Congress we reported the successful use of our new filter system for selectively eliminating most of the non- Doppler-shifted light. We showed one record of a fiber embedded inside an explosive making a continuous detonation velocity-time history. At that time it was difficult to obtain complete records. We have now carried out over 65 inexpensive experiments usually using small cylinders or rectangular blocks of explosives or metals. Most were started by detonating a 25 mm diam by 25 mm long cylinder of Comp B explosive to drive a shock into an adjacent material of similar dimensions, using our embedded fiber probes. In contrast to surface velocimetry, embedded measurements involve detailed hydrodynamic considerations in order to result in a successful record. Calculations have guided us in understanding of various failed and successful experiments. The homogeneity of the explosive, poor contact, the materials used in the cladding and core of the fiber optic probes, and the shock speeds to be covered all greatly affect the success of an experiment. For example, a poor contact between the optical fiber and its environment causes severe loss of data. Non-symmetric air gaps on one side of the fiber cause 3 dimensional hydrodynamic effects which cause the shock wave in the fiber core to be too steeply angled to reflect light. We have recently developed and successfully used a special probe to usually overcome this limitation. We have custom designed several unique types of fiber-optic probes for specialty applications, using both solid and liquid core materials, to extend the usable shock-velocity range.

  2. Bioimage Informatics for Big Data.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hanchuan; Zhou, Jie; Zhou, Zhi; Bria, Alessandro; Li, Yujie; Kleissas, Dean Mark; Drenkow, Nathan G; Long, Brian; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Chen, Hanbo

    2016-01-01

    Bioimage informatics is a field wherein high-throughput image informatics methods are used to solve challenging scientific problems related to biology and medicine. When the image datasets become larger and more complicated, many conventional image analysis approaches are no longer applicable. Here, we discuss two critical challenges of large-scale bioimage informatics applications, namely, data accessibility and adaptive data analysis. We highlight case studies to show that these challenges can be tackled based on distributed image computing as well as machine learning of image examples in a multidimensional environment.

  3. Design and fabrication of an optical probe with a phase filter for extended depth of focus.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jingchao; Kim, Junyoung; Yoo, Hongki

    2016-01-25

    The trade-off between spot size and depth of focus (DOF) often limits the performance of optical systems, such as optical coherence tomography and optical tweezers. Although researchers have proposed various methods to extend the DOF in free-space optics, many are difficult to implement in miniaturized optical probes due to space limitations. In this study, we present an optical probe with an extended DOF using a binary phase spatial filter (BPSF). The BPSF pattern was fabricated on the distal tip of an optical probe with a diameter of 1 mm by replica molding soft lithography, which can be easily implemented in a miniaturized optical probe due to its simple configuration. We optimized the BPSF pattern to enhance DOF, spot diameter, and light efficiency. To evaluate the fabricated endoscopic optical probe, we measured the three-dimensional point spread function of the BPSF probe and compared it with a probe without BPSF. The BPSF probe has a spot diameter of 3.56 μm and a DOF of 199.7 μm, while the probe without BPSF has a spot diameter of 3.69 μm and a DOF of 73.9 μm, representing a DOF gain of 2.7. We anticipate that this optical probe can be used in biomedical applications, including optical imaging and optical trapping techniques.

  4. Raman fiber optic probe assembly for use in hostile environments

    DOEpatents

    Schmucker, John E.; Falk, Jon C.; Archer, William B.; Blasi, Raymond J.

    2000-01-01

    This invention provides a device for Raman spectroscopic measurement of composition and concentrations in a hostile environment by the use of a first fiber optic as a means of directing high intensity monochromatic light from a laser to the hostile environment and a second fiber optic to receive the lower intensity scattered light for transmittal to a monochromator for analysis. To avoid damage to the fiber optics, they are protected from the hostile environment. A preferred embodiment of the Raman fiber optic probe is able to obtain Raman spectra of corrosive gases and solutions at temperatures up to 600.degree. F. and pressures up to 2000 psi. The incident exciting fiber optic cable makes an angle of substantially 90.degree. with the collecting fiber optic cable. This 90.degree. geometry minimizes the Rayleigh scattering signal picked up by the collecting fiber, because the intensity of Rayleigh scattering is lowest in the direction perpendicular to the beam path of the exciting light and therefore a 90.degree. scattering geometry optimizes the signal to noise ratio.

  5. Preparation, Characterization and Application of Optical Switch Probes

    PubMed Central

    Petchprayoon, Chutima; Marriott, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Optical switches represent a new class of molecular probe with applications in high contrast imaging and optical manipulation of protein interactions. Small molecule, organic optical switches based on nitrospirobenzopyran (NitroBIPS) and their reactive derivatives and conjugates undergo efficient, rapid and reversible, orthogonal optically-driven transitions between a colorless spiro (SP) state and a colored merocyanine (MC) state. The excited MC-state also emits fluorescence, which serves as readout of the state of the switch. Defined optical perturbations of SP and MC generate a defined waveform of MC-fluorescence that can be isolated against unmodulated background signals by using a digital optical lock-in detection approach or to control specific dipolar interactions on proteins. The protocols describe general procedures for the synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of NitroBIPS and specifically labeled conjugates along with methods for the manipulation of dipolar interactions on proteins and imaging of the MC-state of NitroBIPS within living cells. PMID:22140655

  6. Development of an otolaryngological interferometric fiber optic diagnostic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conerty, Michelle D.; Castracane, James; Saravia, Eduardo; Parnes, Steven M.; Cacace, Anthony T.

    1992-08-01

    Current medical instrumentation research at InterScience, Inc. is aimed at utilizing state of the art electro-optics in the development of a diagnostic fiber optic instrument capable of quantifying vibration patterns in real time. This work is in collaboration with the Division of Otolaryngology of the Albany Medical College. The innovative diagnostic probe system design involves the miniaturization of an electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) system through the use of fiber optic elements coupled with high speed image acquisition from a solid state matrix detector. Subsequent frame by frame processing produces a high quality three-dimensional spatial representation of the vibrational pattern. The diagnostic probe system is being developed for quantitative tympanic membrane and vocal cord vibration analysis. The significance of the introduction of this instrument to the medical community is the contribution it could make in the efficiency and effectiveness of the diagnosis of otolaryngological disorders. Specific applications include the evaluation of tympanosclerosis, stiffness related middle ear disorders, ossicular chain abnormalities, tympanic membrane replacement, vocal dysphonias, and early detection of laryngeal carcinomas, cysts, and phenomenological properties of mucosal wave dynamics. The current instrumentation research is focused on the production of a prototype system for clinical trials. This research is based in ESPI optical system development and miniaturization, system hardware and software development, and clinical design of the probe heads within anatomical limitations. Significant advantages of this diagnostic tool over currently used instrumentation and procedures are the real time capabilities of the instrument, the ability to quantify the vibrational pattern in time and space, and the possibility of establishing a database of patient history and disorder characteristics. Once fully developed and integrated into the clinical

  7. A new optics-based gastroesophageal reflux probe.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Milton P; Simões, J Basílio; Amorim, Vitor; Fernandes, Ana G; Carneirinho, Ana; Coelho, Carlos; Barros, Catarina; Domingues, José P P; Ferreira, Ricardo; Mota, H Carmona da; Correia, Carlos M

    2002-01-01

    This work was carried out with the purpose of developing a new method of gastroesophageal reflux (GOR) detection. It is based on the emission of a light beam to the inferior part of the oesophagus and on the detection and analysis of the corresponding reflected light intensity. The optical properties of the oesophageal lumen are then used to identify the GOR episodes, solving, in this way, the existing drawback of using pH probes that fail in the cases where GOR episodes are neutral or short duration acid. The necessary instrumentation for the application of this new technique, including the probe itself and its associated optics, was developed. The result is a low-cost portable instrument, based on the Microchip microcontroller PIC16C77, with enough flexibility to be used in other biomedical applications. This new simple apparatus only needs an adequate light source - diode laser - and an adequate photosensor - photodiode - to make the interface to the probe that guides the light to and from oesophagus. Our results show the capability of this new technique to make the identification of GOR episodes.

  8. Biocompatible and Photostable AIE Dots with Red Emission for In Vivo Two-Photon Bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dan; Qian, Jun; Qin, Wei; Qin, Anjun; Tang, Ben Zhong; He, Sailing

    2014-03-01

    Bioimaging systems with cytocompatibility, photostability, red fluorescence, and optical nonlinearity are in great demand. Herein we report such a bioimaging system. Integration of tetraphenylethene (T), triphenylamine (T), and fumaronitrile (F) units yielded adduct TTF with aggregation-induced emission (AIE). Nanodots of the AIE fluorogen with efficient red emission were fabricated by encapsulating TTF with phospholipid. The AIE dots enabled three-dimensional dynamic imaging with high resolution in blood vessels of mouse brain under two-photon excitation.

  9. Biocompatible and photostable AIE dots with red emission for in vivo two-photon bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Qian, Jun; Qin, Wei; Qin, Anjun; Tang, Ben Zhong; He, Sailing

    2014-03-17

    Bioimaging systems with cytocompatibility, photostability, red fluorescence, and optical nonlinearity are in great demand. Herein we report such a bioimaging system. Integration of tetraphenylethene (T), triphenylamine (T), and fumaronitrile (F) units yielded adduct TTF with aggregation-induced emission (AIE). Nanodots of the AIE fluorogen with efficient red emission were fabricated by encapsulating TTF with phospholipid. The AIE dots enabled three-dimensional dynamic imaging with high resolution in blood vessels of mouse brain under two-photon excitation.

  10. Probing electric fields within organic transistors by nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Paulo B.; Motti, Silvia G.; Gomes, Douglas J. C.

    2015-03-01

    Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are important building blocks in many organic devices, but further improvements in their performance will require a detailed knowledge of their operation mechanism. Thus mapping the electric fields in OFETs, both in the active organic layer and inside the gate dielectric, will allow a direct comparison with theoretical OFET models and guide advances in device engineering. The nonlinear optical processes of sum-frequency generation (SFG) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) may be used to probe electric fields in OFETs. With a proper choice of pump wavelength, SHG can selectively probe the field component along the OFET channel, inside the organic semiconductor. In contrast, SFG may probe the field within any organic material by selecting a specific molecular vibration and monitoring the field-enhanced SFG signal. Here we investigate OFETs fabricated with a polythiophene derivative (P3HT) on silicon substrates and with the insulating polymer PMMA for the dielectric layer. Both the strength and sign of the electric field in PMMA can be determined, yielding a direct probe of charge accumulation along the OFET channel. An extension of this technique to map the spatial distribution of accumulated charge along the channel will also be discussed. Work funded by FAPESP and CNPq (Brazil).

  11. Plasmonic nanoprobes for SERS biosensing and bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Wang, Hsin-Neng; Scaffidi, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the development and application of plasmonic nanoprobes developed in our laboratory for biosensing and bioimaging. We describe the use of plasmonics surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) gene probes for the detection of diseases using DNA hybridization to target biospecies (HIV gene, breast cancer genes etc.). For molecular imaging, we describe a hyperspectral surface-enhanced Raman imaging (HSERI) system that combines imaging capabilities with SERS detection to identify cellular components using Raman dye-labeled silver nanoparticles in cellular systems The detection of specific target DNA sequences associated with breast cancer using “molecular sentinel” nanoprobes and the use of a plasmonic nanosensor to monitor pH in single cells are presented and discussed. Plasmonic nanosensors and nanoprobes have been developed as sensitive and selective tolls for environmental monitoring, cellular biosensing, medical diagnostics and high throughput screnning. PMID:19517422

  12. A new optical active probe for chronometric measurements in detonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veaux, Jacqueline; Mercier, Patrick; Basseuil, Severine; Benier, Jacky; Vincent de Araujo, Manuel

    2003-07-01

    In our ordinary detonics experiments, the timing measurements are generally done with passive optical fiber sensors. Each sensor end is fitted with a metallic cap which contains a specially machined air chamber known as the "ionization chamber." When a projected metallic plate shocks the sensor, the air located in the ionization chamber receives a strong shock, which ionizes both the trapped air and the fiber silica core. The emitted light travels down the fiber to the slit of an electronic streak camera or an optic/electric converter coupled with a digitizer. One of our main objectives is to measure the shock breakout time very accurately. Such a measurement is practically impossible to make on a sensor of this type due to low shock pressure level and the difficulty of making contact between the sensor and the target especially in complex devices. This is why we have developed a new probe called "active fiber." This probe is located close to the surface (less than 3 mm) and is composed of two fibers; the first is used to illuminate the target with a laser source and the second collects the back-reflected light which is then analyzed with a photo-detector. It is a "no contact" measurement for shock breakout chronometry. At target impact, a light signal is produced according to the capped passive optical fiber principle. When the dynamic pressure level is low (150 kbar) we obtain a better chronometric accuracy.

  13. Solids Fraction Measurement with a Reflective Fiber Optic Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Seachman, S.M.; Yue, P.C.; Ludlow, J.C.; Shadle, L.J.

    2006-11-01

    A method has been developed to extract solids fraction information from a reflective fiber optic probe. The commercially available reflective fiber optic probe was designed to measure axial particle velocity (both up and down directions). However, the reflected light intensity measured is related to particle size and particle concentration. A light reflection model is used to relate the reflected light intensity to solids fraction. In this model we assume that the reflected light intensity is a fixed fraction, K1, of the total light intensity lost in penetration of a solid layer. Also, the solids fraction is related to particle concentration, N, in the light path, by N = K2 (1- ε), where (1-ε) is the solids fraction. The parameters K1 and K2 are determined through a calibration and curve fitting procedure. This paper describes this procedure and the steps taken to derive the values of K1 and K2. It is proposed that the reflective fiber optic can be used for real time measurement of solids fraction in a circulating fluid bed.

  14. Micromachined fiber optic Fabry-Perot underwater acoustic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fuyin; Shao, Zhengzheng; Hu, Zhengliang; Luo, Hong; Xie, Jiehui; Hu, Yongming

    2014-08-01

    One of the most important branches in the development trend of the traditional fiber optic physical sensor is the miniaturization of sensor structure. Miniature fiber optic sensor can realize point measurement, and then to develop sensor networks to achieve quasi-distributed or distributed sensing as well as line measurement to area monitoring, which will greatly extend the application area of fiber optic sensors. The development of MEMS technology brings a light path to address the problems brought by the procedure of sensor miniaturization. Sensors manufactured by MEMS technology possess the advantages of small volume, light weight, easy fabricated and low cost. In this paper, a fiber optic extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric underwater acoustic probe utilizing micromachined diaphragm collaborated with fiber optic technology and MEMS technology has been designed and implemented to actualize underwater acoustic sensing. Diaphragm with central embossment, where the embossment is used to anti-hydrostatic pressure which would largely deflect the diaphragm that induce interferometric fringe fading, has been made by double-sided etching of silicon on insulator. By bonding the acoustic-sensitive diaphragm as well as a cleaved fiber end in ferrule with an outer sleeve, an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer has been constructed. The sensor has been interrogated by quadrature-point control method and tested in field-stable acoustic standing wave tube. Results have been shown that the recovered signal detected by the sensor coincided well with the corresponding transmitted signal and the sensitivity response was flat in frequency range from 10 Hz to 2kHz with the value about -154.6 dB re. 1/μPa. It has been manifest that the designed sensor could be used as an underwater acoustic probe.

  15. Ultra-bright emission from hexagonal boron nitride defects as a new platform for bio-imaging and bio-labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbadawi, Christopher; Tran, Trong Toan; Shimoni, Olga; Totonjian, Daniel; Lobo, Charlene J.; Grosso, Gabriele; Moon, Hyowan; Englund, Dirk R.; Ford, Michael J.; Aharonovich, Igor; Toth, Milos

    2016-12-01

    Bio-imaging requires robust ultra-bright probes without causing any toxicity to the cellular environment, maintain their stability and are chemically inert. In this work we present hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) nanoflakes which exhibit narrowband ultra-bright single photon emitters1. The emitters are optically stable at room temperature and under ambient environment. hBN has also been noted to be noncytotoxic and seen significant advances in functionalization with biomolecules2,3. We further demonstrate two methods of engineering this new range of extremely robust multicolour emitters across the visible and near infrared spectral ranges for large scale sensing and biolabeling applications.

  16. Full-field modeling of the longitudinal electro-optic probe.

    PubMed

    Freeman, J L; Jefferies, S R; Auld, B A

    1987-10-01

    Optical polarization changes and mode coupling due to spatially varying anisotropic perturbations in caused by electro-optic, acousto-optic, and other effects have been widely studied for both plane-wave and fiber mode propagation. A new optical S-parameter analysis of these effects, applicable to arbitrary optical field distributions, is presented. It is applied to evaluating the performance of the longitudinal electro-optic probe used for noninva-sively examining GaAs integrated circuits. Error in probe measurements of circuit voltage distributions can be characterized by considering the probe as a scanned electro-optic spatial filter.

  17. On the passive probing of fiber optic quantum communication channels

    SciTech Connect

    Korol'kov, A. V.; Katamadze, K. G.; Kulik, S. P.; Molotkov, S. N.

    2010-04-15

    Avalanche photodetectors based on InGaAs:P are the most sensitive and only detectors operating in the telecommunication wavelength range 1.30-1.55 {mu}m in the fiber optic quantum cryptography systems that can operate in the single photon count mode. In contrast to the widely used silicon photodetectors for wavelengths up to 1 {mu}m operating in a waiting mode, these detectors always operate in a gated mode. The production of an electron-hole pair in the process of the absorption of a photon and the subsequent appearance of an avalanche of carriers can be accompanied by the inverse processes of the recombination and emission of photons. Such a backward emission can present a potential serious problem for the stability of fiber optic quantum cryptography systems against passive probing. The results of analyzing the detection of backscattered radiation are reported. The probability of such an emission has been estimated.

  18. Integrated fiber optic probe for dynamic light scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Khan, Romel R.; Suh, Kwang

    1993-01-01

    An integrated fiber optic probe, comprising a monomode optical fiber fusion spliced to a short length of a graded-index multimode fiber, is fabricated for use as a coherent receiver in dynamic light scattering. The multimode fiber is cleaved to provide a gradient-index fiber lens with a focal length of 125 microns and an f-number close to unity. An integrated fiber receiver is used to measure the intensity-intensity autocorrelation data from a 0.05 percent by weight concentration of an aqueous suspension of polystyrene latex spheres. Analysis of 100 independent data sets indicates that the particle size can be recovered with an accuracy of +/- 1 percent.

  19. Interferometric strain measurements with a fiber-optic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnham-Fay, E. D.; Jacobs-Perkins, D. W.; Ellis, J. D.

    2015-09-01

    Experience at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics has shown that broadband base vibrations make it difficult to position cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets. These effects must be mitigated for National Ignition Facility-scale targets; to this end an active vibration stabilization system is proposed. A single-mode optical fiber strain probe and a novel fiber contained heterodyne interferometer have been developed as a position feedback sensor for the vibration control system. A resolution limit of 54.5 nƐ; is measured with the optical strain gauge, limited by the lock-in amplifier. Experimental measurements of the sensor that show good agreement with reference resistive strain gauge measurements are presented.

  20. Integrated fiber optic probe for dynamic light scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Khan, Romel R.; Suh, Kwang

    1993-01-01

    An integrated fiber optic probe, comprising a monomode optical fiber fusion spliced to a short length of a graded-index multimode fiber, is fabricated for use as a coherent receiver in dynamic light scattering. The multimode fiber is cleaved to provide a gradient-index fiber lens with a focal length of 125 microns and an f-number close to unity. An integrated fiber receiver is used to measure the intensity-intensity autocorrelation data from a 0.05 percent by weight concentration of an aqueous suspension of polystyrene latex spheres. Analysis of 100 independent data sets indicates that the particle size can be recovered with an accuracy of +/- 1 percent.

  1. A microwave-assisted solution combustion synthesis to produce europium-doped calcium phosphate nanowhiskers for bioimaging applications.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Darcy E; Eisenmann, Kathryn M; Nestor-Kalinoski, Andrea L; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2013-09-01

    Biocompatible nanoparticles possessing fluorescent properties offer attractive possibilities for multifunctional bioimaging and/or drug and gene delivery applications. Many of the limitations with current imaging systems center on the properties of the optical probes in relation to equipment technical capabilities. Here we introduce a novel high aspect ratio and highly crystalline europium-doped calcium phosphate nanowhisker produced using a simple microwave-assisted solution combustion synthesis method for use as a multifunctional bioimaging probe. X-ray diffraction confirmed the material phase as europium-doped hydroxyapatite. Fluorescence emission and excitation spectra and their corresponding peaks were identified using spectrofluorimetry and validated with fluorescence, confocal and multiphoton microscopy. The nanowhiskers were found to exhibit red and far red wavelength fluorescence under ultraviolet excitation with an optimal peak emission of 696 nm achieved with a 350 nm excitation. Relatively narrow emission bands were observed, which may permit their use in multicolor imaging applications. Confocal and multiphoton microscopy confirmed that the nanoparticles provide sufficient intensity to be utilized in imaging applications. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A targeted illumination optical fiber probe for high resolution fluorescence imaging and optical switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Anant; Perinchery, Sandeep Menon; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2017-04-01

    An optical imaging probe with targeted multispectral and spatiotemporal illumination features has applications in many diagnostic biomedical studies. However, these systems are mostly adapted in conventional microscopes, limiting their use for in vitro applications. We present a variable resolution imaging probe using a digital micromirror device (DMD) with an achievable maximum lateral resolution of 2.7 μm and an axial resolution of 5.5 μm, along with precise shape selective targeted illumination ability. We have demonstrated switching of different wavelengths to image multiple regions in the field of view. Moreover, the targeted illumination feature allows enhanced image contrast by time averaged imaging of selected regions with different optical exposure. The region specific multidirectional scanning feature of this probe has facilitated high speed targeted confocal imaging.

  3. A targeted illumination optical fiber probe for high resolution fluorescence imaging and optical switching.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Anant; Perinchery, Sandeep Menon; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2017-04-03

    An optical imaging probe with targeted multispectral and spatiotemporal illumination features has applications in many diagnostic biomedical studies. However, these systems are mostly adapted in conventional microscopes, limiting their use for in vitro applications. We present a variable resolution imaging probe using a digital micromirror device (DMD) with an achievable maximum lateral resolution of 2.7 μm and an axial resolution of 5.5 μm, along with precise shape selective targeted illumination ability. We have demonstrated switching of different wavelengths to image multiple regions in the field of view. Moreover, the targeted illumination feature allows enhanced image contrast by time averaged imaging of selected regions with different optical exposure. The region specific multidirectional scanning feature of this probe has facilitated high speed targeted confocal imaging.

  4. A targeted illumination optical fiber probe for high resolution fluorescence imaging and optical switching

    PubMed Central

    Shinde, Anant; Perinchery, Sandeep Menon; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2017-01-01

    An optical imaging probe with targeted multispectral and spatiotemporal illumination features has applications in many diagnostic biomedical studies. However, these systems are mostly adapted in conventional microscopes, limiting their use for in vitro applications. We present a variable resolution imaging probe using a digital micromirror device (DMD) with an achievable maximum lateral resolution of 2.7 μm and an axial resolution of 5.5 μm, along with precise shape selective targeted illumination ability. We have demonstrated switching of different wavelengths to image multiple regions in the field of view. Moreover, the targeted illumination feature allows enhanced image contrast by time averaged imaging of selected regions with different optical exposure. The region specific multidirectional scanning feature of this probe has facilitated high speed targeted confocal imaging. PMID:28368033

  5. A resonant scanning dipole-antenna probe for enhanced nanoscale imaging.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Lars; van 't Oever, Jorick; van Hulst, Niek F

    2013-11-13

    We present a scanning antenna probe that provides 35 nm optical hotspots with a 16-fold excitation enhancement. A resonant optical antenna, tuned to operation in the visible, is carved into the aluminum-coated scanning probe. The antenna resonances, field localization, excitation, and polarization response are probed in the near-field by scanning over single fluorescent nanobeads. At the same time, the distance-dependent coupling of the emission to the antenna mode is mapped. Good agreement with theory is obtained. The presented scanning antenna approach is useful for both nanoscale plasmonic mode imaging and (bio)imaging.

  6. Ultrafast Radiation Detection by Modulation of an Optical Probe Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, S P; Lowry, M E

    2006-02-22

    We describe a new class of radiation sensor that utilizes optical interferometry to measure radiation-induced changes in the optical refractive index of a semiconductor sensor medium. Radiation absorption in the sensor material produces a transient, non-equilibrium, electron-hole pair distribution that locally modifies the complex, optical refractive index of the sensor medium. Changes in the real (imaginary) part of the local refractive index produce a differential phase shift (absorption) of an optical probe used to interrogate the sensor material. In contrast to conventional radiation detectors where signal levels are proportional to the incident energy, signal levels in these optical sensors are proportional to the incident radiation energy flux. This allows for reduction of the sensor form factor with no degradation in detection sensitivity. Furthermore, since the radiation induced, non-equilibrium electron-hole pair distribution is effectively measured ''in place'' there is no requirement to spatially separate and collect the generated charges; consequently, the sensor risetime is of the order of the hot-electron thermalization time {le} 10 fs and the duration of the index perturbation is determined by the carrier recombination time which is of order {approx} 600 fs in, direct-bandgap semiconductors, with a high density of recombination defects; consequently, the optical sensors can be engineered with sub-ps temporal response. A series of detectors were designed, and incorporated into Mach Zehnder and Fabry-Perot interferometer-based detection systems: proof of concept, lower detection sensitivity, Mach-Zehnder detectors were characterized at beamline 6.3 at SSRL; three generations of high sensitivity single element and imaging Fabry-Perot detectors were measured at the LLNL Europa facility. Our results indicate that this technology can be used to provide x-ray detectors and x-ray imaging systems with single x-ray sensitivity and S/N {approx} 30 at x

  7. Optical and Probe Diagnostics Applied to Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ticich, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    The general theme of the research my NASA colleague and I have planned is "Optical and probe diagnostics applied to reacting flows". We plan to explore three major threads during the fellowship period. The first interrogates the flame synthesis of carbon nanotubes using aerosol catalysts. Having demonstrated the viability of the technique for nanotube synthesis, we seek to understand the details of this reacting system which are important to its practical application. Laser light scattering will reveal changes in particle size at various heights above the burner. Analysis of the flame gas by mass spectroscopy will reveal the chemical composition of the mixture. Finally, absorption measurements will map the nanotube concentration within the flow. The second thread explores soot oxidation kinetics. Despite the impact of soot on engine performance, fire safety and pollution, models for its oxidation are inhibited by uncertainty in the values of the oxidation rate. We plan to employ both optical and microscopic measurements to refine this rate. Cavity ring-down absorption measurements of the carbonaceous aerosol can provide a measure of the mass concentration with time and, hence, an oxidation rate. Spectroscopic and direct probe measurements will provide the temperature of the system needed for subsequent modeling. These data will be benchmarked against changes in soot nanostructures as revealed by transmission electron microscopic images from directly sampled material.

  8. Reflection based Extraordinary Optical Transmission Fiber Optic Probe for Refractive Index Sensing.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xinwei; Cheng, Baokai; Yang, Qingbo; Huang, Jie; Wang, Hanzheng; Ma, Yinfa; Shi, Honglan; Xiao, Hai

    2014-03-31

    Fiber optic probes for chemical sensing based on the extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) phenomenon are designed and fabricated by perforating subwavelength hole arrays on the gold film coated optical fiber endface. The device exhibits a red shift in response to the surrounding refractive index increases with high sensitivity, enabling a reflection-based refractive index sensor with a compact and simple configuration. By choosing the period of hole arrays, the sensor can be designed to operate in the near infrared telecommunication wavelength range, where the abundant source and detectors are available for easy instrumentation. The new sensor probe is demonstrated for refractive index measurement using refractive index matching fluids. The sensitivity reaches 573 nm/RIU in the 1.333~1.430 refractive index range.

  9. Effect of probe geometry and optical properties on the sampling depth for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, Ricky; Goth, Will; Sharma, Manu; Markey, Mia K; Tunnell, James W

    2014-01-01

    The sampling depth of light for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is analyzed both experimentally and computationally. A Monte Carlo (MC) model was used to investigate the effect of optical properties and probe geometry on sampling depth. MC model estimates of sampling depth show an excellent agreement with experimental measurements over a wide range of optical properties and probe geometries. The MC data are used to define a mathematical expression for sampling depth that is expressed in terms of optical properties and probe geometry parameters.

  10. Probing of multidrug ABC membrane transporters of single living cells using single plasmonic nanoparticle optical probes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kerry J.; Browning, Lauren M.; Huang, Tao; Ding, Feng; Nallathamby, Prakash D.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, molecular mechanisms of multidrug ABC (ATP-binding cassette) membrane transporters remain elusive. In this study, we synthesized and characterized purified spherically shaped silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) (11.8 ± 2.6 nm in diameter), which were stable (non-aggregation) in PBS buffer and inside single living cells. We used the size-dependent localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectra of single Ag NPs to determine their sizes and to probe the size-dependent transport kinetics of the ABC (BmrA, BmrA-EGFP) transporters in single living cells (Bacillus subtilis) in real time at nanometer resolution using dark-field optical microscopy and spectroscopy (DFOMS). The results shows that the smaller NPs stayed longer inside the cells than larger NPs, suggesting size-dependent efflux kinetics of the membrane transporter. Notably, accumulation and efflux kinetics of intracellular NPs for single living cells depended upon the cellular expression level of BmrA, NP concentrations, and a pump inhibitor (25 µM, orthovanadate), suggesting that NPs are substrates of BmrA transporters and that passive diffusion driven by concentration gradients is the primary mechanism by which the NPs enter the cells. The accumulation and efflux kinetics of intracellular NPs for given cells are similar to those observed using a substrate (Hoechst dye) of BmrA, demonstrating that NPs are suitable probes for study of multidrug membrane transporters of single living cells in real-time. Unlike fluorescent probes, single Ag NPs exhibit size-dependent LSPR spectra and superior photostability, enabling them to probe the size-dependent efflux kinetics of membrane transporters of single living cells in real-time for better understanding of multidrug resistance. PMID:20544182

  11. Optical field characteristics of nanofocusing by conical metal-coated dielectric probe.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kazuo; Katayama, Kiyofumi; Tanaka, Masahiro

    2011-10-10

    Nanofocusing of surface plasmon polariton by a conical metal-coated dielectric probe was investigated numerically using the three dimensional volume integral equation. The basic characteristics of the nanofocused optical fields generated by this probe were investigated in detail. The intensity distribution near the probe tip was found to be very sensitive to the shape of the probe tip. Enhanced local fields interfere near the tip for certain probe tip shapes.

  12. Bioimage informatics for experimental biology

    PubMed Central

    Swedlow, Jason R.; Goldberg, Ilya G.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last twenty years there have been great advances in light microscopy with the result that multi-dimensional imaging has driven a revolution in modern biology. The development of new approaches of data acquisition are reportedly frequently, and yet the significant data management and analysis challenges presented by these new complex datasets remains largely unsolved. Like the well-developed field of genome bioinformatics, central repositories are and will be key resources, but there is a critical need for informatics tools in individual laboratories to help manage, share, visualize, and analyze image data. In this article we present the recent efforts by the bioimage informatics community to tackle these challenges and discuss our own vision for future development of bioimage informatics solution. PMID:19416072

  13. Bioimage informatics for experimental biology.

    PubMed

    Swedlow, Jason R; Goldberg, Ilya G; Eliceiri, Kevin W

    2009-01-01

    Over the past twenty years there have been great advances in light microscopy with the result that multidimensional imaging has driven a revolution in modern biology. The development of new approaches of data acquisition is reported frequently, and yet the significant data management and analysis challenges presented by these new complex datasets remain largely unsolved. As in the well-developed field of genome bioinformatics, central repositories are and will be key resources, but there is a critical need for informatics tools in individual laboratories to help manage, share, visualize, and analyze image data. In this article we present the recent efforts by the bioimage informatics community to tackle these challenges, and discuss our own vision for future development of bioimage informatics solutions.

  14. NIR Dyes for Bioimaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Escobedo, Jorge O.; Rusin, Oleksandr; Lim, Soojin

    2009-01-01

    Summary of recent advances Fluorescent dyes based on small organic molecules that function in the near infra red (NIR) region are of great current interest in chemical biology. They allow for imaging with minimal autofluorescence from biological samples, reduced light scattering and high tissue penetration. Herein, examples of ongoing NIR fluorophore design strategies as well as their properties and anticipated applications relevant to the bioimaging are presented. PMID:19926332

  15. A portable optical fiber probe for in vivo brain temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musolino, Stefan; Schartner, Erik P.; Tsiminis, Georgios; Salem, Abdallah; Monro, Tanya M.; Hutchinson, Mark R.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the development of an optical fiber based probe for in vivo measurements of brain temperature. By using a thin layer of rare-earth doped tellurite glass on the tip of a silica optical fiber a durable probe, suitable for long-term in vivo measurements of temperature can be fabricated. The probe can be interrogated using a portable optical measurement setup, allowing for measurements to be performed outside of standard optical laboratories as no alignment of components is required. This setup is deployed to a medical research laboratory to show preliminary results on the use of these optical fibers for in vivo pre-clinical measurements of brain temperature.

  16. Fiber-optic laser Doppler turbine tip clearance probe.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Lars; Pfister, Thorsten; Czarske, Jürgen

    2006-05-01

    A laser Doppler based method for in situ single blade tip clearance measurements of turbomachines with high precision is presented for what we believe is the first time. The sensor is based on two superposed fanlike interference fringe systems generated by two laser wavelengths from a fiber-coupled, passive, and therefore compact measurement head employing diffractive optics. Tip clearance measurements at a transonic centrifugal compressor performed during operation at 50,000 rpm (833 Hz, 586 m/s tip speed) are reported. At these speeds the measured uncertainty of the tip position was less than 20 microm, a factor of 2 more accurate than that of capacitive probes. The sensor offers great potential for in situ and online high-precision tip clearance measurements of metallic and nonmetallic turbine blades.

  17. Thin Film Metal Coated Fiber Optic Hydrophone Probe

    PubMed Central

    Gopinath, R.; Arora, P.; Gandhi, G.; Daryoush, A.S.; El-Sherif, M.; Lewin, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to improve on sensitivity performance of fiber sensor employed as Fiber Optic Hydrophone Probe (FOHP) by nano-scale thin film gold coating. The fiber is designed to provide a uniform and spatial averaging free response up to 100 MHz by etching down to an active diameter of about 9 μm. The sensitivity performance of straight cleaved (i.e. full size core and cladding) uncoated, tapered uncoated and tapered thin film gold coated fiber sensors were compared in the frequency range of 1.5 MHz to 20 MHz in the presence of acoustic pressure amplitude levels of up to 6 MPa. An unprecedented voltage sensitivity of −245 dB re 1V/uPa (560 mV/ MPa) was measured for thin film gold coated FOHP by optimizing the gold coating thickness. PMID:19881652

  18. Direct Optical Probing of Transverse Electric Mode in Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Menabde, Sergey G.; Mason, Daniel R.; Kornev, Evgeny E.; Lee, Changhee; Park, Namkyoo

    2016-01-01

    Unique electrodynamic response of graphene implies a manifestation of an unusual propagating and localised transverse-electric (TE) mode near the spectral onset of interband transitions. However, excitation and further detection of the TE mode supported by graphene is considered to be a challenge for it is extremely sensitive to excitation environment and phase matching condition adherence. Here for the first time, we experimentally prove an existence of the TE mode by its direct optical probing, demonstrating significant coupling to an incident wave in electrically doped multilayer graphene sheet at room temperature. We believe that proposed technique of careful phase matching and obtained access to graphene’s TE excitation would stimulate further studies of this unique phenomenon, and enable its potential employing in various fields of photonics as well as for characterization of graphene. PMID:26898892

  19. Thin film metal coated fiber optic hydrophone probe.

    PubMed

    Gopinath Minasamudram, Rupa; Arora, Piyush; Gandhi, Gaurav; Daryoush, Afshin S; El-Sherif, Mahmoud A; Lewin, Peter A

    2009-11-01

    Our purpose is to improve the performance sensitivity of a fiber sensor used as a fiber optic hydrophone probe (FOHP) by the addition of nanoscale thin film gold coating. The fiber is designed to provide a uniform and spatial averaging free response up to 100 MHz by etching down to an active diameter of approximately 9 mum. The performance sensitivity of straight cleaved (i.e., full size core and cladding) uncoated, tapered uncoated, and tapered thin film gold-coated fiber sensors was compared in the frequency range from 1.5 to 20 MHz in the presence of acoustic amplitude pressure levels as high as 6 MPa. An unprecedented voltage sensitivity of -245 dB relative to 1 V/muPa (560 mV/MPa) was measured for a thin film gold-coated FOHP by optimizing the gold coating thickness.

  20. Probing multiscale mechanics of collagen with optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayegan, Marjan; Rezaei, Naghmeh; Lam, Norman H.; Altindal, Tuba; Wieczorek, Andrew; Forde, Nancy R.

    2013-09-01

    How the molecular structure of the structural, extracellular matrix protein collagen correlates with its mechanical properties at different hierarchical structural levels is not known. We demonstrate the utility of optical tweezers to probe collagen's mechanical response throughout its assembly hierarchy, from single molecule force-extension measurements through microrheology measurements on solutions of collagen molecules, collagen fibrillar gels and gelatin. These experiments enable the determination of collagen's flexibility, mechanics, and timescales and strengths of interaction at different levels of hierarchy, information critical to developing models of how collagen's physiological function and stability are influenced by its chemical composition. By investigating how the viscoelastic properties of collagen are affected by the presence of telopeptides, protein domains that strongly influence fibril formation, we demonstrate that these play a role in conferring transient elasticity to collagen solutions.

  1. Proceedings of "Optical Probes of Dynamics in Complex Environments"

    SciTech Connect

    Sension, R; Tokmakoff, A

    2008-04-01

    This document contains the proceedings from the symposium on Optical Probes of Dynamics in Complex Environments, which organized as part of the 235th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans, LA from April 6 to 10, 2008. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time ƒresolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time resolved spectroscopy is central to all of DOEs grand challenges for fundamental energy science. This symposium brought together leaders in the field of ultrafast spectroscopy, including experimentalists, theoretical chemists, and simulators, to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. DOE support for this conference was used to help young US and international scientists travel to the meeting. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, optical, and xray spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  2. Fiber-optic polarization diversity detection for rotary probe optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anthony M D; Pahlevaninezhad, Hamid; Yang, Victor X D; Lam, Stephen; MacAulay, Calum; Lane, Pierre

    2014-06-15

    We report a polarization diversity detection scheme for optical coherence tomography with a new, custom, miniaturized fiber coupler with single mode (SM) fiber inputs and polarization maintaining (PM) fiber outputs. The SM fiber inputs obviate matching the optical lengths of the X and Y OCT polarization channels prior to interference and the PM fiber outputs ensure defined X and Y axes after interference. Advantages for this scheme include easier alignment, lower cost, and easier miniaturization compared to designs with free-space bulk optical components. We demonstrate the utility of the detection system to mitigate the effects of rapidly changing polarization states when imaging with rotating fiber optic probes in Intralipid suspension and during in vivo imaging of human airways.

  3. Fiber optic probe of free electron evanescent fields in the optical frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    So, Jin-Kyu MacDonald, Kevin F.; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2014-05-19

    We introduce an optical fiber platform which can be used to interrogate proximity interactions between free-electron evanescent fields and photonic nanostructures at optical frequencies in a manner similar to that in which optical evanescent fields are sampled using nanoscale aperture probes in scanning near-field microscopy. Conically profiled optical fiber tips functionalized with nano-gratings are employed to couple electron evanescent fields to light via the Smith-Purcell effect. We demonstrate the interrogation of medium energy (30–50 keV) electron fields with a lateral resolution of a few micrometers via the generation and detection of visible/UV radiation in the 700–300 nm (free-space) wavelength range.

  4. Double common-path interferometer for flexible optical probe of optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Seok; Chen, Zhongping; Jeong, Myung Yung; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2012-01-16

    A flexible curled optical cord is useful for a common-path optical coherence tomography (OCT) system because a bending-insensitive arbitrary length can be chosen for the endoscopic imaging probe. However, there has been a critical problem that the partial reflector needs to be placed in between the sample and the objective lens. It limits the structure design of optical probe and leads to a low transverse resolution OCT imaging. Instead of a conventional single common-path interferometer, we propose a novel double common-path interferometer configuration in order to generate an interference signal that is independent of the optical distance between the partial reflector and sample. Due to the limitless tuning of the objective distance, an objective lens with a high numerical aperture (NA) up to 0.85 can be successfully used for phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography to achieve a 3-dimensional profile image of a transverse resolution of 0.7 μm. The intensity and phase terms of the interference signal can be obtained simultaneously from a Fourier-domain mode locked swept laser source for fast data acquisition with a phase stability of 979 pm.

