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Sample records for optical model study

  1. Optical Studies of model binary miscibility gap system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.; Witherow, W. K.; Facemire, B. R.; Nishioka, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    In order to develop a better understanding of separation processes in binary miscibility gap metal alloys, model transparent fluid systems were studied. The system selected was diethylene glycol-ethyl salicylate which has convenient working temperatures (288 to 350 K), low toxicity, and is relatively easy to purify. The system is well characterized with respect to its phase diagram, density, surface and interfacial tensions, viscosity and other pertinent physical properties. Studies of migration of the dispersed phase in a thermal gradient were performed using conventional photomicroscopy. Velocities of the droplets of the dispersed phase were measured and compared to calculated rates which included both Stokes and thermal components. A holographic microscopy system was used to study growth, coalescence, and particle motions. Sequential holograms allowed determination of particle size distribution changes with respect to time and temperature. Holographic microscopy is capable of recording particle densities up to 10 to the 7th power particles/cu cm and is able to resolve particles of the order of 2 to 3 microns in diameter throughout the entire volume of the test cell. The reconstructed hologram produces a wavefront that is identical to the original wavefront as it existed when the hologram was made. The reconstructed wavefront is analyzed using a variety of conventional optical methods.

  2. The value of adding optics to ecosystem models: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, M.; Boss, E.; Chai, F.

    2007-10-01

    Many ecosystem models have been developed to study the ocean's biogeochemical properties, but most of these models use simple formulations to describe light penetration and spectral quality. Here, an optical model is coupled with a previously published ecosystem model that explicitly represents two phytoplankton (picoplankton and diatoms) and two zooplankton functional groups, as well as multiple nutrients and detritus. Surface ocean color fields and subsurface light fields are calculated by coupling the ecosystem model with an optical model that relates biogeochemical standing stocks with inherent optical properties (absorption, scattering); this provides input to a commercially available radiative transfer model (Ecolight). We apply this bio-optical model to the equatorial Pacific upwelling region, and find the model to be capable of reproducing many measured optical properties and key biogeochemical processes in this region. Our model results suggest that non-algal particles largely contribute to the total scattering or attenuation (>50% at 660 nm) but have a much smaller contribution to particulate absorption (<20% at 440 nm), while picoplankton dominate the total phytoplankton absorption (>95% at 440 nm). These results are consistent with the field observations. In order to achieve such good agreement between data and model results, however, key model parameters, for which no field data are available, have to be constrained. Sensitivity analysis of the model results to optical parameters reveals a significant role played by colored dissolved organic matter through its influence on the quantity and quality of the ambient light. Coupling explicit optics to an ecosystem model provides advantages in generating: (1) a more accurate subsurface light-field, which is important for light sensitive biogeochemical processes such as photosynthesis and photo-oxidation, (2) additional constraints on model parameters that help to reduce uncertainties in ecosystem model

  3. Electrochemical and optical studies of model photosynthetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-15

    The objective of this research is to obtain a better understanding of the relationship between the structural organization of photosynthetic pigments and their spectroscopic and electrochemical properties. Defined model systems were studied first. These included the least ordered (solutions) through the most highly ordered (Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers and self-assembled monolayers) systems containing BChl, BPheo, and UQ. Molecules other than the photosynthetic pigments and quinones were also examined, including chromophores (i.e. surface active cyanine dyes and phtahlocyanines) an redox active compounds (methyl viologen (MV) and surfactant ferrocenes), in order to develop the techniques needed to study the photosynthetic components. Because the chlorophylls are photosensitive and labile, it was easier first to develop procedures using stable species. Three different techniques were used to characterize these model systems. These included electrochemical techniques for determining the standard oxidation and reduction potentials of the photosynthetic components as well as methods for determining the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants for BChl and BPheo at metal electrodes (Pt and Au). Resonance Raman (RR) and surface enhanced resonance Raman (SERR) spectroscopy were used to determine the spectra of the photosynthetic pigments and model compounds. SERRS was also used to study several types of photosynthetic preparations.

  4. The value of adding optics to ecosystem models: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, M.; Boss, E.; Chai, F.

    2007-05-01

    Many ecosystem models have been developed to study the ocean's biogeochemistry, but most of these models use simple formulations to describe light penetration and spectral quality. Given that processes such as photosynthesis and photo-oxidation are uniquely important for biogeochemical processes in the upper ocean, it is necessary to model light distribution accurately. In addition, the global scale observations of proxies of biogeochemical variables are based on the color of the ocean. The ability to simulate the color of the ocean provides the possibility of comparing model simulation with these observations. Here, an optical model is coupled with a previously published ecosystem model that explicitly represents two phytoplankton (picoplankton and diatoms) and two zooplankton functional groups, as well as multiple nutrients and detritus. Surface ocean color field and subsurface light field are calculated by coupling the ecosystem model with an optical model that relates biogeochemical standing stocks with inherent optical properties (absorption, scattering); this provides input to a commercially available radiative transfer model (Ecolight). We apply this bio-optical model to the equatorial Pacific upwelling region, and find the model to be capable of reproducing many measured optical properties and key biogeochemical processes in this region. Results include large contributions by non-algal particles to the total scattering or attenuation (>50% at 660 nm) and their small contribution to particulate absorption (<20% at 440 nm), and a remarkable contribution by picoplankton to total phytoplankton absorption (>95% at 440 nm). These results are consistent with the field observations. In order to achieve such good agreement between data and model results, however, key model parameters, for which no field data is available, have to be constrained. Sensitivity analysis of the model results to optical parameters reveals the significant role of colored dissolved organic

  5. Case study of modeled aerosol optical properties during the SAFARI 2000 campaign.

    PubMed

    Kuzmanoski, Maja; Box, Michael A; Schmid, Beat; Russell, Philip B; Redemann, Jens

    2007-08-01

    We present modeled aerosol optical properties (single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, and lidar ratio) in two layers with different aerosol loadings and particle sizes, observed during the Southern African Regional Science Initiative 2,000 (SAFARI 2,000) campaign. The optical properties were calculated from aerosol size distributions retrieved from aerosol layer optical thickness spectra, measured using the NASA Ames airborne tracking 14-channel sunphotometer (AATS-14) and the refractive index based on the available information on aerosol chemical composition. The study focuses on sensitivity of modeled optical properties in the 0.3-1.5 microm wavelength range to assumptions regarding the mixing scenario. We considered two models for the mixture of absorbing and nonabsorbing aerosol components commonly used to model optical properties of biomass burning aerosol: a layered sphere with absorbing core and nonabsorbing shell and the Maxwell-Garnett effective medium model. In addition, comparisons of modeled optical properties with the measurements are discussed. We also estimated the radiative effect of the difference in aerosol absorption implied by the large difference between the single scattering albedo values (approximately 0.1 at midvisible wavelengths) obtained from different measurement methods for the case with a high amount of biomass burning particles. For that purpose, the volume fraction of black carbon was varied to obtain a range of single scattering albedo values (0.81-0.91 at lambda=0.50 microm). The difference in absorption resulted in a significant difference in the instantaneous radiative forcing at the surface and the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and can result in a change of the sign of the aerosol forcing at TOA from negative to positive.

  6. Optical spectroscopic studies of animal skin used in modeling of human cutaneous tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drakaki, E.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.; Borisova, E.; Avramov, L.; Sianoudis, J. A.

    2007-03-01

    Optical spectroscopy and in particular laser-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy (LIAFS) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), provide excellent possibilities for real-time, noninvasive diagnosis of different skin tissue pathologies. However, the introduction of optical spectroscopy in routine medical practice demands a statistically important data collection, independent from the laser sources and detectors used. The scientists collect databases either from patients, in vivo, or they study different animal models to obtain objective information for the optical properties of various types of normal and diseased tissue. In the present work, the optical properties (fluorescence and reflectance) of two animal skin models are investigated. The aim of using animal models in optical spectroscopy investigations is to examine the statistics of the light induced effects firstly on animals, before any extrapolation effort to humans. A nitrogen laser (λ=337.1 nm) was used as an excitation source for the autofluorescence measurements, while a tungsten-halogen lamp was used for the reflectance measurements. Samples of chicken and pig skin were measured in vitro and were compared with results obtained from measurements of normal human skin in vivo. The specific features of the measured reflectance and fluorescence spectra are discussed, while the limits of data extrapolation for each skin type are also depicted.

  7. Study of the Line Optical Tweezers Characteristics Using a Novel Method and Establishing a Model for Cell Sorting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ho-Chien; Hsu, Long

    2009-07-01

    Optical tweezers have become a powerful tool in cellular and molecule biology. Line optical tweezers enhanced its function in cell sorting. This study presents the line trap model, based on the ray-optics model, and demonstrates its accuracy for the line optical tweezers. The line optical tweezers system is established to produce the optical intensity distribution of a line pattern and to trap the micro-sized beads. The main parameter, optical intensity distribution, is used to calculate the trapping force distribution in the model. The two forces, trapping force and water dragging force, and the equation of motion is used to simulate the trajectory of micro-sized beads as they pass through the line pattern in flowing water in the microchannel. The trajectory is analyzed to determine the effective separation distance between the micro-sized beads or cells. The method will be applied in biological and medical detection.

  8. Modeling and Field Study of Coupled Bio-Optical Physical Processes in the Monterey Bay Area.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulman, I.; Arnone, R.; Teague, W.; Chavez, F.; Schofield, O.; Moline, M.; Penta, B.; Ryan, J.; Gould, R.; Anderson, S.; Jolliff, J. K.; Book, J. W.; Derada, S.; Paduan, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Scientists from government, academia and non-profit organizations participated in an interdisciplinary field program in the Monterey Bay from during May-June of 2008. The experiment was a collaboration between the NRL project "Bio-Optical Studies of Predictability and Assimilation for the Coastal Environment (BIOSPACE)", Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) project "Rapid Environmental Assessment Using an Integrated Coastal Ocean Observation-Modeling System (ESPRESSO)", the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), the NRL project "Unattended Sea-bed Power for In-water Operations", and the U.S. Geological Survey. Objectives of the NRL BIOSPACE and MURI ESPRESSO projects are centered around developing an understanding of coupled bio-optical and physical processes in the coastal zone and improvements of predictability of coastal ocean optical properties on time scales of 1-5 days. MBARI has long-term objectives of monitoring, studying and managing the Monterey Bay ecosystem dynamics and health. The goals for the 2008 field program were to create a synoptic view of the coupled bio- optical physical conditions in the Monterey Bay and to relate satellite observed properties to their subsurface structure. The program was focused on the so-called "upwelling shadow area"(northern part of the bay), where biological processes are enhanced as a result of the slower physical dynamics. The field program deployed a wide range of assets: gliders, AUVs, ScanFish (a ship-towed platform), SEPTR, etc. This deployment was supplemented with intensive station sampling from the R/V Point Sur and satellite ocean color imagery (MODIS, MERIS). The field program was supported by a real-time modeling effort consisting of a hierarchy of different resolution, nested, data assimilating, coupled bio-optical physical models. Development of a pair of cyclonic (in the bay) and anticyclonic (outside of the bay) eddies was observed and predicted by the model during an

  9. Integrated optics technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B.

    1982-01-01

    The materials and processes available for the fabrication of single mode integrated electrooptical components are described. Issues included in the study are: (1) host material and orientation, (2) waveguide formation, (3) optical loss mechanisms, (4) wavelength selection, (5) polarization effects and control, (6) laser to integrated optics coupling,(7) fiber optic waveguides to integrated optics coupling, (8) souces, (9) detectors. The best materials, technology and processes for fabrication of integrated optical components for communications and fiber gyro applications are recommended.

  10. LISA Optics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Krebs, Carolyn (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The LISA experiment has six telescopes, in three spacecraft, in orbit about the sun. There is a continuous laser link between all of the spacecraft. Because of the large, 5 million kilometer distances, between the spacecraft and the need to perform picometer level interferometry and the fact that the optical system is dynamic precludes the use of standard optical codes in the design and analysis of this optical system. A detailed description of the approach used to model all of the optics, in the spacecraft in orbit, is presented and the ability of this model to analyze requirements is discussed. A dynamic computer simulation will be shown to illustrate the laser link and the effects of this dynamic environment on the interferometry.

  11. Optical-Microphysical Cirrus Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichardt, J.; Reichardt, S.; Lin, R.-F.; Hess, M.; McGee, T. J.; Starr, D. O.

    2008-01-01

    A model is presented that permits the simulation of the optical properties of cirrus clouds as measured with depolarization Raman lidars. It comprises a one-dimensional cirrus model with explicit microphysics and an optical module that transforms the microphysical model output to cloud and particle optical properties. The optical model takes into account scattering by randomly oriented or horizontally aligned planar and columnar monocrystals and polycrystals. Key cloud properties such as the fraction of plate-like particles and the number of basic crystals per polycrystal are parameterized in terms of the ambient temperature, the nucleation temperature, or the mass of the particles. The optical-microphysical model is used to simulate the lidar measurement of a synoptically forced cirrostratus in a first case study. It turns out that a cirrus cloud consisting of only monocrystals in random orientation is too simple a model scenario to explain the observations. However, good agreement between simulation and observation is reached when the formation of polycrystals or the horizontal alignment of monocrystals is permitted. Moreover, the model results show that plate fraction and morphological complexity are best parameterized in terms of particle mass, or ambient temperature which indicates that the ambient conditions affect cirrus optical properties more than those during particle formation. Furthermore, the modeled profiles of particle shape and size are in excellent agreement with in situ and laboratory studies, i.e., (partly oriented) polycrystalline particles with mainly planar basic crystals in the cloud bottom layer, and monocrystals above, with the fraction of columns increasing and the shape and size of the particles changing from large thin plates and long columns to small, more isometric crystals from cloud center to top. The findings of this case study corroborate the microphysical interpretation of cirrus measurements with lidar as suggested previously.

  12. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) Signals Using an Analytical Transport Model

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez Villa, A.; Delgado Atencio, J. A.; Vazquez y Montiel, S.; Cunill Rodriguez, M.; Martinez Rodriguez, A. E.; Ramos, J. Castro; Villanueva, A.

    2010-12-07

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive low coherent interferometric technique that provides cross-sectional images of turbid media. OCT is based on the classical Michelson interferometer where the mirror of the reference arm is oscillating and the signal arm contains a biological sample. In this work, we analyzed theoretically the heterodyne optical signal adopting the so called extended Huygens-Fresnel principle (EHFP). We use simulated OCT images with known optical properties to test an algorithm developed by ourselves to recover the scattering coefficient and we recovered the scattering coefficient with a relative error less than 5% for noisy signals. In addition, we applied this algorithm to OCT images from phantoms of known optical properties; in this case curves were indistinguishable. A revision of the validity of the analytical model applied to our system should be done.

  13. Stereo electro-optical tracker study for the measurement of model deformations at the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertel, R. J.; Hoilman, K. A.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of model vibration, camera and window nonlinearities, and aerodynamic disturbances in the optical path on the measurement of target position is examined. Window distortion, temperature and pressure changes, laminar and turbulent boundary layers, shock waves, target intensity and, target vibration are also studied. A general computer program was developed to trace optical rays through these disturbances. The use of a charge injection device camera as an alternative to the image dissector camera was examined.

  14. [Experimental study of offshore oil thickness hyperspectral inversion based on bio-optical model].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jian-wei; Tian, Qing-jiu

    2012-01-01

    Study on the regularity of thin oil film thickness and its reflectance plays an important role in understanding the mechanism of offshore oil slick and ocean hydrocarbon resources exploration. In this work, the thin oil film thickness of biological optical model is established, and introduced the simplified model of inversion thin oil film thickness information by using one single-band or by using two-band ratio image data. With the quantitative inversion test of thin oil film thickness through the natural shallow water and the crude oil sample, the variation rules of between oil spectral parameters and the thin oil film thickness are obtained. The study show that, the oil reflectance in visible and near infrared spectrum (450-800 nm) and the thin film thickness has high inverse correlation, and showed as negative exponent form decline with the increase of oil film thickness. Regarding the shallow water environment, the double band ratio inversion model of using ETM1/ETM3 band ratio can used to be eliminate the impact of sky scattering influence, and to overcome the single-band model fault of Inversion instability when used in different water quality regions, as the inversion result of the model's correlation coefficient can reach 0.98, which is considered to be the ideal hydrocarbon content remote sensing surveying band, and combined with other types of remote sensing technology (such as ultraviolet-laser or SAR), it would provide more economic and precision services of oil total amount infromation for offshore oil exploration and oil spill monitoring.

  15. Molecular Modeling and Experimental Study of Nonlinear Optical Compounds: Mono-Substituted Derivatives of Dicyanovinylbenzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timofeeva, Tatyana V.; Nesterov, Vladimir N.; Antipin, Mikhael Y.; Clark, R. D.; Sanghadasa, M.; Cardelino, B. H.; Moore, C. E.; Frazier, Donald O.

    2000-01-01

    A search for potential nonlinear optical (NLO) compounds has been performed using the Cambridge Structural Database and molecular modeling. We have studied a series of mono-substituted derivatives of dicyanovinylbenzene as the NLO properties of one of its derivatives (o-methoxy-dicyanovinylbenzene, DIVA) were described earlier. The molecular geometry in the series of the compounds studied was investigated with an X- ray analysis and discussed along with results of molecular mechanics and ab initio quantum chemical calculations. The influence of crystal packing on the molecular planarity has been revealed. Two new compounds from the series studied were found to be active for second harmonic generation (SHG) in the powder. The measurements of SHG efficiency have shown that the o-F- and p-Cl-derivatives of dicyanovinylbenzene are about 10 and 20- times more active than urea, respectively. The peculiarities of crystal structure formation in the framework of balance between the van der Waals and electrostatic interactions have been discussed. The crystal morphology of DIVA and two new SHG-active compounds have been calculated on the basis of their known crystal structures.

  16. Increase of Cloud Droplet Size with Aerosol Optical Depth: An Observational and Modeling Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Tianle; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Renyi; Fan, Jiwen

    2008-02-21

    Cloud droplet effective radius (DER) is generally negatively correlated with aerosol optical depth (AOD) as a proxy of cloud condensation nuclei. In this study, cases of positive correlation were found over certain portions of the world by analyzing the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite products, together with a general finding that DER may increase or decrease with aerosol loading depending on environmental conditions. The slope of the correlation between DER and AOD is driven primarily by water vapor amount, which explains 70% of the variance in our study. Various potential artifacts that may cause the positive relation are investigated including water vapor swelling, partially cloudy, atmospheric dynamics, cloud three-dimensional (3-D) and surface influence effects. None seems to be the primary cause for the observed phenomenon, although a certain degree of influence exists for some of the factors. Analyses are conducted over seven regions around the world representing different types of aerosols and clouds. Only two regions show positive dependence of DER on AOD, near coasts of the Gulf of Mexico and South China Sea, which implies physical processes may at work. Using a 2-D spectral-bin microphysics Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE) which incorporated a reformulation of the Köhler theory, two possible physical mechanisms are hypothesized. They are related to the effects of slightly soluble organics (SSO) particles and giant CCNs. Model simulations show a positive correlation between DER and AOD, due to a decrease in activated aerosols with an increasing SSO content. Addition of a few giant CCNs also increases the DER. Further investigations are needed to fully understand and clarify the observed phenomenon.

  17. A spectroelectrochemical study on single-oscillator model and optical constants of sulfonated polyaniline film.

    PubMed

    Caglar, Mujdat; Ilican, Saliha; Caglar, Yasemin; Sahin, Yücel; Yakuphanoglu, Fahrettin; Hür, Deniz

    2008-11-15

    The optical properties of sulfonated polyaniline (SPAN) thin film prepared by electrochemical method have been investigated. Polychromic behavior of SPAN thin film (transparent yellow-green-dark blue) was observed when the cyclic voltammograms were taken between -0.25 V and +1.90 V (vs. Ag/AgCl, sat.) during the growth of polyaniline film. In situ UV-vis spectra of the polymers-indium tin oxide (ITO) glass electrode were taken during the oxidation of the polymers at different applied potentials. The direct band gap values of SPAN thin film changed from 3.771 eV to 3.874 eV with the applied potentials. From in situ UV-vis spectra, the optical constants such as refractive index and dielectric constant of the SPAN thin film were determined. The important changes in absorption edge, refractive index and the dielectric constant were observed due to the applied potentials. The refractive index dispersion curves of the film obey the single-oscillator model and oscillator parameters changed with the applied potentials. The most significant result of the present work is in situ spectroelectrochemical method, which can be used to modify the optical band gaps and constants. PMID:18337162

  18. Parametric studies of magnetic-optic imaging using finite-element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, C.; Udpa, L.; Xuan, L.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Thorne, D.; Shih, W.

    2000-05-01

    Magneto-optic imaging is a relatively new sensor application of bubble memory technology to NDI. The Magneto-Optic Imager (MOI) uses a magneto-optic (MO) sensor to produce analog images of magnetic flux leakage from surface and subsurface defects. The flux leakage is produced by eddy current induction techniques in nonferrous metals and magnetic yokes are used in ferromagnetic materials. The technique has gained acceptance in the aircraft maintenance industry for use to detect surface-breaking cracks and corrosion. Until recently, much of the MOI development has been empirical in nature since the electromagnetic processes that produce images are rather complex. The availability of finite element techniques to numerically solve Maxwell's equations, in conjunction with MOI observations, allows greater understanding of the capabilities of the instrument. In this paper, we present a systematic set of finite element calculations along with MOI measurements on specific defects to quantify the current capability of the MOI as well as its desired performance. Parametric studies including effects of liftoff and proximity of edges are also studied.—This material is based upon work supported by the Federal Aviation Administration under Contract #DTFA03-98-D-00008, Delivery Order #IA013 and performed at Iowa State University's Center for NDE as part of the Center for Aviation Systems Reliability program.

  19. CCD-camera-based diffuse optical tomography to study ischemic stroke in preclinical rat models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zi-Jing; Niu, Haijing; Liu, Yueming; Su, Jianzhong; Liu, Hanli

    2011-02-01

    Stroke, due to ischemia or hemorrhage, is the neurological deficit of cerebrovasculature and is the third leading cause of death in the United States. More than 80 percent of stroke patients are ischemic stroke due to blockage of artery in the brain by thrombosis or arterial embolism. Hence, development of an imaging technique to image or monitor the cerebral ischemia and effect of anti-stoke therapy is more than necessary. Near infrared (NIR) optical tomographic technique has a great potential to be utilized as a non-invasive image tool (due to its low cost and portability) to image the embedded abnormal tissue, such as a dysfunctional area caused by ischemia. Moreover, NIR tomographic techniques have been successively demonstrated in the studies of cerebro-vascular hemodynamics and brain injury. As compared to a fiberbased diffuse optical tomographic system, a CCD-camera-based system is more suitable for pre-clinical animal studies due to its simpler setup and lower cost. In this study, we have utilized the CCD-camera-based technique to image the embedded inclusions based on tissue-phantom experimental data. Then, we are able to obtain good reconstructed images by two recently developed algorithms: (1) depth compensation algorithm (DCA) and (2) globally convergent method (GCM). In this study, we will demonstrate the volumetric tomographic reconstructed results taken from tissuephantom; the latter has a great potential to determine and monitor the effect of anti-stroke therapies.

  20. Optical modeling of extraoral defects.

    PubMed

    Reitemeier, Bernd; Notni, Gunther; Heinze, Matthias; Schöne, Christine; Schmidt, Annette; Fichtner, Dieter

    2004-01-01

    In order to reduce the stress caused to patients by conventional methods of modeling using computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), an optical modeling process has been developed for extraoral defects and body areas. The selected body part is digitized using optical 3-coordinate measuring technology, providing an extensive data record. This is adapted for further use by equalizing the point clouds to obtain a Computer Aided Design (CAD) model, which is converted to a physical model by means of a stereolithographic process. With this technology, the patient's physical and psychological stress may be reduced. This article describes a technique for optical modeling of an ocular prosthesis.

  1. Neutron-induced reactions on AlF3 studied using the optical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Lv, Cui-Juan; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Hong-Wei; Zuo, Jia-Xu

    2015-08-01

    Neutron-induced reactions on 27Al and 19F nuclei are investigated using the optical model implemented in the TALYS 1.4 toolkit. Incident neutron energies in a wide range from 0.1 keV to 30 MeV are calculated. The cross sections for the main channels (n, np), (n, p), (n, α), (n, 2n), and (n, γ) and the total reaction cross section (n, tot) of the reactions are obtained. When the default parameters in TALYS 1.4 are adopted, the calculated results agree with the measured results. Based on the calculated results for the n + 27Al and n + 19F reactions, the results of the n + 27Al19F reactions are predicted. These results are useful both for the design of thorium-based molten salt reactors and for neutron activation analysis techniques.

  2. Integrated optics technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B.; Findakly, T.; Innarella, R.

    1982-01-01

    The status and near term potential of materials and processes available for the fabrication of single mode integrated electro-optical components are discussed. Issues discussed are host material and orientation, waveguide formation, optical loss mechanisms, wavelength selection, polarization effects and control, laser to integrated optics coupling fiber optic waveguides to integrated optics coupling, sources, and detectors. Recommendations of the best materials, technology, and processes for fabrication of integrated optical components for communications and fiber gyro applications are given.

  3. Optical grating analyzer studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    A spectrometer was specifically designed and developed to observe grating spectra over a range of incidence angles from normal to almost grazing incidence. A unique scanning and focusing mechanism is utilized to keep the exit slit on the Rowland circle. Polarization effects in the vacuum were investigated, and efficiency measurements and spectral scans were made simultaneously with the spectrometer. Results of measurements are given. Applications of the spectrometer to the space program and to the study of contamination on optical surfaces are indicated.

  4. Extended optical model for fission

    DOE PAGES

    Sin, M.; Capote, R.; Herman, M. W.; Trkov, A.

    2016-03-07

    A comprehensive formalism to calculate fission cross sections based on the extension of the optical model for fission is presented. It can be used for description of nuclear reactions on actinides featuring multi-humped fission barriers with partial absorption in the wells and direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels. The formalism describes the gross fluctuations observed in the fission probability due to vibrational resonances, and can be easily implemented in existing statistical reaction model codes. The extended optical model for fission is applied for neutron induced fission cross-section calculations on 234,235,238U and 239Pu targets. A triple-humped fission barrier ismore » used for 234,235U(n,f), while a double-humped fission barrier is used for 238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions as predicted by theoretical barrier calculations. The impact of partial damping of class-II/III states, and of direct transmission through discrete and continuum fission channels, is shown to be critical for a proper description of the measured fission cross sections for 234,235,238U(n,f) reactions. The 239Pu(n,f) reaction can be calculated in the complete damping approximation. Calculated cross sections for 235,238U(n,f) and 239Pu(n,f) reactions agree within 3% with the corresponding cross sections derived within the Neutron Standards least-squares fit of available experimental data. Lastly, the extended optical model for fission can be used for both theoretical fission studies and nuclear data evaluation.« less

  5. A preliminary optical visibility model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowles, K.; Levine, B. M.

    1994-01-01

    A model is being created to describe the effect of weather on optical communications links between space and ground sites. This article describes the process by which the model is developed and gives preliminary results for two sites. The results indicate nighttime attenuation of optical transmission at five wavelengths. It is representative of a sampling of nights at Table Mountain Observatory from January to June and Mount Lemmon Observatory from May and June. The results are designed to predict attenuation probabilities for optical communications links.

  6. Optical study of pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanwal, Divas

    The Crab Pulsar emits radiation at all wavelengths from radio to extreme γ-rays including the optical. We have performed extremely high time resolution multicolor photometry of the Crab Pulsar at optical wavelengths to constrain the high energy emission models for pulsars. Our observations with 1 microsecond time resolution are a factor of 20 better than the previous best observations. We have completely resolved the peak of the main pulse of the Crab Pulsar in optical passbands. The peaks of the main pulse and the interpulse move smoothly from the rising branch to the falling branch with neither a flat top nor a cusp. We find that the peak of the Crab Pulsar main pulse in the B band arrives 140 microseconds before the peak of the radio pulse. The color of the emission changes across the phase. The maximum variation in the color ratio is about 25%. The bluest color occurs in the bridge region between the main pulse and the interpulse. The Crab Pulsar has faded by 2 +/- 2.8% since the previous observations in 1991 using the same instrument. The statistics of photon arrival times are consistent with atmospheric scintillation causing most of the variations in addition to the mean pulse variations in the shape. However, the autocorrelation function (ACF) of the Crab Pulsar light curve shows extra correlations at very short time scales. We identify two time scales, one at about 20 microseconds and another one at about 1000 microseconds at which we observe a break in the ACF. We conclude that these short timescale correlations are internal to the pulsar. We attribute the extra correlation observed in our data to microstructures. This is the first time evidence for microstructures has been observed outside the radio wavelengths. The upturn in the ACF at short time scales depends on the color. The U band shows about 10% more correlation at short time scales while the R band shows only about 3% change. We have also observed the young X-ray pulsar PSR 0656+14 at optical

  7. Semiempirical Modeling of Ag Nanoclusters: New Parameters for Optical Property Studies Enable Determination of Double Excitation Contributions to Plasmonic Excitation.

    PubMed

    Gieseking, Rebecca L; Ratner, Mark A; Schatz, George C

    2016-07-01

    Quantum mechanical studies of Ag nanoclusters have shown that plasmonic behavior can be modeled in terms of excited states where collectivity among single excitations leads to strong absorption. However, new computational approaches are needed to provide understanding of plasmonic excitations beyond the single-excitation level. We show that semiempirical INDO/CI approaches with appropriately selected parameters reproduce the TD-DFT optical spectra of various closed-shell Ag clusters. The plasmon-like states with strong optical absorption comprise linear combinations of many singly excited configurations that contribute additively to the transition dipole moment, whereas all other excited states show significant cancellation among the contributions to the transition dipole moment. The computational efficiency of this approach allows us to investigate the role of double excitations at the INDO/SDCI level. The Ag cluster ground states are stabilized by slight mixing with doubly excited configurations, but the plasmonic states generally retain largely singly excited character. The consideration of double excitations in all cases improves the agreement of the INDO/CI absorption spectra with TD-DFT, suggesting that the SDCI calculation effectively captures some of the ground-state correlation implicit in DFT. These results provide the first evidence to support the commonly used assumption that single excitations are in many cases sufficient to describe the optical spectra of plasmonic excitations quantum mechanically.

  8. Optical Studies of Active Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewitt, David

    1998-01-01

    This grant was to support optical studies of comets close enough to the sun to be outgassing. The main focus of the observations was drawn to the two extraordinarily bright comets Hyakutake and Hale-Bopp, but other active comets were also studied in detail during the period of funding. Major findings (all fully published) under this grant include: (1) Combined optical and submillimeter observations of the comet/Centaur P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 were used to study the nature of mass loss from this object. The submillimeter observations show directly that the optically prominent dust coma is ejected by the sublimation of carbon monoxide. Simultaneous optical-submillimeter observations allowed us to test earlier determinations of the dust mass loss rate. (2) We modelled the rotation of cometary nuclei using time-resolved images of dust jets as the primary constraint. (3) We obtained broad-band optical images of several comets for which we subsequently attempted submillimeter observations, in order to test and update the cometary ephemerides. (4) Broad-band continuum images of a set of weakly active comets and, apparently, inactive asteroids were obtained in BVRI using the University of Hawaii 2.2-m telescope. These images were taken in support of a program to test the paradigm that many near-Earth asteroids might be dead or dormant comets. We measured coma vs. nucleus colors in active comets (finding that coma particle scattering is different from, and cannot be simply related to, nucleus color). We obtained spectroscopic observations of weakly active comets and other small bodies using the HIRES spectrograph on the Keck 10-m telescope. These observation place sensitive limits to outgassing from these bodies, aided by the high (40,000) spectral resolution of HIRES.

  9. Acoustic Models of Optical Mirrors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, V. V.; Varaksina, E. I.

    2014-01-01

    Students form a more exact idea of the action of optical mirrors if they can observe the wave field being formed during reflection. For this purpose it is possible to organize model experiments with flexural waves propagating in thin elastic plates. The direct and round edges of the plates are used as models of plane, convex and concave mirrors.…

  10. Numerical study of a continuous optical discharge in atmospheric air in the framework of a one-dimensional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raizer, Iu. P.; Surzhikov, S. T.

