Science.gov

Sample records for optical cluster detections

  1. Optical galaxy cluster detection across a wide redshift range

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Jiangang

    2009-04-01

    The past decade is one of the most exciting period in the history of physics and astronomy. The discovery of cosmic acceleration dramatically changed our understanding about the evolution and constituents of the Universe. To accommodate the new acceleration phase into our well established Big Bang cosmological scenario under the frame work of General Relativity, there must exist a very special substance that has negative pressure and make up about 73% of the total energy density in our Universe. It is called Dark Energy. For the first time people realized that the vast majority of our Universe is made of things that are totally different from the things we are made of. Therefore, one of the major endeavors in physics and astronomy in the coming years is trying to understand, if we can, the nature of dark energy. Understanding dark energy cannot be achieved from pure logic. We need empirical evidence to finally determine about what is dark energy. The better we can constrain the energy density and evolution of the dark energy, the closer we will get to the answer. There are many ways to constrain the energy density and evolution of dark energy, each of which leads to degeneracy in certain directions in the parameter space. Therefore, a combination of complimentary methods will help to reduce the degeneracies and give tighter constraints. Dark energy became dominate over matter in the Universe only very recently (at about z ~ 1.5) and will affect both the cosmological geometry and large scale structure formation. Among the various experiments, some of them constrain the dark energy mainly via geometry (such as CMB, Supernovae) while some others provides constraints from both structures and geometry (such as BAO, Galaxy Clusters) Galaxy clusters can be used as a sensitive probe for cosmology. A large cluster catalog that extends to high redshift with well measured masses is indispensable for precisely constraining cosmological parameters. Detecting clusters in optical

  2. Optical protein detection based on magnetic clusters rotation.

    PubMed

    Ramiandrisoa, Donatien; Brient-Litzler, Elodie; Daynes, Aurélien; Compain, Eric; Bibette, Jérôme; Baudry, Jean

    2015-09-25

    In this paper we present a simple method to quantify aggregates of 200nm magnetic particles. This method relies on the optical and magnetic anisotropy of particle aggregates, whereas dispersed particles are optically isotropic. We orientate aggregates by applying short pulses of a magnetic field, and we measure optical density variation directly linked to this reorientation. By computing the scattering efficiency of doublets and singlets, we demonstrate the absolute quantification of a few % of doublets in a well dispersed suspension. More generally, these optical variations are related to the aggregation state of the sample. This method can be easily applied to an agglutination assay, where target proteins induce aggregation of colloidal particles. By observing only aligned clusters, we increase sensitivity and we reduce the background noise as compared to a classical agglutination assay: we obtain a detection limit on the C-reactive protein of less than 3pM for a total assay time of 10min.

  3. Distant Cluster Hunting. II; A Comparison of X-Ray and Optical Cluster Detection Techniques and Catalogs from the ROSAT Optical X-Ray Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, Megan; Scharf, Caleb A.; Mack, Jennifer; Lee, Y. Paul; Postman, Marc; Rosait, Piero; Dickinson, Mark; Voit, G. Mark; Stocke, John T.

    2002-01-01

    We present and analyze the optical and X-ray catalogs of moderate-redshift cluster candidates from the ROSA TOptical X-Ray Survey, or ROXS. The survey covers the sky area contained in the fields of view of 23 deep archival ROSA T PSPC pointings, 4.8 square degrees. The cross-correlated cluster catalogs were con- structed by comparing two independent catalogs extracted from the optical and X-ray bandpasses, using a matched-filter technique for the optical data and a wavelet technique for the X-ray data. We cross-identified cluster candidates in each catalog. As reported in Paper 1, the matched-filter technique found optical counter- parts for at least 60% (26 out of 43) of the X-ray cluster candidates; the estimated redshifts from the matched filter algorithm agree with at least 7 of 1 1 spectroscopic confirmations (Az 5 0.10). The matched filter technique. with an imaging sensitivity of ml N 23, identified approximately 3 times the number of candidates (155 candidates, 142 with a detection confidence >3 u) found in the X-ray survey of nearly the same area. There are 57 X-ray candidates, 43 of which are unobscured by scattered light or bright stars in the optical images. Twenty-six of these have fairly secure optical counterparts. We find that the matched filter algorithm, when applied to images with galaxy flux sensitivities of mI N 23, is fairly well-matched to discovering z 5 1 clusters detected by wavelets in ROSAT PSPC exposures of 8000-60,000 s. The difference in the spurious fractions between the optical and X-ray (30%) and IO%, respectively) cannot account for the difference in source number. In Paper I, we compared the optical and X-ray cluster luminosity functions and we found that the luminosity functions are consistent if the relationship between X-ray and optical luminosities is steep (Lx o( L&f). Here, in Paper 11, we present the cluster catalogs and a numerical simulation of the ROXS. We also present color-magnitude plots for several of the cluster

  4. Improving Glaucoma Detection Using Spatially Correspondent Clusters of Damage and by Combining Standard Automated Perimetry and Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Ali S.; Zhang, Xian; De Moraes, Carlos G. V.; Reisman, Charles A.; Liebmann, Jeffrey M.; Ritch, Robert; Hood, Donald C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To improve the detection of glaucoma, techniques for assessing local patterns of damage and for combining structure and function were developed. Methods. Standard automated perimetry (SAP) and frequency-domain optical coherence tomography (fdOCT) data, consisting of macular retinal ganglion cell plus inner plexiform layer (mRGCPL) as well as macular and optic disc retinal nerve fiber layer (mRNFL and dRNFL) thicknesses, were collected from 52 eyes of 52 healthy controls and 156 eyes of 96 glaucoma suspects and patients. In addition to generating simple global metrics, SAP and fdOCT data were searched for contiguous clusters of abnormal points and converted to a continuous metric (pcc). The pcc metric, along with simpler methods, was used to combine the information from the SAP and fdOCT. The performance of different methods was assessed using the area under receiver operator characteristic curves (AROC scores). Results. The pcc metric performed better than simple global measures for both the fdOCT and SAP. The best combined structure-function metric (mRGCPL&SAP pcc, AROC = 0.868 ± 0.032) was better (statistically significant) than the best metrics for independent measures of structure and function. When SAP was used as part of the inclusion and exclusion criteria, AROC scores increased for all metrics, including the best combined structure-function metric (AROC = 0.975 ± 0.014). Conclusions. A combined structure-function metric improved the detection of glaucomatous eyes. Overall, the primary sources of value-added for glaucoma detection stem from the continuous cluster search (the pcc), the mRGCPL data, and the combination of structure and function. PMID:24408977

  5. Adaptive cluster detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedenberg, David

    2010-10-01

    the rate of falsely detected active regions. Additionally we examine the more general field of clustering and develop a framework for clustering algorithms based around diffusion maps. Diffusion maps can be used to project high-dimensional data into a lower dimensional space while preserving much of the structure in the data. We demonstrate how diffusion maps can be used to solve clustering problems and examine the influence of tuning parameters on the results. We introduce two novel methods, the self-tuning diffusion map which replaces the global scaling parameter in the typical diffusion map framework with a local scaling parameter and an algorithm for automatically selecting tuning parameters based on a cross-validation style score called prediction strength. The methods are tested on several example datasets.

  6. Detecting galaxy clusters in the DLS and CARS: a Bayesian cluster finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascaso, B.; Wittman, D.; Benítez, N.

    2011-11-01

    The detection of galaxy clusters in present and future surveys enables measuring mass-to-light ratios, clustering properties or galaxy cluster abundances and therefore, constraining cosmological parameters. We present a new technique for detecting galaxy clusters, which is based on the Matched Filter Algorithm from a Bayesian point of view. The method is able to determine the position, redshift and richness of the cluster through the maximization of a filter depending on galaxy luminosity, density and photometric redshift combined with a galaxy cluster prior. We tested the algorithm through realistic mock galaxy catalogs, revealing that the detections are 100% complete and 80% pure for clusters up to z < 1.2 and richer than λ ≥ 25 (Abell richness ≥ 0). We applied the algorithm to the CFHTLS Archive Research Survey (CARS) data, recovering similar detections as previously published using the same data plus additional clusters that are very probably real. We also applied this algorithm to the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), obtaining the first sample of optical-selected galaxy in this survey. The sample is complete up to redshift 0.7 and we detect more than 780 cluster candidates up to redshift 1.2. We conclude by discussing the differences between previous weak lensing detections in this survey and optical detections in both samples.

  7. Optical Detection of Formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patty, Kira D.; Gregory, Don A.

    2008-01-01

    The potential for buildup .of formaldehyde in closed space environments poses a direct health hazard to personnel. The National Aeronautic Space Agency (NASA) has established a maximum permitted concentration of 0.04 ppm for 7 to 180 days for all space craft. Early detection is critical to ensure that formaldehyde levels do not accumulate. above these limits. New sensor technologies are needed to enable real time,in situ detection in a compact and reusable form factor. Addressing this need,research into the use of reactive fluorescent dyes which reversibly bind to formaldehyde (liquid or gas) has been conducted to support the development of a formaldehyde.sensor. In the presence of formaldehyde the dyes' characteristic fluorescence peaks shift providing the basis for an optical detection. Dye responses to formaldehyde exposure were characterized; demonstrating the optical detection of formaldehyde in under 10 seconds and down to concentrations of 0.5 ppm. To .incorporate the dye .in.an optical sensor device requires. a means of containing and manipulating the dye. Multiple form factors using two dissimilar sbstrates were considered to determine a suitable configuration. A prototype sensor was demonstrated and considerations for a field able sensor were presented. This research provides a necessary first step toward the development of a compact, reusable; real time optical formaldehyde sensor suitable for use in the U.S. space program,

  8. Detection of CO emission in Hydra 1 cluster galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huchtmeier, W. K.

    1990-01-01

    A survey of bright Hydra cluster spiral galaxies for the CO(1-0) transition at 115 GHz was performed with the 15m Swedish-ESO submillimeter telescope (SEST). Five out of 15 galaxies observed have been detected in the CO(1-0) line. The largest spiral galaxy in the cluster, NGC 3312, got more CO than any spiral of the Virgo cluster. This Sa-type galaxy is optically largely distorted and disrupted on one side. It is a good candidate for ram pressure stripping while passing through the cluster's central region. A comparison with global CO properties of Virgo cluster spirals shows a relatively good agreement with the detected Hydra cluster galaxies.

  9. Possible Very Distant or Optically Dark Cluster of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vikhlinin, Alexey; Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this proposal was an XMM followup observation of the extended X-ray source detected in our ROSAT PSPC cluster survey. Approximately 95% of extended X-ray sources found in the ROSAT data were optically identified as clusters of galaxies. However, we failed to find any optical counterparts for C10952-0148. Two possibilities remained prior to the XMM observation: (1) This is was a very distant or optically dark cluster of galaxies, too faint in the optical, in which case XMM would easily detect extended X-ray emission and (2) this was a group of point-like sources, blurred to a single extended source in the ROSAT data, but easily resolvable by XMM due to a better energy resolution. The XMM data have settled the case --- C10952-0148 is a group of 7 relatively bright point sources located within 1 square arcmin. All but one source have no optical counterparts down to I=22. Potentially, this can be an interesting group of quasars at a high redshift. We are planning further optical and infrared followup of this system.

  10. Is network clustering detectable in transmission trees?

    PubMed

    Welch, David

    2011-06-01

    Networks are often used to model the contact processes that allow pathogens to spread between hosts but it remains unclear which models best describe these networks. One question is whether clustering in networks, roughly defined as the propensity for triangles to form, affects the dynamics of disease spread. We perform a simulation study to see if there is a signal in epidemic transmission trees of clustering. We simulate susceptible-exposed-infectious-removed (SEIR) epidemics (with no re-infection) over networks with fixed degree sequences but different levels of clustering and compare trees from networks with the same degree sequence and different clustering levels. We find that the variation of such trees simulated on networks with different levels of clustering is barely greater than those simulated on networks with the same level of clustering, suggesting that clustering can not be detected in transmission data when re-infection does not occur.

  11. Low-dimensional clustering detects incipient dominant influenza strain clusters

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiankui; Deem, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    Influenza has been circulating in the human population and has caused three pandemics in the last century (1918 H1N1, 1957 H2N2 and 1968 H3N2). The 2009 A(H1N1) was classified by World Health Organization as the fourth pandemic. Influenza has a high evolution rate, which makes vaccine design challenging. We here consider an approach for early detection of new dominant strains. By clustering the 2009 A(H1N1) sequence data, we found two main clusters. We then define a metric to detect the emergence of dominant strains. We show on historical H3N2 data that this method is able to identify a cluster around an incipient dominant strain before it becomes dominant. For example, for H3N2 as of 30 March 2009, the method detects the cluster for the new A/British Columbia/RV1222/2009 strain. This strain detection tool would appear to be useful for annual influenza vaccine selection. PMID:21036781

  12. The cluster Abell 780: an optical view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durret, F.; Slezak, E.; Adami, C.

    2009-11-01

    Context: The Abell 780 cluster, better known as the Hydra A cluster, has been thouroughly analyzed in X-rays. However, little is known about its optical properties. Aims: We propose to derive the galaxy luminosity function (GLF) in this apparently relaxed cluster and to search for possible environmental effects by comparing the GLFs in various regions and by looking at the galaxy distribution at large scale around Abell 780. Methods: Our study is based on optical images obtained with the ESO 2.2m telescope and WFI camera in the B and R bands, covering a total region of 67.22 × 32.94 arcmin^2, or 4.235 × 2.075 Mpc2 for a cluster redshift of 0.0539. Results: In a region of 500 kpc radius around the cluster center, the GLF in the R band shows a double structure, with a broad and flat bright part and a flat faint end that can be fit by a power law with an index α ~ - 0.85 ± 0.12 in the 20.25 ≤ R ≤ 21.75 interval. If we divide this 500 kpc radius region in north+south or east+west halves, we find no clear difference between the GLFs in these smaller regions. No obvious large-scale structure is apparent within 5 Mpc from the cluster, based on galaxy redshifts and magnitudes collected from the NED database in a much larger region than that covered by our data, suggesting that there is no major infall of material in any preferential direction. However, the Serna-Gerbal method reveals a gravitationally bound structure of 27 galaxies, which includes the cD, and of a more strongly gravitationally bound structure of 14 galaxies. Conclusions: These optical results agree with the overall relaxed structure of Abell 780 previously derived from X-ray analyses. Based on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory, program ESO 68.A-0084(A), P. I. E. Slezak. This research has made use of the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED), which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics

  13. Hanle detection for optical clocks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaogang; Zhang, Shengnan; Pan, Duo; Chen, Peipei; Xue, Xiaobo; Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2015-01-01

    Considering the strong inhomogeneous spatial polarization and intensity distribution of spontaneous decay fluorescence due to the Hanle effect, we propose and demonstrate a universe Hanle detection configuration of electron-shelving method for optical clocks. Experimental results from Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard with electron-shelving method show that a designed Hanle detection geometry with optimized magnetic field direction, detection laser beam propagation and polarization direction, and detector position can improve the fluorescence collection rate by more than one order of magnitude comparing with that of inefficient geometry. With the fixed 423 nm fluorescence, the improved 657 nm optical frequency standard signal intensity is presented. The potential application of the Hanle detection geometry designed for facilitating the fluorescence collection for optical lattice clock with a limited solid angle of the fluorescence collection has been discussed. The Hanle detection geometry is also effective for ion detection in ion optical clock and quantum information experiments. Besides, a cylinder fluorescence collection structure is designed to increase the solid angle of the fluorescence collection in Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard.

  14. Optical-SZE Scaling Relations for DES Optically Selected Clusters within the SPT-SZ Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Saro, A.; et al.

    2016-05-27

    We study the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signature in South Pole Telescope (SPT) data for an ensemble of 719 optically identified galaxy clusters selected from 124.6 deg$^2$ of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) science verification data, detecting a stacked SZE signal down to richness $\\lambda\\sim20$. The SZE signature is measured using matched-filtered maps of the 2500 deg$^2$ SPT-SZ survey at the positions of the DES clusters, and the degeneracy between SZE observable and matched-filter size is broken by adopting as priors SZE and optical mass-observable relations that are either calibrated using SPT selected clusters or through the Arnaud et al. (2010, A10) X-ray analysis. We measure the SPT signal to noise $\\zeta$-$\\lambda$, relation and two integrated Compton-$y$ $Y_\\textrm{500}$-$\\lambda$ relations for the DES-selected clusters and compare these to model expectations accounting for the SZE-optical center offset distribution. For clusters with $\\lambda > 80$, the two SPT calibrated scaling relations are consistent with the measurements, while for the A10-calibrated relation the measured SZE signal is smaller by a factor of $0.61 \\pm 0.12$ compared to the prediction. For clusters at $20 < \\lambda < 80$, the measured SZE signal is smaller by a factor of $\\sim$0.20-0.80 (between 2.3 and 10~$\\sigma$ significance) compared to the prediction, with the SPT calibrated scaling relations and larger $\\lambda$ clusters showing generally better agreement. We quantify the required corrections to achieve consistency, showing that there is a richness dependent bias that can be explained by some combination of contamination of the observables and biases in the estimated masses. We discuss possible physical effects, as contamination from line-of-sight projections or from point sources, larger offsets in the SZE-optical centering or larger scatter in the $\\lambda$-mass relation at lower richnesses.

  15. Optical Detection System Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    cases the wavelength 7 II TABLE 2 SAMPLE CONTENTS OF OPTICAL MATERIAL FILE ODSOPT.INP SRF2 3.000 0.120 13.000 9.000 0.120 0.100 0.130 0.600 0.200 0.850...N THESE ARE THE AVAILABLE FILTER TYPES: CORNING VYCOR SILICA MGF2 SRF2 VYC7905 INFRASIL SAPPHIRE MGO 1102 CDISE CBS CDTE SE ZNSE CAF2 DIAMOND

  16. The Detection of Clusters with Spatial Heterogeneity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Zuoyi

    2011-01-01

    This thesis consists of two parts. In Chapter 2, we focus on the spatial scan statistics with overdispersion and Chapter 3 is devoted to the randomized permutation test for identifying local patterns of spatial association. The spatial scan statistic has been widely used in spatial disease surveillance and spatial cluster detection. To apply it, a…

  17. MASTER: optical transients detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanutsa, P.; Pogrosheva, T.; Lipunov, V.; Buckley, D.; Rebolo, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tiurina, N.; Kuznetsov, A.; Kornilov, V.; Gress, O.; Shumkov, V.; Ivanov, K.; Vladimirov, V.; Chazov, V.; Vlasenko, D.; Potter, S.; Shurpakov, S.

    2016-11-01

    MASTER-IAC auto-detection system ( Lipunov et al., "MASTER Global Robotic Net", Advances in Astronomy, 2010, 30L ) discovered OT source at (RA, Dec) = 18h 12m 58.26s +16d 02m 46.8s on 2016-11-06.81470 UT. The OT unfiltered magnitude is , mlim=18.0m.

  18. MASTER: optical transients detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanutsa, P.; Shurpakov, S.; Pogrosheva, T.; Lipunov, V.; Buckley, D.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tiurina, N.; Kuznetsov, A.; Kornilov, V.; Chazov, V.; Gorbunov, I.; Vlasenko, D.; Vladimirov, V.; Kuvshinov, D.; Ivanov, K.; Budnev, N.; Gress, O.

    2017-03-01

    MASTER-SAAO auto-detection system ( Lipunov et al., "MASTER Global Robotic Net", Advances in Astronomy, 2010, 30L ) discovered OT source at (RA, Dec) = 18h 49m 06.73s -27d 33m 34.9s on 2017-03-18.14205 UT. The OT unfiltered magnitude is 16.3m (mlim=18.2).

  19. Advances in Significance Testing for Cluster Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Deidra Andrea

    Over the past two decades, much attention has been given to data driven project goals such as the Human Genome Project and the development of syndromic surveillance systems. A major component of these types of projects is analyzing the abundance of data. Detecting clusters within the data can be beneficial as it can lead to the identification of specified sequences of DNA nucleotides that are related to important biological functions or the locations of epidemics such as disease outbreaks or bioterrorism attacks. Cluster detection techniques require efficient and accurate hypothesis testing procedures. In this dissertation, we improve upon the hypothesis testing procedures for cluster detection by enhancing distributional theory and providing an alternative method for spatial cluster detection using syndromic surveillance data. In Chapter 2, we provide an efficient method to compute the exact distribution of the number and coverage of h-clumps of a collection of words. This method involves defining a Markov chain using a minimal deterministic automaton to reduce the number of states needed for computation. We allow words of the collection to contain other words of the collection making the method more general. We use our method to compute the distributions of the number and coverage of h-clumps in the Chi motif of H. influenza.. In Chapter 3, we provide an efficient algorithm to compute the exact distribution of multiple window discrete scan statistics for higher-order, multi-state Markovian sequences. This algorithm involves defining a Markov chain to efficiently keep track of probabilities needed to compute p-values of the statistic. We use our algorithm to identify cases where the available approximation does not perform well. We also use our algorithm to detect unusual clusters of made free throw shots by National Basketball Association players during the 2009-2010 regular season. In Chapter 4, we give a procedure to detect outbreaks using syndromic

  20. Detecting clusters of disease with R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Rubio, V.; Ferrándiz-Ferragud, J.; López-Quílez, A.

    2005-06-01

    One of the main concerns of Public Health surveillance is the detection of clusters of disease, i. e., the presence of high incidence rates around a particular location, which usually means a higher risk of suffering from the disease under study (Aylin et al. 1999). Many methods have been proposed for cluster detection, ranging from visual inspection of disease maps to full Bayesian models analysed using MCMC. In this paper we describe the use and implementation, as a package for the R programming language, of several methods which have been widely used in the literature, such as Openshaw’s GAM, Stone’s test and others. Although some of the statistics involved in these methods have an asymptotical distribution, bootstrap will be used to estimate their actual sampling distributions.

  1. Optical detection of intravenous infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchester, Leonard W.; Chou, Nee-Yin

    2006-02-01

    Infiltration of medications during infusion therapy results in complications ranging from erythema and pain to tissue necrosis requiring amputation. Infiltration occurs from improper insertion of the cannula, separation of the cannula from the vein, penetration of the vein by the cannula during movement, and response of the vein to the medication. At present, visual inspection by the clinical staff is the primary means for detecting intravenous (IV) infiltration. An optical sensor was developed to monitor the needle insertion site for signs of IV infiltration. Initial studies on simulated and induced infiltrations on a swine model validated the feasibility of the methodology. The presence of IV infiltration was confirmed by visual inspection of the infusion site and/or absence of blood return in the IV line. Potential sources of error due to illumination changes, motion artifacts, and edema were also investigated. A comparison of the performance of the optical device and blinded expert observers showed that the optical sensor has higher sensitivity and specificity, and shorter detection time than the expert observers. An improved model of the infiltration monitoring device was developed and evaluated in a clinical study on induced infiltrations of healthy adult volunteers. The performance of the device was compared with the observation of a blinded expert observer. The results show that the rates of detection of infiltrations are 98% and 82% for the optical sensor and the observer, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the optical sensor are 0.97 and 0.98, respectively.

  2. Schlieren optics for leak detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peale, Robert E.; Ruffin, Alranzo B.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop an optical method of leak detection. Various modifications of schlieren optics were explored with initial emphasis on leak detection of the plumbing within the orbital maneuvering system of the space shuttle (OMS pod). The schlieren scheme envisioned for OMS pod leak detection was that of a high contrast pattern on flexible reflecting material imaged onto a negative of the same pattern. We find that the OMS pod geometry constrains the characteristic length scale of the pattern to the order of 0.001 inch. Our experiments suggest that optical modulation transfer efficiency will be very low for such patterns, which will limit the sensitivity of the technique. Optical elements which allow a negative of the scene to be reversibly recorded using light from the scene itself were explored for their potential in adaptive single-ended schlieren systems. Elements studied include photochromic glass, bacteriorhodopsin, and a transmissive liquid crystal display. The dynamics of writing and reading patterns were studied using intensity profiles from recorded images. Schlieren detection of index gradients in air was demonstrated.

  3. Optically detected magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, Aharon; Shapiro, Guy; Fischer, Ran; London, Paz; Gershoni, David

    2015-01-19

    Optically detected magnetic resonance provides ultrasensitive means to detect and image a small number of electron and nuclear spins, down to the single spin level with nanoscale resolution. Despite the significant recent progress in this field, it has never been combined with the power of pulsed magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Here, we demonstrate how these two methodologies can be integrated using short pulsed magnetic field gradients to spatially encode the sample. This result in what we denote as an 'optically detected magnetic resonance imaging' technique. It offers the advantage that the image is acquired in parallel from all parts of the sample, with well-defined three-dimensional point-spread function, and without any loss of spectroscopic information. In addition, this approach may be used in the future for parallel but yet spatially selective efficient addressing and manipulation of the spins in the sample. Such capabilities are of fundamental importance in the field of quantum spin-based devices and sensors.

  4. Optical Detection of Blade Flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieberding, W. C.; Pollack, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Dynamic strain gages mounted on rotor blades are used as the primary instrumentation for detecting the onset of flutter and defining the vibratory mode and frequency. Optical devices are evaluated for performing the same measurements as well as providing supplementary information on the vibratory characteristics. Two separate methods are studied: stroboscopic imagery of the blade tip and photoelectric scanning of blade tip motion. Both methods give visual data in real time as well as video tape records. The optical systems are described, and representative results are presented. The potential of this instrumentation in flutter research is discussed.

  5. The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey - XII. FIR properties of optically selected Virgo cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auld, R.; Bianchi, S.; Smith, M. W. L.; Davies, J. I.; Bendo, G. J.; di Serego, S. Alighieri; Cortese, L.; Baes, M.; Bomans, D. J.; Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Ciesla, L.; Clemens, M.; Corbelli, E.; De Looze, I.; Fritz, J.; Gavazzi, G.; Pappalardo, C.; Grossi, M.; Hunt, L. K.; Madden, S.; Magrini, L.; Pohlen, M.; Verstappen, J.; Vlahakis, C.; Xilouris, E. M.; Zibetti, S.

    2013-01-01

    The Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS) is the deepest, confusion-limited survey of the Virgo Cluster at far-infrared (FIR) wavelengths. The entire survey at full depth covers ˜55 deg2 in five bands (100-500 μm), encompassing the areas around the central dominant elliptical galaxies (M87, M86 and M49) and extends as far as the NW cloud, the W cloud and the Southern extension. The survey extends beyond this region with lower sensitivity so that the total area covered is 84 deg2. In this paper we describe the data, the data acquisition techniques and present the detection rates of the optically selected Virgo Cluster Catalogue (VCC). We detect 254 (34 per cent) of 750 VCC galaxies found within the survey boundary in at least one band and 171 galaxies are detected in all five bands. For the remainder of the galaxies we have measured strict upper limits for their FIR emission. The population of detected galaxies contains early as well as late types although the latter dominate the detection statistics. We have modelled 168 galaxies, showing no evidence of a strong synchrotron component in their FIR spectra, using a single-temperature modified blackbody spectrum with a fixed emissivity index (β = 2). A study of the χ2 distribution indicates that this model is not appropriate in all cases, and this is supported by the FIR colours which indicate a spread in β = 1-2. Statistical comparison of the dust mass and temperature distributions from 140 galaxies with χ2d.o.f. = 3 < 7.8 (95 per cent confidence level) shows that late types have typically colder, more massive dust reservoirs; the early-type dust masses have a mean of log[/M⊙] = 6.3 ± 0.3, while for late types log[/M⊙] = 7.1 ± 0.1. The late-type dust temperatures have a mean of = 19.4 ± 0.2 K, while for the early types, = 21.1 ± 0.8 K. Late-type galaxies in the cluster exhibit slightly lower dust masses than those in the field, but the cluster environment seems to have little effect on

  6. Cosmic dust detection by the Cluster spacecraft: First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaverka, Jakub; De Spiegeleer, Alexandre; Hamrin, Maria; Kero, Johan; Mann, Ingrid; Norberg, Carol; Pellinen-Wannberg, Asta; Pitkänen, Timo

    2016-04-01

    There are several different techniques that are used to measure cosmic dust entering the Earth's atmosphere such as space-born dust detectors, meteor and HPLA radars, and optical methods. One complementary method could be to use electric field instruments initially designed to measure electric waves. A plasma cloud generated by a hypervelocity dust impact on a spacecraft body can be detected by the electric field instruments commonly operated on spacecraft. Since Earth-orbiting missions are generally not equipped with conventional dust detectors, the electric field instruments offer an alternative method to measure the Earth's dust environment. We present the first detection of dust impacts on one of the Earth-orbiting Cluster satellites with the Wideband Data Plasma Wave Receiver (WBD). We first describe the concept of dust impact ionization and of the impact detection. Based on these considerations the mass and the velocity of the impinging dust grains can be estimated from the amplitude of the Cluster voltage pulses. In the case of the Cluster instrument an automatic gain control adjusts the dynamic range of the recorded signals. Depending on the gain level the impact signal can both be affected by saturation or be too weak for analysis. We describe how this influences the duty cycle of the impact measurements. We finally discuss the suitability of this method for monitoring dust fluxes near Earth and compare it with other methods.

  7. Detection of meteoroid hypervelocity impacts on the Cluster spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaverka, Jakub; Mann, Ingrid; Kero, Johan; De Spiegeleer, Alexandre; Hamrin, Maria; Norberg, Carol; Pitkanen, Timo; Pellinen-Wannberg, Asta

    2016-07-01

    There are several methods to measure the cosmic dust entering the Earth's atmosphere such as space-born dust detectors, meteor and HPLA radars, and optical imaging. One complementary method could be to use electric field instruments initially designed to measure electric waves. A plasma cloud generated by a hypervelocity dust impact on a spacecraft body can be detected by the electric field instruments commonly operated on the spacecraft. Since Earth-orbiting missions are generally not equipped with conventional dust detectors, the electric field instruments offer an alternative method to measure the Earth's dust environment. We present the first detection of dust impacts on one of the Earth-orbiting Cluster satellites recorded by the Wide-Band Data (WBD) instrument. We describe the concept of dust impact detection focused on specifics of the Cluster spacecraft and the WBD instrument and their influence on dust impact detection. The detected pulses are compared with theoretical shape based on the model of the recollection of plasma clouds electrons. The estimation of the size and the velocity of the impinging dust grains from the amplitude of the Cluster voltage pulses shown that such impacts can be generated by grains of radius of r = 0.1 μm impacting with the velocity v ˜100 km/s or by grains of radius r = 1 μm impacting with the velocity v ˜10 km/s. We discuss the sensitivity of this method for dust grain detection showing that grains of radius r = 0.01 μm can be detected when impacting with velocity v ˜300 km/s and grains of radius r = 10 μm with velocity v ˜1 km/s if the WBD instrument operates in the high gain level (75 dB).

  8. A Test for Cluster Bias: Detecting Violations of Measurement Invariance across Clusters in Multilevel Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jak, Suzanne; Oort, Frans J.; Dolan, Conor V.

    2013-01-01

    We present a test for cluster bias, which can be used to detect violations of measurement invariance across clusters in 2-level data. We show how measurement invariance assumptions across clusters imply measurement invariance across levels in a 2-level factor model. Cluster bias is investigated by testing whether the within-level factor loadings…

  9. α-Cluster Optical Potential Model of 40Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Zakaria M. M.; Behairy, Kassem O.

    2017-04-01

    Elastic scattering of α + 40Ca is analyzed in the framework of the optical model. We adopted an independent α-cluster model to generate the α-cluster and matter density of 40Ca. We proposed a parametrized form for the α-cluster density and fixed its parameters according to the available experimental data about the α-particle and 40Ca nuclei. The obtained α-cluster density of 40Ca is used to generate the real part of the optical potential. The single folding procedure is used to generate this real optical potential with two different effective α-α interactions. The real calculated potential supplied with an imaginary Woods-Saxon squared potential is used to analyze 20 sets of experimental data in the energy range between 18 and 166 MeV. We found that our model is successful in reproducing the data for energies above 40 MeV and still doubtful for lower energies.

  10. α-Cluster Optical Potential Model of 40Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Zakaria M. M.; Behairy, Kassem O.

    2017-01-01

    Elastic scattering of α + 40Ca is analyzed in the framework of the optical model. We adopted an independent α-cluster model to generate the α-cluster and matter density of 40Ca. We proposed a parametrized form for the α-cluster density and fixed its parameters according to the available experimental data about the α-particle and 40Ca nuclei. The obtained α-cluster density of 40Ca is used to generate the real part of the optical potential. The single folding procedure is used to generate this real optical potential with two different effective α-α interactions. The real calculated potential supplied with an imaginary Woods-Saxon squared potential is used to analyze 20 sets of experimental data in the energy range between 18 and 166 MeV. We found that our model is successful in reproducing the data for energies above 40 MeV and still doubtful for lower energies.

  11. Optical fibre gas detections systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culshaw, Brian

    2016-05-01

    This tutorial review covers the principles of and prospects for fibre optic sensor technology in gas detection. Many of the potential benefits common to fibre sensor technology also apply in the context of gas sensing - notably long distance - many km - access to multiple remote measurement points; invariably intrinsic safety; access to numerous important gas species and often uniquely high levels of selectivity and/or sensitivity. Furthermore, the range of fibre sensor network architectures - single point, multiple point and distributed - enable unprecedented flexibility in system implementation. Additionally, competitive technologies and regulatory issues contribute to final application potential.

  12. Applied study of optical interconnection link in computer cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ge; Tian, Jindong; Zhang, Nan; Jing, Wencai; Li, Haifeng

    2000-10-01

    In this paper, some study results to apply fiber link to a computer cluster are presented. The research is based on a ring network topology for a cluster system, which is connected by gigabit/s virtual parallel optical fiber link (VPOFLink) and its driver is for Linux Operating System, the transmission protocol of VPOFLink is compliant with Ethernet standard. We have studied the effect of different types of motherboard on transmission rate of the VPOFLink, and have analyzed the influence of optical interconnection network topology and computer networks protocol on the performance of this optical interconnection computer cluster. The round-trip transmission bandwidth of the VPOFLink have been tested, and the factors that limit transmission bandwidth, such as modes of forwarding data packets in the optical interconnection ring networks, and the size of the link buffer etc., are investigated.

  13. Resource-efficient generation of linear cluster states by linear optics with postselection

    DOE PAGES

    Uskov, D. B.; Alsing, P. M.; Fanto, M. L.; ...

    2015-01-30

    Here we report on theoretical research in photonic cluster-state computing. Finding optimal schemes of generating non-classical photonic states is of critical importance for this field as physically implementable photon-photon entangling operations are currently limited to measurement-assisted stochastic transformations. A critical parameter for assessing the efficiency of such transformations is the success probability of a desired measurement outcome. At present there are several experimental groups that are capable of generating multi-photon cluster states carrying more than eight qubits. Separate photonic qubits or small clusters can be fused into a single cluster state by a probabilistic optical CZ gate conditioned on simultaneousmore » detection of all photons with 1/9 success probability for each gate. This design mechanically follows the original theoretical scheme of cluster state generation proposed more than a decade ago by Raussendorf, Browne, and Briegel. The optimality of the destructive CZ gate in application to linear optical cluster state generation has not been analyzed previously. Our results reveal that this method is far from the optimal one. Employing numerical optimization we have identified that the maximal success probability of fusing n unentangled dual-rail optical qubits into a linear cluster state is equal to 1/2n-1; an m-tuple of photonic Bell pair states, commonly generated via spontaneous parametric down-conversion, can be fused into a single cluster with the maximal success probability of 1/4m-1.« less

  14. Resource-efficient generation of linear cluster states by linear optics with postselection

    SciTech Connect

    Uskov, D. B.; Alsing, P. M.; Fanto, M. L.; Kaplan, L.; Kim, R.; Szep, A.; Smith, A. M.

    2015-01-30

    Here we report on theoretical research in photonic cluster-state computing. Finding optimal schemes of generating non-classical photonic states is of critical importance for this field as physically implementable photon-photon entangling operations are currently limited to measurement-assisted stochastic transformations. A critical parameter for assessing the efficiency of such transformations is the success probability of a desired measurement outcome. At present there are several experimental groups that are capable of generating multi-photon cluster states carrying more than eight qubits. Separate photonic qubits or small clusters can be fused into a single cluster state by a probabilistic optical CZ gate conditioned on simultaneous detection of all photons with 1/9 success probability for each gate. This design mechanically follows the original theoretical scheme of cluster state generation proposed more than a decade ago by Raussendorf, Browne, and Briegel. The optimality of the destructive CZ gate in application to linear optical cluster state generation has not been analyzed previously. Our results reveal that this method is far from the optimal one. Employing numerical optimization we have identified that the maximal success probability of fusing n unentangled dual-rail optical qubits into a linear cluster state is equal to 1/2n-1; an m-tuple of photonic Bell pair states, commonly generated via spontaneous parametric down-conversion, can be fused into a single cluster with the maximal success probability of 1/4m-1.

  15. Optical and acoustical UAV detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christnacher, Frank; Hengy, Sébastien; Laurenzis, Martin; Matwyschuk, Alexis; Naz, Pierre; Schertzer, Stéphane; Schmitt, Gwenael

    2016-10-01

    Recent world events have highlighted that the proliferation of UAVs is bringing with it a new and rapidly increasing threat for national defense and security agencies. Whilst many of the reported UAV incidents seem to indicate that there was no terrorist intent behind them, it is not unreasonable to assume that it may not be long before UAV platforms are regularly employed by terrorists or other criminal organizations. The flight characteristics of many of these mini- and micro-platforms present challenges for current systems which have been optimized over time to defend against the traditional air-breathing airborne platforms. A lot of programs to identify cost-effective measures for the detection, classification, tracking and neutralization have begun in the recent past. In this paper, lSL shows how the performance of a UAV detection and tracking concept based on acousto-optical technology can be powerfully increased through active imaging.

  16. Optical fiber sensor for allergen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendoula, R.; Wacogne, B.; Giust, R.; Cherioux, F.; Sandoz, P.; Gharbi, T.

    2005-08-01

    The sensor is dedicated to the detection of allergens. We use a biochemical reaction in the vicinity of the core of an optical fiber which modifies the propagation conditions of the optical wave by evanescent coupling. The detection involves a intrinsic optical fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer.

  17. OPTICAL COLORS OF INTRACLUSTER LIGHT IN THE VIRGO CLUSTER CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Rudick, Craig S.; Mihos, J. Christopher; Harding, Paul; Morrison, Heather L.; Feldmeier, John J.; Janowiecki, Steven

    2010-09-01

    We continue our deep optical imaging survey of the Virgo cluster using the CWRU Burrell Schmidt telescope by presenting B-band surface photometry of the core of the Virgo cluster in order to study the cluster's intracluster light (ICL). We find ICL features down to {mu}{sub B} {approx}29 mag arcsec{sup -2}, confirming the results of Mihos et al., who saw a vast web of low surface brightness streams, arcs, plumes, and diffuse light in the Virgo cluster core using V-band imaging. By combining these two data sets, we are able to measure the optical colors of many of the cluster's low surface brightness features. While much of our imaging area is contaminated by galactic cirrus, the cluster core near the cD galaxy, M87, is unobscured. We trace the color profile of M87 out to over 2000'', and find a blueing trend with radius, continuing out to the largest radii. Moreover, we have measured the colors of several ICL features which extend beyond M87's outermost reaches and find that they have similar colors to the M87's halo itself, B - V {approx}0.8. The common colors of these features suggest that the extended outer envelopes of cD galaxies, such as M87, may be formed from similar streams, created by tidal interactions within the cluster, that have since dissolved into a smooth background in the cluster potential.

  18. The merging cluster of galaxies Abell 3376: an optical view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durret, F.; Perrot, C.; Lima Neto, G. B.; Adami, C.; Bertin, E.; Bagchi, J.

    2013-12-01

    Context. The cluster Abell 3376 is a merging cluster of galaxies at redshift z = 0.046. It is famous mostly for its giant radio arcs, and shows an elongated and highly substructured X-ray emission, but has not been analysed in detail at optical wavelengths. Aims: To improve our understanding of the effects of the major cluster merger on the galaxy properties, we analyse the galaxy luminosity function (GLF) in the B band in several regions as well as the dynamical properties of the substructures. Methods: We have obtained wide field images of Abell 3376 in the B band and derive the GLF applying a statistical subtraction of the background in three regions: a circle of 0.29 deg radius (1.5 Mpc) encompassing the whole cluster, and two circles centred on each of the two brightest galaxies (BCG2, northeast, coinciding with the peak of X-ray emission, and BCG1, southwest) of radii 0.15 deg (0.775 Mpc). We also compute the GLF in the zone around BCG1, which is covered by the WINGS survey in the B and V bands, by selecting cluster members in the red sequence in a (B - V) versus V diagram. Finally, we discuss the dynamical characteristics of the cluster implied by an analysis based on the Serna & Gerbal (SG) method. Results: The GLFs are not well fit by a single Schechter function, but satisfactory fits are obtained by summing a Gaussian and a Schechter function. The GLF computed by selecting galaxies in the red sequence in the region surrounding BCG1 can also be fit by a Gaussian plus a Schechter function. An excess of galaxies in the brightest bins is detected in the BCG1 and BCG2 regions. The dynamical analysis based on the SG method shows the existence of a main structure of 82 galaxies that can be subdivided into two main substructures of 25 and six galaxies. A smaller structure of six galaxies is also detected. Conclusions: The B band GLFs of Abell 3376 are clearly perturbed, as already found in other merging clusters. The dynamical properties are consistent with the

  19. Capillary Electrophoresis - Optical Detection Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sepaniak, M. J.

    2001-08-06

    Molecular recognition systems are developed via molecular modeling and synthesis to enhance separation performance in capillary electrophoresis and optical detection methods for capillary electrophoresis. The underpinning theme of our work is the rational design and development of molecular recognition systems in chemical separations and analysis. There have been, however, some subtle and exciting shifts in our research paradigm during this period. Specifically, we have moved from mostly separations research to a good balance between separations and spectroscopic detection for separations. This shift is based on our perception that the pressing research challenges and needs in capillary electrophoresis and electrokinetic chromatography relate to the persistent detection and flow rate reproducibility limitations of these techniques (see page 1 of the accompanying Renewal Application for further discussion). In most of our work molecular recognition reagents are employed to provide selectivity and enhance performance. Also, an emerging trend is the use of these reagents with specially-prepared nano-scale materials. Although not part of our DOE BES-supported work, the modeling and synthesis of new receptors has indirectly supported the development of novel microcantilevers-based MEMS for the sensing of vapor and liquid phase analytes. This fortuitous overlap is briefly covered in this report. Several of the more significant publications that have resulted from our work are appended. To facilitate brevity we refer to these publications liberally in this progress report. Reference is also made to very recent work in the Background and Preliminary Studies Section of the Renewal Application.

  20. Cluster optical coding: from biochips to counterfeit security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglmueller, Jakob; Alguel, Yilmaz; Mayer, Christian; Matyushin, Viacheslav; Bauer, Georg; Pittner, Fritz; Leitner, Alfred; Aussenegg, Franz R.; Schalkhammer, Thomas G.

    2004-07-01

    Spatially tuned resonant nano-clusters allow high local field enhancement when exited by electromagnetic radiation. A number of phenomena had been described and subsequently applied to novel nano- and bionano-devices. Decisive for these types of devices and sensors is the precise nanometric assembly, coupling the local field surrounding a cluster to allow resonance with other elements interacting with this field. In particular, the distance cluster-mirror or cluster-fluorophore gives rise to a variety of enhancement phenomena. High throughput transducers using metal cluster resonance technology are based on surface-enhancement of metal cluster light absorption (SEA). The optical property for the analytical application of metal cluster films is the so-called anomalous absorption. At a well defined nanometric distance of a cluster to a mirror the reflected electromagnetic field has the same phase at the position of the absorbing cluster as the incident fields. This feedback mechanism strongly enhances the effective cluster absorption coefficient. The system is characterised by a narrow reflection minimum. Based on this SEA-phenomenon (licensed to and further developed and optimized by NovemberAG, Germany Erlangen) a number of commercial products have been constructed. Brandsealing(R) uses the patented SEA cluster technology to produce optical codings. Cluster SEA thin film systems show a characteristic color-flip effect and are extremely mechanically and thermally robust. This is the basis for its application as an unique security feature. The specific spectroscopic properties as e.g. narrow band multi-resonance of the cluster layers allow the authentication of the optical code which can be easily achieved with a mobile hand-held reader developed by november AG and Siemens AG. Thus, these features are machine-readable which makes them superior to comparable technologies. Cluster labels are available in two formats: as a label for tamper-proof product packaging, and

  1. Excitonic effects and the optical absorption spectrum ofhydrogenated Si clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Rohlfing, Michael; Louie, Steven G.

    1997-10-19

    We calculate the optical absorption spectrum of hydrogen-terminated silicon clusters by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the two-particle Green's function using an ab initio approach. The one-particle Green's function and the electron-hole interaction kernel are calculated within the GW approximation for the electron self-energy operator. Very large exciton binding energies are observed. Our results for the one-particle properties and the optical absorption spectra of the clusters are in very good agreement with available experimental data.

  2. Visual verification and analysis of cluster detection for molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Grottel, Sebastian; Reina, Guido; Vrabec, Jadran; Ertl, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    A current research topic in molecular thermodynamics is the condensation of vapor to liquid and the investigation of this process at the molecular level. Condensation is found in many physical phenomena, e.g. the formation of atmospheric clouds or the processes inside steam turbines, where a detailed knowledge of the dynamics of condensation processes will help to optimize energy efficiency and avoid problems with droplets of macroscopic size. The key properties of these processes are the nucleation rate and the critical cluster size. For the calculation of these properties it is essential to make use of a meaningful definition of molecular clusters, which currently is a not completely resolved issue. In this paper a framework capable of interactively visualizing molecular datasets of such nucleation simulations is presented, with an emphasis on the detected molecular clusters. To check the quality of the results of the cluster detection, our framework introduces the concept of flow groups to highlight potential cluster evolution over time which is not detected by the employed algorithm. To confirm the findings of the visual analysis, we coupled the rendering view with a schematic view of the clusters' evolution. This allows to rapidly assess the quality of the molecular cluster detection algorithm and to identify locations in the simulation data in space as well as in time where the cluster detection fails. Thus, thermodynamics researchers can eliminate weaknesses in their cluster detection algorithms. Several examples for the effective and efficient usage of our tool are presented.

  3. Optical absorption spectra of palladium doped gold cluster cations

    SciTech Connect

    Kaydashev, Vladimir E.; Janssens, Ewald Lievens, Peter

    2015-01-21

    Photoabsorption spectra of gas phase Au{sub n}{sup +} and Au{sub n−1}Pd{sup +} (13 ≤ n ≤ 20) clusters were measured using mass spectrometric recording of wavelength dependent Xe messenger atom photodetachment in the 1.9–3.4 eV photon energy range. Pure cationic gold clusters consisting of 15, 17, and 20 atoms have a higher integrated optical absorption cross section than the neighboring sizes. It is shown that the total optical absorption cross section increases with size and that palladium doping strongly reduces this cross section for all investigated sizes and in particular for n = 14–17 and 20. The largest reduction of optical absorption upon Pd doping is observed for n = 15.

  4. Optical appearance of copper clusters and nanoparticles in zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petranovskii, Vitalii P.; Gurin, Valerij S.; Machorro, Roberto; Abbaspur, Alireza

    2004-08-01

    Copper incorporation into zeolites by the ion-exchange from Cu(II) solutions followed by different heat treatments results in a production of a number of species. Redistribution among different sites after dehydration, spontaneous and forced reduction, cluster and particle aggregation, etc. can occur, and a final copper state depends on type of zeolite, SiO2/Al2O3 molar ratio and processing conditions. Various species where observed: copper ions Cu2+ and Cu+, small particles and clusters Cun. We concentrate on the appearance of small copper clusters feasible in zeolites with size of cavities those match the cluster size. The clusters were simulated with ab initio quantum chemical calculations in the range of sizes 5 < n < 10 those are probable within zeolites cavities. Experimental data available on optical absorption of the reduced copper in the three types of zeolites can argue on the occurrence of the clusters stabilized within channels under mild reduction conditions while the larger copper nanoparticles appear under the harder reduction. The model calculation proposes some few-atomic copper clusters (Cun) as the candidates to fit the zeolite cavities with correspondence of the calculated absorption bands with the experimental spectra.

  5. Modulation and detection of optical signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, F. E.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of information is presented which is related to the modulation and detection of information on optical carriers. It emphasizes the treatment of information transfer through an entire system. The most common configurations are considered: intensity modulation, amplitude modulation, frequency or phase modulation, and both direct and coherent detection. In assessing these configurations information capacity and message signal-to-noise ratio are used as a basis of comparison. The physical and geometric treatment of optical heterodyne (or coherent) detection is given.

  6. Fiber optic sensors for corrosion detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Alphonso C.

    1993-01-01

    The development of fiber optic sensors for the detection of a variety of material parameters has grown tremendously over the past several years. Additionally, the potential for analytical applications of fiber optic sensors have become more widely used. New pH sensors have also been developed using fiber optic techniques to detect fluorescence characteristics from immobilized fluorogenic reagent chemicals. The primary purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using fiber optic sensors to detect the presence of Al(sup 3+) ions made in the process of environmental corrosion of aluminum materials. The Al(sup 3+) ions plus a variety of other type of metal ions can be detected using analytical techniques along with fiber optic sensors.

  7. Growth and optical properties of Ag clusters deposited on poly(ethylene terephthalate).

    PubMed

    Flores-Camacho, J M; Weidlinger, G; Sun, L D; Schmidegg, K; Hohage, M; Primetzhofer, D; Bauer, P; Zeppenfeld, P

    2011-07-08

    The growth and concomitant evolution of the optical properties of Ag nano-clusters deposited on biaxially extruded poly(ethylene terephthalate) films is studied by reflectance difference spectroscopy. It is demonstrated by low energy ion scattering and simulated optical spectra that the clusters form a two-dimensional layer buried beneath the surface of the substrate. The experimental spectra are described by simulations in which different configurations of the host such as anisotropy, amorphization, and dilution are considered in an effective medium approach. The contribution of the anisotropic substrate is used to explain the resulting line shapes. We also discuss the role of the rate of change of the filling fraction with Ag coverage in the evolution of the spectra and the detection of the onset of coalescence by optical means.

  8. Growth and optical properties of Ag clusters deposited on poly(ethylene terephthalate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Camacho, J. M.; Weidlinger, G.; Sun, L. D.; Schmidegg, K.; Hohage, M.; Primetzhofer, D.; Bauer, P.; Zeppenfeld, P.

    2011-07-01

    The growth and concomitant evolution of the optical properties of Ag nano-clusters deposited on biaxially extruded poly(ethylene terephthalate) films is studied by reflectance difference spectroscopy. It is demonstrated by low energy ion scattering and simulated optical spectra that the clusters form a two-dimensional layer buried beneath the surface of the substrate. The experimental spectra are described by simulations in which different configurations of the host such as anisotropy, amorphization, and dilution are considered in an effective medium approach. The contribution of the anisotropic substrate is used to explain the resulting line shapes. We also discuss the role of the rate of change of the filling fraction with Ag coverage in the evolution of the spectra and the detection of the onset of coalescence by optical means.

  9. Optical and near infrared photometry of Butcher-Oemler clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shier, Lisa M.; Rieke, Marcia J.

    1993-01-01

    Rich clusters of galaxies at moderate redshifts (z approx. .3) have a larger proportion of optically blue galaxies than their low redshift counterparts. Spectroscopic examination of the blue galaxies by various authors has shown that the blue galaxies are generally Seyferts, show evidence for recent star formation, or are foreground objects. Unfortunately, spectroscopy is too time consuming to be used on large samples. Thus, we have looked for a way to separate Seyferts, starbursts, ellipticals and nonmembers using photometry alone. Five moderate redshift clusters, Abell numbers 777, 963, 1758, 1961 and 2218, have been observed in the V, R and K bands. We model the spectral energy distributions of various kinds of galaxies found in clusters and derive observed colors. We have modeled the spectral energy distributions (SED) of several kinds of galaxies and compute their colors as a function of redshift. We expect to see ellipticals, spirals, starbursts, post-starburst and Seyfert galaxies. The SED of elliptical and Sbc galaxies was observed by Rieke and Rieke. The SEDs for the starburst galaxies was created by adding a reddened 10(exp 8) year old burst to a spiral galaxy SED. The post-starburst (E+A) galaxy SEDs are composed of a slightly reddened 10(exp 9) year old burst and elliptical galaxy SED. SEDs for the Seyferts were created by adding a v(exp -1.1) power law, and a hot dust thermal spectrum to the Sbc. From the SEDs the colors of galaxies at various redshifts with assorted filters were computed. Lilly & Gunn (1985) have optical and infrared photometry for a sample of galaxies in CL0024+1654 observed spectroscopically by Dressler, Gunn and Schneider (1985). We have used this data to choose the most appropriate SEDs for our starburst and post-starburst models. The most likely explanation for the optically blue colors in most cluster galaxies is star formation. Very few galaxies lie in the Seyfert locus. Abel 1758 has more Seyfert candidates than the other

  10. Prospects for clustering and lensing measurements with forthcoming intensity mapping and optical surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourtsidou, A.; Bacon, D.; Crittenden, R.; Metcalf, R. B.

    2016-06-01

    We explore the potential of using intensity mapping surveys (MeerKAT, SKA) and optical galaxy surveys (DES, LSST) to detect H I clustering and weak gravitational lensing of 21 cm emission in auto- and cross-correlation. Our forecasts show that high-precision measurements of the clustering and lensing signals can be made in the near future using the intensity mapping technique. Such studies can be used to test the intensity mapping method, and constrain parameters such as the H I density Ω _{H I}, the H I bias b_{H I} and the galaxy-H I correlation coefficient r_{H I-g}.

  11. Constraints on the Optical Depth of Galaxy Groups and Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flender, Samuel; Nagai, Daisuke; McDonald, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Future data from galaxy redshift surveys, combined with high-resolutions maps of the cosmic microwave background, will enable measurements of the pairwise kinematic Sunyaev–Zel’dovich (kSZ) signal with unprecedented statistical significance. This signal probes the matter-velocity correlation function, scaled by the average optical depth (τ) of the galaxy groups and clusters in the sample, and is thus of fundamental importance for cosmology. However, in order to translate pairwise kSZ measurements into cosmological constraints, external constraints on τ are necessary. In this work, we present a new model for the intracluster medium, which takes into account star formation, feedback, non-thermal pressure, and gas cooling. Our semi-analytic model is computationally efficient and can reproduce results of recent hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy cluster formation. We calibrate the free parameters in the model using recent X-ray measurements of gas density profiles of clusters, and gas masses of groups and clusters. Our observationally calibrated model predicts the average {τ }500 (i.e., the integrated τ within a disk of size R 500) to better than 6% modeling uncertainty (at 95% confidence level). If the remaining uncertainties associated with other astrophysical uncertainties and X-ray selection effects can be better understood, our model for the optical depth should break the degeneracy between optical depth and cluster velocity in the analysis of future pairwise kSZ measurements and improve cosmological constraints with the combination of upcoming galaxy and CMB surveys, including the nature of dark energy, modified gravity, and neutrino mass.

  12. A graph clustering method for community detection in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, HongFang; Li, Jin; Li, JunHuai; Zhang, FaCun; Cui, YingAn

    2017-03-01

    Information mining from complex networks by identifying communities is an important problem in a number of research fields, including the social sciences, biology, physics and medicine. First, two concepts are introduced, Attracting Degree and Recommending Degree. Second, a graph clustering method, referred to as AR-Cluster, is presented for detecting community structures in complex networks. Third, a novel collaborative similarity measure is adopted to calculate node similarities. In the AR-Cluster method, vertices are grouped together based on calculated similarity under a K-Medoids framework. Extensive experimental results on two real datasets show the effectiveness of AR-Cluster.

  13. Efficient calculation of optical linear response of large silicon clusters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Gefei; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2005-03-01

    Nanoscale silicon clusters have potential applications as light-emitting devices and bio-sensors. Ab initio calculations of the optical linear response of small-size nanoparticles have been performed via time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT)^1 and by solving many-body Bethe-Salpeter equations (MBSE)^2,3. We show that the ab initio calculations can be made much more efficient when the nanocluster possess high point group symmetry and symmetrized basis functions are used. This allows us to extend the ab initio calculation to much larger Si clusters (up to a few hundred Si atoms) on a personal computer. The optical linear response of Si nanocluster (passivated with hydrogen) as a function of cluster size is examined. The effect of phosphorus doping of Si nanocluster on its optical properties is also studied.1. Ogũt,S., J. R. Chelikowsky, and S. G. Louie, PRL 80, 3162(1998); Marques, M., A. Castro, and A. Rubio, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 3006(2001). 2. Rohlfing, M., and S. G. Louie, PRL 80, 3320(1998);PRB 62, 4927(2000). 3. Grossman, J. C., M. Rohlfing, L. Mitas, S. G. Louie, and M. L. Cohen,PRL 86, 472(2001).

  14. Combined hostile fire and optics detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brännlund, Carl; Tidström, Jonas; Henriksson, Markus; Sjöqvist, Lars

    2013-10-01

    Snipers and other optically guided weapon systems are serious threats in military operations. We have studied a SWIR (Short Wave Infrared) camera-based system with capability to detect and locate snipers both before and after shot over a large field-of-view. The high frame rate SWIR-camera allows resolution of the temporal profile of muzzle flashes which is the infrared signature associated with the ejection of the bullet from the rifle. The capability to detect and discriminate sniper muzzle flashes with this system has been verified by FOI in earlier studies. In this work we have extended the system by adding a laser channel for optics detection. A laser diode with slit-shaped beam profile is scanned over the camera field-of-view to detect retro reflection from optical sights. The optics detection system has been tested at various distances up to 1.15 km showing the feasibility to detect rifle scopes in full daylight. The high speed camera gives the possibility to discriminate false alarms by analyzing the temporal data. The intensity variation, caused by atmospheric turbulence, enables discrimination of small sights from larger reflectors due to aperture averaging, although the targets only cover a single pixel. It is shown that optics detection can be integrated in combination with muzzle flash detection by adding a scanning rectangular laser slit. The overall optics detection capability by continuous surveillance of a relatively large field-of-view looks promising. This type of multifunctional system may become an important tool to detect snipers before and after shot.

  15. Optical Detection Of Cryogenic Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, Lynn M.

    1988-01-01

    Conceptual system identifies leakage without requiring shutdown for testing. Proposed device detects and indicates leaks of cryogenic liquids automatically. Detector makes it unnecessary to shut equipment down so it can be checked for leakage by soap-bubble or helium-detection methods. Not necessary to mix special gases or other materials with cryogenic liquid flowing through equipment.

  16. Optical Sizing of Immunolabel Clusters through Multispectral Plasmon Coupling Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongyun; Rong, Guoxin; Yan, Bo; Yang, Linglu; Reinhard, Björn M.

    2011-01-01

    The wavelength dependent scattering cross-sections of self-assembled silver nanoparticle clusters of known size (n) were measured on five different wavelength channels between 427 and 510 nm through correlation of multispectral imaging and scanning electron microscopy. A multivariate statistical analysis of the spectral response of this training set provided a correlation between spectral response and cluster size and enabled a classification of new measurements into four distinct nanoparticle association levels (I1 – I4) whose compositions were dominated by monomers (I1), dimers (I2), trimers and tetramers (I3), and larger clusters (I4), respectively. One potential application of the optical sizing approach is to map association levels of silver immunolabels on cellular surfaces. We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach using silver immunolabels targeted at the epidermal growth factor receptor on A431 cells in a proof of principle experiment. The ability to measure immunolabel association levels on sub-cellular length scales in an optical microscope provides new opportunities for experimentally assessing receptor density distributions on living cells in solution. PMID:21247191

  17. THE ATACAMA COSMOLOGY TELESCOPE: RELATION BETWEEN GALAXY CLUSTER OPTICAL RICHNESS AND SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH EFFECT

    SciTech Connect

    Sehgal, Neelima; Hlozek, Renee; Addison, Graeme; Dunkley, Joanna; Louis, Thibaut; Battaglia, Nick; Battistelli, Elia S.; Bond, J. Richard; Hajian, Amir; Hincks, Adam D.; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Duenner, Rolando; Gralla, Megan; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hilton, Matt; Hughes, John P.; Kosowsky, Arthur; Lin, Yen-Ting; and others

    2013-04-10

    We present the measured Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) flux from 474 optically selected MaxBCG clusters that fall within the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) Equatorial survey region. The ACT Equatorial region used in this analysis covers 510 deg{sup 2} and overlaps Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We also present the measured SZ flux stacked on 52 X-ray-selected MCXC clusters that fall within the ACT Equatorial region and an ACT Southern survey region covering 455 deg{sup 2}. We find that the measured SZ flux from the X-ray-selected clusters is consistent with expectations. However, we find that the measured SZ flux from the optically selected clusters is both significantly lower than expectations and lower than the recovered SZ flux measured by the Planck satellite. Since we find a lower recovered SZ signal than Planck, we investigate the possibility that there is a significant offset between the optically selected brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and the SZ centers, to which ACT is more sensitive due to its finer resolution. Such offsets can arise due to either an intrinsic physical separation between the BCG and the center of the gas concentration or from misidentification of the cluster BCG. We find that the entire discrepancy for both ACT and Planck can be explained by assuming that the BCGs are offset from the SZ maxima with a uniform random distribution between 0 and 1.5 Mpc. Such large offsets between gas peaks and BCGs for optically selected cluster samples seem unlikely given that we find the physical separation between BCGs and X-ray peaks for an X-ray-selected subsample of MaxBCG clusters to have a much narrower distribution that peaks within 0.2 Mpc. It is possible that other effects are lowering the ACT and Planck signals by the same amount, with offsets between BCGs and SZ peaks explaining the remaining difference between ACT and Planck measurements. Several effects that can lower the SZ signal equally for both ACT and Planck, but not explain

  18. Heatwaves detection, clustering and future projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakelian, Ara; D'Andrea, Fabio; Yiou, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    Impacts of heatwaves on infrastructure,particularly nuclear power plants, can be significant and is brought to evolve in the future. As part of the project SEEN (scenario extreme nuclear energy), we evaluated, both in reanalysis and in a set of 10 Euro-Cordex simulations, the frequency and distribution of heatwaves. The results shows the ability of models, GCM associated with RCM, to represent historical events, in terms of frequency and patterns. The study was accompanied by the elaboration of a metric value to assess the ability of a model to correctly represent the classifications and determine the number of significant cluster for reanalysis and climate projections. The increase in frequency and duration of these events varies from one data set to another, but indicates preferential tendency for the various European regions.

  19. Optical response of Cu clusters in zeolite template.

    PubMed

    López-Bastidas, Catalina; Petranovskii, Vitalii; Machorro, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    Optical properties of Cu clusters embedded in mordenite are studied experimentally and theoretically. In this work we discuss spectral features of the system at various reduction steps and compare then with the results of spectra obtained within a theoretical model. The model employed consists of Cu clusters embedded in a homogeneous matrix. A second model employed introduced further variation considering a three component system where air or water can be present. The macroscopic dielectric response of the system is obtained within the Maxwell Garnett approximation. In this approach the complex non-local in homogeneous dielectric response of the zeolite+copper system is replaced by an effective homogeneous dielectric function. Metallic clusters can occupy specific available cavities in the zeolite framework. The presence of clusters that are smaller than the cavities in which they reside can lead to an air-Cu or water-Cu interface which allows shifts in surface plasmon resonance energies. As observed experimentally the energy of the main resonance is seen to be insensitive to the filling fraction ratios and highly susceptible to the embedding matrix properties. Reflectance spectra have been obtained which can be explained within this model.

  20. Sensitivity Enhancement of RF Plasma Etch Endpoint Detection With K-means Cluster Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Honyoung; Jang, Haegyu; Lee, Hak-Seung; Chae, Heeyeop

    2015-09-01

    Plasma etching process is the core process in semiconductor fabrication, and the etching endpoint detection is one of the essential FDC (Fault Detection and Classification) for yield management and mass production. In general, Optical emission spectrocopy (OES) has been used to detect endpoint because OES can be a non-invasive and real-time plasma monitoring tool. In OES, the trend of a few sensitive wavelengths is traced. However, in case of small-open area etch endpoint detection (ex. contact etch), it is at the boundary of the detection limit because of weak signal intensities of reaction reactants and products. Furthemore, the various materials covering the wafer such as photoresist, dielectric materials, and metals make the analysis of OES signals complicated. In this study, full spectra of optical emission signals were collected and the data were analyzed by a data-mining approach, modified K-means cluster analysis. The K-means cluster analysis is modified suitably to analyze a thousand of wavelength variables from OES. This technique can improve the sensitivity of EPD for small area oxide layer etching processes: about 1.0% oxide area. This technique is expected to be applied to various plasma monitoring applications including fault detections as well as EPD. Plasma Etch, EPD, K-means Cluster Analysis.

