Science.gov

Sample records for optical calibration progress

  1. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, Roland L.; Cannon, Theodore W.

    1988-01-01

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

  2. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

  3. Optical calibration of SNO +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leming, Edward; SNO+ Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Situated 2 km underground in Sudbury, Northern Ontario, the SNO + detector consists of an acrylic sphere 12 m in diameter containing 780 tons of target mass, surrounded by approximately 9,500 PMTs. For SNO, this target mass was heavy water, however the change to SNO + is defined by the change of this target mass to a novel scintillator. With the lower energy threshold, low intrinsic radioactivity levels and the best shielding against muons and cosmogenic activation of all existing neutrino experiments, SNO + will be sensitive to exciting new physics. The experiment will be studying solar, reactor, super nova and geo-neutrinos, though the main purpose of SNO + is the search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of Te-130. To meet the requirements imposed by the physics on detector performance, a detailed optical calibration is needed. Source deployment must be kept to a minimum and eliminated if possible, in order to meet the stringent radiopurity requirements. This led to the development of the Embedded LED/laser Light Injection Entity (ELLIE) system. This talk provides a summary of the upgrades to from SNO to SNO +, discussing the requirements on and methods of optical calibration, focusing on the deployed laserball and ELLIE system.

  4. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Stephen K.; Pratt, II, Harold R.

    1991-01-01

    An optical calibration apparatus is provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting an accurate reproducing of spinning "magic angles" in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the "magic angle" of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted. Thereafter, the spinning "magic angle" of a test material having similar nuclear properties to the standard is attained by returning the sample holder back to the originally noted coordinate position.

  5. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, S.K.; Pratt, H.R.

    1991-02-26

    This patent describes an optical calibration apparatus provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting an accurate reproducing of spinning magic angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the magic angle of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted.

  6. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, S.K.; Pratt, H.R. II.

    1989-09-12

    An optical calibration apparatus is provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting and accurate reproducing of spinning magic angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the magic angle of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted. Thereafter, the spinning magic angle of a test material having similar nuclear properties to the standard is attained by returning the sample holder back to the originally noted coordinate position. 2 figs.

  7. Calibration of optical cantilever deflection readers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhiyu; Seeley, Tim; Kossek, Sebastian; Thundat, Thomas

    2004-02-01

    Because of its ultrahigh sensitivity, the optical lever detection method similar to that used in the atomic force microscope (AFM) has been widely employed as a standard technique for measuring microcantilever deflection. Along with the increasing interest in using the microcantilever as a sensing platform, there is also a requirement for a reliable calibration technique. Many researchers have used the concept of optical lever detection to construct microcantilever deflection readout instruments for chemical, physical, and biological detection. However, without an AFM piezo z scanner, it is very difficult to precisely calibrate these instruments. Here, we present a step-by-step method to conveniently calibrate an instrument using commercially available piezoresistive cantilevers. The experimental results closely match the theoretical calculation. Following this procedure, one can easily calibrate any optical cantilever deflection detection system with high reproducibility, precision, and reliability. A detailed discussion of the optical lever readout system design has been addressed in this article.

  8. Portable Optical Sensor Tester (POST) Calibration Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Michael A.; Randolph, Clyde A.

    1983-09-01

    The Portable Optical Sensor Tester (POST) is a low background, long wavelength infrared test and calibration chamber used for evaluation and calibration of developmental LWIR sensors. It is operated by Rockwell International for the Ballistic Missile Defense Advanced Technology Center (BMDATC). The POST system generates a collimated output IR beam from a working blackbody source for test and calibration of LWIR sensors. Internal scan mirrors are used to scan the output beam to simulate flight sensor scanning. The optical path has eleven reflective surfaces making a spectral calibration of the output beam necessary. This calibration is accomplished by utilizing an NBS calibrated blackbody with a calibration accuracy of 4.2% (la quadrature accuracy = 2.0%) as a reference standard. In situ calibration of the output beam is accomplished by sampling part of the output beam and comparing it spectrally, point by point, with the output from the reference blackbody. A grating cube spectroradiometer resident in POST is used to make the spectral comparison. By careful analysis of the diffraction effects at the reference blackbody source and the utilization of a single reflective optical element to direct the reference source energy to the spectroradiometer, the calibration uncertainties are minimized.

  9. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  10. Simplified stereo-optical ultrasound plane calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoßbach, Martin; Noll, Matthias; Wesarg, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Image guided therapy is a natural concept and commonly used in medicine. In anesthesia, a common task is the injection of an anesthetic close to a nerve under freehand ultrasound guidance. Several guidance systems exist using electromagnetic tracking of the ultrasound probe as well as the needle, providing the physician with a precise projection of the needle into the ultrasound image. This, however, requires additional expensive devices. We suggest using optical tracking with miniature cameras attached to a 2D ultrasound probe to achieve a higher acceptance among physicians. The purpose of this paper is to present an intuitive method to calibrate freehand ultrasound needle guidance systems employing a rigid stereo camera system. State of the art methods are based on a complex series of error prone coordinate system transformations which makes them susceptible to error accumulation. By reducing the amount of calibration steps to a single calibration procedure we provide a calibration method that is equivalent, yet not prone to error accumulation. It requires a linear calibration object and is validated on three datasets utilizing di erent calibration objects: a 6mm metal bar and a 1:25mm biopsy needle were used for experiments. Compared to existing calibration methods for freehand ultrasound needle guidance systems, we are able to achieve higher accuracy results while additionally reducing the overall calibration complexity. Ke

  11. Automated Attitude Sensor Calibration: Progress and Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedlak, Joseph; Hashmall, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes ongoing work a NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center to improve the quality of spacecraft attitude sensor calibration and reduce costs by automating parts of the calibration process. The new calibration software can autonomously preview data quality over a given time span, select a subset of the data for processing, perform the requested calibration, and output a report. This level of automation is currently being implemented for two specific applications: inertial reference unit (IRU) calibration and sensor alignment calibration. The IRU calibration utility makes use of a sequential version of the Davenport algorithm. This utility has been successfully tested with simulated and actual flight data. The alignment calibration is still in the early testing stage. Both utilities will be incorporated into the institutional attitude ground support system.

  12. Calibration of optical particle-size analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Pechin, William H.; Thacker, Louis H.; Turner, Lloyd J.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to a system for the calibration of an optical particle-size analyzer of the light-intercepting type for spherical particles, wherein a rotary wheel or disc is provided with radially-extending wires of differing diameters, each wire corresponding to a particular equivalent spherical particle diameter. These wires are passed at an appropriate frequency between the light source and the light detector of the analyzer. The reduction of light as received at the detector is a measure of the size of the wire, and the electronic signal may then be adjusted to provide the desired signal for corresponding spherical particles. This calibrator may be operated at any time without interrupting other processing.

  13. Spectrometer Optics Calibration for Jefferson Lab g2^p Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Chao

    2013-04-01

    The proton spin-dependent structure function g2^p in the resonance region has been measured in a recent experiment at Jefferson Lab's Hall A. The goal of this experiment is to determine the g2^p structure function in the Q^2 region of 0.02-0.20 GeV^2 by using a transversely polarized NH3 target. The Hall A High Resolution Spectrometers (HRS) were used to provide an inclusive measurement of scattered electrons at 5.69^o. A pair of septum magnets were used to bend the 5.69^o scatted electrons into the 12.5^o spectrometers. A full optics calibration of the spectrometer is required to extract the kinematic quantities at the interaction vertex. However, the calibration procedure is challenging due to the complications from the strong transverse target field (2.5 T and 5.0 T) and the varied field configurations of the septum magnets. The details of the optics calibration and the progress will be described in this talk.

  14. [Spectral calibration for space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai-Jin; Liu, Wen-Qing; Si, Fu-Qi; Zhao, Min-Jie; Jiang, Yu; Xue, Hui

    2012-11-01

    Space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer is used for remote sensing of atmospheric trace gas global distribution. This instrument acquires high accuracy UV/Vis radiation scattered or reflected by air or earth surface, and can monitor distribution and variation of trace gases based on differential optical absorption spectrum algorithm. Spectral calibration is the premise and base of quantification of remote sensing data of the instrument, and the precision of calibration directly decides the level of development and application of the instrument. Considering the characteristic of large field, wide wavelength range, high spatial and spectral resolution of the space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer, a spectral calibration method is presented, a calibration device was built, the equation of spectral calibration was calculated through peak searching and regression analysis, and finally the full field spectral calibration of the instrument was realized. The precision of spectral calibration was verified with Fraunhofer lines of solar light.

  15. Novel system for optical axis on-line calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Wen; Yan, Huimin; Lu, Wei

    2007-12-01

    Calibration of optical axis is an essential process to ensure the quality of optical systems. Only when the light path center, CCD (Charge Coupled Device) center and rotary center of motor fit each other well, can the system run properly to fulfill the proposed function. However, in most cases, the process is conducted by experienced workers and it is hard to precisely evaluate the coherence of optical axis. So the development of an optical calibrator that can detect the optical axis and calibrate the center automatically is of high priority for precise optical instruments. In this research project, we aim to develop a novel system for optical axis online calibration. The system is based on photoelectric encoder for rotary signal sampling of motor. MCU (Micro Controlling Unit) is used as the main control module instead of PC to miniaturize and simplify the system. CPLD (Complex Programmable Logic Device) is employed to realize high speed data storage and processing. A motor driving circuit and a voltage interval location method are designed to control the motor to rotate precisely. The novel optical calibrator has already been taken into practical application in factories, and proved to be of high stability and resolution.

  16. One step geometrical calibration method for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Díaz, Jesús; Stritzel, Jenny; Rahlves, Maik; Majdani, Omid; Reithmeier, Eduard; Ortmaier, Tobias; Roth, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel one-step calibration methodology for geometrical distortion correction for optical coherence tomography (OCT). A calibration standard especially designed for OCT is introduced, which consists of an array of inverse pyramidal structures. The use of multiple landmarks situated on four different height levels on the pyramids allow performing a 3D geometrical calibration. The calibration procedure itself is based on a parametric model of the OCT beam propagation. It is validated by experimental results and enables the reduction of systematic errors by more than one order of magnitude. In future, our results can improve OCT image reconstruction and interpretation for medical applications such as real time monitoring of surgery.

  17. Calibration procedure for Slocum glider deployed optical instruments.

    PubMed

    Cetinić, Ivona; Toro-Farmer, Gerardo; Ragan, Matthew; Oberg, Carl; Jones, Burton H

    2009-08-31

    Recent developments in the field of the autonomous underwater vehicles allow the wide usage of these platforms as part of scientific experiments, monitoring campaigns and more. The vehicles are often equipped with sensors measuring temperature, conductivity, chlorophyll a fluorescence (Chl a), colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence, phycoerithrin (PE) fluorescence and spectral volume scattering function at 117 degrees, providing users with high resolution, real time data. However, calibration of these instruments can be problematic. Most in situ calibrations are performed by deploying complementary instrument packages or water samplers in the proximity of the glider. Laboratory calibrations of the mounted sensors are difficult due to the placement of the instruments within the body of the vehicle. For the laboratory calibrations of the Slocum glider instruments we developed a small calibration chamber where we can perform precise calibrations of the optical instruments aboard our glider, as well as sensors from other deployment platforms. These procedures enable us to obtain pre- and post-deployment calibrations for optical fluorescence instruments, which may differ due to the biofouling and other physical damage that can occur during long-term glider deployments. We found that biofouling caused significant changes in the calibration scaling factors of fluorescent sensors, suggesting the need for consistent and repetitive calibrations for gliders as proposed in this paper.

  18. Calibration of optical 3D-measuring instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Uwe

    1998-09-01

    For the inspection and measurement of microstructures small accurate three-dimensional coordinate measuring machines are needed. Typical measurement volumes are 10 mm by 10 mm by 3 mm and the desired 3D-measurement uncertainty is 0.1 micrometer. Up to now only optical coordinate measuring machines (CMM) offer the necessary lateral measurement ranges. But optical CMMs are restricted to two-dimensional measurements and moreover the aimed uncertainty has not been achieved yet. Since a few years new optical techniques are available which are able to measure nearly three-dimensionally (scanning white light, fringe projection, confocal microscopy, photogrammetry). In order to use these instruments and to specify their measurement uncertainty, calibration of these instruments is necessary. The calibration of the three measurement axes is divided into calibration of the lateral axes and calibration of the vertical axis. The contribution focuses on the development of new depth setting standards (1 micrometer - 1 milimeter) and their traceability.

  19. Calibration-free optical chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    DeGrandpre, Michael D.

    2006-04-11

    An apparatus and method for taking absorbance-based chemical measurements are described. In a specific embodiment, an indicator-based pCO2 (partial pressure of CO2) sensor displays sensor-to-sensor reproducibility and measurement stability. These qualities are achieved by: 1) renewing the sensing solution, 2) allowing the sensing solution to reach equilibrium with the analyte, and 3) calculating the response from a ratio of the indicator solution absorbances which are determined relative to a blank solution. Careful solution preparation, wavelength calibration, and stray light rejection also contribute to this calibration-free system. Three pCO2 sensors were calibrated and each had response curves which were essentially identical within the uncertainty of the calibration. Long-term laboratory and field studies showed the response had no drift over extended periods (months). The theoretical response, determined from thermodynamic characterization of the indicator solution, also predicted the observed calibration-free performance.

  20. Near-Infrared Camera Calibration for Optical Surgical Navigation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ken; Yang, Rongqian; Lin, Qinyong; Liu, Sujuan; Chen, Huazhou; Ou, Shanxing; Huang, Wenhua; Zhou, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Near-infrared optical tracking devices, which are important components of surgical navigation systems, need to be calibrated for effective tracking. The calibration results has a direct influence on the tracking accuracy of an entire system. Therefore, the study of calibration techniques is of theoretical significance and practical value. In the present work, a systematic calibration method based on movable plates is established, which analyzes existing calibration theories and implements methods using calibration reference objects. First, the distortion model of near-infrared cameras (NICs) is analyzed in the implementation of this method. Second, the calibration images from different positions and orientations are used to establish the required linear equations. The initial values of the NIC parameters are calculated with the direct linear transformation method. Finally, the accurate internal and external parameters of the NICs are obtained by conducting nonlinear optimization. Analysis results show that the relative errors of the left and right NICs in the tracking system are 0.244 and 0.282 % for the focal lengths and 0.735 and 1.111 % for the principal points, respectively. The image residuals of the left and right image sets are both less than 0.01 pixel. The standard error of the calibration result is lower than 1, and the measurement error of the tracking system is less than 0.3 mm. The experimental data show that the proposed method of calibrating NICs is effective and can generate favorable calibration results. PMID:26728393

  1. Fast calibration of high-order adaptive optics systems.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Markus; Fedrigo, Enrico; Looze, Douglas P; Bonnet, Henri; Ivanescu, Liviu; Oberti, Sylvain

    2004-06-01

    We present a new method of calibrating adaptive optics systems that greatly reduces the required calibration time or, equivalently, improves the signal-to-noise ratio. The method uses an optimized actuation scheme with Hadamard patterns and does not scale with the number of actuators for a given noise level in the wavefront sensor channels. It is therefore highly desirable for high-order systems and/or adaptive secondary systems on a telescope without a Gregorian focal plane. In the latter case, the measurement noise is increased by the effects of the turbulent atmosphere when one is calibrating on a natural guide star. PMID:15191182

  2. Fast calibration of high-order adaptive optics systems.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Markus; Fedrigo, Enrico; Looze, Douglas P; Bonnet, Henri; Ivanescu, Liviu; Oberti, Sylvain

    2004-06-01

    We present a new method of calibrating adaptive optics systems that greatly reduces the required calibration time or, equivalently, improves the signal-to-noise ratio. The method uses an optimized actuation scheme with Hadamard patterns and does not scale with the number of actuators for a given noise level in the wavefront sensor channels. It is therefore highly desirable for high-order systems and/or adaptive secondary systems on a telescope without a Gregorian focal plane. In the latter case, the measurement noise is increased by the effects of the turbulent atmosphere when one is calibrating on a natural guide star.

  3. Optical model and calibration of a sun tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Sergei N.; Samokhvalov, Ignatii V.; Cheong, Hai Du; Kim, Dukhyeon

    2016-09-01

    Sun trackers are widely used to investigate scattering and absorption of solar radiation in the Earth's atmosphere. We present a method for optimization of the optical altazimuth sun tracker model with output radiation direction aligned with the axis of a stationary spectrometer. The method solves the problem of stability loss in tracker pointing at the Sun near the zenith. An optimal method for tracker calibration at the measurement site is proposed in the present work. A method of moving calibration is suggested for mobile applications in the presence of large temperature differences and errors in the alignment of the optical system of the tracker.

  4. Calibration and imaging algorithms for full-Stokes optical interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Nicholas M.; Mozurkewich, David; Schmidt, Luke M.; Jurgenson, Colby A.; Edel, Stanislav S.; Jones, Carol E.; Halonen, Robert J.; Schmitt, Henrique R.; Jorgensen, Anders M.; Hutter, Donald J.

    2012-07-01

    Optical interferometry and polarimetry have separately provided new insights into stellar astronomy, especially in the fields of fundamental parameters and atmospheric models. Optical interferometers will eventually add full-Stokes polarization measuring capabilities, thus combining both techniques. In this paper, we: 1) list the observables, calibration quantities, and data acquisition strategies for both limited and full optical interferometric polarimetry (OIP); 2) describe the masking interferometer AMASING and its polarization measuring enhancement called AMASING-POL; 3) show how a radio interferometry imaging package, CASA, can be used for optical interferometry data reduction; and 4) present imaging simulations for Be stars.

  5. Calibration of optical traps by dual trapping of one bead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutov, Pavel; Schieber, Jay

    2014-03-01

    Optical trapping and tracking is a powerful method for many biological and rheological applications. Recent advances in microrheological techniques, like two-point microrheology, allow probing mechanical properties of viscoelastic networks with mesh size bigger than the size of the microbead itself, but require high signal to noise ratio. Noise level in the system can be reduced by removing active elements, like acousto-optical deflectors or galvo-mirrors from the optical train and making the trap fixed. We introduce a method for optical trap calibration that is suitable for viscoelastic material and allows calibration of a fixed trap. The method is designed for use on experimental setups with two optical tweezers and based on pulling a particle with one trap while simultaneously holding it with the other. No piezo-stage is needed and only one optical trap must be movable with galvo-mirrors, piezo-mirrors or acousto-optical deflectors. The method combines advantages of commonly known PSD-fitting and fast-sweeping methods, allowing calibration of a completely fixed trap in a fluid of unknown viscosity/viscoelasticity. We acknowledge financial support of DARPA grant W911NF-09-1-0378.

  6. High precision Woelter optic calibration facility

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, R.I.; Remington, B.A.; Schwinn, T.

    1994-05-02

    We have developed an off-line facility for very precise characterization of the reflectance and spatial resolution of the grazing incidence Woelter Type 1 x-ray optics used at Nova. The primary component of the facility is a high brightness, ``point`` x-ray source consisting of a focussed DC electron beam incident onto a precision manipulated target/pinhole array. The data are recorded with a selection of detectors. For imaging measurements we use direct exposure x-ray film modules or an x-ray CCD camera. For energy-resolved reflectance measurements, we use lithium drifted silicon detectors and a proportional counter. An in situ laser alignment system allows precise location and rapid periodic alignment verification of the x-ray point source, the statically mounted Woelter optic, and the chosen detector.

  7. Intramural Comparison of NIST Laser and Optical Fiber Power Calibrations

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, John H.; Vayshenker, Igor; Livigni, David J.; Hadler, Joshua

    2004-01-01

    The responsivity of two optical detectors was determined by the method of direct substitution in four different NIST measurement facilities. The measurements were intended to demonstrate the determination of absolute responsivity as provided by NIST calibration services at laser and optical-communication wavelengths; nominally 633 nm, 850 nm, 1060 nm, 1310 nm, and 1550 nm. The optical detectors have been designated as checks standards for the purpose of routine intramural comparison of our calibration services and to meet requirements of the NIST quality system, based on ISO 17025. The check standards are two optical-trap detectors, one based on silicon and the other on indium gallium arsenide photodiodes. The four measurement services are based on: (1) the laser optimized cryogenic radiometer (LOCR) and free field collimated laser light; (2) the C-series isoperibol calorimeter and free-field collimated laser light; (3) the electrically calibrated pyroelectric radiometer and fiber-coupled laser light; (4) the pyroelectric wedge trap detector, which measures light from a lamp source and monochromator. The results indicate that the responsivity of the check standards, as determined independently using the four services, agree to within the published expanded uncertainty ranging from approximately 0.02 % to 1.24 %. PMID:27366611

  8. Recent Progress in Optical Chemical Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Hummad Habib; Mohammad, Abu Bakar bin; Akram, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    Optical chemical sensors have promoted escalating interest in the determination of various pollutants in the environment, which are creating toxicity and may cause serious health problems. This review paper focuses particularly on the recent progress and developments in this field; the working principles and basic classes of optical chemical sensors have been briefly described. PMID:23443392

  9. Certification, self-calibration, and uncertainty in testing optical flats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Chris J.

    2010-10-01

    Many different approaches may be taken in the certification of reference flats used for acceptance testing of optical quality surfaces. Measurement services offered by national measurement institutes cover a limited size range and the uncertainties associated with the transfer of a calibration must be considered when data from any testing service is used in quality assurance. In-situ self-calibration using a full area variant of the 3-flat test enables the lowest possible uncertainty. The first part of this paper shows the options for external calibration and certification as a function of flat size, and orientation. Next the conditions that must be met to achieve traceability, according to the requirements of ISO 17025, will be discussed. Finally hardware and procedures will be described, and data presented, showing traceable measurement of a 450 mm aperture flat with nm level uncertainties.

  10. Absolute calibration for complex-geometry biomedical diffuse optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastanduno, Michael A.; Jiang, Shudong; El-Ghussein, Fadi; diFlorio-Alexander, Roberta; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2013-03-01

    We have presented methodology to calibrate data in NIRS/MRI imaging versus an absolute reference phantom and results in both phantoms and healthy volunteers. This method directly calibrates data to a diffusion-based model, takes advantage of patient specific geometry from MRI prior information, and generates an initial guess without the need for a large data set. This method of calibration allows for more accurate quantification of total hemoglobin, oxygen saturation, water content, scattering, and lipid concentration as compared with other, slope-based methods. We found the main source of error in the method to be derived from incorrect assignment of reference phantom optical properties rather than initial guess in reconstruction. We also present examples of phantom and breast images from a combined frequency domain and continuous wave MRI-coupled NIRS system. We were able to recover phantom data within 10% of expected contrast and within 10% of the actual value using this method and compare these results with slope-based calibration methods. Finally, we were able to use this technique to calibrate and reconstruct images from healthy volunteers. Representative images are shown and discussion is provided for comparison with existing literature. These methods work towards fully combining the synergistic attributes of MRI and NIRS for in-vivo imaging of breast cancer. Complete software and hardware integration in dual modality instruments is especially important due to the complexity of the technology and success will contribute to complex anatomical and molecular prognostic information that can be readily obtained in clinical use.

  11. Calibration of an Optically Levitated Microsphere as a Force Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, Jordan Hall

    By using an optically trapped and cooled microsphere (bead) as a force sensor, it is predicted to be possible to attain force sensitivity of 10 -21 N. This sensitivity is achieved because the force sensor is mechanically decoupled from the environment, which allows for larger quality factors. With this sensitivity, it is possible to test for corrections to Newtonian gravity at 1 mum length scales. This thesis describes the experimental setup of optically trapping and cooling a 3 mum sphere as well as a technique to calibrate the force sensitivity using applied electric fields. The long term goal of the experiment is to use this force sensor to measure gravity and other forces at short ranges, so calibrating the system is important. We have trapped a 3mum microsphere in an optical trap and have taken it to medium vacuum (2 torr). We have also cooled the bead's center of mass motion along three axes. We have applied an external force by using an electrical potential and have measured the force exerted on the bead. We have data that shows the force on the bead as a function of voltage, which allows us to find the charge on the beads. The charges on the beads range from zero electrons to upwards of 100. We have evidence that the charge on a bead can be reduced using light from a halogen light.

  12. Calibration of Viking imaging system pointing, image extraction, and optical navigation measure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, W. G.; Fowler, J. W.; Morgan, E. M.

    1977-01-01

    Pointing control and knowledge accuracy of Viking Orbiter science instruments is controlled by the scan platform. Calibration of the scan platform and the imaging system was accomplished through mathematical models. The calibration procedure and results obtained for the two Viking spacecraft are described. Included are both ground and in-flight scan platform calibrations, and the additional calibrations unique to optical navigation.

  13. Fibre optics wavemeters calibration using a self-referenced optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Santos, J; Velasco, A V; Corredera, P

    2015-01-01

    Self-referenced optical frequency combs enable the measurement of optical frequencies with a very high accuracy, achieving uncertainties close to the atomic clock used as reference (<10(-13) s). In this paper, we present the technique for the measurement of laser frequencies for optical communications followed at IO-CSIC and its application to the calibration of two wavemeters in the 1.5 μm optical communication window. Calibration uncertainties down to 12 MHz and 59 MHz were obtained, respectively, for each of the devices. Furthermore, the long-term behaviour of the higher resolution wavemeter was studied during a 750 h period of sustained operation, exhibiting a dispersion in the measurements of 7.72 MHz. Temperature dependence of the device was analysed, enabling to further reduce dispersion down to a 2.15 MHz range, with no significant temporal deviations.

  14. Fibre optics wavemeters calibration using a self-referenced optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-Santos, J.; Velasco, A. V.; Corredera, P.

    2015-01-01

    Self-referenced optical frequency combs enable the measurement of optical frequencies with a very high accuracy, achieving uncertainties close to the atomic clock used as reference (<10-13 s). In this paper, we present the technique for the measurement of laser frequencies for optical communications followed at IO-CSIC and its application to the calibration of two wavemeters in the 1.5 μm optical communication window. Calibration uncertainties down to 12 MHz and 59 MHz were obtained, respectively, for each of the devices. Furthermore, the long-term behaviour of the higher resolution wavemeter was studied during a 750 h period of sustained operation, exhibiting a dispersion in the measurements of 7.72 MHz. Temperature dependence of the device was analysed, enabling to further reduce dispersion down to a 2.15 MHz range, with no significant temporal deviations.

  15. Fibre optics wavemeters calibration using a self-referenced optical frequency comb

    SciTech Connect

    Galindo-Santos, J.; Velasco, A. V.; Corredera, P.

    2015-01-15

    Self-referenced optical frequency combs enable the measurement of optical frequencies with a very high accuracy, achieving uncertainties close to the atomic clock used as reference (<10{sup −13} s). In this paper, we present the technique for the measurement of laser frequencies for optical communications followed at IO-CSIC and its application to the calibration of two wavemeters in the 1.5 μm optical communication window. Calibration uncertainties down to 12 MHz and 59 MHz were obtained, respectively, for each of the devices. Furthermore, the long-term behaviour of the higher resolution wavemeter was studied during a 750 h period of sustained operation, exhibiting a dispersion in the measurements of 7.72 MHz. Temperature dependence of the device was analysed, enabling to further reduce dispersion down to a 2.15 MHz range, with no significant temporal deviations.

  16. Energy Calibration of the Scintillating Optical Fiber Calorimeter Chamber (SOFCAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, M. C.; Fountain, W. F.; Parnell, T.; Roberts, F. E.; Gregory, J. C.; Johnson, J.; Takahashi, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The Scintillating Optical Fiber Calorimeter (SOFCAL) detector is designed to make direct measures of the primary cosmic ray spectrum from -200 GeV/amu - 20 TeV/amu. The primary particles are resolved into groups according to their charge (p, He, CNO, Medium Z, Heavy Z) using both active and passive components integrated into the detector. The principal part of SOFCAL is a thin ionization calorimeter that measures the electromagnetic cascades that result from these energetic particles interacting in the detector. The calorimeter is divided into two sections: a thin passive emulsion/x-ray film calorimeter, and a fiber calorimeter that uses crossing layers of small scintillating optical fibers to sample the energy deposition of the cascades. The energy determination is made by fitting the fiber data to transition curves generated by Monte Carlo simulations. The fiber data must first be calibrated using the electron counts from the emulsion plates in the calorimeter for a small number of events. The technique and results of this calibration will be presented together with samples of the data from a balloon flight.

  17. A four mirror anastigmat collimator design for optical payload calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolt, Stephen; Calcines, Ariadna; Lomanowski, Bart A.; Bramall, David G.

    2016-07-01

    We present here a four mirror anastigmatic optical collimator design intended for the calibration of an earth observation satellite instrument. Specifically, the collimator is to be applied to the ground based calibration of the Sentinel-4/UVN instrument. This imaging spectrometer instrument itself is expected to be deployed in 2019 in a geostationary orbit and will make spatially resolved spectroscopic measurements of atmospheric contaminants. The collimator is to be deployed during the ground based calibration only and does not form part of the instrument itself. The purpose of the collimator is to provide collimated light within the two instrument passbands in the UV-VIS (305 - 500 nm) and the NIR (750 - 775 nm). Moreover, that collimated light will be derived from a variety of slit like objects located at the input focal (object) plane of the collimator which is uniformly illuminated by a number of light sources. The collimator must relay these objects with exceptionally high fidelity. To this end, the wavefront error of the collimator should be less than 30 nm rms across the collimator field of view. This field is determined by the largest object which is a large rectangular slit, 4.4° x 0.25°. Other important considerations affecting the optical design are the requirements for input telecentricity and the size (85 mm) and location (2500 mm `back focal distance') of the exit pupil. The design of the instrument against these basic requirements is discussed in detail. In addition an analysis of the straylight and tolerancing is presented in detail.

  18. Absolute calibration of optical power for PDT: report of AAPM TG140.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Timothy C; Bonnerup, Chris; Colussi, Valdir C; Dowell, Marla L; Finlay, Jarod C; Lilge, Lothar; Slowey, Thomas W; Sibata, Claudio

    2013-08-01

    This report is primarily concerned with methods for optical calibration of laser power for continuous wave (CW) light sources, predominantly used in photodynamic therapy (PDT). Light power calibration is very important for PDT, however, no clear standard has been established for the calibration procedure nor the requirements of power meters suitable for optical power calibration. The purposes of the report are to provide guidance for establishing calibration procedures for thermopile type power meters and establish calibration uncertainties for most commercially available detectors and readout assemblies. The authors have also provided a review of the use of various power meters for CW and pulsed optical sources, and provided recommended temporal frequencies for optical power meter calibrations and guidance for routine quality assurance procedure.

  19. Optical testing of progressive ophthalmic glasses based on galvo mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuerwald, S.; Schmitt, R.

    2014-03-01

    In production of ophthalmic freeform optics like progressive eyeglasses, the specimens are tested according to a standardized method which is based on the measurement of the vertex power on usually less than 10 points. For a better quality management and thus to ensure more reliable and valid tests, a more comprehensive measurement approach is required. For Shack Hartmann Sensors (SHS) the dynamic range is defined by the number of micro-lenses and the resolution of the imaging sensor. Here, we present an approach for measuring wavefronts with increased dynamic range and lateral resolution by the use of a scanning procedure. Therefore, the proposed innovative setup is based on galvo mirrors that are capable of measuring the vertex power with a lateral resolution below one millimeter since this is sufficient for a functional test of progressive eyeglasses. Expressed in a more abstract way, the concept is based on a selection and thereby encoding of single sub-apertures of the wave front under test. This allows measuring the wave fronts slope consecutively in a scanning procedure. The use of high precision galvo systems allows a lateral resolution below one millimeter as well as a significant fast scanning ability. The measurement concept and performance of this method will be demonstrated for different spherical and freeformed specimens like progressive eye glasses. Furthermore, approaches for calibration of the measurement system will be characterized and the optical design of the detector will be discussed.

  20. Ceilometer calibration for retrieval of aerosol optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yoshitaka; Kai, Kenji; Kawai, Kei; Nagai, Tomohiro; Sakai, Tetsu; Yamazaki, Akihiro; Uchiyama, Akihiro; Batdorj, Dashdondog; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Nishizawa, Tomoaki

    2015-03-01

    Ceilometers are durable compact backscatter lidars widely used to detect cloud base height. They are also useful for measuring aerosols. We introduced a ceilometer (CL51) for observing dust in a source region in Mongolia. For retrieving aerosol profiles with a backscatter lidar, the molecular backscatter signal in the aerosol free heights or system constant of the lidar is required. Although the system constant of the ceilometer is calibrated by the manufacturer, it is not necessarily accurate enough for the aerosol retrieval. We determined a correction factor, which is defined as the ratio of true attenuated backscattering coefficient to the measured attenuated backscattering coefficient, for the CL51 ceilometer using a dual-wavelength Mie-scattering lidar in Tsukuba, Japan before moving the ceilometer to Dalanzadgad, Mongolia. The correction factor determined by minimizing the difference between the ceilometer and lidar backscattering coefficients was approximately 1.2±0.1. Applying the correction to the CL51 signals, the aerosol optical depth (AOD) agreed well with the sky-radiometer AOD during the observation period (13-17 February 2013) in Tsukuba (9 ×10-3 of mean square error). After moving the ceilometer to Dalanzadgad, however, the AOD observed with the CL51 (calibrated by the correction factor determined in Tsukuba) was approximately 60% of the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) sun photometer AOD. The possible causes of the lower AOD results are as follows: (1) the limited height range of extinction integration (< 3 km); (2) change in the correction factor during the ceilometer transportation or with the window contamination in Mongolia. In both cases, on-site calibrations by dual-wavelength lidar are needed. As an alternative method, we showed that the backward inversion method was useful for retrieving extinction coefficients if the AOD was larger than 1.5. This retrieval method does not require the system constant and molecular backscatter signals

  1. Combined holographic-mechanical optical tweezers: Construction, optimization, and calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Hanes, Richard D. L.; Jenkins, Matthew C.; Egelhaaf, Stefan U.

    2009-08-15

    A spatial light modulator (SLM) and a pair of galvanometer-mounted mirrors (GMM) were combined into an optical tweezers setup. This provides great flexibility as the SLM creates an array of traps, which can be moved smoothly and quickly with the GMM. To optimize performance, the effect of the incidence angle on the SLM with respect to phase and intensity response was investigated. Although it is common to use the SLM at an incidence angle of 45 deg., smaller angles give a full 2{pi} phase shift and an output intensity which is less dependent on the magnitude of the phase shift. The traps were calibrated using an active oscillatory technique and a passive probability distribution method.

  2. Combined holographic-mechanical optical tweezers: construction, optimization, and calibration.

    PubMed

    Hanes, Richard D L; Jenkins, Matthew C; Egelhaaf, Stefan U

    2009-08-01

    A spatial light modulator (SLM) and a pair of galvanometer-mounted mirrors (GMM) were combined into an optical tweezers setup. This provides great flexibility as the SLM creates an array of traps, which can be moved smoothly and quickly with the GMM. To optimize performance, the effect of the incidence angle on the SLM with respect to phase and intensity response was investigated. Although it is common to use the SLM at an incidence angle of 45 degrees, smaller angles give a full 2pi phase shift and an output intensity which is less dependent on the magnitude of the phase shift. The traps were calibrated using an active oscillatory technique and a passive probability distribution method. PMID:19725658

  3. Control Program for an Optical-Calibration Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Albert

    2005-01-01

    A computer program provides semiautomatic control of a moveable robot used to perform optical calibration of video-camera-based optoelectronic sensor systems that will be used to guide automated rendezvous maneuvers of spacecraft. The function of the robot is to move a target and hold it at specified positions. With the help of limit switches, the software first centers or finds the target. Then the target is moved to a starting position. Thereafter, with the help of an intuitive graphical user interface, an operator types in coordinates of specified positions, and the software responds by commanding the robot to move the target to the positions. The software has capabilities for correcting errors and for recording data from the guidance-sensor system being calibrated. The software can also command that the target be moved in a predetermined sequence of motions between specified positions and can be run in an advanced control mode in which, among other things, the target can be moved beyond the limits set by the limit switches.

  4. Calibrating FGS2R2 Optical Field Angle Distortion {OFAD}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelan, Edmund

    2009-07-01

    This proposal gathers the data needed to calibrate the optical field angle distortions in FGS2r2 to the level of accuracy { 40 mas} required for guiding HST. In addition, careful selection of guide star pairs allows calibration of the FGS2r2-FGS alignment. Selected stars from the galactic cluster M35 are repeatedly observed in POSITION mode by FGS2r2 with PUPIL element at a variety of spacecraft pointings and telescope roll angles. These stars and guide stars have absolute positions known to an accuracy of about 30 mas based upon the UCAC-3 and McNamara proper motions. In each of the 5 orbits there is also a single Transfer mode observation of a bright star with the PUPIL element to obtain reference S-curves at five different FOV locations. These S-curves are needed by the OTA group to facilitate analysis of guide star acquisition issues {binary stars, K-factor settings, etc}.

  5. Precise uniform light source based on optically connected integrating spheres for optical instrument calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikheenko, Leonid; Borovytsky, Volodymyr

    2011-09-01

    The paper proposes the uniform light sources which have a form of several or multiple optically connected integrating spheres. The principal advantages of these light sources are high photometric and metrological characteristics. As a result they have good perspectives in optical radiometry and calibration of imaging systems and optical instruments. The principal field of their application is calibration of remote sensing instruments and sensitive megapixel cameras. The light source contains several (3 ... 11) primary integrating spheres of small diameters which are installed on a secondary integrating sphere of bigger diameter. The initial light sources - halogen lamps or light emitted diodes are installed inside the primary integrating spheres. These spheres are mounted on the secondary integrating sphere. The radiation comes from the primary integrating spheres to the secondary one through diaphragms which diameters can be varied. The secondary integrating sphere has an output aperture where uniform radiance emits. It is investigated the light source design with an output aperture diameter 0.2 m and 3 or 5 primary integrating spheres. It guarantees the output radiance in range from 0.01 to 1000 W/(st•m2), radiance uniformity bigger 99.5% in an output aperture, non-linearity of an output radiance control - smaller 0.1 %. The paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental research of these light sources including the techniques for radiance calculation and the recommendations for light source design. The proposed light sources can be considered as one of the best candidates for calibration of remote sensing instruments working in optical range 0.4 - 2.2 mkm. Key words: integrating sphere, light source, calibration, uniformity, radiance, remote sensing, optical instrument.

  6. MatLab program for precision calibration of optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolić-Nørrelykke, Iva Marija; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2004-06-01

    Optical tweezers are used as force transducers in many types of experiments. The force they exert in a given experiment is known only after a calibration. Computer codes that calibrate optical tweezers with high precision and reliability in the ( x, y)-plane orthogonal to the laser beam axis were written in MatLab (MathWorks Inc.) and are presented here. The calibration is based on the power spectrum of the Brownian motion of a dielectric bead trapped in the tweezers. Precision is achieved by accounting for a number of factors that affect this power spectrum. First, cross-talk between channels in 2D position measurements is tested for, and eliminated if detected. Then, the Lorentzian power spectrum that results from the Einstein-Ornstein-Uhlenbeck theory, is fitted to the low-frequency part of the experimental spectrum in order to obtain an initial guess for parameters to be fitted. Finally, a more complete theory is fitted, a theory that optionally accounts for the frequency dependence of the hydrodynamic drag force and hydrodynamic interaction with a nearby cover slip, for effects of finite sampling frequency (aliasing), for effects of anti-aliasing filters in the data acquisition electronics, and for unintended "virtual" filtering caused by the position detection system. Each of these effects can be left out or included as the user prefers, with user-defined parameters. Several tests are applied to the experimental data during calibration to ensure that the data comply with the theory used for their interpretation: Independence of x- and y-coordinates, Hooke's law, exponential distribution of power spectral values, uncorrelated Gaussian scatter of residual values. Results are given with statistical errors and covariance matrix. Program summaryTitle of program: tweezercalib Catalogue identifier: ADTV Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland. Program Summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADTV Computer for

  7. Calibrating bead displacements in optical tweezers using acousto-optic deflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeulen, Karen C.; Mameren, Joost van; Stienen, Ger J.M.; Peterman, Erwin J.G.; Wuite, Gijs J.L.; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2006-01-15

    Displacements of optically trapped particles are often recorded using back-focal-plane interferometry. In order to calibrate the detector signals to displacements of the trapped object, several approaches are available. One often relies either on scanning a fixed bead across the waist of the laser beam or on analyzing the power spectrum of movements of the trapped bead. Here, we introduce an alternative method to perform this calibration. The method consists of very rapidly scanning the laser beam across the solvent-immersed, trapped bead using acousto-optic deflectors while recording the detector signals. It does not require any knowledge of solvent viscosity and bead diameter, and works in all types of samples, viscous or viscoelastic. Moreover, it is performed with the same bead as that used in the actual experiment. This represents marked advantages over established methods.

  8. Self-calibration approach for optical long-baseline interferometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Meimon, Serge; Mugnier, Laurent M; Le Besnerais, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Current optical interferometers are affected by unknown turbulent phases on each telescope. In the field of radio interferometry, the self-calibration technique is a powerful tool to process interferometric data with missing phase information. This paper intends to revisit the application of self-calibration to optical long-baseline interferometry (OLBI). We cast rigorously the OLBI data processing problem into the self-calibration framework and demonstrate the efficiency of the method on a real astronomical OLBI data set. PMID:19109607

  9. Optical calibration of a new two-way optical component network analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsao, Shyh-Lin; Ko, Chih-Han; Liou, Tai-Chi

    2003-12-01

    High-speed fiber communications show promising results recently [1,2]. Using of lightwave technology for measuring S parameters with optical component becoming important. For this purpose to develop a two-way network analyzer has been reported [3]. In this paper, we report the calibration method of a new two-way lightwave component analyze for applying in fiber optical signal processing elements. The background error and circulator wavelength response are all calibrated. We have designed a new probe for two-way optical component network analyzer. The probe is composed of frequency division multiplexer(FDM), electrical circulator, optical transmitter, optical receiver, and an optical circulator. We design 2-D grating structures as frequency division. The PCB we adopted is Kinstan GD1530 160 whose relative dielectric constantɛ= 4.3, length= 120 mm, and height= 1.8 mm. Two dimensional non-metal covered array square pads are designed on FR4 Glass-Epoxy board for FDM. The FDM can be achieved by the two dimensional non-metalized covered array square pads. Finally we use a single fiber ring resonator filter as our test samples. Comparing the numerical and experimental results, test the device we made. References [1] D. D. Curtis and E. E. Ames,"Optical Test Set for Microwave Fiber-Optic Network Analysis," IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques. , vol. 38, NO.5, pp. 552-559, 1990. [2] J. A. C. Bingham,"Multicarrier modulation for data transmission: an idea whose time has come," IEEE Commun. Magazine., pp. 5 -14, 1990. [3] M. Nakazawa, K. Suzuki, and Y. Kimura, " 3.2-5 Gbps 100km error-free soliton transmission with erbium amplifiers and repenters," IEEE Photonics Tech Lett.,vol.2,pp.216-219,1990.

  10. Optical Calibration Process Developed for Neural-Network-Based Optical Nondestructive Evaluation Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2004-01-01

    A completely optical calibration process has been developed at Glenn for calibrating a neural-network-based nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method. The NDE method itself detects very small changes in the characteristic patterns or vibration mode shapes of vibrating structures as discussed in many references. The mode shapes or characteristic patterns are recorded using television or electronic holography and change when a structure experiences, for example, cracking, debonds, or variations in fastener properties. An artificial neural network can be trained to be very sensitive to changes in the mode shapes, but quantifying or calibrating that sensitivity in a consistent, meaningful, and deliverable manner has been challenging. The standard calibration approach has been difficult to implement, where the response to damage of the trained neural network is compared with the responses of vibration-measurement sensors. In particular, the vibration-measurement sensors are intrusive, insufficiently sensitive, and not numerous enough. In response to these difficulties, a completely optical alternative to the standard calibration approach was proposed and tested successfully. Specifically, the vibration mode to be monitored for structural damage was intentionally contaminated with known amounts of another mode, and the response of the trained neural network was measured as a function of the peak-to-peak amplitude of the contaminating mode. The neural network calibration technique essentially uses the vibration mode shapes of the undamaged structure as standards against which the changed mode shapes are compared. The published response of the network can be made nearly independent of the contaminating mode, if enough vibration modes are used to train the net. The sensitivity of the neural network can be adjusted for the environment in which the test is to be conducted. The response of a neural network trained with measured vibration patterns for use on a vibration isolation

  11. Embedded calibration system for the DIII-D Langmuir probe analog fiber optic links

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, J. G.; Rajpal, R.; Mandaliya, H.; Watkins, M.; Boivin, R. L.

    2012-10-15

    This paper describes a generally applicable technique for simultaneously measuring offset and gain of 64 analog fiber optic data links used for the DIII-D fixed Langmuir probes by embedding a reference voltage waveform in the optical transmitted signal before every tokamak shot. The calibrated data channels allow calibration of the power supply control fiber optic links as well. The array of fiber optic links and the embedded calibration system described here makes possible the use of superior modern data acquisition electronics in the control room.

  12. Embedded calibration system for the DIII-D Langmuir probe analog fiber optic linksa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, J. G.; Rajpal, R.; Mandaliya, H.; Watkins, M.; Boivin, R. L.

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes a generally applicable technique for simultaneously measuring offset and gain of 64 analog fiber optic data links used for the DIII-D fixed Langmuir probes by embedding a reference voltage waveform in the optical transmitted signal before every tokamak shot. The calibrated data channels allow calibration of the power supply control fiber optic links as well. The array of fiber optic links and the embedded calibration system described here makes possible the use of superior modern data acquisition electronics in the control room.

  13. Embedded calibration system for the DIII-D Langmuir probe analog fiber optic links.

    PubMed

    Watkins, J G; Rajpal, R; Mandaliya, H; Watkins, M; Boivin, R L

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes a generally applicable technique for simultaneously measuring offset and gain of 64 analog fiber optic data links used for the DIII-D fixed Langmuir probes by embedding a reference voltage waveform in the optical transmitted signal before every tokamak shot. The calibrated data channels allow calibration of the power supply control fiber optic links as well. The array of fiber optic links and the embedded calibration system described here makes possible the use of superior modern data acquisition electronics in the control room.

  14. Optical geometry calibration method for free-form digital tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chtcheprov, Pavel; Hartman, Allison; Shan, Jing; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2016-03-01

    Digital tomosynthesis is a type of limited angle tomography that allows 3D information to be reconstructed from a set of x-ray projection images taken at various angles using an x-ray tube, a mechanical arm to rotate the tube about the object, and a digital detector. Tomosynthesis reconstruction requires the precise location of the detector with respect to each x-ray source, forcing all current clinical tomosynthesis systems to use a physically coupled source and detector so the geometry is always known and is always the same. This limits the imaging geometries and its large size is impractical for mobile or field operations. To counter this, we have developed a free form tomosynthesis with a decoupled, free-moving source and detector that uses a novel optical method for accurate and real-time geometry calibration to allow for manual, hand-held tomosynthesis and even CT imaging. We accomplish this by using a camera, attached to the source, to track the motion of the source relative to the detector. Attached to the detector is an optical pattern and the image captured by the camera is then used to determine the relative camera/pattern position and orientation by analyzing the pattern distortion and calculating the source positions for each projection, necessary for 3D reconstruction. This allows for portable imaging in the field and also as an inexpensive upgrade to existing 2D systems, such as in developing countries, to provide 3D image data. Here we report the first feasibility demonstrations of free form digital tomosynthesis systems using the method.

  15. Flux density calibration in diffuse optical tomographic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Samir Kumar; Rajan, Kanhirodan; Vasu, Ram M.

    2013-02-01

    The solution of the forward equation that models the transport of light through a highly scattering tissue material in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) using the finite element method gives flux density (Φ) at the nodal points of the mesh. The experimentally measured flux (U) on the boundary over a finite surface area in a DOT system has to be corrected to account for the system transfer functions (R) of various building blocks of the measurement system. We present two methods to compensate for the perturbations caused by R and estimate true flux density (Φ) from Umeasuredcal. In the first approach, the measurement data with a homogeneous phantom (Umeasuredhomo) is used to calibrate the measurement system. The second scheme estimates the homogeneous phantom measurement using only the measurement from a heterogeneous phantom, thereby eliminating the necessity of a homogeneous phantom. This is done by statistically averaging the data (Umeasuredhetero) and redistributing it to the corresponding detector positions. The experiments carried out on tissue mimicking phantom with single and multiple inhomogeneities, human hand, and a pork tissue phantom demonstrate the robustness of the approach.

  16. Flux density calibration in diffuse optical tomographic systems.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Samir Kumar; Rajan, Kanhirodan; Vasu, Ram M

    2013-02-01

    The solution of the forward equation that models the transport of light through a highly scattering tissue material in diffuse optical tomography (DOT) using the finite element method gives flux density (Φ) at the nodal points of the mesh. The experimentally measured flux (Umeasured) on the boundary over a finite surface area in a DOT system has to be corrected to account for the system transfer functions (R) of various building blocks of the measurement system. We present two methods to compensate for the perturbations caused by R and estimate true flux density (Φ) from Umeasuredcal. In the first approach, the measurement data with a homogeneous phantom (Umeasuredhomo) is used to calibrate the measurement system. The second scheme estimates the homogeneous phantom measurement using only the measurement from a heterogeneous phantom, thereby eliminating the necessity of a homogeneous phantom. This is done by statistically averaging the data (Umeasuredhetero) and redistributing it to the corresponding detector positions. The experiments carried out on tissue mimicking phantom with single and multiple inhomogeneities, human hand, and a pork tissue phantom demonstrate the robustness of the approach.

  17. Optics-Only Calibration of a Neural-Net Based Optical NDE Method for Structural Health Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    2004-01-01

    A calibration process is presented that uses optical measurements alone to calibrate a neural-net based NDE method. The method itself detects small changes in the vibration mode shapes of structures. The optics-only calibration process confirms previous work that the sensitivity to vibration-amplitude changes can be as small as 10 nanometers. A more practical value in an NDE service laboratory is shown to be 50 nanometers. Both model-generated and experimental calibrations are demonstrated using two implementations of the calibration technique. The implementations are based on previously published demonstrations of the NDE method and an alternative calibration procedure that depends on comparing neural-net and point sensor measurements. The optics-only calibration method, unlike the alternative method, does not require modifications of the structure being tested or the creation of calibration objects. The calibration process can be used to test improvements in the NDE process and to develop a vibration-mode-independence of damagedetection sensitivity. The calibration effort was intended to support NASA s objective to promote safety in the operations of ground test facilities or aviation safety, in general, by allowing the detection of the gradual onset of structural changes and damage.

  18. Calibration and operation of a large space-based optical interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laskin, R. A.; Breckenridge, W. G.; Shao, M.; Redding, D. C.

    1990-01-01

    The on-orbit calibration of the optics, structure, and control systems of the CSI Focus Mission Interferometer (FMI) is described. The calibration involves the estimation and propagation of both positional and rotational parameters and the propagation of both positional and rotational parameters at the nanometer/nanoradian level. It is shown that, given a nanometer class metrology system to monitor positional changes of critical optical elements, this calibration procedure should enable the FMI to perform 50 picoradian astrometry. The same Kalman filter that implements the initializing calibration of the interferometer baselines and internal pathlengths will also participate in the astrometric measurements of stellar positions.

  19. Aspects of the optical system relevant for the KM3NeT timing calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieft, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    KM3NeT is a future research infrastructure in the Mediterranean Sea housing the large Cherenkov telescope arrays of optical modules for neutrino detection. The detector control and data transmission system is based on fibre optical technology. For timing calibration of the detector signals the optical system is used to send and fan-out an onshore clock signal, derived from a GPS receiver, to all optical modules in the deep sea. The optical modules use this clock signal to time stamp the light pulses detected by the photomultipliers inside the modules. The delay time between the GPS clock on shore and the clock in each optical module is measured with sub-nanosecond precision using a White Rabbit based timing calibration system. The aspects of the optical system relevant for the timing calibration and the quantification of their effect will be presented.

  20. Low Frequency Error Analysis and Calibration for High-Resolution Optical Satellite's Uncontrolled Geometric Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mi; Fang, Chengcheng; Yang, Bo; Cheng, Yufeng

    2016-06-01

    The low frequency error is a key factor which has affected uncontrolled geometry processing accuracy of the high-resolution optical image. To guarantee the geometric quality of imagery, this paper presents an on-orbit calibration method for the low frequency error based on geometric calibration field. Firstly, we introduce the overall flow of low frequency error on-orbit analysis and calibration, which includes optical axis angle variation detection of star sensor, relative calibration among star sensors, multi-star sensor information fusion, low frequency error model construction and verification. Secondly, we use optical axis angle change detection method to analyze the law of low frequency error variation. Thirdly, we respectively use the method of relative calibration and information fusion among star sensors to realize the datum unity and high precision attitude output. Finally, we realize the low frequency error model construction and optimal estimation of model parameters based on DEM/DOM of geometric calibration field. To evaluate the performance of the proposed calibration method, a certain type satellite's real data is used. Test results demonstrate that the calibration model in this paper can well describe the law of the low frequency error variation. The uncontrolled geometric positioning accuracy of the high-resolution optical image in the WGS-84 Coordinate Systems is obviously improved after the step-wise calibration.

  1. Clumped isotope calibration data for lacustrine carbonates: A progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripati, A.

    2015-12-01

    Our capacity to understand Earth's environmental history is highly dependent on the accuracy of reconstructions of past climates. Lake sediments provide important archives of terrestrial climate change, and represent an important tool for reconstructing paleohydrology, paleoclimate, paleoenvironment, and paleoaltimetry. Unfortunately, while multiple methods for constraining marine temperature exist, quantitative terrestrial proxies are scarcer - tree rings, speleothems, and leaf margin analyses have all been used with varying degrees of accuracy. Clumped isotope thermometry has the potential to be a useful instrument for determining terrestrial climates: multiple studies have shown the fraction of 13C—18O bonds in carbonates is inversely related to the temperature at which the rocks formed. We have been measuring the abundance of 13C18O16O in the CO2 produced by the dissolution of carbonate minerals in phosphoric acid in modern lake samples and comparing results to independently known estimates of lake water temperature. Here we discuss an extensive calibration dataset comprised of 132 analyses of 97 samples from 44 localities, including microbialites, tufas, and micrites endogenic carbonates, freshwater gastropods, bivalves, microbialites, and ooids.

  2. Systematic calibration of an integrated x-ray and optical tomography system for preclinical radiation research

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yidong; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Wong, John W.; Eslami, Sohrab; Iordachita, Iulian I.; Patterson, Michael S.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guided small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) has been developed for focal tumor irradiation, allowing laboratory researchers to test basic biological hypotheses that can modify radiotherapy outcomes in ways that were not feasible previously. CBCT provides excellent bone to soft tissue contrast, but is incapable of differentiating tumors from surrounding soft tissue. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT), in contrast, allows direct visualization of even subpalpable tumors and quantitative evaluation of tumor response. Integration of BLT with CBCT offers complementary image information, with CBCT delineating anatomic structures and BLT differentiating luminescent tumors. This study is to develop a systematic method to calibrate an integrated CBCT and BLT imaging system which can be adopted onboard the SARRP to guide focal tumor irradiation. Methods: The integrated imaging system consists of CBCT, diffuse optical tomography (DOT), and BLT. The anatomy acquired from CBCT and optical properties acquired from DOT serve as a priori information for the subsequent BLT reconstruction. Phantoms were designed and procedures were developed to calibrate the CBCT, DOT/BLT, and the entire integrated system. Geometrical calibration was performed to calibrate the CBCT system. Flat field correction was performed to correct the nonuniform response of the optical imaging system. Absolute emittance calibration was performed to convert the camera readout to the emittance at the phantom or animal surface, which enabled the direct reconstruction of the bioluminescence source strength. Phantom and mouse imaging were performed to validate the calibration. Results: All calibration procedures were successfully performed. Both CBCT of a thin wire and a euthanized mouse revealed no spatial artifact, validating the accuracy of the CBCT calibration. The absolute emittance calibration was validated with a 650 nm laser source, resulting in a 3

  3. The molecular branching ratio method for calibration of optical systems in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    The intensity distribution of bands belonging to six molecular band systems is discussed with special emphasis on their usefulness for intensity calibration of optical systems in the vacuum ultraviolet (1000A Lambda 3000A). The theory of molecular band intensities is outlined and the technique of measuring the spectral response curve is described. Several methods for establishing an absolute intensity calibration are discussed.

  4. Special report, cross calibration of JHU test equipment with GSFC vacuum optical bench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fastie, W. G.

    1972-01-01

    Tests were conducted to confirm the validity of the absolute calibrations which have been performed with the Apollo 17 ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS) in the calibration test equipment (CTE) which were constructed for that purpose. To accomplish this the prototype UV spectrometer SN/01 was retrofitted to be substantially identical to the qualification unit and to the two flight units. It was renamed the cross calibration unit (CCU). The instrument was first calibrated in the JHU calibration test equipment (CTE), then installed in the vacuum optical bench (VOB) at Goddard Space Flight Center and calibrated. The following day a second CTE calibration was conducted which provided substantially the same calibration values as were obtained on the first CTE calibration, and showed remarkably close agreement with the VOB calibration values at two of the wavelengths which were studied. The VOB results at the third wavelength (1216 A) indicate the CTE calibration at 1216 A is 15% too low. This apparent discrepancy is discussed and presents a very important result of the cross calibration effort.

  5. Hodoscope for spectrometer optics calibration in APEX dark matter search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goeckner-Wald, Neil; Price, Tyson; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2012-03-01

    The A' Experiment (APEX) to be conducted in Hall A of Jefferson Lab (JLab) is a high sensitivity search for a proposed dark matter A' boson. To improve sensitivity APEX will make use of a new High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) calibration method using a scintillating fiber (SciFi) hodoscope. A prototype SciFi hodoscope is developed to evaluate and improve the characteristics of the hodoscope design. The use of an active detector to calibrate the HRS is expected to allow for direct spectrometer calibration at any momentum setting without the use of special beam energies and improve scattering angle resolution by approximately 30%.

  6. Electro-optical equivalent calibration technology for high-energy laser energy meters.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ji Feng; Chang, Yan; Sun, Li Qun; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Xiao Yang; Zhang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Electro-optical equivalent calibration with high calibration power and high equivalence is particularly well-suited to the calibration of high-energy laser energy meters. A large amount of energy is reserved during this process, however, which continues to radiate after power-off. This study measured the radiation efficiency of a halogen tungsten lamp during power-on and after power-off in order to calculate the total energy irradiated by a lamp until the high-energy laser energy meter reaches thermal equilibrium. A calibration system was designed based on the measurement results, and the calibration equivalence of the system was analyzed in detail. Results show that measurement precision is significantly affected by the absorption factor of the absorption chamber and by heat loss in the energy meter. Calibration precision is successfully improved by enhancing the equivalent power and reducing power-on time. The electro-optical equivalent calibration system, measurement uncertainty of which was evaluated as 2.4% (k = 2), was used to calibrate a graphite-cone-absorption-cavity absolute energy meter, yielding a calibration coefficient of 1.009 and measurement uncertainty of 3.5% (k = 2). A water-absorption-type high-energy laser energy meter with measurement uncertainty of 4.8% (k = 2) was considered the reference standard, and compared to the energy meter calibrated in this study, yielded a correction factor of 0.995 (standard deviation of 1.4%). PMID:27131714

  7. Electro-optical equivalent calibration technology for high-energy laser energy meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ji Feng; Chang, Yan; Sun, Li Qun; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Xiao Yang; Zhang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Electro-optical equivalent calibration with high calibration power and high equivalence is particularly well-suited to the calibration of high-energy laser energy meters. A large amount of energy is reserved during this process, however, which continues to radiate after power-off. This study measured the radiation efficiency of a halogen tungsten lamp during power-on and after power-off in order to calculate the total energy irradiated by a lamp until the high-energy laser energy meter reaches thermal equilibrium. A calibration system was designed based on the measurement results, and the calibration equivalence of the system was analyzed in detail. Results show that measurement precision is significantly affected by the absorption factor of the absorption chamber and by heat loss in the energy meter. Calibration precision is successfully improved by enhancing the equivalent power and reducing power-on time. The electro-optical equivalent calibration system, measurement uncertainty of which was evaluated as 2.4% (k = 2), was used to calibrate a graphite-cone-absorption-cavity absolute energy meter, yielding a calibration coefficient of 1.009 and measurement uncertainty of 3.5% (k = 2). A water-absorption-type high-energy laser energy meter with measurement uncertainty of 4.8% (k = 2) was considered the reference standard, and compared to the energy meter calibrated in this study, yielded a correction factor of 0.995 (standard deviation of 1.4%).

  8. Electro-optical equivalent calibration technology for high-energy laser energy meters.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ji Feng; Chang, Yan; Sun, Li Qun; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Xiao Yang; Zhang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Electro-optical equivalent calibration with high calibration power and high equivalence is particularly well-suited to the calibration of high-energy laser energy meters. A large amount of energy is reserved during this process, however, which continues to radiate after power-off. This study measured the radiation efficiency of a halogen tungsten lamp during power-on and after power-off in order to calculate the total energy irradiated by a lamp until the high-energy laser energy meter reaches thermal equilibrium. A calibration system was designed based on the measurement results, and the calibration equivalence of the system was analyzed in detail. Results show that measurement precision is significantly affected by the absorption factor of the absorption chamber and by heat loss in the energy meter. Calibration precision is successfully improved by enhancing the equivalent power and reducing power-on time. The electro-optical equivalent calibration system, measurement uncertainty of which was evaluated as 2.4% (k = 2), was used to calibrate a graphite-cone-absorption-cavity absolute energy meter, yielding a calibration coefficient of 1.009 and measurement uncertainty of 3.5% (k = 2). A water-absorption-type high-energy laser energy meter with measurement uncertainty of 4.8% (k = 2) was considered the reference standard, and compared to the energy meter calibrated in this study, yielded a correction factor of 0.995 (standard deviation of 1.4%).

  9. Vision ray calibration for the quantitative geometric description of general imaging and projection optics in metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Bothe, Thorsten; Li Wansong; Schulte, Michael; von Kopylow, Christoph; Bergmann, Ralf B.; Jueptner, Werner P. O.

    2010-10-20

    Exact geometric calibration of optical devices like projectors or cameras is the basis for utilizing them in quantitative metrological applications. The common state-of-the-art photogrammetric pinhole-imaging-based models with supplemental polynomial corrections fail in the presence of nonsymmetric or high-spatial-frequency distortions and in describing caustics efficiently. These problems are solved by our vision ray calibration (VRC), which is proposed in this paper. The VRC takes an optical mapping system modeled as a black box and directly delivers corresponding vision rays for each mapped pixel. The underlying model, the calibration process, and examples are visualized and reviewed, demonstrating the potential of the VRC.

  10. Calibration of optical probe instruments for the measurement of surface microtopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainsah, E.; Dong, Weiping P.; King, Tim

    1995-01-01

    Although noncontacting instruments for the measurement of the 3D microtopography of surfaces are now widely available and are used on a routine basis in many branches of science and engineering, information on many aspects of their use, from measurement through characterization to interpretation, is still limited. One important area in which clear information is required is calibration. This paper sets out to breach some of the gap by proposing routines for the complete calibration of optical probe based instruments for the measurement of surface microtopography. It is suggested that contacting and noncontacting instruments can be calibrated in a very similar manner, but that a few subtle but relevant differences need to be borne in mind and the calibration routine modified accordingly. The calibration of stylus instruments using a calibrated sphere as practiced by some instrument manufacturers (and as is common practice with coordinate measurement machines - CMM) has been advocated with the observation that this technique might be of even greater relevance in optical probe based systems. A new technique based on optical sensors is also proposed for the calibration of the diameter of the optical probe.