    1985-07-01

    A quasi-one-dimensional model of the continuous discharge of a CW CO2 laser is constructed. The laser beam parameters used in the model include: the thermal radiation coefficient; and the motion of the CO2 gas along the optical axis. The parameters of the optical discharge are estimated numerically and the results are compared with the available experimental data. The estimated temperature distribution of a 6-kW optical discharge is given in a graph, and the location and size of the high-temperature region of the discharge are shown.

  11. Study of optical clearing in polarization measurements by Monte Carlo simulations with anisotropic tissue-mimicking models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongsheng; Zeng, Nan; Wang, Yunfei; He, Honghui; Tuchin, Valery V; Ma, Hui

    2016-08-01

    We conducted Monte Carlo simulations based on anisotropic sclera-mimicking models to examine the polarization features in Mueller matrix polar decomposition (MMPD) parameters during the refractive index matching process, which is one of the major mechanisms of optical clearing. In a preliminary attempt, by changing the parameters of the models, wavelengths, and detection geometries, we demonstrate how the depolarization coefficient and retardance vary during the refractive index matching process and explain the polarization features using the average value and standard deviation of scattering numbers of the detected photons. We also study the depth-resolved polarization features during the gradual progression of the refractive index matching process. The results above indicate that the refractive index matching process increases the depth of polarization measurements and may lead to higher contrast between tissues of different anisotropies in deeper layers. MMPD-derived polarization parameters can characterize the refractive index matching process qualitatively. PMID:27240298

  12. Modeling an optical micromachine probe

    SciTech Connect

    Mittas, A.; Dickey, F.M.; Holswade, S.C.

    1997-08-01

    Silicon micromachines are fabricated using Surface Micro-Machining (SMM) techniques. Silicon micromachines include engines that consist of orthogonally oriented linear comb drive actuators mechanically connected to a rotating gear. These gears are as small a 50-{micro}m in diameter and can be driven at rotation rates exceeding 300,000-rpm. Measuring and analyzing microengine performance is basic to micromachine development and system applications. Optical techniques offer the potential for measuring long term statistical performance data and transient responses needed to optimize designs and manufacturing techniques. The authors describe the modeling of an optical probe developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Experimental data will be compared with output from the model.

  13. Optical data processing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinson, L. J.

    1976-01-01

    An onboard coherent optical data processing system was designed to handle large information content of imagery at high speeds, reduce redundancy in picture transmission, and detect specific image features. Theoretically derived Fourier transform characteristics for simple but representative two dimensional images served as a basis for predicting expected features of actual target images. Fourier transformation and spatial filtering of coherent optical images was accomplished theoretically and in the laboratory. The effect of various parameters such as optical aperature, incidence angles, the transparency assumption, the thin lens approximation on resolution, and performance of the system are predicted and tested.

  14. Soot Optical Property Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aung, K. T.; Hassan, M. I.; Krishnan, S. S.; Lin, K.-C.; Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent past studies of soot reaction processes in laminar premixed and nonpremixed flames generally have used the intrusive technique of thermophoretic sampling and analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to observe soot structure and obtain important fundamental information about soot particle properties, such as soot primary particle diameters, the rate of change of soot primary particle diameter as a function of time (or rate of soot surface growth or oxidation), the amount of soot particle reactive surface area per unit volume, the number of primary soot particles per unit volume, and the rate of formation of primary soot particles (or the rate of soot primary particle nucleation). Given the soot volume per unit volume of the flame (or the soot volume fraction), all these properties are readily found from a measurement of the soot primary particle diameter (which usually is nearly a constant for each location within a laminar flame). This approach is not possible within freely propagating flames, however, because soot properties at given positions in such flames vary relatively rapidly as a function of time in the soot formation and oxidation regions compared to the relatively lengthy sampling times needed to accumulate adequate soot samples and to minimize effects of soot collected on the sampling grid as it moves to and from the sampling position through other portions of the flame. Thus, nonintrusive optical methods must be used to find the soot primary particle diameters needed to define the soot surface reaction properties mentioned earlier. Unfortunately, approximate nonintrusive methods used during early studies of soot reaction properties in flames, found from laser scattering and absorption measurements analyzed assuming either Rayleigh scattering or Mie scattering from polydisperse effective soot particles having the same mass of soot as individual soot aggregates, have not been found to be an effective way to estimate the soot surface

  15. Study of negative hydrogen ion beam optics using the 3D3V PIC model

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, K.; Nishioka, S.; Goto, I.; Hatayama, A.; Hanada, M.; Kojima, A.

    2015-04-08

    The mechanism of negative ion extraction under real conditions with the complex magnetic field is studied by using the 3D PIC simulation code. The extraction region of the negative ion source for the negative ion based neutral beam injection system in fusion reactors is modelled. It is shown that the E x B drift of electrons is caused by the magnetic filter and the electron suppression magnetic field, and the resultant asymmetry of the plasma meniscus. Furthermore, it is indicated that that the asymmetry of the plasma meniscus results in the asymmetry of negative ion beam profile including the beam halo. It could be demonstrated theoretically that the E x B drift is not significantly weakened by the elastic collisions of the electrons with neutral particles.

  16. Project OPTEX: Field study at a petrochemical facility to assess optical remote sensing and dispersion modeling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Paien, R.J.; Zwicker, J.O.; Feldman, H.

    1997-12-31

    The American Petroleum Inst. has conducted a field study at a petrochemical facility for the purpose of (1) testing the ability of optical remote sensing (ORS) techniques to characterize fugitive emissions, and (2) assembling ambient and tracer sampler data for evaluating air dispersion models. The study, referred to as the OPTEX (Operational Petrochemical Tracer Experiment) Project, took place during October 1996 at a Texas petrochemical facility. This paper reports on the design of the field study and summarizes the measurements that were obtained in the field. Several aspects of the field study are described in the paper: the types and locations of the emission releases and tracer gases that were used, the deployment of tracer samplers at various downwind distances, the use of open-path FTIR (OP-FTIR) equipment at the site to quantify tracer gas emissions, special short-term tracer gas emissions designed to test the ability of the ORS systems to detect accidental releases, and the use of a Doppler sodar to evaluate vertical profiles of wind and turbulence upwind and downwind of the facility. The data base for this study, as well as that from an earlier field study that took place at the Duke Forest green field site in North Carolina, will be used for evaluating air dispersion model performance and the ability of ORS measurements to quantify fugitive emissions.

  17. Optical adhesive property study

    SciTech Connect

    Sundvold, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Tests were performed to characterize the mechanical and thermal properties of selected optical adhesives to identify the most likely candidate which could survive the operating environment of the Direct Optical Initiation (DOI) program. The DOI system consists of a high power laser and an optical module used to split the beam into a number of channels to initiate the system. The DOI requirements are for a high shock environment which current military optical systems do not operate. Five candidate adhesives were selected and evaluated using standardized test methods to determine the adhesives` physical properties. EC2216, manufactured by 3M, was selected as the baseline candidate adhesive based on the test results of the physical properties.

  18. Integrated optical and electrical modeling of plasmon-enhanced thin film photovoltaics: A case-study on organic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rourke, Devin; Ahn, Sungmo; Nardes, Alexandre M.; Lagemaat, Jao van de; Kopidakis, Nikos; Park, Wounjhang

    2014-09-21

    The nanoscale light control for absorption enhancement of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices inevitably produces strongly non-uniform optical fields. These non-uniformities due to the localized optical modes are a primary route toward absorption enhancement in OPV devices. Therefore, a rigorous modeling tool taking into account the spatial distribution of optical field and carrier generation is necessary. Presented here is a comprehensive numerical model to describe the coupled optical and electrical behavior of plasmon-enhanced polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. In this model, a position-dependent electron-hole pair generation rate that could become highly non-uniform due to photonic nanostructures is directly calculated from the optical simulations. By considering the absorption and plasmonic properties of nanophotonic gratings included in two different popular device architectures, and applying the Poisson, current continuity, and drift/diffusion equations, the model predicts quantum efficiency, short-circuit current density, and desired carrier mobility ratios for bulk heterojunction devices incorporating nanostructures for light management. In particular, the model predicts a significant degradation of device performance when the carrier species with lower mobility are generated far from the collecting electrode. Consequently, an inverted device architecture is preferred for materials with low hole mobility. This is especially true for devices that include plasmonic nanostructures. Additionally, due to the incorporation of a plasmonic nanostructure, we use simulations to theoretically predict absorption band broadening of a BHJ into energies below the band gap, resulting in a 4.8% increase in generated photocurrent.

  19. Laser beam modeling in optical storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treptau, J. P.; Milster, T. D.; Flagello, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    A computer model has been developed that simulates light propagating through an optical data storage system. A model of a laser beam that originates at a laser diode, propagates through an optical system, interacts with a optical disk, reflects back from the optical disk into the system, and propagates to data and servo detectors is discussed.

  20. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnels. Part 4: Model deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George

    1992-01-01

    A survey of systems capable of model deformation measurements was conducted. The survey included stereo-cameras, scanners, and digitizers. Moire, holographic, and heterodyne interferometry techniques were also looked at. Stereo-cameras with passive or active targets are currently being deployed for model deformation measurements at NASA Ames and LaRC, Boeing, and ONERA. Scanners and digitizers are widely used in robotics, motion analysis, medicine, etc., and some of the scanner and digitizers can meet the model deformation requirements. Commercial stereo-cameras, scanners, and digitizers are being improved in accuracy, reliability, and ease of operation. A number of new systems are coming onto the market.

  1. Biophotonic Modelling of Cardiac Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Martin J; Plank, Gernot

    2015-01-01

    Computational models have been recently applied to simulate and better understand the nature of fluorescent photon scattering and optical signal distortion during cardiac optical imaging. The goal of such models is both to provide a useful post-processing tool to facilitate a more accurate and faithful comparison between computational simulations of electrical activity and experiments, as well as providing essential insight into the mechanisms underlying this distortion, suggesting ways in which it may be controlled or indeed utilised to maximise the information derived from the recorded fluorescent signal. Here, we present different modelling methodologies developed and used in the field to simulate both the explicit processes involved in optical signal synthesis and the resulting consequences of the effects of photon scattering within the myocardium upon the optically-detected signal. We focus our attentions to two main types of modelling approaches used to simulate light transport in cardiac tissue, specifically continuous (reaction-diffusion) and discrete stochastic (Monte Carlo) methods. For each method, we provide both a summary of the necessary methodological details of such models, in addition to brief reviews of relevant application studies which have sought to apply these methods to elucidate important information regarding experimentally-recorded optical signals under different circumstances.

  2. Neuronal encoding of object and distance information: a model simulation study on naturalistic optic flow processing

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Patrick; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2011-01-01

    We developed a model of the input circuitry of the FD1 cell, an identified motion-sensitive interneuron in the blowfly's visual system. The model circuit successfully reproduces the FD1 cell's most conspicuous property: its larger responses to objects than to spatially extended patterns. The model circuit also mimics the time-dependent responses of FD1 to dynamically complex naturalistic stimuli, shaped by the blowfly's saccadic flight and gaze strategy: the FD1 responses are enhanced when, as a consequence of self-motion, a nearby object crosses the receptive field during intersaccadic intervals. Moreover, the model predicts that these object-induced responses are superimposed by pronounced pattern-dependent fluctuations during movements on virtual test flights in a three-dimensional environment with systematic modifications of the environmental patterns. Hence, the FD1 cell is predicted to detect not unambiguously objects defined by the spatial layout of the environment, but to be also sensitive to objects distinguished by textural features. These ambiguous detection abilities suggest an encoding of information about objects—irrespective of the features by which the objects are defined—by a population of cells, with the FD1 cell presumably playing a prominent role in such an ensemble. PMID:22461769

  3. Picosecond Optical Studies of Solids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broomfield, Seth Emlyn

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Hot carrier relaxation is studied in the alloy semiconductor Ga_{rm 1-x} Al_{rm x}As by analysis of time-resolved luminescence at 4K. Photoexcited carrier densities in the range 10^{16 } to 10^{18}cm ^{-3} were created by 5ps laser pulses in alloys with x values ranging from 0 to 0.36. Carrier temperature cooling curves are discussed in terms of emission and absorption of non-equilibrium phonons by carriers, intervalley scattering of electrons and alloy disorder effects. Energy relaxation within a band of localised exciton states is studied in Ga_{rm 1 -x}Al_{rm x} As by analysis of time-resolved photoluminescence at 4K with a photoexcited carrier density of 10 ^{14}cm^{-3 }. It is found that the width of the band of localised states increases with the degree of alloy disorder as x ranges from 0 to 0.36. A form for the density of localised states is obtained. The intersite exciton overlap is estimated. Photoluminescence of the semiconductor gallium selenide is measured for carrier densities below 3 times 10^{18}cm ^{-3} at 2K. Biexcitons are identified by analysis of the photoluminescence at high densities. This is confirmed by induced optical absorption experiments. It is shown that biexciton dissociation by interaction with low-energy optical phonons occurs as the lattice temperature is increased. The group velocity of excitonic polaritons is obtained from measurements of the time-of-flight of 5ps optical pulses across a 1mum thick layer of gallium arsenide at 4K. The group velocity has a minimum value of 4 times 10 ^5ms^{-1} at the transverse exciton energy, and has a dependence on photon energy which agrees well with a model describing spatial dispersion of polaritons.

  4. Integrated optical and electrical modeling of plasmon-enhanced thin film photovoltaics: A case-study on organic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rourke, D; Ahn, S; Nardes, AM; van de Lagemaat, J; Kopidakis, N; Park, W

    2014-09-21

    The nanoscale light control for absorption enhancement of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices inevitably produces strongly non-uniform optical fields. These non-uniformities due to the localized optical modes are a primary route toward absorption enhancement in OPV devices. Therefore, a rigorous modeling tool taking into account the spatial distribution of optical field and carrier generation is necessary. Presented here is a comprehensive numerical model to describe the coupled optical and electrical behavior of plasmon-enhanced polymer: fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. In this model, a position-dependent electron-hole pair generation rate that could become highly non-uniform due to photonic nanostructures is directly calculated from the optical simulations. By considering the absorption and plasmonic properties of nanophotonic gratings included in two different popular device architectures, and applying the Poisson, current continuity, and drift/diffusion equations, the model predicts quantum efficiency, short-circuit current density, and desired carrier mobility ratios for bulk heterojunction devices incorporating nanostructures for light management. In particular, the model predicts a significant degradation of device performance when the carrier species with lower mobility are generated far from the collecting electrode. Consequently, an inverted device architecture is preferred for materials with low hole mobility. This is especially true for devices that include plasmonic nanostructures. Additionally, due to the incorporation of a plasmonic nanostructure, we use simulations to theoretically predict absorption band broadening of a BHJ into energies below the band gap, resulting in a 4.8% increase in generated photocurrent. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  5. Dynamical DMRG study of non-linear optical response in one-dimensional dimerized Hubbard model with nearest neighbor Coulomb interaction and alternating on-site potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sota, Shigetoshi; Tohyama, Takami; Brazovskii, Serguei

    2012-02-01

    The optical response of organic compounds has been attracting much attention. The one of the reasons is the huge non-linear and ultrafast optical response [K. Yamamoto et. al., J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 77, 074709(2008)]. In order to investigate such optical properties, we carry out dynamical DMRG calculations to obtain optical responses in the 1/4-filled one-dimensional Hubbard model including the nearest neighbor Coulomb interaction and the alternating electron hopping. The charge gap [S. Nishimoto, M. Takahashi, and Y. Ohta, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 69, 1594(2000)] and the bound state [H. Benthien and E. Jeckelmann, Eur. Phys. J. B 44, 287(2005)] in this model have been discussed based on DMRG calculations. In the present study, we introduce an alternating on-site potential giving the polarization in the system into the dimerized Hubbard model, which breaks the reflection symmetry of the system. In this talk, we discuss the obtained linear and the 2nd order non-linear optical susceptibility in order to make a prediction for non-linear optical experiments in the future.

  6. Effects of Methotrexate in a Rabbit Model of In-Stent Neoatherosclerosis: An Optical Coherence Tomography Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruoxi; Chen, Shuyuan; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Qi; Xing, Jianpang; Zhao, Qi; Wang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Hou, Jingbo

    2016-01-01

    This study used optical coherence tomography (OCT) to investigate the effects of systemic methotrexate, in combination with a drug-eluting stent, on in-stent neoatherosclerosis in a rabbit model. Sirolimus-eluting stents were surgically implanted in the right common carotid arteries of 200 male New Zealand White rabbits; the animals received a high-fat diet, beginning one week before stent implantation. Each animal was randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups, receiving intravenous injections of either methotrexate (0.4 mg/kg) or placebo weekly for 4 or 12 weeks. Stented arterial segments were harvested after stenting for 4 or 12 weeks, and processed for OCT and histological analysis. Prior to harvesting the arterial segments, blood was collected for the determinations of cytokine levels. Compared with the control animals, the methotrexate-treated animals showed lower rates of lipid-rich intima and per-strut low-signal intensity layers, smaller neointimal areas, and reduced neointimal thickness; larger fibrous cap thicknesses and smaller lumen areas were also seen in the animals receiving methotrexate. The levels of serum interleukin, adhesion molecules, and nuclear factor-κB p65 decreased and IL-10 level increased in the methotrexate-treated animals. Targeting the pro-inflammatory pathways may be an effective way to prevent restenosis without the long-term risk of late thrombosis. PMID:27644847

  7. Effects of Methotrexate in a Rabbit Model of In-Stent Neoatherosclerosis: An Optical Coherence Tomography Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruoxi; Chen, Shuyuan; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Qi; Xing, Jianpang; Zhao, Qi; Wang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Hou, Jingbo

    2016-09-20

    This study used optical coherence tomography (OCT) to investigate the effects of systemic methotrexate, in combination with a drug-eluting stent, on in-stent neoatherosclerosis in a rabbit model. Sirolimus-eluting stents were surgically implanted in the right common carotid arteries of 200 male New Zealand White rabbits; the animals received a high-fat diet, beginning one week before stent implantation. Each animal was randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups, receiving intravenous injections of either methotrexate (0.4 mg/kg) or placebo weekly for 4 or 12 weeks. Stented arterial segments were harvested after stenting for 4 or 12 weeks, and processed for OCT and histological analysis. Prior to harvesting the arterial segments, blood was collected for the determinations of cytokine levels. Compared with the control animals, the methotrexate-treated animals showed lower rates of lipid-rich intima and per-strut low-signal intensity layers, smaller neointimal areas, and reduced neointimal thickness; larger fibrous cap thicknesses and smaller lumen areas were also seen in the animals receiving methotrexate. The levels of serum interleukin, adhesion molecules, and nuclear factor-κB p65 decreased and IL-10 level increased in the methotrexate-treated animals. Targeting the pro-inflammatory pathways may be an effective way to prevent restenosis without the long-term risk of late thrombosis.

  8. Effects of Methotrexate in a Rabbit Model of In-Stent Neoatherosclerosis: An Optical Coherence Tomography Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruoxi; Chen, Shuyuan; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Qi; Xing, Jianpang; Zhao, Qi; Wang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Hou, Jingbo

    2016-01-01

    This study used optical coherence tomography (OCT) to investigate the effects of systemic methotrexate, in combination with a drug-eluting stent, on in-stent neoatherosclerosis in a rabbit model. Sirolimus-eluting stents were surgically implanted in the right common carotid arteries of 200 male New Zealand White rabbits; the animals received a high-fat diet, beginning one week before stent implantation. Each animal was randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups, receiving intravenous injections of either methotrexate (0.4 mg/kg) or placebo weekly for 4 or 12 weeks. Stented arterial segments were harvested after stenting for 4 or 12 weeks, and processed for OCT and histological analysis. Prior to harvesting the arterial segments, blood was collected for the determinations of cytokine levels. Compared with the control animals, the methotrexate-treated animals showed lower rates of lipid-rich intima and per-strut low-signal intensity layers, smaller neointimal areas, and reduced neointimal thickness; larger fibrous cap thicknesses and smaller lumen areas were also seen in the animals receiving methotrexate. The levels of serum interleukin, adhesion molecules, and nuclear factor-κB p65 decreased and IL-10 level increased in the methotrexate-treated animals. Targeting the pro-inflammatory pathways may be an effective way to prevent restenosis without the long-term risk of late thrombosis. PMID:27644847

  9. Model studies of the optical rotation, and theoretical determination of its sign for beta-pinene and trans-pinane.

    PubMed

    Baranowska, Angelika; Łaczkowski, Krzysztof Z; Sadlej, Andrzej J

    2010-04-30

    We have carried out extensive studies on the basis set dependence of the calculated specific optical rotation (OR) in molecules at the level of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock and density functional approximations. To reach the limits of the basis set saturation, we have devised an artificial model, the asymmetrically deformed (chiral) methane (CM) molecule. This small system permits to use basis sets which are prohibitively large for real chiral molecules and yet shows all the important features of the basis set dependence of the OR values. The convergence of the OR has been studied with n-aug-cc-pVXZ basis sets of Dunning up to the 6-zeta. In a parallel series of calculations, we have used the recently developed large polarized (LPolX) basis sets. The relatively small LPolX sets have been shown to be competitive to very large n-aug-cc-pVXZ basis sets. The conclusions reached in calculations of OR in CM concerning the usefulness of LPolX basis sets have been further tested on (S)-methyloxirane and (S)-fluoro-oxirane. The smallest set of the LPolX family (LPol-ds) has been found to yield OR values of similar quality as those obtained with much larger Dunning's aug-cc-pVQZ basis set. These results have encouraged us to carry out the OR calculations with LPol-ds basis sets for systems as large as beta-pinene and trans-pinane. In both cases, our calculations have lead to the correct sign of the OR value in these molecules. This makes the relatively small LPol-ds basis sets likely to be useful in OR calculations for large molecules.

  10. MOSE: a feasibility study for optical turbulence forecast with the Meso-Nh mesoscale model to support AO facilities at ESO sites (Paranal and Armazones)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masciadri, Elena; Lascaux, Franck

    2012-07-01

    We present very encouraging preliminary results obtained in the context of the MOSE project, an on-going study aiming at investigating the feasibility of the forecast of the optical turbulence and meteorological parameters (in the free atmosphere as well as in the boundary and surface layer) at Cerro Paranal (site of the Very Large Telescope - VLT) and Cerro Armazones (site of the European Extremely Large Telescope - E-ELT), both in Chile. The study employs the Meso-Nh atmospheric mesoscale model and aims at supplying a tool for optical turbulence forecasts to support the scheduling of the scientific programs and the use of AO facilities at the VLT and the E-ELT. In this study we take advantage of the huge amount of measurements performed so far at Paranal and Armazones by ESO and the TMT consortium in the context of the site selection for the E-ELT and the TMT to constraint / validate the model. A detailed analysis of the model performances in reproducing the atmospheric parameters (T, V, p, H, ...) near the ground as well as in the free atmosphere, is critical and fundamental because the optical turbulence depends on most of these parameters. This approach permits us to provide an exhaustive and complete analysis of the model performances and to better define the model operational application. This also helps us to identify the sources of discrepancies with optical turbulence measurements (when they appear) and to discriminate between different origins of the problem: model parameterization, initial conditions, ... Preliminary results indicate a great accuracy of the model in reproducing most of the main meteorological parameters in statistical terms as well as in each individual night in the free atmosphere and in proximity of the surface. The study is co-funded by ESO and INAF-Arcetri (Italy).

  11. Advances in optical imaging for pharmacological studies

    PubMed Central

    Arranz, Alicia; Ripoll, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Imaging approaches are an essential tool for following up over time representative parameters of in vivo models, providing useful information in pharmacological studies. Main advantages of optical imaging approaches compared to other imaging methods are their safety, straight-forward use and cost-effectiveness. A main drawback, however, is having to deal with the presence of high scattering and high absorption in living tissues. Depending on how these issues are addressed, three different modalities can be differentiated: planar imaging (including fluorescence and bioluminescence in vivo imaging), optical tomography, and optoacoustic approaches. In this review we describe the latest advances in optical in vivo imaging with pharmacological applications, with special focus on the development of new optical imaging probes in order to overcome the strong absorption introduced by different tissue components, especially hemoglobin, and the development of multimodal imaging systems in order to overcome the resolution limitations imposed by scattering. PMID:26441646

  12. Modeling the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waluschka, Eugene; Pedersen, Trace R.; McNamara, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Creating an optical model of the Laser Interferometer Space antenna which can be used to predict optical sensitivities and set tolerances sufficiently well such that picometer level displacements can be reliably seen poses certain challenges. In part, because the distances between key optical elements, the proof masses, are constantly changing, at speeds of meters/second, the separation between them is about 5 million kilometers and a contributing factor to optical jitter is the self-gravity of the spacecraft. A discussion of the current state and future approach(s) to the creation of such an optical model will be presented.

  13. State-space models for optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kary L; Brockwell, Anthony E; Eddy, William F

    2007-09-20

    Measurement of stimulus-induced changes in activity in the brain is critical to the advancement of neuroscience. Scientists use a range of methods, including electrode implantation, surface (scalp) electrode placement, and optical imaging of intrinsic signals, to gather data capturing underlying signals of interest in the brain. These data are usually corrupted by artifacts, complicating interpretation of the signal; in the context of optical imaging, two primary sources of corruption are the heartbeat and respiration cycles. We introduce a new linear state-space framework that uses the Kalman filter to remove these artifacts from optical imaging data. The method relies on a likelihood-based analysis under the specification of a formal statistical model, and allows for corrections to the signal based on auxiliary measurements of quantities closely related to the sources of contamination, such as physiological processes. Furthermore, the likelihood-based modeling framework allows us to perform both goodness-of-fit testing and formal hypothesis testing on parameters of interest. Working with data collected by our collaborators, we demonstrate the method of data collection in an optical imaging study of a cat's brain.

  14. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Allam, Srinivasa Rao E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Satyanarayana, S. V. M. E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Sharan, Alok E-mail: aloksharan@email.com

    2014-10-15

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  15. The Optical-Infared Study and Geometric Model of Young Multipolar Planetary nebula -- IRAS 21282+5050

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsia, Chih-Hao; Chau, Wayne; Kwok, Sun

    2015-08-01

    We present high angular resolution Hubble Space Telescope (HST) optical and near-infrared imaging of the famous compact planetary nebula (PN) IRAS 21282+5050. Optical images of this object reveal several complex morphological structures including three pairs of lobes and an elliptical shell lying close to the plane of the sky. From near-infrared observations, we found a dust torus which is oriented nearly perpendicular to the major axis of elliptical shell. The results suggest that IRAS 21282+5050 (IRAS 21282) is indeed a multipolar PN, and these structures developed in the early stage on its evolutionary track. We also constructed this object by a three-dimensional (3D) model and determined the dimensions of these intrinsic structures. Assuming these lobes are shaped by wind interactions, the presence of these geometric structures has been suggested as the result of multiple phases of fast winds with temporal and directional variations. Based on the visualization of 3D model of this object viewed from different orientations, the appearance of IRAS 21282 shows similar intrinsic structures as other multipolar PNs.

  16. Expected Improvements in the Quantitative Remote Sensing of Optically Complex Waters with the Use of an Optically Fast Hyperspectral Spectrometer—A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Wesley J.; Bowles, Jeffrey H.; Corson, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Using simulated data, we investigated the effect of noise in a spaceborne hyperspectral sensor on the accuracy of the atmospheric correction of at-sensor radiances and the consequent uncertainties in retrieved water quality parameters. Specifically, we investigated the improvement expected as the F-number of the sensor is changed from 3.5, which is the smallest among existing operational spaceborne hyperspectral sensors, to 1.0, which is foreseeable in the near future. With the change in F-number, the uncertainties in the atmospherically corrected reflectance decreased by more than 90% across the visible-near-infrared spectrum, the number of pixels with negative reflectance (caused by over-correction) decreased to almost one-third, and the uncertainties in the retrieved water quality parameters decreased by more than 50% and up to 92%. The analysis was based on the sensor model of the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) but using a 30-m spatial resolution instead of HICO’s 96 m. Atmospheric correction was performed using Tafkaa. Water quality parameters were retrieved using a numerical method and a semi-analytical algorithm. The results emphasize the effect of sensor noise on water quality parameter retrieval and the need for sensors with high Signal-to-Noise Ratio for quantitative remote sensing of optically complex waters. PMID:25781507

  17. Expected improvements in the quantitative remote sensing of optically complex waters with the use of an optically fast hyperspectral spectrometer-a modeling study.

    PubMed

    Moses, Wesley J; Bowles, Jeffrey H; Corson, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Using simulated data, we investigated the effect of noise in a spaceborne hyperspectral sensor on the accuracy of the atmospheric correction of at-sensor radiances and the consequent uncertainties in retrieved water quality parameters. Specifically, we investigated the improvement expected as the F-number of the sensor is changed from 3.5, which is the smallest among existing operational spaceborne hyperspectral sensors, to 1.0, which is foreseeable in the near future. With the change in F-number, the uncertainties in the atmospherically corrected reflectance decreased by more than 90% across the visible-near-infrared spectrum, the number of pixels with negative reflectance (caused by over-correction) decreased to almost one-third, and the uncertainties in the retrieved water quality parameters decreased by more than 50% and up to 92%. The analysis was based on the sensor model of the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) but using a 30-m spatial resolution instead of HICO's 96 m. Atmospheric correction was performed using Tafkaa. Water quality parameters were retrieved using a numerical method and a semi-analytical algorithm. The results emphasize the effect of sensor noise on water quality parameter retrieval and the need for sensors with high Signal-to-Noise Ratio for quantitative remote sensing of optically complex waters. PMID:25781507

  18. Comparative study of some fiber-optic remote Raman probe designs. Part I: Model for liquids and transparent solids

    SciTech Connect

    Cooney, T.F.; Skinner, H.T.; Angel, S.M.

    1996-07-01

    We have developed models describing the sensitivity and sampling volume of various remote fiber-optic Raman probes{emdash}single-fiber, lensed, dual-fiber beveled-tip, dual-fiber flat-tipped, and multi-fiber flat-tipped. The models assume clear samples and incorporate radii, separation, bevel angle, and numerical aperture of the fibers; overlap geometry of illumination and excitation light cones; and refractive index of immersion medium. For the Raman spectra of solid samples in air, single-fiber and lensed probes are predicted to yield the highest Raman signal. Beveled probes should provide greater Raman signal strength than do flat-tipped probes because beveled probes can collect light from a restricted volume closer to the probe end. Although multiple collection fibers improve Raman signal strength, progressively distance concentric fiber rings contribute less and sample material further from the probe. {copyright} {ital 1996} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  19. Neural network models for optical computing

    SciTech Connect

    Athale, R.A. ); Davis, J. )

    1988-01-01

    This volume comprises the record of the conference on neural network models for optical computing. In keeping with the interdisciplinary nature of the field, the invited papers are from diverse research areas, such as neuroscience, parallel architectures, neural modeling, and perception. The papers consist of three major classes: applications of optical neural nets for pattern classification, analysis, and image formation; development and analysis of neural net models that are particularly suited for optical implementation; experimental demonstrations of optical neural nets, particularly with adaptive interconnects.

  20. Optical models of the molecular atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuev, V. E.; Makushkin, Y. S.; Mitsel, A. A.; Ponomarev, Y. N.; Rudenko, V. P.; Firsov, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    The use of optical and laser methods for performing atmospheric investigations has stimulated the development of the optical models of the atmosphere. The principles of constructing the optical models of molecular atmosphere for radiation with different spectral composition (wideband, narrowband, and monochromatic) are considered in the case of linear and nonlinear absorptions. The example of the development of a system which provides for the modeling of the processes of optical-wave energy transfer in the atmosphere is presented. Its physical foundations, structure, programming software, and functioning were considered.