  5. MEMS-based non-rotatory circumferential scanning optical probe for endoscopic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yingshun; Singh, Janak; Siang, Teo Hui; Ramakrishna, Kotlanka; Premchandran, C. S.; Sheng, Chen Wei; Kuan, Chuah Tong; Chen, Nanguang; Olivo, Malini C.; Sheppard, Colin J. R.

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, we present a non-rotatory circumferential scanning optical probe integrated with a MEMS scanner for in vivo endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT). OCT is an emerging optical imaging technique that allows high resolution cross-sectional imaging of tissue microstructure. To extend its usage to endoscopic applications, a miniaturized optical probe based on Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) fabrication techniques is currently desired. A 3D electrothermally actuated micromirror realized using micromachining single crystal silicon (SCS) process highlights its very large angular deflection, about 45 degree, with low driving voltage for safety consideration. The micromirror is integrated with a GRIN lens into a waterproof package which is compatible with requirements for minimally invasive endoscopic procedures. To implement circumferential scanning substantially for diagnosis on certain pathological conditions, such as Barret's esophagus, the micromirror is mounted on 90 degree to optical axis of GRIN lens. 4 Bimorph actuators that are connected to the mirror on one end via supporting beams and springs are selected in this micromirror design. When actuators of the micromirror are driven by 4 channels of sinusoidal waveforms with 90 degree phase differences, beam focused by a GRIN is redirected out of the endoscope by 45 degree tilting mirror plate and achieve circumferential scanning pattern. This novel driving method making full use of very large angular deflection capability of our micromirror is totally different from previously developed or developing micromotor-like rotatory MEMS device for circumferential scanning.

  6. ‘Green’-synthesized near-infrared PbS quantum dots with silica-PEG dual-layer coating: ultrastable and biocompatible optical probes for in vivo animal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Qian, J.; Cai, F.; He, S.; Han, S.; Mu, Y.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, PbS semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) with near-infrared (NIR) photoluminescence were synthesized in oleic acid and paraffin liquid mixture by using an easily handled and ‘green’ approach. Surface functionalization of the QDs was accomplished with a silica and polyethylene glycol (PEG) phospholipid dual-layer coating and the excellent chemical stability of the nanoparticles is demonstrated. We then successfully applied the ultrastable PbS QDs to in vivo sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping of mice. Histological analyses were also carried out to ensure that the intravenously injected nanoparticles did not produce any toxicity to the organism of mice. These experimental results suggested that our ultrastable NIR PbS QDs can serve as biocompatible and efficient probes for in vivo optical bioimaging and has great potentials for disease diagnosis and clinical therapies in the future.

  7. 'Green'-synthesized near-infrared PbS quantum dots with silica-PEG dual-layer coating: ultrastable and biocompatible optical probes for in vivo animal imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Qian, J; Cai, F; He, S; Han, S; Mu, Y

    2012-06-22

    In this paper, PbS semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) with near-infrared (NIR) photoluminescence were synthesized in oleic acid and paraffin liquid mixture by using an easily handled and 'green' approach. Surface functionalization of the QDs was accomplished with a silica and polyethylene glycol (PEG) phospholipid dual-layer coating and the excellent chemical stability of the nanoparticles is demonstrated. We then successfully applied the ultrastable PbS QDs to in vivo sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping of mice. Histological analyses were also carried out to ensure that the intravenously injected nanoparticles did not produce any toxicity to the organism of mice. These experimental results suggested that our ultrastable NIR PbS QDs can serve as biocompatible and efficient probes for in vivo optical bioimaging and has great potentials for disease diagnosis and clinical therapies in the future.

  8. New optical probes for the continuous monitoring of renal function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorshow, Richard B.; Asmelash, Bethel; Chinen, Lori K.; Debreczeny, Martin P.; Fitch, Richard M.; Freskos, John N.; Galen, Karen P.; Gaston, Kimberly R.; Marzan, Timothy A.; Poreddy, Amruta R.; Rajagopalan, Raghavan; Shieh, Jeng-Jong; Neumann, William L.

    2008-02-01

    The ability to continuously monitor renal function via the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in the clinic is currently an unmet medical need. To address this need we have developed a new series of hydrophilic fluorescent probes designed to clear via glomerular filtration for use as real time optical monitoring agents at the bedside. The ideal molecule should be freely filtered via the glomerular filtration barrier and be neither reabsorbed nor secreted by the renal tubule. In addition, we have hypothesized that a low volume of distribution into the interstitial space could also be advantageous. Our primary molecular design strategy employs a very small pyrazine-based fluorophore as the core unit. Modular chemistry for functionalizing these systems for optimal pharmacokinetics (PK) and photophysical properties have been developed. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) and pharmacokinetic (PK) studies involving hydrophilic pyrazine analogues incorporating polyethylene glycol (PEG), carbohydrate, amino acid and peptide functionality have been a focus of this work. Secondary design strategies for minimizing distribution into the interstitium while maintaining glomerular filtration include enhancing molecular volume through PEG substitution. In vivo optical monitoring experiments with advanced candidates have been correlated with plasma PK for measurement of clearance and hence GFR.

  9. Optical probing of exploding wires using schlieren and interferometric imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, V. M.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hu, Min; Sinars, D. B.; Kusse, B. R.; Dimant, Ya. S.; Greenly, J. B.; Hummer, D. A.

    1999-11-01

    Optical diagnostics using an Nd:YAG laser (l=532 nm) were used to probe exploding fine wires (7.5-20 mm initial diameter) driven by a sinusoidal 4.5/,kA current pulse (350 ns risetime). Phase transitions from vapor to plasma have been directly observed during the explosion process of various wire materials (Al, Au, etc.). Three simultaneous schlieren channels and 1--3 interferometry channels were used. For some experiments, the schlieren channels were made up of a bright-field iris, a dark-field knife edge, and a dark-field strip block. For other experiments, three bright-field images were made at 10 ns intervals. Interferometry was performed using a new astigmatism-free shearing interferometer based on a double-prism air wedge. The images were made with a 4 ns exposure time at 50--2000 ns after the start of the wire current. Simultaneous X-ray backlighting [1] of the wires enabled reliable interpretation of the optical images, and with a step wedge [2] was used to measure the ion density. Combining the ion density and electron density measurements allowed us to estimate the ionization state of the exploded wire. 1. T.A.Shelkovenko, S.A.Pikuz, A.R.Mingaleev, D.A.Hammer, Rev. Sci. Instrum., 70, 667 (1999). 2. S.A.Pikuz, T.A.Shelkovenko, A.R.Mingaleev, H.Neves, D.A.Hammer, Phys. Plasmas (in press).

  10. Fiber optic probe augmented sonic scaling versus conventional sonic scaling.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G K; Reinhardt, R A; Tussing, G J; Krejci, R F

    1989-03-01

    Several factors, including access and visualization problems, make total deposit removal during scaling and root planing procedures extremely difficult. This study examined the effectiveness of a mode of therapy designed to improve access and visualization for sonic scaling compared to closed sonic instrumentation. Teeth with moderate to deep probing depths in six patients scheduled to receive immediate dentures were divided into three experimental groups: Group I, sonic scaling with access augmented by interdental papilla reflection and fiber optic illumination/transillumination (34 surfaces); Group II, closed sonic scaling (34 surfaces); and Group III, untreated controls (35 surfaces). Immediately after treatment the experimental teeth were extracted, stained with toluidine blue, and interproximal areas evaluated for remaining accretions with a microscope-digitizing pad-computer system. Group I had a significantly lower percentage (P less than 0.01) of remaining subgingival accretion coverage than Group II (1.30 +/- 0.25% vs 6.35 +/- 1.08%), and both Group I and II demonstrated significantly (P less than 0.01) fewer deposits than the control surfaces (46.61 +/- 4.32%). These findings suggest that minimal tissue reflection and fiber optic illumination/transillumination are beneficial adjuncts to deposit removal in moderate to deep periodontal pockets.

  11. Electric field and temperature measurement using ultra wide bandwidth pigtailed electro-optic probes.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Maxime; Gaborit, Gwenaël; Duvillaret, Lionel; Paupert, Alain; Lasserre, Jean-Louis

    2008-05-01

    We present pigtailed electro-optic probes that allow a simultaneous measurement of high frequency electric fields and temperature using a unique laser probe beam. This has been achieved by the development of a novel probe design associated with a fully automated servo-controlled optical bench, initially developed to stabilize the electric field sensor response. The developed electro-optic probes present a stable response in outdoors conditions over a time duration exceeding 1 h, a frequency bandwidth from kHz to tens of GHz with a sensitivity of 0.7 Vm(-1)Hz(-(1/2)), and a temperature accuracy of 40 mK.

  12. Fibre Fabry - Perot cavity-based aperture probe for near-field optical microscopy systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kulchin, Yurii N; Vitrik, O B; Bezverbnyi, A V; Pustovalov, E V; Kuchmizhak, A A; Nepomnyashchii, A V

    2011-03-31

    We report a theoretical analysis and experimental study of the possibility of producing a novel type of interferometric near-field aperture probe for near-field optical microscopy systems using a fibre Fabry - Perot microcavity with a nanometre-scale aperture made in one of its output mirrors. The probe ensures a spatial resolution no worse than {lambda}/14. (fibre optics)

  13. Nonlinear Nano-Optics: Probing One Exciton at a Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonadeo, Nicolas H.

    1998-03-01

    Optical studies in single quantum dots (QD's) have recently been possible with the use of high spatial resolution techniques (K. Brunner,et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 69, 3216 (1992).)^,(H. F. Hess,et al., Science 264, 1740 (1994).)^,(D. Gammon, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 3005 (1996).). The various approaches remove the spectral blurring caused by inhomogeneous broadening in ensemble measurements revealing extremely sharp resonances that result from the complete energy quantization of the zero-dimensional exciton. Previous experiments in single QD's have been based uniquely in photoluminescence (PL) detection and were mainly performed in the frequency domain. In this work, we present data from two different experimental approaches that go beyond these limitations and open up a new direction of research for direct measurements of exciton dynamics, coherent transients and optical nonlinearities in QD's. The first set of experiments combines the elegance and power of CW coherent nonlinear optical spectroscopy with the breakthrough of single QD probing producing the first nonlinear measurement in a single QD. The nonlinear measurements allow us to identify an incoherent and coherent contribution to the resonant electronic response, extract the excitation decoherence time and energy relaxation rate, as well as demonstrate a behavior similar to two beam coupling. In the second set of experiments, using two phase-locked lasers pulses, we show the possibility to control the population(A. P. Heberly, J.J. Baumberg, and Kohler, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 3596 (1995))of a single QD in times shorter than the excitonic lifetime and taking thus, coherent-control to the ultimate quantum limit of a single exciton per control box. In addition, we performed a series of transient experiments that includes the first direct measurement of the decoherence time in single QD. The measurements are performed at T=6K in a narrow (42 Åsingle MBE grown GaAs quantum well with 250 ÅAl _0.3Ga_0.7As

  14. A Call for Bioimaging Software Usability

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Anne E.; Kamentsky, Lee; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

    2013-01-01

    Bioimaging software developed in a research setting often fails to be widely used by the scientific community. We suggest that, to maximize both the public’s and researchers’ investments, usability should be a more highly valued goal. We describe specific characteristics of usability towards which bioimaging software projects should aim. PMID:22743771

  15. Fluorescent magnetic hybrid nanoprobe for multimodal bioimaging

    PubMed Central

    Bright, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    A fluorescent magnetic hybrid imaging nanoprobe (HINP) was fabricated by conjugation of superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles and visible light-emitting (~600 nm) fluorescent CdTe/CdS quantum dots (QDs). The assembly strategy used the covalent linking of the oxidized dextran shell of magnetic particles to the glutathione ligands of QDs. Synthesized HINP formed stable water-soluble colloidal dispersions. The structure and properties of the particles were characterized by transmission electron and atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering analysis, optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy, and fluorescent imaging. The luminescence imaging region of the nanoprobe was extended to the near-infrared (NIR) (~800 nm) by conjugation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles with synthesized CdHgTe/CdS QDs. Cadmium, mercury based QDs in HINP can be easily replaced by novel water soluble glutathione stabilized AgInS2/ZnS QDs to present a new class of cadmium-free multimodal imaging agents. Observed NIR photoluminescence of fluorescent magnetic nanocomposites supports their use for bioimaging. The developed HINP provides dual-imaging channels for simultaneous optical and magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:21597146

  16. Optical sensing scheme for carbon dioxide using a solvatochromic probe.

    PubMed

    Ali, Reham; Lang, Thomas; Saleh, Sayed M; Meier, Robert J; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2011-04-15

    The novel sensing scheme, unlike previous ones that are based on the use of pH indicator probes, is making use of solvatochromic probe Nile Red (NR). Dissolved in a matrix of ethyl cellulose, it can report the polarity of its microenvironment that is modulated by an additive (a hydrophobic amidine) that is capable of reversibly binding carbon dioxide. The spectra of NR undergo a strong solvatochromic shift both in color (from brick-red to magenta) and in fluorescence (from orange to red) if the respective sensor layer is exposed to gaseous CO(2) (gCO(2)) or dissolved CO(2) (dCO(2)). Both visual and instrumental readouts are possible. The sensor layer responds to gCO(2) in the range from 0 to 100% and to dCO(2) in the range from 0 to 1 M solutions of bicarbonate (equivalent to a CO(2) partial pressure of up to 255 hPa). The detection limits are around 0.23% for gCO(2) and 1.53 hPa for dCO(2). The response time is in the order of 10 min in the forward direction and 3 min in the reverse direction for gCO(2) but up to 25 min in the case of dCO(2). The optical response also was quantified using a digital camera by extracting the spectral information using the blue and green color channels (in reflectometry) and the green and red channels (in fluorescence), respectively, and by generating pseudocolor pictures.

  17. Optical pump terahertz probe studies of semiconducting polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Paul D.

    Optical-pump terahertz-probe spectroscopy (OPTP) has been applied to study charge generation, transport and the evolution of the photo-induced excited states in thin film organic semiconductors, with emphasis on their relevance to photovoltaic technology. In these experiments the response of the photoexcited material to the AC electric field of a terahertz (THz) pulse was measured. From this response, the evolution of the complex conductivity in the far-infrared was monitored. OPTP presents advantages over other techniques by being an all-optical probe of the complex conductivity over nanometer scale distances with sub-picosecond resolution and exhibits particular sensitivity to carrier scattering rates, which typically lay in the THz range. Conductivity models were applied to the extracted conductivity curves in order to determine technologically relevant quantities like the charge carrier mobility and external quantum yield of charge carrier generation. We observed charge carriers generated on a subpicosecond time scale in thin films of polyhexylthiophene (P3HT). Through application of the Drude-Smith model (DSM) over the 0-2 THz band, we determined a room temperature intrinsic mobility of about 30 cm2/Vs. The temperature dependence of the conductivity dynamics showed signs of thermally activated polaron hopping influenced by torsional disorder. Both above and below gap excitation resulted in similar dynamics, showing that the majority of carriers recombine within 1 ps. We were able to observe charge transfer occurring on a sub-ps timescale to the soluble fullerene, PCBM, for both excited states, demonstrating that narrow gap polymers can be blended with PCBM for photovoltaic applications. We observed charge carrier generated on a sub-ps time scale in thin amorphous films of metalated polymers. The time evolution of the conductivity showed that charge carriers recombine and only excitons persist after 100 ps. This characteristic appears to be common to amorphous

  18. Optical imaging of non-fluorescent nanoparticle probes in live cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gufeng; Stender, Anthony S.; Sun, Wei; and Fang, Ning

    2009-12-17

    Precise imaging of cellular and subcellular structures and dynamic processes in live cells is crucial for fundamental research in life sciences and in medical applications. Non-fluorescent nanoparticles are an important type of optical probe used in live-cell imaging due to their photostability, large optical cross-sections, and low toxicity. Here, we provide an overview of recent developments in the optical imaging of non-fluorescent nanoparticle probes in live cells.

  19. Using electrons as a high-resolution probe of optical modes in individual nanowires.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Ilke; Hyun, Jerome K; Erni, Rolf; Fairchild, Michael N; Hersee, Stephen D; Muller, David A

    2009-12-01

    While nanowires show increasing promise for optoelectronic applications, probing the subwavelength details of their optical modes has been a challenge with light-based techniques. Here we report the excitation of dielectric optical waveguide modes in a single GaN nanowire using transition radiation generated by a 1 nm diameter electron beam. This spatially resolved study opens important gateways to probing the optical modes of more complex nanostructures, fundamental for optimization of optoelectronic device performance.

  20. Enhanced vibrational spectroscopy, intracellular refractive indexing for label-free biosensing and bioimaging by multiband plasmonic-antenna array.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng-Kuang; Chang, Ming-Hsuan; Wu, Hsieh-Ting; Lee, Yao-Chang; Yen, Ta-Jen

    2014-10-15

    In this study, we report a multiband plasmonic-antenna array that bridges optical biosensing and intracellular bioimaging without requiring a labeling process or coupler. First, a compact plasmonic-antenna array is designed exhibiting a bandwidth of several octaves for use in both multi-band plasmonic resonance-enhanced vibrational spectroscopy and refractive index probing. Second, a single-element plasmonic antenna can be used as a multifunctional sensing pixel that enables mapping the distribution of targets in thin films and biological specimens by enhancing the signals of vibrational signatures and sensing the refractive index contrast. Finally, using the fabricated plasmonic-antenna array yielded reliable intracellular observation was demonstrated from the vibrational signatures and intracellular refractive index contrast requiring neither labeling nor a coupler. These unique features enable the plasmonic-antenna array to function in a label-free manner, facilitating bio-sensing and imaging development.

  1. Optical coherence tomography and optical coherence domain reflectometry for deep brain stimulation probe guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Sung W.; Shure, Mark A.; Baker, Kenneth B.; Chahlavi, Ali; Hatoum, Nagi; Turbay, Massud; Rollins, Andrew M.; Rezai, Ali R.; Huang, David

    2005-04-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is FDA-approved for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and essential tremor. Currently, placement of DBS leads is guided through a combination of anatomical targeting and intraoperative microelectrode recordings. The physiological mapping process requires several hours, and each pass of the microelectrode into the brain increases the risk of hemorrhage. Optical Coherence Domain Reflectometry (OCDR) in combination with current methodologies could reduce surgical time and increase accuracy and safety by providing data on structures some distance ahead of the probe. For this preliminary study, we scanned a rat brain in vitro using polarization-insensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). For accurate measurement of intensity and attenuation, polarization effects arising from tissue birefringence are removed by polarization diversity detection. A fresh rat brain was sectioned along the coronal plane and immersed in a 5 mm cuvette with saline solution. OCT images from a 1294 nm light source showed depth profiles up to 2 mm. Light intensity and attenuation rate distinguished various tissue structures such as hippocampus, cortex, external capsule, internal capsule, and optic tract. Attenuation coefficient is determined by linear fitting of the single scattering regime in averaged A-scans where Beer"s law is applicable. Histology showed very good correlation with OCT images. From the preliminary study using OCT, we conclude that OCDR is a promising approach for guiding DBS probe placement.

  2. Probing the Active Galactic Nuclei using optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivek, M.

    Variability studies offer one of the best tools for understanding the physical conditions present in regions close to the central engine in an AGN. We probed the various properties of AGN through time variability studies of spectral lines in the optical wavelengths using the 2m telescope in IUCAA Girawali observatory. The absorption line variability studies are mainly concentrated in understanding the nature of outflows in quasars. Quasar outflows have a huge impact on the evolution of central supermassive blackholes, their host galaxies and the surrounding intergalactic medium. Studying the variability in these Broad Absorption Lines (BALs) can help us understand the structure, evolution, and basic physical properties of these outflows. We conducted a repeated Low ionization BAL monitoring program with 27 LoBALs (Low Ionization BALs) at z 0.3-2.1 covering timescales from 3.22 to 7.69 years in the quasar rest frame. We see a variety of phenomena, including some BALs that either appeared or disappeared completely and some BALs which do not vary over the observation period. In one case, the excited fine structure lines have changed dramatically. One source shows signatures of radiative acceleration. Here, we present the results from this program. Emission line studies are concentrated in understanding the peculiar characteristics of a dual-AGN source SDSS J092712.64+294344.0.

  3. Infrared fiber optic probes for evaluation of musculoskeletal tissue pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padalkar, Mugdha; McGoverin, Cushla; Onigbanjo, Quam; Spencer, Richard; Barbash, Scott; Kropf, Eric; Pleshko, Nancy

    2014-03-01

    Musculoskeletal pathology of the knee commonly occurs with aging and as a result of injury. The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries continues to increase annually, and may precede the eventual onset of osteoarthritis (OA), a debilitating and prevalent disease characterized by cartilage degeneration. Early detection of OA remains elusive, with current imaging methods lacking adequate sensitivity to detect early pathologic cartilage changes. We used mid- and near- infrared (IR) spectroscopy through arthroscopic-based fiber-optic devices to assess cartilage damage and differentiate tendon from ligament. Mid-IR spectroscopy is characterized by distinct bands and low penetration depth (< 10 μm) and near-IR spectroscopy is characterized by complex overlapping bands and greater penetration depths (< 1 cm). We have found that combined mid- and near-IR analysis greatly extends the information available through either in the analysis of soft tissues, including cartilage, ligaments and tendons. We discuss here basic science studies and the potential for translation to clinical research with novel arthroscopic probes.

  4. Multipoint Tissue Circulation Monitoring with a Flexible Optical Probe.

    PubMed

    Tomioka, Yoko; Enomoto, Shintaro; Gu, Jian; Kaneko, Akiko; Saito, Itsuro; Inoue, Yusuke; Woo, Taeseong; Koshima, Isao; Yoshimura, Kotaro; Someya, Takao; Sekino, Masaki

    2017-08-29

    Compromised circulation is a potential complication during the postoperative period following tissue transplantation. The use of a monitoring device allows physicians to detect compromised circulation immediately. Such monitoring devices need to be continuously usable, wearable, and area-detectable. However, existing devices fail to satisfy all of these requirements simultaneously. We developed a wearable, multipoint pulse wave-monitoring device. An array of reflective optical sensors implemented on a thin film substrate was used as a lightweight and flexible probe. As a model of tissue transplantation, an inguinal flap in a Wistar rat was dissected and freed from all subcutaneous tissue. By ligating the artery or vein, ischemia or congestion was induced in the tissue. In a human study, ischemia or congestion was induced in the palm by pressing the feeding artery or cutaneous vein, respectively. The amplitude of the pulse wave was evaluated using the power spectrum of Fourier transformed signals. Pulse wave amplitude significantly decreased under compromised circulation in both animal and human models. Moreover, we accomplished 1 week of continuous wireless monitoring in healthy subjects. These results demonstrated the potential utility of the developed device in postoperative blood-flow monitoring to improve the rescue rate of transplanted tissue.

  5. Cellulose acetate polymer film modified microstructured polymer optical fiber towards a nitrite optical probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongdong; Wang, Lili

    2010-07-01

    A novel microstructured polymer optical fiber (MPOF) probe for nitrites (NO 2-) detection was made by forming rhodamine 6G (Rh 6G)-doped cellulose acetate (CA) on the side wall of array holes in a MPOF. It was found that the MPOF probe only have a response to nitrites in a certain concentration of sulfuric acid solution. The calibration graph of fluorescence intensity versus nitrites concentration was linear in the range of 2.0 × 10 - 4 g/ml-5.0 × 10 - 3 g/ml. The method possesses ease of chemical modification, low cost design, and potential for direct integration with existing instrumentation, and has been applied to the determination of nitrites in real samples with satisfactory results.

  6. A trifurcated fiber-optic-probe-based optical system designed for AGEs measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yikun; Zhang, Long; Zhu, Ling; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Gong; Wang, An

    2011-11-01

    Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs) are biochemical end-products of non-enzymatic glycation and are formed irreversibly in human serum and skin tissue. AGEs are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and corresponding complications. All conventional methods for measuring AGEs must take sampling and measure in vitro. These methods are invasive and have the problem of relatively time-consuming. AGEs have fluorescent characteristics. Skin AGEs can be assessed noninvasively by collecting the fluorescence emitted from skin tissue when excited with proper light. However, skin tissue has absorption and scattering effects on fluorescence of AGEs, it is not reliable to evaluate the accumulation of AGEs according the emitted fluorescence but not considering optical properties of skin tissue. In this study, a portable system for detecting AGEs fluorescence and skin reflectance spectrum simultaneously has been developed. The system mainly consists of an ultraviolet light source, a broadband light source, a trifurcated fiber-optic probe, and a compact charge coupled device (CCD) spectrometer. The fiber-optic probe consists of 36 optical fibers which are connected to the ultraviolet light source, 6 optical fibers connected to the broadband light source, and a core fiber connected to the CCD spectrometer. Demonstrative test measurements with the system on skin tissue of 40 healthy subjects have been performed. Using parameters that are calculated from skin reflectance spectrum, the distortion effects caused by skin absorption and scattering can be eliminated, and the integral intensity of corrected fluorescence has a strong correlation with the accumulation of AGEs. The system looks very promising for both laboratory and clinical applications to monitor AGEs related diseases, especially for chronic diabetes and complications.

  7. A trifurcated fiber-optic-probe-based optical system designed for AGEs measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yikun; Zhang, Long; Zhu, Ling; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Gong; Wang, An

    2012-03-01

    Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs) are biochemical end-products of non-enzymatic glycation and are formed irreversibly in human serum and skin tissue. AGEs are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and corresponding complications. All conventional methods for measuring AGEs must take sampling and measure in vitro. These methods are invasive and have the problem of relatively time-consuming. AGEs have fluorescent characteristics. Skin AGEs can be assessed noninvasively by collecting the fluorescence emitted from skin tissue when excited with proper light. However, skin tissue has absorption and scattering effects on fluorescence of AGEs, it is not reliable to evaluate the accumulation of AGEs according the emitted fluorescence but not considering optical properties of skin tissue. In this study, a portable system for detecting AGEs fluorescence and skin reflectance spectrum simultaneously has been developed. The system mainly consists of an ultraviolet light source, a broadband light source, a trifurcated fiber-optic probe, and a compact charge coupled device (CCD) spectrometer. The fiber-optic probe consists of 36 optical fibers which are connected to the ultraviolet light source, 6 optical fibers connected to the broadband light source, and a core fiber connected to the CCD spectrometer. Demonstrative test measurements with the system on skin tissue of 40 healthy subjects have been performed. Using parameters that are calculated from skin reflectance spectrum, the distortion effects caused by skin absorption and scattering can be eliminated, and the integral intensity of corrected fluorescence has a strong correlation with the accumulation of AGEs. The system looks very promising for both laboratory and clinical applications to monitor AGEs related diseases, especially for chronic diabetes and complications.

  8. An optical-fiber-scale electro-optic probe for minimally invasive high-frequency field sensing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Joon; Whitaker, John F

    2008-12-22

    A sub-millimeter-dimension electro-optic probe that provides enhanced scanning accessibility with significantly less intrusiveness than metal-based or even other dielectric probes during electromagnetic characterization of microwave devices is presented. The quantitative and qualitative relative invasiveness of the probe on the operation of an example antenna device-under-test is explored with respect to previously demonstrated fiber and wafer electro-optic sensors. We also demonstrate that the miniaturized probe, with a diameter of 125 microm, can be used to reconstruct the three orthogonal vector components of near-electric fields without the need for different probe crystals or multiple calibration procedures. Finally, the advantages of the reduced size and invasiveness of the new micro-scale probe are demonstrated through the enhanced resolution of detailed images extracted from planar antennas, as well as the capability of reaching into circuit locations heretofore inaccessible.

  9. Ultrasonic near-field optical microscopy using a plasmonic nanofocusing probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Phillip; Zhang, Zhen; Sun, Cheng; Balogun, Oluwaseyi

    2013-06-01

    Ultrasonic waves are sensitive to the elastic properties of solids and have been applied in a variety of nondestructive materials characterization and metrology applications. The spatial resolution of established ultrasound techniques is limited to the order of the ultrasound wavelength, which is insufficient for nanomechanical characterization and imaging of nanoscale aspects of a material microstructure. Here, we report of an ultrasonic near-field optical microscopy (UNOM) technique that enables local mapping of ultrasound with deep sub-optical wavelength spatial resolution. In this technique, ultrasonic waves generated by a pulsed laser are detected by a scanning near-field optical probe over a broad frequency bandwidth. The scanning probe features a plasmonic nano-focusing lens that concentrates light to a strongly localized focal spot at the tip of the probe. The plasmonic probe enhances the scattering of evanescent light at the probe-tip and enables reliable measurement of the dynamic motion of a vibrating surface. The measurements made by the UNOM are purely optical; therefore, it is independent of mechanical coupling between the probe and the sample, which is one of the limitations of force based scanning probe microscopy methods. The UNOM technique allows for spatially and temporally resolved optical measurements of ultrasound with greater penetration depth, and it combines the benefits of local sensitivity to elastic and optical properties. Experimental results are presented, which demonstrate the potential of the technique for local mapping of subsurface optical absorbers in a soft material with high spatial resolution.

  10. Fiber-optic confocal microscopy using a miniaturized needle-compatible imaging probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, Rajesh S.; Lorenser, Dirk; Sampson, David D.

    2011-05-01

    We report on the design and implementation of a 350 μm-diameter confocal imaging probe based on gradient-index (GRIN) optics and a fiber-based scanning arrangement. The form factor of the probe is such that it can potentially be inserted into a 22-gauge hypodermic needle to perform high-resolution confocal fluorescence imaging in solid tissues. We introduce a simple scanning arrangement based on lensed fiber, which eliminates off-axis aberrations induced by conventional scanning optics and is suitable for integration into a compact hand-held unit. We present the details of the optical design and experimental verification of the performance of the optical system. The measured lateral resolution of ~700 nm is in agreement with the optical design and is the highest resolution reported for a confocal fluorescence imaging probe of this size. Further, we demonstrate the imaging capability of the probe by obtaining high-resolution images of fluorescently labeled muscle fibers.

  11. Facile synthesis of fluorescent Au/Ce nanoclusters for high-sensitive bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Ge, Wei; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Ye, Jing; Chen, Donghua; Rehman, Fawad Ur; Li, Qiwei; Chen, Yun; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Xuemei

    2015-02-03

    Tumor-target fluorescence bioimaging is an important means of early diagnosis, metal nanoclusters have been used as an excellent fluorescent probe for marking tumor cells due to their targeted absorption. We have developed a new strategy for facile synthesis of Au/Ce nanoclusters (NCs) by doping trivalent cerium ion into seed crystal growth process of gold. Au/Ce NCs have bright fluorescence which could be used as fluorescent probe for bioimaging. In this study, we synthesized fluorescent Au/Ce NCs through two-step hydrothermal reaction. The concentration range of 25-350 μM, Au/Ce NCs have no obvious cell cytotoxicity effect on HeLa, HepG2 and L02 cells. Furthermore, normal cells (L02) have no obvious absorption of Au/Ce NCs. Characterization of synthesized Au/Ce NCs was done by using TEM, EDS and XPS. Then these prepared Au/Ce NCs were applied for in vitro/in vivo tumor-target bioimaging due to its prolonged fluorescence lifetime and bright luminescence properties. The glutathione stabilized Au/Ce NCs synthesized through hydrothermal reaction possess stable and bright fluorescence that can be readily utilized for high sensitive fluorescence probe. Our results suggest that Au/Ce NCs are useful candidate for in vitro/in vivo tumor bioimaging in potential clinical application.

  12. Dynamics of trapped atoms around an optical nanofiber probed through polarimetry.

    PubMed

    Solano, Pablo; Fatemi, Fredrik K; Orozco, Luis A; Rolston, S L

    2017-06-15

    The evanescent field outside an optical nanofiber (ONF) can create optical traps for neutral atoms. We present a non-destructive method to characterize such trapping potentials. An off-resonance linearly polarized probe beam that propagates through the ONF experiences a slow axis of polarization produced by trapped atoms on opposite sides along the ONF. The transverse atomic motion is imprinted onto the probe polarization through the changing atomic index of refraction. By applying a transient impulse, we measure a time-dependent polarization rotation of the probe beam that provides both a rapid and non-destructive measurement of the optical trapping frequencies.

  13. Dynamics of trapped atoms around an optical nanofiber probed through polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, Pablo; Fatemi, Fredrik K.; Orozco, Luis A.; Rolston, S. L.

    2017-06-01

    The evanescent field outside an optical nanofiber (ONF) can create optical traps for neutral atoms. We present a non-destructive method to characterize such trapping potentials. An off-resonance linearly polarized probe beam that propagates through the ONF experiences a slow axis of polarization produced by trapped atoms on opposite sides along the ONF. The transverse atomic motion is imprinted onto the probe polarization through the changing atomic index of of refraction. By applying a transient impulse, we measure a time-dependent polarization rotation of the probe beam that provides both a rapid and non-destructive measurement of the optical trapping frequencies.

  14. Effect of probe geometry and optical properties on the sampling depth for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, Ricky; Goth, Will; Sharma, Manu; Markey, Mia K.; Tunnell, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. The sampling depth of light for diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is analyzed both experimentally and computationally. A Monte Carlo (MC) model was used to investigate the effect of optical properties and probe geometry on sampling depth. MC model estimates of sampling depth show an excellent agreement with experimental measurements over a wide range of optical properties and probe geometries. The MC data are used to define a mathematical expression for sampling depth that is expressed in terms of optical properties and probe geometry parameters. PMID:25349033

  15. Vector-component isolation of an arbitrary modulating electric field in zincblende electro-optic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reano, Ronald M.; Whitaker, John F.; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    2005-08-01

    Analysis of the field-induced linear birefringence in zincblende crystals shows that one can obtain complete isolation of a single vector component of an arbitrary modulating electric field. For an optical probe beam path aligned parallel to the [110] direction and an optical probe beam polarization aligned parallel to the [110] direction, the field-induced birefringence occurs only for the component of the modulating electric field aligned parallel to the [110] direction. Measurements using a modulating electric field with known polarization and electro-optic probes machined from (110) gallium arsenide wafers demonstrate an alignment-limited isolation between orthogonal modulating electric field components of 17 dB.

  16. A portable device for cancer margin assessment using a pH sensitive optical fibre probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartner, Erik P.; Henderson, Matthew R.; Purdey, Malcolm; Monro, Tanya M.; Gill, P. Grantley; Callen, David F.

    2017-04-01

    We report the development of an optical fibre probe which could find use as an aid for margin detection during surgery. A fluorophore doped polymer is coated on an optical fibre tip, allowing for pH values of unknown tissue to be measured and compared to healthy tissue, to discriminate between healthy and cancerous tissue. This probe is integrated within a portable system, requiring no alignment or access to specialised vibration damped optical tables. A miniature spectrometer allows for measurements to be performed on-site, opening up the potential for use of these probes within the operating theatre for in-vivo measurements.

  17. Focussed ion beam machined cantilever aperture probes for near-field optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Jin, E X; Xu, X

    2008-03-01

    Near-field optical probe is the key element of a near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) system. The key innovation in the first two NSOM experiments (Pohl et al., 1984; Lewis et al., 1984) is the fabrications of a sub-wavelength optical aperture at the apex of a sharply pointed transparent probe tip with a thin metal coating. This paper discusses the routine use of focussed ion beam (FIB) to micro-machine NSOM aperture probes from the commercial silicon nitride cantilevered atomic force microscopy probes. Two FIB micro-machining approaches are used to form a nanoaperture of controllable size and shape at the apex of the tip. The FIB side slicing produces a silicon nitride aperture on the flat-end tips with controllable sizes varying from 120 nm to 30 nm. The FIB head-on drilling creates holes on the aluminium-coated tips with sizes down to 50 nm. Nanoapertures in C and bow tie shapes can also be patterned using the FIB head-on milling method to possibly enhance the optical transmission. A transmission-collection NSOM system is constructed from a commercial atomic force microscopy to characterize the optical resolution of FIB-micro-machined aperture tips. The optical resolution of 78 nm is demonstrated by an aperture probe fabricated by FIB head-on drilling. Simultaneous topography imaging can also be realized using the same probe. By mapping the optical near-field from a bow-tie aperture, optical resolution as small as 59 nm is achieved by an aperture probe fabricated by the FIB side slicing method. Overall, high resolution and reliable optical imaging of routinely FIB-micro-machined aperture probes are demonstrated.

  18. High speed 3D endoscopic optical frequency domain imaging probe for lung cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianan; Feroldi, Fabio; Mo, Jianhua; Helderman, Frank; de Groot, Mattijs; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2013-06-01

    We present a miniature motorized endoscopic probe for Optical Frequency Domain Imaging with an outer diameter of 1.65 mm and a rotation speed of 3,000 - 12,500 rpm. The probe has a motorized distal end which provides a significant advantage over proximally driven probes since it does not require a drive shaft to transfer the rotational torque to the distal end of the probe and functions without a fiber rotary junction. The probe has a focal Full Width at Half Maximum of 9.6 μm and a working distance of 0.47 mm. We analyzed the non-uniform rotation distortion and found a location fluctuation of only 1.87° in repeated measurements of the same object. The probe was integrated in a high-speed Optical Frequency Domain Imaging setup at 1310 nm. We demonstrated its performance with imaging ex vivo pig bronchial and in vivo goat lung.

  19. Optical Probe for Semiconductor: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-206

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.

    2011-02-01

    This CRADA involves development of a new semiconductor characterization tool, Optical Probe, which can be commercialized by GT Solar. GT Solar will participate in the design and testing of this instrument that will be developed under an IPP project.

  20. Gold Nanorods as Nanodevices for Bioimaging, Photothermal Therapeutics, and Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Haine, Aung Thu; Niidome, Takuro

    2017-01-01

    Gold nanorods are promising metals in several biomedical applications such as bioimaging, thermal therapy, and drug delivery. Gold nanorods have strong absorption bands in near-infrared (NIR) light region and show photothermal effects. Since NIR light can penetrate deeply into tissues, their unique optical, chemical, and biological properties have attracted considerable clinical interest. Gold nanorods are expected to act not only as on-demand thermal converters for photothermal therapy but also as mediators of a controlled drug-release system responding to light irradiation. In this review, we discuss current progress using gold nanorods as bioimaging platform, phototherapeutic agents, and drug delivery vehicles.

  1. Reaction-based two-photon probes for mercury ions: fluorescence imaging with dual optical windows.

    PubMed

    Rao, Alla Sreenivasa; Kim, Dokyoung; Wang, Taejun; Kim, Ki Hean; Hwang, Sekyu; Ahn, Kyo Han

    2012-05-18

    For fluorescent imaging of mercury ions in living species, two-photon probes with dual optical windows are in high demand but remain unexplored. Several dithioacetals were evaluated, and a probe was found, which, upon reaction with mercury species, yielded a two-photon dye; this conversion accompanies ratiometric emission changes with a 97-nm shift, enabling fluorescent imaging of both the probe and mercury ions in cells by one- and two-photon microscopy for the first time.

  2. Neurosurgical hand-held optical coherence tomography (OCT) forward-viewing probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cuiru; Lee, Kenneth K. C.; Vuong, Barry; Cusimano, Michael; Brukson, Alexander; Mariampillai, Adrian; Standish, Beau A.; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2012-02-01

    A prototype neurosurgical hand-held optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging probe has been developed to provide micron resolution cross-sectional images of subsurface tissue during open surgery. This new ergonomic hand-held probe has been designed based on our group's previous work on electrostatically driven optical fibers. It has been packaged into a catheter probe in the familiar form factor of the clinically accepted Bayonet shaped neurosurgical non-imaging Doppler ultrasound probes. The optical design was optimized using ZEMAX simulation. Optical properties of the probe were tested to yield an ~20 um spot size, 5 mm working distance and a 3.5 mm field of view. The scan frequency can be increased or decreased by changing the applied voltage. Typically a scan frequency of less than 60Hz is chosen to keep the applied voltage to less than 2000V. The axial resolution of the probe was ~15 um (in air) as determined by the OCT system. A custom-triggering methodology has been developed to provide continuous stable imaging, which is crucial for clinical utility. Feasibility of this probe, in combination with a 1310 nm swept source OCT system was tested and images are presented to highlight the usefulness of such a forward viewing handheld OCT imaging probe. Knowledge gained from this research will lay the foundation for developing new OCT technologies for endovascular management of cerebral aneurysms and transsphenoidal neuroendoscopic treatment of pituitary tumors.

  3. Development of a Hybrid Optical Biopsy Probe to Improve Prostate Cancer Diagnosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Development of a Hybrid Optical Biopsy Probe to...can be developed for guiding needle biopsy for prostate cancer diagnosis. Multi-modal optical measurements to be utilized for the study are (1) light...which collect light scattering and auto-fluorescence from the prostate tissue, into a transrectal-ultrasound, needle- biopsy probe. In the

  4. Microemulsion characterization by the use of a noninvasive backscatter fiber optic probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Cheung, H. M.; Meyer, William V.