  11. Recent Progress in Distributed Fiber Optic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiaoyi; Chen, Liang

    2012-01-01

    Rayleigh, Brillouin and Raman scatterings in fibers result from the interaction of photons with local material characteristic features like density, temperature and strain. For example an acoustic/mechanical wave generates a dynamic density variation; such a variation may be affected by local temperature, strain, vibration and birefringence. By detecting changes in the amplitude, frequency and phase of light scattered along a fiber, one can realize a distributed fiber sensor for measuring localized temperature, strain, vibration and birefringence over lengths ranging from meters to one hundred kilometers. Such a measurement can be made in the time domain or frequency domain to resolve location information. With coherent detection of the scattered light one can observe changes in birefringence and beat length for fibers and devices. The progress on state of the art technology for sensing performance, in terms of spatial resolution and limitations on sensing length is reviewed. These distributed sensors can be used for disaster prevention in the civil structural monitoring of pipelines, bridges, dams and railroads. A sensor with centimeter spatial resolution and high precision measurement of temperature, strain, vibration and birefringence can find applications in aerospace smart structures, material processing, and the characterization of optical materials and devices. PMID:23012508

  12. Recent progress in distributed fiber optic sensors.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiaoyi; Chen, Liang

    2012-01-01

    Rayleigh, Brillouin and Raman scatterings in fibers result from the interaction of photons with local material characteristic features like density, temperature and strain. For example an acoustic/mechanical wave generates a dynamic density variation; such a variation may be affected by local temperature, strain, vibration and birefringence. By detecting changes in the amplitude, frequency and phase of light scattered along a fiber, one can realize a distributed fiber sensor for measuring localized temperature, strain, vibration and birefringence over lengths ranging from meters to one hundred kilometers. Such a measurement can be made in the time domain or frequency domain to resolve location information. With coherent detection of the scattered light one can observe changes in birefringence and beat length for fibers and devices. The progress on state of the art technology for sensing performance, in terms of spatial resolution and limitations on sensing length is reviewed. These distributed sensors can be used for disaster prevention in the civil structural monitoring of pipelines, bridges, dams and railroads. A sensor with centimeter spatial resolution and high precision measurement of temperature, strain, vibration and birefringence can find applications in aerospace smart structures, material processing, and the characterization of optical materials and devices. PMID:23012508

  13. Absolute Calibration of Optical Satellite Sensors Using Libya 4 Pseudo Invariant Calibration Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishra, Nischal; Helder, Dennis; Angal, Amit; Choi, Jason; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to report the improvements in an empirical absolute calibration model developed at South Dakota State University using Libya 4 (+28.55 deg, +23.39 deg) pseudo invariant calibration site (PICS). The approach was based on use of the Terra MODIS as the radiometer to develop an absolute calibration model for the spectral channels covered by this instrument from visible to shortwave infrared. Earth Observing One (EO-1) Hyperion, with a spectral resolution of 10 nm, was used to extend the model to cover visible and near-infrared regions. A simple Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution function (BRDF) model was generated using Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations over Libya 4 and the resulting model was validated with nadir data acquired from satellite sensors such as Aqua MODIS and Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+). The improvements in the absolute calibration model to account for the BRDF due to off-nadir measurements and annual variations in the atmosphere are summarized. BRDF models due to off-nadir viewing angles have been derived using the measurements from EO-1 Hyperion. In addition to L7 ETM+, measurements from other sensors such as Aqua MODIS, UK-2 Disaster Monitoring Constellation (DMC), ENVISAT Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) and Operational Land Imager (OLI) onboard Landsat 8 (L8), which was launched in February 2013, were employed to validate the model. These satellite sensors differ in terms of the width of their spectral bandpasses, overpass time, off-nadir-viewing capabilities, spatial resolution and temporal revisit time, etc. The results demonstrate that the proposed empirical calibration model has accuracy of the order of 3% with an uncertainty of about 2% for the sensors used in the study.

  14. Mach-zehnder based optical marker/comb generator for streak camera calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Edward Kirk

    2015-03-03

    This disclosure is directed to a method and apparatus for generating marker and comb indicia in an optical environment using a Mach-Zehnder (M-Z) modulator. High speed recording devices are configured to record image or other data defining a high speed event. To calibrate and establish time reference, the markers or combs are indicia which serve as timing pulses (markers) or a constant-frequency train of optical pulses (comb) to be imaged on a streak camera for accurate time based calibration and time reference. The system includes a camera, an optic signal generator which provides an optic signal to an M-Z modulator and biasing and modulation signal generators configured to provide input to the M-Z modulator. An optical reference signal is provided to the M-Z modulator. The M-Z modulator modulates the reference signal to a higher frequency optical signal which is output through a fiber coupled link to the streak camera.

  15. Progress in linear optics, non-linear optics and surface alignment of liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, H.L.; Meyer, R.B.; Hurd, A.J.; Karn, A.J.; Arakelian, S.M.; Shen, Y.R.; Sanda, P.N.; Dove, D.B.; Jansen, S.A.; Hoffmann, R.

    1989-01-01

    We first discuss the progress in linear optics, in particular, the formulation and application of geometrical-optics approximation and its generalization. We then discuss the progress in non-linear optics, in particular, the enhancement of a first-order Freedericksz transition and intrinsic optical bistability in homeotropic and parallel oriented nematic liquid crystal cells. Finally, we discuss the liquid crystal alignment and surface effects on field-induced Freedericksz transition. 50 refs.

  16. Recent progress in tissue optical clearing

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dan; Larin, Kirill V; Luo, Qingming; Tuchin, Valery V

    2013-01-01

    Tissue optical clearing technique provides a prospective solution for the application of advanced optical methods in life sciences. This paper gives a review of recent developments in tissue optical clearing techniques. The physical, molecular and physiological mechanisms of tissue optical clearing are overviewed and discussed. Various methods for enhancing penetration of optical-clearing agents into tissue, such as physical methods, chemical-penetration enhancers and combination of physical and chemical methods are introduced. Combining the tissue optical clearing technique with advanced microscopy image or labeling technique, applications for 3D microstructure of whole tissues such as brain and central nervous system with unprecedented resolution are demonstrated. Moreover, the difference in diffusion and/or clearing ability of selected agents in healthy versus pathological tissues can provide a highly sensitive indicator of the tissue health/pathology condition. Finally, recent advances in optical clearing of soft or hard tissue for in vivo imaging and phototherapy are introduced. PMID:24348874

  17. Calibration of a dual-trap optical tweezers for single molecule force spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guoqing; Hu, Chunguang; Gao, Xiaoqing; Su, Chenguang; Wang, Sirong; Lei, Hai; Hu, Xiaodong; Li, Hongbin; Hu, Xiaotang

    2015-10-01

    Optical tweezers has shown its significant advantages in applying pico-Newton force on micro beads and handling them with nanometer-level precision, and becomes a powerful tool for single-molecule biology. Many excellent researching results in use of the optical tweezers have been reported. Most of them focus on the single-trap optical tweezers experiments. However, when a single-trap optical tweezers is applied to biological molecule, there is often an obvious noise from the sample chamber holder to which one end of the sample molecule is tethered. In contrast, a dual-trap optical tweezers can intrinsically avoid this problem because both ends of the sample tethered to microspheres are manipulated with two separate optical traps. In order to force the molecule precisely, it is of importance to do calibrations for both traps. Many approaches have been studied to obtain the stiffness and sensitivity of the trap, but those are not quite suitable for making calibration during experiment. Here, we use a modified method of power spectrum density (PSD) for the calibrations of the stiffness and sensitivity of the traps, which combines a sinusoidal motion of the sample stage. The main strength of the method is that the beads used for the calibration also can be used in experiment later. In addition, the calibration can be performed during experiment. Finally, an experiment using a dsDNA molecule to test the system is presented. The results show that the calibration approach for the dual-trap optical tweezers is efficient and accurate.

  18. Calibrating oscillation response of a piezo-stage using optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jin-Hua; Li, Di; Hu, Xin-Yao; Zhong, Min-Cheng; Wang, Zi-Qiang; Gong, Lei; Liu, Wei-Wei; Li, Yin-Mei

    2015-09-21

    In optical tweezers, a piezo-stage (PZT) is widely used to precisely position samples for force clamp, calibrating optical trap and stretching DNA. For a trapped bead in solution, the oscillation response of PZT is vital for all kinds of applications. A coupling ratio, actual amplitude to nominal amplitude, can be calibrated by power spectral density during sinusoidal oscillations. With oscillation frequency increasing, coupling ratio decreases in both x- and y-directions, which is also confirmed by the calibration with light scattering of scanning two aligned beads on slide. Those oscillation responses are related with deformability of chamber and the intrinsic characteristics of PZT. If we take nominal amplitude as actual amplitude for sinusoidal oscillations at 50 Hz, the amplitude is overestimated ~2 times in x-direction and ~3 times in y-direction. That will lead to huge errors for subsequent calibrations.

  19. Model Calibration and Optics Correction Using Orbit Response Matrix in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, V.A.; Prebys, E.; Petrenko, A.V.; Kopp, S.E.; McAteer, M.J.; /Texas U.

    2012-05-01

    We have calibrated the lattice model and measured the beta and dispersion functions in Fermilab's fast-ramping Booster synchrotron using the Linear Optics from Closed Orbit (LOCO) method. We used the calibrated model to implement ramped coupling, dispersion, and beta-beating corrections throughout the acceleration cycle, reducing horizontal beta beating from its initial magnitude of {approx}30% to {approx}10%, and essentially eliminating vertical beta-beating and transverse coupling.

  20. Fast wavelength calibration method for spectrometers based on waveguide comb optical filter

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhengang; Huang, Meizhen Zou, Ye; Wang, Yang; Sun, Zhenhua; Cao, Zhuangqi

    2015-04-15

    A novel fast wavelength calibration method for spectrometers based on a standard spectrometer and a double metal-cladding waveguide comb optical filter (WCOF) is proposed and demonstrated. By using the WCOF device, a wide-spectrum beam is comb-filtered, which is very suitable for spectrometer wavelength calibration. The influence of waveguide filter’s structural parameters and the beam incident angle on the comb absorption peaks’ wavelength and its bandwidth are also discussed. The verification experiments were carried out in the wavelength range of 200–1100 nm with satisfactory results. Comparing with the traditional wavelength calibration method based on discrete sparse atomic emission or absorption lines, the new method has some advantages: sufficient calibration data, high accuracy, short calibration time, fit for produce process, stability, etc.

  1. The optical field angle distortion calibration feasibility study for the Hubble Space Telescope fine guidance sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luchetti, K.; Abshire, G.; Hallock, L.; Mccutcheon, R.

    1988-01-01

    The results of an analytical study to investigate the feasibility of calibrating the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's) fine guidance sensors (FGSs) within HST mission accuracy limits are presented. The study has two purposes: (1) to determine the mathematical feasibility of the optical field angle distortion (OFAD) calibration algorithm and (2) to confirm that the OFAD, plate scale, and FGS-to-FGS alignment calibration algorithms produced a calibration of the FGSs that satisfied mission requirements. The study concluded that the mathematical specification of the OFAD algorithm is adequate and permits a determination of the FGS calibration parameters (accurate to better than 0.003 arc-second) sufficient to meet the mission requirements. The algorithms implemented, the characteristics of the simulated data and procedures for data analysis, and the study's results are discussed. In addition, several useful techniques for improving the stability and accuracy of the OFAD solution are outlined.

  2. Calibrating single-ended fiber-optic Raman spectra distributed temperature sensing data.

    PubMed

    Hausner, Mark B; Suárez, Francisco; Glander, Kenneth E; van de Giesen, Nick; Selker, John S; Tyler, Scott W

    2011-01-01

    Hydrologic research is a very demanding application of fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) in terms of precision, accuracy and calibration. The physics behind the most frequently used DTS instruments are considered as they apply to four calibration methods for single-ended DTS installations. The new methods presented are more accurate than the instrument-calibrated data, achieving accuracies on the order of tenths of a degree root mean square error (RMSE) and mean bias. Effects of localized non-uniformities that violate the assumptions of single-ended calibration data are explored and quantified. Experimental design considerations such as selection of integration times or selection of the length of the reference sections are discussed, and the impacts of these considerations on calibrated temperatures are explored in two case studies. PMID:22346676

  3. Calibrating Single-Ended Fiber-Optic Raman Spectra Distributed Temperature Sensing Data

    PubMed Central

    Hausner, Mark B.; Suárez, Francisco; Glander, Kenneth E.; van de Giesen, Nick; Selker, John S.; Tyler, Scott W.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrologic research is a very demanding application of fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) in terms of precision, accuracy and calibration. The physics behind the most frequently used DTS instruments are considered as they apply to four calibration methods for single-ended DTS installations. The new methods presented are more accurate than the instrument-calibrated data, achieving accuracies on the order of tenths of a degree root mean square error (RMSE) and mean bias. Effects of localized non-uniformities that violate the assumptions of single-ended calibration data are explored and quantified. Experimental design considerations such as selection of integration times or selection of the length of the reference sections are discussed, and the impacts of these considerations on calibrated temperatures are explored in two case studies. PMID:22346676

  4. Optical System Error Analysis and Calibration Method of High-Accuracy Star Trackers

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ting; Xing, Fei; You, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The star tracker is a high-accuracy attitude measurement device widely used in spacecraft. Its performance depends largely on the precision of the optical system parameters. Therefore, the analysis of the optical system parameter errors and a precise calibration model are crucial to the accuracy of the star tracker. Research in this field is relatively lacking a systematic and universal analysis up to now. This paper proposes in detail an approach for the synthetic error analysis of the star tracker, without the complicated theoretical derivation. This approach can determine the error propagation relationship of the star tracker, and can build intuitively and systematically an error model. The analysis results can be used as a foundation and a guide for the optical design, calibration, and compensation of the star tracker. A calibration experiment is designed and conducted. Excellent calibration results are achieved based on the calibration model. To summarize, the error analysis approach and the calibration method are proved to be adequate and precise, and could provide an important guarantee for the design, manufacture, and measurement of high-accuracy star trackers. PMID:23567527

  5. Calibration of fiber-optic shock pyrometer using high-power coiled tungsten lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fat'yanov, O. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2015-06-01

    Comparison of all known calibration sources indicates that coiled standards of spectral irradiance, despite their very non-uniform brightness, are currently the best practical choice for accurate shock temperature measurements above 3000 K by optical pyrometry. We review all three documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to a coiled lamp and show that only one technique, with no fiber-optics employed, is free of major radiometric errors. We report the development of a new, accurate to 5% and precise to 1-1.5% calibration procedure for the modified Caltech 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution combined open beam and fiber-coupled instrument. A designated central area of an 0.7x demagnified image of 900 W coiled-coil lamp filament is used, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. The results of two slightly different cross-calibrations are reported and the procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of NewFocus 1801 amplified photodetectors. The most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic pyrometer using a coiled irradiance standard lamp are discussed. All these conditions are validated in actual radiometric tests and shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO.

  6. Precision alignment and calibration of optical systems using computer generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyle, Laura Elizabeth

    As techniques for manufacturing and metrology advance, optical systems are being designed with more complexity than ever before. Given these prescriptions, alignment and calibration can be a limiting factor in their final performance. Computer generated holograms (CGHs) have several unique properties that make them powerful tools for meeting these demanding tolerances. This work will present three novel methods for alignment and calibration of optical systems using computer generated holograms. Alignment methods using CGHs require that the optical wavefront created by the CGH be related to a mechanical datum to locate it space. An overview of existing methods is provided as background, then two new alignment methods are discussed in detail. In the first method, the CGH contact Ball Alignment Tool (CBAT) is used to align a ball or sphere mounted retroreflector (SMR) to a Fresnel zone plate pattern with micron level accuracy. The ball is bonded directly onto the CGH substrate and provides permanent, accurate registration between the optical wavefront and a mechanical reference to locate the CGH in space. A prototype CBAT was built and used to align and bond an SMR to a CGH. In the second method, CGH references are used to align axi-symmetric optics in four degrees of freedom with low uncertainty and real time feedback. The CGHs create simultaneous 3D optical references where the zero order reflection sets tilt and the first diffracted order sets centration. The flexibility of the CGH design can be used to accommodate a wide variety of optical systems and maximize sensitivity to misalignments. A 2-CGH prototype system was aligned multiplied times and the alignment uncertainty was quantified and compared to an error model. Finally, an enhanced calibration method is presented. It uses multiple perturbed measurements of a master sphere to improve the calibration of CGH-based Fizeau interferometers ultimately measuring aspheric test surfaces. The improvement in the

  7. Nuclear reactor pulse calibration using a CdZnTe electro-optic radiation detector.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Kyle A; Geuther, Jeffrey A; Neihart, James L; Riedel, Todd A; Rojeski, Ronald A; Saddler, Jeffrey L; Schmidt, Aaron J; McGregor, Douglas S

    2012-07-01

    A CdZnTe electro-optic radiation detector was used to calibrate nuclear reactor pulses. The standard configuration of the Pockels cell has collimated light passing through an optically transparent CdZnTe crystal located between crossed polarizers. The transmitted light was focused onto an IR sensitive photodiode. Calibrations of reactor pulses were performed using the CdZnTe Pockels cell by measuring the change in the photodiode current, repeated 10 times for each set of reactor pulses, set between 1.00 and 2.50 dollars in 0.50 increments of reactivity.

  8. The Optical Field Angle Distortion Calibration of HST Fine Guidance Sensors 1R and 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McArthur, B.; Benedict, G. F.; Jefferys, W. H.; Nelan, E.

    2006-01-01

    To date five OFAD (Optical Field Angle Distortion) calibrations have been performed with a star field in M35, four on FGS3 and one on FGS1, all analyzed by the Astrometry Science Team. We have recently completed an improved FGS1R OFAD calibration. The ongoing Long Term Stability Tests have also been analyzed and incorporated into these calibrations, which are time-dependent due to on-orbit changes in the FGS. Descriptions of these tests and the results of our OFAD modeling are given. Because all OFAD calibrations use the same star field, we calibrate FGS 1 and FGS 3 simultaneously. This increases the precision of our input catalog,resulting in an improvement in both the FGS 1 and FGS 3 calibrations. A redetermination of the proper motions,using 12 years of HST data has significantly improved our calibration. Residuals to our OFAD modeling indicate that FGS 1 will provide astrometry superior to FGS 3 by approx. 20%. Past and future FGS astrometric science supported by these calibrations is briefly reviewed.

  9. Research progress of stem cells on glaucomatous optic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ya-Sha; Xu, Jian; Peng, Jun; Li, Ping; Wen, Xiao-Juan; Liu, Yue; Chen, Ke-Zhu; Liu, Jia-Qi; Wang, Ying; Peng, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma, the second leading cause of blindness, is an irreversible optic neuropathy. The mechanism of optic nerve injury caused by glaucoma is undefined at present. There is no effective treatment method for the injury. Stem cells have the capacity of self-renewal and differentiation. These two features have made them become the research focus on improving the injury at present. This paper reviews the application progress on different types of stem cells therapy for optic nerve injury caused by glaucoma. PMID:27588279

  10. Research progress of stem cells on glaucomatous optic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ya-Sha; Xu, Jian; Peng, Jun; Li, Ping; Wen, Xiao-Juan; Liu, Yue; Chen, Ke-Zhu; Liu, Jia-Qi; Wang, Ying; Peng, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma, the second leading cause of blindness, is an irreversible optic neuropathy. The mechanism of optic nerve injury caused by glaucoma is undefined at present. There is no effective treatment method for the injury. Stem cells have the capacity of self-renewal and differentiation. These two features have made them become the research focus on improving the injury at present. This paper reviews the application progress on different types of stem cells therapy for optic nerve injury caused by glaucoma.

  11. Research progress of stem cells on glaucomatous optic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ya-Sha; Xu, Jian; Peng, Jun; Li, Ping; Wen, Xiao-Juan; Liu, Yue; Chen, Ke-Zhu; Liu, Jia-Qi; Wang, Ying; Peng, Qing-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma, the second leading cause of blindness, is an irreversible optic neuropathy. The mechanism of optic nerve injury caused by glaucoma is undefined at present. There is no effective treatment method for the injury. Stem cells have the capacity of self-renewal and differentiation. These two features have made them become the research focus on improving the injury at present. This paper reviews the application progress on different types of stem cells therapy for optic nerve injury caused by glaucoma. PMID:27588279

  12. Progress in Evaluating Quantitative Optical Gas Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development of advanced fugitive emission detection and assessment technologies that facilitate cost effective leak and malfunction mitigation strategies is an ongoing goal shared by industry, regulators, and environmental groups. Optical gas imaging (OGI) represents an importan...

  13. Glaucoma progression associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Nucci, Carlo; Martucci, Alessio; Mancino, Raffaele; Cerulli, Luciano

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a case of open-angle glaucoma progression associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. Single case analysis method is used. A 53-year-old woman with a previous diagnosis of glaucoma presented with progressive visual field loss. Complete ophthalmological examination and blood tests were negative for other concomitant diseases. Genetic counseling revealed mitochondrial DNA mutation compatible with the diagnosis of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. In conclusion, the case describes the concomitant occurrence of open-angle glaucoma and Leber's optic neuropathy. We hypothesize that the two diseases may have a cumulative effect on oxidative stress and retinal ganglion cell death with the consequent rapid progression of visual impairment. Screening for mitochondrial DNA mutations may be requested in patients with glaucoma who, despite pharmacologically controlled intraocular pressure, show rapid progression of the disease.

  14. Optical Comb Generation for Streak Camera Calibration for Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Justin, Terence Davies, Frans Janson, Bruce Marshall, Perry Bell, Daniel Kalantar, Joseph Kimbrough, Stephen Vernon, Oliver Sweningsen

    2008-09-18

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is coming on-line to support physics experimentation for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and Stockpile Stewardship (SS). Optical streak cameras are an integral part of the experimental diagnostics instrumentation at NIF. To accurately reduce streak camera data a highly accurate temporal calibration is required. This article describes a technique for simultaneously generating a precise +/- 2 ps optical marker pulse (fiducial reference) and trains of precisely timed, short-duration optical pulses (so-called “comb” pulse trains) that are suitable for the timing calibrations. These optical pulse generators are used with the LLNL optical streak cameras. They are small, portable light sources that, in the comb mode, produce a series of temporally short, uniformly spaced optical pulses, using a laser diode source. Comb generators have been produced with pulse-train repetition rates up to 10 GHz at 780 nm, and somewhat lower frequencies at 664 nm. Individual pulses can be as short as 25-ps FWHM. Signal output is via a fiber-optic connector on the front panel of the generator box. The optical signal is transported from comb generator to streak camera through multi-mode, graded-index optical fiber.

  15. A Precision Optical Calibration Module (POCAM) for IceCube-Gen2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkovič, M.; Abraham, K.; Holzapfel, K.; Krings, K.; Resconi, E.; Veenkamp, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present here a new concept of an in-situ self-calibrated isotropic light source for the future IceCube-Gen2 neutrino detector called the Precision Optical Calibration Module (POCAM). IceCube-Gen2 will be a matrix of light sensors buried deep in the ice at the geographic South Pole. The timing, the location, and the amount of Cherenkov light deposited by the secondary charged particles are used to reconstruct the properties of the incident neutrinos. The reconstruction relies on a detailed detector model that includes the response of optical modules to the Cherenkov light, as well as the optical properties of the detector medium - the natural Antarctic ice. To understand these properties, both natural, and artificial light sources are already used for calibration. New calibration devices are being developed in order to improve the precision of these measurements, and reduce systematic errors. The POCAM concept is based on the principle of an inverted integrating sphere. The main components are LEDs emitting light at several wavelengths and solid-state light sensors e.g. calibrated photodiode or silicon photomultipliers to monitor the emitted light intensity. We report on the current status of the POCAM R&D.

  16. Vibrating-Wire, Supercooled Liquid Water Content Sensor Calibration and Characterization Progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael C.; Bognar, John A.; Guest, Daniel; Bunt, Fred

    2016-01-01

    NASA conducted a winter 2015 field campaign using weather balloons at the NASA Glenn Research Center to generate a validation database for the NASA Icing Remote Sensing System. The weather balloons carried a specialized, disposable, vibrating-wire sensor to determine supercooled liquid water content aloft. Significant progress has been made to calibrate and characterize these sensors. Calibration testing of the vibrating-wire sensors was carried out in a specially developed, low-speed, icing wind tunnel, and the results were analyzed. The sensor ice accretion behavior was also documented and analyzed. Finally, post-campaign evaluation of the balloon soundings revealed a gradual drift in the sensor data with increasing altitude. This behavior was analyzed and a method to correct for the drift in the data was developed.

  17. Optical calibration of pressure sensors for high pressures and temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A F; Gregoryanz, E; Zaug, J M; Crowhurst, J C

    2004-10-04

    We present the results of Raman scattering measurements of diamond ({sup 12}C) and of cubic boron nitride (cBN), and fluorescence measurements of ruby, Sm:YAG, and SrB{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Sm{sup 2+} in the diamond anvil cell (DAC) at high pressures and temperatures. These measurements were accompanied by synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements on gold. We have extended the room-temperature calibration of Sm:YAG in a quasihydrostatic regime up to 100 GPa. The ruby scale is shown to systematically underestimate pressure at high pressures and temperatures compared with all other sensors. On this basis, we propose a new high-temperature ruby pressure scale that should be valid to at least 100 GPa and 850 K. Historically, the accurate determination of pressure at high temperature and ultrahigh pressure has been extremely difficult. In fact, the lack of a general pressure scale nullifies, to a significant extent, the great innovations that have been made in recent years in DAC experimental techniques [1]. Now, more than ever a scale is required whose accuracy is comparable with that of the experimental data. Since pressure in the DAC is dependent on temperature (due to thermal pressure and also to changes in the properties of the materials that constitute the DAC) such a scale requires quantitative, and separate measurements of pressure and temperature.

  18. Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer: optical characterization of the calibration panels.

    PubMed

    McGuckin, B T; Haner, D A; Menzies, R T

    1997-09-20

    The reflectance properties of an engineering model (EM) of the Spectralon panel intended for use within an on-board calibrator (OBC) on the NASA Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) instrument have been fully characterized with regard to panel uniformity and isotropy in response to three incident laser wavelengths of 442, 632.8, and 859.9 nm. A regional variation in the relative bidirectional reflectance factor (RBRF) across the surface of the EM panel, which contributes to spatial nonuniformity at the +/-2% level, has been measured at all three laser wavelengths. Further, a reflectance anisotropy has been identified. The mechanism causing these departures from the ideal Lambertian surface may originate in the sanding of the Spectralon surface in the final stage of preparation. This supposition is corroborated by measurements made on a pressed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) panel in which a greatly reduced anisotropy in panel RBRF is measured. The EM panel RBRF exhibits a deviation from Lambertian characteristics as an off-specular peak in the forward scattering direction. A common crossover point at an angle of reflection of approximately 37 degrees at which the BRF is constant within +/-0.4% for an illumination angle range of theta(i) = 30 degrees-60 degrees is observed at all three wavelengths. Two Spectralon protoflight panels that were fabricated after the EM was studied were also the subject of a uniformity study over part of the area of the Spectralon panels at the 442-nm wavelength. The analysis indicated that the panel uniformity satisfies the +/-0.5% criterion, which indicates improved panel preparation. However, the off-specular peak in the forward scattering direction was essentially unchanged, with the crossover point at approximately 37 degrees. PMID:18259576

  19. About the effects of polarising optics on lidar signals and the Δ90 calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudenthaler, Volker

    2016-08-01

    This paper provides a model for assessing the effects of polarising optics on the signals of typical lidar systems, which is based on the description of the individual optical elements of the lidar and of the state of polarisation of the light by means of the Müller-Stokes formalism. General analytical equations are derived for the dependence of the lidar signals on polarisation parameters, for the linear depolarisation ratio, and for the signals of different polarisation calibration setups. The equations can also be used for the calculation of systematic errors caused by nonideal optical elements, their rotational misalignment, and by non-ideal laser polarisation. We present the description of the lidar signals including the polarisation calibration in a closed form, which can be applied for a large variety of lidar systems.

  20. Absolute calibration method for fast-streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Mark D.; Frogget, Brent; Oliver, Bryan Velten; Maron, Yitzhak; Droemer, Darryl W.; Crain, Marlon D.

    2010-04-01

    This report outlines a convenient method to calibrate fast (<1ns resolution) streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems. Such a system is used to collect spectral data on plasmas generated in the A-K gap of electron beam diodes fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (8-12MV, 140-200kA). On RITS, light is collected through a small diameter (200 micron) optical fiber and recorded on a fast streak camera at the output of 1 meter Czerny-Turner monochromator (F/7 optics). To calibrate such a system, it is necessary to efficiently couple light from a spectral lamp into a 200 micron diameter fiber, split it into its spectral components, with 10 Angstroms or less resolution, and record it on a streak camera with 1ns or less temporal resolution.

  1. Calibration of soil moisture sensing with subsurface heated fiber optics using numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez-Buelga, Javier; Rodríguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Sánchez Calvo, Raul; Gil-Rodríguez, María.; Sayde, Chadi; Selker, John S.

    2016-04-01

    The heat pulse probe method can be implemented with actively heated fiber optics (AHFO) to obtain distributed measurements of soil water content (θ) by using reported soil thermal responses measured by Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) and with a soil-specific calibration relationship. However, most reported applications have been calibrated to homogeneous soils in a laboratory, while inexpensive efficient in situ calibration procedures useful in heterogeneous soils are lacking. Here we employed the Hydrus 2-D/3-D code to define a soil-specific calibration curve. We define a 2-D geometry of the fiber optic cable and the surrounding soil media, and simulate heat pulses to capture the soil thermal response at different soil water contents. The model was validated in an irrigated field using DTS data from two locations along the FO deployment in which reference moisture sensors were installed. Results indicate that θ was measured with the model-based calibration with accuracy better than 0.022 m3 m-3.

  2. Calibration of an optical condensate measurement technique using indirect static headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hoke, P B; Loconto, P R; McGrath, J J

    2001-12-01

    Researchers in the Department of Mechanical Engineering seek to obtain a means to measure less than 3 mg of H2O that adheres to a metal surface as condensate. The objective is to calibrate optical reflectance measurements of an aluminum surface as a function of the condensate thickness present. Collaboration with the Hazardous Substance Research Center at Michigan State University results in the development of an indirect static headspace gas chromatographic technique capable of measuring H2O in low-milligram quantities. The technique utilizes manual headspace sampling, a megabore capillary column, and a flame ionization detector. A correlation of r2 = 0.999 is obtained for the calibration of the indirect measurement technique. The calibration of the analytical instrument demonstrates adequate precision (< +/- 50 microg at a 95% confidence interval) for such a heterogeneous sample. The calibration samples consist of a strip of aluminum metal, H2O, and pulverized calcium carbide to convert the H2O to acetylene. A scaled calibration technique is used to simplify handling trace water volumes. The surface reflectance measurements are found to correlate well (r2 = 0.935) with measurements of the condensate mass. This result facilitates the development of an optical mass-transfer measurement technique. This study focuses on the analytical method and its relationship with engineering research.

  3. Absolute calibration method for nanosecond-resolved, time-streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Mark D.; Oliver, Bryan V.; Droemer, Darryl W.; Frogget, Brent; Crain, Marlon D.; Maron, Yitzhak

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes a convenient and accurate method to calibrate fast (<1 ns resolution) streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems. Such systems are inherently difficult to calibrate due to the lack of sufficiently intense, calibrated light sources. Such a system is used to collect spectral data on plasmas generated in electron beam diodes fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (8-12MV, 140-200kA) at Sandia National Laboratories. On RITS, plasma light is collected through a small diameter (200 μm) optical fiber and recorded on a fast streak camera at the output of a 1 meter Czerny-Turner monochromator. For this paper, a 300 W xenon short arc lamp (Oriel Model 6258) was used as the calibration source. Since the radiance of the xenon arc varies from cathode to anode, just the area around the tip of the cathode ("hotspot") was imaged onto the fiber, to produce the highest intensity output. To compensate for chromatic aberrations, the signal was optimized at each wavelength measured. Output power was measured using 10 nm bandpass interference filters and a calibrated photodetector. These measurements give power at discrete wavelengths across the spectrum, and when linearly interpolated, provide a calibration curve for the lamp. The shape of the spectrum is determined by the collective response of the optics, monochromator, and streak tube across the spectral region of interest. The ratio of the spectral curve to the measured bandpass filter curve at each wavelength produces a correction factor (Q) curve. This curve is then applied to the experimental data and the resultant spectra are given in absolute intensity units (photons/sec/cm2/steradian/nm). Error analysis shows this method to be accurate to within +/- 20%, which represents a high level of accuracy for this type of measurement.

  4. Absolute calibration method for nanosecond-resolved, time-streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Mark D; Oliver, Bryan V; Droemer, Darryl W; Frogget, Brent; Crain, Marlon D; Maron, Yitzhak

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes a convenient and accurate method to calibrate fast (<1 ns resolution) streaked, fiber optic light collection, spectroscopy systems. Such systems are inherently difficult to calibrate due to the lack of sufficiently intense, calibrated light sources. Such a system is used to collect spectral data on plasmas generated in electron beam diodes fielded on the RITS-6 accelerator (8-12MV, 140-200kA) at Sandia National Laboratories. On RITS, plasma light is collected through a small diameter (200 μm) optical fiber and recorded on a fast streak camera at the output of a 1 meter Czerny-Turner monochromator. For this paper, a 300 W xenon short arc lamp (Oriel Model 6258) was used as the calibration source. Since the radiance of the xenon arc varies from cathode to anode, just the area around the tip of the cathode ("hotspot") was imaged onto the fiber, to produce the highest intensity output. To compensate for chromatic aberrations, the signal was optimized at each wavelength measured. Output power was measured using 10 nm bandpass interference filters and a calibrated photodetector. These measurements give power at discrete wavelengths across the spectrum, and when linearly interpolated, provide a calibration curve for the lamp. The shape of the spectrum is determined by the collective response of the optics, monochromator, and streak tube across the spectral region of interest. The ratio of the spectral curve to the measured bandpass filter curve at each wavelength produces a correction factor (Q) curve. This curve is then applied to the experimental data and the resultant spectra are given in absolute intensity units (photons/sec/cm(2)/steradian/nm). Error analysis shows this method to be accurate to within +∕- 20%, which represents a high level of accuracy for this type of measurement. PMID:22938275

  5. In situ calibrating optical tweezers with sinusoidal-wave drag force method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di; Zhou, Jin-Hua; Hu, Xin-Yao; Zhong, Min-Cheng; Gong, Lei; Wang, Zi-Qiang; Wang, Hao-Wei; Li, Yin-Mei

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a corrected sinusoidal-wave drag force method (SDFM) into optical tweezers to calibrate the trapping stiffness of the optical trap and conversion factor (CF) of photodetectors. First, the theoretical analysis and experimental result demonstrate that the correction of SDFM is necessary, especially the error of no correction is up to 11.25% for a bead of 5 μm in diameter. Second, the simulation results demonstrate that the SDFM has a better performance in the calibration of optical tweezers than the triangular-wave drag force method (TDFM) and power spectrum density method (PSDM) at the same signal-to-noise ratio or trapping stiffness. Third, in experiments, the experimental standard deviations of calibration of trapping stiffness and CF with the SDFM are about less than 50% of TDFM and PSDM especially at low laser power. Finally, the experiments of stretching DNA verify that the in situ calibration with the SDFM improves the measurement stability and accuracy. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11302220, 11374292, and 31100555) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB910402).

  6. A new optical system for the determination of deformations and strains: calibration characteristics and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Derwin, K A; Soslowsky, L J; Green, W D; Elder, S H

    1994-10-01

    Many types of optical strain measurement systems have been used for the determination of deformations and strains in soft biological tissues. The purpose of this investigation is to report a new optical strain measurement system developed in our laboratory which offers distinct advantages over systems developed in the past. Our optical strain system has demonstrated excellent performance in calibration and experimental tests. Calibration tests illustrate the system's accuracy to 0.05% strain at 3.52% strain and 0.18% strain at 11.74% strain. Further, this system can measure strains to within 2% measurement error for strains in a 0-11.74% range when 100 microns increments of motion are used for calibration. The resolution of our system appears to be at least as good as the linear micrometer (2 microns) used as a calibrating standard. Errors in strain measurement due to whole specimen rotation or translation are quantified. Rotations about an in-plane axis perpendicular to the direction of strain and translations in/out of the plane of focus result in the largest sources of error. Finally, in an in vitro biomechanical study of the rabbit Achilles tendon, experimental failure strains are 4.3 +/- 0.9% using this system. PMID:7962015

  7. An automated optical wedge calibrator for Dobson ozone spectrophotometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, R. D.; Komhyr, W. D.; Grass, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    The Dobson ozone spectrophotometer measures the difference of intensity between selected wavelengths in the ultraviolet. The method uses an optical attenuator (the 'Wedge') in this measurement. The knowledge of the relationship of the wedge position to the attenuation is critical to the correct calculation of ozone from the measurement. The procedure to determine this relationship is time-consuming, and requires a highly skilled person to perform it correctly. The relationship has been found to change with time. For reliable ozone values, the procedure should be done on a Dobson instrument at regular intervals. Due to the skill and time necessary to perform this procedure, many instruments have gone as long as 15 years between procedures. This article describes an apparatus that performs the procedure under computer control, and is adaptable to the majority of existing Dobson instruments. Part of the apparatus is usable for normal operation of the Dobson instrument, and would allow computer collection of the data and real-time ozone measurements.

  8. Testing and Calibration of Phase Plates for JWST Optical Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Qian; Chu, Jenny; Tournois, Severine; Eichhorn, William; Kubalak, David

    2011-01-01

    Three phase plates were designed to simulate the JWST segmented primary mirror wavefront at three on-orbit alignment stages: coarse phasing, intermediate phasing, and fine phasing. The purpose is to verify JWST's on-orbit wavefront sensing capability. Amongst the three stages, coarse alignment is defined to have piston error between adjacent segments being 30 m to 300 m, intermediate being 0.4 m to 10 m, and fine is below 0.4 m. The phase plates were made of fused silica, and were assembled in JWST Optical Simulator (OSIM). The piston difference was realized by the thickness difference of two adjacent segments. The two important parameters to phase plates are piston and wavefront errors. Dispersed Fringe Sensor (DFS) method was used for initial coarse piston evaluation, which is the emphasis of this paper. Point Diffraction Interferometer (PDI) is used for fine piston and wavefront error. In order to remove piston's 2 pi uncertainty with PDI, three laser wavelengths, 640nm, 660nm, and 780nm, are used for the measurement. The DHS test setup, analysis algorithm and results are presented. The phase plate design concept and its application (i.e. verifying the JWST on-orbit alignment algorithm) are described. The layout of JWST OSIM and the function of phase plates in OSIM are also addressed briefly.

  9. ORION OPTICAL DIAGNOSTIC SYSTEMS Construction and commissioning progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, J. B. A.; Drew, D.; Fyrth, J.; Hill, M. P.; Kemshall, P.; Oades, K.; Harvey, E.; Gumbrell, E. T.

    2012-10-01

    The Orion facility provides a unique combined long- and short-pulse laser capability. We report on the progress in constructing a comprehensive plasma optical diagnostic suite for the facility, developed for a range of warm dense matter and other materials' properties experiments. The first VISAR imaging line for the suite is due to be commissioned in 2012 and its progress will be reported. The system consists of configurable optical elements mounted on a TIM, relay optics to an optical table, optics to direct the light through a VISAR bed onto an optical streak camera and the infrastructure systems to provide remote control and services. Due to the operational model of Orion the diagnostic must have comprehensive remote control for its set up and alignment. This makes the system design more complicated than otherwise. The sub-systems required to give the degree of remote control required will be described. A modified version of the suite's ASBO imaging line was used in 2011 to support the commissioning of Orion's long- and short-pulse laser beam lines by imaging optical emission from laser targets. The set up of this system and the data it recorded with an optical streak camera during a short pulse experiment will be presented.

  10. Functional Optical Coherence Tomography: Principles and Progress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jina; Brown, William; Maher, Jason R.; Levinson, Howard; Wax, Adam

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, several functional extensions of optical coherence tomography (OCT) have emerged, and this review highlights key advances in instrumentation, theoretical analysis, signal processing and clinical application of these extensions. We review five principal extensions: Doppler OCT (DOCT), polarization-sensitive OCT (PS-OCT), optical coherence elastography (OCE), spectroscopic OCT (SOCT), and molecular imaging OCT. The former three have been further developed with studies in both ex vivo and in vivo human tissues. This review emphasizes the newer techniques of SOCT and molecular imaging OCT, which show excellent potential for clinical application but have yet to be well reviewed in the literature. SOCT elucidates tissue characteristics, such as oxygenation and carcinogenesis, by detecting wavelength-dependent absorption and scattering of light in tissues. While SOCT measures endogenous biochemical distributions, molecular imaging OCT detects exogenous molecular contrast agents. These newer advances in functional OCT broaden the potential clinical application of OCT by providing novel ways to understand tissue activity that cannot be accomplished by other current imaging methodologies. PMID:25951836

  11. High-accuracy calibration of an adaptive optics system using a phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B J; Campbell, E W; Olivier, S S; Sweider, D R

    1999-06-23

    A phase-shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) has been integrated into an adaptive optics (AO) system developed by LLNL for use on the three meter Shane telescope at Lick Observatory. The interferometer is an all fiber optic design, which is extremely compact. It is useful for calibrating the control sensors, measuring the aberrations of the entire AO optical train, and measuring the influence functions of the individual actuators on the deformable mirror. The PSDI is particularly well suited for this application because it measures converging, quasi-spherical wavefronts, such as are produced by an AO imaging system. Thus, a PSDI can be used to measure the aberrations of the entire AO system, in-situ and without errors introduced by auxiliary optics. This provides an extremely accurate measurement ({approximately} 5 nm RMS) of the optical properties of the AO system.

  12. Fiber optic microphone having a pressure sensing reflective membrane and a voltage source for calibration purpose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Cuomo, Frank W. (Inventor); Robbins, William E. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A fiber optic microphone is provided for measuring fluctuating pressures. An optical fiber probe having at least one transmitting fiber for transmitting light to a pressure-sensing membrane and at least one receiving fiber for receiving light reflected from a stretched membrane is provided. The pressure-sensing membrane may be stretched for high frequency response. Further, a reflecting surface of the pressure-sensing membrane may have dimensions which substantially correspond to dimensions of a cross section of the optical fiber probe. Further, the fiber optic microphone can be made of materials for use in high temperature environments, for example greater than 1000 F. A fiber optic probe is also provided with a back plate for damping membrane motion. The back plate further provides a means for on-line calibration of the microphone.

  13. The role of modeling in the calibration of the Chandra's optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerius, Diab H.; Cohen, Lester; Edgar, Richard J.; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Hughes, John P.; Nguyen, Dan; Podgorski, William A.; Tibbetts, Michael; Van Speybroeck, Leon P.; Zhao, Ping

    2004-02-01

    The mirrors flown in the Chandra Observatory are, without doubt, some of the most exquisite optics ever flown on a space mission. Their angular resolution is matched by no other X-ray observatory, existing or planned. The promise of that performance, along with a goal of achieving 1% calibration of the optics' characteristics, led to a decision early in the construction and assembly phase of the mission to develop an accurate and detailed model of the optics and their support structure. This model has served in both engineering and scientific capacities; as a cross-check of the design and a predictor of scientific performance; as a driver of the ground calibration effort; and as a diagnostic of the as-built performance. Finally, it serves, directly and indirectly, as the primary vehicle with which Chandra observers interpret the contribution of the optics' characteristics to their data. We present the underlying concepts in the model, as well the mechanical, engineering and metrology inputs. We discuss its use during ground calibration and as a characterization of on-orbit performance. Finally, we present measures of the model's accuracy, where further improvements may be made, and its applicability to other missions.

  14. Investigation on dynamic calibration for an optical-fiber solids concentration probe in gas-solid two-phase flows.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guiling; Liang, Cai; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Daoyin; Xu, Pan; Shen, Liu; Zhao, Changsui

    2013-07-17

    This paper presents a review and analysis of the research that has been carried out on dynamic calibration for optical-fiber solids concentration probes. An introduction to the optical-fiber solids concentration probe was given. Different calibration methods of optical-fiber solids concentration probes reported in the literature were reviewed. In addition, a reflection-type optical-fiber solids concentration probe was uniquely calibrated at nearly full range of the solids concentration from 0 to packed bed concentration. The effects of particle properties (particle size, sphericity and color) on the calibration results were comprehensively investigated. The results show that the output voltage has a tendency to increase with the decreasing particle size, and the effect of particle color on calibration result is more predominant than that of sphericity.

  15. Investigation on Dynamic Calibration for an Optical-Fiber Solids Concentration Probe in Gas-Solid Two-Phase Flows

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guiling; Liang, Cai; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Daoyin; Xu, Pan; Shen, Liu; Zhao, Changsui

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a review and analysis of the research that has been carried out on dynamic calibration for optical-fiber solids concentration probes. An introduction to the optical-fiber solids concentration probe was given. Different calibration methods of optical-fiber solids concentration probes reported in the literature were reviewed. In addition, a reflection-type optical-fiber solids concentration probe was uniquely calibrated at nearly full range of the solids concentration from 0 to packed bed concentration. The effects of particle properties (particle size, sphericity and color) on the calibration results were comprehensively investigated. The results show that the output voltage has a tendency to increase with the decreasing particle size, and the effect of particle color on calibration result is more predominant than that of sphericity. PMID:23867745

  16. Optic neuritis progressing to multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Corona-Vazquez, T; Ruiz-Sandoval, J; Arriada-Mendicoa, N

    1997-02-01

    We report a partially retrospective and longitudinal study of patients with optic neuritis (ON) that developed multiple sclerosis (MS). We assessed clinical features or factors that might differentiate these patients from those with ON that did not develop MS. Of the cases followed, 110 (67%) were found to have an idiopathic origin of the disease; whereas 55 (33%) were found to develop it secondary to another disease. Of the 110 idiopathic cases, 13 (12%), developed MS over an average of 2 years. The results of these patients in the laboratory analyses of blood and CSF as well as the results of the MRI and evoked potential studies, were significantly different from the ON patients without MS. We conclude that the percentage of patients with ON in our sample that developed MS is similar to that found in Japan and is relatively low in comparison to other reports.

  17. An Optical Frequency Comb Tied to GPS for Laser Frequency/Wavelength Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jack A.; Egan, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Optical frequency combs can be employed over a broad spectral range to calibrate laser frequency or vacuum wavelength. This article describes procedures and techniques utilized in the Precision Engineering Division of NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) for comb-based calibration of laser wavelength, including a discussion of ancillary measurements such as determining the mode order. The underlying purpose of these calibrations is to provide traceable standards in support of length measurement. The relative uncertainty needed to fulfill this goal is typically 10−8 and never below 10−12, very modest requirements compared to the capabilities of comb-based frequency metrology. In this accuracy range the Global Positioning System (GPS) serves as an excellent frequency reference that can provide the traceable underpinning of the measurement. This article describes techniques that can be used to completely characterize measurement errors in a GPS-based comb system and thus achieve full confidence in measurement results. PMID:27134794

  18. Geometric Calibration of the Orion Optical Navigation Camera using Star Field Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, John A.; Benhacine, Lylia; Hikes, Jacob; D'Souza, Christopher

    2016-07-01

    The Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle will be capable of autonomously navigating in cislunar space using images of the Earth and Moon. Optical navigation systems, such as the one proposed for Orion, require the ability to precisely relate the observed location of an object in a 2D digital image with the true corresponding line-of-sight direction in the camera's sensor frame. This relationship is governed by the camera's geometric calibration parameters — typically described by a set of five intrinsic parameters and five lens distortion parameters. While pre-flight estimations of these parameters will exist, environmental conditions often necessitate on-orbit recalibration. This calibration will be performed for Orion using an ensemble of star field images. This manuscript provides a detailed treatment of the theory and mathematics that will form the foundation of Orion's on-orbit camera calibration. Numerical results and examples are also presented.

  19. Recent progress on silica-based optical switches and free-space optical switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himeno, Akira; Yamaguchi, Masayasu

    1996-03-01

    Space-division optical switches will be indispensable for future fiber-optic communication systems such as fiber-optic subscriber-line concentrators, photonic inter-module connectors, and protection switches. This paper reports recent progress on both silica-based thermo-optic optical switches with drive electronics. Two types of free-space switch modules are also reviewed; analog free-space switching modules which use liquid crystal beam shifters and digital free-space switching modules which incorporate semiconductor photonic switch array devices.

  20. A method to calibrate phase fluctuation in polarization-sensitive swept-source optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zenghai; Kasaragod, Deepa K.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2011-06-01

    A phase fluctuation calibration method is presented for polarization-sensitive swept-source optical coherence tomography (PS-SS-OCT) using continuous polarization modulation. The method consists of the generation of a continuous triggered tone-burst waveform rather than an asynchronous waveform by use of a function generator and the removal of the global phases of the measured Jones matrices by use of matrix normalization. This could remove the use of auxiliary optical components for the phase fluctuation compensation in the system, which reduces the system complexity. Phase fluctuation calibration is necessary to obtain the reference Jones matrix by averaging the measured Jones matrices at sample surfaces. Measurements on an equine tendon sample were made by the PS-SS-OCT system to validate the proposed method.

  1. Optical Comb from a Whispering Gallery Mode Resonator for Spectroscopy and Astronomy Instruments Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.; Yu, Nam; Thompson, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The most accurate astronomical data is available from space-based observations that are not impeded by the Earth's atmosphere. Such measurements may require spectral samples taken as long as decades apart, with the 1 cm/s velocity precision integrated over a broad wavelength range. This raises the requirements specifically for instruments used in astrophysics research missions -- their stringent wavelength resolution and accuracy must be maintained over years and possibly decades. Therefore, a stable and broadband optical calibration technique compatible with spaceflights becomes essential. The space-based spectroscopic instruments need to be calibrated in situ, which puts forth specific requirements to the calibration sources, mainly concerned with their mass, power consumption, and reliability. A high-precision, high-resolution reference wavelength comb source for astronomical and astrophysics spectroscopic observations has been developed that is deployable in space. The optical comb will be used for wavelength calibrations of spectrographs and will enable Doppler measurements to better than 10 cm/s precision, one hundred times better than the current state-of-the- art.

  2. Absolute gauge block calibration using ultra-precise optical frequency synthesizer locked to a femtosecond comb.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Hatem; Farid, Niveen; Terra, Osama

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we report a gauge block (GB) calibration that is traceable to the SI unit of time, the second. Four ultra-stable optical telecommunication wavelengths near 1556 nm are obtained by locking a narrow-tuning-range fiber laser to a fiber-based femtosecond frequency comb. Since the GB calibration system does not operate at this region of spectrum, the superior frequency stability of the laser is transferred to the 778 nm region by using a waveguide periodically poled lithium niobate crystal. After applying the locking scheme, the stability and accuracy of the laser become better than 8×10(-12). The frequency-doubled light is sent through 30 m optical fiber to a GB interferometer, which is installed at a different laboratory in the same building. Using this calibration scheme, a GB with a nominal length of 100 mm is calibrated with an uncertainty of ±52  nm. This uncertainty value is still comparable to or even better than other metrology laboratories for a similar block length.

  3. Self-calibrated dynamical optical biochip system using surface plasmon resonance imaging: application to genotyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hottin, Jérôme; Moreau, Julien; Spadavecchia, Jolanda; Bellemain, Alain; Lecerf, Laure; Goossens, Michel; Canva, Michael

    2008-04-01

    The present paper summarizes some of our work in the field of genetic diagnosis using Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging. The optical setup and its capability are presented, as well as the gold surface functionalization used. Results obtained with oligonucleotides targets, specific to Cystic Fibrosis disease, in high and low concentration are shown. The self-calibration method we have developed to reduce data dispersion in genetic diagnosis applications is described.

  4. A flexible modeling and calibration for the optical triangulation probe using a planar pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yimin; Lu, Naiguang; Lou, Xiaoping

    2013-12-01

    The optical triangulation probe (OTP), which consists of a light spot projector and a camera, has found widespread applications for three-dimensional (3D) measurement and quality control of products in the industrial manufacturing. The OTP calibration is an extremely important issue, since the performances such as high accuracy and repeatability are crucially depended on the calibration results. This paper presents a flexible approach for modeling and calibration of the OTP, which only requires planar patterns observed from a few different orientations and light spots projected on the planes as well. For the calibration procedure, the structure parameters of the OTP are calculated, such as the camera extrinsic and intrinsic parameters which include the coefficients of the lens distortion, and the directional equation for the light axis of the projector. For the measuring procedure, the formulations of 3D computation are concisely described using the calibration results. Experimental tests of the real system confirm the suitable accuracy and repeatability. Furthermore, the technique proposed here is easily generalized for the OTP integration in robot arms or Coordinate Measuring Machines (CMMs).

  5. Spatial-temporal distortions and calibration of ultrashort pulses in complex optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Zhu, L. J.; Chang, S. Q.; Chen, A. Q.; Liu, S. Q.; Yuan, F.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zheng, Z. R.

    2016-07-01

    Ultrashort laser pulse has been widely used in various applications. Its parameters, such as the pulse duration and the spectral bandwidth, should be controlled accurately in order to achieve high spatial and temporal resolution, as well as high local field intensity. In this paper, we have proposed a method to trace the propagation of ultrashort pulses through optical systems, especially the complex optics. The approach, in which both the material's dispersion and optical aberrations are taken into consideration, is developed based on the geometrical ray-tracing combined with wave theories. This method is validated by simulating the propagation of a femtosecond pulse through a specific practical imaging system. As the numerical result shows that the spatial-temporal performances of pulses are influenced greatly by optical elements, the calibration arrangement is employed to compensate for those undesired distortions. The negative dispersion of the optical grisms (the combination of gratings and prisms) is utilized in the calibration process to offset the positive dispersion introduced by lenses. The final result shows effectiveness of the correction.

  6. Vibration detection and calibration method used to remote sensing optical camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Dong, Wende; Xu, Zhihai; Feng, Huajun

    2013-09-01

    In order to obtain sharp remote sensing images, the image stabilization technology of space camera and the remote sensing image restoration technology are usually used now. Vibration detection is the key to realize these technologies: an image stabilization system needs the displacement vector derived from vibration detection to drive the compensation mechanism; and the remote sensing image restoration technology needs the vibration displacement vector to construct the point spread function (PSF). Vibration detection not only can be used to improve image quality of panchromatic camera, infrared cameras and other optical camera, also is motion compensation basis of satellite radar equipment. In this paper we have constructed a vibration measuring method based on Fiber optic gyro (FOG). FOG is a device sensitive to angular velocity or angular displacement. High-precision FOG can be used to measure the jitter angle of the optic axis of a space camera fixed on satellite platform. According to the measured data, the vibration displacement vector of the imaging plane can be calculated. Consequently the vibration data provide a basis for image stabilization of space camera and restoration of remote sensing images. We simulated the vibration of a space camera by using a piezoelectric ceramic deflection platform, and calibrated vibration measurement by using laser beam and a high-speed linear array camera. We compared the feedback output of the deflection platform, the FOG measured data and the calibrated data of the linear array camera, and obtained a calibration accuracy better than 1.5 μrad.

  7. Calibration of passive remote observing optical and microwave instrumentation; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 3-5, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guenther, Bruce W. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Various papers on the calibration of passive remote observing optical and microwave instrumentation are presented. Individual topics addressed include: on-board calibration device for a wide field-of-view instrument, calibration for the medium-resolution imaging spectrometer, cryogenic radiometers and intensity-stabilized lasers for EOS radiometric calibrations, radiometric stability of the Shuttle-borne solar backscatter ultraviolet spectrometer, ratioing radiometer for use with a solar diffuser, requirements of a solar diffuser and measurements of some candidate materials, reflectance stability analysis of Spectralon diffuse calibration panels, stray light effects on calibrations using a solar diffuser, radiometric calibration of SPOT 23 HRVs, surface and aerosol models for use in radiative transfer codes. Also addressed are: calibrated intercepts for solar radiometers used in remote sensor calibration, radiometric calibration of an airborne multispectral scanner, in-flight calibration of a helicopter-mounted Daedalus multispectral scanner, technique for improving the calibration of large-area sphere sources, remote colorimetry and its applications, spatial sampling errors for a satellite-borne scanning radiometer, calibration of EOS multispectral imaging sensors and solar irradiance variability.

  8. Calibration of passive remote observing optical and microwave instrumentation; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Apr. 3-5, 1991

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Bruce W.

    Various papers on the calibration of passive remote observing optical and microwave instrumentation are presented. Individual topics addressed include: on-board calibration device for a wide field-of-view instrument, calibration for the medium-resolution imaging spectrometer, cryogenic radiometers and intensity-stabilized lasers for EOS radiometric calibrations, radiometric stability of the Shuttle-borne solar backscatter ultraviolet spectrometer, ratioing radiometer for use with a solar diffuser, requirements of a solar diffuser and measurements of some candidate materials, reflectance stability analysis of Spectralon diffuse calibration panels, stray light effects on calibrations using a solar diffuser, radiometric calibration of SPOT 23 HRVs, surface and aerosol models for use in radiative transfer codes. Also addressed are: calibrated intercepts for solar radiometers used in remote sensor calibration, radiometric calibration of an airborne multispectral scanner, in-flight calibration of a helicopter-mounted Daedalus multispectral scanner, technique for improving the calibration of large-area sphere sources, remote colorimetry and its applications, spatial sampling errors for a satellite-borne scanning radiometer, calibration of EOS multispectral imaging sensors and solar irradiance variability. (For individual items see A93-23576 to A93-23603)

  9. Optical frequency combs generated by four-wave mixing in optical fibers for astrophysical spectrometer calibration and metrology.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Flavio C

    2008-08-18

    Optical frequency combs generated by multiple four-wave mixing in short and highly nonlinear optical fibers are proposed for use as high precision frequency markers, calibration of astrophysical spectrometers, broadband spectroscopy and metrology. Implementations can involve two optical frequency standards as input lasers, or one standard and a second laser phase-locked to it using a stable microwave reference oscillator. Energy and momentum conservation required by the parametric generation assures phase coherence among comb frequencies, while fibers with short lengths can avoid linewidth broadening and stimulated Brillouin scattering. In contrast to combs from mode-locked lasers or microcavities, the absence of a resonator allows large tuning of the frequency spacing from tens of gigahertz to beyond teraHertz.

  10. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2003-04-01

    This report summarizes technical progress over the first six months of the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Research efforts were focused on analyzing and testing factors that impact performance degradation of the initially designed sensor prototype, including sensing element movement within the sensing probe and optical signal quality degradation. Based these results, a new version of the sensing system was designed by combining the sapphire disk sensing element and the single crystal zirconia right angle light reflector into one novel single crystal sapphire right angle prism. The new sensor prototype was tested up to 1650 C.

  11. Transverse Pupil Shifts for Adaptive Optics Non-Common Path Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, Eric E.

    2011-01-01

    A simple new way of obtaining absolute wavefront measurements with a laboratory Fizeau interferometer was recently devised. In that case, the observed wavefront map is the difference of two cavity surfaces, those of the mirror under test and of an unknown reference surface on the Fizeau s transmission flat. The absolute surface of each can be determined by applying standard wavefront reconstruction techniques to two grids of absolute surface height differences of the mirror under test, obtained from pairs of measurements made with slight transverse shifts in X and Y. Adaptive optics systems typically provide an actuated periscope between wavefront sensor (WFS) and commonmode optics, used for lateral registration of deformable mirror (DM) to WFS. This periscope permits independent adjustment of either pupil or focal spot incident on the WFS. It would be used to give the required lateral pupil motion between common and non-common segments, analogous to the lateral shifts of the two phase contributions in the lab Fizeau. The technique is based on a completely new approach to calibration of phase. It offers unusual flexibility with regard to the transverse spatial frequency scales probed, and will give results quite quickly, making use of no auxiliary equipment other than that built into the adaptive optics system. The new technique may be applied to provide novel calibration information about other optical systems in which the beam may be shifted transversely in a controlled way.

  12. CPAC moisture study: Phase 1 report on the study of optical spectra calibration for moisture

    SciTech Connect

    Veltkamp, D.

    1993-12-16

    This report discusses work done to investigate the feasibility of using optical spectroscopic methods, combined with multivariate Partial Least Squares (PLS) calibration modeling, to quantitatively predict the moisture content of the crust material in Hanford`s waste tank materials. Experiments were conducted with BY-104 simulant material for the 400--1100 nm (VIS), 1100--2500 (NIR), and 400-4000 cm{sup {minus}1}(IR) optical regions. The test data indicated that the NIR optical region, with a single PLS calibration factor, provided the highest accuracy response (better than 0.5 wt %) over a 0--25 wt % moisture range. Issues relating to the preparation of moisture samples with the BY-104 materials and the potential implementation within hot cell and waste tanks are also discussed. The investigation of potential material interferences, including physical and chemical properties, and the scaled demonstration of fiber optic and camera types of applications with simulated waste tanks are outlined as future work tasks.

  13. A robust calibration approach for PM10 prediction from MODIS aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, X. Q.; Hashim, M.

    2012-12-01

    Investigating the human health effects of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) using satellite data are gaining more attention due to their wide spatial coverage and temporal advantages. Such epidemiological studies are, however, susceptible to bias errors and resulted in poor predictive output in some locations. Current methods calibrate aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved from MODIS to further predict PM. The recent satellite-based AOD calibration uses a mixed effects model to predict location-specific PM on a daily basis. The shortcomings of this daily AOD calibration are for areas of high probability of persistent cloud cover throughout the year such as in the humid tropical region along the equatorial belt. Contaminated pixels due to clouds causes radiometric errors in the MODIS AOD, thus causes poor predictive power on air quality. In contrary, a periodic assessment is more practical and robust especially in minimizing these cloud-related contaminations. In this paper, a simple yet robust calibration approach based on monthly AOD period is presented. We adopted the statistical fitting method with the adjustment technique to improve the predictive power of MODIS AOD. The adjustment was made based on the long-term observation (2001-2006) of PM10-AOD residual error characteristic. Besides, we also incorporated the ground PM measurement into the model as a weighting to reduce the bias of the MODIS-derived AOD value. Results indicated that this robust approach with monthly AOD calibration reported an improved average accuracy of PM10 retrieval from MODIS data by 50% compared to widely used calibration methods based on linear regression models, in addition to enabling further spatial patterns of periodic PM exposure to be undertaken.

  14. A robust calibration approach for PM10 prediction from MODIS aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yap, X. Q.; Hashim, M.

    2013-03-01

    Investigating the human health effects of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) using satellite data are gaining more attention due to their wide spatial coverage and temporal advantages. Such epidemiological studies are, however, susceptible to bias errors and resulted in poor predictive output in some locations. Current methods calibrate aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved from MODIS to further predict PM. The recent satellite-based AOD calibration uses a mixed effects model to predict location-specific PM on a daily basis. The shortcomings of this daily AOD calibration are for areas of high probability of persistent cloud cover throughout the year such as in the humid tropical region along the equatorial belt. Contaminated pixels due to clouds causes radiometric errors in the MODIS AOD, thus causes poor predictive power on air quality. In contrary, a periodic assessment is more practical and robust especially in minimizing these cloud-related contaminations. In this paper, a simple yet robust calibration approach based on monthly AOD period is presented. We adopted the statistical fitting method with the adjustment technique to improve the predictive power of MODIS AOD. The adjustment was made based on the long-term observation (2001-2006) of PM10-AOD residual error characteristic. Furthermore, we also incorporated the ground PM measurement into the model as a weighting to reduce the bias of the MODIS-derived AOD value. Results indicated that this robust approach with monthly AOD calibration reported an improved average accuracy of PM10 retrieval from MODIS data by 50% compared to widely used calibration methods based on linear regression models, in addition to enabling further spatial patterns of periodic PM exposure to be undertaken.

  15. Innovative self-calibration method for accelerometer scale factor of the missile-borne RINS with fiber optic gyro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Lei; Liu, Zengjun; Zhang, Yiming

    2016-09-19

    The calibration of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) is a key technique to improve the preciseness of the inertial navigation system (INS) for missile, especially for the calibration of accelerometer scale factor. Traditional calibration method is generally based on the high accuracy turntable, however, it leads to expensive costs and the calibration results are not suitable to the actual operating environment. In the wake of developments in multi-axis rotational INS (RINS) with optical inertial sensors, self-calibration is utilized as an effective way to calibrate IMU on missile and the calibration results are more accurate in practical application. However, the introduction of multi-axis RINS causes additional calibration errors, including non-orthogonality errors of mechanical processing and non-horizontal errors of operating environment, it means that the multi-axis gimbals could not be regarded as a high accuracy turntable. As for its application on missiles, in this paper, after analyzing the relationship between the calibration error of accelerometer scale factor and non-orthogonality and non-horizontal angles, an innovative calibration procedure using the signals of fiber optic gyro and photoelectric encoder is proposed. The laboratory and vehicle experiment results validate the theory and prove that the proposed method relaxes the orthogonality requirement of rotation axes and eliminates the strict application condition of the system. PMID:27661867

  16. A calibration method for optical trap force by use of electrokinetic phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Youli; Zhang, Zhenxi; Zhang, Xiaolin

    2006-09-01

    An experimental method for calibration of optical trap force upon cells by use of electrokinetic phenomena is demonstrated. An electronkinetic sample chamber system (ESCS) is designed instead of a common sample chamber and a costly automatism stage, thus the experimental setup is simpler and cheaper. Experiments indicate that the range of the trap force measured by this method is piconewton and sub-piconewton, which makes it fit for study on non-damage interaction between light and biological particles with optical tweezers especially. Since this method is relevant to particle electric charge, by applying an alternating electric field, the new method may overcome the problem of correcting drag force and allow us to measure simultaneously optical trap stiffness and particle electric charge.

  17. Calibration and accuracy of optical slope measurements for short wind waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaehne, Bernd; Schultz, Howard J.