  1. Nonlinear optical studies of surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Y.R.

    1994-07-01

    The possibly of using nonlinear optical processes for surface studies has attracted increasing attention in recent years. Optical second harmonic generation (SHG) and sum frequency generation (SFG), in particular, have been well accepted as viable surface probes. They have many advantages over the conventional techniques. By nature, they are highly surface-specific and has a submonolayer sensitivity. As coherent optical processes, they are capable of in-situ probing of surfaces in hostile environment as well as applicable to all interfaces accessible by light. With ultrafast pump laser pulses, they can be employed to study surface dynamic processes with a subpicosecond time resolution. These advantages have opened the door to many exciting research opportunities in surface science and technology. This paper gives a brief overview of this fast-growing new area of research. Optical SHG from a surface was first studied theoretically and experimentally in the sixties. Even the submonolayer surface sensitivity of the process was noticed fairly early. The success was, however, limited because of difficulties in controlling the experimental conditions. It was not until the early 1980`s that the potential of the process for surface analysis was duly recognized. The first surface study by SHG was actually motivated by the then active search for an understanding of the intriguing surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). It had been suspected that the enhancement in SERS mainly came from the local-field enhancement due to local plasmon resonances and pointing rod effect on rough metal surfaces. In our view, Raman scattering is a two-photon process and is therefore a nonlinear optical effect.

  2. Microwave vs optical crosslink study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, Paulman W.; Bruno, Ronald C.; Marshalek, Robert G.

    1992-01-01

    The intersatellite links (ISL's) at geostationary orbit is currently a missing link in commercial satellite services. Prior studies have found that potential application of ISL's to domestic, regional, and global satellites will provide more cost-effective services than the non-ISL's systems (i.e., multiple-hop systems). In addition, ISL's can improve and expand the existing satellite services in several aspects. For example, ISL's can conserve the scarce spectrum allocated for fixed satellite services (FSS) by avoiding multiple hopping of the relay stations. ISL's can also conserve prime orbit slot by effectively expanding the geostationary arc. As a result of the coverage extension by using ISL's more users will have direct access to the satellite network, thus providing reduced signal propagation delay and improved signal quality. Given the potential benefits of ISL's system, it is of interest to determine the appropriate implementations for some potential ISL architectures. Summary of the selected ISL network architecture as supplied by NASA are listed. The projected high data rate requirements (greater than 400 Mbps) suggest that high frequency RF or optical implementations are natural approaches. Both RF and optical systems have their own merits and weaknesses which make the choice between them dependent on the specific application. Due to its relatively mature technology base, the implementation risk associated with RF (at least 32 GHz) is lower than that of the optical ISL's. However, the relatively large antenna size required by RF ISL's payload may cause real-estate problems on the host spacecraft. In addition, because of the frequency sharing (for duplex multiple channels communications) within the limited bandwidth allocated, RF ISL's are more susceptible to inter-system and inter-channel interferences. On the other hand, optical ISL's can offer interference-free transmission and compact sized payload. However, the extremely narrow beam widths (on the

  3. Computational modeling of cardiac dual calcium-voltage optical mapping.

    PubMed

    Walton, Richard D; Bernus, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Optical imaging allows mapping the complex spatiotemporal dynamics of transmembrane potential and intracellular calcium in cardiac tissue. Several studies have shown that the epi-fluorescent optical action potential contains contributions from the sub-epicardium, owing to scattering of photons in tissue. Hybrid electro-optical models have allowed careful quantification of these scattering effects and have lead to a better interpretation of the optical action potential. However, until now, these effects have not been investigated for optically recorded calcium transients. Here, we develop a hybrid model of cardiac dual calcium-voltage epi-fluorescence mapping. This model allows simulating both optical action potentials and optical calcium transients and investigating the effects of photon scattering on their synthesis. We find that optical calcium transients contain contributions from sub-epicardial layers up to 0.8 mm below the epicardium. These lead to significant differences in rise time and activation times between the optically acquired calcium signal and the epicardial intracellular calcium concentration. As has been the case with optically recording action potentials, these results should be taken into account in the interpretation of experimental optical measurements of intracellular calcium.

  4. Results from Antarctic optical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Eather, R.H.

    1988-08-01

    This paper summarizes the results of investigations carried out in the past decade on the upper atmosphere and the magnetosphere of Antarctica, using ground-based optical techniques, such as all-sky cameras, spectral imaging, photometry, and interferometry. Special attention is given to studies conducted by the United States, United Kingdom, Australian, French, Japanese, New Zealand, South African, and Japanese teams in Antarctica, that contributed to the information in the areas of dayside aurora, auroral conjugacy, thermospheric dynamics, and wave-particle interactions. The advantages obtained by the use of monochromatic imaging devices are discussed; this technique, used in conjunction with various detectors and sophisticated image-processing methods is considered to be the instrumentation of choice for future optical studies of upper atmosphere. 75 references.

  5. Constraints on the α + nucleus optical-model potential via α-induced reaction studies on 108Cd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, P.; Heim, F.; Mayer, J.; Münker, C.; Netterdon, L.; Wombacher, F.; Zilges, A.

    2016-10-01

    A big part in understanding the nucleosynthesis of heavy nuclei is a proper description of the effective interaction between an α-particle and a target nucleus. Information about the so-called α +nucleus optical-model potential is achieved by precise cross-section measurements at sub-Coulomb energies aiming to constrain the theoretical models for the nuclear physics input-parameters. The cross sections of the 108Cd(α , γ) and 108Cd(α , n) reaction have been measured for the first time close to the astrophysically relevant energy region via the in-beam method at the high-efficiency γ-ray spectrometer HORUS and via the activation technique at the Cologne Clover Counting Setup at the Institute for Nuclear Physics in Cologne, Germany. Comparisons between experimental results and theoretical predictions calculated in the scope of the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model confirm the need for a exponentially decreasing imaginary part of the potential. Moreover, it is shown that the results presented here together with already published data indicate that a systematic investigation of the real part of the potential could help to further improve the understanding of reactions involving α-particles.

  6. Optical topography guided semi-three-dimensional diffuse optical tomography for a multi-layer model of occipital cortex: a pilot methodological study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hao; Zhang, Yao; He, Jie; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, an optical topography (OT) guided diffuse optical tomography (DOT) scheme is developed for functional imaging of the occipital cortex. The method extends the previously proposed semi-three-dimensional DOT methodology to reconstruction of two-dimensional extracerebral and cerebral images using a visual cortex oriented five-layered slab geometry, and incorporate the OT localization regularization in the cerebral reconstruction to achieve enhanced quantitative accuracy and spatial resolution. We validate the methodology using simulated data and demonstrate its merits in comparison to the standalone OT and DOT.

  7. Optical Hall effect-model description: tutorial.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Mathias; Kühne, Philipp; Darakchieva, Vanya; Hofmann, Tino

    2016-08-01

    The optical Hall effect is a physical phenomenon that describes the occurrence of magnetic-field-induced dielectric displacement at optical wavelengths, transverse and longitudinal to the incident electric field, and analogous to the static electrical Hall effect. The electrical Hall effect and certain cases of the optical Hall effect observations can be explained by extensions of the classic Drude model for the transport of electrons in metals. The optical Hall effect is most useful for characterization of electrical properties in semiconductors. Among many advantages, while the optical Hall effect dispenses with the need of electrical contacts, electrical material properties such as effective mass and mobility parameters, including their anisotropy as well as carrier type and density, can be determined from the optical Hall effect. Measurement of the optical Hall effect can be performed within the concept of generalized ellipsometry at an oblique angle of incidence. In this paper, we review and discuss physical model equations, which can be used to calculate the optical Hall effect in single- and multiple-layered structures of semiconductor materials. We define the optical Hall effect dielectric function tensor, demonstrate diagonalization approaches, and show requirements for the optical Hall effect tensor from energy conservation. We discuss both continuum and quantum approaches, and we provide a brief description of the generalized ellipsometry concept, the Mueller matrix calculus, and a 4×4 matrix algebra to calculate data accessible by experiment. In a follow-up paper, we will discuss strategies and approaches for experimental data acquisition and analysis.

  8. Optical Hall effect-model description: tutorial.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Mathias; Kühne, Philipp; Darakchieva, Vanya; Hofmann, Tino

    2016-08-01

    The optical Hall effect is a physical phenomenon that describes the occurrence of magnetic-field-induced dielectric displacement at optical wavelengths, transverse and longitudinal to the incident electric field, and analogous to the static electrical Hall effect. The electrical Hall effect and certain cases of the optical Hall effect observations can be explained by extensions of the classic Drude model for the transport of electrons in metals. The optical Hall effect is most useful for characterization of electrical properties in semiconductors. Among many advantages, while the optical Hall effect dispenses with the need of electrical contacts, electrical material properties such as effective mass and mobility parameters, including their anisotropy as well as carrier type and density, can be determined from the optical Hall effect. Measurement of the optical Hall effect can be performed within the concept of generalized ellipsometry at an oblique angle of incidence. In this paper, we review and discuss physical model equations, which can be used to calculate the optical Hall effect in single- and multiple-layered structures of semiconductor materials. We define the optical Hall effect dielectric function tensor, demonstrate diagonalization approaches, and show requirements for the optical Hall effect tensor from energy conservation. We discuss both continuum and quantum approaches, and we provide a brief description of the generalized ellipsometry concept, the Mueller matrix calculus, and a 4×4 matrix algebra to calculate data accessible by experiment. In a follow-up paper, we will discuss strategies and approaches for experimental data acquisition and analysis. PMID:27505654

  9. Model of computation for Fourier optical processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naughton, Thomas J.

    2000-05-01

    We present a novel and simple theoretical model of computation that captures what we believe are the most important characteristics of an optical Fourier transform processor. We use this abstract model to reason about the computational properties of the physical systems it describes. We define a grammar for our model's instruction language, and use it to write algorithms for well-known filtering and correlation techniques. We also suggest suitable computational complexity measures that could be used to analyze any coherent optical information processing technique, described with the language, for efficiency. Our choice of instruction language allows us to argue that algorithms describable with this model should have optical implementations that do not require a digital electronic computer to act as a master unit. Through simulation of a well known model of computation from computer theory we investigate the general-purpose capabilities of analog optical processors.

  10. A Study of Synchronization Techniques for Optical Communication Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliardi, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    The study of synchronization techniques and related topics in the design of high data rate, deep space, optical communication systems was reported. Data cover: (1) effects of timing errors in narrow pulsed digital optical systems, (2) accuracy of microwave timing systems operating in low powered optical systems, (3) development of improved tracking systems for the optical channel and determination of their tracking performance, (4) development of usable photodetector mathematical models for application to analysis and performance design in communication receivers, and (5) study application of multi-level block encoding to optical transmission of digital data.

  11. New Studies of Acousto-Optic Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neev, Joseph

    1988-06-01

    Acousto-optics is the field of science pertaining to the study of interactions between light and acoustic vibrations in solids, liquids, or gases. In recent years this field has evolved to much more than just the point where acoustics and optics meet. It has become a crossroad for many disciplines and technologies. This diversity in itself makes it a difficult and interesting area of research. In this work some fundamental concepts of acousto -optic interactions are re-examined. New understanding was gained of the process of diffraction of light by a propagating sound column under the condition of changing interaction orientation and changing sound frequency. This new understanding has shown existing treatments of these problems to be incomplete. It is further shown that one such commonly used model yields wrong predictions which stand in violation of the principle of time reversal. A device whose principle of operation is based on the knowledge gained in this study was implemented in a ring laser to induce unidirectional operation. In addition, acousto -optic light deflectors were investigated and new insight to their theory of operation was obtained. New operating configurations for these devices were tested, and future uses and applications are suggested.

  12. The Abelian Higgs model on Optical Lattice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurice, Yannick; Tsai, Shan-Wen; Bazavov, Alexei; Zhang, Jin

    2015-03-01

    We study the Lattice Gauge Theory of the U(1)-Higgs model in 1+1 dimensions in the strongly coupled regime. We discuss the plaquette corrections to the effective theory where link variables are integrated out. We discuss matching with the second-order perturbation theory effective Hamiltonian for various Bose-Hubbard models. This correspondence can be exploited for building a lattice gauge theory simulator on optical lattices. We propose to implement the quantum rotors which appear in the Hamiltonian formulation using Bose mixtures or p-orbitals. Recent progress on magnetic effects in 2+1 dimensions will be discussed. Supported by the Army Research Office of the Department of Defense under Award Number W911NF-13-1-0119.

  13. Optical Telescope Design Study Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, J.; Sankar, S.

    2015-05-01

    We report on the results of a study conducted from Nov 2012-Apr 2013 to develop a telescope design for a space-based gravitational wave detector. The telescope is needed for efficient power delivery but since it is directly in the beam path, the design is driven by the requirements for the overall displacement sensitivity of the gravitational wave observatory. Two requirements in particular, optical pathlength stability and scattered light performance, are beyond the usual specifications for good image quality encountered in traditional telescopic systems. An important element of the study was to tap industrial expertise to develop an optimized design that can be reliably manufactured. Key engineering and design trade-offs and the sometimes surprising results will be presented.

  14. Optical modeling of liquid crystal biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Dae Kun; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2006-11-01

    Optical simulations of a liquid crystal biosensor device are performed using an integrated optical/textural model based on the equations of nematodynamics and two optical methods: the Berreman optical matrix method [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 62, 502 (1972)] and the discretization of the Maxwell equations based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. Testing the two optical methods with liquid crystal films of different degrees of orientational heterogeneities demonstrates that only the FDTD method is suitable to model this device. Basic substrate-induced texturing process due to protein adsorption gives rise to an orientation correlation function that is nearly linear with the transmitted light intensity, providing a basis to calibrate the device. The sensitivity of transmitted light to film thickness, protein surface coverage, and wavelength is established. A crossover incident light wavelength close to λco≈500nm is found, such that when λ >λco thinner films are more sensitive to the amount of protein surface coverage, while for λ <λco the reverse holds. In addition it is found that for all wavelengths the sensitivity increases with the amount of protein coverage. The integrated device model based on FDTD optical simulations in conjunction with the Landau-de Gennes nematodynamics model provides a rational basis for further progress in liquid crystal biosensor devices.

  15. Electrochemical and optical studies of model photosynthetic systems. Final progress report, July 1, 1984--August 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-15

    The objective of this research is to obtain a better understanding of the relationship between the structural organization of photosynthetic pigments and their spectroscopic and electrochemical properties. Defined model systems were studied first. These included the least ordered (solutions) through the most highly ordered (Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers and self-assembled monolayers) systems containing BChl, BPheo, and UQ. Molecules other than the photosynthetic pigments and quinones were also examined, including chromophores (i.e. surface active cyanine dyes and phtahlocyanines) an redox active compounds (methyl viologen (MV) and surfactant ferrocenes), in order to develop the techniques needed to study the photosynthetic components. Because the chlorophylls are photosensitive and labile, it was easier first to develop procedures using stable species. Three different techniques were used to characterize these model systems. These included electrochemical techniques for determining the standard oxidation and reduction potentials of the photosynthetic components as well as methods for determining the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants for BChl and BPheo at metal electrodes (Pt and Au). Resonance Raman (RR) and surface enhanced resonance Raman (SERR) spectroscopy were used to determine the spectra of the photosynthetic pigments and model compounds. SERRS was also used to study several types of photosynthetic preparations.

  16. Analysis of a Thin Optical Lens Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivchenko, Vladimir V.

    2011-01-01

    In this article a thin optical lens model is considered. It is shown that the limits of its applicability are determined not only by the ratio between the thickness of the lens and the modules of the radii of curvature, but above all its geometric type. We have derived the analytical criteria for the applicability of the model for different types…

  17. Modeling study on the surface morphology evolution during removing the optics surface/subsurface damage using atmospheric pressure plasma processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Qiang; Su, Xing; Wang, Bo

    2016-09-01

    Plasma processing has been widely reported as an effective tool in relieving or removing surface/subsurface damage induced by previous mechanical machining process. However, the surface morphology evolution during removing the damage using plasma processing is rarely reported. In this research, this procedure is studied based on experiments and robust numerical models developed on the basis of Level Set Method (LSM). Even if some unique properties of plasma etching are observed, such as particle redistribution, the dominant role of isotropic etching of plasma processing is verified based on experiments and 2D LSM simulations. With 2D LSM models, the damage removal process under various damage characteristics is explored in detail. Corresponding peak-to-valley roughness evolution is investigated as well. Study on morphology evolution is also conducted through the comparison between experiments and 3D LSM computations. The modeling results and experiments show good agreement with each other. The trends of simulated roughness evolution agree with the experiments as well. It is revealed that the plasma processing may end up with a planar surface depending on the damage characteristics. The planarization procedure can be divided into four parts: crack opening and pit formation; pit coalescing and shallow pits subsumed by deep ones; morphology duplicate etching; and finally a planar and damage free surface.

  18. Modeling of sea optical signatures under natural illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haltrin, Vladimir I.

    1997-12-01

    The influence of the illumination by the direct sun light and the diffuse light of the sky on the spectral structure of the apparent optical properties of seawater is studied. The resulting formula of this paper couples the sea diffuse reflection coefficient with the angular distribution of the natural light and the inherent optical properties of the seawater. This work uses a self-consistent approach to solve the radiative transfer equation. That approach was developed earlier to calculate the apparent optical properties including the diffuse reflection coefficient. A model of the inherent optical properties of seawater is proposed. This model expresses the inherent optical properties through the concentrations of chlorophyll, yellow substance, and biogenic and terrigenic hydrosols. The transformations of sea optical signatures, due to the changes in illumination and concentrations of suspended and dissolved matter, are analyzed. It is shown that the atmospheric optical parameters and the sun elevation angle significantly influence optical signatures of the upwelling light. The effective wavelength -- the parameter that is weakly dependent on the conditions of illumination -- is proposed.

  19. Studies in optical parallel processing. [All optical and electro-optic approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    Threshold and A/D devices for converting a gray scale image into a binary one were investigated for all-optical and opto-electronic approaches to parallel processing. Integrated optical logic circuits (IOC) and optical parallel logic devices (OPA) were studied as an approach to processing optical binary signals. In the IOC logic scheme, a single row of an optical image is coupled into the IOC substrate at a time through an array of optical fibers. Parallel processing is carried out out, on each image element of these rows, in the IOC substrate and the resulting output exits via a second array of optical fibers. The OPAL system for parallel processing which uses a Fabry-Perot interferometer for image thresholding and analog-to-digital conversion, achieves a higher degree of parallel processing than is possible with IOC.

  20. Optical modeling of laser ablated microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gower, M. C.; Davies, E.; Holmes, A. S.

    2012-11-01

    From only an a priori knowledge of the optical parameters of a laser beam, the delivery system together with a substrate's material properties, a ray-tracing model capable of predicting the 3-D topology of micro/nanostructures machined by pulsed laser ablation has been developed. The model includes secondary illumination effects produced by the microstructure created by successive pulses (wall reflections, refraction, wave guiding, shadowing, etc.) as well as the complete optical properties of the beam delivery system. We have used material ablation by pulsed excimer lasers and associated beam delivery systems to demonstrate some of the capabilities of the model. Good agreement is obtained between computations and experimental results in terms of the predicted ablation depth per pulse and the wall taper angle of channels and holes. The model can predict ablated profiles of holes and indicate the most efficient drilling strategy in terms of material removal rates. The model also shows diffraction effects are not required to explain the tapering vertical walls observed when ablating microstructures. Finally, the model has been used to demonstrate aberrations in an optical imaging system limiting the creation of submicron features in an ablated microstructure. Provided photons are absorbed linearly in a substrate according to Beer's law with negligible thermal diffusion effects, the model is equally applicable to using other types of pulsed laser sources and systems with imaged or focused beams.

  1. An Optical Study of Ice Grain Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Erik S.

    The equilibrium phase geometry and evolution of polycrystals underlies the nature of materials. In particular, grain boundaries dominate the total interfacial area within polycrystalline materials. Our experimental studies are motivated by the importance of the structure, evolution, and thermodynamic behavior of grain boundaries near bulk melting temperatures. Ice is singled out as a material of interest due to its geophysical importance and its advantageous optical properties. An experimental apparatus and light reflection technique is designed to measure grain boundary melting in ice bicrystals, in thermodynamic equilibrium The technique allows continuous monitoring of reflected light intensity from the grain boundary as the temperature and solutal composition are systematically varied. For each sample the individual crystal orientations are also measured. The type and concentration of impurity in the liquid is controlled and the temperature is continuously recorded and controlled over a range near the melting point. An optical model of the interface is developed in order to convert experimental reflection data into a physical measurement of the liquidity of the grain boundary. Solutions are found for reflection and transmission amplitude coefficients for waves propagating from an arbitrarily oriented uniaxial anisotropic material into an isotropic material. This general model is used to determine solutions for three layer, ice/water/ice, systems with crystals of arbitrary orientation, and is broadly applicable to layered materials. Experimental results show thicker grain boundary liquid layers than expected from classical colligative effects. A physically realistic model of intermolecular interactions succeeds in bounding the measurements. These measurements may have important implications for understanding a wide range of effects in polycrystalline materials. Likewise, the experimental techniques and optical theory may be applied to other systems of broad

  2. Grid Erosion Modeling of the NEXT Ion Thruster Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernhoff, Jerold W.; Boyd, Iain D.; Soulas, George (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Results from several different computational studies of the NEXT ion thruster optics are presented. A study of the effect of beam voltage on accelerator grid aperture wall erosion shows a non-monotonic, complex behavior. Comparison to experimental performance data indicates improvements in simulation of the accelerator grid current, as well as very good agreement with other quantities. Also examined is the effect of ion optics choice on the thruster life, showing that TAG optics provide better margin against electron backstreaming than NSTAR optics. The model is used to predict the change in performance with increasing accelerator grid voltage, showing that although the current collected on the accel grid downstream face increases, the erosion rate decreases. A study is presented for varying doubly-ionized Xenon current fraction. The results show that performance data is not extremely sensitive to the current fraction.

  3. Radius studies of 8Li and 8B using the optical-limit Glauber model in conjunction with relativistic mean-field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Guang-Wei; Xu, Wang; Fukuda, M.; Pan, Qiang-Yan; Cai, Xiao-Lu; Fan, Gong-Tao; Li, Yong-Jiang; Luo, Wen; Xu, Ben-Ji; Yan, Zhe; Yang, Li-Feng

    2010-10-01

    We study the reaction cross sections (σR) and root-mean-square (RMS) radii of 8Li and 8B, the halo-like nuclei, with stable target 12C, 27Al and 9Be within the standard optical-limit Glauber model, using densities obtained from relativistic mean-field (RMF) formalisms and other types of distributions. It is found that the experimental σR can be reproduced well at high energy. The RMS radius and Δr extracted by RMF-theory and harmonic oscillator distribution are compared. We find that the RMS radius and Δr of 8B are larger than those of 8Li. In addition, we analyze in detail the relationship between σR and density distribution.

  4. Optical fiber dispersion characterization study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geeslin, A.; Arriad, A.; Riad, S. M.; Padgett, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    The theory, design, and results of optical fiber pulse dispersion measurements are considered. Both the hardware and software required to perform this type of measurement are described. Hardware includes a thermoelectrically cooled injection laser diode source, an 800 GHz gain bandwidth produce avalanche photodiode and an input mode scrambler. Software for a HP 9825 computer includes fast Fourier transform, inverse Fourier transform, and optimal compensation deconvolution. Test set construction details are also included. Test results include data collected on a 1 Km fiber, a 4 Km fiber, a fused spliced, eight 600 meter length fibers concatenated to form 4.8 Km, and up to nine optical connectors.

  5. Analytical modeling for microwave and optical metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Alessio; Soric, Jason; Alù, Andrea; Toscano, Alessandro; Bilotti, Filiberto

    2016-06-01

    A metasurface is an artificial structure composed by an ultrathin surface textured at a subwavelength scale. In the last years, metasurfaces have been revealed to be particularly useful in the design of electromagnetic scattering cancellation devices operating at microwave and optical frequencies. In this contribution we summarize our results about the analytical modelling of microwave and optical metasurfaces composed, respectively, by patterned metallic surfaces and arrays of plasmonic nanoparticles. The analytical results are compared with the numerical ones obtained with a proper set of full-wave simulations showing an excellent agreement.

  6. Photonic encryption : modeling and functional analysis of all optical logic.

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jason D.; Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Robertson, Perry J.

    2004-10-01

    With the build-out of large transport networks utilizing optical technologies, more and more capacity is being made available. Innovations in Dense Wave Division Multiplexing (DWDM) and the elimination of optical-electrical-optical conversions have brought on advances in communication speeds as we move into 10 Gigabit Ethernet and above. Of course, there is a need to encrypt data on these optical links as the data traverses public and private network backbones. Unfortunately, as the communications infrastructure becomes increasingly optical, advances in encryption (done electronically) have failed to keep up. This project examines the use of optical logic for implementing encryption in the photonic domain to achieve the requisite encryption rates. This paper documents the innovations and advances of work first detailed in 'Photonic Encryption using All Optical Logic,' [1]. A discussion of underlying concepts can be found in SAND2003-4474. In order to realize photonic encryption designs, technology developed for electrical logic circuits must be translated to the photonic regime. This paper examines S-SEED devices and how discrete logic elements can be interconnected and cascaded to form an optical circuit. Because there is no known software that can model these devices at a circuit level, the functionality of S-SEED devices in an optical circuit was modeled in PSpice. PSpice allows modeling of the macro characteristics of the devices in context of a logic element as opposed to device level computational modeling. By representing light intensity as voltage, 'black box' models are generated that accurately represent the intensity response and logic levels in both technologies. By modeling the behavior at the systems level, one can incorporate systems design tools and a simulation environment to aid in the overall functional design. Each black box model takes certain parameters (reflectance, intensity, input response), and models the optical ripple and time delay

  7. Optical models for silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T.; Sopori, B.

    1995-08-01

    Light trapping is an important design feature for high-efficiency silicon solar cells. Because light trapping can considerably enhance optical absorption, a thinner substrate can be used which, in turn, can lower the bulk carrier recombination and concommitantly increase open-circuit voltage, and fill factor of the cell. The basic concepts of light trapping are similar to that of excitation of an optical waveguide, where a prism or a grating structure increases the phase velocity of the incoming optical wave such that waves propagated within the waveguide are totally reflected at the interfaces. Unfortunately, these concepts break down because the entire solar cell is covered with such a structure, making it necessary to develop new analytical approaches to deal with incomplete light trapping in solar cells. This paper describes two models that analyze light trapping in thick and thin solar cells.

  8. Instruction manual, Optical Effects Module, Model OEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The Optical Effects Module Model OEM-1, a laboratory prototype instrument designed for the automated measurement of radiation transmission and scattering through optical samples, is described. The system comprises two main components: the Optical Effects Module Enclosure (OEME) and the Optical Effects Module Electronic Controller and Processor (OEMCP). The OEM is designed for operation in the near UV at approximately 2540A, corresponding to the most intense spectral line activated by the mercury discharge lamp used for illumination. The radiation from this source is detected in transmission and reflection through a number of selectable samples. The basic objective of this operation is to monitor in real time the accretion of possible contamination on the surface of these samples. The optical samples are exposed outside of the OEME proper to define exposure conditions and to separate exposure and measurement environments. Changes in the transmissivity of the sample are attributable to surface contamination or to bulk effects due to radiation. Surface contamination will increase radiation scattering due to Rayleigh-Gans effect or to other phenomena, depending on the characteristics size of the particulate contaminants. Thus, also scattering from the samples becomes a part of the measurement program.

  9. An optical model for composite nuclear scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    The optical model of composite particle scattering is considered and compared to the accuracies of other models. A nonrelativistic Schroedinger equation with two-body potentials is used for the scattering of a single particle by an energy-dependent local potential. The potential for the elastic channel is composed of matrix elements of a single scattering operator taken between the ground states of the projectile and the target; the coherent amplitude is considered as dominating the scattering in the forward direction. A multiple scattering series is analytically explored and formally summed by the solution of an equivalent Schroedinger equation. Cross sections of nuclear scattering are then determined for He-4 and C-12 nuclei at 3.6 GeV/nucleus and O-16 projectiles at 2.1 GeV/nucleus, and the optical model approximations are found to be consistently lower and more accurate than approximations made by use of Glauber's theory.

  10. Study of all-optical sampling using a semiconductor optical amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chen; Wang, Yongjun; Wang, Lina; Wang, Fu

    2016-08-01

    All-optical sampling is an important research content of all-optical signal processing. In recent years, the application of the semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) in optical sampling has attracted lots of attention because of its small volume and large nonlinear coefficient. We propose an optical sampling model based on nonlinear polarization rotation effect of the SOA. The proposed scheme has the advantages of high sampling speed and small input pump power, and a transfer curve with good linearity was obtained through simulation. To evaluate the performance of sampling, we analyze the linearity and efficiency of sampling pulse considering the impact of pulse width and analog signal frequency. We achieve the sampling of analog signal to high frequency pulse and exchange the positions of probe light and pump light to study another sampling.

  11. Research Studies on Advanced Optical Module/Head Designs for Optical Data Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Preprints are presented from the recent 1992 Optical Data Storage meeting in San Jose. The papers are divided into the following topical areas: Magneto-optical media (Modeling/design and fabrication/characterization/testing); Optical heads (holographic optical elements); and Optical heads (integrated optics). Some representative titles are as follow: Diffraction analysis and evaluation of several focus and track error detection schemes for magneto-optical disk systems; Proposal for massively parallel data storage system; Transfer function characteristics of super resolving systems; Modeling and measurement of a micro-optic beam deflector; Oxidation processes in magneto-optic and related materials; and A modal analysis of lamellar diffraction gratings in conical mountings.

  12. Optical coherence tomography based microangiography for quantitative monitoring of structural and vascular changes in a rat model of acute uveitis in vivo: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woo June; Pepple, Kathryn L.; Zhi, Zhongwei; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-01-01

    Uveitis models in rodents are important in the investigation of pathogenesis in human uveitis and the development of appropriate therapeutic strategies for treatment. Quantitative monitoring of ocular inflammation in small animal models provides an objective metric to assess uveitis progression and/or therapeutic effects. We present a new application of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT-based microangiography (OMAG) to a rat model of acute anterior uveitis induced by intravitreal injection of a killed mycobacterial extract. OCT/OMAG is used to provide noninvasive three-dimensional imaging of the anterior segment of the eyes prior to injection (baseline) and two days post-injection (peak inflammation) in rats with and without steroid treatments. OCT imaging identifies characteristic structural and vascular changes in the anterior segment of the inflamed animals when compared to baseline images. Characteristics of inflammation identified include anterior chamber cells, corneal edema, pupillary membranes, and iris vasodilation. In contrast, no significant difference from the control is observed for the steroid-treated eye. These findings are compared with the histology assessment of the same eyes. In addition, quantitative measurements of central corneal thickness and iris vessel diameter are determined. This pilot study demonstrates that OCT-based microangiography promises to be a useful tool for the assessment and management of uveitis in vivo.

  13. RxGen General Optical Model Prescription Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigrist, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    RxGen is a prescription generator for JPL's in-house optical modeling software package called MACOS (Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems), which is an expert optical analysis software package focusing on modeling optics on dynamic structures, deformable optics, and controlled optics. The objectives of RxGen are to simplify and automate MACOS prescription generations, reducing errors associated with creating such optical prescriptions, and improving user efficiency without requiring MACOS proficiency. RxGen uses MATLAB (a high-level language and interactive environment developed by MathWorks) as the development and deployment platform, but RxGen can easily be ported to another optical modeling/analysis platform. Running RxGen within the modeling environment has the huge benefit that variations in optical models can be made an integral part of the modeling state. For instance, optical prescription parameters determined as external functional dependencies, optical variations by controlling the in-/exclusion of optical components like sub-systems, and/or controlling the state of all components. Combining the mentioned capabilities and flexibilities with RxGen's optical abstraction layer completely eliminates the hindering aspects for requiring proficiency in writing/editing MACOS prescriptions, allowing users to focus on the modeling aspects of optical systems, i.e., increasing productivity and efficiency. RxGen provides significant enhancements to MACOS and delivers a framework for fast prototyping as well as for developing very complex controlled optical systems.

  14. Outer planets mission television subsystem optics study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An optics study was performed to establish a candidate optical system design for the proposed NASA Mariner Jupiter/Saturn 77 mission. The study was performed over the 6-month period from January through June 1972. The candidate optical system contains both a wide angle (A) and a narrow angle (B) lens. An additional feature is a transfer mirror mechanism that allows image transfer from the B lens to the vidicon initially used for the A lens. This feature adds an operational redundancy to the optical system in allowing for narrow angle viewing if the narrow angle vidicon were to fail. In this failure mode, photography in the wide angle mode would be discontinued. The structure of the candidate system consists mainly of aluminum with substructures of Invar for athermalization. The total optical system weighs (excluding vidicons) approximately 30 pounds and has overall dimensions of 26.6 by 19.5 by 12.3 inches.