  1. SAR image change detection using watershed and spectral clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Ruican; Jiao, L. C.; Wang, Guiting; Feng, Jie

    2011-12-01

    A new method of change detection in SAR images based on spectral clustering is presented in this paper. Spectral clustering is employed to extract change information from a pair images acquired on the same geographical area at different time. Watershed transform is applied to initially segment the big image into non-overlapped local regions, leading to reduce the complexity. Experiments results and system analysis confirm the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  2. Optical spectroscopy and velocity dispersions of galaxy clusters from the SPT-SZ survey

    SciTech Connect

    Ruel, J.; Bayliss, M.; Bazin, G.; Bocquet, S.; Brodwin, M.; Foley, R. J.; Stalder, B.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Aird, K. A.; Armstrong, R.; Bautz, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Chapman, S. C.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; and others

    2014-09-01

    We present optical spectroscopy of galaxies in clusters detected through the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect with the South Pole Telescope (SPT). We report our own measurements of 61 spectroscopic cluster redshifts, and 48 velocity dispersions each calculated with more than 15 member galaxies. This catalog also includes 19 dispersions of SPT-observed clusters previously reported in the literature. The majority of the clusters in this paper are SPT-discovered; of these, most have been previously reported in other SPT cluster catalogs, and five are reported here as SPT discoveries for the first time. By performing a resampling analysis of galaxy velocities, we find that unbiased velocity dispersions can be obtained from a relatively small number of member galaxies (≲ 30), but with increased systematic scatter. We use this analysis to determine statistical confidence intervals that include the effect of membership selection. We fit scaling relations between the observed cluster velocity dispersions and mass estimates from SZ and X-ray observables. In both cases, the results are consistent with the scaling relation between velocity dispersion and mass expected from dark-matter simulations. We measure a ∼30% log-normal scatter in dispersion at fixed mass, and a ∼10% offset in the normalization of the dispersion-mass relation when compared to the expectation from simulations, which is within the expected level of systematic uncertainty.

  3. Hunting for Optical Companions to Binary Msps in Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Francesco

    2009-07-01

    Here we present a proposal which exploits the re-newed potential of HST after the Service Mission 4 for probing the population of binary Millisecond Pulsars {MSPs} in Globular Clusters. In particular we intend to: {1} extend the search for optical counterparts in Terzan 5, by pushing the performance of the WFC3 IR channel to sample the entire MS extension down to M=0.1 Mo; {2} perform a deep multi-band search of MSP companions with the WFC3, in 3 clusters {namely NGC6440, M28 and M5}, where recent radio observations have found particularly interesting objects; {3} derive an accurate radial velocity {with STIS} of the puzzling optical companion COM6266B recently discovered by our group, to firmly assess its cluster membership.This program is the result of a large collaboration among the three major groups {lead by Freire, Ransom and Possenti} which are performing extensive MSP search in GCs in the radio bands, and our group which has a large experience in performing accurate stellar photometry in crowded environments. This collaboration has produced a number of outstanding discoveries. In fact, three of the 6 optical counterparts to binary MSP companions known to date in GCs have been discovered by our group. The observations here proposed would easily double/triple the existing sample of known MSP companions, allowing the first meaningful approach to the study of the formation, evolution and recycling process of pulsar in GCs. Moreover, since most of binary MSPs in GCs are thought to form via stellar interactions in the high density core regions, the determination of the nature of the companion and the incidence of this collisionally induced population has a significant impact on our knowledge of the cluster dynamics. Even more interesting, the study of the optical companions to NSs in GCs allows one to derive tighter constraints {than those obtainable for NS binaries in the Galactic field} on the system properties. This has, in turn, an intrisic importance for

  4. Novel Detection of Optical Orbital Angular Momentum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-16

    AFRL-RD-PS- AFRL-RD-PS TR-2014-0045 TR-2014-0045 Novel Detection of Optical Orbital Angular Momentum David Voelz Klipsch...Orbital Angular Momentum FA9451-13-1-0261 GR0004113 David Voelz Klipsch School of ECE New Mexico State University MSC 3-O, PO Box 30001 Las Cruces, NM...1026 . Government Purpose Rights. A light beam carry Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM) has typical wave front and singularity at the optical axis. The

  5. Optical detection dental disease using polarized light

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew J.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Fried, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    A polarization sensitive optical imaging system is used to detect changes in polarization in dental tissues to aid the diagnosis of dental disease such as caries. The degree of depolarization is measured by illuminating the dental tissue with polarized light and measuring the polarization state of the backscattered light. The polarization state of this reflected light is analyzed using optical polarimetric imaging techniques. A hand-held fiber optic dental probe is used in vivo to direct the incident beam to the dental tissue and collect the reflected light. To provide depth-resolved characterization of the dental tissue, the polarization diagnostics may be incorporated into optical coherence domain reflectometry and optical coherence tomography (OCDR/OCT) systems, which enables identification of subsurface depolarization sites associated with demineralization of enamel or bone.

  6. Noise thresholds for optical cluster-state quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, Christopher M.; Nielsen, Michael A.; Haselgrove, Henry L.

    2006-05-15

    In this paper we do a detailed numerical investigation of the fault-tolerant threshold for optical cluster-state quantum computation. Our noise model allows both photon loss and depolarizing noise, as a general proxy for all types of local noise other than photon loss noise. We obtain a threshold region of allowed pairs of values for the two types of noise. Roughly speaking, our results show that scalable optical quantum computing is possible in the combined presence of both noise types, provided that the loss probability is less than 3x10{sup -3} and the depolarization probability is less than 10{sup -4}. Our fault-tolerant protocol involves a number of innovations, including a method for syndrome extraction known as telecorrection, whereby repeated syndrome measurements are guaranteed to agree. This paper is an extended version of Dawson et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 020501 (2006)].

  7. Optical Detection of Lightning from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boccippio, Dennis J.; Christian, Hugh J.

    1998-01-01

    Optical sensors have been developed to detect lightning from space during both day and night. These sensors have been fielded in two existing satellite missions and may be included on a third mission in 2002. Satellite-hosted, optically-based lightning detection offers three unique capabilities: (1) the ability to reliably detect lightning over large, often remote, spatial regions, (2) the ability to sample all (IC and CG) lightning, and (3) the ability to detect lightning with uniform (i.e., not range-dependent) sensitivity or detection efficiency. These represent significant departures from conventional RF-based detection techniques, which typically have strong range dependencies (biases) or range limitations in their detection capabilities. The atmospheric electricity team of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Global Hydrology and Climate Center has implemented a three-step satellite lightning research program which includes three phases: proof-of-concept/climatology, science algorithm development, and operational application. The first instrument in the program, the Optical Transient Detector (OTD), is deployed on a low-earth orbit (LEO) satellite with near-polar inclination, yielding global coverage. The sensor has a 1300 x 1300 sq km field of view (FOV), moderate detection efficiency, moderate localization accuracy, and little data bias. The OTD is a proof-of-concept instrument and its mission is primarily a global lightning climatology. The limited spatial accuracy of this instrument makes it suboptimal for use in case studies, although significant science knowledge has been gained from the instrument as deployed.

  8. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cosmology from Galaxy Clusters Detected Via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehgal, Neelima; Trac, Hy; Acquaviva, Viviana; Ade, Peter A. R.; Aguirre, Paula; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John W.; Barrientos, L. Felipe; Battistelli, Elia S.; Bond, J. Richard; Brown, Ben; Burger, Bryce; Chervenak, Jay; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Doriese, W. Bertrand; Dunkley, Joanna; Duenner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fisher, Ryan P.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Wollack, Ed

    2010-01-01

    We present constraints on cosmological parameters based on a sample of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich-selected galaxy clusters detected in a millimeter-wave survey by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. The cluster sample used in this analysis consists of 9 optically-confirmed high-mass clusters comprising the high-significance end of the total cluster sample identified in 455 square degrees of sky surveyed during 2008 at 148 GHz. We focus on the most massive systems to reduce the degeneracy between unknown cluster astrophysics and cosmology derived from SZ surveys. We describe the scaling relation between cluster mass and SZ signal with a 4-parameter fit. Marginalizing over the values of the parameters in this fit with conservative priors gives (sigma)8 = 0.851 +/- 0.115 and w = -1.14 +/- 0.35 for a spatially-flat wCDM cosmological model with WMAP 7-year priors on cosmological parameters. This gives a modest improvement in statistical uncertainty over WMAP 7-year constraints alone. Fixing the scaling relation between cluster mass and SZ signal to a fiducial relation obtained from numerical simulations and calibrated by X-ray observations, we find (sigma)8 + 0.821 +/- 0.044 and w = -1.05 +/- 0.20. These results are consistent with constraints from WMAP 7 plus baryon acoustic oscillations plus type Ia supernova which give (sigma)8 = 0.802 +/- 0.038 and w = -0.98 +/- 0.053. A stacking analysis of the clusters in this sample compared to clusters simulated assuming the fiducial model also shows good agreement. These results suggest that, given the sample of clusters used here, both the astrophysics of massive clusters and the cosmological parameters derived from them are broadly consistent with current models.

  9. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cosmology from Galaxy Clusters Detected via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Sehgal, Neelima; Trac, Hy; Acquaviva, Viviana; Ade, Peter A.R.; Aguirre, Paula; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John W.; Barrientos, L.Felipe; Battistelli, Elia S.; Bond, J.Richard; Brown, Ben; Burger, Bryce; Chervenak, Jay; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Doriese, W.Bertrand; Dunkley, Joanna; Dunner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fisher, Ryan P.

    2011-08-18

    We present constraints on cosmological parameters based on a sample of Sunyaev-Zeldovich-selected galaxy clusters detected in a millimeter-wave survey by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. The cluster sample used in this analysis consists of 9 optically-confirmed high-mass clusters comprising the high-significance end of the total cluster sample identified in 455 square degrees of sky surveyed during 2008 at 148GHz. We focus on the most massive systems to reduce the degeneracy between unknown cluster astrophysics and cosmology derived from SZ surveys. We describe the scaling relation between cluster mass and SZ signal with a 4-parameter fit. Marginalizing over the values of the parameters in this fit with conservative priors gives {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.851 {+-} 0.115 and w = -1.14 {+-} 0.35 for a spatially-flat wCDM cosmological model with WMAP 7-year priors on cosmological parameters. This gives a modest improvement in statistical uncertainty over WMAP 7-year constraints alone. Fixing the scaling relation between cluster mass and SZ signal to a fiducial relation obtained from numerical simulations and calibrated by X-ray observations, we find {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.821 {+-} 0.044 and w = -1.05 {+-} 0.20. These results are consistent with constraints from WMAP 7 plus baryon acoustic oscillations plus type Ia supernoava which give {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.802 {+-} 0.038 and w = -0.98 {+-} 0.053. A stacking analysis of the clusters in this sample compared to clusters simulated assuming the fiducial model also shows good agreement. These results suggest that, given the sample of clusters used here, both the astrophysics of massive clusters and the cosmological parameters derived from them are broadly consistent with current models.

  10. Optical flow based finger stroke detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhongdi; Li, Bin; Wang, Kongqiao

    2010-07-01

    Finger stroke detection is an important topic in hand based Human Computer Interaction (HCI) system. Few research studies have carried out effective solutions to this problem. In this paper, we present a novel approach for stroke detection based on mono vision. Via analyzing the optical flow field within the finger area, our method is able to detect finger stroke under various camera position and visual angles. We present a thorough evaluation for each component of the algorithm, and show its efficiency and effectiveness on solving difficult stroke detection problems.

  11. Cancer detection based on Raman spectra super-paramagnetic clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Solís, José Luis; Guizar-Ruiz, Juan Ignacio; Martínez-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Zerega, Brenda Esmeralda; Juárez-López, Héctor Alfonso; Vargas-Rodríguez, Héctor; Gallegos-Infante, Luis Armando; González-Silva, Ricardo Armando; Espinoza-Padilla, Pedro Basilio; Palomares-Anda, Pascual

    2016-08-01

    The clustering of Raman spectra of serum sample is analyzed using the super-paramagnetic clustering technique based in the Potts spin model. We investigated the clustering of biochemical networks by using Raman data that define edge lengths in the network, and where the interactions are functions of the Raman spectra's individual band intensities. For this study, we used two groups of 58 and 102 control Raman spectra and the intensities of 160, 150 and 42 Raman spectra of serum samples from breast and cervical cancer and leukemia patients, respectively. The spectra were collected from patients from different hospitals from Mexico. By using super-paramagnetic clustering technique, we identified the most natural and compact clusters allowing us to discriminate the control and cancer patients. A special interest was the leukemia case where its nearly hierarchical observed structure allowed the identification of the patients's leukemia type. The goal of this study is to apply a model of statistical physics, as the super-paramagnetic, to find these natural clusters that allow us to design a cancer detection method. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of preliminary results evaluating the usefulness of super-paramagnetic clustering in the discipline of spectroscopy where it is used for classification of spectra.

  12. Cosmological study with galaxy clusters detected by the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Suet-Ying

    In this work, we present various studies to forecast the power of the galaxy clusters detected by the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in constraining cosmological models. The SZ effect is regarded as one of the new and promising technique to identify and study cluster physics. With the latest data being released in recent years from the SZ telescopes, it is essential to explore their potentials in providing cosmological information and investigate their relative strengths with respect to galaxy cluster data from X-ray and optical, as well as other cosmological probes such as Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). One of the topics regard resolving the debate on the existence of an anomalous large scale bulk flow as measured from the kinetic SZ signal of galaxy clusters in the WMAP CMB data. We predict that if such measurement is done with the latest CMB data from the Planck satellite, the sensitivity will be improved by a factor of >5 and thus be able to provide an independent view of its existence. As it turns out, the Planck data, when using the technique developed in this work, find that the observed bulk flow amplitude is consistent with those expected from the LambdaCDM, which is in clear contradiction to the previous claim of a significant bulk flow detection in the WMAP data. We also forecast on the capability of the ongoing and future cluster surveys identified through thermal SZ (tSZ) in constraining three extended models to the LambdaCDM model: modified gravity f( R) model, primordial non-Gaussianity of density perturbation, and the presence of massive neutrinos. We do so by employing their effects on the cluster number count and power spectrum and using Fisher Matrix analysis to estimate the errors on the model parameters. We find that SZ cluster surveys can provide vital complementary information to those expected from non-cluster probes. Our results therefore give the confidence for pursuing these extended cosmological models with SZ clusters.

  13. Competitive SWIFT cluster templates enhance detection of aging changes.

    PubMed

    Rebhahn, Jonathan A; Roumanes, David R; Qi, Yilin; Khan, Atif; Thakar, Juilee; Rosenberg, Alex; Lee, F Eun-Hyung; Quataert, Sally A; Sharma, Gaurav; Mosmann, Tim R

    2016-01-01

    Clustering-based algorithms for automated analysis of flow cytometry datasets have achieved more efficient and objective analysis than manual processing. Clustering organizes flow cytometry data into subpopulations with substantially homogenous characteristics but does not directly address the important problem of identifying the salient differences in subpopulations between subjects and groups. Here, we address this problem by augmenting SWIFT--a mixture model based clustering algorithm reported previously. First, we show that SWIFT clustering using a "template" mixture model, in which all subpopulations are represented, identifies small differences in cell numbers per subpopulation between samples. Second, we demonstrate that resolution of inter-sample differences is increased by "competition" wherein a joint model is formed by combining the mixture model templates obtained from different groups. In the joint model, clusters from individual groups compete for the assignment of cells, sharpening differences between samples, particularly differences representing subpopulation shifts that are masked under clustering with a single template model. The benefit of competition was demonstrated first with a semisynthetic dataset obtained by deliberately shifting a known subpopulation within an actual flow cytometry sample. Single templates correctly identified changes in the number of cells in the subpopulation, but only the competition method detected small changes in median fluorescence. In further validation studies, competition identified a larger number of significantly altered subpopulations between young and elderly subjects. This enrichment was specific, because competition between templates from consensus male and female samples did not improve the detection of age-related differences. Several changes between the young and elderly identified by SWIFT template competition were consistent with known alterations in the elderly, and additional altered subpopulations

  14. Detectivity comparison of bolometric optical antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadrado, Alexander; López-Alonso, José M.; Martínez-Antón, Juan C.; Ezquerro, Jose M.; González, Francisco J.; Alda, Javier

    2015-08-01

    The practical application of optical antennas in detection devices strongly depends on its ability to produce an acceptable signal-to-noise ratio for the given task. It is known that, due to the intrinsic problems arising from its sub-wavelength dimensions, optical antennas produce very small signals. The quality of these signals depends on the involved transduction mechanism. The contribution of different types of noise should be adapted to the transducer and to the signal extraction regime. Once noise is evaluated and measured, the specific detectivity, D*, becomes the parameter of interest when comparing the performance of antenna coupled devices with other detectors. However, this parameter involves some magnitudes that can be defined in several ways for optical antennas. In this contribution we are interested in the evaluation and comparison of D_ values for several bolometric optical antennas working in the infrared and involving two materials. At the same time, some material and geometrical parameters involved in the definition of noise and detectivity will be discussed to analyze the suitability of D_ to properly account for the performance of optical antennas.

  15. Reset Tree-Based Optical Fault Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Geon; Choi, Dooho; Seo, Jungtaek; Kim, Howon

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new reset tree-based scheme to protect cryptographic hardware against optical fault injection attacks. As one of the most powerful invasive attacks on cryptographic hardware, optical fault attacks cause semiconductors to misbehave by injecting high-energy light into a decapped integrated circuit. The contaminated result from the affected chip is then used to reveal secret information, such as a key, from the cryptographic hardware. Since the advent of such attacks, various countermeasures have been proposed. Although most of these countermeasures are strong, there is still the possibility of attack. In this paper, we present a novel optical fault detection scheme that utilizes the buffers on a circuit's reset signal tree as a fault detection sensor. To evaluate our proposal, we model radiation-induced currents into circuit components and perform a SPICE simulation. The proposed scheme is expected to be used as a supplemental security tool. PMID:23698267

  16. Multistage optical smoke detection approach for smoke alarm systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Truc Kim Thi; Kim, Jong-Myon

    2013-05-01

    We propose a novel multistage smoke detection algorithm based on inherent optical characteristics such as diffusion, color, and texture of smoke. Moving regions in a video frame are detected by an approximate median background subtraction method using the diffusion behavior of smoke. These moving regions are segmented by a fuzzy C-means (FCM) clustering algorithm that uses the hue and saturation components of moving pixels in the hue-saturation-intensity color space. A decision rule is used to select candidate smoke regions from smoke-colored FCM clusters. An object tracking approach is employed in the candidate smoke region to detect candidate smoke objects in the video frame, and image texture parameters are extracted from these objects using a gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). The thirteen GLCM features are selected to constitute the feature vector by applying principal components analysis, resulting in high-accuracy smoke detection. Finally, a back propagation neural network is utilized as a classifier to discriminate smoke and nonsmoke using the selected feature vector. Experimental results using a standard experimental dataset of video clips demonstrate that the proposed approach outperforms state-of-the-art smoke detection approaches in terms of accuracy, making real-life implementation feasible.

  17. Parallelization of Edge Detection Algorithm using MPI on Beowulf Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haron, Nazleeni; Amir, Ruzaini; Aziz, Izzatdin A.; Jung, Low Tan; Shukri, Siti Rohkmah

    In this paper, we present the design of parallel Sobel edge detection algorithm using Foster's methodology. The parallel algorithm is implemented using MPI message passing library and master/slave algorithm. Every processor performs the same sequential algorithm but on different part of the image. Experimental results conducted on Beowulf cluster are presented to demonstrate the performance of the parallel algorithm.

  18. An improved unsupervised clustering-based intrusion detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Yong J.; Wu, Yu; Wang, Guo Y.

    2005-03-01

    Practical Intrusion Detection Systems (IDSs) based on data mining are facing two key problems, discovering intrusion knowledge from real-time network data, and automatically updating them when new intrusions appear. Most data mining algorithms work on labeled data. In order to set up basic data set for mining, huge volumes of network data need to be collected and labeled manually. In fact, it is rather difficult and impractical to label intrusions, which has been a big restrict for current IDSs and has led to limited ability of identifying all kinds of intrusion types. An improved unsupervised clustering-based intrusion model working on unlabeled training data is introduced. In this model, center of a cluster is defined and used as substitution of this cluster. Then all cluster centers are adopted to detect intrusions. Testing on data sets of KDDCUP"99, experimental results demonstrate that our method has good performance in detection rate. Furthermore, the incremental-learning method is adopted to detect those unknown-type intrusions and it decreases false positive rate.

  19. New detections of embedded clusters in the Galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo, D.; Bica, E.; Bonatto, C.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Until recently it was thought that high Galactic latitude clouds were a non-star-forming ensemble. However, in a previous study we reported the discovery of two embedded clusters (ECs) far away from the Galactic plane (~ 5 kpc). In our recent star cluster catalogue we provided additional high and intermediate latitude cluster candidates. Aims: This work aims to clarify whether our previous detection of star clusters far away from the disc represents just an episodic event or whether star cluster formation is currently a systematic phenomenon in the Galactic halo. We analyse the nature of four clusters found in our recent catalogue and report the discovery of three new ECs each with an unusually high latitude and distance from the Galactic disc midplane. Methods: The analysis is based on 2MASS and WISE colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), and stellar radial density profiles (RDPs). The CMDs are built by applying a field-star decontamination procedure, which uncovers the cluster's intrinsic CMD morphology. Results: All of these clusters are younger than 5 Myr. The high-latitude ECs C 932, C 934, and C 939 appear to be related to a cloud complex about 5 kpc below the Galactic disc, under the Local arm. The other clusters are above the disc, C 1074 and C 1100 with a vertical distance of ~3 kpc, C 1099 with ~ 2 kpc, and C 1101 with ~1.8 kpc. Conclusions: According to the derived parameters ECs located below and above the disc occur, which gives evidence of widespread star cluster formation throughout the Galactic halo. This study therefore represents a paradigm shift, by demonstrating that a sterile halo must now be understood as a host for ongoing star formation. The origin and fate of these ECs remain open. There are two possibilities for their origin, Galactic fountains or infall. The discovery of ECs far from the disc suggests that the Galactic halo is more actively forming stars than previously thought. Furthermore, since most ECs do not survive the infant

  20. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Relation Between Galaxy Cluster Optical Richness and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sehgal, Neelima; Addison, Graeme; Battaglia, Nick; Battistelli, Elia S.; Bond, J. Richard; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Duenner, Rolando; Gralla, Megan; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek, Renee; Hughes, John P.; Kosowsky, Arthur; Lin, Yen-Ting; Louis, Thibaut; Marriage, Tobias A.; Marsden, Danica; Menateau, Felipe; Moodley, Kavilan; Wollack, Ed

    2012-01-01

    We present the measured Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) flux from 474 optically-selected MaxBCG clusters that fall within the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) Equatorial survey region. The ACT Equatorial region used in this analysis covers 510 square degrees and overlaps Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We also present the measured SZ flux stacked on 52 X-ray-selected MCXC clusters that fall within the ACT Equatorial region and an ACT Southern survey region covering 455 square degrees. We find that the measured SZ flux from the X-ray-selected clusters is consistent with expectations. However, we find that the measured SZ flux from the optically-selected clusters is both significantly lower than expectations and lower than the recovered SZ flux measured by the Planck satellite. Since we find a lower recovered SZ signal than Planck, we investigate the possibility that there is a significant offset between the optically-selected brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and the SZ centers, to which ACT is more sensitive due to its finer resolution. Such offsets can arise due to either an intrinsic physical separation between the BCG and the center of the gas concentration or from misidentification of the cluster BCG. We find that the entire discrepancy for both ACT and Planck can be explained by assuming that the BCGs are offset from the SZ maxima with a uniform random distribution between 0 and 1.5 Mpc. In contrast, the physical separation between BCGs and X-ray peaks for an X-ray-selected subsample of MaxBCG clusters shows a much narrower distribution that peaks within 0.2 Mpc. We conclude that while offsets between BCGs and SZ peaks may be an important component in explaining the discrepancy, it is likely that a combination of factors is responsible for the ACT and Planck measurements. Several effects that can lower the SZ signal equally for both ACT and Planck, but not explain the difference in measured signals, include a larger percentage of false detections in the

  1. Automated detection of masses and clustered microcalcifications on mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Hiroshi; Endo, Tokiko; Matsubara, Tomoko; Hirako, Kenichi; Hara, Takeshi; Ueda, Hitoshi; Torisu, Yasuhiro; Riyahi-Alam, Nader; Horita, Katsuhei; Kido, Choichiro; Ishigaki, Takeo

    1995-05-01

    We are developing automated-detection schemes for the masses and clustered microcalcifications on laser-digitized mammograms (0.1 mm, 10-bit resolution, 2000 X 2510) by using a conventional workstation. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of our recent schemes and to evaluate the current performance of the schemes. The fully automated computer system consists of several parts such as the extraction of breast region, detection of masses, detection of clustered microcalcifications, classification of the candidates, and the display of the detected results. Our schemes tested with more than 200 cases of Japanese women achieved an about 95% (86%) true-positive rate with 0.61 (0.55) false-positive masses (clusters) per image. It was found that the automated method has the potential to aid physicians in screening mammograms for breast tumors. Initial results for the mammograms digitized with the pixel sizes of 25, 50, and 100 micrometers are also discussed, in which a genetic algorithm (GA) technique was applied to the detection filter for the microcalcifications. It was indicated from the experiment with a breast phantom that 100- micrometers pixel size is not enough for the computer detection of microcalcifications, and it seems that at least 50-micrometers pixel size is required.

  2. Optical visualisation of individual biomolecules in densely packed clusters

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Mingjie; Jungmann, Ralf; Yin, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in fluorescence super-resolution microscopy have allowed sub-cellular features and synthetic nanostructures down to ~15 nm in size to be imaged. However, direct optical observation of individual molecular targets (~5 nm) in a densely packed biomolecular cluster remains a challenge. Here, we show that such discrete molecular imaging is possible using DNA-PAINT (points accumulation for imaging in nanoscale topography) - a super-resolution fluorescence microscopy technique that exploits programmable transient oligonucleotide hybridisation - on synthetic DNA nanostructures. We examined the effects of high photon count, high blinking statistics, and appropriate blinking duty cycle on imaging quality, and developed a software-based drift correction method that achieves <1 nm residual drift (r.m.s.) over hours. This allowed us to image a densely packed triangular lattice pattern with ~5 nm point-to-point distance, and analyse DNA origami structural offset with angstrom-level precision (2 Å) from single-molecule studies. By combining the approach with multiplexed Exchange-PAINT imaging, we further demonstrated an optical nano-display with 5×5 nm pixel size and three distinct colours, and with <1 nm cross-channel registration accuracy. This method opens up possibilities for direct and quantitative optical observation of individual biomolecular features in crowded environments. PMID:27376244

  3. Optical detection of radon decay in air

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Johan; Ihantola, Sakari; Peräjärvi, Kari; Toivonen, Harri; Toivonen, Juha

    2016-01-01

    An optical radon detection method is presented. Radon decay is directly measured by observing the secondary radiolumines cence light that alpha particles excite in air, and the selectivity of coincident photon detection is further enhanced with online pulse-shape analysis. The sensitivity of a demonstration device was 6.5 cps/Bq/l and the minimum detectable concentration was 12 Bq/m3 with a 1 h integration time. The presented technique paves the way for optical approaches in rapid radon detec tion, and it can be applied beyond radon to the analysis of any alpha-active sample which can be placed in the measurement chamber. PMID:26867800

  4. Optical detection of radon decay in air.

    PubMed

    Sand, Johan; Ihantola, Sakari; Peräjärvi, Kari; Toivonen, Harri; Toivonen, Juha

    2016-02-12

    An optical radon detection method is presented. Radon decay is directly measured by observing the secondary radiolumines cence light that alpha particles excite in air, and the selectivity of coincident photon detection is further enhanced with online pulse-shape analysis. The sensitivity of a demonstration device was 6.5 cps/Bq/l and the minimum detectable concentration was 12 Bq/m(3) with a 1 h integration time. The presented technique paves the way for optical approaches in rapid radon detec tion, and it can be applied beyond radon to the analysis of any alpha-active sample which can be placed in the measurement chamber.

  5. Competitive SWIFT cluster templates enhance detection of aging changes

    PubMed Central

    Rebhahn, Jonathan A.; Roumanes, David R.; Qi, Yilin; Khan, Atif; Thakar, Juilee; Rosenberg, Alex; Lee, F. Eun‐Hyung; Quataert, Sally A.; Sharma, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Clustering‐based algorithms for automated analysis of flow cytometry datasets have achieved more efficient and objective analysis than manual processing. Clustering organizes flow cytometry data into subpopulations with substantially homogenous characteristics but does not directly address the important problem of identifying the salient differences in subpopulations between subjects and groups. Here, we address this problem by augmenting SWIFT—a mixture model based clustering algorithm reported previously. First, we show that SWIFT clustering using a “template” mixture model, in which all subpopulations are represented, identifies small differences in cell numbers per subpopulation between samples. Second, we demonstrate that resolution of inter‐sample differences is increased by “competition” wherein a joint model is formed by combining the mixture model templates obtained from different groups. In the joint model, clusters from individual groups compete for the assignment of cells, sharpening differences between samples, particularly differences representing subpopulation shifts that are masked under clustering with a single template model. The benefit of competition was demonstrated first with a semisynthetic dataset obtained by deliberately shifting a known subpopulation within an actual flow cytometry sample. Single templates correctly identified changes in the number of cells in the subpopulation, but only the competition method detected small changes in median fluorescence. In further validation studies, competition identified a larger number of significantly altered subpopulations between young and elderly subjects. This enrichment was specific, because competition between templates from consensus male and female samples did not improve the detection of age‐related differences. Several changes between the young and elderly identified by SWIFT template competition were consistent with known alterations in the elderly, and additional

  6. Clustering and community detection in directed networks: A survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malliaros, Fragkiskos D.; Vazirgiannis, Michalis

    2013-12-01

    Networks (or graphs) appear as dominant structures in diverse domains, including sociology, biology, neuroscience and computer science. In most of the aforementioned cases graphs are directed - in the sense that there is directionality on the edges, making the semantics of the edges nonsymmetric as the source node transmits some property to the target one but not vice versa. An interesting feature that real networks present is the clustering or community structure property, under which the graph topology is organized into modules commonly called communities or clusters. The essence here is that nodes of the same community are highly similar while on the contrary, nodes across communities present low similarity. Revealing the underlying community structure of directed complex networks has become a crucial and interdisciplinary topic with a plethora of relevant application domains. Therefore, naturally there is a recent wealth of research production in the area of mining directed graphs - with clustering being the primary method sought and the primary tool for community detection and evaluation. The goal of this paper is to offer an in-depth comparative review of the methods presented so far for clustering directed networks along with the relevant necessary methodological background and also related applications. The survey commences by offering a concise review of the fundamental concepts and methodological base on which graph clustering algorithms capitalize on. Then we present the relevant work along two orthogonal classifications. The first one is mostly concerned with the methodological principles of the clustering algorithms, while the second one approaches the methods from the viewpoint regarding the properties of a good cluster in a directed network. Further, we present methods and metrics for evaluating graph clustering results, demonstrate interesting application domains and provide promising future research directions.

  7. Detecting space-time cancer clusters using residential histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquez, Geoffrey M.; Meliker, Jaymie R.

    2007-04-01

    Methods for analyzing geographic clusters of disease typically ignore the space-time variability inherent in epidemiologic datasets, do not adequately account for known risk factors (e.g., smoking and education) or covariates (e.g., age, gender, and race), and do not permit investigation of the latency window between exposure and disease. Our research group recently developed Q-statistics for evaluating space-time clustering in cancer case-control studies with residential histories. This technique relies on time-dependent nearest neighbor relationships to examine clustering at any moment in the life-course of the residential histories of cases relative to that of controls. In addition, in place of the widely used null hypothesis of spatial randomness, each individual's probability of being a case is instead based on his/her risk factors and covariates. Case-control clusters will be presented using residential histories of 220 bladder cancer cases and 440 controls in Michigan. In preliminary analyses of this dataset, smoking, age, gender, race and education were sufficient to explain the majority of the clustering of residential histories of the cases. Clusters of unexplained risk, however, were identified surrounding the business address histories of 10 industries that emit known or suspected bladder cancer carcinogens. The clustering of 5 of these industries began in the 1970's and persisted through the 1990's. This systematic approach for evaluating space-time clustering has the potential to generate novel hypotheses about environmental risk factors. These methods may be extended to detect differences in space-time patterns of any two groups of people, making them valuable for security intelligence and surveillance operations.

  8. Optical sensor for rapid microbial detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Adhami, Mustafa; Tilahun, Dagmawi; Rao, Govind; Kostov, Yordan

    2016-05-01

    In biotechnology, the ability to instantly detect contaminants is key to running a reliable bioprocess. Bioprocesses are prone to be contaminated by cells that are abundant in our environment; detection and quantification of these cells would aid in the preservation of the bioprocess product. This paper discusses the design and development of a portable kinetics fluorometer which acts as a single-excitation, single-emission photometer that continuously measures fluorescence intensity of an indicator dye, and plots it. Resazurin is used as an indicator dye since the viable contaminant cells reduce Resazurin toResorufin, the latter being strongly fluorescent. A photodiode detects fluorescence change by generating current proportional to the intensity of the light that reached it, and a trans-impedance differential op-amp ensures amplification of the photodiodes' signal. A microfluidic chip was designed specifically for the device. It acts as a fully enclosed cuvette, which enhances the Resazurin reduction rate. E. coli in LB media, along with Resazurin were injected into the microfluidic chip. The optical sensor detected the presence of E. coli in the media based on the fluorescence change that occurred in the indicator dye in concentrations as low as 10 CFU/ml. A method was devised to detect and determine an approximate amount of contamination with this device. This paper discusses application of this method to detect and estimate sample contamination. This device provides fast, accurate, and inexpensive means to optically detect the presence of viable cells.

  9. Target discrimination strategies in optics detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöqvist, Lars; Allard, Lars; Henriksson, Markus; Jonsson, Per; Pettersson, Magnus

    2013-10-01

    Detection and localisation of optical assemblies used for weapon guidance or sniper rifle scopes has attracted interest for security and military applications. Typically a laser system is used to interrogate a scene of interest and the retro-reflected radiation is detected. Different system approaches for area coverage can be realised ranging from flood illumination to step-and-stare or continuous scanning schemes. Independently of the chosen approach target discrimination is a crucial issue, particularly if a complex scene such as in an urban environment and autonomous operation is considered. In this work target discrimination strategies in optics detection are discussed. Typical parameters affecting the reflected laser radiation from the target are the wavelength, polarisation properties, temporal effects and the range resolution. Knowledge about the target characteristics is important to predict the target discrimination capability. Two different systems were used to investigate polarisation properties and range resolution information from targets including e.g. road signs, optical reflexes, rifle sights and optical references. The experimental results and implications on target discrimination will be discussed. If autonomous operation is required target discrimination becomes critical in order to reduce the number of false alarms.

  10. Nanoscale Cluster Detection in Massive Atom Probe Tomography Data

    SciTech Connect

    Seal, Sudip K; Yoginath, Srikanth B; Miller, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Recent technological advances in atom probe tomography (APT) have led to unprecedented data acquisition capabilities that routinely generate data sets containing hundreds of millions of atoms. Detecting nanoscale clusters of different atom types present in these enormous amounts of data and analyzing their spatial correlations with one another are fundamental to understanding the structural properties of the material from which the data is derived. Extant algorithms for nanoscale cluster detection do not scale to large data sets. Here, a scalable, CUDA-based implementation of an autocorrelation algorithm is presented. It isolates spatial correlations amongst atomic clusters present in massive APT data sets in linear time using a linear amount of storage. Correctness of the algorithm is demonstrated using large synthetically generated data with known spatial distributions. Benefits and limitations of using GPU-acceleration for autocorrelation-based APT data analyses are presented with supporting performance results on data sets with up to billions of atoms. To our knowledge, this is the first nanoscale cluster detection algorithm that scales to massive APT data sets and executes on commodity hardware.

  11. A fuzzy clustering algorithm to detect planar and quadric shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnapuram, Raghu; Frigui, Hichem; Nasraoui, Olfa

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new fuzzy clustering algorithm to detect an unknown number of planar and quadric shapes in noisy data. The proposed algorithm is computationally and implementationally simple, and it overcomes many of the drawbacks of the existing algorithms that have been proposed for similar tasks. Since the clustering is performed in the original image space, and since no features need to be computed, this approach is particularly suited for sparse data. The algorithm may also be used in pattern recognition applications.

  12. Abnormal events detection in crowded scenes by trajectory cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shifu; Zhang, Zhijiang; Zeng, Dan; Shen, Wei

    2015-02-01

    Abnormal events detection in crowded scenes has been a challenge due to volatility of the definitions for both normality and abnormality, the small number of pixels on the target, appearance ambiguity resulting from the dense packing, and severe inter-object occlusions. A novel framework was proposed for the detection of unusual events in crowded scenes using trajectories produced by moving pedestrians based on an intuition that the motion patterns of usual behaviors are similar to these of group activity, whereas unusual behaviors are not. First, spectral clustering is used to group trajectories with similar spatial patterns. Different trajectory clusters represent different activities. Then, unusual trajectories can be detected using these patterns. Furthermore, behavior of a mobile pedestrian can be defined by comparing its direction with these patterns, such as moving in the opposite direction of the group or traversing the group. Experimental results indicated that the proposed algorithm could be used to reliably locate the abnormal events in crowded scenes.

  13. ASCA detection of iron line emission from the distant galaxy cluster Abell 370

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautz, Marshall W.; Mushotzky, Richard; Fabian, Andrew C.; Yamashita, Koujun; Gendreau, Keith C.; Arnaud, Keith A.; Crew, Geoffrey B.; Tawara, Yuzuru

    1994-01-01

    ASCA observations of the gravitational lens and Butcher-Oemler cluster Abell 370 (z = 0.37) give kT = 8.8 +/- 0.8 keV and A = 0.5 +/- 0.1 cosmic. If the gas were isothermal the implied cluster mass would be M(sub vir) = (1.5 +/- 0.4) x 10(exp 15) solar masses, a value consistent with the optically-determined virial mass. We detect iron K line emission with high confidence. This measurement increases, by a large factor, the lookback time at which the presence of iron in the intracluster medium has been established. The iron abundance is marginally higher than that of low-redshift clusters of similar temperature, so our results are consistent with models in which all enrichment occurs before the epoch corresponding to z = 0.37.

  14. SOAR Adaptive Optics Observations of the Globular Cluster NGC 6496

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraga, Luciano; Kunder, Andrea; Tokovinin, Andrei

    2013-06-01

    We present high-quality BVRI photometric data in the field of globular cluster NGC 6496 obtained with the SOAR Telescope Adaptive Module (SAM). Our observations were collected as part of the ongoing SAM commissioning. The distance modulus and cluster color excess as found from the red clump are (m - M) V = 15.71 ± 0.02 mag and E(V - I) = 0.28 ± 0.02 mag. An age of 10.5 ± 0.5 Gyr is determined from the difference in magnitude between the red clump and the subgiant branch. These parameters are in excellent agreement with the values derived from isochrone fitting. From the color-magnitude diagram we find a metallicity of [Fe/H] = -0.65 dex and hence support a disk classification for NGC 6496. The complete BVRI data set for NGC 6469 is made available in the electronic edition of the Journal. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  15. Optically-Selected Cluster Catalogs As a Precision Cosmology Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Rozo, Eduardo; Wechsler, Risa H.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Evrard, August E.; McKay, Timothy A.; /Michigan U.

    2007-03-26

    We introduce a framework for describing the halo selection function of optical cluster finders. We treat the problem as being separable into a term that describes the intrinsic galaxy content of a halo (the Halo Occupation Distribution, or HOD) and a term that captures the effects of projection and selection by the particular cluster finding algorithm. Using mock galaxy catalogs tuned to reproduce the luminosity dependent correlation function and the empirical color-density relation measured in the SDSS, we characterize the maxBCG algorithm applied by Koester et al. to the SDSS galaxy catalog. We define and calibrate measures of completeness and purity for this algorithm, and demonstrate successful recovery of the underlying cosmology and HOD when applied to the mock catalogs. We identify principal components--combinations of cosmology and HOD parameters--that are recovered by survey counts as a function of richness, and demonstrate that percent-level accuracies are possible in the first two components, if the selection function can be understood to {approx} 15% accuracy.

  16. Expression profile based gene clusters for ischemic stroke detection Whole blood gene clusters for ischemic stroke detection

    PubMed Central

    Adamski, Mateusz G; Li, Yan; Wagner, Erin; Yu, Hua; Seales-Bailey, Chloe; Soper, Steven A; Murphy, Michael; Baird, Alison E

    2014-01-01

    In microarray studies alterations in gene expression in circulating leukocytes have shown utility for ischemic stroke diagnosis. We studied forty candidate markers identified in three gene expression profiles to (1) quantitate individual transcript expression, (2) identify transcript clusters and (3) assess the clinical diagnostic utility of the clusters identified for ischemic stroke detection. Using high throughput next generation qPCR 16 of the 40 transcripts were significantly up-regulated in stroke patients relative to control subjects (p<0.05). Six clusters of between 5 and 7 transcripts discriminated between stroke and control (p values between 1.01e-9 and 0.03). A 7 transcript cluster containing PLBD1, PYGL, BST1, DUSP1, FOS, VCAN and FCGR1A showed high accuracy for stroke classification (AUC=0.854). These results validate and improve upon the diagnostic value of transcripts identified in microarray studies for ischemic stroke. The clusters identified show promise for acute ischemic stroke detection. PMID:25135788

  17. The Detection and Statistics of Giant Arcs behind CLASH Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bingxiao; Postman, Marc; Meneghetti, Massimo; Seitz, Stella; Zitrin, Adi; Merten, Julian; Maoz, Dani; Frye, Brenda; Umetsu, Keiichi; Zheng, Wei; Bradley, Larry; Vega, Jesus; Koekemoer, Anton

    2016-02-01

    We developed an algorithm to find and characterize gravitationally lensed galaxies (arcs) to perform a comparison of the observed and simulated arc abundance. Observations are from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). Simulated CLASH images are created using the MOKA package and also clusters selected from the high-resolution, hydrodynamical simulations, MUSIC, over the same mass and redshift range as the CLASH sample. The algorithm's arc elongation accuracy, completeness, and false positive rate are determined and used to compute an estimate of the true arc abundance. We derive a lensing efficiency of 4 ± 1 arcs (with length ≥6″ and length-to-width ratio ≥7) per cluster for the X-ray-selected CLASH sample, 4 ± 1 arcs per cluster for the MOKA-simulated sample, and 3 ± 1 arcs per cluster for the MUSIC-simulated sample. The observed and simulated arc statistics are in full agreement. We measure the photometric redshifts of all detected arcs and find a median redshift zs = 1.9 with 33% of the detected arcs having zs > 3. We find that the arc abundance does not depend strongly on the source redshift distribution but is sensitive to the mass distribution of the dark matter halos (e.g., the c-M relation). Our results show that consistency between the observed and simulated distributions of lensed arc sizes and axial ratios can be achieved by using cluster-lensing simulations that are carefully matched to the selection criteria used in the observations.

  18. THE DETECTION AND STATISTICS OF GIANT ARCS BEHIND CLASH CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Bingxiao; Zheng, Wei; Postman, Marc; Bradley, Larry; Meneghetti, Massimo; Koekemoer, Anton; Seitz, Stella; Zitrin, Adi; Merten, Julian; Maoz, Dani; Frye, Brenda; Vega, Jesus

    2016-02-01

    We developed an algorithm to find and characterize gravitationally lensed galaxies (arcs) to perform a comparison of the observed and simulated arc abundance. Observations are from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). Simulated CLASH images are created using the MOKA package and also clusters selected from the high-resolution, hydrodynamical simulations, MUSIC, over the same mass and redshift range as the CLASH sample. The algorithm's arc elongation accuracy, completeness, and false positive rate are determined and used to compute an estimate of the true arc abundance. We derive a lensing efficiency of 4 ± 1 arcs (with length ≥6″ and length-to-width ratio ≥7) per cluster for the X-ray-selected CLASH sample, 4 ± 1 arcs per cluster for the MOKA-simulated sample, and 3 ± 1 arcs per cluster for the MUSIC-simulated sample. The observed and simulated arc statistics are in full agreement. We measure the photometric redshifts of all detected arcs and find a median redshift z{sub s} = 1.9 with 33% of the detected arcs having z{sub s} > 3. We find that the arc abundance does not depend strongly on the source redshift distribution but is sensitive to the mass distribution of the dark matter halos (e.g., the c–M relation). Our results show that consistency between the observed and simulated distributions of lensed arc sizes and axial ratios can be achieved by using cluster-lensing simulations that are carefully matched to the selection criteria used in the observations.

  19. Optical imaging of individual biomolecules in densely packed clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Mingjie; Jungmann, Ralf; Yin, Peng

    2016-09-01

    Recent advances in fluorescence super-resolution microscopy have allowed subcellular features and synthetic nanostructures down to 10-20 nm in size to be imaged. However, the direct optical observation of individual molecular targets (∼5 nm) in a densely packed biomolecular cluster remains a challenge. Here, we show that such discrete molecular imaging is possible using DNA-PAINT (points accumulation for imaging in nanoscale topography)—a super-resolution fluorescence microscopy technique that exploits programmable transient oligonucleotide hybridization—on synthetic DNA nanostructures. We examined the effects of a high photon count, high blinking statistics and an appropriate blinking duty cycle on imaging quality, and developed a software-based drift correction method that achieves <1 nm residual drift (root mean squared) over hours. This allowed us to image a densely packed triangular lattice pattern with ∼5 nm point-to-point distance and to analyse the DNA origami structural offset with ångström-level precision (2 Å) from single-molecule studies. By combining the approach with multiplexed exchange-PAINT imaging, we further demonstrated an optical nanodisplay with 5 × 5 nm pixel size and three distinct colours with <1 nm cross-channel registration accuracy.

  20. Optical Detection of Life on Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara

    2009-01-01

    We describe what is known about the atmospheric properties (Teff, lob g, [FelH]) and fundamental properties (mass, age, and metal content) of nearby stars and how they influence the habitable zones and habitable eras of these stars. We then take an observer's point of view to assess the ability of optical telescopes to detect photosynthetic or methanogenic life on planets orbiting these stars.

  1. Fiber optic hydrophones for acoustic neutrino detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buis, E. J.; Doppenberg, E. J. J.; Lahmann, R.; Toet, P. M.; de Vreugd, J.

    2016-04-01

    Cosmic neutrinos with ultra high energies can be detected acoustically using hydrophones. The detection of these neutrinos may provide crucial information about then GZK mechanism. The flux of these neutrinos, however, is expected to be low, so that a detection volume is required more than a order of magnitude larger than what has presently been realized. With a large detection volume and a large number of hydrophones, there is a need for technology that is cheap and easy to deploy. Fiber optics provide a natural way for distributed sensing. In addition, a sensor has been designed and manufactured that can be produced cost-effectively on an industrial scale. Sensitivity measurements show that the sensor is able to reach the required sea-state zero level. For a proper interpretation of the expected bipolar signals, filtering techniques should be applied to remove the effects of the unwanted resonance peaks.

  2. Evolution of nonlinear optical properties: from gold atomic clusters to plasmonic nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Philip, Reji; Chantharasupawong, Panit; Qian, Huifeng; Jin, Rongchao; Thomas, Jayan

    2012-09-12

    Atomic clusters of metals are an emerging class of extremely interesting materials occupying the intermediate size regime between atoms and nanoparticles. Here we report the nonlinear optical (NLO) characteristics of ultrasmall, atomically precise clusters of gold, which are smaller than the critical size for electronic energy quantization (∼2 nm). Our studies reveal remarkable features of the distinct evolution of the optical nonlinearity as the clusters progress in size from the nonplasmonic regime to the plasmonic regime. We ascertain that the smallest atomic clusters do not show saturable absorption at the surface plasmon wavelength of larger gold nanocrystals (>2 nm). Consequently, the third-order optical nonlinearity in these ultrasmall gold clusters exhibits a significantly lower threshold for optical power limiting. This limiting efficiency, which is superior to that of plasmonic nanocrystals, is highly beneficial for optical limiting applications.

  3. A new detection algorithm for microcalcification clusters in mammographic screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Weiying; Ma, Yide; Li, Yunsong

    2015-05-01

    A novel approach for microcalcification clusters detection is proposed. At the first time, we make a short analysis of mammographic images with microcalcification lesions to confirm these lesions have much greater gray values than normal regions. After summarizing the specific feature of microcalcification clusters in mammographic screening, we make more focus on preprocessing step including eliminating the background, image enhancement and eliminating the pectoral muscle. In detail, Chan-Vese Model is used for eliminating background. Then, we do the application of combining morphology method and edge detection method. After the AND operation and Sobel filter, we use Hough Transform, it can be seen that the result have outperformed for eliminating the pectoral muscle which is approximately the gray of microcalcification. Additionally, the enhancement step is achieved by morphology. We make effort on mammographic image preprocessing to achieve lower computational complexity. As well known, it is difficult to robustly achieve mammograms analysis due to low contrast between normal and lesion tissues, there are also much noise in such images. After a serious preprocessing algorithm, a method based on blob detection is performed to microcalcification clusters according their specific features. The proposed algorithm has employed Laplace operator to improve Difference of Gaussians (DoG) function in terms of low contrast images. A preliminary evaluation of the proposed method performs on a known public database namely MIAS, rather than synthetic images. The comparison experiments and Cohen's kappa coefficients all demonstrate that our proposed approach can potentially obtain better microcalcification clusters detection results in terms of accuracy, sensitivity and specificity.

  4. Circumnuclear Star Clusters in the Galaxy Merger NGC 6240, Observed with Keck Adaptive Optics and HST

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, L K; Max, C E; Schneider, G

    2007-02-12

    We discuss images of the central {approx} 10 kpc (in projection) of the galaxy merger NGC 6240 at H and K{prime} bands, taken with the NIRC2 narrow camera on Keck II using natural guide star adaptive optics. We detect 28 star clusters in the NIRC2 images, of which only 7 can be seen in the similar-spatial-resolution, archival WFPC2 Planetary Camera data at either B or I bands. Combining the NIRC2 narrow camera pointings with wider NICMOS NIC2 images taken with the F110W, F160W, and F222M filters, we identify a total of 32 clusters that are detected in at least one of these 5 infrared ({lambda}{sub c} > 1 {micro}m) bandpasses. By comparing to instantaneous burst, stellar population synthesis models (Bruzual & Charlot 2003), we estimate that most of the clusters are consistent with being {approx} 15 Myr old and have photometric masses ranging from 7 x 10{sup 5} M{sub {circle_dot}} to 4 x 10{sup 7}M{sub {circle_dot}}. The total contribution to the star formation rate (SFR) from these clusters is approximately 10M{sub {circle_dot}} yr{sup -1}, or {approx} 10% of the total SFR in the nuclear region. We use these newly discovered clusters to estimate the extinction toward NGC 6240's double nuclei, and find values of A{sub v} as high as 14 magnitudes along some sightlines, with an average extinction of A{sub v} {approx} 7 mag toward sightlines within {approx} 3-inches of the double nuclei.

  5. Isofunctional Protein Subfamily Detection Using Data Integration and Spectral Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Boari de Lima, Elisa; Meira, Wagner; de Melo-Minardi, Raquel Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    As increasingly more genomes are sequenced, the vast majority of proteins may only be annotated computationally, given experimental investigation is extremely costly. This highlights the need for computational methods to determine protein functions quickly and reliably. We believe dividing a protein family into subtypes which share specific functions uncommon to the whole family reduces the function annotation problem’s complexity. Hence, this work’s purpose is to detect isofunctional subfamilies inside a family of unknown function, while identifying differentiating residues. Similarity between protein pairs according to various properties is interpreted as functional similarity evidence. Data are integrated using genetic programming and provided to a spectral clustering algorithm, which creates clusters of similar proteins. The proposed framework was applied to well-known protein families and to a family of unknown function, then compared to ASMC. Results showed our fully automated technique obtained better clusters than ASMC for two families, besides equivalent results for other two, including one whose clusters were manually defined. Clusters produced by our framework showed great correspondence with the known subfamilies, besides being more contrasting than those produced by ASMC. Additionally, for the families whose specificity determining positions are known, such residues were among those our technique considered most important to differentiate a given group. When run with the crotonase and enolase SFLD superfamilies, the results showed great agreement with this gold-standard. Best results consistently involved multiple data types, thus confirming our hypothesis that similarities according to different knowledge domains may be used as functional similarity evidence. Our main contributions are the proposed strategy for selecting and integrating data types, along with the ability to work with noisy and incomplete data; domain knowledge usage for detecting

  6. Multilayer optical disc system using homodyne detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurokawa, Takahiro; Ide, Tatsuro; Tanaka, Yukinobu; Watanabe, Koichi

    2014-09-01

    A write/read system using high-productivity multilayer optical discs was developed. The recording medium used in the system consists of planar recording layers and a separated guide layer, and is fabricated by web coating and lamination process. The recording layers in the medium are made of one-photon-absorption material, on which data can be recorded with a normal laser diode. The developed system is capable of focusing and tracking on the medium and amplifying readout signals by using phase-diversity homodyne detection. A highly layer-selective focusing method using homodyne detection was also proposed. This method obtains stable focus-error signals with clearly separated S-shaped curves even when layer spacing is quite narrow, causing large interlayer crosstalk. Writing on the medium and reading with the signal amplification effect of homodyne detection was demonstrated. In addition, the effectiveness of the method was experimentally evaluated.

  7. First ALMA Detection of a Galaxy Cluster Merger Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, K.; Sommer, M.; Erler, J.; Eckert, D.; Vazza, F.; Magnelli, B.; Bertoldi, F.; Tozzi, P.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the first ALMA measurement of a galaxy cluster merger shock, observed at the location of a radio relic in the famous El Gordo galaxy cluster at redshift z 0.9. Located at about half the current age of the Universe, this is also the most distant example of a directly measured astrophysical shock. ALMA Band 3 was utilised to measure the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect signature that confirms a small-scale change in pressure as expected from the passage of a shock in the intracluster medium. The results support a previous radio-based estimate of the shock Mach number and display similarities, and also some mild tensions, with the X-ray based results. Most importantly, these results show the potential of ALMA to detect galaxy cluster shocks, observations that will advance our knowledge of cluster formation, non-thermal particle acceleration and amplification of magnetic fields across the entire observable Universe where such relic shocks can be found.

  8. Fiber Optic Thermal Detection of Composite Delaminations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Winfree, William P.

    2011-01-01

    A recently developed technique is presented for thermographic detection of delaminations in composites by performing temperature measurements with fiber optic Bragg gratings. A single optical fiber with multiple Bragg gratings employed as surface temperature sensors was bonded to the surface of a composite with subsurface defects. The investigated structure was a 10-ply composite specimen with prefabricated delaminations of various sizes and depths. Both during and following the application of a thermal heat flux to the surface, the individual Bragg grating sensors measured the temporal and spatial temperature variations. The data obtained from grating sensors were analyzed with thermal modeling techniques of conventional thermography to reveal particular characteristics of the interested areas. Results were compared and found to be consistent with the calculations using numerical simulation techniques. Also discussed are methods including various heating sources and patterns, and their limitations for performing in-situ structural health monitoring.

  9. Ultraviolet light detection using an optical microcavity.

    PubMed

    Harker, Audrey; Mehrabani, Simin; Armani, Andrea M

    2013-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light exposure is connected to both physical and psychological diseases. As such, there is significant interest in developing sensors that can detect UV light in the mW/cm2 intensity range with a high signal-to-noise ratio. In this Letter, we demonstrate a UV sensor based on a silica integrated optical microcavity that has a linear operating response in both the forward and backward directions from 14 to 53 mW/cm2. The sensor response agrees with the developed predictive theory based on a thermodynamic model. Additionally, the signal-to-noise ratio is above 100 at physiologically relevant intensity levels.

  10. Optical "anti-transient" detected by MASTER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisenko, D.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Lipunov, V.; Balanutsa, P.; Yecheistov, V.; Tiurina, N.; Kornilov, V.; Belinski, A.; Shatskiy, N.; Chazov, V.; Kuznetsov, A.; Zimnukhov, D.; Krushinsky, V.; Zalozhnih, I.; Popov, A.; Bourdanov, A.; Punanova, A.; Ivanov, K.; Yazev, S.; Budnev, N.; Konstantinov, E.; Chuvalaev, O.; Poleshchuk, V.; Gress, O.; Parkhomenko, A.; Tlatov, A.; Dormidontov, D.; Senik, V.; Yurkov, V.; Sergienko, Y.; Varda, D.; Sinyakov, E.; Shurpakov, S.; Shumkov, V.; Podvorotny, P.; Levato, H.; Saffe, C.; Mallamaci, C.; Lopez, C.; Podest, F.

    2013-02-01

    We have started the search for the disappearing stars (optical "anti-transients", OATs) in the MASTER database. The first result is the detection of a deep (~3.5 magnitudes) fading of the bright star TYC 2505-672-1 whose variability was previously unknown. This star has the coordinates 09 53 10.00 +33 53 52.7 and magnitudes V=10.71, B=12.51 in Tycho2 catalogue and J=7.61, H=6.78, K=6.57 in 2MASS.

  11. Optics detection and laser countermeasures on a combat vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöqvist, Lars; Allard, Lars; Pettersson, Magnus; Börjesson, Per; Lindskog, Nils; Bodin, Johan; Widén, Anders; Persson, Hâkan; Fredriksson, Jan; Edström, Sten

    2016-10-01

    Magnifying optical assemblies used for weapon guidance or rifle scopes may possess a threat for a combat vehicle and its personnel. Detection and localisation of optical threats is consequently of interest in military applications. Typically a laser system is used in optics detection, or optical augmentation, to interrogate a scene of interest to localise retroreflected laser radiation. One interesting approach for implementing optics detection on a combat vehicle is to use a continuous scanning scheme. In addition, optics detection can be combined with laser countermeasures, or a laser dazzling function, to efficiently counter an optical threat. An optics detection laser sensor demonstrator has been implemented on a combat vehicle. The sensor consists of a stabilised gimbal and was integrated together with a LEMUR remote electro-optical sight. A narrow laser slit is continuously scanned around the horizon to detect and locate optical threats. Detected threats are presented for the operator within the LEMUR presentation system, and by cueing a countermeasure laser installed in the LEMUR sensor housing threats can be defeated. Results obtained during a field demonstration of the optics detection sensor and the countermeasure laser will be presented. In addition, results obtained using a dual-channel optics detection system designed for false alarm reduction are also discussed.

  12. Optical detection of microcystin produced by cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ammar, R.; Nabok, A.; Hashim, A.; Smith, T.

    2013-06-01

    Microcystin (MC-LR) produced by cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) was detected in direct immunoassay with specific monoclonal antibody MC10E7 using an optical method of Total Internal Reflection Ellipsometry (TIRE). The minimal detected concentration of MC-LR of 0.1 ng/ml is a remarkable achievement for direct immunoassay against such low molecular weight analyte molecule. The study of binding kinetics of MC-LR to MC10E7 antibody allowed the evaluation of the association constant KA of about 108 (l/Mol) typical for highly specific immune reactions. Concentration of MC-LR in aqueous solutions was reduced using an absorbent made of polyelectrolyte-coated microparticles functionalized with MC10E7 antibodies.

  13. K2: A New Method for the Detection of Galaxy Clusters Based on Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey Multicolor Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanjavur, Karun; Willis, Jon; Crampton, David

    2009-11-01

    We have developed a new method, K2, optimized for the detection of galaxy clusters in multicolor images. Based on the Red Sequence approach, K2 detects clusters using simultaneous enhancements in both colors and position. The detection significance is robustly determined through extensive Monte Carlo simulations and through comparison with available cluster catalogs based on two different optical methods, and also on X-ray data. K2 also provides quantitative estimates of the candidate clusters' richness and photometric redshifts. Initially, K2 was applied to the two color (gri) 161 deg2 images of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey Wide (CFHTLS-W) data. Our simulations show that the false detection rate for these data, at our selected threshold, is only ~1%, and that the cluster catalogs are ~80% complete up to a redshift of z = 0.6 for Fornax-like and richer clusters and to z ~ 0.3 for poorer clusters. Based on the g-, r-, and i-band photometric catalogs of the Terapix T05 release, 35 clusters/deg2 are detected, with 1-2 Fornax-like or richer clusters every 2 deg2. Catalogs containing data for 6144 galaxy clusters have been prepared, of which 239 are rich clusters. These clusters, especially the latter, are being searched for gravitational lenses—one of our chief motivations for cluster detection in CFHTLS. The K2 method can be easily extended to use additional color information and thus improve overall cluster detection to higher redshifts. The complete set of K2 cluster catalogs, along with the supplementary catalogs for the member galaxies, are available on request from the authors.

  14. K2: A NEW METHOD FOR THE DETECTION OF GALAXY CLUSTERS BASED ON CANADA-FRANCE-HAWAII TELESCOPE LEGACY SURVEY MULTICOLOR IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Thanjavur, Karun; Willis, Jon; Crampton, David

    2009-11-20

    We have developed a new method, K2, optimized for the detection of galaxy clusters in multicolor images. Based on the Red Sequence approach, K2 detects clusters using simultaneous enhancements in both colors and position. The detection significance is robustly determined through extensive Monte Carlo simulations and through comparison with available cluster catalogs based on two different optical methods, and also on X-ray data. K2 also provides quantitative estimates of the candidate clusters' richness and photometric redshifts. Initially, K2 was applied to the two color (gri) 161 deg{sup 2} images of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey Wide (CFHTLS-W) data. Our simulations show that the false detection rate for these data, at our selected threshold, is only approx1%, and that the cluster catalogs are approx80% complete up to a redshift of z = 0.6 for Fornax-like and richer clusters and to z approx 0.3 for poorer clusters. Based on the g-, r-, and i-band photometric catalogs of the Terapix T05 release, 35 clusters/deg{sup 2} are detected, with 1-2 Fornax-like or richer clusters every 2 deg{sup 2}. Catalogs containing data for 6144 galaxy clusters have been prepared, of which 239 are rich clusters. These clusters, especially the latter, are being searched for gravitational lenses-one of our chief motivations for cluster detection in CFHTLS. The K2 method can be easily extended to use additional color information and thus improve overall cluster detection to higher redshifts. The complete set of K2 cluster catalogs, along with the supplementary catalogs for the member galaxies, are available on request from the authors.

  15. Direct optical nanoscopy with axially localized detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourg, N.; Mayet, C.; Dupuis, G.; Barroca, T.; Bon, P.; Lécart, S.; Fort, E.; Lévêque-Fort, S.

    2015-09-01

    Evanescent light excitation is widely used in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to confine light and reduce background noise. Here, we propose a method of exploiting evanescent light in the context of emission. When a fluorophore is located in close proximity to a medium with a higher refractive index, its near-field component is converted into light that propagates beyond the critical angle. This so-called supercritical-angle fluorescence can be captured using a high-numerical-aperture objective and used to determine the axial position of the fluorophore with nanometre precision. We introduce a new technique for three-dimensional nanoscopy that combines direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) with dedicated detection of supercritical-angle fluorescence emission. We demonstrate that our approach of direct optical nanoscopy with axially localized detection (DONALD) typically yields an isotropic three-dimensional localization precision of 20 nm within an axial range of ∼150 nm above the coverslip.

  16. WINGS: A WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey. II. Deep optical photometry of 77 nearby clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, J.; D'Onofrio, M.; Marmo, C.; Fasano, G.; Bettoni, D.; Cava, A.; Couch, W. J.; Dressler, A.; Kjærgaard, P.; Moles, M.; Pignatelli, E.; Poggianti, B. M.; Valentinuzzi, T.

    2009-04-01

    Context: This is the second paper of a series devoted to the WIde Field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS). WINGS is a long term project which is gathering wide-field, multi-band imaging and spectroscopy of galaxies in a complete sample of 77 X-ray selected, nearby clusters (0.04 < z < 0.07) located far from the galactic plane (|b|≥ 20°). The main goal of this project is to establish a local reference for evolutionary studies of galaxies and galaxy clusters. Aims: This paper presents the optical (B,V) photometric catalogs of the WINGS sample and describes the procedures followed to construct them. We have paid special care to correctly treat the large extended galaxies (which includes the brightest cluster galaxies) and the reduction of the influence of the bright halos of very bright stars. Methods: We have constructed photometric catalogs based on wide-field images in B and V bands using SExtractor. Photometry has been performed on images in which large galaxies and halos of bright stars were removed after modeling them with elliptical isophotes. Results: We publish deep optical photometric catalogs (90% complete at V ~ 21.7, which translates to ˜ M^*_V+6 at mean redshift), giving positions, geometrical parameters, and several total and aperture magnitudes for all the objects detected. For each field we have produced three catalogs containing galaxies, stars and objects of “unknown” classification (~6%). From simulations we found that the uncertainty of our photometry is quite dependent of the light profile of the objects with stars having the most robust photometry and de Vaucouleurs profiles showing higher uncertainties and also an additional bias of ~-0.2^m. The star/galaxy classification of the bright objects (V < 20) was checked visually making negligible the fraction of misclassified objects. For fainter objects, we found that simulations do not provide reliable estimates of the possible misclassification and therefore we have compared our data

  17. On event-based optical flow detection

    PubMed Central

    Brosch, Tobias; Tschechne, Stephan; Neumann, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Event-based sensing, i.e., the asynchronous detection of luminance changes, promises low-energy, high dynamic range, and sparse sensing. This stands in contrast to whole image frame-wise acquisition by standard cameras. Here, we systematically investigate the implications of event-based sensing in the context of visual motion, or flow, estimation. Starting from a common theoretical foundation, we discuss different principal approaches for optical flow detection ranging from gradient-based methods over plane-fitting to filter based methods and identify strengths and weaknesses of each class. Gradient-based methods for local motion integration are shown to suffer from the sparse encoding in address-event representations (AER). Approaches exploiting the local plane like structure of the event cloud, on the other hand, are shown to be well suited. Within this class, filter based approaches are shown to define a proper detection scheme which can also deal with the problem of representing multiple motions at a single location (motion transparency). A novel biologically inspired efficient motion detector is proposed, analyzed and experimentally validated. Furthermore, a stage of surround normalization is incorporated. Together with the filtering this defines a canonical circuit for motion feature detection. The theoretical analysis shows that such an integrated circuit reduces motion ambiguity in addition to decorrelating the representation of motion related activations. PMID:25941470

  18. Independent Component Analysis to Detect Clustered Microcalcification Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo-Caballero, R.; García-Orellana, C. J.; García-Manso, A.; González-Velasco, H. M.; Macías-Macías, M.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of clustered microcalcifications is one of the earliest signs in breast cancer detection. Although there exist many studies broaching this problem, most of them are nonreproducible due to the use of proprietary image datasets. We use a known subset of the currently largest publicly available mammography database, the Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM), to develop a computer-aided detection system that outperforms the current reproducible studies on the same mammogram set. This proposal is mainly based on the use of extracted image features obtained by independent component analysis, but we also study the inclusion of the patient's age as a nonimage feature which requires no human expertise. Our system achieves an average of 2.55 false positives per image at a sensitivity of 81.8% and 4.45 at a sensitivity of 91.8% in diagnosing the BCRP_CALC_1 subset of DDSM. PMID:22654626

  19. Orthology Detection Combining Clustering and Synteny for Very Large Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, Marcus; Hernandez-Rosales, Maribel; Doerr, Daniel; Wieseke, Nicolas; Thévenin, Annelyse; Stoye, Jens; Hartmann, Roland K.; Prohaska, Sonja J.; Stadler, Peter F.