    1993-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the utility of a noninvasive backscatter fiber optic probe for dynamic light-scattering characterization of a microemulsion comprising sodium dodecyl sulfate/1-butanol/ brine/heptane. The fiber probe, comprising two optical fibers precisely positioned in a stainless steel body, is a miniaturized and efficient self-beating dynamic light-scattering system. Accuracy of particle size estimation is better than +/- 2 percent.

  5. Chapter 17: bioimage informatics for systems pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Li, Fuhai; Yin, Zheng; Jin, Guangxu; Zhao, Hong; Wong, Stephen T C

    2013-04-01

    Recent advances in automated high-resolution fluorescence microscopy and robotic handling have made the systematic and cost effective study of diverse morphological changes within a large population of cells possible under a variety of perturbations, e.g., drugs, compounds, metal catalysts, RNA interference (RNAi). Cell population-based studies deviate from conventional microscopy studies on a few cells, and could provide stronger statistical power for drawing experimental observations and conclusions. However, it is challenging to manually extract and quantify phenotypic changes from the large amounts of complex image data generated. Thus, bioimage informatics approaches are needed to rapidly and objectively quantify and analyze the image data. This paper provides an overview of the bioimage informatics challenges and approaches in image-based studies for drug and target discovery. The concepts and capabilities of image-based screening are first illustrated by a few practical examples investigating different kinds of phenotypic changes caEditorsused by drugs, compounds, or RNAi. The bioimage analysis approaches, including object detection, segmentation, and tracking, are then described. Subsequently, the quantitative features, phenotype identification, and multidimensional profile analysis for profiling the effects of drugs and targets are summarized. Moreover, a number of publicly available software packages for bioimage informatics are listed for further reference. It is expected that this review will help readers, including those without bioimage informatics expertise, understand the capabilities, approaches, and tools of bioimage informatics and apply them to advance their own studies.

  6. Monte Carlo analysis on probe performance for endoscopic diffuse optical spectroscopy of tubular organ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunyao; Zhu, Jingping; Cui, Weiwen; Nie, Wei; Li, Jie; Xu, Zhenghong

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the performance of endoscopic diffuse optical spectroscopy probes with circular or linear fiber arrangements for tubular organ cancer detection. Probe performance was measured by penetration depth. A Monte Carlo model was employed to simulate light transport in the hollow cylinder that both emits and receives light from the inner boundary of the sample. The influence of fiber configurations and tissue optical properties on penetration depth was simulated. The results show that under the same condition, probes with circular fiber arrangement penetrate deeper than probes with linear fiber arrangement, and the difference between the two probes' penetration depth decreases with an increase in the 'distance between source and detector (SD)' and the radius of the probe. Other results show that the penetration depths and their differences both decrease with an increase in the absorption coefficient and the reduced scattering coefficient but remain constant with changes in the anisotropy factor. Moreover, the penetration depth was more affected by the absorption coefficient than the reduced scattering coefficient. It turns out that in NIR band, probes with linear fiber arrangements are more appropriate for diagnosing superficial cancers, whereas probes with circular fiber arrangements should be chosen for diagnosing adenocarcinoma. But in UV-VIS band, the two probe configurations exhibit nearly the same. These results are useful in guiding endoscopic diffuse optical spectroscopy-based diagnosis for esophageal, cervical, colorectal and other cancers.

  7. Electrostatic MEMS resonating micro-polygonal scanner for circumferential endoscopic bio-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Xiaojing; Zhou, Guangya; Yu, Hongbin; Tsai, Julius Ming-Lin; Neo, Wee Keong; Kumar, A. Senthil; Chau, Fook Siong

    2013-03-01

    An electrostatically-driven microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) based pyramidal-polygonal micro-scanner is developed for circumferential-scanning endoscopic probes. In this paper, an endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe is proposed, which utilizes multiple parallel incident light beams to drastically reduce the required mechanical rotation angle to achieve near 360-degree circumferential scanning. Manual assembly is employed to construct this micro scanner, which combines a silicon micromachined MEMS actuator with four sets of electrostatic comb-drives and a polymer-based pyramidal-polygonal micro-reflector. The pyramidal-polygonal micro-reflector is developed using a combination of high-precision diamond turning and soft lithography molding technologies. The measured average surface roughness and root-mean-square roughness of the diamond turned mold are 7.02 nm and 9.02 nm respectively, and those of the PDMS casted polygon micro-reflector with an Au coating are 48.95 nm and 61.90 nm respectively. Since near-infrared light sources with wavelengths ranging from 930 nm to 1550 nm are typically utilized for OCT applications, the surface roughness of the polygon reflector is better than λ/10 of the operating wavelength indicating that its quality meets the requirement of the OCT bio-imaging applications. An overall optical scan angle of near-360 degrees is demonstrated experimentally at a resonant frequency of 180 Hz with 80 Vpp ac driving voltage. The proposed MEMS scanner offers an alternative solution for circumferential scanning in endoscopic OCT probes owing to its advantages of compact design, fast scanning speed and low operational power consumption.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of a real-time optical fiber dosimeter probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croteau, André; Caron, Serge; Rink, Alexandra; Jaffray, David; Mermut, Ozzy

    2011-07-01

    There is a pressing need for a low cost, passive optical fiber dosimeter probe for use in real-time monitoring of radiation dose delivered to clinical radiation therapy patients. An optical fiber probe using radiochromic material has been designed and fabricated based on the deposition of a radiochromic thin film on a dielectric mirror. Measurements of the net optical density vs. time before, during, and after irradiation at a rate of 500 cGy/minute to a total dose of 5 Gy were performed. Net optical densities increased from 0.2 to 2.0 for radiochromic thin film thicknesses of 2 to 20 μm, respectively. An improved optical fiber probe fabrication method is presented.

  9. Introduction: feature issue on optical molecular probes, imaging, and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Campagnola, Paul; French, Paul M W; Georgakoudi, Irene; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2014-02-01

    The editors introduce the Biomedical Optics Express feature issue "Optical Molecular Probes, Imaging, and Drug Delivery," which is associated with a Topical Meeting of the same name held at the 2013 Optical Society of America (OSA) Optics in the Life Sciences Congress in Waikoloa Beach, Hawaii, April 14-18, 2013. The international meeting focused on the convergence of optical physics, photonics technology, nanoscience, and photochemistry with drug discovery and clinical medicine. Papers in this feature issue are representative of meeting topics, including advances in microscopy, nanotechnology, and optics in cancer research.

  10. High axial resolution Raman probe made of a single hollow optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Takashi; Yamamoto, Yuko S; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Matsuura, Yuji; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2009-01-01

    A ball lens mounted hollow optical fiber Raman probe (BHRP) consisting of a single hollow optical fiber (HOF) and a micro-ball lens was developed for performing a high axial resolution and high-sensitivity remote Raman analysis of biomedical tissues. The total diameter of the probe head is 640 microm. The BHRP is useful in the measurement of thin-layered tissues that are in contact with the probe's surface because the probe has a limited depth-of-field optical property. An optical calculation study suggested that it is possible to vary the probe's working distance by selecting different materials and diameters for the ball lens. Empirical studies revealed that this probe has a higher axial resolution and a higher sensitivity than an HOF Raman probe without the ball lens. The spectrum of a mouse stomach measured with the BHRP had better quality and considerably lower noise than that measured with a conventional Raman microscope. These results strongly suggest that the BHRP can be used effectively in biomedical applications.

  11. A low background Raman probe for optical biopsy of brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Oliver A. C.; Hutchings, Joanne; Gray, William; Day, John C.

    2014-03-01

    Removal of intrinsic brain tumours is a delicate process, where a high degree of specificity is required to remove all of the tumour tissue without damaging healthy brain. The accuracy of this process can be greatly enhanced by intraoperative guidance. Optical biopsies using Raman spectroscopy are a minimally invasive and lower cost alternative to current guidance methods. A miniature Raman probe for performing optical biopsies of human brain tissue is presented. The probe allows sampling inside a conventional stereotactic brain biopsy system: a needle of length 200mm and inner diameter of 1.8mm. The probe achieves a very low fluorescent background whilst maintaining good collection of Raman signal by employing a miniature stand-off Raman design. To illustrate this, the probe is compared with a Raman probe that uses a pair of optical fibres for collection. The miniature stand-off Raman probe is shown to collect a comparable number of Raman scattered photons, but the fluorescence caused by silica fibres in a Raman needle probe is reduced by a factor of two for Raman shifts under 500 cm-1, and by 30% at 600-700 cm-1. In addition, this design contains only medically approved materials at the distal end. The probe's suitability for use on tissue is demonstrated by discriminating between different types of porcine brain tissue.

  12. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber-optic probes for Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Konorov, Stanislav O; Addison, Christopher J; Schulze, H Georg; Turner, Robin F B; Blades, Michael W

    2006-06-15

    We have implemented a new Raman fiber-optic probe design based on a hollow-core photonic-crystal excitation fiber surrounded by silica-core collection fibers. The photonic-crystal fiber offers low attenuation at the pump radiation wavelength, mechanical flexibility, high radiation stability, and low background noise. Because the excitation beam is transmitted through air inside the hollow-core fiber, silica Raman scattering is much reduced, improving the quality of the spectra obtained using probes of this design. Preliminary results show that the new probe design decreases the Raman background from the silica by approximately an order of magnitude compared to solid-core silica Raman probes.

  13. Algorithm for automated selection of application-specific fiber-optic reflectance probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Andrew J.; Backman, Vadim

    2013-02-01

    Several optical techniques and fiber-optic probe systems have been designed to measure the optical properties of tissue. While a wide range of options is often beneficial, it poses a problem to investigators selecting which method to use for their biomedical application of interest. We present a methodology to optimally select a probe that matches the application requirements. Our method is based both on matching a probe's mean sampling depth with the optimal diagnostic depth of the clinical application and on choosing a probe whose interrogation depth and path length is the least sensitive to alterations in the target medium's optical properties. Satisfying these requirements ensures that the selected probe consistently assesses the relevant tissue volume with minimum variability. To aid in probe selection, we have developed a publicly available graphical user interface that takes the desired sampling depth and optical properties of the medium as its inputs and automatically ranks different techniques in their ability to robustly target the desired depth. Techniques investigated include single fiber spectroscopy, differential path length spectroscopy, polarization-gating, elastic light scattering spectroscopy, and diffuse reflectance. The software has been applied to biological case studies.

  14. High quality polyacrylic acid modified multifunction luminescent nanorods for tri-modality bioimaging, in vivo long-lasting tracking and biodistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Zhigao; Lu, Wei; Liu, Hongrong; Zeng, Songjun

    2014-12-01

    Polyacrylic acid (PAA) modified NaYF4:Gd/Yb/Er upconversion nanorods (denoted as PAA-UCNRs) are demonstrated for tri-modal upconversion (UC) optical, computed X-ray tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The hydrophilic PAA-UCNRs were obtained from hydrophobic oleic acid (OA) capped UCNRs (denoted as OA-UCNRs) using a ligand exchange method. The as-prepared UCNRs with a hexagonal phase structure present high monodispersity. These PAA-UCNRs are successfully used as ideal probes for in vivo UC luminescence bioimaging and synergistic X-ray and UC bioimaging. Moreover, X-ray CT imaging reveals that PAA-UCNRs can act as contrast agents for improved detection of the liver and spleen. In addition, a significant signal enhancement in the liver is observed in in vivo MRI, indicating that PAA-UCNRs are ideal T1-weighted MRI agents. More importantly, in vivo long-term tracking based on these PAA-UCNRs in the live mice and the corresponding ex vivo bioimaging of isolated organs also verify the translocation of PAA-UCNRs from the liver to the spleen, and the observed intense UC signals from the feces reveal the biliary excretion mechanism of these UCNRs. These findings contribute to understanding of the translocation and potential route for excretion of PAA-UCNRs, which can provide an important guide for the diagnosis and detection of diseases based on these UCNRs.Polyacrylic acid (PAA) modified NaYF4:Gd/Yb/Er upconversion nanorods (denoted as PAA-UCNRs) are demonstrated for tri-modal upconversion (UC) optical, computed X-ray tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The hydrophilic PAA-UCNRs were obtained from hydrophobic oleic acid (OA) capped UCNRs (denoted as OA-UCNRs) using a ligand exchange method. The as-prepared UCNRs with a hexagonal phase structure present high monodispersity. These PAA-UCNRs are successfully used as ideal probes for in vivo UC luminescence bioimaging and synergistic X-ray and UC bioimaging. Moreover, X-ray CT imaging

  15. Campanile Near-Field Probes Fabricated by Nanoimprint Lithography on the Facet of an Optical Fiber

    DOE PAGES

    Calafiore, Giuseppe; Koshelev, Alexander; Darlington, Thomas P.; ...

    2017-05-10

    One of the major challenges to the widespread adoption of plasmonic and nano-optical devices in real-life applications is the difficulty to mass-fabricate nano-optical antennas in parallel and reproducible fashion, and the capability to precisely place nanoantennas into devices with nanometer-scale precision. In this study, we present a solution to this challenge using the state-of-the-art ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) to fabricate functional optical transformers onto the core of an optical fiber in a single step, mimicking the 'campanile' near-field probes. Imprinted probes were fabricated using a custom-built imprinter tool with co-axial alignment capability with sub < 100 nm position accuracy, followedmore » by a metallization step. Scanning electron micrographs confirm high imprint fidelity and precision with a thin residual layer to facilitate efficient optical coupling between the fiber and the imprinted optical transformer. The imprinted optical transformer probe was used in an actual NSOM measurement performing hyperspectral photoluminescence mapping of standard fluorescent beads. The calibration scans confirmed that imprinted probes enable sub-diffraction limited imaging with a spatial resolution consistent with the gap size. This novel nano-fabrication approach promises a low-cost, high-throughput, and reproducible manufacturing of advanced nano-optical devices.« less

  16. Phase-sensitive optical coherence reflectometer with differential phase-shift keying of probe pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, A E; Vdovenko, V S; Sergachev, I A; Simikin, D E; Gorshkov, B G; Potapov, V T

    2014-10-31

    We report a new method for reconstructing the signal shape of the external dynamic perturbations along the entire length of the fibre of an optical coherence reflectometer. The method proposed is based on differential phase-shift keying of a probe pulse and demodulation of scattered light by the phase diversity technique. Possibilities of the method are demonstrated experimentally. (fibre-optic sensors)

  17. Detection of Luminescent Nanodiamonds Using a Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscope with an Aperture Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shershulin, V. A.; Samoylenko, S. R.; Shenderova, O. A.; Vlasov, I. I.; Konov, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    Scanning near-fi eld optical microscopy (SNOM) with an aperture probe has been used to map the luminescence of isolated submicron diamond crystallites. 532-nm laser light was used to excite luminescence of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers. The sizes of the analyzed diamond crystallites were determined with an atomic-force microscope. The optical resolution for the lateral dimensions of the luminescing diamond crystallites was doubled on going from confocal luminescence microscopy to scanning near-fi eld optical microscopy with a 290-nm probe aperture diameter.

  18. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy with a self-calibrating fiber optic probe

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bing; Fu, Henry; Bydlon, Torre; Bender, Janelle E.; Ramanujam, Nirmala

    2009-01-01

    Calibration of the diffuse reflectance spectrum for instrument response and time-dependent fluctuation as well as interdevice variations is complicated, time consuming, and potentially inaccurate. We describe a novel fiber optic probe with a real-time self-calibration capability that can be used for tissue optical spectroscopy. The probe was tested in a number of liquid phantoms over a relevant range of tissue optical properties. Absorption and scattering coefficients are extracted with an average absolute error and standard deviation of 6.9% ± 7.2% and 3.5% ± 1.5%, respectively. PMID:18709086

  19. Quantitative optical coherence elastography based on fiber-optic probe for in situ measurement of tissue mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yi; Wang, Yahui; Xu, Yiqing; Chandra, Namas; Haorah, James; Hubbi, Basil; Pfister, Bryan J; Liu, Xuan

    2016-02-01

    We developed a miniature quantitative optical coherence elastography (qOCE) instrument with an integrated Fabry-Perot force sensor, for in situ elasticity measurement of biological tissue. The technique has great potential for biomechanics modeling and clinical diagnosis. We designed the fiber-optic qOCE probe that was used to exert a compressive force to deform tissue at the tip of the probe. Using the space-division multiplexed optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal detected by a spectral domain OCT engine, we were able to quantify the probe deformation that was proportional to the force applied, and to quantify the tissue deformation corresponding to the external stimulus. Simultaneous measurement of force and displacement allowed us to extract Young's modulus of biological tissue. We experimentally calibrated our qOCE instrument, and validated its effectiveness on tissue mimicking phantoms and biological tissues.

  20. Quantitative optical coherence elastography based on fiber-optic probe for in situ measurement of tissue mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yi; Wang, Yahui; Xu, Yiqing; Chandra, Namas; Haorah, James; Hubbi, Basil; Pfister, Bryan J.; Liu, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    We developed a miniature quantitative optical coherence elastography (qOCE) instrument with an integrated Fabry-Perot force sensor, for in situ elasticity measurement of biological tissue. The technique has great potential for biomechanics modeling and clinical diagnosis. We designed the fiber-optic qOCE probe that was used to exert a compressive force to deform tissue at the tip of the probe. Using the space-division multiplexed optical coherence tomography (OCT) signal detected by a spectral domain OCT engine, we were able to quantify the probe deformation that was proportional to the force applied, and to quantify the tissue deformation corresponding to the external stimulus. Simultaneous measurement of force and displacement allowed us to extract Young’s modulus of biological tissue. We experimentally calibrated our qOCE instrument, and validated its effectiveness on tissue mimicking phantoms and biological tissues. PMID:26977372

  1. Development of a microwave probe for the optical study of microwave-excited spin physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Yu-Sheng; Chiu, Yi-Hsin; Adur, Rohan; Odenthal, Patrick; Kawakami, Roland; Hammel, P. Chris; Johnston-Halperin, Ezekiel

    2014-03-01

    We have developed an experimental probe that allows simultaneous broadband microwave excitation and optical excitation/detection at variable temperature and magnetic field. Specifically, we have designed a unique sample probe with a microwave stripline based sample mount that allows for direct optical access to the sample under study within a magneto- optical cryostat. This powerful combination enables optical studies of spintronic systems under microwave excitation using both CW (e.g. photo- and electro-luminescence) and time resolved (e.g. time resolved absorption/transmission and time resolved Kerr rotation, TRKR) techniques. To benchmark the capabilities of this probe we present data demonstrating simultaneous ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and TRKR in a Fe/MgO/GaAs heterostructure. Such studies have potential applications in the study of FMR driven spin pumping and interaction of free carrier spins with native and engineered defects. MRSEC (DMR-0820414).

  2. Optical probe for the cytochrome P-450 cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme

    DOEpatents

    Marrone, Babetta L.; Simpson, Daniel J.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Whaley, Thomas W.

    1992-01-01

    An optical probe enables the study of enzyme activity by absorbance spectroscopy or by sensitive fluorescence methods. In particular, the probe provides the ability to monitor the activity of cytochrome P-450.sub.scc enzyme, the rate limiting enzyme for steroid biosynthesis. Located on the inner mitochondrial membrane, P-450.sub.scc catalyzes the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone and isocapraldehyde by sequential oxidations of the cholesterol side chain. The fluorogenic probe includes a cholesterol-like steroid linked to a chromophore through a linking group. The chromophore is selected to have little optical response when linked to the steroid substrate and an enhanced optical response when cleaved from the substrate and linking group. Thus, a fluorescent anion that can be optically detected is generated by the side-chain cleavage reaction during steroidogenesis.

  3. Optical probe for the cytochrome P-450 cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme

    DOEpatents

    Marrone, Babetta L.; Simpson, Daniel J.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Whaley, Thomas W.

    1993-01-01

    An optical probe enables the study of enzyme activity by absorbance spectroscopy or by sensitive fluorescence methods. In particular, the probe provides the ability to monitor the activity of cytochrome P-450.sub.scc enzyme, the rate limiting enzyme for steroid biosynthesis. Located on the inner mitochondrial membrane, P-450.sub.scc catalyzes the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone and isocapraldehyde by sequential oxidations of the cholesterol side chain. The fluorogenic probe includes a cholesterol-like steroid linked to a chromophore through a linking group. The chromophore is selected to have little optical response when linked to the steroid substrate and an enhanced optical response when cleaved from the substrate and linking group. Thus, a fluorescent anion that can be optically detected is generated by the side-chain cleavage reaction during steroidogenesis.

  4. Miniaturized magnetic-driven scanning probe for endoscopic optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Pang, Ziwei; Wu, Jigang

    2015-06-01

    We designed and implemented a magnetic-driven scanning (MDS) probe for endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT). The probe uses an externally-driven tiny magnet in the distal end to achieve unobstructed 360-degree circumferential scanning at the side of the probe. The design simplifies the scanning part inside the probe and thus allows for easy miniaturization and cost reduction. We made a prototype probe with an outer diameter of 1.4 mm and demonstrated its capability by acquiring OCT images of ex vivo trachea and artery samples from a pigeon. We used a spectrometer-based Fourier-domain OCT system and the system sensitivity with our prototype probe was measured to be 91 dB with an illumination power of 850 μW and A-scan exposure time of 1 ms. The axial and lateral resolutions of the system are 6.5 μm and 8.1 μm, respectively.

  5. Activatable Optical Probes for the Detection of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Christopher R.; Miller, David C.; Jones, Ella F.

    2013-01-01

    The early detection of many human diseases is crucial if they are to be treated successfully. Therefore, the development of imaging techniques that can facilitate early detection of disease is of high importance. Changes in the levels of enzyme expression are known to occur in many diseases, making their accurate detection at low concentrations an area of considerable active research. Activatable fluorescent probes show immense promise in this area. If properly designed they should exhibit no signal until they interact with their target enzyme, reducing the level of background fluorescence and potentially endowing them with greater sensitivity. The mechanisms of fluorescence changes in activatable probes vary. This review aims to survey the field of activatable probes, focusing on their mechanisms of action as well as illustrating some of the in vitro and in vivo settings in which they have been employed. PMID:23519774

  6. Probing optical near-fields with photoreactive azo-polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrieva, M. D.; Asadullina, A. R.; Salakhov, M. Kh

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a method to visualize optical near-fields on photosensitive azo-polymer thin films with scanning near-field optical microscopy. A near-field intensity profile is determined in a basis of surface deformations of the azo-polymer thin film exposed to linearly polarized light.

  7. Effect of contact force on breast tissue optical property measurements using a broadband diffuse optical spectroscopy handheld probe

    PubMed Central

    Cerussi, Albert; Siavoshi, Sarah; Durkin, Amanda; Chen, Cynthia; Tanamai, Wendy; Hsiang, David; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effects of operator-applied force on diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) by integrating a force transducer into the handheld probe. Over the typical range of contact forces measured in the breasts of eight patients, absorption and reduced scattering coefficients (650 to 1000 nm) variance was 3.1 ± 1.0% and 1.0 ± 0.4%. For trained operators, we observed <5% variation in hemoglobin and <2% variation in water and lipids. Contact force is not a significant source of variation, most likely because of a relatively wide probe surface area and the stability of the DOS method for calculating tissue optical properties. PMID:19623242

  8. Probing Atomic Dynamics and Structures Using Optical Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittberger, Bonnie L.; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2015-05-01

    Pattern formation is a widely studied phenomenon that can provide fundamental insights into nonlinear systems. Emergent patterns in cold atoms are of particular interest in condensed matter physics and quantum information science because one can relate optical patterns to spatial structures in the atoms. In our experimental system, we study multimode optical patterns generated from a sample of cold, thermal atoms. We observe this nonlinear optical phenomenon at record low input powers due to the highly nonlinear nature of the spatial bunching of atoms in an optical lattice. We present a detailed study of the dynamics of these bunched atoms during optical pattern formation. We show how small changes in the atomic density distribution affect the symmetry of the generated patterns as well as the nature of the nonlinearity that describes the light-atom interaction. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the National Science Foundation through Grant #PHY-1206040.

  9. Probing intracellular dynamics in living cells with near-field optics.

    PubMed

    Bui, J D; Zelles, T; Lou, H J; Gallion, V L; Phillips, M I; Tan, W

    1999-07-01

    Near-field optics (NFO) overcomes the diffraction limit of light microscopes and permits visualization of single molecules. However, despite numerous applications of NFO in the physical sciences, there is still a paucity of applications in the neurosciences. In this work, the authors have developed NFO probes to image intracellular dynamic processes in living cells. This is the first time a NFO probe has been inserted inside a living cell to deliver light to a spatially controlled region for optical measurements and to record cellular responses to external stimuli. Two different optical detection systems (CCD camera and avalanche photon detection) were developed to monitor cellular responses to drug administration in two different cell types. NG108-15 neuroblastoma cells and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) were penetrated with NFO probes. Intracellular Ca2+ increases post drug stimulation were detected by NFO probes. The cells were loaded with either fura-2/AM or fluo-3/AM calcium dyes. VSMC were stimulated with angiotensin II, resulting in a precise area of intracellular Ca2+ increase. Different response profiles of Ca2+ increases were observed after ionomycin and bradykinin administration in NG108-15 cells. Responsive heterogeneities due to ionomycin among different cells of the same type were recorded. The results show that NFO probes make possible real-time visualization of intracellular events. With refinement, intracellular NFO probes offer the potential of probing cell function with fast temporal and excellent spatial resolutions.

  10. Properties of contact pressure induced by manually operated fiber-optic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregar, Maksimilijan; Cugmas, Blaž; Naglič, Peter; Hartmann, Daniela; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan; Bürmen, Miran

    2015-12-01

    We assess the properties of contact pressure applied by manually operated fiber-optic probes as a function of the operator, probe contact area, and sample stiffness. First, the mechanical properties of human skin sites with different skin structures, thicknesses, and underlying tissues were studied by in vivo indentation tests. According to the obtained results, three different homogeneous silicone skin phantoms were created to encompass the observed range of mechanical properties. The silicon phantoms were subsequently used to characterize the properties of the contact pressure by 10 experienced probe operators employing fiber-optic probes with different contact areas. A custom measurement system was used to collect the time-lapse of diffuse reflectance and applied contact pressure. The measurements were characterized by a set of features describing the transient and steady-state properties of the contact pressure and diffuse reflectance in terms of rise time, optical coupling, average value, and variability. The average applied contact pressure and contact pressure variability were found to significantly depend on the probe operator, probe contact area, and surprisingly also on the sample stiffness. Based on the presented results, we propose a set of practical guidelines for operators of manual probes.

  11. Paired-angle-rotation scanning optical coherence tomography forward-imaging probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jigang; Conry, Michael; Gu, Chunhui; Wang, Fei; Yaqoob, Zahid; Yang, Changhuei

    2006-05-01

    We report a novel forward-imaging optical coherence tomography (OCT), needle-probe paired-angle-rotation scanning OCT (PARS-OCT) probe. The probe uses two rotating angled gradient-index lenses to scan the output OCT probe beam over a wide angular arc (˜19° half-angle) of the region forward of the probe. Among other advantages, this probe design is readily amenable to miniaturization and is capable of a variety of scan modes, including volumetric scans. To demonstrate the advantages of the probe design, we have constructed a prototype probe with an outer diameter of 1.65 mm and employed it to acquire four OCT images, with a 45° angle between adjacent images, of the gill structure of a Xenopus laevis tadpole. The system sensitivity was measured to be 93 dB by using the prototype probe with an illumination power of 450 μW on the sample. Moreover, the axial and the lateral resolutions of the probe are 9.3 and 10.3-12.5 μm, respectively.

  12. A simple optical probing technique for nonlinearly induced refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Partha; Abeywickrema, Ujitha

    2013-09-01

    Self phase modulation is a nonlinear effect that is observed when a laser beam is focused on to a high-absorbing thermal medium. A regular tea sample in a plastic cuvette is used as the nonlinear absorbing sample. The change in the refractive index of the medium occurs due to the heat generated by the focused pump beam, which in turn changes the refractive index. In this paper, self phase modulation is investigated in different ways. An Ar-Ion laser of 514 nm is used as the pump beam and a 632 nm He-Ne laser is used as the probe beam. The probe beam is introduced from the opposite side of the pump beam. Ring patterns are observed from the each side of the sample. Regular far field ring patterns are observed from the pump beam, and two sets of rings are observed with the probe beam. The behaviors of these inner and outer rings are monitored for different pump powers. The steady state heat equation is solved to obtain an exact solution for the radial heat distribution and far field ring patterns are simulated using the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction integral. Ring patterns are theoretically explained using simulations results, and compared with experimental observations. Finally, an interferometric setup using the low power He-Ne laser is also used to determine the induced change in refractive index. Results are compared with those obtained directly from self-phase modulation and from the probe beam method.

  13. Algorithm for automated selection of application-specific fiber-optic reflectance probes

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Several optical techniques and fiber-optic probe systems have been designed to measure the optical properties of tissue. While a wide range of options is often beneficial, it poses a problem to investigators selecting which method to use for their biomedical application of interest. We present a methodology to optimally select a probe that matches the application requirements. Our method is based both on matching a probe’s mean sampling depth with the optimal diagnostic depth of the clinical application and on choosing a probe whose interrogation depth and path length is the least sensitive to alterations in the target medium’s optical properties. Satisfying these requirements ensures that the selected probe consistently assesses the relevant tissue volume with minimum variability. To aid in probe selection, we have developed a publicly available graphical user interface that takes the desired sampling depth and optical properties of the medium as its inputs and automatically ranks different techniques in their ability to robustly target the desired depth. Techniques investigated include single fiber spectroscopy, differential path length spectroscopy, polarization-gating, elastic light scattering spectroscopy, and diffuse reflectance. The software has been applied to biological case studies. PMID:23455876

  14. Multi-Modal Nano-Probes for Radionuclide and 5-color Near Infrared Optical Lymphatic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hisataka; Koyama, Yoshinori; Barrett, Tristan; Hama, Yukihiro; Regino, Celeste A. S.; Shin, In Soo; Jang, Beom-Su; Le, Nhat; Paik, Chang H.; Choyke, Peter L.; Urano, Yasuteru

    2008-01-01

    Current contrast agents generally have one function and can only be imaged in monochrome, therefore, the majority of imaging methods can only impart uniparametric information. A single nano-particle has the potential to be loaded with multiple payloads. Such multi-modality probes have the ability to be imaged by more than one imaging technique, which could compensate for the weakness or even combine the advantages of each individual modality. Furthermore, optical imaging using different optical probes enables us to achieve multi-color in vivo imaging, wherein multiple parameters can be read from a single image. To allow differentiation of multiple optical signals in vivo, each probe should have a close but different near infrared emission. To this end, we synthesized nano-probes with multi-modal and multi-color potential, which employed a polyamidoamine dendrimer platform linked to both radionuclides and optical probes, permitting dual-modality scintigraphic and 5-color near infrared optical lymphatic imaging using a multiple excitation spectrally-resolved fluorescence imaging technique. PMID:19079788

  15. Upconverting and NIR emitting rare earth based nanostructures for NIR-bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Hemmer, Eva; Venkatachalam, Nallusamy; Hyodo, Hiroshi; Hattori, Akito; Ebina, Yoshie; Kishimoto, Hidehiro; Soga, Kohei

    2013-12-07

    In recent years, significant progress was achieved in the field of nanomedicine and bioimaging, but the development of new biomarkers for reliable detection of diseases at an early stage, molecular imaging, targeting and therapy remains crucial. The disadvantages of commonly used organic dyes include photobleaching, autofluorescence, phototoxicity and scattering when UV (ultraviolet) or visible light is used for excitation. The limited penetration depth of the excitation light and the visible emission into and from the biological tissue is a further drawback with regard to in vivo bioimaging. Lanthanide containing inorganic nanostructures emitting in the near-infrared (NIR) range under NIR excitation may overcome those problems. Due to the outstanding optical and magnetic properties of lanthanide ions (Ln(3+)), nanoscopic host materials doped with Ln(3+), e.g. Y2O3:Er(3+),Yb(3+), are promising candidates for NIR-NIR bioimaging. Ln(3+)-doped gadolinium-based inorganic nanostructures, such as Gd2O3:Er(3+),Yb(3+), have a high potential as opto-magnetic markers allowing the combination of time-resolved optical imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of high spatial resolution. Recent progress in our research on over-1000 nm NIR fluorescent nanoprobes for in vivo NIR-NIR bioimaging will be discussed in this review.

  16. Probing high quality pentacene monolayers by optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Rui; Tassi, Nancy G.; Blanchet, Graciela B.; Pinczuk, Aron

    2006-05-01

    We report optical studies of pentacene monolayers grown on poly-alpha-methyl-styrene (PAMS) substrates of high uniformity that reaches into the micron length-scale in the lateral dimension. Raman scattering intensities from a two-monolayer pentacene film exhibit large resonance enhancements when incoming and outgoing photon energies overlap the free exciton measured in optical emission. The incoming and outgoing resonance enhancements are of about the same strength. The free exciton optical emission band is sharp and intense, and it blue-shifts by about 85 meV from that of the pentacene single crystal.

  17. Aqueous synthesis and biostabilization of CdS@ZnS quantum dots for bioimaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Liu, Y.; Lai, C.; Berry, R. M.; Tam, K. C.

    2015-10-01

    Bionanohybrids, combining biocompatible natural polymers with inorganic materials, have aroused interest because of their structural, functional, and environmental advantages. In this work, we report on the stabilization of CdS@ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) using carboxylated cellulose nanocrytals (CNCs) as nanocarrieers in aqueous phase. The high colloidal stability was achieved with sufficient negative charge on CNC surface and the coordination of Cd2+ to carboxylate groups. This coordination allows the in-situ nucleation and growth of QDs on CNC surface. The influences of QD to CNC ratio, pH and ZnS coating on colloidal stability and photoluminescence property of CNC/QD nanohybirds were also studied. The results showed that products obtained at pH 8 with a CdS to CNC weight ratio of 0.19 and a ZnS/CdS molar ratio of 1.5 possessed excellent colloidal stability and highest photoluminescence intensity. By anchoring QDs on rigid bionanotemplates, CNC/CdS@ZnS exhibited long-term colloidal and optical stability. Using biocompatible CNC as nanocarriers, the products have been demonstrated to exhibit low cytotoxicity towards HeLa cells and can serve as promising red-emitting fluorescent bioimaging probes.

  18. Rugged fiber optic probes and sampling systems for remote chemical analysis via the Raman technique

    SciTech Connect

    Nave, S.E.

    1996-07-01

    Recent advances in fiber optics, diode lasers, CCD detectors, dielectric and holographic optical filters, grating spectrometers, and chemometric data analysis have greatly simplified Raman spectroscopy. In order to make a rugged fiber optic Raman probe for solids/slurries like these at Savannah River, we have designed a probe that eliminates as many optical elements and surfaces as possible. The diffuse reflectance probe tip is modified for Raman scattering by installing thin dielectric in-line filters. Effects of each filter are shown for the NaNO{sub 3} Raman spectrum. By using a diode laser excitation at 780 nm, fluorescence is greatly reduced, and excellent spectra may be obtained from organic solids. At SRS, fiber optic Raman probes are being developed for in situ chemical mapping of radioactive waste storage tanks. Radiation darkening of silica fiber optics is negligible beyond 700 nm. Corrosion resistance is being evaluated. Analysis of process gas (off-gas from SRS processes) is investigated in some detail: hydrogen in nitrogen with NO{sub 2} interference. Other applications and the advantages of the method are pointed out briefly.

  19. Computational analysis of responses of a wedge-shaped-tip optical fiber probe in bubble measurement.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, A; Saito, T

    2012-07-01

    Optical-fiber probing is widely employed in bubble/droplet measurement in gas-liquid two-phase flows. Several types of optical fiber probes with a very high S/N ratio and high performance have been developed, but further improvement in the probes' measurement accuracy and reliability for industrial applications is desired. We tried to eliminate optical noise in the probe measurements, and we found that the signals include some peak signs that have potential for advanced measurement with optical-fiber probing. We developed a ray-tracing numerical simulator and identified the mechanisms underlying the generation of the signals. In order to numerically simulate the optical probing signals, the simulator must use 3D frameworks composed of incident beams, the reflection and refraction on the surfaces of the optical elements (i.e., an optical fiber, a sensing tip, an air phase, and a water phase), and beams returning from the sensing tip to the other tip through the fiber. We used all of these in a simple rendering framework based on a ray-tracing algorithm with Fresnel's law, and we observed the mechanism of some promising signals that may be useful for extracting the hidden potential of optical-fiber probing. To verify the simulator's performance, we carried out three comparative experiments with fundamental setups using a wedge-shaped single-tip optical fiber probe, examining: (1) the beam trajectories and energy leaking out from the sensing tip into the surrounding air phase or water phase, (2) the probing signals throughout penetration of the sensing tip at the air-water free interface in light of the three-dimensional deformation, and (3) the probing signals throughout penetration of the sensing tip into a bubble in light of the three-dimensional bubble shape. As a result, (a) we found that an optical fiber probe with a wedge-shaped tip has particular characteristics of beam emissions from the tip, and the emitting angles switched depending on the phases covering

  20. Computational analysis of responses of a wedge-shaped-tip optical fiber probe in bubble measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, A.; Saito, T.

    2012-07-01

    Optical-fiber probing is widely employed in bubble/droplet measurement in gas-liquid two-phase flows. Several types of optical fiber probes with a very high S/N ratio and high performance have been developed, but further improvement in the probes' measurement accuracy and reliability for industrial applications is desired. We tried to eliminate optical noise in the probe measurements, and we found that the signals include some peak signs that have potential for advanced measurement with optical-fiber probing. We developed a ray-tracing numerical simulator and identified the mechanisms underlying the generation of the signals. In order to numerically simulate the optical probing signals, the simulator must use 3D frameworks composed of incident beams, the reflection and refraction on the surfaces of the optical elements (i.e., an optical fiber, a sensing tip, an air phase, and a water phase), and beams returning from the sensing tip to the other tip through the fiber. We used all of these in a simple rendering framework based on a ray-tracing algorithm with Fresnel's law, and we observed the mechanism of some promising signals that may be useful for extracting the hidden potential of optical-fiber probing. To verify the simulator's performance, we carried out three comparative experiments with fundamental setups using a wedge-shaped single-tip optical fiber probe, examining: (1) the beam trajectories and energy leaking out from the sensing tip into the surrounding air phase or water phase, (2) the probing signals throughout penetration of the sensing tip at the air-water free interface in light of the three-dimensional deformation, and (3) the probing signals throughout penetration of the sensing tip into a bubble in light of the three-dimensional bubble shape. As a result, (a) we found that an optical fiber probe with a wedge-shaped tip has particular characteristics of beam emissions from the tip, and the emitting angles switched depending on the phases covering

  1. Information storage and retrieval for probe storage using optical diffraction patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Honschoten, Joost W.; de Jong, Henri W.; Koelmans, Wabe W.; Parnell, Thomas P.; Zaboronski, Oleg

    2011-11-01

    A method for fast information retrieval from a probe storage device is considered. It is shown that information can be stored and retrieved using the optical diffraction patterns obtained by the illumination of a large array of cantilevers by a monochromatic light source. In thermo-mechanical probe storage, the information is stored as a sequence of indentations on the polymer medium. To retrieve the information, the array of probes is actuated by applying a bending force to the cantilevers. Probes positioned over indentations experience deflection by the depth of the indentation, probes over the flat media remain un-deflected. Thus the array of actuated probes can be viewed as an irregular optical grating, which creates a data-dependent diffraction pattern when illuminated by laser light. We develop a low complexity modulation scheme, which allows the extraction of information stored in the pattern of indentations on the media from Fourier coefficients of the intensity of the diffraction pattern. We then derive a low-complexity maximum-likelihood sequence detection algorithm for retrieving the user information from the Fourier coefficients. The derivation of both the modulation and the detection schemes is based on the Fraunhofer formula for data-dependent diffraction patterns. The applicability of Fraunhofer diffraction theory to the optical set-up relevant for probe storage is established both theoretically and experimentally. We confirm the potential of the optical readout technique by demonstrating that the impairment characteristics of probe storage channels (channel noise, global positioning errors, small indentation depth) do not lead to an unacceptable increase in data recovery error rates. We also show that for as long as the Fresnel number F ≤ 0.1, the optimal channel detector derived from Fraunhofer diffraction theory does not suffer any significant performance degradation.