    1992-12-01

    A thorough understanding of the hydrodynamics of short ocean wave is important for interpreting measurements made by active microwave remote sensing instruments. However, conventional methods for studying the structure of a water surface are not capable of resolving the fine scale structure of the surface, especially in the ultra-gravity and capillary wavelengths. Optical instruments have the potential for resolving the fine-scale structure of the ocean surface, however, methods for calibrating these instruments and verifying the accuracy of the measurements have not been developed. In this paper we describe a multi-faceted approach for verifying the accuracy and calibration of an imaging wave slope gauge (ISG). The first step is a thorough theoretical analysis of the geometrical optics and photometry. A detailed discussion on the relationship between surface slope and observed pixel intensity is presented. This discussion includes second order effects which may tend to bias the results. Secondly, calibration objects formed from thin transparent Perspex sheets with known slope and height profiles are retrieved. The results show that the measurements of the water surface shape are accurate enough to compute 2-D wave number spectra.

  18. Calibration of optical tweezers with positional detection in the back focal plane

    SciTech Connect

    Tolic-Noerrelykke, Simon F.; Schaeffer, Erik; Howard, Jonathon; Pavone, Francesco S.; Juelicher, Frank; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2006-10-15

    We explain and demonstrate a new method of force and position calibrations for optical tweezers with back-focal-plane photodetection. The method combines power spectral measurements of thermal motion and the response to a sinusoidal motion of a translation stage. It consequently does not use the drag coefficient of the trapped object as an input. Thus, neither the viscosity, nor the size of the trapped object, nor its distance to nearby surfaces needs to be known. The method requires only a low level of instrumentation and can be applied in situ in all spatial dimensions. It is both accurate and precise: true values are returned, with small error bars. We tested this experimentally, near and far from surfaces in the lateral directions. Both position and force calibrations were accurate to within 3%. To calibrate, we moved the sample with a piezoelectric translation stage, but the laser beam could be moved instead, e.g., by acousto-optic deflectors. Near surfaces, this precision requires an improved formula for the hydrodynamical interaction between an infinite plane and a microsphere in nonconstant motion parallel to it. We give such a formula.

  19. Java-Library for the Access, Storage and Editing of Calibration Metadata of Optical Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firlej, M.; Kresse, W.

    2016-06-01

    The standardization of the calibration of optical sensors in photogrammetry and remote sensing has been discussed for more than a decade. Projects of the German DGPF and the European EuroSDR led to the abstract International Technical Specification ISO/TS 19159-1:2014 "Calibration and validation of remote sensing imagery sensors and data - Part 1: Optical sensors". This article presents the first software interface for a read- and write-access to all metadata elements standardized in the ISO/TS 19159-1. This interface is based on an xml-schema that was automatically derived by ShapeChange from the UML-model of the Specification. The software interface serves two cases. First, the more than 300 standardized metadata elements are stored individually according to the xml-schema. Secondly, the camera manufacturers are using many administrative data that are not a part of the ISO/TS 19159-1. The new software interface provides a mechanism for input, storage, editing, and output of both types of data. Finally, an output channel towards a usual calibration protocol is provided. The interface is written in Java. The article also addresses observations made when analysing the ISO/TS 19159-1 and compiles a list of proposals for maturing the document, i.e. for an updated version of the Specification.

  20. Interferometric 30 m bench for calibrations of 1D scales and optical distance measuring instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkuri, J.; Rantanen, A.; Manninen, J.; Esala, V.-P.; Lassila, A.

    2012-09-01

    During construction of a new metrology building for MIKES, a 30 m interferometric bench was designed. The objective was to implement a straight, stable, adjustable and multifunctional 30 m measuring bench for calibrations. Special attention was paid to eliminating the effects of thermal expansion and inevitable concrete shrinkage. The linear guide, situated on top of a monolithic concrete beam, comprises two parallel round shafts with adjustable fixtures every 1 m. A carriage is moved along the rail and its position is followed by a reference interferometer. Depending on the measurement task, one or two retro-reflectors are fixed on the carriage. A microscope with a CCD camera and a monitor can be used to detect line mark positions on different line standards. When calibrating optical distance measuring instruments, various targets can be fixed to the carriage. For the most accurate measurements an online Abbe-error correction based on simultaneous carriage pitch measurement by a separate laser interferometer is applied. The bench is used for calibrations of machinist scales, tapes, circometers, electronic distance meters, total stations and laser trackers. The estimated expanded uncertainty for 30 m displacement for highest accuracy calibrations is 2.6 µm.

  1. Calibrating an optical scanner for quality assurance of large area radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadzhinova, A.; Hildén, T.; Berdova, M.; Lauhakangas, R.; Heino, J.; Tuominen, E.; Franssila, S.; Hæggström, E.; Kassamakov, I.

    2014-11-01

    A gas electron multiplier (GEM) is a particle detector used in high-energy physics. Its main component is a thin copper-polymer-copper sandwich that carries Ø =70  ±  5 µm holes. Quality assurance (QA) is needed to guarantee both long operating life and reading fidelity of the GEM. Absence of layer defects and conformity of the holes to specifications is important. Both hole size and shape influence the detector’s gas multiplication factor and hence affect the collected data. For the scanner the required lateral measurement tolerance is ± 5 µm. We calibrated a high aspect ratio optical scanning system (OSS) to allow ensuring the quality of large GEM foils. For the calibration we microfabricated transfer standards, which were imaged with the OSS and which were compared to corresponding scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. The calibration fulfilled the ISO/IEC 17025 and UKAS M3003 requirements: the calibration factor was 1.01  ±  0.01, determined at 95% confidence level across a 950  ×  950 mm2 area. The proposed large-scale scanning technique can potentially be valuable in other microfabricated products too.

  2. Optical Passive Sensor Calibration for Satellite Remote Sensing and the Legacy of NOAA and NIST Cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Datla, Raju; Weinreb, Michael; Rice, Joseph; Johnson, B. Carol; Shirley, Eric; Cao, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    This paper traces the cooperative efforts of scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to improve the calibration of operational satellite sensors for remote sensing of the Earth’s land, atmosphere and oceans. It gives a chronological perspective of the NOAA satellite program and the interactions between the two agencies’ scientists to address pre-launch calibration and issues of sensor performance on orbit. The drive to improve accuracy of measurements has had a new impetus in recent years because of the need for improved weather prediction and climate monitoring. The highlights of this cooperation and strategies to achieve SI-traceability and improve accuracy for optical satellite sensor data are summarized1. PMID:26601030

  3. Optical Passive Sensor Calibration for Satellite Remote Sensing and the Legacy of NOAA and NIST Cooperation.

    PubMed

    Datla, Raju; Weinreb, Michael; Rice, Joseph; Johnson, B Carol; Shirley, Eric; Cao, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    This paper traces the cooperative efforts of scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to improve the calibration of operational satellite sensors for remote sensing of the Earth's land, atmosphere and oceans. It gives a chronological perspective of the NOAA satellite program and the interactions between the two agencies' scientists to address pre-launch calibration and issues of sensor performance on orbit. The drive to improve accuracy of measurements has had a new impetus in recent years because of the need for improved weather prediction and climate monitoring. The highlights of this cooperation and strategies to achieve SI-traceability and improve accuracy for optical satellite sensor data are summarized.

  4. High-speed spectral calibration by complex FIR filter in phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangmin; Raphael, Patrick D; Oghalai, John S; Applegate, Brian E

    2016-04-01

    Swept-laser sources offer a number of advantages for Phase-sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PhOCT). However, inter- and intra-sweep variability leads to calibration errors that adversely affect phase sensitivity. While there are several approaches to overcoming this problem, our preferred method is to simply calibrate every sweep of the laser. This approach offers high accuracy and phase stability at the expense of a substantial processing burden. In this approach, the Hilbert phase of the interferogram from a reference interferometer provides the instantaneous wavenumber of the laser, but is computationally expensive. Fortunately, the Hilbert transform may be approximated by a Finite Impulse-Response (FIR) filter. Here we explore the use of several FIR filter based Hilbert transforms for calibration, explicitly considering the impact of filter choice on phase sensitivity and OCT image quality. Our results indicate that the complex FIR filter approach is the most robust and accurate among those considered. It provides similar image quality and slightly better phase sensitivity than the traditional FFT-IFFT based Hilbert transform while consuming fewer resources in an FPGA implementation. We also explored utilizing the Hilbert magnitude of the reference interferogram to calculate an ideal window function for spectral amplitude calibration. The ideal window function is designed to carefully control sidelobes on the axial point spread function. We found that after a simple chromatic correction, calculating the window function using the complex FIR filter and the reference interferometer gave similar results to window functions calculated using a mirror sample and the FFT-IFFT Hilbert transform. Hence, the complex FIR filter can enable accurate and high-speed calibration of the magnitude and phase of spectral interferograms. PMID:27446666

  5. High-speed spectral calibration by complex FIR filter in phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangmin; Raphael, Patrick D.; Oghalai, John S.; Applegate, Brian E.

    2016-01-01

    Swept-laser sources offer a number of advantages for Phase-sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PhOCT). However, inter- and intra-sweep variability leads to calibration errors that adversely affect phase sensitivity. While there are several approaches to overcoming this problem, our preferred method is to simply calibrate every sweep of the laser. This approach offers high accuracy and phase stability at the expense of a substantial processing burden. In this approach, the Hilbert phase of the interferogram from a reference interferometer provides the instantaneous wavenumber of the laser, but is computationally expensive. Fortunately, the Hilbert transform may be approximated by a Finite Impulse-Response (FIR) filter. Here we explore the use of several FIR filter based Hilbert transforms for calibration, explicitly considering the impact of filter choice on phase sensitivity and OCT image quality. Our results indicate that the complex FIR filter approach is the most robust and accurate among those considered. It provides similar image quality and slightly better phase sensitivity than the traditional FFT-IFFT based Hilbert transform while consuming fewer resources in an FPGA implementation. We also explored utilizing the Hilbert magnitude of the reference interferogram to calculate an ideal window function for spectral amplitude calibration. The ideal window function is designed to carefully control sidelobes on the axial point spread function. We found that after a simple chromatic correction, calculating the window function using the complex FIR filter and the reference interferometer gave similar results to window functions calculated using a mirror sample and the FFT-IFFT Hilbert transform. Hence, the complex FIR filter can enable accurate and high-speed calibration of the magnitude and phase of spectral interferograms. PMID:27446666

  6. On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Anbo Wang

    2007-03-31

    This report summarizes technical progress October 2006 - March 2007 on the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. During the second phase, an alternative high temperature sensing system based on Fabry-Perot interferometry was developed that offers a number of advantages over the BPDI solution. The objective of this program is to bring the sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. The sapphire wafer-based interferometric sensing system that was installed at TECO's Polk Power Station remained in operation for seven months. Our efforts have been focused on monitoring and analyzing the real-time data collected, and preparing for a second field test.

  7. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang; Zhengyu Huang; Yizheng Zhu

    2005-04-01

    This report summarizes technical progress October 2004-March 2005 on the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Due to the difficulties described on the last report, field testing of the BPDI system has not continued to date. However, we have developed an alternative high temperature sensing solution, which is described in this report.

  8. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2003-11-01

    This report summarizes technical progress over the second six month period of the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Research efforts were focused on evaluating corrosion effects in single crystal sapphire at temperatures up to 1400 C, and designing the sensor mechanical packaging with input from Wabash River Power Plant. Upcoming meetings will establish details for the gasifier field test.

  9. On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2005-11-01

    This report summarizes technical progress April-September 2005 on the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Due to the difficulties described on the last report, field testing of the BPDI system has not continued to date. However, we have developed an alternative high temperature sensing solution, which is described in this report. The sensing system will be installed and tested at TECO's Polk Power Station. Following a site visit in June 2005, our efforts have been focused on preparing for that field test, including he design of the sensor mechanical packaging, sensor electronics, the data transfer module, and the necessary software codes to accommodate this application.. We are currently ready to start sensor fabrication.

  10. ON-LINE SELF-CALIBRATING SINGLE CRYSTAL SAPPHIRE OPTICAL SENSOR INSTRUMENTATION FOR ACCURATE AND RELIABLE COAL GASIFIER TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang; Zhengyu Huang

    2004-04-01

    This report summarizes technical progress over the third six month period of the Phase II program ''On-Line Self-Calibrating Single Crystal Sapphire Optical Sensor Instrumentation for Accurate and Reliable Coal Gasifier Temperature Measurement'', funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. The outcome of the first phase of this program was the selection of broadband polarimetric differential interferometry (BPDI) for further prototype instrumentation development. This approach is based on the measurement of the optical path difference (OPD) between two orthogonally polarized light beams in a single-crystal sapphire disk. The objective of this program is to bring the BPDI sensor technology, which has already been demonstrated in the laboratory, to a level where the sensor can be deployed in the harsh industrial environments and will become commercially viable. Research efforts were focused on sensor probe design and machining, sensor electronics design, software algorithm design, sensor field installation procedures, and sensor remote data access and control. Field testing will begin in the next several weeks.

  11. Retrievals of Thick Cloud Optical Depth from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) by Calibration of Solar Background Signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Yuekui; Marshak, Alexander; Chiu, J. Christine; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Palm, Stephen P.; Davis, Anthony B.; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Nguyen, Louis; Spinhirne, James D.; Minnis, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Laser beams emitted from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), as well as other space-borne laser instruments, can only penetrate clouds to a limit of a few optical depths. As a result, only optical depths of thinner clouds (< about 3 for GLAS) are retrieved from the reflected lidar signal. This paper presents a comprehensive study of possible retrievals of optical depth of thick clouds using solar background light and treating GLAS as a solar radiometer. To do so we first calibrate the reflected solar radiation received by the photon-counting detectors of GLAS' 532 nm channel, which is the primary channel for atmospheric products. The solar background radiation is regarded as a noise to be subtracted in the retrieval process of the lidar products. However, once calibrated, it becomes a signal that can be used in studying the properties of optically thick clouds. In this paper, three calibration methods are presented: (I) calibration with coincident airborne and GLAS observations; (2) calibration with coincident Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and GLAS observations of deep convective clouds; (3) calibration from the first principles using optical depth of thin water clouds over ocean retrieved by GLAS active remote sensing. Results from the three methods agree well with each other. Cloud optical depth (COD) is retrieved from the calibrated solar background signal using a one-channel retrieval. Comparison with COD retrieved from GOES during GLAS overpasses shows that the average difference between the two retrievals is 24%. As an example, the COD values retrieved from GLAS solar background are illustrated for a marine stratocumulus cloud field that is too thick to be penetrated by the GLAS laser. Based on this study, optical depths for thick clouds will be provided as a supplementary product to the existing operational GLAS cloud products in future GLAS data releases.

  12. Method to calibrate phase fluctuation in polarization-sensitive swept-source optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zenghai; Kasaragod, Deepa K.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2011-07-01

    We present a phase fluctuation calibration method for polarization-sensitive swept-source optical coherence tomography (PS-SS-OCT) using continuous polarization modulation. The method uses a low-voltage broadband polarization modulator driven by a synchronized sinusoidal burst waveform rather than an asynchronous waveform, together with the removal of the global phases of the measured Jones matrices by the use of matrix normalization. This makes it possible to average the measured Jones matrices to remove the artifact due to the speckle noise of the signal in the sample without introducing auxiliary optical components into the sample arm. This method was validated on measurements of an equine tendon sample by the PS-SS-OCT system.

  13. Methods for Optical Calibration of the BigBite Hadron Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    M. Mihovilovic, K. Allada, B.D. Anderson, J.R.M. Annand, T. Averett, A. Camsonne, R.W. Chan, J.-P. Chen, K. Chirapatpimol, C.W. de Jager, S. Gilad, D.J. Hamilton, J.-O. Hansen, D.W. Higinbotham, J. Juang, X. Jiang, G. Jin, W. Korsch, J.J. LeRose, R.A. Lindgren, N. Liyanage, E. Long, R. Michaels, B. Moffit, P. Monaghan, V. Nelyubin, B.E. Norum, E. Piasetzky, X. Qian, Y. Qiang, S. Riordan, G. Ron, G. Rosner, B. Sawatzky, M. Shabestari, A. Shahinyan, R. Shneor, S. Sirca, R. Subedi, V. Sulkosky, J.W. Watson, B. Wojtsekhowski, Y.-W. Zhang

    2012-09-01

    The techniques for optical calibration of Jefferson Lab's large-acceptance magnetic hadron spectrometer, BigBite, have been examined. The most consistent and stable results were obtained by using a method based on singular value decomposition. In spite of the complexity of the optics, the particles positions and momenta at the target have been precisely reconstructed from the coordinates measured in the detectors by means of a single back-tracing matrix. The technique is applicable to any similar magnetic spectrometer and any particle type. For 0.55 GeV/c protons, we have established the vertex resolution of 1.2 cm, angular resolutions of 7 mrad and 16 mrad (in-plane and out-of-plane, respectively), and a relative momentum resolution of 1.6%.

  14. The optical method for investigation of the peritonitis progressing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guminetskiy, S. H.; Ushenko, O. G.; Polyanskiy, I. P.; Motrych, A. V.; Grynchuk, F. V.

    2008-05-01

    There have been given the results of the spectrophotometric examination of the dogs' and rats' venous and whole blood plasma taken in the process of the peritonitis progressing within the spectral interval λ = 220 - 320 nm (for plasma) and λ = 350 - 610 nm (for the whole blood). It has been defined that D-optical density values in the field of the long-waved maximum of plasma absorption intensity of the venous blood at λ = 280 nm depend upon the intensity of the inflammatory process and also upon the circumstances against the background of which it started to progress. It was found out that the dynamics of D= values changes for λ = 540 (or 570) nm in the process of the peritonitis progressing in case of the whole blood taken from a portal vein is a mirror symmetrical if to compare to the same dynamics for the blood from cava inferior. The defined conformities with regularities may have a diagnostic meaning. It was also found out that the biggest influence upon the dynamics of D-values at λ = 280nm of the venous blood plasma has the content of the circulating immune complexes, necrosis factor of α-tumors and interleukin - 2, the changes of which explain for almost on 100% the distribution of the optical density parameters and what proves a possible immunologic explanation of its changes.

  15. All-weather calibration of wide-field optical and NIR surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, David L.; Saha, Abhijit; Claver, Jenna; Claver, Chuck; Axelrod, T.; DePoy, Darren; Ivezić, Željko; Jones, Lynne; Smith, R. Chris; Stubbs, Christopher W.

    2014-01-01

    The science goals for ground-based large-area surveys, such as the Dark Energy Survey, Pan-STARRS, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, require calibration of broadband photometry that is stable in time and uniform over the sky to precisions of a percent or better. This performance will need to be achieved with data taken over the course of many years, and often in less than ideal conditions. This paper describes a strategy to achieve precise internal calibration of imaging survey data taken in less than 'photometric' conditions, and reports results of an observational study of the techniques needed to implement this strategy. We find that images of celestial fields used in this case study with stellar densities ∼1 arcmin{sup –2} and taken through cloudless skies can be calibrated with relative precision ∼0.5% (reproducibility). We report measurements of spatial structure functions of cloud absorption observed over a range of atmospheric conditions, and find it possible to achieve photometric measurements that are reproducible to 1% in images that were taken through cloud layers that transmit as little as 25% of the incident optical flux (1.5 magnitudes of extinction). We find, however, that photometric precision below 1% is impeded by the thinnest detectable cloud layers. We comment on implications of these results for the observing strategies of future surveys.

  16. Corneal-Imaging Calibration for Optical See-Through Head-Mounted Displays.

    PubMed

    Plopski, Alexander; Itoh, Yuta; Nitschke, Christian; Kiyokawa, Kiyoshi; Klinker, Gudrun; Takemura, Haruo

    2015-04-01

    In recent years optical see-through head-mounted displays (OST-HMDs) have moved from conceptual research to a market of mass-produced devices with new models and applications being released continuously. It remains challenging to deploy augmented reality (AR) applications that require consistent spatial visualization. Examples include maintenance, training and medical tasks, as the view of the attached scene camera is shifted from the user's view. A calibration step can compute the relationship between the HMD-screen and the user's eye to align the digital content. However, this alignment is only viable as long as the display does not move, an assumption that rarely holds for an extended period of time. As a consequence, continuous recalibration is necessary. Manual calibration methods are tedious and rarely support practical applications. Existing automated methods do not account for user-specific parameters and are error prone. We propose the combination of a pre-calibrated display with a per-frame estimation of the user's cornea position to estimate the individual eye center and continuously recalibrate the system. With this, we also obtain the gaze direction, which allows for instantaneous uncalibrated eye gaze tracking, without the need for additional hardware and complex illumination. Contrary to existing methods, we use simple image processing and do not rely on iris tracking, which is typically noisy and can be ambiguous. Evaluation with simulated and real data shows that our approach achieves a more accurate and stable eye pose estimation, which results in an improved and practical calibration with a largely improved distribution of projection error. PMID:26357098

  17. Accurate and automatic extrinsic calibration method for blade measurement system integrated by different optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wantao; Li, Zhongwei; Zhong, Kai; Shi, Yusheng; Zhao, Can; Cheng, Xu

    2014-11-01

    Fast and precise 3D inspection system is in great demand in modern manufacturing processes. At present, the available sensors have their own pros and cons, and hardly exist an omnipotent sensor to handle the complex inspection task in an accurate and effective way. The prevailing solution is integrating multiple sensors and taking advantages of their strengths. For obtaining a holistic 3D profile, the data from different sensors should be registrated into a coherent coordinate system. However, some complex shape objects own thin wall feather such as blades, the ICP registration method would become unstable. Therefore, it is very important to calibrate the extrinsic parameters of each sensor in the integrated measurement system. This paper proposed an accurate and automatic extrinsic parameter calibration method for blade measurement system integrated by different optical sensors. In this system, fringe projection sensor (FPS) and conoscopic holography sensor (CHS) is integrated into a multi-axis motion platform, and the sensors can be optimally move to any desired position at the object's surface. In order to simple the calibration process, a special calibration artifact is designed according to the characteristics of the two sensors. An automatic registration procedure based on correlation and segmentation is used to realize the artifact datasets obtaining by FPS and CHS rough alignment without any manual operation and data pro-processing, and then the Generalized Gauss-Markoff model is used to estimate the optimization transformation parameters. The experiments show the measurement result of a blade, where several sampled patches are merged into one point cloud, and it verifies the performance of the proposed method.

  18. A Catalog of Stellar Targets and Calibrators for Next Generation Optical Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swihart, Sam; Muterspaugh, M. W.; Garcia, E.; van Belle, G.; Stassun, K.

    2014-01-01

    The Visible Imaging System for Interferometric Observations at the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (VISION) outside Flagstaff, Arizona is a high-resolution, six-telescope beam combiner. VISION is capable of sub-milliarcsecond resolution in visible wavelengths allowing for images of stellar surface features, such as spots and granulation. Here we present a list of the first potential science targets as well as their respective calibrators. Approximately 2900 potential science target stars in the northern hemisphere fit the criteria of being ideal for VISION having angular sizes between 2 and 4 milliarcseconds and brighter than V=6. In order to obtain good interferometric data on these targets, it is vital to establish the system response of the instrument. This is done by observing unresolved calibrator stars with visibilities near unity. The angular sizes of these calibrators must be very accurate to obtain good visibility contrast. We used a spectral energy distribution fitting code, SEDfit, which modeled each star’s angular size based on a template of the spectral type of the star obtained from the Skiff Catalogue of Stellar Spectral Classification (2009-2013). Of the nearly 2000 possible calibrators, 1485 stars have relative errors of their angular sizes less than 10%, 664 have errors less than 5%, and 37 stars have relative errors less than 2%. With this precision, our catalog will be a valuable resource for the interferometric imaging community leading to great opportunities for imaging the surface of a star other than the Sun. We acknowledge the Vanderbilt Physics and Astronomy NSF REU Program.

  19. Toward a Calibration-Free Model for Optical Remote Sensing of Soil Moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, M.; Jones, S. B.; Tuller, M.

    2015-12-01

    A recently developed physically-based model to retrieve soil moisture from optical images was evaluated in this study. The model was derived based on a simple two-flux radiative transfer model describing diffuse reflectance from a uniform, optically thick, absorbing and scattering medium. The model exhibited an unprecedented linear relationship between a novel transformed reflectance and the surface soil moisture in the shortwave infrared bands such as bands 6 and 7 of Landsat 8. Accuracy of the model was tested based on laboratory-measured spectral reflectance data of a broad range of Arizona soils in the optical domain (400 - 2500 nm). Additionally, the original model was further simplified by combining bands 6 and 7 data which reduced the number of model parameters from two to one. The remaining physically-significant parameter was directly measured for the Arizona soils, exhibiting little variability among those varied soil textures. New findings in this study significantly advance this new method toward its application without the need for ground-based model calibration. Further study of potentials and limitations of this model for large-scale application using optical satellite data (e.g. Landsat, MODIS) remains a goal of future research.

  20. High Resolution Spectroscopy of Naphthalene Calibrated by AN Optical Frequency Comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Akiko; Nakashima, Kazuki; Matsuba, Ayumi; Misono, Masatoshi

    2015-06-01

    In high-resolution molecular spectroscopy, the precise measure of the optical frequency is crucial to evaluate minute shifts and splittings of the energy levels. On the other hand, in such spectroscopy, thousands of spectral lines distributed over several wavenumbers have to be measured by a continuously scanning cw laser. Therefore, the continuously changing optical frequency of the scanning laser has to be determined with enough precision. To satisfy these contradictory requirements, we have been developed two types of high-resolution spectroscopic systems employing an optical frequency comb. One of the systems employs RF band-pass filters to generate equally spaced frequency markers for optical frequency calibration, and is appropriate for wide wavelength-range measurement with relatively high scanning rate.^a In the other system, the beat frequency between the optical frequency comb and the scanning laser is controlled by an acousto-optic frequency shifter. This system is suitable for more precise measurement, and enables detailed analyses of frequency characteristics of scanning laser.^b In the present study, we observe Doppler-free two-photon absorption spectra of A^1B1u (v_4 = 1) ← X^1A_g (v = 0) transition of naphthalene around 298 nm. The spectral lines are rotationally resolved and the resolution is about 100 kHz. For ^qQ transition, the rotational lines are assigned, and molecular constants in the excited state are determined. In addition, we analyze the origin of the measured linewidth and Coriolis interactions between energy levels. To determine molecular constants more precisely, we proceed to measure and analyze spectra of other transitions, such as ^sS transitions. ^a A. Nishiyama, D. Ishikawa, and M. Misono, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 30, 2107 (2013). ^b A. Nishiyama, A. Matsuba, and M. Misono, Opt. Lett. 39, 4923 (2014).

  1. Calibration and optimization of computer-controlled optical surfacing for large optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae Wook; Martin, Hubert M.; Burge, James H.

    2011-09-01

    Precision optical surfaces can be efficiently manufactured using a computer-controlled optical surfacing (CCOS) process. Most CCOS processes are based on control of the dwell time of a tool on the workpiece, according to the desired removal and the tool influence function (TIF), which is the material wear function of the tool. Several major topics were investigated to improve current CCOS processes and provide new solutions for the next generation of CCOS processes. A rigid conformal (RC) lap using a visco-elastic non-Newtonian medium was invented. It conforms to the aspheric surface shape, yet maintains stiffness on short time scales to provide natural smoothing. The smoothing removes mid- to high-frequency errors while controlled dwell time removes low-frequency errors. A parametric smoothing model was also introduced to predict the smoothing effects. A parametric edge TIF model to represent measured edge TIFs was developed and demonstrated. This model covers the removal behavior as the tool overhangs the edge of the workpiece. These new tools and models were applied in a new process optimization technique called nonsequential optimization. The non-sequential approach performs a comprehensive optimization of dwell time using multiple TIFs (multiple tools) simultaneously. An overview of these newly implemented CCOS features** is presented along with some actual CCOS results.

  2. Navigated tracking of skin lesion progression with optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duliu, Alexandru; Lasser, Tobias; Wendler, Thomas; Safi, Asad; Ziegler, Sibylle; Navab, Nassir

    2010-03-01

    Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma (CTCL) is a cancer type externally characterized by alterations in the coloring of skin. Optical spectroscopy has been proposed for quantification of minimal changes in skin offering itself as an interesting tool for monitoring of CTCL in real-time. However, in order to be used in a valid way, measurements on the lesions have to be taken at the same position and with the same orientation in each session. Combining hand-held optical spectroscopy devices with tracking and acquiring synchronously spectral information with position and orientation, we introduce a novel computer-assisted scheme for valid spectral quantification of disease progression. We further present an implementation for an augmented reality guidance system that allows to find a point previously analyzed with an accuracy of 0.8[mm] and 5.0[deg] (vs. 1.6[mm] and 6.6[deg] without guidance). The intuitive guidance, as well as the preliminary results shows that the presented approach has great potential towards innovative computer-assistance methods for quantification of disease progression.

  3. High-order polarization mode crosstalk effect: a calibration scheme of white light-based optical coherence domain polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bing; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Jianzhong; Liang, Shuai; Yu, Zhangjun; Yuan, Yonggui; Peng, Feng; Zhou, Ai; Zhang, Yu; Yuan, Libo

    2015-09-01

    We propose a calibration scheme of the white light interferometer based optical coherence domain polarimetry (OCDP), which could be used to measure the ultra-weak polarization mode crosstalk (PMC) or the ultra-high polarization extinction ratio (PER) of different polarization optical devices. The calibration depends on the first and second order PMC effect of different polarization devices in series. The first and second PMCs between 0 and -90dB, established by five pieces of polarization maintaining fiber (PMF) and a Y-waveguide, is used to prove its feasibility.

  4. A Novel Error Model of Optical Systems and an On-Orbit Calibration Method for Star Sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Geng, Yunhai; Jin, Rongyu

    2015-12-12

    In order to improve the on-orbit measurement accuracy of star sensors, the effects of image-plane rotary error, image-plane tilt error and distortions of optical systems resulting from the on-orbit thermal environment were studied in this paper. Since these issues will affect the precision of star image point positions, in this paper, a novel measurement error model based on the traditional error model is explored. Due to the orthonormal characteristics of image-plane rotary-tilt errors and the strong nonlinearity among these error parameters, it is difficult to calibrate all the parameters simultaneously. To solve this difficulty, for the new error model, a modified two-step calibration method based on the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and Least Square Methods (LSM) is presented. The former one is used to calibrate the main point drift, focal length error and distortions of optical systems while the latter estimates the image-plane rotary-tilt errors. With this calibration method, the precision of star image point position influenced by the above errors is greatly improved from 15.42% to 1.389%. Finally, the simulation results demonstrate that the presented measurement error model for star sensors has higher precision. Moreover, the proposed two-step method can effectively calibrate model error parameters, and the calibration precision of on-orbit star sensors is also improved obviously.

  5. A Novel Error Model of Optical Systems and an On-Orbit Calibration Method for Star Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuang; Geng, Yunhai; Jin, Rongyu

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the on-orbit measurement accuracy of star sensors, the effects of image-plane rotary error, image-plane tilt error and distortions of optical systems resulting from the on-orbit thermal environment were studied in this paper. Since these issues will affect the precision of star image point positions, in this paper, a novel measurement error model based on the traditional error model is explored. Due to the orthonormal characteristics of image-plane rotary-tilt errors and the strong nonlinearity among these error parameters, it is difficult to calibrate all the parameters simultaneously. To solve this difficulty, for the new error model, a modified two-step calibration method based on the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and Least Square Methods (LSM) is presented. The former one is used to calibrate the main point drift, focal length error and distortions of optical systems while the latter estimates the image-plane rotary-tilt errors. With this calibration method, the precision of star image point position influenced by the above errors is greatly improved from 15.42% to 1.389%. Finally, the simulation results demonstrate that the presented measurement error model for star sensors has higher precision. Moreover, the proposed two-step method can effectively calibrate model error parameters, and the calibration precision of on-orbit star sensors is also improved obviously. PMID:26703599

  6. Progress toward light weight high angular resolution multilayer coated optics

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmer, M.P.; Graham, M.E.; Vaynman, S.; Echt, J.; Farber, M.; Ehlert, S.; Varlese, S.

    2008-11-18

    We have been working on 3 separate projects that together will give us the ability to make 1 arc second, light weight Wolter I optics that work above 40 keV. The three separate tasks are: (a) plasma spraying of metal-coated micro-balloons; (b) coating of the inside of Wolter I mirrors, (c) actuator designs for improving figure quality. We give a progress report on our work on all three areas. In summary, for future space missions it will be desirable for them to be affordable by reducing mass, keeping the focal length manageable, and yet having high figure quality. The avenues we have described above are straight forward paths to achieving this goal, but a great deal of work needs to be done to take us from the concept stage to a functional system.

  7. Progress in the development of scintillating optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Borenstein, S.R.; Strand, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    Starting with 1 inch diameter PVT scintillator as a preform, the authors have drawn fibers of several diameters ranging from 1 to 4 mm. These fibers have been coated in line with the draw to form optical fibers. Several cladding materials whose index of refraction ranges from 1.35 to 1.55 have been used. The most successful fiber has been obtained with an extra thick (200 micron) cladding of silicone in combination with a linear draw, as opposed to a spool draw. This fiber is acceptable, but it is extremely fragile and its quality is difficult to control. The authors are currently constructing a 12 channel hodoscope with 1 mm spatial resolution using 4 mm diameter fibers. An account is also given of the progress made in using the Avalanche Photo Diode (APD) operated in the Geiger mode as the photo detector.

  8. Progressive auditory neuropathy in patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ceranic, B; Luxon, L

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate auditory neural involvement in patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Methods: Auditory assessment was undertaken in two patients with LHON. One was a 45 year old woman with Harding disease (multiple-sclerosis-like illness and positive 11778mtDNA mutation) and mild auditory symptoms, whose auditory function was monitored over five years. The other was a 59 year old man with positive 11778mtDNA mutation, who presented with a long standing progressive bilateral hearing loss, moderate on one side and severe to profound on the other. Standard pure tone audiometry, tympanometry, stapedial reflex threshold measurements, stapedial reflex decay, otoacoustic emissions with olivo-cochlear suppression, auditory brain stem responses, and vestibular function tests were undertaken. Results: Both patients had good cochlear function, as judged by otoacoustic emissions (intact outer hair cells) and normal stapedial reflexes (intact inner hair cells). A brain stem lesion was excluded by negative findings on imaging, recordable stapedial reflex thresholds, and, in one of the patients, olivocochlear suppression of otoacoustic emissions. The deterioration of auditory function implied a progressive course in both cases. Vestibular function was unaffected. Conclusions: The findings are consistent with auditory neuropathy—a lesion of the cochlear nerve presenting with abnormal auditory brain stem responses and with normal inner hair cells and the cochlear nucleus (lower brain stem). The association of auditory neuropathy, or any other auditory dysfunction, with LHON has not been recognised previously. Further studies are necessary to establish whether this is a consistent finding. PMID:15026512

  9. Sensitivity calibration procedures in optical-CT scanning of BANG 3 polymer gel dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Wuu, Cheng-Shie; Maryanski, Marek J.

    2010-02-15

    The dose response of the BANG 3 polymer gel dosimeter (MGS Research Inc., Madison, CT) was studied using the OCTOPUS laser CT scanner (MGS Research Inc., Madison, CT). Six 17 cm diameter and 12 cm high Barex cylinders, and 18 small glass vials were used to house the gel. The gel phantoms were irradiated with 6 and 10 MV photons, as well as 12 and 16 MeV electrons using a Varian Clinac 2100EX. Three calibration methods were used to obtain the dose response curves: (a) Optical density measurements on the 18 glass vials irradiated with graded doses from 0 to 4 Gy using 6 or 10 MV large field irradiations; (b) optical-CT scanning of Barex cylinders irradiated with graded doses (0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 Gy) from four adjacent 4x4 cm{sup 2} photon fields or 6x6 cm{sup 2} electron fields; and (c) percent depth dose (PDD) comparison of optical-CT scans with ion chamber measurements for 6x6 cm{sup 2}, 12 and 16 MeV electron fields. The dose response of the BANG 3 gel was found to be linear and energy independent within the uncertainties of the experimental methods (about 3%). The slopes of the linearly fitted dose response curves (dose sensitivities) from the four field irradiations (0.0752{+-}3%, 0.0756{+-}3%, 0.0767{+-}3%, and 0.0759{+-}3% cm{sup -1} Gy{sup -1}) and the PDD matching methods (0.0768{+-}3% and 0.0761{+-}3% cm{sup -1} Gy{sup -1}) agree within 2.2%, indicating a good reproducibility of the gel dose response within phantoms of the same geometry. The dose sensitivities from the glass vial approach are different from those of the cylindrical Barex phantoms by more than 30%, owing probably to the difference in temperature inside the two types of phantoms during gel formation and irradiation, and possible oxygen contamination of the glass vial walls. The dose response curve obtained from the PDD matching approach with 16 MeV electron field was used to calibrate the gel phantom irradiated with the 12 MeV, 6x6 cm{sup 2} electron field. Three-dimensional dose distributions

  10. Sensitivity calibration procedures in optical-CT scanning of BANG®3 polymer gel dosimeters

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y.; Wuu, Cheng-Shie; Maryanski, Marek J.

    2010-01-01

    The dose response of the BANG®3 polymer gel dosimeter (MGS Research Inc., Madison, CT) was studied using the OCTOPUS™ laser CT scanner (MGS Research Inc., Madison, CT). Six 17 cm diameter and 12 cm high Barex cylinders, and 18 small glass vials were used to house the gel. The gel phantoms were irradiated with 6 and 10 MV photons, as well as 12 and 16 MeV electrons using a Varian Clinac 2100EX. Three calibration methods were used to obtain the dose response curves: (a) Optical density measurements on the 18 glass vials irradiated with graded doses from 0 to 4 Gy using 6 or 10 MV large field irradiations; (b) optical-CT scanning of Barex cylinders irradiated with graded doses (0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 Gy) from four adjacent 4×4 cm2 photon fields or 6×6 cm2 electron fields; and (c) percent depth dose (PDD) comparison of optical-CT scans with ion chamber measurements for 6×6 cm2, 12 and 16 MeV electron fields. The dose response of the BANG®3 gel was found to be linear and energy independent within the uncertainties of the experimental methods (about 3%). The slopes of the linearly fitted dose response curves (dose sensitivities) from the four field irradiations (0.0752±3%, 0.0756±3%, 0.0767±3%, and 0.0759±3% cm−1 Gy−1) and the PDD matching methods (0.0768±3% and 0.0761±3% cm−1 Gy−1) agree within 2.2%, indicating a good reproducibility of the gel dose response within phantoms of the same geometry. The dose sensitivities from the glass vial approach are different from those of the cylindrical Barex phantoms by more than 30%, owing probably to the difference in temperature inside the two types of phantoms during gel formation and irradiation, and possible oxygen contamination of the glass vial walls. The dose response curve obtained from the PDD matching approach with 16 MeV electron field was used to calibrate the gel phantom irradiated with the 12 MeV, 6×6 cm2 electron field. Three-dimensional dose distributions from the gel measurement and the Eclipse

  11. Calibrating the Optical Luminosity of Red Clump Stars: An Archival Study of Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocholski, Aaron

    2010-09-01

    The core helium burning stars of the red clump {RC} are a conspicuous feature in the color-magnitude diagram of many stellar populations. Its ease of identification, along with its relative brightness {M_I 0} make the RC a popular feature for HST studies of stellar populations in galaxies out to a few Mpc. Such studies generally interpret the data through comparison to theoretical isochrones. For accurate results, the theoretical predictions must be calibrated to match the RC properties of observed populations of known age and metallicity. However, no large scale studies of the luminosity of the RC currently exist in the optical bands. We propose to remedy this situation with an archival study of RC properties in star clusters in the Milky Way, LMC, and SMC. We will focus on HST images of globular clusters, but we will augment the sample with ground-based open cluster observations to extend the coverage of parameter space. The goal is to build a large and homogeneous database, through new analysis and incorporation of literature data, of cluster ages, abundances, distances, and RC photometry. This database will allow us to explore the variations in the RC luminosity as a function of age and [Fe/H] over the full range of parameter space where the RC exists, for both the V and I bands. The results will provide a fundamental calibration for all future HST studies of stellar populations and distances of nearby galaxies using the RC. They will also allow for verification or improvement of theoretical models for red giant phase evolution. This in turn will help many subjects, from stellar modeling to population synthesis and fitting of spectral energy distributions of distant galaxies.

  12. A First Calibration of SBF using Mulit-Conjugate Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Zachary; Jensen, Joseph B.; Blakeslee, John; Schirmer, Mischa

    2016-01-01

    We measured Surface Brightness Fluctuations (SBF) in three galaxies, ESO137-G006, NGC 3309, and NGC 5128, using the GeMS Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) system on the Gemini South telescope. ESO137-G006 is located in the Norma Cluster, NGC 3309 is located in the Hydra Cluster, while NGC 5128, also known as Centaurus A, is a nearby galaxy with numerous other distance measurements, including Cepheids. These galaxies were observed as a pathfinder to establish the SBF technique using the MCAO system.The J and K-band images taken with MCAO were astrometrically corrected and combined using the THELI software. This method allowed us to accurately account for the distortions of the focal plane when combining the images. The foreground stars as well as the globular clusters were measured to account for their contribution to the SBF. J-K color measurements were made to calibrate SBF and determine the stellar populations of the galaxies.The results of these measurements give us an SBF calibration that we can use to measure the distances to much more distant galaxies. Accurate distances are needed to determine the true spatial motions of galaxies and measure the mass distribution and density of the Universe. We now live in the era of "precision cosmology" in which distance measurements have transformed our understanding of the composition of the Universe and revealed the presence of Dark Matter and Dark Energy, the two dominant (but still unidentified) components of the Universe. The origins and nature of Dark Matter and Dark Energy are among the most important unsolved mysteries in physics.

  13. Improved entrance optics design for ground-based solar spectral ultraviolet irradiance measurements and system absolute calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Caihong; Yu, Jialin; Huang, Bo; Tian, Yan

    2009-07-01

    The angular response of entrance optics is an important parameter for solar spectral UV measurements, and ideal cosine entrance optics is required to measure ground-based global solar spectral UV irradiance including direct and diffuse radiation over a solid angle of 2π sr. Early international comparisons have shown that deviations from the ideal cosine response lead to uncertainties in solar measurements of more than 10%. A special spectroradiometer used for solar spectral UV measurements was developed at National Institute of Metrology (NIM). Based on Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) integrating sphere, seven kinds of cosine-entrance system were designed and compared. A special cosine measurement apparatus was developed to measure the angular response of the entrance optics. Experimental results show that, the integral cosine error is 1.41% for a novel combination entrance optics, which is composed by a PTFE integrating sphere, a spherical ground quartz diffuser and a special correction ring, and the cosine error is 0.08% for an incidence angle of θ=+/-30°, 0.84% at θ=+/-45°, -0.47% at θ=+/-60°, -0.74% at θ=+/-70°, and 5.47% at θ=+/-80°. With the new non-plane entrance optics, the angular response of the solar UV spectroradiometer is improved evidently, but on the other side, the system's absolute calibration becomes more difficult owing to the curved geometry of the new diffuser. The calibration source is a 1000W tungsten halogen lamp, but the measurement object is the global radiation of the solar, so a small error of the calibration distance will lead to an enormous measurement error of solar spectral UV irradiance. When the calibration distance is 500mm, for an actual diffuser with spherical radius 32.5mm and spherical height 20mm, the calibration error will be up to 3%~10% on the assumption that the starting point was calculated just from the acme or the bottom of the half-spherical diffuser. It was investigated that which point inside the

  14. The influence of temperature calibration on the OC-EC results from a dual optics thermal carbon analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, J.; Kinsey, J. S.; Hays, M. D.

    2014-04-01

    Thermal-optical analysis (TOA) is a widely used technique that fractionates carbonaceous aerosol particles into organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), or carbonate. Thermal sub-fractions of evolved OC and EC are also used for source identification and apportionment; thus, oven temperature accuracy during TOA analysis is essential. Evidence now indicates that the "actual" sample (filter) temperature and the temperature measured by the built-in oven thermocouple (or set-point temperature) can differ by as much as 50 °C. This difference can affect the OC-EC split point selection and consequently the OC and EC fraction and sub-fraction concentrations being reported, depending on the sample composition and in-use TOA method and instrument. The present study systematically investigates the influence of an oven temperature calibration procedure for TOA. A dual-optical carbon analyzer that simultaneously measures transmission and reflectance (TOT and TOR) is used, functioning under the conditions of both the NIOSH 5040 and IMPROVE protocols. Application of the oven calibration procedure to our dual optics instrument significantly changed NIOSH 5040 carbon fractions (OC and EC) and the IMPROVE OC fraction. In addition, the well-known OC-EC split difference between NIOSH and IMPROVE methods is even further perturbed following the instrument calibration. Further study is needed to determine if the wide-spread application of this oven temperature calibration procedure will indeed improve accuracy and our ability to compare among carbonaceous aerosol studies that use TOA.

  15. Optical trapping

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Block, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    Since their invention just over 20 years ago, optical traps have emerged as a powerful tool with broad-reaching applications in biology and physics. Capabilities have evolved from simple manipulation to the application of calibrated forces on—and the measurement of nanometer-level displacements of—optically trapped objects. We review progress in the development of optical trapping apparatus, including instrument design considerations, position detection schemes and calibration techniques, with an emphasis on recent advances. We conclude with a brief summary of innovative optical trapping configurations and applications. PMID:16878180

  16. Recent progress in X-ray optics at the ESRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, A.

    2003-03-01

    It is the task of x-ray optics to adapt the raw beam generated by modern sources such as synchrotron storage rings to a great variety of experimental requirements in terms of intensity, spot size, polarization and other parameters. The very high quality of synchrotron radiation (source size of a few microns and beam divergence of a few micro-radians) and the extreme x-ray flux (power of several hundred Watts in a few square mm) make this task quite difficult. In particular the heat load aspect is very important in the conditioning process of the brute x-ray power. Cryogenically cooled silicon crystals and water-cooled diamond crystals can presently fulfil this task, but limits will soon be reached and new schemes and materials must be envisioned. A major tendency of instrument improvement has a ways been to concentrate more photons into a smaller spot utilizing a whole variety of focusing devices such as Fresnel zone plates, refractive lenses and Systems based on bent surfaces, for example Kirkpatrick-Baez Systems. Apart from the resistance of the sample, the ultimate limits are determined by the source size and strength on one side, by materials properties, cooling, mounting and bending schemes on the other side, and fundamentally by the diffraction process. There is also the important aspect of coherence that can be both a nuisance and a blessing for the experiments, in particular for imaging techniques. Its conservation puts additional constraints on the quality of the optical elements. A review of recent progress in this field is given.

  17. High-Accuracy Self-Calibration for Smart, Optical Orbiting Payloads Integrated with Attitude and Position Determination.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Xing, Fei; Chu, Daping; Liu, Zilong

    2016-01-01

    A high-accuracy space smart payload integrated with attitude and position (SSPIAP) is a new type of optical remote sensor that can autonomously complete image positioning. Inner orientation parameters (IOPs) are a prerequisite for image position determination of an SSPIAP. The calibration of IOPs significantly influences the precision of image position determination of SSPIAPs. IOPs can be precisely measured and calibrated in a laboratory. However, they may drift to a significant degree because of vibrations during complicated launches and on-orbit functioning. Therefore, laboratory calibration methods are not suitable for on-orbit functioning. We propose an on-orbit self-calibration method for SSPIAPs. Our method is based on an auto-collimating dichroic filter combined with a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) point-source focal plane. A MEMS procedure is used to manufacture a light transceiver focal plane, which integrates with point light sources and a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor. A dichroic filter is used to fabricate an auto-collimation light reflection element. The dichroic filter and the MEMS point light sources focal plane are integrated into an SSPIAP so it can perform integrated self-calibration. Experiments show that our method can achieve micrometer-level precision, which is good enough to complete real-time calibration without temporal or spatial limitations. PMID:27472339

  18. High-Accuracy Self-Calibration for Smart, Optical Orbiting Payloads Integrated with Attitude and Position Determination

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin; Xing, Fei; Chu, Daping; Liu, Zilong

    2016-01-01

    A high-accuracy space smart payload integrated with attitude and position (SSPIAP) is a new type of optical remote sensor that can autonomously complete image positioning. Inner orientation parameters (IOPs) are a prerequisite for image position determination of an SSPIAP. The calibration of IOPs significantly influences the precision of image position determination of SSPIAPs. IOPs can be precisely measured and calibrated in a laboratory. However, they may drift to a significant degree because of vibrations during complicated launches and on-orbit functioning. Therefore, laboratory calibration methods are not suitable for on-orbit functioning. We propose an on-orbit self-calibration method for SSPIAPs. Our method is based on an auto-collimating dichroic filter combined with a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) point-source focal plane. A MEMS procedure is used to manufacture a light transceiver focal plane, which integrates with point light sources and a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor. A dichroic filter is used to fabricate an auto-collimation light reflection element. The dichroic filter and the MEMS point light sources focal plane are integrated into an SSPIAP so it can perform integrated self-calibration. Experiments show that our method can achieve micrometer-level precision, which is good enough to complete real-time calibration without temporal or spatial limitations. PMID:27472339

  19. High-Accuracy Self-Calibration for Smart, Optical Orbiting Payloads Integrated with Attitude and Position Determination.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin; Xing, Fei; Chu, Daping; Liu, Zilong

    2016-01-01

    A high-accuracy space smart payload integrated with attitude and position (SSPIAP) is a new type of optical remote sensor that can autonomously complete image positioning. Inner orientation parameters (IOPs) are a prerequisite for image position determination of an SSPIAP. The calibration of IOPs significantly influences the precision of image position determination of SSPIAPs. IOPs can be precisely measured and calibrated in a laboratory. However, they may drift to a significant degree because of vibrations during complicated launches and on-orbit functioning. Therefore, laboratory calibration methods are not suitable for on-orbit functioning. We propose an on-orbit self-calibration method for SSPIAPs. Our method is based on an auto-collimating dichroic filter combined with a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) point-source focal plane. A MEMS procedure is used to manufacture a light transceiver focal plane, which integrates with point light sources and a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor. A dichroic filter is used to fabricate an auto-collimation light reflection element. The dichroic filter and the MEMS point light sources focal plane are integrated into an SSPIAP so it can perform integrated self-calibration. Experiments show that our method can achieve micrometer-level precision, which is good enough to complete real-time calibration without temporal or spatial limitations.

  20. Optical See-Through Head Mounted Display Direct Linear Transformation Calibration Robustness in the Presence of User Alignment Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axholt, Magnus; Skoglund, Martin; Peterson, Stephen D.; Cooper, Matthew D.; Schoen, Thomas B.; Gustafsson, Fredrik; Ynnerman, Anders; Ellis, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is a technique by which computer generated signals synthesize impressions that are made to coexist with the surrounding real world as perceived by the user. Human smell, taste, touch and hearing can all be augmented, but most commonly AR refers to the human vision being overlaid with information otherwise not readily available to the user. A correct calibration is important on an application level, ensuring that e.g. data labels are presented at correct locations, but also on a system level to enable display techniques such as stereoscopy to function properly [SOURCE]. Thus, vital to AR, calibration methodology is an important research area. While great achievements already have been made, there are some properties in current calibration methods for augmenting vision which do not translate from its traditional use in automated cameras calibration to its use with a human operator. This paper uses a Monte Carlo simulation of a standard direct linear transformation camera calibration to investigate how user introduced head orientation noise affects the parameter estimation during a calibration procedure of an optical see-through head mounted display.

  1. Master-Slave optical coherence tomography for parallel processing, calibration free and dispersion tolerance operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradu, Adrian; Kapinchev, Konstantin; Barnes, Fred; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2015-03-01

    We present further improvements on the Master Slave (MS) interferometry method since our first communication [1]. In this paper, we present more data collection and additionally demonstrate an important feature of the MS method, that of tolerance to dispersion. MS interferometry produces the interference of a selected point in depth based on principles of spectral domain (SD) interferometry, but without the need of a Fast Fourier transformation (FFT). The method can be used to directly produce en-face optical coherence tomography (OCT) images but also as a tool to accurately measure distances in low coherence interferometry for sensing applications [1]. In the MS-OCT method, cross-correlation is applied to both methods of SD-OCT, spectrometer based (SP) or swept source (SS) OCT. The channelled spectrum provided by an OCT system is correlated with the signal produced by reading a stored mask. Several such masks can be used simultaneously. The masks operate as adaptive filters. Each mask (filter) determines recognition in the measured channelled spectrum delivered by the interferometer, of the pattern corresponding to each optical path difference to be recognized. The method presents net advantages in comparison with the classical method of producing axial reflectivity profiles by FFT: no need for resampling of data, possibility to tailor the trade-off between depth resolution and sensitivity. Here, using a swept source, the MS method is used to obtain axial reflectivity profiles, which are compared to the axial profiles obtained by calibration of data and FFT. The tolerance to dispersion of the MS method was assumed in [1] but not demonstrated. Here, measurements are performed to demonstrate its axial resolution independence on dispersion.

  2. Adaptive optics self-calibration using differential OTF (dOTF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodack, Alexander T.; Knight, Justin M.; Codona, Johanan L.; Miller, Kelsey L.; Guyon, Olivier

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate self-calibration of an adaptive optical system using differential OTF [Codona, JL; Opt. Eng. 0001; 52(9):097105-097105. doi:10.1117/1.OE.52.9.097105]. We use a deformable mirror (DM) along with science camera focal plane images to implement a closed-loop servo that both flattens the DM and corrects for non-common-path aberrations within the telescope. The pupil field modification required for dOTF measurement is introduced by displacing actuators near the edge of the illuminated pupil. Simulations were used to develop methods to retrieve the phase from the complex amplitude dOTF measurements for both segmented and continuous sheet MEMS DMs and tests were performed using a Boston Micromachines continuous sheet DM for verification. We compute the actuator correction updates directly from the phase of the dOTF measurements, reading out displacements and/or slopes at segment and actuator positions. Through simulation, we also explore the effectiveness of these techniques for a variety of photons collected in each dOTF exposure pair.

  3. An Optical Sensor Network for Vegetation Phenology Monitoring and Satellite Data Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Eklundh, Lars; Jin, Hongxiao; Schubert, Per; Guzinski, Radoslaw; Heliasz, Michal

    2011-01-01

    We present a network of sites across Fennoscandia for optical sampling of vegetation properties relevant for phenology monitoring and satellite data calibration. The network currently consists of five sites, distributed along an N-S gradient through Sweden and Finland. Two sites are located in coniferous forests, one in a deciduous forest, and two on peatland. The instrumentation consists of dual-beam sensors measuring incoming and reflected red, green, NIR, and PAR fluxes at 10-min intervals, year-round. The sensors are mounted on separate masts or in flux towers in order to capture radiation reflected from within the flux footprint of current eddy covariance measurements. Our computations and model simulations demonstrate the validity of using off-nadir sampling, and we show the results from the first year of measurement. NDVI is computed and compared to that of the MODIS instrument on-board Aqua and Terra satellite platforms. PAR fluxes are partitioned into reflected and absorbed components for the ground and canopy. The measurements demonstrate that the instrumentation provides detailed information about the vegetation phenology and variations in reflectance due to snow cover variations and vegetation development. Valuable information about PAR absorption of ground and canopy is obtained that may be linked to vegetation productivity. PMID:22164039

  4. A versatile photogrammetric camera automatic calibration suite for multispectral fusion and optical helmet tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Villiers, Jason; Jermy, Robert; Nicolls, Fred

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a system to determine the photogrammetric parameters of a camera. The lens distortion, focal length and camera six degree of freedom (DOF) position are calculated. The system caters for cameras of different sensitivity spectra and fields of view without any mechanical modifications. The distortion characterization, a variant of Brown's classic plumb line method, allows many radial and tangential distortion coefficients and finds the optimal principal point. Typical values are 5 radial and 3 tangential coefficients. These parameters are determined stably and demonstrably produce superior results to low order models despite popular and prevalent misconceptions to the contrary. The system produces coefficients to model both the distorted to undistorted pixel coordinate transformation (e.g. for target designation) and the inverse transformation (e.g. for image stitching and fusion) allowing deterministic rates far exceeding real time. The focal length is determined to minimise the error in absolute photogrammetric positional measurement for both multi camera systems or monocular (e.g. helmet tracker) systems. The system determines the 6 DOF position of the camera in a chosen coordinate system. It can also determine the 6 DOF offset of the camera relative to its mechanical mount. This allows faulty cameras to be replaced without requiring a recalibration of the entire system (such as an aircraft cockpit). Results from two simple applications of the calibration results are presented: stitching and fusion of the images from a dual-band visual/ LWIR camera array, and a simple laboratory optical helmet tracker.

  5. An optical sensor network for vegetation phenology monitoring and satellite data calibration.

    PubMed

    Eklundh, Lars; Jin, Hongxiao; Schubert, Per; Guzinski, Radoslaw; Heliasz, Michal

    2011-01-01

    We present a network of sites across Fennoscandia for optical sampling of vegetation properties relevant for phenology monitoring and satellite data calibration. The network currently consists of five sites, distributed along an N-S gradient through Sweden and Finland. Two sites are located in coniferous forests, one in a deciduous forest, and two on peatland. The instrumentation consists of dual-beam sensors measuring incoming and reflected red, green, NIR, and PAR fluxes at 10-min intervals, year-round. The sensors are mounted on separate masts or in flux towers in order to capture radiation reflected from within the flux footprint of current eddy covariance measurements. Our computations and model simulations demonstrate the validity of using off-nadir sampling, and we show the results from the first year of measurement. NDVI is computed and compared to that of the MODIS instrument on-board Aqua and Terra satellite platforms. PAR fluxes are partitioned into reflected and absorbed components for the ground and canopy. The measurements demonstrate that the instrumentation provides detailed information about the vegetation phenology and variations in reflectance due to snow cover variations and vegetation development. Valuable information about PAR absorption of ground and canopy is obtained that may be linked to vegetation productivity.

  6. Progress in Insect-Inspired Optical Navigation Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita; Chahl, Javaan; Zometzer, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Progress has been made in continuing efforts to develop optical flight-control and navigation sensors for miniature robotic aircraft. The designs of these sensors are inspired by the designs and functions of the vision systems and brains of insects. Two types of sensors of particular interest are polarization compasses and ocellar horizon sensors. The basic principle of polarization compasses was described (but without using the term "polarization compass") in "Insect-Inspired Flight Control for Small Flying Robots" (NPO-30545), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 1 (January 2005), page 61. To recapitulate: Bees use sky polarization patterns in ultraviolet (UV) light, caused by Rayleigh scattering of sunlight by atmospheric gas molecules, as direction references relative to the apparent position of the Sun. A robotic direction-finding technique based on this concept would be more robust in comparison with a technique based on the direction to the visible Sun because the UV polarization pattern is distributed across the entire sky and, hence, is redundant and can be extrapolated from a small region of clear sky in an elsewhere cloudy sky that hides the Sun.

  7. In-progress absolute radiometric inflight calibration of the LANDSAT-4 sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, K.; Dinguirard, M.; Ezra, C. E.; Holm, R. G.; Jackson, R. J.; Kastner, C. J.; Palmer, J. M.; Savage, R.; Slater, P. N.

    1983-01-01

    An approach is described for providing periodic inflight absolute radiometric calibrations of the LANDSAT-4 sensors by reference to selected, instrumented ground areas. Results of some early ground measurements and computer simulations are presented. Selection of a suitable ground reference site, accurate measurement of the spectral reflectance of the selected area, determination of atmospheric characteristics during the morning of the sensor overpass, reduction of the measured data and their use in an appropriate atmospheric radiative transfer program, and comparison of the radiance level data with the digital counts of for the images of the selected areas are discussed. Preliminary measurements of gypsum are being made as an aid in defining the characteristics of field equipment to be constructed and calibrated for use over the White Sands Missile Range.

  8. Probing matrix and tumor mechanics with in situ calibrated optical trap based active microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staunton, Jack Rory; Vieira, Wilfred; Tanner, Kandice; Tissue Morphodynamics Unit Team

    Aberrant extracellular matrix deposition and vascularization, concomitant with proliferation and phenotypic changes undergone by cancer cells, alter mechanical properties in the tumor microenvironment during cancer progression. Tumor mechanics conversely influence progression, and the identification of physical biomarkers promise improved diagnostic and prognostic power. Optical trap based active microrheology enables measurement of forces up to 0.5 mm within a sample, allowing interrogation of in vitro biomaterials, ex vivo tissue sections, and small organisms in vivo. We fabricated collagen I hydrogels exhibiting distinct structural properties by tuning polymerization temperature Tp, and measured their shear storage and loss moduli at frequencies 1-15k Hz at multiple amplitudes. Lower Tp gels, with larger pore size but thicker, longer fibers, were stiffer than higher Tp gels; decreasing strain increased loss moduli and decreased storage moduli at low frequencies. We subcutanously injected probes with metastatic murine melanoma cells into mice. The excised tumors displayed storage and loss moduli 40 Pa and 10 Pa at 1 Hz, increasing to 500 Pa and 1 kPa at 15 kHz, respectively.

  9. Aerosol optical depth measurements in eastern China and a new calibration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kwon H.; Li, Zhanqing; Cribb, M. C.; Liu, Jianjun; Wang, Lei; Zheng, Youfei; Xia, Xiangao; Chen, Hongbin; Li, Bai

    2010-04-01

    We present a new calibration method to derive aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the MultiFilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) under extremely hazy atmospheric conditions during the East Asian Study of Tropospheric Aerosols: an International Regional Experiment (EAST-AIRE) and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment in China. MFRSR measurements have been made at Xianghe since September 2004 and at Taihu and Shouxian since March and May 2008, respectively. Aerosol property retrievals from CIMEL Electonique, Paris, Sun and sky radiometers located at each site show that aerosol loading is substantial and highly variable during a given year (averaged daily AOD550 = 0.80 ± 0.14). The conventional application of the Langley method to calibrate the MFRSR is not possible at these sites because there is a dearth of stable atmospheric and low-AOD conditions. To overcome this limitation of the traditional Langley plot method, highest irradiance values at a given air mass during a given period are used here. These highest values can represent the clear-sky and minimum aerosol loading conditions. A scatterplot of the AOD estimated by this method with the CIMEL Sun and sky radiometer AOD shows very good agreement: correlation coefficients are on the order of 0.98-0.99, slopes range from 0.93 to 0.97, and offsets are less than 0.02 for the three sites. AOD and Ångström exponents were derived from application of the method to all MFRSR data acquired at the three sites. AOD values at 500 nm are τ500 = 0.99 ± 0.71 (α500-870 = 1.45 ± 0.59) at Xianghe, 0.87 ± 0.54 (1.14 ± 0.31) at Taihu, and 0.84 ± 0.43 (1.15 ± 0.28) at Shouxian. Anthropogenic aerosols appear to dominate in the study region with significant contributions from large dust particles and influence of hydroscopic growth.

  10. Calibration of the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) Hard X-ray Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Gaskin, Jessica; Christe, Steven; Shih, Albert; Tennant, Allyn; Swartz, Doug; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Elsner, Ron; Kolodziejczak, Jeff; Ramsey, Brian

    On 2013 September 21-22, the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) hard X-ray telescope flew as a balloon payload from Ft. Sumner, NM. HEROES observed the Sun, the black hole binary GRS 1915+105, and the Crab Nebula during its 27 h flight. In this paper, we describe laboratory calibration measurements of the HEROES detectors using line and continuum sources and applications of these measurements to define channel to energy (gain) corrections for observed events and to define detector response matrices. We characterize the HEROES X-ray grazing incidence optics using measurements taken in the Stray Light Facility (SLF) in Huntsville, AL, and using ray traces. We describe the application of our calibration measurements to in-flight observations of the Crab Nebula.

  11. Calibration of optical tweezers with non-spherical probes via high-resolution detection of Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butykai, A.; Mor, F. M.; Gaál, R.; Domínguez-García, P.; Forró, L.; Jeney, S.

    2015-11-01

    Optical tweezers are commonly used and powerful tools to perform force measurements on the piconewton scale and to detect nanometer-scaled displacements. However, the precision of these instruments relies to a great extent on the accuracy of the calibration method. A well-known calibration procedure is to record the stochastic motion of the trapped particle and compare its statistical behavior with the theory of the Brownian motion in a harmonic potential. Here we present an interactive calibration software which allows for the simultaneous fitting of three different statistical observables (power spectral density, mean square displacement and velocity autocorrelation function) calculated from the trajectory of the probe to enhance fitting accuracy. The fitted theory involves the hydrodynamic interactions experimentally observable at high sampling rates. Furthermore, a qualitative extension is included in our model to handle the thermal fluctuations in the orientation of optically trapped asymmetric objects. The presented calibration methodology requires no prior knowledge of the bead size and can be applied to non-spherical probes as well. The software was validated on synthetic and experimental data.

  12. Calibration of diffuse correlation spectroscopy blood flow index with venous-occlusion diffuse optical spectroscopy in skeletal muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhe; Baker, Wesley B.; Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Ko, Tiffany S.; Wang, Detian; Schenkel, Steven; Durduran, Turgut; Li, Gang; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate and assess the utility of a simple scheme for continuous absolute blood flow monitoring based on diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS). The scheme calibrates DCS using venous-occlusion diffuse optical spectroscopy (VO-DOS) measurements of arm muscle tissue at a single time-point. A calibration coefficient (γ) for the arm is determined, permitting conversion of DCS blood flow indices to absolute blood flow units, and a study of healthy adults (N=10) is carried out to ascertain the variability of γ. The average DCS calibration coefficient for the right (i.e., dominant) arm was γ=(1.24±0.15)×108 (mL·100 mL-1·min-1)/(cm2/s). However, variability can be significant and is apparent in our site-to-site and day-to-day repeated measurements. The peak hyperemic blood flow overshoot relative to baseline resting flow was also studied following arm-cuff ischemia; excellent agreement between VO-DOS and DCS was found (R2=0.95, slope=0.94±0.07, mean difference=-0.10±0.45). Finally, we show that incorporation of subject-specific absolute optical properties significantly improves blood flow calibration accuracy.