    2014-01-01

    The elucidation of orthology relationships is an important step both in gene function prediction as well as towards understanding patterns of sequence evolution. Orthology assignments are usually derived directly from sequence similarities for large data because more exact approaches exhibit too high computational costs. Here we present PoFF, an extension for the standalone tool Proteinortho, which enhances orthology detection by combining clustering, sequence similarity, and synteny. In the course of this work, FFAdj-MCS, a heuristic that assesses pairwise gene order using adjacencies (a similarity measure related to the breakpoint distance) was adapted to support multiple linear chromosomes and extended to detect duplicated regions. PoFF largely reduces the number of false positives and enables more fine-grained predictions than purely similarity-based approaches. The extension maintains the low memory requirements and the efficient concurrency options of its basis Proteinortho, making the software applicable to very large datasets. PMID:25137074

  20. Resonant mixing of optical orbital and spin angular momentum by using chiral silicon nanosphere clusters.

    PubMed

    Al-Jarro, Ahmed; Biris, Claudiu G; Panoiu, Nicolae C

    2016-04-04

    We present an in-depth analysis of the resonant intermixing between optical orbital and spin angular momentum of Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams, mediated by chiral clusters made of silicon nanospheres. In particular, we establish a relationship between the spin and orbital quantum numbers characterizing the LG beam and the order q of the rotation symmetry group q of the cluster of nanospheres for which resonantly enhanced coupling between the two components of the optical angular momentum is observed. Thus, similar to the case of diffraction grating-mediated transfer of linear momentum between optical beams, we demonstrate that clusters of nanospheres that are invariant to specific rotation transformations can efficiently transfer optical angular momentum between LG beams with different quantum numbers. We also discuss the conditions in which the resonant interaction between LG beams and a chiral cluster of nanospheres leads to the generation of superchiral light.

  1. A Detailed Study of Two Optically Selected, High-Redshift Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubin, Lori M.

    2000-01-01

    We are obtaining detailed X-ray spectral and structural data for two distant, optically-selected clusters of galaxies which are known X-ray emitters, CL1324+3011 at z = 0.76 and CL,1604+4304 at z = 0.90. These observations will allow us to place accurate constraints on the temperature, surface-brightness profile, and mass fraction of the intracluster medium in rich, optically-selected clusters at very high redshift. The two target clusters are the most well-studied systems at z greater than 0.7 in the optical and infrared regimes; therefore, with the addition of the XMM data, we plan to study the specifies of the relationship between the X-ray and optical properties and their implications for galaxy and cluster evolution.

  2. Hard X-ray-induced optical luminescence via biomolecule-directed metal clusters.

    PubMed

    Osakada, Yasuko; Pratx, Guillem; Sun, Conroy; Sakamoto, Masanori; Ahmad, Moiz; Volotskova, Olga; Ong, Qunxiang; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Harada, Yoshie; Xing, Lei; Cui, Bianxiao

    2014-04-07

    Here, we demonstrate that biomolecule-directed metal clusters are applicable in the study of hard X-ray excited optical luminescence, promising a new direction in the development of novel X-ray-activated imaging probes.

  3. OPTICAL REDSHIFT AND RICHNESS ESTIMATES FOR GALAXY CLUSTERS SELECTED WITH THE SUNYAEV-Zel'dovich EFFECT FROM 2008 SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    High, F. W.; Stalder, B.; Song, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aird, K. A.; Allam, S. S.; Buckley-Geer, E. J.; Armstrong, R.; Barkhouse, W. A.; Benson, B. A.; Bertin, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Brodwin, M.; Challis, P.; De Haan, T.

    2010-11-10

    We present redshifts and optical richness properties of 21 galaxy clusters uniformly selected by their Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) signature. These clusters, plus an additional, unconfirmed candidate, were detected in a 178 deg{sup 2} area surveyed by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) in 2008. Using griz imaging from the Blanco Cosmology Survey and from pointed Magellan telescope observations, as well as spectroscopy using Magellan facilities, we confirm the existence of clustered red-sequence galaxies, report red-sequence photometric redshifts, present spectroscopic redshifts for a subsample, and derive R{sub 200} radii and M{sub 200} masses from optical richness. The clusters span redshifts from 0.15 to greater than 1, with a median redshift of 0.74; three clusters are estimated to be at z>1. Redshifts inferred from mean red-sequence colors exhibit 2% rms scatter in {sigma}{sub z}/(1 + z) with respect to the spectroscopic subsample for z < 1. We show that the M{sub 200} cluster masses derived from optical richness correlate with masses derived from SPT data and agree with previously derived scaling relations to within the uncertainties. Optical and infrared imaging is an efficient means of cluster identification and redshift estimation in large SZ surveys, and exploiting the same data for richness measurements, as we have done, will be useful for constraining cluster masses and radii for large samples in cosmological analysis.

  4. Detecting eavesdropping activity in fiber optic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Gregory G.

    The secure transmission of data is critical to governments, military organizations, financial institutions, health care providers and other enterprises. The primary method of securing in-transit data is though data encryption. A number of encryption methods exist but the fundamental approach is to assume an eavesdropper has access to the encrypted message but does not have the computing capability to decrypt the message in a timely fashion. Essentially, the strength of security depends on the complexity of the encryption method and the resources available to the eavesdropper. The development of future technologies, most notably quantum computers and quantum computing, is often cited as a direct threat to traditional encryption schemes. It seems reasonable that additional effort should be placed on prohibiting the eavesdropper from coming into possession of the encrypted message in the first place. One strategy for denying possession of the encrypted message is to secure the physical layer of the communications path. Because the majority of transmitted information is over fiber-optic networks, it seems appropriate to consider ways of enhancing the integrity and security of the fiber-based physical layer. The purpose of this research is to investigate the properties of light, as they are manifested in single mode fiber, as a means of insuring the integrity and security of the physical layer of a fiber-optic based communication link. Specifically, the approach focuses on the behavior of polarization in single mode fiber, as it is shown to be especially sensitive to fiber geometry. Fiber geometry is necessarily modified during the placement of optical taps. The problem of detecting activity associated with the placement of an optical tap is herein approached as a supervised machine learning anomaly identification task. The inputs include raw polarization measurements along with additional features derived from various visualizations of the raw data (the inputs are

  5. Detection of Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, P.; Lederer, S.; Barker, E.; Cowardin, H.; Abercromby, K.; Silha, J.; Burkhardt, A.

    2014-01-01

    There have been extensive optical surveys for debris at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) conducted with meter-class telescopes, such as those conducted with MODEST (the Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope, a 0.6-m telescope located at Cerro Tololo in Chile), and the European Space Agency's 1.0-m space debris telescope (SDT) in the Canary Islands. These surveys have detection limits in the range of 18th or 19th magnitude, which corresponds to sizes larger than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175. All of these surveys reveal a substantial population of objects fainter than R = 15th magnitude that are not in the public U.S. Satellite Catalog. To detect objects fainter than 20th magnitude (and presumably smaller than 10 cm) in the visible requires a larger telescope and excellent imaging conditions. This combination is available in Chile. NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office has begun collecting orbital debris observations with the 6.5-m (21.3-ft diameter) "Walter Baade" Magellan telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. The goal is to detect objects as faint as possible from a ground-based observatory and begin to understand the brightness distribution of GEO debris fainter than R = 20th magnitude.

  6. Parallel Optical and Electrochemical DNA Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Wolfgang; Liu, Jianyun; Niu, Lifang; Nielsen, Peter Eigil; Tiefenauer, Louis

    This contribution introduces strategies for the sensitive detection of oligonucleotides as bio-analytes binding from solution to a variety of probe architectures assembled at the (Au-) sensor surface. Detection principles based on surface plasmon optics and electrochemical techniques are compared. In particular, cyclic- and square wave voltammetry (SWV) are applied for the read-out of ferrocene redox labels conjugated to streptavidin that binds to the (biotinylated) DNA targets after hybridizing to the interfacial probe matrix of either DNA or peptide nucleic acid (PNA) strands. By employing streptavidin modified with fluorophores the identical sensor architecture can be used for the recording of hybridization reactions by surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS). The Langmuir isotherms determined by both techniques, i.e., by SWV and SPFS, give virtually identical affinity constants KA, confirming that the mode of detection has no influence on the hybridization reaction. By using semiconducting nanoparticles as luminescence labels that can be tuned in their bandgap energies over a wide range of emission wavelengths surface plasmon fluorescence microscopy allows for the parallel read-out of multiple analyte binding events simultaneously.

  7. Optical Scaling Relations of X-ray Selected Clusters at Moderate Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloster, Dylan; Rines, K.; Svoboda, B. E.; Arnold, R. L.; Welch, T. J.; Finn, R. A.; Vikhlinin, A.

    2011-01-01

    The relation between dark matter and galaxies is a fundamental problem in astrophysics. Here, we study this relation using optical observations of an X-ray-selected sample of clusters at moderate redshift (z=0.35-0.90). We collected griz images of 30 clusters with WIYN/OPTIC to measure the bright end of the luminosity function. Our imaging extends approximately 2 magnitudes fainter than M*, thus including most of the total cluster light. We use the red sequence and statistical background subtraction to estimate the richnesses and stellar luminosities of the clusters. We measure scaling relations by comparing the optical properties to X-ray mass estimates derived from Chandra observations. At low redshift, some studies indicate that total stellar luminosity is a better predictor of cluster mass than X-ray luminosity. We test whether a similar result holds at moderate redshift. In the future, we will compare the optical and X-ray properties to virial mass estimates from optical spectroscopy and to Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect observations. If photometric properties of clusters are good predictors of cluster mass, these relations could be applied to large surveys like SPT, Planck, DES, eROSITA, and LSST to improve constraints on the properties of dark energy.

  8. Non-virialized clusters for detection of dark energy-dark matter interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Delliou, M.; Marcondes, R. J. F.; Lima Neto, G. B.; Abdalla, E.

    2015-10-01

    The observation of galaxy and gas distributions, as well as cosmological simulations in a ΛCDM cold dark matter universe, suggests that clusters of galaxies are still accreting mass and are not expected to be in equilibrium. In this work, we investigate the possibility to evaluate the departure from virial equilibrium in order to detect, in that balance, effects from a dark matter-dark energy interaction. We continue, from previous works, using a simple model of interacting dark sector, the Layzer-Irvine equation for dynamical virial evolution, and employ optical observations in order to obtain the mass profiles through weak-lensing and X-ray observations giving the intracluster gas temperatures. Through a Monte Carlo method, we generate, for a set of clusters, measurements of observed virial ratios, interaction strength, rest virial ratio and departure from equilibrium factors. We found a compounded interaction strength of -1.99^{+2.56}_{-16.00}, compatible with no interaction, but also a compounded rest virial ratio of -0.79 ± 0.13, which would entail a 2σ detection. We confirm quantitatively that clusters of galaxies are out of equilibrium but further investigation is needed to constrain a possible interaction in the dark sector.

  9. Automated optic disk boundary detection by modified active contour model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Chutatape, Opas; Chew, Paul

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a novel deformable-model-based algorithm for fully automated detection of optic disk boundary in fundus images. The proposed method improves and extends the original snake (deforming-only technique) in two aspects: clustering and smoothing update. The contour points are first self-separated into edge-point group or uncertain-point group by clustering after each deformation, and these contour points are then updated by different criteria based on different groups. The updating process combines both the local and global information of the contour to achieve the balance of contour stability and accuracy. The modifications make the proposed algorithm more accurate and robust to blood vessel occlusions, noises, ill-defined edges and fuzzy contour shapes. The comparative results show that the proposed method can estimate the disk boundaries of 100 test images closer to the groundtruth, as measured by mean distance to closest point (MDCP) <3 pixels, with the better success rate when compared to those obtained by gradient vector flow snake (GVF-snake) and modified active shape models (ASM).

  10. Fiber-optic sensor detects nonaqueous compounds

    SciTech Connect

    1992-11-01

    Scientists have used a fiber-optic sensor that detects scattered light to locate and identify nonaqueous liquids such as gasoline, that have seeped below the ground`s surface. The technique, called Raman spectroscopy, can be used to find both non-aqueous phase liquids - such as gasoline, that float on water, and dense nonaqueous phase liquids - such as the chemical perchloroethylene, or PCE - that sink below water. The in situ Raman spectra of the gasoline clearly showed the relative amounts of different chemical compounds, thus indicating the type of gasoline. The amount of fluorescence in the spectrum seems to be related to the degradation products in the gasoline and, thus, might be some measure of the history of the fuel.

  11. Optical Detection of Hepatic and Renal Function.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorshow, Richard B.; Bugaj, Joseph E.; Burleigh, B. Daniel; Johnson, Michael A.; Jones, William B.; Duncan, James R.

    1997-03-01

    The feasibility of a new methodology for organ function determination, based on optical detection, is investigated. Differentiation between normal and abnormal organ function is demonstrated in an animal model for both the liver and the kidney. Two commercial dyes were employed in this initial study. Characteristic blood clearance curves associated with normal hepatic function and normal renal function are obtained. Upon ablation of a portion of the liver, the clearance curve ascribed to hepatic function is greatly extended as expected. Upon ligation of both kidneys, the clearance curve ascribed to renal function remains elevated and constant, indicating little if any clearance. The clearance curves are fit to standard physiological compartment models to yield quantitative information on decay times.

  12. Submerged turbulence detection with optical satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.; Keeler, R. Norris; Bondur, Valery G.; Leung, Pak T.; Prandke, H.; Vithanage, D.

    2007-09-01

    During fall periods in 2002, 2003 and 2004 three major oceanographic expeditions were carried out in Mamala Bay, Hawaii. These were part of the RASP Remote Anthropogenic Sensing Program. Ikonos and Quickbird optical satellite images of sea surface glint revealed ~100 m spectral anomalies in km2 averaging patches in regions leading from the Honolulu Sand Island Municipal Outfall diffuser to distances up to 20 km. To determine the mechanisms behind this phenomenon, the RASP expeditions monitored the waters adjacent to the outfall with an array of hydrographic, optical and turbulence microstructure sensors in anomaly and ambient background regions. Drogue tracks and mean turbulence parameters for 2 × 10 4 microstructure patches were analyzed to understand complex turbulence, fossil turbulence and zombie turbulence near-vertical internal wave transport processes. The dominant mechanism appears to be generic to stratified natural fluids including planet and star atmospheres and is termed beamed zombie turbulence maser action (BZTMA). Most of the bottom turbulent kinetic energy is converted to ~ 100 m fossil turbulence waves. These activate secondary (zombie) turbulence in outfall fossil turbulence patches that transmit heat, mass, chemical species, momentum and information vertically to the sea surface for detection in an efficient maser action. The transport is beamed in intermittent mixing chimneys.

  13. Submerged turbulence detection with optical satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.; Keeler, R. Norris; Bondur, Valery G.; Leung, Pak T.; Prandke, H.; Vithanage, D.

    2013-01-01

    During fall periods in 2002, 2003 and 2004 three major oceanographic expeditions were carried out in Mamala Bay, Hawaii. These were part of the RASP Remote Anthropogenic Sensing Program. Ikonos and Quickbird optical satellite images of sea surface glint revealed !100 m spectral anomalies in km2 averaging patches in regions leading from the Honolulu Sand Island Municipal Outfall diffuser to distances up to 20 km. To determine the mechanisms behind this phenomenon, the RASP expeditions monitored the waters adjacent to the outfall with an array of hydrographic, optical and turbulence microstructure sensors in anomaly and ambient background regions. Drogue tracks and mean turbulence parameters for 2 ! 104 microstructure patches were analyzed to understand complex turbulence, fossil turbulence and zombie turbulence near-vertical internal wave transport processes. The dominant mechanism appears to be generic to stratified natural fluids including planet and star atmospheres and is termed beamed zombie turbulence maser action (BZTMA). Most of the bottom turbulent kinetic energy is converted to ! 100 m fossil turbulence waves. These activate secondary (zombie) turbulence in outfall fossil turbulence patches that transmit heat, mass, chemical species, momentum and information vertically to the sea surface for detection in an efficient maser action. The transport is beamed in intermittent mixing chimneys.

  14. AN EXAMINATION OF THE OPTICAL SUBSTRUCTURE OF GALAXY CLUSTERS HOSTING RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, Joshua D.; Blanton, Elizabeth L.

    2013-04-20

    Using radio sources from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm survey, and optical counterparts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we have identified a large number of galaxy clusters. The radio sources within these clusters are driven by active galactic nuclei, and our cluster samples include clusters with bent, and straight, double-lobed radio sources. We also included a single-radio-component comparison sample. We examine these galaxy clusters for evidence of optical substructure, testing the possibility that bent double-lobed radio sources are formed as a result of large-scale cluster mergers. We use a suite of substructure analysis tools to determine the location and extent of substructure visible in the optical distribution of cluster galaxies, and compare the rates of substructure in clusters with different types of radio sources. We found no preference for significant substructure in clusters hosting bent double-lobed radio sources compared to those with other types of radio sources.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: WINGS: Deep optical phot. of 77 nearby clusters (Varela+, 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, J.; D'Onofrio, M.; Marmo, C.; Fasano, G.; Bettoni, D.; Cava, A.; Couch, J. W.; Dressler, A.; Kjaergaard, P.; Moles, M.; Pignatelli, E.; Poggianti, M. B.; Valentinuzzi, T.

    2009-05-01

    This is the second paper of a series devoted to the WIde Field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS). WINGS is a long term project which is gathering wide-field, multi-band imaging and spectroscopy of galaxies in a complete sample of 77 X-ray selected, nearby clusters (0.04200deg). The main goal of this project is to establish a local reference for evolutionary studies of galaxies and galaxy clusters. This paper presents the optical (B,V) photometric catalogs of the WINGS sample and describes the procedures followed to construct them. We have paid special care to correctly treat the large extended galaxies (which includes the brightest cluster galaxies) and the reduction of the influence of the bright halos of very bright stars. We have constructed photometric catalogs based on wide-field images in B and V bands using SExtractor. Photometry has been performed on images in which large galaxies and halos of bright stars were removed after modeling them with elliptical isophotes. We publish deep optical photometric catalogs (90% complete at V21.7, which translates to ~ MV* + 6 at mean redshift), giving positions, geometrical parameters, and several total and aperture magnitudes for all the objects detected. For each field we have produced three catalogs containing galaxies, stars and objects of "unknown" classification (~16%). From simulations we found that the uncertainty of our photometry is quite dependent of the light profile of the objects with stars having the most robust photometry and de Vaucouleurs profiles showing higher uncertainties and also an additional bias of ~-0.2m. The star/galaxy classification of the bright objects (V<20) was checked visually making negligible the fraction of misclassified objects. For fainter objects, we found that simulations do not provide reliable estimates of the possible misclassification and therefore we have compared our data with that from deep counts of galaxies and star counts from models of our Galaxy. Both sets turned

  16. Mammographic calcification cluster detection and threshold gold thickness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. M.; Mackenzie, A.; Cooke, J.; Given-Wilson, R.; Wallis, M. G.; Chakraborty, D. P.; Dance, D. R.; Young, K. C.

    2012-03-01

    European Guidelines for quality control in digital mammography specify acceptable and achievable standards of image quality (IQ) in terms of threshold gold thickness using the CDMAM test object. However, there is little evidence relating such measurements to cancer detection. This work investigated the relationship between calcification detection and threshold gold thickness. An observer study was performed using a set of 162 amorphous selenium direct digital (DR) detector images (81 no cancer and 81 with 1-3 inserted calcification clusters). From these images four additional IQs were simulated: different digital detectors (computed radiography (CR) and DR) and dose levels. Seven observers marked and rated the locations of suspicious regions. DBM analysis of variances was performed on the JAFROC figure of merit (FoM) yielding 95% confidence intervals for IQ pairs. Automated threshold gold thickness (Tg) analysis was performed for the 0.25mm gold disc diameter on CDMAM images at the same IQs (16 images per IQ). Tg was plotted against FoM and a power law fitted to the data. There was a significant reduction in FoM for calcification detection for CR images compared with DR; FoM decreased from 0.83 to 0.63 (p<=0.0001). Detection was also sensitive to dose. There was a good correlation between FoM and Tg (R2=0.80, p<0.05), consequently threshold gold thickness was a good predictor of calcification detection at the same IQ. Since the majority of threshold gold thicknesses for the various IQs were above the acceptable standard despite large variations in calcification detection by radiologists, current EU guidelines may need revising.

  17. Maneuver Detection and Estimation with Optical Tracklets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K.

    2014-09-01

    A method is proposed for detecting and estimating maneuvers using optical (angles-only) tracklets. After the correlator recognizes that a Resident Space Object (RSO) has maneuvered and no longer matches its pre-maneuver trajectory, observations for that RSO will be classified as Uncorrelated Tracks (UCTs). Using an algorithm to indicate when known RSOs have gone missing, an initial estimate for a maneuver can be obtained by processing the pool of UCTs with an algorithm called Two Angle Pairs Initial Orbit with Conjunction Analysis (TAPIOCA). TAPIOCA computes hypothesized orbits on the admissible region for two angles-only observations and back-propagates the orbits to look for conjunctions with the last known trajectories for the missing RSOs. If a conjunction is found with a small miss distance and velocity difference, it is used as an estimate for a maneuver. Once an initial estimate for the maneuver is obtained from TAPIOCA, a batch least-squares process is outlined which can refine that maneuver estimate and provide predictions for the trajectory and covariance after the maneuver such that the correlator will correctly identify that object for subsequent tracklets. As more tracklets become available after the maneuver, it is continually refined in the least-squares estimator. The maneuver estimates include start time and thrust. Maneuver detection results are shown for both simulated and real geostationary objects. Using Raven observations of Galaxy 15, the method was able to find five maneuvers over four weeks which were verified against precise WAAS ephemeris.

  18. Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography detection method

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, M J; Sathyam, U S; Colston, B W; DaSilva, L B; Fried, D; Ragadio, J N; Featherstone, J D B

    1999-05-12

    This study demonstrates the potential of polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) for non-invasive in vivo detection and characterization of early, incipient caries lesions. PS-OCT generates cross-sectional images of biological tissue while measuring the effect of the tissue on the polarization state of incident light. Clear discrimination between regions of normal and demineralized enamel is first shown in PS-OCT images of bovine enamel blocks containing well-characterized artificial lesions. High-resolution, cross-sectional images of extracted human teeth are then generated that clearly discriminate between the normal and carious regions on both the smooth and occlusal surfaces. Regions of the teeth that appeared to be demineralized in the PS-OCT images were verified using histological thin sections examined under polarized light microscopy. The PS-OCT system discriminates between normal and carious regions by measuring the polarization state of the back-scattered 1310 nm light, which is affected by the state of demineralization of the enamel. Demineralization of enamel increases the scattereing coefficient, thus depolarizing the incident light. This study shows that PS-OCT has great potential for the detection, characterization, and monitoring of incipient caries lesions.

  19. Study of Optical Properties on Fractal Aggregation Using the GMM Method by Different Cluster Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kuo-En; Lin, Tang-Huang; Lien, Wei-Hung

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic pollutants or smoke from biomass burning contribute significantly to global particle aggregation emissions, yet their aggregate formation and resulting ensemble optical properties are poorly understood and parameterized in climate models. Particle aggregation refers to formation of clusters in a colloidal suspension. In clustering algorithms, many parameters, such as fractal dimension, number of monomers, radius of monomer, and refractive index real part and image part, will alter the geometries and characteristics of the fractal aggregation and change ensemble optical properties further. The cluster-cluster aggregation algorithm (CCA) is used to specify the geometries of soot and haze particles. In addition, the Generalized Multi-particle Mie (GMM) method is utilized to compute the Mie solution from a single particle to the multi particle case. This computer code for the calculation of the scattering by an aggregate of spheres in a fixed orientation and the experimental data have been made publicly available. This study for the model inputs of optical determination of the monomer radius, the number of monomers per cluster, and the fractal dimension is presented. The main aim in this study is to analyze and contrast several parameters of cluster aggregation aforementioned which demonstrate significant differences of optical properties using the GMM method finally. Keywords: optical properties, fractal aggregation, GMM, CCA

  20. A method to determine the number of nanoparticles in a cluster using conventional optical microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyeonggon; Attota, Ravikiran Tondare, Vipin; Vladár, András E.; Kavuri, Premsagar

    2015-09-07

    We present a method that uses conventional optical microscopes to determine the number of nanoparticles in a cluster, which is typically not possible using traditional image-based optical methods due to the diffraction limit. The method, called through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM), uses a series of optical images taken at varying focus levels to achieve this. The optical images cannot directly resolve the individual nanoparticles, but contain information related to the number of particles. The TSOM method makes use of this information to determine the number of nanoparticles in a cluster. Initial good agreement between the simulations and the measurements is also presented. The TSOM method can be applied to fluorescent and non-fluorescent as well as metallic and non-metallic nano-scale materials, including soft materials, making it attractive for tag-less, high-speed, optical analysis of nanoparticles down to 45 nm diameter.

  1. Advanced defect detection algorithm using clustering in ultrasonic NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gongzhang, Rui; Gachagan, Anthony

    2016-02-01

    A range of materials used in industry exhibit scattering properties which limits ultrasonic NDE. Many algorithms have been proposed to enhance defect detection ability, such as the well-known Split Spectrum Processing (SSP) technique. Scattering noise usually cannot be fully removed and the remaining noise can be easily confused with real feature signals, hence becoming artefacts during the image interpretation stage. This paper presents an advanced algorithm to further reduce the influence of artefacts remaining in A-scan data after processing using a conventional defect detection algorithm. The raw A-scan data can be acquired from either traditional single transducer or phased array configurations. The proposed algorithm uses the concept of unsupervised machine learning to cluster segmental defect signals from pre-processed A-scans into different classes. The distinction and similarity between each class and the ensemble of randomly selected noise segments can be observed by applying a classification algorithm. Each class will then be labelled as `legitimate reflector' or `artefacts' based on this observation and the expected probability of defection (PoD) and probability of false alarm (PFA) determined. To facilitate data collection and validate the proposed algorithm, a 5MHz linear array transducer is used to collect A-scans from both austenitic steel and Inconel samples. Each pulse-echo A-scan is pre-processed using SSP and the subsequent application of the proposed clustering algorithm has provided an additional reduction to PFA while maintaining PoD for both samples compared with SSP results alone.

  2. Facile assembly of tetragonal Pt clusters on graphene oxide for enhanced nonlinear optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chan; Li, Yubing; Huang, Li; Li, Wei; Chen, Wenzhe

    2015-11-01

    A facile method to assemble tetragonal Pt clusters on the surface of graphene oxide (Pt-cluster/GO) using anatase TiO2 as a template is proposed. The morphology and structure of Pt-cluster/GO were investigated, revealing that tetragonal Pt clusters with a diameter of 20-50 nm composed of 2-3 nm Pt nanoparticles (NPs) were homogenously decorated on the surface of GO. The nonlinear optical properties were characterized by the open-aperture Z-scan technique in the nanosecond regime using a laser with wavelength of 532 nm. The as-prepared Pt-cluster/GO hybrid was found to show strong optical limiting (OL) effects for nanosecond laser pulses at 532 nm, and the OL performance is superior to that of carbon nanotubes, a benchmark optical limiter. Furthermore, the Z-scan results showed that the OL performance of the Pt-cluster/GO hybrid is superior to that of GO and the Pt-NP/GO hybrid. The OL behavior of the metal/GO composite nanostructure can be effectively tailored by altering the aggregation means of metal NPs. Scattering measurements suggested that nonlinear scattering (NLS) played an important role in the observed OL behavior in the Pt-cluster/GO hybrid. The OL properties of the Pt-cluster/GO hybrid are attributed to the reverse saturable absorption in the GO sheet and NLS in the metal NPs.

  3. Optical and electronic properties of graphene nanoribbons upon adsorption of ligand-protected aluminum clusters.

    PubMed

    Gomes da Rocha, Claudia; Clayborne, P Andre; Koskinen, Pekka; Häkkinen, Hannu

    2014-02-28

    We have carried out first-principles calculations to investigate how the electronic and optical features of graphene nanoribbons are affected by the presence of atomic clusters. Aluminum clusters of different sizes and stabilized by organic ligands were deposited on graphene nanoribbons from which the energetic features of the adsorption plus electronic structure were treated within density-functional theory. Our results point out that, depending on their size and structure shape, the clusters perturb distinctively the electronic properties of the ribbons. We suggest that such selective response can be measured through optical means revealing that graphene nanoribbons can work as an efficient characterization medium of atomic clusters. In addition, we demonstrate that atomic clusters can fine-tune the electronic and spin-polarized states of graphene ribbons from which novel spin-filter devices could be designed.

  4. Electro-Optic Generation and Detection of Femtosecond Electromagnetic Pulses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-20

    electromagnetic pulses from an electro - optic crystal following their generation by electro - optic Cherenkov radiation, and their subsequent propagation and detection...in free space; (4) The measurement of subpicosecond electrical response of a new organic electrooptic material (polymer); (5) The observation of terahertz transition radiation from the surfaces of electro - optic crystals.

  5. GALAXY CLUSTERS IN THE SWIFT/BAT ERA. II. 10 MORE CLUSTERS DETECTED ABOVE 15 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Reimer, O.; Rebusco, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Boehringer, H.; La Parola, V.; Cusumano, G.

    2010-12-20

    We report on the discovery of 10 additional galaxy clusters detected in the ongoing Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) all-sky survey. Among the newly BAT-discovered clusters there are Bullet, A85, Norma, and PKS 0745-19. Norma is the only cluster, among those presented here, which is resolved by BAT. For all the clusters, we perform a detailed spectral analysis using XMM-Newton and Swift/BAT data to investigate the presence of a hard (non-thermal) X-ray excess. We find that in most cases the clusters' emission in the 0.3-200 keV band can be explained by a multi-temperature thermal model confirming our previous results. For two clusters (Bullet and A3667), we find evidence for the presence of a hard X-ray excess. In the case of the Bullet cluster, our analysis confirms the presence of a non-thermal, power-law-like, component with a 20-100 keV flux of 3.4 x 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} as detected in previous studies. For A3667, the excess emission can be successfully modeled as a hot component (kT {approx} 13 keV). We thus conclude that the hard X-ray emission from galaxy clusters (except the Bullet) has most likely a thermal origin.

  6. Galaxy Clusters in the Swift/BAT era II: 10 more Clusters detected above 15 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Ajello, M.; Rebusco, P.; Cappelluti, N.; Reimer, O.; Boehringer, H.; La Parola, V.; Cusumano, G.; /Palermo Observ.

    2010-10-27

    We report on the discovery of 10 additional galaxy clusters detected in the ongoing Swift/BAT all-sky survey. Among the newly BAT-discovered clusters there are: Bullet, Abell 85, Norma, and PKS 0745-19. Norma is the only cluster, among those presented here, which is resolved by BAT. For all the clusters we perform a detailed spectral analysis using XMM-Newton and Swift/BAT data to investigate the presence of a hard (non-thermal) X-ray excess. We find that in most cases the clusters emission in the 0.3-200 keV band can be explained by a multi-temperature thermal model confirming our previous results. For two clusters (Bullet and Abell 3667) we find evidence for the presence of a hard X-ray excess. In the case of the Bullet cluster, our analysis confirms the presence of a non-thermal, power-law like, component with a 20-100 keV flux of 3.4 x 10{sup -12} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} as detected in previous studies. For Abell 3667 the excess emission can be successfully modeled as a hot component (kT = {approx}13 keV). We thus conclude that the hard X-ray emission from galaxy clusters (except the Bullet) has most likely thermal origin.

  7. Maximum Likelihood Detection of Electro-Optic Moving Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-16

    The description of a maximum likelihood algorithm to detect moving targets in electro - optic data is presented. The algorithm is based on processing...optimum algorithm to determine the performance loss. A processing architecture concept is also described. Electro - optic sensor, detection, infrared sensor, moving target, binary integration, velocity filter.

  8. THE SPATIAL CLUSTERING OF ROSAT ALL-SKY SURVEY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. III. EXPANDED SAMPLE AND COMPARISON WITH OPTICAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Krumpe, Mirko; Coil, Alison L.; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Aceves, Hector

    2012-02-10

    This is the third paper in a series that reports on our investigation of the clustering properties of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) identified in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). In this paper, we extend the redshift range to 0.07 < z < 0.50 and measure the clustering amplitudes of both X-ray-selected and optically selected SDSS broad-line AGNs with and without radio detections as well as for X-ray-selected narrow-line RASS/SDSS AGNs. We measure the clustering amplitude through cross-correlation functions (CCFs) with SDSS galaxies and derive the bias by applying a halo occupation distribution model directly to the CCFs. We find no statistically convincing difference in the clustering of X-ray-selected and optically selected broad-line AGNs, as well as with samples in which radio-detected AGNs are excluded. This is in contrast to low-redshift optically selected narrow-line AGNs, where radio-loud AGNs are found in more massive halos than optical AGNs without a radio detection. The typical dark matter halo masses of our broad-line AGNs are log (M{sub DMH}/[h{sup -1} M{sub Sun }]) {approx} 12.4-13.4, consistent with the halo mass range of typical non-AGN galaxies at low redshifts. We find no significant difference between the clustering of X-ray-selected narrow-line AGNs and broad-line AGNs. We confirm the weak dependence of the clustering strength on AGN X-ray luminosity at a {approx}2{sigma} level. Finally, we summarize the current picture of AGN clustering to z {approx} 1.5 based on three-dimensional clustering measurements.

  9. Optical response of small closed-shell sodium clusters.

    PubMed

    Pal, George; Lefkidis, Georgios; Schneider, Hans Christian; Hübner, Wolfgang

    2010-10-21

    Absorption spectra of closed-shell Na(2), Na(3) (+), Na(4), Na(5) (+), Na(6), Na(7) (+), and Na(8) clusters are calculated using a complex Bethe-Salpeter equation derived using a conserving linear response method. In the framework of a quasiparticle approach, we determine electron-hole correlations in the presence of an external field. The calculated results are in excellent agreement with experimental spectra, and some possible cluster geometries that occur in experiments are analyzed. The position and the broadening of the resonances in the spectra arise from a consistent treatment of the scattering and dephasing contributions in the linear response calculation. Comparison between the experimental and the theoretical results yields information about the cluster geometry, which is not accessible experimentally.

  10. The Nature of Optically-Luminous Stellar Clusters in a Large Sample of Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavilkin, Tatjana

    2011-08-01

    Luminous Star Clusters (SCs) are fundamental building blocks of galaxies, and they provide basic information regarding the mechanisms of star formation and the process of galaxy formation and evolution. In my PhD thesis project I investigated properties of young SCs in a sample of 87 nearby Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs: LIR>10^11 L_sun) imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys at 0.4μm (F435W) and 0.9μm (F814W). Many LIRGs are observed to be ongoing mergers of gas-rich disk galaxies. They contain extreme starbursts and hence are expected to host particularly rich and luminous populations of SCs. This project represents the largest sample of galaxies with uniformly characterized properties of their SC population. The size of the sample allows an identification of trends in SC properties with merger stage and star formation rate. A large fraction (∼17%) of the cluster population is younger than 10 Myr. There is uncertainty in the determination of the ages of the bulk of the SCs due to an age-extinction degeneracy--the majority of the detected cluster population may have ages of up to a few hundred Myr. The median SC luminosity function index of the LIRG sample is alpha=-1.8, which is in a good agreement with previously published studies in various galaxy types. This sample contains some of the most luminous clusters observed so far, with Mmax (F435W) exceeding -17 mag. LIRGs follow the "brightest cluster--star formation rate" correlation observed for lower luminosity star-forming galaxies quite closely, although a large degree of scatter possibly due to extinction and over-estimation of Star Formation Rates (SFRs) in galaxies containing an Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) is present. Thus, the size-of-sample effect and the observed high SFRs are responsible for high luminosity of SCs found in LIRGs. The specific luminosity TL(F435W)--SFR(far-IR + far-UV) relation observed for nearby non-interacting spiral galaxies is not applicable

  11. Spectral Clustering for Unsupervised Segmentation of Lower Extremity Wound Beds Using Optical Images.

    PubMed

    Dhane, Dhiraj Manohar; Krishna, Vishal; Achar, Arun; Bar, Chittaranjan; Sanyal, Kunal; Chakraborty, Chandan

    2016-09-01

    Chronic lower extremity wound is a complicated disease condition of localized injury to skin and its tissues which have plagued many elders worldwide. The ulcer assessment and management is expensive and is burden on health establishment. Currently accurate wound evaluation remains a tedious task as it rely on visual inspection. This paper propose a new method for wound-area detection, using images digitally captured by a hand-held, optical camera. The strategy proposed involves spectral approach for clustering, based on the affinity matrix. The spectral clustering (SC) involves construction of similarity matrix of Laplacian based on Ng-Jorden-Weiss algorithm. Starting with a quadratic method, wound photographs were pre-processed for color homogenization. The first-order statistics filter was then applied to extract spurious regions. The filter was selected based on the performance, evaluated on four quality metrics. Then, the spectral method was used on the filtered images for effective segmentation. The segmented regions were post-processed using morphological operators. The performance of spectral segmentation was confirmed by ground-truth pictures labeled by dermatologists. The SC results were additionally compared with the results of k-means and Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) clustering algorithms. The SC approach on a set of 105 images, effectively delineated targeted wound beds yielding a segmentation accuracy of 86.73 %, positive predictive values of 91.80 %, and a sensitivity of 89.54 %. This approach shows the robustness of tool for ulcer perimeter measurement and healing progression. The article elucidates its potential to be incorporated in patient facing medical systems targeting a rapid clinical assistance.

  12. How to reliably detect molecular clusters and nucleation mode particles with Neutral cluster and Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manninen, Hanna E.; Mirme, Sander; Mirme, Aadu; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-08-01

    To understand the very first steps of atmospheric particle formation and growth processes, information on the size where the atmospheric nucleation and cluster activation occurs, is crucially needed. The current understanding of the concentrations and dynamics of charged and neutral clusters and particles is based on theoretical predictions and experimental observations. This paper gives a standard operation procedure (SOP) for Neutral cluster and Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS) measurements and data processing. With the NAIS data, we have improved the scientific understanding by (1) direct detection of freshly formed atmospheric clusters and particles, (2) linking experimental observations and theoretical framework to understand the formation and growth mechanisms of aerosol particles, and (3) parameterizing formation and growth mechanisms for atmospheric models. The SOP provides tools to harmonize the world-wide measurements of small clusters and nucleation mode particles and to verify consistent results measured by the NAIS users. The work is based on discussions and interactions between the NAIS users and the NAIS manufacturer.

  13. Measuring the scatter in the cluster optical richness-mass relation with machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boada, Steven Alvaro

    The distribution of massive clusters of galaxies depends strongly on the total cosmic mass density, the mass variance, and the dark energy equation of state. As such, measures of galaxy clusters can provide constraints on these parameters and even test models of gravity, but only if observations of clusters can lead to accurate estimates of their total masses. Here, we carry out a study to investigate the ability of a blind spectroscopic survey to recover accurate galaxy cluster masses through their line-of- sight velocity dispersions (LOSVD) using probability based and machine learning methods. We focus on the Hobby Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX), which will employ new Visible Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrographs (VIRUS), over 420 degree2 on the sky with a 1/4.5 fill factor. VIRUS covers the blue/optical portion of the spectrum (3500 - 5500 A), allowing surveys to measure redshifts for a large sample of galaxies out to z < 0.5 based on their absorption or emission (e.g., [O II], Mg II, Ne V) features. We use a detailed mock galaxy catalog from a semi-analytic model to simulate surveys observed with VIRUS, including: (1) Survey, a blind, HETDEX-like survey with an incomplete but uniform spectroscopic selection function; and (2) Targeted, a survey which targets clusters directly, obtaining spectra of all galaxies in a VIRUS-sized field. For both surveys, we include realistic uncertainties from galaxy magnitude and line-flux limits. We benchmark both surveys against spectroscopic observations with perfect" knowledge of galaxy line-of-sight velocities. With Survey observations, we can recover cluster masses to ˜ 0.1 dex which can be further improved to < 0.1 dex with Targeted observations. This level of cluster mass recovery provides important measurements of the intrinsic scatter in the optical richness-cluster mass relation, and enables constraints on the key cosmological parameter, sigma 8, to < 20%. As a demonstration of the methods

  14. An X-ray and optical study of the cluster of galaxies Abell 754

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabricant, D.; Beers, T. C.; Geller, M. J.; Gorenstein, P.; Huchra, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray and optical data for A754 are used to study the relative distribution of the luminous and dark matter in this dense, rich cluster of galaxies with X-ray luminosity comparable to that of the Coma Cluster. A quantitative statistical comparison is made of the galaxy positions with the total mass responsible for maintaining the X-ray emitting gas in hydrostatic equilibrium. A simple bimodal model which fits both the X-ray and optical data suggests that the galaxies are distributed consistently with the projected matter distribution within the region covered by the X-ray map (0.5-1 Mpc). The X-ray and optical estimates of the mass in the central region of the cluster are 2.9 x 10 to the 14th and 3.6 + or - 0.5 x 10 to the 14th solar masses, respectively.

  15. Spectral clustering for optical confirmation and redshift estimation of X-ray selected galaxy cluster candidates in the SDSS Stripe 82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, E.; Takey, A.; Shoukry, A.

    2016-07-01

    We develop a galaxy cluster finding algorithm based on spectral clustering technique to identify optical counterparts and estimate optical redshifts for X-ray selected cluster candidates. As an application, we run our algorithm on a sample of X-ray cluster candidates selected from the third XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalog (3XMM-DR5) that are located in the Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our method works on galaxies described in the color-magnitude feature space. We begin by examining 45 galaxy clusters with published spectroscopic redshifts in the range of 0.1-0.8 with a median of 0.36. As a result, we are able to identify their optical counterparts and estimate their photometric redshifts, which have a typical accuracy of 0.025 and agree with the published ones. Then, we investigate another 40 X-ray cluster candidates (from the same cluster survey) with no redshift information in the literature and found that 12 candidates are considered as galaxy clusters in the redshift range from 0.29 to 0.76 with a median of 0.57. These systems are newly discovered clusters in X-rays and optical data. Among them 7 clusters have spectroscopic redshifts for at least one member galaxy.

  16. Optical signatures of molecular particles via mass-selected cluster spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    A new molecular beam apparatus was developed to study optical absorption in cold (less than 100 K) atomic clusters and complexes produced by their condensation with simple molecular gases. In this instrument, ionized clusters produced in a laser vaporization nozzle source are mass selected and studied with photodissociation spectroscopy at visible and ultraviolet wavelengths. This new approach can be applied to synthesize and characterize numerous particulates and weakly bound complexes expected in planetary atmospheres and in comets.

  17. Digital breast tomosynthesis: feasibility of automated detection of microcalcification clusters on projections views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Wei, Jun; Sahiner, Berkman; Zhou, Chuan; Helvie, Mark A.

    2010-03-01

    We are developing a computer-aided detection (CAD) system to assist radiologists in detecting microcalcification clusters in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of a 2D approach using the projection-view (PV) images as input. In the first stage, automated detection of the microcalcification clusters on the PVs is performed. In the second stage, the detected cluster candidates or the individual microcalcifications on the PVs are back-projected to the 3D volume. The true clusters or microcalcifications will therefore converge at their focal planes and ideally will result in higher cluster or microcalcification scores than the FPs. In the final step an analysis of the back-projected cluster or microcalcification candidates is performed to differentiate the true and false clusters. In this pilot study, a limited data set of 39 cases with biopsy proven microcalcification clusters (17 malignant, 22 benign) was used. The DBT scans were obtained in both CC and MLO views using a GE GEN2 prototype system which acquires 21 PVs over a 60º arc in 3º increments. In the 78 DBT volumes, a total of 74 clusters (33 malignant clusters in 34 breasts and 41 benign clusters in 44 breasts) were identified by an experienced radiologist. The computer detected 61% (956/1554) of the clusters on the PVs from the 74 scans. After back-projection of the microcalcification candidates detected on the individual PVs and excluding the first few PVs that had higher noise in back-projection stage, 84% (62/74) of the true clusters were detected in the 3D volume. Study is underway to develop methods to reduce FPs and to compare this 2D approach with 3D or combined 2D and 3D approaches.

  18. Computer-aided detection of polyps in optical colonoscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, Saad; Kaufman, Arie

    2016-03-01

    We present a computer-aided detection algorithm for polyps in optical colonoscopy images. Polyps are the precursors to colon cancer. In the US alone, 14 million optical colonoscopies are performed every year, mostly to screen for polyps. Optical colonoscopy has been shown to have an approximately 25% polyp miss rate due to the convoluted folds and bends present in the colon. In this work, we present an automatic detection algorithm to detect these polyps in the optical colonoscopy images. We use a machine learning algorithm to infer a depth map for a given optical colonoscopy image and then use a detailed pre-built polyp profile to detect and delineate the boundaries of polyps in this given image. We have achieved the best recall of 84.0% and the best specificity value of 83.4%.

  19. Comparison of galaxy clusters selected by weak-lensing, optical spectroscopy, and X-rays in the deep lens survey F2 field

    SciTech Connect

    Starikova, Svetlana; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Vikhlinin, Alexey; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Murray, Stephen S.; Geller, Margaret J.; Dell'Antonio, Ian P.

    2014-05-10

    We compare galaxy clusters selected in Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations of the 4 deg{sup 2} Deep Lens Survey (DLS) F2 field to the cluster samples previously selected in the same field from a sensitive weak-lensing shear map derived from the DLS and from a detailed galaxy redshift survey—the Smithsonian Hectospec Lensing Survey (SHELS). Our Chandra and XMM-Newton observations cover 1.6 deg{sup 2} of the DLS F2 field, including all 12 weak-lensing peaks above a signal-to-noise ratio of 3.5, along with 16 of the 20 SHELS clusters with published velocity dispersions >500 km s{sup –1}. We detect 26 extended X-ray sources in this area and confirm 23 of them as galaxy clusters using the optical imaging. Approximately 75% of clusters detected in either X-ray or spectroscopic surveys are found in both; these follow the previously established scaling relations between velocity dispersion, L {sub X}, and T {sub X}. A lower percentage, 60%, of clusters are in common between X-ray and DLS samples. With the exception of a high false-positive rate in the DLS weak-lensing search (5 out of 12 DLS candidates appear to be false), differences between the three cluster detection methods can be attributed primarily to observational uncertainties and intrinsic scatter between different observables and cluster mass.

  20. Near-infrared silver cluster optically signaling oligonucleotide hybridization and assembling two DNA hosts.

    PubMed

    Petty, Jeffrey T; Nicholson, David A; Sergev, Orlin O; Graham, Stuart K

    2014-09-16

    Silver clusters with ~10 atoms form within DNA strands, and the conjugates are chemical sensors. The DNA host hybridizes with short oligonucleotides, and the cluster moieties optically respond to these analytes. Our studies focus on how the cluster adducts perturb the structure of their DNA hosts. Our sensor is comprised of an oligonucleotide with two components: a 5'-cluster domain that complexes silver clusters and a 3'-recognition site that hybridizes with a target oligonucleotide. The single-stranded sensor encapsulates an ~11 silver atom cluster with violet absorption at 400 nm and with minimal emission. The recognition site hybridizes with complementary oligonucleotides, and the violet cluster converts to an emissive near-infrared cluster with absorption at 730 nm. Our key finding is that the near-infrared cluster coordinates two of its hybridized hosts. The resulting tertiary structure was investigated using intermolecular and intramolecular variants of the same dimer. The intermolecular dimer assembles in concentrated (~5 μM) DNA solutions. Strand stoichiometries and orientations were chromatographically determined using thymine-modified complements that increase the overall conjugate size. The intramolecular dimer develops within a DNA scaffold that is founded on three linked duplexes. The high local cluster concentrations and relative strand arrangements again favor the antiparallel dimer for the near-infrared cluster. When the two monomeric DNA/violet cluster conjugates transform to one dimeric DNA/near-infrared conjugate, the DNA strands accumulate silver. We propose that these correlated changes in DNA structure and silver stoichiometry underlie the violet to near-infrared cluster transformation.

  1. Soar adaptive optics observations of the globular cluster NGC 6496

    SciTech Connect

    Fraga, Luciano; Kunder, Andrea; Tokovinin, Andrei E-mail: lfraga@lna.br

    2013-06-01

    We present high-quality BVRI photometric data in the field of globular cluster NGC 6496 obtained with the SOAR Telescope Adaptive Module (SAM). Our observations were collected as part of the ongoing SAM commissioning. The distance modulus and cluster color excess as found from the red clump are (m – M) {sub V} = 15.71 ± 0.02 mag and E(V – I) = 0.28 ± 0.02 mag. An age of 10.5 ± 0.5 Gyr is determined from the difference in magnitude between the red clump and the subgiant branch. These parameters are in excellent agreement with the values derived from isochrone fitting. From the color-magnitude diagram we find a metallicity of [Fe/H] = –0.65 dex and hence support a disk classification for NGC 6496. The complete BVRI data set for NGC 6469 is made available in the electronic edition of the Journal.

  2. Early Detection of Dengue Infections using Cluster Sampling Around Index Cases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    EARLY DETECTION OF DENGUE INFECTIONS USING CLUSTER SAMPLING AROUND INDEX CASES CHARMAGNE G. BECKETT, HERMAN KOSASIH, INDRA FAISAL, NURHAYATI, RATNA...Abstract. A two-year study using a cluster investigation method was conducted in West Jakarta, Indonesia to demonstrate the detection of dengue cases prior...to onset of clinical illness. The clusters consisted of family members and neighbors of 53 hospitalized dengue index cases. Among 785 adult and child

  3. Excitonic Effects and the Optical Absorption Spectrum of Hydrogenated Si Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Rohlfing, M.; Louie, S.G. |

    1998-04-01

    We calculate the optical absorption spectrum of hydrogen-terminated silicon clusters by solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the two-particle Green{close_quote}s function using an {ital ab initio} approach. The one-particle Green{close_quote}s function and the electron-hole interaction kernel are calculated within the GW approximation for the electron self-energy operator. Very large exciton binding energies are observed. Our results for the one-particle properties and the optical absorption spectra of the clusters are in very good agreement with available experimental data. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Enhanced spatio-temporal clustering in the detection of neonatal seizures using context-based rules.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Joyeeta; Glover, John R; Frost, James D; Ktonas, Periklis A; Hrachovy, Richard A; Mizrahi, Eli M

    2004-01-01

    This work describes the clustering stage of a three-stage automated neonatal seizure detection system. This stage clusters spatio-temporally the short candidate seizure segments detected in prior stages, and then applies a variety of context-based rules to eliminate false detections and determine the final detected seizures. The work discusses important considerations in the implementation of rules and presents preliminary results.

  5. X-ray and optical spectroscopy of the massive young open cluster IC 1805

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauw, G.; Nazé, Y.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Very young open clusters are ideal places to study the X-ray properties of a homogeneous population of early-type stars. In this respect, the IC 1805 open cluster is very interesting as it hosts the O4 If+ star HD 15570 thought to be in an evolutionary stage intermediate between a normal O-star and a Wolf-Rayet star. Aims: Such a star could provide a test for theoretical models aiming at explaining the empirical scaling relation between the X-ray and bolometric luminosities of O-type stars. Methods: We have observed IC 1805 with XMM-Newton and further collected optical spectroscopy of some of the O-star members of the cluster. Results: The optical spectra allow us to revisit the orbital solutions of BD+60° 497 and HD 15558, and provide the first evidence of binarity for BD+60° 498. X-ray emission from colliding winds does not appear to play an important role among the O-stars of IC 1805. Notably, the X-ray fluxes do not vary significantly between archival X-ray observations and our XMM-Newton pointing. The very fast rotator BD+60° 513, and to a lesser extent the O4 If+ star HD 15570 appear somewhat underluminous. Whilst the underluminosity of HD 15570 is only marginally significant, its amplitude is found to be compatible with theoretical expectations based on its stellar and wind properties. A number of other X-ray sources are detected in the field, and the brightest objects, many of which are likely low-mass pre-main sequence stars, are analyzed in detail. Based on observations collected with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA member states and the USA (NASA), and with the TIGRE telescope (La Luz, Mexico).Table A.1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/594/A82

  6. Performance Assessment of the Optical Transient Detector and Lightning Imaging Sensor. Part 2; Clustering Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Christian, Hugh J.; Blakeslee, Richard; Boccippio, Dennis J.; Goodman, Steve J.; Boeck, William

    2006-01-01

    We describe the clustering algorithm used by the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) for combining the lightning pulse data into events, groups, flashes, and areas. Events are single pixels that exceed the LIS/OTD background level during a single frame (2 ms). Groups are clusters of events that occur within the same frame and in adjacent pixels. Flashes are clusters of groups that occur within 330 ms and either 5.5 km (for LIS) or 16.5 km (for OTD) of each other. Areas are clusters of flashes that occur within 16.5 km of each other. Many investigators are utilizing the LIS/OTD flash data; therefore, we test how variations in the algorithms for the event group and group-flash clustering affect the flash count for a subset of the LIS data. We divided the subset into areas with low (1-3), medium (4-15), high (16-63), and very high (64+) flashes to see how changes in the clustering parameters affect the flash rates in these different sizes of areas. We found that as long as the cluster parameters are within about a factor of two of the current values, the flash counts do not change by more than about 20%. Therefore, the flash clustering algorithm used by the LIS and OTD sensors create flash rates that are relatively insensitive to reasonable variations in the clustering algorithms.

  7. Tuning the energetics and tailoring the optical properties of silver clusters confined in zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenwick, Oliver; Coutiño-Gonzalez, Eduardo; Grandjean, Didier; Baekelant, Wouter; Richard, Fanny; Bonacchi, Sara; de Vos, Dirk; Lievens, Peter; Roeffaers, Maarten; Hofkens, Johan; Samorì, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    The integration of metal atoms and clusters in well-defined dielectric cavities is a powerful strategy to impart new properties to them that depend on the size and geometry of the confined space as well as on metal-host electrostatic interactions. Here, we unravel the dependence of the electronic properties of metal clusters on space confinement by studying the ionization potential of silver clusters embedded in four different zeolite environments over a range of silver concentrations. Extensive characterization reveals a strong influence of silver loading and host environment on the cluster ionization potential, which is also correlated to the cluster’s optical and structural properties. Through fine-tuning of the zeolite host environment, we demonstrate photoluminescence quantum yields approaching unity. This work extends our understanding of structure-property relationships of small metal clusters and applies this understanding to develop highly photoluminescent materials with potential applications in optoelectronics and bioimaging.

  8. High performance fiber-based optical coherent detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Youming

    The sensitivity of signal detection is of major interest for optical high speed communication systems and LIght Detection And Ranging (lidar) systems. Sensitive receivers in fiber-optical networks can reduce transmitter power or amplifier amplification requirements and extend link spans. High receiver sensitivity allows links to be established over long distances in deep space satellite communication systems and large atmospheric attenuation to be overcome in terrestrial free space communications. For lidar systems, the sensitivity of signal detection determines how far and how accurately the lidar can detect the remote objects. Optical receivers employ either coherent or direct detection. In addition to amplitude, coherent detection extracts frequency and phase information from received signals, whereas direct detection extracts the received pulse amplitude only. In theory, coherent detection should yield the highest receiver sensitivity. Another possible technique to improve detection sensitivity is to employ a fiber preamplifier. This technique has been successfully demonstrated in direct detection systems but not in the coherent detection systems. Due to the existence of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) inside the amplifier, the sensitivity of coherent detection varies with the data rate or pulse rate. For this reason, optically preamplified coherent detection is not used in applications as commonly as optically preamplified direct detection. We investigate the performance of coherent detection employing a fiber amplifier and time-domain-filter. The fiber amplifier is used as the optical preamplifier of the coherent detection system. To reduce the noise induced by the preamplifier to a maximum extent, we investigate the noise properties for both a single pass amplifier and a double pass amplifier. The relative intensity noise and linewidth broadening caused by ASE have been experimentally characterized. The results show that the double pass amplifier has

  9. Global survey of star clusters in the Milky Way. IV. 63 new open clusters detected by proper motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, R.-D.; Kharchenko, N. V.; Piskunov, A. E.; Röser, S.; Schilbach, E.

    2015-09-01

    Context. The global Milky Way Star Clusters (MWSC) survey provided new cluster membership lists and mean cluster parameters for nearly 80% of all previously known Galactic clusters. The MWSC data reduction pipeline involved the catalogue of positions and proper motions (PPMXL) on the International Celestial Reference System (ICRS) and near-infrared photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). Aims: In the first extension to the MWSC, photometric filters were applied to the 2MASS catalogue to find new cluster candidates that were subsequently confirmed or rejected by the MWSC pipeline. To further extend the MWSC census, particularly of nearby clusters, we aimed at discovering new clusters by conducting an almost global search in proper motion catalogues as a starting point. Methods: We first selected high-quality samples from the PPMXL and the Fourth US Naval Observatory CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC4) for comparison and verification of the proper motions. For 441 circular proper motion bins (radius 15 mas/yr) within ±50 mas/yr, the sky outside a thin Galactic plane zone (| b | < 5°) was binned in small areas ("sky pixels") of 0.25 × 0.25 deg2. Sky pixels with enhanced numbers of stars with a certain common proper motion in both catalogues were considered as cluster candidates. After visual inspection of the sky images, we built an automated procedure that combined these representations of the sky for neighbouring proper motion subsamples after a background correction. The 692 compact cluster candidates detected above a threshold that was equivalent to a minimum of 12 to 130 cluster stars in dependence on the Galactic latitude were then cross-checked with known star clusters and clusters of galaxies. New candidates served as input for the MWSC pipeline. Results: About half of our candidates overlapped with known clusters (46 globular and 68 open clusters in the Galaxy, about 150 known clusters of galaxies) or the Magellanic Clouds. About 10% of our

  10. Optical spectroscopy and the UV luminosity function of galaxies in the Abell 1367, Coma and Virgo clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.; Gavazzi, G.; Iglesias-Paramo, J.; Boselli, A.; Carrasco, L.

    2003-04-01

    Optical spectroscopy of 93 galaxies, 60 projected in the direction of Abell 1367, 21 onto the Coma cluster and 12 on Virgo, is reported. The targets were selected because they were detected in previous Hα , UV or r' surveys. The present observations bring to 100% the redshift completeness of Hα selected galaxies in the Coma region and to 75% in Abell 1367. All observed galaxies except one show Hα emission and belong to the clusters. This confirms previous determinations of the Hα luminosity function of the two clusters that were based on the assumption that all Hα detected galaxies were cluster members. Using the newly obtained data we re-determine the UV luminosity function of Coma and we compute for the first time the UV luminosity function of A1367. Their faint end slopes remain uncertain (-2.00clusters (Iglesias-Paramo et al. \\cite{lha}). We discover a point-like Hα source in the Virgo cluster, associated with the giant galaxy VCC873, possibly an extragalactic HII region similar to the one recently observed in Virgo by Gerhard et al. (\\cite{Gerhard}). Based on observations obtained with the Loiano telescope belonging to the University of Bologna (Italy), with the G. Haro telescope of the INAOE (Mexico) and with the Calar Alto observatory operated by the Centro Astronomico Hispano Aleman (Spain).

  11. Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey: detection of a far-infrared population around galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppin, K. E. K.; Geach, J. E.; Smail, Ian; Dunne, L.; Edge, A. C.; Ivison, R. J.; Maddox, S.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Dariush, A.; de Zotti, G.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Fritz, J.; Hopwood, R.; Ibar, E.; Jarvis, M.; Michałowski, M. J.; Murphy, D. N. A.; Negrello, M.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.; Rigby, E.; Rodighiero, G.; Scott, D.; Serjeant, S.; Smith, D. J. B.; Temi, P.; van der Werf, P.

    2011-09-01

    We report the detection of a significant excess in the surface density of far-infrared sources from the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey within ˜1 Mpc of the centres of 66 optically selected clusters of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey with ˜ 0.25. From the analysis of the multiwavelength properties of their counterparts we conclude that the far-infrared emission is associated with dust-obscured star formation and/or active galactic nuclei (AGN) within galaxies in the clusters themselves. The excess reaches a maximum at a radius of ˜0.8 Mpc, where we find 1.0 ± 0.3 S250 > 34 mJy sources on average per cluster above what would be expected for random field locations. If the far-infrared emission is dominated by star formation (as opposed to AGN) then this corresponds to an average star formation rate of ˜7 M⊙ yr-1 per cluster in sources with LIR > 5 × 1010 L⊙. Although lensed sources make a negligible contribution to the excess signal, a fraction of the sources around the clusters could be gravitationally lensed, and we have identified a sample of potential cases of cluster-lensed Herschel sources that could be targeted in follow-up studies. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  12. Molecular detection using Rydberg, autoionizing, and cluster states. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wessel, J.

    1989-08-17

    Continuing investigations of multiphoton ionization processes in naphthalene have established the geometry and spectroscopy of trimer and tetramer cluster states. A new, highly efficient ionization mechanism has been identified in the trimer. It is closely related to autoionization of 2-electron atoms by resonant 2-photon excitation and to exciton fusion in larger clusters.

  13. Synthesis and optical power limiting properties of heteroleptic Mo3S7 clusters.

    PubMed

    Recatalá, David; Llusar, Rosa; Barlow, Adam; Wang, Genmiao; Samoc, Marek; Humphrey, Mark G; Guschin, Artem L

    2015-08-07

    Substitution of the halide ligands in (Bu4N)2[Mo3S7X6] (X = Cl, Br) by diimine ligands, such as 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (dmbpy), 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), affords the neutral heteroleptic clusters Mo3S7Cl4(dmbpy) (), Mo3S7Br4(dmbpy) (), Mo3S7Br4(bpy) (), and Mo3S7Br4(phen) (). Further substitution of the halide ligands in Mo3S7Br4(diimine) clusters by dmit (1,3-dithiole-2-thione-4,5-dithiolate) allows the preparation of the mixed diimine-dithiolene neutral cluster complexes Mo3S7(dnbpy)(dmit)2 (, dnbpy = 4,4'-dinonyl-2,2'-bipyridine), Mo3S7(dcmbpy)(dmit)2 (, dcmbpy = 4,4'-dimethoxycarbonyl-2,2'-bipyridine), and Mo3S7(dcbpy)(dmit)2 (, dcbpy = 2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid). The optical limiting properties of complexes have been assessed by the open-aperture Z-scan technique at 570 nm, employing a nanosecond optical parametric oscillator. In order to investigate the effect of increasing the π-system, complexes , with the general formula Mo3S7X4(diimine), (X = Cl, Br), were compared to clusters , containing the dmit ligand. The influence of the metal content on the optical power limiting properties was also investigated by comparing the trinuclear series of complexes prepared herein with the bis(dithiolene) dinuclear cluster (Et4N)2[Mo2O2S2(BPyDTS2)2], which has been recently prepared by our group. All trinuclear clusters are efficient optical limiters (σeff > σ0) with the threshold limiting fluence F15% decreasing on proceeding from dinuclear to trinuclear clusters and, generally, on extending the π-system.

  14. The merging cluster Abell 1758: an optical and dynamical view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro-Oliveira, Rogerio; Serra Cypriano, Eduardo; Machado, Rubens; Lima Neto, Gastao B.

    2015-08-01

    The galaxy cluster Abell 1758-North (z=0.28) is a binary system composed by the sub-structures NW and NE. This is supposed to be a post-merging cluster due to observed detachment between the NE BCG and the respective X-ray emitting hot gas clump in a scenario very close to the famous Bullet Cluster. On the other hand, the projected position of the NW BCG coincides with the local hot gas peak. This system was been targeted previously by several studies, using multiple wavelengths and techniques, but there is still no clear picture of the scenario that could have caused this unusual configuration. To help solving this complex puzzle we added some pieces: firstly, we have used deep B, RC and z' Subaru images to perform both weak lensing shear and magnification analysis of A1758 (including here the South component that is not in interaction with A1758-North) modeling each sub-clump as an NFW profile in order to constrain masses and its center positions through MCMC methods; the second piece is the dynamical analysis using radial velocities available in the literature (143) plus new Gemini-GMOS/N measurements (68 new redshifts).From weak lensing we found that independent shear and magnification mass determinations are in excellent agreement between them and combining both we could reduce mass error bar by ~30% compared to shear alone. By combining this two weak-lensing probes we found that the position of both Northern BCGs are consistent with the masses centers within 2σ and and the NE hot gas peak to be offseted of the respective mass peak (M200=5.5 X 1014 M⊙) with very high significance. The most massive structure is NW (M200=7.95 X 1014 M⊙ ) where we observed no detachment between gas, DM and BCG.We have calculated a low line-of-sight velocity difference (<300 km/s) between A1758 NW and NE. We have combined it with the projected velocity of 1600 km/s which was estimated by previous X-ray analysis (David & Kempner 2004) and we have obtained a small angle between

  15. Chemical detection demonstrated using an evanescent wave graphene optical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliakal, Ashok; Reith, Leslie; Cabot, Steve

    2016-04-01

    Graphene devices have been constructed on silicon mirrors, and the graphene is optically probed through an evanescent wave interaction in an attenuated total reflectance configuration using an infrared spectrometer. The graphene is electrically biased in order to tune its optical properties. Exposure of the device to the chemicals iodine and ammonia causes observable and reversible changes to graphene's optical absorption spectra in the mid to near infrared range which can be utilized for the purpose of sensing. Electrical current measurements through the graphene are made simultaneously with optical measurements allowing for simultaneous sensing using two separate detection modalities. Our current results reveal sub-ppm detection limits for iodine and approximately 100 ppm detection limits for ammonia. We have also demonstrated that this approach will work at 1.55 μm, which opens up the possibility for graphene optical sensors that leverage commercial telecom light sources.