  2. Fiber-Optic Probes for Small Scale Measurements of Scalar Irradiance.

    PubMed

    Rickelt, Lars Fledelius; Lichtenberg, Mads; Trampe, Erik Christian Løvbjerg; Kühl, Michael

    2015-12-30

    A new method for producing fiber-optic microprobes for scalar irradiance (=fluence rate) measurements is described. Such fine scale measurements are important in many photobiological disciplines. With the new method, it is possible to cast spherical 30-600 μm wide light integrating sensor tips onto tapered or untapered optical fibers. The sensor tip is constructed by first casting a clear poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) sphere (~80% of the size of the final probe tip diameter) onto the optical fiber via dip-coating. Subsequently, the clear sphere is covered with light diffusing layers of PMMA mixed with TiO2 until the fiber probe exhibits a satisfactory isotropic response (typically ±5-10%). We also present an experimental setup for measuring the isotropic response of fiber-optic scalar irradiance probes in air and water. The fiber probes can be mounted in a syringe equipped with a needle, facilitating retraction of the spherical fiber tip. This makes it e.g. possible to cut a hole in cohesive tissue with the needle before inserting the probe. The light collecting properties of differently sized scalar irradiance probes (30 μm, 40 μm, 100 μm, 300 μm, and 470 μm) produced by this new method were compared to probes produced with previously published methods. The new scalar irradiance probes showed both higher throughput of light, especially for blue light, as well as a better isotropic light collection over a wide spectral range. The new method also allowed manufacturing of significantly smaller scalar irradiance microprobes (down to 30 μm tip diameters) than hitherto possible, and such sensors allow minimally invasive high resolution scalar irradiance measurements in thin biofilms, leaves and animal tissues. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Resolving phase information of the optical local density of state with scattering near-field probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, R.; Vincent, R.

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically discuss the link between the phase measured using a scattering optical scanning near-field microscopy (s-SNOM) and the local density of optical states (LDOS). A remarkable result is that the LDOS information is directly included in the phase of the probe. Therefore by monitoring the spatial variation of the trans-scattering phase, we locally measure the phase modulation associated with the probe and the optical paths. We demonstrate numerically that a technique involving two-phase imaging of a sample with two different sized tips should allow to obtain the image the pLDOS. For this imaging method, numerical comparison with extinction probe measurement shows crucial qualitative and quantitative improvement.

  4. Design and optimization of a miniaturized imaging probe for simultaneous endomicroscopy and optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretschmer, Simon; Vilches, Sergio; Blattmann, Marc; Ataman, Caglar; Zappe, Hans

    2017-02-01

    A highly-integrated MEMS-based bimodal probe design with integrated piezoelectric fiber scanner for simul- taneous endomicroscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) is presented. The two modalities rely on spectrally-separated optical paths that run partially in parallel through a micro-optical bench system, which has dimensions of only 13 x 2 x 3mm3 (l x w x h). An integrated tubular piezoelectric fiber scanner is used to perform en face scanning required for three dimensional OCT measurements. This scanning engine has an outer diameter of 0.9mm and a length of 9mm, and features custom fabricated 10 μm thick polyimide flexible interconnect lines to address the four piezoelectric electrodes. As a platform combining a full-field and a scanning imaging modality, the developed probe design constitutes a blue print for a wide range of multi-modal endoscopic imaging probes.

  5. Single-body lensed photonic crystal fibers as side-viewing probes for optical imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hae Young; Ryu, Seon Young; Na, Jihoon; Lee, Byeong Ha; Sohn, Ik-Bu; Noh, Young-Chul; Lee, Jongmin

    2008-01-01

    We report the fabrication and performance of a lensed photonic crystal fiber (PCF) designed as a compact but effective side-viewing optical imaging probe. The lensed-PCF probe was implemented in a single body without using any other fibers or additional optics. The beam expansion region and a focusing ball lens, necessary for a focuser, were simultaneously formed along a small piece of PCF by applying arc discharges. The side-viewing ability was provided by polishing the ball lens with a femtosecond laser to form a total internal reflection surface. The working distance and the transverse resolution of the fabricated single-body lensed-PCF were experimentally measured to be 570 and 6.8 microm, respectively. With the proposed lensed-PCF probe, optical coherence tomography images of an in vitro biological sample were successfully obtained.

  6. Broadband miniature optical ultrasound probe for high resolution vascular tissue imaging

    PubMed Central

    Colchester, Richard J.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Mosse, Charles A.; Beard, Paul C.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2015-01-01

    An all-optical ultrasound probe for vascular tissue imaging was developed. Ultrasound was generated by pulsed laser illumination of a functionalized carbon nanotube composite coating on the end face of an optical fiber. Ultrasound was detected with a Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity on the end face of an adjacent optical fiber. The probe diameter was < 0.84 mm and had an ultrasound bandwidth of ~20 MHz. The probe was translated across the tissue sample to create a virtual linear array of ultrasound transmit/receive elements. At a depth of 3.5 mm, the axial resolution was 64 µm and the lateral resolution was 88 µm, as measured with a carbon fiber target. Vascular tissues from swine were imaged ex vivo and good correspondence to histology was observed. PMID:25909031

  7. Gaseous ammonia fluorescence probe based on cellulose acetate modified microstructured optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lirong; Yang, Xinghua; Yuan, Libo; Wang, Lili; Zhao, Enming; Tian, Fengjun; Liu, Yanxin

    2011-09-01

    In this article, we report a novel fluorescent ammonia gas probe based on microstructured optical fiber (MOF) which is modified with eosin-doped cellulose acetate film. This probe was fabricated by liquid fluxion coating process. Polymer solution doped with eosin was directly inhaled into 18 array holes of MOF and then formed matrix film in them. The sensing properties of the optical fiber sensor to gaseous ammonia at room temperature were investigated. The sensing probe showed different fluorescence intensity at 576 nm to different concentrations of trace ammonia in carrier gas of nitrogen. The response range was 50-400 ppm, with short response time within 500 ms. Furthermore, the response range could be tailored through CTAB co-entrapment process in the sensing film. These test results demonstrated that low cost, simple structured fiber optic sensors for detecting ammonia gas samples could be developed based on MOF.

  8. Carbon dots as a luminescence sensor for ultrasensitive detection of phosphate and their bioimaging properties.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingyi; Zhou, Ying; Cheng, Guifang; Dong, Meiting; Liu, Shuxian; Huang, Chaobiao

    2015-06-01

    Highly blue fluorescence carbon dots were synthesized by one-step hydrothermal treatment of potatoes. The as-obtained C-dots have been applied to bioimaging of HeLa cells, which shows their excellent biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity. The results reveal that C-dots are promising for real cell imaging applications. In addition, the carbon dots can be utilized as a probe for sensing phosphate. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Neurotransmitter measurement with a fiber optic probe using pulsed ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, H. Georg; Greek, L. Shane; Blades, Michael W.; Bree, Alan V.; Gorzalka, Boris B.; Turner, Robin F. B.

    1997-05-01

    Many techniques have been developed to investigate the chemistry associated with brain activity. These techniques generally fall into two categories: fast techniques with species restricted sensitivity and slow techniques with generally unrestricted species sensitivity. Therefore, a need exists for a fast non-invasive technique sensitive to a wide array of biologically relevant compounds in order to measure chemical brain events in real time. The work presented here describes the progress made toward the development of a novel neurotransmitter probe. A fiber-optic linked Raman and tunable ultraviolet resonance Raman system was assembled with custom designed optical fiber probes. Probes of several different geometries were constructed and their working curves obtained in aqueous mixtures of methyl orange and potassium nitrate to determine the best probe configuration given particular sample characteristics. Using this system, the ultraviolet resonance Raman spectra of some neurotransmitters were measured with a fiber-optic probe and are reported here for the first time. The probe has also been used to measure neurotransmitter secretions obtained from depolarized rat pheochromocytoma cells.

  10. Electrostatic forward-viewing scanning probe for Doppler optical coherence tomography using a dissipative polymer catheter.

    PubMed

    Munce, Nigel R; Mariampillai, Adrian; Standish, Beau A; Pop, Mihaela; Anderson, Kevan J; Liu, George Y; Luk, Tim; Courtney, Brian K; Wright, Graham A; Vitkin, I Alex; Yang, Victor X D

    2008-04-01

    A novel flexible scanning optical probe is constructed with a finely etched optical fiber strung through a platinum coil in the lumen of a dissipative polymer. The packaged probe is 2.2 mm in diameter with a rigid length of 6mm when using a ball lens or 12 mm when scanning the fiber proximal to a gradient-index (GRIN) lens. Driven by constant high voltage (1-3 kV) at low current (< 5 microA), the probe oscillates to provide wide forward-viewing angle (13 degrees and 33 degrees with ball and GRIN lens designs, respectively) and high-frame-rate (10-140 fps) operation. Motion of the probe tip is observed with a high-speed camera and compared with theory. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging with the probe is demonstrated with a wavelength-swept source laser. Images of an IR card as well as in vivo Doppler OCT images of a tadpole heart are presented. This optomechanical design offers a simple, inexpensive method to obtain a high-frame-rate forward-viewing scanning probe.

  11. Fundamental modes of a trapped probe photon in optical fibers conveying periodic pulse trains

    SciTech Connect

    Dikande, Alain M.

    2010-01-15

    Wave modes induced by cross-phase reshaping of a probe photon in the guiding structure of a periodic train of temporal pulses are investigated theoretically with emphasis on exact solutions to the wave equation for the probe. The study has direct connection with recent advances on the issue of light control by light, the focus being on the trapping of a low-power probe by a temporal sequence of periodically matched high-power pulses of a dispersion-managed optical fiber. The problem is formulated in terms of the nonlinear optical fiber equation with averaged dispersion, coupled to a linear equation for the probe including a cross-phase modulation term. Shape-preserving modes which are robust against the dispersion are shown to be induced in the probe, they form a family of mutually orthogonal solitons the characteristic features of which are determined by the competition between the self-phase and cross-phase effects. Considering a specific context of this competition, the theory predicts two degenerate modes representing a train of bright signals and one mode which describes a train of dark signals. When the walk-off between the pump and probe is taken into consideration, these modes have finite-momentum envelopes and none of them is totally transparent vis-a-vis the optical pump soliton.

  12. The development and evaluation of head probes for optical imaging of the infant head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branco, Gilberto

    The objective of this thesis was to develop and evaluate optical imaging probes for mapping oxygenation and haemodynamic changes in the newborn infant brain. Two imaging approaches are being developed at University College London (UCL): optical topography (surface mapping of the cortex) and optical tomography (volume imaging). Both have the potential to provide information about the function of the normal brain and about a variety of neurophysiologies! abnormalities. Both techniques require an array of optical fibres/fibre bundles to be held in contact with the head, for periods of time from tens of seconds to an hour or more. The design of suitable probes must ensure the comfort and safety of the subject, and provide measurements minimally sensitive to external sources of light and patient motion. A series of prototype adaptable helmets were developed for optical tomography of the premature infant brain using the UCL 32-channel time-resolved system. They were required to attach 32 optical fibre bundles over the infant scalp, and were designed to accommodate infants with a variety of head shapes and sizes, aged between 24-weeks gestational age and term. Continual improvements to the helmet design were introduced following the evaluation of each prototype on infants in the hospital. Data were acquired to generate images revealing the concentration and oxygenation of blood in the brain, and the response of the brain to sensory stimulation. This part of the project also involved designing and testing new methods of acquiring calibration data using reference phantoms. The second focus of the project was the development of probes for use with the UCL frequency-multiplexed near-infrared topography system. This is being used to image functional activation in the infant cortex. A series of probes were developed and experiments were conducted to evaluate their sensitivity to patient motion and to compression of the probe. The probes have been used for a variety of

  13. Use of genetic algorithms to optimize fiber optic probe design for the extraction of tissue optical properties.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Gregory M; Ramanujam, Nirmala

    2007-08-01

    This paper outlines a framework by which the optimal illumination/collection geometry can be identified for a particular biomedical application. In this paper, this framework was used to identify the optimal probe geometry for the accurate determination of tissue optical properties representative of that in the ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectral range. An optimal probe geometry was identified which consisted of a single illumination and two collection fibers, one of which is insensitive to changes in scattering properties, and the other is insensitive to changes in the attenuation coefficient. Using this probe geometry in conjunction with a neural network algorithm, the optical properties could be extracted with root-mean-square errors of 0.30 cm(-1) for the reduced scattering coefficient (tested range of 3-40 cm(-1)), and 0.41 cm(-1) for the absorption coefficient (tested range of 0-80 cm(-1)).

  14. Embedded calibration system for the DIII-D Langmuir probe analog fiber optic links

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, J. G.; Rajpal, R.; Mandaliya, H.; Watkins, M.; Boivin, R. L.

    2012-10-15

    This paper describes a generally applicable technique for simultaneously measuring offset and gain of 64 analog fiber optic data links used for the DIII-D fixed Langmuir probes by embedding a reference voltage waveform in the optical transmitted signal before every tokamak shot. The calibrated data channels allow calibration of the power supply control fiber optic links as well. The array of fiber optic links and the embedded calibration system described here makes possible the use of superior modern data acquisition electronics in the control room.

  15. Embedded calibration system for the DIII-D Langmuir probe analog fiber optic links.

    PubMed

    Watkins, J G; Rajpal, R; Mandaliya, H; Watkins, M; Boivin, R L

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes a generally applicable technique for simultaneously measuring offset and gain of 64 analog fiber optic data links used for the DIII-D fixed Langmuir probes by embedding a reference voltage waveform in the optical transmitted signal before every tokamak shot. The calibrated data channels allow calibration of the power supply control fiber optic links as well. The array of fiber optic links and the embedded calibration system described here makes possible the use of superior modern data acquisition electronics in the control room.

  16. Optical imaging of reporter gene expression using a positron-emission-tomography probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongguang; Ren, Gang; Liu, Shuanglong; Zhang, Xiaofen; Chen, Luxi; Han, Peizhen; Cheng, Zhen

    2010-11-01

    Reporter gene/reporter probe technology is one of the most important techniques in molecular imaging. Lately, many reporter gene/reporter probe systems have been coupled to different imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) and optical imaging (OI). It has been recently found that OI techniques could be used to monitor radioactive tracers in vitro and in living subjects. In this study, we further demonstrate that a reporter gene/nuclear reporter probe system [herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and 9-(4-18F-fluoro-3-[hydroxymethyl] butyl) guanine ([18F]FHBG)] could be successfully imaged by OI in vitro and in vivo. OI with radioactive reporter probes will facilitate and broaden the applications of reporter gene/reporter probe techniques in medical research.

  17. Micro sized implantable ball lens-based fiber optic probe design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Jaepyeong; Kang, Jin U.

    2014-02-01

    A micro sized implantable ball lens-based fiber optic probe design is described for continuous monitoring of brain activity in freely behaving mice. A prototype uses a 500-micron ball lens and a highly flexible 350-micron-diameter fiber bundle, which are enclosed by a 21G stainless steel sheath. Several types and thickness of brain tissue, consisting of fluorescent probes such as GFP, GCaMP3 calcium indicator, are used to evaluate the performance of the imaging probe. Measured working distance is approximately 400-μm, but is long enough to detect neural activities from cortical and cerebellar tissues of mice brain.

  18. Probing DNA with micro- and nanocapillaries and optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbock, L. J.; Otto, O.; Skarstam, D. R.; Jahn, S.; Chimerel, C.; Gornall, J. L.; Keyser, U. F.

    2010-11-01

    We combine for the first time optical tweezer experiments with the resistive pulse technique based on capillaries. Quartz glass capillaries are pulled into a conical shape with tip diameters as small as 27 nm. Here, we discuss the translocation of λ-phage DNA which is driven by an electrophoretic force through the nanocapillary. The resulting change in ionic current indicates the folding state of single λ-phage DNA molecules. Our flow cell design allows for the straightforward incorporation of optical tweezers. We show that a DNA molecule attached to an optically trapped colloid is pulled into a capillary by electrophoretic forces. The detected electrophoretic force is in good agreement with measurements in solid-state nanopores.

  19. Optical probing of electric fields with an electro-acoustic effect toward integrated circuit diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ru-Long; Yang, Han; Zhao, Di; Chen, Qi-Dai; Yan, Zhao-Xu; Yi, Mao-Bin; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2010-02-15

    Electro-optic probing of electric fields has been considered as a promising approach for integrated circuit diagnosis. However, the method is subject to relatively weak voltage sensitivity. In this Letter, we solve the problems with electro-acoustic effect. In contrast to the general electro-optic effect, the light phase modulation induced by the acoustic effect is 2 orders of magnitude stronger at its resonant frequency, as we observed in a GaAs thin film probe. Furthermore, this what we believe to be a novel method shows a highly reproducible linearity between the detected signals and the input voltages, which facilitates the voltage calibration.

  20. Fluorocarbon Fiber-Optic Raman Probe for Non-Invasive Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    OKAGBARE, PAUL I.; MORRIS, MICHAEL D.

    2012-01-01

    We report the development of a novel fiber-optic Raman probe using a graded index fluorocarbon optical fiber. The fluorocarbon fiber has a simple Raman spectrum, a low fluorescence background, and generates a Raman signal that in turbid media serves as an intense reference Raman signal that corrects for albedo. The intensity of the reference signal can easily be varied as needed by scaling the length of the excitation fiber. Additionally, the fluorocarbon probe eliminates the broad silica Raman bands generated in conventional silica-core fiber without the need for filters. PMID:22732546

  1. High power laser and explosive driven shock wave characterization in solids using fiber optic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cranch, G. A.; Grün, J.; Weaver, J.; Gran, J. K.; Groethe, M. A.; Compton, S.; Fournier, K.; Dunlop, B.

    2015-09-01

    Shock wave transmission and propagation in solid media is studied using fiber optic pressure and velocity probes. Shock waves are generated in two experiments using a high power laser facility as well as conventional explosives. Shock wave properties including peak overpressure, mass velocity, shock duration, impulse, arrival time and shock velocity are characterized using fiber tip interferometric displacement sensors and Fabry-Perot pressure sensors. Measurements are conducted in polymethyl methacrylate and limestone. The probes recorded shock pressures up to 0.1 GPa (1 kbar). Measurements from the fiber optic sensors are shown to be in close agreement with measurements from an electrical sensor based on a Dremin loop.

  2. A fiber-optic probe for particle sizing in concentrated suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Ansari, Rafat R.; Meyer, William V.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber-optic probe employing two monomode optical fibers, one for transmitting a Gaussian laser beam to the scattering volume and the second, positioned at some backscatter angle, for receiving the scattered light is described. Performance and suitability of the system for a process control environment is assessed by studying a suspension of polystyrene latex particles over a wide range of sizes and concentrations. The results show that the probe is ideal for a process control environment in industrial and laboratory applications. Particle size is recovered, without any additional corrections for multiple light scattering, in concentrations containing up to 10 percent solids of 39-nm polystyrene latex spheres.

  3. A fiber-optic probe for particle sizing in concentrated suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Ansari, Rafat R.; Meyer, William V.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber-optic probe employing two monomode optical fibers, one for transmitting a Gaussian laser beam to the scattering volume and the second, positioned at some backscatter angle, for receiving the scattered light is described. Performance and suitability of the system for a process control environment is assessed by studying a suspension of polystyrene latex particles over a wide range of sizes and concentrations. The results show that the probe is ideal for a process control environment in industrial and laboratory applications. Particle size is recovered, without any additional corrections for multiple light scattering, in concentrations containing up to 10 percent solids of 39-nm polystyrene latex spheres.

  4. High speed miniature motorized endoscopic probe for 3D optical frequency domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianan; Feroldi, Fabio; Mo, Jianhua; Helderman, Frank; de Groot, Mattijs; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2013-03-01

    We present a miniature motorized endoscopic probe for Optical Frequency Domain Imaging with an outer diameter of 1.65 mm and a rotation speed of 3,000 - 12,500 rpm. This is the smallest motorized high speed OCT probe to our knowledge. The probe has a motorized distal end which provides a significant advantage over proximally driven probes since it does not require a drive shaft to transfer the rotational torque to the distal end of the probe and functions without a fiber rotary junction. The probe has a focal Full Width at Half Maximum of 9.6 μm and a working distance of 0.47 mm. We analyzed the non-uniform rotation distortion and found a location fluctuation of only 1.87° in repeated measurements of the same object. The probe was integrated in a high-speed Optical Frequency Domain Imaging setup at 1310 nm We demonstrated its performance with imaging ex vivo pig bronchial and in vivo goat lung.

  5. Effect of optical pumping in V and λ type pump probe systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Shrabana; Ray, Biswajit; Ghosh, Pradip N.

    2008-05-01

    We have investigated the effect of a strong pump laser copropagating with a probe laser for both λ and V type level schemes of the pump and probe fields inside a room temperature Rb vapour cell. With the λ type scheme certain absorption enhanced peaks are observed across the Doppler broadened probe absorption profile. In addition to these peaks an Electromagnetically Induced Transparency dip is also observed at the centre of one of these peaks. For V type scheme pump probe spectroscopy with co and counter propagating pump probe beams are studied. In both cases we observe velocity selective resonances (VSR) which are strongly modified by optical pumping effects to another hyperfine component of the ground state. A repumping laser, from the dark ground level is used to transfer atoms from the dark state to the pump probe cycle to reduce the optical pumping effect. The effect of a control laser on the Lamb dip spectrum of the probe laser has also been investigated.

  6. Generating and probing entangled states for optical atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletic, Vladan

    2016-05-01

    The precision of quantum measurements is inherently limited by projection noise caused by the measurement process itself. Spin squeezing and more complex forms of entanglement have been proposed as ways of surpassing this limitation. In our system, a high-finesse asymmetric micromirror-based optical cavity can mediate the atom-atom interaction necessary for generating entanglement in an 171 Yb optical lattice clock. I will discuss approaches for creating, characterizing, and optimally utilizing these nonclassical states for precision measurement, as well as recent progress toward their realization. This research is supported by DARPA QuASAR, NSF, and NSERC.

  7. Electro-optic probe measurements of electric fields in plasmas.

    PubMed

    Nishiura, M; Yoshida, Z; Mushiake, T; Kawazura, Y; Osawa, R; Fujinami, K; Yano, Y; Saitoh, H; Yamasaki, M; Kashyap, A; Takahashi, N; Nakatsuka, M; Fukuyama, A

    2017-02-01

    The direct measurements of high-frequency electric fields in a plasma bring about significant advances in the physics and engineering of various waves. We have developed an electro-optic sensor system based on the Pockels effect. Since the signal is transmitted through an optical fiber, the system has high tolerance for electromagnetic noises. To demonstrate its applicability to plasma experiments, we report the first result of measurement of the ion-cyclotron wave excited in the RT-1 magnetosphere device. This study compares the results of experimental field measurements with simulation results of electric fields in plasmas.

  8. Electro-optic probe measurements of electric fields in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiura, M.; Yoshida, Z.; Mushiake, T.; Kawazura, Y.; Osawa, R.; Fujinami, K.; Yano, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2017-02-01

    The direct measurements of high-frequency electric fields in a plasma bring about significant advances in the physics and engineering of various waves. We have developed an electro-optic sensor system based on the Pockels effect. Since the signal is transmitted through an optical fiber, the system has high tolerance for electromagnetic noises. To demonstrate its applicability to plasma experiments, we report the first result of measurement of the ion-cyclotron wave excited in the RT-1 magnetosphere device. This study compares the results of experimental field measurements with simulation results of electric fields in plasmas.

  9. Transpiration-purged optical probe: a novel sensor for high temperature harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanOsdol, John; Woodruff, Steve; Straub, Douglas

    2007-09-01

    Typical control systems that are found in modern power plants must control the many physical aspects of the complex processes that occur inside the various components of the power plant. As detection and monitoring of pollutants becomes increasingly important to plant operation, these control systems will become increasingly complex, and will depend upon accurate monitoring of the concentration levels of the various chemical species that are found in the gas streams. In many cases this monitoring can be done optically. Optical access can also be used to measure thermal emissions and the particulate loading levels in the fluid streams. Some typical environments were optical access is needed are combustion chambers, reactor vessels, the gas and solid flows in fluidized beds, hot gas filters and heat exchangers. These applications all have harsh environments that are at high temperatures and pressures. They are often laden with products of combustion and other fine particulate matter which is destructive to any optical window that could be used to monitor the processes in these environments in order to apply some control scheme over the process. The dust and char that normally collects on the optical surfaces reduces the optical quality and thus impairs the ability of the optical surface to transmit data. Once this has occurred, there is generally no way to clean the optical surface during operation. The probe must be dismounted from the vessel, disassembled and cleaned or replaced, then remounted. This would require the shutdown of the particular component of the plant where optical monitoring is required. This renders the probe ineffective to be used as the monitoring part of any control system application. The components of optical monitoring equipment are usually built in supporting structures that require precise alignment. This is almost always accomplished using fine scale adjustments to specialized mounting hardware that is attached to the reactor vessel. When

  10. Transpiration-purged optical probe: a novel sensor for high temperature harsh environments

    SciTech Connect

    VanOsdol, J.G.; Woodruff, S.D.; Straub, D.L.

    2007-10-05

    Typical control systems that are found in modern power plants must control the many physical aspects of the complex processes that occur inside the various components of the power plant. As detection and monitoring of pollutants becomes increasingly important to plant operation, these control systems will become increasingly complex, and will depend upon accurate monitoring of the concentration levels of the various chemical species that are found in the gas streams. In many cases this monitoring can be done optically. Optical access can also be used to measure thermal emissions and the particulate loading levels in the fluid streams. Some typical environments were optical access is needed are combustion chambers, reactor vessels, the gas and solid flows in fluidized beds, hot gas filters and heat exchangers. These applications all have harsh environments that are at high temperatures and pressures. They are often laden with products of combustion and other fine particulate matter which is destructive to any optical window that could be used to monitor the processes in these environments in order to apply some control scheme over the process. The dust and char that normally collects on the optical surfaces reduces the optical quality and thus impairs the ability of the optical surface to transmit data. Once this has occurred, there is generally no way to clean the optical surface during operation. The probe must be dismounted from the vessel, disassembled and cleaned or replaced, then remounted. This would require the shutdown of the particular component of the plant where optical monitoring is required. This renders the probe ineffective to be used as the monitoring part of any control system application. The components of optical monitoring equipment are usually built in supporting structures that require precise alignment. This is almost always accomplished using fine scale adjustments to specialized mounting hardware that is attached to the reactor vessel. When

  11. A novel colorimetric and fluorescent probe for simultaneous detection of SO3(2-)/HSO3(-) and HSO4(-) by different emission channels and its bioimaging in living cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ting; Yin, Guoxing; Niu, Tingting; Yin, Peng; Li, Haitao; Zhang, Youyu; Chen, Haimin; Zeng, Ying; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2018-01-01

    A novel fluorescent probe (E)-3-ethyl-2-(4-hydroxystyryl)-1,1-di-methyl-1H-benzo-[e]indolium iodide (probe EDB) based on benzo[e]indolium was synthesized, which provided the simultaneous detection of SO3(2-)/HSO3(-) and HSO4(-) ion with different emission channels. Based on the principle of ion-induced rotation-displaced H-aggregates, when treated with NaHSO4, a fluorescence enhancement at 580nm was observed with the excitation wavelength at 420nm. While, in the advantage of the nucleophilic addition of SO3(2-) to the vinyl group, strong fluorescence was obtained at 455nm when treated with Na2SO3 with the excitation wavelength at 320nm, along with obvious color change by naked eyes. So the probe could be applied to sense SO3(2-)/HSO3(-) and HSO4(-) ion via different excited and emission channels simultaneously. The probe was also applicable for fluorescence imagings of bisulfite and hydrosulfate in HeLa cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Bases for time-resolved probing of transient carrier dynamics by optical pump-probe scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Munenori; Yoshida, Shoji; Mera, Yutaka; Takeuchi, Osamu; Oigawa, Haruhiro; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2013-10-07

    The tangled mechanism that produces optical pump-probe scanning tunneling microscopy spectra from semiconductors was analyzed by comparing model simulation data with experimental data. The nonlinearities reflected in the spectra, namely, the excitations generated by paired laser pulses with a delay time, the logarithmic relationship between carrier density and surface photovoltage (SPV), and the effect of the change in tunneling barrier height depending on SPV, were examined along with the delay-time-dependent integration process used in measurement. The optimum conditions required to realize reliable measurement, as well as the validity of the microscopy technique, were demonstrated for the first time.

  13. Probing myocardium biomechanics using quantitative optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shang; Lopez, Andrew L.; Morikawa, Yuka; Tao, Ge; Li, Jiasong; Larina, Irina V.; Martin, James F.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    We present a quantitative optical coherence elastographic method for noncontact assessment of the myocardium elasticity. The method is based on shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography (SWI-OCT), where a focused air-puff system is used to induce localized tissue deformation through a low-pressure short-duration air stream and a phase-sensitive OCT system is utilized to monitor the propagation of the induced tissue displacement with nanoscale sensitivity. The 1-D scanning of M-mode OCT imaging and the application of optical phase retrieval and mapping techniques enable the reconstruction and visualization of 2-D depth-resolved shear wave propagation in tissue with ultra-high frame rate. The feasibility of this method in quantitative elasticity measurement is demonstrated on tissue-mimicking phantoms with the estimated Young's modulus compared with uniaxial compression tests. We also performed pilot experiments on ex vivo mouse cardiac muscle tissues with normal and genetically altered cardiomyocytes. Our results indicate this noncontact quantitative optical coherence elastographic method can be a useful tool for the cardiac muscle research and studies.

  14. Optical probing of supersonic flows with statistical correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, B. H.

    1971-01-01

    Remote sensing tool reliably measures statistical properties of supersonic turbulence. Tool neither affects nor is adversely affected by flow field. Device determines characteristics of supersonic flow with optical system and provides method and apparatus for separating translational and rotational motions of turbulent structures in supersonic flow.

  15. Optical Probing of Acoustic Emission During Deformation of Microtensile Specimens.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    Drawing of Actuator Cross-head Showing Details of Rolling Piston Seal ......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 9 Optical Arrangement of Fizeau ...Inter- ferometer from Vibrations and Dimensional Changes of the Specimens . 25 11 Fizeau Interferometer Mounted on Load Frame...bottom grip centerlines are precisely in line with one another and with the centerline of the other components of the load train . Moreover, they are

  16. Waveguide refractometry as a probe of thin film optical uniformity

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Jr. B.G.; Dimos, D.; Sinclair, M.B.

    1997-02-01

    Optical inhomogeneities through the thickness of a sol-gel-derived, spin-coated Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} (PZT) thin film have been evaluated using prism-coupled waveguide refractometry. Unusual waveguide coupling angle behavior has been treated using a multilayer model to describe the optical characteristics of the film. Waveguide refractometry measurements, performed after incremental reductions in film thickness, were used to develop a consistent model for optical inhomogeneity through the film thickness. Specifically, a thin film layer model, consisting of alternating layers of high and low refractive index material, was found to accurately predict irregularities in transverse-electric (TE) mode coupling angles exhibited by the film. This layer structure has a spatial periodicity that is consistent with the positions of the upper film surface at intermediate firings during film synthesis. The correlation emphasizes the impact of the multistep thin-film deposition approach on the optical characteristics of the resulting thin film. {copyright} {ital 1997 Materials Research Society.}

  17. An integrated fiber-optic probe combined with support vector regression for fast estimation of optical properties of turbid media.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Fu, Xiaping; Ying, Yibin; Fang, Zhenhuan

    2015-06-23

    A fiber-optic probe system was developed to estimate the optical properties of turbid media based on spatially resolved diffuse reflectance. Because of the limitations in numerical calculation of radiative transfer equation (RTE), diffusion approximation (DA) and Monte Carlo simulations (MC), support vector regression (SVR) was introduced to model the relationship between diffuse reflectance values and optical properties. The SVR models of four collection fibers were trained by phantoms in calibration set with a wide range of optical properties which represented products of different applications, then the optical properties of phantoms in prediction set were predicted after an optimal searching on SVR models. The results indicated that the SVR model was capable of describing the relationship with little deviation in forward validation. The correlation coefficient (R) of reduced scattering coefficient μ'(s) and absorption coefficient μ(a) in the prediction set were 0.9907 and 0.9980, respectively. The root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP) of μ'(s) and μ(a) in inverse validation were 0.411 cm(-1) and 0.338 cm(-1), respectively. The results indicated that the integrated fiber-optic probe system combined with SVR model were suitable for fast and accurate estimation of optical properties of turbid media based on spatially resolved diffuse reflectance.

  18. Single-step method for fiber-optic probe-based full-range spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Min, Eun Jung; Shin, Jun Geun; Lee, Jae Hwi; Yasuno, Yoshiaki; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2013-07-20

    We propose a single-step method appropriated for a fiber-optic probe-based full-range spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT). The fiber-optic probe was scanned over a sample with a magnetically driven actuator. In the reference arm, a phase shift of π/2 was applied during two neighbor axial scanning, from which the complex spectral interferogram was directly reconstructed. Since the complex-conjugate-free OCT image is obtained by doing just one Fourier transform on the complex interferogram, obtaining the full-range image is simple in algorithm and effective in computation time. Some full-range images of biological samples created with the proposed method are presented and the processing time is analyzed.

  19. Simulation analysis for thermo-chromic fiber optic temperature sensing probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xueyan; Dou, Yinping; Huan, Kewei

    2016-03-01

    Fiber-optic temperature sensor based on thermo-chromic materials is a kind of effective facility to solve the problem of measuring temperature in the electrical power system. But the measuring range by this method is narrow, it is necessary to improve the measuring range by the means of append an attenuator. In this paper,based on traditional fiber optic temperature sensor , the purpose and principle of thermo-chromic optical fiber temperature sensing probe is introduced. The degree of attenuation of temperature which is obtained through ANSYS software thermal simulation is used as an evaluation index to make the choice of probe structure, and analyzes the result of simulation in detail. Finally, the functional between the temperature of heat source and the temperature of attenuator is fitted. So, this paper could be a reference or an example for the application of fiber-optic temperature sensor based on thermo-chromic materials.

  20. Second harmonic generation at the probe tip for background-free near-field optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhaogang; Soh, Yeng Chai

    2012-08-13

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) has been applied to reduce background signals in near-field optical imaging, but this technique is usually limited to samples with strong second-order nonlinear susceptibilities. To overcome this limitation, in this paper, we present a versatile background-free SHG configuration, where it utilizes the second-order nonlinear susceptibility of the probe which essentially functions as a near-field polarizer capable of filtering out the background signal component. In the theoretical analysis, we first model the probe-sample optical interactions at both the fundamental frequency and the second harmonic frequency by using the coupled dipole method. The theoretical model reveals that the proposed versatile background-free SHG configuration requires two conditions. The first condition is that the incident optical field must be s-polarized. The second condition is that the probe must be made of crystals from symmetry class 222, symmetry class 622, symmetry class 422, symmetry class 42m, symmetry class 43m or symmetry class 23. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed versatile background-free SHG configuration, a probe made of deuterated potassium dideuterium phosphate (DKDP) crystal from symmetry class 42m is analyzed numerically. It is shown that when imaging samples with negligible second-order nonlinear susceptibilities, the proposed background-free SHG configuration improves the imaging contrast by more than one-order of magnitude as compared to all other imaging configurations. Moreover, we also investigate the dependence of its performance on other parameters, such as the probe-sample distance, the relative size between probe and sample, and the tilt angle of probe crystal. It is believed that the proposed configuration could be widely used to achieve high contrast near-field optical imaging.

  1. Design of a compact laparoscopic probe for optical stimulation of the cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2009-02-01

    The cavernous nerves are responsible for erectile function and course along the prostate surface, varying in size and location among patients, making preservation of sexual function challenging after prostate cancer surgery. Electrical stimulation has proven inconsistent and unreliable in identifying these nerves and evaluating nerve function. Optical stimulation of the rat cavernous nerves has recently been reported as a alternative to electrical stimulation, with potential advantages including noncontact stimulation and improved spatial selectivity. This study describes the design of a compact laparoscopic probe for future clinical use in optical nerve stimulation. The 10-Fr (3.4-mm-OD) prototype laparoscopic probe includes an aspheric lens for collimation of the laser beam with a 0.8- mm-diameter spot, coupled with a 200-μm-core optical fiber. A 45° gold-coated rod mirror in the probe tip provides side-firing delivery of the laser radiation. The probe handle houses a miniature linear motorized stage for lateral scanning of the probe tip over a 25-mm line along the prostate surface. A 5.5-W Thulium fiber laser with tunable wavelength range of 1850-1880 nm was tested with the probe. The probe fits through a standard 5-mm-ID laparoscopic port and is capable of delivering pulse energies up to 8 mJ (1.6 J/cm2) at a 2.5-ms pulse duration, well above the threshold (~ 0.35 J/cm2) for optical stimulation of the cavernous nerves.

  2. Asteroid (4179) Toutatis size determination via optical images observed by the Chang'e-2 probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.; Huang, J.; Zhao, W.; Wang, X.; Meng, L.; Tang, X.

    2014-07-01

    This work is a physical and statistical study of the asteroid (4179) Toutatis using the optical images obtained by a solar panel monitor of the Chang'e-2 probe on Dec. 13, 2012 [1]. In the imaging strategy, the camera is focused at infinity. This is specially designed for the probe with its solar panels monitor's principle axis pointing to the relative velocity direction of the probe and Toutatis. The imaging strategy provides a dedicated way to resolve the size by multi-frame optical images. The inherent features of the data are: (1) almost no rotation was recorded because of the 5.41-7.35 Earth-day rotation period and the small amount of elapsed imaging time, only minutes, make the object stay in the images in a fixed position and orientation; (2) the sharpness of the upper left boundary and the vagueness of lower right boundary resulting from the direction of SAP (Sun-Asteroid-Probe angle) cause a varying accuracy in locating points at different parts of Toutatis. A common view is that direct, accurate measurements of asteroid shapes, sizes, and pole positions are now possible for larger asteroids that can be spatially resolved using the Hubble Space Telescope or large ground-based telescopes equipped with adaptive optics. For a quite complex planetary/asteroid probe study, these measurements certainly need continuous validation via a variety of ways [2]. Based on engineering parameters of the probe during the fly-by, the target spatial resolving and measuring procedures are described in the paper. Results estimated are optical perceptible size on the flyby epoch under the solar phase angles during the imaging. It is found that the perceptible size measured using the optical observations and the size derived from the radar observations by Ostro et al.~in 1995 [3], are close to one another.

  3. Pump-probe quantum state tomography in a semiconductor optical amplifier.

    PubMed

    Grosse, N B; Owschimikow, N; Aust, R; Lingnau, B; Koltchanov, A; Kolarczik, M; Lüdge, K; Woggon, U

    2014-12-29

    Pump-probe quantum state tomography was applied to the transmission of a coherent state through an In(Ga)As based quantum dot optical amplifier during the interaction with an optical pump pulse. The Wigner function and the statistical moments of the field were extracted and used to determine the degree of population inversion and the signal-to-noise ratio in a sub-picosecond time window.

  4. Common path ball lens probe for optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kanwarpal; Yamada, Daisuke; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2016-02-01

    Background: Common path probes are highly desirable for optical coherence tomography (OCT) as they reduce system complexity and cost. In this work we report an all-fiber common path side viewing monolithic probe for coronary artery imaging. Methods: Our common path probe was designed for spectrometer based Fourier domain OCT at 1310 nm wavelength. Light from the fiber expands in the coreless fiber region and then focussed by the ball lens. Reflection from ball lens-air interface served as reference signal. The monolithic ball lens probe was assembled within a 560 µmouter diameter drive shaft which was attached to a rotary junction. The drive shaft was placed inside an outer, transparent sheath of 800 µm diameter. Results: With a source input power of 25 mW, we could achieve sensitivity of 100.5 dB. The axial resolution of the system was found to be 15.6 µm in air and the lateral resolution (full width half maximum) was approximately 49 µm. As proof of principal, images of skin acquired using this probe demonstrated clear visualization of the stratum corneum, epidermis, and papillary dermis, along with sweat ducts. Conclusion: In this work we have demonstrated a monolithic, ball lens common, path probe for OCT imaging. The designed ball lens probe is easy to fabricate using a laser splicer. Based on the features and capability of common path probes to provide a simpler solution for OCT, we believe that this development will be an important enhancement for certain types of catheters.

  5. CTU Optical probes for liquid phase detection in the 1000 MW steam turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolovratník, Michal; Bartoš, Ondřej

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce the measurement capacity of a new generation of CTU's optical probes to determine the liquid phase distribution in steam turbines and other energy systems. At the same time the paper presents the first part of the results concerning output wetness achieved through the use of experimental research performed with the probes in a new low pressure (LP) part of the steam turbine 1000MW in the Temelin nuclear power plant (ETE). Two different probes were used. A small size extinction probe with a diameter of 25mm which was developed for measuring in a wider range of turbines in comparison with the previous generation with a diameter of 50mm. The second probe used was a photogrammetric probe developed to observe the coarse droplets. This probe is still under development and this measurement was focused on verifying the capabilities of the probe. The data processing technique is presented together with yielded examples of the wetness distribution along the last blade of the 1000MW steam turbine. The experimental measurement was done in cooperation with Doosan Škoda Power s.r.o. (DSP).