  15. A Thermo-Optic Propagation Modeling Capability.

    SciTech Connect

    Schrader, Karl; Akau, Ron

    2014-10-01

    A new theoretical basis is derived for tracing optical rays within a finite-element (FE) volume. The ray-trajectory equations are cast into the local element coordinate frame and the full finite-element interpolation is used to determine instantaneous index gradient for the ray-path integral equation. The FE methodology (FEM) is also used to interpolate local surface deformations and the surface normal vector for computing the refraction angle when launching rays into the volume, and again when rays exit the medium. The method is implemented in the Matlab(TM) environment and compared to closed- form gradient index models. A software architecture is also developed for implementing the algorithms in the Zemax(TM) commercial ray-trace application. A controlled thermal environment was constructed in the laboratory, and measured data was collected to validate the structural, thermal, and optical modeling methods.

  16. Optical Imaging and Radiometric Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Kong Q.; Fitzmaurice, Michael W.; Moiser, Gary E.; Howard, Joseph M.; Le, Chi M.

    2010-01-01

    OPTOOL software is a general-purpose optical systems analysis tool that was developed to offer a solution to problems associated with computational programs written for the James Webb Space Telescope optical system. It integrates existing routines into coherent processes, and provides a structure with reusable capabilities that allow additional processes to be quickly developed and integrated. It has an extensive graphical user interface, which makes the tool more intuitive and friendly. OPTOOL is implemented using MATLAB with a Fourier optics-based approach for point spread function (PSF) calculations. It features parametric and Monte Carlo simulation capabilities, and uses a direct integration calculation to permit high spatial sampling of the PSF. Exit pupil optical path difference (OPD) maps can be generated using combinations of Zernike polynomials or shaped power spectral densities. The graphical user interface allows rapid creation of arbitrary pupil geometries, and entry of all other modeling parameters to support basic imaging and radiometric analyses. OPTOOL provides the capability to generate wavefront-error (WFE) maps for arbitrary grid sizes. These maps are 2D arrays containing digital sampled versions of functions ranging from Zernike polynomials to combination of sinusoidal wave functions in 2D, to functions generated from a spatial frequency power spectral distribution (PSD). It also can generate optical transfer functions (OTFs), which are incorporated into the PSF calculation. The user can specify radiometrics for the target and sky background, and key performance parameters for the instrument s focal plane array (FPA). This radiometric and detector model setup is fairly extensive, and includes parameters such as zodiacal background, thermal emission noise, read noise, and dark current. The setup also includes target spectral energy distribution as a function of wavelength for polychromatic sources, detector pixel size, and the FPA s charge

  17. Numerical model for thermal parameters in optical materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yoichi; Taira, Takunori

    2016-04-01

    Thermal parameters of optical materials, such as thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, temperature coefficient of refractive index play a decisive role for the thermal design inside laser cavities. Therefore, numerical value of them with temperature dependence is quite important in order to develop the high intense laser oscillator in which optical materials generate excessive heat across mode volumes both of lasing output and optical pumping. We already proposed a novel model of thermal conductivity in various optical materials. Thermal conductivity is a product of isovolumic specific heat and thermal diffusivity, and independent modeling of these two figures should be required from the viewpoint of a clarification of physical meaning. Our numerical model for thermal conductivity requires one material parameter for specific heat and two parameters for thermal diffusivity in the calculation of each optical material. In this work we report thermal conductivities of various optical materials as Y3Al5O12 (YAG), YVO4 (YVO), GdVO4 (GVO), stoichiometric and congruent LiTaO3, synthetic quartz, YAG ceramics and Y2O3 ceramics. The dependence on Nd3+-doping in laser gain media in YAG, YVO and GVO is also studied. This dependence can be described by only additional three parameters. Temperature dependence of thermal expansion and temperature coefficient of refractive index for YAG, YVO, and GVO: these are also included in this work for convenience. We think our numerical model is quite useful for not only thermal analysis in laser cavities or optical waveguides but also the evaluation of physical properties in various transparent materials.

  18. Femtosecond optical studies of cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Michael L.; Rast, S.; Onellion, Marshall; Demsar, Jure; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Glinka, Yu D.; Tolk, Norman H.; Ren, Yuhang; Luepke, Gunter; Klimov, A.; Xu, Ying; Sobolewski, Roman; Si, Weidong; Zeng, X. H.; Soukiassian, A.; Xi, Xiaoxing; Abrecht, M.; Ariosa, Daniel; Pavuna, Davor; Manzke, Recardo; Printz, J. O.; Parkhurst, D. K.; Downum, K. E.; Guptasarma, P.; Bozovic, Ivan

    2002-11-01

    Femtosecond optical reflectivity measurements of La2-xSrxCuO4, La2CuO4+y, Bi2Sr2CuO6+z and Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ thin films and single crystal samples indicate qualitative changes with fluence. At the lowest fluencies, there is a power law divergence in the relaxation time. The divergence has an onset temperature of 55+/-15K, independent of whether the sample is in the superconducting or normal states. At slightly higher fluencies, still perturbative, the additional response does not exhibit this power law divergence. At quite high fluencies- no longer perturbative- the metallic samples exhibit oscillations in the reflectivity amplitude. The period of these oscillations varies with the probe wavelength but not with the pump wavelength. The oscillations exhibit a decay time as long as 10 nsec.

  19. Enhancing the sensitivity to scattering coefficient of the epithelium in a two-layered tissue model by oblique optical fibers: Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Kung-Bin; Chen, Hsi-Hsun

    2012-10-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy has been applied to detect tissue absorption and scattering properties associated with dysplasia, which is a potential precursor of epithelial cancers. The ability of DRS techniques to detect dysplasia could be improved by enhancing the detection of optical properties of the thin epithelial layer where dysplasia occurs. We propose a beveled fiber bundle probe consisting of a source fiber and multiple detection fibers parallel to each other and oriented obliquely to the tissue surface and investigate the sensitivity of reflectance measured with the probe to optical properties of a two-layered normal oral mucosa model. A scalable Monte Carlo method is employed to speed up analyzing spatially resolved reflectance spectra. Results reveal that the oblique probe is more sensitive to epithelial scattering and less sensitive to both stromal absorption and scattering than conventional perpendicular fiber configuration. The clinical relevance of the enhanced sensitivity to epithelial scattering by the proposed probe is demonstrated by quantifying optical properties of the two-layered tissue model from simulated data. The average error of extracted epithelial scattering coefficient is 1.5% and 32% using the oblique and perpendicular probe, respectively. The errors in other optical properties are all below 10% using the oblique probe.

  20. Ultrastructural characterization of the optic pathway in a mouse model of neurofibromatosis-1 optic glioma.

    PubMed

    Kim, K Y; Ju, W K; Hegedus, B; Gutmann, D H; Ellisman, M H

    2010-09-29

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the progression of changes in retinal ganglion cells and optic nerve glia in neurofibromatosis-1 (NF1) genetically-engineered mice with optic glioma. Optic glioma tumors were generated in Nf1+/- mice lacking Nf1 expression in GFAP+ cells (astrocytes). Standard immunohistochemistry methods were employed to identify astrocytes (GFAP, S100beta), proliferating progenitor cells (sox2, nestin), microglia (Iba1), endothelial cells (CD31) and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons (Neurofilament 68k) in Nf1+/-, Nf1(GFAP)CKO (wild-type mice with Nf1 loss in glial cells), and Nf1+/-(GFAP)CKO (Nf1+/- mice with Nf1 loss in glial cells) mice. Ultrastructural changes in the optic chiasm and nerve were assessed by electron microscopy (EM). RGC were counted in whole retina preparations using high-resolution, mosaic confocal microscopy following their delineation by retrograde FluoroGold labeling. We found that only Nf1+/-(GFAP)CKO mice exhibited gross pre-chiasmatic optic nerve and chiasm enlargements containing aggregated GFAP+/nestin+ and S100beta+/sox2+ cells (neoplastic glia) as well as increased numbers of blood vessels and microglia. Optic gliomas in Nf1+/-(GFAP)CKO mice contained axon fiber irregularities and multilamellar bodies of degenerated myelin. EM and EM tomographic analyses showed increased glial disorganization, disoriented axonal projections, profiles of degenerating myelin and structural alterations at nodes of Ranvier. Lastly, we found reduced RGC numbers in Nf1+/-(GFAP)CKO mice, supporting a model in which the combination of optic nerve Nf1 heterozygosity and glial cell Nf1 loss results in disrupted axonal-glial relationships, subsequently culminating in the degeneration of optic nerve axons and loss of their parent RGC neurons. PMID:20600672

  1. Gaussian-optics-based optical modeling and characterization of a Fabry-Perot microcavity for sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dagang; Lin, Rongming; Wang, Weijun

    2005-08-01

    A generalized study has been carried out on the modeling of a Fabry-Perot microcavity for sensing applications. Different analytical models on transmission characteristics of a Fabry-Perot microcavity are established by using plane-wave-based techniques, such as the Macleod characteristic matrix technique, the transfer matrix technique, and Smith's technique. A novel Gaussian-optics-based model for a Fabry-Perot microcavity illuminated by a laser beam is then developed and validated. The influence of laser beam waist on microcavity optical response is investigated, and the required minimal beam waist size is explored to ensure a useful optical response for sensing applications that can be accurately predicted by plane-wave optics. Also, the perturbations of microcavity performance induced by different types of microcavity mirror imperfections are discussed, based on the novel optical model. The prototype of the proposed Fabry-Perot microcavity for sensing applications has been successfully fabricated and characterized.

  2. Research studies on advanced optical module/head designs for optical devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, James J.

    1991-01-01

    A summary is presented of research in optical data storage materials and of research at the center. The first section contains summary reports under the general headings of: (1) Magnetooptic media: modeling, design, fabrication, characterization, and testing; (2) Optical heads: holographic optical elements; and (3) Optical heads: integrated optics. The second section consist of a proposal entitled, Signal Processing Techniques for Optical Data Storage. And section three presents various publications prepared by the center.

  3. Cluster dynamical mean field theory study of antiferromagnetic transition in the square-lattice Hubbard model: Optical conductivity and electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Toshihiro; Tsunetsugu, Hirokazu

    2016-08-01

    We numerically study optical conductivity σ (ω ) near the "antiferromagnetic" phase transition in the square-lattice Hubbard model at half filling. We use a cluster dynamical mean field theory and calculate conductivity including vertex corrections and, to this end, we have reformulated the vertex corrections in the antiferromagnetic phase. We find that the vertex corrections change various important details in temperature and ω dependencies of conductivity in the square lattice, and this contrasts sharply the case of the Mott transition in the frustrated triangular lattice. Generally, the vertex corrections enhance variations in the ω dependence, and sharpen the Drude peak and a high-ω incoherent peak in the paramagnetic phase. They also enhance the dip in σ (ω ) at ω =0 in the antiferromagnetic phase. Therefore, the dc conductivity is enhanced in the paramagnetic phase and suppressed in the antiferromagnetic phase, but this change occurs slightly below the transition temperature. We also find a temperature region above the transition temperature in which the dc conductivity shows an insulating behavior but σ (ω ) retains the Drude peak, and this region is stabilized by the vertex corrections. We also investigate which fluctuations are important in the vertex corrections and analyze momentum dependence of the vertex function in detail.

  4. Phase diagram of ultracold atoms in optical lattices: Comparative study of slave fermion and slave boson approaches to Bose-Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Yue; Chui, S. T.

    2005-03-01

    We perform a comparative study of the finite temperature behavior of ultracold Bose atoms in optical lattices by the slave fermion and the slave boson approaches to the Bose-Hubbard model. The phase diagram of the system is presented. Although both approaches are equivalent without approximations, the mean field theory based on the slave fermion technique is quantitatively more appropriate. Conceptually, the slave fermion approach automatically excludes the double occupancy of two identical fermions on the same lattice site. By comparing to known results in limiting cases, we find the slave fermion approach better than the slave boson approach. For example, in the non-interacting limit, the critical temperature of the superfluid-normal liquid transition calculated by the slave fermion approach is closer to the well-known ideal Bose gas result. At zero-temperature limit of the critical interaction, strength from the slave fermion approach is also closer to that from the direct calculation using a zero-temperature mean field theory.

  5. Bond models in linear and nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspnes, D. E.

    2015-08-01

    Bond models, also known as polarizable-point or mechanical models, have a long history in optics, starting with the Clausius-Mossotti relation but more accurately originating with Ewald's largely forgotten work in 1912. These models describe macroscopic phenomena such as dielectric functions and nonlinear-optical (NLO) susceptibilities in terms of the physics that takes place in real space, in real time, on the atomic scale. Their strengths lie in the insights that they provide and the questions that they raise, aspects that are often obscured by quantum-mechanical treatments. Statics versions were used extensively in the late 1960's and early 1970's to correlate NLO susceptibilities among bulk materials. Interest in NLO applications revived with the 2002 work of Powell et al., who showed that a fully anisotropic version reduced by more than a factor of 2 the relatively large number of parameters necessary to describe secondharmonic- generation (SHG) data for Si(111)/SiO2 interfaces. Attention now is focused on the exact physical meaning of these parameters, and to the extent that they represent actual physical quantities.

  6. Integrated modeling of advanced optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.; Needels, Laura; Levine, B. Martin

    1993-02-01

    This poster session paper describes an integrated modeling and analysis capability being developed at JPL under funding provided by the JPL Director's Discretionary Fund and the JPL Control/Structure Interaction Program (CSI). The posters briefly summarize the program capabilities and illustrate them with an example problem. The computer programs developed under this effort will provide an unprecedented capability for integrated modeling and design of high performance optical spacecraft. The engineering disciplines supported include structural dynamics, controls, optics and thermodynamics. Such tools are needed in order to evaluate the end-to-end system performance of spacecraft such as OSI, POINTS, and SMMM. This paper illustrates the proof-of-concept tools that have been developed to establish the technology requirements and demonstrate the new features of integrated modeling and design. The current program also includes implementation of a prototype tool based upon the CAESY environment being developed under the NASA Guidance and Control Research and Technology Computational Controls Program. This prototype will be available late in FY-92. The development plan proposes a major software production effort to fabricate, deliver, support and maintain a national-class tool from FY-93 through FY-95.

  7. Modeling and measurement of a micro-optic beam deflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milster, Tom D.; Wong, J. Nan

    1992-01-01

    The use is studied of a unity-magnification micro-optic beam deflector. The defelector consists of two arrays of positively powered lenslets. The lenslets on each array are arranged in a square grid. Design criteria are based on usefulness in optical data storage devices. The deflector is designed to operate over a + or - 1.6 range of deflection angles. Modeling results are compared with interferometric analysis of the wavefront from a single lenslet pair. The results indicate that the device is nearly diffraction limited, but there are substantial wavefront errors at the edges and corners of the lenslets.

  8. Integrated Modeling Activities for the James Webb Space Telescope: Structural-Thermal-Optical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, John D.; Howard, Joseph M.; Mosier, Gary E.; Parrish, Keith A.; McGinnis, Mark A.; Bluth, Marcel; Kim, Kevin; Ha, Kong Q.

    2004-01-01

    The James Web Space Telescope (JWST) is a large, infrared-optimized space telescope scheduled for launch in 2011. This is a continuation of a series of papers on modeling activities for JWST. The structural-thermal-optical, often referred to as STOP, analysis process is used to predict the effect of thermal distortion on optical performance. The benchmark STOP analysis for JWST assesses the effect of an observatory slew on wavefront error. Temperatures predicted using geometric and thermal math models are mapped to a structural finite element model in order to predict thermally induced deformations. Motions and deformations at optical surfaces are then input to optical models, and optical performance is predicted using either an optical ray trace or a linear optical analysis tool. In addition to baseline performance predictions, a process for performing sensitivity studies to assess modeling uncertainties is described.

  9. Mathematical modeling and computation of the optical response from nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuanchang

    This dissertation studies the computational modeling for nanostructures in response to external electromagnetic fields. Light-matter interactions on nanoscale are at the heart of nano-optics. To fully characterize the optical interactions with nanostructures quantum electrodynamics (QED) must be invoked, however, the required extremely intense computation and analysis prohibit QED from applications in nano-optics. To avoid the expensive computations and be able to seize the essential quantum effects a semiclassical model is developed. The wellposedness of the model partial differential equations is established. Emphasis is placed on the optical interactions with an individual nanostructure, excitons and biexcitons effects and finite-size effects are investigated. The crucial step of our model is to couple the electromagnetic fields with the motion of the excited particles to yield a new dielectric constant which contains quantum effects of interest. A novel feature of the dielectric constant is the wavevector-dependence which leads to a multi-wave propagation inside the medium. Additional boundary conditions are proposed to deal with this situation. We proceed with incorporating this dielectric constant to Maxwell's equations, and by solving a scattering problem the quantum effects can be captured in the scattered spectra.

  10. Modeling nanoparticle optics and surface enhanced emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuford, Kevin L.

    2014-03-01

    This account focuses on using classical electrodynamics methods to model the optical properties of metal nanoparticles as well as the excitation dynamics of molecules interacting with them. We begin by reviewing several approaches being utilized currently to predict and interpret optical spectra and plasmonic phenomena. Results for various nanoparticles are presented to emphasize general concepts, extract trends, and correlate spectral features to specific plasmon modes. Next we show how coupling a molecule to a nanostructure can drastically alter the fluorescence. As an example, we present the emission characteristics of a molecule placed in the gap of a nanoparticle dimer. In contrast to the single nanosphere-molecule system, we find that the emission intensity undergoes a quenching effect only when the inter-nanoparticle gap distance of the dimer is very small, meaning that strong coupling prevails over energy engaged in the heating process unless the molecule is extremely close to the metal surface. These examples highlight the importance of accurately modeling the nanoparticle and understanding the interplay between system components in plasmonic applications.

  11. Optical study of solar tower power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddhibi, F.; Ben Amara, M.; Balghouthi, M.; Guizani, A.

    2015-04-01

    The central receiver technology for electricity generation consists of concentrating solar radiation coming from the solar tracker field into a central receiver surface located on the top of the tower. The heliostat field is constituted of a big number of reflective mirrors; each heliostat tracks the sun individually and reflects the sunlight to a focal point. Therefore, the heliostat should be positioned with high precision in order to minimize optical losses. In the current work, a mathematical model for the analysis of the optical efficiency of solar tower field power plant is proposed. The impact of the different factors which influence the optical efficiency is analyzed. These parameters are mainly, the shading and blocking losses, the cosine effect, the atmospheric attenuation and the spillage losses. A new method for the calculation of blocking and shadowing efficiency is introduced and validated by open literature.

  12. A Optical and Microstructural Characterization Study and Microstructural Model of Co-Evaporated Polycrystalline Thin Film Copper Indium Diselenide for Photovoltaic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, John R.

    The electrical, optical, microstructural, and morphological properties of polycrystalline thin film CuInSe _2 are investigated by X-Ray Diffraction, spectrophotometry, and Transmission Electron Microscopy as a function of compositional parameters and processing conditions. The film microstructure is redefined as a compositionally and temperature dependent polycrystalline aggregate mixture of CuInSe_2 and Cu_{rm x}Se/In _{rm y}Se minor phases, with a core crystallite exhibiting order-disorder phase separation and a CuInSe_2-CuIn_2 Se_{3.5} solid solution. The secondary phase phenomena includes Cu _{1.85}Se at grain boundaries and free surfaces, with sufficient amount for percolation in near-stoichiometric and Cu-rich compositions, and Cu _{rm x}Se inclusions for Cu-rich compositions, and for Cu-poor compositions at substrate temperatures of 500^circC. The inclusions are modeled by the Maxwell-Garnett theory as metallic inclusions with a filling fraction as little as eta = 0.01. The observed polymorphisms include phase separation of ordered chalcopyrite and disordered sphalerite regions, where the latter is the majority phase, and a solid solution of chalcopyrite CuInSe_2 and the ordered vacancy compound (OVC) CuIn_2Se _{3.5}, with an associated temperature dependent lattice shrinkage proportional to the deviation in molecularity. The polymorphisms reported here are the first in the CuInSe_2 material system. The stability of excessive Cu-vacancies observed in the OVC has significant ramifications on the electronic structure of CuInSe_2. The optical absorption coefficient, alpha , for thin film CuInSe_2 is reported as a function of composition and exhibits behavior indicative of a two-phase mixture and a solid solution for Cu-rich and Cu-poor compositions, respectively. The magnitude of alpha is significantly lower than previously reported values, and is substantiated by device modeling that accurately reproduces the measured internal quantum efficiency of Cd

  13. Nonlinear optical techniques for surface studies. [Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Y.R.

    1981-09-01

    Recent effort in developing nonlinear optical techniques for surface studies is reviewed. Emphasis is on monolayer detection of adsorbed molecules on surfaces. It is shown that surface coherent antiStokes Raman scattering (CARS) with picosecond pulses has the sensitivity of detecting submonolayer of molecules. On the other hand, second harmonic or sum-frequency generation is also sensitive enough to detect molecular monolayers. Surface-enhanced nonlinear optical effects on some rough metal surfaces have been observed. This facilitates the detection of molecular monolayers on such surfaces, and makes the study of molecular adsorption at a liquid-metal interface feasible. Advantages and disadvantages of the nonlinear optical techniques for surface studies are discussed.

  14. Optical Performance Modeling of FUSE Telescope Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Timo T.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Friedman, Scott D.; Moos, H. Warren

    2000-01-01

    We describe the Metrology Data Processor (METDAT), the Optical Surface Analysis Code (OSAC), and their application to the image evaluation of the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) mirrors. The FUSE instrument - designed and developed by the Johns Hopkins University and launched in June 1999 is an astrophysics satellite which provides high resolution spectra (lambda/Delta(lambda) = 20,000 - 25,000) in the wavelength region from 90.5 to 118.7 nm The FUSE instrument is comprised of four co-aligned, normal incidence, off-axis parabolic mirrors, four Rowland circle spectrograph channels with holographic gratings, and delay line microchannel plate detectors. The OSAC code provides a comprehensive analysis of optical system performance, including the effects of optical surface misalignments, low spatial frequency deformations described by discrete polynomial terms, mid- and high-spatial frequency deformations (surface roughness), and diffraction due to the finite size of the aperture. Both normal incidence (traditionally infrared, visible, and near ultraviolet mirror systems) and grazing incidence (x-ray mirror systems) systems can be analyzed. The code also properly accounts for reflectance losses on the mirror surfaces. Low frequency surface errors are described in OSAC by using Zernike polynomials for normal incidence mirrors and Legendre-Fourier polynomials for grazing incidence mirrors. The scatter analysis of the mirror is based on scalar scatter theory. The program accepts simple autocovariance (ACV) function models or power spectral density (PSD) models derived from mirror surface metrology data as input to the scatter calculation. The end product of the program is a user-defined pixel array containing the system Point Spread Function (PSF). The METDAT routine is used in conjunction with the OSAC program. This code reads in laboratory metrology data in a normalized format. The code then fits the data using Zernike polynomials for normal incidence

  15. Versatile transmission ellipsometry to study linear ferrofluid magneto-optics.

    PubMed

    Kooij, E S; Gâlcă, A C; Poelsema, B

    2006-12-01

    Linear birefringence and dichroism of magnetite ferrofluids are studied simultaneously using spectroscopic ellipsometry in transmission mode. It is shown that this versatile technique enables highly accurate characterisation of magneto-optical phenomena. Magnetic field-dependent linear birefringence and dichroism as well as the spectral dependence are shown to be in line with previous results. Despite the qualitative agreement with established models for magneto-optical phenomena, these fail to provide an accurate, quantitative description of our experimental results using the bulk dielectric function of magnetite. We discuss the results in relation to these models, and indicate how the modified dielectric function of the magnetite nanoparticles can be obtained. PMID:16997315

  16. Optical trapping of a spherically symmetric sphere in the ray-optics regime: a model for optical tweezers upon cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Ren; Hsu, Long; Chi, Sien

    2006-06-01

    Since their invention in 1986, optical tweezers have become a popular manipulation and force measurement tool in cellular and molecular biology. However, until recently there has not been a sophisticated model for optical tweezers on trapping cells in the ray-optics regime. We present a model for optical tweezers to calculate the optical force upon a spherically symmetric multilayer sphere representing a common biological cell. A numerical simulation of this model shows that not only is the magnitude of the optical force upon a Chinese hamster ovary cell significantly three times smaller than that upon a polystyrene bead of the same size, but the distribution of the optical force upon a cell is also much different from that upon a uniform particle, and there is a 30% difference in the optical trapping stiffness of these two cases. Furthermore, under a small variant condition for the refractive indices of any adjacent layers of the sphere, this model provides a simple approximation to calculate the optical force and the stiffness of an optical tweezers system. PMID:16724154

  17. Optical trapping of a spherically symmetric sphere in the ray-optics regime: a model for optical tweezers upon cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yiren; Hsu Long; Chi Sien

    2006-06-01

    Since their invention in 1986, optical tweezers have become a popular manipulation and force measurement tool in cellular and molecular biology. However, until recently there has not been a sophisticated model for optical tweezers on trapping cells in the ray-optics regime. We present a model for optical tweezers to calculate the optical force upon a spherically symmetric multilayer sphere representing a common biological cell. A numerical simulation of this model shows that not only is the magnitude of the optical force upon a Chinese hamster ovary cell significantly three times smaller than that upon a polystyrene bead of the same size, but the distribution of the optical force upon a cell is also much different from that upon a uniform particle, and there is a 30% difference in the optical trapping stiffness of these two cases. Furthermore, under a small variant condition for the refractive indices of any adjacent layers of the sphere, this model provides a simple approximation to calculate the optical force and the stiffness of an optical tweezers system.

  18. A study of optical design for optics of high contrast projector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Chih-Ta; Fang, Yi-Chin; Tsai, Chen-Mu

    2011-10-01

    A new optical design inclusive of zoom optics and optical engine system is proposed in this paper. Traditionally, there is trade-off between F-number of projection optics and contrast, which seems that super high-contrast image from commercial projector was simply a dream. Some ideas of adaptive optics were announced before for the improvement of high contrast. However, few reach success or cost will be high. Traditionally, there is nothing to do with optics of projector and optical engine of projector if lens meets the specification. In this paper, a new optical design for optics and optical engine is studied with liquid optics arrays. Thanks to advanced optical design and LED light luminance, simulation results show that 50% improvement for image contrast could be made without sacrifice of volumetric size.

  19. Fiber optic displacement measurement model based on finite reflective surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuhe; Guan, Kaisen; Hu, Zhaohui

    2016-10-01

    We present a fiber optic displacement measurement model based on finite reflective plate. The theoretical model was derived, and simulation analysis of light intensity distribution, reflective plate width, and the distance between fiber probe and reflective plate were conducted in details. The three dimensional received light intensity distribution and the characteristic curve of light intensity were studied as functions of displacement of finite reflective plate. Experiments were carried out to verify the established model. The physical fundamentals and the effect of operating parameters on measuring system performance were revealed in the end.

  20. Optical modeling of the wide-field imaging interferometry testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Anita K.; Martino, Anthony J.; Rinehart, Stephen A.; Leisawitz, David T.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Frey, Bradley J.

    2006-06-01

    The technique of wide field imaging for optical/IR interferometers for missions like Space Infrared Interferometric (SPIRIT), Submillimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS), and the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF-I)/DARWIN has been demonstrated through the Wide-field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT). In this paper, we present an optical model of the WIIT testbed using the commercially available optical modeling and analysis software FRED. Interferometric results for some simple source targets are presented for a model with ideal surfaces and compared with theoretical closed form solutions. Measured surface deformation data of all mirror surfaces in the form of Zernike coefficients are then added to the optical model compared with results of some simple source targets to laboratory test data. We discuss the sources of error and approximations in the current FRED optical model. Future plans to refine the optical model are also be discussed.

  1. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-07-10

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes routinely used in the synchrotron community.

  2. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-04-06

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes rou tinely used in the synchrotron community.

  3. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes.

    PubMed

    Naulleau, Patrick P; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A

    2011-07-10

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes routinely used in the synchrotron community.

  4. Modeling electrostrictive deformable mirrors in adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hom, Craig L.; Dean, Peter D.; Winzer, Stephen R.

    2000-06-01

    Adaptive optics correct light wavefront distortion caused by atmospheric turbulence or internal heating of optical components. This distortion often limits performance in ground-based astronomy, space-based earth observation and high energy laser applications. The heart of the adaptive optics system is the deformable mirror. In this study, an electromechanical model of a deformable mirror was developed as a design tool. The model consisted of a continuous, mirrored face sheet driven with multilayered, electrostrictive actuators. A fully coupled constitutive law simulated the nonlinear, electromechanical behavior of the actuators, while finite element computations determined the mirror's mechanical stiffness observed by the array. Static analysis of the mirror/actuator system related different electrical inputs to the array with the deformation of the mirrored surface. The model also examined the nonlinear influence of internal stresses on the active array's electromechanical performance and quantified crosstalk between neighboring elements. The numerical predictions of the static version of the model agreed well with experimental measurements made on an actual mirror system. The model was also used to simulate the systems level performance of a deformable mirror correcting a thermally bloomed laser beam. The nonlinear analysis determined the commanded actuator voltages required for the phase compensation and the resulting wavefront error.

  5. Physic-Based Imaginary Potential and Incoherent Current Models for RTD Simulation Using Optical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, M. J.; Navi, Keivan

    In this study, a physic-based model for calculating incoherent current of Resonant Tunneling Diode (RTD) has been introduced which is based on the meta-stable states of RTD. Also a physic-based model for imaginary potential is introduced which has full position, bias, energy and temperature dependency of the imaginary potential. By incorporating these two physic-based models, the conventional optical model becomes a completely physic-based approach to RTD.

  6. Underwater Optical Wireless Channel Modeling Using Monte-Carlo Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, P. Sri; Prince, Shanthi

    2011-10-01

    At present, there is a lot of interest in the functioning of the marine environment. Unmanned or Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (UUVs or AUVs) are used in the exploration of the underwater resources, pollution monitoring, disaster prevention etc. Underwater, where radio waves do not propagate, acoustic communication is being used. But, underwater communication is moving towards Optical Communication which has higher bandwidth when compared to Acoustic Communication but has shorter range comparatively. Underwater Optical Wireless Communication (OWC) is mainly affected by the absorption and scattering of the optical signal. In coastal waters, both inherent and apparent optical properties (IOPs and AOPs) are influenced by a wide array of physical, biological and chemical processes leading to optical variability. The scattering effect has two effects: the attenuation of the signal and the Inter-Symbol Interference (ISI) of the signal. However, the Inter-Symbol Interference is ignored in the present paper. Therefore, in order to have an efficient underwater OWC link it is necessary to model the channel efficiently. In this paper, the underwater optical channel is modeled using Monte-Carlo method. The Monte Carlo approach provides the most general and most flexible technique for numerically solving the equations of Radiative transfer. The attenuation co-efficient of the light signal is studied as a function of the absorption (a) and scattering (b) coefficients. It has been observed that for pure sea water and for less chlorophyll conditions blue wavelength is less absorbed whereas for chlorophyll rich environment red wavelength signal is absorbed less comparative to blue and green wavelength.

  7. Nonlinear optical studies of organic monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Y.R.

    1988-02-01

    Second-order nonlinear optical effects are forbidden in a medium with inversion symmetry, but are necessarily allowed at a surface where the inversion summary is broken. They are often sufficiently strong so that a submonolayer perturbation of the surface can be readily detected. They can therefore be used as effective tools to study monolayers adsorbed at various interfaces. We discuss here a number of recent experiments in which optical second harmonic generation (SHG) and sum-frequency generation (SFG) are employed to probe and characterize organic monolayers. 15 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Dynamic ray tracing for modeling optical cell manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Sraj, Ihab; Szatmary, Alex C.; Marr, David W. M.; Eggleton, Charles D.