  16. Optical Techniques for the Remote Detection of Biological Aerosols

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-01

    enhancement of Raman or fluorescent signals, and multiwavelength differential. absorption. As will be evident from the discussions in subsequent sections of...detection of aerosols, using optical techniques. B. Rationale SRI Proposal ERU 72-62, which led to this project, describes several optical...enhancement of Raman or fluorescent signals, and multiwavelength differential absorption. The optical interactions were reviewed early in the project, with

  17. WINGS: a WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey. I. Optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasano, G.; Marmo, C.; Varela, J.; D'Onofrio, M.; Poggianti, B. M.; Moles, M.; Pignatelli, E.; Bettoni, D.; Kjærgaard, P.; Rizzi, L.; Couch, W. J.; Dressler, A.

    2006-01-01

    This is the first paper of a series that will present data and scientific results from the WINGS project, a wide-field, multiwavelength imaging and spectroscopic survey of galaxies in 77 nearby clusters. The sample was extracted from the ROSAT catalogs of X-Ray emitting clusters, with constraints on the redshift (0.04< z<0.07) and distance from the galactic plane ({\\vert}b{\\vert}≥ 20 deg). The global goal of the WINGS project is the systematic study of the local cosmic variance of the cluster population and of the properties of cluster galaxies as a function of cluster properties and local environment. This data collection will allow the definition of a local, "zero-point" reference against which to gauge the cosmic evolution when compared to more distant clusters. The core of the project consists of wide-field optical imaging of the selected clusters in the B and V bands. We have also completed a multi-fiber, medium-resolution spectroscopic survey for 51 of the clusters in the master sample. The imaging and spectroscopy data were collected using, respectively, the WFC@INT and WYFFOS@WHT in the northern hemisphere, and the WFI@MPG and 2dF@AAT in the southern hemisphere. In addition, a NIR (J, K) survey of ˜50 clusters and an Hα+U survey of some 10 clusters are presently ongoing with the WFCAM@UKIRT and WFC@INT, respectively, while a very-wide-field optical survey has also been programmed with OmegaCam@VST. In this paper we briefly outline the global objectives and the main characteristics of the WINGS project. Moreover, the observing strategy and the data reduction of the optical imaging survey (WINGS-OPT) are presented. We have achieved a photometric accuracy of ˜0.025 mag, reaching completeness to V˜ 23.5. Field size and resolution (FWHM) span the absolute intervals (1.6-2.7) Mpc and (0.7-1.7) kpc, respectively, depending on the redshift and on the seeing. This allows the planned studies to obtain a valuable description of the local properties of clusters

  18. X-RAY SOURCES AND THEIR OPTICAL COUNTERPARTS IN THE GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTER M12 (NGC 6218)

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, T.-N.; Kong, Albert K. H.; Bassa, Cees; Verbunt, Frank; Lewin, Walter H. G.; Anderson, Scott F.; Pooley, David

    2009-11-01

    We study a Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS-S observation of the Galactic globular cluster M12. With a 26 ks exposure time, we detect six X-ray sources inside the half-mass radius (2.'16) of which two are inside the core radius (0.'72) of the cluster. If we assume that these sources are all associated with globular cluster M12, the luminosity L {sub X} among these sources between 0.3 and 7.0 keV varies roughly from 10{sup 30} to 10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1}. For identification, we also analyzed the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) data and identified the optical counterparts to five X-ray sources inside the HST ACS field of view. According to the X-ray and optical features, we found 2-5 candidate active binaries (ABs) or cataclysmic variables (CVs) and 0-3 background galaxies within the HST ACS field of view. Based on the assumption that the number of X-ray sources scales with the encounter rate and the mass of the globular cluster, we expect two X-ray sources inside M12, and the expectation is consistent with our observational results. Therefore, the existence of identified X-ray sources (possible CVs or ABs) in M12 suggests the primordial origin of X-ray sources in globular clusters which is in agreement with previous studies.

  19. Electro-optical detection of single λ-DNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuo; Wall, Thomas A; Ozcelik, Damla; Parks, Joshua W; Hawkins, Aaron R; Schmidt, Holger

    2015-02-07

    Single λ-DNA molecules are detected on a nanopore-gated optofluidic chip electrically and optically. Statistical variations in the single particle trajectories are used to predict the intensity distribution of the fluorescence signals.

  20. Lamb wave detection with a fiber optic angular displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Marlon R.; Sakamoto, João. M. S.; Higuti, Ricardo T.; Kitano, Cláudio

    2015-09-01

    In this work we show that the fiber optic angular displacement sensor is capable of Lamb wave detection, with results comparable to a piezoelectric transducer. Therefore, the fiber optic sensor has a great potential to be used as the Lamb wave ultrasonic receiver and to perform non-destructive and non-contact testing.

  1. THE OPTICAL COUNTERPART TO THE X-RAY TRANSIENT IGR J1824-24525 IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER M28

    SciTech Connect

    Pallanca, C.; Dalessandro, E.; Ferraro, F. R.; Lanzoni, B.

    2013-08-20

    We report on the identification of the optical counterpart to the recently detected INTEGRAL transient IGR J1824-24525 in the Galactic globular cluster M28. From analysis of a multi-epoch Hubble Space Telescope data set, we have identified a strongly variable star positionally coincident with the radio and Chandra X-ray sources associated with the INTEGRAL transient. The star has been detected during both a quiescent and an outburst state. In the former case it appears as a faint, unperturbed main-sequence star, while in the latter state it is about two magnitudes brighter and slightly bluer than main-sequence stars. We also detected H{alpha} excess during the outburst state, suggestive of active accretion processes by the neutron star.

  2. Integrated optical biosensor for detection of multivalent proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Dan; Grace, Karen M.; Song, Xuedong; Swanson, Basil I.; Frayer, Daniel; Mendes, Sergio B.; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    1999-12-01

    We have developed a simple, highly sensitive and specific optical waveguide sensor for the detection of multivalent proteins. The optical biosensor is based on optically tagged glycolipid receptors embedded within a fluid phospholipid bilayer membrane formed upon the surface of a planar optical waveguide. Binding of multivalent cholera toxin triggers a fluorescence resonance energy transfer that results in a two-color optical change that is monitored by measurement of emitted luminescence above the waveguide surface. The sensor approach is highly sensitive and specific and requires no additional reagents and washing steps. Demonstration of protein-receptor recognition by use of planar optical waveguides provides a path forward for the development of fieldable miniaturized biosensor arrays. (c) 1999 Optical Society of America.

  3. Substructures in DAFT/FADA survey clusters based on XMM and optical data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durret, F.; DAFT/FADA Team

    2014-07-01

    The DAFT/FADA survey was initiated to perform weak lensing tomography on a sample of 90 massive clusters in the redshift range [0.4,0.9] with HST imaging available. The complementary deep multiband imaging constitutes a high quality imaging data base for these clusters. In X-rays, we have analysed the XMM-Newton and/or Chandra data available for 32 clusters, and for 23 clusters we fit the X-ray emissivity with a beta-model and subtract it to search for substructures in the X-ray gas. This study was coupled with a dynamical analysis for the 18 clusters with at least 15 spectroscopic galaxy redshifts in the cluster range, based on a Serna & Gerbal (SG) analysis. We detected ten substructures in eight clusters by both methods (X-rays and SG). The percentage of mass included in substructures is found to be roughly constant with redshift, with values of 5-15%. Most of the substructures detected both in X-rays and with the SG method are found to be relatively recent infalls, probably at their first cluster pericenter approach.

  4. Optical properties of silicon clusters deposited on the basal plane of graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh, L. N.; Chase, L. L.; Balooch, M.; Terminello, L. J.; Tench, R. J.; Wooten, F.

    1994-04-01

    Laser ablation was used to deposit of silicon on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surfaces in an ultra high-vacuum environment equipped with Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and luminescence spectroscopy. For deposition of up to several monolayers, post annealing produced silicon clusters, whose size distribution was determined vs annealing time and temperature using STM. Pure silicon clusters ranging from 1 to 10 nm showed no detectable photoluminescence in visible range. Exposure to oxygen at 10(exp -6) Torr and for up to 8 hours showed adsorption on the surface of the clusters without silicon oxide formation and no detectable luminescence. Hydrogen termination of these clusters was accomplished by exposing them to atomic hydrogen beam but did not result in any photoluminescence. Prolonged exposure of these clusters to ambient air, however, resulted in strong photoluminescence spectra with color ranging from red to greenish-blue depending on average cluster size. Auger electron spectra revealed the existence of partially oxidized silicon clusters. This luminescence could be due to either an oxide phase or to changes in electronic structure of the clusters as a result of quantum confinement effect.

  5. An Integrated Intrusion Detection Model of Cluster-Based Wireless Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xuemei; Yan, Bo; Zhang, Xinzhong; Rong, Chuitian

    2015-01-01

    Considering wireless sensor network characteristics, this paper combines anomaly and mis-use detection and proposes an integrated detection model of cluster-based wireless sensor network, aiming at enhancing detection rate and reducing false rate. Adaboost algorithm with hierarchical structures is used for anomaly detection of sensor nodes, cluster-head nodes and Sink nodes. Cultural-Algorithm and Artificial-Fish–Swarm-Algorithm optimized Back Propagation is applied to mis-use detection of Sink node. Plenty of simulation demonstrates that this integrated model has a strong performance of intrusion detection. PMID:26447696

  6. An Integrated Intrusion Detection Model of Cluster-Based Wireless Sensor Network.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuemei; Yan, Bo; Zhang, Xinzhong; Rong, Chuitian

    2015-01-01

    Considering wireless sensor network characteristics, this paper combines anomaly and mis-use detection and proposes an integrated detection model of cluster-based wireless sensor network, aiming at enhancing detection rate and reducing false rate. Adaboost algorithm with hierarchical structures is used for anomaly detection of sensor nodes, cluster-head nodes and Sink nodes. Cultural-Algorithm and Artificial-Fish-Swarm-Algorithm optimized Back Propagation is applied to mis-use detection of Sink node. Plenty of simulation demonstrates that this integrated model has a strong performance of intrusion detection.

  7. Generalized Optical Theorem Detection in Random and Complex Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jing

    The problem of detecting changes of a medium or environment based on active, transmit-plus-receive wave sensor data is at the heart of many important applications including radar, surveillance, remote sensing, nondestructive testing, and cancer detection. This is a challenging problem because both the change or target and the surrounding background medium are in general unknown and can be quite complex. This Ph.D. dissertation presents a new wave physics-based approach for the detection of targets or changes in rather arbitrary backgrounds. The proposed methodology is rooted on a fundamental result of wave theory called the optical theorem, which gives real physical energy meaning to the statistics used for detection. This dissertation is composed of two main parts. The first part significantly expands the theory and understanding of the optical theorem for arbitrary probing fields and arbitrary media including nonreciprocal media, active media, as well as time-varying and nonlinear scatterers. The proposed formalism addresses both scalar and full vector electromagnetic fields. The second contribution of this dissertation is the application of the optical theorem to change detection with particular emphasis on random, complex, and active media, including single frequency probing fields and broadband probing fields. The first part of this work focuses on the generalization of the existing theoretical repertoire and interpretation of the scalar and electromagnetic optical theorem. Several fundamental generalizations of the optical theorem are developed. A new theory is developed for the optical theorem for scalar fields in nonhomogeneous media which can be bounded or unbounded. The bounded media context is essential for applications such as intrusion detection and surveillance in enclosed environments such as indoor facilities, caves, tunnels, as well as for nondestructive testing and communication systems based on wave-guiding structures. The developed scalar

  8. Control of optical response of a supported cluster on different dielectric substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Iida, Kenji Noda, Masashi; Nobusada, Katsuyuki

    2015-06-07

    We develop a computational method for optical response of a supported cluster on a dielectric substrate. The substrate is approximated by a dielectric continuum with a frequency-dependent dielectric function. The computational approach is based on our recently developed first-principles simulation method for photoinduced electron dynamics in real-time and real-space. The approach allows us to treat optical response of an adsorbate explicitly taking account of interactions at an interface between an adsorbate and a substrate. We calculate optical absorption spectra of supported Ag{sub n} (n = 2, 54) clusters, changing the dielectric function of a substrate. By analyzing electron dynamics in real-time and real-space, we clarify the mechanisms for variations in absorption spectra, such as peak shifts and intensity changes, relating to various experimental results for optical absorption of supported clusters. Attractive and repulsive interactions between an adsorbate and a substrate result in red and blue shifts, respectively, and the intensity decreases by energy dissipation into a substrate. We demonstrate that optical properties can be controlled by varying the dielectric function of a substrate.

  9. Optical Detection of Anomalous Nitrogen in Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-12-01

    VLT Opens New Window towards Our Origins Summary A team of European astronomers [1] has used the UVES spectrograph on the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope to perform a uniquely detailed study of Comet LINEAR (C/2000 WM1) . This is the first time that this powerful instrument has been employed to obtain high-resolution spectra of a comet. At the time of the observations in mid-March 2002, Comet LINEAR was about 180 million km from the Sun, moving outwards after its perihelion passage in January. As comets are believed to carry "pristine" material - left-overs from the formation of the solar system, about 4,600 million years ago - studies of these objects are important to obtain clues about the origins of the solar system and the Earth in particular. The high quality of the data obtained of this moving 9th-magnitude object has permitted a determination of the cometary abundance of various elements and their isotopes [2]. Of particular interest is the unambiguous detection and measurement of the nitrogen-15 isotope. The only other comet in which this isotope has been observed is famous Comet Hale-Bopp - this was during the passage in 1997, when it was much brighter than Comet LINEAR. Most interestingly, Comet LINEAR and Comet Hale-Bopp display the same isotopic abundance ratio, about 1 nitrogen-15 atom for each 140 nitrogen-14 atoms ( 14 N/ 15 N = 140 ± 30) . That is about half of the terrestrial value (272). It is also very different from the result obtained by means of radio measurements of Comet Hale-Bopp ( 14 N/ 15 N = 330 ± 75). Optical and radio measurements concern different molecules (CN and HCN, respectively), and this isotopic anomaly must be explained by some differentiation mechanism. The astronomers conclude that part of the cometary nitrogen is trapped in macromolecules attached to dust particles . The successful entry of UVES into cometary research now opens eagerly awaited opportunities for similiar observations in other, comparatively faint comets. These

  10. [Optical detection system for micro biochemical analyses].

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Wu, Yi-hui; Zhao, Hua-bing; Ju, Hui

    2005-04-01

    For the need of biochemical chip, which consumes fewer specimens and is easy to integrate with micro-fluid chip, two kinds of spectrophotometric analysis methods are described in the present paper. Both the direct detection method and evanescent wave detection method are used in the experiments with visible light (460-800 nm). The experimental results proved that the direct detection is simple and evident; on the other hand the evanescent wave detection method consumes much less reagent and is easy to integrate with microchips.

  11. An Optical Biosensor for Bacillus Cereus Spore Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengquan; Tom, Harry W. K.

    2005-03-01

    We demonstrate a new transduction scheme for optical biosensing. Bacillus cereus is a pathogen that may be found in food and dairy products and is able to produce toxins and cause food poisoning. It is related to Bacillus anthracis (anthrax). A CCD array covered with micro-structured glass coverslip is used to detect the optical resonant shift due to the binding of the antigen (bacillus cereus spore) to the antibody (polyclonal antibody). This novel optical biosensor scheme has the potential for detecting 10˜100 bioagents in a single device as well as the potential to test for antigens with multiple antibody tests to avoid ``false positives.''

  12. Nanomechanical displacement detection using fiber-optic interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Azak, N. O.; Shagam, M. Y.; Karabacak, D. M.; Ekinci, K. L.; Kim, D. H.; Jang, D. Y.

    2007-08-27

    We describe a fiber-optic interferometer to detect the motion of nanomechanical resonators. In this system, the primary technical challenge of aligning the fiber-optic probe to nanometer-scale resonators is overcome by simply monitoring the scattered light from the devices. The system includes no free-space optical components, and is thus simple, stable, and compact with an estimated displacement sensitivity of {approx}0.3 pm/{radical}(Hz) at optical power levels of {approx}0.75 mW.

  13. The Open Cluster Chemical Abundances and Mapping (OCCAM) Survey: Optical Extension for Neutron Capture Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melendez, Matthew; O'Connell, Julia; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Donor, John; Cunha, Katia M. L.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Majewski, Steven R.; Zasowski, Gail; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Stassun, Keivan G.; APOGEE Team

    2017-01-01

    The Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) survey is a systematic survey of Galactic open clusters using data primarily from the SDSS-III/APOGEE-1 survey. However, neutron capture elements are very limited in the IR region covered by APOGEE. In an effort to fully study detailed Galactic chemical evolution, we are conducting a high resolution (R~60,000) spectroscopic abundance analysis of neutron capture elements for OCCAM clusters in the optical regime to complement the APOGEE results. As part of this effort, we present Ba II, La II, Ce II and Eu II results for a few open clusters without previous abundance measurements using data obtained at McDonald Observatory with the 2.1m Otto Struve telescope and Sandiford Echelle Spectrograph.This work is supported by an NSF AAG grant AST-1311835.

  14. Electronic structure and optical properties of the thiolate-protected Au28(SMe)20 cluster.

    PubMed

    Knoppe, Stefan; Malola, Sami; Lehtovaara, Lauri; Bürgi, Thomas; Häkkinen, Hannu

    2013-10-10

    The recently reported crystal structure of the Au28(TBBT)20 cluster (TBBT: p-tert-butylbenzenethiolate) is analyzed with (time-dependent) density functional theory (TD-DFT). Bader charge analysis reveals a novel trimeric Au3(SR)4 binding motif. The cluster can be formulated as Au14(Au2(SR)3)4(Au3(SR)4)2. The electronic structure of the Au14(6+) core and the ligand-protected cluster were analyzed, and their stability can be explained by formation of distorted eight-electron superatoms. Optical absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectra were calculated and compared to the experiment. Assignment of handedness of the intrinsically chiral cluster is possible.

  15. OPTICAL IDENTIFICATION OF He WHITE DWARFS ORBITING FOUR MILLISECOND PULSARS IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER 47 TUCANAE

    SciTech Connect

    Cadelano, M.; Pallanca, C.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Lanzoni, B.; Freire, P. C. C.

    2015-10-10

    We used ultra-deep UV observations obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope to search for optical companions to binary millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. We identified four new counterparts (to MSPs 47TucQ, 47TucS, 47TucT, and 47TucY) and confirmed those already known (to MSPs 47TucU and 47TucW). In the color–magnitude diagram, the detected companions are located in a region between the main sequence and the CO white dwarf (WD) cooling sequences, consistent with the cooling tracks of He WDs with masses between 0.15 M{sub ⊙} and 0.20 M{sub ⊙}. For each identified companion, mass, cooling age, temperature, and pulsar mass (as a function of the inclination angle) have been derived and discussed. For 47TucU we also found that the past accretion history likely proceeded at a sub-Eddington rate. The companion to the redback 47TucW is confirmed to be a non-degenerate star, with properties particularly similar to those observed for black widow systems. Two stars have been identified within the 2σ astrometric uncertainty from the radio positions of 47TucH and 47TucI, but the available data prevent us from firmly assessing whether they are the true companions of these two MSPs.

  16. Detection of Laser Optic Defects Using Gradient Direction Matching

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B Y; Kegelmeyer, L M; Liebman, J A; Salmon, J T; Tzeng, J; Paglieroni, D W

    2005-12-14

    That National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will be the world's largest and most energetic laser. It has thousands of optics and depends heavily on the quality and performance of these optics. Over the past several years, we have developed the NIF Optics Inspection Analysis System that automatically finds defects in a specific optic by analyzing images taken of that optic. This paper describes a new and complementary approach for the automatic detection of defects based on detecting the diffraction ring patterns in downstream optic images caused by defects in upstream optics. Our approach applies a robust pattern matching algorithm for images called Gradient Direction Matching (GDM). GDM compares the gradient directions (the direction of flow from dark to light) of pixels in a test image to those of a specified model and identifies regions in the test image whose gradient directions are most in line with those of the specified model. For finding rings, we use luminance disk models whose pixels have gradient directions all pointing toward the center of the disk. After GDM identifies potential rings locations, we rank these rings by how well they fit the theoretical diffraction ring pattern equation. We perform false alarm mitigation by throwing out rings of low fit. A byproduct of this fitting procedure is an estimate of the size of the defect and its distance from the image plane. We demonstrate the potential effectiveness of this approach by showing examples of rings detected in real images of NIF optics.

  17. Optical detection of oil on water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, J. P.; Arvesen, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Three radiometric techniques utilizing sunlight reflected and backscattered from water bodies have potential application for remote sensing of oil spills. Oil on water can be detected by viewing perpendicular polarization component of reflected light or difference between polarization components. Best detection is performed in ultraviolet or far-red portions of spectrum and in azimuth directions toward or opposite sun.

  18. The optical measurement of large cluster tracks in a gas jet

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Liu, Dong; Han, Jifeng; Bai, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    We propose an optical method based on Rayleigh scattering for the direct measurement of cluster tracks produced by a high-pressure gas jet. The tracks of the argon and methane clusters are acquired by a high-speed camera. It is found that the cluster sizes of these tracks are within the range of 7E + 03~1E + 07 for argon and 2E + 06~4E + 08 for methane. Most argon tracks are continuous and their intensity changes gradually, while the majority of the methane tracks are separated into discrete fractions and their intensity alters periodically along the flight path, which may indicate the methane clusters are more unstable and easily to break up. Special methane clusters which may fly at an axial velocity of less than 2.5m/s are also found. This method is very sensitive to large gas cluster and has broad application prospects in cluster physics. PMID:27561338

  19. The optical measurement of large cluster tracks in a gas jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiyuan; Liu, Dong; Han, Jifeng; Bai, Lixin

    2016-08-01

    We propose an optical method based on Rayleigh scattering for the direct measurement of cluster tracks produced by a high-pressure gas jet. The tracks of the argon and methane clusters are acquired by a high-speed camera. It is found that the cluster sizes of these tracks are within the range of 7E + 03~1E + 07 for argon and 2E + 06~4E + 08 for methane. Most argon tracks are continuous and their intensity changes gradually, while the majority of the methane tracks are separated into discrete fractions and their intensity alters periodically along the flight path, which may indicate the methane clusters are more unstable and easily to break up. Special methane clusters which may fly at an axial velocity of less than 2.5m/s are also found. This method is very sensitive to large gas cluster and has broad application prospects in cluster physics.

  20. Structure of Abell 1995 from optical and X-ray data: a galaxy cluster with an elongated radio halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschin, W.; Girardi, M.; Barrena, R.

    2012-11-01

    Context. Abell 1995 is a puzzling galaxy cluster hosting a powerful radio halo, but it has not yet been recognized as a obvious cluster merger, as usually expected for clusters with diffuse radio emission. Aims: We aim at an exhaustive analysis of the internal structure of Abell 1995 to verify that this cluster is really dynamically relaxed, as reported in previous studies. Methods: We base our analysis on new and archival spectroscopic and photometric data for 126 galaxies in the field of Abell 1995. The study of the hot intracluster medium was performed on X-ray archival data. Results: Based on 87 fiducial cluster members, we have computed the average cluster redshift ⟨z⟩ = 0.322 and the global radial velocity dispersion σV ~ 1300 km s-1. We detect two main optical subclusters separated by 1.5'that cause the known NE-SW elongation of the galaxy distribution and a significant velocity gradient in the same direction. As for the X-ray analysis, we confirm that the intracluster medium is mildly elongated, but we also detect three X-ray peaks. Two X-ray peaks are offset with respect to the two galaxy peaks and lie between them, thus suggesting a bimodal merger caught in a phase of post core-core passage. The third X-ray peak lies between the NE galaxy peak and a third, minor galaxy peak suggesting a more complex merger. The difficulty of separating the two main systems leads to a large uncertainty on the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity separation and the system mass: ΔVrf,LOS = 600-2000 km s-1and Msys = 2-5×1015 h70-1 M⊙, respectively. Simple analytical arguments suggest a merging scenario for Abell 1995, where two main subsystems are seen just after the collision with an intermediate projection angle. Conclusions: The high mass of Abell 1995 and the evidence of merging suggest it is not atypical among clusters with known radio halos. Interestingly, our findings reinforce the previous evidence for the peculiar dichotomy between the dark matter and galaxy

  1. Optical detection strategies for centrifugal microfluidic platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Damien; O'Sullivan, Mary; Ducrée, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Centrifugal microfluidic systems have become one of the principal platforms for implementing bioanalytical assays, most notably for biomedical point-of-care diagnostics. These so-called 'lab-on-a-disc' systems primarily utilise the rotationally controlled centrifugal field in combination with capillary forces to automate a range of laboratory unit operations (LUOs) for sample preparation, such as metering, aliquoting, mixing and extraction for biofluids as well as sorting, isolation and counting of bioparticles. These centrifugal microfluidic LUOs have been regularly surveyed in the literature. However, even though absolutely essential to provide true sample-to-answer functionality of lab-on-a-disc platforms, systematic examination of associated, often optical, read-out technologies has been so far neglected. This review focusses on the history and state-of-the-art of optical read-out strategies for centrifugal microfluidic platforms, arising (commercial) application potential and future opportunities.

  2. Passive Optical Detection of a Vibrating Surface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    a refrigerator door vibrates from the compressor . The ability to optically image such vibrations may lead to a better speaker or a quieter...quote Nicode- mus: “Reflection is the process by which electromagnetic flux (power), incident on a stationary surface or medium, leaves that surface or...medium from the incident side without change in frequency; reflectance is the fraction of the incident flux that is reflected.” Nicodemus defines more

  3. Optical protein sensor for detecting cancer markers in saliva.

    PubMed

    Tan, Winny; Sabet, Leyla; Li, Yang; Yu, Tianwei; Klokkevold, Perry R; Wong, David T; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2008-10-15

    A surface immobilized optical protein sensor has been utilized to detect Interleukin-8 (IL-8) protein, an oral cancer marker, and can reach limit of detection (LOD) at 1.1 pM in buffer without using enzymatic amplification. Only after applying enzymatic amplification to increase the signal level by a few orders of magnitude, ELISA can reach the LOD of 1 pM level. We then develop the confocal optics based sensor for further reducing the optical noise and can extend the LOD of the surface immobilized optical protein sensor two orders in magnitude. These improvements have allowed us to detect IL-8 protein at 4.0 fM in buffer. In addition, these sensitive LODs were achieved without the use of enzymatic signal amplification, such that the simplified protocol can further facilitate the development of point-of-care devices. The ultra sensitive optical protein sensor presented in this paper has a wide number of applications in disease diagnoses. Measurements for detecting biomarkers in clinical sample are much more challenging than the measurements in buffer, due to high background noise contributed by large collections of non-target molecules. We used clinical saliva samples to validate the functionality of the optical protein sensor. Clinical detection of disease-specific biomarkers in saliva offers a non-invasive, alternative approach to using blood or urine. Currently, the main challenge of using saliva as a diagnostic fluid is its inherently low concentration of biomarkers. We compare the measurements of 40 saliva samples; half from oral cancer patients and half from a control group. The data measured by the optical protein sensor is compared with the traditional Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbant Assay (ELISA) values to validate the accuracy of our system. These positive results enable us to proceed to using confocal optical protein sensor to detect other biomarkers, which have much lower concentrations.

  4. Improvement of optical systems for detection of smokes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panin, V. F.; Dashkovskii, A. G.

    2015-04-01

    The theory of electromagnetic radiation dispersion by polydisperse particles is analyzed. Methods of reliable optical indication of smokes to identify Fire Danger are considered. The conventional method of optical smoke detection implies measuring optical characteristics of the environment under control. After that the results obtained are converted into microphysical parameters which can be compared to the known microphysical properties of smokes.The calculated optical portrait of smokes is offered. The portrait of smokes is the field of representation points in coordinates of the degree of diffusion radiation polarization for two diffusion angles. Each of the spots indicates one of the numerous realizations of smokes. The direct match of the representation spots in the optical increases the probability of smoke A different way to protect optical system is to use the device with mutually orthogonal polarizers of the light source and detector. If hindrance is nonspherical aerosol, the signal from the device is used to correct the signals from smoke detectors.

  5. Galaxy cluster center detection methods with weak lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simet, Melanie

    The precise location of galaxy cluster centers is a persistent problem in weak lensing mass estimates and in interpretations of clusters in a cosmological context. In this work, we test methods of centroid determination from weak lensing data and examine the effects of such self-calibration on the measured masses. Drawing on lensing data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82, a 275 square degree region of coadded data in the Southern Galactic Cap, together with a catalog of MaxBCG clusters, we show that halo substructure as well as shape noise and stochasticity in galaxy positions limit the precision of such a self-calibration (in the context of Stripe 82, to ˜ 500 h-1 kpc or larger) and bias the mass estimates around these points to a level that is likely unacceptable for the purposes of making cosmological measurements. We also project the usefulness of this technique in future surveys.

  6. Evaluation of the Gini Coefficient in Spatial Scan Statistics for Detecting Irregularly Shaped Clusters.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyu; Jung, Inkyung

    2017-01-01

    Spatial scan statistics with circular or elliptic scanning windows are commonly used for cluster detection in various applications, such as the identification of geographical disease clusters from epidemiological data. It has been pointed out that the method may have difficulty in correctly identifying non-compact, arbitrarily shaped clusters. In this paper, we evaluated the Gini coefficient for detecting irregularly shaped clusters through a simulation study. The Gini coefficient, the use of which in spatial scan statistics was recently proposed, is a criterion measure for optimizing the maximum reported cluster size. Our simulation study results showed that using the Gini coefficient works better than the original spatial scan statistic for identifying irregularly shaped clusters, by reporting an optimized and refined collection of clusters rather than a single larger cluster. We have provided a real data example that seems to support the simulation results. We think that using the Gini coefficient in spatial scan statistics can be helpful for the detection of irregularly shaped clusters.

  7. Evaluation of the Gini Coefficient in Spatial Scan Statistics for Detecting Irregularly Shaped Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiyu; Jung, Inkyung

    2017-01-01

    Spatial scan statistics with circular or elliptic scanning windows are commonly used for cluster detection in various applications, such as the identification of geographical disease clusters from epidemiological data. It has been pointed out that the method may have difficulty in correctly identifying non-compact, arbitrarily shaped clusters. In this paper, we evaluated the Gini coefficient for detecting irregularly shaped clusters through a simulation study. The Gini coefficient, the use of which in spatial scan statistics was recently proposed, is a criterion measure for optimizing the maximum reported cluster size. Our simulation study results showed that using the Gini coefficient works better than the original spatial scan statistic for identifying irregularly shaped clusters, by reporting an optimized and refined collection of clusters rather than a single larger cluster. We have provided a real data example that seems to support the simulation results. We think that using the Gini coefficient in spatial scan statistics can be helpful for the detection of irregularly shaped clusters. PMID:28129368

  8. Clustering of Mueller matrix images for skeletonized structure detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collet, Christophe; Zallat, Jihad; Takakura, Yoshitate

    2004-04-01

    This paper extends and refines previous work on clustering of polarization-encoded images. The polarization-encoded images used in this work are considered as multidimensional parametric images where a clustering scheme based on Markovian Bayesian inference is applied. Hidden Markov Chains Model (HMCM) and Hidden Hierarchical Markovian Model (HHMM) show to handle effectively Mueller images and give very good results for biological tissues (vegetal leaves). Pretreatments attempting to reduce the image dimensionality based on the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) turns out to be useless for Mueller matrix images.

  9. A Spectral Clustering Approach to Lagrangian Vortex Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjighasem, Alireza; Karrasch, Daniel; Teramoto, Hiroshi; Haller, George

    2015-11-01

    One of the ubiquitous features of real-life turbulent flows is the existence and persistence of coherent vortices. Here we show that such coherent vortices can be extracted as clusters of Lagrangian trajectories. We carry out the clustering on a weighted graph, with the weights measuring pairwise distances of fluid trajectories in the extended phase space of positions and time. We then extract coherent vortices from the graph using tools from spectral graph theory. Our method locates all coherent vortices in the flow simultaneously, thereby showing high potential for automated vortex tracking. We illustrate the performance of this technique by identifying coherent Lagrangian vortices in several two- and three-dimensional flows.

  10. Spectral-clustering approach to Lagrangian vortex detection.

    PubMed

    Hadjighasem, Alireza; Karrasch, Daniel; Teramoto, Hiroshi; Haller, George

    2016-06-01

    One of the ubiquitous features of real-life turbulent flows is the existence and persistence of coherent vortices. Here we show that such coherent vortices can be extracted as clusters of Lagrangian trajectories. We carry out the clustering on a weighted graph, with the weights measuring pairwise distances of fluid trajectories in the extended phase space of positions and time. We then extract coherent vortices from the graph using tools from spectral graph theory. Our method locates all coherent vortices in the flow simultaneously, thereby showing high potential for automated vortex tracking. We illustrate the performance of this technique by identifying coherent Lagrangian vortices in several two- and three-dimensional flows.

  11. Spectral-clustering approach to Lagrangian vortex detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjighasem, Alireza; Karrasch, Daniel; Teramoto, Hiroshi; Haller, George

    2016-06-01

    One of the ubiquitous features of real-life turbulent flows is the existence and persistence of coherent vortices. Here we show that such coherent vortices can be extracted as clusters of Lagrangian trajectories. We carry out the clustering on a weighted graph, with the weights measuring pairwise distances of fluid trajectories in the extended phase space of positions and time. We then extract coherent vortices from the graph using tools from spectral graph theory. Our method locates all coherent vortices in the flow simultaneously, thereby showing high potential for automated vortex tracking. We illustrate the performance of this technique by identifying coherent Lagrangian vortices in several two- and three-dimensional flows.

  12. Selective detection of antibodies in microstructured polymer optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jesper; Hoiby, Poul; Emiliyanov, Grigoriy; Bang, Ole; Pedersen, Lars; Bjarklev, Anders

    2005-07-25

    We demonstrate selective detection of fluorophore labeled antibodies from minute samples probed by a sensor layer of complementary biomolecules immobilized inside the air holes of microstructured Polymer Optical Fiber (mPOF). The fiber core is defined by a ring of 6 air holes and a simple procedure was applied to selectively capture either alpha-streptavidin or alpha-CRP antibodies inside these air holes. A sensitive and easy-to-use fluorescence method was used for the optical detection. Our results show that mPOF based biosensors can provide reliable and selective antibody detection in ultra small sample volumes.

  13. Continuous Variable Cluster State Generation over the Optical Spatial Mode Comb

    DOE PAGES

    Pooser, Raphael C.; Jing, Jietai

    2014-10-20

    One way quantum computing uses single qubit projective measurements performed on a cluster state (a highly entangled state of multiple qubits) in order to enact quantum gates. The model is promising due to its potential scalability; the cluster state may be produced at the beginning of the computation and operated on over time. Continuous variables (CV) offer another potential benefit in the form of deterministic entanglement generation. This determinism can lead to robust cluster states and scalable quantum computation. Recent demonstrations of CV cluster states have made great strides on the path to scalability utilizing either time or frequency multiplexingmore » in optical parametric oscillators (OPO) both above and below threshold. The techniques relied on a combination of entangling operators and beam splitter transformations. Here we show that an analogous transformation exists for amplifiers with Gaussian inputs states operating on multiple spatial modes. By judicious selection of local oscillators (LOs), the spatial mode distribution is analogous to the optical frequency comb consisting of axial modes in an OPO cavity. We outline an experimental system that generates cluster states across the spatial frequency comb which can also scale the amount of quantum noise reduction to potentially larger than in other systems.« less

  14. Planck intermediate results. XXVI. Optical identification and redshifts of Planck clusters with the RTT150 telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Clements, D. L.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Gilfanov, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2015-10-01

    We present the results of approximately three years of observations of Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) sources with the Russian-Turkish 1.5 m telescope (RTT150), as a part of the optical follow-up programme undertaken by the Planck collaboration. During this time period approximately 20% of all dark and grey clear time available at the telescope was devoted to observations of Planck objects. Some observations of distant clusters were also done at the 6 m Bolshoi Telescope Alt-azimutalnyi (BTA) of the Special Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences. In total, deep, direct images of more than one hundred fields were obtained in multiple filters. We identified 47 previously unknown galaxy clusters, 41 of which are included in the Planck catalogue of SZ sources. The redshifts of 65 Planck clusters were measured spectroscopically and 14 more were measured photometrically. We discuss the details of cluster optical identifications and redshift measurements. We also present new spectroscopic redshifts for 39 Planck clusters that were not included in the Planck SZ source catalogue and are published here for the first time.

  15. Continuous Variable Cluster State Generation over the Optical Spatial Mode Comb

    SciTech Connect

    Pooser, Raphael C.; Jing, Jietai

    2014-10-20

    One way quantum computing uses single qubit projective measurements performed on a cluster state (a highly entangled state of multiple qubits) in order to enact quantum gates. The model is promising due to its potential scalability; the cluster state may be produced at the beginning of the computation and operated on over time. Continuous variables (CV) offer another potential benefit in the form of deterministic entanglement generation. This determinism can lead to robust cluster states and scalable quantum computation. Recent demonstrations of CV cluster states have made great strides on the path to scalability utilizing either time or frequency multiplexing in optical parametric oscillators (OPO) both above and below threshold. The techniques relied on a combination of entangling operators and beam splitter transformations. Here we show that an analogous transformation exists for amplifiers with Gaussian inputs states operating on multiple spatial modes. By judicious selection of local oscillators (LOs), the spatial mode distribution is analogous to the optical frequency comb consisting of axial modes in an OPO cavity. We outline an experimental system that generates cluster states across the spatial frequency comb which can also scale the amount of quantum noise reduction to potentially larger than in other systems.

  16. Detecting tissue optical and mechanical properties with an ultrasound modulated optical imaging system in reflection detection geometry

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi; Li, Sinan; Eckersley, Robert J.; Elson, Daniel S.; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Tissue optical and mechanical properties are correlated to tissue pathologic changes. This manuscript describes a dual-mode ultrasound modulated optical imaging system capable of sensing local optical and mechanical properties in reflection geometry. The optical characterisation was achieved by the acoustic radiation force assisted ultrasound modulated optical tomography (ARF-UOT) with laser speckle contrast detection. Shear waves generated by the ARF were also tracked optically by the same system and the shear wave speed was used for the elasticity measurement. Tissue mimicking phantoms with multiple inclusions buried at 11 mm depth were experimentally scanned with the dual-mode system. The inclusions, with higher optical absorption and/or higher stiffness than background, were identified based on the dual results and their stiffnesses were quantified. The system characterises both optical and mechanical properties of the inclusions compared with the ARF-UOT or the elasticity measurement alone. Moreover, by detecting the backward scattered light in reflection detection geometry, the system is more suitable for clinical applications compared with transmission geometry. PMID:25657875

  17. Using the XMM-Newton Optical Monitor to Study Cluster Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Neal A.; O'Steen, Richard; Yen, Steffi; Kuntz, K. D.; Hammer, Derek

    2012-01-01

    We explore the application of XMM Newton Optical Monitor (XMM-OM) ultraviolet (UV) data to study galaxy evolution. Our sample is constructed as the intersection of all Abell clusters with z < 0.05 and having archival XMM-OM data in either the UVM2 or UVW1 filters, plus optical and UV photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and GALEX, respectively. The 11 resulting clusters include 726 galaxies with measured redshifts, 520 of which have redshifts placing them within their parent Abell clusters. We develop procedures for manipulating the XMM-OM images and measuring galaxy photometry from them, and we confirm our results via comparison with published catalogs. Color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) constructed using the XMM-OM data along with SDSS optical data show promise for evolutionary studies, with good separation between red and blue sequences and real variation in the width of the red sequence that is likely indicative of differences in star formation history. This is particularly true for UVW1 data, as the relative abundance of data collected using this filter and its depth make it an attractive choice. Available tools that use stellar synthesis libraries to fit the UV and optical photometric data may also be used, thereby better describing star formation history within the past billion years and providing estimates of total stellar mass that include contributions from young stars. Finally, color-color diagrams that include XMM-OM UV data appear useful to the photometric identification of both extragalactic and stellar sources.

  18. A Young Stellar Cluster within the RCW41 H II Region: Deep NIR Photometry and Optical/NIR Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Fábio P.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Franco, Gabriel A. P.

    2012-06-01

    The RCW41 star-forming region is embedded within the Vela Molecular Ridge, hosting a massive stellar cluster surrounded by a conspicuous H II region. Understanding the role of interstellar magnetic fields and studying the newborn stellar population is crucial to building a consistent picture of the physical processes acting on this kind of environment. We carried out a detailed study of the interstellar polarization toward RCW41 with data from an optical and near-infrared polarimetric survey. Additionally, deep near-infrared images from the 3.5 meter New Technology Telescope were used to study the photometric properties of the embedded young stellar cluster, revealing several YSO candidates. By using a set of pre-main-sequence isochrones, a mean cluster age in the range 2.5-5.0 million years was determined, and evidence of sequential star formation was revealed. An abrupt decrease in R-band polarization degree was noticed toward the central ionized area, probably due to low grain alignment efficiency caused by the turbulent environment and/or the weak intensity of magnetic fields. The distortion of magnetic field lines exhibits dual behavior, with the mean orientation outside the area approximately following the borders of the star-forming region and directed radially toward the cluster inside the ionized area, in agreement with simulations of expanding H II regions. The spectral dependence of polarization allowed a meaningful determination of the total-to-selective extinction ratio by fittings of the Serkowski relation. Furthermore, a large rotation of polarization angle as a function of wavelength was detected toward several embedded stars. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory (La Silla, Chile), National Optical Astronomy Observatory (CTIO, Chile), and Observatório do Pico dos Dias, operated by Laboratório Nacional de Astrofísica (LNA/MCT, Brazil).

  19. Fiber optic approach for detecting corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostecki, Roman; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Davis, Claire; McAdam, Grant; Wang, Tianyu; Monro, Tanya M.

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion is a multi-billion dollar problem faced by industry. The ability to monitor the hidden metallic structure of an aircraft for corrosion could result in greater availability of existing aircraft fleets. Silica exposed-core microstructured optical fiber sensors are inherently suited towards this application, as they are extremely lightweight, robust, and suitable both for distributed measurements and for embedding in otherwise inaccessible corrosion-prone areas. By functionalizing the fiber with chemosensors sensitive to corrosion by-products, we demonstrate in-situ kinetic measurements of accelerated corrosion in simulated aluminum aircraft joints.

  20. Optical Detection Of Deformations Of An Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, L. L.; Vivian, H. C.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed control subsystem generates small aiming-bias signals to correct for deviations of 70-m-diameter reflector of microwave antenna from its ideal shape. Takes optical measurements to determine deformations produced by such environmental factors as wind, gravity, and thermal differentials. Using these measurements, subsystem estimates misalignment of radiation pattern caused by deformations. Signals to correct for estimated misalignment added to angle-command signals of main antenna-aiming system. To measure deviations laser ranging devices placed at base of feed on rigid intermediate reference structure, white retroreflectors placed on parts that deviate from assigned positions relative to intermediate reference structure.

  1. Optical Detection of Non-amplified Genomic DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di; Fan, Chunhai

    Nucleic acid sequences are unique to every living organisms including animals, plants and even bacteria and virus, which provide a practical molecular target for the identification and diagnosis of various diseases. DNA contains heterocyclic rings that has inherent optical absorbance at 260 nm, which is widely used to quantify single and double stranded DNA in biology. However, this simple quantification method could not differentiate sequences; therefore it is not suitable for sequence-specific analyte detection. In addition to a few exceptions such as chiral-related circular dichroism spectra, DNA hybridization does not produce significant changes in optical signals, thus an optical label is generally needed for sequence-specific DNA detection with optical means. During the last two decades, we have witnessed explosive progress in the area of optical DNA detection, especially with the help of simultaneously rapidly developed nanomaterials. In this chapter, we will summarize recent advances in optical DNA detection including colorimetric, fluorescent, luminescent, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and Raman scattering assays. Challenges and problems remained to be addressed are also discussed.

  2. Metal clusters and nanoparticles in dielectric matrices: Formation and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladskikh, I. A.; Vartanyan, T. A.

    2016-12-01

    The optical properties of thin dielectric films with metal inclusions and their dependence on thermal and laser annealing are studied experimentally. Metal clusters (Ag, Au, and Cu) in dielectric materials (Al2O3 and SiO2) are obtained by simultaneous vacuum deposition of metal and dielectric on the surface of a corresponding dielectric substrate (sapphire and quartz). It is shown that, depending on the deposited dielectric material, on the weight ratio of deposited metal and dielectric, and on the subsequent thermal treatment, one can obtain different metal structures, from clusters with a small number of atoms to complex dendritic plasmonic structures.

  3. Prediction, Detection, and Validation of Isotope Clusters in Mass Spectrometry Data

    PubMed Central

    Treutler, Hendrik; Neumann, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is a key analytical platform for metabolomics. The precise quantification and identification of small molecules is a prerequisite for elucidating the metabolism and the detection, validation, and evaluation of isotope clusters in LC-MS data is important for this task. Here, we present an approach for the improved detection of isotope clusters using chemical prior knowledge and the validation of detected isotope clusters depending on the substance mass using database statistics. We find remarkable improvements regarding the number of detected isotope clusters and are able to predict the correct molecular formula in the top three ranks in 92% of the cases. We make our methodology freely available as part of the Bioconductor packages xcms version 1.50.0 and CAMERA version 1.30.0. PMID:27775610

  4. Nanostructured optical microchips for cancer biomarker detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianhua; He, Yuan; Wei, Jianjun; Que, Long

    2012-01-01

    Herein we report the label-free detection of a cancer biomarker using newly developed arrayed nanostructured Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) microchips. Specifically, the prostate cancer biomarker free prostate-specific antigen (f-PSA) has been detected with a mouse anti-human PSA monoclonal antibody (mAb) as the receptor. Experiments found that the limit-of-detection of current nanostructured FPI microchip for f-PSA is about 10 pg/mL and the upper detection range for f-PSA can be dynamically changed by varying the amount of the PSA mAb immobilized on the sensing surface. The control experiments have also demonstrated that the immunoassay protocol used in the experiments shows excellent specificity and selectivity, suggesting the great potential to detect the cancer biomarkers at trace levels in complex biofluids. In addition, given its nature of low cost, simple-to-operation and batch fabrication capability, the arrayed nanostructured FPI microchip-based platform could provide an ideal technical tool for point-of-care diagnostics application and anticancer drug screen and discovery.

  5. Optical methods for the detection of heavy metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uglov, A. N.; Bessmertnykh-Lemeune, A.; Guilard, R.; Averin, A. D.; Beletskaya, I. P.

    2014-03-01

    The review covers an important area of the modern chemistry, namely, the detection of heavy metal ions using optical molecular detectors. The role of this method in metal ion detection and the physicochemical grounds of operation of chemosensors are discussed, and examples of detection of most abundant heavy metal ions and synthetic approaches to molecular detectors are presented. The immobilization of molecular detectors on solid substrates for the design of analytical sensor devices is described. The bibliography includes 178 references.

  6. First Principles Studies of Electronic and Optical Excitations in Noble Metal and Titania Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baishya, Kopinjol

    Clusters are metastable structures that form a bridge between the atomic and the bulk phase. Due to their small size, quantum confinement effects are very important in clusters. They also have large surface to volume ratio, and as such, surface effects are also important. Due to these effects the properties of clusters are quite different from those of the bulk. When the size of a cluster is increased, its properties change from atomic to bulk values usually in nontrivial ways, often displaying interesting effects. By studying the evolution of cluster properties as a function of size one can try to understand the evolution and origin of bulk properties. This thesis concentrates on two main topics, noble-metal clusters of Ag and Cu, and TiO2 nanocrystals. I present my study of the optical properties of these systems calculated using first principles methods. Noble metal clusters have intriguing physical and chemical properties due to their electronic structure that contains a fully filled and localized d orbital energetically and spatially very close to the half filled s orbital. In Chapters 3 and 4 of this thesis, I present a detailed study of the role of d electrons on the optical properties of Ag and Cu clusters. I also show that the optical spectra of these clusters can be explained remarkably well by the classical Mie-Gans theory which uses the bulk dielectric constant of the material to predict their optical absorption spectra. The fact that the concept of the bulk dielectric constant survives up to the sub-nanometer size range is one of the main findings of this thesis. TiO2 is arguably the most studied single-crystalline material in the field of surface science of metal oxides. In chapter 5 of this thesis I present results and analyses on the electronic and optical excitations in rutile TiO2 nanocrystals. The motivation for this study stems from the following observation: In modeling optical prooperties of DSSC configurations with various organic molecules

  7. The NIDS Cluster: Scalable, Stateful Network Intrusion Detection on Commodity Hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, Brian L; Vallentin, Matthias; Sommer, Robin; Lee, Jason; Leres, Craig; Paxson, Vern; Tierney, Brian

    2007-09-19

    In this work we present a NIDS cluster as a scalable solution for realizing high-performance, stateful network intrusion detection on commodity hardware. The design addresses three challenges: (i) distributing traffic evenly across an extensible set of analysis nodes in a fashion that minimizes the communication required for coordination, (ii) adapting the NIDS's operation to support coordinating its low-level analysis rather than just aggregating alerts; and (iii) validating that the cluster produces sound results. Prototypes of our NIDS cluster now operate at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California at Berkeley. In both environments the clusters greatly enhance the power of the network security monitoring.

  8. The role of fiber optics in mass spectrometer electro-optical ion detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, D. D.; Giffin, C. E.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an electro-optical ion detector combining the best features of photographic and electrical ion detection (i.e., wide mass range coverage and low ion detection threshold respectively). A nineteen fold fiber optic image dissector is discussed which reformats the 1 mm x 361 mm mass spectrometer focal plane format to a 19 mm x 19 mm format suitable for vidicon imaging and electronic display of the data.

  9. Optic disc detection and boundary extraction in retinal images.

    PubMed

    Basit, A; Fraz, Muhammad Moazam

    2015-04-10

    With the development of digital image processing, analysis and modeling techniques, automatic retinal image analysis is emerging as an important screening tool for early detection of ophthalmologic disorders such as diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. In this paper, a robust method for optic disc detection and extraction of the optic disc boundary is proposed to help in the development of computer-assisted diagnosis and treatment of such ophthalmic disease. The proposed method is based on morphological operations, smoothing filters, and the marker controlled watershed transform. Internal and external markers are used to first modify the gradient magnitude image and then the watershed transformation is applied on this modified gradient magnitude image for boundary extraction. This method has shown significant improvement over existing methods in terms of detection and boundary extraction of the optic disc. The proposed method has optic disc detection success rate of 100%, 100%, 100% and 98.9% for the DRIVE, Shifa, CHASE_DB1, and DIARETDB1 databases, respectively. The optic disc boundary detection achieved an average spatial overlap of 61.88%, 70.96%, 45.61%, and 54.69% for these databases, respectively, which are higher than currents methods.

  10. Optical disassembly of cellular clusters by tunable ‘tug-of-war’ tweezers

    PubMed Central

    Bezryadina, Anna S; Preece, Daryl C; Chen, Joseph C; Chen, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms underlie many persistent infections, posing major hurdles in antibiotic treatment. Here we design and demonstrate ‘tug-of-war’ optical tweezers that can facilitate the assessment of cell–cell adhesion—a key contributing factor to biofilm development, thanks to the combined actions of optical scattering and gradient forces. With a customized optical landscape distinct from that of conventional tweezers, not only can such ‘tug-of-war’ tweezers stably trap and stretch a rod-shaped bacterium in the observing plane, but, more importantly, they can also impose a tunable lateral force that pulls apart cellular clusters without any tethering or mechanical movement. As a proof of principle, we examined a Sinorhizobium meliloti strain that forms robust biofilms and found that the strength of intercellular adhesion depends on the growth medium. This technique may herald new photonic tools for optical manipulation and biofilm study, as well as other biological applications. PMID:27818838

  11. Optical properties of Al-CdO nano-clusters thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahia, I. S.; Salem, G. F.; Abd El-sadek, M. S.; Yakuphanoglu, F.

    2013-12-01

    The aluminum doped cadmium oxide (CdO:Al) thin films were grown onto glass substrates by sol-gel spin-coating method. The structural properties of undoped and Al-doped CdO thin films were studied by atomic force microscopy. AFM results reveal that the studied CdO films were formed from the nano-clusters. The optical transmittance of undoped and Al-doped CdO is decreased with increasing Al contents. The optical band gaps of the CdO films were varied from 2.54 eV to 2.32 eV with increasing Al dopants. The width of localized states in the optical band gap of the films is increased with increasing Al content. The improvement of the optical constant of Al-doped CdO has potential applications as transparent conducting oxide for different optoelectronic device applications.

  12. OPTICAL LINE EMISSION IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES AT 0 < z < 0.6: EVIDENCE FOR A LACK OF STRONG COOL CORES 3.5 Gyr AGO?

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael

    2011-12-15

    In recent years the number of known galaxy clusters beyond z {approx}> 0.2 has increased drastically with the release of multiple catalogs containing >30,000 optically detected galaxy clusters over the range 0 < z < 0.6. Combining these catalogs with the availability of optical spectroscopy of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey allows for the evolution of optical emission-line nebulae in cluster cores to be quantified. For the first time, the continuous evolution of optical line emission in BCGs over the range 0 < z < 0.6 is determined. A minimum in the fraction of BCGs with optical line emission is found at z {approx} 0.3, suggesting that complex, filamentary emission in systems such as Perseus A is a recent phenomenon. Evidence for an upturn in the number of strongly emitting systems is reported beyond z > 0.3, hinting at an earlier epoch of strong cooling. We compare the evolution of emission-line nebulae to the X-ray-derived cool core (CC) fraction from the literature over the same redshift range and find overall agreement, with the exception that an upturn in the strong CC fraction is not observed at z > 0.3. The overall agreement between the evolution of CCs and optical line emission at low redshift suggests that emission-line surveys of galaxy clusters may provide an efficient method of indirectly probing the evolution of CCs and thus provide insights into the balance of heating and cooling processes at early cosmic times.

  13. Proper motions of the optically visible open clusters based on the UCAC4 catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, W. S.; Monteiro, H.; Caetano, T. C.; Lépine, J. R. D.; Assafin, M.; Oliveira, A. F.

    2014-04-01

    We present a catalog of mean proper motions and membership probabilities of individual stars for optically visible open clusters, which have been determined using data from the UCAC4 catalog in a homogeneous way. The mean proper motion of the cluster and the membership probabilities of the stars in the region of each cluster were determined by applying the statistical method in a modified fashion. In this study, we applied a global optimization procedure to fit the observed distribution of proper motions with two overlapping normal bivariate frequency functions, which also take the individual proper motion errors into account. For 724 clusters, this is the first determination of proper motion, and for the whole sample, we present results with a much larger number of identified astrometric member stars. Furthermore, it was possible to estimate the mean radial velocity of 364 clusters (102 unpublished so far) with the stellar membership using published radial velocity catalogs. These results provide an increase of 30% and 19% in the sample of open clusters with a determined mean absolute proper motion and mean radial velocity, respectively. Tables 2 to 1809 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/564/A79

  14. A NEW REDUCTION OF THE BLANCO COSMOLOGY SURVEY: AN OPTICALLY SELECTED GALAXY CLUSTER CATALOG AND A PUBLIC RELEASE OF OPTICAL DATA PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bleem, L. E.; Stalder, B.; Brodwin, M.; Busha, M. T.; Wechsler, R. H.; Gladders, M. D.; High, F. W.; Rest, A.

    2015-01-01

    The Blanco Cosmology Survey is a four-band (griz) optical-imaging survey of ∼80 deg{sup 2} of the southern sky. The survey consists of two fields centered approximately at (R.A., decl.) = (23{sup h}, –55°) and (5{sup h}30{sup m}, –53°) with imaging sufficient for the detection of L {sub *} galaxies at redshift z ≤ 1. In this paper, we present our reduction of the survey data and describe a new technique for the separation of stars and galaxies. We search the calibrated source catalogs for galaxy clusters at z ≤ 0.75 by identifying spatial over-densities of red-sequence galaxies and report the coordinates, redshifts, and optical richnesses, λ, for 764 galaxy clusters at z ≤ 0.75. This sample, >85% of which are new discoveries, has a median redshift of z = 0.52 and median richness λ(0.4 L {sub *}) = 16.4. Accompanying this paper we also release full survey data products including reduced images and calibrated source catalogs. These products are available at http://data.rcc.uchicago.edu/dataset/blanco-cosmology-survey.

  15. Amplifier Noise Based Optical Steganography with Coherent Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ben; Chang, Matthew P.; Caldwell, Naomi R.; Caldwell, Myles E.; Prucnal, Paul R.

    2014-12-01

    We summarize the principle and experimental setup of optical steganography based on amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise. Using ASE noise as the signal carrier, optical steganography effectively hides a stealth channel in both the time domain and the frequency domain. Coherent detection is used at the receiver of the stealth channel. Because ASE noise has short coherence length and random phase, it only interferes with itself within a very short range. Coherent detection requires the stealth transmitter and stealth receiver to precisely match the optical delay,which generates a large key space for the stealth channel. Several methods to further improve optical steganography, signal to noise ratio, compatibility with the public channel, and applications of the stealth channel are also summarized in this review paper.

  16. Toxin detection using a fiber-optic-based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogert, Robert A.; Shriver-Lake, Lisa C.; Ligler, Frances S.

    1993-05-01

    Using an evanescent wave fiber optic-based biosensor developed at Naval Research Laboratory, ricin toxin can be detected in the low ng/ml range. Sensitivity was established at 1 - 5 ng/ml using a two-step assay. The two-step assay showed enhanced signal levels in comparison to a one-step assay. A two-step assay utilizes a 10 minute incubation of an immobilized affinity purified anti-ricin antibody fiber optic probe in the ricin sample before placement in a solution of fluorophore-labeled goat anti-ricin antibodies. The specific fluorescent signal is obtained by the binding of the fluorophore-labeled antibodies to ricin which is bound by the immobilized antibodies on the fiber optic probe. The toxin can be detected directly from urine and river water using this fiber optic assay.

  17. Cluster Formation of Sulfuric Acid with Dimethylamine or Diamines and Detection with Chemical Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, C. N.; McMurry, P. H.; Hanson, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Chemical ionization (CI) mass spectrometers are used to study atmospheric nucleation by detecting clusters produced by reactions of sulfuric acid and various basic gases. These instruments typically use nitrate to chemically ionize clusters for detection. In this study, we compare measured cluster concentrations formed by reacting sulfuric acid vapor with dimethylamine, ethylene diamine, tetramethylethylene diamine, or butanediamine (also known as putrescine) using nitrate and acetate ions. We show from flow reactor measurements that nitrate is unable to chemically ionize clusters with weak acidities. In addition, we vary the ion-molecule reaction time to probe the chemical ionization processes and lifetimes of ions composed of sulfuric acid and base molecules. We then model the neutral and ion cluster formation pathways, including chemical ionization, ion-induced clustering, and ion decomposition, to better identify which cluster types cannot be chemically ionized by nitrate. Our results show that sulfuric acid dimer with two diamines and sulfuric acid trimer with 2 or more base molecules cannot be chemical ionized by nitrate. We conclude that cluster concentrations measured with acetate CI gives a better representation of both cluster abundancies and their base content than nitrate CI.

  18. Fault Detection Using the Clustering-kNN Rule for Gas Sensor Arrays.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingli; Sun, Zhen; Chen, Yinsheng

    2016-12-06

    The k-nearest neighbour (kNN) rule, which naturally handles the possible non-linearity of data, is introduced to solve the fault detection problem of gas sensor arrays. In traditional fault detection methods based on the kNN rule, the detection process of each new test sample involves all samples in the entire training sample set. Therefore, these methods can be computation intensive in monitoring processes with a large volume of variables and training samples and may be impossible for real-time monitoring. To address this problem, a novel clustering-kNN rule is presented. The landmark-based spectral clustering (LSC) algorithm, which has low computational complexity, is employed to divide the entire training sample set into several clusters. Further, the kNN rule is only conducted in the cluster that is nearest to the test sample; thus, the efficiency of the fault detection methods can be enhanced by reducing the number of training samples involved in the detection process of each test sample. The performance of the proposed clustering-kNN rule is fully verified in numerical simulations with both linear and non-linear models and a real gas sensor array experimental system with different kinds of faults. The results of simulations and experiments demonstrate that the clustering-kNN rule can greatly enhance both the accuracy and efficiency of fault detection methods and provide an excellent solution to reliable and real-time monitoring of gas sensor arrays.

  19. Fault Detection Using the Clustering-kNN Rule for Gas Sensor Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingli; Sun, Zhen; Chen, Yinsheng

    2016-01-01

    The k-nearest neighbour (kNN) rule, which naturally handles the possible non-linearity of data, is introduced to solve the fault detection problem of gas sensor arrays. In traditional fault detection methods based on the kNN rule, the detection process of each new test sample involves all samples in the entire training sample set. Therefore, these methods can be computation intensive in monitoring processes with a large volume of variables and training samples and may be impossible for real-time monitoring. To address this problem, a novel clustering-kNN rule is presented. The landmark-based spectral clustering (LSC) algorithm, which has low computational complexity, is employed to divide the entire training sample set into several clusters. Further, the kNN rule is only conducted in the cluster that is nearest to the test sample; thus, the efficiency of the fault detection methods can be enhanced by reducing the number of training samples involved in the detection process of each test sample. The performance of the proposed clustering-kNN rule is fully verified in numerical simulations with both linear and non-linear models and a real gas sensor array experimental system with different kinds of faults. The results of simulations and experiments demonstrate that the clustering-kNN rule can greatly enhance both the accuracy and efficiency of fault detection methods and provide an excellent solution to reliable and real-time monitoring of gas sensor arrays. PMID:27929412

  20. Optical detection of cracks in translucent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosky, E.J.; Meeks, R.F.

    1982-03-30

    The qualitative determination of macroscopic and microscopic cracking in ferroelectric ceramics and other translucent materials is achieved by observing the attenuation of light across internal fracture planes within the material. The study was performed on ferroelectric and ceramic disks up to 0.5 in. thick. The microscopic equipment used was an Olympus Vanox Microscope fitted with a vertical brightfield illuminator, polarizer, rotatable analyzer and a quartz-halogen light source. Macroscopic inspection was made with a typical laboratory quartz-halogen illuminator equipped with a fiber-optic light guide. It is shown that inspection by internal lighting using polarized light is a highly effective means for the nondestructive determination of microscopic and macroscopic cracking in translucent materials.

  1. Optically selective, acoustically resonant gas detecting transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A gas analyzer is disclosed which responds to the resonant absorption or emission spectrum of a specific gas by producing an acoustic resonance in a chamber containing a sample of that gas, and which measures the amount of that emission or absorption by measuring the strength of that acoustic resonance, e.g., the maximum periodic pressure, velocity or density achieved. In the preferred embodiment, a light beam is modulated periodically at the acoustical resonance frequency of a closed chamber which contains an optically dense sample of the gas of interest. Periodic heating of the absorbing gas by the light beam causes a cyclic expansion, movement, and pressure within the gas. An amplitude is reached where the increased losses were the cyclic radiation energy received. A transducing system is inclined for converting the pressure variations of the resonant gas into electronic readout signals.

  2. Applicability of Fiber Optics to Aircraft Fire Detection Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-01

    in aircraft, such as elevated temperatures, chemical contamination, acoustic noise, vibration, shock, altitude and reliability/maintainability...in and fan-out techniques - and their optical, mechanical, and chemical characteristics relevant to air- craft fire detection system applications...the acceptance half-angle (0NA) of optical fibers is a property of the fibers themselves (ranging from 8’ for fluorocarbon resin clad quartz fibers that

  3. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2010-07-13

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  4. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2010-06-29

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  5. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2009-11-10

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of impaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  6. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2007-12-11

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  7. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2009-10-27

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  8. An Intrusion Detection System Based on Multi-Level Clustering for Hierarchical Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Butun, Ismail; Ra, In-Ho; Sankar, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    In this work, an intrusion detection system (IDS) framework based on multi-level clustering for hierarchical wireless sensor networks is proposed. The framework employs two types of intrusion detection approaches: (1) “downward-IDS (D-IDS)” to detect the abnormal behavior (intrusion) of the subordinate (member) nodes; and (2) “upward-IDS (U-IDS)” to detect the abnormal behavior of the cluster heads. By using analytical calculations, the optimum parameters for the D-IDS (number of maximum hops) and U-IDS (monitoring group size) of the framework are evaluated and presented. PMID:26593915

  9. Ophiuchus: An optical view of a very massive cluster of galaxies hidden behind the Milky Way ⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durret, F.; Wakamatsu, K.; Nagayama, T.; Adami, C.; Biviano, A.