  13. On-Orbit Geometric Calibration Approach for High-Resolution Geostationary Optical Satellite GaoFen-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mi; Cheng, Yufeng; Long, Xiaoxiang; Yang, Bo

    2016-06-01

    The GaoFen-4 (GF-4) remote sensing satellite is China's first civilian high-resolution geostationary optical satellite, which has been launched at the end of December 2015. To guarantee the geometric quality of imagery, this paper presents an on-orbit geometric calibration method for the area-array camera of GF-4. Firstly, we introduce the imaging features of area-array camera of GF-4 and construct a rigorous imaging model based on the analysis of the major error sources from three aspects: attitude measurement error, orbit measurement error and camera distortion. Secondly, we construct an on-orbit geometric calibration model by selecting and optimizing parameters of the rigorous geometric imaging model. On this basis, the calibration parameters are divided into two groups: external and internal calibration parameters. The external parameters are installation angles between the area-array camera and the star tracker, and we propose a two-dimensional direction angle model as internal parameters to describe the distortion of the areaarray camera. Thirdly, we propose a stepwise parameters estimation method that external parameters are estimated firstly, then internal parameters are estimated based on the generalized camera frame determined by external parameters. Experiments based on the real data of GF-4 shows that after on-orbit geometric calibration, the geometric accuracy of the images without ground control points is significantly improved.

  14. tweezercalib 2.1: Faster version of MatLab package for precise calibration of optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Poul Martin; Tolic-Nørrelykke, Iva Marija; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2006-10-01

    New version program summaryTitle of program: tweezercalib Catalogue identifier:ADTV_v2_1 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADTV_v2_1 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:no No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 134 188 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 050 368 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MatLab (Mathworks Inc.), standard license Computer:General computer running MatLab (Mathworks Inc.) Operating system:Windows2000, Windows-XP, Linux RAM:Of order four times the size of the data file Classification:3, 4.14, 18, 23 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADTV_v2_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 174 (2006) 518 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: yes Nature of problem:Calibrate optical tweezers with precision by fitting theory to experimental power spectrum of position of bead doing Brownian motion in incompressible fluid, possibly near microscope cover slip, while trapped in optical tweezers. Thereby determine spring constant of optical trap and conversion factor for arbitrary-units-to-nanometers for detection system. The theoretical underpinnings of the procedure may be found in Ref. [3]. Solution method:Elimination of cross-talk between quadrant photo-diodes, output channels for positions (optional). Check that distribution of recorded positions agrees with Boltzmann distribution of bead in harmonic trap. Data compression and noise reduction by blocking method applied to power spectrum. Full accounting for hydrodynamic effects; Frequency-dependent drag force and interaction with nearby cover slip (optional). Full accounting for electronic filters (optional), for "virtual filtering" caused by detection system (optional). Full accounting for aliasing caused by finite sampling rate (optional). Standard non-linear least-squares fitting with custom written

  15. Calibrating Ultracool Dwarfs: Optical Template Spectra, Bolometric Corrections, and χ Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sarah J.; West, Andrew A.; Bochanski, John J.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Kielty, Collin

    2014-07-01

    We present optical template spectra, bolometric corrections, and χ values for ultracool dwarfs. The templates are based on spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5 m telescope. The spectral features and overall shape of the L dwarf templates are consistent with previous spectroscopic standards and the templates have a radial velocity precision of ~10-20 km s-1. We calculate bolometric fluxes (accurate to 10-20%) for 101 late-M and L dwarfs from SDSS, 2MASS, and WISE photometry, SDSS spectra, and BT-Settl model spectra. We find that the z-band and J-band bolometric corrections for late-M and L dwarfs have a strong correlation with z-J and J-KS colors, respectively. The new χ values, which can be used to convert Hα equivalent widths to activity strength, are based on spectrophotometrically calibrated SDSS spectra and the new bolometric fluxes. While the measured χ values have typical uncertainties of ~20%, ultracool dwarf models show the continuum surrounding Hα can vary by up to an order of magnitude with changing surface gravity. Our semiempirical χ values are one to two orders of magnitude larger than previous χ values for mid-to-late L dwarfs, indicating that the upper limits for Hα activity strength on the coolest L dwarfs have been underestimated. This publication is partially based on observations obtained with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 meter telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium.

  16. Sensitive periods for visual calibration of the auditory space map in the barn owl optic tectum.

    PubMed

    Brainard, M S; Knudsen, E I

    1998-05-15

    Previous studies have identified sensitive periods for the developing barn owl during which visual experience has a powerful influence on the calibration of sound localization behavior. Here we investigated neural correlates of these sensitive periods by assessing developmental changes in the capacity of visual experience to alter the map of auditory space in the optic tectum of the barn owl. We used two manipulations. (1) We equipped owls with prismatic spectacles that optically displaced the visual field by 23 degrees to the left or right, and (2) we restored normal vision to prism-reared owls that had been raised wearing prisms. In agreement with previous behavioral experiments, we found that the capacity of abnormal visual experience to shift the tectal auditory space map was restricted to an early sensitive period. However, this period extended until later in life (approximately 200 d) than described previously in behavioral studies (approximately 70 d). Furthermore, unlike the previous behavioral studies that found that the capacity to recover normal sound localization after restoration of normal vision was lost at approximately 200 d of age, we found that the capacity to recover a normal auditory space map was never lost. Finally, we were able to reconcile the behaviorally and neurophysiologically defined sensitive periods by taking into account differences in the richness of the environment in the two sets of experiments. We repeated the behavioral experiments and found that when owls were housed in a rich environment, the capacity to adjust sound localization away from normal extended to later in life, whereas the capacity to recover to normal was never lost. Conversely, when owls were housed in an impoverished environment, the capacity to recover a normal auditory space map was restricted to a period ending at approximately 200 d of age. The results demonstrate that the timing and even the existence of sensitive periods for plasticity of a neural circuit

  17. Flexible geometrical calibration for fringe-reflection optical three-dimensional shape measurement.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ting; Zhang, Feng; Tao, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xuejun; Zhou, Run

    2015-11-01

    Accurate geometrical calibration is the basis of a fringe-reflection testing system, especially the calibration of reflection ray directions. However, such a calibration procedure is challenging because of two reasons: first of all, the common method of reflection ray directions calibration, which is based on the pinhole camera imaging model, fails in the presence of the pupil imaging aberration. What's more, although using a camera lens with an external stop in front can remove the pupil imaging aberration, it is difficult to achieve the exact geometrical measurement of the camera pinhole and the calibration of the reflection ray directions into the camera because of the low signal-to-noise ratio of images. In this paper, we introduce a new calibration method by finding the points on the liquid crystal display in front of the camera with different positions corresponding to the same camera pixels through correspondence matching. The calibration process and the results from the experiments on fringe-reflection testing demonstrate that the calibration method presented in this paper is simple, practical, and flexible.

  18. Development of a High-Pressure Gaseous Burner for Calibrating Optical Diagnostic Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, Jun; Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    2003-01-01

    In this work-in-progress report, we show the development of a unique high-pressure burner facility (up to 60 atm) that provides steady, reproducible premixed flames with high precision, while having the capability to use multiple fuel/oxidizer combinations. The highpressure facility has four optical access ports for applying different laser diagnostic techniques and will provide a standard reference flame for the development of a spectroscopic database in high-pressure/temperature conditions. Spontaneous Raman scattering (SRS) was the first diagnostic applied, and was used to successfully probe premixed hydrogen-air flames generated in the facility using a novel multi-jet micro-premixed array burner element. The SRS spectral data include contributions from H2, N2, O2, and H2O and were collected over a wide range of equivalence ratios ranging from 0.16 to 4.9 at an initial pressure of 10-atm via a spatially resolved point SRS measurement with a high-performance optical system. Temperatures in fuel-lean to stoichiometric conditions were determined from the ratio of the Stokes to anti-Stokes scattering of the Q-branch of N2, and those in fuel-rich conditions via the rotational temperature of H2. The SRS derived temperatures using both techniques were consistent and indicated that the flame temperature was approximately 500 K below that predicted by adiabatic equilibrium, indicating a large amount of heat-loss at the measurement zone. The integrated vibrational SRS signals show that SRS provides quantitative number density data in high-pressure H2-air flames.

  19. Progress on the development of active micro-structured optical arrays for x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Sanmartin, Daniel; Zhang, Dou; Button, Tim; Atkins, Carolyn; Doel, Peter; Wang, Hongchang; Brooks, David; Feldman, Charlotte; Willingale, Richard; Michette, Alan; Pfauntsch, Slawka; Sahraei, Shahin; Shand, Matthew; James, Ady; Dunare, Camelia; Stevenson, Tom; Parkes, William; Smith, Andy

    2009-08-01

    The Smart X-Ray Optics (SXO) project comprises a U.K.-based consortium developing active/adaptive micro-structured optical arrays (MOAs). These devices are designed to focus X-rays using grazing incidence reflection through consecutive aligned arrays of microscopic channels etched in silicon. The silicon channels have been produced both by dry and wet etching, the latter providing smoother channel walls. Adaptability is achieved using piezoelectric actuators, which bend the device and therefore change its focal distance. We aim to achieve a 5 cm radius of curvature which can provide a suitable focal length using a tandem pair MOA configuration. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) modelling has been carried out for the optimization of the MOA device design, consider different types of actuators (unimorph, bimorph and active fibre composites), and different Si/piezoelectric absolute and relative thicknesses. Prototype devices have been manufactured using a Viscous Plastic Processing Process for the piezoelectric actuators and dry etched silicon channels, bonded together using a low shrinkage adhesive. Characterisation techniques have been developed in order to evaluate the device performance in terms of the bending of the MOA channels produced by the actuators. This paper evaluates the progress to date on the actuation of the MOAs, comparing FEA modelling with the results obtained for different prototype structures.

  20. Using optical tweezers for measuring the interaction forces between human bone cells and implant surfaces: System design and force calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Martin; Madgavkar, Ashwin; Stjerndahl, Maria; Wu, Yanrong; Tan, Weihong; Duran, Randy; Niehren, Stefan; Mustafa, Kamal; Arvidson, Kristina; Wennerberg, Ann

    2007-07-15

    Optical tweezers were used to study the interaction and attachment of human bone cells to various types of medical implant materials. Ideally, the implant should facilitate cell attachment and promote migration of the progenitor cells in order to decrease the healing time. It is therefore of interest, in a controlled manner, to be able to monitor the cell adhesion process. Results from such studies would help foresee the clinical outcome of integrating medical implants. The interactions between two primary cell culture models, human gingival fibroblasts and bone forming human osteoblast cells, and three different implant materials, glass, titanium, and hydroxyapatite, were studied. A novel type of optical tweezers, which has a newly designed quadrant detector and a powerful 3 W laser was constructed and force calibrated using two different methods: one method in which the stiffness of the optical trap was obtained by monitoring the phase lag between the trap and the moved object when imposing a forced oscillation on the trapped object and another method in which the maximum trapping force was derived from the critical velocity at which the object escapes the trap. Polystyrene beads as well as cells were utilized for the calibrations. This is the first time that cells have been used directly for these types of force calibrations and, hence, direct measurements of forces exerted on cells can be performed, thus avoiding the difficulties often encountered when translating the results obtained from cell measurements to the calibrations obtained with reference materials. This more straightforward approach represents an advantage in comparison to established methods.

  1. The influence of temperature calibration on the OC-EC results from a dual-optics thermal carbon analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, J.; Kinsey, J. S.; Hays, M. D.

    2014-09-01

    Thermal-optical analysis (TOA) is a widely used technique that fractionates carbonaceous aerosol particles into organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), or carbonate. Thermal sub-fractions of evolved OC and EC are also used for source identification and apportionment; thus, oven temperature accuracy during TOA analysis is essential. Evidence now indicates that the "actual" sample (filter) temperature and the temperature measured by the built-in oven thermocouple (or set-point temperature) can differ by as much as 50 °C. This difference can affect the OC-EC split point selection and consequently the OC and EC fraction and sub-fraction concentrations being reported, depending on the sample composition and in-use TOA method and instrument. The present study systematically investigates the influence of an oven temperature calibration procedure for TOA. A dual-optical carbon analyzer that simultaneously measures transmission and reflectance (TOT and TOR) is used, functioning under the conditions of both the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health Method 5040 (NIOSH) and Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) protocols. The application of the oven calibration procedure to our dual-optics instrument significantly changed NIOSH 5040 carbon fractions (OC and EC) and the IMPROVE OC fraction. In addition, the well-known OC-EC split difference between NIOSH and IMPROVE methods is even further perturbed following the instrument calibration. Further study is needed to determine if the widespread application of this oven temperature calibration procedure will indeed improve accuracy and our ability to compare among carbonaceous aerosol studies that use TOA.

  2. Fiber Optic Repair and Maintainability (FORM) Program Progresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Advanced aircraft will employ fiber-optic interconnection components to transmit information from airframe and propulsion sensors to the flight control computers. Although these optical interconnects have been rigorously tested under laboratory conditions to determine their operating and environmental limits, there is concern as to their repairability and maintainability when placed in actual service. The Fiber Optic Repair and Maintainability (FORM) flight test program will provide data to enable designers to improve these fiber-optic interconnection systems for the next generation of aircraft. FORM is identifying critical problems in installing, maintaining, testing, and repairing fiber-optic interconnection systems in an operational avionics environment. This program is a cooperative Government/industry effort to evaluate optical component acceptability and installation techniques for aircraft.

  3. Design and calibration of a digital Fourier holographic microscope for particle sizing via goniometry and optical scatter imaging in transmission.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Vincent M; Jacques, Steven L

    2016-06-13

    Goniometry and optical scatter imaging have been used for optical determination of particle size based upon optical scattering. Polystyrene microspheres in suspension serve as a standard for system validation purposes. The design and calibration of a digital Fourier holographic microscope (DFHM) are reported. Of crucial importance is the appropriate scaling of scattering angle space in the conjugate Fourier plane. A detailed description of this calibration process is described. Spatial filtering of the acquired digital hologram to use photons scattered within a restricted angular range produces an image. A pair of images, one using photons narrowly scattered within 8 - 15° (LNA), and one using photons broadly scattered within 8 - 39° (HNA), are produced. An image based on the ratio of these two images, OSIR = HNA/LNA, following Boustany et al. (2002), yields a 2D Optical Scatter Image (OSI) whose contrast is based on the angular dependence of photon scattering and is sensitive to the microsphere size, especially in the 0.5-1.0µm range. Goniometric results are also given for polystyrene microspheres in suspension as additional proof of principle for particle sizing via the DFHM. PMID:27410298

  4. Wavelength-Filter Based Spectral Calibrated Wave number - Linearization in 1.3 mm Spectral Domain Optical Coherence

    PubMed Central

    Wijeisnghe, Ruchire Eranga Henry; Cho, Nam Hyun; Park, Kibeom; Shin, Yongseung; Kim, Jeehyun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the enhanced spectral calibration method for 1.3 μm spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The calibration method using wavelength-filter simplifies the SD-OCT system, and also the axial resolution and the entire speed of the OCT system can be dramatically improved as well. An externally connected wavelength-filter is utilized to obtain the information of the wavenumber and the pixel position. During the calibration process the wavelength-filter is placed after a broadband source by connecting through an optical circulator. The filtered spectrum with a narrow line width of 0.5 nm is detected by using a line-scan camera. The method does not require a filter or a software recalibration algorithm for imaging as it simply resamples the OCT signal from the detector array without employing rescaling or interpolation methods. One of the main drawbacks of SD-OCT is the broadened point spread functions (PSFs) with increasing imaging depth can be compensated by increasing the wavenumber-linearization order. The sensitivity of our system was measured at 99.8 dB at an imaging depth of 2.1 mm compared with the uncompensated case. PMID:25688338

  5. Absolute wavelength calibration of a Doppler spectrometer with a custom Fabry-Perot optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltzer, M. M.; Craig, D.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Nishizawa, T.; Nornberg, M. D.

    2016-11-01

    An Ion Doppler Spectrometer (IDS) is used for fast measurements of C VI line emission (343.4 nm) in the Madison Symmetric Torus. Absolutely calibrated flow measurements are difficult because the IDS records data within 0.25 nm of the line. Commercial calibration lamps do not produce lines in this narrow range. A light source using an ultraviolet LED and etalon was designed to provide a fiducial marker 0.08 nm wide. The light is coupled into the IDS at f/4, and a holographic diffuser increases homogeneity of the final image. Random and systematic errors in data analysis were assessed. The calibration is accurate to 0.003 nm, allowing for flow measurements accurate to 3 km/s. This calibration is superior to the previous method which used a time-averaged measurement along a chord believed to have zero net Doppler shift.

  6. Commercialization and Standardization Progress Towards an Optical Communications Earth Relay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Bernard L.; Israel, David J.

    2015-01-01

    NASA is planning to launch the next generation of a space based Earth relay in 2025 to join the current Space Network, consisting of Tracking and Data Relay Satellites in space and the corresponding infrastructure on Earth. While the requirements and architecture for that relay satellite are unknown at this time, NASA is investing in communications technologies that could be deployed to provide new communications services. One of those new technologies is optical communications. The Laser Communications Relay Demonstration (LCRD) project, scheduled for launch in 2018 as a hosted payload on a commercial communications satellite, is a critical pathfinder towards NASA providing optical communications services on the next generation space based relay. This paper will describe NASA efforts in the on-going commercialization of optical communications and the development of inter-operability standards. Both are seen as critical to making optical communications a reality on future NASA science and exploration missions. Commercialization is important because NASA would like to eventually be able to simply purchase an entire optical communications terminal from a commercial provider. Inter-operability standards are needed to ensure that optical communications terminals developed by one vendor are compatible with the terminals of another. International standards in optical communications would also allow the space missions of one nation to use the infrastructure of another.

  7. A 12.5 GHz-spaced optical frequency comb spanning >400 nm for near-infrared astronomical spectrograph calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, F.; Diddams, S. A.; Ycas, G.; Osterman, S.

    2010-06-15

    A 12.5 GHz-spaced optical frequency comb locked to a global positioning system disciplined oscillator for near-infrared (IR) spectrograph calibration is presented. The comb is generated via filtering a 250 MHz-spaced comb. Subsequent nonlinear broadening of the 12.5 GHz comb extends the wavelength range to cover 1380-1820 nm, providing complete coverage over the H-band transmission window of earth's atmosphere. Finite suppression of spurious sidemodes, optical linewidth, and instability of the comb has been examined to estimate potential wavelength biases in spectrograph calibration. Sidemode suppression varies between 20 and 45 dB, and the optical linewidth is {approx}350 kHz at 1550 nm. The comb frequency uncertainty is bounded by {+-}30 kHz (corresponding to a radial velocity of {+-}5 cm/s), limited by the global positioning system disciplined oscillator reference. These results indicate that this comb can readily support radial velocity measurements below 1 m/s in the near IR.

  8. A new method for calibrating the nonlinear range of a single-beam optical trap (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Jamianne C.; Lopez, Benjamin J.; Campas, Otger; Valentine, Megan T.

    2015-08-01

    Optical traps allow for the precise application and measurement of pico-Newton forces in a wide variety of situations, and are particularly well suited for biophysical measurements of motor proteins and cells. Nearly all experiments exploit the linear regime of the optical trap, where force and displacement are related by a simple spring constant that does not depend on the trapped object's position. This typically limits the useful force range to < 100 pN for high-NA objective lenses and reasonable laser powers. Several biological studies require larger forces, which are not accessible in the linear regime of the trap. The best means to extend the maximum force is to make use of the entire nonlinear range; however, current techniques for calibrating the full nonlinear regime are limited. Here we report a new method for calibrating the nonlinear trap region that uses the fluctuations in the position of a trapped object when it is displaced from the center of a single gradient optical trap by controlled flow. From the position fluctuations, we measure the local trap stiffness, in both the linear and non-linear regimes. This approach requires only knowledge of the system temperature, and is especially useful for measurements involving trapped objects of unknown size, or objects in a fluid of unknown viscosity.

  9. Calibration procedures to test the feasibility of heated fiber optics for measuring soil water content in field conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez, Javier; Sayde, Chadi; Rodríguez Sinobas, Leonor; Sánchez, Raúl; Gil, María; Selker, John

    2013-04-01

    This research provides insights of the calibration procedures carried out at the agricultural field of La Nava de Arévalo (Spain). The suitability of the heat pulse theory applied to fiber optics for measuring soil water content, in field conditions, is here analyzed. In addition, it highlights the major findings obtained and the weakness to be addressed in future studies. Within a corn field, in a plot of 500 m2 of bare soil, 600 m of fiber optic cable (BruggSteal) were buried on a ziz-zag deployment at two depths, 30cm and 60cm. Various electrical heat pulses of 20W/m were applied to the stainless steel shield of the fiber optic cable during 2 minutes. The resulting thermal response was captured by means of Distributed Fiber Optic Temperature sensing (DFOT), within a spatial and temporal resolution up to 25 cm and 1 s, respectively. The soil thermal response was then correlated to the soil water content by using undisturbed soil samples and soil moisture sensors (Decagon ECHO 5TM). The process was also modeled by applying the numerical methods software Hydrus 2D. Also, the soil thermal properties were measured in situ by using a dual heat pulse probe (Decagon Kd2Pro). For an ongoing process, first results obtained show the suitability of heated fiber optics for measuring soil water content, in real field conditions. Also, they highlight the usefulness of Hydrus 2D as a complementary tool for calibration purposes and for reducing uncertainty in addressing soil spatial variability.

  10. VNIR, MWIR, and LWIR source assemblies for optical quality testing and spectro-radiometric calibration of earth observation satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compain, Eric; Maquet, Philippe; Leblay, Pierrick; Gavaud, Eric; Marque, Julien; Glastre, Wilfried; Cortese, Maxime; Sugranes, Pierre; Gaillac, Stephanie; Potheau, Hervé

    2015-09-01

    This document presents several original OGSEs, Optical Ground Support Equipment, specifically designed and realized for the optical testing and calibration of earth observation satellites operating in a large spectral band from 0.4μm to 14.7μm. This work has been mainly supported by recent development dedicated to MTG, Meteosat Third Generation, the ESA next generation of meteorological satellites. The improved measurement capabilities of this new satellite generation has generated new challenging requirements for the associated optical test equipments. These improvements, based on design and component innovation will be illustrated for the MOTA, the GICS and the DEA OGSEs. MOTA and GICS are dedicated to the AIT, Assembly Integration and Test, of FCI, the Flexible Combined Imager of the imaging satellite MTG-I. DEA OGSE is dedicated to the AIT of the DEA, Detection Electronics Assembly, which is part of IRS instrument, an IR sounder part of MTG-S satellite. From an architectural point of view, the presented original designs enable to run many optical tests with a single system thanks to a limited configuration effort. Main measurement capabilities are optical quality testing (MTF based mainly on KEF measurement), Line of Sight (LoS) stability measurement, straylight analyses, VNIR-MWIR-LWIR focal plane array co-registration, and broadband large dynamic spectro-radiometric calibration. Depending on the AIT phase of the satellite, these source assemblies are operated at atmospheric pressure or under secondary vacuum. In operation, they are associated with an opto-mechanical projection system that enables to conjugate the image of the source assembly with the focal plane of the satellite instruments. These conjugation systems are usually based on high resolution, broadband collimator, and are optionally mounted on hexapod to address the entire field of instruments.

  11. Optic glioma with progressive occlusion of the aqueduct of Sylvius in monozygotic twins with neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Castroviejo, I; Verdú, A; Román, M; De la Cruz-Medina, M; Villarejo, F

    1988-01-01

    Monozygotic twins sisters with optic glioma "in mirror image" (one with involvement of the left optic nerve and the other with the right optic nerve) and hydrocephalus secondary to progressive stenosis of the aqueduct have been found in a series of 128 cases below 14 years of age with neurofibromatosis. The optic glioma was diagnosed in each of the twins at 2 years of age. In one twin the tumor involved only the optic nerve but in the other the glioma affected the optic nerve and spread to the homolateral zone of the optic chiasm. First symptoms of hydrocephalus appeared at 8 years and 11 years of age respectively but ventriculo-peritoneal shunting procedures were performed to relieve intracranial hypertension at 11 years and 15 years of age respectively. At 2 years of age both twins had pneumoencephalography which demonstrated normal air passage through the aqueduct and cerebral ventricles of normal size and morphology. Posterior studies with CT-scan demonstrated progressive obstruction of the aqueduct with very slow progression of the hydrocephalus in each twin, although it was not observed simultaneously. The increased intracranial pressure was tolerated for many years in each twin without obvious symptoms which could be attributed to the slow progression of the aqueduct obstruction.

  12. Egs Exploration Methodology Development Using the Dixie Valley Geothermal Wellfield as a Calibration Site, a Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iovenitti, J. L.; Blackwell, D. D.; Sainsbury, J.; Tibuleac, I. M.; Waibel, A.; Cladouhos, T. T.; Karlin, R. E.; Kennedy, B. M.; Isaaks, E.; Wannamaker, P. E.; Clyne, M.; Callahan, O.

    2011-12-01

    An Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) exploration methodology is being developed using the Dixie Valley geothermal system in Nevada as a field laboratory. This area was chosen as the test site because its has an extensive public domain database and deep geothermal wells allowing for calibration of the developed methodology. The calibration effort is focused on the Dixie Valley Geothermal Wellfield (DVGW), an area with 30 geothermal wells. Calibration will be based on cross-correlation of qualitative and quantitative results with known well conditions. This project is structured in the following manner (Task 1) review and assess existing public domain and other available data (baseline data); (Task 2) develop and populate a GIS-database; (Task 3) develop a baseline (existing public domain data) geothermal conceptual model, evaluate the geostatistical relationships between the various data sets, and generate a Baseline EGS favorability map from the surface to a 5-km depth focused on identifying EGS drilling targets; (Task 4) collect new gravity, seismic, magneto-tellurics (MT), geologic, and geochemical data to fill in data gaps and improve model resolution; and (Task 5) update the GIS-database for the newly acquired data and repeating the elements of Task 3 incorporating the baseline and new data to generate an Enhanced EGS Favorability Map. Innovative aspects of this project include: (1) developing interdisciplinary method(s) for synthesizing, integrating, and evaluating geoscience data both qualitatively and quantitatively; (2) demonstrating new seismic techniques based on ambient noise which is a passive survey not requiring local earthquakes and is a relatively inexpensive method to image seismic velocity, attenuation, and density; (3) determining if seismic data can infer temperature and lithology at depth; (4) extending 2D MT modeling/mapping to 3D MT; (5) generating a MT derived temperature map; and (6) jointly analyzing gravity, magnetic, seismic, and MT

  13. Comparative study of methods to calibrate the stiffness of a single-beam gradient-force optical tweezers over various laser trapping powers.

    PubMed

    Sarshar, Mohammad; Wong, Winson T; Anvari, Bahman

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers have become an important instrument in force measurements associated with various physical, biological, and biophysical phenomena. Quantitative use of optical tweezers relies on accurate calibration of the stiffness of the optical trap. Using the same optical tweezers platform operating at 1064 nm and beads with two different diameters, we present a comparative study of viscous drag force, equipartition theorem, Boltzmann statistics, and power spectral density (PSD) as methods in calibrating the stiffness of a single beam gradient force optical trap at trapping laser powers in the range of 0.05 to 1.38 W at the focal plane. The equipartition theorem and Boltzmann statistic methods demonstrate a linear stiffness with trapping laser powers up to 355 mW, when used in conjunction with video position sensing means. The PSD of a trapped particle's Brownian motion or measurements of the particle displacement against known viscous drag forces can be reliably used for stiffness calibration of an optical trap over a greater range of trapping laser powers. Viscous drag stiffness calibration method produces results relevant to applications where trapped particle undergoes large displacements, and at a given position sensing resolution, can be used for stiffness calibration at higher trapping laser powers than the PSD method.

  14. Comparative study of methods to calibrate the stiffness of a single-beam gradient-force optical tweezers over various laser trapping powers

    PubMed Central

    Sarshar, Mohammad; Wong, Winson T.; Anvari, Bahman

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Optical tweezers have become an important instrument in force measurements associated with various physical, biological, and biophysical phenomena. Quantitative use of optical tweezers relies on accurate calibration of the stiffness of the optical trap. Using the same optical tweezers platform operating at 1064 nm and beads with two different diameters, we present a comparative study of viscous drag force, equipartition theorem, Boltzmann statistics, and power spectral density (PSD) as methods in calibrating the stiffness of a single beam gradient force optical trap at trapping laser powers in the range of 0.05 to 1.38 W at the focal plane. The equipartition theorem and Boltzmann statistic methods demonstrate a linear stiffness with trapping laser powers up to 355 mW, when used in conjunction with video position sensing means. The PSD of a trapped particle’s Brownian motion or measurements of the particle displacement against known viscous drag forces can be reliably used for stiffness calibration of an optical trap over a greater range of trapping laser powers. Viscous drag stiffness calibration method produces results relevant to applications where trapped particle undergoes large displacements, and at a given position sensing resolution, can be used for stiffness calibration at higher trapping laser powers than the PSD method. PMID:25375348

  15. A joint estimation detection of Glaucoma progression in 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography optic nerve head images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belghith, Akram; Bowd, Christopher; Weinreb, Robert N.; Zangwill, Linda M.

    2014-03-01

    Glaucoma is an ocular disease characterized by distinctive changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) and visual field. Glaucoma can strike without symptoms and causes blindness if it remains without treatment. Therefore, early disease detection is important so that treatment can be initiated and blindness prevented. In this context, important advances in technology for non-invasive imaging of the eye have been made providing quantitative tools to measure structural changes in ONH topography, an essential element for glaucoma detection and monitoring. 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), an optical imaging technique, has been commonly used to discriminate glaucomatous from healthy subjects. In this paper, we present a new framework for detection of glaucoma progression using 3D SD-OCT images. In contrast to previous works that the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurement provided by commercially available spectral-domain optical coherence tomograph, we consider the whole 3D volume for change detection. To integrate a priori knowledge and in particular the spatial voxel dependency in the change detection map, we propose the use of the Markov Random Field to handle a such dependency. To accommodate the presence of false positive detection, the estimated change detection map is then used to classify a 3D SDOCT image into the "non-progressing" and "progressing" glaucoma classes, based on a fuzzy logic classifier. We compared the diagnostic performance of the proposed framework to existing methods of progression detection.

  16. Optical treatment strategies to slow myopia progression: effects of the visual extent of the optical treatment zone.

    PubMed

    Smith, Earl L

    2013-09-01

    In order to develop effective optical treatment strategies for myopia, it is important to understand how visual experience influences refractive development. Beginning with the discovery of the phenomenon of form deprivation myopia, research involving many animal species has demonstrated that refractive development is regulated by visual feedback. In particular, animal studies have shown that optically imposed myopic defocus slows axial elongation, that the effects of vision are dominated by local retinal mechanisms, and that peripheral vision can dominate central refractive development. In this review, the results obtained from clinical trials of traditional optical treatment strategies employed in efforts to slow myopia progression in children are interpreted in light of the results from animal studies and are compared to the emerging results from preliminary clinical studies of optical treatment strategies that manipulate the effective focus of the peripheral retina. Overall, the results suggest that imposed myopic defocus can slow myopia progression in children and that the effectiveness of an optical treatment strategy in reducing myopia progression is influenced by the extent of the visual field that is manipulated. PMID:23290590

  17. Progress with collision optics of the Fermilab tevatron collider.

    SciTech Connect

    Valishev, A.; Alexahin, Yu.; Annala, J.; Labedev, V.; Nagaslaev, V.; Sajaev, V.; Accelerator Systems Division; FNAL

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in the measurement and modeling of the machine parameters and lattice functions at the Tevatron allowed modifications of the collision optics to be performed in order to increase the collider luminosity. As the result, beta functions in the two collision points were decreased from 35cm to 29cm which resulted in {approx} 10% increase of the peak luminosity. In this report we describe the results of optics measurements and corrections. We also discuss planned improvements, including the new betatron tune working point and correction of the beta function chromaticity.

  18. Calibration of the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) Hard X-ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Gaskin, Jessica; Christe, Steven; Shih, Albert; Tennant, Allyn; Swartz, Doug; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Elsner, Ron; Kolodziejczak, Jeff; Ramsey, Brian

    2014-01-01

    On September 21-22, 2013, the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) hard X-ray telescope, flew as a balloon payload from Ft. Sumner, N.M. HEROES observed the Sun, the black hole binary GRS 1915+105, and the Crab Nebula during its 27 hour flight. In this paper we describe laboratory calibration measurements of the HEROES detectors using line and continuum sources, applications of these measurements to define channel to energy (gain) corrections for observed events and to define detector response matrices. We characterize the HEROES X-ray grazing incidence optics using measurements taken in the Stray-Light (SLF) Facility in Huntsville, AL, and using ray traces.

  19. Laboratory Calibration of the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.; Stewart, Mike F.; Christian, Hugh J.; Bergstrom, James W.; Hall, John M.; Solakiewicz, Richard J.

    1994-01-01

    We present in detail the laboratory apparatus and techniques that were used to complete a full radiometric calibration of two space-based lightning detectors developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). A discussion of the methods applied to geolocate lightning and to estimate lightning detection efficiency are provided.

  20. Online catalog of world-wide test sites for the post-launch characterization and calibration of optical sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chander, G.; Christopherson, J.B.; Stensaas, G.L.; Teillet, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    In an era when the number of Earth-observing satellites is rapidly growing and measurements from these sensors are used to answer increasingly urgent global issues, it is imperative that scientists and decision-makers can rely on the accuracy of Earth-observing data products. The characterization and calibration of these sensors are vital to achieve an integrated Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) for coordinated and sustained observations of Earth. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as a supporting member of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) and GEOSS, is working with partners around the world to establish an online catalog of prime candidate test sites for the post-launch characterization and calibration of space-based optical imaging sensors. The online catalog provides easy public Web site access to this vital information for the global community. This paper describes the catalog, the test sites, and the methodologies to use the test sites. It also provides information regarding access to the online catalog and plans for further development of the catalog in cooperation with calibration specialists from agencies and organizations around the world. Through greater access to and understanding of these vital test sites and their use, the validity and utility of information gained from Earth remote sensing will continue to improve. Copyright IAF/IAA. All rights reserved.

  1. Four-position heading effect calibration algorithm for rotation inertial navigation system based on fiber optic gyro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Pengyu; Li, Kui; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Qian

    2016-07-01

    Fiber optic gyros (FOGs) are sensitive to the environment fields where they are mounted, and their drifts are easily affected when surrounding temperature field or magnetic field changes. In FOG strapdown inertial navigation system (INS), gyro drifts caused by environmental fields are stable mostly, thus they could be calibrated and compensated beforehand and would not cause obvious alignment and navigation errors. However, in rotation INS (RINS), although navigation errors caused by the constant components of FOG drifts could be well attenuated, the gyro sensing axes are changing relative to the environmental fields in the RINS, which would lead to periodically changing gyro drift components when inertial measurement unit is pointing to different headings, thus producing serious alignment and navigation errors in FOG RINS. To solve this problem, a four-position heading effect calibration algorithm was proposed, and its effectiveness and validity were verified through a dual-axis FOG RINS by turntable experiments. The experimental results show that the azimuth alignment accuracy of the FOG RINS improves from 0.2 deg to about 0.04 deg, increasing five times approximately, which illustrates that the proposed heading effect calibration algorithm could further improve the navigation performance of FOG RINS significantly.

  2. Automatable on-line generation of calibration curves and standard additions in solution-cathode glow discharge optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Andrew J.; Ray, Steven J.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2015-03-01

    Two methods are described that enable on-line generation of calibration standards and standard additions in solution-cathode glow discharge optical emission spectrometry (SCGD-OES). The first method employs a gradient high-performance liquid chromatography pump to perform on-line mixing and delivery of a stock standard, sample solution, and diluent to achieve a desired solution composition. The second method makes use of a simpler system of three peristaltic pumps to perform the same function of on-line solution mixing. Both methods can be computer-controlled and automated, and thereby enable both simple and standard-addition calibrations to be rapidly performed on-line. Performance of the on-line approaches is shown to be comparable to that of traditional methods of sample preparation, in terms of calibration curves, signal stability, accuracy, and limits of detection. Potential drawbacks to the on-line procedures include signal lag between changes in solution composition and pump-induced multiplicative noise. Though the new on-line methods were applied here to SCGD-OES to improve sample throughput, they are not limited in application to only SCGD-OES-any instrument that samples from flowing solution streams (flame atomic absorption spectrometry, ICP-OES, ICP-mass spectrometry, etc.) could benefit from them.

  3. Four-position heading effect calibration algorithm for rotation inertial navigation system based on fiber optic gyro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Pengyu; Li, Kui; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Qian

    2016-07-01

    Fiber optic gyros (FOGs) are sensitive to the environment fields where they are mounted, and their drifts are easily affected when surrounding temperature field or magnetic field changes. In FOG strapdown inertial navigation system (INS), gyro drifts caused by environmental fields are stable mostly, thus they could be calibrated and compensated beforehand and would not cause obvious alignment and navigation errors. However, in rotation INS (RINS), although navigation errors caused by the constant components of FOG drifts could be well attenuated, the gyro sensing axes are changing relative to the environmental fields in the RINS, which would lead to periodically changing gyro drift components when inertial measurement unit is pointing to different headings, thus producing serious alignment and navigation errors in FOG RINS. To solve this problem, a four-position heading effect calibration algorithm was proposed, and its effectiveness and validity were verified through a dual-axis FOG RINS by turntable experiments. The experimental results show that the azimuth alignment accuracy of the FOG RINS improves from 0.2 deg to about 0.04 deg, increasing five times approximately, which illustrates that the proposed heading effect calibration algorithm could further improve the navigation performance of FOG RINS significantly.

  4. Introducing Novel Generation of High Accuracy Camera Optical-Testing and Calibration Test-Stands Feasible for Series Production of Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekouei Shahraki, M.; Haala, N.

    2015-12-01

    The recent advances in the field of computer-vision have opened the doors of many opportunities for taking advantage of these techniques and technologies in many fields and applications. Having a high demand for these systems in today and future vehicles implies a high production volume of video cameras. The above criterions imply that it is critical to design test systems which deliver fast and accurate calibration and optical-testing capabilities. In this paper we introduce new generation of test-stands delivering high calibration quality in single-shot calibration of fisheye surround-view cameras. This incorporates important geometric features from bundle-block calibration, delivers very high (sub-pixel) calibration accuracy, makes possible a very fast calibration procedure (few seconds), and realizes autonomous calibration via machines. We have used the geometrical shape of a Spherical Helix (Type: 3D Spherical Spiral) with special geometrical characteristics, having a uniform radius which corresponds to the uniform motion. This geometrical feature was mechanically realized using three dimensional truncated icosahedrons which practically allow the implementation of a spherical helix on multiple surfaces. Furthermore the test-stand enables us to perform many other important optical tests such as stray-light testing, enabling us to evaluate the certain qualities of the camera optical module.

  5. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp.

    PubMed

    Fat'yanov, O V; Asimow, P D

    2015-10-01

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30,000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  6. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Fat’yanov, O. V. Asimow, P. D.

    2015-10-15

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  7. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp.

    PubMed

    Fat'yanov, O V; Asimow, P D

    2015-10-01

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30,000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  8. Contributed Review: Absolute spectral radiance calibration of fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometers using a coiled-coil irradiance standard lamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fat'yanov, O. V.; Asimow, P. D.

    2015-10-01

    We describe an accurate and precise calibration procedure for multichannel optical pyrometers such as the 6-channel, 3-ns temporal resolution instrument used in the Caltech experimental geophysics laboratory. We begin with a review of calibration sources for shock temperatures in the 3000-30 000 K range. High-power, coiled tungsten halogen standards of spectral irradiance appear to be the only practical alternative to NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamps, which are no longer available with large enough calibrated area. However, non-uniform radiance complicates the use of such coiled lamps for reliable and reproducible calibration of pyrometers that employ imaging or relay optics. Careful analysis of documented methods of shock pyrometer calibration to coiled irradiance standard lamps shows that only one technique, not directly applicable in our case, is free of major radiometric errors. We provide a detailed description of the modified Caltech pyrometer instrument and a procedure for its absolute spectral radiance calibration, accurate to ±5%. We employ a designated central area of a 0.7× demagnified image of a coiled-coil tungsten halogen lamp filament, cross-calibrated against a NIST-traceable tungsten ribbon lamp. We give the results of the cross-calibration along with descriptions of the optical arrangement, data acquisition, and processing. We describe a procedure to characterize the difference between the static and dynamic response of amplified photodetectors, allowing time-dependent photodiode correction factors for spectral radiance histories from shock experiments. We validate correct operation of the modified Caltech pyrometer with actual shock temperature experiments on single-crystal NaCl and MgO and obtain very good agreement with the literature data for these substances. We conclude with a summary of the most essential requirements for error-free calibration of a fiber-optic shock-temperature pyrometer using a high-power coiled tungsten halogen

  9. Recent progress on mid-IR sensing with optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellner, Robert A.; Gobel, R.; Goetz, R.; Lendl, B.; Edl-Mizaikoff, B.; Tacke, Maurus; Katzir, Abraham

    1995-09-01

    Chemical sensors are analytical systems for the evaluation of compound- or ion-specific or - selective signals produced by specific or selective chemical reactions taking place at the interface between the chemically modified sensor surface and the substrate. The well known electrochemical sensing schemes have greatly contributed that sensors are considered now as the 'third supporting pillar of analytical chemistry' besides chromatography and spectroscopy. The aim of this paper is to describe the novel capabilities of chemical modified IR-transparent fibers as chemical IR-sensors for the on-line analysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons and organic compounds in aqueous solutions and gaseous mixtures, glucose, and sucrose in aqueous solution as developed in our laboratory. Moreover, the relative merits of this new method wil be depicted in comparison to other sensing techniques. Optical fiber sensors are novel analysis systems, based on molecular spectroscopy in the UV/VIS/IR-range. They benefit from the tremendous development in the field of optical fibers, an offspring of the telecommunication industry and the electronic revolution during the last few years. With the development of new materials besides the well known quartz fibers for the UV/VIS/NIR-range the optical window for fiber optic sensors was enlarged from 0,2 to 20 micrometers recently. The fiber length was increased recently to up to 2 meters for silver halides and approximately 10 meters for chalcogenides. New applications for environmental, food, and clinical sensing as well as process analysis are the driving force for modern research in IR-optical fiber sensors using mainly sapphire (Al2O3), chalcogenide (As-Se-Te) and silver halide (AgBr/AgCl) fibers and flow injection analysis (FIA) systems. Few representative examples for each of the various optical sensor types will be presented. Particular attention will be given to the use of silver halide fibers for the simultaneous determination of traces of

  10. Does Your Optical Particle Counter Measure What You Think it Does? Calibration and Refractive Index Correction Methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Phil; Dean, Angela; Williams, Paul; Dorsey, James; Minikin, Andreas; Pickering, Martyn; Petzold, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Optical Particle Counters (OPCs) are the de-facto standard for in-situ measurements of airborne aerosol size distributions and small cloud particles over a wide size range. This is particularly the case on airborne platforms where fast response is important. OPCs measure scattered light from individual particles and generally bin particles according to the measured peak amount of light scattered (the OPC's response). Most manufacturers provide a table along with their instrument which indicates the particle diameters which represent the edges of each bin. It is important to correct the particle size reported by OPCs for the refractive index of the particles being measured, which is often not the same as for those used during calibration. However, the OPC's response is not a monotonic function of particle diameter and obvious problems occur when refractive index corrections are attempted, but multiple diameters correspond to the same OPC response. Here we recommend that OPCs are calibrated in terms of particle scattering cross section as this is a monotonic (usually linear) function of an OPC's response. We present a method for converting a bin's boundaries in terms of scattering cross section into a bin centre and bin width in terms of diameter for any aerosol species for which the scattering properties are known. The relationship between diameter and scattering cross section can be arbitrarily complex and does not need to be monotonic; it can be based on Mie-Lorenz theory or any other scattering theory. Software has been provided on the Sourceforge open source repository for scientific users to implement such methods in their own measurement and calibration routines. As a case study data is presented showing data from Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP) and a Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP) calibrated using polystyrene latex spheres and glass beads before being deployed as part of the Fennec project to measure airborne dust in the inaccessible regions of

  11. Research progress of the resonant fiber optic gyroscope technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linglan; Yan, Yuchao; Ma, Huilian; Jin, Zhonghe

    2015-10-01

    The resonant fiber optic gyro (RFOG) is a high accuracy inertial rotation sensor based on the Sagnac effect. The existence of various noises, including the nonreciprocal noises such as the polarization noise and the Kerr noise as well as the reciprocal circuit noise, limits the performance improvement of the RFOG. An improved scheme by inserting two in-line polarizers in the polarization maintaining fiber transmission-type resonator has been proposed to suppress the polarization-fluctuation induced drift. Furthermore, the adoption of the air-core photonic bandgap fibers (PBFs) offers a novel solution to reduce the optical Kerr effect. In addition, A digital signal processor is designed to reduce the reciprocal noises and detect the rotation information. A minimum actual rotation of 0.001°/s is achieved. The dynamic range is improved by a factor of 7 and the scale factor nonlinearity is decreased by a factor of 60.

  12. Progress Toward Demonstrating a High Performance Optical Tape Recording Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakley, W. S.

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the technology developments achieved during the first year of a program to develop a high performance digital optical tape recording device using a solid state, diode pumped, frequency doubled green laser source. The goal is to demonstrate, within two years, useful read/write data transfer rates to at least 100 megabytes per second and a user capacity of up to one terabyte per cartridge implemented in a system using a '3480' style mono-reel tape cartridge.

  13. Optical configuration optimization and calibration for the POINT system on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Z. Y.; Liu, H. Q.; Li, W. M.; Lian, H.; Wang, S. X.; Yao, Y.; Lan, T.; Zeng, L.; Jie, Y. X.

    2016-11-01

    Calibration of the polarimeter system is one of the key elements to determine the overall measurement accuracy. The anisotropic reflection and transmission properties of the mesh beam splitters can easily distort the polarization state of the circularly polarized beams. Using a rotating crystal quartz λ/2-waveplate to replace the plasma can effectively allow us to obtain the ratio of the measured Faraday rotation angle to the known rotation angle of the waveplate. This ratio is used to estimate the calibration factor for each chord to be accurately determined and help to minimize distortions introduced by the wire-mesh beam splitters. With the novel configuration optimization, the distortion of polarization state is effectively eliminated.

  14. Report of Optical Radiometric Instruments and Calibration Panel. [spaceborne instrumentation technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Measurement and accuracy needs for remote sensing are analyzed. Topics discussed include: (1) in orbit performance degradation due to contamination; (2) increased radiometric accuracy required for detecting small changes over long periods of time in environmental parameters; (3) references for verifying calibration in orbit; (4) high attenuation neutral density filters; (5) the sun as a radiation source for testing; (6) rejection of stray light; (7) development of spectrally flat detectors for flight sensors; and (8) long term stability of sensor components.

  15. Recent progress of electro-optic polymers for device applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jen, A.K.Y.; Yang, Q.; Marder, S.R.; Dalton, L.R.; Shu, C.F.

    1998-07-01

    Electro-optic (E-O) polymers have drawn great interest in recent years because of their potential applications in photonics devices such as high speed modulators and switches, optical data storage and information processing. In order to have suitable materials for device fabrication, it is essential to design and develop polymeric material systems (active and passive polymers) with matched refractive indices, large E-O coefficients, good temporal and photochemical stability. The E-O response of an active polymer commonly arises from the electric field induced alignment of its second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) chromophore, either doped as a guest/host system or covalently bonded as a side-chain. Because of the strong interaction among the electric dipoles, the poled structure is in a meta-stable state; the poled NLO chromophores which possess large dipole moment will tend to relax back to the randomly oriented state. As a result, the stability of the poled structure strongly depends on the rigidity of the overall material system. As it might be expected, the continuous increases of the rigidity and T{sub g} of poled polymers imposes constraints on the selection of suitable chromophores that can survive the high-temperature poling and processing conditions. To circumvent this problem, the authors have developed a series of chromophores that possess conformation-locked geometry and perfluoro-dicyanovinyl-substituted electron-accepting group which demonstrate both good thermal stability and nonlinearity. This paper provides a brief review of these highly efficient and thermally stable chromophores and polymers for device applications.

  16. Recent progress on the 27Al+ ion optical clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z. T.; Yuan, W. H.; Zeng, X. Y.; Che, H.; Shi, X. H.; Deng, K.; Zhang, J.; Lu, Z. H.

    2016-06-01

    An aluminium ion optical clock is under development at Huazhong University of Science and Technology. The 25Mg+ ion is chosen as logic ion to sympathetically cool an Al+ ion and to detect its states. The 25Mg+ ion is cooled to the motional ground state through Raman sideband cooling as the first step for quantum logic spectroscopy. Ultra-stable lasers for the interrogation of the clock transition are developed. The instability of the laser beat frequency is 1.2 x 10-15 at 1 s, which is close to the thermal noise limit of the reference cavity.

  17. Holographic optical metasurfaces: a review of current progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genevet, Patrice; Capasso, Federico

    2015-02-01

    In this article, we review recent developments in the field of surface electromagnetic wave holography. The holography principle is used as a tool to solve an inverse engineering problem consisting of designing novel plasmonic interfaces to excite either surface waves or free-space beams with any desirable field distributions. Leveraging on the new nanotechnologies to carve subwavelength features within the large diffracting apertures of conventional holograms, it is now possible to create binary holographic interfaces to shape both amplitude phase and polarization of light. The ability of the new generation of ultrathin and compact holographic optical devices to fully address light properties could find widespread applications in photonics.

  18. Recent Progress in Adjustable X-ray Optics for Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Paul B.; Allured, Ryan; Cotroneo, Vincenzo; McMuldroch, Stuart; Marquez, Vanessa; Schwartz, Daniel A.; Vikhlinin, Alexey; ODell, Stephen L.; Ramsey, Brian; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Johnson-Wilke, Raegan; Wilke, Rudeger H.

    2014-01-01

    Two adjustable X-ray optics approaches are being developed for thin grazing incidence optics for astronomy. The first approach employs thin film piezoelectric material sputter deposited as a continuous layer on the back of thin, lightweight Wolter-I mirror segments. The piezoelectric material is used to correct mirror figure errors from fabrication, mounting/alignment, and any ground to orbit changes. The goal of this technology is to produce Wolter mirror segment pairs corrected to 0.5 arc sec image resolution. With the combination of high angular resolution and lightweight, this mirror technology is suitable for the Square Meter Arc Second Resolution Telescope for X-rays (SMART-X) mission concept.. The second approach makes use of electrostrictive adjusters and full shell nickel/cobalt electroplated replication mirrors. An array of radial adjusters is used to deform the full shells to correct the lowest order axial and azimuthal errors, improving imaging performance from the 10 - 15 arc sec level to 5 arc sec. We report on recent developments in both technologies. In particular, we discuss the use of insitu strain gauges on the thin piezo film mirrors for use as feedback on piezoelectric adjuster functionality, including their use for on-orbit figure correction. We also report on the first tests of full shell nickel/cobalt mirror correction with radial adjusters.

  19. Recent progress in adjustable X-ray optics for astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Paul B.; Allured, R.; Cotroneo, V.; McMuldroch, S.; Marquez, V.; Schwartz, D. A.; Vikhlinin, A.; O'Dell, S. L.; Ramsey, B.; Trolier-McKinstry, S.; Johnson-Wilke, R.; Wilke, R. H.

    2014-01-01

    Two adjustable X-ray optics approaches are being developed for thin grazing incidence optics for astronomy. The first approach employs thin film piezoelectric material sputter deposited as a continuous layer on the back of thin, lightweight Wolter-I mirror segments. The piezoelectric material is used to correct mirror figure errors from fabrication, mounting/alignment, and any ground to orbit changes. The goal of this technology is to produce Wolter mirror segment pairs corrected to 0.5 arc sec image resolution. With the combination of high angular resolution and lightweight, this mirror technology is suitable for the Square Meter Arc Second Resolution Telescope for X-rays (SMART-X) mission concept.. The second approach makes use of electrostrictive adjusters and full shell nickel/cobalt electroplated replication mirrors. An array of radial adjusters is used to deform the full shells to correct the lowest order axial and azimuthal errors, improving imaging performance from the 10 - 15 arc sec level to ~ 5 arc sec. We report on recent developments in both technologies. In particular, we discuss the use of in-situ strain gauges on the thin piezo film mirrors for use as feedback on piezoelectric adjuster functionality, including their use for on-orbit figure correction. We also report on the first tests of full shell nickel/cobalt mirror correction with radial adjusters.

  20. Automatic calibration of an optical see-through head-mounted display for augmented reality applications in computer-assisted interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figl, Michael; Ede, Christopher; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Hummel, Johann; Seemann, Rudolf; Bergmann, Helmar

    2004-05-01

    We are developing an optical see through head mounted display in which preoperative planning data provided by a computer aided surgery system is overlaid to the optical image of the patient. In order to cope with head movements of the surgeon the device has to be calibrated for a wide zoom and focus range. For such a calibration accurate and robust localization of a huge amount of calibration points is of utmost importance. Because of the negligible radial distortion of the optics in our device, we were able to use projective invariants for stable detection of the calibration fiducials on a planar grid. The pattern at the planar grid was designed using a different cross ratio for four consecutive points in x respectively y direction. For automated image processing we put a CCD camera behind the eye piece of the device. The resulting image was thresholded and segmented, after deleting the artefacts a Sobel edge detector was applied and the image was Hough transformed to detect the x and y axes. Then the world coordinates of fiducial points on the grid could be detected. A series of six camera calibrations with two zoom settings was done. The mean values of the errors for the two calibrations were 0.08 mm respectively 0.3 mm.

  1. Calibration and deployment of a fiber-optic sensing system for monitoring debris flows.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Jer; Chu, Chung-Ray; Tien, Tsung-Mo; Yin, Hsiao-Yuen; Chen, Ping-Sen

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel fiber-optic sensing system, capable of monitoring debris flows or other natural hazards that produce ground vibrations. The proposed sensing system comprises a demodulator (BraggSCOPE, FS5500), which includes a broadband light source and a data logger, a four-port coupler and four Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) accelerometers. Based on field tests, the performance of the proposed fiber-optic sensing system is compared with that of a conventional sensing system that includes a geophone or a microphone. Following confirmation of the reliability of the proposed sensing system, the fiber-optic sensing systems are deployed along the Ai-Yu-Zi and Chu-Shui Creeks in Nautou County of central Taiwan for monitoring debris flows. Sensitivity test of the deployed fiber-optic sensing system along the creek banks is also performed. Analysis results of the seismic data recorded by the systems reveal in detail the frequency characteristics of the artificially generated ground vibrations. Results of this study demonstrate that the proposed fiber-optic sensing system is highly promising for use in monitoring natural disasters that generate ground vibrations.

  2. Calibration and Deployment of a Fiber-Optic Sensing System for Monitoring Debris Flows

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ching-Jer; Chu, Chung-Ray; Tien, Tsung-Mo; Yin, Hsiao-Yuen; Chen, Ping-Sen

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel fiber-optic sensing system, capable of monitoring debris flows or other natural hazards that produce ground vibrations. The proposed sensing system comprises a demodulator (BraggSCOPE, FS5500), which includes a broadband light source and a data logger, a four-port coupler and four Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) accelerometers. Based on field tests, the performance of the proposed fiber-optic sensing system is compared with that of a conventional sensing system that includes a geophone or a microphone. Following confirmation of the reliability of the proposed sensing system, the fiber-optic sensing systems are deployed along the Ai-Yu-Zi and Chu-Shui Creeks in Nautou County of central Taiwan for monitoring debris flows. Sensitivity test of the deployed fiber-optic sensing system along the creek banks is also performed. Analysis results of the seismic data recorded by the systems reveal in detail the frequency characteristics of the artificially generated ground vibrations. Results of this study demonstrate that the proposed fiber-optic sensing system is highly promising for use in monitoring natural disasters that generate ground vibrations. PMID:22778616

  3. Calibration and deployment of a fiber-optic sensing system for monitoring debris flows.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ching-Jer; Chu, Chung-Ray; Tien, Tsung-Mo; Yin, Hsiao-Yuen; Chen, Ping-Sen

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel fiber-optic sensing system, capable of monitoring debris flows or other natural hazards that produce ground vibrations. The proposed sensing system comprises a demodulator (BraggSCOPE, FS5500), which includes a broadband light source and a data logger, a four-port coupler and four Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) accelerometers. Based on field tests, the performance of the proposed fiber-optic sensing system is compared with that of a conventional sensing system that includes a geophone or a microphone. Following confirmation of the reliability of the proposed sensing system, the fiber-optic sensing systems are deployed along the Ai-Yu-Zi and Chu-Shui Creeks in Nautou County of central Taiwan for monitoring debris flows. Sensitivity test of the deployed fiber-optic sensing system along the creek banks is also performed. Analysis results of the seismic data recorded by the systems reveal in detail the frequency characteristics of the artificially generated ground vibrations. Results of this study demonstrate that the proposed fiber-optic sensing system is highly promising for use in monitoring natural disasters that generate ground vibrations. PMID:22778616

  4. Progress toward optical biopsy: bringing the microscope to the patient.

    PubMed

    Newton, Richard C; Kemp, Samuel V; Shah, Pallav L; Elson, Daniel; Darzi, Ara; Shibuya, Kiyoshi; Mulgrew, Stephen; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2011-04-01

    The investigation of many lung diseases currently requires bronchoscopic or surgical histopathological tissue biopsy. This creates risks for patients and entails processing costs and delays in diagnosis. However, several mainly probe-based biophotonic techniques that can image solitary lesions and diffuse lung diseases are fuelling a paradigm shift toward real-time in vivo diagnosis. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) uses near-infrared light in a process analogous to ultrasonography to image the mucosal and submucosal tissue boundaries of the bronchial tree. With 15-μm resolution, early work suggests it can differentiate between neoplasia, carcinoma in situ, dysplasia, and metaplasia based around epithelial thickness and breaches in the basement membrane. Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) has superior resolution but less penetration than OCT and employs blue argon laser light to fluoresce the endogenous elastin of (1) the acinar scaffold of the peripheral lung and (2) the basement membrane lying under bronchial mucosa. Initial studies suggest that the regular fibre arrangement of the basement membrane is altered in the presence of overlying malignant epithelium. pCLE produces detailed representations of the alveolar septal walls, microvessels, and some inflammatory cells. A third device, the endocytoscope, is a contact microscope requiring contrast agent to provide subcellular resolution of bronchial mucosa. Further development of these "optical biopsy" techniques and evaluation of diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the acquired images are needed before they can be considered effective methods for eliminating the need for, and thus risks of, pinch biopsy to enable real-time diagnosis to streamline management.

  5. Design, calibration and application of broad-range optical nanosensors for determining intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Rikke V; Henriksen, Jonas R; Andresen, Thomas L

    2014-12-01

    Particle-based nanosensors offer a tool for determining the pH in the endosomal-lysosomal system of living cells. Measurements providing absolute values of pH have so far been restricted by the limited sensitivity range of nanosensors, calibration challenges and the complexity of image analysis. This protocol describes the design and application of a polyacrylamide-based nanosensor (∼60 nm) that covalently incorporates two pH-sensitive fluorophores, fluorescein (FS) and Oregon Green (OG), to broaden the sensitivity range of the sensor (pH 3.1-7.0), and uses the pH-insensitive fluorophore rhodamine as a reference fluorophore. The nanosensors are spontaneously taken up via endocytosis and directed to the lysosomes where dynamic changes in pH can be measured with live-cell confocal microscopy. The most important focus areas of the protocol are the choice of pH-sensitive fluorophores, the design of calibration buffers, the determination of the effective range and especially the description of how to critically evaluate results. The entire procedure typically takes 2-3 weeks.

  6. Design, calibration and application of broad-range optical nanosensors for determining intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Rikke V; Henriksen, Jonas R; Andresen, Thomas L

    2014-12-01

    Particle-based nanosensors offer a tool for determining the pH in the endosomal-lysosomal system of living cells. Measurements providing absolute values of pH have so far been restricted by the limited sensitivity range of nanosensors, calibration challenges and the complexity of image analysis. This protocol describes the design and application of a polyacrylamide-based nanosensor (∼60 nm) that covalently incorporates two pH-sensitive fluorophores, fluorescein (FS) and Oregon Green (OG), to broaden the sensitivity range of the sensor (pH 3.1-7.0), and uses the pH-insensitive fluorophore rhodamine as a reference fluorophore. The nanosensors are spontaneously taken up via endocytosis and directed to the lysosomes where dynamic changes in pH can be measured with live-cell confocal microscopy. The most important focus areas of the protocol are the choice of pH-sensitive fluorophores, the design of calibration buffers, the determination of the effective range and especially the description of how to critically evaluate results. The entire procedure typically takes 2-3 weeks. PMID:25411952

  7. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets.

  8. Calibration method for spectroscopic systems

    DOEpatents

    Sandison, D.R.

    1998-11-17

    Calibration spots of optically-characterized material placed in the field of view of a spectroscopic system allow calibration of the spectroscopic system. Response from the calibration spots is measured and used to calibrate for varying spectroscopic system operating parameters. The accurate calibration achieved allows quantitative spectroscopic analysis of responses taken at different times, different excitation conditions, and of different targets. 3 figs.

  9. Optical Assessment of Vascular Disease Progression and Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels, Joshua A.

    Vascular disease manifests itself in many different forms, including chronic ulcers which do not heal, impaired blood flow to the limbs, or damage to the natural reperfusion process. The current forms of assessing vascular disease are often subjective and provide incomplete knowledge about the tissue of interest. This work focused on developing non-invasive techniques to quantitatively evaluate three specific elements of vascular disease: diabetic ulcers, venous ulcers, and peripheral arterial disease. Diffuse Near Infrared Spectroscopy (DNIRS) was used to predict healing (82% positive predictive value) in diabetic ulcers after 4 weeks of assessment (sensitivity of 0.9 and specificity of 0.86; p<0.002), proving to be an alternative and superior method to wound size reduction alone (the current gold standard). A novel therapeutic ultrasound treatment for venous ulcers, using a low-frequency (20kHz), low intensity (<100mW/cm2 ISPTP), fully-wearable applicator, was assessed using DNIRS and Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy (DCS), wherein it was established that capillary flow changes over time in healing venous ulcers compared to wounds which do not heal (p<0.01). It was also determined that the ultrasound therapy was successful at improving wound outcomes, specifically the rate of wound closure per week (p<0.05 for wound size, p<0.01 for optical data). Finally, DNIRS and DCS were used in conjunction to assess the reactive hyperemic response in patients with suspected Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD). It was found that the time between the release of cuff occlusion in the diseased limb and the first peak of reperfusion (flow mediated dilatation) correlated to PAD severity, with longer times (>30 seconds) belonging to patients with PAD (p<0.05). Additionally, it was discovered that the magnitude of the reperfusion did not relate to PAD, but rather to tobacco use. Patients who smoked had reduced hyperemic responses (p<0.02), whether or not they had PAD. Overall, this

  10. Progressive ladder network topology combining interferometric and intensity fiber-optic-based sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, A. B. Lobo; Santos, J. L.; Caleya, R. F.

    1995-10-01

    Progressive ladder topology is studied by consideration of its properties of power budget and coupler tailoring. Optimization criteria are addressed for lossless and real systems, and their basic characteristics are compared with other topologies. Numerical results are presented, and an experiment is described for the case in which the network supports interferometric and intensity (with referentiation) fiber-optic-based sensors.

  11. Data Report for Calibration of a Bio-Optical Model for Narragansett Bay

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bio-optical models describe the quality and quantity of the light field at various depths in the water column. The absorption and scattering of light within the water column are wavelength dependent. The behavior of light also varies depending on the specific dissolved and partic...

  12. Progress in the expansion of the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, J. T.; Restaino, S. R.; Clark, J. H.; Schmitt, H. R.; Baines, E. K.; Hutter, D. J.; Benson, J. A.; Zavala, R. T.; Shankland, P. D.; van Belle, G.; Jorgensen, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past three years, the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI) has been undergoing significant expansion toward its ultimate design goal of six siderostats that can be moved among up to 30 stations. The additional stations that will become available by next spring include E7 (98 m baseline with W7), plus E10 and W10 (432 m baseline between them). Several other close-in stations will produce baselines as short as 7 m tailored to large-scale targets. Significant upgrades to the NPOI backend are also under way. The VISION beam combiner, based on single-mode fiber spatial filtering and a photon-counting CCD and very similar in design to the MIRC combiner at the CHARA array, has been installed and is on its shakedown cruise. The NPOI's current "Classic" combiner is undergoing firmware improvements that will increase both the spectral range and the number of baselines simultaneously available. Coupled with concurrent improvements to the delay line controllers, these developments should significantly increase data quality and instrumental efficiency. Finally, many of the the initial preparations for adding four 1.8 m telescopes (the former Keck outrigger telescopes, now owned by USNO) have been completed, and funding for the first installations is anticipated.