    2010-01-01

    Current methods for predicting stress distribution on a cell surface due to optical trapping forces are based on a traditional ray optics scheme for fixed geometries. Cells are typically modeled as solid spheres as this facilitates optical force calculation. Under such applied forces however, real and non-rigid cells can deform, so assumptions inherent in traditional ray optics methods begin to break down. In this work, we implement a dynamic ray tracing technique to calculate the stress distribution on a deformable cell induced by optical trapping. Here, cells are modeled as three-dimensional elastic capsules with a discretized surface with associated hydrodynamic forces calculated using the Immersed Boundary Method. We use this approach to simulate the transient deformation of spherical, ellipsoidal and biconcave capsules due to external optical forces induced by a single diode bar optical trap for a range of optical powers. PMID:20721060

  9. Nonlinear optical studies of polymer interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Y.R. |

    1993-11-01

    Second-order nonlinear optical processes can be used as effective surface probes. They can provide some unique opportunities for studies of polymer interfaces. Here the author describes two examples to illustrate the potential of the techniques. One is on the formation of metal/polymer interfaces. The other is on the alignment of liquid crystal films by mechanically rubbed polymer surfaces.

  10. Studying Charged Particle Optics: An Undergraduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ovalle, V.; Otomar, D. R.; Pereira, J. M.; Ferreira, N.; Pinho, R. R.; Santos A. C. F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes some computer-based activities to bring the study of charged particle optics to undergraduate students, to be performed as a part of a one-semester accelerator-based experimental course. The computational simulations were carried out using the commercially available SIMION program. The performance parameters, such as the focal…

  11. Optics damage modeling and analysis at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Z. M.; Raymond, B.; Gaylord, J.; Fallejo, R.; Bude, J.; Wegner, P.

    2014-10-01

    Comprehensive modeling of laser-induced damage in optics for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has been performed on fused silica wedge focus lenses with a metric that compares the modeled damage performance to online inspections. The results indicate that damage models are successful in tracking the performance of the fused silica final optics when properly accounting for various optical finishes and mitigation processes. This validates the consistency of the damage models and allows us to further monitor and evaluate different system parameters that potentially can affect optics performance.

  12. Optical model for light distribution during transscleral cyclophotocoagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nemati, B.; Dunn, A.; Welch, A.J.; Rylander, H.G. III

    1998-02-01

    Transscleral cyclophotocoagulation (TSCPC) is currently performed clinically as an effective treatment for end-stage glaucoma. We develop a theoretical model for the analysis of optical attenuation phenomena during TSCPC as a basis for selection of an optimal wavelength. A multilayered Monte Carlo model was developed to calculate the fluence and the rate of heat generation in each tissue layer for the wavelengths of Nd:YAG, diode, ruby, krypton yellow, and argon lasers. Of the five wavelengths under study, our theoretical results suggest that the diode laser wavelength offers the best penetration through the conjunctiva, sclera, and ciliary muscle and highest absorption within the ciliary pigment epithelium. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America.

  13. FDTD modeling of anisotropic nonlinear optical phenomena in silicon waveguides.

    PubMed

    Dissanayake, Chethiya M; Premaratne, Malin; Rukhlenko, Ivan D; Agrawal, Govind P

    2010-09-27

    A deep insight into the inherent anisotropic optical properties of silicon is required to improve the performance of silicon-waveguide-based photonic devices. It may also lead to novel device concepts and substantially extend the capabilities of silicon photonics in the future. In this paper, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, we present a three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for modeling optical phenomena in silicon waveguides, which takes into account fully the anisotropy of the third-order electronic and Raman susceptibilities. We show that, under certain realistic conditions that prevent generation of the longitudinal optical field inside the waveguide, this model is considerably simplified and can be represented by a computationally efficient algorithm, suitable for numerical analysis of complex polarization effects. To demonstrate the versatility of our model, we study polarization dependence for several nonlinear effects, including self-phase modulation, cross-phase modulation, and stimulated Raman scattering. Our FDTD model provides a basis for a full-blown numerical simulator that is restricted neither by the single-mode assumption nor by the slowly varying envelope approximation.

  14. Accelerated optical polymer aging studies for LED luminaire applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estupiñán, Edgar; Wendling, Peter; Kostrun, Marijan; Garner, Richard

    2013-09-01

    There is a need in the lighting industry to design and implement accelerated aging methods that accurately simulate the aging process of LED luminaire components. In response to this need, we have built a flexible and reliable system to study the aging characteristics of optical polymer materials, and we have employed it to study a commercially available LED luminaire diffuser made of PMMA. The experimental system consists of a "Blue LED Emitter" and a working surface. Both the temperatures of the samples and the optical powers of the LEDs are appropriately characterized in the system. Several accelerated aging experiments are carried out at different temperatures and optical powers over a 90 hour period and the measured transmission values are used as inputs to a degradation model derived using plausibility arguments. This model seems capable of predicting the behavior of the material as a function of time, temperature and optical power. The model satisfactorily predicts the measured transmission values of diffusers aged in luminaires at two different times and thus can be used to make application recommendations for this material. Specifically, at 35000 hours (the manufacturer's stated life of the luminaire) and at the typical operational temperature of the diffuser, the model predicts a transmission loss of only a few percent over the original transmission of the material at 450 nm, which renders this material suitable for this application.

  15. Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and its experimental models

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Steven L.; Johnson, Mary A.; Miller, Neil R.

    2011-01-01

    Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) can be divided into nonarteritic (NAION) and arteritic (AAION) forms. NAION makes up ~85% of all cases of AION, and until recently was poorly understood. There is no treatment for NAION, and its initiating causes are poorly understood, in part because NAION is not lethal, making it difficult to obtain fresh, newly affected tissue for study. In-vivo electrophysiology and post-mortem studies reveal specific responses that are associated with NAION. New models of NAION have been developed which enable insights into the pathophysiological events surrounding this disease. These models include both rodent and primate species, and the power of a `vertically integrated' multi-species approach can help in understanding the common cellular mechanisms and physiological responses to clinical NAION, and to identify potential approaches to treatment. The models utilize laser light to activate intravascular photoactive dye to induce capillary vascular thrombosis, while sparing the larger vessels. The observable optic nerve changes associated with rodent models of AION (rAION) and primate NAION (pNAION) are indistinguishable from that seen in clinical disease, including sectoral axonal involvement, and in-vivo electrophysiological data from these models are consistent with clinical data. Early post-infarct events reveal an unexpected inflammatory response, and changes in intraretinal gene expression for both stress response, while sparing outer retinal function, which occurs in AAION models. Histologically, the NAION models reveal an isolated loss of retinal ganglion cells by apoptosis. There are changes detectable by immunohistochemistry suggesting that other retinal cells mount a brisk response to retinal ganglion cell distress without themselves dying. The optic nerve ultimately shows axonal loss and scarring. Inflammation is a prominent early histological feature. This suggests that clinically, specific modulation of inflammation may

  16. Integrated Modeling Activities for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST): Structural-Thermal-Optical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, John D.; Parrish, Keith; Howard, Joseph M.; Mosier, Gary E.; McGinnis, Mark; Bluth, Marcel; Kim, Kevin; Ha, Hong Q.

    2004-01-01

    This is a continuation of a series of papers on modeling activities for JWST. The structural-thermal- optical, often referred to as "STOP", analysis process is used to predict the effect of thermal distortion on optical performance. The benchmark STOP analysis for JWST assesses the effect of an observatory slew on wavefront error. The paper begins an overview of multi-disciplinary engineering analysis, or integrated modeling, which is a critical element of the JWST mission. The STOP analysis process is then described. This process consists of the following steps: thermal analysis, structural analysis, and optical analysis. Temperatures predicted using geometric and thermal math models are mapped to the structural finite element model in order to predict thermally-induced deformations. Motions and deformations at optical surfaces are input to optical models and optical performance is predicted using either an optical ray trace or WFE estimation techniques based on prior ray traces or first order optics. Following the discussion of the analysis process, results based on models representing the design at the time of the System Requirements Review. In addition to baseline performance predictions, sensitivity studies are performed to assess modeling uncertainties. Of particular interest is the sensitivity of optical performance to uncertainties in temperature predictions and variations in metal properties. The paper concludes with a discussion of modeling uncertainty as it pertains to STOP analysis.

  17. Study of the Microphysical and Optical Properties of Ice Clouds and Dust Aerosols using observations made by active and passive satellite sensors in conjunction with modeling capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, P.; Dessler, A. E.

    2011-12-01

    Ice clouds and airborne dust aerosols are two unique and important components of atmospheric constituents. The passive sensors (e.g., MODIS, POLDER, and MISR) and active senor (CALIPSO-CALIOP) from the A-train constellation provide an unprecedented opportunity to investigate the microphysical and optical properties of ice clouds and dust aerosols. In this talk, we will demonstrate how to use the CALIPSO-CALIOP observations in conjunction with modeling capabilities to quantify the percentage of horizontally oriented ice crystals in ice clouds. At present, in remote sensing applications and radiative parameterizations involving ice clouds, ice crystals are assumed to be randomly oriented. Because the optical properties of horizontally and randomly oriented ice crystals are quite different, it is necessary to estimate the percentage of horizontally oriented ice crystals for a better understanding of the radiative properties of ice clouds. To infer the percentage of horizontally oriented particles, we have developed new modeling capabilities to simulate the single-scattering and multiple scattering (i.e., radiative transfer) processes involving these particles. Furthermore, we will demonstrate how to use the polarization measurements by CALIOP and POLDER to infer the morphologies of ice crystals and dust aerosols. Specifically, by minimizing the differences between radiative transfer simulations and observations, an optimal mixture of various ice crystal habits and the mean aspect ratio of dust aerosols are inferred. The outcomes of this effort may be potentially useful for more accurate parameterizations of the bulk radiative properties of ice clouds and dust aerosols for applications to radiative transfer simulations involved in climate models.

  18. Spectral model of optical scintillation for terrestrial free-space optical communication link design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung-Hwan; Higashino, Takeshi; Tsukamoto, Katsutoshi; Komaki, Shozo; Kazaura, Kamugisha; Matsumoto, Mitsuji

    2011-03-01

    Since a deep and long-term fading in optical intensity results in considerable burst errors in the data, a terrestrial free-space optical (FSO) system has to be designed with consideration of a frequency characteristic of optical scintillation to achieve high quality wireless services over the link. In designing a terrestrial FSO link, we had better design the system considering variations caused by some slow time-varying parameters. This paper proposes a Butterworth-type spectral model of optical scintillation to design a terrestrial FSO link, which enables us to estimate the power spectral density of optical scintillation in a current optical wireless channel when time zone and weather parameters, such as temperature and rainfall intensity, are given. The spectral parameters of optical scintillation, cut-off frequency, and spectral slope are estimated from the data obtained in the experiment, and then their dependencies on time zone, temperature, and rainfall intensity are examined.

  19. Optical scattering modeling of etched ZnO:Al superstrates and device simulation studies of a-Si:H solar cells with different texture morphologies.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xia; Li, Weimin; Aberle, Armin G; Venkataraj, Selvaraj

    2016-08-20

    Transparent conductive oxide (TCO) materials have been widely used as the front electrodes of thin-film amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells. To improve the performance of solar cells, textured front TCO is required as the optical layer which effectively scatters the incoming light and thus enhances the photon absorption within the device. One promising TCO material is aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO), which is most commonly prepared by magnetron sputtering. After deposition, sputtered AZO films are typically wet-chemically etched using diluted hydrochloric (HCl) or hydrofluoric (HF) acid to obtain rough surface morphologies. In this paper, we report the effects of a textured AZO front electrode on the performance of a-Si:H solar cells based on optical scattering modeling and electrical device simulations, involving four different AZO surface morphologies. The simulated light scattering behaviors indicate that a better textured surface not only scatters more light, but also allows more light get transmitted into the absorber (∼90% of visible light), due to greatly reduced front reflection by the rough surface. Device simulation results show that the two-step AZO texturing process should give improved a-Si:H solar cell performance, with an enhanced short-circuit current density of 16.5  mA/cm2, which leads to a high photovoltaic (PV) efficiency of 9.9%. PMID:27556994

  20. An improved transfer-matrix model for optical superlenses.

    PubMed

    Moore, Ciaran P; Blaikie, Richard J; Arnold, Matthew D

    2009-08-01

    The use of transfer-matrix analyses for characterizing planar optical superlensing systems is studied here, and the simple model of the planar superlens as an isolated imaging element is shown to be defective in certain situations. These defects arise due to neglected interactions between the superlens and the spatially varying shadow masks that are normally used as scattering objects for imaging, and which are held in near-field proximity to the superlenses. An extended model is proposed that improves the accuracy of the transfer-matrix analysis, without adding significant complexity, by approximating the reflections from the shadow mask by those from a uniform metal layer. Results obtained using both forms of the transfer matrix model are compared to finite element models and two example superlenses, one with a silver monolayer and the other with three silver sublayers, are characterized. The modified transfer matrix model gives much better agreement in both cases.

  1. Modelization of the optical and colorimetric properties of lustred ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reillon, V.; Berthier, S.

    2006-05-01

    The lustre decoration is one of the most famous decorations of glazed ceramics in the Mediterranean basin. Unfortunately, the recipes and fabrication techniques used during medieval times have been lost and that is why these objects have been widely studied. But until now, little was known on their optical properties. In this work it is shown that, despite the common belief, the chemical composition of the decoration (copper and/or silver nanoparticles) is not the only relevant parameter in order to explain the optical properties of lustres. By the use of optical characterization and the elaboration of a model - based on the Maxwell Garnett theory and the Abeles matrices theory for interferences -, simulated reflection spectra have been obtained in good agreement with the measured reflection spectra, confirming that the concentration of metal, the size of the metallic nanoparticles as well as the optical index of the glaze play a key-role in order to explain the coloured metallic shine exhibited by the lustres.

  2. Constitutive Modeling of the Mechanical Properties of Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeti, L.; Moghazy, S.; Veazie, D.; Cuddihy, E.

    1998-01-01

    Micromechanical modeling of the composite mechanical properties of optical fibers was conducted. Good agreement was obtained between the values of Young's modulus obtained by micromechanics modeling and those determined experimentally for a single mode optical fiber where the wave guide and the jacket are physically coupled. The modeling was also attempted on a polarization-maintaining optical fiber (PANDA) where the wave guide and the jacket are physically decoupled, and found not to applicable since the modeling required perfect bonding at the interface. The modeling utilized constituent physical properties such as the Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and shear modulus to establish bounds on the macroscopic behavior of the fiber.

  3. Modeling optical absorption for thermoreflectance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jia; Ziade, Elbara; Schmidt, Aaron J.

    2016-03-01

    Optical pump-probe techniques based on thermoreflectance, such as time domain thermoreflectance and frequency domain thermoreflectance (FDTR), have been widely used to characterize the thermal conductivity of thin films and the thermal conductance across interfaces. These techniques typically use a transducer layer to absorb the pump light and improve the thermoreflectance signal. The transducer, however, complicates the interpretation of the measured signal because the approximation that all the energy from the pump beam is deposited at the transducer surface is not always accurate. In this paper, we consider the effect of laser absorption in the top layer of a multilayer sample, and derive an analytical solution for the thermoreflectance signal in the diffusion regime based on volumetric heating. We analyze the measurement sensitivity to the pump absorption depth for transducers with different thermal conductivities, and investigate the additional effect of probe laser penetration depth on the measured signal. We validate our model using FDTR measurements on 490 nm thick amorphous silicon films deposited on fused silica and silicon substrates.

  4. Optical manipulation and microfluidics for studies of single cell dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, E.; Scrimgeour, J.; Granéli, A.; Ramser, K.; Wellander, R.; Enger, J.; Hanstorp, D.; Goksör, M.

    2007-08-01

    Most research on optical manipulation aims towards investigation and development of the system itself. In this paper we show how optical manipulation, imaging and microfluidics can be combined for investigations of single cells. Microfluidic systems have been fabricated and are used, in combination with optical tweezers, to enable environmental changes for single cells. The environment within the microfluidic system has been modelled to ensure control of the process. Three biological model systems have been studied with different combinations of optical manipulation, imaging techniques and microfluidics. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, environmentally induced size modulations and spatial localization of proteins have been studied to elucidate various signalling pathways. In a similar manner the oxygenation cycle of single red blood cells was triggered and mapped using Raman spectroscopy. In the third experiment the forces between the endoplasmic reticulum and chloroplasts were studied in Pisum sativum and Arabidopsis thaliana. By combining different techniques we make advanced biological research possible, revealing information on a cellular level that is impossible to obtain with traditional techniques.

  5. Magneto-optic studies of magnetic oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Gillian A.; Alshammari, Marzook S.; Score, David S.; Neal, James R.; Mokhtari, Abbas; Fox, A. Mark

    2012-10-01

    A brief review of the use of magneto-optic methods to study magnetic oxides is given. A simple method to obtain the magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) of a thin film on a transparent substrate is described. The method takes full account of multiple reflections in the film and substrate. Examples of the magneto-optic spectra of Co-doped ZnO, Fe3O4, and GdMnO3 are given. The Maxwell-Garnett method is used to describe the effects of metallic cobalt inclusions in Co:ZnO samples, and the change of the MCD spectra of Fe3O4 at the Verwey temperature is discussed. Data showing different MCD signals at different energies is presented for GdMnO3.

  6. Numerical Simulations of Optical Turbulence Using an Advanced Atmospheric Prediction Model: Implications for Adaptive Optics Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliss, R.

    2014-09-01

    deweights the contribution of the buoyancy term in the equation for TKE by reducing the ratio of the eddy diffusivity of heat to momentum. This is necessary particularly in the stably stratified free atmosphere where turbulence occurs in thin layers not typically resolvable by the model. The modified MYJ scheme increases the probability and strength of TKE in thermally stable conditions thereby increasing the probability of optical turbulence. Over twelve months of simulations have been generated. Results indicate realistic values of the Fried Coherence Length (ro) are obtained when compared with observations from a Differential Image Motion Monitor (DIMM) instrument. Seeing is worse during day than at night with large ros observed just after sunset and just before sunrise. Three dimensional maps indicate that the vast lava fields, which characterize the Big Island, have a large impact on turbulence generation with a large dependence on elevation. Results from this study are being used to make design decisions for adaptive optics systems. Detailed results of this study will be presented at the conference.

  7. INEX modeling of the Boeing ring optical resonator free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, J.C.; Tokar, R.L.; McVey, B.D.; Elliott, C.J. ); Dowell, D.H.; Laucks, M.L.; Lowrey, A.R. )

    1990-01-01

    We present new results from the integrated numerical model of the accelerator/beam transport system and ring optical resonator of the Boeing free-electron laser experiment. Modifications of the electron-beam transport have been included in a previously developed PARMELA model and are shown to reduce dramatically emittance growth in the 180{degree} bend. The new numerically generated electron beam is used in the 3-D FEL simulation code FELEX to calculate expected laser characteristics with the ring optical resonator and the 5-m untapered THUNDER wiggler. Gain, extraction efficiency, and optical power are compared with experimental data. Performance sensitivity to optical cavity misalignments is studied.

  8. Shuttle sortie electro-optical instruments study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A study to determine the feasibility of adapting existing electro-optical instruments (designed and sucessfully used for ground operations) for use on a shuttle sortie flight and to perform satisfactorily in the space environment is considered. The suitability of these two instruments (a custom made image intensifier camera system and an off-the-shelf secondary electron conduction television camera) to support a barium ion cloud experiment was studied for two different modes of spacelab operation - within the pressurized module and on the pallet.

  9. Characterization of eosinophilic esophagitis murine models using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Aneesh; Noti, Mario; Wojno, Elia D. Tait; Artis, David; Zhou, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Pre-clinical studies using murine models are critical for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying immune-mediated disorders such as Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). In this study, an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system capable of providing three-dimensional images with axial and transverse resolutions of 5 µm and 10 µm, respectively, was utilized to obtain esophageal images from a murine model of EoE-like disease ex vivo. Structural changes in the esophagus of wild-type (Tslpr+/+) and mutant (Tslpr−/−) mice with EoE-like disease were quantitatively evaluated and food impaction sites in the esophagus of diseased mice were monitored using OCT. Here, the capability of OCT as a label-free imaging tool devoid of tissue-processing artifacts to effectively characterize murine EoE-like disease models has been demonstrated. PMID:24575353

  10. A new optical parametric amplifier based on lithium thioindate used for sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopic studies of the Amide I mode of an interfacial model peptide

    SciTech Connect

    York, Roger L.; Holinga, George J.; Guyer, Dean R.; McCrea, Keith R.; Ward, Robert S.; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-05-03

    We describe a new optical parametric amplifier (OPA) that employs lithium thioindate, LiInS{sub 2} (LIS), to create tunable infrared light between 1500 cm{sup -1} and 2000 cm{sup -1}. The OPA based on LIS described within provides intense infrared light with a good beam profile relative to similar OPAs built on silver gallium sulfide, AgGaS{sub 2} (AGS), or silver gallium selenide, AgGaSe{sub 2} (AGSe). We have used the new LIS OPA to perform surface-specific sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy of the amide I vibrational mode of a model peptide at the hydrophobic deuterated polystyrene (d{sub 8}-PS)-phosphate buffered saline interface. This model polypeptide (which is known to be an ?-helix in the bulk solution under the high ionic strength conditions employed here) contains hydrophobic leucyl (L) residues and hydrophilic lysyl (K) residues, with sequence Ac-LKKLLKLLKKLLKL-NH{sub 2}. The amide I mode at the d{sub 8}-PS-buffer interface was found to be centered around 1655 cm{sup -1}. This can be interpreted as the peptide having maintained its {alpha}-helical structure when adsorbed on the hydrophobic surface, although other interpretations are discussed.

  11. A new optical parametric amplifier based on lithium thioindate used for sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopic studies of the amide I mode of an interfacial model peptide.

    PubMed

    York, Roger L; Holinga, George J; Guyer, Dean R; McCrea, Keith R; Ward, Robert S; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2008-09-01

    We describe a new optical parametric amplifier (OPA) that employs lithium thioindate, LiInS2 (LIS), to create tunable infrared light between 1500 cm(-1) and 2000 cm(-1). The OPA based on LIS described within provides intense infrared light with a good beam profile relative to similar OPAs built on silver gallium sulfide, AgGaS2 (AGS), or silver gallium selenide, AgGaSe2 (AGSe). We have used the new LIS OPA to perform surface-specific sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy of the amide I vibrational mode of a model peptide at the hydrophobic deuterated polystyrene (d8-PS)-phosphate buffered saline interface. This model polypeptide (which is known to be an alpha-helix in the bulk solution under the high ionic strength conditions employed here) contains hydrophobic leucyl (L) residues and hydrophilic lysyl (K) residues, with sequence Ac-LKKLLKLLKKLLKL-NH2. The amide I mode at the d8-PS-buffer interface was found to be centered around 1655 cm(-1). This can be interpreted as the peptide having maintained its alpha-helical structure when adsorbed on the hydrophobic surface, although other interpretations are discussed. PMID:18801230

  12. Comparison of Three Optical Methods for Measuring Model Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Fleming, G. A.; Hoppe, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare the current state-of-the-art of the following three optical techniques under study by NASA for measuring model deformation in wind tunnels: (1) video photogrammetry, (2) projection moire interferometry, and (3) the commercially available Optotrak system. An objective comparison of these three techniques should enable the selection of the best technique for a particular test undertaken at various NASA facilities. As might be expected, no one technique is best for all applications. The techniques are also not necessarily mutually exclusive and in some cases can be complementary to one another.

  13. Bioaerosol optical sensor model development and initial validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Steven D.; Jeys, Thomas H.; Eapen, Xuan Le

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes the development and initial validation of a bioaerosol optical sensor model. This model was used to help determine design parameters and estimate performance of a new low-cost optical sensor for detecting bioterrorism agents. In order to estimate sensor performance in detecting biowarfare simulants and rejecting environmental interferents, use was made of a previously reported catalog of EEM (excitation/emission matrix) fluorescence cross-section measurements and previously reported multiwavelength-excitation biosensor modeling work. In the present study, the biosensor modeled employs a single high-power 365 nm UV LED source plus an IR laser diode for particle size determination. The sensor has four output channels: IR size channel, UV elastic channel and two fluorescence channels. The sensor simulation was used to select the fluorescence channel wavelengths of 400-450 and 450-600 nm. Using these selected fluorescence channels, the performance of the sensor in detecting simulants and rejecting interferents was estimated. Preliminary measurements with the sensor are presented which compare favorably with the simulation results.

  14. Unified optomechanical modeling: thermo-elastic stability of a fiber optic diffractive encoding system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatheway, Alson E.

    2015-09-01

    A common mechanical failure in optical systems is inadequate stability in the supporting structure. Thermal stability is crucial for maintaining the alignment of the optical elements and achieving adequate optical performance as the environmental temperature changes. It is the responsibility of the mechanical engineer to provide adequate stability in the mechanical design. Optical engineers assume that their large-displacement non-linear codes are required to analyze the perturbations caused by mechanical deflections. However, the permitted deflections of the optical elements are usually quite small, on the order of microns for structures of meter-sized dimensions. For perturbations of this magnitude it may be shown that a non-linear solver is not required for engineering accuracies. In fact, it can be argued that the optical functions are more linear than the solid mechanics functions, of which the finite element method itself is but a linear simplification. Unified optomechanical modeling provides a vehicle for tracing offending image motions to particular optical elements and their supporting structure. The unified modeling method imports the optical elements' imaging properties into a finite element structural model of the optical system. It convolves the elements' motions and their optical properties in a single optomechanical modeling medium, unifying them. This provides the engineer with a tool that discloses each element's contribution to the offending motions of the image on the detector. This paper presents the theory of unified optomechanical modeling as applied to the thermal stability of the optical image in a Nastran1 finite element model. The steps used in developing a unified optomechanical model are described in detail. Comparisons of the unified modeling technique to both analytical and empirical validation studies are shown.

  15. Modelling global multi-conjugated adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viotto, Valentina; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Magrin, Demetrio; Bergomi, Maria; Dima, Marco; Farinato, Jacopo; Marafatto, Luca; Greggio, Davide

    2014-08-01

    The recently proposed concept of Global MCAO (GMCAO) aims to look for Natural Guide Stars in a very wide technical Field of View (FoV), to increase the overall sky coverage, and deals with the consequent depth of focus reduction introducing numerically a quite-high number of Virtual Deformable Mirrors (VDMs), which are then the starting point for an optimization of the real DMs shapes for the correction of the -smaller- scientific FoV. To translate the GMCAO concept into a real system, a number of parameters requires to be analyzed and optimized, like the number of references and VDMs to be used, the technical FoV size, the spatial samplings, the sensing wavelength. These and some other major choices, like the open loop WFSs concept and design, will then drive the requirements and the performance of the system (e.g. limiting magnitude, linear response, and sensitivity). This paper collects some major results of the on-going study on the feasibility of an Adaptive Optics system for the E-ELT, based on GMCAO, with a particular emphasis on the sky coverage issue. Besides the sensitivity analysis of the optimization of the already mentioned parameters, such a topic involves the implementation of an IDL code simulation tool to estimate the system performance in terms of Strehl Ratio in a 2×2 arcmin FoV, when a variable number of NGSs and VDMs are used. Different technical FoV diameters for the references selection and various constellations can be also compared. This study could be the starting point for a dedicated laboratory testing and, in the future, an on-sky experiment at an 8m telescope with a "scaled down" demonstrator.

  16. Bio-optical modeling of photosynthetic pigments in corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochberg, Eric J.; Apprill, Amy M.; Atkinson, Marlin J.; Bidigare, Robert R.

    2006-03-01

    The spectral reflectance of coral is inherently related to the amounts of photosynthetic pigments present in the zooxanthellae. There are no studies, however, showing that the suite of major photosynthetic pigments can be predicted from optical reflectance spectra. In this study, we measured cm-scale in vivo and in situ spectral reflectance for several colonies of the massive corals Porites lobata and Porites lutea, two colonies of the branching coral Porites compressa, and one colony of the encrusting coral Montipora flabellata in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii. For each reflectance spectrum, we collected a tissue sample and utilized high-performance liquid chromatography to quantify six major photosynthetic pigments, located in the zooxanthellae. We used multivariate multiple regression analysis with cross-validation to build and test an empirical linear model for predicting pigment concentrations from optical reflectance spectra. The model accurately predicted concentrations of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c 2, peridinin, diadinoxanthin, diatoxanthin and β-carotene, with correlation coefficients of 0.997, 0.941, 0.995, 0.996, 0.980 and 0.984, respectively. The relationship between predicted and actual concentrations was 1:1 for each pigment, except chlorophyll c 2. This simple empirical model demonstrates the potential for routine, rapid, non-invasive monitoring of coral-zooxanthellae status, and ultimately for remote sensing of reef biogeochemical processes.

  17. Optical design study for NASA's spherical primary optical telescope (SPOT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Joseph M.

    2004-10-01

    Several of NASA's future space telescopes project teams have chosen or are considering segmented primary mirrors as a part of their architecture. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) design employs a 6.5-meter conic primary mirror constructed of 18 hexagonal segments, where each hex is one of three off-axis surface profiles corresponding to its radial distance to the parent mirror axis. Other future mission concepts such as SAFIR (Single Aperture Far-Infra Red) and SUVO (Space Ultra Violet Optical telescope) are considering even larger segmented primary mirrors. The goal of the Spherical Primary Optical Telescope (SPOT) project discussed in this paper is to investigate the option of a spherical primary mirror for such future large aperture NASA missions. Ground-based telescopes such as the Hobby-Eberly have realized this design option, and the current baseline design for ESO's OWL project incorporates a 100-meter segmented spherical primary mirror. While the benefits of fabricating large numbers of identical spherical surface segments are obvious, the optical design for the telescope becomes more complex in order to correct the significant aberration resulting from a spherical primary surface. This paper briefly surveys design approaches of spherical primary telescopes. Image based performance comparisons are made, and examples are presented.

  18. Thermal modeling for an optical refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, K. W.; Schomacker, J.; Fraser, T.; Dodson, C.

    2015-03-01

    Optical refrigeration is currently the only completely solid state cooling method capable of reaching cryogenic temperatures from room temperature. Optical cooling utilizing Yb:YLF as the refrigerant crystal has resulted in temperatures lower than 123K measured via a fluorescence thermometry technique. However, to be useful as a refrigerator this cooling crystal must be attached to a sensor or other payload. The phenomenology behind laser cooling, known as anti-Stokes fluorescence, has a relatively low efficiency which makes the system level optimization and limitation of parasitic losses imperative. We propose a variety of potential designs for a final optical refrigerator, enclosure and thermal link; calculate conductive and radiative losses, and estimate direct fluorescence reabsorption. Our simulated designs show losses between 60 and 255 mW, depending on geometry and enclosure choice, with a lower bound as low as 23 mW.

  19. Modelling the optical properties of aerosols in a chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, E.; Kahnert, M.

    2015-12-01

    According to the IPCC fifth assessment report (2013), clouds and aerosols still contribute to the largest uncertainty when estimating and interpreting changes to the Earth's energy budget. Therefore, understanding the interaction between radiation and aerosols is both crucial for remote sensing observations and modelling the climate forcing arising from aerosols. Carbon particles are the largest contributor to the aerosol absorption of solar radiation, thereby enhancing the warming of the planet. Modelling the radiative properties of carbon particles is a hard task and involves many uncertainties arising from the difficulties of accounting for the morphologies and heterogeneous chemical composition of the particles. This study aims to compare two ways of modelling the optical properties of aerosols simulated by a chemical transport model. The first method models particle optical properties as homogeneous spheres and are externally mixed. This is a simple model that is particularly easy to use in data assimilation methods, since the optics model is linear. The second method involves a core-shell internal mixture of soot, where sulphate, nitrate, ammonia, organic carbon, sea salt, and water are contained in the shell. However, by contrast to previously used core-shell models, only part of the carbon is concentrated in the core, while the remaining part is homogeneously mixed with the shell. The chemical transport model (CTM) simulations are done regionally over Europe with the Multiple-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry (MATCH) model, developed by the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI). The MATCH model was run with both an aerosol dynamics module, called SALSA, and with a regular "bulk" approach, i.e., a mass transport model without aerosol dynamics. Two events from 2007 are used in the analysis, one with high (22/12-2007) and one with low (22/6-2007) levels of elemental carbon (EC) over Europe. The results of the study help to assess the

  20. SAFENET 2 fiber optic implementation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, V. W.; Sevinsky, T. P.; Owens, F. J.