    2015-11-01

    Context. The Ophiuchus cluster, at a redshift z = 0.0296, is known from X-rays to be one of the most massive nearby clusters, but its optical properties have not been investigated in detail because of its very low Galactic latitude. Aims: We discuss the optical properties of the galaxies in the Ophiuchus cluster, in particular, with the aim of understanding its dynamical properties better. Methods: We have obtained deep optical imaging in several bands with various telescopes, and applied a sophisticated method to model and subtract the contributions of stars to measure galaxy magnitudes as accurately as possible. The colour-magnitude relations obtained show that there are hardly any blue galaxies in Ophiuchus (at least brighter than r' ≤ 19.5), and this is confirmed by the fact that we only detect two galaxies in Hα. We also obtained a number of spectra with ESO-FORS2, which we combined with previously available redshifts. Altogether, we have 152 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the 0.02 ≤ z ≤ 0.04 range, and 89 galaxies with both a redshift within the cluster redshift range and a measured r' band magnitude (limited to the Megacam 1 × 1 deg2 field). Results: A complete dynamical analysis based on the galaxy redshifts available shows that the overall cluster is relaxed and has a mass of 1.1 × 1015 M⊙. The Sernal-Gerbal method detects a main structure and a much smaller substructure, which are not separated in projection. Conclusions: From its dynamical properties derived from optical data, the Ophiuchus cluster seems overall to be a relaxed structure, or at most a minor merger, though in X-rays the central region (radius ~ 150 kpc) may show evidence for merging effects. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam (program 10AF02), a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the

  10. Coherent electro-optical detection of terahertz radiation from an optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Meng, F Z; Thomson, M D; Molter, D; Löffler, T; Jonuscheit, J; Beigang, R; Bartschke, J; Bauer, T; Nittmann, M; Roskos, H G

    2010-05-24

    We report the realization of coherent electro-optical detection of nanosecond terahertz (THz) pulses from an optical parametric oscillator, which is pumped by a Q-switched nanosecond Nd:YVO4 laser at 1064 nm and emits at approximately 1.5 THz. The beam profile and wavefront of the THz beam at focus are electro-optically characterized toward the realization of a real-time THz camera. A peak dynamic range of approximately 37 dB/radical Hz is achieved with single-pixel detection.

  11. LLNL electro-optical mine detection program

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.; Aimonetti, W.; Barth, M.; Buhl, M.; Bull, N.; Carter, M.; Clark, G.; Fields, D.; Fulkerson, S.; Kane, R.

    1994-09-30

    Under funding from the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) and the US Marine Corps (USMC), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has directed a program aimed at improving detection capabilities against buried mines and munitions. The program has provided a national test facility for buried mines in arid environments, compiled and distributed an extensive data base of infrared (IR), ground penetrating radar (GPR), and other measurements made at that site, served as a host for other organizations wishing to make measurements, made considerable progress in the use of ground penetrating radar for mine detection, and worked on the difficult problem of sensor fusion as applied to buried mine detection. While the majority of our effort has been concentrated on the buried mine problem, LLNL has worked with the U.S.M.C. on surface mine problems as well, providing data and analysis to support the COBRA (Coastal Battlefield Reconnaissance and Analysis) program. The original aim of the experimental aspect of the program was the utilization of multiband infrared approaches for the detection of buried mines. Later the work was extended to a multisensor investigation, including sensors other than infrared imagers. After an early series of measurements, it was determined that further progress would require a larger test facility in a natural environment, so the Buried Object Test Facility (BOTF) was constructed at the Nevada Test Site. After extensive testing, with sensors spanning the electromagnetic spectrum from the near ultraviolet to radio frequencies, possible paths for improvement were: improved spatial resolution providing better ground texture discrimination; analysis which involves more complicated spatial queueing and filtering; additional IR bands using imaging spectroscopy; the use of additional sensors other than IR and the use of data fusion techniques with multi-sensor data; and utilizing time dependent observables like temperature.

  12. Breast Cancer Detection Using Optical Vascular Fusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    growing characteristics in order to determine the strengths and weaknesses of the current non- invasive imaging technique . As a model for breast cancer...cells, to help improve technique detection and validation of the imaging system and protocols. In this work we used two human breast cancer models...brain cancer, and DLD-1 colon cancer). Our imaging technique examines the vasculature of the tumor through its response to inhalation of carbon

  13. High pressure studies on nanometer sized clusters: Structural, optical, and cooperative properties

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, Sarah Helen

    1995-05-01

    High-pressure Se EXAFS is used to study pressure-induced structural transformations in CdSe nanocrystals. The transformation is wurtzite to rock salt, at a pressure much higher than in bulk. High-pressure XRD is used to confirm the EXAFS results. Diffraction peak widths indicate that nanocrystals do not fragment upon transformation. Optical absorption correlates with structural transformations and is used to measure transition pressures; transformation pressure increases smoothly as nanocrystal size decreases. Thermodynamics of transformation is modeled using an elevated surface energy in the high-pressure phase. High-pressure study of Si nanocrystals show large increases in transformation pressure in crystallites to 500{angstrom} diameter, and an overall change in crystallite shape upon transformation is seen from XRD line widths. C{sub 60} single crystals were studied using Raman scattering; results provide information about the clusters` rotational state. Optical properties of high-pressure phase CdSe clusters were studied.

  14. MASTER-SAAO: optical transient detections and followups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, David A. H.; Lipunov, Vladimir; Gorbovskoy, Evgeny; Gress, Oleg; Potter, Stephen Brian; Kniazev, Alexei

    2015-08-01

    Following its installation at Sutherland in late Dec 2014, the SAAO node of the MASTER optical transient detection network has been busy discovering new optical transient sources and following up on other transient triggers. This is the first general transient detection system to be installed at SAAO, allowing for the rapid detection and followup of the likes of CVs, GRBs, SNe and flaring blazars. Up to mid-March 2015, some 40 transients have been discovered by MASTER-SAAO. In addition several Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) follow-up observations were conducted with MASTER-SAAO, leading to the identification of optical counterparts and the determination of the afterglow decay light curves for two of them, and upper limits for the rest. We discuss the MASTER-SAAO system and future plans to automate followup observations with SALT and a new 1.0 m robotic telescope at SAAO.

  15. Detecting Gravitational Lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background by Galaxy Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Eric Jones

    2014-08-01

    Clusters of galaxies gravitationally lens the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) leading to a distinct signal in the CMB on arcminute scales. Measurement of the cluster lensing effect offers the exciting possibility of constraining the masses of galaxy clusters using CMB data alone. Improved constraints on cluster masses are in turn essential to the use of clusters as cosmological probes: uncertainties in cluster masses are currently the dominant systematic affecting cluster abundance constraints on cosmology. To date, however, the CMB cluster lensing signal remains undetected because of its small magnitude and angular size. In this thesis, we develop a maximum likelihood approach to extracting the signal from CMB temperature data. We validate the technique by applying it to mock data designed to replicate as closely as possible real data from the South Pole Telescope’s (SPT) Sunyaev-Zel’dovich (SZ) survey: the effects of the SPT beam, transfer function, instrumental noise and cluster selection are incorporated. We consider the effects of foreground emission on the analysis and show that uncertainty in amount of foreground lensing results in a small systematic error on the lensing constraints. Additionally, we show that if unaccounted for, the SZ effect leads to unacceptably large biases on the lensing constraints and develop an approach for removing SZ contamination. The results of the mock analysis presented here suggest that a 4σ first detection of the cluster lensing effect can be achieved with current SPT-SZ data.

  16. Tumor margin detection using optical biopsy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Li, Jiyou; Li, Zhongwu; Zhou, Lixin; Chen, Ke; Pu, Yang; He, Yong; Zhu, Ke; Li, Qingbo; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to use the Resonance Raman (RR) and fluorescence spectroscopic technique for tumor margin detection with high accuracy based on native molecular fingerprints of breast and gastrointestinal (GI) tissues. This tumor margins detection method utilizes advantages of RR spectroscopic technique in situ and in real-time to diagnose tumor changes providing powerful tools for clinical guiding intraoperative margin assessments and postoperative treatments. The tumor margin detection procedures by RR spectroscopy were taken by scanning lesion from center or around tumor region in ex-vivo to find the changes in cancerous tissues with the rim of normal tissues using the native molecular fingerprints. The specimens used to analyze tumor margins include breast and GI carcinoma and normal tissues. The sharp margin of the tumor was found by the changes of RR spectral peaks within 2 mm distance. The result was verified using fluorescence spectra with 300 nm, 320 nm and 340 nm excitation, in a typical specimen of gastric cancerous tissue within a positive margin in comparison with normal gastric tissues. This study demonstrates the potential of RR and fluorescence spectroscopy as new approaches with labeling free to determine the intraoperative margin assessment.

  17. Microstructured Optical Fiber for X-ray Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeHaven, Stanton L.

    2009-01-01

    A novel scintillating optical fiber is presented using a composite micro-structured quartz optical fiber. Scintillating materials are introduced into the multiple inclusions of the fiber. This creates a composite optical fiber having quartz as a cladding with an organic scintillating material core. X-ray detection using these fibers is compared to a collimated cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. Results show a good correlation between the fiber count rate trend and that of the CdTe detector.

  18. A FOSSIL BULGE GLOBULAR CLUSTER REVEALED BY VERY LARGE TELESCOPE MULTI-CONJUGATE ADAPTIVE OPTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Ortolani, Sergio; Barbuy, Beatriz; Momany, Yazan; Saviane, Ivo; Jilkova, Lucie; Bica, Eduardo; Salerno, Gustavo M.; Jungwiert, Bruno E-mail: barbuy@astro.iag.usp.br E-mail: isaviane@eso.org E-mail: bica@if.ufrgs.br

    2011-08-10

    The globular cluster HP 1 is projected on the bulge, very close to the Galactic center. The Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics Demonstrator on the Very Large Telescope allowed us to acquire high-resolution deep images that, combined with first epoch New Technology Telescope data, enabled us to derive accurate proper motions. The cluster and bulge fields' stellar contents were disentangled through this process and produced an unprecedented definition in color-magnitude diagrams of this cluster. The metallicity of [Fe/H] {approx} -1.0 from previous spectroscopic analysis is confirmed, which together with an extended blue horizontal branch imply an age older than the halo average. Orbit reconstruction results suggest that HP 1 is spatially confined within the bulge.

  19. Optical detection of ultrasound from optically rough surfaces using a custom CMOS sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achamfuo-Yeboah, S. O.; Light, R. A.; Sharples, S. D.

    2015-01-01

    The optical detection of ultrasound from optically rough surfaces is severely limited when using a conventional interferometric or optical beam deflection (OBD) setup because the detected light is speckled. This means that complicated and expensive setups are required to detect ultrasound optically on rough surfaces. We present a CMOS integrated circuit that can detect laser ultrasound in the presence of speckle. The detector circuit is based on the simple knife edge detector. It is self-adapting and is fast, inxepensive, compact and robust. The CMOS circuit is implemented as a widefield array of 32×32 pixels. At each pixel the received light is compared with an adjacent pixel in order to determine the local light gradient. The result of this comparison is stored and used to connect each pixel to the positive or negative gradient output as appropriate (similar to a balanced knife edge detector). The perturbation of the surface due to ultrasound preserves the speckle distribution whilst deflecting it. The spatial disturbance of the speckle pattern due to the ultrasound is detected by considering each pair of pixels as a knife edge detector. The sensor can adapt itself to match the received optical speckle pattern in less than 0.1 μs, and then detect the ultrasound within 0.5 μs of adaptation. This makes it possible to repeatedly detect ultrasound from optically rough surfaces very quickly. The detector is capable of independent operation controlled by a local microcontroller, or it may be connected to a computer for more sophisticated configuration and control. We present the theory of its operation and discuss results validating the concept and operation of the device. We also present preliminary results from an improved design which grants a higher bandwidth, allowing for optical detection of higher frequency ultrasound.

  20. Approximate nearest neighbour field based optic disk detection.

    PubMed

    Ramakanth, S Avinash; Babu, R Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    Approximate Nearest Neighbour Field maps are commonly used by computer vision and graphics community to deal with problems like image completion, retargetting, denoising, etc. In this paper, we extend the scope of usage of ANNF maps to medical image analysis, more specifically to optic disk detection in retinal images. In the analysis of retinal images, optic disk detection plays an important role since it simplifies the segmentation of optic disk and other retinal structures. The proposed approach uses FeatureMatch, an ANNF algorithm, to find the correspondence between a chosen optic disk reference image and any given query image. This correspondence provides a distribution of patches in the query image that are closest to patches in the reference image. The likelihood map obtained from the distribution of patches in query image is used for optic disk detection. The proposed approach is evaluated on five publicly available DIARETDB0, DIARETDB1, DRIVE, STARE and MESSIDOR databases, with total of 1540 images. We show, experimentally, that our proposed approach achieves an average detection accuracy of 99% and an average computation time of 0.2 s per image.

  1. Digitalized detection of optical axes' parallelism in multi-optical axes system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bingqi; Ling, Jun; Zhou, Bing; Zhao, Xilin

    2002-09-01

    Automation and intelligent function in performance testing of optical instrument are the key problems in modern detection technology. In this paper a testing system based on the detection in laboratory is proposed and has successfully realized the detection of multi-optical axes" parallelism. This system is on the base of optics, mechanics and electricity, and combines the modern computer technology to gather and process the data obtained in the experiment, finally high-precision quantified results can be gotten, so these results can provide reliable data for the alignment of optical axes. The paper introduces the whole testing system"s design options, system composition, operational principle and software design in detail, and it"s technical difficulties and emphases are also analyzed and discussed.

  2. Optical and Infrared Stellar abundances in the globular clusters NGC 5466 and NGC 5024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Masen

    2015-01-01

    Stellar chemical abundances in globular clusters (GCs) can reveal clues about the formation history of stellar populations within the Milky Way (MW). In particular, abundance ratios such as [α/Fe] and [Fe/H] can be used to distill accreted GCs from those that are believed to form in situ. Two GCs which have uncertain origins (i.e. show a tidal tail or have been associated with a stellar stream) are NGC 5466 and 5024; these clusters also have had little to no chemical abundance analyses performed in the past. In this work we present a detailed chemical abundance analysis on 5 stars in these two clusters. The abundances are derived from high-resolution spectroscopic observations at both optical (with the HRS on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope) and infrared (from the APOGEE survey) wavelengths. We have two major aims in the abundance analysis: i) to find clues as to the origins of both clusters and ii) to compare the results of independently observed spectra between two different wavelength regions. For NGC 5466 and 5024 we find an average [Fe/H] = -2.06, -2.16, respectively. We find the typical abundances ratios of both clusters follow chemical trends of both stars and GCs within the MW, indicating from this sample that both clusters do not show evidence of being accreted; although we note the abundance patterns of dwarf and massive galaxies are similar at such low metallicities. We also find that the infrared analysis is in generally good agreement with the optical observations and that the two wavelength analyses complement each other in a powerful way. Developing infrared observing and analysis strategies is greatly beneficial to the emerging field, especially when considering observations in regions where infrared wavelengths are an advantage (i.e. the Galactic Bulge).

  3. FDTD study of the formation of optical vortices associated with core-shell nanoparticle cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md Mahfuzur; Lu, Jin You; Ni, George; Fang, Nicholas Xuanlai; Zhang, Tiejun; Ghaferi, Amal Al

    2015-03-01

    Light absorbing plasmonic metal-dielectric nanoparticles suspended in water, or nanofluids have recently been experimentally demonstrated to produce steam at high efficiencies upon solar illumination. This approach localizes high temperatures to the interior of the liquid through efficient trapping of incoming light via scattering and absorption mechanisms. In suspensions, nanoparticles may form clusters due to surface wetting properties, and little work has focused on understanding the optical properties of clusters. In this work, we use the FDTD method to accurately visualize the optical power flow through various plasmonic metal-silica core-shell nanoparticle pairs at different inter-particle separations (10-100 nm). At these separations phase singularities of the power flow can occur, such as vortices of light inside the dielectric core which can enhance the absorption cross-section of the cluster. We study the conditions required to form these vortices. We also consider titanium nitride as shell, other than the widely studied noble metals to visualize the extinction cross-section of a cluster which depends on the separation, and the permittivity of the dielectric core. The authors would like to acknowledge the valuable support from Masdar Institute and Massachusetts Institute of Technology for the soler thermal project grant.

  4. Optical response and gas sequestration properties of metal cluster supported graphene nanoflakes.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Debdutta; Chattaraj, Pratim Kumar

    2016-07-28

    The possibility of obtaining metal cluster (M3O(+), M = Li, Na, K) supported pristine, B-doped and BN-doped graphene nanoflakes (GR, BGR and BNGR, respectively) has been investigated by carrying out density functional theory (DFT) based calculations. Thermochemical analysis reveals the good stability of M3O(+)@GR/BGR/BNGR moieties. The dynamic stability of M3O(+)@GR/BGR/BNGR moieties is confirmed through an atom-centered density matrix propagation simulation at 298 K up to 500 fs. Orbital and electrostatic interactions play pivotal roles in stabilizing the metal-cluster supported graphene nanoflakes. The metal clusters lower the Fermi levels of the host nanoflakes and enable them to exhibit reasonably good optical response properties such as polarizability and static first hyperpolarizability. In particular, Na3O(+)/K3O(+)@BGR complexes exhibit very large first hyperpolarizability values at the static field limit. All the M3O(+)@BGR/BNGR moieties demonstrate broadband optical absorption encompassing the ultraviolet, visible as well as infrared domains. The metal-cluster supported graphene nanoflakes, in general, can sequestrate polar molecules, viz. CO, NO and CH3OH, in a thermodynamically more favorable way than GR, BGR and BNGR. In the adsorbed state, the CO, NO and CH3OH molecules, in general, attain an 'active' state as compared to their free counterparts.

  5. Comparison of Bayesian Clustering and Edge Detection Methods for Inferring Boundaries in Landscape Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Safner, Toni; Miller, Mark P.; McRae, Brad H.; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Manel, Stéphanie

    2011-01-01

    Recently, techniques available for identifying clusters of individuals or boundaries between clusters using genetic data from natural populations have expanded rapidly. Consequently, there is a need to evaluate these different techniques. We used spatially-explicit simulation models to compare three spatial Bayesian clustering programs and two edge detection methods. Spatially-structured populations were simulated where a continuous population was subdivided by barriers. We evaluated the ability of each method to correctly identify boundary locations while varying: (i) time after divergence, (ii) strength of isolation by distance, (iii) level of genetic diversity, and (iv) amount of gene flow across barriers. To further evaluate the methods’ effectiveness to detect genetic clusters in natural populations, we used previously published data on North American pumas and a European shrub. Our results show that with simulated and empirical data, the Bayesian spatial clustering algorithms outperformed direct edge detection methods. All methods incorrectly detected boundaries in the presence of strong patterns of isolation by distance. Based on this finding, we support the application of Bayesian spatial clustering algorithms for boundary detection in empirical datasets, with necessary tests for the influence of isolation by distance. PMID:21541031

  6. Comparison of Bayesian clustering and edge detection methods for inferring boundaries in landscape genetics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safner, T.; Miller, M.P.; McRae, B.H.; Fortin, M.-J.; Manel, S.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, techniques available for identifying clusters of individuals or boundaries between clusters using genetic data from natural populations have expanded rapidly. Consequently, there is a need to evaluate these different techniques. We used spatially-explicit simulation models to compare three spatial Bayesian clustering programs and two edge detection methods. Spatially-structured populations were simulated where a continuous population was subdivided by barriers. We evaluated the ability of each method to correctly identify boundary locations while varying: (i) time after divergence, (ii) strength of isolation by distance, (iii) level of genetic diversity, and (iv) amount of gene flow across barriers. To further evaluate the methods' effectiveness to detect genetic clusters in natural populations, we used previously published data on North American pumas and a European shrub. Our results show that with simulated and empirical data, the Bayesian spatial clustering algorithms outperformed direct edge detection methods. All methods incorrectly detected boundaries in the presence of strong patterns of isolation by distance. Based on this finding, we support the application of Bayesian spatial clustering algorithms for boundary detection in empirical datasets, with necessary tests for the influence of isolation by distance. ?? 2011 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

  7. Optical fiber fluorescence spectroscopy for detecting AFM1 in milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, A. G.; Cucci, C.; Ciaccheri, L.; Dall'Asta, C.; Galaverna, G.; Dossena, A.; Marchelli, R.

    2008-04-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy carried out by means of optical fibers was used for the rapid screening of M1 aflatoxin in milk, enabling the detection of concentrations up to the legal limit, which is 50 ppt. A compact fluorometric device equipped with a LED source, a miniaturized spectrometer, and optical fibers for illumination/detection of the measuring micro-cell was tested for measuring threshold values of AFM1 in pre-treated milk samples. Multivariate processing of the spectral data made it possible to obtain a preliminary screening at the earlier stages of the industrial process, as well as to discard contaminated milk stocks before their inclusion in the production chain.

  8. Optical mammography combined with fluorescence imaging: lesion detection using scatterplots

    PubMed Central

    Leproux, Anaïs; van der Voort, Marjolein; van der Mark, Martin B.; Harbers, Rik; van de Ven, Stephanie M. W. Y.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2011-01-01

    Using scatterplots of 2 or 3 parameters, diffuse optical tomography and fluorescence imaging are combined to improve detectability of breast lesions. Small or low contrast phantom-lesions that were missed in the optical and fluorescence images were detected in the scatterplots. In patient measurements, all tumors were visible and easily differentiated from artifacts and areolas in the scatterplots. The different rate of intake and wash out of the fluorescent contrast agent in the healthy versus malignant tissues was also observed in the scatterplot: this information can be used to discriminate malignant lesion from normal structures. PMID:21483622

  9. Theoretical study of structural and optical properties of noble metal cluster-dipeptide hybrids at defect centers of MgO.

    PubMed

    Kulesza, Alexander; Mitrić, Roland; Bonačić-Koutecký, Vlasta

    2012-07-14

    We present the theoretical investigation of structural and optical properties of silver and gold cluster-dipeptide hybrids bound to the F(S) defect of the MgO (100) surface. We use DFT and its TDDFT variant combined with the polarizable embedded cluster model for the description of the extended MgO environment. As model peptide we have chosen CysTrp since the cysteine residue interacts strongly with metal particles through the sulfur atom and tryptophan is the most important chromophoric amino acid. Our results show that in the case of CysTrp bound to the supported Ag(4) cluster an intense optical signal arises at 400 nm. In contrast, in the case of gold no strongly localized absorption is present since the optical response of supported gold-peptide hybrids is dominated by a large number of low intensity d-electron excitations spread over a broad energy range. Such a localized optical signal which is present in supported silver hybrids can be exploited for the optical detection of peptides and thus can serve as basis for the development of biosensing materials.

  10. Optimal mode transformations for linear-optical cluster-state generation

    SciTech Connect

    Uskov, Dmitry B.; Lougovski, Pavel; Alsing, Paul M.; Fanto, Michael L.; Kaplan, Lev; Smith, Amos Matthew

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we analyze the generation of linear-optical cluster states (LOCSs) via sequential addition of one and two qubits. Existing approaches employ the stochastic linear-optical two-qubit controlled-Z (CZ) gate with success rate of 1/9 per operation. The question of optimality of the CZ gate with respect to LOCS generation has remained open. We report that there are alternative schemes to the CZ gate that are exponentially more efficient and show that sequential LOCS growth is indeed globally optimal. We find that the optimal cluster growth operation is a state transformation on a subspace of the full Hilbert space. Finally, we show that the maximal success rate of postselected entangling n photonic qubits or m Bell pairs into a cluster is (1/2)n-1 and (1/4)m-1, respectively, with no ancilla photons, and we give an explicit optical description of the optimal mode transformations.

  11. Optimal mode transformations for linear-optical cluster-state generation

    DOE PAGES

    Uskov, Dmitry B.; Lougovski, Pavel; Alsing, Paul M.; ...

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we analyze the generation of linear-optical cluster states (LOCSs) via sequential addition of one and two qubits. Existing approaches employ the stochastic linear-optical two-qubit controlled-Z (CZ) gate with success rate of 1/9 per operation. The question of optimality of the CZ gate with respect to LOCS generation has remained open. We report that there are alternative schemes to the CZ gate that are exponentially more efficient and show that sequential LOCS growth is indeed globally optimal. We find that the optimal cluster growth operation is a state transformation on a subspace of the full Hilbert space. Finally,more » we show that the maximal success rate of postselected entangling n photonic qubits or m Bell pairs into a cluster is (1/2)n-1 and (1/4)m-1, respectively, with no ancilla photons, and we give an explicit optical description of the optimal mode transformations.« less

  12. Airborne optical detection of oil on water.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, J. P.; Arvesen, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Airborne measurements were made over controlled oil-spill test sites to evaluate various techniques, utilizing reflected sunlight, for detecting oil on water. The results of these measurements show that (1) maximum contrast between oil and water is in the UV and red portions of the spectrum; (2) minimum contrast is in the blue-green; (3) differential polarization appears to be a very promising technique; (4) no characteristic absorption bands, which would permit one oil to be distinguished from another, were discovered in the spectral regions measured; (5) sky conditions greatly influence the contrast between oil and water; and (6) highest contrast was achieved under overcast sky conditions.

  13. Optical biopsy - a new armamentarium to detect disease using light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    Optical spectroscopy has been considered a promising method for cancer detection for past thirty years because of its advantages over the conventional diagnostic methods of no tissue removal, minimal invasiveness, rapid diagnoses, less time consumption and reproducibility since the first use in 1984. It offers a new armamentarium. Human tissue is mainly composed of extracellular matrix of collagen fiber, proteins, fat, water, and epithelial cells with key molecules in different structures. Tissues contain a number of key fingerprint native endogenous fluorophore molecules, such as tryptophan, collagen, elastin, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and porphyrins. It is well known that abnormalities in metabolic activity precede the onset of a lot of main diseases: carcinoma, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer, and Parkinson's disease, etc. Optical spectroscopy may help in detecting various disorders. Conceivably the biochemical or morphologic changes that cause the spectra variations would appear earlier than the histological aberration. Therefore, "optical biopsy" holds a great promise as clinical tool for diagnosing early stage of carcinomas and other deceases by combining with available photonic technology (e.g. optical fibers, photon detectors, spectrographs spectroscopic ratiometer, fiber-optic endomicroscope and nasopharyngoscope) for in vivo use. This paper focuses on various methods available to detect spectroscopic changes in tissues, for example to distinguish cancerous prostate tissues and/or cells from normal prostate tissues and/or cells. The methods to be described are fluorescence, stokes shift, scattering, Raman, and time-resolved spectroscopy will be reviewed. The underlying physical and biological basis for these optical approaches will be discussed with examples. The idea is to present some of the salient works to show the usefulness and methods of Optical Biopsy for cancer detection and

  14. Optical and SAR data integration for automatic change pattern detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, B.; Susaki, J.

    2014-09-01

    Automatic change pattern mapping in urban and sub-urban area is important but challenging due to the diversity of urban land use pattern. With multi-sensor imagery, it is possible to generate multidimensional unique information of Earth surface features that allow developing a relationship between a response of each feature to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and optical sensors to track the change automatically. Thus, a SAR and optical data integration framework for change detection and a relationship for automatic change pattern detection were developed. It was carried out in three steps: (i) Computation of indicators from SAR and optical images, namely: normalized difference ratio (NDR) from multi-temporal SAR images and the normalized difference vegetation index difference (NDVI) from multi-temporal optical images, (ii) computing the change magnitude image from NDR and ΔNDVI and delineating the change area and (iii) the development of an empirical relationship, for automatic change pattern detection. The experiment was carried out in an outskirts part of Ho Chi Minh City, one of the fastest growing cities in the world. The empirical relationship between the response of surface feature to optical and SAR imagery has successfully delineated six changed classes in a very complex urban sprawl area that was otherwise impossible with multi-spectral imagery. The improvement of the change detection results by making use of the unique information on both sensors, optical and SAR, is also noticeable with a visual inspection and the kappa index was increased by 0.13 (0.75 to 0.88) in comparison to only optical images.

  15. Optical carrier wave shocking: detection and dispersion.

    PubMed

    Kinsler, P; Radnor, S B P; Tyrrell, J C A; New, G H C

    2007-06-01

    Carrier wave shocking is studied using the pseudospectral spatial-domain (PSSD) technique. We describe the shock detection diagnostics necessary for this numerical study and verify them against theoretical shocking predictions for the dispersionless case. These predictions show a carrier envelope phase and pulse bandwidth sensitivity in the single-cycle regime. The flexible dispersion management offered by the PSSD enables us to independently control the linear and nonlinear dispersion. Customized dispersion profiles allow us to analyze the development of both carrier self-steepening and shocks. The results exhibit a marked asymmetry between normal and anomalous dispersion, both in the limits of the shocking regime and in the (near) shocked pulse wave forms. Combining these insights, we offer some suggestions on how carrier shocking (or at least extreme self-steepening) might be realized experimentally.

  16. Standoff detection of explosives: a challenging approach for optical technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Désilets, S.; Hô, N.; Mathieu, P.; Simard, J. R.; Puckrin, E.; Thériault, J. M.; Lavoie, H.; Théberge, F.; Babin, F.; Gay, D.; Forest, R.; Maheux, J.; Roy, G.; Châteauneuf, M.

    2011-06-01

    Standoff detection of explosives residues on surfaces at few meters was made using optical technologies based on Raman scattering, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and passive standoff FTIR radiometry. By comparison, detection and analysis of nanogram samples of different explosives was made with a microscope system where Raman scattering from a micron-size single point illuminated crystal of explosive was observed. Results from standoff detection experiments using a telescope were compared to experiments using a microscope to find out important parameters leading to the detection. While detection and spectral identification of the micron-size explosive particles was possible with a microscope, standoff detection of these particles was very challenging due to undesired light reflected and produced by the background surface or light coming from other contaminants. Results illustrated the challenging approach of detecting at a standoff distance the presence of low amount of micron or submicron explosive particles.

  17. Fingerprint fake detection by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, Sven; Breithaupt, Ralph; Koch, Edmund

    2013-03-01

    The most established technique for the identification at biometric access control systems is the human fingerprint. While every human fingerprint is unique, fingerprints can be faked very easily by using thin layer fakes. Because commercial fingerprint scanners use only a two-dimensional image acquisition of the finger surface, they can only hardly differentiate between real fingerprints and fingerprint fakes applied on thin layer materials. A Swept Source OCT system with an A-line rate of 20 kHz and a lateral and axial resolution of approximately 13 μm, a centre wavelength of 1320 nm and a band width of 120 nm (FWHM) was used to acquire fingerprints and finger tips with overlying fakes. Three-dimensional volume stacks with dimensions of 4.5 mm x 4 mm x 2 mm were acquired. The layering arrangement of the imaged finger tips and faked finger tips was analyzed and subsequently classified into real and faked fingerprints. Additionally, sweat gland ducts were detected and consulted for the classification. The manual classification between real fingerprints and faked fingerprints results in almost 100 % correctness. The outer as well as the internal fingerprint can be recognized in all real human fingers, whereby this was not possible in the image stacks of the faked fingerprints. Furthermore, in all image stacks of real human fingers the sweat gland ducts were detected. The number of sweat gland ducts differs between the test persons. The typical helix shape of the ducts was observed. In contrast, in images of faked fingerprints we observe abnormal layer arrangements and no sweat gland ducts connecting the papillae of the outer fingerprint and the internal fingerprint. We demonstrated that OCT is a very useful tool to enhance the performance of biometric control systems concerning attacks by thin layer fingerprint fakes.

  18. Integrated optics ring-resonator sensors for protein detection.

    PubMed

    Ksendzov, A; Lin, Y

    2005-12-15

    Using an integrated optics ring-resonator biosensor, we have demonstrated the detection of protein in low concentrations. We detected 0.3 nM of avidin in a buffered saline solution; the calculated detection limit is 0.1 nM (6.8 ng/ml) for avidin, which compares favorably with those of other optical protein detection techniques. Further improvement is possible. Our ring resonator utilizes Si(x)N(y)/SiO2 waveguides, which, owing to evanescent field interaction, change the effective refractive index when target molecules are immobilized on their surfaces. The selectivity of the sensor depends on the biotin surface coating, which causes the specific binding and immobilization of avidin.

  19. Detection of Abnormal Events via Optical Flow Feature Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tian; Snoussi, Hichem

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a novel algorithm is proposed to detect abnormal events in video streams. The algorithm is based on the histogram of the optical flow orientation descriptor and the classification method. The details of the histogram of the optical flow orientation descriptor are illustrated for describing movement information of the global video frame or foreground frame. By combining one-class support vector machine and kernel principal component analysis methods, the abnormal events in the current frame can be detected after a learning period characterizing normal behaviors. The difference abnormal detection results are analyzed and explained. The proposed detection method is tested on benchmark datasets, then the experimental results show the effectiveness of the algorithm. PMID:25811227

  20. New Optical Methods for Liveness Detection on Fingers

    PubMed Central

    Dolezel, Michal; Vana, Jan; Brezinova, Eva; Yim, Jaegeol; Shim, Kyubark

    2013-01-01

    This paper is devoted to new optical methods, which are supposed to be used for liveness detection on fingers. First we describe the basics about fake finger use in fingerprint recognition process and the possibilities of liveness detection. Then we continue with introducing three new liveness detection methods, which we developed and tested in the scope of our research activities—the first one is based on measurement of the pulse, the second one on variations of optical characteristics caused by pressure change, and the last one is based on reaction of skin to illumination with different wavelengths. The last part deals with the influence of skin diseases on fingerprint recognition, especially on liveness detection. PMID:24151584

  1. Integrated optics ring-resonator sensors for protein detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksendzov, A.; Lin, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Using an integrated optics ring-resonator biosensor, we have demonstrated the detection of protein in low concentrations. We detected 0.3 nM of avidin in a buffered saline solution; the calculated detection limit is 0.1 nM (6.8ng/ml) for avidin, which compares favorably with those of other optical protein detection techniques. Further improvement is possible. Our ring resonator utilizes SixNy/SiO2 waveguides, which, owing to evanescent field interaction, change the effective refractive index when target molecules are immobilized on their surfaces. The selectivity of the sensor depends on the biotin surface coating, which causes the specific binding and immobilization of avidin.

  2. Structure, optical properties and defects in nitride (III-V) nanoscale cage clusters.

    PubMed

    Shevlin, S A; Guo, Z X; van Dam, H J J; Sherwood, P; A Catlow, C R; Sokol, A A; Woodley, S M

    2008-04-14

    Density Functional Theory calculations are reported on cage structured BN, AlN, GaN and InN sub- and low nanosize stoichiometric clusters, including two octahedral families of T(d) and T(h) symmetry. The structures and energetics are determined, and we observe that BN clusters in particular show high stability with respect to the bulk phase. The cluster formation energy is demonstrated to include a constant term that we attribute to the curvature energy and the formation of six tetragonal defects. The (BN)(60) onion double-bubble structure was found to be particularly unstable. In contrast, similar or greater stability was found for double and single shell cages for the other nitrides. The optical absorption spectra have been first characterised by the one-electron Kohn-Sham orbital energies for all compounds, after which we concentrated on BN where we employed a recently developed Time Dependent Density Functional Theory approach. The one-electron band gaps do not show a strong and consistent size dependency, in disagreement with the predictions of quantum confinement theory. The density of excited bound states and absorption spectrum have been calculated for four smallest BN clusters within the first ionisation potential cut-off energy. The relative stability of different BN clusters has been further explored by studying principal point defects and their complexes including topological B-N bond rotational defects, vacancies, antisites and interstititials. The latter have the lowest energy of formation.

  3. Flexible-rate optical packet generation/detection and label swapping for optical label switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhongying; Li, Juhao; Tian, Yu; Ge, Dawei; Zhu, Paikun; Chen, Yuanxiang; Chen, Zhangyuan; He, Yongqi

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, optical label switching (OLS) gains lots of attentions due to its intrinsic advantages to implement protocol, bit-rate, granularity and data format transparency packet switching. In this paper, we propose a novel scheme to realize flexible-rate optical packet switching for OLS networks. At the transmitter node, flexible-rate packet is generated by parallel modulating different combinations of optical carriers generated from the optical multi-carrier generator (OMCG), among which the low-speed optical label occupies one carrier. At the switching node, label is extracted and re-generated in label processing unit (LPU). The payloads are switched based on routing information and new label is added after switching. At the receiver node, another OMCG serves as local oscillators (LOs) for optical payloads coherent detection. The proposed scheme offers good flexibility for dynamic optical packet switching by adjusting the payload bandwidth and could also effectively reduce the number of lasers, modulators and receivers for packet generation/detection. We present proof-of-concept demonstrations of flexible-rate packet generation/detection and label swapping in 12.5 GHz grid. The influence of crosstalk for cascaded label swapping is also investigated.

  4. Characterization of fiber optic Cerenkov radiation sensor for detecting neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, K. W.; Yagi, T.; Pyeon, C. H.; Shin, S. H.; Yoo, W. J.; Misawa, T.; Lee, B.

    2013-09-01

    Cerenkov radiation can be observed easily as a shimmer of blue light from the water in boiling- and pressurized-water reactors, or spent fuel storage pools. In this research, we fabricated the fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor using a Gdfoil, rutile crystal and optical fiber for detecting neutrons. Also, the reference sensor for measuring background gammarays was fabricated with the rutile crystal and optical fiber. The neutron fluxes could be obtained by measuring the signal difference between two sensors. To characterize the fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor, we measured neutron fluxes using a Cf-252 neutron source according to depths of polyethylene. As the results, the counts of fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor were higher than those of reference sensor due to additional interactions between Gd-foil and neutrons. Also, the counts of Cerenkov radiation decreased with increasing polyethylene thickness. It is anticipated that the novel and simple fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor using the Cerenkov effect can be widely used to detect the neutrons in hazardous nuclear facilities.

  5. Optical knife-edge technique for nanomechanical displacement detection

    SciTech Connect

    Karabacak, D.; Kouh, T.; Huang, C.C.; Ekinci, K.L.

    2006-05-08

    We describe an optical knife-edge technique for nanomechanical displacement detection. Here, one carefully focuses a laser spot on a moving edge and monitors the reflected power as the edge is displaced sideways. To demonstrate nanomechanical displacement detection using the knife-edge technique, we have measured in-plane resonances of nanometer scale doubly clamped beams. The obtained displacement sensitivity is in the {approx}1 pm/{radical}(Hz) range--in close agreement with a simple analytical model.

  6. West Ford Dipole Belt: Optical Detection at Palomar.

    PubMed

    Sandage, A; Kowal, C

    1963-08-30

    Optical detection of the West Ford orbiting dipole belt was accomplished on at least four occasions during the second week in May 1963. The maxi-mum surface brightness was about 4 percent of the night sky radiation at an effective wavelength of lambda = 4400 A The density of the belt has evidently decreased because it was not detected in a second observation period during the third week in June.

  7. Resurrecting the red from the dead: optical properties of BCGs in X-ray luminous clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bildfell, Chris; Hoekstra, Henk; Babul, Arif; Mahdavi, Andisheh

    2008-10-01

    We present measurements of surface brightness and colour profiles for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) in a sample of 48 X-ray luminous galaxy clusters. These data were obtained as part of the Canadian Cluster Comparison Project (CCCP). The Kormendy relation of our BCGs is steeper than that of the local ellipticals, suggesting differences in the assembly history of these types of systems. We also find that while most BCGs show monotonic colour gradients consistent with a decrease in metallicity with radius, 25 per cent of the BCGs show colour profiles that turn bluer towards the centre (blue cores). We interpret this bluing trend as evidence for recent star formation. The excess blue light leads to a typical offset from the red sequence of 0.5 to 1.0mag in (g' - r'), thus affecting optical cluster studies that may reject the BCG based on colour. All of the blue-core BCGs are located within ~10kpc of the peak in the cluster X-ray emission. Furthermore, virtually all of the BCGs with recent star formation are in clusters that lie above the Lx-Tx relation. Based on photometry alone, these findings suggest that central star formation is a ubiquitous feature of BCGs in dynamically relaxed cool-core clusters. This implies that while active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and other heating mechanisms are effective at tempering cooling, they do not full compensate for the energy lost via radiation. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France and the University of Hawaii. E-mail: bildfell@uvic.ca (CB); hoekstra@uvic.ca (HH); babul@uvic.ca (AB); amahdavi@uvic.ca (AM) ‡ Alfred P. Sloan fellow.

  8. Surface-bonded fiber optic Sagnac sensors for ultrasound detection.

    PubMed

    Jang, Tae Seong; Lee, Seung Seok; Kim, Young Gil

    2004-04-01

    This paper describes a fiber optic sensor suitable for remote sensing and multi-point detection of ultrasound. This ultrasound sensor is based on the surface-bonded fiber optic Sagnac interferometer with the output fringe visibility of 1; it consists of a laser source, an ordinary single mode fiber delay line, a fiber coupler, a phase modulator and polarization controllers. For the validation of the sensor, surface acoustic waves and Lamb waves are excited by illuminating a steel specimen with an array of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser-generated line sources and the measurement of laser-generated ultrasonic waves are performed on the specimen surface using the surface-mounting fiber optic Sagnac sensor. The surface-bonded fiber optic sensor developed in this study has a simple configuration for detection of ultrasonic waves. Effectiveness of surface-bonded fiber optic Sagnac sensors for remote sensing of ultrasound and in situ monitoring of structures is investigated. The capability of multi-point detection of ultrasound by this Sagnac sensor is also discussed.

  9. A flexible spatial scan statistic with a restricted likelihood ratio for detecting disease clusters.

    PubMed

    Tango, Toshiro; Takahashi, Kunihiko

    2012-12-30

    Spatial scan statistics are widely used tools for detection of disease clusters. Especially, the circular spatial scan statistic proposed by Kulldorff (1997) has been utilized in a wide variety of epidemiological studies and disease surveillance. However, as it cannot detect noncircular, irregularly shaped clusters, many authors have proposed different spatial scan statistics, including the elliptic version of Kulldorff's scan statistic. The flexible spatial scan statistic proposed by Tango and Takahashi (2005) has also been used for detecting irregularly shaped clusters. However, this method sets a feasible limitation of a maximum of 30 nearest neighbors for searching candidate clusters because of heavy computational load. In this paper, we show a flexible spatial scan statistic implemented with a restricted likelihood ratio proposed by Tango (2008) to (1) eliminate the limitation of 30 nearest neighbors and (2) to have surprisingly much less computational time than the original flexible spatial scan statistic. As a side effect, it is shown to be able to detect clusters with any shape reasonably well as the relative risk of the cluster becomes large via Monte Carlo simulation. We illustrate the proposed spatial scan statistic with data on mortality from cerebrovascular disease in the Tokyo Metropolitan area, Japan.

  10. Detection of second-generation asymptotic giant branch stars in metal-poor globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. A.

    2017-03-01

    Multiple stellar populations are actually known to be present in Galactic globular clusters (GCs). The first generation (FG) displays a halo-like chemical pattern, while the second generation (SG) one is enriched in Al and Na (depleted in Mg and O).Both generations of stars are found at different evolutionary stages like the main-sequence turnoff, the subgiant branch, and the red giant branch (RGB), but the SG seems to be absent - especially in metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -1) GCs - in more evolved evolutionary stages such as the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. This suggests that not all SG stars experience the AGB phase and that AGB-manqué stars may be quite common in metal-poor GCs, which represents a fundamental problem for the theories of GC formation and evolution and stellar evolution. Very recently, we have combined the H-band Al abundances obtained by the APOGEE survey with ground-based optical photometry, reporting the first detection of SG Al-rich AGB stars in several metal-poor GCs with different observational properties such as horizontal branch (HB) morphology, metallicity, and age. The APOGEE observations thus resolve the apparent problem for stellar evolution, supporting the existing horizontal branch star canonical models, and may help to discern the nature of the GC polluters.

  11. Indirect photometric detection of boron cluster anions electrophoretically separated in methanol.

    PubMed

    Vítová, Lada; Fojt, Lukáš; Vespalec, Radim

    2014-04-18

    3,5-Dinitrobenzoate and picrate are light absorbing anions pertinent to indirect photometric detection of boron cluster anions in buffered methanolic background electrolytes (BGEs). Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and morpholine have been used as buffering bases, which eliminated baseline steps, and minimized the baseline noise. In methanolic BGEs, mobilities of boron cluster anions depend on both ionic constituents of the BGE buffer. This dependence can be explained by ion pair interaction of detected anions with BGE cations, which are not bonded into ion pairs with the BGE anions. The former ion pair interaction decreases sensitivity of the indirect photometric detection.

  12. Photoacoustic microtomography using optical interferometric detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuster, Robert; Holotta, Markus; Kremser, Christian; Grossauer, Harald; Burgholzer, Peter; Paltauf, Günther

    2010-03-01

    A device for three-dimensional (3-D) photoacoustic tomography with resolution in the range of tens of micrometers is presented that uses a light beam for interferometric detection of acoustic waves. Reconstruction of the 3-D initial pressure distribution from the signals representing line integrals of the acoustic field is a two-step process. It uses an inversion of 2-D wave propagation to obtain line projections of the initial pressure distribution and the inverse Radon transform. The light beam, propagating freely in a water bath, is scanned either in an arc- or box-shaped curve around the object. Simulations are performed to compare the two scanning procedures. The projection images are obtained either using the filtered back projection algorithm for the π-arc scanning mode or the frequency domain algorithm for the box scanning mode. While the former algorithm provides slightly better image quality, the latter is about 20 times faster. The ability of the photoacoustic tomography device to create 3-D images with constant resolution throughout the reconstruction volume is demonstrated experimentally using a human hair phantom. These measurements revealed a 3-D resolution below 100 μm. In a second experiment, 3-D imaging of an isolated mouse heart is demonstrated to show the applicability for preclinical and biological research.

  13. Integrated optical biosensor for rapid detection of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathesz, Anna; Valkai, Sándor; Újvárosy, Attila; Aekbote, Badri; Sipos, Orsolya; Stercz, Balázs; Kocsis, Béla; Szabó, Dóra; Dér, András

    2016-02-01

    In medical diagnostics, rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria from body fluids is one of the basic issues. Most state-of-the-art methods require optical labeling, increasing the complexity, duration and cost of the analysis. Therefore, there is a strong need for developing selective sensory devices based on label-free techniques, in order to increase the speed, and reduce the cost of detection. In a recent paper, we have shown that an integrated optical Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a highly sensitive all-optical device made of a cheap photopolymer, can be used as a powerful lab-on-a-chip tool for specific, labelfree detection of proteins. By proper modifications of this technique, our interferometric biosensor was combined with a microfluidic system allowing the rapid and specific detection of bacteria from solutions, having the surface of the sensor functionalized by bacterium-specific antibodies. The experiments proved that the biosensor was able to detect Escherichia coli bacteria at concentrations of 106 cfu/ml within a few minutes, that makes our device an appropriate tool for fast, label-free detection of bacteria from body fluids such as urine or sputum. On the other hand, possible applications of the device may not be restricted to medical microbiology, since bacterial identification is an important task in microbial forensics, criminal investigations, bio-terrorism threats and in environmental studies, as well.

  14. Integrated optical biosensor for rapid detection of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathesz, Anna; Valkai, Sándor; Újvárosy, Attila; Aekbote, Badri; Sipos, Orsolya; Stercz, Balázs; Kocsis, Béla; Szabó, Dóra; Dér, András

    2015-12-01

    In medical diagnostics, rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria from body fluids is one of the basic issues. Most state-of-the-art methods require optical labeling, increasing the complexity, duration and cost of the analysis. Therefore, there is a strong need for developing selective sensory devices based on label-free techniques, in order to increase the speed, and reduce the cost of detection. In a recent paper, we have shown that an integrated optical Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a highly sensitive all-optical device made of a cheap photopolymer, can be used as a powerful lab-on-a-chip tool for specific, labelfree detection of proteins. By proper modifications of this technique, our interferometric biosensor was combined with a microfluidic system allowing the rapid and specific detection of bacteria from solutions, having the surface of the sensor functionalized by bacterium-specific antibodies. The experiments proved that the biosensor was able to detect Escherichia coli bacteria at concentrations of 106 cfu/ml within a few minutes, that makes our device an appropriate tool for fast, label-free detection of bacteria from body fluids such as urine or sputum. On the other hand, possible applications of the device may not be restricted to medical microbiology, since bacterial identification is an important task in microbial forensics, criminal investigations, bio-terrorism threats and in environmental studies, as well.

  15. Community detection in complex networks using density-based clustering algorithm and manifold learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Tao; Cheng, Hui-Min; Ning, Yi-Zi; Shia, Ben-Chang; Zhang, Zhong-Yuan

    2016-12-01

    Like clustering analysis, community detection aims at assigning nodes in a network into different communities. Fdp is a recently proposed density-based clustering algorithm which does not need the number of clusters as prior input and the result is insensitive to its parameter. However, Fdp cannot be directly applied to community detection due to its inability to recognize the community centers in the network. To solve the problem, a new community detection method (named IsoFdp) is proposed in this paper. First, we use IsoMap technique to map the network data into a low dimensional manifold which can reveal diverse pair-wised similarity. Then Fdp is applied to detect the communities in the network. An improved partition density function is proposed to select the proper number of communities automatically. We test our method on both synthetic and real-world networks, and the results demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm over the state-of-the-art methods.

  16. Optical Cluster-Finding with an Adaptive Matched-Filter Technique: Algorithm and Comparison with Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Feng; Pierpaoli, Elena; Gunn, James E.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2007-10-29

    We present a modified adaptive matched filter algorithm designed to identify clusters of galaxies in wide-field imaging surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The cluster-finding technique is fully adaptive to imaging surveys with spectroscopic coverage, multicolor photometric redshifts, no redshift information at all, and any combination of these within one survey. It works with high efficiency in multi-band imaging surveys where photometric redshifts can be estimated with well-understood error distributions. Tests of the algorithm on realistic mock SDSS catalogs suggest that the detected sample is {approx} 85% complete and over 90% pure for clusters with masses above 1.0 x 10{sup 14}h{sup -1} M and redshifts up to z = 0.45. The errors of estimated cluster redshifts from maximum likelihood method are shown to be small (typically less that 0.01) over the whole redshift range with photometric redshift errors typical of those found in the Sloan survey. Inside the spherical radius corresponding to a galaxy overdensity of {Delta} = 200, we find the derived cluster richness {Lambda}{sub 200} a roughly linear indicator of its virial mass M{sub 200}, which well recovers the relation between total luminosity and cluster mass of the input simulation.

  17. Gravitational wave detection with optical lattice atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkowitz, S.; Pikovski, I.; Langellier, N.; Lukin, M. D.; Walsworth, R. L.; Ye, J.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a space-based gravitational wave (GW) detector consisting of two spatially separated, drag-free satellites sharing ultrastable optical laser light over a single baseline. Each satellite contains an optical lattice atomic clock, which serves as a sensitive, narrowband detector of the local frequency of the shared laser light. A synchronized two-clock comparison between the satellites will be sensitive to the effective Doppler shifts induced by incident GWs at a level competitive with other proposed space-based GW detectors, while providing complementary features. The detected signal is a differential frequency shift of the shared laser light due to the relative velocity of the satellites, and the detection window can be tuned through the control sequence applied to the atoms' internal states. This scheme enables the detection of GWs from continuous, spectrally narrow sources, such as compact binary inspirals, with frequencies ranging from ˜3 mHz - 10 Hz without loss of sensitivity, thereby bridging the detection gap between space-based and terrestrial optical interferometric GW detectors. Our proposed GW detector employs just two satellites, is compatible with integration with an optical interferometric detector, and requires only realistic improvements to existing ground-based clock and laser technologies.

  18. Prospects of Optical Single Atom Detection for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jaideep

    2015-10-01

    We will discuss the prospects of optically detecting single atoms captured in a cryogenic thin film of a noble gas such as neon. This proposed detection scheme, when coupled with a recoil separator, could be used to measure rare nuclear reactions relevant for nuclear astrophysics. In particular, we will focus on the 22Ne(α, n)25Mg reaction, which is an important source of neutrons for the s-process. Noble gas solids are an attractive medium because they are optically transparent and provide efficient, pure, stable, & chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of atomic and molecular species. Atoms embedded inside of noble gas solids have a fluorescence spectrum that is often significantly shifted from its absorption spectrum. This makes possible the detection of individual fluorescence photons against a background of intense excitation light, which can be suppressed using the appropriate optical filters. We will report on our efforts to optically detect single Yb atoms in solid Ne. Yb is an ideal candidate for initial studies because it emits a strong green fluorescence when excited by blue light and it has an atomic structure that very closely resembles that of Mg. This work is supported by funds from Michigan State University.

  19. Channel simulation for direct-detection optical communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tycz, M.; Fitzmaurice, M. W.

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described for simulating the random modulation imposed by atmospheric scintillation and transmitter pointing jitter on a direct-detection optical communication system. The system is capable of providing signal fading statistics which obey log-normal, beta, Rayleigh, Ricean, or chi-square density functions. Experimental tests of the performance of the channel simulator are presented.

  20. Channel simulation for direct detection optical communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tycz, M.; Fitzmaurice, M. W.

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described for simulating the random modulation imposed by atmospheric scintillation and transmitter pointing jitter on a direct detection optical communication system. The system is capable of providing signal fading statistics which obey log normal, beta, Rayleigh, Ricean or chi-squared density functions. Experimental tests of the performance of the Channel Simulator are presented.

  1. Novel optical sensors for detection of toxins, viruses and bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmerson, Gregory D.; Sparrow, Ian J. G.; Bhatta, Devaki; SohnaSohna, Jean E.

    2008-10-01

    A novel optical sensor system for rapid, sensitive and robust biological detection is presented. Sensor elements based on integrated optical circuits confine all optical signals into a planar format, resulting in a small, low-cost and mechanically stable refractive index sensor, without any external bulk optics. Consequently, the sensor elements are able to operate in real-world environments, resilient to vibration and temperature changes, whilst maintaining refractive index resolution of 10-6. Oxide surfaces on the sensor are ideal for protein attachment and have a long lifetime in buffer solutions (>100hrs). Real-time, label-free detection of biological agents has been demonstrated using antibodies attached to the sensor surface. The sensor design results in a large penetration depth of the sensing light, up to 1μm into the sample liquid, conferring the ability to detect various classes of biological targets, spanning toxins, viruses and bacteria. Each sensing element utilizes parallel multiple wavelength data to provide additional information at the point of measurement, resulting in on-chip temperature and strain referencing, focused towards increased accuracy and reduction of false alarms. The large size range of biological detection, coupled with the long lifetime of the sensors makes the system ideally suited to applications ranging from medical diagnostics to confirmatory detectors for homeland security

  2. Time-resolved pulsed EPR: microwave and optical detection

    SciTech Connect

    Trifunac, A.D.; Smith, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    Time-resolved pulsed EPR spectrometers are described. EPR spectra, kinetic profiles, and relaxation studies are used to illustrate some capabilities of the pulsed EPR experiment. Optical detection of time-resolved EPR spectra of radical ion pairs is used to study radical-ion recombination kinetics, recombination pathways, and the structure of radical anions and cations. 17 figures.

  3. Fiber-optic polarization diversity detection for rotary probe optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anthony M D; Pahlevaninezhad, Hamid; Yang, Victor X D; Lam, Stephen; MacAulay, Calum; Lane, Pierre

    2014-06-15

    We report a polarization diversity detection scheme for optical coherence tomography with a new, custom, miniaturized fiber coupler with single mode (SM) fiber inputs and polarization maintaining (PM) fiber outputs. The SM fiber inputs obviate matching the optical lengths of the X and Y OCT polarization channels prior to interference and the PM fiber outputs ensure defined X and Y axes after interference. Advantages for this scheme include easier alignment, lower cost, and easier miniaturization compared to designs with free-space bulk optical components. We demonstrate the utility of the detection system to mitigate the effects of rapidly changing polarization states when imaging with rotating fiber optic probes in Intralipid suspension and during in vivo imaging of human airways.

  4. A Novel Automatic Detection System for ECG Arrhythmias Using Maximum Margin Clustering with Immune Evolutionary Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bohui; Ding, Yongsheng; Hao, Kuangrong

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel maximum margin clustering method with immune evolution (IEMMC) for automatic diagnosis of electrocardiogram (ECG) arrhythmias. This diagnostic system consists of signal processing, feature extraction, and the IEMMC algorithm for clustering of ECG arrhythmias. First, raw ECG signal is processed by an adaptive ECG filter based on wavelet transforms, and waveform of the ECG signal is detected; then, features are extracted from ECG signal to cluster different types of arrhythmias by the IEMMC algorithm. Three types of performance evaluation indicators are used to assess the effect of the IEMMC method for ECG arrhythmias, such as sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Compared with K-means and iterSVR algorithms, the IEMMC algorithm reflects better performance not only in clustering result but also in terms of global search ability and convergence ability, which proves its effectiveness for the detection of ECG arrhythmias. PMID:23690875

  5. Optical Detection of Organic Chemical Biosignatures at Hydrothermal Vents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, P. G.; Lane, A. L.; Bhartia, R.; Hug, W. H.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a non-contact, optical life detection instrument that can detect organic chemical biosignatures in a number of different environments, including dry land, shallow aqueous, deep marine or in ice. Hence, the instrument is appropriate as a biosignature survey tool both for Mars exploration or in situ experiments in an ice-covered ocean such as one might wish to explore on Europa. Here, we report the results we obtained on an expedition aboard the Russian oceanographic vessel Akademik Mstislav Keldysh to hydrothermal vent sites in the Pacific Ocean using our life detection instrument MCDUVE, a multichannel, deep ultraviolet excitation fluorescence detector. MCDUVE detected organic material distribution on rocks near the vent, as well as direct detection of organisms, both microbial and microscopic. We also were able to detect organic material issuing directly from vent chimneys, measure the organic signature of the water column as we ascended, and passively observe the emission of light directly from some vents.

  6. Multivariate optical element platform for compressed detection of fluorescence markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priore, Ryan J.; Swanstrom, Joseph A.

    2014-05-01

    The success of a commercial fluorescent diagnostic assay is dependent on the selection of a fluorescent biomarker; due to the broad nature of fluorescence biomarker emission profiles, only a small number of fluorescence biomarkers may be discriminated from each other as a function of excitation source. Multivariate Optical Elements (MOEs) are thin-film devices that encode a broad band, spectroscopic pattern allowing a simple broadband detector to generate a highly sensitive and specific detection for a target analyte. MOEs have historically been matched 1:1 to a discrete analyte or class prediction; however, MOE filter sets are capable of sensing projections of the original sparse spectroscopic space enabling a small set of MOEs to discriminate a multitude of target analytes. This optical regression can offer real-time measurements with relatively high signal-to-noise ratios that realize the advantages of multiplexed detection and pattern recognition in a simple optical instrument. The specificity advantage of MOE-based sensors allows fluorescent biomarkers that were once incapable of discrimination from one another via optical band pass filters to be employed in a common assay panel. A simplified MOE-based sensor may ultimately reduce the requirement for highly trained operators as well as move certain life science applications like disease prognostication from the laboratory to the point of care. This presentation will summarize the design and fabrication of compressed detection MOE filter sets for detecting multiple fluorescent biomarkers simultaneously with strong spectroscopic interference as well as comparing the detection performance of the MOE sensor with traditional optical band pass filter methodologies.

  7. OPTICAL AND INFRARED PHOTOMETRY OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS IN NGC 1399: EVIDENCE FOR COLOR-METALLICITY NONLINEARITY

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeslee, John P.; Ferrarese, Laura; Martel, Andre R.; Cho, Hyejeon; Peng, Eric W.; Jordan, Andres

    2012-02-10

    We combine new Wide Field Camera 3 IR Channel (WFC3/IR) F160W (H{sub 160}) imaging data for NGC 1399, the central galaxy in the Fornax cluster, with archival F475W (g{sub 475}), F606W (V{sub 606}), F814W (I{sub 814}), and F850LP (z{sub 850}) optical data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The purely optical g{sub 475} - I{sub 814}, V{sub 606} - I{sub 814}, and g{sub 475} - z{sub 850} colors of NGC 1399's rich globular cluster (GC) system exhibit clear bimodality, at least for magnitudes I{sub 814} > 21.5. The optical-IR I{sub 814} - H{sub 160} color distribution appears unimodal, and this impression is confirmed by mixture modeling analysis. The V{sub 606} - H{sub 160} colors show marginal evidence for bimodality, consistent with bimodality in V{sub 606} - I{sub 814} and unimodality in I{sub 814} - H{sub 160}. If bimodality is imposed for I{sub 814} - H{sub 160} with a double Gaussian model, the preferred blue/red split differs from that for optical colors; these 'differing bimodalities' mean that the optical and optical-IR colors cannot both be linearly proportional to metallicity. Consistent with the differing color distributions, the dependence of I{sub 814} - H{sub 160} on g{sub 475} - I{sub 814} for the matched GC sample is significantly nonlinear, with an inflection point near the trough in the g{sub 475} - I{sub 814} color distribution; the result is similar for the I{sub 814} - H{sub 160} dependence on g{sub 475} - z{sub 850} colors taken from the ACS Fornax Cluster Survey. These g{sub 475} - z{sub 850} colors have been calibrated empirically against metallicity; applying this calibration yields a continuous, skewed, but single-peaked metallicity distribution. Taken together, these results indicate that nonlinear color-metallicity relations play an important role in shaping the observed bimodal distributions of optical colors in extragalactic GC systems.

  8. A YOUNG STELLAR CLUSTER WITHIN THE RCW41 H II REGION: DEEP NIR PHOTOMETRY AND OPTICAL/NIR POLARIMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Fabio P.; Franco, Gabriel A. P.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre E-mail: franco@fisica.ufmg.br

    2012-06-01

    The RCW41 star-forming region is embedded within the Vela Molecular Ridge, hosting a massive stellar cluster surrounded by a conspicuous H II region. Understanding the role of interstellar magnetic fields and studying the newborn stellar population is crucial to building a consistent picture of the physical processes acting on this kind of environment. We carried out a detailed study of the interstellar polarization toward RCW41 with data from an optical and near-infrared polarimetric survey. Additionally, deep near-infrared images from the 3.5 meter New Technology Telescope were used to study the photometric properties of the embedded young stellar cluster, revealing several YSO candidates. By using a set of pre-main-sequence isochrones, a mean cluster age in the range 2.5-5.0 million years was determined, and evidence of sequential star formation was revealed. An abrupt decrease in R-band polarization degree was noticed toward the central ionized area, probably due to low grain alignment efficiency caused by the turbulent environment and/or the weak intensity of magnetic fields. The distortion of magnetic field lines exhibits dual behavior, with the mean orientation outside the area approximately following the borders of the star-forming region and directed radially toward the cluster inside the ionized area, in agreement with simulations of expanding H II regions. The spectral dependence of polarization allowed a meaningful determination of the total-to-selective extinction ratio by fittings of the Serkowski relation. Furthermore, a large rotation of polarization angle as a function of wavelength was detected toward several embedded stars.

  9. Detection of Galaxy Cluster Motions with the Kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hand, Nick; Addison, Graeme E.; Aubourg, Eric; Battaglia, Nick; Battistelli, Elia S.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bond, J. Richard; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, Jon; Brown, Benjamin R.; Das, Sudeep; Dawson, Kyle S.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Dunner, Rolando; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Flowler, Joseph W.; Gralla, Megan B.; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek, Renee; Hughes, John P.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    Using high-resolution microwave sky maps made by the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, we for the first time detect motions of galaxy clusters and groups via microwave background .temperature distortions due to the kinematic Sunyaev.Zel'dovich effect. Galaxy clusters are identified by their constituent luminous galaxies observed by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. The mean pairwise momentum of clusters is measured. at a statistical. significance of 3.8 sigma, and the signal is consistent with the growth of cosmic structure in the standard model of cosmology

  10. Fiber-Optic Based Compact Gas Leak Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroot, Wim A.

    1995-01-01

    A propellant leak detection system based on Raman scattering principles is introduced. The proposed system is flexible and versatile as the result of the use of optical fibers. It is shown that multiple species can be monitored simultaneously. In this paper oxygen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen are detected and monitored. The current detection sensitivity for both hydrogen and carbon monoxide is 1% partial pressure at ambient conditions. The sensitivity for oxygen and nitrogen is 0.5% partial pressure. The response time to changes in species concentration is three minutes. This system can be used to monitor multiple species at several locations.

  11. Balanced detection in Brillouin optical time domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez-Lopez, Alejandro; Lopez-Gil, Alexia; Martin-Lopez, Sonia; Gonzalez-Herraez, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    We propose the use of balanced detection in Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis (BOTDA) sensors. Balanced detection can be effectively accomplished among the Stokes and anti-Stokes bands in the probe signal. This type of detection leads to a doubling of the trace amplitude and at least a √2 increase in signal to noise ratio over the conventional configuration. Moreover, it leads to a complete cancellation of the common-mode noise in the probe signal, including relative intensity noise in Raman-assisted configurations. We show all these benefits both theoretically and experimentally.

  12. Noncontact detection of ultrasonic waves using fiber optic Sagnac interferometer.

    PubMed

    Jang, Tae Seong; Lee, Seung Seok; Kwon, Il Bum; Lee, Wang Joo; Lee, Jung Ju

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes a fiber optic sensor suitable for noncontact detection of ultrasonic waves. This sensor is based on the fiber optic Sagnac interferometer, which has a path-matched configuration and does not require active stabilization. Quadrature phase bias between two interfering laser beams in the Sagnac loop is applied by controlling the birefringence using a fiber polarization controller. A stable quadrature phase bias can be confirmed by observing the interferometer output according to the change of phase bias. Additional signal processing is not needed for the detection of ultrasonic waves using the Sagnac interferometer. Ultrasonic oscillations produced by conventional ultrasonic piezoelectric transducers were successfully detected, and the performance of this interferometer was investigated by a power spectrum analysis of the output signal. Based on the validation of the fiber optic Sagnac interferometer, noncontact detection of laser-generated surface waves was performed. The configured Sagnac interferometer is very effective for the detection of small displacement with high frequency, such as ultrasonic waves used in conventional nondestructive testing (NDT).