  6. Multiple optical probing of high frequency semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetterman, Harold

    1989-11-01

    The purchase was made of a complete Nd:YAG pumped picosecond dye laser and related optical components. Matching support was provided for an autocorrelator, power meters, lock-in detectors and Optical Table to form a complete measurement system. The idea was to fabricate a picosecond system which would measure devices and systems out to at least 200 GHz. It would be used to validate Network analyzer measurements in the region of overlap and to develop a degree of confidence in the entire technique of S parameter measurement using picosecond pulses. The highest frequency GaAs and GaAs alloy devices were investigated. New types of devices, MMIC amplifiers and finally the operational constraints of optical interconnections were studied. The system proved to be so useful that all of these tests were preformed and were extended to the generation of millimeter radiation and the demonstration of spectroscopic use. Current measurements are on ballistic field effect devices and resonant tunneling structures which were fabricated by local industries and universities directly as a result of this unique measurement capability.

  7. Optical probing of sodium dynamics in neurons and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Christophe M; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2011-09-15

    Changes in intracellular Na(+) concentration underlie essential neurobiological processes, but few reliable tools exist for their measurement. Here we characterize a new synthetic Na(+)-sensitive fluorescent dye, Asante Natrium Green (ANG), with unique properties. This indicator was excitable in the visible spectrum and by two-photon illumination, suffered little photobleaching and located to the cytosol were it remained for long durations without noticeable unwanted effects on basic cell properties. When used in brain tissue, ANG yielded a bright fluorescent signal during physiological Na(+) responses both in neurons and astrocytes. Synchronous electrophysiological and fluorometric recordings showed that ANG produced accurate Na(+) measurement in situ. This new Na(+) indicator opens innovative ways of probing neuronal circuits.

  8. Tapered Optical Fiber Probe Assembled with Plasmonic Nanostructures for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Application.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhulin; Lei, Xing; Liu, Ye; Wang, Zhiwei; Wang, Xiujuan; Wang, Zhaoming; Mao, Qinghe; Meng, Guowen

    2015-08-12

    Optical fiber-Raman devices integrated with plasmonic nanostructures have promising potentials for in situ probing remote liquid samples and biological samples. In this system, the fiber probe is required to simultaneously demonstrate stable surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals and high sensitivity toward the target species. Here we demonstrate a generic approach to integrate presynthesized plasmonic nanostructures with tapered fiber probes that are prepared by a dipping-etching method, through reversed electrostatic attraction between the silane couple agent modified silica fiber probe and the nanostructures. Using this approach, both negatively and positively charged plasmonic nanostructures with various morphologies (such as Au nanosphere, Ag nanocube, Au nanorod, Au@Ag core-shell nanorod) can be stably assembled on the tapered silica fiber probes. Attributed to the electrostatic force between the plasmonic units and the fiber surface, the nanostructures do not disperse in liquid samples easily, making the relative standard deviation of SERS signals as low as 2% in analyte solution. Importantly, the detection sensitivity of the system can be optimized by adjusting the cone angle (from 3.6° to 22°) and the morphology of nanostructures assembled on the fiber. Thus, the nanostructures-sensitized optical fiber-Raman probes show great potentials in the applications of SERS-based environmental detection of liquid samples.

  9. Optical coherence tomography endoscopic probe based on a tilted MEMS mirror.

    PubMed

    Duan, Can; Tanguy, Quentin; Pozzi, Antonio; Xie, Huikai

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports a compact microendoscopic OCT probe with an outer diameter of only 2.7 mm. The small diameter is enabled by a novel 2-axis scanning MEMS mirror with a preset 45° tilted angle. The tilted MEMS mirror is directly integrated on a silicon optical bench (SiOB). The SiOB provides mechanical support and electrical wiring to the mirror plate via a set of bimorph flexure, enabling a compact probe mount design without the requirement of a 45° slope, which is capable to dramatically reduce the probe size and ease the assembly process. Additionally, the SiOB also provides trenches with properly-designed opening widths for automatic alignment of the MEMS mirror, GRIN lens and optical fiber. The 45°-tilted MEMS mirror plate is actuated by four electrothermal bimorph actuators. The packaged 2.7 mm-diameter probe offers 2-axis side-view optical scanning with a large optical scan range of 40° at a low drive voltage of 5.5 Vdc in both axes, allowing a lateral scan area of 2.2 mm × 2.2 mm at a 3 mm working distance. High-resolution 2D and 3D OCT images of the IR card, ex vivo imaging of meniscus specimens and rat brain slices, in vivo imaging of the human finger and nail have been obtained with a TDOCT system.

  10. Optical coherence tomography endoscopic probe based on a tilted MEMS mirror

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Can; Tanguy, Quentin; Pozzi, Antonio; Xie, Huikai

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a compact microendoscopic OCT probe with an outer diameter of only 2.7 mm. The small diameter is enabled by a novel 2-axis scanning MEMS mirror with a preset 45° tilted angle. The tilted MEMS mirror is directly integrated on a silicon optical bench (SiOB). The SiOB provides mechanical support and electrical wiring to the mirror plate via a set of bimorph flexure, enabling a compact probe mount design without the requirement of a 45° slope, which is capable to dramatically reduce the probe size and ease the assembly process. Additionally, the SiOB also provides trenches with properly-designed opening widths for automatic alignment of the MEMS mirror, GRIN lens and optical fiber. The 45°-tilted MEMS mirror plate is actuated by four electrothermal bimorph actuators. The packaged 2.7 mm-diameter probe offers 2-axis side-view optical scanning with a large optical scan range of 40° at a low drive voltage of 5.5 Vdc in both axes, allowing a lateral scan area of 2.2 mm × 2.2 mm at a 3 mm working distance. High-resolution 2D and 3D OCT images of the IR card, ex vivo imaging of meniscus specimens and rat brain slices, in vivo imaging of the human finger and nail have been obtained with a TDOCT system. PMID:27699103

  11. Development of erbium-doped silica sensor probe for fiber-optic fluorescence thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, H.; Takei, K.; Katsumata, T.; Komuro, S.; Morikawa, T.; Ishizawa, H.; Toba, E.

    2005-09-01

    A fabrication process of the erbium (Er)-doped silica sensor probe, in which the sensor head is directly coupled with silica glass fiber, has been developed for the fiber-optic thermometer application. In this fabrication process, a droplet of slurry of Er-doped silica powders are formed on the end of the silica glass fiber, and are dried, sintered, and then melted and solidified in a LPG-O2 gas furnace. The temperature dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) lifetime from the Er-doped silica senor probe with various dopant concentrations has been evaluated for the fiber-optic thermometer application. An Er-doped silica sensor probe with an Er density above 10000ppm and aluminum (Al) content about Al /Er=20 is considered to be suitable for a fiber-optic thermometer because of the strong PL intensity and long PL lifetime. The PL lifetimes of the Er sensor head decreases from 9.9msto8.1ms at temperatures from 273Kto473K. An Er-doped silica sensor probe, which is fabricated by a modified process, is considered to be potentially useful for a fiber-optic fluorescence thermometer.

  12. Optical signaling in biofluids: a nondenaturing photostable molecular probe for serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Dey, Gourab; Gaur, Pankaj; Giri, Rajanish; Ghosh, Subrata

    2016-01-31

    The systematic investigation of the interaction of a new class of molecular materials with proteins through structure-optical signaling relationship studies has led to the development of efficient fluorescent probes that can detect and quantify serum albumins in biofluids without causing any denaturation.

  13. Local measurement in Freon R123 two-phase vertical upflow using bi-optical probe

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, T.; Matsutani, K.; Iwase, T.; Sunami, T.; Tomomatsu, K.; Ueno, T.; Osaki, T.

    1995-12-31

    In the U-bend region of steam generator of PWR plant, the authors have experienced some tube failures due to flow induced vibration. In this project, the thermal hydraulic and flow induced vibration tests are planned using the model steam generator equipped with the large scale U-bend tube bundle and the Freon two-phase flow loop. The objectives of this project are to verify the reliability of U-bend tubes and to upgrade the technologies to evaluate the thermal hydraulic behaviors in U-bend region and the flow induced vibration of U-bend tubes. The void fraction and interfacial velocity are key parameters for the flow induced vibration phenomena. So, it is important to measure the void fraction and interfacial velocity precisely. In order to confirm the capability of bi-optical probe for the measurement of those key parameters in the Freon two-phase flow, the authors performed the verification test of bi-optical probe. This paper describes the results of the verification test of bi-optical probe. The verification test has been performed using a single pipe. The void fractions and interfacial velocities have been measured at some local positions in the single pipe using bi-optical probe.

  14. Fiber optic cone penetrometer raman probe for in situ chemical characterization of the Hanford underground waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle, K.R.; Brown, S.B.

    1997-03-03

    A field hardened fiber optic Raman probe has been developed for cone penetrometer deployment in the Hanford underground chemical waste storage tanks. The corrosive chemical environment of the tanks, as well as Hanford specific deployment parameters, provide unique challenges for the design of an optical probe.

  15. A New Generation Fiber Optic Probe: Characterization of Biological Fluids, Protein Crystals and Ophthalmic Diseases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Suh, Kwang I.

    1996-01-01

    A new fiber optic probe developed for determining transport properties of sub-micron particles in fluids experiments in a microgravity environment has been applied to characterize particulate dispersions/suspensions in various challenging environments which have been hitherto impossible. The probe positioned in front of a sample delivers a low power light (few nW - 3mW) from a laser and guides the light which is back scattered by the suspended particles through a receiving optical fiber to a photo detector and to a digital correlator. The probe provides rapid determination of macromolecular diffusivities and their respective size distributions. It has been applied to characterize various biological fluids, protein crystals, and ophthalmic diseases.

  16. Single-crystal sapphire tubes as economical probes for optical pyrometry in harsh environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ruzicka, Jakub; Houzvicka, Jindrich; Bok, Jiri; Praus, Petr; Mojzes, Peter

    2011-12-20

    One-end-sealed single-crystal sapphire tubes are presented as a simple, robust, and economical alternative for bulky lightpipe probes. Thermal radiation from a blackbody cavity created at the inner surface of the sealed end is gathered by a simple lens-based collecting system and transmitted via optical fiber to the remote detection unit. Simplicity and applicability of the concept are demonstrated by the combination of commercially available sapphire tubes with a common optical pyrometer. Radiation thermometers with sapphire tubes as invasive probes can be useful for applications requiring immunity to electromagnetic interference, resistance to harsh environments, simple replacement in the case of failure, and enhanced mechanical firmness, enabling wider range probe positioning inside the medium of interest.

  17. Probe-sample optical interaction: size and wavelength dependence in localized plasmon near-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Habteyes, Terefe G; Dhuey, Scott; Kiesow, Karissa I; Vold, Alexander

    2013-09-09

    The probe-sample optical interaction in apertureless near-field optical microscopy is studied at 633 nm and 808 nm excitation wavelengths using gold nanodisks as model systems. The near-field distributions of the dipolar and quadrupolar surface plasmon modes have been mapped successfully using metal coated probes with different polarization combinations of excitation and detection except when the incident and the scattered light polarizations are chosen to be parallel to the probe axis. For the parallel polarization of the incident and the scattered light, the pattern of the near-field distribution differs from the inherent plasmon mode structures of the sample, depending sensitively on the sample size and excitation energy. For a given excitation energy, the near-field amplitude shifts from one pole to the other as the sample size increases, having nearly equal amplitude at the two poles when the plasmon resonance peak spectrally overlaps with the excitation energy.

  18. Surface registration using a multi-beam optical probe and backscatter reflectometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielson, Jeremy R.; Maskaly, Garry; Younk, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a technique for locating the position and orientation of an object surrounding a compound optical probe. The probe allows for simultaneous measurement of 150 points of laser velocimetry, and prior to a dynamic experiment it is important to know the initial position of the surface. Using an optical switch and a Luna OBR rangefinder, we measure the surface distance at hundreds of locations. These measurements are then combined with a dimensional inspection of the object and analysis routines to report the orientation and location of the inner surface relative to the probe. In addition, we present a technique to simultaneously measure the beam paths using a reference hemispherical surface and a number of distance measurements. LA-UR-15-26588

  19. Probing graphene defects and estimating graphene quality with optical microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Shen; Kyu Jang, Sung; Jae Song, Young; Lee, Sungjoo

    2014-01-27

    We report a simple and accurate method for detecting graphene defects that utilizes the mild, dry annealing of graphene/Cu films in air. In contrast to previously reported techniques, our simple approach with optical microscopy can determine the density and degree of dislocation of defects in a graphene film without inducing water-related damage or functionalization. Scanning electron microscopy, confocal Raman and atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis were performed to demonstrate that our nondestructive approach to characterizing graphene defects with optimized thermal annealing provides rapid and comprehensive determinations of graphene quality.

  20. Temperature dependence of coherent phonons in TbVO4 crystal probed by ultrafast optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Z.; Ma, H.; Li, D.; Wang, L.; Ma, G.; Guo, F.; Chen, J.

    2011-07-01

    Coherent optical phonons in terbium vanadate (TbVO4) are investigated by using femtosecond time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy at temperatures from 20 to 300 K. Combined with the Raman spectrum, the coherent phonon mode is attributed to an optical phonon mode of B1g symmetry. The main generation mechanism of the coherent optical phonons is revealed to be the impulsive stimulated Raman scattering. The temperature dependence of the dephasing time reveals that the main mechanism of the coherent phonon population decay is anharmonic phonon-phonon coupling, which causes a redshift of the coherent phonon frequency with increasing temperature.

  1. Common-path optical coherence tomography using a microelectromechanical-system-based endoscopic probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Donglin; Duan, Can; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Yun, Zhao; Pozzi, Antonio; Xie, Huikai

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a common-path (CP) swept-source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) system based on a special endoscopic probe design with an in-line internal reflection as the reference and a two-axis electrothermal microelectromechanical system mirror for image scanning. The rear surface of a gradient reflective index (GRIN) lens inside the probe is set as the reference reflection plane. The length of the GRIN lens is optimized to eliminate the artifacts in SSOCT images successfully. Doppler OCT is also demonstrated based on the CP endoscopic probe. The diameter of the probe is only 2.5 mm, so it can be easily inserted into the biopsy channel of traditional endoscopes to access human internal organs for in vivo diagnoses.

  2. Probing vacuum birefringence using x-ray free electron and optical high-intensity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karbstein, Felix; Sundqvist, Chantal

    2016-07-01

    Vacuum birefringence is one of the most striking predictions of strong field quantum electrodynamics: Probe photons traversing a strong field region can indirectly sense the applied "pump" electromagnetic field via quantum fluctuations of virtual charged particles which couple to both pump and probe fields. This coupling is sensitive to the field alignment and can effectively result in two different indices of refraction for the probe photon polarization modes giving rise to a birefringence phenomenon. In this article, we perform a dedicated theoretical analysis of the proposed discovery experiment of vacuum birefringence at an x-ray free electron laser/optical high-intensity laser facility. Describing both pump and probe laser pulses realistically in terms of their macroscopic electromagnetic fields, we go beyond previous analyses by accounting for various effects not considered before in this context. Our study facilitates stringent quantitative predictions and optimizations of the signal in an actual experiment.

  3. Fabrication and characterization of an optical fiber probe for esophageal pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romolini, A.; Falciai, Riccardo; Schena, Alessandro

    1996-11-01

    A miniaturized optical fiber probe for measuring the esophageal pressure, making use of biconically tapered fibers, has been built and characterized. The operation of the probe is based on the decrease of the transmitted power from a biconical fiber when it is bent, in its biconical part, under the action of pressure. The necessary sensitivity is about 1 divided by 2 mm Hg in the range between 0 and 50 mm Hg. To obtain it we have fabricated and tested some probes using different fibers (four-mode, two- mode and monomode) and different values of tapering. Our best result has been achieved with a probe made with a monomode fiber of waist 36 micrometer whose sensitivity is 2 mm Hg in the range between 5 and 55 mm Hg.

  4. Probing many-body interactions in an optical lattice clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, A. M.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Kraus, C. V.; Martin, M. J.; Bishof, M.; Swallows, M. D.; Zhang, X.; Benko, C.; Ye, J.; Lemke, N. D.; Ludlow, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    We present a unifying theoretical framework that describes recently observed many-body effects during the interrogation of an optical lattice clock operated with thousands of fermionic alkaline earth atoms. The framework is based on a many-body master equation that accounts for the interplay between elastic and inelastic p-wave and s-wave interactions, finite temperature effects and excitation inhomogeneity during the quantum dynamics of the interrogated atoms. Solutions of the master equation in different parameter regimes are presented and compared. It is shown that a general solution can be obtained by using the so called Truncated Wigner Approximation which is applied in our case in the context of an open quantum system. We use the developed framework to model the density shift and decay of the fringes observed during Ramsey spectroscopy in the JILA 87Sr and NIST 171Yb optical lattice clocks. The developed framework opens a suitable path for dealing with a variety of strongly-correlated and driven open-quantum spin systems.

  5. Probing many-body interactions in an optical lattice clock

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, A.M.; Gorshkov, A.V.; Kraus, C.V.; Martin, M.J.; Bishof, M.; Swallows, M.D.; Zhang, X.; Benko, C.; Ye, J.; Lemke, N.D.; Ludlow, A.D.

    2014-01-15

    We present a unifying theoretical framework that describes recently observed many-body effects during the interrogation of an optical lattice clock operated with thousands of fermionic alkaline earth atoms. The framework is based on a many-body master equation that accounts for the interplay between elastic and inelastic p-wave and s-wave interactions, finite temperature effects and excitation inhomogeneity during the quantum dynamics of the interrogated atoms. Solutions of the master equation in different parameter regimes are presented and compared. It is shown that a general solution can be obtained by using the so called Truncated Wigner Approximation which is applied in our case in the context of an open quantum system. We use the developed framework to model the density shift and decay of the fringes observed during Ramsey spectroscopy in the JILA {sup 87}Sr and NIST {sup 171}Yb optical lattice clocks. The developed framework opens a suitable path for dealing with a variety of strongly-correlated and driven open-quantum spin systems. -- Highlights: •Derived a theoretical framework that describes many-body effects in a lattice clock. •Validated the analysis with recent experimental measurements. •Demonstrated the importance of beyond mean field corrections in the dynamics.

  6. All-optical pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colchester, Richard J.; Noimark, Sacha; Mosse, Charles A.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Beard, Paul C.; Parkin, Ivan P.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-02-01

    High frequency ultrasound probes such as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters can be invaluable for guiding minimally invasive medical procedures in cardiology such as coronary stent placement and ablation. With current-generation ultrasound probes, ultrasound is generated and received electrically. The complexities involved with fabricating these electrical probes can result in high costs that limit their clinical applicability. Additionally, it can be challenging to achieve wide transmission bandwidths and adequate wideband reception sensitivity with small piezoelectric elements. Optical methods for transmitting and receiving ultrasound are emerging as alternatives to their electrical counterparts. They offer several distinguishing advantages, including the potential to generate and detect the broadband ultrasound fields (tens of MHz) required for high resolution imaging. In this study, we developed a miniature, side-looking, pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging, with fibre-optic transmission and reception. The axial resolution was better than 70 microns, and the imaging depth in tissue was greater than 1 cm. Ultrasound transmission was performed by photoacoustic excitation of a carbon nanotube/polydimethylsiloxane composite material; ultrasound reception, with a fibre-optic Fabry-Perot cavity. Ex vivo tissue studies, which included healthy swine tissue and diseased human tissue, demonstrated the strong potential of this technique. To our knowledge, this is the first study to achieve an all-optical pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging. The potential for performing all-optical B-mode imaging (2D and 3D) with virtual arrays of transmit/receive elements, and hybrid imaging with pulse-echo ultrasound and photoacoustic sensing are discussed.

  7. Optical and Probe Diagnostics Applied to Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ticich, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    We plan to explore three major threads during the fellowship period. The first interrogates the flame synthesis of carbon nanotubes using aerosol catalysts. Laser light scattering will reveal changes in particle size at various heights above the burner. Analysis of the flame gas by mass spectroscopy will reveal the chemical composition of the mixture. Finally, absorption measurements will map the nanotube concentration within the flow. The second thread explores soot oxidation kinetics. Cavity ring-down absorption measurements of the carbonaceous aerosol can provide a measure of the mass concentration with time and, hence, an oxidation rate. Spectroscopic and direct probe measurements will provide the temperature of the system needed for subsequent modeling. The third thread will explore the details of turbulent flame dynamics. Laser induced incandescence will be applied to measurements of soot volume fraction in a 2-d configuration. Analysis of seed tracer particles by planar laser light MIE scattering will reveal the elemental fuel mixture fraction in the flames. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy, a pulsed transient absorption method, will determine the instantaneous mass loading and its fluctuation. Finally, fluorescence measurements will investigate the formation of PAH's in these flames.

  8. Through-wafer optical probe characterization for microelectromechanical systems positional state monitoring and feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Jeremy M.; Chen, Jingdong; Brown, Kolin S.; Famouri, Parviz F.; Hornak, Lawrence A.

    2000-12-01

    Implementation of closed-loop microelectromechanical system (MEMS) control enables mechanical microsystems to adapt to the demands of the environment that they are actuating, opening a broad range of new opportunities for future MEMS applications. Integrated optical microsystems have the potential to enable continuous in situ optical interrogation of MEMS microstructure position fully decoupled from the means of mechanical actuation that is necessary for realization of feedback control. We present the results of initial research evaluating through-wafer optical microprobes for surface micromachined MEMS integrated optical position monitoring. Results from the through-wafer free-space optical probe of a lateral comb resonator fabricated using the multiuser MEMS process service (MUMPS) indicate significant positional information content with an achievable return probe signal dynamic range of up to 80% arising from film transmission contrast. Static and dynamic deflection analysis and experimental results indicate a through-wafer probe positional signal sensitivity of 40 mV/micrometers for the present setup or 10% signal change per micrometer. A simulation of the application of nonlinear sliding control is presented illustrating position control of the lateral comb resonator structure given the availability of positional state information.

  9. Intelligent spectral signature bio-imaging in vivo for surgical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jihoon; Frykman, Philip K.; Gaon, Mark; Chung, Alice P.; Lindsley, Erik H.; Hwang, Jae Y.; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2007-02-01

    Multi-spectral imaging provides digital images of a scene or object at a large, usually sequential number of wavelengths, generating precise optical spectra at every pixel. We use the term "spectral signature" for a quantitative plot of optical property variations as a function of wavelengths. We present here intelligent spectral signature bio-imaging methods we developed, including automatic signature selection based on machine learning algorithms and database search-based automatic color allocations, and selected visualization schemes matching these approaches. Using this intelligent spectral signature bio-imaging method, we could discriminate normal and aganglionic colon tissue of the Hirschsprung's disease mouse model with over 95% sensitivity and specificity in various similarity measure methods and various anatomic organs such as parathyroid gland, thyroid gland and pre-tracheal fat in dissected neck of the rat in vivo.

  10. Handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography: developments, applications, and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duma, V.-F.; Demian, D.; Sinescu, C.; Cernat, R.; Dobre, G.; Negrutiu, M. L.; Topala, F. I.; Hutiu, Gh.; Bradu, A.; Podoleanu, A. G.

    2016-03-01

    We present the handheld scanning probes that we have recently developed in our current project for biomedical imaging in general and for Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) in particular. OCT is an established, but dynamic imagistic technique based on laser interferometry, which offers micrometer resolutions and millimeters penetration depths. With regard to existing devices, the newly developed handheld probes are simple, light and relatively low cost. Their design is described in detail to allow for the reproduction in any lab, including for educational purposes. Two probes are constructed almost entirely from off-the-shelf components, while a third, final variant is constructed with dedicated components, in an ergonomic design. The handheld probes have uni-dimensional (1D) galvanometer scanners therefore they achieve transversal sections through the biological sample investigated - in contrast to handheld probes equipped with bi-dimensional (2D) scanners that can also achieve volumetric (3D) reconstructions of the samples. These latter handheld probes are therefore also discussed, as well as the possibility to equip them with galvanometer 2D scanners or with Risley prisms. For galvanometer scanners the optimal scanning functions studied in a series of previous works are pointed out; these functions offer a higher temporal efficiency/duty cycle of the scanning process, as well as artifact-free OCT images. The testing of the handheld scanning probes in dental applications is presented, for metal ceramic prosthesis and for teeth.

  11. Characterisation of a fibre optic Raman probe within a hypodermic needle.

    PubMed

    Iping Petterson, Ingeborg E; Day, John C C; Fullwood, Leanne M; Gardner, Benjamin; Stone, Nick

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the first use of a multifibre Raman probe that fits inside the bore of a hypodermic needle. A Raman probe containing multiple collection fibres provides improved signal collection efficiency in biological samples compared with a previous two-fibre design. Furthermore, probe performance (signal-to-noise ratios) compared favourably with the performance achieved in previous Raman microscope experiments able to distinguish between benign lymph nodes, primary malignancies in lymph nodes and secondary malignancies in lymph nodes. The experimental measurements presented here give an indication of the sampling volume of the Raman needle probe in lymphoid tissues. Liquid tissue phantoms were used that contained scattering medium encompassing a range of scattering properties similar to those of a variety of tissue types, including lymph node tissues. To validate the appropriateness of the phantoms, the sampling depth of the probe was also measured in excised lymph node tissue. More than 50 % of Raman photons collected were found to originate from between the tip of the needle and a depth of 500 μm into the tissue. The needle probe presented here achieves spectral quality comparable to that in numerous studies previously demonstrating Raman disease discrimination. It is expected that this approach could achieve targeted subcutaneous tissue measurements and be viable for use for the in vivo Raman diagnostics of solid organs located within a few centimetres below the skin's surface. Graphical Abstract Schematic of multi-fibre Raman needle probe with disposible tips and proximal optical filtration.

  12. Molecular engineering of a mitochondrial-targeting two-photon in and near-infrared out fluorescent probe for gaseous signal molecules H2S in deep tissue bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liyi; Lu, Danqing; Wang, Qianqian; Liu, Sihua; Lin, Qinlu; Sun, Hongyan

    2017-05-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), one of the biologically important gaseous signal molecules, plays an essential role in diverse normal biochemical functions and pathological processes. Herein, an efficient two-photon in and near-infrared out mitochondria-targeting dye has been designed, synthesized and characterized. It is easily synthesized by the condensation reaction (C˭C) of 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and 6-(diethylamino)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroxanthylium (mitochondria-targeting), which possesses large two-photon action absorption cross-section ~160g and high fluorescence quantum yield ~0.15. Encouraged by the results, we proceeded to conjugate this new dye with a H2S recognition moiety (4-dinitrobenzene-ether, DNB), on the basis of the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) strategy, to construct a novel H2S fluorescent probe (TP-NIR-HS), which shows a targeting ability with high sensitivity and selectivity, and low cytotoxicity. This new probe was then applied for two-photon imaging of living cells and tissues and showed high imaging resolution and a deep-tissue imaging depth of ~350µm, thus demonstrating its practical application in biological systems, and providing a valuable theoretical basis and technical support for the study of physiological and pathological functions of H2S. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Recent Advances in the Design of Electro-Optic Sensors for Minimally Destructive Microwave Field Probing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Joon; Kang, No-Weon; Choi, Jun-Ho; Kim, Junyeon; Whitaker, John F.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we review recent design methodologies for fully dielectric electro-optic sensors that have applications in non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of devices and materials that radiate, guide, or otherwise may be impacted by microwave fields. In many practical NDE situations, fiber-coupled-sensor configurations are preferred due to their advantages over free-space bulk sensors in terms of optical alignment, spatial resolution, and especially, a low degree of field invasiveness. We propose and review five distinct types of fiber-coupled electro-optic sensor probes. The design guidelines for each probe type and their performances in absolute electric-field measurements are compared and summarized. PMID:22346604

  14. Influence of self-diffraction effect on femtosecond pump-probe optical Kerr measurements.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lihe; Yue, Juanjuan; Si, Jinhai; Hou, Xun

    2008-08-04

    We investigated influence of the self-diffraction effect on optical Kerr signals of Bi2O3-B2O3-SiO2 glass (BI glass) and CS2 in femtosecond non-collinear pump-probe optical Kerr experiments. By measuring the dependence of the Kerr signals on the pump power and on the polarization angle between pump and probe beams, we found that the optical Kerr signals of CS2 consisted of two components: a fast response and a slow response,which were attributed to the self-diffraction effect and the photoinduced birefringence effect, respectively. The contribution of the self-diffraction effect to the Kerr signals increased with increase of the pump power. For the BI glass, no evident influence of self-diffraction on the Kerr signals was observed.

  15. Nanoaperture formation at metal covered tips by microspark optimized for near-field optical probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigneau, M.; Louarn, G.; Minea, T. M.

    2008-03-01

    A simple and reproducible method for nanoaperture opening of metal film covered tapered optical fibers is reported as the last step of the manufacturing process for near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) probes. It uses a microspark between the biased tip and another plane electrode working as a coronalike discharge in point-to-plane configuration. The resultant high electric field is enhanced at the extremity of the metallized tip self-focusing the discharge ions. The opening process is performed in situ in a specially designed plasma reactor which also allows, for the optical fiber tips, their surface cleaning and silver coating. Nanoaperture diameter can be controlled between 30 and 100nm. These probes are able to generate subwavelength resolved images and are appropriate for high resolution NSOM.

  16. Optically Induced Lattice Dynamics Probed with Ultrafast X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, H. J.; Taylor, A. J.; Averitt, R. D.; Lim, D.; Workman, J.; Roberts, J. P.; McCulloch, Q.; Hof, D. E.; Funk, D. J.; Hur, N.; Cheong, S. W.

    2004-03-01

    We report our initial studies using ultrafast x-ray diffraction for the characterization of lattice dynamics in optically pumped manganites. For these studies, single crystal LuMnO3 is pumped with an 800 nm 100fs Ti:Sapphire laser. The induced lattice dynamics are observed using Al K-alpha x-rays, generated by focusing a portion of the same laser onto a moving Al wire. The x-rays are relay imaged onto the sample using a spherically bent quartz 10-10 crystal. The single crystal LuMnO3 is oriented with the c-axis perpendicular to the face of the crystal, with the x-rays probing the [002] reflection. An overview of the experiment and results to date along with a comparison with optical pump-optical probe measurements of the coherent phonon dynamics will be presented.

  17. Optical pump-probe microscopy for biomedicine and art conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy can provide contrast in highly heterogeneous media and a wide range of applications has emerged, primarily in biology, medicine, and materials science. Compared to linear microscopy methods, the localized nature of nonlinear interactions leads to high spatial resolution, optical sectioning, and larger possible imaging depth in scattering media. However, nonlinear contrast (other than fluorescence, harmonic generation or CARS) is generally difficult to measure because it is overwhelmed by the large background of detected illumination light. This background can be suppressed by using femtosecond pulse or pulse train shaping to encode nonlinear interactions in background-free regions of the frequency spectrum. We have developed this shaping technology to study novel intrinsic structural and molecular contrast in biological tissue, generally using less power than a laser pointer. For example we have recently been able to sensitively measure detailed transient absorption dynamics of melanin sub-types in a variety of skin lesions, showing clinically relevant differences of melanin type and distribution between cancerous and benign tissue.[1] Recently we have also applied this technology to paint samples and to historic artwork in order to provide detailed, depth-resolved pigment identification. Initial studies in different inorganic and organic pigments have shown a rich and pigment-specific nonlinear absorption signature.[2] Some pigments, for example lapis lazuli (natural ultramarine), even show marked differences in signal depending on its geographic origin and on age, demonstrating the potential of this technique to determine authenticity, provenance, technology of manufacture, or state of preservation of historic works of art.

  18. Toward a selective, sensitive, fast-responsive, and biocompatible two-photon probe for hydrogen sulfide in live cells.

    PubMed

    Singha, Subhankar; Kim, Dokyoung; Moon, Hyunsoo; Wang, Taejun; Kim, Ki Hean; Shin, Youn Ho; Jung, Junyang; Seo, Eunseok; Lee, Sang-Joon; Ahn, Kyo Han

    2015-01-20

    Hydrogen sulfide has emerged as an exciting endogenous gasotransmitter in addition to nitric oxide and carbon dioxide. Noninvasive detection methods for hydrogen sulfide thus become indispensable tools for studying its diverse roles in biological systems. Accordingly, fluorescent probes for hydrogen sulfide have received great attention in recent years. A practically useful fluorescent probe for bioimaging of hydrogen sulfide should be selective, sensitive, fast-responsive, biocompatible, observable in the biological optical window, and capable of deep-tissue imaging. These sensing properties, however, are extremely difficult to achieve at the same time. Disclosed here is the two-photon fluorescent probe that meets all of these criteria. The probe belongs to a Michael acceptor system, which raised a serious selectivity issue over the competing biothiols such as cysteine and glutathione. We have addressed the selectivity issue by optimizing the electronic and steric interactions between biothiols and the probe, in addition to achieving very high sensitivity, fast-response, and biocompatibility. Also, the sensing mechanism suggested in the literature was revised. The probe thus enables us to image the endogenously produced hydrogen sulfide with negligible interference from other biothiols in live cells. The excellent sensing properties of the probe combined with its capability of bioimaging thus make it a practically useful tool for further studying biological roles of hydrogen sulfide.

  19. Hand-held probe based optical imaging system towards breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jiajia; Jayachandran, Bhavani; Regalado, Steven; Zhu, Banghe; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2007-02-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging is an emerging noninvasive modality for breast cancer diagnosis. However, the currently available optical imaging systems towards tomography studies are limited either by instrument portability, patient comfort, or flexibility to image any given tissue volume. Herein, a hand-held based optical imaging system is developed such that it can possibly overcome some of the above limitations. The unique features of the hand-held optical probe are: (i) to perform simultaneous multiple point illumination and detection, thus decreasing the total imaging time and improving the overall signal strength; (ii) to adapt to the contour of tissue surface, thus decreasing the leakage of excitation and emission signal at contact surface; and (iii) to obtain trans-illumination measurements apart from reflectance measurements, thus improving the depth information. The increased detected signal strength as well as total interrogated tissue volume is demonstrated by simulation studies (i.e. forward model) over a 5×10×10 cc slab phantom. The appropriate number and layout of the source and detection points on the probe head is determined and the hand-held optical probe is developed. A frequency-domain ICCD (intensified charge coupled device) detection system, which allows simultaneous multiple points detection, is developed and coupled to the hand-held probe in order to perform fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging of tissue phantoms. In the future, imaging of homogenous liquid phantoms will be used for the assessment of this hand-held system, followed by extensive imaging studies on different phantoms types under various experimental conditions.

  20. Silicon nanomaterials platform for bioimaging, biosensing, and cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fei; Su, Yuanyuan; Zhong, Yiling; Fan, Chunhai; Lee, Shuit-Tong; He, Yao

    2014-02-18

    Silicon nanomaterials are an important class of nanomaterials with great potential for technologies including energy, catalysis, and biotechnology, because of their many unique properties, including biocompatibility, abundance, and unique electronic, optical, and mechanical properties, among others. Silicon nanomaterials are known to have little or no toxicity due to favorable biocompatibility of silicon, which is an important precondition for biological and biomedical applications. In addition, huge surface-to-volume ratios of silicon nanomaterials are responsible for their unique optical, mechanical, or electronic properties, which offer exciting opportunities for design of high-performance silicon-based functional nanoprobes, nanosensors, and nanoagents for biological analysis and detection and disease treatment. Moreover, silicon is the second most abundant element (after oxygen) on earth, providing plentiful and inexpensive resources for large-scale and low-cost preparation of silicon nanomaterials for practical applications. Because of these attractive traits, and in parallel with a growing interest in their design and synthesis, silicon nanomaterials are extensively investigated for wide-ranging applications, including energy, catalysis, optoelectronics, and biology. Among them, bioapplications of silicon nanomaterials are of particular interest. In the past decade, scientists have made an extensive effort to construct a silicon nanomaterials platform for various biological and biomedical applications, such as biosensors, bioimaging, and cancer treatment, as new and powerful tools for disease diagnosis and therapy. Nonetheless, there are few review articles covering these important and promising achievements to promote the awareness of development of silicon nanobiotechnology. In this Account, we summarize recent representative works to highlight the recent developments of silicon functional nanomaterials for a new, powerful platform for biological and

  1. Two-photon bioimaging utilizing supercontinuum light generated by a high-peak-power picosecond semiconductor laser source.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Tsubokawa, Hiroshi; Guo, Hengchang; Shikata, Jun-ichi; Sato, Ki-ichi; Takashima, Keijiro; Kashiwagi, Kaori; Saito, Naoaki; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Ito, Hiromasa

    2007-01-01

    We developed a novel scheme for two-photon fluorescence bioimaging. We generated supercontinuum (SC) light at wavelengths of 600 to 1200 nm with 774-nm light pulses from a compact turn-key semiconductor laser picosecond light pulse source that we developed. The supercontinuum light was sliced at around 1030- and 920-nm wavelengths and was amplified to kW-peak-power level using laboratory-made low-nonlinear-effects optical fiber amplifiers. We successfully demonstrated two-photon fluorescence bioimaging of mouse brain neurons containing green fluorescent protein (GFP).

  2. In Situ Biosynthesis of Fluorescent Platinum Nanoclusters: Toward Self-Bioimaging-Guided Cancer Theranostics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Donghua; Zhao, Chunqiu; Ye, Jing; Li, Qiwei; Liu, Xiaoli; Su, Meina; Jiang, Hui; Amatore, Christian; Selke, Matthias; Wang, Xuemei

    2015-08-19

    Among the noble-metal clusters, very few reports about platinum clusters were used as bioimaging probes of tumors except as a reducing catalyst. It is first established herein that the biocompatible platinum nanoclusters are spontaneously biosynthesized by cancerous cells (i.e., HepG2 (human hepatocarcinoma), A549 (lung cancer), and others) rather than noncancerous cells (i.e., L02 (human embryo liver cells)) when incubated with micromolar chloroplatinic acid solutions. These in situ biosynthesized platinum nanoclusters could be readily realized in a biological environment and emit a bright fluorescence at 460 nm, which could be further utilized to facilitate an excellent cancer-cell-killing efficiency when combined with porphyrin derivatives for photothermal treatment. This raises the possibility of providing a promising and precise bioimaging strategy for specific fluorescent self-biomarking of tumor locations and realizing fluorescence imaging-guided photothermal therapy of tumors.

  3. Sulfobetaine-Vinylimidazole Block Copolymers: A Robust Quantum Dot Surface Chemistry Expanding Bioimaging's Horizons.

    PubMed

    Tasso, Mariana; Giovanelli, Emerson; Zala, Diana; Bouccara, Sophie; Fragola, Alexandra; Hanafi, Mohamed; Lenkei, Zsolt; Pons, Thomas; Lequeux, Nicolas

    2015-11-24

    Long-term inspection of biological phenomena requires probes of elevated intra- and extracellular stability and target biospecificity. The high fluorescence and photostability of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles contributed to foster their promise as bioimaging tools that could overcome limitations associated with traditional fluorophores. However, QDs' potential as a bioimaging platform relies upon a precise control over the surface chemistry modifications of these nano-objects. Here, a zwitterion-vinylimidazole block copolymer ligand was synthesized, which regroups all anchoring groups in one compact terminal block, while the rest of the chain is endowed with antifouling and bioconjugation moieties. By further application of an oriented bioconjugation approach with whole IgG antibodies, QD nanobioconjugates were obtained that display outstanding intra- and extracellular stability as well as biorecognition capacity. Imaging the internalization and intracellular dynamics of a transmembrane cell receptor, the CB1 brain cannabinoid receptor, both in HEK293 cells and in neurons, illustrates the breadth of potential applications of these nanoprobes.

  4. Optical Riblet Sensor: Beam Parameter Requirements for the Probing Laser Source

    PubMed Central

    Tschentscher, Juliane; Hochheim, Sven; Brüning, Hauke; Brune, Kai; Voit, Kay-Michael; Imlau, Mirco

    2016-01-01

    Beam parameters of a probing laser source in an optical riblet sensor are studied by considering the high demands on a sensors’ precision and reliability for the determination of deviations of the geometrical shape of a riblet. Mandatory requirements, such as minimum intensity and light polarization, are obtained by means of detailed inspection of the optical response of the riblet using ray and wave optics; the impact of wavelength is studied. Novel measures for analyzing the riblet shape without the necessity of a measurement with a reference sample are derived; reference values for an ideal riblet structure obtained with the optical riblet sensor are given. The application of a low-cost, frequency-doubled Nd:YVO4 laser pointer sufficient to serve as a reliable laser source in an appropriate optical riblet sensor is discussed. PMID:27043567

  5. Optical Riblet Sensor: Beam Parameter Requirements for the Probing Laser Source.

    PubMed

    Tschentscher, Juliane; Hochheim, Sven; Brüning, Hauke; Brune, Kai; Voit, Kay-Michael; Imlau, Mirco

    2016-03-30

    Beam parameters of a probing laser source in an optical riblet sensor are studied by considering the high demands on a sensors' precision and reliability for the determination of deviations of the geometrical shape of a riblet. Mandatory requirements, such as minimum intensity and light polarization, are obtained by means of detailed inspection of the optical response of the riblet using ray and wave optics; the impact of wavelength is studied. Novel measures for analyzing the riblet shape without the necessity of a measurement with a reference sample are derived; reference values for an ideal riblet structure obtained with the optical riblet sensor are given. The application of a low-cost, frequency-doubled Nd:YVO₄ laser pointer sufficient to serve as a reliable laser source in an appropriate optical riblet sensor is discussed.