    1991-06-01

    The SAFENET II draft Military Handbook, MCCR-0036-DRAFT, establishes requirements and provides guidance for the implementation of a Survivable Adaptable Fiber Optic Network. SAFENET II. The fiber optics communications channel essentially adopts the ANSI Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) Physical Layer Medium Dependent (PMD) Specification, modified by a requirement for increased transmitter optical output power and decreased minimum receiver optical input power (increased sensitivity) to provide a 21 dB overall optical flux budget between (and including) the equipment fiber optic interface connectors (FOIC). A network of cables, optical bypass switches, and spliced fiber joints is described in the Handbook which permit ring operation through up to 5 bypassed nodes while maintaining a minimum 6 dB link optical power margin.

  1. Channel capacity study of underwater wireless optical communications links based on Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Ma, Yong; Zhou, Qunqun; Zhou, Bo; Wang, Hongyuan

    2012-01-01

    Channel capacity of ocean water is limited by propagation distance and optical properties. Previous studies on this problem are based on water-tank experiments with different amounts of Maalox antacid. However, propagation distance is limited by the experimental set-up and the optical properties are different from ocean water. Therefore, the experiment result is not accurate for the physical design of underwater wireless communications links. This letter developed a Monte Carlo model to study channel capacity of underwater optical communications. Moreover, this model can flexibly configure various parameters of transmitter, receiver and channel, and is suitable for physical underwater optical communications links design.

  2. Optical tweezers for studying taxis in parasites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Fontes, A.; Stahl, C. V.; Pozzo, L. Y.; Ayres, D. C.; Almeida, D. B.; Farias, P. M. A.; Santos, B. S.; Santos-Mallet, J.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Giorgio, S.; Feder, D.; Cesar, C. L.

    2011-04-01

    In this work we present a methodology to measure force strengths and directions of living parasites with an optical tweezers setup. These measurements were used to study the parasites chemotaxis in real time. We observed behavior and measured the force of: (i) Leishmania amazonensis in the presence of two glucose gradients; (ii) Trypanosoma cruzi in the vicinity of the digestive system walls, and (iii) Trypanosoma rangeli in the vicinity of salivary glands as a function of distance. Our results clearly show a chemotactic behavior in every case. This methodology can be used to study any type of taxis, such as chemotaxis, osmotaxis, thermotaxis, phototaxis, of any kind of living microorganisms. These studies can help us to understand the microorganism sensory systems and their response function to these gradients.

  3. A preliminary weather model for optical communications through the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaik, K. S.

    1988-01-01

    A preliminary weather model is presented for optical propagation through the atmosphere. It can be used to compute the attenuation loss due to the atmosphere for desired link availability statistics. The quantitative results that can be obtained from this model provide good estimates for the atmospheric link budget necessary for the design of an optical communication system. The result is extended to provide for the computation of joint attenuation probability for n sites with uncorrelated weather patterns.

  4. Analytical model and experimental verification of the critical power for modulation instability in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Alem, Mehdi; Soto, Marcelo A; Thévenaz, Luc

    2015-11-16

    Modulation instability is thoroughly investigated and a simple analytical model for its power critically modifying the wave properties in terms of system parameters is derived and experimentally validated. The differences on the modulation instability gain spectrum in lossless and lossy optical fibers are analyzed based on theoretical models and numerical simulations. In particular the impact of background noise on the behavior of modulation instability is studied analytically and verified by measurements and simulations. The proposed analytical model is experimentally validated by monitoring the wave propagation along an optical fiber using a Brillouin optical time-domain analyzer. This way, the evolution of the optical signal traveling through optical fibers, especially, the pump depletion and the recurrence phenomenon are investigated. PMID:26698435

  5. Dynamic viscoelastic models of human skin using optical elastography

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Steven P.; Khan, Altaf; Dai, Zoujun; Royston, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    A novel technique for measuring in vivo human skin viscoelastic properties using optical elastography has been developed. The technique uses geometrically focused surface (GFS) waves that allow for wide bandwidth measurements of the wave field. An analytical solution for the case of a radiating annular disk surface source was fit to experimentally measured GFS waves, enabling an estimate of the frequency-dependent surface wavenumber, which can then be related to the dynamic shear modulus. Several viscoelastic models were then fit to the dynamic shear modulus dispersion curve. Viscoelastic models were evaluated based on their overall quality of fit and variability amongst healthy volunteers. An Ecoflex phantom was used to validate the procedure and results by comparison to similar studies using the same type of phantom. For skin results, it was found that the “α” parameters from the fractional models had the least variability, with coefficients of variability of 0.15, and 0.16. The best fitting models were the standard linear solid, and the fractional Voigt, with a mean fit correlation coefficient, R2, of 0.93, 0.89, respectively. This study has demonstrated the efficacy of this new method, and with larger studies the viscoelastic skin models could be used to identify various skin diseases and their response to treatment. PMID:26305137

  6. Dynamic viscoelastic models of human skin using optical elastography.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Steven P; Khan, Altaf; Dai, Zoujun; Royston, Thomas J

    2015-09-01

    A novel technique for measuring in vivo human skin viscoelastic properties using optical elastography has been developed. The technique uses geometrically focused surface (GFS) waves that allow for wide bandwidth measurements of the wave field. An analytical solution for the case of a radiating annular disk surface source was fit to experimentally measured GFS waves, enabling an estimate of the frequency-dependent surface wavenumber, which can then be related to the dynamic shear modulus. Several viscoelastic models were then fit to the dynamic shear modulus dispersion curve. Viscoelastic models were evaluated based on their overall quality of fit and variability amongst healthy volunteers. An Ecoflex phantom was used to validate the procedure and results by comparison to similar studies using the same type of phantom. For skin results, it was found that the 'α' parameters from the fractional models had the least variability, with coefficients of variability of 0.15, and 0.16. The best fitting models were the standard linear solid, and the fractional Voigt, with a mean fit correlation coefficient, R(2), of 0.93, 0.89, respectively. This study has demonstrated the efficacy of this new method, and with larger studies the viscoelastic skin models could be used to identify various skin diseases and their response to treatment. PMID:26305137

  7. Stellar population model dependence in optical AGN identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanping; Zaw, Ingyin; Farrar, Glennys

    2016-08-01

    The choice of stellar templates plays an important role in optical spectroscopic AGN classification, because the host galaxy contribution must be accurately subtracted in order to isolate the true contribution of the AGN. Up to now, simple stellar population models such as BC03, have been used as templates in doing the stellar component analysis. As more stellar population models become available, systematic study of the impact of the stellar population modeling becomes possible. This is important not only for finding the best template but also for understanding the merits and limitations of the templates. We analyzed the SDSS DR8 spectra, using different empirical, theoretical, and mixed stellar population models. We found that some templates lead to systematic biases in the identification of AGN candidates. We investigated the effects of the range of age,metallicity, and the total wavelength used in full-spectrum fitting. We found that the completeness of parameter space in the template model plays a vital role in classifying AGN candidates; the wavelength range used to analyze the spectra also affects the result but in a relative minor way. Empirical stellar models can be expected to yield the most reliable estimate of the absorption features in the host galaxies, since there will be less model dependence (e.g., on opacity assumption, line profile representation).

  8. Integrated structural and optical modeling of the orbiting stellar interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaklan, Stuart B.; Yu, Jeffrey W.; Briggs, Hugh C.

    1993-11-01

    The Integrated Modeling of Optical Systems (IMOS) Integration Workbench at JPL has been used to model the effects of structural perturbations on the optics in the proposed Orbiting Stellar Interferometer (OSI). OSI consists of 3 pairs of interferometers and delay lines attached to a 7.5 meter truss. They are interferometrically monitored from a separate boom by a laser metrology system. The spatially distributed nature of the science instrument calls for a high level of integration between the optics and support structure. Because OSI is designed to achieve micro-arcsecond astrometry, many of its alignment, stability, and knowledge tolerances are in the submicron regime. The spacecraft will be subject to vibrations caused by reaction wheels and on-board equipment, as well as thermal strain due to solar and terrestrial heating. These perturbations affect optical parameters such as optical path differences and beam co-parallelism which are critical to instrument performance. IMOS provides an environment that allows one to design and perturb the structure, attach optics to structural or non-structural nodes, trace rays, and analyze the impact of mechanical perturbations on optical performance. This tool makes it simple to change the structure and immediately see performance enhancement/degradation. We have employed IMOS to analyze the effect of reaction wheel disturbances on the optical path difference in both the science and metrology interferometers.

  9. Rate equations model and optical external efficiency of optically pumped electrically driven terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamadou, A.; Thobel, J.-L.; Lamari, S.

    2016-10-01

    A four level rate equations model for a terahertz optically pumped electrically driven quantum cascade laser is here introduced and used to model the system both analytically and numerically. In the steady state, both in the presence and absence of the terahertz optical field, we solve the resulting nonlinear system of equations and obtain closed form expressions for the levels occupation, population inversion as well as the mid-infrared pump threshold intensity in terms of the device parameters. We also derive, for the first time for this system, an analytical formula for the optical external efficiency and analyze the simultaneous effects of the cavity length and pump intensity on it. At moderate to high pump intensities, we find that the optical external efficiency scales roughly as the reciprocal of the cavity length.

  10. Modeling plasmonic scattering combined with thin-film optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, M.; Klenk, R.; Lux-Steiner, M. Ch; Topič, M.; Krč, J.

    2011-01-01

    Plasmonic scattering from metal nanostructures presents a promising concept for improving the conversion efficiency of solar cells. The determination of optimal nanostructures and their position within the solar cell is crucial to boost the efficiency. Therefore we established a one-dimensional optical model combining plasmonic scattering and thin-film optics to simulate optical properties of thin-film solar cells including metal nanoparticles. Scattering models based on dipole oscillations and Mie theory are presented and their integration in thin-film semi-coherent optical descriptions is explained. A plasmonic layer is introduced in the thin-film structure to simulate scattering properties as well as parasitic absorption in the metal nanoparticles. A proof of modeling concept is given for the case of metal-island grown silver nanoparticles on glass and ZnO:Al/glass substrates. Using simulations a promising application of the nanoparticle integration is shown for the case of CuGaSe2 solar cells.

  11. Simulations of Keratoconus Patient Vision with Optical Eye Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Bo; Chen, Ying-Ling; Lewis, J. W. L.; Shi, Lei; Wang, Ming

    2007-11-01

    Keratoconus (KC) is an eye condition that involves progressive corneal thinning. Pushed by the intraocular pressure, the weakened cornea bulges outward and creates an irregular surface shape. The result is degraded vision that is difficult to correct with regular eye glasses or contact lens. In this study we use the optical lens design software, ZeMax, and patient data including cornea topography and refraction prescription to construct KC eye models. The variation of KC ``cone height'' on the cornea is used to simulate KC progression. The consequent patients' night vision and Snellen letter chart vision at 20 feet are simulated using these anatomically accurate 3-dimensional models. 100 million rays are traced for each image simulation. Animated results illustrate the change of KC visual acuity with the progression of disease. This simulation technique provides a comprehensive tool for medical training and patient consultation/education.

  12. Modeling of optical wireless scattering communication channels over broad spectra.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weihao; Zou, Difan; Xu, Zhengyuan

    2015-03-01

    The air molecules and suspended aerosols help to build non-line-of-sight (NLOS) optical scattering communication links using carriers from near infrared to visible light and ultraviolet bands. This paper proposes channel models over such broad spectra. Wavelength dependent Rayleigh and Mie scattering and absorption coefficients of particles are analytically obtained first. They are applied to the ray tracing based Monte Carlo method, which models the photon scattering angle from the scatterer and propagation distance between two consecutive scatterers. Communication link path loss is studied under different operation conditions, including visibility, particle density, wavelength, and communication range. It is observed that optimum communication performances exist across the wavelength under specific atmospheric conditions. Infrared, visible light and ultraviolet bands show their respective features as conditions vary.

  13. Impact of green technologies in optical networks case study: green wireless optical broadband access network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puche, William S.; Sierra, Javier E.

    2014-09-01

    This article analyzes the current state of green technologies in optical telecommunications networks, analyzing in detail the basic structure of a hybrid network (Optical-Wireless), taking into account energy consumption by proposing a mathematical model is presented to establish the optimum number of ONUs in a network.

  14. Optical Depth from Realistic Microlensing Models of M31

    SciTech Connect

    Gyuk, Geza; Crotts, Arlin

    2000-06-01

    We provide a set of microlensing optical depth maps for M31. Optical depths toward Andromeda were calculated on the basis of a four-component model of the lens and source populations: disk and bulge sources lensed by bulge, M31 halo, and Galactic halo lenses. We confirm the high optical depth and the strong optical depth gradient along the M31 minor axis due to a dark halo of lenses and also discuss the magnitude of the self-lensing due to the bulge. We explore how the shape of the optical depth maps to M31 vary with the halo parameters core radius and flattening. (c) 2000 The American Astronomical Society.

  15. Optical and Hygroscopic Studies of Aerosols In Simulated Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenkopf, Christa A.

    2011-08-01

    Basic characteristics of the early Earth climate, the only known environment in the Universe in which life has been known to emerge and thrive, remain a mystery. In particular, little is understood about the Earth's atmosphere 2.8 billion years ago. From climate models and laboratory studies, it is postulated that an organic haze, much like that found on Saturn's largest moon Titan, covered the early Earth. This haze, generated from photolysis of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), may have had profound climatic consequences. Climate models of the early Earth that include this haze have had to rely upon optical properties of a Titan laboratory analog. Titan haze, though thought to be similar, is formed from a different combination of precursor gases and by different energy sources than early Earth haze. This thesis examines the direct and indirect radiative effects of aerosol on early Earth climate by studying the optical and hygroscopic properties of a laboratory analog. A Titan analog is studied for comparison and to better understand spacecraft-retrieved haze chemical and optical properties from Titan. The properties of the laboratory analogs, generated in a flowing reactor cell with a continuum ultraviolet (UV) light source, were primarily measured using cavity ringdown aerosol extinction spectroscopy and UV-visible (UV-Vis) transmission spectroscopy. We find that the optical properties of our early Earth analog are significantly different than those of the Titan analog from Khare et al. (1984). In both the UV and visible, when modeled as fractals, particles with the optical properties of the early Earth analog have approximately 30% larger extinction efficiencies than particles with Khare et al. (1984) values. This result implies our early Earth haze analog would provide a more efficient UV shield and have a stronger antigreenhouse effect than the Khare et al. (1984) Titan analog. Our Titan analog has significantly smaller imaginary refractive index values

  16. A coupled physical, optical, and photochemical model of snow: relating measurements of specific surface area to snow optical properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, G.; Simpson, W. R.; Taillandier, A.; Domine, F.

    2004-12-01

    Recent experiments and modeling studies have shown that chemical processes in the snow pack have significant impacts on the chemistry of the atmosphere. Solar ultraviolet radiation penetrating the snow pack is the driving force for some of these chemical processes. Therefore, factors controlling photochemical processes in the snowpack need to be understood. Here, we present field investigations of the relationship between physical and optical properties of the snowpack and laboratory studies validating radiation models that predict photochemical reaction rates within the snowpack. A critical parameter in modeling snow photochemistry is the scattering coefficient for the snow. Steve Warren (University of Washington) proposed that the best physical measurement that correlates with scattering is the specific surface area (SSA); however, this correlation has not been tested to our knowledge. Therefore, we performed field experiments comparing optical measurements of scattering and the SSA. The measurement of the snow SSA was achieved by using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method to analyse CH4 adsorption onto snow samples. The optical determination of scattering in the snowpack used a variation of the method of Beaglehole. In this method, the light penetration of a snow sample was measured using decreasing thicknesses of the sample on a black base. In the thin layers, the scattering dominates the light attenuation within the snow. In the thicker layers both the absorption and scattering determine the light attenuation. Kubelka-Munk two-flux theory was used to model the data and calculate the scattering and absorption within the samples. This determination of the scattering was found to be proportional to the measured SSA. This linkage between SSA and optical properties confirms Warren`s hypothesis and allows the literatures of optical and physical properties of snow to be coupled. A laboratory study of the performance of snow radiation models was also carried out. A delta

  17. Application of Peterson's stray light model to complex optical instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fray, S.; Goepel, M.; Kroneberger, M.

    2016-07-01

    Gary L. Peterson (Breault Research Organization) presented a simple analytical model for in- field stray light evaluation of axial optical systems. We exploited this idea for more complex optical instruments of the Meteosat Third Generation (MTG) mission. For the Flexible Combined Imager (FCI) we evaluated the in-field stray light of its three-mirroranastigmat telescope, while for the Infrared Sounder (IRS) we performed an end-to-end analysis including the front telescope, interferometer and back telescope assembly and the cold optics. A comparison to simulations will be presented. The authors acknowledge the support by ESA and Thales Alenia Space through the MTG satellites program.

  18. Ray-tracing optical modeling of negative dysphotopsia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xin; Liu, Yueai; Karakelle, Mutlu; Masket, Samuel; Fram, Nicole R.

    2011-12-01

    Negative dysphotopsia is a relatively common photic phenomenon that may occur after implantation of an intraocular lens. The etiology of negative dysphotopsia is not fully understood. In this investigation, optical modeling was developed using nonsequential-component Zemax ray-tracing technology to simulate photic phenomena experienced by the human eye. The simulation investigated the effects of pupil size, capsulorrhexis size, and bag diffusiveness. Results demonstrated the optical basis of negative dysphotopsia. We found that photic structures were mainly influenced by critical factors such as the capsulorrhexis size and the optical diffusiveness of the capsular bag. The simulations suggested the hypothesis that the anterior capsulorrhexis interacting with intraocular lens could induce negative dysphotopsia.

  19. Multilayered model in optics and quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, M. D.

    2009-08-01

    Three types of dispersion equations are analyzed that describe the eigenvalues of the effective refractive index of a multilayer plane optical waveguide and the energy eigenvalues of a quantum particle placed in a piecewise constant potential field. The first equation (D1) is derived by setting to zero the determinant of the system of linear equations produced by matching the solutions in the layers. The second equation (D2) is obtained using the well-known method of characteristic matrices. The third equation has been obtained in the general case by the author and is known as a multilayer equation. Simple relations between the three equations are established. It is shown that the set of roots of D2 exactly coincides with the set of eigenvalues of the multilayer problem, while the roots of D1 and the multilayer equation contain those equal to the refractive index in the optical case (or to the potential in the quantum case) in internal layers of the system, which may be superfluous. Examples are presented.

  20. Optical signal impairment study of cascaded optical filters in 40 Gbps DQPSK and 100 Gbps PM-DQPSK systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoyong; Horche, Paloma R.; Minguez, Alfredo M.

    2013-09-01

    Optical filters are crucial elements in optical communications. The influence of cascaded filters in the optical signal will affect the communications quality seriously. In this paper we will study and simulate the optical signal impairment caused by different kinds of filters which include Butterworth, Bessel, Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) and Fabry-Perot (FP). Optical signal impairment is analyzed from an Eye Opening Penalty (EOP) and optical spectrum point of view. The simulation results show that when the center frequency of all filters aligns with the laser's frequency, the Butterworth has the smallest influence to the signal while the F-P has the biggest. With a -1dB EOP, the amount of cascaded Butterworth optical filters with a bandwidth of 50 GHz is 18 in 40 Gbps NRZ-DQPSK systems and 12 in 100 Gbps PMNRZ- DQPSK systems. The value is reduced to 9 and 6 respectively for Febry-Perot optical filters. In the situation of frequency misalignment, the impairment caused by filters is more serious. Our research shows that with a frequency deviation of 5 GHz, only 12 and 9 Butterworth optical filters can be cascaded in 40 Gbps NRZ-DQPSK and 100 Gbps PM-NRZ-DQPSK systems respectively. We also study the signal impairment caused by different orders of the Butterworth filter model. Our study shows that although the higher-order has a smaller clipping effect in the transmission spectrum, it will introduce a more serious phase ripple which seriously affects the signal. Simulation result shows that the 2nd order Butterworth filter has the best performance.

  1. Accuracy of optical dental digitizers: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Vandeweghe, Stefan; Vervack, Valentin; Vanhove, Christian; Dierens, Melissa; Jimbo, Ryo; De Bruyn, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy, in terms of trueness and precision, of optical dental scanners. An experimental acrylic resin cast was created and digitized using a microcomputed tomography (microCT) scanner, which served as the reference model. Five polyether impressions were made of the acrylic resin cast to create five stone casts. Each dental digitizer (Imetric, Lava ST, Smart Optics, KaVo Everest) made five scans of the acrylic resin cast and one scan of every stone cast. The scans were superimposed and compared using metrology software. Deviations were calculated between the datasets obtained from the dental digitizers and the microCT scanner (= trueness) and between datasets from the same dental digitizer (= precision). With exception of the Smart Optics scanner, there were no significant differences in trueness for the acrylic resin cast. For the stone casts, however, the Lava ST performed better than Imetric, which did better than the KaVo scanner. The Smart Optics scanner demonstrated the highest deviation. All digitizers demonstrated a significantly higher trueness for the acrylic resin cast compared to the plaster cast, except the Lava ST. The Lava ST was significantly more precise compared to the other scanners. Imetric and Smart Optics also demonstrated a higher level of precision compared to the KaVo scanner. All digitizers demonstrated some degree of error. Stone cast copies are less accurate because of difficulties with scanning the rougher surface or dimensional deformations caused during the production process. For complex, large-span reconstructions, a highly accurate scanner should be selected. PMID:25734714

  2. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnel, part 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George

    1993-01-01

    A summary of optical techniques for the Ames Unitary Plan wind tunnels are discussed. Six optical techniques were studied: Schlieren, light sheet and laser vapor screen, angle of attack, model deformation, infrared imagery, and digital image processing. The study includes surveys and reviews of wind tunnel optical techniques, some conceptual designs, and recommendations for use of optical methods in the Ames Unitary Plan wind tunnels. Particular emphasis was placed on searching for systems developed for wind tunnel use and on commercial systems which could be readily adapted for wind tunnels. This final report is to summarize the major results and recommendations.

  3. Remark on: the neutron spherical optical-model absorption.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A. B.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-06-30

    The energy-dependent behavior of the absorption term of the spherical neutron optical potential for doubly magic {sup 208}Pb and the neighboring {sup 209}Bi is examined. These considerations suggest a phenomenological model that results in an intuitively attractive energy dependence of the imaginary potential that provides a good description of the observed neutron cross sections and that is qualitatively consistent with theoretical concepts. At the same time it provides an alternative to some of the arbitrary assumptions involved in many conventional optical-model interpretations reported in the literature and reduces the number of the parameters of the model.

  4. Optical Properties of the α-T3 Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illes, Emilia; Carbotte, Jules; Nicol, Elisabeth

    The α-T3 model, recently introduced by Raoux et. al, provides a continuous evolution between the honeycomb lattice of graphene and the T3 or dice lattice. It is characterized by a variable Berry phase that changes continuously from π to 0. We present our calculations of optical properties of the α-T3 model, including the Hall quantization and optical conductivity, with an emphasis on the effect of the variable Berry's phase of the model. In particular, we describe the continuous evolution of the Hall quantization from a relativistic to a non-relativistic regime.

  5. Developing a stochastic model for acousto-optic tissue imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resink, Steffen G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2012-02-01

    Direct optical measurements in scattering media offer poor resolution due to the high scattering. Ultrasound is scattered orders of magnitude less in tissue compared with light and therefore offers good resolution. Photoacoustics and acoustooptics are both relatively new hybrid techniques that enable measurements of optical properties in scattering media by combining ultrasound and light. Quantified measurements of the fluence and absorption coefficient however are desired and can not be performed by these separate techniques. A new approach to achieve this goal is to combine both hybrid techniques. By combining photoacoustic and acousto-optic measurements there is sufficient information to calculate the absorption coefficient and fluence at the ultrasound focus used for the acousto-optics. We require knowledge on the interaction of light and sound inside tissue, so the size of the so called tagging volume can be determined. This tagging volume is defined by the size and shape of the ultrasound focus used in the acousto-optic measurements. A stochastic model for acousto-optics is under development that used existing knowledge on the in the interaction between light and sound. By separating light transport and the interactions of light and sound and writing this interaction as a probability density function it is possible to find the effective geometrical properties of the tagging volume. At the moment multiple interaction mechanisms of sound and light are added to this model. In the future this model will be validated in phantoms and biological tissue.

  6. Optical linear algebra processors: noise and error-source modeling.

    PubMed

    Casasent, D; Ghosh, A

    1985-06-01

    The modeling of system and component noise and error sources in optical linear algebra processors (OLAP's) are considered, with attention to the frequency-multiplexed OLAP. General expressions are obtained for the output produced as a function of various component errors and noise. A digital simulator for this model is discussed.

  7. A versatile optical model for hybrid rendering of volume data.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fei; Li, Qingde; Xiang, Dehui; Cao, Yong; Tian, Jie

    2012-06-01

    In volume rendering, most optical models currently in use are based on the assumptions that a volumetric object is a collection of particles and that the macro behavior of particles, when they interact with light rays, can be predicted based on the behavior of each individual particle. However, such models are not capable of characterizing the collective optical effect of a collection of particles which dominates the appearance of the boundaries of dense objects. In this paper, we propose a generalized optical model that combines particle elements and surface elements together to characterize both the behavior of individual particles and the collective effect of particles. The framework based on a new model provides a more powerful and flexible tool for hybrid rendering of isosurfaces and transparent clouds of particles in a single scene. It also provides a more rational basis for shading, so the problem of normal-based shading in homogeneous regions encountered in conventional volume rendering can be easily avoided. The model can be seen as an extension to the classical model. It can be implemented easily, and most of the advanced numerical estimation methods previously developed specifically for the particle-based optical model, such as preintegration, can be applied to the new model to achieve high-quality rendering results.

  8. Optical linear algebra processors - Noise and error-source modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, D.; Ghosh, A.

    1985-01-01

    The modeling of system and component noise and error sources in optical linear algebra processors (OLAPs) are considered, with attention to the frequency-multiplexed OLAP. General expressions are obtained for the output produced as a function of various component errors and noise. A digital simulator for this model is discussed.

  9. First principles study of the optical contrast in phase change materials.

    PubMed

    Caravati, S; Bernasconi, M; Parrinello, M

    2010-08-11

    We study from first principles the optical properties of the phase change materials Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) (GST), GeTe and Sb(2)Te(3) in the crystalline phase and in realistic models of the amorphous phase generated by quenching from the melt in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The calculations reproduce the strong optical contrast between the crystalline and amorphous phases measured experimentally and exploited in optical data storage. It is demonstrated that the optical contrast is due to a change in the optical matrix elements across the phase change in all the compounds. It is concluded that the reduction of the optical matrix elements in the amorphous phases is due to angular disorder in p-bonding which dominates the amorphous network in agreement with previous proposals (Huang and Robertson 2010 Phys. Rev. B 81 081204) based on calculations on crystalline models.

  10. Modeling of coherent ultrafast magneto-optical experiments: Light-induced molecular mean-field model

    SciTech Connect

    Hinschberger, Y.; Hervieux, P.-A.

    2015-12-28

    We present calculations which aim to describe coherent ultrafast magneto-optical effects observed in time-resolved pump-probe experiments. Our approach is based on a nonlinear semi-classical Drude-Voigt model and is used to interpret experiments performed on nickel ferromagnetic thin film. Within this framework, a phenomenological light-induced coherent molecular mean-field depending on the polarizations of the pump and probe pulses is proposed whose microscopic origin is related to a spin-orbit coupling involving the electron spins of the material sample and the electric field of the laser pulses. Theoretical predictions are compared to available experimental data. The model successfully reproduces the observed experimental trends and gives meaningful insight into the understanding of magneto-optical rotation behavior in the ultrafast regime. Theoretical predictions for further experimental studies are also proposed.

  11. Parameterized modeling and estimation of spatially varying optical blur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpkins, Jonathan D.; Stevenson, Robert L.

    2015-02-01

    Optical blur can display significant spatial variation across the image plane, even for constant camera settings and object depth. Existing solutions to represent this spatially varying blur requires a dense sampling of blur kernels across the image, where each kernel is defined independent of the neighboring kernels. This approach requires a large amount of data collection, and the estimation of the kernels is not as robust as if it were possible to incorporate knowledge of the relationship between adjacent kernels. A novel parameterized model is presented which relates the blur kernels at different locations across the image plane. The model is motivated by well-established optical models, including the Seidel aberration model. It is demonstrated that the proposed model can unify a set of hundreds of blur kernel observations across the image plane under a single 10-parameter model, and the accuracy of the model is demonstrated with simulations and measurement data collected by two separate research groups.

  12. Cost Modeling for Space Optical Telescope Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Henrichs, Todd; Luedtke, Alexander; West, Miranda

    2011-01-01

    Parametric cost models are used to plan missions, compare concepts and justify technology investments. This paper reviews an on-going effort to develop cost modes for space telescopes. This paper summarizes the methodology used to develop cost models and documents how changes to the database have changed previously published preliminary cost models. While the cost models are evolving, the previously published findings remain valid: it costs less per square meter of collecting aperture to build a large telescope than a small telescope; technology development as a function of time reduces cost; and lower areal density telescopes cost more than more massive telescopes.

  13. Optical Second Harmonic Generation Studies of Electrochemical Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Gabor

    Optical second harmonic generation (SHG) is an intrinsically surface sensitive tool that can be used to probe a wide variety of surface processes. In this work, SHG is employed to study the surface behavior of three polycrystalline electrodes, Cu, Ni, and brass, in an electrochemical environment. For the Cu electrode, SHG is used to examine the surface during oxidation and reduction in halide and non -halide electrolytes. The optical data indicate the probable formation of previously undetected small, resonant Cu clusters which are stabilized by Cu-halide crystallites on the electrode surface. The surface charge dependence of SHG is explored at a polycrystalline Ni electrode in the absence of faradaic reactions. The resulting correlation between surface charge and SHG indicates that in an electrochemical environment, the DC field activated contribution to the second order susceptibility plays the dominant role in SHG from Ni. Also with the polycrystalline Ni electrode, the behavior of the SH signal during the electrodeposition of Ag on the Ni surface is examined. The analysis of the optical data in conjunction with a diffusion limited Ag island growth model indicates that the SH signal experiences an electromagnetic enhancement on the Ni surface as a result of the Ag islands. The charge dependence of the SH signal is examined on a polycrystalline alpha-brass electrode in the absence of faradaic reactions, with two incident wavelengths. The experiments show that, as is the case with Cu, SHG from brass may (depending on the incident wavelength) also involve an interband transition and can be affected by a charge dependent Stark shift of the interband transition threshold. The brass electrode is also examined with SHG in a potential region where the selective dissolution of the surface Zn sites is known to occur. By using a layer-by-layer reordering model of the dissolving surface, the electrochemical data is correlated with simultaneously obtained optical SHG data to

  14. Representing the observer in electro-optical target acquisition models.

    PubMed

    Vollmerhausen, Richard H

    2009-09-28

    Electro-optical target acquisition models predict the probability that a human observer recognizes or identifies a target. To accurately model targeting performance, the impact of imager blur and noise on human vision must be quantified. In the most widely used target acquisition models, human vision is treated as a "black box" that is characterized by its signal transfer response and detection thresholds. This paper describes an engineering model of observer vision. Characteristics of the observer model are compared to psychophysical data. This paper also describes how to integrate the observer model into both reflected light and thermal sensor models. PMID:19907512

  15. Simulating the Wess-Zumino Supersymmetry Model in Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Yue; Yang Kun

    2010-10-08

    We study a cold atom-molecule mixture in two-dimensional optical lattices. We show that, by fine-tuning the atomic and molecular interactions, the Wess-Zumino supersymmetry (SUSY) model in 2+1 dimensions emerges in the low-energy limit and can be simulated in such mixtures. At zero temperature, SUSY is not spontaneously broken, which implies identical relativistic dispersions of the atom and its superpartner, a bosonic diatom molecule. This defining signature of SUSY can be probed by single-particle spectroscopies. Thermal breaking of SUSY at a finite temperature is accompanied by a thermal Goldstone fermion, i.e., phonino excitation. This and other signatures of broken SUSY can also be probed experimentally.