  13. Endogenous light scattering as an optical signature of circulating tumor cell clusters

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Joe; Polmear, Michael; Mineva, Nora D.; Romagnoli, Mathilde; Sonenshein, Gail E.; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cell clusters (CTCCs) are significantly more likely to form metastases than single tumor cells. We demonstrate the potential of backscatter-based flow cytometry (BSFC) to detect unique light scattering signatures of CTCCs in the blood of mice orthotopically implanted with breast cancer cells and treated with an anti-ADAM8 or a control antibody. Based on scattering detected at 405, 488, and 633 nm from blood samples flowing through microfluidic devices, we identified 14 CTCCs with large scattering peak widths and intensities, whose presence correlated strongly with metastasis. These initial studies demonstrate the potential to detect CTCCs via label-free BSFC. PMID:27231606

  14. Endogenous light scattering as an optical signature of circulating tumor cell clusters.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Joe; Polmear, Michael; Mineva, Nora D; Romagnoli, Mathilde; Sonenshein, Gail E; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2016-03-01

    Circulating tumor cell clusters (CTCCs) are significantly more likely to form metastases than single tumor cells. We demonstrate the potential of backscatter-based flow cytometry (BSFC) to detect unique light scattering signatures of CTCCs in the blood of mice orthotopically implanted with breast cancer cells and treated with an anti-ADAM8 or a control antibody. Based on scattering detected at 405, 488, and 633 nm from blood samples flowing through microfluidic devices, we identified 14 CTCCs with large scattering peak widths and intensities, whose presence correlated strongly with metastasis. These initial studies demonstrate the potential to detect CTCCs via label-free BSFC.

  15. Optical symbolic substitution: edge detection using Prewitt, Sobel, and Roberts operators.

    PubMed

    Cherri, A K; Karim, M A

    1989-11-01

    Edge detection schemes based on Prewitt, Sobel, and Roberts operators are realized using optical symbolic substitution. The corresponding optical systems are compared in terms of hardware and performance.

  16. Chemiluminescent optical fiber immunosensor for detecting cholera antitoxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Robert S.; Bassis, Effim; Bychenko, Alexei; Levine, Myron M.

    1997-12-01

    A chemiluminescent-based optical fiber immunosensor is developed to detect the presence of jejunal cholera antitoxin IgA immunoglobulins. This was accomplished using optical fiber tips, conjugated with the cholera toxin B subunit. The cholera antitoxin analyte is marked by a secondary antibody labeled with horseradish peroxidase. A photoelectronic setup is designed specifically to monitor the signal. This immunosensor system is shown to be specific, sensitive, and fast to run, without requiring a purification step. The lowest titer detected was 1:1,310,720. When the luminol-containing buffer solution was replaced by air, thus dramatically lowering the index of refraction of the surrounding medium, sensitivity increased and cholera antitoxin was detected at an additional titer dilution at 1:2,621,440.

  17. MEMS-based extreme adaptive optics for planet detection

    SciTech Connect

    Macintosh, B A; Graham, J R; Oppenheimer, B; Poyneer, L; Sivaramakrishnan, A; Veran, J

    2005-11-18

    The next major step in the study of extrasolar planets will be the direct detection, resolved from their parent star, of a significant sample of Jupiter-like extrasolar giant planets. Such detection will open up new parts of the extrasolar planet distribution and allow spectroscopic characterization of the planets themselves. Detecting Jovian planets at 5-50 AU scale orbiting nearby stars requires adaptive optics systems and coronagraphs an order of magnitude more powerful than those available today--the realm of ''Extreme'' adaptive optics. We present the basic requirements and design for such a system, the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI.) GPI will require a MEMS-based deformable mirror with good surface quality, 2-4 micron stroke (operated in tandem with a conventional low-order ''woofer'' mirror), and a fully-functional 48-actuator-diameter aperture.

  18. Detecting edges in the X-ray surface brightness of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, J. S.; Fabian, A. C.; Russell, H. R.; Walker, S. A.; Blundell, K. M.

    2016-08-01

    The effects of many physical processes in the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters imprint themselves in X-ray surface brightness images. It is therefore important to choose optimal methods for extracting information from and enhancing the interpretability of such images. We describe in detail a gradient filtering edge detection method that we previously applied to images of the Centaurus cluster of galaxies. The Gaussian gradient filter measures the gradient in the surface brightness distribution on particular spatial scales. We apply this filter on different scales to Chandra X-ray observatory images of two clusters with active galactic nucleus feedback, the Perseus cluster and M 87, and a merging system, A 3667. By combining filtered images on different scales using radial filters spectacular images of the edges in a cluster are produced. We describe how to assess the significance of features in filtered images. We find the gradient filtering technique to have significant advantages for detecting many kinds of features compared to other analysis techniques, such as unsharp masking. Filtering cluster images in this way in a hard energy band allows shocks to be detected.

  19. Detecting modules in biological networks by edge weight clustering and entropy significance

    PubMed Central

    Lecca, Paola; Re, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Detection of the modular structure of biological networks is of interest to researchers adopting a systems perspective for the analysis of omics data. Computational systems biology has provided a rich array of methods for network clustering. To date, the majority of approaches address this task through a network node classification based on topological or external quantifiable properties of network nodes. Conversely, numerical properties of network edges are underused, even though the information content which can be associated with network edges has augmented due to steady advances in molecular biology technology over the last decade. Properly accounting for network edges in the development of clustering approaches can become crucial to improve quantitative interpretation of omics data, finally resulting in more biologically plausible models. In this study, we present a novel technique for network module detection, named WG-Cluster (Weighted Graph CLUSTERing). WG-Cluster's notable features, compared to current approaches, lie in: (1) the simultaneous exploitation of network node and edge weights to improve the biological interpretability of the connected components detected, (2) the assessment of their statistical significance, and (3) the identification of emerging topological properties in the detected connected components. WG-Cluster utilizes three major steps: (i) an unsupervised version of k-means edge-based algorithm detects sub-graphs with similar edge weights, (ii) a fast-greedy algorithm detects connected components which are then scored and selected according to the statistical significance of their scores, and (iii) an analysis of the convolution between sub-graph mean edge weight and connected component score provides a summarizing view of the connected components. WG-Cluster can be applied to directed and undirected networks of different types of interacting entities and scales up to large omics data sets. Here, we show that WG-Cluster can be

  20. A novel fibre-optic system for methane detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xijun; Wang, Yutian; Chen, Leilei; Huang, Xinyan

    2007-11-01

    A novel fibre-optic methane detection system was proposed, which involved sampled fibre grating and improved differential absorption detection technique. By this method, near-infrared equal-spaced multi absorption line of methane was detected simultaneously, and that gas weak absorption detection theory was developed. Using the comb shaped filter characteristic of sampled fibre grating, R2, R3 and R4 line of molecule absorption spectrum in 2ν 3 overtone band around 1.66μm was measured at one time. Two sampled fibre gratings of same type were used to fulfill the task of difference absorption detection. One sampled grating worked as measure grating with its reflection spectrum corresponding to the absorption line. The other grating worked as reference grating with its reflection spectrum deviate from that of measure grating to some extent. Chirped fibre grating with its central wavelength around R3 was adopted as optical band-pass filter. The light power of the three absorption line and the three reference wavelength was detected alternately by PIN PD at the same time. So that difference absorption detection was achieved. The effect of light source instability was avoided by ratio treatment. The validity of the system was verified by experiments.

  1. BRIGHTEST X-RAY CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES IN THE CFHTLS WIDE FIELDS: CATALOG AND OPTICAL MASS ESTIMATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Mirkazemi, M.; Finoguenov, A.; Lerchster, M.; Erfanianfar, G.; Seitz, S.; Pereira, M. J.; Egami, E.; Tanaka, M.; Brimioulle, F.; Kettula, K.; McCracken, H. J.; Mellier, Y.; Kneib, J. P.; Rykoff, E.; Erben, T.; Taylor, J. E.

    2015-01-20

    The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) presents a unique data set for weak-lensing studies, having high-quality imaging and deep multiband photometry. We have initiated an XMM-CFHTLS project to provide X-ray observations of the brightest X-ray-selected clusters within the wide CFHTLS area. Performance of these observations and the high quality of CFHTLS data allow us to revisit the identification of X-ray sources, introducing automated reproducible algorithms, based on the multicolor red sequence finder. We have also introduced a new optical mass proxy. We provide the calibration of the red sequence observed in the Canada-France-Hawaii filters and compare the results with the traditional single-color red sequence and photo-z. We test the identification algorithm on the subset of highly significant XMM clusters and identify 100% of the sample. We find that the integrated z-band luminosity of the red sequence galaxies correlates well with the X-ray luminosity, with a surprisingly small scatter of 0.20 dex. We further use the multicolor red sequence to reduce spurious detections in the full XMM and ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) data sets, resulting in catalogs of 196 and 32 clusters, respectively. We made spectroscopic follow-up observations of some of these systems with HECTOSPEC and in combination with BOSS DR9 data. We also describe the modifications needed to the source detection algorithm in order to maintain high purity of extended sources in the shallow X-ray data. We also present the scaling relation between X-ray luminosity and velocity dispersion.

  2. Ultrafast Radiation Detection by Modulation of an Optical Probe Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, S P; Lowry, M E

    2006-02-22

    We describe a new class of radiation sensor that utilizes optical interferometry to measure radiation-induced changes in the optical refractive index of a semiconductor sensor medium. Radiation absorption in the sensor material produces a transient, non-equilibrium, electron-hole pair distribution that locally modifies the complex, optical refractive index of the sensor medium. Changes in the real (imaginary) part of the local refractive index produce a differential phase shift (absorption) of an optical probe used to interrogate the sensor material. In contrast to conventional radiation detectors where signal levels are proportional to the incident energy, signal levels in these optical sensors are proportional to the incident radiation energy flux. This allows for reduction of the sensor form factor with no degradation in detection sensitivity. Furthermore, since the radiation induced, non-equilibrium electron-hole pair distribution is effectively measured ''in place'' there is no requirement to spatially separate and collect the generated charges; consequently, the sensor risetime is of the order of the hot-electron thermalization time {le} 10 fs and the duration of the index perturbation is determined by the carrier recombination time which is of order {approx} 600 fs in, direct-bandgap semiconductors, with a high density of recombination defects; consequently, the optical sensors can be engineered with sub-ps temporal response. A series of detectors were designed, and incorporated into Mach Zehnder and Fabry-Perot interferometer-based detection systems: proof of concept, lower detection sensitivity, Mach-Zehnder detectors were characterized at beamline 6.3 at SSRL; three generations of high sensitivity single element and imaging Fabry-Perot detectors were measured at the LLNL Europa facility. Our results indicate that this technology can be used to provide x-ray detectors and x-ray imaging systems with single x-ray sensitivity and S/N {approx} 30 at x

  3. Progress Towards Optical Single Atom Detection for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jaideep; Wenzl, Jennifer; Frisbie, Dustin; Parzuchowski, Kristen; Johnson, Maegan

    2016-09-01

    We are developing the technique of optically detecting individual atoms embedded in thin films of cryogenically frozen solids. Noble gas solids such as frozen neon are an attractive medium because they are optically transparent and provide efficient, pure, stable, & chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of atomic and molecular species. We propose to couple this new detection technique to a recoil separator with the goal of measuring rare nuclear reactions relevant for nuclear astrophysics. Because of the additional selectivity provided by the atomic transitions of the captured atom, this detection scheme would help loosen the often demanding beam rejection requirements imposed on recoil separators. Our initial focus is the 22Ne(α, n)25Mg reaction, which is an important source of neutrons for the s-process. We will describe our measurements of the atomic & optical parameters needed to optimize the optical layout as well as a promising design for a prototype detector. This work is generously supported by Michigan State University.

  4. Plastic optical fibre sensor for damage detection in offshore structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, K. S. C.; Koh, C. G.

    2009-12-01

    It is important to ensure the safe and reliable use of massive engineering structures such as offshore platforms, including all aspects of safety and design code compliance. Although routine inspection is an integral part of the safety protocol in operating and maintaining these structures, regular assessment of the effectiveness and efficiency of existing safety evaluation methods is clearly desired in view of emerging technologies for structural health monitoring of engineering structures. The recent advancement in plastic optical fibre (POF) materials and processing render POF sensors an attractive alternative to glass-based optical fibre sensors as they offer much greater being flexibility, high resistance to fracture and hence the ease in their handling and installation. In this paper, some preliminary results demonstrating the use of plastic optical fibre sensors for damage detection and structural health monitoring for offshore and marine-related applications will be summarized. In this study, POF will be used for crack detection in tubular steel specimens in conjunction with a high-resolution photon-counting optical time-domain reflectrometry (v-OTDR). Although the use of OTDR technique is an established method in the telecommunication industry, this study is new in that it is now possible, with the availability of v-OTDR and graded-index perfluorinated POF, to detect and locate the crack position in the host structure to within 10 cm accuracy or better. It will also be shown that this technique could readily be configured to monitor crack growth in steel tubular members.

  5. Plastic optical fibre sensor for damage detection in offshore structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, K. S. C.; Koh, C. G.

    2010-03-01

    It is important to ensure the safe and reliable use of massive engineering structures such as offshore platforms, including all aspects of safety and design code compliance. Although routine inspection is an integral part of the safety protocol in operating and maintaining these structures, regular assessment of the effectiveness and efficiency of existing safety evaluation methods is clearly desired in view of emerging technologies for structural health monitoring of engineering structures. The recent advancement in plastic optical fibre (POF) materials and processing render POF sensors an attractive alternative to glass-based optical fibre sensors as they offer much greater being flexibility, high resistance to fracture and hence the ease in their handling and installation. In this paper, some preliminary results demonstrating the use of plastic optical fibre sensors for damage detection and structural health monitoring for offshore and marine-related applications will be summarized. In this study, POF will be used for crack detection in tubular steel specimens in conjunction with a high-resolution photon-counting optical time-domain reflectrometry (v-OTDR). Although the use of OTDR technique is an established method in the telecommunication industry, this study is new in that it is now possible, with the availability of v-OTDR and graded-index perfluorinated POF, to detect and locate the crack position in the host structure to within 10 cm accuracy or better. It will also be shown that this technique could readily be configured to monitor crack growth in steel tubular members.

  6. An algorithm for image clusters detection and identification based on color for an autonomous mobile robot

    SciTech Connect

    Uy, D.L.

    1996-02-01

    An algorithm for detection and identification of image clusters or {open_quotes}blobs{close_quotes} based on color information for an autonomous mobile robot is developed. The input image data are first processed using a crisp color fuszzyfier, a binary smoothing filter, and a median filter. The processed image data is then inputed to the image clusters detection and identification program. The program employed the concept of {open_quotes}elastic rectangle{close_quotes}that stretches in such a way that the whole blob is finally enclosed in a rectangle. A C-program is develop to test the algorithm. The algorithm is tested only on image data of 8x8 sizes with different number of blobs in them. The algorithm works very in detecting and identifying image clusters.

  7. GeoSurveillance: a GIS-based system for the detection and monitoring of spatial clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Ikuho; Rogerson, Peter A.; Lee, Gyoungju

    2009-06-01

    This article introduces a software package named GeoSurveillance that combines spatial statistical techniques and GIS routines to perform tests for the detection and monitoring of spatial clustering. GeoSurveillance provides both retrospective and prospective tests. While retrospective tests are applied to spatial data collected for a particular point in time, prospective tests attempt to incorporate the dynamic nature of spatial patterns via analyzing time-series data to detect emergent clusters as quickly as possible. This article will outline the structure of GeoSurveillance as well as describe the statistical cluster detection methods implemented in the software. It concludes with an illustration of the use of the software to analyze the spatial pattern of low birth weights in Los Angeles County, California.

  8. System and Method for Outlier Detection via Estimating Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iverson, David J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An efficient method and system for real-time or offline analysis of multivariate sensor data for use in anomaly detection, fault detection, and system health monitoring is provided. Models automatically derived from training data, typically nominal system data acquired from sensors in normally operating conditions or from detailed simulations, are used to identify unusual, out of family data samples (outliers) that indicate possible system failure or degradation. Outliers are determined through analyzing a degree of deviation of current system behavior from the models formed from the nominal system data. The deviation of current system behavior is presented as an easy to interpret numerical score along with a measure of the relative contribution of each system parameter to any off-nominal deviation. The techniques described herein may also be used to "clean" the training data.

  9. Near infrared photometric and optical spectroscopic study of 22 low mass star clusters embedded in nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, J. B.; Bica, E.; Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.

    2008-02-01

    Aims:Among the star clusters in the Galaxy, those embedded in nebulae represent the youngest group, which has only recently been explored. The analysis of a sample of 22 candidate embedded stellar systems in reflection nebulae and/or HII environments is presented. Methods: We employed optical spectroscopic observations of stars in the directions of the clusters carried out at CASLEO (Argentina) together with near infrared photometry from the 2MASS catalogue. Our analysis is based on source surface density, colour-colour diagrams and on theoretical pre-main sequence isochrones. We take into account the field star contamination by carrying out a statistical subtraction. Results: The studied objects have the characteristics of low mass systems. We derive their fundamental parameters. Most of the cluster ages are younger than 2 Myr. The studied embedded stellar systems in reflection nebulae and/or HII region complexes do not have stars of spectral types earlier than B. The total stellar masses locked in the clusters are in the range 20-220 M⊙. They are found to be gravitationally unstable and are expected to dissolve in a timescale of a few Myr. Based on observations made at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan, Argentina.

  10. Ligand effects on the optical and chiroptical properties of the thiolated Au18 cluster.

    PubMed

    Tlahuice-Flores, Alfredo

    2016-10-12

    The effect of chiral and achiral ligands protecting the inner Au9 core of the Au18(SR)14 cluster is studied based on density functional theory (DFT) and its corrected long-range interaction (DFT-D) approach. It was found that the electronic properties (energy levels) depend on the specific ligands, which induce distinct distortions on the Au-S framework. However, the substitution of S-c-C6H11 as SCH3 ligands may be considered to be correct given the obtained resemblance to the displayed bonding, optical and chiroptical properties. A further comparison of the CD and UV spectra displayed by the Au18 cluster protected by chiral and achiral ligands attests that more intense profiles are featured by ligands including phenyl rings and/or oxygen atoms such that the Au18 cluster protected by either achiral meta-mercaptobenzoic acid (m-MBA) or achiral SPh ligands displays more intense UV and CD signals. These results provide new insight into the effect of ligands on thiolated gold clusters.

  11. Optical spectroscopy for the detection of ischemic tissue injury

    DOEpatents

    Demos, Stavros; Fitzgerald, Jason; Troppmann, Christoph; Michalopoulou, Andromachi

    2009-09-08

    An optical method and apparatus is utilized to quantify ischemic tissue and/or organ injury. Such a method and apparatus is non-invasive, non-traumatic, portable, and can make measurements in a matter of seconds. Moreover, such a method and apparatus can be realized through optical fiber probes, making it possible to take measurements of target organs deep within a patient's body. Such a technology provides a means of detecting and quantifying tissue injury in its early stages, before it is clinically apparent and before irreversible damage has occurred.

  12. Generalized model for incoherent detection in confocal optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hammoum, Rachid; Hamady, Sidi Ould Saad; Fontana, Marc D

    2010-06-01

    We develop a generalized model in order to calculate the point spread functions in both the focal and the detection planes for the electric field strengths. In these calculations, based on the generalized Jones matrices, we introduce all of the interdependent parameters that could influence the spatial resolution of a confocal optical microscope. Our proposed model is more nearly complete, since we make no approximations of the scattered electric fields. These results can be successfully applied to standard confocal optical techniques to get a better understanding for more quantitative interpretations of the probe.

  13. A fibre optic chemical sensor for the detection of cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. Hien; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.; Hardwick, S. A.

    2010-09-01

    A fibre-optic chemical sensor for the detection of cocaine has been developed, based on a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) containing a fluorescein moiety as the signalling group. The fluorescent MIP was formed and covalently attached to the distal end of an optical fibre. The sensor exhibited an increase in fluorescence intensity in response to cocaine in the concentration range of 0 - 500 μM in aqueous acetonitrile mixtures with good reproducibility over 24 h. Selectivity for cocaine over others drugs has also been demonstrated.

  14. Detecting ionizing radiation with optical fibers down to biomedical doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avino, S.; D'Avino, V.; Giorgini, A.; Pacelli, R.; Liuzzi, R.; Cella, L.; De Natale, P.; Gagliardi, G.

    2013-10-01

    We report on a passive ionizing radiation sensor based on a fiber-optic resonant cavity interrogated by a high resolution interferometric technique. After irradiation in clinical linear accelerators, we observe significant variations of the fiber thermo-optic coefficient. Exploiting this effect, we demonstrate an ultimate detection limit of 160 mGy with an interaction volume of only 6 × 10-4 mm3. Thanks to its reliability, compactness, and sensitivity at biomedical dose levels, our system lends itself to real applications in radiation therapy procedures as well as in radiation monitoring and protection in medicine, aerospace, and nuclear power plants.

  15. Quantum dots microstructured optical fiber for x-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeHaven, S. L.; Williams, P. A.; Burke, E. R.

    2016-02-01

    A novel concept for the detection of x-rays with microstructured optical fibers containing quantum dots scintillation material comprised of zinc sulfide nanocrystals doped with magnesium sulfide is presented. These quantum dots are applied inside the microstructured optical fibers using capillary action. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The results of the fiber light output and associated effects of an acrylate coating and the quantum dots application technique are discussed.

  16. Optical detection of radio waves through a nanomechanical transducer.

    PubMed

    Bagci, T; Simonsen, A; Schmid, S; Villanueva, L G; Zeuthen, E; Appel, J; Taylor, J M; Sørensen, A; Usami, K; Schliesser, A; Polzik, E S

    2014-03-06

    Low-loss transmission and sensitive recovery of weak radio-frequency and microwave signals is a ubiquitous challenge, crucial in radio astronomy, medical imaging, navigation, and classical and quantum communication. Efficient up-conversion of radio-frequency signals to an optical carrier would enable their transmission through optical fibres instead of through copper wires, drastically reducing losses, and would give access to the set of established quantum optical techniques that are routinely used in quantum-limited signal detection. Research in cavity optomechanics has shown that nanomechanical oscillators can couple strongly to either microwave or optical fields. Here we demonstrate a room-temperature optoelectromechanical transducer with both these functionalities, following a recent proposal using a high-quality nanomembrane. A voltage bias of less than 10 V is sufficient to induce strong coupling between the voltage fluctuations in a radio-frequency resonance circuit and the membrane's displacement, which is simultaneously coupled to light reflected off its surface. The radio-frequency signals are detected as an optical phase shift with quantum-limited sensitivity. The corresponding half-wave voltage is in the microvolt range, orders of magnitude less than that of standard optical modulators. The noise of the transducer--beyond the measured 800 pV Hz-1/2 Johnson noise of the resonant circuit--consists of the quantum noise of light and thermal fluctuations of the membrane, dominating the noise floor in potential applications in radio astronomy and nuclear magnetic imaging. Each of these contributions is inferred to be 60 pV Hz-1/2 when balanced by choosing an electromechanical cooperativity of ~150 with an optical power of 1 mW. The noise temperature of the membrane is divided by the cooperativity. For the highest observed cooperativity of 6,800, this leads to a projected noise temperature of 40 mK and a sensitivity limit of 5 pV Hz-1/2. Our approach to

  17. On the Motion of Carbon Nanotube Clusters near Optical Fiber Tips: Thermophoresis, Radiative Pressure, and Convection Effects.

    PubMed

    Vélez-Cordero, J Rodrigo; Hernández-Cordero, J

    2015-09-15

    We analyze the motion of multiwalled carbon nanotubes clusters in water or ethanol upon irradiation with a 975 and 1550 nm laser beam guided by an optical fiber. Upon measuring the velocities of the nanotube clusters in and out of the laser beam cone, we were able to identify thermophoresis, convection and radiation pressure as the main driving forces that determine the equilibrium position of the dispersion at low optical powers: while thermophoresis and convection pull the clusters toward the laser beam axis (negative Soret coefficient), radiation pressure pushes the clusters away from the fiber tip. A theoretical solution for the thermophoretic velocity, which considers interfacial motion and a repulsive potential interaction between the nanotubes and the solvent (hydrophobic interaction), shows that the main mechanism implicated in this type of thermophoresis is the thermal expansion of the fluid, and that the clusters migrate to hotter regions with a characteristic thermal diffusion coefficient D(T) of 9 × 10(-7) cm(2) K(-1) s(-1). We further show that the characteristic length associated with thermophoresis is not that of the nanotube clusters size, O(1) μm, but that corresponding to the microstructure of the clusters, O(1) nm. We finally discuss the role of the formation of gas-liquid interfaces (microbubbles) at high optical powers on the deposition of carbon nanotubes on the optical fiber end faces.

  18. Noninvasive detection of cardiovascular pulsations by optical Doppler techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, HyunDae; Fox, Martin D.

    1997-10-01

    A system has been developed based on the measurement of skin surface vibration that can be used to detect the underlying vascular wall motion of superficial arteries and the chest wall. Data obtained from tissue phantoms suggested that the detected signals were related to intravascular pressure, an important clinical and physiological parameter. Unlike the conventional optical Doppler techniques that have been used to measure blood perfusion in skin layers and blood flow within superficial arteries, the present system was optimized to pick up skin vibrations. An optical interferometer with a 633-nm He:Ne laser was utilized to detect micrometer displacements of the skin surface. Motion velocity profiles of the skin surface near each superficial artery and auscultation points on a chest for the two heart valve sounds exhibited distinctive profiles. The theoretical and experimental results demonstrated that the system detected the velocity of skin movement, which is related to the time derivative of the pressure. The system also reduces the loading effect on the pulsation signals and heart sounds produced by the conventional piezoelectric vibration sensors. The system's sensitivity, which could be optimized further, was 366.2 micrometers /s for the present research. Overall, optical cardiovascular vibrometry has the potential to become a simple noninvasive approach to cardiovascular screening.

  19. A Community Detection Algorithm Based on Topology Potential and Spectral Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhixiao; Chen, Zhaotong; Zhao, Ya; Chen, Shaoda

    2014-01-01

    Community detection is of great value for complex networks in understanding their inherent law and predicting their behavior. Spectral clustering algorithms have been successfully applied in community detection. This kind of methods has two inadequacies: one is that the input matrixes they used cannot provide sufficient structural information for community detection and the other is that they cannot necessarily derive the proper community number from the ladder distribution of eigenvector elements. In order to solve these problems, this paper puts forward a novel community detection algorithm based on topology potential and spectral clustering. The new algorithm constructs the normalized Laplacian matrix with nodes' topology potential, which contains rich structural information of the network. In addition, the new algorithm can automatically get the optimal community number from the local maximum potential nodes. Experiments results showed that the new algorithm gave excellent performance on artificial networks and real world networks and outperforms other community detection methods. PMID:25147846

  20. Clustering and Recurring Anomaly Identification: Recurring Anomaly Detection System (ReADS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McIntosh, Dawn

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Recurring Anomaly Detection System (ReADS). The Recurring Anomaly Detection System is a tool to analyze text reports, such as aviation reports and maintenance records: (1) Text clustering algorithms group large quantities of reports and documents; Reduces human error and fatigue (2) Identifies interconnected reports; Automates the discovery of possible recurring anomalies; (3) Provides a visualization of the clusters and recurring anomalies We have illustrated our techniques on data from Shuttle and ISS discrepancy reports, as well as ASRS data. ReADS has been integrated with a secure online search

  1. A Fusion Method of Gabor Wavelet Transform and Unsupervised Clustering Algorithms for Tissue Edge Detection

    PubMed Central

    Ergen, Burhan

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes two edge detection methods for medical images by integrating the advantages of Gabor wavelet transform (GWT) and unsupervised clustering algorithms. The GWT is used to enhance the edge information in an image while suppressing noise. Following this, the k-means and Fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering algorithms are used to convert a gray level image into a binary image. The proposed methods are tested using medical images obtained through Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) devices, and a phantom image. The results prove that the proposed methods are successful for edge detection, even in noisy cases. PMID:24790590

  2. A two-level detection algorithm for optical fiber vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Fukun; Ren, Xuecong; Qu, Hongquan; Jiang, Ruiqing

    2015-09-01

    Optical fiber vibration is detected by the coherent optical time domain reflection technique. In addition to the vibration signals, the reflected signals include clutters and noises, which lead to a high false alarm rate. The "cell averaging" constant false alarm rate algorithm has a high computing speed, but its detection performance will be declined in nonhomogeneous environments such as multiple targets. The "order statistics" constant false alarm rate algorithm has a distinct advantage in multiple target environments, but it has a lower computing speed. An intelligent two-level detection algorithm is presented based on "cell averaging" constant false alarm rate and "order statistics" constant false alarm rate which work in serial way, and the detection speed of "cell averaging" constant false alarm rate and performance of "order statistics" constant false alarm rate are conserved, respectively. Through the adaptive selection, the "cell averaging" is applied in homogeneous environments, and the two-level detection algorithm is employed in nonhomogeneous environments. Our Monte Carlo simulation results demonstrate that considering different signal noise ratios, the proposed algorithm gives better detection probability than that of "order statistics".

  3. Recent developments in optical detection methods for microchip separations.

    PubMed

    Götz, Sebastian; Karst, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes the features and performances of optical detection systems currently applied in order to monitor separations on microchip devices. Fluorescence detection, which delivers very high sensitivity and selectivity, is still the most widely applied method of detection. Instruments utilizing laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and lamp-based fluorescence along with recent applications of light-emitting diodes (LED) as excitation sources are also covered in this paper. Since chemiluminescence detection can be achieved using extremely simple devices which no longer require light sources and optical components for focusing and collimation, interesting approaches based on this technique are presented, too. Although UV/vis absorbance is a detection method that is commonly used in standard desktop electrophoresis and liquid chromatography instruments, it has not yet reached the same level of popularity for microchip applications. Current applications of UV/vis absorbance detection to microchip separations and innovative approaches that increase sensitivity are described. This article, which contains 85 references, focuses on developments and applications published within the last three years, points out exciting new approaches, and provides future perspectives on this field.

  4. Cd/Hg cationic substitution in magic-sized CdSe clusters: Optical characterization and theoretical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antanovich, Artsiom; Prudnikau, Anatol; Gurin, Valerij; Artemyev, Mikhail

    2015-07-01

    We examine conversion of magic-sized CdSe clusters (MSCs) into HgSe ones by means of Cd/Hg cation exchange. With this procedure Cd8Cd17- and Cd32-selenide clusters can be converted into corresponding Hg8-, Hg17- and Hg32-selenide ones. Upon cationic exchange MSCs behavior differs from that of bulkier counterparts - larger (2-3 nm) quantum dots. Unlike CdSe colloidal quantum dots, magic-sized clusters are converted in fast and complete manner without a formation of intermediate mixed CdxHg1-x compounds that was established on the basis of optical absorption spectroscopy and chemical composition analysis. These assumptions were supported by DFT quantum chemical calculations performed for Cd8-, Cd17- and Hg8-, Hg17-selenide model clusters. Energies of experimental and calculated optical transitions were compared in order to prove the isostructural character of cationic substitution in magic-sized clusters.

  5. Partially Nondestructive Continuous Detection of Individual Traveling Optical Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Mahdi; Beck, Kristin M.; Duan, Yiheng; Chen, Wenlan; Vuletić, Vladan

    2016-01-01

    We report the continuous and partially nondestructive measurement of optical photons. For a weak light pulse traveling through a slow-light optical medium (signal), the associated atomic-excitation component is detected by another light beam (probe) with the aid of an optical cavity. We observe strong correlations of gsp (2 )=4.4 (5 ) between the transmitted signal and probe photons. The observed (intrinsic) conditional nondestructive quantum efficiency ranges between 13% and 1% (65% and 5%) for a signal transmission range of 2% to 35%, at a typical time resolution of 2.5 μ s . The maximal observed (intrinsic) device nondestructive quantum efficiency, defined as the product of the conditional nondestructive quantum efficiency and the signal transmission, is 0.5% (2.4%). The normalized cross-correlation function violates the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality, confirming the nonclassical character of the correlations.

  6. Procedure to detect anatomical structures in optical fundus images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Langis; Lalonde, Marc; Beaulieu, Mario; Boucher, Marie-Carole

    2001-07-01

    We present an overview of the design and test of an image processing procedure for detecting all important anatomical structures in color fundus images. These structures are the optic disk, the macula and the retinal network. The algorithm proceeds through five main steps: (1) automatic mask generation using pixels value statistics and color threshold, (2) visual image quality assessment using histogram matching and Canny edge distribution modeling, (3) optic disk localization using pyramidal decomposition, Hausdorff-based template matching and confidence assignment, (4) macula localization using pyramidal decomposition and (5) bessel network tracking using recursive dual edge tracking and connectivity recovering. The procedure has been tested on a database of about 40 color fundus images acquired from a digital non-mydriatic fundus camera. The database is composed of images of various types (macula- and optic disk-centered) and of various visual quality (with or without abnormal bright or dark regions, blurred, etc).

  7. Real-time detection of optical transients with RAPTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Borozdin, K. N.; Brumby, Steven P.; Galassi, M. C.; McGowan, K. E.; Starr, D. L.; Vestrand, W. T.; White, R. R.; Wozniak, P. R.; Wren, J.

    2002-01-01

    Fast variability of optical objects is an interesting though poorly explored subject in modern astronomy. Real-time data processing and identification of transient, celestial events in the images is very important, for such study as it allows rapid follow-up with more sensitive instruments, We discuss an approach which we have chosen for the RAPTOR project which is a pioneering close-loop system combining real-time transient detection with rapid follow-up. Our data processing pipeline is able to identify and localize an optical transient within seconds after the observation. We describe the challenges we met, solutions we found and some results obtained in our search for fast optical transients. The software pipeline we have developed for RAPTOR can easily be applied to the data from other experiments.

  8. A Novel Clustering Methodology Based on Modularity Optimisation for Detecting Authorship Affinities in Shakespearean Era Plays

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Hugh; Berretta, Regina; Moscato, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    In this study we propose a novel, unsupervised clustering methodology for analyzing large datasets. This new, efficient methodology converts the general clustering problem into the community detection problem in graph by using the Jensen-Shannon distance, a dissimilarity measure originating in Information Theory. Moreover, we use graph theoretic concepts for the generation and analysis of proximity graphs. Our methodology is based on a newly proposed memetic algorithm (iMA-Net) for discovering clusters of data elements by maximizing the modularity function in proximity graphs of literary works. To test the effectiveness of this general methodology, we apply it to a text corpus dataset, which contains frequencies of approximately 55,114 unique words across all 168 written in the Shakespearean era (16th and 17th centuries), to analyze and detect clusters of similar plays. Experimental results and comparison with state-of-the-art clustering methods demonstrate the remarkable performance of our new method for identifying high quality clusters which reflect the commonalities in the literary style of the plays. PMID:27571416

  9. A Novel Clustering Methodology Based on Modularity Optimisation for Detecting Authorship Affinities in Shakespearean Era Plays.

    PubMed

    Naeni, Leila M; Craig, Hugh; Berretta, Regina; Moscato, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    In this study we propose a novel, unsupervised clustering methodology for analyzing large datasets. This new, efficient methodology converts the general clustering problem into the community detection problem in graph by using the Jensen-Shannon distance, a dissimilarity measure originating in Information Theory. Moreover, we use graph theoretic concepts for the generation and analysis of proximity graphs. Our methodology is based on a newly proposed memetic algorithm (iMA-Net) for discovering clusters of data elements by maximizing the modularity function in proximity graphs of literary works. To test the effectiveness of this general methodology, we apply it to a text corpus dataset, which contains frequencies of approximately 55,114 unique words across all 168 written in the Shakespearean era (16th and 17th centuries), to analyze and detect clusters of similar plays. Experimental results and comparison with state-of-the-art clustering methods demonstrate the remarkable performance of our new method for identifying high quality clusters which reflect the commonalities in the literary style of the plays.

  10. Constraints on the richness-mass relation and the optical-SZE positional offset distribution for SZE-selected clusters

    DOE PAGES

    Saro, A.

    2015-10-12

    In this study, we cross-match galaxy cluster candidates selected via their Sunyaev–Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signatures in 129.1 deg2 of the South Pole Telescope 2500d SPT-SZ survey with optically identified clusters selected from the Dark Energy Survey science verification data. We identify 25 clusters between 0.1 ≲ z ≲ 0.8 in the union of the SPT-SZ and redMaPPer (RM) samples. RM is an optical cluster finding algorithm that also returns a richness estimate for each cluster. We model the richness λ-mass relation with the following function 500> ∝ Bλln M500 + Cλln E(z) and use SPT-SZ cluster masses and RM richnessesmore » λ to constrain the parameters. We find Bλ=1.14+0.21–0.18 and Cλ=0.73+0.77–0.75. The associated scatter in mass at fixed richness is σlnM|λ = 0.18+0.08–0.05 at a characteristic richness λ = 70. We demonstrate that our model provides an adequate description of the matched sample, showing that the fraction of SPT-SZ-selected clusters with RM counterparts is consistent with expectations and that the fraction of RM-selected clusters with SPT-SZ counterparts is in mild tension with expectation. We model the optical-SZE cluster positional offset distribution with the sum of two Gaussians, showing that it is consistent with a dominant, centrally peaked population and a subdominant population characterized by larger offsets. We also cross-match the RM catalogue with SPT-SZ candidates below the official catalogue threshold significance ξ = 4.5, using the RM catalogue to provide optical confirmation and redshifts for 15 additional clusters with ξ ε [4, 4.5].« less

  11. Matrix computations for information retrieval and major and outlier cluster detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Aono, M.; Takeuchi, H.; Samukawa, H.

    2002-12-01

    In this paper we introduce COV, a novel information retrieval (IR) algorithm for massive databases based on vector space modeling and spectral analysis of the covariance matrix, for the document vectors, to reduce the scale of the problem. Since the dimension of the covariance matrix depends on the attribute space and is independent of the number of documents, COV can be applied to databases that are too massive for methods based on the singular value decomposition of the document-attribute matrix, such as latent semantic indexing (LSI). In addition to improved scalability, theoretical considerations indicate that results from our algorithm tend to be more accurate than those from LSI, particularly in detecting subtle differences in document vectors. We demonstrate the power and accuracy of COV through an important topic in data mining, known as outlier cluster detection. We propose two new algorithms for detecting major and outlier clusters in databases--the first is based on LSI, and the second on COV. Our implementation studies indicate that our cluster detection algorithms outperform the basic LSI and COV algorithm in detecting outlier clusters.

  12. Segmentation of the Clustered Cells with Optimized Boundary Detection in Negative Phase Contrast Images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuliang; Zhang, Zaicheng; Wang, Huimin; Bi, Shusheng

    2015-01-01

    Cell image segmentation plays a central role in numerous biology studies and clinical applications. As a result, the development of cell image segmentation algorithms with high robustness and accuracy is attracting more and more attention. In this study, an automated cell image segmentation algorithm is developed to get improved cell image segmentation with respect to cell boundary detection and segmentation of the clustered cells for all cells in the field of view in negative phase contrast images. A new method which combines the thresholding method and edge based active contour method was proposed to optimize cell boundary detection. In order to segment clustered cells, the geographic peaks of cell light intensity were utilized to detect numbers and locations of the clustered cells. In this paper, the working principles of the algorithms are described. The influence of parameters in cell boundary detection and the selection of the threshold value on the final segmentation results are investigated. At last, the proposed algorithm is applied to the negative phase contrast images from different experiments. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated. Results show that the proposed method can achieve optimized cell boundary detection and highly accurate segmentation for clustered cells.

  13. Fiber Optic Sensors for Detection of Toxic and Biological Threats

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherif, Mahmoud; Bansal, Lalitkumar; Yuan, Jianming

    2007-01-01

    Protection of public and military personnel from chemical and biological warfare agents is an urgent and growing national security need. Along with this idea, we have developed a novel class of fiber optic chemical sensors, for detection of toxic and biological materials. The design of these fiber optic sensors is based on a cladding modification approach. The original passive cladding of the fiber, in a small section, was removed and the fiber core was coated with a chemical sensitive material. Any change in the optical properties of the modified cladding material, due to the presence of a specific chemical vapor, changes the transmission properties of the fiber and result in modal power redistribution in multimode fibers. Both total intensity and modal power distribution (MPD) measurements were used to detect the output power change through the sensing fibers. The MPD technique measures the power changes in the far field pattern, i.e. spatial intensity modulation in two dimensions. Conducting polymers, such as polyaniline and polypyrrole, have been reported to undergo a reversible change in conductivity upon exposure to chemical vapors. It is found that the conductivity change is accompanied by optical property change in the material. Therefore, polyaniline and polypyrrole were selected as the modified cladding material for the detection of hydrochloride (HCl), ammonia (NH3), hydrazine (H4N2), and dimethyl-methl-phosphonate (DMMP) {a nerve agent, sarin stimulant}, respectively. Several sensors were prepared and successfully tested. The results showed dramatic improvement in the sensor sensitivity, when the MPD method was applied. In this paper, an overview on the developed class of fiber optic sensors is presented and supported with successful achieved results.

  14. AUTOMATED CELL COUNTING AND CLUSTER SEGMENTATION USING CONCAVITY DETECTION AND ELLIPSE FITTING TECHNIQUES

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Sonal; Chaudry, Qaiser; Wang, May D

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel, fast and semi-automatic method for accurate cell cluster segmentation and cell counting of digital tissue image samples. In pathological conditions, complex cell clusters are a prominent feature in tissue samples. Segmentation of these clusters is a major challenge for development of an accurate cell counting methodology. We address the issue of cluster segmentation by following a three step process. The first step involves pre-processing required to obtain the appropriate nuclei cluster boundary image from the RGB tissue samples. The second step involves concavity detection at the edge of a cluster to find the points of overlap between two nuclei. The third step involves segmentation at these concavities by using an ellipse-fitting technique. Once the clusters are segmented, individual nuclei are counted to give the cell count. The method was tested on four different types of cancerous tissue samples and shows promising results with a low percentage error, high true positive rate and low false discovery rate.

  15. A Bayesian method for cluster detection with application to five cancer sites in Puget Sound

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Albert; Wakefield, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Cluster detection is an important public health endeavor and in this paper we describe and apply a recently developed Bayesian method. Commonly-used approaches are based on so-called scan statistics and suffer from a number of difficulties including how to choose a level of significance and how to deal with the possibility of multiple clusters. The basis of our model is to partition the study region into a set of areas which are either “null” or “non-null”, the latter corresponding to clusters (excess risk) or anti-clusters (reduced risk). We demonstrate the Bayesian method and compare with a popular existing approach, using data on breast, brain, lung, prostate and colorectal cancer, in the Puget Sound region of Washington St ate. We address the important issues of sensitivity to the priors, and the incorporation of covariates. The approach is implemented within the freely-available R package SpatialEpi. PMID:26841056

  16. Fluorescent optical fibre chemosensor for the detection of mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. Hien; Wren, Stephen P.; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.

    2016-11-01

    This work aims to develop a stable, compact and portable fibre optic sensing system which is capable of real time detection of the mercury ion (II), Hg2+. A novel fluorescent polymeric material for Hg2+ detection, based on a coumarin derivative (acting as the fluorophore) and an azathia crown ether moiety (acting as the mercury ion receptor), has been designed and synthesized. The material was covalently attached to the distal end of an optical fibre and exhibited a significant increase in fluorescence intensity in response to Hg2+ in the μM concentration range via a photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism. The sensor has also demonstrated a high selectivity for Hg2+ over other metal ions. A washing protocol was identified for sensor regeneration, allowing the probe to be re-used. The approach developed in this work can also be used for the preparation of sensors for other heavy metals.

  17. Optical detection of parasitic protozoa in sol-gel matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livage, Jacques; Barreau, J. Y.; Da Costa, J. M.; Desportes, I.

    1994-10-01

    Whole cell parasitic protozoa have been entrapped within sol-gel porous silica matrices. Stationary phase promastigote cells of Leishmania donovani infantum are mixed with a silica sol before gelation occurs. They remain trapped within the growing oxide network and their cellular organization appears to be well preserved. Moreover protozoa retain their antigenic properties in the porous gel. They are still able to detect parasite specific antibodies in serum samples from infected patients via an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Antigen- antibody associations occurring in the gel are optically detected via the reactions of a peroxidase conjugate with ortho-phenylenediamine leading to the formation of a yellow coloration. A clear-cut difference in optical density is measured between positive and negative sera. Such an entrapment of antigenic species into porous sol-gel matrices avoids the main problems due to non specific binding and could be advantageously used in diagnostic kits.

  18. Resonant optical transducers for in-situ gas detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Tiziana C; Cole, Garrett; Goddard, Lynford

    2016-06-28

    Configurations for in-situ gas detection are provided, and include miniaturized photonic devices, low-optical-loss, guided-wave structures and state-selective adsorption coatings. High quality factor semiconductor resonators have been demonstrated in different configurations, such as micro-disks, micro-rings, micro-toroids, and photonic crystals with the properties of very narrow NIR transmission bands and sensitivity up to 10.sup.-9 (change in complex refractive index). The devices are therefore highly sensitive to changes in optical properties to the device parameters and can be tunable to the absorption of the chemical species of interest. Appropriate coatings applied to the device enhance state-specific molecular detection.

  19. Improvements in NDIR gas detection within the same optical chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Anton, Juan Carlos; Silva-Lopez, Manuel

    2011-10-01

    Non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) is a well known technique for gas concentration monitoring. Lead salt photoconductors and thermopile detectors are typically used. Together with gas filter correlation (GFC) they are the basis for a reference standard in environmental gas monitoring like carbon monoxide determination and other gas species. To increase gas sensitivity, a multi-pass optical cavity is often used. In this contribution we propose a new optical design that allows for auto-reference multiple gas detection. It basically consists of an array of White's cell multi-pass camera that allows multiple channels with independent lengths inside the same volume. We explore its performance for carbon monoxide detection and based on recent commercial developments in infrared detector and emitter technologies.

  20. Measuring the Mean and Scatter of the X-ray Luminosity -- Optical Richness Relation for maxBCG Galaxy Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Rykoff, E.S.; McKay, T.A.; Becker, M.A.; Evrard, A.; Johnston, D.E.; Koester, B.P.; Rozo, E.; Sheldon, E.S.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2007-10-02

    We interpret and model the statistical weak lensing measurements around 130,000 groups and clusters of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey presented by Sheldon et al. (2007). We present non-parametric inversions of the 2D shear profiles to the mean 3D cluster density and mass profiles in bins of both optical richness and cluster i-band luminosity. Since the mean cluster density profile is proportional to the cluster-mass correlation function, the mean profile is spherically symmetric by the assumptions of large-scale homogeneity and isotropy. We correct the inferred 3D profiles for systematic effects, including non-linear shear and the fact that cluster halos are not all precisely centered on their brightest galaxies. We also model the measured cluster shear profile as a sum of contributions from the brightest central galaxy, the cluster dark matter halo, and neighboring halos. We infer the relations between mean cluster virial mass and optical richness and luminosity over two orders of magnitude in cluster mass; the virial mass at fixed richness or luminosity is determined with a precision of {approx} 13% including both statistical and systematic errors. We also constrain the halo concentration parameter and halo bias as a function of cluster mass; both are in good agreement with predictions from N-body simulations of LCDM models. The methods employed here will be applicable to deeper, wide-area optical surveys that aim to constrain the nature of the dark energy, such as the Dark Energy Survey, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and space-based surveys.

  1. Water wave frequency detection by optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ziyi; Bao, Xiaoyi; Rennie, Colin D.; Nistor, Ioan; Cornett, Andrew

    2008-12-01

    An optical fiber sensor has been developed and applied to measure frequency of water waves based on wave induced polarization change of the light. The fiber sensor can accurately detect water wave frequency for regular and irregular waves. The optimum sag of sensing fiber to the sensor output's linearity has been studied. The agreement of the fiber sensor and wave gauge in frequency and time domain suggests that the fiber sensor has great potential for passive acoustic sensing and wave monitoring.

  2. Use of Optical and Thermal Sights in Daylight Target Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    demonstrated in this research (see Table 1), it is clear that this variable had an effect on performance. Second , the proportion of t arge t perimeter... Research Report 1358 0- Use of Optical and Thermal Sights in Daylight Target Detection,, Brian L. Kottas and David W. Bessemer ARI Field Unit at Fort...Knox, Kentucky Training Research Laboratory DTIC ":1 Al ELECTE APR20 984 O3 U. S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences

  3. Detection of biological molecules using chemical amplification and optical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Van Antwerp, William Peter; Mastrototaro, John Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Methods are provided for the determination of the concentration of biological levels of polyhydroxylated compounds, particularly glucose. The methods utilize an amplification system that is an analyte transducer immobilized in a polymeric matrix, where the system is implantable and biocompatible. Upon interrogation by an optical system, the amplification system produces a signal capable of detection external to the skin of the patient. Quantitation of the analyte of interest is achieved by measurement of the emitted signal.

  4. Detection of biological molecules using chemical amplification and optical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Van Antwerp, William Peter; Mastrototaro, John Joseph

    2004-10-12

    Methods are provided for the determination of the concentration of biological levels of polyhydroxylated compounds, particularly glucose. The methods utilize an amplification system that is an analyte transducer immobilized in a polymeric matrix, where the system is implantable and biocompatible. Upon interrogation by an optical system, the amplification system produces a signal capable of detection external to the skin of the patient. Quantitation of the analyte of interest is achieved by measurement of the emitted signal.

  5. Detection of biological molecules using chemical amplification and optical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Antwerp, W.P. van; Mastrototaro, J.J.

    2000-01-04

    Methods are provided for the determination of the concentration of biological levels of polyhydroxylated compounds, particularly glucose. The methods utilize an amplification system that is an analyte transducer immobilized in a polymeric matrix, where the system is implantable and biocompatible. Upon interrogation by an optical system, the amplification system produces a signal capable of detection external to the skin of the patient. Quantitation of the analyte of interest is achieved by measurement of the emitted signal.

  6. Balanced detection for spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Wen-Chuan; Lai, Chih-Ming; Huang, Yi-Shiang; Chang, Cheng-Yi; Kuo, Yue-Ming

    2013-08-12

    The use and advantages of applying balanced-detection (BD) operation method to high speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) are presented in this study, which we believe is the first such demonstration. Compared to conventional SDOCT, BD-SDOCT provides two unique advantages. First, the method can suppress background noise and autocorrelation artifacts in biological tissues. Second, it is a power-efficient method which is particularly helpful for high speed SDOCT to eliminate random intensity noise and to achieve shot noise limited detection. This performance allows in vivo three-dimensional tissue visualization with high imaging quality and high speed.

  7. Optical detection of meteoroidal impacts on the Moon

    PubMed

    Ortiz; Sada; Bellot Rubio LR; Aceituno; Aceituno; Gutierrez; Thiele

    2000-06-22

    Impacts of meteoroids on the Moon should cause detectable optical flashes, but the population of objects that are big enough is very low, and hitherto no unambiguous impact flashes have been recorded. The flux of meteoroids associated with the Leonid meteor shower of 18 November 1999 was predicted to produce observable flashes on the night side of the Moon. Here we report the unambiguous detection of five such impact flashes, three of which were seen simultaneously by other observers. We also observed a possible impact flash on 16 July 1999. All of the flashes were of very brief duration (<0.02 s), as expected for high-speed impacts.

  8. Optical Path Switching Based Differential Absorption Radiometry for Substance Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, Glen W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A system and method are provided for detecting one or more substances. An optical path switch divides sample path radiation into a time series of alternating first polarized components and second polarized components. The first polarized components are transmitted along a first optical path and the second polarized components along a second optical path. A first gasless optical filter train filters the first polarized components to isolate at least a first wavelength band thereby generating first filtered radiation. A second gasless optical filter train filters the second polarized components to isolate at least a second wavelength band thereby generating second filtered radiation. The first wavelength band and second wavelength band are unique. Further, spectral absorption of a substance of interest is different at the first wavelength band as compared to the second wavelength band. A beam combiner combines the first and second filtered radiation to form a combined beam of radiation. A detector is disposed to monitor magnitude of at least a portion of the combined beam alternately at the first wavelength band and the second wavelength band as an indication of the concentration of the substance in the sample path.

  9. Experimental constraint on dark matter detection with optical atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wcisło, P.; Morzyński, P.; Bober, M.; Cygan, A.; Lisak, D.; Ciuryło, R.; Zawada, M.

    2016-12-01

    The total mass density of the Universe appears to be dominated by dark matter. However, beyond its gravitational interactions at the galactic scale, little is known about its nature1. Several proposals have been advanced in recent years for the detection of dark matter2-4. In particular, a network of atomic clocks could be used to search for transient indicators of hypothetical dark matter5 in the form of stable topological defects; for example, monopoles, strings or domain walls6. The clocks become desynchronized when a dark-matter object sweeps through the network. This pioneering approach5 requires a comparison between at least two distant optical atomic clocks7-9. Here, by exploiting differences in the susceptibilities of the atoms and the cavity to the fine-structure constant10,11, we show that a single optical atomic clock12 is already sensitive to dark-matter events. This implies that existing optical atomic clocks13,14 can serve as a global topological-defect dark-matter observatory, without any further developments in experimental apparatus or the need for long phase-noise-compensated optical-fibre links15. Using optical atomic clocks, we explored a new dimension of astrophysical observations by constraining the strength of atomic coupling to hypothetical dark-matter cosmic objects. Under the conditions of our experiments, the degree of constraint was found to exceed the previously reported limits16 by more than three orders of magnitude.

  10. Optical aptasensors for quantitative detection of small biomolecules: a review.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chunjing; Dai, Shuang; Wang, Lei

    2014-09-15

    Aptasensors are aptamer-based biosensors with excellent recognition capability towards a wide range of targets. Specially, there have been ever-growing interests in the development of aptasensors for the detection of small molecules. This phenomenon is contributed to two reasons. On one hand, small biomolecules play an important role in living organisms with many kinds of biological function, such as antiarrhythmic effect and vasodilator activity of adenosine. On the other hand, the concentration of small molecules can be an indicator for disease diagnosis, for example, the concentration of ATP is closely associated with cell injury and cell viability. As a potential analysis tool in the construction of aptasensors, optical analysis has attracted much more interest of researchers due to its high sensitivity, quick response and simple operation. Besides, it promises the promotion of aptasensors in performance toward a new level. Review the development of optical aptasensors for small biomolecules will give readers an overall understanding of its progress and provide some theoretical guidelines for its future development. Hence, we give a mini-review on the advance of optical aptasensors for small biomolecules. This review focuses on recent achievements in the design of various optical aptasensors for small biomolecules, containing fluorescence aptasensors, colorimetric aptasensors, chemiluminescence aptasensors and other optical aptasensors.

  11. Development of optical automatic positioning and wafer defect detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Chuen-Lin; Lai, Qun-Huang; Lin, Chern-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    The data of a wafer with defects can provide engineers with very important information and clues to improve the yield rate and quality in manufacturing. This paper presents a microscope automatic positioning and wafer detection system with human-machine interface based on image processing and fuzzy inference algorithms. In the proposed system, a XY table is used to move the position of each die on 6 inch or 8 inch wafers. Then, a high-resolution CCD and one set of two-axis optical linear encoder are used to accurately measure the position on the wafer. Finally, the developed human-machine interface is used to display the current position of an actual wafer in order to complete automatic positioning, and a wafer map database can be created. In the process of defect detection, CCD is used for image processing, and during preprocessing, it is required to filter noise, acquire the defect characteristics, define the defective template, and then take the characteristic points of the defective template as the reference input for fuzzy inference. A high-accuracy optical automatic positioning and wafer defect detection system is thus constructed. This study focused on automatic detection of spots, scratches, and bruises, and attempted to reduce the time to detect defective die and improve the accuracy of determining the defects of semiconductor devices.

  12. Quantum dots as optical labels for ultrasensitive detection of polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Akshath, Uchangi Satyaprasad; Shubha, Likitha R; Bhatt, Praveena; Thakur, Munna Singh

    2014-07-15

    Considering the fact that polyphenols have versatile activity in-vivo, its detection and quantification is very much important for a healthy diet. Laccase enzyme can convert polyphenols to yield mono/polyquinones which can quench Quantum dots fluorescence. This phenomenon of charge transfer from quinones to QDs was exploited as optical labels to detect polyphenols. CdTe QD may undergo dipolar interaction with quinones as a result of broad spectral absorption due to multiple excitonic states resulting from quantum confinement effects. Thus, "turn-off" fluorescence method was applied for ultrasensitive detection of polyphenols by using laccase. We observed proportionate quenching of QDs fluorescence with respect to polyphenol concentration in the range of 100 µg to 1 ng/mL. Also, quenching of the photoluminescence was highly efficient and stable and could detect individual and total polyphenols with high sensitivity (LOD-1 ng/mL). Moreover, proposed method was highly efficient than any other reported methods in terms of sensitivity, specificity and selectivity. Therefore, a novel optical sensor was developed for the detection of polyphenols at a sensitive level based on the charge transfer mechanism.

  13. Optical sensors for the detection of trace chloroform.

    PubMed

    Fong, Jonathan K; Pena, Justin K; Xue, Zi-Ling; Alam, Maksudul M; Sampathkumaran, Uma; Goswami, Kisholoy

    2015-02-03

    Optical thin film sensors have been developed to detect chloroform in aqueous and nonaqueous solutions. These sensors utilize a modified Fujiwara reaction, one of the only known methods for detecting halogenated hydrocarbons in the visible spectrum. The modified Fujiwara reagents, 2,2'-dipyridyl and tetra-n-butyl ammonium hydroxide (n-Bu4NOH or TBAH), are encapsulated in an ethyl cellulose (EC) or sol-gel film. Upon exposure of the EC sensor film to HCCl3 in petroleum ether, a colored product is produced within the film, which is analyzed spectroscopically, yielding a detection limit of 0.830 ppm (parts per million v/v or μL/L hereinafter) and a quantification limit of 2.77 ppm. When the chloroform concentration in pentane is ≥5 ppm, the color change of the EC sensor is visible to the naked eye. In aqueous chloroform solution, reaction in the sol-gel sensor film turns the sensor from colorless to dark yellow/brown, also visible to the naked eye, with a detection limit of 500 ppm. This is well below the solubility of chloroform in water (ca. 5,800 ppm). To our knowledge, these are the first optical quality thin film sensors using Fujiwara reactions for halogenated hydrocarbon detection.

  14. Detecting cell death with optical coherence tomography and envelope statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Golnaz; Yang, Victor X. D.; Czarnota, Gregory J.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2011-02-01

    Currently no standard clinical or preclinical noninvasive method exists to monitor cell death based on morphological changes at the cellular level. In our past work we have demonstrated that quantitative high frequency ultrasound imaging can detect cell death in vitro and in vivo. In this study we apply quantitative methods previously used with high frequency ultrasound to optical coherence tomography (OCT) to detect cell death. The ultimate goal of this work is to use these methods for optically-based clinical and preclinical cancer treatment monitoring. Optical coherence tomography data were acquired from acute myeloid leukemia cells undergoing three modes of cell death. Significant increases in integrated backscatter were observed for cells undergoing apoptosis and mitotic arrest, while necrotic cells induced a decrease. These changes appear to be linked to structural changes observed in histology obtained from the cell samples. Signal envelope statistics were analyzed from fittings of the generalized gamma distribution to histograms of envelope intensities. The parameters from this distribution demonstrated sensitivities to morphological changes in the cell samples. These results indicate that OCT integrated backscatter and first order envelope statistics can be used to detect and potentially differentiate between modes of cell death in vitro.

  15. Optical detection of E. coli bacteria by mesoporous silicon biosensors.

    PubMed

    Massad-Ivanir, Naama; Shtenberg, Giorgi; Segal, Ester

    2013-11-20

    A label-free optical biosensor based on a nanostructured porous Si is designed for rapid capture and detection of Escherichia coli K12 bacteria, as a model microorganism. The biosensor relies on direct binding of the target bacteria cells onto its surface, while no pretreatment (e.g. by cell lysis) of the studied sample is required. A mesoporous Si thin film is used as the optical transducer element of the biosensor. Under white light illumination, the porous layer displays well-resolved Fabry-Pérot fringe patterns in its reflectivity spectrum. Applying a fast Fourier transform (FFT) to reflectivity data results in a single peak. Changes in the intensity of the FFT peak are monitored. Thus, target bacteria capture onto the biosensor surface, through antibody-antigen interactions, induces measurable changes in the intensity of the FFT peaks, allowing for a 'real time' observation of bacteria attachment. The mesoporous Si film, fabricated by an electrochemical anodization process, is conjugated with monoclonal antibodies, specific to the target bacteria. The immobilization, immunoactivity and specificity of the antibodies are confirmed by fluorescent labeling experiments. Once the biosensor is exposed to the target bacteria, the cells are directly captured onto the antibody-modified porous Si surface. These specific capturing events result in intensity changes in the thin-film optical interference spectrum of the biosensor. We demonstrate that these biosensors can detect relatively low bacteria concentrations (detection limit of 10(4) cells/ml) in less than an hour.

  16. Heartbeat detection from a hydraulic bed sensor using a clustering approach.

    PubMed

    Rosales, Licet; Skubic, Marjorie; Heise, David; Devaney, Michael J; Schaumburg, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Encouraged by previous performance of a hydraulic bed sensor, this work presents a new hydraulic transducer configuration which improves the system's ability to capture a heartbeat signal from four subjects with different body weight and height, gender, age and cardiac history. It also proposes a new approach for detecting the occurrence of heartbeats from ballistocardiogram (BCG) signals through the use of the k-means clustering algorithm, based on finding the location of the J-peaks. Preliminary testing showed that the new transducer arrangement was able to capture the occurrence of heartbeats for all the participants, and the clustering approach achieved correct heartbeat detection ranging from 98.6 to 100% for three of them. Some considerations are discussed regarding adjustments that can be done in order to increase the correct detection of heartbeats for the participant whose percentage of correct detection ranged from 71.0 to 92.5%.

  17. Detecting communities in clustered networks based on group action on set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhanli; Jiang, Xin; Ma, Lili; Tang, Shaoting; Zheng, Zhiming

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a well targeted algorithm (GAS algorithm) for detecting communities in high clustered networks by presenting group action technology on community division. During the processing of this algorithm, the underlying community structure of a clustered network emerges simultaneously as the corresponding partition of orbits by the permutation groups acting on the node set are achieved. As the derivation of the orbit partition, an algebraic structure r-cycle can be considered as the origin of the community. To be a priori estimation for the community structure of the algorithm, the community separability is introduced to indicate whether a network has distinct community structure. By executing the algorithm on several typical networks and the LFR benchmark, it shows that this GAS algorithm can detect communities accurately and effectively in high clustered networks. Furthermore, we compare the GAS algorithm and the clique percolation algorithm on the LFR benchmark. It is shown that the GAS algorithm is more accurate at detecting non-overlapping communities in clustered networks. It is suggested that algebraic techniques can uncover fresh light on detecting communities in complex networks.

  18. Side information and noise learning for distributed video coding using optical flow and clustering.

    PubMed

    Luong, Huynh Van; Rakêt, Lars Lau; Huang, Xin; Forchhammer, Søren

    2012-12-01

    Distributed video coding (DVC) is a coding paradigm that exploits the source statistics at the decoder side to reduce the complexity at the encoder. The coding efficiency of DVC critically depends on the quality of side information generation and accuracy of noise modeling. This paper considers transform domain Wyner-Ziv (TDWZ) coding and proposes using optical flow to improve side information generation and clustering to improve the noise modeling. The optical flow technique is exploited at the decoder side to compensate for weaknesses of block-based methods, when using motion-compensation to generate side information frames. Clustering is introduced to capture cross band correlation and increase local adaptivity in the noise modeling. This paper also proposes techniques to learn from previously decoded WZ frames. Different techniques are combined by calculating a number of candidate soft side information for low density parity check accumulate decoding. The proposed decoder side techniques for side information and noise learning (SING) are integrated in a TDWZ scheme. On test sequences, the proposed SING codec robustly improves the coding efficiency of TDWZ DVC. For WZ frames using a GOP size of 2, up to 4-dB improvement or an average (Bjøntegaard) bit-rate savings of 37% is achieved compared with DISCOVER.

  19. Increased absorption in InAsSb nanowire clusters through coupled optical modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, Johannes; Chen, Yang; Anttu, Nicklas; Pistol, Mats-Erik; Wernersson, Lars-Erik

    2017-02-01

    Nanowires can act as efficient light absorbers where waveguide modes are resonant to specific wavelengths. This resonant wavelength can easily be tuned by the nanowire dimensions, but the absorption of infrared radiation requires diameters of hundreds of nm, which is difficult to achieve using epitaxial growth. Here, we demonstrate that infrared absorption in InAsSb nanowires with the diameters of only 140 nm grown on Si substrates can be enhanced resonantly by placing them closely packed in clusters of different sizes. We find that coating the nanowires with a dielectric to optically connect them results in an efficient absorption diameter far exceeding the diameter of the constituent nanowires and that the cut-off wavelength is redshifted with an increasing cluster diameter. Numerical simulations are in agreement with the experimental results and demonstrate that if nanowires are positioned in clusters, a peak absorptance of 20% is possible at 5.6 μm with only 3% surface coverage. This absorptance is 200 times higher than for wires placed in an equidistant pattern. Our findings have direct implications for the design of efficient nanowire based photodetectors and solar cells.