  6. Transurethral optical-laser knife and probe director for lateral firing laser probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, Reza S.

    1994-02-01

    Laser energy has been used by many for transurethral incision of small, obstructive prostates, vesical neck contractures, and urethral strictures. The customary techniques of moving the tip of the laser fiber through a cystoscope with a conventional laser guide, almost tangentially to the tissue to be incised, or drilling radially arranged holes in the scar, or both, have been cumbersome and imprecise. To provide exact control of the laser fiber and precise delivery of laser energy, a new guide was devised. It conducts the quartz fiber through the sheath and along the lens of an optical urethrotome. The tip of the quartz fiber contacts the tissue at an angle of 20 degree(s). KTP/532 laser energy is used to perform internal urethrotomy for urethral stricture, transurethral incision of postoperative contracture of the vesical neck, and transurethral incision of the small prostate under constant visual control.

  7. Recent applications of carbon nanomaterials in fluorescence biosensing and bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jia; Xu, Yongqian; Li, Hongjuan; Lu, Aiping; Sun, Shiguo

    2015-07-21

    Carbon-based nanomaterials as important agents for biological applications have emerged in the past few years due to their unique optical, electronic, mechanical, and chemical properties. Many of these applications rely on successful surface modifications. This review article comprises two main parts. In the first part, we briefly review the properties and surface modifications of several classes of carbon nanomaterials, mainly carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene and its derivatives, carbon dots (CDs) and graphene quantum dots (GQDs), as well as some other forms of carbon-based nanomaterials such as fullerene, carbon nanohorns (CNHs) and carbon nanoonions (CNOs). In the second part, we focus on the biological applications of these carbon nanomaterials, in particular their applications for fluorescence biosensing as well as bioimaging.

  8. Two-photon fluorescence bioimaging with an all-semiconductor laser picosecond pulse source.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Masaru; Kitajima, Nobuyoshi; Guo, Hengchang; Furushima, Yuji; Ikeda, Masao; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki

    2007-09-15

    We have demonstrated successful two-photon excitation fluorescence bioimaging using a high-power pulsed all-semiconductor laser. Toward this purpose, we developed a pulsed light source consisting of a mode-locked laser diode and a two-stage diode laser amplifier. This pulsed light source provided optical pulses of 5 ps duration and having a maximum peak power of over 100 W at a wavelength of 800 nm and a repetition frequency of 500 MHz.

  9. A simple one-step synthesis of melanin-originated red shift emissive carbonaceous dots for bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chuan; Liu, Yongmei; Chen, Jiantao; He, Qin; Gao, Huile

    2016-10-15

    Carbonaceous dots (CDs) are superior nanomaterials owing to their promising luminescence properties and good biocompatibility. However, most CDs have relatively short excitation/emission, which restrict their application in bioimaging. In this study, a simple one-step procedure was developed for synthesis of melanin-originated CDs (MNPs). The MNPs showed two long red shift emissions at 570nm and 645nm with broad absorptions from 200nm to 400nm and 500nm to 700nm, suggesting the great potential of MNPs in bioimaging. Besides, several experiments indicated that MNPs possessed good serum stability and well blood compatibility. In vitro, MNPs could be taken up by C6 cell in a concentration- and time-dependent manner with endosomes involved. In conclusion, MNPs were prepared using a simple one-step method with unique optical and good biological properties and could be used for bioimaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Core-shell designs of photoluminescent nanodiamonds with porous silica coatings for bioimaging and drug delivery II: application.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Neeraj; Näreoja, Tuomas; von Haartman, Eva; Karaman, Didem Şen; Jiang, Hua; Koho, Sami; Dolenko, Tatiana A; Hänninen, Pekka E; Vlasov, Denis I; Ralchenko, Victor G; Hosomi, Satoru; Vlasov, Igor I; Sahlgren, Cecilia; Rosenholm, Jessica M

    2013-05-07

    Recent advances within materials science and its interdisciplinary applications in biomedicine have emphasized the potential of using a single multifunctional composite material for concurrent drug delivery and biomedical imaging. Here we present a novel composite material consisting of a photoluminescent nanodiamond (ND) core with a porous silica (SiO2) shell. This novel multifunctional probe serves as an alternative nanomaterial to address the existing problems with delivery and subsequent tracing of the particles. Whereas the unique optical properties of ND allows for long-term live cell imaging and tracking of cellular processes, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have proven to be efficient drug carriers. The advantages of both ND and MSNs were hereby integrated in the new composite material, ND@MSN. The optical properties provided by the ND core rendered the nanocomposite suitable for microscopy imaging in fluorescence and reflectance mode, as well as super-resolution microscopy as a STED label; whereas the porous silica coating provided efficient intracellular delivery capacity, especially in surface-functionalized form. This study serves as a demonstration how this novel nanomaterial can be exploited for both bioimaging and drug delivery for future theranostic applications.

  11. Development of novel nanocarrier-based near-infrared optical probes for in vivo tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yoichi; Temma, Takashi; Hara, Isao; Yamahara, Ryo; Ozeki, Ei-ichi; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2012-03-01

    Optical imaging with near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes is a useful diagnostic technology for in vivo tumor detection. Our plan was to develop novel NIR fluorophore-micelle complex probes. IC7-1 and IC7-2 were synthesized as novel lipophilic NIR fluorophores, which were encapsulated in an amphiphilic polydepsipeptide micelle "lactosome". The fluorophore-micelle complexes IC7-1 lactosome and IC7-2 lactosome were evaluated as NIR fluorescent probes for in vivo tumor imaging. IC7-1 and IC7-2 were synthesized and then encapsulated in lactosomes. The optical properties of IC7-1, IC7-2, IC7-1 lactosome and IC7-2 lactosome were measured. IC7-1 lactosome and IC7-2 lactosome were administered to tumor-bearing mice, and fluorescence images were acquired for 48 h. IC7-1 and IC7-2 were successfully synthesized in 12% and 6.3% overall yield, and maximum emission wavelengths in chloroform were observed at 858 nm and 897 nm, respectively. Aqueous buffered solutions of IC7-1 lactosome and IC7-2 lactosome showed similar fluorescence spectra in chloroform and higher or comparable quantum yields and higher photostability compared with ICG. Both lactosome probes specifically visualized tumor tissue 6 h post-administration. IC7-1 lactosome and IC7-2 lactosome could be promising NIR probes for in vivo tumor imaging.

  12. Updates on Optical Emission Spectroscopy & Langmuir Probe Investigations on the Helicon Plasma Experiment (HPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karama, Jackson; Frank, John; Azzari, Phillip; Hopson, Jordan; James, Royce; Duke-Tinson, Omar; Paolino, Richard; Sandri, Eva; Sherman, Justin; Wright, Eva; Turk, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    HPX is developing a to shorter lifetime (20 - 30 ns) more reproducible plasma at the Coast Guard Academy Plasma Laboratory (CGAPL). Once achieved, spectral and particle probes will help to verify plasma mode transitions to the W-mode. These optical probes utilize movable filters, and ccd cameras to gather data at selected spectral frequency bands. Once corrections for the RF field are in place for the Langmuir probe, raw data will be collected and used to measure the plasma's density, temperature, and potentially the structure and behavior during experiments. Direct measurements of plasma properties can be determined with modeling and by comparison with the state transition tables, both using Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES). The spectral will add to HPX's data collection capabilities and be used in conjunction with the particle probes, and Thomson Scattering device to create a robust picture of the internal and external plasma parameters on HPX. Progress on the implementation of the OES and Langmuir probes will be reported. Supported by U.S. DEPS Grant [HEL-JTO] PRWJFY15.

  13. Wide bandwidth fiber-optic ultrasound probe in MOMS technology: Preliminary signal processing results.

    PubMed

    Vannacci, E; Granchi, S; Belsito, L; Roncaglia, A; Biagi, E

    2017-03-01

    An ultrasonic probe consisting of two optical fiber-based miniaturized transducers for wideband ultrasound emission and detection is employed for the characterization of in vitro biological tissues. In the probe, ultrasound generation is obtained by thermoelastic emission from patterned carbon films in Micro-Opto-Mechanical-System (MOMS) devices mounted on the tip of an optical fiber, whereas acousto-optical detection is performed in a similar way by a miniaturized polymeric interferometer. The microprobe presents a wide, flat bandwidth that is a very attractive feature for ultrasonic investigation, especially for tissue characterization. Thanks to the very high ultrasonic frequencies obtained, the probe is able to reveal different details of the object under investigation by analyzing the ultrasonic signal within different frequencies ranges, as shown by specific experiments performed on a patterned cornstarch flour sample in vitro. This is confirmed by measurements executed to determine the lateral resolution of the microprobe at different frequencies of about 70μm at 120MHz. Moreover, measurements performed with the wideband probe in pulsed-echo mode on a histological finding of porcine kidney are presented, on which two different spectral signal processing algorithms are applied. After processing, the ultrasonic spectral features show a peculiar spatial distribution on the sample, which is expected to depend on different ultrasonic backscattering properties of the analyzed tissues.

  14. Use of optical tweezers to probe epithelial mechanosensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnick, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Cellular mechanosensation mechanisms have been implicated in a variety of disease states. Specifically in renal tubules, the primary cilium and associated mechanosensitive ion channels are hypothesized to play a role in water and salt homeostasis, with relevant disease states including polycystic kidney disease and hypertension. Previous experiments investigating ciliary-mediated cellular mechanosensation have used either fluid flow chambers or micropipetting to elicit a biological response. The interpretation of these experiments in terms of the ``ciliary hypothesis'' has been difficult due the spatially distributed nature of the mechanical disturbance-several competing hypotheses regarding possible roles of primary cilium, glycocalyx, microvilli, cell junctions, and actin cytoskeleton exist. I report initial data using optical tweezers to manipulate individual primary cilia in an attempt to elicit a mechanotransduction response-specifically, the release of intracellular calcium. The advantage of using laser tweezers over previous work is that the applied disturbance is highly localized. I find that stimulation of a primary cilium elicits a response, while stimulation of the apical surface membrane does not. These results lend support to the hypothesis that the primary cilium mediates transduction of mechanical strain into a biochemical response in renal epithelia.

  15. Use of optical tweezers to probe epithelial mechanosensation.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Cellular mechanosensation mechanisms have been implicated in a variety of disease states. Specifically in renal tubules, the primary cilium and associated mechanosensitive ion channels are hypothesized to play a role in water and salt homeostasis, with relevant disease states including polycystic kidney disease and hypertension. Previous experiments investigating ciliary-mediated cellular mechanosensation have used either fluid flow chambers or micropipetting to elicit a biological response. The interpretation of these experiments in terms of the "ciliary hypothesis" has been difficult due the spatially distributed nature of the mechanical disturbance-several competing hypotheses regarding possible roles of primary cilium, glycocalyx, microvilli, cell junctions, and actin cytoskeleton exist. I report initial data using optical tweezers to manipulate individual primary cilia in an attempt to elicit a mechanotransduction response-specifically, the release of intracellular calcium. The advantage of using laser tweezers over previous work is that the applied disturbance is highly localized. I find that stimulation of a primary cilium elicits a response, while stimulation of the apical surface membrane does not. These results lend support to the hypothesis that the primary cilium mediates transduction of mechanical strain into a biochemical response in renal epithelia.

  16. SU-E-T-610: Phosphor-Based Fiber Optic Probes for Proton Beam Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Darafsheh, A; Soldner, A; Liu, H; Kassaee, A; Zhu, T; Finlay, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate feasibility of using fiber optics probes with rare-earth-based phosphor tips for proton beam radiation dosimetry. We designed and fabricated a fiber probe with submillimeter resolution (<0.5 mm3) based on TbF3 phosphors and evaluated its performance for measurement of proton beam including profiles and range. Methods: The fiber optic probe with TbF3 phosphor tip, embedded in tissue-mimicking phantoms was irradiated with double scattering proton beam with energy of 180 MeV. Luminescence spectroscopy was performed by a CCD-coupled spectrograph to analyze the emission spectra of the fiber tip. In order to measure the spatial beam profile and percentage depth dose, we used singular value decomposition method to spectrally separate the phosphors ionoluminescence signal from the background Cerenkov radiation signal. Results: The spectra of the TbF3 fiber probe showed characteristic ionoluminescence emission peaks at 489, 542, 586, and 620 nm. By using singular value decomposition we found the contribution of the ionoluminescence signal to measure the percentage depth dose in phantoms and compared that with measurements performed with ion chamber. We observed quenching effect at the spread out Bragg peak region, manifested as under-responding of the signal, due to the high LET of the beam. However, the beam profiles were not dramatically affected by the quenching effect. Conclusion: We have evaluated the performance of a fiber optic probe with submillimeter resolution for proton beam dosimetry. We demonstrated feasibility of spectral separation of the Cerenkov radiation from the collected signal. Such fiber probes can be used for measurements of proton beams profile and range. The experimental apparatus and spectroscopy method developed in this work provide a robust platform for characterization of proton-irradiated nanophosphor particles for ultralow fluence photodynamic therapy or molecular imaging applications.

  17. Acousto-optic, point receiver hydrophone probe for operation up to 100 MHz.

    PubMed

    Lewin, P A; Mu, C; Umchid, S; Daryoush, A; El-Sherif, M

    2005-12-01

    This work describes the results of initial evaluation of a wideband acousto-optic hydrophone probe designed to operate as point receiver in the frequency range up to 100 MHz. The hydrophone was implemented as a tapered fiber optic (FO) probe sensor with a tip diameter of approximately 7 microm. Such small physical dimensions of the sensor eliminate the need for spatial averaging corrections so that true pressure-time (p-t) waveforms can be faithfully recorded. The theoretical considerations that predicted the FO probe sensitivity to be equal to 4.3 mV/MPa are presented along with a brief description of the manufacturing process. The calibration results that verified the theoretically predicted sensitivity are also presented along with a brief description of the improvements being currently implemented to increase this sensitivity level by approximately 20 dB. The results of preliminary measurements indicate that the fiber optic probes will exhibit a uniform frequency response and a zero phase shift in the frequency range considered. These features might be very useful in rapid complex calibration i.e. determining both magnitude and phase response of other hydrophones by the substitution method. Also, because of their robust design and linearity, these fiber optic hydrophones could also meet the challenges posed by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and other therapeutic applications. Overall, the outcome of this work shows that when fully developed, the FO probes will be well suited for high frequency measurements of ultrasound fields and will be able to complement the data collected by the current finite aperture piezoelectric PVDF hydrophones.

  18. External electro-optic probing of millimeter-wave integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, J. F.; Valdmanis, J. A.; Jackson, T. A.; Bhasin, K. B.; Romanofsky, Robert R.; Mourou, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    An external, noncontact electro-optic measurement system, designed to operate at the wafer level with conventional wafer probing equipment and without any special circuit preparation, has been developed. Measurements have demonstrated the system's ability to probe continuous and pulsed signals on microwave integrated circuits on arbitrary substrates with excellent spatial resolution. Experimental measurements on a variety of digital and analog circuits, including a GaAs selectively-doped heterostructure transistor prescaler, an NMOS silicon multiplexer, and a GaAs power amplifier MMIC are reported.

  19. Characterization of laser-driven shock waves in solids using a fiber optic pressure probe.

    PubMed

    Cranch, Geoffrey A; Lunsford, Robert; Grün, Jacob; Weaver, James; Compton, Steve; May, Mark; Kostinski, Natalie

    2013-11-10

    Measurement of laser-driven shock wave pressure in solid blocks of polymethyl methacrylate is demonstrated using fiber optic pressure probes. Three probes based on a fiber Fabry-Perot, fiber Bragg grating, and interferometric fiber tip sensor are tested and compared. Shock waves are generated using a high-power laser focused onto a thin foil target placed in close proximity to the test blocks. The fiber Fabry-Perot sensor appears capable of resolving the shock front with a rise time of 91 ns. The peak pressure is estimated, using a separate shadowgraphy measurement, to be 3.4 GPa.

  20. Characterization of laser-driven shock waves in solids using a fiber optic pressure probe

    DOE PAGES

    Cranch, Geoffrey A.; Lunsford, Robert; Grun, Jacob; ...

    2013-11-08

    Measurement of laser-driven shock wave pressure in solid blocks of polymethyl methacrylate is demonstrated using fiber optic pressure probes. Three probes based on a fiber Fabry–Perot, fiber Bragg grating, and interferometric fiber tip sensor are tested and compared. Shock waves are generated using a high-power laser focused onto a thin foil target placed in close proximity to the test blocks. The fiber Fabry–Perot sensor appears capable of resolving the shock front with a rise time of 91 ns. As a result, the peak pressure is estimated, using a separate shadowgraphy measurement, to be 3.4 GPa.

  1. Probing nonlinear magnetization dynamics in Fe/MgO(001) film by all optical pump-probe technique

    SciTech Connect

    He, Wei; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Xiang-Qun; Cheng, Zhao-Hua; Zhan, Qing-Feng

    2014-04-07

    An all-optical pump-probe technique has been employed to investigate the nonlinear magnetization dynamics of a 10 nm Fe/MgO(001) thin film in time domain. The magnetization precession was excited by pump-laser pulses and modulated by laser fluence variations. With increasing the laser fluence up to 7.1 mJ/cm{sup 2}, in addition to the uniform precession mode, a second harmonic signal was detected. The time evolution of the second harmonic signal was obtained in time-frequency domain. Based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, the numerical simulation was performed to reproduce the observed the frequency doubling behaviors in Fe/MgO(001) film.

  2. Probing other solar systems with current and future adaptive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Macintosh, B; Marois, C; Phillion, D; Poyneer, L; Graham, J; Zuckerman, B; Gavel, D; Veran, J; Wilhelmsen-Evans, J; Mellis, C

    2008-09-08

    Over the past decade, the study of extrasolar planets through indirect techniques--primarily Doppler measurements--has revolutionized our understanding of other solar systems. The next major step in this field will be the direct detection and characterization, via imaging and spectroscopy, of the planets themselves. To achieve this, we must separate the light from the faint planet from the extensive glare of its parent star. We pursued this goal using the current generation of adaptive optics (AO) systems on large ground-based telescopes, using infrared imaging to search for the thermal emission from young planets and developing image processing techniques to distinguish planets from telescope-induced artifacts. Our new Angular Differential Imaging (ADI) technique, which uses the sidereal rotation of the Earth and telescope, is now standard for ground-based high-contrast imaging. Although no young planets were found in our surveys, we placed the strongest limits yet on giant planets in wide orbits (>30 AU) around young stars and characterized planetary companion candidates. The imaging of planetary companions on solar-system-like scales (5-30 AU) will require a new generation of advanced AO systems that are an order of magnitude more powerful than the LLNL-built Keck AO system. We worked to develop and test the key technologies needed for these systems, including a spatially-filtered wavefront sensor, efficient and accurate wavefront reconstruction algorithms, and precision AO wavefront control at the sub-nm level. LLNL has now been selected by the Gemini Observatory to lead the construction of the Gemini Planet Imager, a $24M instrument that will be the most advanced AO system in the world.

  3. Optical properties of biomimetic probes engineered from erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Joshua M.; Saager, Rolf; Majaron, Boris; Jia, Wangcun; Anvari, Bahman

    2017-01-01

    Light-activated theranostic materials offer a potential platform for optical imaging and phototherapeutic applications. We have engineered constructs derived from erythrocytes, which can be doped with the FDA-approved near infrared (NIR) chromophore, indocyanine green (ICG). We refer to these constructs as NIR erythrocyte-mimicking transducers (NETs). Herein, we investigated the effects of changing the NETs mean diameter from micron- (≈4 μm) to nano- (≈90 nm) scale, and the ICG concentration utilized in the fabrication of NETs from 5 to 20 μM on the resulting absorption and scattering characteristics of the NETs. Our approach consisted of integrating sphere-based measurements of light transmittance and reflectance, and subsequent utilization of these measurements in an inverse adding-doubling algorithm to estimate the absorption (μ a) and reduced scattering (μ s‧) coefficients of these NETs. For a given NETs diameter, values of μ a increased over the approximate spectral band of 630-860 nm with increasing ICG concentration. Micron-sized NETs produced the highest peak value of μ a when using ICG concentrations of 10 and 20 μM, and showed increased values of μ s‧ as compared to nano-sized NETs. Spectral profiles of μ s‧ for these NETs showed a trend consistent with Mie scattering behavior for spherical objects. For all NETs investigated, changing the ICG concentration minimally affected the scattering characteristics. A Monte Carlo-based model of light distribution showed that the presence of these NETs enhanced the fluence levels within simulated blood vessels. These results provide important data towards determining the appropriate light dosimetry parameters for an intended light-based biomedical application of NETs.

  4. Design and testing of prototype handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Demian, Dorin; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Cernat, Ramona; Topala, Florin Ionel; Hutiu, Gheorghe; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2014-01-01

    Three simple and low-cost configurations of handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography have been developed. Their design and testing for dentistry applications are presented. The first two configurations were built exclusively from available off-the-shelf optomechanical components, which, to the best of our knowledge, are the first designs of this type. The third configuration includes these components in an optimized and ergonomic probe. All the designs are presented in detail to allow for their duplication in any laboratory with a minimum effort, for applications that range from educational to high-end clinical investigations. Requirements that have to be fulfilled to achieve configurations which are reliable, ergonomic—for clinical environments, and easy to build are presented. While a range of applications is possible for the prototypes developed, in this study the handheld probes are tested ex vivo with a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system built in-house, for dental constructs. A previous testing with a swept source optical coherence tomography system has also been performed both in vivo and ex vivo for ear, nose, and throat—in a medical environment. The applications use the capability of optical coherence tomography to achieve real-time, high-resolution, non-contact, and non-destructive interferometric investigations with micrometer resolutions and millimeter penetration depth inside the sample. In this study, testing the quality of the material of one of the most used types of dental prosthesis, metalo-ceramic is thus demonstrated. PMID:25107512

  5. Fiber optic probe for determining heavy metals in solids based on laser-induced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquardt, Brian J.; Cullum, Brian M.; Shaw, Tim J.; Angel, S. M.

    1997-05-01

    A fiber-optic probe suitable for remote elemental analysis using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been developed and has been used to determine the concentration of lead in samples of dry paint. To develop a suitable fiber- optic sensor for remote measurements using LIBS a number of key issues must be addressed. The issue of coupling high-power laser pulses into optical fibers without fiber damage was first addressed by measuring damage threshold values, and by performing long-term durability tests for several different fiber types and sizes. This study led to the design of a highly flexible fiber-optic LIBS probe that can be used for a variety of sample substrates. To address the issue of reproducibility, we are investigating matrix affects and the dynamics of the laser ablation and laser-induced plasma processes by using a variety of spectroscopic techniques including time-resolved spectroscopic imaging. We have also modified the probe so that laser ablated material can be injected into a mass spectrometer.

  6. Design and testing of prototype handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Demian, Dorin; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Cernat, Ramona; Topala, Florin Ionel; Hutiu, Gheorghe; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2014-08-01

    Three simple and low-cost configurations of handheld scanning probes for optical coherence tomography have been developed. Their design and testing for dentistry applications are presented. The first two configurations were built exclusively from available off-the-shelf optomechanical components, which, to the best of our knowledge, are the first designs of this type. The third configuration includes these components in an optimized and ergonomic probe. All the designs are presented in detail to allow for their duplication in any laboratory with a minimum effort, for applications that range from educational to high-end clinical investigations. Requirements that have to be fulfilled to achieve configurations which are reliable, ergonomic-for clinical environments, and easy to build are presented. While a range of applications is possible for the prototypes developed, in this study the handheld probes are tested ex vivo with a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system built in-house, for dental constructs. A previous testing with a swept source optical coherence tomography system has also been performed both in vivo and ex vivo for ear, nose, and throat-in a medical environment. The applications use the capability of optical coherence tomography to achieve real-time, high-resolution, non-contact, and non-destructive interferometric investigations with micrometer resolutions and millimeter penetration depth inside the sample. In this study, testing the quality of the material of one of the most used types of dental prosthesis, metalo-ceramic is thus demonstrated.

  7. Tumor Bioimaging: Morphology-Tailoring of a Red AIEgen from Microsized Rods to Nanospheres for Tumor-Targeted Bioimaging (Adv. Mater. 16/2016).

    PubMed

    Li, Yongsheng; Shao, Andong; Wang, Yao; Mei, Ju; Niu, Dechao; Gu, Jinlou; Shi, Ping; Zhu, Weihong; Tian, He; Shi, Jianlin

    2016-04-01

    Y. Li, W. Zhu, and co-workers develop a convenient and versatile "make-up" strategy to modulate the micro-sized rods of a near-infrared-emissive AIEgen probe integrated into nanospheres via a self-assembly encapsulation process, as presented on page 3187. The obtained nanospheres outperform microrods in terms of brightness, photostability, biocompatibility, tumor-accumulation, and targeting ability, making them perfect bioprobes for tumor-targeted bioimaging. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Use of upconverting fluorescent nanoparticles for bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Dev K.; Zhang, Yong

    2012-02-01

    Lanthanide doped nanocrystals with upconversion fluorescence emission have been synthesized. The surface of these nanocrystals are modified to render them water dispersible and biocompatible. Use of these nanocrystals for bioimaging introduces many advantages, for example, minimum photo-damage to biological samples, weak auto-fluorescence, high detection sensitivity, high light penetration depth, etc. Here, we use upconversion nanocrystals to label cancer cells and demonstrate confocal imaging of the labeled cells implanted in mouse muscle.

  9. Ultra-thin and flexible endoscopy probe for optical coherence tomography based on stepwise transitional core fiber.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jangbeom; Chae, Yugyeong; Ahn, Yeh-Chan; Moon, Sucbei

    2015-05-01

    We present an ultra-thin fiber-body endoscopy probe for optical coherence tomography (OCT) which is based on a stepwise transitional core (STC) fiber. In a minimalistic design, our probe was made of spliced specialty fibers that could be directly used for beam probing optics without using a lens. In our probe, the OCT light delivered through a single-mode fiber was efficiently expanded to a large mode field of 24 μm diameter for a low beam divergence. The size of our probe was 85 μm in the probe's diameter while operated in a 160-μm thick protective tubing. Through theoretical and experimental analyses, our probe was found to exhibit various attractive features in terms of compactness, flexibility and reliability along with its excellent fabrication simplicity.

  10. Challenges and Benchmarks in Bioimage Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kozubek, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Similar to the medical imaging community, the bioimaging community has recently realized the need to benchmark various image analysis methods to compare their performance and assess their suitability for specific applications. Challenges sponsored by prestigious conferences have proven to be an effective means of encouraging benchmarking and new algorithm development for a particular type of image data. Bioimage analysis challenges have recently complemented medical image analysis challenges, especially in the case of the International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI). This review summarizes recent progress in this respect and describes the general process of designing a bioimage analysis benchmark or challenge, including the proper selection of datasets and evaluation metrics. It also presents examples of specific target applications and biological research tasks that have benefited from these challenges with respect to the performance of automatic image analysis methods that are crucial for the given task. Finally, available benchmarks and challenges in terms of common features, possible classification and implications drawn from the results are analysed.

  11. Using optical forces to probe mechanical response from single molecules to biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forde, Nancy

    2010-10-01

    In the past decade, the ability to manipulate and measure forces exerted by single biological molecules has transformed our understanding of their mechanical response, stability, and the mechanisms by which they operate. One of the essential tools in this revolution has been optical tweezers, which use a focused laser beam to ``trap'' (hold stably in three dimensions) micrometer-sized refractive particles. In this talk, I will briefly describe how optical tweezers work and how they can be used to manipulate and probe the mechanical response of single DNA and protein molecules. I will then describe the technique of holographic optical tweezers, which modify the phase of a laser beam in order to generate multiple optical traps at specified locations in three dimensions within a sample. I will discuss our work towards applying this technique to mechanical studies of protein-based biomaterials on the microscale.

  12. Design of a rectal probe for diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging for chemotherapy and radiotherapy monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Giessen, Martijn; Santoro, Ylenia; Mirzaei Zarandi, Soroush; Pigazzi, Alessio; Cerussi, Albert E.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2014-03-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging (DOSI) has shown great potential for the early detection of non-responding tumors during neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer, already one day after therapy starts. Patients with rectal cancer receive similar chemotherapy treatment. The rectum geometry and tissue properties of healthy and tumor tissue in the rectum and the requirement of surface contact impose constraints on the probe design. In this work we present the design of a DOSI probe with the aim of early chemotherapy/radiotherapy effectiveness detection in rectal tumors. We show using Monte Carlo simulations and phantom measurements that the colon tissue can be characterized reliably using a source-detector separation in the order of 10 mm. We present a design and rapid prototype of a probe for DOSI measurements that can be mounted on a standard laparoscope and that fits through a standard rectoscope. Using predominantly clinically approved components we aim at fast clinical translation.

  13. Tiny endoscopic optical coherence tomography probe driven by a miniaturized hollow ultrasonic motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tianyuan; Zhang, Ning; Huo, Tiancheng; Wang, Chengming; Zheng, Jing-gao; Zhou, Tieying; Xue, Ping

    2013-08-01

    We present an endoscopic probe for optical coherence tomography (OCT) equipped with a miniaturized hollow ultrasonic motor that rotates the objective lens and provides an internal channel for the fiber to pass through, enabling 360 deg unobstructed circumferential scanning. This probe has an outer diameter of 1.5 mm, which is ultra-small for motorized probes with an unobstructed view in distal scanning endoscopic OCT. Instead of a mirror or prism, a customized aspheric right-angle lens is utilized, leading to an enlargement of the numerical aperture and thus high transverse resolution. Spectral-domain OCT imaging of bio-tissue and a phantom are demonstrated with resolution of 7.5 μm(axial)×6.6 μm(lateral) and sensitivity of 96 dB.

  14. Probe-pin device for optical neurotransmitter sensing in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min Hyuck; Song, Kyo D.; Yoon, Hargsoon; Park, Yeonjoon; Choi, Sang H.; Lee, Dae-Sung; Shin, Kyu-Sik; Hwang, Hak-In; Lee, Uhn

    2015-04-01

    Development of an optical neurotransmitter sensing device using nano-plasmonic probes and a micro-spectrometer for real time monitoring of neural signals in the brain is underway. Clinical application of this device technology is to provide autonomous closed-loop feedback control to a deep brain stimulation (DBS) system and enhance the accuracy and efficacy of DBS treatment. By far, we have developed an implantable probe-pin device based on localized field enhancement of surface plasmonic resonance on a nanostructured sensing domain which can amplify neurochemical signals from evoked neural activity in the brain. In this paper, we will introduce the details of design and sensing performance of a proto-typed microspectrometer and nanostructured probing devices for real time measurement of neurotransmitter concentrations.

  15. Fiber optic photoacoustic probe with ultrasonic tracking for guiding minimally invasive procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenfeng; Mosse, Charles A.; Colchester, Richard J.; Mari, Jean Martial; Nikitichev, Daniil I.; West, Simeon J.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2015-07-01

    In a wide range of clinical procedures, accurate placement of medical devices such as needles and catheters is critical to optimize patient outcomes. Ultrasound imaging is often used to guide minimally invasive procedures, as it can provide real-time visualization of patient anatomy and medical devices. However, this modality can provide low image contrast for soft tissues, and poor visualization of medical devices that are steeply angled with respect to the incoming ultrasound beams. Photoacoustic sensors can provide information about the spatial distributions of tissue chromophores that could be valuable for guiding minimally invasive procedures. In this study, a system for guiding minimally invasive procedures using photoacoustic sensing was developed. This system included a miniature photoacoustic probe with three optical fibers: one with a bare end for photoacoustic excitation of tissue, a second for photoacoustic excitation of an optically absorbing coating at the distal end to transmit ultrasound, and a third with a Fabry-Perot cavity at the distal end for receiving ultrasound. The position of the photoacoustic probe was determined with ultrasonic tracking, which involved transmitting pulses from a linear-array ultrasound imaging probe at the tissue surface, and receiving them with the fiber-optic ultrasound receiver in the photoacoustic probe. The axial resolution of photoacoustic sensing was better than 70 μm, and the tracking accuracy was better than 1 mm in both axial and lateral dimensions. By translating the photoacoustic probe, depth scans were obtained from different spatial positions, and two-dimensional images were reconstructed using a frequency-domain algorithm.

  16. Elliptical polarization of near-resonant linearly polarized probe light in optically pumped alkali metal vapor.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingying; Wang, Zhiguo; Jin, Shilong; Yuan, Jie; Luo, Hui

    2017-02-20

    Optically pumped alkali metal atoms currently provide a sensitive solution for magnetic microscopic measurements. As the most practicable plan, Faraday rotation of linearly polarized light is extensively used in spin polarization measurements of alkali metal atoms. In some cases, near-resonant Faraday rotation is applied to improve the sensitivity. However, the near-resonant linearly polarized probe light is elliptically polarized after passing through optically pumped alkali metal vapor. The ellipticity of transmitted near-resonant probe light is numerically calculated and experimentally measured. In addition, we also analyze the negative impact of elliptical polarization on Faraday rotation measurements. From our theoretical estimate and experimental results, the elliptical polarization forms an inevitable error in spin polarization measurements.

  17. Brillouin optical time-domain analyzer for extended sensing range using probe dithering and cyclic coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iribas, Haritz; Loayssa, Alayn; Sauser, Florian; Llera, Miguel; Le Floch, Sébastien

    2017-04-01

    We present an enhanced performance Brillouin optical time-domain analysis sensor that uses dual probes waves with optical frequency modulation and cyclic coding. The frequency modulation serves to increase the probe power that can be injected in the fiber before the onset of non-local effects and noise generated by spontaneous Brillouin scattering. This leads to higher detected signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which is further increased by the coding gain. The enhanced SNR translates to extended range for the sensor, with experiments demonstrating 1-m spatial resolution over a 164 km fiber loop with a 3-MHz Brillouin frequency shift measurement precision at the worst contrast position. In addition, we introduce a study of the power limits that can be injected in the fiber with cyclic coding before the appearance of distortions in the decoded signal.

  18. Elliptical polarization of near-resonant linearly polarized probe light in optically pumped alkali metal vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yingying; Wang, Zhiguo; Jin, Shilong; Yuan, Jie; Luo, Hui

    2017-02-01

    Optically pumped alkali metal atoms currently provide a sensitive solution for magnetic microscopic measurements. As the most practicable plan, Faraday rotation of linearly polarized light is extensively used in spin polarization measurements of alkali metal atoms. In some cases, near-resonant Faraday rotation is applied to improve the sensitivity. However, the near-resonant linearly polarized probe light is elliptically polarized after passing through optically pumped alkali metal vapor. The ellipticity of transmitted near-resonant probe light is numerically calculated and experimentally measured. In addition, we also analyze the negative impact of elliptical polarization on Faraday rotation measurements. From our theoretical estimate and experimental results, the elliptical polarization forms an inevitable error in spin polarization measurements.

  19. Elliptical polarization of near-resonant linearly polarized probe light in optically pumped alkali metal vapor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingying; Wang, Zhiguo; Jin, Shilong; Yuan, Jie; Luo, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Optically pumped alkali metal atoms currently provide a sensitive solution for magnetic microscopic measurements. As the most practicable plan, Faraday rotation of linearly polarized light is extensively used in spin polarization measurements of alkali metal atoms. In some cases, near-resonant Faraday rotation is applied to improve the sensitivity. However, the near-resonant linearly polarized probe light is elliptically polarized after passing through optically pumped alkali metal vapor. The ellipticity of transmitted near-resonant probe light is numerically calculated and experimentally measured. In addition, we also analyze the negative impact of elliptical polarization on Faraday rotation measurements. From our theoretical estimate and experimental results, the elliptical polarization forms an inevitable error in spin polarization measurements. PMID:28216649

  20. Imaging individual proteins and nanodomains on intact cell membranes with a probe-based optical antenna.

    PubMed

    van Zanten, Thomas S; Lopez-Bosque, Maria J; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F

    2010-01-01

    Optical antennas that confine and enhance electromagnetic fields in a nanometric region hold great potential for nanobioimaging and biosensing. Probe-based monopole optical antennas are fabricated to enhance fields localized to <30 nm near the antenna apex in aqueous conditions. These probes are used under appropriate excitation antenna conditions to image individual antibodies with an unprecedented resolution of 26 +/- 4 nm and virtually no surrounding background. On intact cell membranes in physiological conditions, the obtained resolution is 30 +/- 6 nm. Importantly, the method allows individual proteins to be distinguished from nanodomains and the degree of clustering to be quantified by directly measuring physical size and intensity of individual fluorescent spots. Improved antenna geometries should lead to true live cell imaging below 10-nm resolution with position accuracy in the subnanometric range.

  1. Probe-controlled soliton frequency shift in the regime of optical event horizon.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jie; Guo, Hairun; Wang, Shaofei; Zeng, Xianglong

    2015-08-24

    In optical analogy of the event horizon, temporal pulse collision and mutual interactions are mainly between an intense solitary wave (soliton) and a dispersive probe wave. In such a regime, here we numerically investigate the probe-controlled soliton frequency shift as well as the soliton self-compression. In particular, in the dispersion landscape with multiple zero dispersion wavelengths, bi-directional soliton spectral tunneling effects is possible. Moreover, we propose a mid-infrared soliton self-compression to the generation of few-cycle ultrashort pulses, in a bulk of quadratic nonlinear crystals in contrast to optical fibers or cubic nonlinear media, which could contribute to the community with a simple and flexible method to experimental implementations.

  2. Probing the mechanics of the complete DNA transcription cycle in real-time using optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Christoph G; Cross, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a DNA-dependent motor protein that links ribonucleotide polymerization to force generation and DNA translocation through its active site, i.e., mechanical work. Single-molecule studies using optical tweezers have allowed researchers to probe the load-dependent ribonucleotide incorporation rate and processivity of both single-subunit viral and multisubunit prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNAPs engaged in transcription elongation. A single-molecule method is described here, which allows the complete transcription cycle (i.e., promoter binding, initiation, elongation and termination) to be followed in real-time using dual-trap optical tweezers and a unique "three-bead" geometry. This single-molecule transcription assay can be used to probe the mechanics of both stationary and moving RNAP-DNA complexes engaged in different stages of transcription.

  3. Probing the structural dynamics of proteins and nucleic acids with optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Dustin B; Woodside, Michael T

    2015-10-01

    Conformational changes are an essential feature of most molecular processes in biology. Optical tweezers have emerged as a powerful tool for probing conformational dynamics at the single-molecule level because of their high resolution and sensitivity, opening new windows on phenomena ranging from folding and ligand binding to enzyme function, molecular machines, and protein aggregation. By measuring conformational changes induced in a molecule by forces applied by optical tweezers, new insight has been gained into the relationship between dynamics and function. We discuss recent advances from studies of how structure forms in proteins and RNA, including non-native structures, fluctuations in disordered proteins, and interactions with chaperones assisting native folding. We also review the development of assays probing the dynamics of complex protein-nucleic acid and protein-protein assemblies that reveal the dynamic interactions between biomolecular machines and their substrates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A simple and non-contact optical imaging probe for evaluation of corneal diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xun Jie Jeesmond; Shinoj, V. K.; Murukeshan, V. M.; Baskaran, M.; Aung, T.

    2015-09-01

    Non-contact imaging techniques are preferred in ophthalmology. Corneal disease is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide, and a possible way of detection is by analyzing the shape and optical quality of the cornea. Here, a simple and cost-effective, non-contact optical probe system is proposed and illustrated. The probe possesses high spatial resolutions and is non-dependent on coupling medium, which are significant for a clinician and patient friendly investigation. These parameters are crucial, when considering an imaging system for the objective diagnosis and management of corneal diseases. The imaging of the cornea is performed on ex vivo porcine samples and subsequently on small laboratory animals, in vivo. The clinical significance of the proposed study is validated by performing imaging of the New Zealand white rabbit's cornea infected with Pseudomonas.

  5. Probing conformational changes of prestin with thiol-reactive optical switches.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jie; Sakata, Tomoyo; Marriott, Gerard; Iwasa, Kuni H

    2008-09-15

    Thiol-reactive optical switch probes were used to examine conformational changes of prestin-based membrane motor. Because this motor is based on mechanoelectric coupling similar to piezoelectricity, the motile activity can be monitored by charge movements across the plasma membrane, which appears as nonlinear capacitance. When the plasma membrane is conjugated with the probes, optically induced spiro-merocyanine transition positively shifted nonlinear capacitance of outer hair cells and prestin-transfected cells by approximately 10 mV. These shifts were reversible and were eliminated by pretreatment with iodoacetamide. However, they were little affected by pretreatment with biotin maleimide, which cannot reach the cytoplasmic surface. Our results showed that merocyanine states, with a larger dipole moment, interact with the motor's extended conformation stronger than with the compact conformation by 1.6 x 10(-21) J/molecule. The interaction sites are near the cytoplasmic side of the motor protein.