  16. Study on optical measurement conditions for noninvasive blood glucose sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kexin; Chen, Wenliang; Jiang, Jingying; Qiu, Qingjun

    2004-05-01

    Utilizing Near-infrared Spectroscopy for non-invasive glucose concentration sensing has been a focusing topic in biomedical optics applications. In this paper study on measuring conditions of spectroscopy on human body is carried out and a series of experiments on glucose concentration sensing are conducted. First, Monte Carlo method is applied to simulate and calculate photons" penetration depth within skin tissues at 1600 nm. The simulation results indicate that applying our designed optical probe, the detected photons can penetrate epidermis of the palm and meet the glucose sensing requirements within the dermis. Second, we analyze the influence of the measured position variations and the contact pressure between the optical fiber probe and the measured position on the measured spectrum during spectroscopic measurement of a human body. And, a measurement conditions reproduction system is introduced to enhance the measurement repeatability. Furthermore, through a series of transmittance experiments on glucose aqueous solutions sensing from simple to complex we found that though some absorption variation information of glucose can be obtained from measurements using NIR spectroscopy, while under the same measuring conditions and with the same modeling method, choices toward measured components reduce when complication degree of components increases, and this causes a decreased prediction accuracy. Finally, OGTT experiments were performed, and a PLS (Partial Least Square) mathematical model for a single experiment was built. We can easily get a prediction expressed as RMSEP (Root Mean Square Error of Prediction) with a value of 0.5-0.8mmol/dl. But the model"s extended application and reliability need more investigation.

  17. Surface diffusion studies by optical diffraction techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.D.

    1992-11-01

    The newly developed optical techniques have been combined with either second harmonic (SH) diffraction or linear diffraction off a monolayer adsorbate grating for surface diffusion measurement. Anisotropy of surface diffusion of CO on Ni(l10) was used as a demonstration for the second harmonic dim reaction method. The linear diffraction method, which possesses a much higher sensitivity than the SH diffraction method, was employed to study the effect of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction on CO diffusion on Ni(l10) surface. Results showed that only the short range direct CO-CO orbital overlapping interaction influences CO diffusion but not the long range dipole-dipole and CO-NI-CO interactions. Effects of impurities and defects on surface diffusion were further explored by using linear diffraction method on CO/Ni(110) system. It was found that a few percent S impurity can alter the CO diffusion barrier height to a much higher value through changing the Ni(110) surface. The point defects of Ni(l10) surface seem to speed up CO diffusion significantly. A mechanism with long jumps over multiple lattice distance initiated by CO filled vacancy is proposed to explain the observed defect effect.

  18. Optical neural stimulation modeling on degenerative neocortical neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zverev, M.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.; Salas-García, I.; Arce-Diego, J. L.

    2015-07-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases usually appear at advanced age. Medical advances make people live longer and as a consequence, the number of neurodegenerative diseases continuously grows. There is still no cure for these diseases, but several brain stimulation techniques have been proposed to improve patients' condition. One of them is Optical Neural Stimulation (ONS), which is based on the application of optical radiation over specific brain regions. The outer cerebral zones can be noninvasively stimulated, without the common drawbacks associated to surgical procedures. This work focuses on the analysis of ONS effects in stimulated neurons to determine their influence in neuronal activity. For this purpose a neural network model has been employed. The results show the neural network behavior when the stimulation is provided by means of different optical radiation sources and constitute a first approach to adjust the optical light source parameters to stimulate specific neocortical areas.

  19. Classification of scalar and dyadic nonlocal optical response models.

    PubMed

    Wubs, M

    2015-11-30

    Nonlocal optical response is one of the emerging effects on the nanoscale for particles made of metals or doped semiconductors. Here we classify and compare both scalar and tensorial nonlocal response models. In the latter case the nonlocality can stem from either the longitudinal response, the transverse response, or both. In phenomenological scalar models the nonlocal response is described as a smearing out of the commonly assumed infinitely localized response, as characterized by a distribution with a finite width. Here we calculate explicitly whether and how tensorial models, such as the hydrodynamic Drude model and generalized nonlocal optical response theory, follow this phenomenological description. We find considerable differences, for example that nonlocal response functions, in contrast to simple distributions, assume negative and complex values. Moreover, nonlocal response regularizes some but not all diverging optical near fields. We identify the scalar model that comes closest to the hydrodynamic model. Interestingly, for the hydrodynamic Drude model we find that actually only one third (1/3) of the free-electron response is smeared out nonlocally. In that sense, nonlocal response is stronger for transverse and scalar nonlocal response models, where the smeared-out fractions are 2/3 and 3/3, respectively. The latter two models seem to predict novel plasmonic resonances also below the plasma frequency, in contrast to the hydrodynamic model that predicts standing pressure waves only above the plasma frequency. PMID:26698757

  20. A population-competition model for analyzing transverse optical patterns including optical control and structural anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, Y. C.; Chan, Chris K. P.; Luk, M. H.; Kwong, N. H.; Leung, P. T.; Binder, R.; Schumacher, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    We present a detailed study of a low-dimensional population-competition (PC) model suitable for analysis of the dynamics of certain modulational instability patterns in extended systems. The model is applied to analyze the transverse optical exciton-polariton patterns in semiconductor quantum well microcavities. It is shown that, despite its simplicity, the PC model describes quite well the competitions among various two-spot and hexagonal patterns when four physical parameters, representing density saturation, hexagon stabilization, anisotropy, and switching beam intensity, are varied. The combined effects of the last three parameters are given detailed considerations here. Although the model is developed in the context of semiconductor polariton patterns, its equations have more general applicability, and the results obtained here may benefit the investigation of other pattern-forming systems. The simplicity of the PC model allows us to organize all steady state solutions in a parameter space ‘phase diagram’. Each region in the phase diagram is characterized by the number and type of solutions. The main numerical task is to compute inter-region boundary surfaces, where some steady states either appear, disappear, or change their stability status. The singularity types of the boundary points, given by Catastrophe theory, are shown to provide a simple geometric overview of the boundary surfaces. With all stable and unstable steady states and the phase boundaries delimited and characterized, we have attained a comprehensive understanding of the structure of the four-parameter phase diagram. We analyze this rich structure in detail and show that it provides a transparent and organized interpretation of competitions among various patterns built on the hexagonal state space.

  1. Optic ataxia as a model to investigate the role of the posterior parietal cortex in visually guided action: evidence from studies of patient M.H.

    PubMed Central

    Cavina-Pratesi, Cristiana; Connolly, Jason D.; Milner, A. David

    2013-01-01

    Optic ataxia is a neuropsychological disorder that affects the ability to interact with objects presented in the visual modality following either unilateral or bilateral lesions of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC). Patients with optic ataxia fail to reach accurately for objects, particularly when they are presented in peripheral vision. The present review will focus on a series of experiments performed on patient M.H. Following a lesion restricted largely to the left PPC, he developed mis-reaching behavior when using his contralesional right arm for movements directed toward the contralesional (right) visual half-field. Given the clear-cut specificity of this patient's deficit, whereby reaching actions are essentially spared when executed toward his ipsilateral space or when using his left arm, M.H. provides a valuable “experiment of nature” for investigating the role of the PPC in performing different visually guided actions. In order to address this, we used kinematic measurement techniques to investigate M.H.'s reaching and grasping behavior in various tasks. Our experiments support the idea that optic ataxia is highly function-specific: it affects a specific sub-category of visually guided actions (reaching but not grasping), regardless of their specific end goal (both reaching toward an object and reaching to avoid an obstacle); and finally, is independent of the limb used to perform the action (whether the arm or the leg). Critically, these results are congruent with recent functional MRI experiments in neurologically intact subjects which suggest that the PPC is organized in a function-specific, rather than effector-specific, manner with different sub-portions of its mantle devoted to guiding actions according to their specific end-goal (reaching, grasping, or looking), rather than according to the effector used to perform them (leg, arm, hand, or eyes). PMID:23882200

  2. Model of optical scatter from microimpacts on the Hubble Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowell, L. B.

    1993-01-01

    The investigation and modelling of optical scatter from damaged or contaminated mirrors is of interest to those who wish to estimate the working life cycle of an optical system. A space born telescope faces a threat to its survival from naturally occurring micrometeoroids and man-made debris. High velocity, in the range of 4 to 14 km/s, impacts of small particles, in the range of 1 to 100 microns, will produce small craters on the impacted surface. These microcraters will typically have a size range of 3 to 300 microns for debris impacts and 6 to 600 microns for micrometeoroid impacts. If the microcraters accumulate on a telescope mirror, there will be an increase in optical scatter and a loss of image resolution. The micrometeoroid model of Cour-Palais and the orbital debris model of Kessler have been encoded in a computer program (SPENV) by the author. The output from this program has been matched with previous calculations and compared with impact data on the LDEF satellite. Subsequent work has been done to marry this computer program with an algorithm to compute optical scatter. The optical scatter algorithm employs Mie theory of scatter from small particles.

  3. Theoretical and experimental studies of optically pumped molecular gas lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratanavis, Amarin

    Optically pumped molecular gas lasers based on vibrational-rotational transitions in the infrared spectral region were studied experimentally and theoretically. A model was developed to predict the performance of such lasers and explore their potentials for energy and power scaling. This rate equation model was applied to explore the performance of a second-overtone (pulsed) and a first-overtone (CW) pumped HBr laser. Experimental improvements concerning temperature spectral tuning and frequency stabilization of a Nd:YAG laser that pumped HBr were accomplished. Lasing at 4 microns was demonstrated from such a system. We identified acetylene and hydrogen cyanide as potential laser gases that can be pumped with lasers emitting in the attractive telecommunication C band region at about 1.5 microns. Estimations and fluorescence measurements suggest the possibility of lasing in the 3 micron region. Lasing was demonstrated for the first time with a 5 ns pump pulse from an optical parametric oscillator using traditional cavities. The first gas filled hollow fiber laser based on population inversion was demonstrated with C2H2 and emission in the 3 micron region was observed. An analytical model indicates the possibility of CW lasing with small Stokes shift in both C2H 2 and HCN.

  4. Optic flow representation in the optic lobes of Diptera: modeling innervation matrices onto collators and their evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Douglass, J K; Strausfeld, N J

    2000-09-01

    A network model of optic flow processing, based on physiological and anatomical features of motion-processing neurons, is used to investigate the role of small-field motion detectors emulating T5 cells in producing optic flow selective properties in wide-field collator neurons. The imposition of different connectivities can mimic variations observed in comparative studies of lobula plate architecture across the Diptera. The results identify two features that are crucial for optic flow selectivity: the broadness of the spatial patterns of synaptic connections from motion detectors to collators, and the relative contributions of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic outputs. If these two aspects of the innervation matrix are balanced appropriately, the network's sensitivity to perturbations in physiological properties of the small-field motion detectors is dramatically reduced, suggesting that sensory systems can evolve robust mechanisms that do not rely upon precise control of network parameters. These results also suggest that alternative lobula plate architectures observed in insects are consistent in allowing optic flow selective properties in wide-field neurons. The implications for the evolution of optic flow selective neurons are discussed.

  5. Toward a Calibration-Free Model for Optical Remote Sensing of Soil Moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, M.; Jones, S. B.; Tuller, M.

    2015-12-01

    A recently developed physically-based model to retrieve soil moisture from optical images was evaluated in this study. The model was derived based on a simple two-flux radiative transfer model describing diffuse reflectance from a uniform, optically thick, absorbing and scattering medium. The model exhibited an unprecedented linear relationship between a novel transformed reflectance and the surface soil moisture in the shortwave infrared bands such as bands 6 and 7 of Landsat 8. Accuracy of the model was tested based on laboratory-measured spectral reflectance data of a broad range of Arizona soils in the optical domain (400 - 2500 nm). Additionally, the original model was further simplified by combining bands 6 and 7 data which reduced the number of model parameters from two to one. The remaining physically-significant parameter was directly measured for the Arizona soils, exhibiting little variability among those varied soil textures. New findings in this study significantly advance this new method toward its application without the need for ground-based model calibration. Further study of potentials and limitations of this model for large-scale application using optical satellite data (e.g. Landsat, MODIS) remains a goal of future research.

  6. Research and development optical deep space antenna sizing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wonica, D.

    1994-01-01

    Results from this study provide a basis for the selection of an aperture size appropriate for a research and development ground-based receiver for deep space optical communications. Currently achievable or near-term realizable hardware performance capabilities for both a spacecraft optical terminal and a ground terminal were used as input parameters to the analysis. Links were analyzed using OPTI, our optical link analysis program. Near-term planned and current missions were surveyed and categorized by data rate and telecommunications-subsystems prime power consumption. The spacecraft optical-terminal transmitter power was selected by matching these (RF) data rates and prime power requirements and by applying power efficiencies suitable to an optical communications subsystem. The study was baselined on a Mars mission. Results are displayed as required ground aperture size for given spacecraft transmitter aperture size, parametrized by data rate, transmit optical power, and wavelength.

  7. Optical-based spectral modeling of infrared focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouzali, Salima; Lefebvre, Sidonie; Rommeluère, Sylvain; Ferrec, Yann; Primot, Jérôme

    2016-07-01

    We adopt an optical approach in order to model and predict the spectral signature of an infrared focal plane array. The modeling is based on a multilayer description of the structure and considers a one-dimensional propagation. It provides a better understanding of the physical phenomena occurring within the pixels, which is useful to perform radiometric measurements, as well as to reliably predict the spectral sensitivity of the detector. An exhaustive model is presented, covering the total spectral range of the pixel response. A heuristic model is also described, depicting a complementary approach that separates the different optical phenomena inside the pixel structure. Promising results are presented, validating the models through comparison with experimental results. Finally, advantages and limitations of this approach are discussed.

  8. Optical studies of meteors at Mount Hopkins Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weekes, T. C.; Williams, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    The 10-m optical reflector and an array of phototubes are used to extend the optical measurements beyond the present limit achieved by the Vidicon system. The first detection of optical meteors with M sub v = + 12 is reported. It is hoped that this system can be used to determine intermediate points in the meteor frequency mass curve for sporadic meteors and to study in detail the faint components of meteor showers. Preliminary observations made on three nights in September 1974 are presented.

  9. Histopathologic studies of ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, D L; Kerrison, J B; Green, W R

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To define the histopathologic features of eyes in which a pathologic diagnosis of ischemic optic neuropathy had been made in the years 1951 through 1998. METHODS: The following data were documented: age of patient, race, sex, source of tissue, cause of death, clinical history, interval from loss of vision to death, enucleation, exenteration, and biopsy. The histopathologic criteria for diagnosis of ischemic optic neuropathy were the presence of localized ischemic edema, cavernous degeneration, or an area of atrophy located superior or inferior in the optic nerve. Cases with history of abrupt loss of vision were combined with reports from the literature to construct a time table of histopathologic features and associated conditions. RESULTS: Ischemic optic neuropathy was present in 193 eyes. There were 88 females and 65 males. The average age was 71.6 years. Ischemic edema without (early) and with (later) gitter macrophages was present in 26 (13.5%). Cavernous degeneration was present in 69 nerves (36%). Mucopolysaccharide (MPS) was present in 37 cavernous lesions 1 month or longer after loss of vision. Cavernous lesions were seen in 3 eyes in which peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer hemorrhage had been observed prior to death. Atrophic lesions, the most common pattern, were observed in 133 optic nerves (66.8%). More than 1 ischemic lesion was seen in 38 optic nerves (19.7%). Bilateral ischemic lesions were seen in 50 (35.2%) of 142 paired eyes. CONCLUSIONS: Ischemic optic nerve lesions are initially acellular and later show macrophage infiltration. Cavernous lesions with MPS are present 4 weeks or longer after vision loss. The location of MPS posteriorly and along the internal margin suggests that MPS is produced at the edges of lesions. Progressive vision loss in ischemic optic neuropathy may be secondary to compression of intact nerve from ischemic edema and cavernous swelling, or a second ischemic lesion. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5

  10. Numerical Modeling and Analysis of Optical Response of Electro-optic Modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, Y

    2004-04-14

    This paper presents an analysis of a LiNbO{sub 3} electro-optic modulator using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique, and also a new and efficient multiresolution time-domain technique for fast and accurate modeling of photonic devices. The electromagnetic fields computed by FDTD are coupled to standard electro-optic relations that characterize electro-optic interactions. This novel approach to LiNbO{sub 3} electro-optic modulators using a coupled FDTD technique allows for previously unattainable investigations into device operating bandwidth and data transmission speed. On the other hand, the proposed multiresolution approach presented in this paper solves Maxwell's Equations on nonuniform self-adaptive grids, obtained by applying wavelet transforms followed by hard thresholding. The developed technique is employed to simulate a coplanar waveguide CPW, which represents an electro-optic modulator. Different numerical examples are presented showing more than 75% CPU-time reduction, while maintaining the same degree of accuracy of standard FDTD techniques.

  11. ABAREX: A neutron spherical optical-statistical model code

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, R.D.

    1992-06-01

    The spherical optical-statistical model is briefly reviewed and the capabilities of the neutron scattering code, ABAREX, are presented. Input files for ten examples, in which neutrons are scattered by various nuclei, are given and the output of each run is discussed in detail.

  12. Multipartite model of evaporative cooling in optical dipole traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Matthew J.; Fertig, Chad

    2015-02-01

    We propose and study a model of forced evaporation of atomic clouds in crossed-beam optical dipole traps that explicitly includes the growth of a population in the "wings" of the trap and its subsequent impact on dimple temperature and density. It has long been surmised that a large wing population is an impediment to the efficient production of Bose-Einstein condensates in crossed-beam traps. Understanding the effect of the wings is particularly important for λ =1.06 μ m traps, for which a large ratio of Rayleigh range to beam waist results in wings that are large in volume and extend far from the dimple. Key ingredients to our model's realism are (1) our explicit treatment of the nonthermal, time-dependent energy distribution of wing atoms in the full anharmonic potential and (2) our accurate estimations of transition rates among dimple, wing, and free-atom populations, obtained with Monte Carlo simulations of atomic trajectories. We apply our model to trap configurations in which neither, one, or both of the wing potentials are made unbound by applying a "tipping" gradient. We find that forced evaporation in a trap with two bound wing potentials produces a large wing population which can collisionally heat the dimple so strongly as to preclude reaching quantum degeneracy. Evaporation in a trap with one unbound wing, such as that made by crossing one vertical beam and one horizontal beam, also leads to a persistent wing population which dramatically degrades the evaporation process. However, a trap with both wings tilted so as to be just unbound enjoys a nearly complete recovery of efficient evaporation. By introducing to our physical model an ad hoc, tunable escape channel for wing atoms, we study the effect of partially filled wings, finding that a wing population caused by single-beam potentials can drastically slow down evaporative cooling and increase the sensitivity to the choice of η .

  13. Mapping of Total Suspended Solid from Inherent Optical Properties using Optical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syahreza, S.; Beh, B. C.; Lim, H. S.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Abdullah, K.

    2011-03-01

    Environmental monitoring through the method of traditional ship sampling is time consuming and requires a high survey cost. An investigation has been conducted to test the feasibility of using OceanSat-2 for estimating Total Suspended Solid (TSS) in the coastal waters of Penang Island, Malaysia. The proposed algorithm is based on the reflectance model that is a function of the inherent optical properties of water, which can be related to its constituent's concentrations. Water samples were collected simultaneously with the satellite image acquisition and later analyzed in the laboratory. Water sample's locations were determined by using a handheld GPS. A simple atmospheric correction, namely darkest pixel technique was performed in this study. The pixel with the lowest value for each band was selected as the darkest pixel. The digital numbers for each band corresponding to the sea-truth locations were extracted and then converted into radiance values and reflectance values. The accuracies of algorithms was also investigated based on the observations of correlation coefficient (R) and root-mean-square deviations (RMS) with the sea-truth data. This algorithm was then used to map the TSS concentration over Penang, Malaysia. This study indicates that TSS mapping can be carried out using remote sensing technique of the satellite digital photography system over Penang, Malaysia.

  14. Optical laboratory solution and error model simulation of a linear time-varying finite element equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, B. K.; Casasent, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    The use of simplified error models to accurately simulate and evaluate the performance of an optical linear-algebra processor is described. The optical architecture used to perform banded matrix-vector products is reviewed, along with a linear dynamic finite-element case study. The laboratory hardware and ac-modulation technique used are presented. The individual processor error-source models and their simulator implementation are detailed. Several significant simplifications are introduced to ease the computational requirements and complexity of the simulations. The error models are verified with a laboratory implementation of the processor, and are used to evaluate its potential performance.

  15. Fast and Efficient Dynamic WDM Semiconductor Optical Amplifier Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathlouthi, Walid; Lemieux, Pascal; Salsi, Massimiliano; Vannucci, Armando; Bononi, Alberto; Rusch, Leslie A.

    2006-11-01

    A novel state-variable model for semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) that is amenable to block diagram implementation of wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) signals and fast execution times is presented. The novel model is called the reservoir model, in analogy with similar block-oriented models for Raman and erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs). A procedure is proposed to extract the needed reservoir model parameters from the parameters of a detailed and accurate space-resolved SOA model due to Connelly, which was extended to cope with the time-resolved gain transient analysis. Several variations of the reservoir model are considered with increasing complexity, which allow the accurate inclusion of scattering losses and gain saturation induced by amplified spontaneous emission. It is shown that at comparable accuracy, the reservoir model can be 20 times faster than the Connelly model in single-channel operation; much more significant time savings are expected for WDM operation. The model neglects intraband SOA phenomena and is thus limited to modulation rates per channel not exceeding 10 Gb/s. The SOA reservoir model provides a unique tool with reasonably short computation times for a reliable analysis of gain transients in WDM optical networks with complex topologies.

  16. Optical model and calibration of a sun tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Sergei N.; Samokhvalov, Ignatii V.; Cheong, Hai Du; Kim, Dukhyeon

    2016-09-01

    Sun trackers are widely used to investigate scattering and absorption of solar radiation in the Earth's atmosphere. We present a method for optimization of the optical altazimuth sun tracker model with output radiation direction aligned with the axis of a stationary spectrometer. The method solves the problem of stability loss in tracker pointing at the Sun near the zenith. An optimal method for tracker calibration at the measurement site is proposed in the present work. A method of moving calibration is suggested for mobile applications in the presence of large temperature differences and errors in the alignment of the optical system of the tracker.

  17. Optical model of transient light scattering in ferroelectric liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Loiko, V. A. Konkolovich, A. V.; Miskevich, A. A.

    2009-03-15

    A static optical model is developed for the effect of field-induced transient scattering on coherent light transmission through ferroelectric liquid crystals. Scattering processes are described by introducing an optically anisotropic medium containing scatterers (transient domains). The results presented in the paper are obtained for a plane parallel layer of ferroelectric liquid crystals with a planar helicoidal structure under normal illumination with a linearly polarized plane wave. An analysis is presented of the coherent transmittance of the layer in static applied electric fields.

  18. A theoretical study of optical contact of vitreous silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, T. D.

    1972-01-01

    Optical contact has been proposed as a method of bonding quartz parts of the Stanford relativity satellite. The theory of the van der Waals force is outlined and applied to the problem of optical contact. The effect of various contaminations is discussed and a program of experimentation for further study of the problem is presented.

  19. Theoretical study of Fourier-transform acousto-optic imaging.

    PubMed

    Barjean, Kinia; Ramaz, François; Tualle, Jean-Michel

    2016-05-01

    We propose a full theoretical study of Fourier-transform acousto-optic imaging, which we recently introduced and experimentally assessed in [Opt. Lett.40, 705-708 (2015)OPLEDP0146-959210.1364/OL.40.000705] as an alternative to achieve axial resolution in acousto-optic imaging with a higher signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:27140883

  20. Computational Modeling of Ultrafast Pulse Propagation in Nonlinear Optical Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, Peter M.; Agrawal, Govind P.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    There is an emerging technology of photonic (or optoelectronic) integrated circuits (PICs or OEICs). In PICs, optical and electronic components are grown together on the same chip. rib build such devices and subsystems, one needs to model the entire chip. Accurate computer modeling of electromagnetic wave propagation in semiconductors is necessary for the successful development of PICs. More specifically, these computer codes would enable the modeling of such devices, including their subsystems, such as semiconductor lasers and semiconductor amplifiers in which there is femtosecond pulse propagation. Here, the computer simulations are made by solving the full vector, nonlinear, Maxwell's equations, coupled with the semiconductor Bloch equations, without any approximations. The carrier is retained in the description of the optical pulse, (i.e. the envelope approximation is not made in the Maxwell's equations), and the rotating wave approximation is not made in the Bloch equations. These coupled equations are solved to simulate the propagation of femtosecond optical pulses in semiconductor materials. The simulations describe the dynamics of the optical pulses, as well as the interband and intraband.

  1. Study of contrasting properties of nanoparticles for optical diffuse spectroscopy problems

    SciTech Connect

    Krainov, A D; Agrba, P D; Sergeeva, E A; Kirillin, M Yu; Zabotnov, S V

    2014-08-31

    The results of experimental studies of the optical properties of gold and silicon nanoparticle suspensions and their use as contrasting agents in optical diffusion spectroscopy (ODS) are presented. The optical properties of nanoparticle suspensions and model media were reconstructed based on the data of spectrophotometry measurements in the range 500 – 1100 nm using an original theoretical model. The experimental studies using the ODS system were performed in a liquid phantom on the basis of the solution of lipofundin and Indian ink, modelling the optical properties of a real biotissue. The enhanced contrast of images, obtained using the ODS method in the experiments with the chosen suspensions of nanoparticles confirm the assumption about high potentialities of using them as contrast agents for the ODS problems. (laser biophotonics)

  2. Optical character recognition of handwritten Arabic using hidden Markov models

    SciTech Connect

    Aulama, Mohannad M.; Natsheh, Asem M.; Abandah, Gheith A.; Olama, Mohammed M

    2011-01-01

    The problem of optical character recognition (OCR) of handwritten Arabic has not received a satisfactory solution yet. In this paper, an Arabic OCR algorithm is developed based on Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) combined with the Viterbi algorithm, which results in an improved and more robust recognition of characters at the sub-word level. Integrating the HMMs represents another step of the overall OCR trends being currently researched in the literature. The proposed approach exploits the structure of characters in the Arabic language in addition to their extracted features to achieve improved recognition rates. Useful statistical information of the Arabic language is initially extracted and then used to estimate the probabilistic parameters of the mathematical HMM. A new custom implementation of the HMM is developed in this study, where the transition matrix is built based on the collected large corpus, and the emission matrix is built based on the results obtained via the extracted character features. The recognition process is triggered using the Viterbi algorithm which employs the most probable sequence of sub-words. The model was implemented to recognize the sub-word unit of Arabic text raising the recognition rate from being linked to the worst recognition rate for any character to the overall structure of the Arabic language. Numerical results show that there is a potentially large recognition improvement by using the proposed algorithms.

  3. Machine optics studies for the LHC measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzebiński, Maciej

    2014-11-01

    In this work the properties of scattered protons in the vicinity of the ATLAS Interaction Point (IP1) for various LHC optics settings are discussed. Firstly, the beam elements installed around IP1 are presented. Then the ATLAS forward detector systems: Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS (ALFA) and ATLAS Forward Protons (AFP) are described and their similarities and differences are discussed. Next, the various optics used at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are described and the beam divergence and width at the Interaction Point as well as at the ATLAS forward detectors locations are calculated. Finally, the geometric acceptance of the ATLAS forward detectors is shown and the impact of the LHC collimators on it is discussed.

  4. Steerable optical tweezers for ultracold atom studies.

    PubMed

    Roberts, K O; McKellar, T; Fekete, J; Rakonjac, A; Deb, A B; Kjærgaard, N

    2014-04-01

    We report on the implementation of an optical tweezer system for controlled transport of ultracold atoms along a narrow, static confinement channel. The tweezer system is based on high-efficiency acousto-optic deflectors and offers two-dimensional control over beam position. This opens up the possibility for tracking the transport channel when shuttling atomic clouds along it, forestalling atom spilling. Multiple clouds can be tracked independently by time-shared tweezer beams addressing individual sites in the channel. The deflectors are controlled using a multichannel direct digital synthesizer, which receives instructions on a submicrosecond time scale from a field-programmable gate array. Using the tweezer system, we demonstrate sequential binary splitting of an ultracold 87Rb cloud into 2(5) clouds.

  5. Modelling thermal parasitic load lines for an optical refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, K. W.; Shomacker, J.; Fraser, T.; Dodson, C.

    2015-12-01

    Optical refrigeration is currently the only completely solid state cooling method capable of reaching cryogenic temperatures from room temperature. Optical cooling utilizing Yb:YLF as the refrigerant crystal has resulted in temperatures lower than 123K measured via a fluorescence thermometry technique. However, to be useful as a refrigerator this cooling crystal must be attached to a sensor or other payload. The phenomenology behind laser cooling, known as anti-Stokes fluorescence, has a relatively low efficiency which makes the system level optimization and limitation of parasitic losses imperative. We propose and model a variety of potential designs for a final optical refrigerator, enclosure and thermal link; calculate conductive and radiative losses, and estimate direct fluorescence reabsorption. We generate parasitic load-lines; these curves define temperature-dependent minimum heat lift thresholds that must be achieved to generate cooling for detectors.

  6. Optical storage media data integrity studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podio, Fernando L.

    1994-01-01

    Optical disk-based information systems are being used in private industry and many Federal Government agencies for on-line and long-term storage of large quantities of data. The storage devices that are part of these systems are designed with powerful, but not unlimited, media error correction capacities. The integrity of data stored on optical disks does not only depend on the life expectancy specifications for the medium. Different factors, including handling and storage conditions, may result in an increase of medium errors in size and frequency. Monitoring the potential data degradation is crucial, especially for long term applications. Efforts are being made by the Association for Information and Image Management Technical Committee C21, Storage Devices and Applications, to specify methods for monitoring and reporting to the user medium errors detected by the storage device while writing, reading or verifying the data stored in that medium. The Computer Systems Laboratory (CSL) of the National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST) has a leadership role in the development of these standard techniques. In addition, CSL is researching other data integrity issues, including the investigation of error-resilient compression algorithms. NIST has conducted care and handling experiments on optical disk media with the objective of identifying possible causes of degradation. NIST work in data integrity and related standards activities is described.

  7. Optical, size and mass properties of mixed type aerosols in Greece and Romania as observed by synergy of lidar and sunphotometers in combination with model simulations: a case study.

    PubMed

    Papayannis, A; Nicolae, D; Kokkalis, P; Binietoglou, I; Talianu, C; Belegante, L; Tsaknakis, G; Cazacu, M M; Vetres, I; Ilic, L

    2014-12-01

    A coordinated experimental campaign aiming to study the aerosol optical, size and mass properties was organized in September 2012, in selected sites in Greece and Romania. It was based on the synergy of lidar and sunphotometers. In this paper we focus on a specific campaign period (23-24 September), where mixed type aerosols (Saharan dust, biomass burning and continental) were confined from the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) up to 4-4.5 km height. Hourly mean linear depolarization and lidar ratio values were measured inside the dust layers, ranging from 13 to 29 and from 44 to 65sr, respectively, depending on their mixing status and the corresponding air mass pathways over Greece and Romania. During this event the columnar Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) values ranged from 0.13 to 0.26 at 532 nm. The Lidar/Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) and the Polarization Lidar Photometer Networking (POLIPHON) codes were used and inter-compared with regards to the retrieved aerosol (fine and coarse spherical/spheroid) mass concentrations, showing that LIRIC generally overestimates the aerosol mass concentrations, in the case of spherical particles. For non-spherical particles the difference in the retrieved mass concentration profiles from these two codes remained smaller than ±20%. POLIPHON retrievals showed that the non-spherical particles reached concentrations of the order of 100-140 μg/m(3) over Romania compared to 50-75 μg/m(3) over Greece. Finally, the Dust Regional Atmospheric Model (DREAM) model was used to simulate the dust concentrations over the South-Eastern Europe.