  20. A survey on object detection in optical remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Gong; Han, Junwei

    2016-07-01

    Object detection in optical remote sensing images, being a fundamental but challenging problem in the field of aerial and satellite image analysis, plays an important role for a wide range of applications and is receiving significant attention in recent years. While enormous methods exist, a deep review of the literature concerning generic object detection is still lacking. This paper aims to provide a review of the recent progress in this field. Different from several previously published surveys that focus on a specific object class such as building and road, we concentrate on more generic object categories including, but are not limited to, road, building, tree, vehicle, ship, airport, urban-area. Covering about 270 publications we survey (1) template matching-based object detection methods, (2) knowledge-based object detection methods, (3) object-based image analysis (OBIA)-based object detection methods, (4) machine learning-based object detection methods, and (5) five publicly available datasets and three standard evaluation metrics. We also discuss the challenges of current studies and propose two promising research directions, namely deep learning-based feature representation and weakly supervised learning-based geospatial object detection. It is our hope that this survey will be beneficial for the researchers to have better understanding of this research field.

  1. Comparison of direct and heterodyne detection optical intersatellite communication links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. C.; Gardner, C. S.

    1987-01-01

    The performance of direct and heterodyne detection optical intersatellite communication links are evaluated and compared. It is shown that the performance of optical links is very sensitive to the pointing and tracking errors at the transmitter and receiver. In the presence of random pointing and tracking errors, optimal antenna gains exist that will minimize the required transmitter power. In addition to limiting the antenna gains, random pointing and tracking errors also impose a power penalty in the link budget. This power penalty is between 1.6 to 3 dB for a direct detection QPPM link, and 3 to 5 dB for a heterodyne QFSK system. For the heterodyne systems, the carrier phase noise presents another major factor of performance degradation that must be considered. In contrast, the loss due to synchronization error is small. The link budgets for direct and heterodyne detection systems are evaluated. It is shown that, for systems with large pointing and tracking errors, the link budget is dominated by the spatial tracking error, and the direct detection system shows a superior performance because it is less sensitive to the spatial tracking error. On the other hand, for systems with small pointing and tracking jitters, the antenna gains are in general limited by the launch cost, and suboptimal antenna gains are often used in practice. In which case, the heterodyne system has a slightly higher power margin because of higher receiver sensitivity.

  2. Breaking the concentration limit of optical single-molecule detection.

    PubMed

    Holzmeister, Phil; Acuna, Guillermo P; Grohmann, Dina; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-02-21

    Over the last decade, single-molecule detection has been successfully utilized in the life sciences and materials science. Yet, single-molecule measurements only yield meaningful results when working in a suitable, narrow concentration range. On the one hand, diffraction limits the minimal size of the observation volume in optical single-molecule measurements and consequently a sample must be adequately diluted so that only one molecule resides within the observation volume. On the other hand, at ultra-low concentrations relevant for sensing, the detection volume has to be increased in order to detect molecules in a reasonable timespan. This in turn results in the loss of an optimal signal-to-noise ratio necessary for single-molecule detection. This review discusses the requirements for effective single-molecule fluorescence applications, reflects on the motivation for the extension of the dynamic concentration range of single-molecule measurements and reviews various approaches that have been introduced recently to solve these issues. For the high-concentration limit, we identify four promising strategies including molecular confinement, optical observation volume reduction, temporal separation of signals and well-conceived experimental designs that specifically circumvent the high concentration limit. The low concentration limit is addressed by increasing the measurement speed, parallelization, signal amplification and preconcentration. The further development of these ideas will expand our possibilities to interrogate research questions with the clarity and precision provided only by the single-molecule approach.

  3. DETECTION OF SOLAR-LIKE OSCILLATIONS FROM KEPLER PHOTOMETRY OF THE OPEN CLUSTER NGC 6819

    SciTech Connect

    Stello, Dennis; Bedding, Timothy R.; Huber, Daniel; Basu, Sarbani; Bruntt, Hans; Mosser, BenoIt; Barban, Caroline; Goupil, Marie-Jo; Stevens, Ian R.; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Hekker, Saskia; Brown, Timothy M.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen; Kjeldsen, Hans; Arentoft, Torben; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Ballot, Jerome; GarcIa, Rafael A.

    2010-04-20

    Asteroseismology of stars in clusters has been a long-sought goal because the assumption of a common age, distance, and initial chemical composition allows strong tests of the theory of stellar evolution. We report results from the first 34 days of science data from the Kepler Mission for the open cluster NGC 6819-one of the four clusters in the field of view. We obtain the first clear detections of solar-like oscillations in the cluster red giants and are able to measure the large frequency separation, {delta}{nu}, and the frequency of maximum oscillation power, {nu}{sub max}. We find that the asteroseismic parameters allow us to test cluster membership of the stars, and even with the limited seismic data in hand, we can already identify four possible non-members despite their having a better than 80% membership probability from radial velocity measurements. We are also able to determine the oscillation amplitudes for stars that span about 2 orders of magnitude in luminosity and find good agreement with the prediction that oscillation amplitudes scale as the luminosity to the power of 0.7. These early results demonstrate the unique potential of asteroseismology of the stellar clusters observed by Kepler.

  4. Automatic detection of tooth cracks in optical coherence tomography images

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aims of the present study were to compare the image quality and visibility of tooth cracks between conventional methods and swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) and to develop an automatic detection technique for tooth cracks by SS-OCT imaging. Methods We evaluated SS-OCT with a near-infrared wavelength centered at 1,310 nm over a spectral bandwidth of 100 nm at a rate of 50 kHz as a new diagnostic tool for the detection of tooth cracks. The reliability of the SS-OCT images was verified by comparing the crack lines with those detected using conventional methods. After performing preprocessing of the obtained SS-OCT images to emphasize cracks, an algorithm was developed and verified to detect tooth cracks automatically. Results The detection capability of SS-OCT was superior or comparable to that of trans-illumination, which did not discriminate among the cracks according to depth. Other conventional methods for the detection of tooth cracks did not sense initial cracks with a width of less than 100 μm. However, SS-OCT detected cracks of all sizes, ranging from craze lines to split teeth, and the crack lines were automatically detected in images using the Hough transform. Conclusions We were able to distinguish structural cracks, craze lines, and split lines in tooth cracks using SS-OCT images, and to automatically detect the position of various cracks in the OCT images. Therefore, the detection capability of SS-OCT images provides a useful diagnostic tool for cracked tooth syndrome. PMID:28261523

  5. Intersection Detection Based on Qualitative Spatial Reasoning on Stopping Point Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zourlidou, S.; Sester, M.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this research is to propose and test a method for detecting intersections by analysing collectively acquired trajectories of moving vehicles. Instead of solely relying on the geometric features of the trajectories, such as heading changes, which may indicate turning points and consequently intersections, we extract semantic features of the trajectories in form of sequences of stops and moves. Under this spatiotemporal prism, the extracted semantic information which indicates where vehicles stop can reveal important locations, such as junctions. The advantage of the proposed approach in comparison with existing turning-points oriented approaches is that it can detect intersections even when not all the crossing road segments are sampled and therefore no turning points are observed in the trajectories. The challenge with this approach is that first of all, not all vehicles stop at the same location - thus, the stop-location is blurred along the direction of the road; this, secondly, leads to the effect that nearby junctions can induce similar stop-locations. As a first step, a density-based clustering is applied on the layer of stop observations and clusters of stop events are found. Representative points of the clusters are determined (one per cluster) and in a last step the existence of an intersection is clarified based on spatial relational cluster reasoning, with which less informative geospatial clusters, in terms of whether a junction exists and where its centre lies, are transformed in more informative ones. Relational reasoning criteria, based on the relative orientation of the clusters with their adjacent ones are discussed for making sense of the relation that connects them, and finally for forming groups of stop events that belong to the same junction.

  6. THE CORRELATION FUNCTION OF GALAXY CLUSTERS AND DETECTION OF BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, T.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.; Sun, L.; Zhan, H.

    2012-04-10

    We calculate the correlation function of 13,904 galaxy clusters of z {<=} 0.4 selected from the cluster catalog of Wen et al. The correlation function can be fitted with a power-law model {xi}(r) = (r/R{sub 0}){sup -{gamma}} on the scales of 10 h{sup -1} Mpc {<=} r {<=} 50 h{sup -1} Mpc, with a larger correlation length of R{sub 0} = 18.84 {+-} 0.27 h{sup -1} Mpc for clusters with a richness of R {>=} 15 and a smaller length of R{sub 0} = 16.15 {+-} 0.13 h{sup -1} Mpc for clusters with a richness of R {>=} 5. The power-law index of {gamma} = 2.1 is found to be almost the same for all cluster subsamples. A pronounced baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) peak is detected at r {approx} 110 h{sup -1} Mpc with a significance of {approx}1.9{sigma}. By analyzing the correlation function in the range of 20 h{sup -1} Mpc {<=} r {<=} 200 h{sup -1} Mpc, we find that the constraints on distance parameters are D{sub v} (z{sub m} = 0.276) = 1077 {+-} 55(1{sigma}) Mpc and h = 0.73 {+-} 0.039(1{sigma}), which are consistent with the cosmology derived from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) seven-year data. However, the BAO signal from the cluster sample is stronger than expected and leads to a rather low matter density {Omega}{sub m} h{sup 2} = 0.093 {+-} 0.0077(1{sigma}), which deviates from the WMAP7 result by more than 3{sigma}. The correlation function of the GMBCG cluster sample is also calculated and our detection of the BAO feature is confirmed.

  7. The Correlation Function of Galaxy Clusters and Detection of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, T.; Han, J. L.; Wen, Z. L.; Sun, L.; Zhan, H.

    2012-04-01

    We calculate the correlation function of 13,904 galaxy clusters of z <= 0.4 selected from the cluster catalog of Wen et al. The correlation function can be fitted with a power-law model ξ(r) = (r/R 0)-γ on the scales of 10 h -1 Mpc <= r <= 50 h -1 Mpc, with a larger correlation length of R 0 = 18.84 ± 0.27 h -1 Mpc for clusters with a richness of R >= 15 and a smaller length of R 0 = 16.15 ± 0.13 h -1 Mpc for clusters with a richness of R >= 5. The power-law index of γ = 2.1 is found to be almost the same for all cluster subsamples. A pronounced baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) peak is detected at r ~ 110 h -1 Mpc with a significance of ~1.9σ. By analyzing the correlation function in the range of 20 h -1 Mpc <= r <= 200 h -1 Mpc, we find that the constraints on distance parameters are Dv (zm = 0.276) = 1077 ± 55(1σ) Mpc and h = 0.73 ± 0.039(1σ), which are consistent with the cosmology derived from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) seven-year data. However, the BAO signal from the cluster sample is stronger than expected and leads to a rather low matter density Ω m h 2 = 0.093 ± 0.0077(1σ), which deviates from the WMAP7 result by more than 3σ. The correlation function of the GMBCG cluster sample is also calculated and our detection of the BAO feature is confirmed.

  8. Coherent Detection of High-Rate Optical PPM Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, Victor; Fernandez, Michela Munoz

    2006-01-01

    A method of coherent detection of high-rate pulse-position modulation (PPM) on a received laser beam has been conceived as a means of reducing the deleterious effects of noise and atmospheric turbulence in free-space optical communication using focal-plane detector array technologies. In comparison with a receiver based on direct detection of the intensity modulation of a PPM signal, a receiver based on the present method of coherent detection performs well at much higher background levels. In principle, the coherent-detection receiver can exhibit quantum-limited performance despite atmospheric turbulence. The key components of such a receiver include standard receiver optics, a laser that serves as a local oscillator, a focal-plane array of photodetectors, and a signal-processing and data-acquisition assembly needed to sample the focal-plane fields and reconstruct the pulsed signal prior to detection. The received PPM-modulated laser beam and the local-oscillator beam are focused onto the photodetector array, where they are mixed in the detection process. The two lasers are of the same or nearly the same frequency. If the two lasers are of different frequencies, then the coherent detection process is characterized as heterodyne and, using traditional heterodyne-detection terminology, the difference between the two laser frequencies is denoted the intermediate frequency (IF). If the two laser beams are of the same frequency and remain aligned in phase, then the coherent detection process is characterized as homodyne (essentially, heterodyne detection at zero IF). As a result of the inherent squaring operation of each photodetector, the output current includes an IF component that contains the signal modulation. The amplitude of the IF component is proportional to the product of the local-oscillator signal amplitude and the PPM signal amplitude. Hence, by using a sufficiently strong local-oscillator signal, one can make the PPM-modulated IF signal strong enough to

  9. Deep-Space Optical Transceiver Uplink Detection Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkacenko, A.; Quirk, J. J.; Srinivasan, M.

    2013-05-01

    In this article, we develop and analyze an uplink signal detection technique for the Deep-Space Optical Transceiver (DOT). Here, the detection is carried out using a set of test statistics obtained from up-down counter (UDC) photon detection systems. Specifically, we address two sets of statistics: the count outputs from a bank of uniformly temporally spaced UDCs as well as the counts from a single UDC that cycles through multiple uniformly spaced timing phases. From these test statistics, we derive the Neyman-Pearson decision rule under certain input conditions and analyze the performance of this hypothesis test. We show the performance trade-offs associated with both sets of test statistics, which can then be used to determine which set to use as well as the number of UDCs or timing phases required for implementation.

  10. Detection of filarial antibody using an fiber optics immunosensor (FOI).

    PubMed

    Madhan Mohan, T; Nath, N; Anand, S

    1997-12-01

    Optical waveguides based immunoassay has been reported in the literature for the detection of pathogens likeC. botulinum and F1 antigen ofY. pestis (3) and also for the antibodies to pathogens like the Rubella virus (4) in the serum or the whole blood. In this line we have demonstrated the FOI for the detection ofS. digitata antibody. Experiments are in progress in our laboratory to standardise the sensor for detection of Bancroftian filariasis caused byW. bancrofti. Few modifications are also in the process so as to improve the signal amplification at evanescent region as well as to reduce the two step method into single step method. The FOI has an advantage over other conventional methods because no extensive washing steps are required and the whole procedure takes just 15 minutes to get the result. The FOI designed for this experiment can be made portable for use in the field level for epidemiological studies.

  11. Biomimetic/Optical Sensors for Detecting Bacterial Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie; Ksendzov, Alexander; Yen, Shiao-Pin; Ryan, Margaret; Lazazzera, Beth

    2006-01-01

    Biomimetic/optical sensors have been proposed as means of real-time detection of bacteria in liquid samples through real-time detection of compounds secreted by the bacteria. Bacterial species of interest would be identified through detection of signaling compounds unique to those species. The best-characterized examples of quorum-signaling compounds are acyl-homoserine lactones and peptides. Each compound, secreted by each bacterium of an affected species, serves as a signal to other bacteria of the same species to engage in a collective behavior when the population density of that species reaches a threshold level analogous to a quorum. A sensor according to the proposal would include a specially formulated biomimetic film, made of a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP), that would respond optically to the signaling compound of interest. The MIP film would be integrated directly onto an opticalwaveguide- based ring resonator for optical readout. Optically, the sensor would resemble the one described in Chemical Sensors Based on Optical Ring Resonators (NPO-40601), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 10 (October 2005), page 32. MIPs have been used before as molecular- recognition compounds, though not in the manner of the present proposal. Molecular imprinting is an approach to making molecularly selective cavities in a polymer matrix. These cavities function much as enzyme receptor sites: the chemical functionality and shape of a cavity in the polymer matrix cause the cavity to bind to specific molecules. An MIP matrix is made by polymerizing monomers in the presence of the compound of interest (template molecule). The polymer forms around the template. After the polymer solidifies, the template molecules are removed from the polymer matrix by decomplexing them from their binding sites and then dissolving them, leaving cavities that are matched to the template molecules in size, shape, and chemical functionality. The cavities thus become molecular-recognition sites

  12. Miniature endoscopic optical coherence tomography for calculus detection.

    PubMed

    Kao, Meng-Chun; Lin, Chun-Li; Kung, Che-Yen; Huang, Yi-Fung; Kuo, Wen-Chuan

    2015-08-20

    The effective treatment of periodontitis involves the detection and removal of subgingival dental calculus. However, subgingival calculus is more difficult to detect than supragingival calculus because it is firmly attached to root surfaces within periodontal pockets. To achieve a smooth root surface, clinicians often remove excessive amounts of root structure because of decreased visibility. In addition, enamel pearl, a rare type of ectopic enamel formation on the root surface, can easily be confused with dental calculus in the subgingival environment. In this study, we developed a fiber-probe swept-source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) technique and combined it with the quantitative measurement of an optical parameter [standard deviation (SD) of the optical coherence tomography (OCT) intensity] to differentiate subgingival calculus from sound enamel, including enamel pearl. Two-dimensional circumferential images were constructed by rotating the miniprobe (0.9 mm diameter) while acquiring image lines, and the adjacent lines in each rotation were stacked to generate a three-dimensional volume. In OCT images, compared to sound enamel and enamel pearls, dental calculus showed significant differences (P<0.001) in SD values. Finally, the receiver operating characteristic curve had a high capacity (area under the curve=0.934) for discriminating between healthy regions (including enamel pearl) and dental calculus.

  13. Optical detection of spin Hall effect in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Erve, O. M. J. van ‘t Hanbicki, A. T.; McCreary, K. M.; Li, C. H.; Jonker, B. T.

    2014-04-28

    Optical techniques have been widely used to probe the spin Hall effect in semiconductors. In metals, however, only electrical methods such as nonlocal spin valve transport, ferromagnetic resonance, or spin torque transfer experiments have been successful. These methods require complex processing techniques and measuring setups. We show here that the spin Hall effect can be observed in non-magnetic metals such as Pt and β-W, using a standard bench top magneto-optical Kerr system with very little sample preparation. Applying a square wave current and using Fourier analysis significantly improve our detection level. One can readily determine the angular dependence of the induced polarization on the bias current direction (very difficult to do with voltage detection), the orientation of the spin Hall induced polarization, and the sign of the spin Hall angle. This optical approach is free from the complications of various resistive effects, which can compromise voltage measurements. This opens up the study of spin Hall effect in metals to a variety of spin dynamic and spatial imaging experiments.

  14. Integration of waveguides for optical detection in microfabricated analytical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutter, Joerg P.; Mogensen, Klaus B.; Friis, Peter; Jorgensen, Anders M.; Petersen, Nickolaj J.; Telleman, Pieter; Huebner, Joerg

    2000-08-01

    Buried optical channel waveguides integrated with a fluidic channel network on a planar microdevice are presented. The waveguides were fabricated using silica-on-silicon technology with the goal to replace bulk optical elements and facilitate various optical detection techniques for miniaturized total analysis systems or lab-on-a-chip systems. Waveguide structures with core layers doped with germanium were employed for fluorescence measurements, while waveguides with nitrogen- only doped core layers were used for absorbance measurements. By the elimination of germanium oxygen deficiency centers transmission of light down to 210nm was possible, allowing absorance measurements in the mid and far UV region (210 to 280nm), which is the region where a large number of different molecules absorb light. Robust, alignment-free microdevices, which can easily be hooked up to a number of light sources and detectors were used for fluorescence measurements of two dyes, fluorescein and Bodipy, and absorbance measurements of a stres-reducing drug, propranolol. The lowest detected concentrations were 250pM for fluorescein, 100nM for Bodipy and 12(mu) M for propranolol.

  15. A Fiber Optic Probe for the Detection of Cataracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Dhadwal, Harbans S.

    1993-01-01

    A compact fiber optic probe developed for on-orbit science experiments was used to detect the onset of cataracts, a capability that could eliminate physicians' guesswork and result in new drugs to 'dissolve' or slow down the cataract formation before surgery is necessary. The probe is based upon dynamic light scattering (DLS) principles. It has no moving parts, no apertures, and requires no optical alignment. It is flexible and easy to use. Results are presented for excised but intact human eye lenses. In a clinical setting, the device can be easily incorporated into a slit-lamp apparatus (ophthalmoscope) for complete eye diagnostics. In this set-up, the integrated fiber optic probe, the size of a pencil, delivers a low power cone of laser light into the eye of a patient and guides the light which is backscattered by the protein molecules of the lens through a receiving optical fiber to a photo detector. The non-invasive DLS measurements provide rapid determination of protein crystalline size and its size distribution in the eye lens.

  16. Optical cloud detection from a disposable airborne sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoll, Keri; Harrison, R. Giles; Brus, David

    2016-04-01

    In-situ measurement of cloud droplet microphysical properties is most commonly made from manned aircraft platforms due to the size and weight of the instrumentation, which is both costly and typically limited to sampling only a few clouds. This work describes the development of a small, lightweight (<200g), disposable, optical cloud sensor which is designed for use on routine radiosonde balloon flights and also small unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) platforms. The sensor employs the backscatter principle, using an ultra-bright LED as the illumination source, with a photodiode detector. Scattering of the LED light by cloud droplets generates a small optical signal which is separated from background light fluctuations using a lock-in technique. The signal to noise obtained permits cloud detection using the scattered LED light, even in daytime. During recent field tests in Pallas, Finland, the retrieved optical sensor signal has been compared with the DMT Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS) which measures cloud droplets in the size range from 0.5 to 50 microns. Both sensors were installed at the hill top observatory of Sammaltunturi during a field campaign in October and November 2015, which experienced long periods of immersion inside cloud. Preliminary analysis shows very good agreement between the CAPS and the disposable cloud sensor for cloud droplets >5micron effective diameter. Such data and calibration of the sensor will be discussed here, as will simultaneous balloon launches of the optical cloud sensor through the same cloud layers.

  17. Fiber optic oxygen sensor leak detection system for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Alex A.; Goswami, Kish; Mendoza, Edgar A.; Kempen, Lothar U.

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes the successful test of a multi-point fiber optic oxygen sensor system during the static firing of an Evolved Expandable Launch Vehicle (EELV)/Delta IV common booster core (CBC) rocket engine at NASA's Stennis Flight Center. The system consisted of microsensors (optrodes) using an oxygen gas sensitive indicator incorporated onto an optically transparent porous substrate. The modular optoelectronics and multiplexing network system was designed and assembled utilizing a multi-channel opto-electronic sensor readout unit that monitored the oxygen and temperature response of the individual optrodes in real-time and communicated this information via a serial communication port to a remote laptop computer. The sensor packaging for oxygen consisted of two optrodes - one doped with an indicator sensitive to oxygen, and the other doped with an indicator sensitive to temperature. The multichannel oxygen sensor system is fully reversible. It has demonstrated a dynamic response to oxygen gas in the range of 0% to 100% with 0.1% resolution and a response time of <=10 seconds. The sensor package was attached to a custom fiber optic ribbon cable, which was then connected to a fiber optic trunk communications cable (standard telecommunications-grade fiber) that connected to the optoelectronics module. Each board in the expandable module included light sources, photo-detectors, and associated electronics required for detecting oxygen and temperature. The paper illustrates the sensor design and performance data under field deployment conditions.

  18. Ferromagnetic Resonance detection using stroboscopic magneto optical Kerr effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seungha; Moriyama, Takahiro; McMichael, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) is a powerful method for measuring the magnetic properties of ferromagnets. A number of related optical techniques have become popular, including time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (TR-MOKE) microscopy and Brillouin light scattering (BLS). In this presentation we describe a new, stroboscopic method of measuring FMR based on the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE). We use a polarized telecommunications fiber laser (wavelength = 1550 nm) and a fiber modulator driven at a frequency of interest (1 GHz to 10 GHz) to create pulsed, linearly polarized light incident on a CoFeB thin film sample. Precession in the sample is driven via a coplanar waveguide in the sample holder while the reflected light is split by a polarizing beam splitter and detected by a balanced detector. As the magnetic field is swept, oscillations in the Kerr angle and in the light intensity mix to produce a DC resonance signal. The spectra are Lorentzian, with a superposition of symmetric and anti-symmetric shapes that depends on the phase of the optical and microwave signals. In the presentation, we will also discuss phase sensitive measurements with this technique as well as the advantages over other FMR techniques.

  19. Research on key problems for LAMOST optical fiber detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengxin; Chen, Jianjun; Luo, Ali; Chen, Xiaoran

    2014-07-01

    The large sky area multi-object fiber spectroscopic telescope (LAMOST) is an innovative reflecting schmidt telescope, promising a very high spectrum acquiring rate of several ten-thousands of spectra per night. By using the parallel controllable fiber positioning technique, LAMOST makes reconfiguration of fibers accurately according to the positions of objects in minutes and fine adjusting the fibers. During telescope observation period, each optical fiber unit positional accuracy directly determines the quality of subsequent spectrum acqusition, yet for real-time optical fiber positional accuracy, there only exists an internal information feedback which focus on the corresponding stepper motor driving conditions, however, this available information is not comprehensive, it can not offer the actual positional information for each fiber unit. Considering the LAMOST on-site environment, a novel real-time optical fiber positional accuracy detection system which can be integrated in the existing observation and control system need to be developed to solve this problem. During the observation interval, this system can offer a comprehensive and effective information feedback about the focal optical fiber positional accuracy. Based on this feedback, the observation assistants can properly adjust the observation strategies to ensure the effectiveness and accuracy of acquired spectrum. Furthermore, this fiber positional accuracy feedback can provide prior spectral quality information to the spectral processing personnel and optimal the spectrum processing efficiency.

  20. New Detections of Radio Minihalos in Cool Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacintucci, Simona; Markevitch, Maxim; Venturi, Tiziana; Clarke, Tracy E.; Cassano, Rossella; Mazzotta, Pasquale

    2013-01-01

    Cool cores of some galaxy clusters exhibit faint radio minihalos. Their origin is unclear, and their study has been limited by their small number. We undertook a systematic search for minihalos in a large sample of X-ray luminous clusters with high-quality radio data. In this article, we report four new minihalos (A 478, ZwCl 3146,RXJ 1532.9+3021, and A 2204) and five candidates found in the reanalyzed archival Very Large Array observations.The radio luminosities of our minihalos and candidates are in the range of 102325 W Hz1 at 1.4 GHz, which is consistent with these types of radio sources. Their sizes (40160 kpc in radius) are somewhat smaller than those of previously known minihalos. We combine our new detections with previously known minihalos, obtaining a total sample of 21 objects, and briefly compare the cluster radio properties to the average X-ray temperature and the total masses estimated from Planck.We find that nearly all clusters hosting minihalos are hot and massive. Beyond that, there is no clear correlation between the minihalo radio power and cluster temperature or mass (in contrast with the giant radio halos found in cluster mergers, whose radio luminosity correlates with the cluster mass). Chandra X-ray images indicate gas sloshing in the cool cores of most of our clusters, with minihalos contained within the sloshing regions in many of them. This supports the hypothesis that radio-emitting electrons are reaccelerated by sloshing. Advection of relativistic electrons by the sloshing gas may also play a role in the formation of the less extended minihalos.

  1. Nationwide registry-based analysis of cancer clustering detects strong familial occurrence of Kaposi sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Kaasinen, Eevi; Aavikko, Mervi; Vahteristo, Pia; Patama, Toni; Li, Yilong; Saarinen, Silva; Kilpivaara, Outi; Pitkänen, Esa; Knekt, Paul; Laaksonen, Maarit; Artama, Miia; Lehtonen, Rainer; Aaltonen, Lauri A; Pukkala, Eero

    2013-01-01

    Many cancer predisposition syndromes are rare or have incomplete penetrance, and traditional epidemiological tools are not well suited for their detection. Here we have used an approach that employs the entire population based data in the Finnish Cancer Registry (FCR) for analyzing familial aggregation of all types of cancer, in order to find evidence for previously unrecognized cancer susceptibility conditions. We performed a systematic clustering of 878,593 patients in FCR based on family name at birth, municipality of birth, and tumor type, diagnosed between years 1952 and 2011. We also estimated the familial occurrence of the tumor types using cluster score that reflects the proportion of patients belonging to the most significant clusters compared to all patients in Finland. The clustering effort identified 25,910 birth name-municipality based clusters representing 183 different tumor types characterized by topography and morphology. We produced information about familial occurrence of hundreds of tumor types, and many of the tumor types with high cluster score represented known cancer syndromes. Unexpectedly, Kaposi sarcoma (KS) also produced a very high score (cluster score 1.91, p-value <0.0001). We verified from population records that many of the KS patients forming the clusters were indeed close relatives, and identified one family with five affected individuals in two generations and several families with two first degree relatives. Our approach is unique in enabling systematic examination of a national epidemiological database to derive evidence of aberrant familial aggregation of all tumor types, both common and rare. It allowed effortless identification of families displaying features of both known as well as potentially novel cancer predisposition conditions, including striking familial aggregation of KS. Further work with high-throughput methods should elucidate the molecular basis of the potentially novel predisposition conditions found in this

  2. THE OPTICAL COMPANION TO THE BINARY MILLISECOND PULSAR J1824-2452H IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER M28

    SciTech Connect

    Pallanca, C.; Dalessandro, E.; Ferraro, F. R.; Lanzoni, B.; Rood, R. T.; Possenti, A.; D'Amico, N.; Freire, P. C.; Stairs, I.; Begin, S.; Ransom, S. M.

    2010-12-10

    We report on the optical identification of the companion star to the eclipsing millisecond pulsar (MSP) PSR J1824-2452H in the galactic globular cluster M28 (NGC 6626). This star is at only 0.''2 from the nominal position of the pulsar and it shows optical variability ({approx}0.25 mag) that nicely correlates with the pulsar orbital period. It is located on the blue side of the cluster main sequence, {approx}1.5 mag fainter than the turnoff point. The observed light curve shows two distinct and asymmetric minima, suggesting that the companion star is suffering tidal distortion from the pulsar. This discovery increases the number of non-degenerate MSP companions optically identified so far in globular clusters (four out of seven), suggesting that these systems could be a common outcome of the pulsar recycling process, at least in dense environments where they can be originated by exchange interactions.

  3. A multi-similarity spectral clustering method for community detection in dynamic networks.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xuanmei; Dai, Weidi; Jiao, Pengfei; Wang, Wenjun; Yuan, Ning

    2016-08-16

    Community structure is one of the fundamental characteristics of complex networks. Many methods have been proposed for community detection. However, most of these methods are designed for static networks and are not suitable for dynamic networks that evolve over time. Recently, the evolutionary clustering framework was proposed for clustering dynamic data, and it can also be used for community detection in dynamic networks. In this paper, a multi-similarity spectral (MSSC) method is proposed as an improvement to the former evolutionary clustering method. To detect the community structure in dynamic networks, our method considers the different similarity metrics of networks. First, multiple similarity matrices are constructed for each snapshot of dynamic networks. Then, a dynamic co-training algorithm is proposed by bootstrapping the clustering of different similarity measures. Compared with a number of baseline models, the experimental results show that the proposed MSSC method has better performance on some widely used synthetic and real-world datasets with ground-truth community structure that change over time.

  4. A multi-similarity spectral clustering method for community detection in dynamic networks

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xuanmei; Dai, Weidi; Jiao, Pengfei; Wang, Wenjun; Yuan, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Community structure is one of the fundamental characteristics of complex networks. Many methods have been proposed for community detection. However, most of these methods are designed for static networks and are not suitable for dynamic networks that evolve over time. Recently, the evolutionary clustering framework was proposed for clustering dynamic data, and it can also be used for community detection in dynamic networks. In this paper, a multi-similarity spectral (MSSC) method is proposed as an improvement to the former evolutionary clustering method. To detect the community structure in dynamic networks, our method considers the different similarity metrics of networks. First, multiple similarity matrices are constructed for each snapshot of dynamic networks. Then, a dynamic co-training algorithm is proposed by bootstrapping the clustering of different similarity measures. Compared with a number of baseline models, the experimental results show that the proposed MSSC method has better performance on some widely used synthetic and real-world datasets with ground-truth community structure that change over time. PMID:27528179

  5. Detection and quantification of solute clusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K.; Larson, David J.; Reinhard, D. A.

    2014-12-26

    A series of simulated atom probe datasets were examined with a friends-of-friends method to establish the detection efficiency required to resolve solute clusters in the ferrite phase of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy. The size and number densities of solute clusters in the ferrite of the as-milled mechanically-alloyed condition and the stir zone of a friction stir weld were estimated with a prototype high-detection-efficiency (~80%) local electrode atom probe. High number densities, 1.8 × 1024 m–3 and 1.2 × 1024 m–3, respectively of solute clusters containing between 2 and 9 solute atoms of Ti, Y and O and were detected for these two conditions. Furthermore, these results support first principle calculations that predicted that vacancies stabilize these Ti–Y–O– clusters, which retard diffusion and contribute to the excellent high temperature stability of the microstructure and radiation tolerance of nanostructured ferritic alloys.

  6. A multi-similarity spectral clustering method for community detection in dynamic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xuanmei; Dai, Weidi; Jiao, Pengfei; Wang, Wenjun; Yuan, Ning

    2016-08-01

    Community structure is one of the fundamental characteristics of complex networks. Many methods have been proposed for community detection. However, most of these methods are designed for static networks and are not suitable for dynamic networks that evolve over time. Recently, the evolutionary clustering framework was proposed for clustering dynamic data, and it can also be used for community detection in dynamic networks. In this paper, a multi-similarity spectral (MSSC) method is proposed as an improvement to the former evolutionary clustering method. To detect the community structure in dynamic networks, our method considers the different similarity metrics of networks. First, multiple similarity matrices are constructed for each snapshot of dynamic networks. Then, a dynamic co-training algorithm is proposed by bootstrapping the clustering of different similarity measures. Compared with a number of baseline models, the experimental results show that the proposed MSSC method has better performance on some widely used synthetic and real-world datasets with ground-truth community structure that change over time.

  7. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Survey of Clusters in Nearby Galaxies. I. Detection and Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolphin, Andrew E.; Kennicutt, Robert C., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed photometric techniques that can be applied to images with highly variable backgrounds, as well as to slightly extended objects (object size comparable to or smaller than point-spread function [PSF] size). We have shown that ordinary stellar PSF-fitting photometry can be applied to slightly extended objects provided that one applies a systematic correction to the photometry that is a function primarily of the observed sharpness. Applying these techniques to the Cepheid target NGC 3627, we find that we are successfully able to photometer the stars and clusters, as well as discriminate the cluster population with a negligible number of false detections.

  8. Digital balanced detection for fast optical computerized tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz, Rehan; Ozanyan, Krikor B.

    2006-10-01

    Analogue Balanced Photo-detection has found extensive usage in high- sensitivity small signal applications e.g. coherent heterodyne detection. It is particularly effective for laser intensity noise removal. Nevertheless, the high cost of the commercially available analogue systems makes them unsuitable for multi-channel applications, such as fast tomography. In this paper a flexible, scalable, inexpensive and compact solution for multi channel digital balanced detection is presented. The proposed system has two components: an analogue front-end, comprising a differential photodiode amplifier for minimizing the external interference noise, and a digital balanced noise remover. The latter component initially calculates a balancing factor (BF) from the average power ratio of the signal and reference photocurrents, measured with the object removed from the signal path. Three digital balancing algorithms (DBAx) are considered for subsequent processing. In DBA1, BF is directly used in real-time ratiometric calculations. In DBA2, the BF is adjusted in real time by monitoring the window-averaged power of the received photocurrents. In DBA3, first the baseline is removed using differentiation and then ratiometric detection is performed. Using the digital alternative only one measurement of the reference beam is necessary for single-source, multi-channel detection systems. The data from multiple channels are processed in parallel by pipelined hardware, configured as a state machine. The proposed system leads to a fast optical computerized tomography system using digital balanced detection.

  9. Magnetic and optical properties of K and Na clusters arrayed in a diamond structure in zeolite FAU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikemoto, Y.; Nakano, T.; Kuno, M.; Nozue, Y.

    2000-06-01

    K and Na clusters are generated in zeolite FAU with an Si-to-Al ratio of 1.25. We measured magnetic susceptibility, electron-spin resonance spectrum and the optical one. Observed magnetic properties are discussed from the viewpoint of the correlated electrons and/or the narrow energy band with a properly localized nature of clusters, together with a finite disorder effect.

  10. Theoretical investigation of stabilities and optical properties of Si12C12 clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiaofeng F.; Burggraf, Larry W.

    2015-01-01

    By sorting through hundreds of globally stable Si12C12 isomers using a potential surface search and using simulated annealing, we have identified low-energy structures. Unlike isomers knit together by Si-C bonds, the lowest energy isomers have segregated carbon and silicon regions that maximize stronger C-C bonding. Positing that charge separation between the carbon and silicon regions would produce interesting optical absorption in these cluster molecules, we used time-dependent density functional theory to compare the calculated optical properties of four isomers representing structural classes having different types of silicon and carbon segregation regions. Absorptions involving charge transfer between segregated carbon and silicon regions produce lower excitation energies than do structures having alternating Si-C bonding for which frontier orbital charge transfer is exclusively from separated carbon atoms to silicon atoms. The most stable Si12C12 isomer at temperatures below 1100 K is unique as regards its high symmetry and large optical oscillator strength in the visible blue. Its high-energy and low-energy visible transitions (1.15 eV and 2.56 eV) are nearly pure one-electron silicon-to-carbon transitions, while an intermediate energy transition (1.28 eV) is a nearly pure carbon-to-silicon one-electron charge transfer.

  11. Theoretical investigation of stabilities and optical properties of Si12C12 clusters.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaofeng F; Burggraf, Larry W

    2015-01-21

    By sorting through hundreds of globally stable Si12C12 isomers using a potential surface search and using simulated annealing, we have identified low-energy structures. Unlike isomers knit together by Si-C bonds, the lowest energy isomers have segregated carbon and silicon regions that maximize stronger C-C bonding. Positing that charge separation between the carbon and silicon regions would produce interesting optical absorption in these cluster molecules, we used time-dependent density functional theory to compare the calculated optical properties of four isomers representing structural classes having different types of silicon and carbon segregation regions. Absorptions involving charge transfer between segregated carbon and silicon regions produce lower excitation energies than do structures having alternating Si-C bonding for which frontier orbital charge transfer is exclusively from separated carbon atoms to silicon atoms. The most stable Si12C12 isomer at temperatures below 1100 K is unique as regards its high symmetry and large optical oscillator strength in the visible blue. Its high-energy and low-energy visible transitions (1.15 eV and 2.56 eV) are nearly pure one-electron silicon-to-carbon transitions, while an intermediate energy transition (1.28 eV) is a nearly pure carbon-to-silicon one-electron charge transfer.

  12. Relation between the optical properties of composite Si3N4 thin films with embedded Cu clusters and the clusters morphology: Irradiation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardeau, T.; Camelio, S.; Traverse, A.; Lignou, F.; Allain, J.; Naudon, A.; Guérin, Ph.

    2001-08-01

    Ion beam sputtering codeposition has been used to elaborate ceramic-metal (cermet) composite thin films consisting of copper nanoclusters embedded in an amorphous Si3N4 matrix. As prepared, the clusters have a size smaller than 3 nm and postirradiation by high energetic Ar+ ions leads to an homogenization of the clusters' morphology and an increase of the clusters' size to an average diameter of 4.5 nm. This work deals with the relation between the morphology of the clusters, characterized by extended x-ray absorption fine spectroscopy and grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering, and the optical properties (obtained by spectroscopic ellipsometry) of the cermets, which are classically modeled with the help of the effective medium theory. In the case of the as-prepared sample, the Bruggeman effective medium theory has been successfully used. This comes from the fact that the clusters are sufficiently close to each other to create mutual interactions. On the other hand, the morphology of the postirradiated film is in agreement with the hypothesis made by the Maxwell-Garnett effective medium theory, and a resonance peak appears due to the surface plasmon excitation whose position depends on the cluster size.

  13. Compact fiber optic dual-detection confocal displacement sensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Ryoung; Jang, Suin; Lee, Min Woo; Yoo, Hongki

    2016-09-20

    We propose a dual-detection confocal displacement sensor (DDCDS) with a compact fiber-based optical probe. This all-fiber-optic sensor probe is simple and robust, since it only requires simple alignment of a gradient refractive index lens and a double-clad fiber (DCF). The DDCDS is composed of two point detectors, one coupled to a single mode fiber and the other coupled to a multimode fiber, which are used to measure the light intensity from a core and an inner clad of a DCF, respectively. The ratio of the axial response curves, measured by the two detectors, can be used to obtain a linear relationship between the axial position of the object plane and the ratio of the intensity signals. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed method by measuring micromovement and fast vibration.

  14. Optical detection of blade flutter. [in YF-100 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieberding, W. C.; Pollack, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    The paper examines the capabilities of photoelectric scanning (PES) and stroboscopic imagery (SI) as optical monitoring tools for detection of the onset of flutter in the fan blades of an aircraft gas turbine engine. Both optical techniques give visual data in real time as well as video-tape records. PES is shown to be an ideal flutter monitor, since a single cathode ray tube displays the behavior of all the blades in a stage simultaneously. Operation of the SI system continuously while searching for a flutter condition imposes severe demands on the flash tube and affects its reliability, thus limiting its use as a flutter monitor. A better method of operation is to search for flutter with the PES and limit the use of SI to those times when the PES indicates interesting blade activity.

  15. Applying Mean-Shift - Clustering for 3D object detection in remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Jürgen-Lorenz; Diederich, Malte; Troemel, Silke

    2013-04-01

    The timely warning and forecasting of high-impact weather events is crucial for life, safety and economy. Therefore, the development and improvement of methods for detection and nowcasting / short-term forecasting of these events is an ongoing research question. A new 3D object detection and tracking algorithm is presented. Within the project "object-based analysis and seamless predictin (OASE)" we address a better understanding and forecasting of convective events based on the synergetic use of remotely sensed data and new methods for detection, nowcasting, validation and assimilation. In order to gain advanced insight into the lifecycle of convective cells, we perform an object-detection on a new high-resolution 3D radar- and satellite based composite and plan to track the detected objects over time, providing us with a model of the lifecycle. The insights in the lifecycle will be used in order to improve prediction of convective events in the nowcasting time scale, as well as a new type of data to be assimilated into numerical weather models, thus seamlessly bridging the gap between nowcasting and NWP.. The object identification (or clustering) is performed using a technique borrowed from computer vision, called mean-shift clustering. Mean-Shift clustering works without many of the parameterizations or rigid threshold schemes employed by many existing schemes (e. g. KONRAD, TITAN, Trace-3D), which limit the tracking to fully matured, convective cells of significant size and/or strength. Mean-Shift performs without such limiting definitions, providing a wider scope for studying larger classes of phenomena and providing a vehicle for research into the object definition itself. Since the mean-shift clustering technique could be applied on many types of remote-sensing and model data for object detection, it is of general interest to the remote sensing and modeling community. The focus of the presentation is the introduction of this technique and the results of its

  16. Investigation of the optical-absorption bands of Nb4+ and Ti3+ in lithium niobate using magnetic circular dichroism and optically detected magnetic-resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyher, H.-J.; Schulz, R.; Thiemann, O.

    1994-08-01

    The magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) of the absorption of Nb4+Li and Ti3+Li centers in LiNbO3 has been selectively measured by applying optically detected magnetic resonance. The attribution of a well-known broad and unstructured absorption band peaking at 1.6 eV to the Nb4+Li bound small polaron is now unambiguously confirmed. In the MCD spectrum of the isoelectronic Ti3+Li center, bands show up, which closely resemble the MCD bands at 1.6 eV of this bound small polaron. This striking similarity is explained by a cluster model, representing both defects. Either TiLi or NbLi is at the center of this cluster. In both cases, the small polaron is bound to the cluster, and its MCD bands correspond to intervalence transfer transitions within the constituents of the cluster. A study of the spin-orbit coupling of the molecular orbitals of the cluster allows one to analyze the structure of the MCD bands at 2.9 eV of Ti3+Li have no counterpart in the Nb4+Li spectrum. These bands are assigned to transitions to excited states, which are specific to the impurity and are related to the 10Dq transitions known for the crystal field states of a d1 ion.

  17. A GMBCG galaxy cluster catalog of 55,880 rich clusters from SDSS DR7

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Jiangang; McKay, Timothy A.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Rozo, Eduardo; Annis, James; Wechsler, Risa H.; Evrard, August; Siegel, Seth R.; Becker, Matthew; Busha, Michael; /Fermilab /Michigan U. /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /UC, Santa Barbara /KICP, Chicago /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Caltech /Brookhaven

    2010-08-01

    We present a large catalog of optically selected galaxy clusters from the application of a new Gaussian Mixture Brightest Cluster Galaxy (GMBCG) algorithm to SDSS Data Release 7 data. The algorithm detects clusters by identifying the red sequence plus Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) feature, which is unique for galaxy clusters and does not exist among field galaxies. Red sequence clustering in color space is detected using an Error Corrected Gaussian Mixture Model. We run GMBCG on 8240 square degrees of photometric data from SDSS DR7 to assemble the largest ever optical galaxy cluster catalog, consisting of over 55,000 rich clusters across the redshift range from 0.1 < z < 0.55. We present Monte Carlo tests of completeness and purity and perform cross-matching with X-ray clusters and with the maxBCG sample at low redshift. These tests indicate high completeness and purity across the full redshift range for clusters with 15 or more members.

  18. A GMBCG Galaxy Cluster Catalog of 55,424 Rich Clusters from SDSS DR7

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Jiangang; McKay, Timothy A.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Rozo, Eduardo; Annis, James; Wechsler, Risa H.; Evrard, August; Siegel, Seth R.; Becker, Matthew; Busha, Michael; Gerdes, David; Johnston, David E.; Sheldon, Erin; /Brookhaven

    2011-08-22

    We present a large catalog of optically selected galaxy clusters from the application of a new Gaussian Mixture Brightest Cluster Galaxy (GMBCG) algorithm to SDSS Data Release 7 data. The algorithm detects clusters by identifying the red sequence plus Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) feature, which is unique for galaxy clusters and does not exist among field galaxies. Red sequence clustering in color space is detected using an Error Corrected Gaussian Mixture Model. We run GMBCG on 8240 square degrees of photometric data from SDSS DR7 to assemble the largest ever optical galaxy cluster catalog, consisting of over 55,000 rich clusters across the redshift range from 0.1 < z < 0.55. We present Monte Carlo tests of completeness and purity and perform cross-matching with X-ray clusters and with the maxBCG sample at low redshift. These tests indicate high completeness and purity across the full redshift range for clusters with 15 or more members.

  19. The XXL Survey. XII. Optical spectroscopy of X-ray-selected clusters and the frequency of AGN in superclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulouridis, E.; Poggianti, B.; Altieri, B.; Valtchanov, I.; Jaffé, Y.; Adami, C.; Elyiv, A.; Melnyk, O.; Fotopoulou, S.; Gastaldello, F.; Horellou, C.; Pierre, M.; Pacaud, F.; Plionis, M.; Sadibekova, T.; Surdej, J.

    2016-06-01

    Context. This article belongs to the first series of XXL publications. It presents multifibre spectroscopic observations of three 0.55 deg2 fields in the XXL Survey, which were selected on the basis of their high density of X-ray-detected clusters. The observations were obtained with the AutoFib2+WYFFOS (AF2) wide-field fibre spectrograph mounted on the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope. Aims: The paper first describes the scientific rationale, the preparation, the data reduction, and the results of the observations, and then presents a study of active galactic nuclei (AGN) within three superclusters. Methods: To determine the redshift of galaxy clusters and AGN, we assign high priority to a) the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), b) the most probable cluster galaxy candidates, and c) the optical counterparts of X-ray point-like sources. We use the outcome of the observations to study the projected (2D) and the spatial (3D) overdensity of AGN in three superclusters. Results: We obtained redshifts for 455 galaxies in total, 56 of which are counterparts of X-ray point-like sources. We were able to determine the redshift of the merging supercluster XLSSC-e, which consists of six individual clusters at z ~ 0.43, and we confirmed the redshift of supercluster XLSSC-d at z ~ 0.3. More importantly, we discovered a new supercluster, XLSSC-f, that comprises three galaxy clusters also at z ~ 0.3. We find a significant 2D overdensity of X-ray point-like sources only around the supercluster XLSSC-f. This result is also supported by the spatial (3D) analysis of XLSSC-f, where we find four AGN with compatible spectroscopic redshifts and possibly one more with compatible photometric redshift. In addition, we find two AGN (3D analysis) at the redshift of XLSSC-e, but no AGN in XLSSC-d. Comparing these findings with the optical galaxy overdensity we conclude that the total number of AGN in the area of the three superclusters significantly exceeds the field expectations. All of the

  20. Optics industry in Spain: a cluster approach to increasing competitiveness through collaboration in R&D and innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifuentes, Andrés F.

    2011-10-01

    The optics industry in Spain pooled together to create the Southern European Cluster in Photonics and Optics - SECPhO, founded in April 2009, with the mission to help the sector increase competitiveness, specially through collaboration. From 10 founding members, SECPhO no incorporates over 40 members, which is nearly 40% of the optics industry in the region. From the beginning of operations the cluster has focused on three strategic challenges: R&D+i and Productivity, Visibility and Internationalization, and Betterment and Retention of Talent. A brief summary of the clusters activities is given. In this article, the focus will be on R&D and innovation, through industry driven collaborative initiatives and the tools and actions that lead to successful partnerships. Topics discussed in this work are will be a cluster's role in promoting strategic change, the value chain approach to partnerships, international collaboration in projects and specific cluster activities. Some practical examples of initiatives relating to effective collaboration are described, focusing on one of the mayor challenges of our time: the greening of the planet. Examples will be addressed in smart cities, efficient LASER applications and lightweight optical sensors for civil security. In all cases the collaboration between the public and private sectors is shown.

  1. Detection of defects in optics based on scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bin; Bai, Jian; Liang, Yiyong; Wang, Kaiwei; Lu, Qianbo; Zhang, Sai

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a method to detect internal pocks and bubbles of optical elements based on laser line source scanning is proposed. In dark field environment, a laser line source is used to illuminate from one side of the glass under test, a high-resolution CCD camera is used to take pictures in front of the glass sample. Images which contain information of defects are acquired through rough scanning and accurate scanning. Accurate three-dimensional coordinates of the internal defects are acquired after image processing, which descript the characteristic information of internal defects quantificationally. Compared with the microscope imaging measurement, this proposed detection of defects in optics based on laser line source scanning has a relative aberration smaller than 2%. In addition, the detection time is approximately reduced to 20 minutes from 1 hour dramatically. The analysis indicates that the error of the position of defects is much smaller than the size of them, which means the position of the defects can be acquired accurately by this approach.

  2. CRTS detection of optical outburst of PKS 2023-07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabal, A. A.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Drake, A. J.; Graham, M. J.; Williams, R.; Catelan, M.; Beshore, E. C.; Larson, S. M.; Christensen, E.

    2009-08-01

    We report on the discovery of an optical outburst associated with PKS 2023-07 by the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey (CRTS). Recently, Gasparrini et al. ATel#2175 noted the Fermi LAT detection of a GeV flare from blazar PKS 2023-07. On Aug 29.17 UT CRTS automatically detected and alerted that this object was undergoing a significant optical outburst with V~15.2.

    ID Detection DateRADecMagVOEvent ID
    CSS090829:202541-073553 2009-08-29 UT 04:15:36 20:25:40.63-07:35:52.7 15.2 908290071094126135
    Past photometry dating back to April 2005 suggests that this blazar is highly variable often showing wild variations in brightness over relatively short periods, and is in that sense unlike most blazars.

  3. Tapered optical fiber sensor for chemical pollutants detection in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irigoyen, Maite; Sánchez-Martin, Jose Antonio; Bernabeu, Eusebio; Zamora, Alba

    2017-04-01

    Three tapered silica optical fibers, uncoated and coated with metallic (Al or Cu) and dielectric layers (TiO2), are employed to determine the presence of oil and Hazardous and Noxious Substances (HNS from now on) in water, by means of the measurement of their spectral transmittance. With our experimental assembly, the presence of oil and HNS spills can be detected employing the three different kinds of tapers, since the complete range of refractive indices of the pollutants (1.329–1.501) is covered with these tapers. The most suitable spectral range to detect the presence of a chemical pollutant in seawater has been identified and a complete spectral characterization of the three types of optical fiber tapers has been carried out. The results obtained show that, in general terms, these devices working together can be employed for the early detection of oil and HNS spills in seawater in a marine industrial environment. These sensors have many advantages, such as its low cost, its simplicity and versatility (with interesting properties as quick response and repeatability), and especially that they can be self-cleaned with seawater in motion.

  4. Dental caries detection by optical spectroscopy: a polarized Raman approach with fibre-optic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, A. C.-T.; Choo-Smith, L.-P.; Werner, J.; Hewko, M.; Sowa, M. G.; Dong, C.; Cleghorn, B.

    2006-09-01

    Incipient dental caries lesions appear as white spots on the tooth surface; however, accurate detection of early approximal lesions is difficult due to limited sensitivity of dental radiography and other traditional diagnostic tools. A new fibre-optic coupled spectroscopic method based on polarized Raman spectroscopy (P-RS) with near-IR laser excitation is introduced which provides contrast for detecting and characterizing incipient caries. Changes in polarized Raman spectra are observed in PO 4 3- vibrations arising from hydroxyapatite of mineralized tooth tissue. Demineralization-induced morphological/orientational alteration of enamel crystallites is believed to be responsible for the reduction of Raman polarization anisotropy observed in the polarized Raman spectra of caries lesions. Supporting evidence obtained by polarized Raman spectral imaging is presented. A specially designed fibre-optic coupled setup for simultaneous measurement of parallel- and cross-polarized tooth Raman spectra is demonstrated in this study.

  5. Magneto-optical contrast in liquid-state optically detected NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pagliero, Daniela; Meriles, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    We use optical Faraday rotation (OFR) to probe nuclear spins in real time at high-magnetic field in a range of diamagnetic sample fluids. Comparison of OFR-detected NMR spectra reveals a correlation between the relative signal amplitude and the fluid Verdet constant, which we interpret as a manifestation of the variable detuning between the probe beam and the sample optical transitions. The analysis of chemical-shift-resolved, optically detected spectra allows us to set constraints on the relative amplitudes of hyperfine coupling constants, both for protons at chemically distinct sites and other lower-gyromagnetic-ratio nuclei including carbon, fluorine, and phosphorous. By considering a model binary mixture we observe a complex dependence of the optical response on the relative concentration, suggesting that the present approach is sensitive to the solvent-solute dynamics in ways complementary to those known in inductive NMR. Extension of these experiments may find application in solvent suppression protocols, sensitivity-enhanced NMR of metalloproteins in solution, the investigation of solvent-solute interactions, or the characterization of molecular orbitals in diamagnetic systems. PMID:22100736

  6. Optical beat interference noise reduction in OFDMA optical access link using self-homodyne balanced detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sang-Min; Won, Yong-Yuk; Han, Sang-Kook

    2013-12-01

    A Novel technique for reducing the OBI noise in optical OFDMA-PON uplink is presented. OFDMA is a multipleaccess/ multiplexing scheme that can provide multiplexing operation of user data streams onto the downlink sub-channels and uplink multiple access by means of dividing OFDM subcarriers as sub-channels. The main issue of high-speed, single-wavelength upstream OFDMA-PON arises from optical beating interference noise. Because the sub-channels are allocated dynamically to multiple access users over same nominal wavelength, it generates the optical beating interference among upstream signals. In this paper, we proposed a novel scheme using self-homodyne balanced detection in the optical line terminal (OLT) to reduce OBI noise which is generated in the uplink transmission of OFDMA-PON system. When multiple OFDMA sub-channels over the same nominal wavelength are received at the same time in the proposed architecture, OBI noises can be removed using balanced detection. Using discrete multitone modulation (DMT) to generate real valued OFDM signals, the proposed technique is verified through experimental demonstration.

  7. Label propagation algorithm based on edge clustering coefficient for community detection in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xian-Kun; Tian, Xue; Li, Ya-Nan; Song, Chen

    2014-08-01

    The label propagation algorithm (LPA) is a graph-based semi-supervised learning algorithm, which can predict the information of unlabeled nodes by a few of labeled nodes. It is a community detection method in the field of complex networks. This algorithm is easy to implement with low complexity and the effect is remarkable. It is widely applied in various fields. However, the randomness of the label propagation leads to the poor robustness of the algorithm, and the classification result is unstable. This paper proposes a LPA based on edge clustering coefficient. The node in the network selects a neighbor node whose edge clustering coefficient is the highest to update the label of node rather than a random neighbor node, so that we can effectively restrain the random spread of the label. The experimental results show that the LPA based on edge clustering coefficient has made improvement in the stability and accuracy of the algorithm.

  8. CHANDRA DETECTION OF A NEW DIFFUSE X-RAY COMPONENT FROM THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER 47 TUCANAE

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, E. M. H.; Cheng, K. S.; Hui, C. Y.; Kong, A. K. H.; Tam, P. H. T.; Dogiel, V. A.

    2014-06-20

    In re-analyzing the archival Chandra data of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae, we have detected a new diffuse X-ray emission feature within the half-mass radius of the cluster. The spectrum of the diffuse emission can be described by a power-law model plus a plasma component with photon index Γ ∼ 1.0 and plasma temperature kT ∼ 0.2 keV. While the thermal component is apparently uniform, the non-thermal contribution falls off exponentially from the core. The observed properties could possibly be explained in the context of multiple shocks resulting from the collisions among the stellar wind in the cluster and the inverse Compton scattering between the pulsar wind and the relic photons.

  9. Toward the detection of pure carbon clusters in the Interstellar Medium (ISM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, J. R.; Van Orden, A.; Hwang, H. J.; Kuo, E. W.; Tanaka, K.; Saykally, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    Determination of the form and distribution of carbon in the universe is critical to understanding the origin of life on Earth and elsewhere. Two potentially large reservoirs of carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM) remain unexplored. These are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and pure carbon clusters. Little information exists on the structures, properties, and transition frequencies of pure carbon clusters. The work described is designed to provide a specific inventory of laboratory frequencies and physical properties of this carbon clusters so that efforts can be made to detect them in cold interstellar sources by far-infrared astronomy. Data is given from infrared laser spectroscopy determination of the structure of C3, C4, C5, C6, C7, and C9.

  10. All optical contention detection and resolution for asynchronous variable length optical packets switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Rim; Farhat, Amel; Menif, Mourad

    2016-04-01

    We proposed a novel 2×2 all optical packet switching router architecture supporting asynchronous, labelled and variablelength packet. A proof of concept through Matlab Simulink simulation is validated. Then we discussed the three possible scenarios to demonstrate the contention resolution technique based on deflection routing. We have showing that the contending packet is detected and forwarded according FIFO (First In First Out) strategy to another output.

  11. A first-principles study of the influence of helium atoms on the optical response of small silver clusters.

    PubMed

    Pereiro, M; Baldomir, D; Arias, J E

    2011-02-28

    Optical excitation spectra of Ag(n) and Ag(n)@He(60) (n = 2, 8) clusters are investigated in the framework of the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) within the linear response regime. We have performed the ab initio calculations for two different exact exchange functionals (GGA-exact and LDA-exact). The computed spectra of Ag(n)@He(60) clusters with the GGA-exact functional accounting for exchange-correlation effects are found to be generally in a relatively good agreement with the experiment. A strategy is proposed to obtain the ground-state structures of the Ag(n)@He(60) clusters and in the initial process of the geometry optimization, the He environment is simulated with buckyballs. A redshift of the silver clusters spectra is observed in the He environment with respect to the ones of bare silver clusters. This observation is discussed and explained in terms of a contraction of the Ag-He bonding length and a consequent confinement of the s valence electrons in silver clusters. Likewise, the Mie-Gans predictions combined with our TDDFT calculations also show that the dielectric effect produced by the He matrix is considerably less important in explaining the redshifting observed in the optical spectra of Ag(n)@He(60) clusters.

  12. Depth resolution enhancement in double-detection optical scanning holography.

    PubMed

    Ou, Haiyan; Poon, Ting-Chung; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Lam, Edmund Y

    2013-05-01

    We propose an optical scanning holography system with enhanced axial resolution using two detections at different depths. By scanning the object twice, we can obtain two different sets of Fresnel zone plates to sample the same object, which in turn provides more information for the sectional image reconstruction process. We develop the computation algorithm that makes use of such information, solving a constrained optimization problem using the conjugate gradient method. Simulation results show that this method can achieve a depth resolution up to 1 μm.

  13. Automated detection of dilated capillaries on optical coherence tomography angiography

    PubMed Central

    Dongye, Changlei; Zhang, Miao; Hwang, Thomas S.; Wang, Jie; Gao, Simon S.; Liu, Liang; Huang, David; Wilson, David J.; Jia, Yali

    2017-01-01

    Automated detection and grading of angiographic high-risk features in diabetic retinopathy can potentially enhance screening and clinical care. We have previously identified capillary dilation in angiograms of the deep plexus in optical coherence tomography angiography as a feature associated with severe diabetic retinopathy. In this study, we present an automated algorithm that uses hybrid contrast to distinguish angiograms with dilated capillaries from healthy controls and then applies saliency measurement to map the extent of the dilated capillary networks. The proposed algorithm agreed well with human grading. PMID:28271005

  14. Optical Algorithm for Cloud Shadow Detection Over Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    contextual information to detect cumulus clouds and cloud shadows in Landsat data," Int. J. Remote Sens., vol. 3, no. l.pp. 51-62,1982. [12] T...Betendes, S. K. Sengupta, R. M. Welch, B. A. Wielicki, and M. Navar, " Cumulus cloud base height estimation from high spatial resolution rr-r 740 IEEE...REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 05-02-2013 2. REPORT TYPE Journal Article 3. DATES COVERED (From ■ To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Optical Algorithm for Cloud

  15. Fiber Optic Thermographic Detection of Flaws in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Winfree, William P.

    2009-01-01

    Optical fibers with multiple Bragg gratings bonded to surfaces of structures were used for thermographic detection of subsurface defects in structures. The investigated structures included a 10-ply composite specimen with subsurface delaminations of various sizes and depths. Both during and following the application of a thermal heat flux to the surface, the individual Bragg grating sensors measured the temporal and spatial temperature variations. The obtained data were analyzed with thermal modeling to reveal particular characteristics of the interested areas. These results were found to be consistent with the simulation results.

  16. Depth resolved detection of lipid using spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Christine P.; Eckert, Jocelyn; Halpern, Elkan F.; Gardecki, Joseph A.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2013-01-01

    Optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) can identify key components related to plaque vulnerability but can suffer from artifacts that could prevent accurate identification of lipid rich regions. In this paper, we present a model of depth resolved spectral analysis of OFDI data for improved detection of lipid. A quadratic Discriminant analysis model was developed based on phantom compositions known chemical mixtures and applied to a tissue phantom of a lipid-rich plaque. We demonstrate that a combined spectral and attenuation model can be used to predict the presence of lipid in OFDI images. PMID:24009991

  17. Preparation and detection of magnetic quantum phases in optical superlattices.

    PubMed

    Rey, A M; Gritsev, V; Bloch, I; Demler, E; Lukin, M D

    2007-10-05

    We describe a novel approach to prepare, detect, and characterize magnetic quantum phases in ultracold spinor atoms loaded in optical superlattices. Our technique makes use of singlet-triplet spin manipulations in an array of isolated double-well potentials in analogy to recently demonstrated control in quantum dots. We also discuss the many-body singlet-triplet spin dynamics arising from coherent coupling between nearest neighbor double wells and derive an effective description for such systems. We use it to study the generation of complex magnetic states by adiabatic and nonequilibrium dynamics.

  18. Detection of biological molecules using chemical amplification and optical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Van Antwerp, William Peter; Mastrototaro, John Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Methods are provided for the determination of the concentration of biological levels of polyhydroxylated compounds, particularly glucose. The methods utilize an amplification system that is an analyte transducer immobilized in a polymeric matrix, where the system is implantable and biocompatible. Upon interrogation by an optical system, the amplification system produces a signal capable of detection external to the skin of the patient. Quantitation of the analyte of interest is achieved by measurement of the emitted signal. Specifically, the analyte transducer immobilized in a polymeric matrix can be a boronic acid moiety.

  19. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography with dual-balanced detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, En; Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Si; Luo, Yuemei; Wang, Nanshuo; Wang, Xianghong; Liu, Linbo

    2016-03-01

    We developed a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system employing dual-balanced detection (DBD) for direct current term suppression and SNR enhancement, especially for auto-autocorrelation artifacts reduction. The DBD was achieved by using a beam splitter to building a free-space Michelson interferometer, which generated two interferometric spectra with a phase difference of π. These two phase-opposed spectra were guided to the spectrometer through two single mode fibers of the 8 fiber v-groove array and acquired by ultizing the upper two lines of a three-line CCD camera. We rotated this fiber v-groove array by 1.35 degrees to focus two spectra onto the first and second line of the CCD camera. Two spectra were aligned by optimum spectrum matching algorithm. By subtracting one spectrum from the other, this dual-balanced detection system achieved a direct current term suppression of ~30 dB, SNR enhancement of ~3 dB, and auto-autocorrelation artifacts reduction of ~10 dB experimentally. Finally we respectively validated the feasibility and performance of dual-balanced detection by imaging a glass plate and swine corneal tissue ex vivo. The quality of images obtained using dual-balanced detection was significantly improved with regard to the conventional single-detection (SD) images.