  13. Calibration of Optical Tweezers for In Vivo Force Measurements: How do Different Approaches Compare?

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Yonggun; Tripathy, Suvranta K.; Narayanareddy, Babu R.J.; Mattson-Hoss, Michelle K.; Gross, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    There is significant interest in quantifying force production inside cells, but since conditions in vivo are less well controlled than those in vitro, in vivo measurements are challenging. In particular, the in vivo environment may vary locally as far as its optical properties, and the organelles manipulated by the optical trap frequently vary in size and shape. Several methods have been proposed to overcome these difficulties. We evaluate the relative merits of these methods and directly compare two of them, a refractive index matching method, and a light-momentum-change method. Since in vivo forces are frequently relatively high (e.g., can exceed 15 pN for lipid droplets), a high-power laser is employed. We discover that this high-powered trap induces local temperature changes, and we develop an approach to compensate for uncertainties in the magnitude of applied force due to such temperature variations. PMID:25229154

  14. Two-tier calibrated electro-optic sensing system for intense field characterization of high-power W-band gyrotron.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok; Hong, Young-Pyo; Yang, Jong-Won; Lee, Dong-Joon

    2016-05-16

    We present a field-calibrated electro-optic sensing system for measurement of the electric field radiating from a high-power vacuum oscillator at ~95 GHz. The intense electric field is measured in absolute scale via two probe-calibration steps, associated with a photonic heterodyne scheme. First, a micro-electro-optic probe, fabricated to less than one-tenth the oscillation wavelength scale to minimize field-perturbation due to the probe, is placed on the aperture of a field-calculable WR-10 waveguide to calibrate the probe in V/m scale. Then, using this arrangement as a calibrated reference probe at the first-tier position, another probe-bulkier, and thus more robust and sensitive but not accessible to the aperture-is calibrated at the second-tier position away from the waveguide aperture. This two-tier calibrated probe was utilized to diagnose the sub-MV/m scale of intense electric fields and emissions from a high-power W-band gyrotron. The experimental results obtained proved consistent with calculated analytical results-verifying the efficacy of the developed system. PMID:27409877

  15. Agreement in identification of glaucomatous progression between the optic disc photography and Heidelberg retina tomography in young glaucomatous patients

    PubMed Central

    Hentova-Sencanic, Paraskeva; Sencanic, Ivan; Trajković, Goran; Bozic, Marija; Bjelovic, Nevena

    2014-01-01

    AIM To evaluate concordance between the clinical assessment of glaucomatous progression of the optic disc photography and progression identified by Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT) in patients with suspected primary juvenile open angle glaucoma (JOAG). METHODS Optic disc photographs and corresponding HRT II series were reviewed. Optic disc changes between first and final photographs were noted as well as progression identified by HRT topographic change analysis (TCA) and rim area regression line (RARL) Agreement between progression indentified by photography and HRT methods was assessed. Progression, determined from optic disc photographs by consensus assessment was used as the reference standard. RESULTS A total of 31 patients (59 eyes) with suspected JOAG were studied. Agreement for progression/no progression between TCA and photography was obtained in 4 progressing eyes and 38 stable eyes (71.19%, k=0.11). Agreement for progression/no progression between RARL and photography was detected in 5 progressing eyes and in 34 stable eyes (66.10%, k=0.15). The number of HRT per patient was statistically higher in the progressing group (P=0.034). CONCLUSION Agreement for detection of longitudinal changes between photography and HRT analysis was poor. One way to improve the chance of discovery of the progression could be increasing the number of HRT examinations. PMID:24967194

  16. Determination of Propranolol Hydrochloride in Pharmaceutical Preparations Using Near Infrared Spectrometry with Fiber Optic Probe and Multivariate Calibration Methods

    PubMed Central

    Marques Junior, Jucelino Medeiros; Muller, Aline Lima Hermes; Foletto, Edson Luiz; da Costa, Adilson Ben; Bizzi, Cezar Augusto; Irineu Muller, Edson

    2015-01-01

    A method for determination of propranolol hydrochloride in pharmaceutical preparation using near infrared spectrometry with fiber optic probe (FTNIR/PROBE) and combined with chemometric methods was developed. Calibration models were developed using two variable selection models: interval partial least squares (iPLS) and synergy interval partial least squares (siPLS). The treatments based on the mean centered data and multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) were selected for models construction. A root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 8.2 mg g−1 was achieved using siPLS (s2i20PLS) algorithm with spectra divided into 20 intervals and combination of 2 intervals (8501 to 8801 and 5201 to 5501 cm−1). Results obtained by the proposed method were compared with those using the pharmacopoeia reference method and significant difference was not observed. Therefore, proposed method allowed a fast, precise, and accurate determination of propranolol hydrochloride in pharmaceutical preparations. Furthermore, it is possible to carry out on-line analysis of this active principle in pharmaceutical formulations with use of fiber optic probe. PMID:25861516

  17. Determination of propranolol hydrochloride in pharmaceutical preparations using near infrared spectrometry with fiber optic probe and multivariate calibration methods.

    PubMed

    Marques Junior, Jucelino Medeiros; Muller, Aline Lima Hermes; Foletto, Edson Luiz; da Costa, Adilson Ben; Bizzi, Cezar Augusto; Irineu Muller, Edson

    2015-01-01

    A method for determination of propranolol hydrochloride in pharmaceutical preparation using near infrared spectrometry with fiber optic probe (FTNIR/PROBE) and combined with chemometric methods was developed. Calibration models were developed using two variable selection models: interval partial least squares (iPLS) and synergy interval partial least squares (siPLS). The treatments based on the mean centered data and multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) were selected for models construction. A root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 8.2 mg g(-1) was achieved using siPLS (s2i20PLS) algorithm with spectra divided into 20 intervals and combination of 2 intervals (8501 to 8801 and 5201 to 5501 cm(-1)). Results obtained by the proposed method were compared with those using the pharmacopoeia reference method and significant difference was not observed. Therefore, proposed method allowed a fast, precise, and accurate determination of propranolol hydrochloride in pharmaceutical preparations. Furthermore, it is possible to carry out on-line analysis of this active principle in pharmaceutical formulations with use of fiber optic probe.

  18. The Atlantic Meridional Transect: Spatially Extensive Calibration and Validation of Optical Properties and Remotely Sensed Measurements of Ocean Colour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiken, James; Hooker, Stanford

    1997-01-01

    Twice a year, the Royal Research Ship (RRS) James Clark Ross (JCR) steams a meridional transect of the atlantic Ocean between Grimsly (UK) and Stanley (Falkland Islands) with a port call in Montevideo (Uruguay), as part of the annual research activities of the British Antarctic Survey (BAS). In September, the JCR sails from the UK, and the following April it makes the return trip. The ship is operated by the BAS for the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC). The Atlantic Meridional Transect (AMT) Program exploits the passage of the JCR from approximately 50 deg. N to 50 deg. S with a primary objective to investigate physical and biological processes, as well as to measure the mesi-to-basin-scale bio-optical properties of the atlantic Ocean. The calibration and validation of remotely sensed observations of ocean colour is an inherent objective of these studies: first, by relating in situ measurements of water leaving radiance to satellite measurement, and second, by measuring the bio-optically active constituents of the water.

  19. Design and Field-of-View Calibration of 114-660-GHz Optics of the Earth Observing System Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofield, Richard E.; Stek, Paul C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the optics design and field-of view (FOV) calibration for five radiometers covering 114-660 GHz which share a common antenna in the Microwave Limb Sounder instrument on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Aura satellite. Details of near-field pattern measurements are presented. Estimated systematic scaling uncertainties (3/spl sigma/) on calibrated limb emissions, due to FOV calibration uncertainties, are below 0.4%. 3/spl sigma/ uncertainties in beamwidth and relative pointing of radiometer boresights are 0.006A(deg) and 0.003A(deg) , respectively. The uncertainty in modeled instrument response, due to the scan dependence of FOV patterns, is less than +/- 0.24 K equivalent blackbody temperature. Refinements to the calibration using in-flight data are presented.

  20. Use of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer to calibrate the optical sensor on board the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Conel, James E.; Vandenbosch, Jeannette; Shimada, Masanobu

    1993-01-01

    We describe an experiment to calibrate the optical sensor (OPS) on board the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite-1 with data acquired by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). On 27 Aug. 1992 both the OPS and AVIRIS acquired data concurrently over a calibration target on the surface of Rogers Dry Lake, California. The high spectral resolution measurements of AVIRIS have been convolved to the spectral response curves of the OPS. These data in conjunction with the corresponding OPS digitized numbers have been used to generate the radiometric calibration coefficients for the eight OPS bands. This experiment establishes the suitability of AVIRIS for the calibration of spaceborne sensors in the 400 to 2500 nm spectral region.

  1. Calibrated and completeness-corrected optical stellar density maps of the northern Galactic plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnhill, H. J.; Drew, J. E.; Barentsen, G.; González-Solares, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    Following on from the second release of calibrated photometry from IPHAS, the INT/WFC Photometric Hα Survey of the Northern Galactic Plane, we present incompleteness-corrected stellar density maps in the r and i photometric bands. These have been computed to a range of limiting magnitudes reaching to 20th magnitude in r and 19th in i (Vega system), and with different angular resolutions - the highest resolution available being 1 arcmin2. The maps obtained cover 94 per cent of the 1800 square degree IPHAS footprint, spanning the Galactic latitude range, -5° < b < +5°, north of the celestial equator. The corrections for incompleteness, due to confusion and sensitivity loss at the faint limit, have been deduced by the method of artificial source injection. The presentation of this method is preceded by a discussion of other more approximate methods of determining completeness. Our method takes full account of position-dependent seeing and source ellipticity in the survey data base. The application of the star counts to testing reddened Galactic disc models is previewed by a comparison with predicted counts along three constant-longitude cuts at ℓ ≃ 30°, 90° and 175°: some overprediction of the most heavily reddened ℓ ≃ 30° counts is found, alongside good agreement at ℓ ≃ 90° and 175°.

  2. Progress toward a spin squeezed optical atomic clock beyond the standard quantum limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletic, Vladan

    2014-05-01

    State of the art optical lattice atomic clocks have reached a relative inaccuracy level of 10-18, already making them the most stable time references in existence. One restriction on the precision of these clocks is the projection noise caused by the measurement of the atomic state. This limit, known as the standard quantum limit (SQL), can be overcome by entangling the atoms. By performing spin squeezing, we can robustly generate such entanglement and surpass the SQL of precision in optical atomic clocks. I will report on recent experimental progress toward realizing spin squeezing in an 171Yb optical lattice clock. A high-finesse micromirror-based optical cavity mediates the atom-atom interaction necessary for generating the entanglement. By exceeding the SQL in this state of the art system, we are aiming to advance precision time metrology, as well as expanding the boundaries of quantum control and measurement. Supported by DARPA QUASAR and NSERC.

  3. Progress toward a spin squeezed optical atomic clock beyond the standard quantum limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, Boris; Kawasaki, Akio; Vuletic, Vladan

    2015-05-01

    State of the art optical lattice atomic clocks have reached a relative inaccuracy level of 10-18, already making them the most stable time references in existence. One restriction on the precision of these clocks is the projection noise caused by the measurement of the atomic state. This limit, known as the standard quantum limit (SQL), can be overcome by entangling the atoms. By performing spin squeezing, it is possible to robustly generate such entanglement and therefore surpass the SQL of precision in optical atomic clocks. I will report on recent experimental progress toward realizing spin squeezing in an 171Yb optical lattice clock. A high-finesse micromirror-based optical cavity mediates the atom-atom interaction necessary for generating the entanglement. By exceeding the SQL in this state of the art system, we are aiming to advance precision time metrology, as well as expanding the boundaries of quantum control and measurement.

  4. Test procedure for calibration, grooming and alignment of the LDUA Optical Alignment Scope

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J.D.

    1995-12-07

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) is a remotely operated manipulator used to enter into underground waste tanks through one of the tank risers. The LDUA must be carefully aligned with the tank riser during the installation process. The Optical Alignment Scope (OAS) is used to determine when optimum alignment has been achieved between the LDUA and the riser. This procedure is used to assure that the instrumentation and equipment comprising the OAS is properly adjusted in order to achieve its intended functions successfully.

  5. Calibration of the MEarth Photometric System: Optical Magnitudes and Photometric Metallicity Estimates for 1802 Nearby M-Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmann, Jason A.; Irwin, Jonathan M.; Charbonneau, David; Newton, Elisabeth R.

    2016-02-01

    The MEarth Project is a photometric survey systematically searching the smallest stars near the Sun for transiting rocky planets. Since 2008, MEarth has taken approximately two million images of 1844 stars suspected to be mid-to-late M dwarfs. We have augmented this survey by taking nightly exposures of photometric standard stars and have utilized this data to photometrically calibrate the MEarth system, identify photometric nights, and obtain an optical magnitude with 1.5% precision for each M dwarf system. Each optical magnitude is an average over many years of data, and therefore should be largely immune to stellar variability and flaring. We combine this with trigonometric distance measurements, spectroscopic metallicity measurements, and 2MASS infrared magnitude measurements in order to derive a color-magnitude-metallicity relation across the mid-to-late M dwarf spectral sequence that can reproduce spectroscopic metallicity determinations to a precision of 0.1 dex. We release optical magnitudes and metallicity estimates for 1567 M dwarfs, many of which did not have an accurate determination of either prior to this work. For an additional 277 stars without a trigonometric parallax, we provide an estimate of the distance, assuming solar neighborhood metallicity. We find that the median metallicity for a volume-limited sample of stars within 20 pc of the Sun is [Fe/H] = -0.03 ± 0.008, and that 29/565 of these stars have a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -0.5 or lower, similar to the low-metallicity distribution of nearby G dwarfs. When combined with the results of ongoing and future planet surveys targeting these objects, the metallicity estimates presented here will be important for assessing the significance of any putative planet-metallicity correlation.

  6. Calibration-free B-scan images produced by master/slave optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2014-02-01

    We report on a novel method to produce B-scan images in spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The method proceeds in two steps. In the first step, using a mirror in the sample arm of the interferometer, channelled spectra are acquired for different values of the optical path difference (OPD) and stored as masks. In the second step, the mirror is replaced with an object and the captured channelled spectrum is correlated with each mask, providing the interference strength from the OPD value used to collect the respective mask. Such a procedure does not require data organized in equal frequency slots, and therefore there is no need for resampling as practiced in the conventional fast Fourier transform (FFT)-based SD-OCT technology. We show that the sensitivity drop-off versus OPD and the quality of B-scan images of the novel method are similar to those obtained in the conventional FFT-based SD-OCT, using spectral data linearly organized in frequency. PMID:24487837

  7. Highly Sensitive Dual-Phase Nanoglass-Ceramics Self-Calibrated Optical Thermometer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daqin; Wan, Zhongyi; Liu, Shen

    2016-04-01

    A strategy to achieve high sensitivity of noncontact optical thermometer via the structure design of nanoglass-ceramic and the usage of Ln(3+) (Ln = Eu, Tb, Dy) luminescence as reference signal and Cr(3+) emission as temperature signal was provided. Specifically, the synthesized dual-phase glass-ceramics were evidenced to enable spatially confined doping of Ln(3+) in the hexagonal GdF3 nanocrystals and Cr(3+) in the cubic Ga2O3 nanoparticles, being beneficial to suppressing detrimental energy transfer between Ln(3+) and Cr(3+) and thus significantly enhancing their luminescence. As a consequence, completely different temperature-sensitive luminescence of Ln(3+)4f → 4f transition and Cr(3+) 3d → 3d transition in the present glass-ceramic resulted in obvious variation of Cr(3+)/Ln(3+) fluorescence intensity ratio with temperature and strikingly high detecting temperature sensitivity of 15-22% per K. We believe that this preliminary study will provide an important advance in exploring other innovative optical thermometry. PMID:26937775

  8. Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR): Optical Characterization of the Spectralon Calibration Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuckin, B. T.; Haner, D. A.; Menzies, R. T.

    1995-01-01

    The reflectance properties of an engineering model of the Spectralon panel intended for use within an On-Board Calibrator (OBC) on the NASA Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument have been fully characterized with regard to panel uniformity and isotropy in response to three incident laser wavelengths of 442, 632.8 and 859.9 nm. A regional variation in bidirectional reflectance function (BRF) across the surface of the engineering model (EM) panel, contributing to spatial non-uniformity at the +/-2% level has been measured at all three laser wavelengths. Further, a BRF anisotropy has been identified. The mechanism causing these departures from the ideal Lambertian surface may originate in the sanding of the Spectralon surface in the final stage of preparation. This is corroborated by measurements made on a 'pressed' polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) panel in which a greatly reduced anisotropy in panel BRF is measured. The EM panel BRF reveals deviation from a Lambertian characteristic manifest as an off-specular peak in the forward scattering direction. A common cross-over point at an angle of reflection of around 37 at which the BRF is constant within 0.4% for an illumination angle range of ui = 30 60 is observed at all three wavelengths. Two Spectralon protoflight panels which were fabricated after the engineering model was studied were also the subject of a uniformity study over part of the area of the Spectralon panels at the 442 nm wavelength. The analysis indicated that the panel uniformity satisfies the 0.5% criterion indicating improved panel preparation. However, the off specular peak in the forward scattering direction is essentially unchanged with the cross-over point at approximately 37.

  9. Research progress in the key device and technology for fiber optic sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Deming; Sun, Qizhen; Lu, Ping; Xia, Li; Sima, Chaotan

    2016-03-01

    The recent research progress in the key device and technology of the fiber optic sensor network (FOSN) is introduced in this paper. An architecture of the sensor optical passive network (SPON), by employing hybrid wavelength division multiplexing/time division multiplexing (WDM/TDM) techniques similar to the fiber communication passive optical network (PON), is proposed. The network topology scheme of a hybrid TDM/WDM/FDM (frequency division multiplexing) three-dimension fiber optic sensing system for achieving ultra-large capacity, long distance, and high resolution sensing performance is performed and analyzed. As the most important device of the FOSN, several kinds of light source are developed, including the wideband multi-wavelength fiber laser operating at C band, switchable and tunable 2 μm multi-wavelength fiber lasers, ultra-fast mode-locked fiber laser, as well as the optical wideband chaos source, which have very good application prospects in the FOSN. Meanwhile, intelligent management techniques for the FOSN including wideband spectrum demodulation of the sensing signals and real-time fault monitoring of fiber links are presented. Moreover, several typical applications of the FOSN are also discussed, such as the fiber optic gas sensing network, fiber optic acoustic sensing network, and strain/dynamic strain sensing network.

  10. An innovative procedure for calibration of strapdown electro-optical sensors onboard unmanned air vehicles.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Giancarmine; Accardo, Domenico; Moccia, Antonio; Rispoli, Attilio

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an innovative method for estimating the attitude of airborne electro-optical cameras with respect to the onboard autonomous navigation unit. The procedure is based on the use of attitude measurements under static conditions taken by an inertial unit and carrier-phase differential Global Positioning System to obtain accurate camera position estimates in the aircraft body reference frame, while image analysis allows line-of-sight unit vectors in the camera based reference frame to be computed. The method has been applied to the alignment of the visible and infrared cameras installed onboard the experimental aircraft of the Italian Aerospace Research Center and adopted for in-flight obstacle detection and collision avoidance. Results show an angular uncertainty on the order of 0.1° (rms).

  11. An innovative procedure for calibration of strapdown electro-optical sensors onboard unmanned air vehicles.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Giancarmine; Accardo, Domenico; Moccia, Antonio; Rispoli, Attilio

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an innovative method for estimating the attitude of airborne electro-optical cameras with respect to the onboard autonomous navigation unit. The procedure is based on the use of attitude measurements under static conditions taken by an inertial unit and carrier-phase differential Global Positioning System to obtain accurate camera position estimates in the aircraft body reference frame, while image analysis allows line-of-sight unit vectors in the camera based reference frame to be computed. The method has been applied to the alignment of the visible and infrared cameras installed onboard the experimental aircraft of the Italian Aerospace Research Center and adopted for in-flight obstacle detection and collision avoidance. Results show an angular uncertainty on the order of 0.1° (rms). PMID:22315559

  12. An Innovative Procedure for Calibration of Strapdown Electro-Optical Sensors Onboard Unmanned Air Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Fasano, Giancarmine; Accardo, Domenico; Moccia, Antonio; Rispoli, Attilio

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an innovative method for estimating the attitude of airborne electro-optical cameras with respect to the onboard autonomous navigation unit. The procedure is based on the use of attitude measurements under static conditions taken by an inertial unit and carrier-phase differential Global Positioning System to obtain accurate camera position estimates in the aircraft body reference frame, while image analysis allows line-of-sight unit vectors in the camera based reference frame to be computed. The method has been applied to the alignment of the visible and infrared cameras installed onboard the experimental aircraft of the Italian Aerospace Research Center and adopted for in-flight obstacle detection and collision avoidance. Results show an angular uncertainty on the order of 0.1° (rms). PMID:22315559

  13. Review on recent progress of three-dimensional optical photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Mei-Li; Kuang, Ping; Bur, James A.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; John, Sajeev

    2014-03-31

    Over the past two decades, the field of photonic-crystals has become one of the most influential realms of contemporary optics. In this paper, we will review two recent experimental progresses in three-dimensional photonic-crystal operating in optical wavelengths. The first is the observation of anomalous light-refraction, an acutely negative refraction, in a 3D photonic-crystal for light trapping, guiding and near-unity absorption. The second is the observation of quasi-coherent thermal emission from an all-metallic 3D photonic-crystal at elevated temperatures.

  14. Nonlinear Optical Measurements of the Artery Wall: Parameters Related to the Progression of Atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowa, Michael G.; Mostaco-Guidolin, Leila B.; Smith, Michael S. D.; Kohlenberg, Elica K.; Ridsdale, Andrew; Stolow, Albert; Ko, Alex C. T.

    2009-01-01

    Nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopy is used to follow key structural and biochemical changes associated with the progression of atherosclerosis. Arteries from WHHL-MI rabbits are examined using a 3 channel NLO microscope that can simultaneously monitor the coherent anti-stokes Raman scattered light (CARS), the two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and the second harmonic generation (SHG) from a sample. Distinct differences in the nonlinear optical signals are observed that correlate with the age of the vessel and the presence of atherosclerotic plaque. These differences are attributed to the changing extracellular matrix and the increased lipid deposition associated with plaque development. The capability of NLO to perform 3D sectioning in thick highly scattering vessels in order to visualize structural details of the artery wall and highlight vessel pathology is demonstrated. These features make NLO a potentially valuable tool to help understand the progression of atherosclerosis.

  15. Total light loss optic spectroscopy. Progress towards a fiber optic Raman organic vapor sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle, K.R.; Vess, T.M.; Angel, S.M.

    1993-09-01

    A Raman probe has been developed utilizing a single optical fiber as both a light pipe and an active sensing element. By coating a small segment of the surface of an exposed glass fiber core with a thin polymer film, an inverted waveguide is formed where light transmitted down the fiber is stripped out of the core and into the polymer film. The polymer coating is used both as a waveguide and as a medium for concentrating small organic molecules to be interrogated by Raman spectroscopy. The ability of the fiber optic thin film waveguide probe to detect organic vapors is demonstrated. The utility of the probe in the detection of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) is also described.

  16. Radiometric calibration and noise estimation of acousto-optic tunable filter hyperspectral imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Katrašnik, Jaka; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2013-05-20

    The accuracy of the radiometric response of acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) hyperspectral imaging systems is crucial for obtaining reliable measurements. It is therefore important to know the radiometric response and noise characteristics of the hyperspectral imaging system used. A radiometric model of an AOTF hyperspectral imaging system composed of an imaging sensor radiometric model (CCD, CMOS, and sCMOS) and an AOTF light transmission model is proposed. Using the radiometric model, a method for obtaining the fixed pattern noise (FPN) of the imaging system by displacing and imaging an illuminated reference target is developed. Methods for estimating the temporal noise of the imaging system, using the photon transfer method, and for correcting FPN are also presented. Noise estimation and image restoration methods were tested on an AOTF hyperspectral imaging system. The results indicate that the developed methods can accurately calculate temporal and FPN, and can effectively correct the acquired images. After correction, the signal-to-noise ratio of the acquired images was shown to increase by 26%. PMID:23736239

  17. Radiometric calibration and noise estimation of acousto-optic tunable filter hyperspectral imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Katrašnik, Jaka; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2013-05-20

    The accuracy of the radiometric response of acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) hyperspectral imaging systems is crucial for obtaining reliable measurements. It is therefore important to know the radiometric response and noise characteristics of the hyperspectral imaging system used. A radiometric model of an AOTF hyperspectral imaging system composed of an imaging sensor radiometric model (CCD, CMOS, and sCMOS) and an AOTF light transmission model is proposed. Using the radiometric model, a method for obtaining the fixed pattern noise (FPN) of the imaging system by displacing and imaging an illuminated reference target is developed. Methods for estimating the temporal noise of the imaging system, using the photon transfer method, and for correcting FPN are also presented. Noise estimation and image restoration methods were tested on an AOTF hyperspectral imaging system. The results indicate that the developed methods can accurately calculate temporal and FPN, and can effectively correct the acquired images. After correction, the signal-to-noise ratio of the acquired images was shown to increase by 26%.

  18. New Researches and Application Progress of Commonly Used Optical Molecular Imaging Technology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Yi; Yang, Feng; Lin, Yan; Zhou, Qiu-Lan; Liao, Yang-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Optical molecular imaging, a new medical imaging technique, is developed based on genomics, proteomics and modern optical imaging technique, characterized by non-invasiveness, non-radiativity, high cost-effectiveness, high resolution, high sensitivity and simple operation in comparison with conventional imaging modalities. Currently, it has become one of the most widely used molecular imaging techniques and has been applied in gene expression regulation and activity detection, biological development and cytological detection, drug research and development, pathogenesis research, pharmaceutical effect evaluation and therapeutic effect evaluation, and so forth, This paper will review the latest researches and application progresses of commonly used optical molecular imaging techniques such as bioluminescence imaging and fluorescence molecular imaging. PMID:24696850

  19. Particle sizing calibration with refractive index correction for light scattering optical particle counters and impacts upon PCASP and CDP data collected during the Fennec campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, P. D.; Dean, A. R.; Williams, P. I.; Dorsey, J. R.; Minikin, A.; Pickering, M. A.; Petzold, A.

    2012-05-01

    Optical particle counters (OPCs) are used regularly for atmospheric research, measuring particle scattering cross sections to generate particle size distribution histograms. This manuscript presents two methods for calibrating OPCs with case studies based on a Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (PCASP) and a Cloud Droplet Probe (CDP), both of which are operated on the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements BAe-146 research aircraft. A probability density function based method is provided for modification of the OPC bin boundaries when the scattering properties of measured particles are different to those of the calibration particles due to differences in refractive index or shape. This method provides mean diameters and widths for OPC bins based upon Mie-Lorenz theory or any other particle scattering theory, without the need for smoothing, despite the highly nonlinear and non-monotonic relationship between particle size and scattering cross section. By calibrating an OPC in terms of its scattering cross section the optical properties correction can be applied with minimal information loss, and performing correction in this manner provides traceable and transparent uncertainty propagation throughout the whole process. Analysis of multiple calibrations has shown that for the PCASP the bin centres differ by up to 30% from the manufacturer's nominal values and can change by up to approximately 20% when routine maintenance is performed. The CDP has been found to be less sensitive than the manufacturer's specification with differences in sizing of between 1.6 ± 0.8 μm and 4.7 ± 1.8 μm for one flight. Over the course of the Fennec project in the Sahara the variability of calibration was less than the calibration uncertainty in 6 out of 7 calibrations performed. As would be expected from Mie-Lorenz theory, the impact of the refractive index corrections has been found to be largest for absorbing materials and the impact on Saharan dust measurements made

  20. Optical Sensors for Planetary Radiant Energy (OSPREy): Calibration and Validation of Current and Next-Generation NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B.; Bernhard, Germar; Morrow, John H.; Booth, Charles R.; Comer, Thomas; Lind, Randall N.; Quang, Vi

    2012-01-01

    A principal objective of the Optical Sensors for Planetary Radiance Energy (OSPREy) activity is to establish an above-water radiometer system as a lower-cost alternative to existing in-water systems for the collection of ground-truth observations. The goal is to be able to make high-quality measurements satisfying the accuracy requirements for the vicarious calibration and algorithm validation of next-generation satellites that make ocean color and atmospheric measurements. This means the measurements will have a documented uncertainty satisfying the established performance metrics for producing climate-quality data records. The OSPREy approach is based on enhancing commercial-off-the-shelf fixed-wavelength and hyperspectral sensors to create hybridspectral instruments with an improved accuracy and spectral resolution, as well as a dynamic range permitting sea, Sun, sky, and Moon observations. Greater spectral diversity in the ultraviolet (UV) will be exploited to separate the living and nonliving components of marine ecosystems; UV bands will also be used to flag and improve atmospheric correction algorithms in the presence of absorbing aerosols. The short-wave infrared (SWIR) is expected to improve atmospheric correction, because the ocean is radiometrically blacker at these wavelengths. This report describes the development of the sensors, including unique capabilities like three-axis polarimetry; the documented uncertainty will be presented in a subsequent report.

  1. Fundus autofluorescence and optical coherence tomography in the management of progressive outer retinal necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Steven; Wong, Wai T.; Weichel, Eric D.; Lew, Julie C.; Chew, Emily Y.; Nussenblatt, Robert B.

    2011-01-01

    A 41 year-old female patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) presented with progressive nasal visual field loss in her right eye. Ophthalmic exam revealed widespread areas of retinal opacification with hemorrhage consistent with progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN), which was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for varicella zoster virus (VZV) DNA. The patient was treated with intravenous and intravitreal foscarnet and ganciclovir with a resultant improvement clinically. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging revealed progressive changes indicative of widespread retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) and outer retinal dysfunction. OCT was useful in documenting progressive changes in macular architecture during therapy including neurosensory elevation, cystoid macular edema, and severe outer retinal necrosis, at initial exam, 1 week, and 1 month follow-up. Fundus autofluorescence revealed areas of stippled, hyperfluorescence within extensive zones of hypofluorescence, which progressed during the follow-up period. These areas appeared to represent lipofuscin or its photoreactive components within larger regions of RPE loss. The combination of OCT and FAF was useful in the characterization of the RPE and retinal anatomy in this patient with PORN. PMID:20337261

  2. An Automated Method of MFRSR Calibration for Aerosol Optical Depth Analysis with Application to an Asian Dust Outbreak over the United States.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, John A.; Cornwall, Christopher R.; Hodges, Gary B.; Long, Charles N.; Medina, Carlos I.; Deluisi, John J.

    2003-02-01

    Over the past decade, networks of Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSR) and automated sun photometers have been established in the United States to monitor aerosol properties. The MFRSR alternately measures diffuse and global irradiance in six narrow spectral bands and a broadband channel of the solar spectrum, from which the direct normal component for each may be inferred. Its 500-nm channel mimics sun photometer measurements and thus is a source of aerosol optical depth information. Automatic data reduction methods are needed because of the high volume of data produced by the MFRSR. In addition, these instruments are often not calibrated for absolute irradiance and must be periodically calibrated for optical depth analysis using the Langley method. This process involves extrapolation to the signal the MFRSR would measure at the top of the atmosphere (I0). Here, an automated clear-sky identification algorithm is used to screen MFRSR 500-nm measurements for suitable calibration data. The clear-sky MFRSR measurements are subsequently used to construct a set of calibration Langley plots from which a mean I0 is computed. This calibration I0 may be subsequently applied to any MFRSR 500-nm measurement within the calibration period to retrieve aerosol optical depth. This method is tested on a 2-month MFRSR dataset from the Table Mountain NOAA Surface Radiation Budget Network (SURFRAD) station near Boulder, Colorado. The resultant I0 is applied to two Asian dust-related high air pollution episodes that occurred within the calibration period on 13 and 17 April 2001. Computed aerosol optical depths for 17 April range from approximately 0.30 to 0.40, and those for 13 April vary from background levels to >0.30. Errors in these retrievals were estimated to range from ±0.01 to ±0.05, depending on the solar zenith angle. The calculations are compared with independent MFRSR-based aerosol optical depth retrievals at the Pawnee National Grasslands, 85 km to the

  3. Radiometric calibration of optical microscopy and microspectroscopy apparata over a broad spectral range using a special thin-film luminescence standard

    SciTech Connect

    Valenta, J. Greben, M.

    2015-04-15

    Application capabilities of optical microscopes and microspectroscopes can be considerably enhanced by a proper calibration of their spectral sensitivity. We propose and demonstrate a method of relative and absolute calibration of a microspectroscope over an extraordinary broad spectral range covered by two (parallel) detection branches in visible and near-infrared spectral regions. The key point of the absolute calibration of a relative spectral sensitivity is application of the standard sample formed by a thin layer of Si nanocrystals with stable and efficient photoluminescence. The spectral PL quantum yield and the PL spatial distribution of the standard sample must be characterized by separate experiments. The absolutely calibrated microspectroscope enables to characterize spectral photon emittance of a studied object or even its luminescence quantum yield (QY) if additional knowledge about spatial distribution of emission and about excitance is available. Capabilities of the calibrated microspectroscope are demonstrated by measuring external QY of electroluminescence from a standard poly-Si solar-cell and of photoluminescence of Er-doped Si nanocrystals.

  4. Determination of Aerosol Optical Depth with a Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer using in-place calibrations at a coastal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denn, F. M.; Fabbri, B. E.; Schuster, G. L.

    2012-12-01

    Direct and indirect aerosol effects are identified among the largest sources of uncertainty in model projections of climate change (IPCC AR-4). Even though aerosol optical depths (AODs) are currently derived on a global scale from satellite measurements as well as within data assimilation models, ground-based sun photometer measurements of AOD are extremely important for validating these indirect retrievals. Calibration of surface sun photometers requires knowledge of the instrument-specific solar signal at each measurement channel (V0), determined by doing Langley extrapolations. V0s are often difficult to determine at ground sites, and are very difficult to obtain at the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy (CERES) Ocean Validation Experiment (COVE) site. Some reasons for this difficulty are varying humidity, aerosol loading, and generally unstable atmospheric conditions. For these reasons, many researchers prefer to determine instrument V0s at pristine mountain sites, such as Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) Hawaii, where these problems are greatly reduced. However, taking an instrument to a mountain top location can introduce a new set of problems, such as shipping damage and potential environmental influences on the instrument (temperature). For instruments with an exposed Spectralon diffuser such as the Multifilter Rotating Shadowband radiometer (MFRSR), diffuser bleaching by ultraviolet radiation and possible distortion of the diffuser by changes in atmospheric pressure can occur. For these reasons, our goal is to determine AODs for our MFRSR using V0s determined in-place at the COVE site. The reference AOD data is from a co-located CIMEL sun photometer, which is part of NASA's Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET). We show that in-place V0s can be determined with nearly the same precision as at a mountain site, and that the resultant AODs obtained using these in-place V0s agree better with AERONET than the AODs determined using the mountain derived V0s. The

  5. Retrobulbar optic neuritis and meningoencephalitis following progressive outer retinal necrosis due to CMV in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Park, K H; Bang, J H; Park, W B; Kim, H B; Kim, N J; Ahn, J K; Chang, K H; Oh, M D; Choe, K W

    2008-10-01

    We report on a 34-year-old male patient with AIDS who developed retrobulbar optic neuritis and meningoencephalitis following bilateral progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) caused by cytomegalovirus (CMV). This case documents the presumed association of PORN with retrobulbar optic neuritis, and CMV meningoencephalitis in an AIDS patient. PMID:18574556

  6. Retrobulbar optic neuritis and meningoencephalitis following progressive outer retinal necrosis due to CMV in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Park, K H; Bang, J H; Park, W B; Kim, H B; Kim, N J; Ahn, J K; Chang, K H; Oh, M D; Choe, K W

    2008-10-01

    We report on a 34-year-old male patient with AIDS who developed retrobulbar optic neuritis and meningoencephalitis following bilateral progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) caused by cytomegalovirus (CMV). This case documents the presumed association of PORN with retrobulbar optic neuritis, and CMV meningoencephalitis in an AIDS patient.

  7. Progress of Focusing X-ray and Gamma-ray Optics for Small Animal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovaroff, M J; Funk, T; Barber, W C; Ramsey, B D; Hasegawa, B H

    2005-08-05

    Significant effort is currently being devoted to the development of noninvasive imaging systems that allow in vivo assessment of biological and biomolecular interactions in mice and other small animals. Ideally, one would like to discern these functional and metabolic relationships with in vivo radionuclide imaging at spatial resolutions approaching those that can be obtained using the anatomical imaging techniques (i.e., <100 {micro}m), which would help to answer outstanding questions in many areas of biomedicine. In this paper, we report progress on our effort to develop high-resolution focusing X-ray and gamma-ray optics for small-animal radionuclide imaging. The use of reflective optics, in contrast to methods that rely on absorptive collimation like single- or multiple-pinhole cameras, decouples spatial resolution from sensitivity (efficiency). Our feasibility studies have refined and applied ray-tracing routines to design focusing optics for small animal studies. We also have adopted a replication technique to manufacture the X-ray mirrors, and which in experimental studies have demonstrated a spatial resolution of {approx}190 {micro}m. We conclude that focusing optics can be designed and fabricated for gamma-ray energies, and with spatial resolutions, and field of view suitable for in vivo biological studies. While the efficiency of a single optic is limited, fabrication methods now are being developed that may make it possible to develop imaging systems with multiple optics that could collect image data over study times that would be practical for performing radionuclide studies of small animals.

  8. Progress on the Global Network of Optical Magnetometers to search for Exotic physics (GNOME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson Kimball, D. F.; Decamp, G.; Thulasi, S.; Fuentes, D.; Viegas, I.; Pustelny, S.; Wlodarczyk, P.; Gawlik, W.; Budker, D.; Leefer, N.; Wickenbrock, A.; Afach, S.; Zhivun, L.; Pankow, C.; Smith, J.; Read, J.; Folman, R.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Pospelov, M.; Semertzidis, Y. K.; Shin, Y.; Kornack, T. W.; Stalnaker, J.

    2015-05-01

    We discuss progress on the design and construction of a network of geographically separated, time-synchronized ultrasensitive atomic comagnetometers to search for correlated transient signals heralding new physics. The Global Network of Optical Magnetometers to search for Exotic physics (GNOME) would be sensitive to nuclear and electron spin couplings to various exotic fields generated by astrophysical sources. To date, no such search has ever been carried out, making the GNOME a novel experimental window on new physics. A specific example of new physics detectable with the GNOME, presently unconstrained by astrophysical observations and laboratory experiments, is a network of domain walls of light pseudoscalar fields.

  9. Progress on the Global Network of Optical Magnetometers to search for Exotic physics (GNOME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budker, Dmitri; Gnome Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We discuss progress on the construction, implementation, and coordination of a network of geographically separated, time-synchronized ultrasensitive atomic magnetometers and comagnetometers to search for correlated transient signals heralding new physics. The Global Network of Optical Magnetometers to search for Exotic physics (GNOME) is sensitive to nuclear and electron spin couplings to various exotic fields generated by astrophysical sources. A specific example of new physics detectable with the GNOME, presently unconstrained by previous experiments, is a network of domain walls of light pseudoscalar (axion-like) fields. Supported by the Heising-Simons Foundation, Simons Foundation, and the National Science Foundation.

  10. Recent Progress Towards Quantum Dot Solar Cells with Enhanced Optical Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zerui; Ji, Haining; Yu, Peng; Wang, Zhiming

    2016-05-01

    Quantum dot solar cells, as a promising candidate for the next generation solar cell technology, have received tremendous attention in the last 10 years. Some recent developments in epitaxy growth and device structures have opened up new avenues for practical quantum dot solar cells. Unfortunately, the performance of quantum dot solar cells is often plagued by marginal photon absorption. In this review, we focus on the recent progress made in enhancing optical absorption in quantum dot solar cells, including optimization of quantum dot growth, improving the solar cells structure, and engineering light trapping techniques.

  11. Follow-up review: recent progress in the development of super-resolution optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Katsumasa

    2016-08-01

    The advent of super-resolution microscopy brought a huge impact to various research fields ranging from the fundamental science to medical and industrial applications. The technological development is still ongoing with involving different scientific disciplines and often changing the standard of optical imaging. In this review, I would like to introduce the recent research progress in super-resolution microscopy as a follow-up for the featured issue in Microscopy (Vol. 64, No. 4, 2015) with discussions especially on the current trends and new directions in the technological development. PMID:27385787

  12. Recent Progress Towards Quantum Dot Solar Cells with Enhanced Optical Absorption.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zerui; Ji, Haining; Yu, Peng; Wang, Zhiming

    2016-12-01

    Quantum dot solar cells, as a promising candidate for the next generation solar cell technology, have received tremendous attention in the last 10 years. Some recent developments in epitaxy growth and device structures have opened up new avenues for practical quantum dot solar cells. Unfortunately, the performance of quantum dot solar cells is often plagued by marginal photon absorption. In this review, we focus on the recent progress made in enhancing optical absorption in quantum dot solar cells, including optimization of quantum dot growth, improving the solar cells structure, and engineering light trapping techniques.

  13. Cancer imaging by optical coherence tomography: preclinical progress and clinical potential.

    PubMed

    Vakoc, Benjamin J; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K; Bouma, Brett E

    2012-05-01

    The past decade has seen dramatic technological advances in the field of optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. These advances have driven commercialization and clinical adoption in ophthalmology, cardiology and gastrointestinal cancer screening. Recently, an array of OCT-based imaging tools that have been developed for preclinical intravital cancer imaging applications has yielded exciting new capabilities to probe and to monitor cancer progression and response in vivo. Here, we review these results, forecast the future of OCT for preclinical cancer imaging and discuss its exciting potential to translate to the clinic as a tool for monitoring cancer therapy.

  14. Simulation and measurement of optical aberrations of injection molded progressive addition lenses.

    PubMed

    Li, Likai; Raasch, Thomas W; Yi, Allen Y

    2013-08-20

    Injection molding is an important mass-production tool in the optical industry. In this research our aim is to develop a process of combining ultraprecision diamond turning and injection molding to create a unique low-cost manufacturing process for progressive addition lenses (PALs). In industry, it is a well-known fact that refractive index variation and geometric deformation of injection molded lenses due to the rheological properties of polymers will distort their optical performance. To address this problem, we developed a method for determining the optical aberrations of the injection molded PALs. This method involves reconstructing the wavefront pattern in the presence of uneven refractive index distribution and surface warpage using a finite element method. In addition to numerical modeling, a measurement system based on a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor was used to verify the modeling results. The measured spherocylindrical powers and aberrations of the PALs were in good agreement with the model. Consequently, the optical aberrations of injection molded PALs were successfully predicted by finite element modeling. In summary, it was demonstrated in this study that numerically based optimization for PAL manufacturing is feasible. PMID:24085007

  15. Photogrammetric camera calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tayman, W.P.; Ziemann, H.

    1984-01-01

    Section 2 (Calibration) of the document "Recommended Procedures for Calibrating Photogrammetric Cameras and Related Optical Tests" from the International Archives of Photogrammetry, Vol. XIII, Part 4, is reviewed in the light of recent practical work, and suggestions for changes are made. These suggestions are intended as a basis for a further discussion. ?? 1984.

  16. Progress in hollow core photonic crystal fiber for atomic vapour based coherent optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, T. D.; Wang, Y. Y.; Alharbi, M.; Fourcade Dutin, C.; Mangan, B. J.; Wheeler, N. V.; Benabid, F.

    2012-03-01

    We report on progress in different hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) design and fabrication for atomic vapor based applications. We have fabricated a Photonic bandgap (PBG) guiding HC-PCF with a record loss of 107dB/km at 785nm in this class of fiber. A double photonic bandgap (DPBG) guiding HC-PCF with guidance bands centred at 780nm and 1064nm is reported. A 7-cell 3-ring Kagome HC-PCF with hypocycloid core is reported, the optical loss at 780nm has been reduced to 70dB/km which to the best of our knowledge is the lowest optical loss reported at this wavelength using HC-PCF. Details on experimental loading of alkali metal vapours using a far off red detuned laser are reported. This optical loading has been shown to decrease the necessary loading time for Rb into the hollow core of a fiber. The quantity of Rb within the fiber core has been enhanced by a maximum of 14% through this loading procedure.

  17. Progress making the top end optical assembly (TEOA) for the 4-meter Advanced Technology Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canzian, Blaise; Barentine, J.; Arendt, J.; Bader, S.; Danyo, G.; Heller, C.

    2012-09-01

    L-3 Integrated Optical Systems (IOS) Division has been selected by the National Solar Observatory (NSO) to design and produce the Top End Optical Assembly (TEOA) for the 4-meter Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) to operate at Haleakal', Maui. ATST will perform to a very high optical performance level in a difficult thermal environment. The TEOA, containing the 0.65-meter silicon carbide secondary mirror and support, mirror thermal management system, mirror positioning and fast tip-tilt system, field stop with thermally managed heat dump, thermally managed Lyot stop, safety interlock and control system, and support frame, operates in the "hot spot" at the prime focus of the ATST and so presents special challenges. In this paper, we describe progress in the L-3 technical approach to meeting these challenges, including silicon carbide off-axis mirror design, fabrication, and high accuracy figuring and polishing all within L-3; mirror support design; the design for stray light control; subsystems for opto-mechanical positioning and high accuracy absolute mirror orientation sensing; Lyot stop design; and thermal management of all design elements to remain close to ambient temperature despite the imposed solar irradiance load.

  18. Best Practice Guidelines for Pre-Launch Characterization and Calibration of Instruments for Passive Optical Remote Sensing.

    PubMed

    Datla, R U; Rice, J P; Lykke, K R; Johnson, B C; Butler, J J; Xiong, X

    2011-01-01

    The pre-launch characterization and calibration of remote sensing instruments should be planned and carried out in conjunction with their design and development to meet the mission requirements. The onboard calibrators such as blackbodies and the sensors such as spectral radiometers should be characterized and calibrated using SI traceable standards. In the case of earth remote sensing, this allows inter-comparison and intercalibration of different sensors in space to create global time series of climate records of high accuracy where some inevitable data gaps can be easily bridged. The recommended best practice guidelines for this pre-launch effort is presented based on experience gained at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) programs over the past two decades. The currently available radiometric standards and calibration facilities at NIST serving the remote sensing community are described. Examples of best practice calibrations and intercomparisons to build SI (international System of Units) traceable uncertainty budget in the instrumentation used for preflight satellite sensor calibration and validation are presented. PMID:26989588

  19. Best Practice Guidelines for Pre-Launch Characterization and Calibration of Instruments for Passive Optical Remote Sensing1

    PubMed Central

    Datla, R. U.; Rice, J. P.; Lykke, K. R.; Johnson, B. C.; Butler, J. J.; Xiong, X.

    2011-01-01

    The pre-launch characterization and calibration of remote sensing instruments should be planned and carried out in conjunction with their design and development to meet the mission requirements. The onboard calibrators such as blackbodies and the sensors such as spectral radiometers should be characterized and calibrated using SI traceable standards. In the case of earth remote sensing, this allows inter-comparison and intercalibration of different sensors in space to create global time series of climate records of high accuracy where some inevitable data gaps can be easily bridged. The recommended best practice guidelines for this pre-launch effort is presented based on experience gained at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) programs over the past two decades. The currently available radiometric standards and calibration facilities at NIST serving the remote sensing community are described. Examples of best practice calibrations and intercomparisons to build SI (international System of Units) traceable uncertainty budget in the instrumentation used for preflight satellite sensor calibration and validation are presented. PMID:26989588

  20. Best Practice Guidelines for Pre-Launch Characterization and Calibration of Instruments for Passive Optical Remote Sensing.

    PubMed

    Datla, R U; Rice, J P; Lykke, K R; Johnson, B C; Butler, J J; Xiong, X

    2011-01-01

    The pre-launch characterization and calibration of remote sensing instruments should be planned and carried out in conjunction with their design and development to meet the mission requirements. The onboard calibrators such as blackbodies and the sensors such as spectral radiometers should be characterized and calibrated using SI traceable standards. In the case of earth remote sensing, this allows inter-comparison and intercalibration of different sensors in space to create global time series of climate records of high accuracy where some inevitable data gaps can be easily bridged. The recommended best practice guidelines for this pre-launch effort is presented based on experience gained at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) programs over the past two decades. The currently available radiometric standards and calibration facilities at NIST serving the remote sensing community are described. Examples of best practice calibrations and intercomparisons to build SI (international System of Units) traceable uncertainty budget in the instrumentation used for preflight satellite sensor calibration and validation are presented.

  1. Progress in obtaining an absolute calibration of a total deuterium-tritium neutron yield diagnostic based on copper activationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, C. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Fehl, D. L.; Hahn, K. D.; Leeper, R. J.; McWatters, B. R.; Nelson, A. J.; Smelser, R. M.; Snow, C. S.; Torres, J. A.

    2012-10-01

    The 350-keV Cockroft-Walton accelerator at Sandia National laboratory's Ion Beam facility is being used to calibrate absolutely a total DT neutron yield diagnostic based on the 63Cu(n,2n)62Cu(β+) reaction. These investigations have led to first-order uncertainties approaching 5% or better. The experiments employ the associated-particle technique. Deuterons at 175 keV impinge a 2.6 μm thick erbium tritide target producing 14.1 MeV neutrons from the T(d,n)4He reaction. The alpha particles emitted are measured at two angles relative to the beam direction and used to infer the neutron flux on a copper sample. The induced 62Cu activity is then measured and related to the neutron flux. This method is known as the F-factor technique. Description of the associated-particle method, copper sample geometries employed, and the present estimates of the uncertainties to the F-factor obtained are given.

  2. Recent progress in distributed optical fiber Raman photon sensors at China Jiliang University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zaixuan; Wang, Jianfeng; Li, Yi; Gong, Huaping; Yu, Xiangdong; Liu, Honglin; Jin, Yongxing; Kang, Juan; Li, Chenxia; Zhang, Wensheng; Zhang, Wenping; Niu, Xiaohui; Sun, Zhongzhou; Zhao, Chunliu; Dong, Xinyong; Jin, Shangzhong

    2012-06-01

    A brief review of recent progress in researches, productions and applications of full distributed fiber Raman photon sensors at China Jiliang University (CJLU) is presented. In order to improve the measurement distance, the accuracy, the space resolution, the ability of multi-parameter measurements, and the intelligence of full distributed fiber sensor systems, a new generation fiber sensor technology based on the optical fiber nonlinear scattering fusion principle is proposed. A series of new generation full distributed fiber sensors are investigated and designed, which consist of new generation ultra-long distance full distributed fiber Raman and Rayleigh scattering photon sensors integrated with a fiber Raman amplifier, auto-correction full distributed fiber Raman photon temperature sensors based on Raman correlation dual sources, full distributed fiber Raman photon temperature sensors based on a pulse coding source, full distributed fiber Raman photon temperature sensors using a fiber Raman wavelength shifter, a new type of Brillouin optical time domain analyzers (BOTDAs) integrated with a fiber Raman amplifier for replacing a fiber Brillouin amplifier, full distributed fiber Raman and Brillouin photon sensors integrated with a fiber Raman amplifier, and full distributed fiber Brillouin photon sensors integrated with a fiber Brillouin frequency shifter. The Internet of things is believed as one of candidates of the next technological revolution, which has driven hundreds of millions of class markets. Sensor networks are important components of the Internet of things. The full distributed optical fiber sensor network (Rayleigh, Raman, and Brillouin scattering) is a 3S (smart materials, smart structure, and smart skill) system, which is easy to construct smart fiber sensor networks. The distributed optical fiber sensor can be embedded in the power grids, railways, bridges, tunnels, roads, constructions, water supply systems, dams, oil and gas pipelines and other

  3. Langley method applied in study of aerosol optical depth in the Brazilian semiarid region using 500, 670 and 870 nm bands for sun photometer calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerqueira, J. G.; Fernandez, J. H.; Hoelzemann, J. J.; Leme, N. M. P.; Sousa, C. T.

    2014-10-01

    Due to the high costs of commercial monitoring instruments, a portable sun photometer was developed at INPE/CRN laboratories, operating in four bands, with two bands in the visible spectrum and two in near infrared. The instrument calibration process is performed by applying the classical Langley method. Application of the Langley’s methodology requires a site with high optical stability during the measurements, which is usually found in high altitudes. However, far from being an ideal site, Harrison et al. (1994) report success with applying the Langley method to some data for a site in Boulder, Colorado. Recently, Liu et al. (2011) show that low elevation sites, far away from urban and industrial centers can provide a stable optical depth, similar to high altitudes. In this study we investigated the feasibility of applying the methodology in the semiarid region of northeastern Brazil, far away from pollution areas with low altitudes, for sun photometer calibration. We investigated optical depth stability using two periods of measurements in the year during dry season in austral summer. The first one was in December when the native vegetation naturally dries, losing all its leaves and the second one was in September in the middle of the dry season when the vegetation is still with leaves. The data were distributed during four days in December 2012 and four days in September 2013 totaling eleven half days of collections between mornings and afternoons and by means of fitted line to the data V0 values were found. Despite the high correlation between the collected data and the fitted line, the study showed a variation between the values of V0 greater than allowed for sun photometer calibration. The lowest V0 variation reached in this experiment with values lower than 3% for the bands 500, 670 and 870 nm are displayed in tables. The results indicate that the site needs to be better characterized with studies in more favorable periods, soon after the rainy season.

  4. Modelling PTB's spatial angle autocollimator calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranz, Oliver; Geckeler, Ralf D.; Just, Andreas; Krause, Michael

    2013-05-01

    The accurate and traceable form measurement of optical surfaces has been greatly advanced by a new generation of surface profilometers which are based on the reflection of light at the surface and the measurement of the reflection angle. For this application, high-resolution electronic autocollimators provide accurate and traceable angle metrology. In recent years, great progress has been made at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in autocollimator calibration. For an advanced autocollimator characterisation, a novel calibration device has been built up at PTB: the Spatial Angle Autocollimator Calibrator (SAAC). The system makes use of an innovative Cartesian arrangement of three autocollimators (two reference autocollimators and the autocollimator to be calibrated), which allows a precise measurement of the angular orientation of a reflector cube. Each reference autocollimator is sensitive primarily to changes in one of the two relevant tilt angles, whereas the autocollimator to be calibrated is sensitive to both. The distance between the reflector cube and the autocollimator to be calibrated can be varied flexibly. In this contribution, we present the SAAC and aspects of the mathematical modelling of the system for deriving analytical expressions for the autocollimators' angle responses. These efforts will allow advancing the form measurement substantially with autocollimator-based profilometers and approaching fundamental measurement limits. Additionally, they will help manufacturers of autocollimators to improve their instruments and will provide improved angle measurement methods for precision engineering.

  5. Imaging caries lesions and lesion progression with polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Daniel; Xie, John; Shafi, Sahar; Featherstone, John D. B.; Breunig, Thomas; Le, Charles Q.

    2002-06-01

    New diagnostic tools are needed for the characterization of dental caries in the early stages of development. If carious lesions are detected early enough, they can be arrested without the need for surgical intervention. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) can be used for the imaging of early caries lesions and for the monitoring of lesion progression over time. High-resolution polarization resolved images were acquired of natural caries lesions and simulated caries lesions of varying severity created over time periods of 1 to 14 days. Linearly polarized light was incident on the tooth samples and the reflected intensity in both orthogonal polarizations was measured. PS-OCT was invaluable for removing the confounding influence of surface reflections and native birefringence and for resolving the surface structure of caries lesions. This study demonstrated that PS-OCT is well suited for the resolution of interproximal and occlusal caries, early root caries, and secondary caries around composite fillings. Longitudinal measurements of lesion progression established a strong correlation (p<0.001) between the reflected light from the lesion area and the square root of time indicating that PS-OCT is well suited for monitoring changes in enamel mineralization over time.

  6. Capillary electrokinetic separations with optical detection. Technical progress report, February 1, 1993--January 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Sepaniak, M.J.

    1993-10-01

    This program seeks the development of capillary electrokinetic separation techniques and associated optical methods of detection. Fundamental studies of pertinent separation and band broadening mechanisms are being conducted, with the emphasis on understanding systems that include highly-ordered assemblies as running buffer additives. The additives include cyclodextrins, affinity reagents, and soluble (entangled) polymers and are employed with capillary electrophoresis, CE and/or micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography, MECC modes of separation. The utility of molecular modeling techniques for predicting the effects of highly ordered assemblies on the retention behavior of isomeric compounds is under investigation. The feasibility of performing separations using a non-aqueous solvent/fullerene electrochromatographic system is being explored. The analytical methodologies associated with these capillary separation techniques are being advanced through the development of retention programming instumentation/techniques and new strategies for performing optical detection. The advantages of laser fluorimetry are extended through the inclusion of fluorogenic, reagents in the running buffer. These reagents include oligonucleotide intercalation reagents for detecting DNA fragments. Chemiluminescence detection using post-capillary reactors/flow cells is also in progress. Successful development of these separation and detection systems will fill current voids in the capabilities of capillary separation techniques.

  7. Progress Toward Slowing and Cooling of CaF with Optical Bichromatic Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyler, Edward E.; Chieda, Michael A.

    2012-06-01

    While rapid progress has been made on slowing and cooling of molecules by optical radiative forces, accepted (2012).} there remain major obstacles because molecules do not have true two-level cyling transitions -- eventually they are ``lost" to radiative decay into a dark state. The optical bichromatic force (BCF) can multiply the available velocity change for a given number of radiative cycles, by employing alternating cycles of excitation and stimulated emission from opposing directions. We recently proposed methods for BCF deceleration of CaF molecules with about 12.4 times the acceleration of the usual radiative force, and demonstrated the feasibility of the scheme with test experiments in metastable helium. Experiments on the CaF molecule are now getting underway, similar to the scheme in Ref. [b] except that we utilize the 531 nm B ^2Σ^+lrarr; X ^2Σ^+ transition rather than the A\\lrarr X transition. Although our initial tests will emphasize transverse deflection, which is particularly easy to achieve, longitudinal deceleration by 150 m/s or more should eventually be possible. We also expect significant laser-induced cooling due to the non-adiabatic BCF velocity profile. This research is supported by the National Science Foundation. J. F. Barry, E. S. Shuman, E. B. Norrgard, and D. DeMille, Phys. Rev. Lett., accepted (2012). M. A. Chieda and E. E. Eyler, Phys. Rev. A 84, 063401 (2011).

  8. Boresight Calibration of Construction Misalignments for 3D Scanners Built with a 2D Laser Rangefinder Rotating on Its Optical Center

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Jesús; Martínez, Jorge L.; Mandow, Anthony; Reina, Antonio J.; Pequeño-Boter, Alejandro; García-Cerezo, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Many applications, like mobile robotics, can profit from acquiring dense, wide-ranging and accurate 3D laser data. Off-the-shelf 2D scanners are commonly customized with an extra rotation as a low-cost, lightweight and low-power-demanding solution. Moreover, aligning the extra rotation axis with the optical center allows the 3D device to maintain the same minimum range as the 2D scanner and avoids offsets in computing Cartesian coordinates. The paper proposes a practical procedure to estimate construction misalignments based on a single scan taken from an arbitrary position in an unprepared environment that contains planar surfaces of unknown dimensions. Inherited measurement limitations from low-cost 2D devices prevent the estimation of very small translation misalignments, so the calibration problem reduces to obtaining boresight parameters. The distinctive approach with respect to previous plane-based intrinsic calibration techniques is the iterative maximization of both the flatness and the area of visible planes. Calibration results are presented for a case study. The method is currently being applied as the final stage in the production of a commercial 3D rangefinder. PMID:25347585

  9. Boresight calibration of construction misalignments for 3D scanners built with a 2D laser range finder rotating on its optical center.

    PubMed

    Morales, Jesús; Martínez, Jorge L; Mandow, Anthony; Reina, Antonio J; Pequeño-Boter, Alejandro; García-Cerezo, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Many applications, like mobile robotics, can profit from acquiring dense, wide-ranging and accurate 3D laser data. Off-the-shelf 2D scanners are commonly customized with an extra rotation as a low-cost, lightweight and low-power-demanding solution. Moreover, aligning the extra rotation axis with the optical center allows the 3D device to maintain the same minimum range as the 2D scanner and avoids offsets in computing Cartesian coordinates. The paper proposes a practical procedure to estimate construction misalignments based on a single scan taken from an arbitrary position in an unprepared environment that contains planar surfaces of unknown dimensions. Inherited measurement limitations from low-cost 2D devices prevent the estimation of very small translation misalignments, so the calibration problem reduces to obtaining boresight parameters. The distinctive approach with respect to previous plane-based intrinsic calibration techniques is the iterative maximization of both the flatness and the area of visible planes. Calibration results are presented for a case study. The method is currently being applied as the final stage in the production of a commercial 3D rangefinder. PMID:25347585

  10. The influence of temperature calibration on the OC–EC results from a dual-optics thermal carbon analyzer

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Sunset Laboratory Dual-Optical Carbonaceous Analyzer that simultaneously measures transmission and reflectance signals is widely used in thermal-optical analysis of particulate matter samples. Most often this instrument is used to measure total carbon (TC), organic carbon (O...

  11. Practical calibration curve of small-type optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter for evaluation of entrance skin dose in the diagnostic X-ray region.

    PubMed

    Takegami, Kazuki; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Okino, Hiroki; Kimoto, Natsumi; Maehata, Itsumi; Kanazawa, Yuki; Okazaki, Tohru; Kobayashi, Ikuo

    2015-07-01

    For X-ray diagnosis, the proper management of the entrance skin dose (ESD) is important. Recently, a small-type optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (nanoDot OSL dosimeter) was made commercially available by Landauer, and it is hoped that it will be used for ESD measurements in clinical settings. Our objectives in the present study were to propose a method for calibrating the ESD measured with the nanoDot OSL dosimeter and to evaluate its accuracy. The reference ESD is assumed to be based on an air kerma with consideration of a well-known back scatter factor. We examined the characteristics of the nanoDot OSL dosimeter using two experimental conditions: a free air irradiation to derive the air kerma, and a phantom experiment to determine the ESD. For evaluation of the ability to measure the ESD, a calibration curve for the nanoDot OSL dosimeter was determined in which the air kerma and/or the ESD measured with an ionization chamber were used as references. As a result, we found that the calibration curve for the air kerma was determined with an accuracy of 5 %. Furthermore, the calibration curve was applied to the ESD estimation. The accuracy of the ESD obtained was estimated to be 15 %. The origin of these uncertainties was examined based on published papers and Monte-Carlo simulation. Most of the uncertainties were caused by the systematic uncertainty of the reading system and the differences in efficiency corresponding to different X-ray energies.

  12. Calibration of the Al2O3:C optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signal for linear energy transfer (LET) measurements in therapeutic proton beams.

    PubMed

    Granville, Dal A; Sahoo, Narayan; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O

    2014-08-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) detectors (OSLDs) have shown potential for measurements of linear energy transfer (LET) in proton therapy beams. However, the technique lacks the efficiency needed for clinical implementation, and a faster, simpler approach to LET measurements is desirable. The goal of this work was to demonstrate and evaluate the potential of calibrating Al2O3:C OSLDs for LET measurements using new methods. We exposed batches of OSLDs to unmodulated proton beams of varying LET and calibrated three parameters of the resulting OSL signals as functions of fluence-averaged LET (ϕ-LET) and dose-averaged LET (D-LET). These three parameters included the OSL curve shape evaluated under continuous wave stimulation (CW-OSL), the OSL curve shape evaluated under pulsed stimulation (P-OSL), and the intensity ratio of the two main emission bands in the Al2O3:C OSL emission spectrum (ultraviolet [UV]/blue ratio). To test the calibration, we then irradiated new batches of OSLDs in modulated proton beams of varying LET, and used the OSL signal parameters to calculate ϕ-LET and D-LET under these new test conditions. Using the P-OSL curve shape, D-LET was measured within 5.7% of the expected value. We conclude that from a single 10 s readout (following initial calibration), both the absorbed dose and LET in proton therapy beams can be measured using OSLDs. This has potential future applications in the quality assurance of proton therapy treatment plans, particularly for those that may account for LET or relative biological effectiveness in their optimization. The methods demonstrated in this work may also be applicable to other particle therapy beams, including carbon ion beams. PMID:25029434

  13. Practical calibration curve of small-type optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter for evaluation of entrance skin dose in the diagnostic X-ray region.