  6. Probing Conformational Changes of Prestin with Thiol-Reactive Optical Switches

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jie; Sakata, Tomoyo; Marriott, Gerard; Iwasa, Kuni H.

    2008-01-01

    Thiol-reactive optical switch probes were used to examine conformational changes of prestin-based membrane motor. Because this motor is based on mechanoelectric coupling similar to piezoelectricity, the motile activity can be monitored by charge movements across the plasma membrane, which appears as nonlinear capacitance. When the plasma membrane is conjugated with the probes, optically induced spiro-merocyanine transition positively shifted nonlinear capacitance of outer hair cells and prestin-transfected cells by ∼10 mV. These shifts were reversible and were eliminated by pretreatment with iodoacetamide. However, they were little affected by pretreatment with biotin maleimide, which cannot reach the cytoplasmic surface. Our results showed that merocyanine states, with a larger dipole moment, interact with the motor's extended conformation stronger than with the compact conformation by 1.6 × 10−21 J/molecule. The interaction sites are near the cytoplasmic side of the motor protein. PMID:18556757

  7. Probe of three-dimensional chiral topological insulators in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Wang, S-T; Deng, D-L; Duan, L-M

    2014-07-18

    We propose a feasible experimental scheme to realize a three-dimensional chiral topological insulator with cold fermionic atoms in an optical lattice, which is characterized by an integer topological invariant distinct from the conventional Z(2) topological insulators and has a remarkable macroscopic zero-energy flat band. To probe its property, we show that its characteristic surface states--the Dirac cones--can be probed through time-of-flight imaging or Bragg spectroscopy and the flat band can be detected via measurement of the atomic density profile in a weak global trap. The realization of this novel topological phase with a flat band in an optical lattice will provide a unique experimental platform to study the interplay between interaction and topology and open new avenues for application of topological states.

  8. Laser-based technology of scanning near-field optical probes fabrication: study of kinetics and progress of measuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, Vadim P.; Kalachev, Alexey I.; Kaporsky, Lev N.; Volkov, Sergey A.; Voznesensky, Nikolay B.

    2003-02-01

    Basic principles of laser assisted process of fiber etching for scanning near-field optical (SNO) probes formation and control technique are presented. The thermal and temporal regimes are considered in order to provide stable reproducibility and high quality of a tapered end of the optical fiber. Problems of adequate definition of the scanning imaging properties of a SNO probe are discussed. Thus an optical method of far-field registration and processing together with a new autoelectronic emission method are considered for solution of the task of a subwavelength SNO probe aperture measurement and estimation of its apparatus function.

  9. Design and Evaluation of a Fiber Optic Probe as a means of Subsurface Planetary Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilgrim, Robert Paul

    The Optical Probe for Regolith Analysis (OPRA) is an instrumentation concept designed to provide spectroscopic analysis of the near subsurface of unconsolidated regolith on bodies such as moons, asteroids and planets. Below a chemically altered surface may lay the geological history in the form of stratigraphy that is shielded from degradation due to harsh external environments. Most of what we know about our solar system comes from remote platforms, such as satellites that are deployed into orbit around the target body. In the case of Mars, we have had several successful landers and rovers however, with the exception of the Mars Science Laboratory that just drilled its first hole, the complexity of subsurface excavation has limited the extent of subsurface exploration to simple scoops deployed on the ends of robotic arms which, by their very nature, will erase any stratigraphy that it may be digging into. The OPRA instrumentation concept allows for an integrated, lightweight and simple apparatus for subsurface exploration via a small, spike like structure which contains integrated optical fibers coupled to small windows running down the length of the probe. Each window is connected to a spectrometer housed onboard the deploying spacecraft. Each window is separately interrogated via the spectrometer over the wavelength range 1-2.5 nm to produce a spectroscopic profile as a function of depth. This project takes the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of the OPRA instrumentation concept to level 3, which is defined by NASA to be the demonstration either analytically or experimentally of the proof of concept for critical functions of the proposed instrument. Firstly, to demonstrate that optical fibers are feasible for this type of application, we report on the techniques used by NASA to space qualify optical fibers. We investigate the optical performance of several fiber optic bundle configurations, both experimentally and numerically, to help optimize bundle performance

  10. Distributed optical fiber sensor based on modulated dual-pulse probe signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wenhui; Fang, Gaosheng; Chen, Xinwei; Wu, Pengsheng; Wang, Kai

    2016-01-01

    A distributed fiber sensor based on Rayleigh scattering is described which converts vibration-induced optical phase changes into optical intensity variations by using modulated dual-pulses injected into sensing fiber. Phase generated carrier algorithm is used to permit arctangent operation to demodulate the phase information along the sensing fiber. The demonstrated sensor is capable of probing dynamic acoustic or vibration disturbances over 10km of sensing length with spatial resolution of 6m and large signal to noise ratio. The background noise of our system is estimated about 1×10-3 rad/√Hz.

  11. Probing photonic and optoelectronic structures by apertureless scanning near-field optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bachelot, Renaud; Lerondel, Gilles; Blaize, Sylvain; Aubert, Sebastien; Bruyant, Aurelien; Royer, Pascal

    2004-08-01

    This report presents the Apertureless Scanning Optical Near-Field Microscope as a powerful tool for the characterization of modern optoelectronic and photonic components with sub-wavelength resolution. We present an overview of the results we obtained in our laboratory over the past few years. By significant examples, it is shown that this specific probe microscopy allows for in situ local quantitative study of semiconductor lasers in operation, integrated optical waveguides produced by ion exchange (single channel or Y junction), and photonic structures. 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Automated coregistered imaging using a hand-held probe-based optical imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regalado, Steven; Erickson, Sarah J.; Zhu, Banghe; Ge, Jiajia; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2010-02-01

    Near-infrared optical imaging holds a promise as a noninvasive technology toward cancer diagnostics and other tissue imaging applications. In recent years, hand-held based imagers are of great interest toward the clinical translation of the technology. However hand-held imagers developed to date are typically designed to obtain surface images and not tomography information due to lack of coregistration facilities. Herein, a recently developed hand-held probe-based optical imager in our Optical Imaging Laboratory has been implemented with novel coregistration facilities toward real-time and tomographic imaging of tissue phantoms. Continuous-wave fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging studies were performed using an intensified charge coupled device camera based imaging system in order to demonstrate the feasibility of automated coregistered imaging of flat phantom surfaces, using a flexible probe that can also contour to curvatures. Three-dimensional fluorescence tomographic reconstructions were also demonstrated using coregistered frequency-domain measurements obtained using the hand-held based optical imager. It was also observed from preliminary studies on cubical phantoms that multiple coregistered scans differentiated deeper targets (˜3 cm) from artifacts that were not feasible from a single coregistered scan, demonstrating the possibility of improved target depth detectability in the future.

  13. Transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy of bone global sampling and ring/disk fiber optic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulmerich, Matthew V.; Morris, Michael D.; Vanasse, Thomas M.; Goldstein, Steven A.

    2007-02-01

    We have used fiber optic probes with global illumination/collection (PhAT probe, Kaiser Optical Systems) and ring illumination/disk collection configurations for transcutaneous Raman spectroscopy of bone tissue. Both illumination/collection schemes can be used for recovery of spectra of subsurface components. In this paper the global illumination configuration provides minimum local power density and so minimizes the probability of damage to specimens, animals or human subjects. It also allows non-destructive subsurface mapping under certain conditions. The ring/disk probe utilizes a ring of laser light and collects Raman scatter from within the diameter of the ring. This design distributes the laser power for efficient heat dissipation and provides a better collection ratio of subsurface to surface components than the global illumination design. For non-invasive tissue spectroscopy the ring/disk design also provides better rejection of fluorescence from melanocytes. We have tested the performance of these Raman probes on polymer model systems and chicken tibiae.

  14. Studying complex fluids and crystal formation using Dynamic Light Scattering and Optical Probe Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streletzky, Kiril A.

    2004-10-01

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) spectroscopy provides non-destructive analytic technique for probing structure and dynamics of polymer solutions, colloids, micellar systems, liquid crystals, and, in some cases, observation of nucleation and crystal growth. The method of optical probe diffusion uses DLS to measure transport of dilute mesoscopic probes in a complex fluid solution. If tracer particles are the dominant scatterers in solution, their diffusion provides important information for inferring physical properties of the complex fluid. In situ nature of DLS allows non-invasive studies of different chemical and physical processes such as polymer and colloidal diffusion, gelation, micellar aggregation and dynamics. DLS is also useful for studying critical behavior of liquid crystals and for observing crystallization from clear solutions. The highlights of our results obtained using DLS and optical probe diffusion are presented. These examples include: a) research on polymer dynamics in dilute and concentrated solutions of a neutral HPC polymer; b) project on aggregation and transport of spherical Tx-100 micelles; c) study of crystallization of molecular sieve zeolite NaA.

  15. A simple optical fibre probe for differentiation between healthy and tumorous tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartner, Erik P.; Henderson, Matthew R.; Purdey, Malcolm; Monro, Tanya M.; Gill, P. Grantley; Callen, David F.

    2016-11-01

    Incomplete removal of malignant tumours continues to be a significant issue in cancer surgery. It increases the risk of local recurrence and impaired survival, and results in the need for additional surgery with associated attendant costs and morbidity. While pathological methods exist to determine tissue type during surgery, these methods can compromise post-operative pathology, have a lag of minutes to hours before the surgeon receives the results of the tissue analysis and are restricted to excised tissue. In this work we report the development of an optical fibre probe which could find use as an aid for margin detection during surgery. A fluorophore doped polymer coating is deposited on the tip of an optical fibre, which can then be used to record the pH by monitoring the emission spectra from the embedded indicator. The pH values of unknown tissue are measured and compared to healthy tissue, allowing for discrimination between healthy and cancerous tissue. The probe developed here shows strong potential for use during surgery, as the probe design can be readily adapted to a low-cost portable configuration which could find use in the operating theatre. Use of this probe in surgery either on excised or in-vivo tissue has the potential to improve success rates for complete removal of cancers.

  16. Velocity anisotropy effect in pump-probe spectra of cesium in a micrometric thickness optical cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P. N.; Mitra, S.; Ray, B.; Krasteva, A.; Slavov, D.; Todorov, P.; Cartaleva, S.

    2015-01-01

    The pump-probe spectra in a cell of micrometric thickness containing cesium vapor are reported. The line shape and nonlinear features observed in the case of fluorescence in the direction parallel to the cell windows and the transmission spectra observed along the propagation direction of the probe beam show considerable differences in the spectral profiles. We observed Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) and enhanced Velocity Selective Optical Pumping (VSOP) signals. Atoms moving nearly parallel to the windows and perpendicular to the collinear pump and probe beams will see much lower Doppler shift of incident frequencies and hence will lead to considerable narrowing of the Doppler background in the fluorescence spectra. The coherence decay rate is also low for such atoms as they do not meet with the cell walls. A theoretical model based on five level optical Bloch equations is used to simulate the spectra. The Doppler convolution includes all possible orientation of atomic velocities with respect to the laser beam direction. The simulated curves reproduce the observed sharp EIT peaks and enhanced broad VSOP signals for the closed probe transition in the fluorescence and absorption spectra. The observed effect of the light intensity and temperature change on the non-linear features is reproduced by the simulation.

  17. Ophthalmic diagnostics using a new dynamic light scattering fiber optic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Suh, Kwang I.; Dellavecchia, Michael A.; Dubin, Stephen

    1995-11-01

    A new fiber optic probe is developed to study different parts of the eye. The probe positioned in front of an eye, delivers a low power light from a laser diode into the eye and guides the light which is back scattered by different components (aqueous humor, lens, and vitreous humor) of the eye through a receiving optical fiber to a photo detector. The probe provides rapid determination of macromolecular diffusivities and their respective size distributions in the eye lens and the gel-like material in the vitreous humor. We report alpha-crystalline size distributions, as a function of penetration depth, inside the lens and hyaluronic acid molecular size distribution in the vitreous body. In a clinical setting, the probe can be mounted on a slit-lamp apparatus simply by using a H-ruby lens holder. The capability of detecting cataracts, both nuclear and peripheral, in their early stages of formation, in a non invasive and quantitative fashion, has the potential in patient monitoring and in developing and testing new drugs or diet therapies to 'dissolve' or slow down the cataract formation before surgery is necessary. The ability to detect biochemical and macromolecular changes in the vitreous structure can be very useful in identifying certain diseases of the posterior chamber, e.g., posterior vitreous detachment.

  18. Fabrication of integrated optic fibre tip for micron CMMs touch trigger probe application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, H.; Hsu, H. Y.; Chua, J.; Kong, L. X.; Wedding, A. B.; She, M.; Lin, G. C. I.; Fan, K. C.

    2005-12-01

    In the last decade the general miniaturisation of complex products has lead to an increased importance of high precision machining and assembly. Together with increasing precision of products, the need for highly accurate dimensional inspection increases. CMMs (Coordinate Measuring Machines), as a versatile and widespread dimensional metrology tool, can efficiently perform complex measurement with a resolution of about 0.1μm and a repeatability of about 0.3μm. The existing probes for CMMs tend to be very bulky and result in high probing forces for geometrical measurements of high accuracy on small parts. In this paper, an economical flexible method, which is based on optical fibre splicer, is proposed to fabricate an integrated micro scale silicon probe with spherical tip for micron CMMs. Based on Taguchi method, a combination of optimised process parameters has been obtained to control the fabrication conditions that will ensure the manufacturing of tips of a high and consistent quality. With proper control of the process parameters, an optic fibre probe tip with the diameter dimension in the range of 200 to 400μm is achieved and there is a great potential to fabricate a smaller tip with a diameter of 50-100μm in the future.

  19. Ophthalmic Diagnostics Using a New Dynamic Light Scattering Fiber Optic Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Suh, Kwang I.; Dellavecchia, Michael A.; Dubin, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    A new fiber optic probe is developed to study different parts of the eye. The probe positioned in front of an eye, delivers a low power light from a laser diode into the eye and guides the light which is back scattered by different components (aqueous humor, lens, and vitreous humor) of the eye through a receiving optical fiber to a photo detector. The probe provides rapid determination of macromolecular diffusivities and their respective size distributions in the eye lens and the gel-like material in the vitreous humor. We report alpha-crystalline size distributions, as a function of penetration depth, inside the lens and hyaluronic acid molecular size distribution in the vitreous body. In a clinical setting, the probe can be mounted on a slit-lamp apparatus simply by using a H-ruby lens holder. The capability of detecting cataracts, both nuclear and peripheral, in their early stages of formation, in a non invasive and quantitative fashion, has the potential in patient monitoring and in developing and testing new drugs or diet therapies to 'dissolve' or slow down the cataract formation before surgery is necessary. The ability to detect biochemical and macromolecular changes in the vitreous structure can be very useful in identifying certain diseases of the posterior chamber, e.g., posterior vitreous detachment.

  20. Fiber-optic Raman sensing of cell proliferation probes and molecular vibrations: Brain-imaging perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronina-Amitonova, Lyubov V.; Fedotov, Il'ya V.; Ivashkina, Olga I.; Zots, Marina A.; Fedotov, Andrei B.; Anokhin, Konstantin V.; Zheltikov, Aleksei M.

    2012-09-01

    Optical fibers are employed to sense fingerprint molecular vibrations in ex vivo experiments on the whole brain and detect cell proliferation probes in a model study on a quantitatively controlled solution. A specifically adapted spectral filtering procedure is shown to allow the Raman signal from molecular vibrations of interest to be discriminated against the background from the fiber, allowing a highly sensitive Raman detection of the recently demonstrated EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) labels of DNA synthesis in cells.

  1. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of epithelial tissue with a smart fiber-optic probe.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing; Shah, Amy; Nagarajan, Vivek K; Ferris, Daron G

    2014-03-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) with a fiber-optic probe can noninvasively quantify the optical properties of epithelial tissues and has shown the potential as a cost-effective, fast and sensitive tool for diagnosis of early precancerous changes in the cervix and oral cavity. However, current DRS systems are susceptible to several sources of systematic and random errors, such as uncontrolled probe-to-tissue pressure and lack of a real-time calibration that can significantly impair the measurement accuracy, reliability and validity of this technology as well as its clinical utility. In addition, such systems use bulky, high power and expensive optical components which impede their widespread use in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) where epithelial cancer related death is disproportionately high. In this paper we report a portable, easy-to-use and low cost, yet accurate and reliable DRS device that can aid in the screening and diagnosis of oral and cervical cancer. The device uses an innovative smart fiber-optic probe to eliminate operator bias, state-of-the-art photonics components to reduce size and power consumption, and automated software to reduce the need of operator training. The device showed a mean error of 1.4 ± 0.5% and 6.8 ± 1.7% for extraction of phantom absorption and reduced scattering coefficients, respectively. A clinical study on healthy volunteers indicated that a pressure below 1.0 psi is desired for oral mucosal tissues to minimize the probe effects on tissue physiology and morphology.

  2. Optical analysis of the star-tracker telescope for Gravity Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zissa, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    A ray tracing modeling of the star tracker telescope for Gravity Probe was used to predict the character of the output signal and its sensitivity to fabrication errors. In particular, the impact of the optical subsystem on the requirement of 1 milliarc second signal linearity over a + or - 50 milliarc second range was examined. Photomultiplier and solid state detector options were considered. Recommendations are made.

  3. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy of epithelial tissue with a smart fiber-optic probe

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bing; Shah, Amy; Nagarajan, Vivek K.; Ferris, Daron G.

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) with a fiber-optic probe can noninvasively quantify the optical properties of epithelial tissues and has shown the potential as a cost-effective, fast and sensitive tool for diagnosis of early precancerous changes in the cervix and oral cavity. However, current DRS systems are susceptible to several sources of systematic and random errors, such as uncontrolled probe-to-tissue pressure and lack of a real-time calibration that can significantly impair the measurement accuracy, reliability and validity of this technology as well as its clinical utility. In addition, such systems use bulky, high power and expensive optical components which impede their widespread use in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) where epithelial cancer related death is disproportionately high. In this paper we report a portable, easy-to-use and low cost, yet accurate and reliable DRS device that can aid in the screening and diagnosis of oral and cervical cancer. The device uses an innovative smart fiber-optic probe to eliminate operator bias, state-of-the-art photonics components to reduce size and power consumption, and automated software to reduce the need of operator training. The device showed a mean error of 1.4 ± 0.5% and 6.8 ± 1.7% for extraction of phantom absorption and reduced scattering coefficients, respectively. A clinical study on healthy volunteers indicated that a pressure below 1.0 psi is desired for oral mucosal tissues to minimize the probe effects on tissue physiology and morphology. PMID:24688805

  4. Construction of specific magnetic resonance imaging/optical dual-modality molecular probe used for imaging angiogenesis of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xuejie; Song, Xiaoyan; Wang, Zhenbo

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to construct specific magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/optical dual-modality molecular probe. Tumor-bearing animal models were established. MRI/optical dual-modality molecular probe was construed by coupling polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified nano-Fe3O4 with specific targeted cyclopeptide GX1 and near-infrared fluorescent dyes Cy5.5. MRI/optical imaging effects of the probe were observed and the feasibility of in vivo double-modality imaging was discussed. It was found that, the double-modality probe was of high stability; tumor signal of the experimental group tended to be weak after injection of the probe, but rose to a level which was close to the previous level after 18 h (p > 0.05). We successively completed the construction of an ideal MRI/optical dual-modality molecular probe. MRI/optical dual-modality molecular probe which can selectively gather in gastric cancer is expected to be a novel probe used for diagnosing gastric cancer in the early stage.

  5. Hybrid probing technique for coordinate measurement with optically trapped micro sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yuki; Michihata, Masaki; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Takaya, Yasuhiro

    2016-11-01

    Engineered surfaces have been fabricated to provide enhanced properties such as low friction, anti-adhesive behavior, or low reflection of light. At micro-scales, surface force highly affects the functionality of mechanical parts. In order to reduce surface force such as friction, micro mechanical parts that have engineered surfaces are demanded. In order to investigate the functionality of the textured micro parts, it is necessary to evaluate both the three-dimensional shape and the surface topography along with its geometry. Then we propose novel hybrid probing technique using an optically trapped micro sphere. Tightly focused laser beam makes it possible for a dielectric micro sphere to sustain near the focal point in the air. The dynamic behavior of the micro sphere changes as the result of the interaction of the surface. Therefore, the surface is detected by monitoring the micro sphere. This enables the three-dimensional shape measurement of the substrate. On the other hand, Surface topography is imaged with the lensing effect of the trapped micro sphere. Therefore, this trapped sphere is used as both a probe for coordinate metrology and a micro-lens in optical microscopy in this study. This present investigation deals with the development and fundamental validation of the hybrid probing system with the optically trapped micro sphere. The measurement result with high performance was demonstrated using the tilted diffraction grating.

  6. Noninvasive probing of the ocean surface using laser-based nonlinear optical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Korenowski, G.M.; Frysinger, G.S.; Asher, W.E.

    1992-06-01

    The laser-based nonlinear optical methods of second-harmonic generation and sum-frequency generation have been developed to study the chemical composition and concentration of natural surfactant materials present as slicks on the ocean surface. These noninvasive second-harmonic and sum-frequency generation methods produce signals which originate from only the top few molecular layers of the ocean surface, thereby producing an accurate picture of the ocean surface condition without interference from the bulk ocean chemistry. Chemical specificity of the methods is achieved by tuning the incident laser frequency to coincide with optical absorptions in the surface absorbed materials. We show that laser-based second-order nonlinear optical processes of SHG and SFG provide highly surface selective, noninvasive, in situ probes of the ocean surface. Although only preliminary experiments are reported in this paper, the probes provide important information about the nature of surfactants at the ocean surface and their behavior in response to dynamic forces at the sea/air interface. The future of the probes lies in their further development and use as in situ interfacial spectroscopic techniques.

  7. Upconverting and NIR emitting rare earth based nanostructures for NIR-bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmer, Eva; Venkatachalam, Nallusamy; Hyodo, Hiroshi; Hattori, Akito; Ebina, Yoshie; Kishimoto, Hidehiro; Soga, Kohei

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, significant progress was achieved in the field of nanomedicine and bioimaging, but the development of new biomarkers for reliable detection of diseases at an early stage, molecular imaging, targeting and therapy remains crucial. The disadvantages of commonly used organic dyes include photobleaching, autofluorescence, phototoxicity and scattering when UV (ultraviolet) or visible light is used for excitation. The limited penetration depth of the excitation light and the visible emission into and from the biological tissue is a further drawback with regard to in vivo bioimaging. Lanthanide containing inorganic nanostructures emitting in the near-infrared (NIR) range under NIR excitation may overcome those problems. Due to the outstanding optical and magnetic properties of lanthanide ions (Ln3+), nanoscopic host materials doped with Ln3+, e.g. Y2O3:Er3+,Yb3+, are promising candidates for NIR-NIR bioimaging. Ln3+-doped gadolinium-based inorganic nanostructures, such as Gd2O3:Er3+,Yb3+, have a high potential as opto-magnetic markers allowing the combination of time-resolved optical imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of high spatial resolution. Recent progress in our research on over-1000 nm NIR fluorescent nanoprobes for in vivo NIR-NIR bioimaging will be discussed in this review.In recent years, significant progress was achieved in the field of nanomedicine and bioimaging, but the development of new biomarkers for reliable detection of diseases at an early stage, molecular imaging, targeting and therapy remains crucial. The disadvantages of commonly used organic dyes include photobleaching, autofluorescence, phototoxicity and scattering when UV (ultraviolet) or visible light is used for excitation. The limited penetration depth of the excitation light and the visible emission into and from the biological tissue is a further drawback with regard to in vivo bioimaging. Lanthanide containing inorganic nanostructures emitting in the near

  8. Multicolor FISH using a novel spectral bioimaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soenksen, Dirk G.; Garini, Yuval; Bar-Am, Irit

    1996-05-01

    FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) is a cytogenetic technique for locating and quantifying small genetic defects that cannot be detected by traditional karyotyping, the banding analysis of stained chromosomes. The selectivity of FISH holds the promise for the accurate, low cost and fast diagnosis of genetic disorders, birth defects, and various types of cancer that are not detectable by other means. To aid investigators with their FISH measurements, filter-based digital imaging systems are available to enhance and analyze faint FISH images. The accuracy and reliability of traditional FISH measurements is generally compromised when there is (1) sample autofluorescence, (2) image movement, e.g., due to lack of registration between images acquired through different filter sets, or (3) spectral overlap between fluorescent DNA probe emission spectra. SpectraCubeTM is an interferometric imaging method which is not subject to the limitations of filters-based systems. By measuring a definitive spectrum, simultaneously at all points in a sample, SpectraCubeTM has the potential to revolutionize FISH by enabling the detection and separation of a large number of spectrally and spatially overlapping fluorescent DNA probes, and by eliminating sample autofluorescence. Details of the Applied Spectral Imaging SD200 spectral bio-imaging system and the results of a six-color FISH measurement will be discussed.

  9. Electric field measurement in microwave discharge ion thruster with electro-optic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ise, Toshiyuki; Tsukizaki, Ryudo; Togo, Hiroyoshi; Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Kuninaka, Hitoshi

    2012-12-01

    In order to understand the internal phenomena in a microwave discharge ion thruster, it is important to measure the distribution of the microwave electric field inside the discharge chamber, which is directly related to the plasma production. In this study, we proposed a novel method of measuring a microwave electric field with an electro-optic (EO) probe based on the Pockels effect. The probe, including a cooling system, contains no metal and can be accessed in the discharge chamber with less disruption to the microwave distribution. This method enables measurement of the electric field profile under ion beam acceleration. We first verified the measurement with the EO probe by a comparison with a finite-difference time domain numerical simulation of the microwave electric field in atmosphere. Second, we showed that the deviations of the reflected microwave power and the beam current were less than 8% due to inserting the EO probe into the ion thruster under ion beam acceleration. Finally, we successfully demonstrated the measurement of the electric-field profile in the ion thruster under ion beam acceleration. These measurements show that the electric field distribution in the thruster dramatically changes in the ion thruster under ion beam acceleration as the propellant mass flow rate increases. These results indicate that this new method using an EO probe can provide a useful guide for improving the propulsion of microwave discharge ion thrusters.

  10. An optical backscatter probe for time resolved droplet measurements in turbomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosdas, Ilias; Mansour, Michel; Kalfas, Anestis I.; Abhari, Reza S.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of particles in the flow path of turbomachines can result in undesirable engine operation. In order to improve the efficiency of turbomachines and guarantee their safe operation, the flow mechanisms that govern the particles’ need to be studied and associated with the main aerodynamic flow field. This paper describes a newly developed optical backscatter probe for droplet diameter and speed measurements in turbomachines. The miniature probe has a tip diameter of 5 mm and is capable of resolving droplets from 40 to 110 μm in diameter that travel up to 200 m s-1. The calibration of the novel probe is performed with a droplet generator capable of producing monodispersed water droplets. In addition, the probe is calibrated for droplet speed measurements in the same calibration facility. The paper conducts a detailed uncertainty analysis and describes the post processing code. In the final part of this paper the probe is used in an axial turbine with an installed spray generator to perform droplet measurements under two different operating conditions. Measurements have shown that the part load condition results in larger droplet diameters and higher relative droplet speeds. As a consequence higher erosion rates at the rotor leading edge suction side will occur when operating at part load condition.

  11. Electric field measurement in microwave discharge ion thruster with electro-optic probe.

    PubMed

    Ise, Toshiyuki; Tsukizaki, Ryudo; Togo, Hiroyoshi; Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Kuninaka, Hitoshi

    2012-12-01

    In order to understand the internal phenomena in a microwave discharge ion thruster, it is important to measure the distribution of the microwave electric field inside the discharge chamber, which is directly related to the plasma production. In this study, we proposed a novel method of measuring a microwave electric field with an electro-optic (EO) probe based on the Pockels effect. The probe, including a cooling system, contains no metal and can be accessed in the discharge chamber with less disruption to the microwave distribution. This method enables measurement of the electric field profile under ion beam acceleration. We first verified the measurement with the EO probe by a comparison with a finite-difference time domain numerical simulation of the microwave electric field in atmosphere. Second, we showed that the deviations of the reflected microwave power and the beam current were less than 8% due to inserting the EO probe into the ion thruster under ion beam acceleration. Finally, we successfully demonstrated the measurement of the electric-field profile in the ion thruster under ion beam acceleration. These measurements show that the electric field distribution in the thruster dramatically changes in the ion thruster under ion beam acceleration as the propellant mass flow rate increases. These results indicate that this new method using an EO probe can provide a useful guide for improving the propulsion of microwave discharge ion thrusters.

  12. Electric field measurement in microwave discharge ion thruster with electro-optic probe

    SciTech Connect

    Ise, Toshiyuki; Tsukizaki, Ryudo; Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Togo, Hiroyoshi; Kuninaka, Hitoshi

    2012-12-15

    In order to understand the internal phenomena in a microwave discharge ion thruster, it is important to measure the distribution of the microwave electric field inside the discharge chamber, which is directly related to the plasma production. In this study, we proposed a novel method of measuring a microwave electric field with an electro-optic (EO) probe based on the Pockels effect. The probe, including a cooling system, contains no metal and can be accessed in the discharge chamber with less disruption to the microwave distribution. This method enables measurement of the electric field profile under ion beam acceleration. We first verified the measurement with the EO probe by a comparison with a finite-difference time domain numerical simulation of the microwave electric field in atmosphere. Second, we showed that the deviations of the reflected microwave power and the beam current were less than 8% due to inserting the EO probe into the ion thruster under ion beam acceleration. Finally, we successfully demonstrated the measurement of the electric-field profile in the ion thruster under ion beam acceleration. These measurements show that the electric field distribution in the thruster dramatically changes in the ion thruster under ion beam acceleration as the propellant mass flow rate increases. These results indicate that this new method using an EO probe can provide a useful guide for improving the propulsion of microwave discharge ion thrusters.

  13. Unique tri-output optical probe for specific and ultrasensitive detection of hydrazine.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lei; Ji, Chunfei; Peng, Zhixing; Zhong, Lin; Zhou, Chaohui; Yan, Luliang; Qu, Song; Zhang, Shuping; Huang, Chusen; Qian, Xuhong; Xu, Yufang

    2014-05-06

    An optical probe based on colorimetric and ratiometric as well as chemiluminometric signal outputs is developed for the specific detection of hydrazine. On the basis of a Gabriel-type reaction, hydrazinolysis of a simple probe CF (4-phtalamide-N-(4'-methylcoumarin) naphthalimide) produces both the fluorescence of 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin with the max emission wavelength changed from 480 to 420 nm (along with a color change from yellow to transparent) and the luminol chemiluminescence activated by H2O2 with a max emission wavelength at 450 nm. The experimental detection limit of hydrazine is 3.2 ppb (0.1 μM). Selectivity experiments proved CF has excellent selectivity to hydrazine over other interfering substances. Probe CF was also successfully applied in the vapor hydrazine detection over other interfering volatile analytes. Furthermore, the probe CF loaded thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plate for vapor hydrazine detection limit is 5.4 mg/m(3) which is well below the half lethal dose of hydrazine gas for mice (LC50(mice), 330 mg/m(3)) and National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health's immediately dangerous to life or health limit (NIOSHIDLH, 66 mg/m(3)). With H2O2, only hydrazinolysis product luminol can be lighted at 450 nm, other species have no signal. Probe CF can also be used for the detection of hydrazine in HeLa cells.

  14. Nanodiamonds and silicon quantum dots: ultrastable and biocompatible luminescent nanoprobes for long-term bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Montalti, M; Cantelli, A; Battistelli, G

    2015-07-21

    Fluorescence bioimaging is a powerful, versatile, method for investigating, both in vivo and in vitro, the complex structures and functions of living organisms in real time and space, also using super-resolution techniques. Being poorly invasive, fluorescence bioimaging is suitable for long-term observation of biological processes. Long-term detection is partially prevented by photobleaching of organic fluorescent probes. Semiconductor quantum dots, in contrast, are ultrastable, fluorescent contrast agents detectable even at the single nanoparticle level. Emission color of quantum dots is size dependent and nanoprobes emitting in the near infrared (NIR) region are ideal for low back-ground in vivo imaging. Biocompatibility of nanoparticles, containing toxic elements, is debated. Recent safety concerns enforced the search for alternative ultrastable luminescent nanoprobes. Most recent results demonstrated that optimized silicon quantum dots (Si QDs) and fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) show almost no photobleaching in a physiological environment. Moreover in vitro and in vivo toxicity studies demonstrated their unique biocompatibility. Si QDs and FNDs are hence ideal diagnostic tools and promising non-toxic vectors for the delivery of therapeutic cargos. Most relevant examples of applications of Si QDs and FNDs to long-term bioimaging are discussed in this review comparing the toxicity and the stability of different nanoprobes.

  15. Ultra-thin and flexible endoscopy probe for optical coherence tomography based on stepwise transitional core fiber

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jangbeom; Chae, Yugyeong; Ahn, Yeh-Chan; Moon, Sucbei

    2015-01-01

    We present an ultra-thin fiber-body endoscopy probe for optical coherence tomography (OCT) which is based on a stepwise transitional core (STC) fiber. In a minimalistic design, our probe was made of spliced specialty fibers that could be directly used for beam probing optics without using a lens. In our probe, the OCT light delivered through a single-mode fiber was efficiently expanded to a large mode field of 24 μm diameter for a low beam divergence. The size of our probe was 85 μm in the probe’s diameter while operated in a 160-μm thick protective tubing. Through theoretical and experimental analyses, our probe was found to exhibit various attractive features in terms of compactness, flexibility and reliability along with its excellent fabrication simplicity. PMID:26137380

  16. A Fiber-Optic Probe Design for Combustion Chamber Flame Detection Applications-Design Criteria, Performance Specifications, and Fabrication Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borg, Stephen E.; Harper, Samuel E.

    2001-01-01

    This paper documents the design and development of the fiber-optic probes utilized in the flame detection systems used in NASA Langley Research Center's 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel (8-ft HTT). Two independent flame detection systems are utilized to monitor the presence and stability of the main-burner and pilot-level flames during facility operation. Due to the harsh environment within the combustor, the successful development of a rugged and efficient fiber-optic probe was a critical milestone in the development of these flame detection systems. The final optical probe design for the two flame detection systems resulted from research that was conducted in Langley's 7-in High Temperature Pilot Tunnel (7-in HTT). A detailed description of the manufacturing process behind the optical probes used in the 8-ft HTT is provided in Appendix A of this report.

  17. Investigation on dynamic calibration for an optical-fiber solids concentration probe in gas-solid two-phase flows.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guiling; Liang, Cai; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Daoyin; Xu, Pan; Shen, Liu; Zhao, Changsui

    2013-07-17

    This paper presents a review and analysis of the research that has been carried out on dynamic calibration for optical-fiber solids concentration probes. An introduction to the optical-fiber solids concentration probe was given. Different calibration methods of optical-fiber solids concentration probes reported in the literature were reviewed. In addition, a reflection-type optical-fiber solids concentration probe was uniquely calibrated at nearly full range of the solids concentration from 0 to packed bed concentration. The effects of particle properties (particle size, sphericity and color) on the calibration results were comprehensively investigated. The results show that the output voltage has a tendency to increase with the decreasing particle size, and the effect of particle color on calibration result is more predominant than that of sphericity.

  18. Investigation on Dynamic Calibration for an Optical-Fiber Solids Concentration Probe in Gas-Solid Two-Phase Flows

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guiling; Liang, Cai; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Daoyin; Xu, Pan; Shen, Liu; Zhao, Changsui

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a review and analysis of the research that has been carried out on dynamic calibration for optical-fiber solids concentration probes. An introduction to the optical-fiber solids concentration probe was given. Different calibration methods of optical-fiber solids concentration probes reported in the literature were reviewed. In addition, a reflection-type optical-fiber solids concentration probe was uniquely calibrated at nearly full range of the solids concentration from 0 to packed bed concentration. The effects of particle properties (particle size, sphericity and color) on the calibration results were comprehensively investigated. The results show that the output voltage has a tendency to increase with the decreasing particle size, and the effect of particle color on calibration result is more predominant than that of sphericity. PMID:23867745

  19. X-ray pump optical probe cross-correlation study of GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, S. M.; Clevenger, T.; Graber, T.; Henning, R.

    2012-02-01

    Ultrafast dynamics in atomic, molecular and condensed-matter systems are increasingly being studied using optical-pump, X-ray probe techniques where subpicosecond laser pulses excite the system and X-rays detect changes in absorption spectra and local atomic structure. New opportunities are appearing as a result of improved synchrotron capabilities and the advent of X-ray free-electron lasers. These source improvements also allow for the reverse measurement: X-ray pump followed by optical probe. We describe here how an X-ray pump beam transforms a thin GaAs specimen from a strong absorber into a nearly transparent window in less than 100 ps, for laser photon energies just above the bandgap. We find the opposite effect--X-ray induced optical opacity--for photon energies just below the bandgap. This raises interesting questions about the ultrafast many-body response of semiconductors to X-ray absorption, and provides a new approach for an X-ray/optical cross-correlator for synchrotron and X-ray free-electron laser applications.

  20. Lensed fiber-optic probe design for efficient photon collection in scattering media

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Youngjae; Shin, Younghoon; Lee, Dasol; Altarejos, Judith Y.; Chung, Euiheon; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Measurement of bioluminescent or fluorescent optical reporters with an implanted fiber-optic probe is a promising approach to allow real-time monitoring of molecular and cellular processes in conscious behaving animals. Technically, this approach relies on sensitive light detection due to the relatively limited light signal and inherent light attenuation in scattering tissue. In this paper, we show that specific geometries of lensed fiber probes improve photon collection in turbid tissue such as brain. By employing Monte Carlo simulation and experimental measurement, we demonstrate that hemispherical- and axicon-shaped lensed fibers increase collection efficiency by up to 2-fold when compared with conventional bare fiber. Additionally we provide theoretical evidence that axicon lenses with specific angles improve photon collection over a wider axial range while conserving lateral collection when compared to hemispherical lensed fiber. These findings could guide the development of a minimally-invasive highly sensitive fiber optic-based light signal monitoring technique and may have broad implications such as fiber-based detection used in diffuse optical spectroscopy. PMID:25657886

  1. Design and validation of a fiber optic point probe instrument for therapy guidance and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Xie, Haiyan; Xie, Zhiyuan; Mousavi, Monirehalsadat; Bendsoe, Niels; Brydegaard, Mikkel; Axelsson, Johan; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2014-07-01

    Optical techniques for tissue diagnostics currently are experiencing tremendous growth in biomedical applications, mainly due to their noninvasive, inexpensive, and real-time functionality. Here, we demonstrate a hand-held fiber optic probe instrument based on fluorescence/reflectance spectroscopy for precise tumor delineation. It is mainly aimed for brain tumor resection guidance with clinical adaptation to minimize the disruption of the standard surgical workflow and is meant as a complement to the state-of-the-art fluorescence surgical microscopy technique. Multiple light sources with fast pulse modulation and detection enable precise quantification of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), tissue optical properties, and ambient light suppression. Laboratory measurements show the system is insensitive to strong ambient light. Validation measurements of tissue phantoms using nonlinear least squares support vector machines (LS-SVM) regression analysis demonstrate an error of <5% for PpIX concentration ranging from 400 to 1000 nM, even in the presence of large variations in phantom optical properties. The mean error is 3% for reduced scattering coefficient and 5% for blood concentration. Diagnostic precision of 100% was obtained by LS-SVM classification for in vivo skin tumors with topically applied 5-aminolevulinic acid during photodynamic therapy. The probe could easily be generalized to other tissue types and fluorophores for therapy guidance and monitoring.

  2. Design and validation of a fiber optic point probe instrument for therapy guidance and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Haiyan; Xie, Zhiyuan; Mousavi, Monirehalsadat; Bendsoe, Niels; Brydegaard, Mikkel; Axelsson, Johan; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2014-07-01

    Optical techniques for tissue diagnostics currently are experiencing tremendous growth in biomedical applications, mainly due to their noninvasive, inexpensive, and real-time functionality. Here, we demonstrate a hand-held fiber optic probe instrument based on fluorescence/reflectance spectroscopy for precise tumor delineation. It is mainly aimed for brain tumor resection guidance with clinical adaptation to minimize the disruption of the standard surgical workflow and is meant as a complement to the state-of-the-art fluorescence surgical microscopy technique. Multiple light sources with fast pulse modulation and detection enable precise quantification of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), tissue optical properties, and ambient light suppression. Laboratory measurements show the system is insensitive to strong ambient light. Validation measurements of tissue phantoms using nonlinear least squares support vector machines (LS-SVM) regression analysis demonstrate an error of <5% for PpIX concentration ranging from 400 to 1000 nM, even in the presence of large variations in phantom optical properties. The mean error is 3% for reduced scattering coefficient and 5% for blood concentration. Diagnostic precision of 100% was obtained by LS-SVM classification for in vivo skin tumors with topically applied 5-aminolevulinic acid during photodynamic therapy. The probe could easily be generalized to other tissue types and fluorophores for therapy guidance and monitoring.