  20. Detecting single DNA molecule interactions with optical microcavities (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Detecting molecules and their interactions lies at the heart of all biosensor devices, which have important applications in health, environmental monitoring and biomedicine. Achieving biosensing capability at the single molecule level is, moreover, a particularly important goal since single molecule biosensors would not only operate at the ultimate detection limit by resolving individual molecular interactions, but they could also monitor biomolecular properties which are otherwise obscured in ensemble measurements. For example, a single molecule biosensor could resolve the fleeting interaction kinetics between a molecule and its receptor, with immediate applications in clinical diagnostics. We have now developed a label-free biosensing platform that is capable of monitoring single DNA molecules and their interaction kinetics[1], hence achieving an unprecedented sensitivity in the optical domain, Figure 1. We resolve the specific contacts between complementary oligonucleotides, thereby detecting DNA strands with less than 2.4 kDa molecular weight. Furthermore we can discern strands with single nucleotide mismatches by monitoring their interaction kinetics. Our device utilizes small glass microspheres as optical transducers[1,2, 3], which are capable of increasing the number of interactions between a light beam and analyte molecules. A prism is used to couple the light beam into the microsphere. Ourr biosensing approach resolves the specific interaction kinetics between single DNA fragments. The optical transducer is assembled in a simple three-step protocol, and consists of a gold nanorod attached to a glass microsphere, where the surface of the nanorod is further modified with oligonucleotide receptors. The interaction kinetics of an oligonucleotide receptor with DNA fragments in the surrounding aqueous solution is monitored at the single molecule level[1]. The light remains confined inside the sphere where it is guided by total internal reflections along a

  1. Detection of X-ray emission from distant clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, J. P.; Branduardi, G.; Fabricant, D.; Feigelson, E.; Murray, S.; Tananbaum, H.; Briel, U.; Soltan, A.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reports the first extensive detection of X-ray emission from clusters of galaxies at cosmological distances. The properties of these objects are similar to those observed in objects at low redshifts. The 0.5-4.5 keV luminosities are in the range of less than 1 x 10 to the 43rd to 2 x 10 to the 45th ergs/s; the core radii are on the order of 0.5 Mpc; and Bautz-Morgan type I clusters are more luminous than types II or III. The observations are consistent with models assuming an evolving cluster potential and moderately efficient galaxy formation, but do not require them when observational selection is considered. X-ray observations of the 3C 295 cluster indicate that there is sufficient intergalactic medium to cause stripping of the cluster spirals, but the colors of these galaxies imply that they have not been stripped. A possible explanation of this discrepancy is discussed.

  2. Distribution-based fuzzy clustering of electrical resistivity tomography images for interface detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, W. O. C.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Chambers, J. E.; Oxby, L. S.; Bai, L.

    2014-04-01

    A novel method for the effective identification of bedrock subsurface elevation from electrical resistivity tomography images is described. Identifying subsurface boundaries in the topographic data can be difficult due to smoothness constraints used in inversion, so a statistical population-based approach is used that extends previous work in calculating isoresistivity surfaces. The analysis framework involves a procedure for guiding a clustering approach based on the fuzzy c-means algorithm. An approximation of resistivity distributions, found using kernel density estimation, was utilized as a means of guiding the cluster centroids used to classify data. A fuzzy method was chosen over hard clustering due to uncertainty in hard edges in the topography data, and a measure of clustering uncertainty was identified based on the reciprocal of cluster membership. The algorithm was validated using a direct comparison of known observed bedrock depths at two 3-D survey sites, using real-time GPS information of exposed bedrock by quarrying on one site, and borehole logs at the other. Results show similarly accurate detection as a leading isosurface estimation method, and the proposed algorithm requires significantly less user input and prior site knowledge. Furthermore, the method is effectively dimension-independent and will scale to data of increased spatial dimensions without a significant effect on the runtime. A discussion on the results by automated versus supervised analysis is also presented.

  3. Optical studies of galaxies in clusters. Observations of spirals in Virgo. III.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperandio, M.; Chincarini, G.; Rampazzo, R.; de Souza, R.

    1995-04-01

    We present the analysis of the rotation curves of a sample of 32 spiral galaxies derived from the spectroscopic observations of a sample of 47 galaxies. For 15 galaxies we were either unable to detect emission lines or measure a reasonably good rotation curve. Of the 32 rotation curves 23 are of galaxies member of the Virgo Cluster and 9 selected from the "field". Analysis of mass and density distribution have been obtained. The mass distribution of cluster galaxies belongs to the Type III proposed by Burstein & Rubin (1985) with few exceptions (NGC 4519 Type I, NGC 2280, NGC 4189, NGC 5861, NGC 6070 Type II) and, is unrelated to the morphological type. Density distribution curves from equidensity surface spheroids model, computed for the Virgo sample, result to be primarily composed of three classes. Rotation curves, none of which shows a peculiar trend, have been parametrized using the criteria introduced by Whitmore et al. (1984). The clustercentric distance of Virgo spirals does not correlate neither with OG nor with OGML in agreement with the findings of Distefano et al. (1990) and Amram et al. (1993, 1994) for other clusters.

  4. Unsupervised sports video scene clustering and its applications to story units detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weigang; Ye, Qixiang; Xing, Liyuan; Huang, Qingming; Gao, Wen

    2005-07-01

    In this paper, we present a new and efficient clustering approach for scene analysis in sports video. This method is generic and does not require any prior domain knowledge. It performs in an unsupervised manner and relies on the scene likeness analysis of the shots in the video. The two most similar shots are merged into the same scene in each iteration. And this procedure is repeated until the merging stop criterion is satisfied. The stop criterion is defined based on a J value which is defined according to the Fisher Discriminant Function. We call this method J-based Scene Clustering. By using this method, the low-level video content representation-shots could be clustered into the midlevel video content representation-scenes, which are useful for high-level sports video content analysis such as playbreak parsing, story units detection, highlights extraction and summarization, etc. Experimental results obtained from various types of broadcast sports videos demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed approach. Moreover, in this paper, we also present a simple application of our scene clustering method to story units detection in periodic sports videos like archery video, diving video and so on. The experimental results are encouraging.

  5. Detection and quantification of solute clusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Miller, Michael K.; Larson, David J.; Reinhard, D. A.

    2014-12-26

    A series of simulated atom probe datasets were examined with a friends-of-friends method to establish the detection efficiency required to resolve solute clusters in the ferrite phase of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy. The size and number densities of solute clusters in the ferrite of the as-milled mechanically-alloyed condition and the stir zone of a friction stir weld were estimated with a prototype high-detection-efficiency (~80%) local electrode atom probe. High number densities, 1.8 × 1024 m–3 and 1.2 × 1024 m–3, respectively of solute clusters containing between 2 and 9 solute atoms of Ti, Y and O and were detectedmore » for these two conditions. Furthermore, these results support first principle calculations that predicted that vacancies stabilize these Ti–Y–O– clusters, which retard diffusion and contribute to the excellent high temperature stability of the microstructure and radiation tolerance of nanostructured ferritic alloys.« less

  6. An Energy-Efficient Cluster-Based Vehicle Detection on Road Network Using Intention Numeration Method

    PubMed Central

    Devasenapathy, Deepa; Kannan, Kathiravan

    2015-01-01

    The traffic in the road network is progressively increasing at a greater extent. Good knowledge of network traffic can minimize congestions using information pertaining to road network obtained with the aid of communal callers, pavement detectors, and so on. Using these methods, low featured information is generated with respect to the user in the road network. Although the existing schemes obtain urban traffic information, they fail to calculate the energy drain rate of nodes and to locate equilibrium between the overhead and quality of the routing protocol that renders a great challenge. Thus, an energy-efficient cluster-based vehicle detection in road network using the intention numeration method (CVDRN-IN) is developed. Initially, sensor nodes that detect a vehicle are grouped into separate clusters. Further, we approximate the strength of the node drain rate for a cluster using polynomial regression function. In addition, the total node energy is estimated by taking the integral over the area. Finally, enhanced data aggregation is performed to reduce the amount of data transmission using digital signature tree. The experimental performance is evaluated with Dodgers loop sensor data set from UCI repository and the performance evaluation outperforms existing work on energy consumption, clustering efficiency, and node drain rate. PMID:25793221

  7. A porous silicon optical microcavity for sensitive bacteria detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sha; Huang, Jianfeng; Cai, Lintao

    2011-10-01

    A porous silicon microcavity (PSM) is highly sensitive to subtle interface changes due to its high surface area, capillary condensation ability and a narrow resonance peak (~10 nm). Based on the well-defined optical properties of a PSM, we successfully fabricated a bacteria detection chip for molecular or subcellular analysis by surface modification using undecylenic acid (UA), and the specific recognition binding of vancomycin to the D-alanyl-D-alanine of bacteria. The red shift of the PSM resonance peak showed a good linear relationship with bacteria concentration ranging from 100 to 1000 bacteria ml - 1 at the level of relative standard deviation of 0.994 and detection limit of 20 bacteria ml - 1. The resulting PSM sensors demonstrated high sensitivity, good reproducibility, fast response and low cost for biosensing.

  8. Adaptive target detection with a polarization-sensitive optical system.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingfei; Kerekes, John P

    2011-05-01

    We developed an adaptive polarimetric target detector (APTD) to determine the optimum combination strategy for a multichannel polarization-sensitive optical system. The proposed algorithm is based on scene-derived polarization properties of the target and background, and it seeks to find an optimum multichannel combination of linear polarizing filters that maximizes the signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR) in intensity and Stokes parameter images. The algorithm is validated by performing RX anomaly detection and a generalized likelihood ratio test on both synthetic and real imagery. The experimental results are analyzed through calculated SCR and receiver operating characteristic curves. Compared with several conventional operation methods, we find that better target detection performance is achieved with the APTD algorithm.

  9. Chirality detection of enantiomers using twisted optical metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Askarpour, Amir N.; Sun, Liuyang; Shi, Jinwei; Li, Xiaoqin; Alù, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Many naturally occurring biomolecules, such as amino acids, sugars and nucleotides, are inherently chiral. Enantiomers, a pair of chiral isomers with opposite handedness, often exhibit similar physical and chemical properties due to their identical functional groups and composition, yet show different toxicity to cells. Detecting enantiomers in small quantities has an essential role in drug development to eliminate their unwanted side effects. Here we exploit strong chiral interactions with plasmonic metamaterials with specifically designed optical response to sense chiral molecules down to zeptomole levels, several orders of magnitude smaller than what is typically detectable with conventional circular dichroism spectroscopy. In particular, the measured spectra reveal opposite signs in the spectral regime directly associated with different chiral responses, providing a way to univocally assess molecular chirality. Our work introduces an ultrathin, planarized nanophotonic interface to sense chiral molecules with inherently weak circular dichroism at visible and near-infrared frequencies. PMID:28120825

  10. Detecting staphylococcal enterotoxin B using an automated fiber optic biosensor.

    PubMed

    King, K D; Anderson, G P; Bullock, K E; Regina, M J; Saaski, E W; Ligler, F S

    1999-02-01

    The Man-portable Analyte Identification System (MANTIS), the first fully automated, self-contained, portable fiber optic biosensor, was utilized for the detection of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB), a bacterial toxin produced by Staphylococcus aureus that commonly causes food poisoning. Because of its remarkable toxicity and stability, SEB is considered a prime threat as a biological weapon of mass destruction. The assay for SEB was used to evaluate the MANTIS' ability to function in the presence of various environmental interferents. The sensor could reliably detect SEB spiked into liquid samples containing a variety of smoke particles. However, substantial interference occurred when SEB was mixed into matrices capable of adsorbing SEB, such as 1% solutions of clay, topsoil, or pollen. Of equal importance, none of the interferents produced false positives in the MANTIS. The MANTIS demonstrated the capability to perform simultaneous immunoassays rapidly in the field with little or no user intervention.

  11. Chirality detection of enantiomers using twisted optical metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Askarpour, Amir N.; Sun, Liuyang; Shi, Jinwei; Li, Xiaoqin; Alù, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Many naturally occurring biomolecules, such as amino acids, sugars and nucleotides, are inherently chiral. Enantiomers, a pair of chiral isomers with opposite handedness, often exhibit similar physical and chemical properties due to their identical functional groups and composition, yet show different toxicity to cells. Detecting enantiomers in small quantities has an essential role in drug development to eliminate their unwanted side effects. Here we exploit strong chiral interactions with plasmonic metamaterials with specifically designed optical response to sense chiral molecules down to zeptomole levels, several orders of magnitude smaller than what is typically detectable with conventional circular dichroism spectroscopy. In particular, the measured spectra reveal opposite signs in the spectral regime directly associated with different chiral responses, providing a way to univocally assess molecular chirality. Our work introduces an ultrathin, planarized nanophotonic interface to sense chiral molecules with inherently weak circular dichroism at visible and near-infrared frequencies.

  12. Amylin Detection with a Miniature Optical-Fiber Based Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhaowen; Ann, Matsko; Hughes, Adam; Reeves, Mark

    We present results of a biosensor based on shifts in the localized surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles self-assembled on the end of an optical fiber. This system allows for detection of protein expression in low sensing volumes and for scanning in cell cultures and tissue samples. Positive and negative controls were done using biotin/avidin and the BSA/Anti-BSA system. These demonstrate that detection is specific and sensitive to nanomolar levels. Sensing of amylin, an important protein for pancreatic function, was performed with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. The measured data demonstrates the difference in sensitivity to the two types of antibodies, and titration experiments establish the sensitivity of the sensor. Further experiments demonstrate that the sensor can be regenerated and then reused.

  13. Nanoparticle cluster arrays for high-performance SERS through directed self-assembly on flat substrates and on optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Yap, Fung Ling; Thoniyot, Praveen; Krishnan, Sathiyamoorthy; Krishnamoorthy, Sivashankar

    2012-03-27

    We demonstrate template-guided self-assembly of gold nanoparticles into ordered arrays of uniform clusters suitable for high-performance SERS on both flat (silicon or glass) chips and an optical fiber faucet. Cluster formation is driven by electrostatic self-assembly of anionic citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles (~11.6 nm diameter) onto two-dimensionally ordered polyelectrolyte templates realized by self-assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine). A systematic variation is demonstrated for the number of particles (N ≈ 5, 8, 13, or 18) per cluster as well as intercluster separations (S(c) ≈ 37-10 nm). Minimum interparticle separations of <5 nm, intercluster separations of ~10 nm, and nanoparticle densities on surfaces as high as ~7 × 10(11)/in.(2) are demonstrated. Geometric modeling is used to support experimental data toward estimation of interparticle and intercluster separations in cluster arrays. Optical modeling and simulations using the finite difference time domain method are used to establish the influence of cluster size, shape, and intercluster separations on the optical properties of the cluster arrays in relation to their SERS performance. Excellent SERS performance, as evidenced by a high enhancement factor, >10(8) on flat chips and >10(7) for remote sensing, using SERS-enabled optical fibers is demonstrated. The best performing cluster arrays in both cases are achievable without the use of any expensive equipment or clean room processing. The demonstrated approach paves the way to significantly low-cost and high-throughput production of sensor chips or 3D-configured surfaces for remote sensing applications.

  14. Formation of metallic magnetic clusters in a Kondo-lattice metal: evidence from an optical study.

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, N N; Kugel, K I; Bazhenov, A V; Fursova, T N; Löser, W; Xu, Y; Behr, G; Kusmartsev, F V

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic materials are usually divided into two classes: those with localised magnetic moments, and those with itinerant charge carriers. We present a comprehensive experimental (spectroscopic ellipsomerty) and theoretical study to demonstrate that these two types of magnetism do not only coexist but complement each other in the Kondo-lattice metal, Tb(2)PdSi(3). In this material the itinerant charge carriers interact with large localised magnetic moments of Tb(4f) states, forming complex magnetic lattices at low temperatures, which we associate with self-organisation of magnetic clusters. The formation of magnetic clusters results in low-energy optical spectral weight shifts, which correspond to opening of the pseudogap in the conduction band of the itinerant charge carriers and development of the low- and high-spin intersite electronic transitions. This phenomenon, driven by self-trapping of electrons by magnetic fluctuations, could be common in correlated metals, including besides Kondo-lattice metals, Fe-based and cuprate superconductors.

  15. Formation of metallic magnetic clusters in a Kondo-lattice metal: Evidence from an optical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, N. N.; Kugel, K. I.; Bazhenov, A. V.; Fursova, T. N.; Löser, W.; Xu, Y.; Behr, G.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2012-11-01

    Magnetic materials are usually divided into two classes: those with localised magnetic moments, and those with itinerant charge carriers. We present a comprehensive experimental (spectroscopic ellipsomerty) and theoretical study to demonstrate that these two types of magnetism do not only coexist but complement each other in the Kondo-lattice metal, Tb2PdSi3. In this material the itinerant charge carriers interact with large localised magnetic moments of Tb(4f) states, forming complex magnetic lattices at low temperatures, which we associate with self-organisation of magnetic clusters. The formation of magnetic clusters results in low-energy optical spectral weight shifts, which correspond to opening of the pseudogap in the conduction band of the itinerant charge carriers and development of the low- and high-spin intersite electronic transitions. This phenomenon, driven by self-trapping of electrons by magnetic fluctuations, could be common in correlated metals, including besides Kondo-lattice metals, Fe-based and cuprate superconductors.

  16. Formation of metallic magnetic clusters in a Kondo-lattice metal: Evidence from an optical study

    PubMed Central

    Kovaleva, N. N.; Kugel, K. I.; Bazhenov, A. V.; Fursova, T. N.; Löser, W.; Xu, Y.; Behr, G.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic materials are usually divided into two classes: those with localised magnetic moments, and those with itinerant charge carriers. We present a comprehensive experimental (spectroscopic ellipsomerty) and theoretical study to demonstrate that these two types of magnetism do not only coexist but complement each other in the Kondo-lattice metal, Tb2PdSi3. In this material the itinerant charge carriers interact with large localised magnetic moments of Tb(4f) states, forming complex magnetic lattices at low temperatures, which we associate with self-organisation of magnetic clusters. The formation of magnetic clusters results in low-energy optical spectral weight shifts, which correspond to opening of the pseudogap in the conduction band of the itinerant charge carriers and development of the low- and high-spin intersite electronic transitions. This phenomenon, driven by self-trapping of electrons by magnetic fluctuations, could be common in correlated metals, including besides Kondo-lattice metals, Fe-based and cuprate superconductors. PMID:23189239

  17. Optical absorption of small copper clusters in neon: Cu(n), (n = 1-9).

    PubMed

    Lecoultre, S; Rydlo, A; Félix, C; Buttet, J; Gilb, S; Harbich, W

    2011-02-21

    We present optical absorption spectra in the UV-visible range (1.6 eV < ℏω < 5.5 eV) of mass selected neutral copper clusters Cu(n)(n = 1-9) embedded in a solid neon matrix at 7 K. The atom and the dimer have already been measured in neon matrices, while the absorption spectra for sizes between Cu(3) and Cu(9) are entirely (n = 6-9) or in great part new. They show a higher complexity and a larger number of transitions distributed over the whole energy range compared to similar sizes of silver clusters. The experimental spectra are compared to the time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) implemented in the TURBOMOLE package. The analysis indicates that for energies larger than 3 eV the transitions are mainly issued from d-type states; however, the TD-DFT scheme does not reproduce well the detailed structure of the absorption spectra. Below 3 eV the agreement for transitions issued from s-type states is better.

  18. A Bayesian clustering approach for detecting gene-gene interactions in high-dimensional genotype data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sui-Pi; Huang, Guan-Hua

    2014-06-01

    This paper uses a Bayesian formulation of a clustering procedure to identify gene-gene interactions under case-control studies, called the Algorithm via Bayesian Clustering to Detect Epistasis (ABCDE). The ABCDE uses Dirichlet process mixtures to model SNP marker partitions, and uses the Gibbs weighted Chinese restaurant sampling to simulate posterior distributions of these partitions. Unlike the representative Bayesian epistasis detection algorithm BEAM, which partitions markers into three groups, the ABCDE can be evaluated at any given partition, regardless of the number of groups. This study also develops permutation tests to validate the disease association for SNP subsets identified by the ABCDE, which can yield results that are more robust to model specification and prior assumptions. This study examines the performance of the ABCDE and compares it with the BEAM using various simulated data and a schizophrenia SNP dataset.

  19. Ant colony clustering with fitness perception and pheromone diffusion for community detection in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Junzhong; Song, Xiangjing; Liu, Chunnian; Zhang, Xiuzhen

    2013-08-01

    Community structure detection in complex networks has been intensively investigated in recent years. In this paper, we propose an adaptive approach based on ant colony clustering to discover communities in a complex network. The focus of the method is the clustering process of an ant colony in a virtual grid, where each ant represents a node in the complex network. During the ant colony search, the method uses a new fitness function to percept local environment and employs a pheromone diffusion model as a global information feedback mechanism to realize information exchange among ants. A significant advantage of our method is that the locations in the grid environment and the connections of the complex network structure are simultaneously taken into account in ants moving. Experimental results on computer-generated and real-world networks show the capability of our method to successfully detect community structures.

  20. Accounting for Limited Detection Efficiency and Localization Precision in Cluster Analysis in Single Molecule Localization Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shivanandan, Arun; Unnikrishnan, Jayakrishnan; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Single Molecule Localization Microscopy techniques like PhotoActivated Localization Microscopy, with their sub-diffraction limit spatial resolution, have been popularly used to characterize the spatial organization of membrane proteins, by means of quantitative cluster analysis. However, such quantitative studies remain challenged by the techniques’ inherent sources of errors such as a limited detection efficiency of less than 60%, due to incomplete photo-conversion, and a limited localization precision in the range of 10 – 30nm, varying across the detected molecules, mainly depending on the number of photons collected from each. We provide analytical methods to estimate the effect of these errors in cluster analysis and to correct for them. These methods, based on the Ripley’s L(r) – r or Pair Correlation Function popularly used by the community, can facilitate potentially breakthrough results in quantitative biology by providing a more accurate and precise quantification of protein spatial organization. PMID:25794150

  1. a New Online Distributed Process Fault Detection and Isolation Approach Using Potential Clustering Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrampour, Soheil; Moshiri, Behzad; Salahshoor, Karim

    2009-08-01

    Most of process fault monitoring systems suffer from offline computations and confronting with novel faults that limit their applicabilities. This paper presents a new online fault detection and isolation (FDI) algorithm based on distributed online clustering approach. In the proposed approach, clustering algorithm is used for online detection of a new trend of time series data which indicates faulty condition. On the other hand, distributed technique is used to decompose the overall monitoring task into a series of local monitoring sub-tasks so as to locally track and capture the process faults. This algorithm not only solves the problem of online FDI, but also can handle novel faults. The diagnostic performances of the proposed FDI approach is evaluated on the Tennessee Eastman process plant as a large-scale benchmark problem.

  2. Metrological characterization of the pulsed Rb clock with optical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micalizio, S.; Calosso, C. E.; Godone, A.; Levi, F.

    2012-08-01

    We report on the implementation and metrological characterization of a vapour-cell Rb frequency standard working in a pulsed regime. The three main parts of the clock, physics package, optics and electronics, are described in detail in this paper. The prototype is designed and optimized to detect the clock transition in the optical domain. Specifically, the reference atomic transition, excited with a Ramsey scheme, is detected by observing the interference pattern on a laser absorption signal. The metrological analysis includes the observation and characterization of the clock signal and the measurement of frequency stability and drift. In terms of Allan deviation, the measured frequency stability is as low as 1.7 × 10-13τ-1/2, τ being the averaging time, and reaches the value of a few units of 10-15 for τ = 104 s, an unprecedented result for a vapour-cell clock. We discuss the physical effects leading to this result in this paper with particular care to laser and microwave noises transferred to the clock signal. The frequency drift, probably related to temperature, stays below 10-14 per day, and no evidence of flicker floor is observed. We also mention some possible improvements that in principle would lead to a clock stability below the 10-13 level at 1 s and to a drift of a few units of 10-15 per day.

  3. Pressure and Temperature Spin Crossover Sensors with Optical Detection

    PubMed Central

    Linares, Jorge; Codjovi, Epiphane; Garcia, Yann

    2012-01-01

    Iron(II) spin crossover molecular materials are made of coordination centres switchable between two states by temperature, pressure or a visible light irradiation. The relevant macroscopic parameter which monitors the magnetic state of a given solid is the high-spin (HS) fraction denoted nHS, i.e., the relative population of HS molecules. Each spin crossover material is distinguished by a transition temperature T1/2 where 50% of active molecules have switched to the low-spin (LS) state. In strongly interacting systems, the thermal spin switching occurs abruptly at T1/2. Applying pressure induces a shift from HS to LS states, which is the direct consequence of the lower volume for the LS molecule. Each material has thus a well defined pressure value P1/2. In both cases the spin state change is easily detectable by optical means thanks to a thermo/piezochromic effect that is often encountered in these materials. In this contribution, we discuss potential use of spin crossover molecular materials as temperature and pressure sensors with optical detection. The ones presenting smooth transitions behaviour, which have not been seriously considered for any application, are spotlighted as potential sensors which should stimulate a large interest on this well investigated class of materials. PMID:22666041

  4. A dual-detector optical receiver for PDM signals detection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanyu; Yu, Yu; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-01-01

    We propose and fabricate a silicon based dual-detector optical receiver, which consists of a two dimensional (2D) grating coupler (GC) and two separate germanium photodetectors (Ge PDs). The 2D GC performs polarization diversity, and thus demultiplexing and detection for polarization division multiplexed (PDM) signals can be achieved. Through a specific design with double-sides illumination, the space charge density can be reduced and the responsivity and saturation power can be improved significantly. The measured dark current, responsivity and bandwidth are 0.86 μA, 1.06 A/W and 36 GHz under 3 V reverse biased voltage, respectively. Both DC currents and eye diagrams are measured for the proposed device and the results validate its performance successfully. The power penalty between the single and dual polarized signals is about 1.9 dB under 10 and 20 Gb/s cases for both the two Ge PDs. The proposed direct detection (DD) for PDM signals with high speed, high responsivity and large saturation power is cost-effective and promising for short reach optical communication. PMID:27198501

  5. Micromachined microphones with diffraction-based optical displacement detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wook; Hall, Neal A.; Jeelani, M. Kamran; Bicen, Baris; Okandan, Murat; Degertekin, F. Levent; Qureshi, Shakeel

    2005-07-01

    Micromachined microphones with diffraction-based optical displacement detection are introduced. The approach enables interferometric displacement detection sensitivity in a system that can be optoelectronically integrated with a multichip module into mm{sup 3} volumes without beamsplitters, focusing optics, or critical alignment problems. Prototype devices fabricated using Sandia National Laboratories silicon based SwIFT-Lite{trademark} process are presented and characterized in detail. Integrated electrostatic actuation capabilities of the microphone diaphragm are used to perform dynamic characterization in vacuum and air environments to study the acoustic impedances in an equivalent circuit model of the device. The characterization results are used to predict the thermal mechanical noise spectrum, which is in excellent agreement with measurements performed in an anechoic test chamber. An A weighted displacement noise of 2.4 x 10{sup -2} {angstrom} measured from individual prototype 2100 {micro}m x 2100 {micro}m diaphragms demonstrates the potential for achieving precision measurement quality microphone performance from elements 1 mm{sup 2} in size. The high sensitivity to size ratio coupled with the ability to fabricate elements with precisely matched properties on the same silicon chip may make the approach ideal for realizing high fidelity miniature microphone arrays (sub-cm{sup 2} aperture) employing recently developed signal processing algorithms for sound source separation and localization in the audio frequency range.

  6. Single-target molecule detection with nonbleaching multicolor optical immunolabels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Sheldon; Smith, David R.; Mock, Jack J.; Schultz, David A.

    2000-02-01

    We introduce and demonstrate the use of colloidal silver plasmon-resonant particles (PRPs) as optical reporters in typical biological assays. PRPs are ultrabright, nanosized optical scatterers, which scatter light elastically and can be prepared with a scattering peak at any color in the visible spectrum. PRPs are readily observed individually with a microscope configured for dark-field microscopy, with white-light illumination of typical power. Here we illustrate the use of PRPs, surface coated with standard ligands, as target-specific labels in an in situ hybridization and an immunocytology assay. We propose that PRPs can replace or complement established labels, such as those based on radioactivity, fluorescence, chemiluminescence, or enzymatic/colorimetric detection that are used routinely in biochemistry, cell biology, and medical diagnostic applications. Moreover, because PRP labels are nonbleaching and bright enough to be rapidly identified and counted, an ultrasensitive assay format based on single-target molecule detection is now practical. We also present the results of a model sandwich immunoassay for goat anti-biotin antibody, in which the number of PRP labels counted in an image constitutes the measured signal.

  7. Laser spot detection and characteristic analysis in space optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jin; Kong, Chuiliu; Jing, Wenbo; Zhang, Dan; Jiang, Huilin

    2007-11-01

    In the space laser communication, the link of communication is builded in atmospheric random channel. the laser transmission is affected by the atmospheric turbulence seriously. The communication laser is modulated to circular polarized light in order to reduce the influence of the atmospheric turbulence. A several experiments are designed to validate that the circular polarized laser is available to reduce the communication noise in the space optical communication. The methods of the laser spot detection and spot parameter analysis is put forward in this paper: Firstly the subtraction of the background is used in image preprocessing in order to eliminate the influence of static background, then a series of methods such as the local dynamic threshold segmentation, edge extraction are used to detect and recognize the spot. Finally the parameters of the spot are calculated such as spot's average brightness, background's average brightness and the contrast gradient, and the characteristic of the laser communication is analyzed. The experiment results show that the circular polarized laser can enhance the contrast and improve the communication quality in the spatial optical communication. This method satisfies the request of real-time processing in communication, and is also effective and practical. practical.

  8. Fiber optic system design for vehicle detection and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedoma, Jan; Zboril, Ondrej; Fajkus, Marcel; Zavodny, Petr; Kepak, Stanislav; Bednarek, Lukas; Martinek, Radek; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Fiber optic interferometers belong to a group of highly sensitive and precise devices enabling to measure small changes in the deformation shapes, changes in pressure, temperature, vibration and so on. The basis of their activity is to evaluate the number of fringes over time, not changes in the intensity of the optical signal. The methodology described in the article is based on using the interferometer to monitor traffic density. The base of the solution is a Mach-Zehnder interferometer operating with single-mode G.652 optical fiber at the wavelength of 1550 nm excited by a DFB laser. The power distribution of the laser light into the individual arms of the interferometer is in the ratio 1:1. Realized measuring scheme was terminated by an optical receiver including InGaAs PIN photodiode. Registered signal from the photodetector was through 8 Hz high pass filter fed to the measuring card that captures the analog input voltage using an application written in LabView development environment. The interferometer was stored in a waterproof box and placed at the side of the road. Here panned individual transit of cars in his environs. Vertically across the road was placed in contact removable belt simulating a retarder, which was used when passing cars to create sufficient vibration response detecting interferometer. The results demonstrated that the individual vehicles passing around boxing showed characteristic amplitude spectra, which was unique for each object, and had sufficient value signal to noise ratio (SNR). The signal was processed by applications developed for the amplitude-frequency spectrum. Evaluated was the maximum amplitude of the signal and compared to the noise. The results were verified by repeated transit of the different types of cars.

  9. Liquid crystals as optical amplifiers for bacterial detection.

    PubMed

    Zafiu, C; Hussain, Z; Küpcü, S; Masutani, A; Kilickiran, P; Sinner, E-K

    2016-06-15

    Interactions of bacteria with target molecules (e.g. antibiotics) or other microorganisms are of growing interest. The first barrier for targeting gram-negative bacteria is layer of a Lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Liquid crystal (LC) based sensors covered with LPS monolayers, as presented in this study, offer a simple model to study and make use of this type of interface for detection and screening. This work describes in detail the production and application of such sensors based on three different LPS that have been investigated regarding their potential to serve as sensing layer to detect bacteria. The LPS O127:B8 in combination with a LC based sensor was identified to be most useful as biomimetic sensing surface. This LPS/LC combination interacts with three different bacteria species, one gram-positive and two gram-negative species, allowing the detection of bacterial presence regardless from their viability. It could be shown that even very low bacterial cell numbers (minimum 500 cell ml(-1)) could be detected within minutes (maximum 15 min). The readout mechanism is the adsorption of bacterial entities on surface bond LPS molecules with the LC serving as an optical amplifier.

  10. Optical detection of disordered water within a protein cavity.

    PubMed

    Goldbeck, Robert A; Pillsbury, Marlisa L; Jensen, Russell A; Mendoza, Juan L; Nguyen, Rosa L; Olson, John S; Soman, Jayashree; Kliger, David S; Esquerra, Raymond M

    2009-09-02

    Internal water molecules are important to protein structure and function, but positional disorder and low occupancies can obscure their detection by X-ray crystallography. Here, we show that water can be detected within the distal cavities of myoglobin mutants by subtle changes in the absorbance spectrum of pentacoordinate heme, even when the presence of solvent is not readily observed in the corresponding crystal structures. A well-defined, noncoordinated water molecule hydrogen bonded to the distal histidine (His64) is seen within the distal heme pocket in the crystal structure of wild type (wt) deoxymyoglobin. Displacement of this water decreases the rate of ligand entry into wt Mb, and we have shown previously that the entry of this water is readily detected optically after laser photolysis of MbCO complexes. However, for L29F and V68L Mb no discrete positions for solvent molecules are seen in the electron density maps of the crystal structures even though His64 is still present and slow rates of ligand binding indicative of internal water are observed. In contrast, time-resolved perturbations of the visible absorption bands of L29F and V68L deoxyMb generated after laser photolysis detect the entry and significant occupancy of water within the distal pockets of these variants. Thus, the spectral perturbation of pentacoordinate heme offers a potentially robust system for measuring nonspecific hydration of the active sites of heme proteins.

  11. Evolution of a totally fiber optic fluid detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Schopper, M.D.; Taylor, J.L. III; Bennett, P.R. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    As environmental and safety requirements for Aboveground Storage Tank (AST) operators increase, the demand for suitable leak detection equipment and methodology has brought about innovative sensor technology. Increasing opportunities to apply this new technology have arisen as state and local ordinances begin to mandate secondary containment and continuous leak detection. Similar federal requirements appear to be on the horizon. Due to the fact that most available leak detection systems have been devised for use in underground storage tank (UST) systems, most products currently available are not amenable to AST application. This is due to the long distances and the vast electrically restricted areas typical in AST setting. There now exists a need for innovative AST specific fluid detection technology. An improved method has been developed for continuously monitoring roof drains and the interstitial spaces in double-bottomed ASTs. Additionally, the system is used for conducting bottom water draws and monitors storm water drains. This technique employs fiber optic sensors which can be placed up to 100 meters from their photoelectric controller. Because the sensor system distinguishes between fluids based on the principle of refractive index, the intermittent presence of water does not undermine its function as a fluid detector since water is discerned from various hydrocarbons. This paper describes the evolution of the new methodology, from initial analog prototype to fully digital, commercial implementation in a modern fuel terminal.

  12. Configuration of electro-optic fire source detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, Ram Z.; Steiner, Zeev; Hofman, Nir

    2007-04-01

    The recent fighting activities in various parts of the world have highlighted the need for accurate fire source detection on one hand and fast "sensor to shooter cycle" capabilities on the other. Both needs can be met by the SPOTLITE system which dramatically enhances the capability to rapidly engage hostile fire source with a minimum of casualties to friendly force and to innocent bystanders. Modular system design enable to meet each customer specific requirements and enable excellent future growth and upgrade potential. The design and built of a fire source detection system is governed by sets of requirements issued by the operators. This can be translated into the following design criteria: I) Long range, fast and accurate fire source detection capability. II) Different threat detection and classification capability. III) Threat investigation capability. IV) Fire source data distribution capability (Location, direction, video image, voice). V) Men portability. ) In order to meet these design criteria, an optimized concept was presented and exercised for the SPOTLITE system. Three major modular components were defined: I) Electro Optical Unit -Including FLIR camera, CCD camera, Laser Range Finder and Marker II) Electronic Unit -including system computer and electronic. III) Controller Station Unit - Including the HMI of the system. This article discusses the system's components definition and optimization processes, and also show how SPOTLITE designers successfully managed to introduce excellent solutions for other system parameters.

  13. Optical system and method for gas detection and monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A. (Inventor); Korman, Valentin (Inventor); Witherow, William K. (Inventor); Hendrickson, Adam Gail (Inventor); Sinko, John Elihu (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A free-space optical path of an optical interferometer is disposed in an environment of interest. A light beam is guided to the optical interferometer using a single-mode optical fiber. The light beam traverses the interferometer's optical path. The light beam guided to the optical path is combined with the light beam at the end of the optical path to define an output light. A temporal history of the output light is recorded.

  14. RAPTOR: Closed-Loop monitoring of the night sky and the earliest optical detection of GRB 021211

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestrand, W. T.; Borozdin, K.; Casperson, D. J.; Fenimore, E.; Galassi, M.; McGowan, K.; Starr, D.; White, R. R.; Wozniak, P.; Wren, J.

    2004-10-01

    We discuss the RAPTOR (Rapid Telescopes for Optical Response) sky monitoring system at Los Alamos National Laboratory. RAPTOR is a fully autonomous robotic system that is designed to identify and make follow-up observations of optical transients with durations as short as one minute. The RAPTOR design is based on Biomimicry of Human Vision. The sky monitor is composed of two identical arrays of telescopes, separated by 38 kilometers, which stereoscopically monitor a field of about 1300 square-degrees for transients. Both monitoring arrays are carried on rapidly slewing mounts and are composed of an ensemble of wide-field telescopes clustered around a more powerful narrow-field telescope called the ``fovea'' telescope. All telescopes are coupled to real-time analysis pipelines that identify candidate transients and relay the information to a central decision unit that filters the candidates to find real celestial transients and command a response. When a celestial transient is found, the system can point the fovea telescopes to any position on the sky within five seconds and begin follow-up observations. RAPTOR also responds to Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) alerts generated by GRB monitoring spacecraft. Here we present RAPTOR observations of GRB 021211 that constitute the earliest detection of optical emission from that event and are the second fastest achieved for any GRB. The detection of bright optical emission from GRB021211, a burst with modest gamma-ray fluence, indicates that prompt optical emission, detectable with small robotic telescopes, is more common than previously thought. Further, the very fast decline of the optical afterglow from GRB 021211 suggests that some so-called ``optically dark'' GRBs were not detected only because of the slow response of the follow-up telescopes.

  15. Unsupervised change detection in satellite images using fuzzy c-means clustering and principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesikoğlu, M. H.; Atasever, Ü. H.; Özkan, C.

    2013-10-01

    Change detection analyze means that according to observations made in different times, the process of defining the change detection occurring in nature or in the state of any objects or the ability of defining the quantity of temporal effects by using multitemporal data sets. There are lots of change detection techniques met in literature. It is possible to group these techniques under two main topics as supervised and unsupervised change detection. In this study, the aim is to define the land cover changes occurring in specific area of Kayseri with unsupervised change detection techniques by using Landsat satellite images belonging to different years which are obtained by the technique of remote sensing. While that process is being made, image differencing method is going to be applied to the images by following the procedure of image enhancement. After that, the method of Principal Component Analysis is going to be applied to the difference image obtained. To determine the areas that have and don't have changes, the image is grouped as two parts by Fuzzy C-Means Clustering method. For achieving these processes, firstly the process of image to image registration is completed. As a result of this, the images are being referred to each other. After that, gray scale difference image obtained is partitioned into 3 × 3 nonoverlapping blocks. With the method of principal component analysis, eigenvector space is gained and from here, principal components are reached. Finally, feature vector space consisting principal component is partitioned into two clusters using Fuzzy C-Means Clustering and after that change detection process has been done.

  16. Fermi Detection of a Luminous gamma-ray Pulsar in a Globular Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freire, P. C. C.; Abdo, A. A.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Celik, O.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Harding, A.; Johnson, T. J.; McEnery, J. E.; Thompson, D. J.; Troja, E.

    2011-01-01

    We report the Fermi Large Area Telescope detection of gamma -ray (>100 mega-electron volts) pulsations from pulsar J1823--3021A in the globular cluster NGC 6624 with high significance (approx 7 sigma). Its gamma-ray luminosity L (sub 3) = (8:4 +/- 1:6) X 10(exp 34) ergs per second, is the highest observed for any millisecond pulsar (MSP) to date, and it accounts for most of the cluster emission. The non-detection of the cluster in the off-pulse phase implies that its contains < 32 gamma-ray MSPs, not approx 100 as previously estimated. The gamma -ray luminosity indicates that the unusually large rate of change of its period is caused by its intrinsic spin-down. This implies that J1823--3021A has the largest magnetic field and is the youngest MSP ever detected, and that such anomalous objects might be forming at rates comparable to those of the more normal MSPs.

  17. The detection of Fermi AGN above 100 GeV using clustering analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Thomas; Brown, Anthony M.; Chadwick, Paula M.; Nolan, S. J.

    2015-09-01

    The density-based clustering algorithm DBSCAN has been applied to the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data set of Eγ ≥ 100 GeV events with |b| > 10°, in order to search for new very high energy (VHE) γ-ray sources. The clustering analysis returned 49 clusters, of which 21 correspond to already known VHE-emitting active galactic nuclei (AGN) within the TeVCat catalogue and a further 11 were found to be significant in a full Fermi analysis. Of these, two are previously detected Fermi VHE AGN, and nine represent new VHE sources consisting of six BL Lac objects, one blazar of unknown type and two unassociated sources. Comparing these, along with the VHE AGN RBS 0679 and RBS 0970 previously detected with Fermi-LAT, to the current populations of AGN detected with ground-based instruments and Fermi suggests that the VHE-emitting AGN discovered in this study are very similar to the TeVCat AGN and therefore further observations with ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes are recommended.

  18. Regions of micro-calcifications clusters detection based on new features from imbalance data in mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Keju; Dong, Min; Yang, Zhen; Guo, Yanan; Ma, Yide

    2017-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. Micro-calcification cluster on X-ray mammogram is one of the most important abnormalities, and it is effective for early cancer detection. Surrounding Region Dependence Method (SRDM), a statistical texture analysis method is applied for detecting Regions of Interest (ROIs) containing microcalcifications. Inspired by the SRDM, we present a method that extract gray and other features which are effective to predict the positive and negative regions of micro-calcifications clusters in mammogram. By constructing a set of artificial images only containing micro-calcifications, we locate the suspicious pixels of calcifications of a SRDM matrix in original image map. Features are extracted based on these pixels for imbalance date and then the repeated random subsampling method and Random Forest (RF) classifier are used for classification. True Positive (TP) rate and False Positive (FP) can reflect how the result will be. The TP rate is 90% and FP rate is 88.8% when the threshold q is 10. We draw the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve and the Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) value reaches 0.9224. The experiment indicates that our method is effective. A novel regions of micro-calcifications clusters detection method is developed, which is based on new features for imbalance data in mammography, and it can be considered to help improving the accuracy of computer aided diagnosis breast cancer.

  19. Detection and clustering of features in aerial images by neuron network-based algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vozenilek, Vit

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the algorithm for detection and clustering of feature in aerial photographs based on artificial neural networks. The presented approach is not focused on the detection of specific topographic features, but on the combination of general features analysis and their use for clustering and backward projection of clusters to aerial image. The basis of the algorithm is a calculation of the total error of the network and a change of weights of the network to minimize the error. A classic bipolar sigmoid was used for the activation function of the neurons and the basic method of backpropagation was used for learning. To verify that a set of features is able to represent the image content from the user's perspective, the web application was compiled (ASP.NET on the Microsoft .NET platform). The main achievements include the knowledge that man-made objects in aerial images can be successfully identified by detection of shapes and anomalies. It was also found that the appropriate combination of comprehensive features that describe the colors and selected shapes of individual areas can be useful for image analysis.

  20. Studies on structural, optical and cluster size of poly(m-toluidine)-polyvinyl chloride blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi, G. B. V. S.; Ali, Vazid; Siddiqui, Azher M.; Kulriya, Pawan K.; Zulfequar, M.

    Poly(m-toluidine) (PmT), a derivative of polyaniline, has been prepared by chemical oxidation polymerization method. The synthesized PmT powder is blended with plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) to achieve 20 μm thick self-supported films. These films were irradiated with 60 MeV Si5+ ions at three different fluences whose Se (electronic energy loss) value is found to be 1.988×103 KeV/μ m, an order of magnitude larger than 60 MeV C5+ (2.958×102 KeV/μ m). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and ultraviolet-visible (UV) absorption studies of pre- and post-irradiated films of PmT-PVC blends were carried out to study the heavy ion irradiation effects on these polymer blends. An overall change in the structure of the polymer blend has been observed from FTIR studies. UV-visible spectra show a decrease in the optical band gap (Eg) and an increase in cluster size with increasing fluence. An effort is made to compare these results with our earlier studies. We found that the variation in Se plays an important role in the structural and optical properties of PmT-PVC blends.

  1. Assessment of detection limits of fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing for detection of illicit connections.

    PubMed

    Nienhuis, Jaap; de Haan, Cornelis; Langeveld, Jeroen; Klootwijk, Martijn; Clemens, François

    2013-01-01

    Distributed temperature sensing (DTS) with fiber-optic cables is a powerful tool to detect illicit connections in storm sewer systems. High-frequency temperature measurements along the in-sewer cable create a detailed representation of temperature anomalies due to illicit discharges. The detection limits of the monitoring equipment itself are well-known, but there is little information available on detection limits for the discovery of illicit connections, as in mixing of sewers, and attenuation also plays an important role. This paper describes the results of full-scale experiments aiming to quantify the detection limits for illicit connections under various sewer conditions. Based on the results, a new monitoring set-up for (partially) filled sewer conduits has been proposed.

  2. Streak detection and analysis pipeline for optical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, J.; Granvik, M.; Torppa, J.; Muinonen, K.; Poikonen, J.; Lehti, J.; Säntti, T.; Komulainen, T.; Flohrer, T.

    2014-07-01

    We describe a novel data processing and analysis pipeline for optical observations of moving objects, either of natural (asteroids, meteors) or artificial origin (satellites, space debris). The monitoring of the space object populations requires reliable acquisition of observational data to support the development and validation of population models, and to build and maintain catalogues of orbital elements. The orbital catalogues are, in turn, needed for the assessment of close approaches (for asteroids, with the Earth; for satellites, with each other) and for the support of contingency situations or launches. For both types of populations, there is also increasing interest to detect fainter objects corresponding to the small end of the size distribution. We focus on the low signal-to-noise (SNR) detection of objects with high angular velocities, resulting in long and faint object trails, or streaks, in the optical images. The currently available, mature image processing algorithms for detection and astrometric reduction of optical data cover objects that cross the sensor field-of-view comparably slowly, and, particularly for satellites, within a rather narrow, predefined range of angular velocities. By applying specific tracking techniques, the objects appear point-like or as short trails in the exposures. However, the general survey scenario is always a 'track-before-detect' problem, resulting in streaks of arbitrary lengths. Although some considerations for low-SNR processing of streak-like features are available in the current image processing and computer vision literature, algorithms are not readily available yet. In the ESA-funded StreakDet (Streak detection and astrometric reduction) project, we develop and evaluate an automated processing pipeline applicable to single images (as compared to consecutive frames of the same field) obtained with any observing scenario, including space-based surveys and both low- and high-altitude populations. The algorithmic

  3. Microbial community pattern detection in human body habitats via ensemble clustering framework

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The human habitat is a host where microbial species evolve, function, and continue to evolve. Elucidating how microbial communities respond to human habitats is a fundamental and critical task, as establishing baselines of human microbiome is essential in understanding its role in human disease and health. Recent studies on healthy human microbiome focus on particular body habitats, assuming that microbiome develop similar structural patterns to perform similar ecosystem function under same environmental conditions. However, current studies usually overlook a complex and interconnected landscape of human microbiome and limit the ability in particular body habitats with learning models of specific criterion. Therefore, these methods could not capture the real-world underlying microbial patterns effectively. Results To obtain a comprehensive view, we propose a novel ensemble clustering framework to mine the structure of microbial community pattern on large-scale metagenomic data. Particularly, we first build a microbial similarity network via integrating 1920 metagenomic samples from three body habitats of healthy adults. Then a novel symmetric Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF) based ensemble model is proposed and applied onto the network to detect clustering pattern. Extensive experiments are conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of our model on deriving microbial community with respect to body habitat and host gender. From clustering results, we observed that body habitat exhibits a strong bound but non-unique microbial structural pattern. Meanwhile, human microbiome reveals different degree of structural variations over body habitat and host gender. Conclusions In summary, our ensemble clustering framework could efficiently explore integrated clustering results to accurately identify microbial communities, and provide a comprehensive view for a set of microbial communities. The clustering results indicate that structure of human microbiome is

  4. Optical detection of sepsis markers using liquid crystal based biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCamley, Maureen K.; Artenstein, Andrew W.; Opal, Steven M.; Crawford, Gregory P.

    2007-02-01

    A liquid crystal based biosensor for the detection and diagnosis of sepsis is currently in development. Sepsis, a major clinical syndrome with a significant public health burden in the US due to a large elderly population, is the systemic response of the body to a localized infection and is defined as the combination of pathologic infection and physiological changes. Bacterial infections are responsible for 90% of cases of sepsis in the US. Currently there is no bedside diagnostic available to positively identify sepsis. The basic detection scheme employed in a liquid crystal biosensor contains attributes that would find value in a clinical setting, especially for the early detection of sepsis. Utilizing the unique properties of liquid crystals, such as birefringence, a bedside diagnostic is in development which will optically report the presence of biomolecules. In a septic patient, an endotoxin known as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is released from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and can be found in the blood stream. It is hypothesized that this long chained molecule will cause local disruptions to the open surface of a sensor containing aligned liquid crystal. The bulk liquid crystal ampli.es these local changes at the surface due to the presence of the sepsis marker, providing an optical readout through polarizing microscopy images. Liquid crystal sensors consisting of both square and circular grids, 100-200 μm in size, have been fabricated and filled with a common liquid crystal material, 5CB. Homeotropic alignment was confirmed using polarizing microscopy. The grids were then contacted with either saline only (control), or saline with varying concentrations of LPS. Changes in the con.guration of the nematic director of the liquid crystal were observed through the range of concentrations tested (5mg/mL - 1pg/mL) which have been confirmed by a consulting physician as clinically relevant levels.

  5. Detection of single and clustered microcalcifications in mammograms using fractals models and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Bocchi, L; Coppini, G; Nori, J; Valli, G

    2004-05-01

    Microcalcifications (microCas) are often early signs of breast cancer. However, detecting them is a difficult visual task and recognizing malignant lesions is a complex diagnostic problem. In recent years, several research groups have been working to develop computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems for X-ray mammography. In this paper, we propose a method to detect and classify microcalcifications. In order to discover the presence of microCas clusters, particular attention is paid to the analysis of the spatial arrangement of detected lesions. A fractal model has been used to describe the mammographic image, thus, allowing the use of a matched filtering stage to enhance microcalcifications against the background. A region growing algorithm, coupled with a neural classifier, detects existing lesions. Subsequently, a second fractal model is used to analyze their spatial arrangement so that the presence of microcalcification clusters can be detected and classified. Reported results indicate that fractal models provide an adequate framework for medical image processing; consequently high correct classification rates are achieved.

  6. A Hybrid Spectral Clustering and Deep Neural Network Ensemble Algorithm for Intrusion Detection in Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Tao; Wang, Fen; Cheng, Jianjun; Yu, Yang; Chen, Xiaoyun

    2016-01-01

    The development of intrusion detection systems (IDS) that are adapted to allow routers and network defence systems to detect malicious network traffic disguised as network protocols or normal access is a critical challenge. This paper proposes a novel approach called SCDNN, which combines spectral clustering (SC) and deep neural network (DNN) algorithms. First, the dataset is divided into k subsets based on sample similarity using cluster centres, as in SC. Next, the distance between data points in a testing set and the training set is measured based on similarity features and is fed into the deep neural network algorithm for intrusion detection. Six KDD-Cup99 and NSL-KDD datasets and a sensor network dataset were employed to test the performance of the model. These experimental results indicate that the SCDNN classifier not only performs better than backpropagation neural network (BPNN), support vector machine (SVM), random forest (RF) and Bayes tree models in detection accuracy and the types of abnormal attacks found. It also provides an effective tool of study and analysis of intrusion detection in large networks. PMID:27754380

  7. A Hybrid Spectral Clustering and Deep Neural Network Ensemble Algorithm for Intrusion Detection in Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tao; Wang, Fen; Cheng, Jianjun; Yu, Yang; Chen, Xiaoyun

    2016-10-13

    The development of intrusion detection systems (IDS) that are adapted to allow routers and network defence systems to detect malicious network traffic disguised as network protocols or normal access is a critical challenge. This paper proposes a novel approach called SCDNN, which combines spectral clustering (SC) and deep neural network (DNN) algorithms. First, the dataset is divided into k subsets based on sample similarity using cluster centres, as in SC. Next, the distance between data points in a testing set and the training set is measured based on similarity features and is fed into the deep neural network algorithm for intrusion detection. Six KDD-Cup99 and NSL-KDD datasets and a sensor network dataset were employed to test the performance of the model. These experimental results indicate that the SCDNN classifier not only performs better than backpropagation neural network (BPNN), support vector machine (SVM), random forest (RF) and Bayes tree models in detection accuracy and the types of abnormal attacks found. It also provides an effective tool of study and analysis of intrusion detection in large networks.

  8. Constraints on the richness-mass relation and the optical-SZE positional offset distribution for SZE-selected clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Saro, A.

    2015-10-12

    In this study, we cross-match galaxy cluster candidates selected via their Sunyaev–Zel'dovich effect (SZE) signatures in 129.1 deg2 of the South Pole Telescope 2500d SPT-SZ survey with optically identified clusters selected from the Dark Energy Survey science verification data. We identify 25 clusters between 0.1 ≲ z ≲ 0.8 in the union of the SPT-SZ and redMaPPer (RM) samples. RM is an optical cluster finding algorithm that also returns a richness estimate for each cluster. We model the richness λ-mass relation with the following function 500> ∝ Bλln M500 + Cλln E(z) and use SPT-SZ cluster masses and RM richnesses λ to constrain the parameters. We find Bλ=1.14+0.21–0.18 and Cλ=0.73+0.77–0.75. The associated scatter in mass at fixed richness is σlnM|λ = 0.18+0.08–0.05 at a characteristic richness λ = 70. We demonstrate that our model provides an adequate description of the matched sample, showing that the fraction of SPT-SZ-selected clusters with RM counterparts is consistent with expectations and that the fraction of RM-selected clusters with SPT-SZ counterparts is in mild tension with expectation. We model the optical-SZE cluster positional offset distribution with the sum of two Gaussians, showing that it is consistent with a dominant, centrally peaked population and a subdominant population characterized by larger offsets. We also cross-match the RM catalogue with SPT-SZ candidates below the official catalogue threshold significance ξ = 4.5, using the RM catalogue to provide optical confirmation and redshifts for 15 additional clusters with ξ ε [4, 4.5].

  9. Influence of laser beam characteristics and focusing optics on optical laser-induced breakdown detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, C.; Hauser, W.

    2009-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD) is a well established technique for measuring size and concentration of inorganic colloids in liquids. However, most applications of LIBD are restricted to the measurement of mean sizes, which is problematic in cases of wide colloid size distributions (PSD) as typically is the case in natural systems. Evaluation of PSDs from LIBD is possible but requires detailed control of the power density within the laser focus. In the present work we describe the mathematical treatment how to calculate this power density from the beam characteristics of the light source and the optical properties of the focusing optics. The results are compared to measured spatial distributions of breakdown events of three LIBD setups.

  10. Variable size small targets detection using density-based clustering combined with backtracking strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiying; Lin, Yonggui; Xiao, Fangxiong

    2016-10-01

    The series problem of infrared small target detection in heavy clutter is a challenging work in active vision. During different imaging environments the size and gray intensity of target will keep changing which lead to unstable detection. Focus on mining more robust feature of small targets and following the sequential detection framework, we propose a novel research scheme based on density-based clustering and backtracking strategy in this paper. First, point of interest is extracted by the speeded up robust feature (SURF) detector for its better performance in digging features invariant to uniform scaling, orientation and illumination changes. Second, due to the local aggregation property of target trajectory in space, a new proposed density-based clustering method is introduced to segment the target trajectory, so that the target detection problem is transformed into the extract the target trajectory. Then, In order to keep the integral and independence of the trace as much as possible, two factors: percent and are exploited to help deciding the clustering granularity. Later, the backtracking strategy is adopted to search for the target trajectory with pruning function on the basis of the consistence and continuity of the short-time target trajectory in temporal-spatial. Extended experiments show the validity of our method. Compared with the data association methods executed on the huge candidate trajectory space, the time-consuming is reduced obviously. Additional, the feature detection is more stable for the use of SURF and the false alarm suppression rate is superior to most baseline and state-of-arts methods.

  11. Noninvasive optical detection of carotenoid antioxidants in the human retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifzadeh, Mohsen

    wavelengths, respectively, results in pixel intensity maps which are used to quantify the macular pigment levels. The results obtained to date show that optical imaging approaches are very promising, that they are well suited for clinical applications, and that they may well lead to a widely used, early screening technology of subjects based on a non-invasive, rapid, precise, and objective optical detection technology.

  12. Damage detection and characterization using fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glisic, Branko; Sigurdardottir, Dorotea; Yao, Yao; Hubbell, David

    2013-04-01

    Fiber optic sensors (FOS) have significantly evolved and have reached their market maturity during the last decade. Their widely recognized advantages are high precision, long-term stability, and durability. But in addition to these advantageous performances, FOS technologies allow for affordable instrumentation of large areas of structure enabling global large-scale monitoring based on long-gauge sensors and integrity monitoring based on distributed sensors. These two approaches are particularly suitable for damage detection and characterization, i.e., damage localization and to certain extent quantification and propagation, as illustrated by two applications presented in detail in this paper: post-tensioned concrete bridge and segmented concrete pipeline. Early age cracking was detected, localized and quantified in the concrete deck of a pedestrian bridge using embedded long-gauge FOS. Post-tensioning of deck closed the cracks; however, permanent weakening in a bridge joint occurred due to cracking and it was identified and quantified. The damage was confirmed using embedded distributed FOS and a separate load test of the bridge. Real-size concrete pipeline specimens and surrounding soil were equipped with distributed FOS and exposed to permanent ground displacement in a large-scale testing facility. Two tests were performed on different pipeline specimens. The sensors bonded on the pipeline specimens successfully detected and localized rupture of pipeline joints, while the sensors embedded in the soil were able to detect and localize the failure plane. Comparison with strain-gauges installed on the pipeline and visual inspection after the test confirmed accurate damage detection and characterization.

  13. Method and apparatus for detecting and/or imaging clusters of small scattering centers in the body

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Sommer, F.G.

    1982-07-13

    An ultrasonic method and apparatus are provided for detecting and imaging clusters of small scattering centers in the breast wherein periodic pulses are applied to an ultrasound emitting transducer and projected into the body, thereafter being received by at least one receiving transducer positioned to receive scattering from the scattering center clusters. The signals are processed to provide an image showing cluster extent and location. 6 figs.

  14. Method and apparatus for detecting and/or imaging clusters of small scattering centers in the body

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, Victor; Sommer, Frank G.

    1982-01-01

    An ultrasonic method and apparatus are provided for detecting and imaging clusters of small scattering centers in the breast wherein periodic pulses are applied to an ultrasound emitting transducer and projected into the body, thereafter being received by at least one receiving transducer positioned to receive scattering from the scattering center clusters. The signals are processed to provide an image showing cluster extent and location.

  15. DETECTION OF A SECOND-GENERATION BINARY IN THE GLOBULAR CLUSTER {omega} CENTAURI

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kai; Qian, S.-B.

    2012-08-10

    {omega} Centauri is the largest globular cluster in the Milky Way; it is composed of multiple stellar populations. Photometric solutions for the EA-type eclipsing binary NV364 in this cluster indicate that NV364 is a well-detached binary and that both of its components are early-type normal main-sequence stars. There is no evidence for mass transfer between the two components, which are at an early stage in their evolution. Using the luminosity-color relation with optical (BV) observations, we obtain the distance modulus of (m - M) = 14.05 for NV364, which confirms that it is a member of {omega} Centauri. The ages of the binary components and the first-generation stars in {omega} Centauri are about 1.19 Gyr and 16 Gyr, respectively. Thus, the binary components are much younger than the first-generation stars. There is therefore a strong basis for considering NV364 to be a second-generation binary in this globular cluster.

  16. Development of a Biosensor Concept to Detect the Production of Cluster-Specific Secondary Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi-Qian; Busche, Tobias; Rückert, Christian; Paulus, Constanze; Rebets, Yuriy; Novakova, Renata; Kalinowski, Jörn; Luzhetskyy, Andriy; Kormanec, Jan; Sekurova, Olga N; Zotchev, Sergey B

    2017-03-03

    Genome mining of actinomycete bacteria aims at the discovery of novel bioactive secondary metabolites that can be developed into drugs. A new repressor-based biosensor to detect activated secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters in Streptomyces was developed. Biosynthetic gene clusters for undecylprodigiosin and coelimycin in the genome of Streptomyces lividans TK24, which encoded TetR-like repressors and appeared to be almost "silent" based on the RNA-seq data, were chosen for the proof-of-principle studies. The bpsA reporter gene for indigoidine synthetase was placed under control of the promotor/operator regions presumed to be controlled by the cluster-associated TetR-like repressors. While the biosensor for undecylprodigiosin turned out to be nonfunctional, the coelimycin biosensor was shown to perform as expected, turning on biosynthesis of indigoidine in response to the concomitant production of coelimycin. The developed reporter system concept can be applied to those cryptic gene clusters that encode metabolite-sensing repressors to speed up discovery of novel bioactive compounds in Streptomyces.

  17. Improving statistical keyword detection in short texts: Entropic and clustering approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretero-Campos, C.; Bernaola-Galván, P.; Coronado, A. V.; Carpena, P.

    2013-03-01

    In the last years, two successful approaches have been introduced to tackle the problem of statistical keyword detection in a text without the use of external information: (i) The entropic approach, where Shannon’s entropy of information is used to quantify the information content of the sequence of occurrences of each word in the text; and (ii) The clustering approach, which links the heterogeneity of the spatial distribution of a word in the text (clustering) with its relevance. In this paper, first we present some modifications to both techniques which improve their results. Then, we propose new metrics to evaluate the performance of keyword detectors based specifically on the needs of a typical user, and we employ them to find out which approach performs better. Although both approaches work well in long texts, we obtain in general that measures based on word-clustering perform at least as well as the entropic measure, which needs a convenient partition of the text to be applied, such as chapters of a book. In the latter approach we also show that the partition of the text chosen affects strongly its results. Finally, we focus on short texts, a case of high practical importance, such as short reports, web pages, scientific articles, etc. We show that the performance of word-clustering measures is also good in generic short texts since these measures are able to discriminate better the degree of relevance of low frequency words than the entropic approach.

  18. Detecting mass substructure in galaxy clusters: an aperture mass statistic for gravitational flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Adrienne; King, Lindsay J.; Wilkins, Stephen M.

    2009-05-01

    Gravitational flexion has been introduced as a technique by which one can map out and study substructure in clusters of galaxies. Previous analyses involving flexion have measured the individual galaxy-galaxy flexion signal, or used either parametric techniques or a Kaiser, Squires and Broadhurst (KSB)-type inversion to reconstruct the mass distribution in Abell 1689. In this paper, we present an aperture mass statistic for flexion, and apply it to the lensed images of background galaxies obtained by ray-tracing simulations through a simple analytic mass distribution and through a galaxy cluster from the Millennium Simulation. We show that this method is effective at detecting and accurately tracing structure within clusters of galaxies on subarcminute scales with high signal to noise even using a moderate background source number density and image resolution. In addition, the method provides much more information about both the overall shape and the small-scale structure of a cluster of galaxies than can be achieved through a weak lensing mass reconstruction using gravitational shear data. Lastly, we discuss how the zero-points of the aperture mass might be used to infer the masses of structures identified using this method.

  19. Noninvasive detection of plant nutrient stress using fiber optic spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun-Wei; Asundi, Anand K.; Liew, Oi Wah; Boey, William S. L.

    2001-05-01

    In a previous paper, we described the use of fiber optic spectrophotometry as a non-destructive and sensitive method to detect early symptoms of plant nutrient deficiency. We report further developments of our work on Brassica chinensis var parachinensis (Bailey) showing reproducibility of our data collected at a different seasonal period. Plants at the mid-log growth phase were subjected to nutrient stress by transferring them to nitrate- and calcium- deficient nutrient solution in a standing aerated hydroponic system. After tracking changes in leaf reflectance by FOSpectr for nine days, the plants were returned to complete nutrient solution and their recovery was monitored for a further nine days. The responses of nutrient stressed plants were compared with those grown under complete nutrient solution over the 18-day trial period. We also compared the sensitivity of FOSpectr detection against plant growth measurements vis-a-vis average leaf number and leaf width and show that the former method gave an indication of nutrient stress much earlier than the latter. In addition, this work indicated that while normal and nutrient-stressed plants could not be distinguished within the first 7 days by tracking plant growth indicators, stressed plants did show a clear decline in average leaf number and leaf width in later stages of growth even after the plants were returned to complete nutrient solution. The results further reinforce the need for early detection of nutrient stress, as late remedial action could not reverse the loss in plant growth in later stages of plant development.

  20. Detection of early seizures by diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Hajihashemi, M. Reza; Zhou, Junli; Carney, Paul R.; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-03-01

    In epilepsy it has been challenging to detect early changes in brain activity that occurs prior to seizure onset and to map their origin and evolution for possible intervention. Besides, preclinical seizure experiments need to be conducted in awake animals with images reconstructed and displayed in real-time. We demonstrate using a rat model of generalized epilepsy that diffuse optical tomography (DOT) provides a unique functional neuroimaging modality for noninvasively and continuously tracking brain activities with high spatiotemporal resolution. We developed methods to conduct seizure experiments in fully awake rats using a subject-specific helmet and a restraining mechanism. For the first time, we detected early hemodynamic responses with heterogeneous patterns several minutes preceding the electroencephalographic seizure onset, supporting the presence of a "pre-seizure" state both in anesthetized and awake rats. Using a novel time-series analysis of scattering images, we show that the analysis of scattered diffuse light is a sensitive and reliable modality for detecting changes in neural activity associated with generalized seizure. We found widespread hemodynamic changes evolving from local regions of the bilateral cortex and thalamus to the entire brain, indicating that the onset of generalized seizures may originate locally rather than diffusely. Together, these findings suggest DOT represents a powerful tool for mapping early seizure onset and propagation pathways.