    PubMed

    Takegami, Kazuki; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Okino, Hiroki; Kimoto, Natsumi; Maehata, Itsumi; Kanazawa, Yuki; Okazaki, Tohru; Kobayashi, Ikuo

    2015-07-01

    For X-ray diagnosis, the proper management of the entrance skin dose (ESD) is important. Recently, a small-type optically stimulated luminescence dosimeter (nanoDot OSL dosimeter) was made commercially available by Landauer, and it is hoped that it will be used for ESD measurements in clinical settings. Our objectives in the present study were to propose a method for calibrating the ESD measured with the nanoDot OSL dosimeter and to evaluate its accuracy. The reference ESD is assumed to be based on an air kerma with consideration of a well-known back scatter factor. We examined the characteristics of the nanoDot OSL dosimeter using two experimental conditions: a free air irradiation to derive the air kerma, and a phantom experiment to determine the ESD. For evaluation of the ability to measure the ESD, a calibration curve for the nanoDot OSL dosimeter was determined in which the air kerma and/or the ESD measured with an ionization chamber were used as references. As a result, we found that the calibration curve for the air kerma was determined with an accuracy of 5 %. Furthermore, the calibration curve was applied to the ESD estimation. The accuracy of the ESD obtained was estimated to be 15 %. The origin of these uncertainties was examined based on published papers and Monte-Carlo simulation. Most of the uncertainties were caused by the systematic uncertainty of the reading system and the differences in efficiency corresponding to different X-ray energies. PMID:25975450

  14. Calibration of the Al2O3:C optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signal for linear energy transfer (LET) measurements in therapeutic proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granville, Dal A.; Sahoo, Narayan; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O.

    2014-08-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) detectors (OSLDs) have shown potential for measurements of linear energy transfer (LET) in proton therapy beams. However, the technique lacks the efficiency needed for clinical implementation, and a faster, simpler approach to LET measurements is desirable. The goal of this work was to demonstrate and evaluate the potential of calibrating Al2O3:C OSLDs for LET measurements using new methods. We exposed batches of OSLDs to unmodulated proton beams of varying LET and calibrated three parameters of the resulting OSL signals as functions of fluence-averaged LET (ϕ-LET) and dose-averaged LET (D-LET). These three parameters included the OSL curve shape evaluated under continuous wave stimulation (CW-OSL), the OSL curve shape evaluated under pulsed stimulation (P-OSL), and the intensity ratio of the two main emission bands in the Al2O3:C OSL emission spectrum (ultraviolet [UV]/blue ratio). To test the calibration, we then irradiated new batches of OSLDs in modulated proton beams of varying LET, and used the OSL signal parameters to calculate ϕ-LET and D-LET under these new test conditions. Using the P-OSL curve shape, D-LET was measured within 5.7% of the expected value. We conclude that from a single 10 s readout (following initial calibration), both the absorbed dose and LET in proton therapy beams can be measured using OSLDs. This has potential future applications in the quality assurance of proton therapy treatment plans, particularly for those that may account for LET or relative biological effectiveness in their optimization. The methods demonstrated in this work may also be applicable to other particle therapy beams, including carbon ion beams.

  15. Progress on developing wavefront sensorless adaptive optics optical coherence tomography for in vivo retinal imaging in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zam, Azhar; Zhang, Pengfei; Jian, Yifan; Sarunic, Marinko V.; Bonora, Stefano; Pugh, Edward N.; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2015-03-01

    We present a new design for a wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WS-AO) Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) system for small animal retinal imaging in vivo. Without the optical complications necessary for inclusion of a wavefront sensor in the optical system, this version of WS-AO FD-OCT system has a simplified optical design, including elimination of long focal length scanning optics and optical conjugation of vertical and horizontal scanners. This modification provides a modular large Field of View for retinal screening (25 degree visual angle), while also allowing a "zoom" capability for allocating all the scanning resources to a smaller region of interest, allowing high resolution aberration-corrected imaging. In the present system we used a 0 Dpt contact lens to stabilize the mouse eye position and to allow long duration imaging. Defocus (axial focus position) in our system is controlled by the collimation of the OCT sample arm entrance beam.

  16. Prime candidate earth targets for the post-launch radiometric calibration of space-based optical imaging instruments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teillet, P.M.; Barsi, J.A.; Chander, G.; Thome, K.J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive list of prime candidate terrestrial targets for consideration as benchmark sites for the post-launch radiometric calibration of space-based instruments. The key characteristics of suitable sites are outlined primarily with respect to selection criteria, spatial uniformity, and temporal stability. The establishment and utilization of such benchmark sites is considered an important element of the radiometric traceability of satellite image data products for use in the accurate monitoring of environmental change.

  17. Carboplatin is effective therapy for young children with progressive optic pathway tumors: a Pediatric Oncology Group phase II study.

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, D. H.; Cohen, M. E.; Friedman, H. S.; Kepner, J. L.; Gemer, L.; Langston, J. W.; James, H. E.; Duffner, P. K.; Kun, L. E.

    2000-01-01

    The Pediatric Oncology Group conducted a phase II study to evaluate the activity of carboplatin in children 5 years or younger with progressive optic pathway tumors (OPTs). Of the 51 patients accrued to this study, 1 was not eligible because the child was older than 6 years. Fifty patients were eligible and had either neuro-imaging or symptomatic evidence of progressive OPTs. Twenty-one of 50 had evidence of neurofibromatosis type I (NF-1). Therapy consisted of carboplatin 560 mg/m2 at 4-week intervals. Patients with stable disease or better after two courses were continued on therapy for 18 months or until progressive disease. Of the 50 eligible children, 39 had stable disease or better, and 34 completed the 18-month therapy. Our data are sufficient to conclude that the proportion of objective responses (complete, partial, or minor response or stable disease) exceeded 30% (P < 0.00001), and the approximate 95% confidence interval estimate of the objective response rate was 0.665 to 0.895. Twenty-one patients went off protocol because of progressive disease. Fifteen patients progressed during the 18-month therapy, and 6 patients progressed after completing therapy. Six children died with progressive disease. Major toxicities were neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, and 3 children experienced allergic reactions. Carboplatin is active and safe for the treatment of young children with progressive OPTs. The addition of other potentially active drugs may further increase the event-free survival for these children. PMID:11265230

  18. Lidar Calibration Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Freudenthaler, Volker; Nicolae, Doina; Mona, Lucia; Belegante, Livio; D'Amico, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the newly established Lidar Calibration Centre, a distributed infrastructure in Europe, whose goal is to offer services for complete characterization and calibration of lidars and ceilometers. Mobile reference lidars, laboratories for testing and characterization of optics and electronics, facilities for inspection and debugging of instruments, as well as for training in good practices are open to users from the scientific community, operational services and private sector. The Lidar Calibration Centre offers support for trans-national access through the EC HORIZON2020 project ACTRIS-2.

  19. Reverse propagation and negative angular momentum density flux of an optical nondiffracting nonparaxial fractional Bessel vortex beam of progressive waves.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2016-09-01

    Energy and angular momentum flux density characteristics of an optical nondiffracting nonparaxial vector Bessel vortex beam of fractional order are examined based on the dual-field method for the generation of symmetric electric and magnetic fields. Should some conditions determined by the polarization state, the half-cone angle as well as the beam-order (or topological charge) be met, the axial energy and angular momentum flux densities vanish (representing Poynting singularities), before they become negative. These negative counterintuitive properties suggest retrograde (negative) propagation as well as a rotation reversal of the angular momentum with respect to the beam handedness. These characteristics of nondiffracting nonparaxial Bessel fractional vortex beams of progressive waves open new capabilities in optical tractor beam tweezers, optical spanners, invisibility cloaks, optically engineered metamaterials, and other applications. PMID:27607486

  20. Reverse propagation and negative angular momentum density flux of an optical nondiffracting nonparaxial fractional Bessel vortex beam of progressive waves.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G

    2016-09-01

    Energy and angular momentum flux density characteristics of an optical nondiffracting nonparaxial vector Bessel vortex beam of fractional order are examined based on the dual-field method for the generation of symmetric electric and magnetic fields. Should some conditions determined by the polarization state, the half-cone angle as well as the beam-order (or topological charge) be met, the axial energy and angular momentum flux densities vanish (representing Poynting singularities), before they become negative. These negative counterintuitive properties suggest retrograde (negative) propagation as well as a rotation reversal of the angular momentum with respect to the beam handedness. These characteristics of nondiffracting nonparaxial Bessel fractional vortex beams of progressive waves open new capabilities in optical tractor beam tweezers, optical spanners, invisibility cloaks, optically engineered metamaterials, and other applications.

  1. Progress in studies of Electron-Cloud-Induced Optics Distortions at CESRTA

    SciTech Connect

    Crittenden, J.A.; Calvey, J.R.; Dugan, G.F.; Kreinick, D.L.; Leong, Z.; Livezey, J.A.; Palmer, M.A.; Rubin, D.L; Sagan, D.C.; Holtzapple, R.L.; Furman, M.A.; Penn, G.; Venturini, M.; Pivi, M.; Wang, L.; Harkay, K.

    2010-05-23

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) program has included extensive measurements of coherent betatron tune shifts for a variety of electron and positron beam energies, bunch population levels, and bunch train configurations. The tune shifts have been shown to result primarily from the interaction of the beam with the space-charge field of the beam-induced lowenergy electron cloud in the vacuum chamber. Comparison to several advanced electron cloud simulation program packages has allowed determination of the sensitivity of these measurements to physical parameters characterizing the synchrotron radiation flux, the production of photoelectrons on the vacuum chamberwall, the beam emittance, lattice optics,and the secondary-electron yield model. We report on progress in understanding the cloud buildup and decay mechanisms in magnetic fields and in field-free regions, addressing quantitatively the precise determination of the physical parameters of the modeling. Validation of these models will serve as essential input in the design of damping rings for future high-energy linear colliders.

  2. Progress in Studies of Electron-Cloud-Induced Optics Distortions at CesrTA

    SciTech Connect

    Crittenden, James; Calvey, Joseph; Dugan, Gerald; Kreinick, David; Leong, Zhidong; Livezey, Jesse; Palmer, Mark; Rubin, David; Sagan, David; Furman, Miguel; Penn, Gregory; Venturini, Marco; Harkay, Katherine; Holtzapple, Robert; Pivi, Mauro; Wang, Lanfa; /SLAC

    2012-06-25

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) program has included extensive measurements of coherent betatron tune shifts for a variety of electron and positron beam energies, bunch population levels, and bunch train configurations. The tune shifts have been shown to result primarily from the interaction of the beam with the space-charge field of the beam-induced low-energy electron cloud in the vacuum chamber. Comparison to several advanced electron cloud simulation codes has allowed determination of the sensitivity of these measurements to physical parameters characterizing the synchrotron radiation flux, the production of photo-electrons on the vacuum chamber wall, the beam emittance, lattice optics, and the secondary-electron yield model. We report on progress in understanding the cloud buildup and decay mechanisms in magnetic fields and in field-free regions, addressing quantitatively the precise determination of the physical parameters of the modeling. Validation of these models will serve as essential input in the design of damping rings for future high-energy linear colliders.

  3. Raman spectroscopic measurements of CO2 density: Experimental calibration with high-pressure optical cell (HPOC) and fused silica capillary capsule (FSCC) with application to fluid inclusion observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, X.; Chou, I.-Ming; Hu, W.; Burruss, R.C.; Sun, Q.; Song, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful method for the determination of CO2 densities in fluid inclusions, especially for those with small size and/or low fluid density. The relationship between CO2 Fermi diad split (??, cm-1) and CO2 density (??, g/cm3) has been documented by several previous studies. However, significant discrepancies exist among these studies mainly because of inconsistent calibration procedures and lack of measurements for CO2 fluids having densities between 0.21 and 0.75g/cm3, where liquid and vapor phases coexist near room temperature.In this study, a high-pressure optical cell and fused silica capillary capsules were used to prepare pure CO2 samples with densities between 0.0472 and 1.0060g/cm3. The measured CO2 Fermi diad splits were calibrated with two well established Raman bands of benzonitrile at 1192.6 and 1598.9cm-1. The relationship between the CO2 Fermi diad split and density can be represented by: ??=47513.64243-1374.824414????+13.25586152????2-0.04258891551????3 (r2=0.99835, ??=0.0253g/cm3), and this relationship was tested by synthetic fluid inclusions and natural CO2-rich fluid inclusions. The effects of temperature and the presence of H2O and CH4 on this relationship were also examined. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. The Optics and Alignment of the Divergent Beam Laboratory X-ray Powder Diffractometer and its Calibration Using NIST Standard Reference Materials

    PubMed Central

    Cline, James P.; Mendenhall, Marcus H.; Black, David; Windover, Donald; Henins, Albert

    2015-01-01

    The laboratory X-ray powder diffractometer is one of the primary analytical tools in materials science. It is applicable to nearly any crystalline material, and with advanced data analysis methods, it can provide a wealth of information concerning sample character. Data from these machines, however, are beset by a complex aberration function that can be addressed through calibration with the use of NIST Standard Reference Materials (SRMs). Laboratory diffractometers can be set up in a range of optical geometries; considered herein are those of Bragg-Brentano divergent beam configuration using both incident and diffracted beam monochromators. We review the origin of the various aberrations affecting instruments of this geometry and the methods developed at NIST to align these machines in a first principles context. Data analysis methods are considered as being in two distinct categories: those that use empirical methods to parameterize the nature of the data for subsequent analysis, and those that use model functions to link the observation directly to a specific aspect of the experiment. We consider a multifaceted approach to instrument calibration using both the empirical and model based data analysis methods. The particular benefits of the fundamental parameters approach are reviewed. PMID:26958446

  5. Ultrasound-Guided Diffuse Optical Tomography for Predicting and Monitoring Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy of Breast Cancers: Recent Progress

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chen; Vavadi, Hamed; Merkulov, Alex; Li, Hai; Erfanzadeh, Mohsen; Mostafa, Atahar; Gong, Yanping; Salehi, Hassan; Tannenbaum, Susan; Zhu, Quing

    2016-01-01

    In this manuscript, we review the current progress of utilizing ultrasound-guided diffuse optical tomography (US-guided DOT) for predicting and monitoring neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) outcomes of breast cancer patients. We also report the recent advance on optical tomography systems toward portable and robust clinical use at multiple clinical sites. The first patient who has been closely monitored before NAC, at day 2, day 8, end of first three cycles of NAC, and before surgery is given as an example to demonstrate the potential of US-guided DOT technique. PMID:25887527

  6. Vibrational and optical properties of amorphous metals: Progress report and projected research, July 1, 1988--June 20, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Lannin, J.S.

    1989-02-01

    This report covers progress and projected research in vibrational and optical properties of amorphous metals. Topics covered are: the setup and initiation of thin film deposition and analysis capabilities in ultrahigh vaccuum, Auger and LPS measurements on ion bombarded films of a-Ni/sub 95/Tb/sub 5/ films that have been studied by diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering measurements, and Raman scattering measurements on crystalline NiSi/sub 2/metals. (JL)

  7. A high sensitivity fiber optic macro-bend based gas flow rate transducer for low flow rates: Theory, working principle, and static calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Schena, Emiliano; Saccomandi, Paola; Silvestri, Sergio

    2013-02-15

    A novel fiber optic macro-bend based gas flowmeter for low flow rates is presented. Theoretical analysis of the sensor working principle, design, and static calibration were performed. The measuring system consists of: an optical fiber, a light emitting diode (LED), a Quadrant position sensitive Detector (QD), and an analog electronic circuit for signal processing. The fiber tip undergoes a deflection in the flow, acting like a cantilever. The consequent displacement of light spot center is monitored by the QD generating four unbalanced photocurrents which are function of fiber tip position. The analog electronic circuit processes the photocurrents providing voltage signal proportional to light spot position. A circular target was placed on the fiber in order to increase the sensing surface. Sensor, tested in the measurement range up to 10 l min{sup -1}, shows a discrimination threshold of 2 l min{sup -1}, extremely low fluid dynamic resistance (0.17 Pa min l{sup -1}), and high sensitivity, also at low flow rates (i.e., 33 mV min l{sup -1} up to 4 l min{sup -1} and 98 mV min l{sup -1} from 4 l min{sup -1} up to 10 l min{sup -1}). Experimental results agree with the theoretical predictions. The high sensitivity, along with the reduced dimension and negligible pressure drop, makes the proposed transducer suitable for medical applications in neonatal ventilation.

  8. A high sensitivity fiber optic macro-bend based gas flow rate transducer for low flow rates: Theory, working principle, and static calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schena, Emiliano; Saccomandi, Paola; Silvestri, Sergio

    2013-02-01

    A novel fiber optic macro-bend based gas flowmeter for low flow rates is presented. Theoretical analysis of the sensor working principle, design, and static calibration were performed. The measuring system consists of: an optical fiber, a light emitting diode (LED), a Quadrant position sensitive Detector (QD), and an analog electronic circuit for signal processing. The fiber tip undergoes a deflection in the flow, acting like a cantilever. The consequent displacement of light spot center is monitored by the QD generating four unbalanced photocurrents which are function of fiber tip position. The analog electronic circuit processes the photocurrents providing voltage signal proportional to light spot position. A circular target was placed on the fiber in order to increase the sensing surface. Sensor, tested in the measurement range up to 10 l min-1, shows a discrimination threshold of 2 l min-1, extremely low fluid dynamic resistance (0.17 Pa min l-1), and high sensitivity, also at low flow rates (i.e., 33 mV min l-1 up to 4 l min-1 and 98 mV min l-1 from 4 l min-1 up to 10 l min-1). Experimental results agree with the theoretical predictions. The high sensitivity, along with the reduced dimension and negligible pressure drop, makes the proposed transducer suitable for medical applications in neonatal ventilation.

  9. Committee on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences (CAMOS). Technical progress report and continuation proposal, February 1, 1992--January 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The Committee on Atomic, Molecular and Optical Sciences (CAMOS) of the National Research Council (NRC) is charged with monitoring the health of the field of atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) science in the United States. Accordingly, the Committee identifies and examines both broad and specific issues affecting the field. Regular meetings, teleconferences, briefings from agencies and the scientific community, the formation of study panels to prepare reports, and special symposia are among the mechanisms used by the CAMOS to meet its charge. This progress report presents a review of CAMOS activities from February 1, 1992 to January 31, 1993. This report also includes the status of activities associated with the CAMOS study on the field that is being conducted by the Panel on the Future of Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences (FAMOS).

  10. Doppler-free two-photon absorption spectroscopy of rovibronic transition of naphthalene calibrated with an optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, A.; Nakashima, K.; Matsuba, A.; Misono, M.

    2015-12-01

    We performed Doppler-free two-photon absorption spectroscopy of naphthalene using an optical frequency comb as a frequency reference. Rotationally resolved rovibronic spectra were observed, and absolute frequencies of the rovibronic transitions were determined with an uncertainty of several tens of kHz. The resolution and precision of our system are finer than the natural width of naphthalene. We assigned 1466 lines of the Q (Ka) Q (J) transition and calculated molecular constants. We attribute systematic spectral line shifts to the Coriolis interaction, and discuss the origin of the spectral linewidths.

  11. NVLAP calibration laboratory program

    SciTech Connect

    Cigler, J.L.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the progress up to April 1993 in the development of the Calibration Laboratories Accreditation Program within the framework of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

  12. Gemini facility calibration unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay-Howat, Suzanne K.; Harris, John W.; Gostick, David C.; Laidlaw, Ken; Kidd, Norrie; Strachan, Mel; Wilson, Ken

    2000-08-01

    High-quality, efficient calibration instruments is a pre- requisite for the modern observatory. Each of the Gemini telescopes will be equipped with identical facility calibration units (GCALs) designed to provide wavelength and flat-field calibrations for the suite of instruments. The broad range of instrumentation planned for the telescopes heavily constrains the design of GCAL. Short calibration exposures are required over wavelengths from 0.3micrometers to 5micrometers , field sizes up to 7 arcminutes and spectral resolution from R-5 to 50,000. The output from GCAL must mimic the f-16 beam of the telescope and provide a uniform illumination of the focal plane. The calibration units are mounted on the Gemini Instrument Support Structure, two meters from the focal pane, necessitating the use of large optical components. We will discuss the opto-mechanical design of the Gemini calibration unit, with reference to those feature which allow these stringent requirements to be met. A novel reflector/diffuser unit replaces the integration sphere more normally found in calibration systems. The efficiency of this system is an order of magnitude greater than for an integration sphere. A system of two off-axis mirrors reproduces the telescope pupil and provides the 7 foot focal plane. The results of laboratory test of the uniformity and throughput of the GCAL will be presented.

  13. Progress toward unprecedented imaging of stellar surfaces with the Navy precision optical interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, A. M.; Mozurkewich, D.; Schmitt, H. R.; van Belle, G. T.; Hutter, D. J.; Clark, J.; Armstrong, J. T.; Baines, E. K.; Newman, K.; Landavazo, M.; Sun, B.; Restaino, S. R.

    2014-07-01

    We present progress on the stellar surface imaging project recently funded by the U. S. National Science Foun- dation. With the unique layout of the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI) in combination with data acquisition and fringe-tracking upgrades we expect to be able to substantially exceed the imaging fidelity and resolution of any other interferometer in operation. The project combines several existing advances and infras- tructure at NPOI with modest enhancements. For optimal imaging there are several requirements that should be fulfilled. The observatory should be capable of measuring visibilities on a wide range of baseline lengths and orientations, providing complete Fourier (UV) coverage in a short period of time. It should measure visibility amplitudes with good SNR on all baselines as critical imaging information is often contained in low-amplitude visibilities. It should measure the visibility phase on all baselines. The technologies which can achieve this are the NPOI Y-shaped array with (nearly) equal spacing between telescopes and an ability for rapid configuration. Placing 6-telescopes in a row makes it possible to measure visibilities into the 4th lobe of the visibility function. By arranging the 12 available telescopes carefully we can switch, every few days, between 6 different 6-station chains which provide symmetric coverage in the Fourier plane without moving any telescopes, only by moving beam relay mirrors. The 6-station chains are important to achieve the highest imaging resolution, and switching rapidly between station chains provides uniform coverage. Coherent integration techniques can be used to obtain good SNR on very small visibilities. Coherently integrated visibilities can be used for imaging with standard radio imaging packages such as AIPS. The commissioning of one additional station, the use of new data acqui- sition hardware and fringe tracking algorithms are the enhancements which are making this project a reality

  14. Preflight Calibration Test Results for Optical Navigation Camera Telescope (ONC-T) Onboard the Hayabusa2 Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameda, S.; Suzuki, H.; Takamatsu, T.; Cho, Y.; Yasuda, T.; Yamada, M.; Sawada, H.; Honda, R.; Morota, T.; Honda, C.; Sato, M.; Okumura, Y.; Shibasaki, K.; Ikezawa, S.; Sugita, S.

    2016-05-01

    The optical navigation camera telescope (ONC-T) is a telescopic framing camera with seven colors onboard the Hayabusa2 spacecraft launched on December 3, 2014. The main objectives of this instrument are to optically navigate the spacecraft to asteroid Ryugu and to conduct multi-band mapping the asteroid. We conducted performance tests of the instrument before its installation on the spacecraft. We evaluated the dark current and bias level, obtained data on the dependency of the dark current on the temperature of the charge-coupled device (CCD). The bias level depends strongly on the temperature of the electronics package but only weakly on the CCD temperature. The dark-reference data, which is obtained simultaneously with observation data, can be used for estimation of the dark current and bias level. A long front hood is used for ONC-T to reduce the stray light at the expense of flatness in the peripheral area of the field of view (FOV). The central area in FOV has a flat sensitivity, and the limb darkening has been measured with an integrating sphere. The ONC-T has a wheel with seven bandpass filters and a panchromatic glass window. We measured the spectral sensitivity using an integrating sphere and obtained the sensitivity of all the pixels. We also measured the point-spread function using a star simulator. Measurement results indicate that the full width at half maximum is less than two pixels for all the bandpass filters and in the temperature range expected in the mission phase except for short periods of time during touchdowns.

  15. Optical system for the calibration and verification of correct axis positioning in medium-big sized milling boring machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocellin, M.; Fedel, M.; Cocola, L.; Casarin, R.; Poletto, L.

    2015-05-01

    An optical system for the automatic recalibration of large machine tools during the machining process has been developed. The system provides an error signal during operation in order to compensate for structural deformations of axis and sliding parts. Those signals are used to reach a global positioning error below 50 microns on 3-axis translation stages, having range of several meters. One collimated diode laser beam has been mounted to the machining table reference system. Three resistive-type 2D-position-sensing devices are used to locate the beam on each axis. Before the first two sensors in the optical path, the beam is split by a wedge pentaprism in two secondary beams. The first one propagates linearly along the sensor for the displacement measurement. The second one is deflected with a fixed 90° angle and defines the sampling direction of the next axis. By duplicating the system using a second pentaprism on the latter deflected beam, three axis are monitored. In order to avoid any active electronic devises on the milling head, a passive corner cube is placed on the side of the head. Laser beam is then back reflected on a final position-sensitive sensor mounted in proximity of the second pentaprism. Additional channels consisting in laser beams back-reflected by mirrors on similar position sensing devices were used to acquire angular measurements as well. The tests performed on the prototype demonstrate the capability of mapping the actual deviations from the ideal linear translation with an error of 25 um along the full axis travel.

  16. Design and progress toward a multi-conjugate adaptive optics system for distributed aberration correction

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K; Olivier, S; Tucker, J; Silva, D; Gavel, D; Lim, R; Gratrix, E

    2004-08-17

    This article investigates the use of a multi-conjugate adaptive optics system to improve the field-of-view for the system. The emphasis of this research is to develop techniques to improve the performance of optical systems with applications to horizontal imaging. The design and wave optics simulations of the proposed system are given. Preliminary results from the multi-conjugate adaptive optics system are also presented. The experimental system utilizes a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator and an interferometric wave-front sensor for correction and sensing of the phase aberrations, respectively.

  17. Tracking radiometric responsivity of optical sensors without on-board calibration systems-case of the Chinese HJ-1A/1B CCD sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Chen, Xiaoling; Tian, Liqiao; Feng, Lian

    2015-01-26

    The radiometric stability of satellite sensors is crucial for generating highly consistent remote sensing measurements and products. We have presented a radiometric responsivity tracking method designed especially for optical sensors without on-board calibration systems. Using a temporally stable desert site with high reflectance, the sensor responsivity was simulated using the Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) radiative transfer model (RTM) with information from validated MODIS atmospheric data. Next, radiometric responsivity drifting was identified using a linear regression of the time series bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) normalized coefficients. The proposed method was applied to Chinese HJ-1A/1B charge-coupled device (CCD) sensors, which have been on-orbit operations for more than 5 years without continuous assessment of their radiometric performance. Results from the Dunhuang desert site between 2008 and 2013 indicated that the CCD sensors degraded at various rates, with the most significant degradation occurring in the blue bands, ranging from 2.8% to 4.2% yr-1. The red bands were more stable, with a degradation rate of 0.7-3.1% yr-1. A cross-sensor comparison revealed the least degradation for the HJ-1A CCD1 (blue: 2.8%; green: 2.8%; red: 0.7%; and NIR: 0.9% yr-1), whereas the degradation of HJ-1B CCD1 was most pronounced (blue: 3.5%; green: 4.1%; red: 2.3%; and NIR: 3.4% yr-1). The uncertainties of the method were evaluated theoretically based on the propagation of uncertainties from all possible sources of the RT simulations. In addition, a cross comparison with matchup ground-based absolute calibration results was conducted. The comparison demonstrated that the method was useful for continuously monitoring the radiometric performance of remote sensors, such as HJ-1A/1B CCD and GaoFen (GF) series (China's latest high-definition Earth observation

  18. Transferring diffractive optics from research to commercial applications: Part I - progress in the patent landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Robert

    2013-12-01

    In the last 20 years, diffractive optics experienced a strong research interest and was in the center of many development projects in applied optics. To offer a side view for optical engineers, here, we discuss selected, business-related aspects of the current status of the transfer process to bring diffractive optics into commercial products. The contribution is divided into two parts. Here, in part I, we focus on the patent landscape of diffractive optics with a closer look on the temporal development and the distribution over main players. As an important result, currently, new strong patent activities are observed especially in the context of imaging systems. In the second part, the business volumes of selected market segments are discussed.

  19. Submicrometer fiber-optic chemical sensors: Measuring pH inside single cells. Progress report, October 1990--August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kopelman, R.

    1993-12-01

    Starting from scratch, we went in two and a half years to 0.04 micron optical microscopy resolution. We have demonstrated the application of near-field scanning optical microscopy to DNA samples and opened the new fields of near-field scanning spectroscopy and submicron opto- chemical sensors. All of these developments have been important steps towards in-situ DNA imaging and characterization on the nanoscale. Our first goal was to make NSOM (near-field scanning optical microscopy) a working enterprise, capable of ``zooming-in`` towards a sample and imaging with a resolution exceeding that of traditional microscopy by a factor of ten. This has been achieved. Not only do we have a resolution of about 40 nm but we can image a 1 {times} 1 micron object in less than 10 seconds. Furthermore, the NSOM is a practical instrument. The tips survive for days or weeks of scanning and new methods of force feedback will soon protect the most fragile samples. Reproducible images of metal gratings, gold particles, dye balls (for calibration) and of several DNA samples have been made, proving the practicality of our approach. We also give highly resolved Force/NSOM images of human blood cells. Our second goal has been to form molecular optics (e.g., exciton donor) tips with a resolution of 2--10 nm for molecular excitation microscopy (MEM). We have produced such tips, and scanned with them, but only with a resolution comparable to that of our standard NSOM tips. However, we have demonstrated their potential for high resolution imaging capabilities: (1) An energy transfer (tip to sample) based feedback capability. (2) A Kasha (external heavy atom) effect based feedback. In addition, a novel and practical opto-chemical sensor that is a billion times smaller than the best ones available has been developed as well. Finally, we have also performed spatially resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

  20. The use and calibration of read-out streaks to increase the dynamic range of the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. J.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Breeveld, A. A.; Hancock, B.; Holland, S. T.; Marshall, F. E.; Oates, S.; Roming, P. W. A.; Siegel, M. H.; Smith, P. J.; Carter, M.; De Pasquale, M.; Symeonidis, M.; Yershov, V.; Beardmore, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    The dynamic range of photon counting micro-channel-plate (MCP) intensified charged-coupled device (CCD) instruments such as the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) and the XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (XMM-OM) is limited at the bright end by coincidence loss, the superposition of multiple photons in the individual frames recorded by the CCD. Photons which arrive during the brief period in which the image frame is transferred for read out of the CCD are displaced in the transfer direction in the recorded images. For sufficiently bright sources, these displaced counts form read-out streaks. Using UVOT observations of Tycho-2 stars, we investigate the use of these read-out streaks to obtain photometry for sources which are too bright (and hence have too much coincidence loss) for normal aperture photometry to be reliable. For read-out-streak photometry, the bright-source limiting factor is coincidence loss within the MCPs rather than the CCD. We find that photometric measurements can be obtained for stars up to 2.4 mag brighter than the usual full-frame coincidence-loss limit by using the read-out streaks. The resulting bright-limit Vega magnitudes in the UVOT passbands are UVW2 = 8.80, UVM2 = 8.27, UVW1 = 8.86, u = 9.76, b = 10.53, v = 9.31 and White = 11.71; these limits are independent of the windowing mode of the camera. We find that a photometric precision of 0.1 mag can be achieved through read-out streak measurements. A suitable method for the measurement of read-out streaks is described and all necessary calibration factors are given.

  1. Neural networks for calibration tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur

    1993-01-01

    Artificial neural networks are suitable for performing pattern-to-pattern calibrations. These calibrations are potentially useful for facilities operations in aeronautics, the control of optical alignment, and the like. Computed tomography is compared with neural net calibration tomography for estimating density from its x-ray transform. X-ray transforms are measured, for example, in diffuse-illumination, holographic interferometry of fluids. Computed tomography and neural net calibration tomography are shown to have comparable performance for a 10 degree viewing cone and 29 interferograms within that cone. The system of tomography discussed is proposed as a relevant test of neural networks and other parallel processors intended for using flow visualization data.

  2. First Steps Toward Ultrasound-Based Motion Compensation for Imaging and Therapy: Calibration with an Optical System and 4D PET Imaging.

    PubMed

    Schwaab, Julia; Kurz, Christopher; Sarti, Cristina; Bongers, André; Schoenahl, Frédéric; Bert, Christoph; Debus, Jürgen; Parodi, Katia; Jenne, Jürgen Walter

    2015-01-01

    Target motion, particularly in the abdomen, due to respiration or patient movement is still a challenge in many diagnostic and therapeutic processes. Hence, methods to detect and compensate this motion are required. Diagnostic ultrasound (US) represents a non-invasive and dose-free alternative to fluoroscopy, providing more information about internal target motion than respiration belt or optical tracking. The goal of this project is to develop an US-based motion tracking for real-time motion correction in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging, notably in 4D positron emission tomography (PET). In this work, a workflow is established to enable the transformation of US tracking data to the coordinates of the treatment delivery or imaging system - even if the US probe is moving due to respiration. It is shown that the US tracking signal is equally adequate for 4D PET image reconstruction as the clinically used respiration belt and provides additional opportunities in this concern. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the US probe being within the PET field of view generally has no relevant influence on the image quality. The accuracy and precision of all the steps in the calibration workflow for US tracking-based 4D PET imaging are found to be in an acceptable range for clinical implementation. Eventually, we show in vitro that an US-based motion tracking in absolute room coordinates with a moving US transducer is feasible. PMID:26649277

  3. First Steps Toward Ultrasound-Based Motion Compensation for Imaging and Therapy: Calibration with an Optical System and 4D PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Schwaab, Julia; Kurz, Christopher; Sarti, Cristina; Bongers, André; Schoenahl, Frédéric; Bert, Christoph; Debus, Jürgen; Parodi, Katia; Jenne, Jürgen Walter

    2015-01-01

    Target motion, particularly in the abdomen, due to respiration or patient movement is still a challenge in many diagnostic and therapeutic processes. Hence, methods to detect and compensate this motion are required. Diagnostic ultrasound (US) represents a non-invasive and dose-free alternative to fluoroscopy, providing more information about internal target motion than respiration belt or optical tracking. The goal of this project is to develop an US-based motion tracking for real-time motion correction in radiation therapy and diagnostic imaging, notably in 4D positron emission tomography (PET). In this work, a workflow is established to enable the transformation of US tracking data to the coordinates of the treatment delivery or imaging system – even if the US probe is moving due to respiration. It is shown that the US tracking signal is equally adequate for 4D PET image reconstruction as the clinically used respiration belt and provides additional opportunities in this concern. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the US probe being within the PET field of view generally has no relevant influence on the image quality. The accuracy and precision of all the steps in the calibration workflow for US tracking-based 4D PET imaging are found to be in an acceptable range for clinical implementation. Eventually, we show in vitro that an US-based motion tracking in absolute room coordinates with a moving US transducer is feasible. PMID:26649277

  4. Research Progress on F-P Interference-Based Fiber-Optic Sensors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi Wen; Tao, Jin; Huang, Xu Guang

    2016-01-01

    We review our works on Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometric fiber-optic sensors with various applications. We give a general model of F-P interferometric optical fiber sensors including diffraction loss caused by the beam divergence and the Gouy phase shift. Based on different structures of an F-P cavity formed on the end of a single-mode fiber, the F-P interferometric optical sensor has been extended to measurements of the refractive index (RI) of liquids and solids, temperature as well as small displacement. The RI of liquids and solids can be obtained by monitoring the fringe contrast related to Fresnel reflections, while the ambient temperature and small displacement can be obtained by monitoring the wavelength shift of the interference fringes. The F-P interferometric fiber-optic sensors can be used for many scientific and technological applications. PMID:27598173

  5. Research Progress on F-P Interference-Based Fiber-Optic Sensors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi Wen; Tao, Jin; Huang, Xu Guang

    2016-09-03

    We review our works on Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometric fiber-optic sensors with various applications. We give a general model of F-P interferometric optical fiber sensors including diffraction loss caused by the beam divergence and the Gouy phase shift. Based on different structures of an F-P cavity formed on the end of a single-mode fiber, the F-P interferometric optical sensor has been extended to measurements of the refractive index (RI) of liquids and solids, temperature as well as small displacement. The RI of liquids and solids can be obtained by monitoring the fringe contrast related to Fresnel reflections, while the ambient temperature and small displacement can be obtained by monitoring the wavelength shift of the interference fringes. The F-P interferometric fiber-optic sensors can be used for many scientific and technological applications.

  6. Research Progress on F-P Interference—Based Fiber-Optic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi Wen; Tao, Jin; Huang, Xu Guang

    2016-01-01

    We review our works on Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometric fiber-optic sensors with various applications. We give a general model of F-P interferometric optical fiber sensors including diffraction loss caused by the beam divergence and the Gouy phase shift. Based on different structures of an F-P cavity formed on the end of a single-mode fiber, the F-P interferometric optical sensor has been extended to measurements of the refractive index (RI) of liquids and solids, temperature as well as small displacement. The RI of liquids and solids can be obtained by monitoring the fringe contrast related to Fresnel reflections, while the ambient temperature and small displacement can be obtained by monitoring the wavelength shift of the interference fringes. The F-P interferometric fiber-optic sensors can be used for many scientific and technological applications. PMID:27598173

  7. ONU power saving modes in next generation optical access networks: progress, efficiency and challenges.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Abhishek; Lannoo, Bart; Colle, Didier; Pickavet, Mario; Demeester, Piet

    2012-12-10

    The optical network unit (ONU), installed at a customer's premises, accounts for about 60% of power in current fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) networks. We propose a power consumption model for the ONU and evaluate the ONU power consumption in various next generation optical access (NGOA) architectures. Further, we study the impact of the power savings of the ONU in various low power modes such as power shedding, doze and sleep.

  8. Internet Cognitive Failure and Fatigue Relevant to Learners' Self-Regulation and Learning Progress in English Vocabulary with a Calibration Scheme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, J.-C.; Hwang, M.-Y.; Chang, H.-W.; Tai, K.-H.; Kuo, Y.-C.; Tsai, Y.-H.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the factors of learning effectiveness in English vocabulary learning when using a calibration scheme, this study developed a freshman English mobile device application (for iPhone 4) for students with low levels of English proficiency to practise vocabulary in the beginning of their Freshman English course. Data were collected and…

  9. Anemometer calibrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bate, T.; Calkins, D. E.; Price, P.; Veikins, O.

    1971-01-01

    Calibrator generates accurate flow velocities over wide range of gas pressure, temperature, and composition. Both pressure and flow velocity can be maintained within 0.25 percent. Instrument is essentially closed loop hydraulic system containing positive displacement drive.

  10. Optical Communication with Semiconductor Laser Diode. Interim Progress Report. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Frederic; Sun, Xiaoli

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental performance limits of a free-space direct detection optical communication system were studied using a semiconductor laser diode as the optical transmitter and a silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) as the receiver photodetector. Optical systems using these components are under consideration as replacements for microwave satellite communication links. Optical pulse position modulation (PPM) was chosen as the signal format. An experimental system was constructed that used an aluminum gallium arsenide semiconductor laser diode as the transmitter and a silicon avalanche photodiode photodetector. The system used Q=4 PPM signaling at a source data rate of 25 megabits per second. The PPM signal format requires regeneration of PPM slot clock and word clock waveforms in the receiver. A nearly exact computational procedure was developed to compute receiver bit error rate without using the Gaussion approximation. A transition detector slot clock recovery system using a phase lock loop was developed and implemented. A novel word clock recovery system was also developed. It was found that the results of the nearly exact computational procedure agreed well with actual measurements of receiver performance. The receiver sensitivity achieved was the closest to the quantum limit yet reported for an optical communication system of this type.

  11. Progress in Design and Construction of the Optical Communications Laser Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, K. E.; Britcliffe, M.; Golshan, N.

    1999-01-01

    The deployment of advanced hyperspectral imaging and other Earth sensing instruments on board Earth observing satellites is driving the demand for high-data-rate communications. Optical communications meet the required data rates with small, low mass, and low-power communications packages. JPL, as NASA's lead center in optical communications, plans to construct a 1-m Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) at its Table Mountain Facility (TMF) complex in the San Gabriel Mountains of Southern California. The design of the building has been completed, and the construction contractor has been selected. Ground breaking is expected to start at the beginning of the 1999 TMF construction season. A request for proposal (RFP) has been issued for the procurement of the telescope system. Prior to letting the RFP we conducted a request for information with industry for the telescope system. Several vendors responded favorably and provided information on key elements of the proposed design. These inputs were considered in developing the final requirements in the RFP. Keywords: Free space optical communications, lasercom, telescopes, ground stations, adaptive optics, astrometry, Table Mountain Facility

  12. Progress in miniaturization of a multichannel optical fiber Bragg grating sensor interrogator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopatin, Craig M.; Mahmood, Shah; Mendoza, Edgar; Moslehi, Behzad; Black, Richard; Chau, Kelvin; Oblea, Levy

    2007-07-01

    An effort to develop a miniaturized multichannel optical fiber Bragg grating sensor interrogator was initiated in 2006 under the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program. The goal was to develop an interrogator that would be sufficiently small and light to be incorporated into a health monitoring system for use on tactical missiles. Two companies, Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) and Redondo Optics, were funded in Phase I, and this paper describes the prototype interrogators that were developed. The two companies took very different approaches: IFOS focused on developing a unit that would have a high channel count and high resolution, using off-the-shelf components, while Redondo Optics chose to develop a unit that would be very small and lightweight, using custom designed integrated optical chips. It is believed that both approaches will result in interrogators that will be significantly small, lighter, and possibly even more precise than what is currently commercially available. This paper will also briefly describe some of the sensing concepts that may be used to interrogate the health of the solid rocket motors used in many missile systems. The sponsor of this program was NAVAIR PMA 280.

  13. Optical effects of the operation of the onboard engine of the Progress M-17M spacecraft at thermospheric heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhalev, A. V.; Khakhinov, V. V.; Beletskii, A. B.; Lebedev, V. P.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents the results of optical observations in the active space experiment "Radar-Progress" on April 17, 2013, after switching on the approach-correction engine of the Progress M-17M cargo spacecraft at thermospheric heights (412 km), are presented in this paper. During engine operation, a region of enhanced emission intensity has been recorded. It was presumably related to the scatter of twilight solar emission at the engine exhausts in the cargo spacecraft orbit and, probably to the occurrence of an additional emission in the atomic oxygen line [OI] 630 nm. The maximum observed dimensions of the emission region were ~350 and ~250 km along the orbit and across it, respectively. The velocity of the expansion of the emission region at the first moments after the initiation of engine operation was ~7 and ~3.5 km/s along the orbit and across it, respectively. The maximum intensity of the disturbed region is estimated to be a value equivalent to ~40-60 R within the spectral band of 2 nm. No optical manifestation, which would exceed the natural variations in brightness of the night airglow and which would be related to possible large-scale modification of the ionosphere, was detected in the natural emission lines [O] 557.7 and 630.0 nm in a zone remote from the place of injection of engine exhausts.

  14. Advanced Technology Lunar Telescopes I. Overview and Progress Report On Ultra-Lightweight Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P. C.; Pitts, R. E.; Oliversen, R. J.; Stolarik, J. D.; Segal, K.; Wilson, T. L.; Lin, E. I.; Hull, J. R.; Romeo, R.; Hojaji, H.; Ma, K. B.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chu, W. K.; Chu, C. W.

    1993-12-01

    The materials and technology already exist to build fully functional steerable telescopes for use on the moon, telescopes that are cost effective, that can be deployed using existing launchers, and that can function for extended periods without human maintenance. We describe our concept of advanced technology telescopes (ATT) which combines the elements of i) ultra-lightweight precision optics and structures, ii) non-contact, electronically controlled superconductor bearings and drive mechanisms, and iii) high dynamic range radiation resistant sensors. Unlike previous transit telescope designs, the ATTs can point and track objects anywhere in the sky over the entire lunar night (or day), can be deployed in multiple unit arrays, and can be equipped with standard astronomical instruments including spectrographs, imagers, or even interferometers. We first describe the optics. Lightweight optics are crucial because they minimize the mass of the telescope assembly and its support structure and ultimately the entire payload. By using materials and fabrication technology similar to that already refined by ESA and proven for space applications, we show that it is possible to produce precision optical elements of very low areal density (< 2 kg per sq. m). The process also has much lower per unit cost compared to traditional mirror fabrication techniques. By supporting the optical elements with a class of very lightweight but stiff material already developed by NASA, a telescope assembly can be made that has essentially the minimum possible mass. Such ultra-lightweight construction makes possible astronomical payloads that can be sent to the moon using existing small and medium size rockets. The very low per unit cost permits the production and deployment of multiple units, thereby increasing the versatility and productivity of a lunar observatory while providing good redundancy. We demonstrate a proof-of-concept optical telescope assembly that has a 31 cm diameter primary

  15. Controlling light with freeform optics: recent progress in computational methods for optical design of freeform lenses with prescribed irradiance properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliker, Vladimir I.; Cherkasskiy, Boris

    2014-09-01

    Structural color is produced when nanostructures called schemochromes alter light reflected from a surface through different optic principles, in contrast with other types of colors that are produced when pigments selectively absorb certain wavelengths of light. Research on biogenic photonic nanostructures has focused primarily on bird feathers, butterfly wings and beetle elytra, ignoring other diverse groups such as spiders. We argue that spiders are a good model system to study the functions and evolution of colors in nature for the following reasons. First, these colors clearly function in spiders such as the tarantulas outside of sexual selection, which is likely the dominant driver of the evolution of structural colors in birds and butterflies. Second, within more than 44,000 currently known spider species, colors are used in every possible way based on the same sets of relatively simple materials. Using spiders, we can study how colors evolve to serve different functions under a variety of combinations of driving forces, and how those colors are produced within a relatively simple system. Here, we first review the different color-producing materials and mechanisms (i.e., light absorbing, reflecting and emitting) in birds, butterflies and beetles, the interactions between these different elements, and the functions of colors in different organisms. We then summarize the current state of knowledge of spider colors and compare it with that of birds and insects. We then raise questions including: 1. Could spiders use fluorescence as a mechanism to protect themselves from UV radiation, if they do not have the biosynthetic pathways to produce melanins? 2. What functions could color serve for nearly blind tarantulas? 3. Why are only multilayer nanostructures (thus far) found in spiders, while birds and butterflies use many diverse nanostructures? And, does this limit the diversity of structural colors found in spiders? Answering any of these questions in the future

  16. "Once is Enough" in Radiometric Calibrations.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Gerald T; Gibson, Charles E; Yoon, Howard W; Parr, Albert C

    2007-01-01

    The successful development of an Optical Technology Division quality system for optical radiation measurement services has provided the opportunity to reconsider the existing calibration procedures to improve quality and reduce costs. We have instituted procedures in our calibration programs to eliminate uninformative repetitive measurements by concentrating our efforts on controlling and understanding the measurement process. The first program in our calibration services to undergo these revisions is described in this paper.

  17. Progress in interpreting CO2 lidar signatures to obtain cirrus microphysical and optical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhard, Wynn L.

    1993-01-01

    One cloud/radiation issue at FIRE 2 that has been addressed by the CO2 lidar team is the zenith-enhanced backscatter (ZEB) signature from oriented crystals. A second topic is narrow-beam optical depth measurements using CO2 lidar. This paper describes the theoretical models we have developed for these phenomena and the data-processing algorithms derived from them.

  18. Committee on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences (CAMOS). Technical progress report, [February 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Committee on Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Sciences is a standing committee under the auspices of the Board on Physics and Astronomy, Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications of the National Academy of Sciences -- National Research Council. The atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) sciences represent a broad and diverse field in which much of the research is carried out by small groups. These groups generally have not operated in concert with each other and, prior to the establishment of CAMOS, there was no single committee or organization that accepted the responsibility of monitoring the continuing development and assessing the general public health of the field as a whole. CAMOS has accepted this responsibility and currently provides a focus for the AMO community that is unique and essential. The membership of CAMOS is drawn from research laboratories in universities, industry, and government. Areas of expertise on the committee include atomic physics, molecular science, and optics. A special effort has been made to include a balanced representation from the three subfields. (A roster is attached.) CAMOS has conducted a number of studies related to the health of atomic and molecular science and is well prepared to response to requests for studies on specific issues. This report brief reviews the committee work of progress.

  19. Capillary electrokinetic separations with optical detection. Technical progress report, February 1, 1994--January 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Sepaniak, M.J.

    1995-05-01

    This multifarious research program is dedicated to the development of capillary electrokinetic separation techniques and associated optical methods of detection. Currently, research is directed at three general objectives. First, fundamental studies of pertinent separation and band broadening mechanisms are being conducted, with the emphasis on achieving rapid separations and understanding separation systems that include highly-ordered assemblies as running buffer additives. Second, instrumentation and methodologies associated with these capillary separation techniques are being advanced. Third, applications of these separation and detection systems should fill current voids in the capabilities of capillary separation techniques. In particular, it should be possible to perform rapid, highly efficient, and selective separations of hydrophobic compounds (e.g., higher MW polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and fullerenes), certain optical isomers, DNA fragments, and various pollutants including certain heavy metals.

  20. Progress on the Slumped Glass X-Ray Optics for the International X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre, Robert

    2011-01-01

    NASA has been developing technology for the large area IXO mirror based on precise slumping of glass sheets into parabolic and hyperbolic mirror segments. Recent progress toward attaining the stringent IXO angular resolution requirement and demonstrating technical readiness of the slumped glass technology will be described. This includes a series of X-ray measurements of mirror segment pairs in a flight-like mount. Additionally, the plan for maturing the slumped glass approach over the next several years will be summarized.

  1. Progress and prospects of silicon-based design for optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Weiwei; Peng, Chao; Chang-Hasnain, Connie

    2016-03-01

    The high-speed, high-efficient, compact phase modulator array is indispensable in the Optical-phased array (OPA) which has been considered as a promising technology for realizing flexible and efficient beam steering. In our research, two methods are presented to utilize high-contrast grating (HCG) as high-efficient phase modulator. One is that HCG possesses high-Q resonances that origins from the cancellation of leaky waves. As a result, sharp resonance peaks appear on the reflection spectrum thus HCGs can be utilized as efficient phase shifters. Another is that low-Q mode HCG is utilized as ultra-lightweight mirror. With MEMS technology, small HCG displacement (~50 nm) leads to large phase change (~1.7π). Effective beam steering is achieved in Connie Chang-Hasnian's group. On the other hand, we theoretically and experimentally investigate the system design for silicon-based optical phased array, including the star coupler, phased array, emission elements and far-field patterns. Further, the non-uniform optical phased array is presented.

  2. Evaluation of osteoarthritis progression using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassif, Nader A.; Pierce, Mark C.; Park, B. Hyle; Cense, Barry; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2004-07-01

    Osteoarthritis is a prevalent medical condition that presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to physicians today because of the inability to assess the integrity of the articular cartilage early in the disease. Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) is a high resolution, non-contact imaging modality that provides cross-sectional images with additional information regarding the integrity of the collagen matrix. Using PS-OCT to image provides information regarding thickness of the articular cartilage and gives an index of biochemical changes based on alterations in optical properties (i.e. birefringence) of the tissue. We demonstrate initial experiments performed on specimens collected following total knee replacement surgery. Articular cartilage was imaged using a 1310 nm PS-OCT system where both intensity and phase images were acquired. PS-OCT images were compared with histology, and the changes in tissue optical properties were characterized. Analysis of the intensity images demonstrates differences between healthy and diseased cartilage surface and thickness. Phase maps of the tissue demonstrated distinct differences between healthy and diseased tissue. PS-OCT was able to image a gradual loss of birefringence as the tissue became more diseased. In this way, determining the rate of change of the phase provides a quantitative measure of pathology. Thus, imaging and evaluation of osteoarthritis using PS-OCT can be a useful means of quantitative assessment of the disease.

  3. Development of a slicer integral field unit for the existing optical spectrograph FOCAS: progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Shinobu; Tanaka, Yoko; Hattori, Takashi; Mitsui, Kenji; Fukushima, Mitsuhiro; Okada, Norio; Obuchi, Yoshiyuki; Tsuzuki, Toshihiro; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Yamashita, Takuya

    2014-07-01

    We are developing an integral field unit (IFU) with an image slicer for the existing optical spectrograph, Faint Object Camera And Spectrograph (FOCAS), on the Subaru Telescope. The slice width is 0.43 arcsec, the slice number is 23, and the field of view is 13.5 × 9.89 arcsec2. Sky spectrum separated by about 5.7 arcmin from an object field can be simultaneously obtained, which allows us precise background subtraction. Slice mirrors, pupil mirrors and slit mirrors are all glass, and their mirror surfaces are fabricated by polishing. Our IFU is about 200 mm × 300 mm × 80 mm in size and 1 kg in weight. It is installed into a mask storage in FOCAS along with one or two mask plates, and inserted into the optical path by using the existing mask exchange mechanism. This concept allow us flexible operation such as Targets of Opportunity observations. High reflectivity of multilayer dielectric coatings offers high throughput (>80%) of the IFU. In this paper, we will report a final optical layout, its performances, and results of prototyping works.

  4. Effect of low-addition soft contact lenses with decentered optical design on myopia progression in children: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Fujikado, Takashi; Ninomiya, Sayuri; Kobayashi, Takuma; Suzaki, Asaki; Nakada, Mitsuhiko; Nishida, Kohji

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of low-addition soft contact lenses (CLs) with decentered optical design on the progression of myopia in children in a pilot study. Subjects and methods Twenty-four Japanese children age 10–16 years with baseline myopia of −0.75 to −3.50 D sphere and ≤1.00 D cylinder were studied. The new CLs were designed to have a nasal decentration with the optical center centered on the line of sight, and with progressive-addition power of +0.5 D peripherally. Monofocal soft CLs were used as controls. A pair of new CLs or control CLs was randomly assigned to the children, and they wore the lenses for 12 months during the first phase. Then, the type of CLs was changed, ie, a crossover design, and the children were observed for another 12 months during the second phase. The end points were changes in axial length and refractive error (spherical equivalent) under cycloplegia. Results The change of axial length in the new-CL and control-CL groups was not different between 12 months and baseline, the change of axial length between 12 months and 1 month in the new-CL group (0.09±0.08 mm) was significantly smaller (47%) than that in the control-CL group (0.17±0.08 mm, P<0.05). During the same period, the change of refractive error in the new-CL group was not significantly different from that in the control group. Neither the change in axial length nor refractive error in the new-CL group was significantly different from those in the control-CL group in the second phase. Conclusion This pilot study suggests that low-addition soft CLs with decentered optical design can reduce the degree of axial elongation in myopic children after an initial transient phase of CL wear. The reduction of the progression of myopia by low-addition soft CLs warrants further investigations. PMID:25284981

  5. Image Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peay, Christopher S.; Palacios, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Calibrate_Image calibrates images obtained from focal plane arrays so that the output image more accurately represents the observed scene. The function takes as input a degraded image along with a flat field image and a dark frame image produced by the focal plane array and outputs a corrected image. The three most prominent sources of image degradation are corrected for: dark current accumulation, gain non-uniformity across the focal plane array, and hot and/or dead pixels in the array. In the corrected output image the dark current is subtracted, the gain variation is equalized, and values for hot and dead pixels are estimated, using bicubic interpolation techniques.

  6. Flow Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Flow Technology Inc. worked with Lewis Research Center to develop a system for monitoring two different propellants being supplied to a spacecraft rocket thruster. They then commercialized the technology in the Microtrack, an extremely precise low-flow calibration system. Moog Inc., one of the device's primary users, measures the flow rate or the speed at which hydraulic oil flows through pin sized holes in disc shaped sapphires with the Microtrack. Using this data, two orifices with exactly the same flow rate can be matched as a pair and used as masters in servovalve production. The microtrack can also be used to calibrate other equipment.

  7. Recent progress in the measurement of temperature and salinity by optical scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, D. J.; Mcdermid, I. S.; Breckinridge, J. B.; Bell, J. A.; Zanoni, R.

    1984-01-01

    Recent progress is described in the use of Brillouin and Raman scattering for the measurement of temperature and salinity in the ocean. The use of Brillouin scattering is described for the measurement of the sound velocity, and the use of Raman scattering is described for the independent measurement of the temperature and salinity. Coupling these techniques permits the assessment of both temperature and salinity. The experimental techniques are described together with the results of recent experiments and an assessment of the errors to be expected.

  8. Magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopic studies of carotenoids. Progress report, December 1, 1994--November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kispert, L.D.

    1995-06-01

    The fundamental goals of this project are (1) to understand the role of a host matrix in the formation and decay mechanisms of carotenoid cation radical and dication and (2) to determine the special properties of carotenoids that enable them to serve as photoprotective agents in photosynthesis and as possible components in electron transfer processes. Results to date are discussed briefly. Work will continue as outlined in the original proposal with emphasis on using simultaneous electrochemistry EPR, and optical methods, variable temperature electrochemistry using microelectrodes and fast scans to examine the more unstable intermediates formed upon electrochemical oxidation of synthetically prepared carotenoids.

  9. Recent progress in optically-pumped cesium beam clock at Peking University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Zhou, S.; Wan, J.; Wang, S.; Wang, Y.

    2016-06-01

    A compact, long-life, and low-drift cesium beam clock is investigated at Peking University, where the atoms are magnetic-state selected and optically detected. Stability close to that of the best commercial cesium clocks has been achieved from 10 to 105 s. As previously shown, the short-term stability is determined by atomic shot noise or laser frequency noise. The stabilizations of microwave power and C-field improve the long-term stability, with the help of a digital servo system based on field-programmable gate array.

  10. Progress on the Flash X-Ray Optical Transition Radiation Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, V; Houck, T; Brown, C

    2008-03-30

    This document summarizes the Flash X-Ray accelerator (FXR) optical transition radiation (OTR) spot-size diagnostics efforts in FY07. During this year, new analysis, simulation, and experimental approaches were utilized to interpret OTR spot data from both dielectric foils such as Kapton (VN type) and metal coated foils. Significant new findings of the intricacies involved in the diagnostic and of FXR operational issues were achieved. Geometry and temperature based effects were found to affect the beam image profiles from the OTR foils. These effects must be taken into account in order to deduce accurately the beam current density profile.

  11. Probe for optically monitoring progress of in-situ vitrification of soil

    DOEpatents

    Timmerman, Craig L.; Oma, Kenton H.; Davis, Karl C.

    1988-01-01

    A detector system for sensing the progress of an ISV process along an expected path comprises multiple sensors each having an input port. The input ports are distributed along the expected path of the ISV process between a starting location and an expected ending location. Each sensor generates an electrical signal representative of the temperature in the vicinity of its input port. A signal processor is coupled to the sensors to receive an electrical signal generated by a sensor, and generate a signal which is encoded with information which identifies the sensor and whether the ISV process has reached the sensor's input port. A transmitter propagates the encoded signal. The signal processor and the transmitter are below ground at a location beyond the expected ending location of the ISV process in the direction from the starting location to the expected ending location. A signal receiver and a decoder are located above ground for receiving the encoded signal propagated by the transmitter, decoding the encoded signal and providing a human-perceptible indication of the progress of the ISV process.

  12. Probe for optically monitoring progress of in-situ vitrification of soil

    DOEpatents

    Timmerman, C.L.; Oma, K.H.; Davis, K.C.

    1988-08-09

    A detector system for sensing the progress of an ISV process along an expected path comprises multiple sensors each having an input port. The input ports are distributed along the expected path of the ISV process between a starting location and an expected ending location. Each sensor generates an electrical signal representative of the temperature in the vicinity of its input port. A signal processor is coupled to the sensors to receive an electrical signal generated by a sensor, and generate a signal which is encoded with information which identifies the sensor and whether the ISV process has reached the sensor's input port. A transmitter propagates the encoded signal. The signal processor and the transmitter are below ground at a location beyond the expected ending location of the ISV process in the direction from the starting location to the expected ending location. A signal receiver and a decoder are located above ground for receiving the encoded signal propagated by the transmitter, decoding the encoded signal and providing a human-perceptible indication of the progress of the ISV process. 7 figs.

  13. DRAGON, the Durham real-time, tomographic adaptive optics test bench: progress and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Andrew P.; Myers, Richard M.; Morris, Timothy J.; Basden, Alastair G.; Bharmal, Nazim A.; Rolt, Stephen; Bramall, David G.; Dipper, Nigel A.; Younger, Edward J.

    2014-08-01

    DRAGON is a real-time, tomographic Adaptive Optics test bench currently under development at Durham University. Optical and mechanical design work for DRAGON is now complete, and the system is close to becoming fully operational. DRAGON emulates current 4.2 m and 8 m telescopes, and can also be used to investigate ELT scale issues. The full system features 4 Laser Guide Star (LGS) Wavefront Sensors (WFS), 3 Natural Guide Star (NGS) WFSs and one Truth Sensor, all of which are 31 × 31 sub-aperture Shack-Hartmann WFS. Two Deformable Mirrors (DMs), a Boston MEMS Kilo DM and a Xinetics 97 actuator DM, correct for turbulence induced aberrations and these can be configured to be either open or closed loop of the WFS. A novel method of LGS emulation is implemented which includes the effects of uplink turbulence and elongation in real-time. The atmosphere is emulated by 4 rotating phase screens which can be translated in real-time to replicate altitude evolution of turbulent layers. DRAGON will be used to extensively study tomographic AO algorithms, such as those required for Multi-Object AO. As DRAGON has been designed to be compatible with CANARY, the MOAO demonstrator, results can be compared to those from the CANARY MOAO demonstrator on the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope. We present here an overview of the current status of DRAGON and some early results, including investigations into the validity of the LGS emulation method.

  14. The progress of optical parametric oscillator based on LiNbO3 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Lin-zhong; Zhang, Chun-xiao

    2014-11-01

    The MgO:PPLN-based QPM OPO is one of the most important method to generate mid-infrared laser. In this paper we attempt to briefly overview the historic development of LiNbO3 crystal and introduce the theoretical foundation of MgO:PPLN-based QPM OPO. We subsequently give a analysis of different kinds of MgO:PPLN-based QPM OPO. The wavelength region of 3-5 μm (belonging to the mid-infrared) is important atmospheric window in the optical spectrum. The mid-infrared lasers have drawn enormous interest and obtained a variety of applications, such as, air pollution detection, optical fiber communication, military countermeasures, and so on. In recent years, along with the emergence of lots of nonlinear materials (such as AgGaS2 and AgGaSe2, KTP and KTA, ZnGeP2, LiIO3, LiNbO3), it's become easier to obtain mid-infrared lasers. Because of those new nonlinear materials can satisfy the follow conditions, large nonlinearity, transparency in operating wavelength range and high damage resistance. Among those nonlinear materials, the LiNbO3 (LN) crystal is one of the most suitable materials to be used to obtain mid-infrared laser.

  15. Real-time optical monitoring of permanent lesion progression in radiofrequency ablated cardiac tissue (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh-Moon, Rajinder P.; Hendon, Christine P.

    2016-02-01

    Despite considerable advances in guidance of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) therapies for atrial fibrillation, success rates have been hampered by an inability to intraoperatively characterize the extent of permanent injury. Insufficient lesions can elusively create transient conduction blockages that eventually reconduct. Prior studies suggest significantly greater met-myoglobin (Mmb) concentrations in the lesion core than those in the healthy myocardium and may serve as a marker for irreversible tissue damage. In this work, we present real-time monitoring of permanent injury through spectroscopic assessment of Mmb concentrations at the catheter tip. Atrial wedges (n=6) were excised from four fresh swine hearts and submerged under pulsatile flow of warm (37oC) phosphate buffered saline. A commercial RFA catheter inserted into a fiber optic sheath allowed for simultaneous measurement of tissue diffuse reflectance (DR) spectra (500-650nm) during application of RF energy. Optical measurements were continuously acquired before, during, and post-ablation, in addition to healthy neighboring tissue. Met-myoglobin, oxy-myoglobin, and deoxy-myoglobin concentrations were extracted from each spectrum using an inverse Monte Carlo method. Tissue injury was validated with Masson's trichrome and hematoxylin and eosin staining. Time courses revealed a rapid increase in tissue Mmb concentrations at the onset of RFA treatment and a gradual plateauing thereafter. Extracted Mmb concentrations were significantly greater post-ablation (p<0.0001) as compared to healthy tissue and correlated well with histological assessment of severe thermal tissue destruction. On going studies are aimed at integrating these findings with prior work on near infrared spectroscopic lesion depth assessment. These results support the use of spectroscopy-facilitated guidance of RFA therapies for real-time permanent injury estimation.

  16. Research progress of optical H2O sensor with a DFB diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Guangping; Chang, Jun; Wang, Qingpu; Wang, Qiang; Wei, Wei

    2014-06-01

    In the field of near infrared H2O sensing, the acquisition of the absorption signal usually is from a noisy background, thus it is important to adopt an effective signal demodulation method. This study introduced the research progress in the field of trace water vapor detection, covering different individual gas detection techniques. On the basis of the conventional double-beam differential absorption, the division method in voltage and the dual-peak method based on the differential value of two adjacent absorption lines have been studied. Voltage division has an excellent stability to temperature variation, mechanical extrusion, and fiber bend loss. The dual-peak method proved a linear relation with the water vapor concentration, and this method provided a way to measure the concentration at high pressure. Furthermore, the so called balanced ratiometer detection (BRD) was introduced. It has an outstanding self-adjusting capability, and it can also avoid an excess phase difference caused by the current-to-voltage converting circuit, thus this method has a high sensitivity. In addition, the second harmonic technique applied to gas detection was introduced, and for the high-frequency modulation via driving current, 1/ f was suppressed apparently; as a result, this technique realized a better sensitive detection by one to two orders of magnitude.