  3. Novel failure analysis techniques using photon probing with a scanning optical microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.I. Jr.; Soden, J.M.; Rife, J.L.; Barton, D.L.; Henderson, C.L.

    1993-12-31

    Three new failure analysis techniques for integrated circuits (ICs) have been developed using localized photon probing with a scanning optical microscope (SOM). The first two are light-induced voltage alteration (LIVA) imaging techniques that (1) localize open-circuited and damaged junctions and (2) image transistor logic states. The third technique uses the SOM to control logic states optically from the IC backside. LIVA images are produced by monitoring the voltage fluctuations of a constant current power supply as a laser beam is scanned over the IC. High selectivity for localizing defects has been demonstrated using the LIVA approach. Logic state mapping results, similar to previous work using biased optical beam induced current (OBIC) and laser probing approaches have also been produced using LIVA. Application of the two LIVA based techniques to backside failure analysis has been demonstrated using an infrared laser source. Optical logic state control is based upon earlier work examining transistor response to photon injection. The physics of each method and their applications for failure analysis are described.

  4. X-ray pump optical probe cross-correlation study of GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Durbin, S.M.; Clevenger, T.; Graber, T.; Henning, R.

    2012-09-10

    Ultrafast dynamics in atomic, molecular and condensed-matter systems are increasingly being studied using optical-pump, X-ray probe techniques where subpicosecond laser pulses excite the system and X-rays detect changes in absorption spectra and local atomic structure. New opportunities are appearing as a result of improved synchrotron capabilities and the advent of X-ray free-electron lasers. These source improvements also allow for the reverse measurement: X-ray pump followed by optical probe. We describe here how an X-ray pump beam transforms a thin GaAs specimen from a strong absorber into a nearly transparent window in less than 100 ps, for laser photon energies just above the bandgap. We find the opposite effect - X-ray induced optical opacity - for photon energies just below the bandgap. This raises interesting questions about the ultrafast many-body response of semiconductors to X-ray absorption, and provides a new approach for an X-ray/optical cross-correlator for synchrotron and X-ray free-electron laser applications.

  5. Investigation of the properties of the autonomous optical navigation of a space probe during rendezvous with an asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashkin, V. V.

    1990-11-01

    The determination of the planetocentric coordinates of a spacecraft flying by an asteroid and of a probe separated from the spaceraft for rendezvous with the asteroid is considered. It is shown that sighting of the planet on the star background makes possible the accurate evaluation of the spacecraft and probe positions with respect to the asteroid. The results obtained suggest that autonomous optical navigation can be used to guide a probe for landing on a planet.

  6. Waveguide analysis of heat-drawn and chemically etched probe tips for scanning near-field optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Moar, Peter N; Love, John D; Ladouceur, François; Cahill, Laurence W

    2006-09-01

    We analyze two basic aspects of a scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) probe's operation: (i) spot-size evolution of the electric field along the probe with and without a metal layer, and (ii) a modal analysis of the SNOM probe, particularly in close proximity to the aperture. A slab waveguide model is utilized to minimize the analytical complexity, yet provides useful quantitative results--including losses associated with the metal coating--which can then be used as design rules.

  7. All-optical endoscopic probe for high resolution 3D photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Zhang, E.; Desjardins, A. E.; Beard, P. C.

    2017-03-01

    A novel all-optical forward-viewing photoacoustic probe using a flexible coherent fibre-optic bundle and a Fabry- Perot (FP) ultrasound sensor has been developed. The fibre bundle, along with the FP sensor at its distal end, synthesizes a high density 2D array of wideband ultrasound detectors. Photoacoustic waves arriving at the sensor are spatially mapped by optically scanning the proximal end face of the bundle in 2D with a CW wavelength-tunable interrogation laser. 3D images are formed from the detected signals using a time-reversal image reconstruction algorithm. The system has been characterized in terms of its PSF, noise-equivalent pressure and field of view. Finally, the high resolution 3D imaging capability has been demonstrated using arbitrary shaped phantoms and duck embryo.

  8. Probing interactions of thermal Sr Rydberg atoms using simultaneous optical and ion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, Ryan K.; Bounds, Alistair D.; Huillery, Paul; Keegan, Niamh C.; Faoro, Riccardo; Bridge, Elizabeth M.; Weatherill, Kevin J.; Jones, Matthew P. A.

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate a method for probing interaction effects in a thermal beam of strontium atoms using simultaneous measurements of Rydberg EIT and spontaneously created ions or electrons. We present a Doppler-averaged optical Bloch equation model that reproduces the optical signals and allows us to connect the optical coherences and the populations. We use this to determine that the spontaneous ionization process in our system occurs due to collisions between Rydberg and ground state atoms in the EIT regime. We measure the cross section of this process to be 0.6+/- 0.2 {σ }{geo}, where {σ }{geo} is the geometrical cross section of the Rydberg atom. This result adds complementary insight to a range of recent studies of interacting thermal Rydberg ensembles.

  9. Interferometric pump-probe characterization of the nonlocal response of optically transparent ion implanted polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanov, Ivan L.; Hadjichristov, Georgi B.

    2012-03-01

    Optical interferometric technique is applied to characterize the nonlocal response of optically transparent ion implanted polymers. The thermal nonlinearity of the ion-modified material in the near-surface region is induced by continuous wave (cw) laser irradiation at a relatively low intensity. The interferometry approach is demonstrated for a subsurface layer of a thickness of about 100 nm formed in bulk polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) by implantation with silicon ions at an energy of 50 keV and fluence in the range 1014-1017 cm-2. The laser-induced thermooptic effect in this layer is finely probed by interferometric imaging. The interference phase distribution in the plane of the ion implanted layer is indicative for the thermal nonlinearity of the near-surface region of ion implanted optically transparent polymeric materials.

  10. Optic probe for multiple angle image capture and optional stereo imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Robert M.; Kaufman, Morris I.

    2016-11-29

    A probe including a multiple lens array is disclosed to measure velocity distribution of a moving surface along many lines of sight. Laser light, directed to the moving surface is reflected back from the surface and is Doppler shifted, collected into the array, and then directed to detection equipment through optic fibers. The received light is mixed with reference laser light and using photonic Doppler velocimetry, a continuous time record of the surface movement is obtained. An array of single-mode optical fibers provides an optic signal to the multiple lens array. Numerous fibers in a fiber array project numerous rays to establish many measurement points at numerous different locations. One or more lens groups may be replaced with imaging lenses so a stereo image of the moving surface can be recorded. Imaging a portion of the surface during initial travel can determine whether the surface is breaking up.

  11. A novel fiber optic biosensor for nitric oxide determination based on vicinal diaminobenzozcridine fluorescent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Liyun; Huang, Lanfen; Huang, Jun; Zhong, Yunming; Fan, Dian

    2010-04-01

    A novel fiber optic biosensor for the determination of nitric oxide based on vicinal diaminobenzozcridine (VDABA) fluorescent probe was designed and fabricated. The reaction conditions between VDABA and NO, which include concentration of VDABA, temperature and pH, were studied in-depth. The sensitivity of VDABA for NO detection under the optimum conditions and its optical properties were also investigated. The fluorescence responses were concentration-dependent and a good linear relationship (R2=0.9863) was observed over the range 1.8×10-6 to 9×10-6 mol/L NO, the regression equation was F = 3.8889[NO] (mol/L)+217.2. Besides, a complex sensitive film embedding VDABA in cellulose acetate (CA) was prepared, and a fiber optic NO biosensor was fabricated using this film. Then the change of fluorescence phase shift of this biosensor was studied preliminarily by means of the lock-in technology.

  12. An optical biopsy system with miniaturized Raman and spectral imaging probes; in vivo animal and ex vivo clinical application studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Andriana, Bibin B.; Morita, Shin'ichi; Maruyama, Atsushi; Shinzawa, Hideyuki; Komachi, Yuichi; Kanai, Gen'ichi; Ura, Nobuo; Masutani, Koji; Matsuura, Yuji; Toi, Masakazu; Shimosegawa, Toru; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2009-02-01

    An optical biopsy system which equips miniaturized Raman probes, a miniaturized endoscope and a fluorescent image probe has been developed for in vivo studies of live experimental animals. The present report describes basic optical properties of the system and its application studies for in vivo cancer model animals and ex vivo human cancer tissues. It was developed two types of miniaturized Raman probes, micro Raman probe (MRP) made of optical fibers and ball lens hollow optical fiber Raman probe (BHRP) made of single hollow optical fiber (HOF) with a ball lens. The former has rather large working distance (WD), up to one millimeter. The latter has small WD (~300μm) which depends on the focal length of the ball lens. Use of multiple probes with different WD allows one to obtain detailed information of subsurface tissues in the totally noninvasive manner. The probe is enough narrow to be inserted into a biopsy needle (~19G), for observations of the lesion at deeper inside bodies. The miniaturized endoscope has been applied to observe progression of a stomach cancer in the same rat lesion. It was succeeded to visualize structure of non-stained cancer tissue in live model animals by the fluorescent image technique. The system was also applied to ex vivo studies of human breast and stomach cancers.

  13. Evaluation of improvement of diffuse optical imaging of brain function by high-density probe arrangements and imaging algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Yusuke; Kurihara, Kazuki; Okada, Eiji

    2016-04-01

    Diffuse optical imaging has been applied to measure the localized hemodynamic responses to brain activation. One of the serious problems with diffuse optical imaging is the limitation of the spatial resolution caused by the sparse probe arrangement and broadened spatial sensitivity profile for each probe pair. High-density probe arrangements and an image reconstruction algorithm considering the broadening of the spatial sensitivity can improve the spatial resolution of the image. In this study, the diffuse optical imaging of the absorption change in the brain is simulated to evaluate the effect of the high-density probe arrangements and imaging methods. The localization error, equivalent full-width half maximum and circularity of the absorption change in the image obtained by the mapping and reconstruction methods from the data measured by five probe arrangements are compared to quantitatively evaluate the imaging methods and probe arrangements. The simple mapping method is sufficient for the density of the measurement points up to the double-density probe arrangement. The image reconstruction method considering the broadening of the spatial sensitivity of the probe pairs can effectively improve the spatial resolution of the image obtained from the probe arrangements higher than the quadruple density, in which the distance between the neighboring measurement points is 10.6 mm.

  14. Biological properties of coral GFP-type proteins provide clues for engineering novel optical probes and biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salih, Anya; Larkum, Anthony W.; Cronin, Thomas W.; Wiedenmann, Joerg; Szymczak, Ron; Cox, Guy C.

    2004-06-01

    In recent years, a variety of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)-like pigments have been discovered from corals and other marine organisms. They are widely used to expand the range of available GFP-type proteins in imaging applications, such as in vivo markers for gene expression and protein localization studies, FRET-based (Förster resonance energy transfer) multicolor imaging and biosensors. They have known diverse optical and biochemical properties but their in vivo spectral properties and biological function in marine organisms is only beginning to be understood. We have investigated their spectral diversity, optical properties and cellular microstructure in corals of the Great Barrier Reef with the aim of elucidating their photo-biological function/s as well as to identify novel proteins suitable for GFP-based technologies. We found numerous spectral variants, with emissions covering almost the full range of the visible spectrum. Many of these GFP-like proteins, especially in corals from the more extreme habitats, such as sun-exposed shallows or in deep water, showed a range of light-related spectral characteristics: high photostability, spectral tuning for energy transfer and dynamic photo-induced transformation properties. Intra-cellularly they were organized into spectral donor-acceptor pairs or even arrays, tuned for FRET. Coral color proteins thus offer an exciting potential to expand the use of the available GFPs in bio-imaging applications and as a basis for improved protein engineering.

  15. Green synthesis of multifunctional carbon dots from coriander leaves and their potential application as antioxidants, sensors and bioimaging agents.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, Abhay; Gopinath, P

    2015-06-21

    In the present study, a facile one-step hydrothermal treatment of coriander leaves for preparing carbon dots (CDs) has been reported. Optical and structural properties of the CDs have been extensively studied by UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic, microscopic (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy) and X-ray diffraction techniques. Surface functionality and composition of the CDs have been illustrated by elemental analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Quenching of the fluorescence of the CDs in the presence of metal ions is of prime significance, hence CDs have been used as a fluorescence probe for sensitive and selective detection of Fe(3+) ions. Eventually, biocompatibility and bioimaging aspects of CDs have been evaluated on lung normal (L-132) and cancer (A549) cell lines. Qualitative analysis of cellular uptake of CDs has been pursued through fluorescence microscopy, while quantitative analysis using a flow cytometer provided an insight into the concentration and cell-type dependent uptake of CDs. The article further investigates the antioxidant activity of CDs. Therefore, we have validated the practicality of CDs obtained from a herbal carbon source for versatile applications.

  16. Multi-projection fluorescence optical tomography using a hand-held probe-based optical imager: Phantom studies

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Jiajia; Erickson, Sarah J; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2010-01-01

    A hand-held probe based optical optical imager has recently been developed towards three-dimensional tomography. In this study, the improvement of target depth recovery was demonstrated using a multi-projection technique on large slab phantoms using 0.45 cc fluorescing target(s) (with 1:0 contrast ratio) of 1.5 to 2.5 cm deep. Tomographic results using single- and multi (here dual) projection measurements (with and without a priori information of target location) were compared. In all experimental cases, the use of multi-projection measurements along with a priori information recovered target depth and location closer to its true values, demonstrating its applicability for clinical translation. PMID:20697435

  17. A Fiber Optic Probe for Monitoring Protein Aggregation, Nucleation, and Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Suh, Kwang I.; Arabshahi, Alireza; Wilson, William W.; Bray, Terry L.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.

    1996-01-01

    Protein crystals are experimentally grown in hanging drops in microgravity experiments on-board the Space Shuttle orbiter. The technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS) can be used to monitor crystal growth process in hanging droplets (approx. 30 (L)) in microgravity experiments, but elaborate instrumentation and optical alignment problems have made in-situ applications difficult. In this paper we demonstrate that such experiments are now feasible. We apply a newly developed fiber optic probe to various earth and space (micro- gravity) bound protein crystallization system configurations to test its capability. These include conventional batch (cuvette or capillary) systems, hanging drop method in a six-pack hanging drop vapor diffusion apparatus (HDVDA), a modified HDVDA for temperature- induced nucleation and aggregation studies, and a newly envisioned dynamically controlled vapor diffusion system (DCVDS) configuration. Our compact system exploits the principles of DLS and offers a fast (within a few seconds) means of quantitatively and non-invasively monitoring the various growth stages of protein crystallization. In addition to DLS capability, the probe can also be used for performing single-angle static light scattering measurements. It utilizes extremely low levels of laser power (approx. few (W)) without a need of having any optical alignment and vibration isolation. The compact probe is also equipped with a miniaturized microscope for visualization of macroscopic protein crystals. This new optical diagnostic system opens up enormous opportunity for exploring new ways to grow good quality crystals suitable for x-ray crystallographic analysis and may help develop a concrete scientific basis for understanding the process of crystallization.

  18. Probing nano-scale structures of SmC* variant phases by resonant x-ray diffraction and optical probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. C.

    2005-03-01

    Since the identification of antiferroelectric response in one liquid crystal compound having large polarization by Chandani et al., considerable experimental and theoretical effort has been aimed to gain a much better understanding of the molecular orientation order within each phases and associated molecular interactions. Employing polarization-analyzed resonant x-ray diffraction and specially-designed state-of-the-art ellipsometry systems, we have identified the molecular arrangements in three new SmC* variant phases, namely, SmC(alpha1)*, SmC(FI2)*, and SmC(FI1)*. Moreover, guided by our proposed phenomenological model to explain the stability of these phases, we have developed a novel experimental method to identify a new mesophase, namely, SmC(alpha2)* by employing an optical probe (wavelength = 633nm) to obtain an incommensurate nano-scale helical pitch structure with pitch length < 11nm. Collaborators of this project: P. Mach, P. Johnson, D. Olson, A. Cady, X. F. Han, L. S. Hirst, A. M. Levelut, P. Barois, H. T. Nguyen, J. W. Goodby, M. Hird, H. F. Gleeson, L. Furenlid, W. Caliebe, and R. Pindak.

  19. Using DLS Spectroscopy and Optical Probe Diffusion to examine structure of Brij Micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Karen; Lekan, Mike; Streletzky, Kiril

    2008-03-01

    We studied properties of Brij-35 surfactant micelles in solution using Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) Spectroscopy and Optical Probe Diffusion method. Aqueous solutions of Brij-35 with concentrations ranging from 2 to 100g/L were prepared, both with and without polystyrene latex probes of diameters 24, 50, 186, 282 and 792nm. Solutions were studied at four temperatures of 10, 25, 40 and 70^oC with DLS to obtain micelle and probe diffusion coefficients (Dm, Dp). Using both diffusion coefficients we deduced micelle radius (am), micelle water content (δ), and number of surfactant molecules per micelle (N) using two different models. First, hard sphere model of micelles/probe interaction was used to analyze the data by two methods, after am was obtained from intercept of Dm(c). The first method uses the slope of Dm(c) and size of probes to determine N and δ. The second method uses the linear least-squares fit of Dp(c) for different probe sizes to determine N and δ. Both methods reveal that with increase in solution temperature am increases by 10%, N increases and δ decreases by a factor of 2. The second model treats micelles as core-shell particles with corona radius (ac). This model used two different approaches based on linear least-squares fits of Dm(c) and Dp(c). We found am to be 4-4.5nm and ac-am to be 1nm without relying on Stokes-Einstein equation. Results for N and δg were also consistent.

  20. Fiber-Optic Imaging Probe Developed for Space Used to Detect Diabetes Through the Eye

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Chenault, Michelle V.; Datiles, Manuel B., III; Sebag, J.; Suh, Kwang I.

    2000-01-01

    Approximately 16 million Americans have diabetes mellitus, which can severely impair eyesight by causing cataracts, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Cataracts are 1.6 times more common in people with diabetes than in those without diabetes, and cataract extraction is the only surgical treatment. In many cases, diabetes-related ocular pathologies go undiagnosed until visual function is compromised. This ongoing pilot project seeks to study the progression of diabetes in a unique animal model by monitoring changes in the lens with a safe, sensitive, dynamic light-scattering probe. Dynamic light scattering (DLS), has the potential to diagnose cataracts at the molecular level. Recently, a new DLS fiber-optic probe was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field for noncontact, accurate, and extremely sensitive particle-sizing measurements in fluid dispersions and suspensions (ref. 1). This compact, portable, and rugged probe is free of optical alignment, offers point-and-shoot operation for various online field applications and challenging environments, and yet is extremely flexible in regards to sample container sizes, materials, and shapes. No external vibration isolation and no index matching are required. It can measure particles as small as 1 nm and as large as few micrometers in a wide concentration range from very dilute (waterlike) dispersions to very turbid (milklike) suspensions. It is safe and fast to use, since it only requires very low laser power (10 nW to 3 mW) with very short data acquisition times (2 to 10 sec).

  1. Probing vacuum-induced coherence via magneto-optical rotation in molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pardeep; Deb, Bimalendu; Dasgupta, Shubhrangshu

    2016-05-01

    Vacuum-induced coherence (VIC) arises due to the quantum interference between the spontaneous emission pathways from the degenerate excited states to a common ground state. The stringent requirement for the VIC to occur is the nonorthogonality of the transition dipole matrix elements. Unlike atoms, molecules are the promising systems for exploration of VIC, as it is possible to identify the non-orthogonal transitions due to the coupling of the rotation of molecular axis with molecular electronic angular momentum. Usually, the possible signatures of VIC are obtained by manipulating the absorption of the probe field. In this paper, we show how the dispersion of the probe field can be manipulated to obtain a measurable signature of VIC. Precisely speaking, we explore a way to probe VIC in molecules by observing its influence on magneto-optical rotation (MOR). We show that VIC in the presence of a control laser and a magnetic field can lead to large enhancement in the rotation of the plane of polarization of a linearly polarized weak laser with vanishing circular dichroism. This effect can be realized in cold molecular gases. Such a large MOR angle may be used as a tool for optical magnetometry to detect weak magnetic field with large measurement sensitivity.

  2. Contact-pressure reduction of pyramidal optical probe array on corrugated aluminium/silicon nitride membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jinhee; Oh, Seonghyeon; Hahn, Jae W.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we develop an optical contact probe array for scanning near-field lithography. We fabricate the optical probes with a pyramidal tip array on an aluminium/silicon nitride composite membrane. Here, we reduce the contact pressure using the corrugations on the silicon nitride membrane and the flattened surface on top of the tip. After fabricating the 5  ×  5 probes in the array, we evaluate the contact pressure using the force–distance curve obtained by an atomic force microscope. The spring constants of the corrugated membranes are 10  ±  0.6 N m‑1. The contact pressure on a flattened 295 nm in-radius is calculated to be approximately 33 MPa for a 300 nm deflection. This value is 22 times smaller than that of a sharp pyramidal tip of 20 nm in-radius on a flat membrane.

  3. Fiber optic probes for laser light scattering: Ground based evaluation for micgrogravity flight experimentation. Integrated coherent imaging fiber optic systems for laser light scattering and other applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhadwal, Harbans Singh

    1994-01-01

    The research work presented in this report has established a new class of backscatter fiber optics probes for remote dynamic light scattering capability over a range of scattering angles from 94 degrees to 175 degrees. The fiber optic probes provide remote access to scattering systems, and can be utilized in either a noninvasive or invasive configuration. The fiber optics create an interference free data channel to inaccessible and harsh environments. Results from several studies of concentrated suspension, microemulsions, and protein systems are presented. The second part of the report describes the development of a new technology of wavefront processing within the optical fiber, that is, integrated fiber optics. Results have been very encouraging and the technology promises to have significant impact on the development of fiber optic sensors in a variety of fields ranging from environmental monitoring to optical recording, from biomedical sensing to photolithography.

  4. Nanocluster: photothermal bubble as optical probes for cytometric and microscopic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotko, Dmitri O.; Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y.; Hafner, Jason H.

    2007-06-01

    The ability to detect optical signals form a cellular target depends upon the amount of optical energy that can be generated by this target as the signal. Given that the sensitivity of optical detectors has some finite limit, further increase of the sensitivity of optical diagnostic methods requires increasing the energy of target-generated signal. Usually this energy is converted by the cellular target upon its optical excitation and is limited by many factors such as: cell and target damage thresholds, efficiency of excitation energy conversion, size of the target etc. All these put principal limitation on sensing small targets (like molecules) in living cells with any optical method because the energy that can be safely converted by the target into a signal is limited. To overcome this limitation and to improve the sensitivity of optical microscopy of living cells (and cytometry in general) we propose the concept of intracellular amplification of the optical signal. This concept includes two major steps. First, primary (pump) optical radiation interacts with the target (a probe molecule) to generate a transient target. Second, the transient target is sensed with additional optical radiation that does not interact strongly with primary target or the cell, and, hence, may have high enough energy to increase the signal from transient target even above the energy of pump radiation, which is limited by cell and target damage thresholds. We propose to use optical scattering from clusters of gold nanoparticles (the target) that are selectively formed in specific cells through antibody-receptor interaction and through endocytosis. To amplify this optical signal we propose to generate photothermal bubbles (the transient target) around those clusters. In experiments with water suspensions and with individual tumor K562 cells we have achieved optical signal amplification in individual cells (relatively to the scattering signal from intact cells): with gold nanorod

  5. Wearable near-infrared optical probe for continuous monitoring during breast cancer neoadjuvant chemotherapy infusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Fei; Cormier, Timothy; Sauer-Budge, Alexis; Chaudhury, Rachita; Pera, Vivian; Istfan, Raeef; Chargin, David; Brookfield, Samuel; Ko, Naomi Yu; Roblyer, Darren M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a new continuous-wave wearable diffuse optical probe aimed at investigating the hemodynamic response of locally advanced breast cancer patients during neoadjuvant chemotherapy infusions. The system consists of a flexible printed circuit board that supports an array of six dual wavelength surface-mount LED and photodiode pairs. The probe is encased in a soft silicone housing that conforms to natural breast shape. Probe performance was evaluated using tissue-simulating phantoms and in vivo normal volunteer measurements. High SNR (71 dB), low source-detector crosstalk (-60 dB), high measurement precision (0.17%), and good thermal stability (0.22% Vrms/°C) were achieved in phantom studies. A cuff occlusion experiment was performed on the forearm of a healthy volunteer to demonstrate the ability to track rapid hemodynamic changes. Proof-of-principle normal volunteer measurements were taken to demonstrate the ability to collect continuous in vivo breast measurements. This wearable probe is a first of its kind tool to explore prognostic hemodynamic changes during chemotherapy in breast cancer patients.

  6. Fiber optic probe having fibers with endfaces formed for improved coupling efficiency and method using same

    DOEpatents

    O`Rourke, P.E.; Livingston, R.R.

    1995-03-28

    A fiber optic probe is disclosed for detecting scattered light, with transmitting and receiving fibers having slanted ends and bundled together to form a bevel within the tip of the probe. The probe comprises a housing with a transparent window across its tip for protecting the transmitting and receiving fibers held therein. The endfaces of the fibers are slanted, by cutting, polishing and the like, so that they lie in a plane that is not perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the respective fiber. The fibers are held in the tip of the probe using an epoxy and oriented so that lines normal to the slanted endfaces are divergent with respect to one another. The epoxy, which is positioned substantially between the transmitting and receiving fibers, is tapered so that the transmitting fiber, the epoxy and the receiving fiber form a bevel of not more than 20 degrees. The angled fiber endfaces cause directing of the light cones toward each other, resulting in improved light coupling efficiency. A light absorber, such as carbon black, is contained in the epoxy to reduce crosstalk between the transmitting and receiving fibers. 3 figures.

  7. Fiber optic probe having fibers with endfaces formed for improved coupling efficiency and method using same

    DOEpatents

    O'Rourke, Patrick E.; Livingston, Ronald R.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic probe for detecting scattered light, with transmitting and receiving fibers having slanted ends and bundled together to form a bevel within the tip of the probe. The probe comprises a housing with a transparent window across its tip for protecting the transmitting and receiving fibers held therein. The endfaces of the fibers are slanted, by cutting, polishing and the like, so that they lie in a plane that is not perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the respective fiber. The fibers are held in the tip of the probe using an epoxy and oriented so that lines normal to the slanted endfaces are divergent with respect to one another. The epoxy, which is positioned substantially between the transmitting and receiving fibers, is tapered so that the transmitting fiber, the epoxy and the receiving fiber form a bevel of not more than 20 degrees. The angled fiber endfaces cause directing of the light cones toward each other, resulting in improved light coupling efficiency. A light absorber, such as carbon black, is contained in the epoxy to reduce crosstalk between the transmitting and receiving fibers.

  8. Thermometry and dosimetry of heat with specific reference to the liquid-crystal optical fiber temperature probe.

    PubMed

    Livingston, G K

    1980-01-01

    A temperature sensing probe was designed utilizing the unique optical properties of thermotropic liquid crystals. An electronic and fiberoptic system coupled to the sensor was used to monitor temperature-dependent interactions of light (660 nm) with the liquid crystal mixture. The probe is a nonmetallic, nonperturbing thermal sensor for continuous temperature measurements of biological specimens subjected to electromagnetic fields. The advantages and disadvantages of the Liquid Crystal Optical Fiber (LCOF) temperature probe are discussed along with some typical applications where accurate dosimetry and thermometry are important parameters in experimental studies.

  9. A new method of optical biopsy: demonstration of mechanical contrast in deep tissue using an optical coherence elastography needle probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Kelsey M.; Kennedy, Brendan F.; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Sampson, David D.

    2012-02-01

    We incorporate for the first time optical coherence elastography (OCE) into a needle probe and demonstrate its ability to provide depth-resolved information about the mechanical properties of soft tissues. This allows analysis of tissues located much deeper than has previously been possible with other forms of OCE. OCE exploits the microscopic resolution of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to produce high-resolution maps of tissue mechanical properties. While OCE has potential to delineate diseased and healthy tissues (e.g., stiff tumor in soft tissue), standard techniques are limited by the penetration depth of OCT in tissue (2-3 mm). Our OCE needle probe overcomes this limitation, as it may be inserted deep within the body to perform measurements. We tested needle-based OCE in tissue-mimicking phantoms and ex vivo porcine airway tissue comprising layers of varying stiffness. Results demonstrate mechanical differentiation of tissues and identification of tissue interfaces. The proof-of-principle results presented here pave the way for future measurements in human breast tissue that will aim to establish needle-based OCE as a viable technique for intraoperative guidance of breast cancer surgery.

  10. In Vivo Bioimaging Rats for Translational Research in Cell and Tissue Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Teratani, Takumi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    The rat is an excellent cell transplantation model. In accordance with the innovative development of in vivo bioimaging technology, over the last decade we have been developing an engineered rat system based on transgenic technology and have been demonstrating the usefulness of the system with genetically encoded imaging probes such as fluorescent and luminescent proteins. In cooperation with the Japan Society for Organ Preservation and Medical Biology (President: Professor T. Asano), we have also been using luciferase-Tg rats for research into organ preservation and cell transplantation. In this minireview, we introduce the results obtained recently by using these powerful experimental tools during international collaboration in cell transplantation research.

  11. The Intersection of CMOS Microsystems and Upconversion Nanoparticles for Luminescence Bioimaging and Bioassays

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Liping.; Doughan, Samer.; Han, Yi.; DaCosta, Matthew V.; Krull, Ulrich J.; Ho, Derek.

    2014-01-01

    Organic fluorophores and quantum dots are ubiquitous as contrast agents for bio-imaging and as labels in bioassays to enable the detection of biological targets and processes. Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) offer a different set of opportunities as labels in bioassays and for bioimaging. UCNPs are excited at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths where biological molecules are optically transparent, and their luminesce in the visible and ultraviolet (UV) wavelength range is suitable for detection using complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. These nanoparticles provide multiple sharp emission bands, long lifetimes, tunable emission, high photostability, and low cytotoxicity, which render them particularly useful for bio-imaging applications and multiplexed bioassays. This paper surveys several key concepts surrounding upconversion nanoparticles and the systems that detect and process the corresponding luminescence signals. The principle of photon upconversion, tuning of emission wavelengths, UCNP bioassays, and UCNP time-resolved techniques are described. Electronic readout systems for signal detection and processing suitable for UCNP luminescence using CMOS technology are discussed. This includes recent progress in miniaturized detectors, integrated spectral sensing, and high-precision time-domain circuits. Emphasis is placed on the physical attributes of UCNPs that map strongly to the technical features that CMOS devices excel in delivering, exploring the interoperability between the two technologies. PMID:25211198

  12. The intersection of CMOS microsystems and upconversion nanoparticles for luminescence bioimaging and bioassays.

    PubMed

    Wei, Liping; Doughan, Samer; Han, Yi; DaCosta, Matthew V; Krull, Ulrich J; Ho, Derek

    2014-09-10

    Organic fluorophores and quantum dots are ubiquitous as contrast agents for bio-imaging and as labels in bioassays to enable the detection of biological targets and processes. Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) offer a different set of opportunities as labels in bioassays and for bioimaging. UCNPs are excited at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths where biological molecules are optically transparent, and their luminesce in the visible and ultraviolet (UV) wavelength range is suitable for detection using complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. These nanoparticles provide multiple sharp emission bands, long lifetimes, tunable emission, high photostability, and low cytotoxicity, which render them particularly useful for bio-imaging applications and multiplexed bioassays. This paper surveys several key concepts surrounding upconversion nanoparticles and the systems that detect and process the corresponding luminescence signals. The principle of photon upconversion, tuning of emission wavelengths, UCNP bioassays, and UCNP time-resolved techniques are described. Electronic readout systems for signal detection and processing suitable for UCNP luminescence using CMOS technology are discussed. This includes recent progress in miniaturized detectors, integrated spectral sensing, and high-precision time-domain circuits. Emphasis is placed on the physical attributes of UCNPs that map strongly to the technical features that CMOS devices excel in delivering, exploring the interoperability between the two technologies.

  13. Ultrathin forward-imaging short multimode fiber probe for full-field optical coherence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Manabu; Saito, Daisuke; Shouji, Kou; Kurotani, Reiko; Abe, Hiroyuki; Nishidate, Izumi

    2016-12-01

    To extend the applications of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to the fields of physiology and clinical medicine, less invasive, robust, and reliable optical probes are required. Thus, we demonstrate an ultrathin forward-imaging short multimode fiber (SMMF) optical coherence microscopy (OCM) probe with a 50 μm core diameter, 125 μm total diameter, and 5.12 mm length. Imaging conditions and magnification were analyzed, and they correspond closely to the measured results. The dispersion of the SMMF was investigated, and the modal dispersion coefficient was found to be 2.3% of the material dispersion coefficient. The axial resolution was minimized at 2.15 μm using a 0.885-mm-thick dispersion compensator. The lateral resolution was evaluated to be 4.38 μm using a test pattern. The contrast of the OCM images was 5.7 times higher than that of the signal images owing to the coherence gate. The depth of focus and diameter of the field of view were measured to be 60 μm and 40-50 μm, respectively. OCM images of the dried fins of small fish (Medaka) were measured and internal structures could be recognized.

  14. Minibody-Indocyanine Green Based Activatable Optical Imaging Probes: The Role of Short Polyethylene Glycol Linkers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Minibodies show rapider blood clearance than IgGs due to smaller size that improves target-to-background ratio (TBR) in in vivo imaging. Additionally, the ability to activate an optical probe after binding to the target greatly improves the TBR. An optical imaging probe based on a minibody against prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA-MB) and conjugated with an activatable fluorophore, indocyanine green (ICG), was designed to fluoresce only after binding to cell-surface PSMA. To further reduce background signal, short polyethylene glycol (PEG) linkers were employed to improve the covalent bonding ratio of ICG. New PSMA-MBs conjugated with bifunctional ICG derivatives specifically visualized PSMA-positive tumor xenografts in mice bearing both PSMA-positive and -negative tumors within 6 h postinjection. The addition of short PEG linkers significantly improved TBRs; however, it did not significantly alter the biodistribution. Thus, minibody-ICG conjugates could be a good alternative to IgG-ICG in the optical cancer imaging for further clinical applications. PMID:24900850

  15. Photoacoustic guidance of diffusive optical tomography with a hybrid reflection geometry probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamelin, John; Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Aguirre, Andres; Takavoli, Behnoosh; Zhu, Quing

    2009-02-01

    We report experimental investigations of photoacoustic guidance of diffusive optical tomography for detection and characterization of optical contrast targets. The hybrid system combined an 8-source, 10-detector frequency domain DOT with a clinical reflection geometry probe. For the photoacoustic tomography (PAT) functionality, a high-energy 1×7 optical fiber delivery system illuminated a 2 cm central region for localization of absorptive targets. Two-dimensional PAT images along one central axis of the probe defined of regions of interest for a dual-zone mesh DOT imaging algorithm. PVC Plastisol phantom absorbers, 1 cm on a side, with absorption coefficients ranging from 0.075 to 0.23 cm-1 were imaged at depths up to 2.5 cm. Pairs of absorbers simulating a multi-lobed heterogeneous tumor were also investigated. Without PAT guidance, the absorber location was not clear and lower contrast targets in the twoabsorber configurations were not distinguishable. With PAT guidance, the two targets were well resolved and the reconstructed absorption coefficients improved to within 15% of the true values.

  16. Tapered optical fiber tip probes based on focused ion beam-milled Fabry-Perot microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Ricardo M.; Warren-Smith, Stephen C.; Becker, Martin; Dellith, Jan; Rothhardt, Manfred; Zibaii, M. I.; Latifi, H.; Marques, Manuel B.; Bartelt, Hartmut; Frazão, Orlando

    2016-09-01

    Focused ion beam technology is combined with dynamic chemical etching to create microcavities in tapered optical fiber tips, resulting in fiber probes for temperature and refractive index sensing. Dynamic chemical etching uses hydrofluoric acid and a syringe pump to etch standard optical fibers into cone structures called tapered fiber tips where the length, shape, and cone angle can be precisely controlled. On these tips, focused ion beam is used to mill several different types of Fabry-Perot microcavities. Two main cavity types are initially compared and then combined to form a third, complex cavity structure. In the first case, a gap is milled on the tapered fiber tip which allows the external medium to penetrate the light guiding region and thus presents sensitivity to external refractive index changes. In the second, two slots that function as mirrors are milled on the tip creating a silica cavity that is only sensitive to temperature changes. Finally, both cavities are combined on a single tapered fiber tip, resulting in a multi-cavity structure capable of discriminating between temperature and refractive index variations. This dual characterization is performed with the aid of a fast Fourier transform method to separate the contributions of each cavity and thus of temperature and refractive index. Ultimately, a tapered optical fiber tip probe with sub-standard dimensions containing a multi-cavity structure is projected, fabricated, characterized and applied as a sensing element for simultaneous temperature and refractive index discrimination.

  17. Dicke superradiance as nondestructive probe for the state of atoms in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinke, Nicolai ten; Schützhold, Ralf

    2016-05-01

    We present a proposal for a probing scheme utilizing Dicke superradiance to obtain information about ultracold atoms in optical lattices. A probe photon is absorbed collectively by an ensemble of lattice atoms generating a Dicke state. The lattice dynamics (e.g., tunneling) affects the coherence properties of that Dicke state and thus alters the superradiant emission characteristics - which in turn provides insight into the lattice (dynamics). Comparing the Bose-Hubbard and the Fermi-Hubbard model, we find similar superradiance in the strongly interacting Mott insulator regime, but crucial differences in the weakly interacting (superfluid or metallic) phase. Furthermore, we study the possibility to detect whether a quantum phase transition between the two regimes can be considered adiabatic or a quantum quench.

  18. Observation of stimulated Brillouin scattering in polymer optical fiber with pump-probe technique.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Kishi, Masato; Hotate, Kazuo; Ishigure, Takaaki; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2011-06-15

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in a perfluorinated graded-index polymer optical fiber (POF) with 120 μm core diameter was experimentally observed for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, at 1.55 μm wavelength with the pump-probe technique. Compared to spontaneous Brillouin scattering previously reported, the Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS) was detected with an extremely high signal-to-noise ratio, even with a short POF (1 m) and scrambled polarization state. We also investigated the BGS dependences on probe power and temperature, which indicate that SBS in a POF measured with this technique can be utilized to develop high-accuracy temperature sensing systems.

  19. Probing the flat band of optically trapped spin-orbital-coupled Bose gases using Bragg spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wu; Chen, Lei; Chen, Zhu; Hu, Ying; Zhang, Zhidong; Liang, Zhaoxin

    2015-02-01

    Motivated by recent efforts in creating flat bands in ultracold atomic systems, we investigate how to probe a flat band in an optically trapped spin-orbital-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate using Bragg spectroscopy. We find that the excitation spectrum and the dynamic structure factor of the condensate are dramatically altered when the band structure exhibits various levels of flatness. In particular, when the band exhibits perfect flatness around the band minima corresponding to a near-infinite effective mass, a quadratic dispersion emerges in the low-energy excitation spectrum; in sharp contrast, for the opposite case when an ordinary band is present, the familiar linear dispersion arises. Such linear-to-quadratic crossover in the low-energy spectrum presents a striking manifestation of the transition of an ordinary band into a flat band, thereby allowing a direct probe of the flat band by using Bragg spectroscopy.

  20. Fiber-optic probes for in vivo Raman spectroscopy in the high-wavenumber region.

    PubMed

    Santos, Luís F; Wolthuis, Rolf; Koljenović, S; Almeida, Rui M; Puppels, Gerwin J

    2005-10-15

    In vivo Raman spectroscopy, using fiber-optic probes is hindered by the intense background signal, which is generated in the fused-silica fibers, in the fingerprint region of the Raman spectrum (approximately 0-2000 cm(-1)). Optical filtering is necessary to obtain tissue spectra of sufficient quality. The complexity of fiber-optic probes for fingerprint Raman spectroscopy, in combination with size constraints and flexibility requirements for in vivo use have been a major obstacle in the development of in vivo diagnostic tools based on Raman spectroscopy. A setup for remote Raman spectroscopic tissue characterization in the high-wavenumber region ( approximately 2400-3800 cm(-1)) is presented. It makes use of a single, unfiltered, optical fiber for guiding laser light to the sample and for collecting scattered light and guiding it back to a spectrometer. Such a simple configuration is possible because the fused-silica core and cladding of the fiber present almost no Raman background signal at these wavenumbers. Several commercially available optical fibers were tested with respect to Raman signal background, to determine their suitability for in vivo Raman spectroscopy measurements in the high-wavenumber region. Different fiber core, cladding, and coating materials were tested. Silica core-silica clad fibers, with an acrylate coating and a black nylon jacket, proved to be one of the best candidates. In vitro measurements on brain tissue of a 6-month-old pig were obtained with a remote high-wavenumber Raman setup. They illustrate the low background signal generated in the setup and the signal quality obtained with a collection time of 1 s.