  17. Progress toward mid-IR chip-scale integrated-optic TDLAS gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frish, Michael B.; Shankar, Raji; Bulu, Irfan; Frank, Ian; Laderer, Matthew C.; Wainner, Richard T.; Allen, Mark G.; Lončar, Marko

    2013-01-01

    We are building prototype chip-scale low-power integrated-optic gas-phase chemical sensors based on mid-infrared (3-5μm) Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS). TDLAS is able to sense many gas phase chemicals with high sensitivity and selectivity. Novel gas sensing elements using low-loss resonant photonic crystal cavities or waveguides will permit compact integration of a laser source, sampling elements, and detector in configurations suitable for inexpensive mass production. Recently developed Interband Cascade Lasers (ICLs) that operate at room temperature with low power consumption are expected to serve as monochromatic sources to probe the mid-IR molecular spectral transitions. Practical challenges to fabricating these sensors include: a) selecting and designing the high-Q microresonator sensing element appropriate for the selected analyte; b) coupling laser light into and out of the sensing element; and c) device thermal management, especially stabilizing laser temperature with the precision needed for sensitive spectroscopic detection. This paper describes solutions to these challenges.

  18. POLCAL - POLARIMETRIC RADAR CALIBRATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, J.

    1994-01-01

    Calibration of polarimetric radar systems is a field of research in which great progress has been made over the last few years. POLCAL (Polarimetric Radar Calibration) is a software tool intended to assist in the calibration of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems. In particular, POLCAL calibrates Stokes matrix format data produced as the standard product by the NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) airborne imaging synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR). POLCAL was designed to be used in conjunction with data collected by the NASA/JPL AIRSAR system. AIRSAR is a multifrequency (6 cm, 24 cm, and 68 cm wavelength), fully polarimetric SAR system which produces 12 x 12 km imagery at 10 m resolution. AIRSTAR was designed as a testbed for NASA's Spaceborne Imaging Radar program. While the images produced after 1991 are thought to be calibrated (phase calibrated, cross-talk removed, channel imbalance removed, and absolutely calibrated), POLCAL can and should still be used to check the accuracy of the calibration and to correct it if necessary. Version 4.0 of POLCAL is an upgrade of POLCAL version 2.0 released to AIRSAR investigators in June, 1990. New options in version 4.0 include automatic absolute calibration of 89/90 data, distributed target analysis, calibration of nearby scenes with calibration parameters from a scene with corner reflectors, altitude or roll angle corrections, and calibration of errors introduced by known topography. Many sources of error can lead to false conclusions about the nature of scatterers on the surface. Errors in the phase relationship between polarization channels result in incorrect synthesis of polarization states. Cross-talk, caused by imperfections in the radar antenna itself, can also lead to error. POLCAL reduces cross-talk and corrects phase calibration without the use of ground calibration equipment. Removing the antenna patterns during SAR processing also forms a very important part of the calibration of SAR data. Errors in the

  19. Progress in Y-00 physical cipher for Giga bit/sec optical data communications (intensity modulation method)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirota, Osamu; Futami, Fumio

    2014-10-01

    To guarantee a security of Cloud Computing System is urgent problem. Although there are several threats in a security problem, the most serious problem is cyber attack against an optical fiber transmission among data centers. In such a network, an encryption scheme on Layer 1(physical layer) with an ultimately strong security, a small delay, and a very high speed should be employed, because a basic optical link is operated at 10 Gbit/sec/wavelength. We have developed a quantum noise randomied stream cipher so called Yuen- 2000 encryption scheme (Y-00) during a decade. This type of cipher is a completely new type random cipher in which ciphertext for a legitimate receiver and eavesdropper are different. This is a condition to break the Shannon limit in theory of cryptography. In addition, this scheme has a good balance on a security, a speed and a cost performance. To realize such an encryption, several modulation methods are candidates such as phase-modulation, intensity-modulation, quadrature amplitude modulation, and so on. Northwestern university group demonstrated a phase modulation system (α=η) in 2003. In 2005, we reported a demonstration of 1 Gbit/sec system based on intensity modulation scheme(ISK-Y00), and gave a design method for quadratic amplitude modulation (QAM-Y00) in 2005 and 2010. An intensity modulation scheme promises a real application to a secure fiber communication of current data centers. This paper presents a progress in quantum noise randomized stream cipher based on ISK-Y00, integrating our theoretical and experimental achievements in the past and recent 100 Gbit/sec(10Gbit/sec × 10 wavelengths) experiment.

  20. ALTEA calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaconte, V.; Altea Team

    The ALTEA project is aimed at studying the possible functional damages to the Central Nervous System (CNS) due to particle radiation in space environment. The project is an international and multi-disciplinary collaboration. The ALTEA facility is an helmet-shaped device that will study concurrently the passage of cosmic radiation through the brain, the functional status of the visual system and the electrophysiological dynamics of the cortical activity. The basic instrumentation is composed by six active particle telescopes, one ElectroEncephaloGraph (EEG), a visual stimulator and a pushbutton. The telescopes are able to detect the passage of each particle measuring its energy, trajectory and released energy into the brain and identifying nuclear species. The EEG and the Visual Stimulator are able to measure the functional status of the visual system, the cortical electrophysiological activity, and to look for a correlation between incident particles, brain activity and Light Flash perceptions. These basic instruments can be used separately or in any combination, permitting several different experiments. ALTEA is scheduled to fly in the International Space Station (ISS) in November, 15th 2004. In this paper the calibration of the Flight Model of the silicon telescopes (Silicon Detector Units - SDUs) will be shown. These measures have been taken at the GSI heavy ion accelerator in Darmstadt. First calibration has been taken out in November 2003 on the SDU-FM1 using C nuclei at different energies: 100, 150, 400 and 600 Mev/n. We performed a complete beam scan of the SDU-FM1 to check functionality and homogeneity of all strips of silicon detector planes, for each beam energy we collected data to achieve good statistics and finally we put two different thickness of Aluminium and Plexiglas in front of the detector in order to study fragmentations. This test has been carried out with a Test Equipment to simulate the Digital Acquisition Unit (DAU). We are scheduled to

  1. Comparison of event-based analysis of glaucoma progression assessed subjectively on visual fields and retinal nerve fibre layer attenuation measured by optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Sushmita; Mulkutkar, Samyak; Pandav, Surinder Singh; Verma, Neelam; Gupta, Amod

    2015-02-01

    The purpose is to study the ability of an event-based analysis of retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) attenuation measured by Stratus(®) optical coherence tomography (OCT) and to detect progression across the spectrum of glaucoma. Adult glaucoma suspects, ocular hypertensives and glaucoma patients who had undergone baseline RNFL thickness measurement on Stratus OCT and reliable automated visual field examination by Humphrey's visual field analyser prior to March 2007 and had 5-year follow-up data were recruited. Progression on OCT was defined by two criteria: decrease in average RNFL thickness from baseline by at least 10 and 20 µ. Visual field progression was defined by the modified Hodapp-Parrish-Anderson criteria. Absolute and percentage change in RNFL thickness from baseline was compared in progressors and non-progressors on visual fields. Concordance between structural and functional progression was analysed. 318 eyes of 162 patients were analysed. 35 eyes (11 %) progressed by visual fields, 8 (2.5 %) progressed using the 20 µ loss criterion, while 30 eyes (9.4 %) progressed using the 10 µ loss criterion. In glaucoma suspects, mean absolute RNFL attenuation was 8.6 µ (12.1 % of baseline) in those who progressed to glaucoma by visual fields. OCT was more useful to detect progression in early glaucoma, but performed poorly in advanced glaucoma. The 10 µ criterion appears to be closer to visual field progression. However, the ability to detect progression varies considerably between functional and structural tools depending upon the severity of the disease. PMID:25502985

  2. The use of the Sonoran Desert as a pseudo-invariant site for optical sensor cross-calibration and long-term stability monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Angal, A.; Chander, Gyanesh; Choi, Taeyoung; Wu, Aisheng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2010-01-01

    The Sonoran Desert is a large, flat, pseudo-invariant site near the United States-Mexico border. It is one of the largest and hottest deserts in North America, with an area of 311,000 square km. This site is particularly suitable for calibration purposes because of its high spatial and spectral uniformity and reasonable temporal stability. This study uses measurements from four different sensors, Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+), Aqua MODIS, and Landsat 5 (L5) Thematic Mapper (TM), to assess the suitability of this site for long-term stability monitoring and to evaluate the “radiometric calibration differences” between spectrally matching bands of all four sensors. In general, the drift in the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance of each sensor over a span of nine years is within the specified calibration uncertainties. Monthly precipitation measurements of the Sonoran Desert region were obtained from the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN), and their effects on the retrieved TOA reflectances were evaluated. To account for the combined uncertainties in the TOA reflectance due to the surface and atmospheric Bi-directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF), a semi-empirical BRDF model has been adopted to monitor and reduce the impact of illumination geometry differences on the retrieved TOA reflectances. To evaluate calibration differences between the MODIS and Landsat sensors, correction for spectral response differences using a hyperspectral sensor is also demonstrated.

  3. Self Calibration of a 2-wavelength Pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    Pyrometers require calibrations to determine their instrument constants before they can be used in remote temperature measurements. These constants reflect the combined effects of detector response, the transmissivities of intervening optical media (windows and gases) and the emissivity of the measured surface. We describe here the principal and the demonstration of self calibrating 2-wavelength pyrometer.

  4. Laser Calibration of an Impact Disdrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John E.; Kasparis, Takis; Metzger, Philip T.; Jones, W. Linwood

    2014-01-01

    A practical approach to developing an operational low-cost disdrometer hinges on implementing an effective in situ adaptive calibration strategy. This calibration strategy lowers the cost of the device and provides a method to guarantee continued automatic calibration. In previous work, a collocated tipping bucket rain gauge was utilized to provide a calibration signal to the disdrometer's digital signal processing software. Rainfall rate is proportional to the 11/3 moment of the drop size distribution (a 7/2 moment can also be assumed, depending on the choice of terminal velocity relationship). In the previous case, the disdrometer calibration was characterized and weighted to the 11/3 moment of the drop size distribution (DSD). Optical extinction by rainfall is proportional to the 2nd moment of the DSD. Using visible laser light as a means to focus and generate an auxiliary calibration signal, the adaptive calibration processing is significantly improved.

  5. NOTE: Analysis of the measurement precision of an amorphous silicon EPID used for MLC leaf position quality control and the long-term calibration stability of an optically controlled MLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budgell, G. J.; Clarke, M. F.

    2008-08-01

    Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have been shown to be suitable for multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf positioning quality control (QC). In our centre, a continuous dataset is available of 2 years of film measurements followed by 3 years of EPID measurements on five MLC-equipped linear accelerators of identical head design. The aim of this work was to analyse this unique dataset in order to determine the relative precision of film and EPID for MLC leaf positioning measurements and to determine the long-term stability of the MLC calibration. The QC dataset was examined and periods without MLC adjustments that contained at least four successive collimator position measurements (a minimum of 6 months) were identified. By calculating the standard deviations (SD) of these results, the reproducibility of the measurements can be determined. Comparison of the film and EPID results enables their relative measurement precision to be assessed; on average film gave an SD of 0.52 mm compared to 0.13 mm for EPIDs. The MLC and conventional collimator results were compared to assess MLC calibration stability; on average, for EPID measurements, the MLC gave an SD of 0.12 mm compared to 0.14 mm for a conventional collimator. The long-term relative individual leaf positions were compared and found to vary between 0.07 and 0.15 mm implying that they are stable over long time periods. These results suggest that the calibration of an optically controlled MLC is inherently very stable between disturbances to the optical system which normally occur on service days.

  6. Demonstration of spectral calibration for stellar interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demers, Richard T.; An, Xin; Tang, Hong; Rud, Mayer; Wayne, Leonard; Kissil, Andrew; Kwack, Eug-Yun

    2006-01-01

    A breadboard is under development to demonstrate the calibration of spectral errors in microarcsecond stellar interferometers. Analysis shows that thermally and mechanically stable hardware in addition to careful optical design can reduce the wavelength dependent error to tens of nanometers. Calibration of the hardware can further reduce the error to the level of picometers. The results of thermal, mechanical and optical analysis supporting the breadboard design will be shown.

  7. Designing an in-flight airborne calibration site using experience from vicarious radiometric satellite calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livens, Stefan; Debruyn, Walter; Sterckx, Sindy; Reusen, Ils

    2011-11-01

    Laboratory calibration of electro-optical sensors is preferably complemented by regular in-flight verification. This checks whether the lab calibration parameters remain valid or recalibration is necessary. In-flight verification can be achieved by vicarious calibration using in-flight measurements of calibration targets. We intend to identify and design a set of suitable radiometric calibration targets. For this, we borrow from expertise gained with the PROBA-V satellite calibration system, which uses multiple vicarious methods relying on diverse natural on-ground targets. Besides reflectance based calibration using ground measurements, the PROBA-V calibration methods are unproven for use in airborne calibration. The selected targets should be suitable for the calibration of both multispectral and hyperspectral imagers. We start from general requirements for radiometric targets and investigate their applicability to airborne calibration. From this we identify two possible sets of natural calibration sites in Belgium. One set, located in the Campine region, contains small water bodies and sandy lakesides. Another set is located in the Westhoek region near the Belgian coast. It offers better suitable water bodies, as well as sandy areas, grass fields and dark targets. Airborne calibration lends itself to the use of smaller artifical targets. We propose to complement the natural targets with a portable target consisting of agricultural nets with different densities. The definition of sets of calibration targets, both natural and artificial can facilitate the investigation of the usability of vicarious targets and method for inflight radiometric verification.

  8. Comprehensive Calibration and Validation Site for Information Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. R.; Tang, L. L.; Ma, L. L.; Zhou, Y. S.; Gao, C. X.; Wang, N.; Li, X. H.; Wang, X. H.; Zhu, X. H.

    2015-04-01

    As a naturally part of information technology, Remote Sensing (RS) is strongly required to provide very precise and accurate information product to serve industry, academy and the public at this information economic era. To meet the needs of high quality RS product, building a fully functional and advanced calibration system, including measuring instruments, measuring approaches and target site become extremely important. Supported by MOST of China via national plan, great progress has been made to construct a comprehensive calibration and validation (Cal&Val) site, which integrates most functions of RS sensor aviation testing, EO satellite on-orbit caration and performance assessment and RS product validation at this site located in Baotou, 600km west of Beijing. The site is equipped with various artificial standard targets, including portable and permanent targets, which supports for long-term calibration and validation. A number of fine-designed ground measuring instruments and airborne standard sensors are developed for realizing high-accuracy stepwise validation, an approach in avoiding or reducing uncertainties caused from nonsynchronized measurement. As part of contribution to worldwide Cal&Val study coordinated by CEOS-WGCV, Baotou site is offering its support to Radiometric Calibration Network of Automated Instruments (RadCalNet), with an aim of providing demonstrated global standard automated radiometric calibration service in cooperation with ESA, NASA, CNES and NPL. Furthermore, several Cal&Val campaigns have been performed during the past years to calibrate and validate the spaceborne/airborne optical and SAR sensors, and the results of some typical demonstration are discussed in this study.

  9. Application of optical analyzer technique for measurements of sound velocities in shock-compressed Al-Mn alloy for calibration of recent elastic-viscous-plastic models

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, E. A.; Tarzhanov, V. I.; Pankratov, D. G.; Yakunin, A. K.; Yelkin, V. M.; Mikhailov, V. N.

    2006-08-03

    Registration results of longitudinal CL({sigma}XX) and volume CB({sigma}XX) sound velocities in shock-compressed aluminum alloy are presented. Experimental data were obtained in wide range of longitudinal stress, including the stress, corresponding to solid-liquid shock-induced transformation. By using experimentally measured values of sound velocities, the changes of Poisson ratio and shear modulus were calculated along the shock adiabat. These data are needed for calibration of resent elastic-viscous-plastic models.

  10. Assessment of estimated retinal atrophy progression in Stargardt macular dystrophy using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Rupert W; Muñoz, Beatriz; Wolfson, Yulia; Sophie, Raafay; Fletcher, Emily; Bittencourt, Millena G; Scholl, Hendrik P N

    2016-01-01

    Aims To estimate disease progression based on analysis of macular volume measured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in patients affected by Stargardt macular dystrophy (STGD1) and to evaluate the influence of software errors on these measurements. Methods 58 eyes of 29 STGD1 patients were included. Numbers and types of algorithm errors were recorded and manually corrected. In a subgroup of 36 eyes of 18 patients with at least two examinations over time, total macular volume (TMV) and volumes of all nine Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) subfields were obtained. Random effects models were used to estimate the rate of change per year for the population, and empirical Bayes slopes were used to estimate yearly decline in TMV for individual eyes. Results 6958 single B-scans from 190 macular cube scans were analysed. 2360 (33.9%) showed algorithm errors. Mean observation period for follow-up data was 15 months (range 3–40). The median (IQR) change in TMV using the empirical Bayes estimates for the individual eyes was −0.103 (−0.145, −0.059) mm3 per year. The mean (±SD) TMV was 6.321±1.000 mm3 at baseline, and rate of decline was −0.118 mm3 per year (p=0.003). Yearly mean volume change was −0.004 mm3 in the central subfield (mean baseline=0.128 mm3), −0.032 mm3 in the inner (mean baseline=1.484 mm3) and −0.079 mm3 in the outer ETDRS subfields (mean baseline=5.206 mm3). Conclusions SD-OCT measurements allow monitoring the decline in retinal volume in STGD1; however, they require significant manual correction of software errors. PMID:26568636

  11. FY2008 Calibration Systems Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Broocks, Bryan T.

    2009-01-01

    The Calibrations project has been exploring alternative technologies for calibration of passive sensors in the infrared (IR) spectral region. In particular, we have investigated using quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) because these devices offer several advantages over conventional blackbodies such as reductions in size and weight while providing a spectral source in the IR with high output power. These devices can provide a rapid, multi-level radiance scheme to fit any nonlinear behavior as well as a spectral calibration that includes the fore-optics, which is currently not available for on-board calibration systems.

  12. Progress on Developing Adaptive Optics–Optical Coherence Tomography for In Vivo Retinal Imaging: Monitoring and Correction of Eye Motion Artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Capps, Arlie G.; Kim, Dae Yu; Panorgias, Athanasios; Stevenson, Scott B.; Hamann, Bernd; Werner, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in retinal image acquisition techniques, including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), combined with improved performance of adaptive optics (AO) instrumentation, has resulted in improvement in the quality of in vivo images of cellular structures in the human retina. Here, we present a short review of progress on developing AO-OCT instruments. Despite significant progress in imaging speed and resolution, eye movements present during acquisition of a retinal image with OCT introduce motion artifacts into the image, complicating analysis and registration. This effect is especially pronounced in high-resolution datasets acquired with AO-OCT instruments. Several retinal tracking systems have been introduced to correct retinal motion during data acquisition. We present a method for correcting motion artifacts in AO-OCT volume data after acquisition using simultaneously captured adaptive optics-scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) images. We extract transverse eye motion data from the AO-SLO images, assign a motion adjustment vector to each AO-OCT A-scan, and re-sample from the scattered data back onto a regular grid. The corrected volume data improve the accuracy of quantitative analyses of microscopic structures. PMID:25544826

  13. The in-flight calibration of the Hubble Space Telescope attitude sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welter, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed review of the in-flight calibration of the Hubble Space Telescope attitude sensors is presented. The review, which covers the period from the April 24, 1990, launch of the spacecraft until the time of this writing (June 1991), describes the calibrations required and accuracies achieved for the four principal attitude sensing systems on the spacecraft: the magnetometers, the fixed head star trackers, the gyroscopes, and the fine guidance sensors (FGS's). In contrast to the other three sensor groups, the Hubble Telecope's FGS's are unique in the precision and performance levels being attempted; spacecraft control and astrometric research at the near-milliarcsecond level are the ultimate goals. FGS calibration accuracies at the 20-milliarcsecond level have already been achieved, and plans for new data acquisitions and reductions that should substantially improve these results are in progress. A summary of the basic attributes of each of the four sensor groups with respect to its usage as an attitude measuring system is presented, followed by a discussion of the calibration items of interest for that group. The calibration items are as follows: for the magnetometers, the corrections for the spacecraft's static and time-varying magnetic fields; for the fixed-head star trackers, their relative alignments and use in performing onboard attitude updates; for the gyroscopes, their scale factors, alignments, and drift rate biases; and for the FGS's, their magnifications, optical distortions, and alignments. The discussion covers the procedures used for each calibration, as well as the order of the calibrations within the general flow of orbital verification activities. It also includes a synopsis of current plans for the eventual calibration of the FGS's to achieve their near-milliarcsecond design accuracy. The conclusions include a table indicating the current and predicted ultimate accuracies for each of the calibration items.

  14. Comparing two new camera calibration methods with traditional pinhole calibrations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Psang D; Sung, Chi K

    2007-03-19

    Two novel camera calibration methods are compared with traditional pinhole calibration: one new method uses an analytic geometrical version of Snell's law (denoted as the Snell model); the other uses 6x6 matrix-based paraxial ray-tracing (referred to as the paraxial model). Pinhole model uses a perspective projection approximation to give a single lumped result for the multiple optical elements in a camera system. It is mathematically simple, but suffers from accuracy limitations since it does not consider the lens system. The Snell model is mathematically the most complex but potentially has the highest levels of accuracy for the widest range of conditions. The paraxial model has the merit of offering analytical equations for calibration.

  15. Calibration of sound calibrators: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milhomem, T. A. B.; Soares, Z. M. D.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an overview of calibration of sound calibrators. Initially, traditional calibration methods are presented. Following, the international standard IEC 60942 is discussed emphasizing parameters, target measurement uncertainty and criteria for conformance to the requirements of the standard. Last, Regional Metrology Organizations comparisons are summarized.

  16. Least-Squares Camera Calibration Including Lens Distortion and Automatic Editing of Calibration Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gennery, D. B.

    1998-01-01

    A method is described for calibrating cameras including radial lens distortion, by using known points such as those measured from a calibration fixture. The distortion terms are relative to the optical axis, which is included in the model so that it does not have to be orthogonal to the image sensor plane.

  17. Solar-Reflectance-Based Calibration of Spectral Radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattrall, Christopher; Carder, Kendall L.; Thome, Kurtis J.; Gordon, Howard R.

    2001-01-01

    A method by which to calibrate a spectral radiometer using the sun as the illumination source is discussed. Solar-based calibrations eliminate several uncertainties associated with applying a lamp-based calibration to field measurements. The procedure requires only a calibrated reflectance panel, relatively low aerosol optical depth, and measurements of atmospheric transmittance. Further, a solar-reflectance-based calibration (SRBC), by eliminating the need for extraterrestrial irradiance spectra, reduces calibration uncertainty to approximately 2.2% across the solar-reflective spectrum, significantly reducing uncertainty in measurements used to deduce the optical properties of a system illuminated by the sun (e.g., sky radiance). The procedure is very suitable for on-site calibration of long-term field instruments, thereby reducing the logistics and costs associated with transporting a radiometer to a calibration facility.

  18. “Once is Enough” in Radiometric Calibrations

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Gerald T.; Gibson, Charles E.; Yoon, Howard W.; Parr, Albert C.

    2007-01-01

    The successful development of an Optical Technology Division quality system for optical radiation measurement services has provided the opportunity to reconsider the existing calibration procedures to improve quality and reduce costs. We have instituted procedures in our calibration programs to eliminate uninformative repetitive measurements by concentrating our efforts on controlling and understanding the measurement process. The first program in our calibration services to undergo these revisions is described in this paper. PMID:27110453

  19. Spectralon diffuser calibration for MERIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olij, Carina; Schaarsberg, Jos G.; Werij, Henri G.; Zoutman, Erik; Baudin, Gilles; Chommeloux, Beatrice; Bezy, Jean-Loup; Gourmelon, Georges

    1997-12-01

    One of the key payload instruments of ESA's ENVISAT polar platform is the medium resolution imaging spectrometer (MERIS), aiming at improved knowledge of our planet in the fields of bio-optical oceanography, and atmospheric and land surface processes. MERIS, which is built under responsibility of Aerospatiale, will monitor the solar irradiation scattered by the Earth by employing five cameras which simultaneously record data in 15 visible and near-infrared programmable spectral bands with very low degree of polarization sensitivity. The combined field-of-view of the five cameras spans a range of 68.5 degrees. Crucial for obtaining the desired high accuracy during a four-years lifetime, is the on- board calibration unit. This calibration unit contains a set of Spectralon diffusers, which were manufactured having in mind excellent in-flight stability as well as spectral and spatial uniformity. Preflight calibration of the Spectralon diffusers was carried out at TNO-TPD. This calibration includes the measurement of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) for applicable angles and wavelengths, i.e., while varying angle of incidence, angle of observation, observation area on the elongated diffusers, wavelength and polarization. The diffuser calibration was performed in a class 100 cleanroom. For these measurements the TPD calibration facility, which is described in detail, has been adapted, so that it now has five geometrical degrees of freedom. Detectors have been optimized to minimize stray light. Due to extensive commissioning of the calibration setup the absolute error (1 sigma) of these measurements amounts to less than 0.5%; relative errors are in the 0.3 - 0.4% range.

  20. Calibration strategies for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaug, Markus; Berge, David; Daniel, Michael; Doro, Michele; Förster, Andreas; Hofmann, Werner; Maccarone, Maria C.; Parsons, Dan; de los Reyes Lopez, Raquel; van Eldik, Christopher

    2014-08-01

    The Central Calibration Facilities workpackage of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory for very high energy gamma ray astronomy defines the overall calibration strategy of the array, develops dedicated hardware and software for the overall array calibration and coordinates the calibration efforts of the different telescopes. The latter include LED-based light pulsers, and various methods and instruments to achieve a calibration of the overall optical throughput. On the array level, methods for the inter-telescope calibration and the absolute calibration of the entire observatory are being developed. Additionally, the atmosphere above the telescopes, used as a calorimeter, will be monitored constantly with state-of-the-art instruments to obtain a full molecular and aerosol profile up to the stratosphere. The aim is to provide a maximal uncertainty of 10% on the reconstructed energy-scale, obtained through various independent methods. Different types of LIDAR in combination with all-sky-cameras will provide the observatory with an online, intelligent scheduling system, which, if the sky is partially covered by clouds, gives preference to sources observable under good atmospheric conditions. Wide-field optical telescopes and Raman Lidars will provide online information about the height-resolved atmospheric extinction, throughout the field-of-view of the cameras, allowing for the correction of the reconstructed energy of each gamma-ray event. The aim is to maximize the duty cycle of the observatory, in terms of usable data, while reducing the dead time introduced by calibration activities to an absolute minimum.

  1. Optical guiding and sideband suppression in the FEL and IFEL. Yearly technical progress report, July 1993--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T.C.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    1994-10-01

    Several studies have been made of optical guiding and sideband effects that might occur using the hardware of certain experiments which are scheduled to operate in late 1994 at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven. We find that experimental observations of optical guiding and sidebanding would be fruitful in connection with the blue-green FEL oscillator experiment. Should the data bear out our expectations (obtained from TDA code runs described below), then some confidence would be established in our tentative conclusion --based upon the code as well as analytic theory-- that neither optical guiding nor sidebands are to be expected in connection with the IFEL accelerator.

  2. Calibration and Rating of Photovoltaics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Emery, K.

    2012-06-01

    Rating the performance of photovoltaic (PV) modules is critical to determining the cost per watt, and efficiency is useful to assess the relative progress among PV concepts. Procedures for determining the efficiency for PV technologies from 1-sun to low concentration to high concentration are discussed. We also discuss the state of the art in primary and secondary calibration of PV reference cells used by calibration laboratories around the world. Finally, we consider challenges to rating PV technologies and areas for improvement.

  3. Boeing infrared sensor (BIRS) calibration facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazen, John D.; Scorsone, L. V.

    1990-01-01

    The Boeing Infrared Sensor (BIRS) Calibration Facility represents a major capital investment in optical and infrared technology. The facility was designed and built for the calibration and testing of the new generation large aperture long wave infrared (LWIR) sensors, seekers, and related technologies. Capability exists to perform both radiometric and goniometric calibrations of large infrared sensors under simulated environmental operating conditions. The system is presently configured for endoatmospheric calibrations with a uniform background field which can be set to simulate the expected mission background levels. During calibration, the sensor under test is also exposed to expected mission temperatures and pressures within the test chamber. Capability exists to convert the facility for exoatmospheric testing. The configuration of the system is described along with hardware elements and changes made to date are addressed.

  4. SkyProbe: Real-Time Precision Monitoring in the Optical of the Absolute Atmospheric Absorption on the Telescope Science and Calibration Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuillandre, J.-C.; Magnier, E.; Sabin, D.; Mahoney, B.

    2016-05-01

    Mauna Kea is known for its pristine seeing conditions but sky transparency can be an issue for science operations since at least 25% of the observable (i.e. open dome) nights are not photometric, an effect mostly due to high-altitude cirrus. Since 2001, the original single channel SkyProbe mounted in parallel on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) has gathered one V-band exposure every minute during each observing night using a small CCD camera offering a very wide field of view (35 sq. deg.) encompassing the region pointed by the telescope for science operations, and exposures long enough (40 seconds) to capture at least 100 stars of Hipparcos' Tycho catalog at high galactic latitudes (and up to 600 stars at low galactic latitudes). The measurement of the true atmospheric absorption is achieved within 2%, a key advantage over all-sky direct thermal infrared imaging detection of clouds. The absolute measurement of the true atmospheric absorption by clouds and particulates affecting the data being gathered by the telescope's main science instrument has proven crucial for decision making in the CFHT queued service observing (QSO) representing today all of the telescope time. Also, science exposures taken in non-photometric conditions are automatically registered for a new observation at a later date at 1/10th of the original exposure time in photometric conditions to ensure a proper final absolute photometric calibration. Photometric standards are observed only when conditions are reported as being perfectly stable by SkyProbe. The more recent dual color system (simultaneous B & V bands) will offer a better characterization of the sky properties above Mauna Kea and should enable a better detection of the thinnest cirrus (absorption down to 0.01 mag., or 1%).

  5. Improving self-calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enßlin, Torsten A.; Junklewitz, Henrik; Winderling, Lars; Greiner, Maksim; Selig, Marco

    2014-10-01

    Response calibration is the process of inferring how much the measured data depend on the signal one is interested in. It is essential for any quantitative signal estimation on the basis of the data. Here, we investigate self-calibration methods for linear signal measurements and linear dependence of the response on the calibration parameters. The common practice is to augment an external calibration solution using a known reference signal with an internal calibration on the unknown measurement signal itself. Contemporary self-calibration schemes try to find a self-consistent solution for signal and calibration by exploiting redundancies in the measurements. This can be understood in terms of maximizing the joint probability of signal and calibration. However, the full uncertainty structure of this joint probability around its maximum is thereby not taken into account by these schemes. Therefore, better schemes, in sense of minimal square error, can be designed by accounting for asymmetries in the uncertainty of signal and calibration. We argue that at least a systematic correction of the common self-calibration scheme should be applied in many measurement situations in order to properly treat uncertainties of the signal on which one calibrates. Otherwise, the calibration solutions suffer from a systematic bias, which consequently distorts the signal reconstruction. Furthermore, we argue that nonparametric, signal-to-noise filtered calibration should provide more accurate reconstructions than the common bin averages and provide a new, improved self-calibration scheme. We illustrate our findings with a simplistic numerical example.

  6. Progress in differential deposition for improving the figures of full-shell astronomical grazing incidence x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Atkins, Carolyn; Ramsey, Brian D.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery K.; Lis, Tomasz M.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Gaskin, Jessica A.; Broadway, David M.

    2015-09-01

    One of the developments at MSFC that is underway to meet the demand of high-resolution X-ray optics for future X-ray astronomy missions is the `differential deposition' technique. This process corrects the axial figure profile of optics by selectively depositing material onto the mirror's reflective surface. The process relies on accurate metrology achieved using a long trace profiler whose slope resolution is better than 1μrad. From these metrology data an error map is generated that shows the profile of material to be deposited to correct the optic's figure. A computer-controlled, deposition system then applies this corrective coating. Simulations show that a substantial improvement in angular resolution is possible with this approach after multiple correction `cycles'. To assess this, custom coating systems have been developed and corrections of full-shell optics are underway. To date, a factor of < 2 improvement in the imaging quality of the optics has been demonstrated in x-ray tests after a single stage of correction.

  7. Implicit Spacecraft Gyro Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, Richard; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an implicit algorithm for spacecraft onboard instrument calibration, particularly to onboard gyro calibration. This work is an extension of previous work that was done where an explicit gyro calibration algorithm was applied to the AQUA spacecraft gyros. The algorithm presented in this paper was tested using simulated data and real data that were downloaded from the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) spacecraft. The calibration tests gave very good results. A comparison between the use of the implicit calibration algorithm used here with the explicit algorithm used for AQUA spacecraft indicates that both provide an excellent estimation of the gyro calibration parameters with similar accuracies.

  8. Recent Progress In Lithium Niobate Integrated Optics Technology Under A Collaborative Joint Opto-Electronics Research Scheme (JOERS) Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, M. F.; Donaldson, A.; Gibson, D. R.; Wale, M.

    1988-01-01

    In January 1984, a United Kingdom Joint Opto-Electronics Research Scheme (JOERS) on LiNbO3 technology for integrated optics commenced. This 65 man-year programme, which ended in April 1987, was undertaken jointly by four industrial companies and four universities, representing almost all of the LiNbO3 integrated optics expertise in the U.K. at that time. The aim of the programme was twofold: to develop high quality LiNbO3 wafers for integrated optics applications through close collaboration between the material manufacturers and the material users and to establish a strong technology base in device design and fabrication. This paper outlines some of the main achievements of the programme. Topics covered include work on LiNbO3 material optimisation, waveguide fabrication technology (Ti-indiffused, proton-exchanged, and ion-implanted waveguides), and waveguide interconnection technology (low loss curves, modal profile variation), and fibre-guide coupling.

  9. Recent progress in the growth and characterization of large Ge single crystals for IR optics and microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, Moshe; Gafni, Gabriella; Roth, Michael

    1991-11-01

    During recent years there has been an increasing demand for large homogeneous Ge single crystals to be used as optical components in high resolution thermal imaging systems. Thus, the authors' research focused on understanding the roles of dopant and stress distribution in large Ge crystals and their influence on the optical performance in the IR region, 8-12 micrometers . More recently, a new application for heavily dope, n-type Ge crystals with low resistivity (~0.1 Ω.cm) and high crystalline perfection (EPD ~5 X 103cm-2) has been reported. This paper presents the growth and characterization of large homogeneous Ge single crystals with diameters up to 240 mm for IR optics. Preliminary results on the growth of 75 mm diameter Ge single crystals for substrates preparation are given. These substrates can be used in GaAs solar cells for space applications.

  10. Status of Photovoltaic Calibration and Measurement Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baraona, Cosmo; Bailey, Sheila; Curtis, Henry; Brinker, David; Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, David

    2001-01-01

    The 7th International Workshop on Space Solar Cell Calibration and Measurement was held on September 25-27, 2000 in Girdwood, Alaska. Representatives from eight countries discussed international standards for single and multijunction solar cell measurement and calibration methods, round robin intercomparisons, and irradiation test methods for space solar cells. Progress toward adoption of an ISO standard on single junction cells was made. Agreement was reached to begin work on new standards for multijunction cells and irradiation testing. Progress on present single junction round robin measurements was discussed and future multijunction round robins were planned. The next workshop will be held in Germany in October 2001.

  11. Automated Camera Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Siqi; Cheng, Yang; Willson, Reg

    2006-01-01

    Automated Camera Calibration (ACAL) is a computer program that automates the generation of calibration data for camera models used in machine vision systems. Machine vision camera models describe the mapping between points in three-dimensional (3D) space in front of the camera and the corresponding points in two-dimensional (2D) space in the camera s image. Calibrating a camera model requires a set of calibration data containing known 3D-to-2D point correspondences for the given camera system. Generating calibration data typically involves taking images of a calibration target where the 3D locations of the target s fiducial marks are known, and then measuring the 2D locations of the fiducial marks in the images. ACAL automates the analysis of calibration target images and greatly speeds the overall calibration process.

  12. Analytical multicollimator camera calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tayman, W.P.

    1978-01-01

    Calibration with the U.S. Geological survey multicollimator determines the calibrated focal length, the point of symmetry, the radial distortion referred to the point of symmetry, and the asymmetric characteristiecs of the camera lens. For this project, two cameras were calibrated, a Zeiss RMK A 15/23 and a Wild RC 8. Four test exposures were made with each camera. Results are tabulated for each exposure and averaged for each set. Copies of the standard USGS calibration reports are included. ?? 1978.

  13. Method for Ground-to-Space Laser Calibration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukashin, Constantine (Inventor); Wielicki, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention comprises an approach for calibrating the sensitivity to polarization, optics degradation, spectral and stray light response functions of instruments on orbit. The concept is based on using an accurate ground-based laser system, Ground-to-Space Laser Calibration (GSLC), transmitting laser light to instrument on orbit during nighttime substantially clear-sky conditions. To minimize atmospheric contribution to the calibration uncertainty the calibration cycles should be performed in short time intervals, and all required measurements are designed to be relative. The calibration cycles involve ground operations with laser beam polarization and wavelength changes.

  14. Method for Ground-to-Satellite Laser Calibration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lukashin, Constantine (Inventor); Wielicki, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention comprises an approach for calibrating the sensitivity to polarization, optics degradation, spectral and stray light response functions of instruments on orbit. The concept is based on using an accurate ground-based laser system, Ground-to-Space Laser Calibration (GSLC), transmitting laser light to instrument on orbit during nighttime substantially clear-sky conditions. To minimize atmospheric contribution to the calibration uncertainty the calibration cycles should be performed in short time intervals, and all required measurements are designed to be relative. The calibration cycles involve ground operations with laser beam polarization and wavelength changes.

  15. Real-time calibration-free C-scan images of the eye fundus using Master Slave swept source optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradu, Adrian; Kapinchev, Konstantin; Barnes, Fred; Garway-Heath, David F.; Rajendram, Ranjan; Keane, Pearce; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2015-03-01

    Recently, we introduced a novel Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) method, termed as Master Slave OCT (MS-OCT), specialized for delivering en-face images. This method uses principles of spectral domain interfereometry in two stages. MS-OCT operates like a time domain OCT, selecting only signals from a chosen depth only while scanning the laser beam across the eye. Time domain OCT allows real time production of an en-face image, although relatively slowly. As a major advance, the Master Slave method allows collection of signals from any number of depths, as required by the user. The tremendous advantage in terms of parallel provision of data from numerous depths could not be fully employed by using multi core processors only. The data processing required to generate images at multiple depths simultaneously is not achievable with commodity multicore processors only. We compare here the major improvement in processing and display, brought about by using graphic cards. We demonstrate images obtained with a swept source at 100 kHz (which determines an acquisition time [Ta] for a frame of 200×200 pixels2 of Ta =1.6 s). By the end of the acquired frame being scanned, using our computing capacity, 4 simultaneous en-face images could be created in T = 0.8 s. We demonstrate that by using graphic cards, 32 en-face images can be displayed in Td 0.3 s. Other faster swept source engines can be used with no difference in terms of Td. With 32 images (or more), volumes can be created for 3D display, using en-face images, as opposed to the current technology where volumes are created using cross section OCT images.

  16. Computer Generated Hologram System for Wavefront Measurement System Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olczak, Gene

    2011-01-01

    Computer Generated Holograms (CGHs) have been used for some time to calibrate interferometers that require nulling optics. A typical scenario is the testing of aspheric surfaces with an interferometer placed near the paraxial center of curvature. Existing CGH technology suffers from a reduced capacity to calibrate middle and high spatial frequencies. The root cause of this shortcoming is as follows: the CGH is not placed at an image conjugate of the asphere due to limitations imposed by the geometry of the test and the allowable size of the CGH. This innovation provides a calibration system where the imaging properties in calibration can be made comparable to the test configuration. Thus, if the test is designed to have good imaging properties, then middle and high spatial frequency errors in the test system can be well calibrated. The improved imaging properties are provided by a rudimentary auxiliary optic as part of the calibration system. The auxiliary optic is simple to characterize and align to the CGH. Use of the auxiliary optic also reduces the size of the CGH required for calibration and the density of the lines required for the CGH. The resulting CGH is less expensive than the existing technology and has reduced write error and alignment error sensitivities. This CGH system is suitable for any kind of calibration using an interferometer when high spatial resolution is required. It is especially well suited for tests that include segmented optical components or large apertures.

  17. Progress in updatable photorefractive polymer-based holographic displays via direct optical writing of computer-generated fringe patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Sundeep; Barabas, James; Smalley, Daniel; Bove, V. Michael

    2013-03-01

    We have previously introduced an architecture for updatable photorefractive holographic display based around direct fringe writing of computer-generated holographic fringe patterns. In contrast to interference-based stereogram techniques for hologram exposure in photorefractive polymer (PRP) materials, the direct fringe writing architecture simplifies system design, reduces system footprint and cost, and offers greater affordances over the types of holographic images that can be recorded. In this paper, motivations and goals for employing a direct fringe writing architecture for photorefractive holographic imagers are reviewed, new methods for PRP exposure by micro-optical fields generated via spatial light modulation and telecentric optics are described, and resulting holographic images are presented and discussed. Experimental results are reviewed in the context of theoretical indicators for system performance.

  18. SUMS calibration test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, G.

    1982-01-01

    Calibration was performed on the shuttle upper atmosphere mass spectrometer (SUMS). The results of the calibration and the as run test procedures are presented. The output data is described, and engineering data conversion factors, tables and curves, and calibration on instrument gauges are included. Static calibration results which include: instrument sensitive versus external pressure for N2 and O2, data from each scan of calibration, data plots from N2 and O2, and sensitivity of SUMS at inlet for N2 and O2, and ratios of 14/28 for nitrogen and 16/32 for oxygen are given.

  19. Standalone Calibration Toolset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, M.

    2013-12-01

    Radioxenon measurements require a well calibrated nuclear detector, which typically requires several weeks to perform a complex analysis of the resulting data to determine the detection efficiencies. To reduce the need to have an expert in nuclear physics, PNNL has developed a Standalone Calibration Toolset (SCT), which will aid an analyst in B-y nuclear detector calibration. SCT takes data generated from measurement of isotopically pure calibration samples: Xe-135, Xe-133, Xe-133m and Xe-131m, and generates nuclear detector configuration files. This will result in a simplified calibration and will make verification and corrections to b-g detectors routine.

  20. Slumped glass optics with interfacing ribs for high angular resolution x-ray astronomy: a progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civitani, M.; Basso, S.; Brizzolari, C.; Ghigo, M.; Pareschi, G.; Salmaso, B.; Spiga, D.; Vecchi, G.; Breunig, E.; Burwitz, V.; Hartner, G. D.; Menz, B.

    2015-09-01

    The Slumped Glass Optics technology, developed at INAF/OAB since a few years, is becoming a competitive solution for the realization of the future X-ray telescopes with a very large collecting area, as e.g. the proposed Athena, with more than 2 m2 effective area at 1 keV and with a high angular resolution (5'' HEW). The developed technique is based on modular elements, named X-ray Optical Units (XOUs), made of several layers of thin foils of glass, previously formed by direct hot slumping in cylindrical configuration, and then stacked in a Wolter-I configuration, through interfacing ribs. The achievable global angular resolution of the optics relies on the surface shape accuracy of the slumped foils, on the smoothness of the mirror surfaces and on the correct integration and co-alignment of the mirror segments achieved with a dedicated Integration Machine (IMA). In this paper we provide an update of the project development, reporting on the last results achieved. In particular, we will present the results obtained with full illumination X-ray tests for the last developed prototypes.

  1. Optical imaging in vivo with a focus on paediatric disease: technical progress, current preclinical and clinical applications and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Napp, Joanna; Mathejczyk, Julia E.

    2011-01-01

    To obtain information on the occurrence and location of molecular events as well as to track target-specific probes such as antibodies or peptides, drugs or even cells non-invasively over time, optical imaging (OI) technologies are increasingly applied. Although OI strongly contributes to the advances made in preclinical research, it is so far, with the exception of optical coherence tomography (OCT), only very sparingly applied in clinical settings. Nevertheless, as OI technologies evolve and improve continuously and represent relatively inexpensive and harmful methods, their implementation as clinical tools for the assessment of children disease is increasing. This review focuses on the current preclinical and clinical applications as well as on the future potential of OI in the clinical routine. Herein, we summarize the development of different fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging techniques for microscopic and macroscopic visualization of microstructures and biological processes. In addition, we discuss advantages and limitations of optical probes with distinct mechanisms of target-detection as well as of different bioluminescent reporter systems. Particular attention has been given to the use of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes enabling observation of molecular events in deeper tissue. PMID:21221568

  2. Progress of a Cross-correlation Based Optical Strain Measurement Technique for Detecting Radial Growth on a Rotating Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clem, Michelle M.; Woike, Mark; Abdul-Aziz, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The Aeronautical Sciences Project under NASAs Fundamental Aeronautics Program is extremely interested in the development of fault detection technologies, such as optical surface measurements in the internal parts of a flow path, for in situ health monitoring of gas turbine engines. In situ health monitoring has the potential to detect flaws, i.e. cracks in key components, such as engine turbine disks, before the flaws lead to catastrophic failure. In the present study, a cross-correlation imaging technique is investigated in a proof-of-concept study as a possible optical technique to measure the radial growth and strain field on an already cracked sub-scale turbine engine disk under loaded conditions in the NASA Glenn Research Centers High Precision Rotordynamics Laboratory. The optical strain measurement technique under investigation offers potential fault detection using an applied background consisting of a high-contrast random speckle pattern and imaging the background under unloaded and loaded conditions with a CCD camera. Spinning the cracked disk at high speeds induces an external load, resulting in a radial growth of the disk of approximately 50.8-m in the flawed region and hence, a localized strain field. When imaging the cracked disk under static conditions, the disk will appear shifted. The resulting background displacements between the two images will then be measured using the two-dimensional cross-correlation algorithms implemented in standard Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) software to track the disk growth, which facilitates calculation of the localized strain field. In order to develop and validate this optical strain measurement technique an initial proof-of-concept experiment is carried out in a controlled environment. Using PIV optimization principles and guidelines, three potential backgrounds, for future use on the rotating disk, are developed and investigated in the controlled experiment. A range of known shifts are induced on the

  3. Residual gas analyzer calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilienkamp, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    A technique which employs known gas mixtures to calibrate the residual gas analyzer (RGA) is described. The mass spectra from the RGA are recorded for each gas mixture. This mass spectra data and the mixture composition data each form a matrix. From the two matrices the calibration matrix may be computed. The matrix mathematics requires the number of calibration gas mixtures be equal to or greater than the number of gases included in the calibration. This technique was evaluated using a mathematical model of an RGA to generate the mass spectra. This model included shot noise errors in the mass spectra. Errors in the gas concentrations were also included in the valuation. The effects of these errors was studied by varying their magnitudes and comparing the resulting calibrations. Several methods of evaluating an actual calibration are presented. The effects of the number of gases in then, the composition of the calibration mixture, and the number of mixtures used are discussed.

  4. Improving the Generic Camera Calibration Technique by an Extended Model of Calibration Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reh, T.; Li, W.; Burke, J.; Bergmann, R. B.

    2014-10-01

    Generic camera calibration is a method to characterize vision sensors by describing a line of sight for every single pixel. This procedure frees the calibration process from the restriction to pinhole-like optics that arises in the common photogrammetric camera models. Generic camera calibration also enables the calibration of high-frequency distortions, which is beneficial for high-precision measurement systems. The calibration process is as follows: To collect sufficient data for calculating a line of sight for each pixel, active grids are used as calibration reference rather than static markers such as corners of chessboard patterns. A common implementation of active grids are sinusoidal fringes presented on a flat TFT display. So far, the displays have always been treated as ideally flat. In this work we propose new and more sophisticated models to account for additional properties of the active grid display: The refraction of light in the glass cover is taken into account as well as a possible deviation of the top surface from absolute flatness. To examine the effectiveness of the new models, an example fringe projection measurement system is characterized with the resulting calibration methods and with the original generic camera calibration. Evaluating measurements using the different calibration methods shows that the extended display model substantially improves the uncertainty of the measurement system.

  5. New approach for the radiometric calibration of spectral imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Kohler, David; Bissett, W; Steward, Robert; Davis, Curtiss

    2004-05-31

    The calibration of multispectral and hyperspectral imaging systems is typically done in the laboratory using an integrating sphere, which usually produces a signal that is red rich. Using such a source to calibrate environmental monitoring systems presents some difficulties. Not only is much of the calibration data outside the range and spectral quality of data values that are expected to be captured in the field, using these measurements alone may exaggerate the optical flaws found within the system. Left unaccounted for, these flaws will become embedded in to the calibration, and thus, they will be passed on to the field data when the calibration is applied. To address these issues, we used a series of well-characterized spectral filters within our calibration. It provided us with a set us stable spectral standards to test and account for inadequacies in the spectral and radiometric integrity of the optical imager.

  6. Transrectal ultrasound-integrated spectral optical tomography of hypoxic progression of a regressing tumor in a canine prostate.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Z; Piao, D; Bartels, K E; Holyoak, G R; Ritchey, J W; Ownby, C L; Rock, K; Slobodov, G

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate if transrectal optical tomography implemented at three wavelength bands for spectral detection could monitor changes of the hemoglobin oxygen saturation (StO2) in addition to those of the total hemoglobin concentration ([HbT]) in lesions of a canine prostate, including an induced tumor modeling canine prostate cancer. Near-infrared (NIR) optical tomography was integrated with ultrasound (US) for transrectal imaging. Multi-spectral detection at 705_nm, 785_nm and 808_nm rendered measurements of [HbT] and StO2. Canine transmissible venereal tumor (TVT) cells were injected into the right lobe of a dog's prostate gland, which had a pre-existing cyst in the left lobe. Longitudinal assessments of the prostate were performed weekly over a 63-day duration by NIR imaging concurrent with grey-scale and Doppler US. Ultrasonography revealed a bi-lobular tumor-mass regressing from day-49 to day-63. At day-49 this tumor-mass developed a hypoxic core that became larger and more intense by day-56 and expanded further by day-63. The tumor-mass presented a strong hyper-[HbT] feature on day-56 that was inconsistent with US-visualized blood flow. Histology confirmed two necrotic TVT foci within this tumor-mass. The cyst appeared to have a large anoxic-like interior that was greater in size than its ultrasonographically delineated lesion, and a weak lesional elevation of [HbT]. On day-56, the cyst presented a strong hyper-[HbT] feature consistent with US-resolved blood flow. Histology revealed acute and chronic hemorrhage in the periphery of the cyst. The NIR imaging features of two other TVT nodules and a metastatic lymph node were evaluated retrospectively. Transrectal US-integrated spectral optical tomography seems to enable longitudinal monitoring of intra-lesional oxygenation dynamics in addition to the hemoglobin content of lesions in the canine prostate.

  7. Maximally concentrating optics for photovoltaic solar energy conversion. Technical progress report, [July 1, 1985--February 15, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, R.; O`Gallagher, J.; Ning, X.

    1986-02-27

    The use of a two-stage concentrator with a fresnel lens primary and a non-imaging dielectric totally internally reflecting secondary, has unique advantages for photovoltaic concentration. This new design has a much larger acceptance angle than the conventional lens-cell concentrating system. In the continuation of this research, an optimally designed prototype which employs a 13.6-cm diameter flat fresnel tons as the primary focusing device, a dielectric compound hyperbolic concentrator (DCHC) as secondary and a 1-cm diameter high-concentration cell for electricity conversion has been built, tested and analyzed. Measurements under sunlight show that it has an angular acceptance of {plus_minus}3.6 degrees, which is dramatically better than the {plus_minus}0.5 degree achievable without a secondary concentrator. This performance agrees well with theoretical ray-tracing predictions. The secondary shows an optical efficiency of (91{plus_minus}2)% at normal incidence. Combining with the primary fresnel tens which has an optical efficiency of (82{plus_minus}2)%, tho two-stage system yields a total optical efficiency of (7l{plus_minus}2)%. The measurement of the system electrical performance yielded a net electrical efficiency of 11.9%. No problems associated with non-uniform cell illumination were found, as evidenced by the excellent fill factor of (79{plus_minus}2)% measured under concentration. The secondary geometrical properties and the optimal two-stage design procedures for various primary- cell combinations were systematical studied. A general design principle has been developed.

  8. Considerations for Calibrating a Laser Doppler Anemometer

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Michael L; Keck, Joe

    2010-01-01

    Laser Doppler Anemometers have long been the device-of-choice for air velocity measurements due to their avoidance of turbulence induced by insertion-method air velocity measurement devices. At first glance, the use of a Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA) for calibrating air velocity meters appears to be a relatively simple and straightforward process. As is typical in most metrological applications the process becomes much more complex when attempting to use the apparatus to make high-performance, metrology measurements. This paper focuses on the considerations for calibration of a LDA beginning with a discussion why an LDA needs to be calibrated. Other areas of discussion include alignment of the optics, dealing with imperfections in the alignment process, establishing the traceability of measurements from the apparatus and design and development of and experiences with using a calibration apparatus.

  9. Calibration of cameras with radially symmetric distortion.

    PubMed

    Tardif, Jean-Philippe; Sturm, Peter; Trudeau, Martin; Roy, Sébastien

    2009-09-01

    We present algorithms for plane-based calibration of general radially distorted cameras. By this, we understand cameras that have a distortion center and an optical axis such that the projection rays of pixels lying on a circle centered on the distortion center form a right viewing cone centered on the optical axis. The camera is said to have a single viewpoint (SVP) if all such viewing cones have the same apex (the optical center); otherwise, we speak of NSVP cases. This model encompasses the classical radial distortion model [5], fisheyes, and most central or noncentral catadioptric cameras. Calibration consists in the estimation of the distortion center, the opening angles of all viewing cones, and their optical centers. We present two approaches of computing a full calibration from dense correspondences of a single or multiple planes with known euclidean structure. The first one is based on a geometric constraint linking viewing cones and their intersections with the calibration plane (conic sections). The second approach is a homography-based method. Experiments using simulated and a broad variety of real cameras show great stability. Furthermore, we provide a comparison with Hartley-Kang's algorithm [12], which, however, cannot handle such a broad variety of camera configurations, showing similar performance.

  10. Uses of continuum radiation in the AXAF calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolodziejczak, J. J.; Austin, R. A.; Elsner, R. F.; O'Dell, S. L.; Sulkanen, M. E.; Swartz, D. A.; Tennant, A. F.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Zirnstein, G.; McDermott, W. C.

    1997-01-01

    X-ray calibration of the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) observatory at the MSFC X-Ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) made novel use of the x-ray continuum from a conventional electron-impact source. Taking advantage of the good spectral resolution of solid-state detectors, continuum measurements proved advantageous in calibrating the effective area of AXAF's High-Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) and in verifying its alignment to the XRCF's optical axis.

  11. User guide for the USGS aerial camera Report of Calibration.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tayman, W.P.

    1984-01-01

    Calibration and testing of aerial mapping cameras includes the measurement of optical constants and the check for proper functioning of a number of complicated mechanical and electrical parts. For this purpose the US Geological Survey performs an operational type photographic calibration. This paper is not strictly a scientific paper but rather a 'user guide' to the USGS Report of Calibration of an aerial mapping camera for compliance with both Federal and State mapping specifications. -Author

  12. Development of a multi-sensor in situ fiber optic fluorometer. Progress report, June 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lohrenz, S.E.; Asper, V.L.; Morris, M.J.; Walters, R.A.

    1992-12-01

    Objective is to develop and evaluate a multi-sensor in situ fiber optic fluorometer. The instrument is designed to sample and store in vivo strobe-stimulated fluorescence data at multiple depths and high frequencies (1 Hz). This information may be used for estimating the distribution and abundance of particulate pigment biomass, for supporting models of water column primary production and as a complement to remotely sensed ocean color estimates of pigment biomass. The instrument is unique in that it uses fiber optic technology to increase vertical resolution. While it is theoretically possible to accomplish this task using a large number of commercially available fluorometers, our proposed design would provide a less expensive approach. A laboratory prototype has been built and is being tested. Preliminary results indicate that the instrument meets all the project goals and that low cost, high frequency, high spatial resolution chlorophyll data are obtainable with the current design. Further work is required to develop the seagoing version, and optimize the configuration of the fiber sensors.

  13. Development of a multi-sensor in situ fiber optic fluorometer. Progress report, June 1, 1992--October 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lohrenz, S.E.; Asper, V.L.; Morris, M.J.; Walters, R.A.

    1993-11-01

    Our objective is to develop and evaluate a multi-sensor in situ fiber optic fluorometer. The instruments is designed to sample and store in vivo strobe-stimulated fluorescence data at multiple depths and high frequencies (1 Hz). This information may be used for estimating the distribution and abundance of particulate pigment biomass, for supporting models of water column primary production and as a complement to remotely sensed ocean color estimates of pigment biomass. The instrument is unique in that it uses fiber optic technology to increase vertical resolution. While it is theoretically possible to accomplish this task using a large number of commercially available fluorometers, our proposed design would provide a less expensive approach. Two prototype instruments have been built and are being tested. The first, a single sensor instrument interfaced with a 486 personal computer, has been used to optimize hardware and sensor design and to evaluate fiber performance an instrument detection limits. The second instrument, containing 8 sensors and capable of autonomous operation with time-series data acquisition and storage, was recently deployed in a cruise in the Gulf of Mexico. Preliminary results indicate that the instrument meets all the project goals and that low cost, high frequency, high spatial resolution fluorescence data are obtainable with the current design. Additional work will focus on further optimization of hardware design and software algorithms, and construction of an additional instrument specifically designed for deployement in the benthic boundary layer.

  14. Research progress of cholesteric liquid crystals with broadband reflection characteristics in application of intelligent optical modulation materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lan-Ying; Gao, Yan-Zi; Song, Ping; Wu, Xiao-Juan; Yuan, Xiao; He, Bao-Feng; Chen, Xing-Wu; Hu, Wang; Guo, Ren-Wei; Ding, Hang-Jun; Xiao, Jiu-Mei; Yang, Huai

    2016-09-01

    Cholesteric liquid crystals (CLCs) have recently sparked an enormous amount of interest in the development of soft matter materials due to their unique ability to self-organize into a helical supra-molecular architecture and their excellent selective reflection of light based on the Bragg relationship. Nowadays, by the virtue of building the self-organized nanostructures with pitch gradient or non-uniform pitch distribution, extensive work has already been performed to obtain CLC films with a broad reflection band. Based on authors’ many years’ research experience, this critical review systematically summarizes the physical and optical background of the CLCs with broadband reflection characteristics, methods to obtain broadband reflection of CLCs, as well as the application in the field of intelligent optical modulation materials. Combined with the research status and the advantages in the field, the important basic and applied scientific problems in the research direction are also introduced. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51573006, 51573003, 51203003, 51303008, 51302006, 51402006, 51272026, and 51273022), the Major Project of Beijing Science and Technology Program, China (Grant Nos. Z151100003315023 and Z141100003814011), and the Fok Ying Tung Education Foundation, China (Grant No. 142009).

  15. Progress in silicon-to-silicon direct bonding and its application to synchrotron x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect

    Graber, T.; Krasnicki, S.; Fernandez, P.B.

    1997-02-01

    X-ray optical elements (such as single-crystal silicon monochromators) illuminated with high-power synchrotron-radiation beams produced by insertion devices and, to a lesser extent bending magnets, require cooling, When operating a silicon crystal at room temperature, channels for the coolant are often fabricated directly beneath the diffracting surface. Then a separate silicon distribution manifold/plenum is manufactured, and the components are bonded together using an adhesive or some intermediate material. In many cases, such monochromators suffer from strains induced by the bond. A silicon-to-silicon direct-bonding technique (i.e., without any intermediate material) has been developed that appears to be an attractive method for creating a bond with less strain between two pieces of silicon. This technique is well understood for the case of thin wafers ({approximately}0.5 mm thickness) and is used by the semiconductor industry. Recently, bonding of 16-mm-thick 10-cm-diameter silicon crystals has been successfully performed inducing very little strain. A short review of the silicon-to-silicon crystals has been successfully performed inducing very little strain. A short review of the silicon-to-silicon direct-bonding process will be presented with an emphasis on its application to room temperature high-heat-load x-ray optics with the present status of direct bonding efforts at the APS.

  16. Wireless Inclinometer Calibration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    A special system was fabricated to properly calibrate the wireless inclinometer, a new device that will measure the Orbiter s hang angle. The wireless inclinometer has a unique design and method of attachment to the Orbiter that will improve the accuracy of the measurements, as well as the safety and ease of the operation. The system properly calibrates the four attached inclinometers, in both the horizontal and vertical axes, without needing to remove any of the component parts. The Wireless Inclinometer Calibration System combines (1) a calibration fixture that emulates the point of attachment to the Orbiter in both the horizontal and vertical axes and the measurement surfaces, (2) an application-specific software program that accepts calibration data such as dates, zero functions, or offsets and tables, and (3) a wireless interface module that enables the wireless inclinometer to communicate with a calibration PC.

  17. SAR calibration technology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. L.; Larson, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) calibration technology including a general description of the primary calibration techniques and some of the factors which affect the performance of calibrated SAR systems are reviewed. The use of reference reflectors for measurement of the total system transfer function along with an on-board calibration signal generator for monitoring the temporal variations of the receiver to processor output is a practical approach for SAR calibration. However, preliminary error analysis and previous experimental measurements indicate that reflectivity measurement accuracies of better than 3 dB will be difficult to achieve. This is not adequate for many applications and, therefore, improved end-to-end SAR calibration techniques are required.

  18. Transrectal Ultrasound-Integrated Spectral Optical Tomography of Hypoxic Progression of a Regressing Tumor in a Canine Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Z.; Piao, D.; Bartels, K. E.; Holyoak, G. R.; Ritchey, J. W.; Ownby, C. L.; Rock, K.; Slobodov, G.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate if transrectal optical tomography implemented at three wavelength bands for spectral detection could monitor changes of the hemoglobin oxygen saturation (StO2) in addition to those of the total hemoglobin concentration ([HbT]) in lesions of a canine prostate, including an induced tumor modeling canine prostate cancer. Near-infrared (NIR) optical tomography was integrated with ultrasound (US) for transrectal imaging. Multi-spectral detection at 705 nm, 785 nm and 808 nm rendered measurements of [HbT] and StO2. Canine transmissible venereal tumor (TVT) cells were injected into the right lobe of a dog's prostate gland, which had a pre-existing cyst in the left lobe. Longitudinal assessments of the prostate were performed weekly over a 63-day duration by NIR imaging concurrent with grey-scale and Doppler US. Ultrasonography revealed a bi-lobular tumor-mass regressing from day-49 to day-63. At day-49 this tumor-mass developed a hypoxic core that became larger and more intense by day-56 and expanded further by day-63. The tumor-mass presented a strong hyper-[HbT] feature on day-56 that was inconsistent with US-visualized blood flow. Histology confirmed two necrotic TVT foci within this tumor-mass. The cyst appeared to have a large anoxic-like interior that was greater in size than its ultrasonographically delineated lesion, and a weak lesional elevation of [HbT]. On day-56, the cyst presented a strong hyper-[HbT] feature consistent with US-resolved blood flow. Histology revealed acute and chronic hemorrhage in the periphery of the cyst. The NIR imaging features of two other TVT nodules and a metastatic lymph node were evaluated retrospectively. Transrectal US-integrated spectral optical tomography seems to enable longitudinal monitoring of intra-lesional oxygenation dynamics in addition to the hemoglobin content of lesions in the canine prostate. PMID:22066593

  19. Unassisted 3D camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanassov, Kalin; Ramachandra, Vikas; Nash, James; Goma, Sergio R.

    2012-03-01

    With the rapid growth of 3D technology, 3D image capture has become a critical part of the 3D feature set on mobile phones. 3D image quality is affected by the scene geometry as well as on-the-device processing. An automatic 3D system usually assumes known camera poses accomplished by factory calibration using a special chart. In real life settings, pose parameters estimated by factory calibration can be negatively impacted by movements of the lens barrel due to shaking, focusing, or camera drop. If any of these factors displaces the optical axes of either or both cameras, vertical disparity might exceed the maximum tolerable margin and the 3D user may experience eye strain or headaches. To make 3D capture more practical, one needs to consider unassisted (on arbitrary scenes) calibration. In this paper, we propose an algorithm that relies on detection and matching of keypoints between left and right images. Frames containing erroneous matches, along with frames with insufficiently rich keypoint constellations, are detected and discarded. Roll, pitch yaw , and scale differences between left and right frames are then estimated. The algorithm performance is evaluated in terms of the remaining vertical disparity as compared to the maximum tolerable vertical disparity.

  20. Force detection with an optically levitated microsphere in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjit, G.; Atherton, D.; Stutz, J.; Cunningham, M.; Karr, D.; Geraci, A. A.

    2014-05-01

    A microsphere levitated using purely optical forces in vacuum has a high quality factor and can be used as a micro-mechanical sensor for the precise measurements of small forces such as non-Newtonian gravity in the nanoscale regime and Casimir forces. In this talk, I will discuss the progress on our experiment towards the cooling of the center-of-mass motion of a dielectric microsphere trapped in an optical cavity. I will also discuss the calibration of the force sensitivity using known modulated electric fields. NSF grant PHY-1205994.

  1. Calibration of a Thomson scattering diagnostic for fluctuation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, H. D.; Borchardt, M. T.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Falkowski, A. F.; Holly, D. J.; O'Connell, R.; Reusch, J. A.

    2008-10-15

    Detailed calibrations of the Madison Symmetric Torus polychromator Thomson scattering system have been made suitable for electron temperature fluctuation measurements. All calibrations have taken place focusing on accuracy, ease of use and repeatability, and in situ measurements wherever possible. Novel calibration processes have been made possible with an insertable integrating sphere (ISIS), using an avalanche photodiode (APD) as a reference detector and optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Discussed are a novel in situ spatial calibration with the use of the ISIS, the use of an APD as a reference detector to streamline the APD calibration process, a standard dc spectral calibration, and in situ pulsed spectral calibration made possible with a combination of an OPO as a light source, the ISIS, and an APD used as a reference detector. In addition a relative quantum efficiency curve for the APDs is obtained to aid in uncertainty analysis.

  2. Radiometer Calibration and Characterization

    1994-12-31

    The Radiometer Calibration and Characterization (RCC) software is a data acquisition and data archival system for performing Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations (BORCAL). RCC provides a unique method of calibrating solar radiometers using techniques that reduce measurement uncertainty and better characterize a radiometer’s response profile. The RCC software automatically monitors and controls many of the components that contribute to uncertainty in an instrument’s responsivity.

  3. Progress with the Prime Focus Spectrograph for the Subaru Telescope: a massively multiplexed optical and near-infrared fiber spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, Hajime; Tamura, Naoyuki; Karoji, Hiroshi; Shimono, Atsushi; Takato, Naruhisa; Kimura, Masahiko; Ohyama, Youichi; Ueda, Akitoshi; Aghazarian, Hrand; de Arruda, Marcio V.; Barkhouser, Robert H.; Bennett, Charles L.; Bickerton, Steve; Bozier, Alexandre; Braun, David F.; Bui, Khanh; Capocasale, Christopher M.; Carr, Michael A.; Castilho, Bruno; Chang, Yin-Chang; Chen, Hsin-Yo; Chou, Richard C. Y.; Dawson, Olivia R.; Dekany, Richard G.; Ek, Eric M.; Ellis, Richard S.; English, Robin J.; Ferrand, Didier; Ferreira, Décio; Fisher, Charles D.; Golebiowski, Mirek; Gunn, James E.; Hart, Murdock; Heckman, Timothy M.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Hope, Stephen; Hovland, Larry E.; Hsu, Shu-Fu; Hu, Yen-Sang; Huang, Pin Jie; Jaquet, Marc; Karr, Jennifer E.; Kempenaar, Jason G.; King, Matthew E.; Le Fèvre, Olivier; Le Mignant, David; Ling, Hung-Hsu; Loomis, Craig; Lupton, Robert H.; Madec, Fabrice; Mao, Peter; Marrara, Lucas S.; Ménard, Brice; Morantz, Chaz; Murayama, Hitoshi; Murray, Graham J.; de Oliveira, Antonio Cesar; de Oliveira, Claudia M.; de Oliveira, Ligia S.; Orndorff, Joe D.; de Paiva Vilaça, Rodrigo; Partos, Eamon J.; Pascal, Sandrine; Pegot-Ogier, Thomas; Reiley, Daniel J.; Riddle, Reed; Santos, Leandro; dos Santos, Jesulino B.; Schwochert, Mark A.; Seiffert, Michael D.; Smee, Stephen A.; Smith, Roger M.; Steinkraus, Ronald E.; Sodré, Laerte; Spergel, David N.; Surace, Christian; Tresse, Laurence; Vidal, Clément; Vives, Sebastien; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Wen, Chih-Yi; Wu, Amy C.; Wyse, Rosie; Yan, Chi-Hung

    2014-07-01

    The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is an optical/near-infrared multi-fiber spectrograph with 2394 science fibers, which are distributed in 1.3 degree diameter field of view at Subaru 8.2-meter telescope. The simultaneous wide wavelength coverage from 0.38 μm to 1.26 μm, with the resolving power of 3000, strengthens its ability to target three main survey programs: cosmology, Galactic archaeology, and galaxy/AGN evolution. A medium resolution mode with resolving power of 5000 for 0.71 μm to 0.89 μm also will be available by simply exchanging dispersers. PFS takes the role for the spectroscopic part of the Subaru Measurement of Images and Redshifts (SuMIRe) project, while Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) works on the imaging part. HSC's excellent image qualities have proven the high quality of the Wide Field Corrector (WFC), which PFS shares with HSC. The PFS collaboration has succeeded in the project Preliminary Design Review and is now in a phase of subsystem Critical Design Reviews and construction. To transform the telescope plus WFC focal ratio, a 3-mm thick broad-band coated microlens is glued to each fiber tip. The microlenses are molded glass, providing uniform lens dimensions and a variety of refractive-index selection. After successful production of mechanical and optical samples, mass production is now complete. Following careful investigations including Focal Ratio Degradation (FRD) measurements, a higher transmission fiber is selected for the longest part of cable system, while one with a better FRD performance is selected for the fiber-positioner and fiber-slit components, given the more frequent fiber movements and tightly curved structure. Each Fiber positioner consists of two stages of piezo-electric rotary motors. Its engineering model has been produced and tested. After evaluating the statistics of positioning accuracies, collision avoidance software, and interferences (if any) within/between electronics boards, mass production will commence. Fiber

  4. The Science of Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a broad overview of the many issues involved in calibrating astronomical data, covering the full electromagnetic spectrum from radio waves to gamma rays, and considering both ground-based and space-based missions. These issues include the science drivers for absolute and relative calibration, the physics behind calibration and the mechanisms used to transfer it from the laboratory to an astronomical source, the need for networks of calibrated astronomical standards, and some of the challenges faced by large surveys and missions.

  5. Dual modality intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging: a fully automated algorithm for the distance-calibration of NIRF signal intensity for quantitative molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ughi, Giovanni J.; Verjans, Johan; Fard, Ali M.; Wang, Hao; Osborn, Eric; Hara, Tetsuya; Mauskapf, Adam; Jaffer, Farouc A.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) is a well-established method for the high-resolution investigation of atherosclerosis in vivo. Intravascular near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is a novel technique for the assessment of molecular processes associated with coronary artery disease. Integration of NIRF and IVOCT technology in a single catheter provides the capability to simultaneously obtain co-localized anatomical and molecular information from the artery wall. Since NIRF signal intensity attenuates as a function of imaging catheter distance to the vessel wall, the generation of quantitative NIRF data requires an accurate measurement of the vessel wall in IVOCT images. Given that dual modality, intravascular OCT-NIRF systems acquire data at a very high frame-rate (>100 frames/second), a high number of images per pullback need to be analyzed, making manual processing of OCT-NIRF data extremely time consuming. To overcome this limitation, we developed an algorithm for the automatic distance-correction of dual-modality OCT-NIRF images. We validated this method by comparing automatic to manual segmentation results in 180 in vivo images from 6 New Zealand White rabbit atherosclerotic after indocyanine-green (ICG) injection. A high Dice similarity coefficient was found (0.97 ± 0.03) together with an average individual A-line error of 22 μm (i.e., approximately twice the axial resolution of IVOCT) and a processing time of 44 ms per image. In a similar manner, the algorithm was validated using 120 IVOCT clinical images from 8 different in vivo pullbacks in human coronary arteries. The results suggest that the proposed algorithm enables fully automatic visualization of dual modality OCT-NIRF pullbacks, and provides an accurate and efficient calibration of NIRF data for quantification of the molecular agent in the atherosclerotic vessel wall. PMID:25341407

  6. Energy calibration of the fly's eye detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baltrusaitis, R. M.; Cassiday, G. L.; Cooper, R.; Elbert, J. W.; Gerhardy, P. R.; Ko, S.; Loh, E. C.; Mizumoto, Y.; Sokolsky, P.; Steck, D.

    1985-01-01

    The methods used to calibrate the Fly's eye detector to evaluate the energy of EAS are discussed. The energy of extensive air showers (EAS) as seen by the Fly's Eye detector are obtained from track length integrals of observed shower development curves. The energy of the parent cosmic ray primary is estimated by applying corrections to account for undetected energy in the muon, neutrino and hadronic channels. Absolute values for E depend upon the measurement of shower sizes N sub e(x). The following items are necessary to convert apparent optical brightness into intrinsical optical brightness: (1) an assessment of those factors responsible for light production by the relativistic electrons in an EAS and the transmission of light thru the atmosphere, (2) calibration of the optical detection system, and (3) a knowledge of the trajectory of the shower.

  7. Progress of a Cross-Correlation Based Optical Strain Measurement Technique for Detecting Radial Growth on a Rotating Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clem, Michelle M.; Woike, Mark R.; Abdul-Aziz, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The Aeronautical Sciences Project under NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program is interested in the development of novel measurement technologies, such as optical surface measurements for the in situ health monitoring of critical constituents of the internal flow path. In situ health monitoring has the potential to detect flaws, i.e. cracks in key components, such as engine turbine disks, before the flaws lead to catastrophic failure. The present study, aims to further validate and develop an optical strain measurement technique to measure the radial growth and strain field of an already cracked disk, mimicking the geometry of a sub-scale turbine engine disk, under loaded conditions in the NASA Glenn Research Center's High Precision Rotordynamics Laboratory. The technique offers potential fault detection by imaging an applied high-contrast random speckle pattern under unloaded and loaded conditions with a CCD camera. Spinning the cracked disk at high speeds (loaded conditions) induces an external load, resulting in a radial growth of the disk of approximately 50.0-µm in the flawed region and hence, a localized strain field. When imaging the cracked disk under static conditions, the disk will be undistorted; however, during rotation the cracked region will grow radially, thus causing the applied particle pattern to be 'shifted'. The resulting particle displacements between the two images is measured using the two-dimensional cross-correlation algorithms implemented in standard Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) software to track the disk growth, which facilitates calculation of the localized strain field. A random particle distribution is adhered onto the surface of the cracked disk and two bench top experiments are carried out to evaluate the technique's ability to measure the induced particle displacements. The disk is shifted manually using a translation stage equipped with a fine micrometer and a hotplate is used to induce thermal growth of the disk, causing the

  8. Superconductivity in epitaxially grown self-assembled indium islands: progress towards hybrid superconductor/semiconductor optical sources

    DOE PAGES

    Gehl, Michael; Gibson, Ricky; Zandbergen, Sander; Keiffer, Patrick; Sears, Jasmine; Khitrova, Galina

    2016-02-01

    Currently, superconducting qubits lead the way in potential candidates for quantum computing. This is a result of the robust nature of superconductivity and the non-linear Josephson effect which make possible many types of qubits. At the same time, transferring quantum information over long distances typically relies on the use of photons as the elementary qubit. Converting between stationary electronic qubits in superconducting systems and traveling photonic qubits is a challenging yet necessary goal for the interface of quantum computing and communication. The most promising path to achieving this goal appears to be the integration of superconductivity with optically active semiconductors,more » with quantum information being transferred between the two by means of the superconducting proximity effect. Obtaining good interfaces between superconductor and semiconductor is the next obvious step for improving these hybrid systems. As a result, we report on our observation of superconductivity in self-assembled indium structures grown epitaxially on the surface of semiconductor material.« less

  9. Estimation of lesion progress in artificial root caries by swept source optical coherence tomography in comparison to transverse microradiography.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Yuko; Nakashima, Syozi; Sadr, Alireza; Shimada, Yasushi; Tagami, Junji; Sumi, Yasunori

    2011-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) could estimate the lesion depth and mineral loss quantitatively without the use of polarization sensitivity, and to examine a relationship between OCT data and transverse microradiography (TMR) lesion parameters. Twenty-four bovine root dentin specimens were allocated to three groups of 4-, 7-, and 14-day demineralization. Cross-sectional images of the specimens before and after the demineralization were captured by OCT at 1319 nm center wavelength. Following the demineralization, these specimens were cut into sections for TMR analysis. Correlations between the OCT data and TMR lesion parameters were examined. TMR images of the specimens showed cavitated lesions (lesion depth or LD(TMR): 200 to 500 μm, ΔZ or mineral loss: 10,000 to 30,000 vol % μm). The OCT images showed "boundaries," suggesting the lesion front. Integrated dB values before and after the demineralization and their difference (R(D), R(S), and ΔR, respectively) were calculated from the lesion surface to the corrected depth of boundary (LD(OCT)). A statistically significant correlation was found between LD(OCT) and LD(TMR) (p < 0.05, r = 0.68). Similarly, statistically significant correlations were found between ΔZ and R(D) or ΔR. The OCT showed a potential for quantitative estimation of lesion depth and mineral loss with cavitated dentin lesions in vitro.

  10. Estimation of lesion progress in artificial root caries by swept source optical coherence tomography in comparison to transverse microradiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsume, Yuko; Nakashima, Syozi; Sadr, Alireza; Shimada, Yasushi; Tagami, Junji; Sumi, Yasunori

    2011-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) could estimate the lesion depth and mineral loss quantitatively without the use of polarization sensitivity, and to examine a relationship between OCT data and transverse microradiography (TMR) lesion parameters. Twenty-four bovine root dentin specimens were allocated to three groups of 4-, 7-, and 14-day demineralization. Cross-sectional images of the specimens before and after the demineralization were captured by OCT at 1319 nm center wavelength. Following the demineralization, these specimens were cut into sections for TMR analysis. Correlations between the OCT data and TMR lesion parameters were examined. TMR images of the specimens showed cavitated lesions (lesion depth or LDTMR: 200 to 500 μm, ΔZ or mineral loss: 10,000 to 30,000 vol % μm). The OCT images showed ``boundaries,'' suggesting the lesion front. Integrated dB values before and after the demineralization and their difference (RD, RS, and ΔR, respectively) were calculated from the lesion surface to the corrected depth of boundary (LDOCT). A statistically significant correlation was found between LDOCT and LDTMR (p < 0.05, r = 0.68). Similarly, statistically significant correlations were found between ΔZ and RD or ΔR. The OCT showed a potential for quantitative estimation of lesion depth and mineral loss with cavitated dentin lesions in vitro.

  11. Calibration and validation areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menard, Y.

    1984-08-01

    Difficulties in calibrating the SEASAT altimeter using the Bermuda laser site are recalled, and the use of Dakar (Senegal) for altimeter calibration is discussed. The site is flat, has clear skies for 200 to 250 days per year, and a local tide model is available. Atmospheric parameters can be studied using existing facilities with two additional weather stations.

  12. OLI Radiometric Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, Brian; Morfitt, Ron; Kvaran, Geir; Biggar, Stuart; Leisso, Nathan; Czapla-Myers, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Goals: (1) Present an overview of the pre-launch radiance, reflectance & uniformity calibration of the Operational Land Imager (OLI) (1a) Transfer to orbit/heliostat (1b) Linearity (2) Discuss on-orbit plans for radiance, reflectance and uniformity calibration of the OLI

  13. Sandia WIPP calibration traceability

    SciTech Connect

    Schuhen, M.D.; Dean, T.A.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the work performed to establish calibration traceability for the instrumentation used by Sandia National Laboratories at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) during testing from 1980-1985. Identifying the calibration traceability is an important part of establishing a pedigree for the data and is part of the qualification of existing data. In general, the requirement states that the calibration of Measuring and Test equipment must have a valid relationship to nationally recognized standards or the basis for the calibration must be documented. Sandia recognized that just establishing calibration traceability would not necessarily mean that all QA requirements were met during the certification of test instrumentation. To address this concern, the assessment was expanded to include various activities.

  14. SI-Traceable Calibrations of Celestial Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, C. E.; Lykke, K. R.; Woodward, J. T.

    2016-05-01

    Photometric calibration is currently the leading source of systematic uncertainty in supernova surveys that aim to determine the nature of dark energy. The bulk of this uncertainty is due to imperfect knowledge of the spectral energy distribution of stars used as primary standards. We review the challenges associated with establishing an absolute calibration of stellar spectra and describe how it is possible to do better by using recent advances in optical metrology, paying particular attention to the measurement chain establishing SI-traceability and reporting of measurement uncertainties.

  15. Calibrating Images from the MINERVA Cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercedes Colón, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The MINiature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) consists of an array of robotic telescopes located on Mount Hopkins, Arizona with the purpose of performing transit photometry and spectroscopy to find Earth-like planets around Sun-like stars. In order to make photometric observations, it is necessary to perform calibrations on the CCD cameras of the telescopes to take into account possible instrument error on the data. In this project, we developed a pipeline that takes optical images, calibrates them using sky flats, darks, and biases to generate a transit light curve.

  16. Source calibrations and SDC calorimeter requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.

    1992-10-01

    Several studies of the problem of calibration of the SDC calorimeter exist. In this note the attempt is made to give a connected account of the requirements on the source calibration from the point of view of the desired, and acceptable, constant term induced in the EM resolution. It is assumed that a ``local`` calibration resulting from exposing each tower to a beam of electrons is not feasible. It is further assumed that an ``in situ`` calibration is either not yet performed, or is unavailable due to tracking alignment problems or high luminosity operation rendering tracking inoperative. Therefore, the assumptions used are rather conservative. In this scenario, each scintillator plate of each tower is exposed to a moving radioactive source. That reading is used to ``mask`` an optical ``cookie`` in a grey code chosen so as to make the response uniform. The source is assumed to be the sole calibration of the tower. Therefore, the phrase ``global`` calibration of towers by movable radioactive sources is adopted.

  17. Source calibrations and SDC calorimeter requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.

    1992-10-01

    Several studies of the problem of calibration of the SDC calorimeter exist. In this note the attempt is made to give a connected account of the requirements on the source calibration from the point of view of the desired, and acceptable, constant term induced in the EM resolution. It is assumed that a local'' calibration resulting from exposing each tower to a beam of electrons is not feasible. It is further assumed that an in situ'' calibration is either not yet performed, or is unavailable due to tracking alignment problems or high luminosity operation rendering tracking inoperative. Therefore, the assumptions used are rather conservative. In this scenario, each scintillator plate of each tower is exposed to a moving radioactive source. That reading is used to mask'' an optical cookie'' in a grey code chosen so as to make the response uniform. The source is assumed to be the sole calibration of the tower. Therefore, the phrase global'' calibration of towers by movable radioactive sources is adopted.

  18. Simple transfer calibration method for a Cimel Sun-Moon photometer: calculating lunar calibration coefficients from Sun calibration constants.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengqiang; Li, Kaitao; Li, Donghui; Yang, Jiuchun; Xu, Hua; Goloub, Philippe; Victori, Stephane

    2016-09-20

    The Cimel new technologies allow both daytime and nighttime aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements. Although the daytime AOD calibration protocols are well established, accurate and simple nighttime calibration is still a challenging task. Standard lunar-Langley and intercomparison calibration methods both require specific conditions in terms of atmospheric stability and site condition. Additionally, the lunar irradiance model also has some known limits on its uncertainty. This paper presents a simple calibration method that transfers the direct-Sun calibration constant, V0,Sun, to the lunar irradiance calibration coefficient, CMoon. Our approach is a pure calculation method, independent of site limits, e.g., Moon phase. The method is also not affected by the lunar irradiance model limitations, which is the largest error source of traditional calibration methods. Besides, this new transfer calibration approach is easy to use in the field since CMoon can be obtained directly once V0,Sun is known. Error analysis suggests that the average uncertainty of CMoon over the 440-1640 nm bands obtained with the transfer method is 2.4%-2.8%, depending on the V0,Sun approach (Langley or intercomparison), which is comparable with that of lunar-Langley approach, theoretically. In this paper, the Sun-Moon transfer and the Langley methods are compared based on site measurements in Beijing, and the day-night measurement continuity and performance are analyzed.

  19. Simple transfer calibration method for a Cimel Sun-Moon photometer: calculating lunar calibration coefficients from Sun calibration constants.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengqiang; Li, Kaitao; Li, Donghui; Yang, Jiuchun; Xu, Hua; Goloub, Philippe; Victori, Stephane

    2016-09-20

    The Cimel new technologies allow both daytime and nighttime aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements. Although the daytime AOD calibration protocols are well established, accurate and simple nighttime calibration is still a challenging task. Standard lunar-Langley and intercomparison calibration methods both require specific conditions in terms of atmospheric stability and site condition. Additionally, the lunar irradiance model also has some known limits on its uncertainty. This paper presents a simple calibration method that transfers the direct-Sun calibration constant, V0,Sun, to the lunar irradiance calibration coefficient, CMoon. Our approach is a pure calculation method, independent of site limits, e.g., Moon phase. The method is also not affected by the lunar irradiance model limitations, which is the largest error source of traditional calibration methods. Besides, this new transfer calibration approach is easy to use in the field since CMoon can be obtained directly once V0,Sun is known. Error analysis suggests that the average uncertainty of CMoon over the 440-1640 nm bands obtained with the transfer method is 2.4%-2.8%, depending on the V0,Sun approach (Langley or intercomparison), which is comparable with that of lunar-Langley approach, theoretically. In this paper, the Sun-Moon transfer and the Langley methods are compared based on site measurements in Beijing, and the day-night measurement continuity and performance are analyzed. PMID:27661591

  20. EDITORIAL: Catalysing progress Catalysing progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-01-01

    procedures. One man who was well aware of the role of nanostructured catalysts in the progress of material science research was the late Ulrich Gösele, director at the Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik Halle, who passed away at the age of 60 on 8 November, 2009. Ulrich Gösele published over 750 papers of premium calibre research that have collectively been cited over 20,000 times. His research output includes a cornucopia of excellent work published in Nanotechnology, amongst which are a number of papers detailing the deft manipulation of nanocatalysts to control the quality and structure of nanomaterials [5-8]. Ulrich Gösele was a pioneer in nanoscience. In 1991, when the nanotechnology revolution was little more than a portentous rumble, he published a seminal report examining the effect of quantum confinement on the optical properties of silicon nanowires [9]. While we lament the loss to the community, we have much to celebrate in the insights his legacy has provided for the progress of materials science. It would be unwise to assume that science will or can ultimately advance in such a way as to allow ample means to indulge an unrestrained appetite for consumerism and energy consumption. As with most things, a balanced approach, considering solutions to the problem from many angles, seems sensible. Nonetheless, a browse through the latest literature leaves much cause for optimism for the positive role science can play in improving and sustaining our lifestyle. References [1] Mukherjee P, Roy M, Mandal B P, Dey G K, Mukherjee P K, Ghatak J, Tyagi A K and Kale S P 2008 Nanotechnology 19 075103 [2] Greenham N C and Grätzel M 2008 Nanotechnology 19 420201 [3] Vajo J, Pinkerton F and Stetson N 2009 Nanotechnology 20 200201 [4] Zhong C-J, Luo J, Fang B, Wanjala B N, Njoki P N, Loukrakpam R and Yin J 2010 Nanotechnology 21 062001 [5] Sivakov V A, Scholz A, Syrowatka F, Falk F, Gösele U and Christiansen S H 2009 Nanotechnology 20 405607 [6] Liu L, Lee W, Huang Z

  1. EDITORIAL: Catalysing progress Catalysing progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-01-01

    procedures. One man who was well aware of the role of nanostructured catalysts in the progress of material science research was the late Ulrich Gösele, director at the Max-Planck-Institut für Mikrostrukturphysik Halle, who passed away at the age of 60 on 8 November, 2009. Ulrich Gösele published over 750 papers of premium calibre research that have collectively been cited over 20,000 times. His research output includes a cornucopia of excellent work published in Nanotechnology, amongst which are a number of papers detailing the deft manipulation of nanocatalysts to control the quality and structure of nanomaterials [5-8]. Ulrich Gösele was a pioneer in nanoscience. In 1991, when the nanotechnology revolution was little more than a portentous rumble, he published a seminal report examining the effect of quantum confinement on the optical properties of silicon nanowires [9]. While we lament the loss to the community, we have much to celebrate in the insights his legacy has provided for the progress of materials science. It would be unwise to assume that science will or can ultimately advance in such a way as to allow ample means to indulge an unrestrained appetite for consumerism and energy consumption. As with most things, a balanced approach, considering solutions to the problem from many angles, seems sensible. Nonetheless, a browse through the latest literature leaves much cause for optimism for the positive role science can play in improving and sustaining our lifestyle. References [1] Mukherjee P, Roy M, Mandal B P, Dey G K, Mukherjee P K, Ghatak J, Tyagi A K and Kale S P 2008 Nanotechnology 19 075103 [2] Greenham N C and Grätzel M 2008 Nanotechnology 19 420201 [3] Vajo J, Pinkerton F and Stetson N 2009 Nanotechnology 20 200201 [4] Zhong C-J, Luo J, Fang B, Wanjala B N, Njoki P N, Loukrakpam R and Yin J 2010 Nanotechnology 21 062001 [5] Sivakov V A, Scholz A, Syrowatka F, Falk F, Gösele U and Christiansen S H 2009 Nanotechnology 20 405607 [6] Liu L, Lee W, Huang Z

  2. Calibration of acoustic transients.

    PubMed

    Burkard, Robert

    2006-05-26

    This article reviews the appropriate stimulus parameters (click duration, toneburst envelope) that should be used when eliciting auditory brainstem responses from mice. Equipment specifications required to calibrate these acoustic transients are discussed. Several methods of calibrating the level of acoustic transients are presented, including the measurement of peak equivalent sound pressure level (peSPL) and peak sound pressure level (pSPL). It is hoped that those who collect auditory brainstem response thresholds in mice will begin to use standardized methods of acoustic calibration, so that hearing thresholds across mouse strains obtained in different laboratories can more readily be compared.

  3. Dynamic Pressure Calibration Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, P. C.; Cate, K. H.; Young, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Vibrating columns of fluid used to calibrate transducers. Dynamic pressure calibration standard developed for calibrating flush diaphragm-mounted pressure transducers. Pressures up to 20 kPa (3 psi) accurately generated over frequency range of 50 to 1,800 Hz. System includes two conically shaped aluminum columns one 5 cm (2 in.) high for low pressures and another 11 cm (4.3 in.) high for higher pressures, each filled with viscous fluid. Each column mounted on armature of vibration exciter, which imparts sinusoidally varying acceleration to fluid column. Signal noise low, and waveform highly dependent on quality of drive signal in vibration exciter.

  4. Airdata Measurement and Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haering, Edward A., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This memorandum provides a brief introduction to airdata measurement and calibration. Readers will learn about typical test objectives, quantities to measure, and flight maneuvers and operations for calibration. The memorandum informs readers about tower-flyby, trailing cone, pacer, radar-tracking, and dynamic airdata calibration maneuvers. Readers will also begin to understand how some data analysis considerations and special airdata cases, including high-angle-of-attack flight, high-speed flight, and nonobtrusive sensors are handled. This memorandum is not intended to be all inclusive; this paper contains extensive reference and bibliography sections.

  5. Compact radiometric microwave calibrator

    SciTech Connect

    Fixsen, D. J.; Wollack, E. J.; Kogut, A.; Limon, M.; Mirel, P.; Singal, J.; Fixsen, S. M.

    2006-06-15

    The calibration methods for the ARCADE II instrument are described and the accuracy estimated. The Steelcast coated aluminum cones which comprise the calibrator have a low reflection while maintaining 94% of the absorber volume within 5 mK of the base temperature (modeled). The calibrator demonstrates an absorber with the active part less than one wavelength thick and only marginally larger than the mouth of the largest horn and yet black (less than -40 dB or 0.01% reflection) over five octaves in frequency.

  6. DIRBE External Calibrator (DEC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Clair L.; Thurgood, V. Alan; Allred, Glenn D.

    1987-01-01

    Under NASA Contract No. NAS5-28185, the Center for Space Engineering at Utah State University has produced a calibration instrument for the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE). DIRBE is one of the instruments aboard the Cosmic Background Experiment Observatory (COBE). The calibration instrument is referred to as the DEC (Dirbe External Calibrator). DEC produces a steerable, infrared beam of controlled spectral content and intensity and with selectable point source or diffuse source characteristics, that can be directed into the DIRBE to map fields and determine response characteristics. This report discusses the design of the DEC instrument, its operation and characteristics, and provides an analysis of the systems capabilities and performance.

  7. Calibration Fixture For Anemometer Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Charles R.; Nagel, Robert T.

    1993-01-01

    Fixture facilitates calibration of three-dimensional sideflow thermal anemometer probes. With fixture, probe oriented at number of angles throughout its design range. Readings calibrated as function of orientation in airflow. Calibration repeatable and verifiable.

  8. Use of rotating pinholes and reticles for calibration of cloud droplet instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovenac, Edward A.; Hirleman, E. Dan

    1991-01-01

    Calibration devices for the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP) and the Optical Array Probe (OAP) were developed. The device used with the FSSP is a rotating pinhole calibrator. It utilizes light diffracted by a pinhole of a known diameter to simulate scattered light from a water droplet. This device can be used to calibrate the FSSP, measure the FSSP's optical collection angles and for instrument alignment and troubleshooting. The device used with the OAP is a rotating reticle calibrator. Chrome disks of a known diameter on the reticle are used for calibration of the OAP and for determining the OAP's response to out-of-focus particles in the probe volume.

  9. Update on Optical Design of Adaptive Optics System at Lick Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B J; Gavel, D T; Waltjen, K E; Freeze, G J; Hurd, R L; Gates, E I; Max, C E; Olivier, S S; Pennington, D M

    2001-07-31

    In 1999, we presented our plan to upgrade the adaptive optics (AO) system on the Lick Observatory Shane telescope (3m) from a prototype instrument pressed into field service to a facility instrument. This paper updates the progress of that plan and details several important improvements in the alignment and calibration of the AO bench. The paper also includes a discussion of the problems seen in the original design of the tip/tilt (t/t) sensor used in laser guide star mode, and how these problems were corrected with excellent results.

  10. Roundness calibration standard

    DOEpatents

    Burrus, Brice M.

    1984-01-01

    A roundness calibration standard is provided with a first arc constituting the major portion of a circle and a second arc lying between the remainder of the circle and the chord extending between the ends of said first arc.

  11. Calibrated Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    C.F. Ahlers, H.H. Liu

    2001-12-18

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Calibrated Properties Model that provides calibrated parameter sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This work was performed in accordance with the AMR Development Plan for U0035 Calibrated Properties Model REV00 (CRWMS M&O 1999c). These calibrated property sets include matrix and fracture parameters for the UZ Flow and Transport Model (UZ Model), drift seepage models, drift-scale and mountain-scale coupled-processes models, and Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models as well as Performance Assessment (PA) and other participating national laboratories and government agencies. These process models provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal-loading conditions.

  12. Calibrated Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    C. Ahlers; H. Liu

    2000-03-12

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the Calibrated Properties Model that provides calibrated parameter sets for unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport process models for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This work was performed in accordance with the ''AMR Development Plan for U0035 Calibrated Properties Model REV00. These calibrated property sets include matrix and fracture parameters for the UZ Flow and Transport Model (UZ Model), drift seepage models, drift-scale and mountain-scale coupled-processes models, and Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) models as well as Performance Assessment (PA) and other participating national laboratories and government agencies. These process models provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal-loading conditions.

  13. Radar altimeter calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, C. R.

    1983-02-01

    The operating principles and design of a radar altimeter representative of those proposed of ERS-1 are described and geophysical influences on the measurements are discussed. General aspects of calibration are examined, and the critical areas of time and frequency resolution pointed out. A method of internal calibration of delay and backscatter coefficient, by rerouting the tramsitter signal, is described. External prelaunch calibration can be carried out by airborne trials, or using a return signal simulator. It is established that airborne calibration requires high altitudes and high speeds, and is likely to be difficult and expensive. The design of a return signal simulator is shown to be very difficult. No feasible design is identified.

  14. Absolute radiometric calibration of Landsat using a pseudo invariant calibration site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helder, D.; Thome, K.J.; Mishra, N.; Chander, G.; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Angal, A.; Choi, Tae-young

    2013-01-01

    Pseudo invariant calibration sites (PICS) have been used for on-orbit radiometric trending of optical satellite systems for more than 15 years. This approach to vicarious calibration has demonstrated a high degree of reliability and repeatability at the level of 1-3% depending on the site, spectral channel, and imaging geometries. A variety of sensors have used this approach for trending because it is broadly applicable and easy to implement. Models to describe the surface reflectance properties, as well as the intervening atmosphere have also been developed to improve the precision of the method. However, one limiting factor of using PICS is that an absolute calibration capability has not yet been fully developed. Because of this, PICS are primarily limited to providing only long term trending information for individual sensors or cross-calibration opportunities between two sensors. This paper builds an argument that PICS can be used more extensively for absolute calibration. To illustrate this, a simple empirical model is developed for the well-known Libya 4 PICS based on observations by Terra MODIS and EO-1 Hyperion. The model is validated by comparing model predicted top-of-atmosphere reflectance values to actual measurements made by the Landsat ETM+ sensor reflective bands. Following this, an outline is presented to develop a more comprehensive and accurate PICS absolute calibration model that can be Système international d'unités (SI) traceable. These initial concepts suggest that absolute calibration using PICS is possible on a broad scale and can lead to improved on-orbit calibration capabilities for optical satellite sensors.

  15. Colorimetric calibration of coupled infrared simulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Fei, Jindong; Gao, Yang; Du, Jian

    2015-10-01

    In order to test 2-color infrared sensors, a coupled infrared simulation system can generate radiometric outputs with wavelengths that range from less than 3 microns to more than 12 microns. There are two channels in the coupled simulation system, optically combined by a diachronic beam combiner. Each channel has an infrared blackbody, a filter, a diaphragm, and diaphragm-motors. The system is projected to the sensor under testing by a collimator. This makes it difficult to calibrate the system with only one-band thermal imager. Errors will be caused in the radiance levels measured by the narrow band thermal imager. This paper describes colorimetric temperature measurement techniques that have been developed to perform radiometric calibrations of these infrared simulation systems above. The calibration system consists of two infrared thermal imagers; one is operated at the wavelength range of MW-IR, and the other at the range of LW-IR.

  16. Auroral meridian scanning photometer calibration using Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackel, Brian J.; Unick, Craig; Creutzberg, Fokke; Baker, Greg; Davis, Eric; Donovan, Eric F.; Connors, Martin; Wilson, Cody; Little, Jarrett; Greffen, M.; McGuffin, Neil

    2016-10-01

    Observations of astronomical sources provide information that can significantly enhance the utility of auroral data for scientific studies. This report presents results obtained by using Jupiter for field cross calibration of four multispectral auroral meridian scanning photometers during the 2011-2015 Northern Hemisphere winters. Seasonal average optical field-of-view and local orientation estimates are obtained with uncertainties of 0.01 and 0.1°, respectively. Estimates of absolute sensitivity are repeatable to roughly 5 % from one month to the next, while the relative response between different wavelength channels is stable to better than 1 %. Astronomical field calibrations and darkroom calibration differences are on the order of 10 %. Atmospheric variability is the primary source of uncertainty; this may be reduced with complementary data from co-located instruments.

  17. Overview of the radiometric calibration of MOBY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Dennis K.; Feinholz, Michael; Yarbrough, Mark; Johnson, B. Carol; Brown, Steven W.; Kim, Yong S.; Barnes, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    The Marine Optical Buoy (MOBY) provides values of water- leaving radiance for the calibration and validation of satellite ocean color instruments. Located in clear, deep ocean waters near the Hawaiian Island of Lanai, MOBY measures the upwelling radiance and downwelling irradiance at three levels below the ocean surface plus the incident solar irradiance just above the surface. The radiance standards for MOBY are two integrating spheres with calibrations based on standards traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). For irradiance, the MOBY project uses standard lamps that are routinely calibrated at NIST. Wavelength calibrations are conducted with a series of emission lines observed from a set of low pressure lamps. Each MOBY instrument views these standards before and after its deployment to provide system responses (calibration coefficients). During each deployment, the stability of the MOBY spectrographs and internal optics are monitored using three internal reference sources. In addition, the collection optics for the instrument are cleaned and checked on a monthly basis while the buoy is deployed. Divers place lamps over the optics before and after each cleaning to monitor changes at the system level. As a hyperspectral instrument, MOBY uses absorption lines in the solar spectrum to monitor its wavelength stability. When logistically feasible during each deployment, coincident measurements are made with the predecessor buoy before that buoy's recovery. Measurements of the underwater light fields from the deployment vessel are compared with those from the buoy. Based on this set of absolute calibrations and the suite of stability reference measurements, a calibration history is created for each buoy. These calibration histories link the measurement time series from the set of MOBY buoys. In general, the differences between the pre- and post-deployment radiance calibrations of the buoys range from +1% to -6% with a definitive bias to

  18. Visible/infrared radiometric calibration station

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, D.A.; Maier, W.B. II; Bender, S.C.; Holland, R.F.; Michaud, F.D.; Luettgen, A.L.; Christensen, R.W.; O`Brian, T.R.

    1994-07-01

    We have begun construction of a visible/infrared radiometric calibration station that will allow for absolute calibration of optical and IR remote sensing instruments with clear apertures less than 16 inches in diameter in a vacuum environment. The calibration station broadband sources will be calibrated at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and allow for traceable absolute radiometric calibration to within {plus_minus}3% in the visible and near IR (0.4--2.5 {mu}m), and less than {plus_minus}1% in the infrared, up to 12 {mu}m. Capabilities for placing diffraction limited images or for sensor full-field flooding will exist. The facility will also include the calibration of polarization and spectral effects, spatial resolution, field of view performance, and wavefront characterization. The configuration of the vacuum calibration station consists of an off-axis 21 inch, f/3.2, parabolic collimator with a scanning fold flat in collimated space. The sources are placed, via mechanisms to be described, at the focal plane of the off-axis parabola. Vacuum system pressure will be in the 10{sup {minus}6} Torr range. The broadband white-light source is a custom design by LANL with guidance from Labsphere Inc. The continuous operating radiance of the integrating sphere will be from 0.0--0.006 W/cm{sup 2}/Sr/{mu}m (upper level quoted for {approximately}500 nm wavelength). The blackbody source is also custom designed at LANL with guidance from NIST. The blackbody temperature will be controllable between 250--350{degrees}K. Both of the above sources have 4.1 inch apertures with estimated radiometric instability at less than 1%. The designs of each of these units will be described. The monochromator and interferometer light sources are outside the vacuum, but all optical relay and beam shaping optics are enclosed within the vacuum calibration station. These sources are described, as well as the methodology for alignment and characterization.

  19. Polarization Calibration of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmore, D. F.

    2014-10-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) will be the World's largest solar polarimeter with a number of polarimetric instruments simultaneously sharing the ATST light beam. Polarization calibration requires determination of the polarization properties of the telescope optics that are shared by all instruments and the polarization response of each instrument. Hundreds of parameters are required to fully specify the telescope optics but by grouping successive optical elements separated at the Gregorian focus, the elevation rotation, and the Coudé - azimuth rotation and performing calibrations over the course of a day, it is possible to infer the polarization properties of each of the groups, and the instruments themselves with many fewer parameters.

  20. Study on self-calibration angle encoder using simulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Xue, Zi; Huang, Yao; Wang, Xiaona

    2016-01-01

    The angle measurement technology is very important in precision manufacture, optical industry, aerospace, aviation and navigation, etc. Further, the angle encoder, which uses concept `subdivision of full circle (2π rad=360°)' and transforms the angle into number of electronic pulse, is the most common instrument for angle measurement. To improve the accuracy of the angle encoder, a novel self-calibration method was proposed that enables the angle encoder to calibrate itself without angle reference. An angle deviation curve among 0° to 360° was simulated with equal weights Fourier components for the study of the self-calibration method. In addition, a self-calibration algorithm was used in the process of this deviation curve. The simulation result shows the relationship between the arrangement of multi-reading heads and the Fourier components distribution of angle encoder deviation curve. Besides, an actual self-calibration angle encoder was calibrated by polygon angle standard in national institute of metrology, China. The experiment result indicates the actual self-calibration effect on the Fourier components distribution of angle encoder deviation curve. In the end, the comparison, which is between the simulation self-calibration result and the experiment self-calibration result, reflects good consistency and proves the reliability of the self-calibration angle encoder.

  1. A Cryogenic Infrared Calibration Target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Kinzer, R. E., Jr.; Rinehart, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    A compact cryogenic calibration target is presented that has a peak diffuse reflectance, R < or = 0.003, from 800 to 4800/cm (12 - 2 microns ). Upon expanding the spectral range under consideration to 400-10,000/ cm-1 (25 - 1 microns) the observed performance gracefully degrades to R < or = 0.02 at the band edges. In the implementation described, a high-thermal-conductivity metallic substrate is textured with a pyramidal tiling and subsequently coated with a thin lossy dielectric coating that enables high absorption and thermal uniformity across the target. The resulting target assembly is lightweight, has a low-geometric profile, and has survived repeated thermal cycling from room temperature to approx.4 K. Basic design considerations, governing equations, and test data for realizing the structure described are provided. The optical properties of selected absorptive materials-Acktar Fractal Black, Aeroglaze Z306, and Stycast 2850 FT epoxy loaded with stainless steel powder-are characterized and presented

  2. The CALIFA Survey: Calibration Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husemann, B.; Sánchez, S. F.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Mast, D.; García-Benito, R.; Califa Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The currently ongoing Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) survey is aimed to observe ˜600 galaxies in the local Universe (0.005optical integral field spectroscopy. Here, we shortly introduce the main characteristics of the survey and discuss a few important steps related to the calibration of the data, focussing on the spectrophotometry and astrometry. Error estimation is always needed for a proper interpretation of astronomical data, so CALIFA will provide proper errors associated with the data. However, all CALIFA users need to be aware of the correlated noise that is unavoidable present in the data as we highlight at the end. We find that the overall quality of the data is excellent for all the core CALIFA science goals, but we are already prepared to increase the accuracy even more for future data releases.

  3. A new autosomal recessive non-progressive congenital cerebellar ataxia associated with mental retardation, optic atrophy, and skin abnormalities (CAMOS) maps to chromosome 15q24-q26 in a large consanguineous Lebanese Druze Family.

    PubMed

    Delague, Valérie; Bareil, Corinne; Bouvagnet, Patrice; Salem, Nabiha; Chouery, Eliane; Loiselet, Jacques; Mégarbané, André; Claustres, Mireille

    2002-03-01

    Congenital cerebellar ataxias are a heterogeneous group of non-progressive disorders characterized by hypotonia and developmental delay followed by the appearance of ataxia, and often associated with dysarthria, mental retardation, and atrophy of the cerebellum. We report the mapping of a disease gene in a large inbred Lebanese Druze family, with five cases of a new form of non-progressive autosomal recessive congenital ataxia associated with optic atrophy, severe mental retardation, and structural skin abnormalities, to a 3.6-cM interval on chromosome 15q24-15q26.

  4. Integrated calibration sphere and calibration step fixture for improved coordinate measurement machine calibration

    DOEpatents

    Clifford, Harry J.

    2011-03-22

    A method and apparatus for mounting a calibration sphere to a calibration fixture for Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM) calibration and qualification is described, decreasing the time required for such qualification, thus allowing the CMM to be used more productively. A number of embodiments are disclosed that allow for new and retrofit manufacture to perform as integrated calibration sphere and calibration fixture devices. This invention renders unnecessary the removal of a calibration sphere prior to CMM measurement of calibration features on calibration fixtures, thereby greatly reducing the time spent qualifying a CMM.

  5. Absolute Radiometric Calibration of EUNIS-06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, R. J.; Rabin, D. M.; Kent, B. J.; Paustian, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrometer (EUNIS) is a soundingrocket payload that obtains imaged high-resolution spectra of individual solar features, providing information about the Sun's corona and upper transition region. Shortly after its successful initial flight last year, a complete end-to-end calibration was carried out to determine the instrument's absolute radiometric response over its Longwave bandpass of 300 - 370A. The measurements were done at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in England, using the same vacuum facility and EUV radiation source used in the pre-flight calibrations of both SOHO/CDS and Hinode/EIS, as well as in three post-flight calibrations of our SERTS sounding rocket payload, the precursor to EUNIS. The unique radiation source provided by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) had been calibrated to an absolute accuracy of 7% (l-sigma) at 12 wavelengths covering our bandpass directly against the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY, which is itself a primary radiometric source standard. Scans of the EUNIS aperture were made to determine the instrument's absolute spectral sensitivity to +- 25%, considering all sources of error, and demonstrate that EUNIS-06 was the most sensitive solar E W spectrometer yet flown. The results will be matched against prior calibrations which relied on combining measurements of individual optical components, and on comparisons with theoretically predicted 'insensitive' line ratios. Coordinated observations were made during the EUNIS-06 flight by SOHO/CDS and EIT that will allow re-calibrations of those instruments as well. In addition, future EUNIS flights will provide similar calibration updates for TRACE, Hinode/EIS, and STEREO/SECCHI/EUVI.

  6. Optical modeling of liquid crystal biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Dae Kun; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2006-11-01

    Optical simulations of a liquid crystal biosensor device are performed using an integrated optical/textural model based on the equations of nematodynamics and two optical methods: the Berreman optical matrix method [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 62, 502 (1972)] and the discretization of the Maxwell equations based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. Testing the two optical methods with liquid crystal films of different degrees of orientational heterogeneities demonstrates that only the FDTD method is suitable to model this device. Basic substrate-induced texturing process due to protein adsorption gives rise to an orientation correlation function that is nearly linear with the transmitted light intensity, providing a basis to calibrate the device. The sensitivity of transmitted light to film thickness, protein surface coverage, and wavelength is established. A crossover incident light wavelength close to λco≈500nm is found, such that when λ >λco thinner films are more sensitive to the amount of protein surface coverage, while for λ <λco the reverse holds. In addition it is found that for all wavelengths the sensitivity increases with the amount of protein coverage. The integrated device model based on FDTD optical simulations in conjunction with the Landau-de Gennes nematodynamics model provides a rational basis for further progress in liquid crystal biosensor devices.

  7. Psychophysical contrast calibration

    PubMed Central

    To, Long; Woods, Russell L; Goldstein, Robert B; Peli, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Electronic displays and computer systems offer numerous advantages for clinical vision testing. Laboratory and clinical measurements of various functions and in particular of (letter) contrast sensitivity require accurately calibrated display contrast. In the laboratory this is achieved using expensive light meters. We developed and evaluated a novel method that uses only psychophysical responses of a person with normal vision to calibrate the luminance contrast of displays for experimental and clinical applications. Our method combines psychophysical techniques (1) for detection (and thus elimination or reduction) of display saturating nonlinearities; (2) for luminance (gamma function) estimation and linearization without use of a photometer; and (3) to measure without a photometer the luminance ratios of the display’s three color channels that are used in a bit-stealing procedure to expand the luminance resolution of the display. Using a photometer we verified that the calibration achieved with this procedure is accurate for both LCD and CRT displays enabling testing of letter contrast sensitivity to 0.5%. Our visual calibration procedure enables clinical, internet and home implementation and calibration verification of electronic contrast testing. PMID:23643843

  8. Polarimetric Palsar Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touzi, R.; Shimada, M.

    2008-11-01

    Polarimetric PALSAR system parameters are assessed using data sets collected over various calibration sites. The data collected over the Amazonian forest permits validating the zero Faraday rotation hypotheses near the equator. The analysis of the Amazonian forest data and the response of the corner reflectors deployed during the PALSAR acquisitions lead to the conclusion that the antenna is highly isolated (better than -35 dB). Theses results are confirmed using data collected over the Sweden and Ottawa calibration sites. The 5-m height trihedrals deployed in the Sweden calibration site by the Chalmers University of technology permits accurate measurement of antenna parameters, and detection of 2-3 degree Faraday rotation during day acquisition, whereas no Faraday rotation was noted during night acquisition. Small Faraday rotation angles (2-3 degree) have been measured using acquisitions over the DLR Oberpfaffenhofen and the Ottawa calibration sites. The presence of small but still significant Faraday rotation (2-3 degree) induces a CR return at the cross-polarization HV and VH that should not be interpreted as the actual antenna cross-talk. PALSAR antenna is highly isolated (better than -35 dB), and diagonal antenna distortion matrices (with zero cross-talk terms) can be used for accurate calibration of PALSAR polarimetric data.

  9. Calibration Under Uncertainty.

    SciTech Connect

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2005-03-01

    This report is a white paper summarizing the literature and different approaches to the problem of calibrating computer model parameters in the face of model uncertainty. Model calibration is often formulated as finding the parameters that minimize the squared difference between the model-computed data (the predicted data) and the actual experimental data. This approach does not allow for explicit treatment of uncertainty or error in the model itself: the model is considered the %22true%22 deterministic representation of reality. While this approach does have utility, it is far from an accurate mathematical treatment of the true model calibration problem in which both the computed data and experimental data have error bars. This year, we examined methods to perform calibration accounting for the error in both the computer model and the data, as well as improving our understanding of its meaning for model predictability. We call this approach Calibration under Uncertainty (CUU). This talk presents our current thinking on CUU. We outline some current approaches in the literature, and discuss the Bayesian approach to CUU in detail.

  10. A miniature remote deadweight calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Tcheng, Ping

    A miniature, computer-controlled, deadweight calibrator was developed to remotely calibrate a force transducer mounted in a cryogenic chamber. This simple mechanism allows automatic loading and unloading of deadweights placed onto a skin friction balance during calibrations. Equipment for the calibrator includes a specially designed set of five interlocking 200-milligram weights, a motorized lifting platform, and a controller box taking commands from a microcomputer on an IEEE interface. The computer is also used to record and reduce the calibration data and control other calibration parameters. The full-scale load for this device is 1,000 milligrams; however, the concept can be extended to accommodate other calibration ranges.

  11. Summarising the retinal vascular calibres in healthy, diabetic and diabetic retinopathy eyes.

    PubMed

    Leontidis, Georgios; Al-Diri, Bashir; Hunter, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Retinal vessel calibre has been found to be an important biomarker of several retinal diseases, including diabetic retinopathy (DR). Quantifying the retinal vessel calibres is an important step for estimating the central retinal artery and vein equivalents. In this study, an alternative method to the already established branching coefficient (BC) is proposed for summarising the vessel calibres in retinal junctions. This new method combines the mean diameter ratio with an alternative to Murray׳s cube law exponent, derived by the fractal dimension,experimentally, and the branch exponent of cerebral vessels, as has been suggested in previous studies with blood flow modelling. For the above calculations, retinal images from healthy, diabetic and DR subjects were used. In addition, the above method was compared with the BC and was also applied to the evaluation of arteriovenous ratio as a biomarker of progression from diabetes to DR in four consecutive years, i.e. three/two/one years before the onset of DR and the first year of DR. Moreover, the retinal arteries and veins around the optic nerve head were also evaluated. The new approach quantifies the vessels more accurately. The decrease in terms of the mean absolute percentage error was between 0.24% and 0.49%, extending at the same time the quantification beyond healthy subjects.

  12. Calibration Systems Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Broocks, Bryan T.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2006-02-01

    The Calibration Systems project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is aimed towards developing and demonstrating compact Quantum Cascade (QC) laser-based calibration systems for infrared imaging systems. These on-board systems will improve the calibration technology for passive sensors, which enable stand-off detection for the proliferation or use of weapons of mass destruction, by replacing on-board blackbodies with QC laser-based systems. This alternative technology can minimize the impact on instrument size and weight while improving the quality of instruments for a variety of missions. The potential of replacing flight blackbodies is made feasible by the high output, stability, and repeatability of the QC laser spectral radiance.

  13. Rain gauge calibration and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, John

    1994-01-01

    Prior to the Tropical Oceans Global Atmosphere-Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA-COARE), 42 Model 100 series optical gauges were tested in the rain simulator facility at Wallops Island before shipment to the field. Baseline measurements at several rain rates were made simultaneously with collector cans, tipping bucket, and a precision weighing gauge and held for post-COARE evaluation with a repeat set of measurements that were to be recorded after the instruments were returned. This was done as a means of detecting any calibration changes that might have occurred while deployed. Although it was known that the artificial rain in the simulator did not contain the required exponential distribution for accurate optical rain gauge rate measurements, use of the facility was necessary because it was the only means available for taking controlled observations with instruments that were received, tested, and shipped out in groups over a period of months. At that point, it was believed that these measurements would be adequately precise for detecting performance changes over time. However, analysis of the data by STI now indicates that this may not be true. Further study of the data will be undertaken to resolve this.

  14. Iterative Magnetometer Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sedlak, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an iterative method for three-axis magnetometer (TAM) calibration that makes use of three existing utilities recently incorporated into the attitude ground support system used at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The method combines attitude-independent and attitude-dependent calibration algorithms with a new spinning spacecraft Kalman filter to solve for biases, scale factors, nonorthogonal corrections to the alignment, and the orthogonal sensor alignment. The method is particularly well-suited to spin-stabilized spacecraft, but may also be useful for three-axis stabilized missions given sufficient data to provide observability.

  15. Multivariate calibration applied to the quantitative analysis of infrared spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Haaland, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    Multivariate calibration methods are very useful for improving the precision, accuracy, and reliability of quantitative spectral analyses. Spectroscopists can more effectively use these sophisticated statistical tools if they have a qualitative understanding of the techniques involved. A qualitative picture of the factor analysis multivariate calibration methods of partial least squares (PLS) and principal component regression (PCR) is presented using infrared calibrations based upon spectra of phosphosilicate glass thin films on silicon wafers. Comparisons of the relative prediction abilities of four different multivariate calibration methods are given based on Monte Carlo simulations of spectral calibration and prediction data. The success of multivariate spectral calibrations is demonstrated for several quantitative infrared studies. The infrared absorption and emission spectra of thin-film dielectrics used in the manufacture of microelectronic devices demonstrate rapid, nondestructive at-line and in-situ analyses using PLS calibrations. Finally, the application of multivariate spectral calibrations to reagentless analysis of blood is presented. We have found that the determination of glucose in whole blood taken from diabetics can be precisely monitored from the PLS calibration of either mind- or near-infrared spectra of the blood. Progress toward the non-invasive determination of glucose levels in diabetics is an ultimate goal of this research. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Dose calibration optimization and error propagation in polymer gel dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jirasek, A.; Hilts, M.

    2014-02-01

    This study reports on the relative precision, relative error, and dose differences observed when using a new full-image calibration technique in NIPAM-based x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry. The effects of calibration parameters (e.g. gradient thresholding, dose bin size, calibration fit function, and spatial remeshing) on subsequent errors in calibrated gel images are reported. It is found that gradient thresholding, dose bin size, and fit function all play a primary role in affecting errors in calibrated images. Spatial remeshing induces minimal reductions or increases in errors in calibrated images. This study also reports on a full error propagation throughout the CT gel image pre-processing and calibration procedure thus giving, for the first time, a realistic view of the errors incurred in calibrated CT polymer gel dosimetry. While the work is based on CT polymer gel dosimetry, the formalism is valid for and easily extended to MRI or optical CT dosimetry protocols. Hence, the procedures developed within the work are generally applicable to calibration of polymer gel dosimeters.

  17. GREAT optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner-Gentner, Armin; Graf, Urs U.; Philipp, Martin; Rabanus, David; Stutzki, Jürgen

    2004-10-01

    The German REceiver for Astronomy at Terahertz frequencies (GREAT) is a first generation PI instrument for the SOFIA telescope, developed by a collaboration between the MPIfR, KOSMA, DLR, and the MPAe. The first three institutes each contribute one heterodyne receiver channel to operate at 1.9, 2.7 and 4.7 THz, respectively. A later addition of a e.g. 1.4 THz channel is planned. The GREAT instrument is developed to carry two cryostats at once. That means that any two of the three frequencies can be observed simultaneously. Therefore, we need to be able to quickly exchange the optics benches, the local oscillator (LO) subsystems, and the cryostats containing the mixer devices. This demands a high modularity and flexibility of our receiver concept. Our aim is to avoid the need for realignment when swapping receiver channels. After an overview of the common GREAT optics, a detailed description of several parts (optics benches, calibration units, diplexer, focal plane imager) is given. Special emphasis is given to the LO optics of the KOSMA 1.9 THz channel, because its backward wave oscillator has an astigmatic output beam profile, which has to be corrected for. We developed astigmatic off-axis mirrors to compensate this astigmatism. The mirrors are manufactured in-house on a 5 axis CNC milling machine. We use this milling machine to obtain optical components with highest surface accuracy (about 5 microns) appropriate for these wavelengths. Based on the CNC machining capabilities we present our concept of integrated optics, which means to manufacture optical subsystems monolithically. The optics benches are located on three point mounts, which in conjunction with the integrated optics concept ensure the required adjustment free optics setup.

  18. Lattice Calibration with Turn-By-Turn BPM Data

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Sebek, James; /SLAC

    2012-07-02

    Turn-by-turn beam position monitor (BPM) data from multiple BPMs are fitted with a tracking code to calibrate magnet strengths in a manner similar to the well known LOCO code. Simulation shows that this turn-by-turn method can be a quick and efficient way for optics calibration. The method is applicable to both linacs and ring accelerators. Experimental results for a section of the SPEAR3 ring is also shown.

  19. Calibration aspects of the JEM-EUSO mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. H.; Ahmad, S.; Albert, J.-N.; Allard, D.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andreev, V.; Anzalone, A.; Arai, Y.; Asano, K.; Ave Pernas, M.; Baragatti, P.; Barrillon, P.; Batsch, T.; Bayer, J.; Bechini, R.; Belenguer, T.; Bellotti, R.; Belov, K.; Berlind, A. A.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Biktemerova, S.; Blaksley, C.; Blanc, N.; Błȩcki, J.; Blin-Bondil, S.; Blümer, J.; Bobik, P.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonamente, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Briz, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Capdevielle, J.-N.; Caruso, R.; Casolino, M.; Cassardo, C.; Castellinic, G.; Catalano, C.; Catalano, G.; Cellino, A.; Chikawa, M.; Christl, M. J.; Cline, D.; Connaughton, V.; Conti, L.; Cordero, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cremonini, R.; Csorna, S.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; de Castro, A. J.; De Donato, C.; de la Taille, C.; De Santis, C.; del Peral, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; De Simone, N.; Di Martino, M.; Distratis, G.; Dulucq, F.; Dupieux, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Engel, R.; Falk, S.; Fang, K.; Fenu, F.; Fernández-Gómez, I.; Ferrarese, S.; Finco, D.; Flamini, M.; Fornaro, C.; Franceschi, A.; Fujimoto, J.; Fukushima, M.; Galeotti, P.; Garipov, G.; Geary, J.; Gelmini, G.; Giraudo, G.; Gonchar, M.; González Alvarado, C.; Gorodetzky, P.; Guarino, F.; Guzmán, A.; Hachisu, Y.; Harlov, B.; Haungs, A.; Hernández Carretero, J.; Higashide, K.; Ikeda, D.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, N.; Inoue, S.; Insolia, A.; Isgrò, F.; Itow, Y.; Joven, E.; Judd, E. G.; Jung, A.; Kajino, F.; Kajino, T.; Kaneko, I.; Karadzhov, Y.; Karczmarczyk, J.; Karus, M.; Katahira, K.; Kawai, K.; Kawasaki, Y.; Keilhauer, B.; Khrenov, B. A.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, S.-W.; Kleifges, M.; Klimov, P. A.; Kolev, D.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kudela, K.; Kurihara, Y.; Kusenko, A.; Kuznetsov, E.; Lacombe, M.; Lachaud, C.; Lee, J.; Licandro, J.; Lim, H.; López, F.; Maccarone, M. C.; Mannheim, K.; Maravilla, D.; Marcelli, L.; Marini, A.; Martinez, O.; Masciantonio, G.; Mase, K.; Matev, R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mernik, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizumoto, Y.; Modestino, G.; Monaco, A.; Monnier-Ragaigne, D.; Morales de los Ríos, J. A.; Moretto, C.; Morozenko, V. S.; Mot, B.; Murakami, T.; Murakami, M. Nagano; Nagata, M.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Napolitano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nava, R.; Neronov, A.; Nomoto, K.; Nonaka, T.; Ogawa, T.; Ogio, S.; Ohmori, H.; Olinto, A. V.; Orleański, P.; Osteria, G.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Parizot, E.; Park, I. H.; Park, H. W.; Pastircak, B.; Patzak, T.; Paul, T.; Pennypacker, C.; Perez Cano, S.; Peter, T.; Picozza, P.; Pierog, T.; Piotrowski, L. W.; Piraino, S.; Plebaniak, Z.; Pollini, A.; Prat, P.; Prévôt, G.; Prieto, H.; Putis, M.; Reardon, P.; Reyes, M.; Ricci, M.; Rodríguez, I.; Rodríguez Frías, M. D.; Ronga, F.; Roth, M.; Rothkaehl, H.; Roudil, G.; Rusinov, I.; Rybczyński, M.; Sabau, M. D.; Sáez-Cano, G.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, A.; Sakaki, N.; Sakata, M.; Salazar, H.; Sánchez, S.; Santangelo, A.; Santiago Crúz, L.; Sanz Palomino, M.; Saprykin, O.; Sarazin, F.; Sato, H.; Sato, M.; Schanz, T.; Schieler, H.; Scotti, V.; Segreto, A.; Selmane, S.; Semikoz, D.; Serra, M.; Sharakin, S.; Shibata, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Shinozaki, K.; Shirahama, T.; Siemieniec-Oziȩbło, G.; Silva López, H. H.; Sledd, J.; Słomińska, K.; Sobey, A.; Sugiyama, T.; Supanitsky, D.; Suzuki, M.; Szabelska, B.; Szabelski, J.; Tajima, F.; Tajima, N.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Takami, H.; Takeda, M.; Takizawa, Y.; Tenzer, C.; Tibolla, O.; Tkachev, L.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Tone, N.; Toscano, S.; Trillaud, F.; Tsenov, R.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsuno, K.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Unger, M.; Vaduvescu, O.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vallania, P.; Valore, L.; Vankova, G.; Vigorito, C.; Villaseñor, L.; von Ballmoos, P.; Wada, S.; Watanabe, J.; Watanabe, S.; Watts, J.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T. J.; Wibig, T.; Wiencke, L.; Wille, M.; Wilms, J.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, J.; Yano, H.; Yashin, I. V.; Yonetoku, D.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshida, S.; Young, R.; Zotov, M. Yu.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.

    2015-11-01

    The JEM-EUSO telescope will be, after calibration, a very accurate instrument which yields the number of received photons from the number of measured photo-electrons. The project is in phase A (demonstration of the concept) including already operating prototype instruments, i.e. many parts of the instrument have been constructed and tested. Calibration is a crucial part of the instrument and its use. The focal surface (FS) of the JEM-EUSO telescope will consist of about 5000 photo-multiplier tubes (PMTs), which have to be well calibrated to reach the required accuracy in reconstructing the air-shower parameters. The optics system consists of 3 plastic Fresnel (double-sided) lenses of 2.5 m diameter. The aim of the calibration system is to measure the efficiencies (transmittances) of the optics and absolute efficiencies of the entire focal surface detector. The system consists of 3 main components: (i) Pre-flight calibration devices on ground, where the efficiency and gain of the PMTs will be measured absolutely and also the transmittance of the optics will be. (ii) On-board relative calibration system applying two methods: a) operating during the day when the JEM-EUSO lid will be closed with small light sources on board. b) operating during the night, together with data taking: the monitoring of the background rate over identical sites. (iii) Absolute in-flight calibration, again, applying two methods: a) measurement of the moon light, reflected on high altitude, high albedo clouds. b) measurements of calibrated flashes and tracks produced by the Global Light System (GLS). Some details of each calibration method will be described in this paper.

  20. Issues in Absolute Spectral Radiometric Calibration: Intercomparison of Eight Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Alexander F. H.; Kindel, Bruce; Pilewskie, Peter

    1998-01-01

    The application of atmospheric models to AVIRIS and other spectral imaging data to derive surface reflectance requires that the sensor output be calibrated to absolute radiance. Uncertainties in absolute calibration are to be expected, and claims of 92% accuracy have been published. Measurements of accurate surface albedos and cloud absorption to be used in radiative balance calculations depend critically on knowing the absolute spectral-radiometric response of the sensor. The Earth Observing System project is implementing a rigorous program of absolute radiometric calibration for all optical sensors. Since a number of imaging instruments that provide output in terms of absolute radiance are calibrated at different sites, it is important to determine the errors that can be expected among calibration sites. Another question exists about the errors in the absolute knowledge of the exoatmospheric spectral solar irradiance.