  8. Comprehensive analytical model to characterize randomness in optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junhe; Gallion, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the coupled mode theory (CMT) is used to derive the corresponding stochastic differential equations (SDEs) for the modal amplitude evolution inside optical waveguides with random refractive index variations. Based on the SDEs, the ordinary differential equations (ODEs) are derived to analyze the statistics of the modal amplitudes, such as the optical power and power variations as well as the power correlation coefficients between the different modal powers. These ODEs can be solved analytically and therefore, it greatly simplifies the analysis. It is demonstrated that the ODEs for the power evolution of the modes are in excellent agreement with the Marcuse' coupled power model. The higher order statistics, such as the power variations and power correlation coefficients, which are not exactly analyzed in the Marcuse' model, are discussed afterwards. Monte-Carlo simulations are performed to demonstrate the validity of the analytical model.

  9. Numerical modelling and image reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Hamid; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Pogue, Brian W.; Gibson, Adam

    2009-01-01

    The development of diffuse optical tomography as a functional imaging modality has relied largely on the use of model-based image reconstruction. The recovery of optical parameters from boundary measurements of light propagation within tissue is inherently a difficult one, because the problem is nonlinear, ill-posed and ill-conditioned. Additionally, although the measured near-infrared signals of light transmission through tissue provide high imaging contrast, the reconstructed images suffer from poor spatial resolution due to the diffuse propagation of light in biological tissue. The application of model-based image reconstruction is reviewed in this paper, together with a numerical modelling approach to light propagation in tissue as well as generalized image reconstruction using boundary data. A comprehensive review and details of the basis for using spatial and structural prior information are also discussed, whereby the use of spectral and dual-modality systems can improve contrast and spatial resolution. PMID:19581256

  10. Geometric-optical Modeling of a Conifer Forest Canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahler, A. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research is to explore how the geometry of trees in forest stands influences the reflectance of the forest as imaged from space. Most plant canopy modeling has viewed the canopy as an assemblage of plane-parallel layers on top of a soil surface. For these models, leaf angle distribution, leaf area index, and the angular transmittance and reflectance of leaves are the primary optical and geometric parameters. Such models are now sufficiently well developed to explain most of the variance in angular reflectance measurements observed from homogeneous plant canopies. However, forest canopies as imaged by airborne and spaceborne scanners exhibit considerable variance at quite a different scale. Brightness values vary strongly from one pixel to the next primarily as a function of the number of trees they contain. At this scale, the forest canopy is nonuniform and discontinuous. This research focuses on a discrete-element, geometric-optical view of the forest canopy.

  11. Bridging the Gap between RF and Optical Patch Antenna Analysis via the Cavity Model.

    PubMed

    Unal, G S; Aksun, M I

    2015-01-01

    Although optical antennas with a variety of shapes and for a variety of applications have been proposed and studied, they are still in their infancy compared to their radio frequency (rf) counterparts. Optical antennas have mainly utilized the geometrical attributes of rf antennas rather than the analysis tools that have been the source of intuition for antenna engineers in rf. This study intends to narrow the gap of experience and intuition in the design of optical patch antennas by introducing an easy-to-understand and easy-to-implement analysis tool in rf, namely, the cavity model, into the optical regime. The importance of this approach is not only its simplicity in understanding and implementation but also its applicability to a broad class of patch antennas and, more importantly, its ability to provide the intuition needed to predict the outcome without going through the trial-and-error simulations with no or little intuitive guidance by the user. PMID:26522889

  12. Bridging the Gap between RF and Optical Patch Antenna Analysis via the Cavity Model

    PubMed Central

    Unal, G. S.; Aksun, M. I.

    2015-01-01

    Although optical antennas with a variety of shapes and for a variety of applications have been proposed and studied, they are still in their infancy compared to their radio frequency (rf) counterparts. Optical antennas have mainly utilized the geometrical attributes of rf antennas rather than the analysis tools that have been the source of intuition for antenna engineers in rf. This study intends to narrow the gap of experience and intuition in the design of optical patch antennas by introducing an easy-to-understand and easy-to-implement analysis tool in rf, namely, the cavity model, into the optical regime. The importance of this approach is not only its simplicity in understanding and implementation but also its applicability to a broad class of patch antennas and, more importantly, its ability to provide the intuition needed to predict the outcome without going through the trial-and-error simulations with no or little intuitive guidance by the user. PMID:26522889

  13. Surface properties of hard protective coatings studied by optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaglarz, Janusz; Wolska, N.; Mitura, K.; Duraj, R.; Marszalek, K. W.; El Kouari, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The paper describes optical study of SiC, C and NiC layers deposited on Si substrates by double beam ion sputtering (DBIS) method. The following optical methods: ellipsometry, bidirectional reflection distribution function (BRDF) and total integrated scattering (TIS) studies have been applied. The obtained results allowed us to determine the refractive indices, extinction coefficients and the roughness parameters of DBIS films. Also surface profiles of optical constants determined from scanning ellipsometric measurements have been presented. The power spectral density functions (PSD) of surface roughness for studied samples have been determined. The influence of the deposition technology on film topography has been discussed.

  14. Controllably Inducing and Modeling Optical Response from Graphene Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Nicholas; Naumov, Anton

    Graphene, a novel 2-dimensional sp2-hybridized allotrope of Carbon, has unique electrical and mechanical properties. While it is naturally a highly conductive zero band gap semiconductor, graphene does not exhibit optical emission. It has been shown that functionalization with oxygen-containing groups elicits an opening of band gap in graphene. In this work, we aim to induce an optical response in graphene via controlled oxidation, and then explore potential origins of its photoluminescence through mathematical modeling. We employ timed ozone treatment of initially non-fluorescent reduced graphene oxide (RGO) to produce graphene oxide (GO) with specific optical properties. Oxidized material exhibits substantial changes in the absorption spectra and a broad photoluminescence feature, centered at 532 nm, which suggests the appearance of a band gap. We then explore a number of possible mechanisms for the origin of GO photoluminescence via PM3 and ab initio calculations on a functionalized single sheet of graphene. By adjusting modeling parameters to fit experimentally obtained optical transition energies we estimate the size of the sp2 graphitic regions in GO and the arrangement of functional groups that could be responsible for the observed emission.

  15. Quantification of morphology of bacterial colonies using laser scatter measurements and solid element optical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavesley, Silas; Bayraktar, Bülent; Venkatapathi, Murugesan; Hirleman, E. Dan; Bhunia, Arun K.; Robinson, J. Paul; Hassler, Richard; Smith, Linda; Rajwa, Bartek

    2007-02-01

    Traditional biological and chemical methods for pathogen identification require complicated sample preparation for reliable results. Optical scattering technology has been used for identification of bacterial cells in suspension, but with only limited success. Our published reports have demonstrated that scattered light based identification of Listeria colonies growing on solid surfaces is feasible with proper pattern recognition tools. Recently we have extended this technique to classification of other bacterial genera including, Salmonella, Bacillus, and Vibrio. Our approach may be highly applicable to early detection and classification of pathogens in food-processing industry and in healthcare. The unique scattering patterns formed by colonies of different species are created through differences in colony microstructure (on the order of wavelength used), bulk optical properties, and the macroscopic morphology. While it is difficult to model the effect on scatter-signal patterns owing to the microstructural changes, the influence of bulk optical properties and overall shape of colonies can be modeled using geometrical optics. Our latest research shows that it is possible to model the scatter pattern of bacterial colonies using solid-element optical modeling software (TracePro), and theoretically assess changes in macro structure and bulk refractive indices. This study allows predicting the theoretical limits of resolution and sensitivity of our detection and classification methods. Moreover, quantification of changes in macro morphology and bulk refractive index provides an opportunity to study the response of colonies to various reagents and antibiotics.

  16. Time-domain model of quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers for wideband optical signals.

    PubMed

    Puris, D; Schmidt-Langhorst, C; Lüdge, K; Majer, N; Schöll, E; Petermann, K

    2012-11-19

    We present a novel theoretical time-domain model for a quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifier, that allows to simulate subpicosecond pulse propagation including power-based and phase-based effects. Static results including amplified spontaneous emission spectra, continuous wave amplification, and four-wave mixing experiments in addition to dynamic pump-probe simulations are presented for different injection currents. The model uses digital filters to describe the frequency dependent gain and microscopically calculated carrier-carrier scattering rates for the interband carrier dynamics. It can be used to calculate the propagation of multiple signals with different wavelengths or one wideband signal with high bitrate.

  17. Optical modeling of black chrome solar-selective coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, J.N.; Pettit, R.B.

    1982-07-01

    Various investigations of coating microstructure are reviewed and the results of these studies are used to develop a picture of the microstructure of black chrome films plated from the Harshaw Chromonyx bath. In this model, the black chrome film is composed of roughly spherical particles which may tend to cluster together. These particles in turn are composed of small crystallites of metallic chrome and various oxides of chrome. The film void volume fraction appears to be greater than or equal to 0.6. The microstructural picture has been idealized to facilitate calculations of the spectral reflectance for films deposited onto nickel substrates and for freestanding or stripped films. In the idealized model, the metallic chromium is assumed to be in the form of spherical crystallites with concentric shells of Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and the crystallite volume fraction is assumed to increase with depth into the film. Various experimental data are utilized to define film thickness, average volume fraction of Cr + Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and volume ratio of Cr to Cr + Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Both the Maxwell-Garnett (MG) and the Bruggeman effective medium theories for the dielectric constant of a composite media are reviewed. The extension of the MG theory to high inclusion volume fractions is discussed. Various forms of the MG theory and the Bruggeman theory are then utilized in reflectance calculations for both regular and stripped films.The results indicate that the MG formalism provides the best overall description of the optical response of black chrome films. Both model and experiment show that the solar absorptance initially decreases slowly as the amount of Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ increases; however a rapid decrease occurs when the Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ content passes 70 vol %.

  18. Studies of nondegenerate, quasi-phase-matched optical parametric amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2004-03-18

    We have performed extensive numerical studies of quasi-phase-matched optical parametric amplification with the aim to improve its nondegenerate spectral bandwidth. Our multi-section fan-out design calculations indicate a 35-fold increase in spectral bandwidth.

  19. Computational modeling of femtosecond optical solitons from Maxwell's equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorjian, Peter M.; Taflove, Allen; Joseph, Rose M.; Hagness, Susan C.

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm is developed that permits the direct time integration of full-vector nonlinear Maxwell's equations. This capability permits the modeling of both linear and nonlinear instantaneous and dispersive effects in the electric polarization in material media. The modeling of the optical carrier is retained. The fundamental innovation is to notice that it is possible to treat the linear and nonlinear convolution integrals, which describe the dispersion, as new dependent variables. A coupled system of nonlinear second-order ordinary differential equations can then be derived for the linear and nonlinear convolution integrals, by differentiating them in the time domain. These equations, together with Maxwell's equations, are solved to determine the electromagnetic fields in nonlinear dispersive media. Results are presented of calculations in one dimension of the propagation and collision of femtosecond electromagnetic solitons that retain the optical carrier, taking into account as the Kerr and Raman interactions.

  20. Analogical optical modeling of the asymmetric lateral coherence of betatron radiation.

    PubMed

    Paroli, B; Chiadroni, E; Ferrario, M; Potenza, M A C

    2015-11-16

    By exploiting analogical optical modeling of the radiation emitted by ultrarelativistic electrons undergoing betatron oscillations, we demonstrate peculiar properties of the spatial coherence through an interferometric method reminiscent of the classical Young's double slit experiment. The expected effects due to the curved trajectory and the broadband emission are accurately reproduced. We show that by properly scaling the fundamental parameters for the wavelength, analogical optical modeling of betatron emission can be realized in many cases of broad interest. Applications to study the feasibility of future experiments and to the characterization of beam diagnostics tools are described.

  1. Optical spectroscopy study of Weyl Semimetal NbP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jeremy; Jiang, Yuxuan; Dun, Zhiling; Zhou, Haidong; Smirnov, Dmitry; Jiang, Zhigang

    Weyl semimetals have attracted much interest lately because of its unique band structure, where conduction band and valence band touch at discrete points. Here, we report on optical spectroscopy study of Weyl semimetal NbP, seeking evidence for the existence of Weyl fermions. Specifically, using Raman spectroscopy we investigate the anisotropic response of Raman-active phonon modes in NbP and compare with Quantum Espresso simulations. Using magneto-infrared spectroscopy in a high magnetic field up to 17.5T, we observe several Landau level transitions and compare with the theoretical model of three-dimensional massless Dirac/Weyl fermions. By combining our data with low-temperature magneto-transport measurement, the magnetic field dispersion of Landau levels in NbP is obtained.

  2. Accommodating volume-constant age-dependent optical (AVOCADO) model of the crystalline GRIN lens

    PubMed Central

    Sheil, Conor J.; Goncharov, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to introduce a new age-dependent model of the human lens with two GRIN power distributions (axial and radial) that allow decoupling of its refractive power and axial optical path length. The aspect ratio of the lens core can be held constant under accommodation, as well as the lens volume by varying the asphericity of the lens external surfaces. The spherical aberration calculated by exact raytracing is shown to be in line with experimental data. The proposed model is compared to previous GRIN models from the literature, and it is concluded that the features of the new model will be useful for GRIN reconstruction in future experimental studies; in particular, studies of the accommodation-dependent properties of the ageing human eye. A proposed logarithmic model of the lens core enables decoupling of three fundamental optical characteristics of the lens, namely axial optical path length, optical power and third-order spherical aberration, without changing the external shape of the lens. Conversely, the near-surface GRIN structure conforms to the external shape of the lens, which is necessary for accommodation modelling. PMID:27231637

  3. Accommodating volume-constant age-dependent optical (AVOCADO) model of the crystalline GRIN lens.

    PubMed

    Sheil, Conor J; Goncharov, Alexander V

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to introduce a new age-dependent model of the human lens with two GRIN power distributions (axial and radial) that allow decoupling of its refractive power and axial optical path length. The aspect ratio of the lens core can be held constant under accommodation, as well as the lens volume by varying the asphericity of the lens external surfaces. The spherical aberration calculated by exact raytracing is shown to be in line with experimental data. The proposed model is compared to previous GRIN models from the literature, and it is concluded that the features of the new model will be useful for GRIN reconstruction in future experimental studies; in particular, studies of the accommodation-dependent properties of the ageing human eye. A proposed logarithmic model of the lens core enables decoupling of three fundamental optical characteristics of the lens, namely axial optical path length, optical power and third-order spherical aberration, without changing the external shape of the lens. Conversely, the near-surface GRIN structure conforms to the external shape of the lens, which is necessary for accommodation modelling. PMID:27231637

  4. Optical Thin Film Modeling: Using FTG's FilmStar Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freese, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Every material has basic optical properties that define its interaction with light: The index of refraction (n) and extinction coefficient (k) vary for the material as a function of the wavelength of the incident light. Also significant are the phase velocity and polarization of the incident light These inherent properties allow for the accurate modeling of light s behavior upon contact with a surface: Reflectance, Transmittance, Absorptance.

  5. Universal squash model for optical communications using linear optics and threshold detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, Chi-Hang Fred; Chau, H. F.; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2011-08-15

    Transmission of photons through open-air or optical fibers is an important primitive in quantum-information processing. Theoretical descriptions of this process often consider single photons as information carriers and thus fail to accurately describe experimental implementations where any number of photons may enter a detector. It has been a great challenge to bridge this big gap between theory and experiments. One powerful method for achieving this goal is by conceptually squashing the received multiphoton states to single-photon states. However, until now, only a few protocols admit a squash model; furthermore, a recently proven no-go theorem appears to rule out the existence of a universal squash model. Here we show that a necessary condition presumed by all existing squash models is in fact too stringent. By relaxing this condition, we find that, rather surprisingly, a universal squash model actually exists for many protocols, including quantum key distribution, quantum state tomography, Bell's inequality testing, and entanglement verification.

  6. Universal squash model for optical communications using linear optics and threshold detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Chi-Hang Fred; Chau, H. F.; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2011-08-01

    Transmission of photons through open-air or optical fibers is an important primitive in quantum-information processing. Theoretical descriptions of this process often consider single photons as information carriers and thus fail to accurately describe experimental implementations where any number of photons may enter a detector. It has been a great challenge to bridge this big gap between theory and experiments. One powerful method for achieving this goal is by conceptually squashing the received multiphoton states to single-photon states. However, until now, only a few protocols admit a squash model; furthermore, a recently proven no-go theorem appears to rule out the existence of a universal squash model. Here we show that a necessary condition presumed by all existing squash models is in fact too stringent. By relaxing this condition, we find that, rather surprisingly, a universal squash model actually exists for many protocols, including quantum key distribution, quantum state tomography, Bell's inequality testing, and entanglement verification.

  7. Global Modeling of Mineral Dust and its Optical Thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ginoux, Paul A.; Chin, Mian; Tegen, Ina; Herman, Jay R.; Torres, Omar; Winker, David; Holben, Brent; Lin, S.-J.

    1999-01-01

    Global distribution of dust in the atmosphere has been simulated using the NASA Goddard chemical transport model (GEOS-CTM) to help retrieve the aerosol optical thickness from TOMS absorbing aerosol index. The model contains a dust module which accounts for sources and removal processes. The transport is driven by the assimilated meteorological fields generated by the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS). One of the key parameters, in the retrieval algorithm of optical thickness from Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data, is the vertical profile of aerosols. During the period 10- 19 September 1994, Lidar on-space Technology Experiment (LITE) was flown on space shuttle Discovery. The 53 hours of data collected cover the lower atmosphere from the earth surface to 20 kilometers altitude and from 57 N to 57 S with a high resolution of about 15 meters. The model results are compared with LITE data over the source regions of dust (Africa, Middle East, Asia, Australia) and in the remote troposphere (Atlantic and Pacific). The simulated horizontal distribution is compared with TOMS absorbing aerosol index. Finally the calculated optical thickness will be assessed with ground based sun-photometers (AERONET).

  8. Behavioral Model of High Performance Camera for NIF Optics Inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, B M

    2007-08-30

    The purpose of this project was to develop software that will model the behavior of the high performance Spectral Instruments 1000 series Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera located in the Final Optics Damage Inspection (FODI) system on the National Ignition Facility. NIF's target chamber will be mounted with 48 Final Optics Assemblies (FOAs) to convert the laser light from infrared to ultraviolet and focus it precisely on the target. Following a NIF shot, the optical components of each FOA must be carefully inspected for damage by the FODI to ensure proper laser performance during subsequent experiments. Rapid image capture and complex image processing (to locate damage sites) will reduce shot turnaround time; thus increasing the total number of experiments NIF can conduct during its 30 year lifetime. Development of these rapid processes necessitates extensive offline software automation -- especially after the device has been deployed in the facility. Without access to the unique real device or an exact behavioral model, offline software testing is difficult. Furthermore, a software-based behavioral model allows for many instances to be running concurrently; this allows multiple developers to test their software at the same time. Thus it is beneficial to construct separate software that will exactly mimic the behavior and response of the real SI-1000 camera.

  9. Photodynamics of optical excitations in one-dimensional models for organic salts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincon, Julian; Al-Hassanieh, Khaled; Feiguin, Adrian; Dagotto, Elbio

    2015-03-01

    We study the time-dependent evolution of photogenerated optical excitations in a model for organic salts, using the density matrix renormalization group method. The model consists of the quarter-filled one-dimensional extended Peierls-Hubbard Hamiltonian interacting with a classical time-dependent electric field. Our main results show that the overall dynamics of the dominating 4kF bond and charge instabilities corresponds to a gigantic fluctuating behavior as a function of time, whereas the 2kF state remains largely unaffected. These results remain valid regardless of the nature of the optical excitations and whether the system is driven resonantly or not. We compare our calculations with experimental pump-and-probe ultrafast spectroscopy studies of the optical conductivity in organic compounds.

  10. An HST proper-motion study of the optical jet in 3C 264: Direct Evidence for the Internal Shock Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Eileen T.; Georganopoulos, Markos; Sparks, William B.; Perlman, Eric S.; Van Der Marel, Roeland P.; Anderson, Jay; Sohn, S. Tony; Biretta, John A.; Norman, Colin Arthur; Chiaberge, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Some of the most energetic phenomena in the Universe involve highly relativistic flows, in which particles are accelerated up to TeV energies. In the case of relativistic jets from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), these flows can carry enough energy to significantly influence both galactic and cluster evolution. While the exact physical mechanism that accelerates the radiating particles within the jet is not known, a widely adopted framework is the internal shock model, invoked to explain high-energy, non-thermal radiation from objects as diverse as microquasars, gamma-ray bursts, and relativistic jets in AGN. This model posits an unsteady relativistic flow that gives rise to components in the jet with different speeds. Faster components catch up to and collide with slower ones, leading to internal shocks. Despite its wide popularity as a theoretical framework, however, no occurance of this mechanism has ever been directly observed. We will present evidence of such a collision in a relativistic jet observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in the nearby radio galaxy 3C 264 (Meyer et al., 2015, Nature). Using images taken over 20 years, we show that a bright ‘knot’ in the jet is moving at an apparent speed of 7.0 +/- 0.8c and is in the incipient stages of a collision with a slow-moving knot (1.8 +/- 0.5c) just downstream. In the most recent epoch of imaging, we see evidence of brightening of the two knots as they commence their kiloparsec-scale collision. This is the behaviour expected in the internal shock scenario and the first direct evidence that internal shocks are a valid description of particle acceleration in relativistic jets.

  11. Modeling of optical losses in perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghavi, M. Javad; Houshmand, Mohammad; Zandi, M. Hossein; Gorji, Nima E.

    2016-09-01

    The optical losses within the structure of hybrid perovskite solar cells are investigated using only the optical properties of each layer e.g. refractive index and extinction coefficient. This model allows calculating the transmission/reflection rates at the interfaces and absorption loss within any layer. Then, the short circuit current density and loss percentage are calculated versus the perovskite and TiO2 thicknesses from 50 nm to 150 nm. To make our calculations closer to reality, we extracted the optical properties of each device component from the literature reports on glass/TCO/TiO2/perovskite/metal. The simulations were fitted with the experimental results of some relevant references. Our simulations show that ITO transmits the light better than SnO2 as the TCO front electrode, and the light reflection at both sides of the perovskite layer, e.g. at TiO2/perovskite and perovskite/Spiro-OMeTAD, is lower than 25%. The light interference and multiple reflections have been accounted in our calculations and finally we showed that a thicker TiO2 and perovskite cause more optical loss in current density due to stronger absorption.

  12. Aging study of silica optical fibers under acid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severin, I.; El Abdi, R.; Poulain, M.

    2005-05-01

    Optical fibers are key components in telecommunication technologies. Apart from optical specifications, optical fibers are expected to keep most of their physical properties for 10 to 20 years in current operating conditions. The reliability and the expected lifetime of optical links are closely related to the action of the chemical environment on the silica network. However, the coating also contributes largely to the mechanical properties of the fibers. The aim of this work was to study the strength and the mechanical behaviour of the silica optical fibers in an acid environment. A container with ammonium bifluoride acid salt was plunged into hot water at different temperatures (55° and 75°C). This emitted acid vapors which attacked the optical fibers for a period of 1 to 18 days. An aging study was performed on silica optical fibers with standard polyacrylate coating and with hermetic carbon coating. A dynamic two-point bending bench at different faceplate velocities (100, 200, 400 and 800 μm/s) was used. For comparison, the same dynamic measurements were also carried out on non-aged fibers. After acid vapor condensation, salt crystal deposits on the fibers were displayed using an electron scanning microscope. These crystals became visible to the naked eye from the 7th day post exposure.

  13. Adiabatic Floquet model for the optical response in femtosecond filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Michael; Brée, Carsten

    2016-10-01

    The standard model of femtosecond filamentation is based on phenomenological assumptions which suggest that the ionization-induced carriers can be treated as a homogeneous, uncorrelated plasma according to the Drude model, while the nonlinear response of the bound carriers is responsible for the all-optical Kerr effect. Here, we demonstrate that the additional plasma generated at a multiphoton resonance dominates the saturation of the nonlinear refractive index. Since resonances are not captured by the standard model, we propose a modification of the latter in which ionization enhancements can be accounted for by an ionization rate obtained from non-Hermitian Floquet theory. In the adiabatic regime of long pulse envelopes, this augmented standard model is in excellent agreement with direct quantum mechanical simulations. Since our proposal maintains the structure of the standard model, it can be easily incorporated into existing codes for the numerical simulation of femtosecond filaments.

  14. Atmospheric turbulence optical model (ATOM) based on fractal theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaenisch, Holger M.; Handley, James W.; Scoggins, Jim; Carroll, Marvin P.

    1994-06-01

    An Atmospheric Turbulence Optical Model (ATOM) is presented that used cellular automata (CA) rules as the basis for modeling synthetic phase sheets. This method allows image fracture, scintillation and blur to be correctly models using the principle of convolution with a complex kernel derived from CA rules interaction. The model takes into account the changing distribution of turbules from micro-turbule domination at low altitudes to macro-domination at high altitudes. The wavelength of propagating images (such as a coherent laser beam) and the range are taken into account. The ATOM model is written in standard FORTRAN 77 and enables high-speed in-line calculation of atmospheric effects to be performed without resorting to computationally intensive solutions of Navier Stokes equations or Cn2 profiles.

  15. Optical modeling of graphene contacted CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldosari, Marouf; Sohrabpoor, Hamed; Gorji, Nima E.

    2016-04-01

    For the first time, an optical model is applied on CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells with graphene front or back contact. Graphene is highly conductive and is as thin as a single atom which reduces the light reflection and absorption, and thus enhances the light transmission to CdTe layer for a wide range of wavelengths including IR. Graphene as front electrode of CdTe devices led to loss in short circuit current density of 10% ΔJsc ≤ 15% compared to the conventional electrodes of TCO and ITO at CdS thickness of dCdS = 100 nm. In addition, all the multilayer graphene electrodes with 2, 4, and 7 graphene layers led to Jsc ≤ 20 mA/cm2. Therefore, we conclude that a single monolayer graphene with hexagonal carbon network reduces optical losses and enhances the carrier collection measured as Jsc. In another structure design, we applied the optical model to graphene back contacted CdS/CdTe device. This scheme allows double side irradiation of the cell which is expected to enhance the Jsc. We obtained 1 ∼ 6 , 23, and 38 mA/cm2 for back, front and bifacial illumination of graphene contacted CdTe cell with CdS = 100 nm. The bifacial irradiated cell, to be efficient, requires an ultrathin CdTe film with dCdTe ≤ 1 μm. In this case, the junction electric field extends to the back region and collects out the generated carriers efficiently. This was modelled by absorptivity rather than transmission rate and optical losses. Since the literature suggest that ZnO can increase the graphene conductivity and enhance the Jsc, we performed our simulations for a graphene/ZnO electrode (ZnO = 100 nm) instead of a single graphene layer.

  16. Design and analysis study of a spacecraft optical transceiver package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, S. G.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed system level design of an Optical Transceiver Package (OPTRANSPAC) for a deep space vehicle whose mission is outer planet exploration is developed. In addition to the terminal design, this study provides estimates of the dynamic environments to be encountered by the transceiver throughout its mission life. Optical communication link analysis, optical thin lens design, electronic functional design and mechanical layout and packaging are employed in the terminal design. Results of the study describe an Optical Transceiver Package capable of communicating to an Earth Orbiting Relay Station at a distance of 10 Astronomical Units (AU) and data rates up to 100 KBPS. The transceiver is also capable of receiving 1 KBPS of command data from the Earth Relay. The physical dimensions of the terminal are contained within a 3.5' x 1.5' x 2.0' envelope and the transceiver weight and power are estimated at 52.2 Kg (115 pounds) and 57 watts, respectively.

  17. Applied study of optical interconnection link in computer cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ge; Tian, Jindong; Zhang, Nan; Jing, Wencai; Li, Haifeng

    2000-10-01

    In this paper, some study results to apply fiber link to a computer cluster are presented. The research is based on a ring network topology for a cluster system, which is connected by gigabit/s virtual parallel optical fiber link (VPOFLink) and its driver is for Linux Operating System, the transmission protocol of VPOFLink is compliant with Ethernet standard. We have studied the effect of different types of motherboard on transmission rate of the VPOFLink, and have analyzed the influence of optical interconnection network topology and computer networks protocol on the performance of this optical interconnection computer cluster. The round-trip transmission bandwidth of the VPOFLink have been tested, and the factors that limit transmission bandwidth, such as modes of forwarding data packets in the optical interconnection ring networks, and the size of the link buffer etc., are investigated.

  18. Working sketch of an anatomically and optically equivalent physical model eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakaraju, Ravi Chandra; Ehrmann, Klaus; Falk, Darrin; Papas, Eric B.; Ho, Arthur

    2009-02-01

    Our aim was to fabricate a bench-top physical model eye that closely replicates anatomical and optical properties of the average human eye, and to calibrate and standardize this model to suit normal viewing conditions and subsequently utilize it to understand the optical performance of corrective lens designs; especially multifocal soft contact lenses. Using available normative data on ocular biometrics and Zemax ray-tracing software as a tool, we modeled 25, 45 and 55 year-old average adult human eyes with discrete accommodation levels and pupil sizes. Specifications for the components were established following manufacturing tolerance analyses. The cornea was lathed from an optical material with refractive index of 1.376 @ 589 nm and the crystalline lenses were made of Boston RGP polymers with refractive indices of 1.423 (45 & 55yr) and 1.429 (25yr) @ 589 nm. These two materials served to model the equivalent crystalline lens of the different age-groups. A camera, the acting retina, was hosted on the motor-base having translatory and rotary functions to facilitate the simulation of different states of ametropia and peripheral refraction respectively. We report on the implementation of the first prototype and present some simulations of the optical performance of certain contact lenses with specific levels of ametropia, to demonstrate the potential use of such a physical model eye. On completion of development, calibration and standardization, optical quality assessment and performance predictions of different ophthalmic lenses can be studied in great detail. Optical performance with corrective lenses may be reliably simulated and predicted by customized combined computational and physical models giving insight into the merits and pitfalls of their designs

  19. Modeling of optical quadrature microscopy for imaging mouse embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warger, William C., II; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2008-02-01

    Optical quadrature microscopy (OQM) has been shown to provide the optical path difference through a mouse embryo, and has led to a novel method to count the total number of cells further into development than current non-toxic imaging techniques used in the clinic. The cell counting method has the potential to provide an additional quantitative viability marker for blastocyst transfer during in vitro fertilization. OQM uses a 633 nm laser within a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration to measure the amplitude and phase of the signal beam that travels through the embryo. Four cameras preceded by multiple beamsplitters record the four interferograms that are used within a reconstruction algorithm to produce an image of the complex electric field amplitude. Here we present a model for the electric field through the primary optical components in the imaging configuration and the reconstruction algorithm to calculate the signal to noise ratio when imaging mouse embryos. The model includes magnitude and phase errors in the individual reference and sample paths, fixed pattern noise, and noise within the laser and detectors. This analysis provides the foundation for determining the imaging limitations of OQM and the basis to optimize the cell counting method in order to introduce additional quantitative viability markers.

  20. Wavefront Sensing for WFIRST with a Linear Optical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurling, Alden S.; Content, David A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we develop methods to use a linear optical model to capture the field dependence of wavefront aberrations in a nonlinear optimization-based phase retrieval algorithm for image-based wavefront sensing. The linear optical model is generated from a ray trace model of the system and allows the system state to be described in terms of mechanical alignment parameters rather than wavefront coefficients. This approach allows joint optimization over images taken at different field points and does not require separate convergence of phase retrieval at individual field points. Because the algorithm exploits field diversity, multiple defocused images per field point are not required for robustness. Furthermore, because it is possible to simultaneously fit images of many stars over the field, it is not necessary to use a fixed defocus to achieve adequate signal-to-noise ratio despite having images with high dynamic range. This allows high performance wavefront sensing using in-focus science data. We applied this technique in a simulation model based on the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Intermediate Design Reference Mission (IDRM) imager using a linear optical model with 25 field points. We demonstrate sub-thousandth-wave wavefront sensing accuracy in the presence of noise and moderate undersampling for both monochromatic and polychromatic images using 25 high-SNR target stars. Using these high-quality wavefront sensing results, we are able to generate upsampled point-spread functions (PSFs) and use them to determine PSF ellipticity to high accuracy in order to reduce the systematic impact of aberrations on the accuracy of galactic ellipticity determination for weak-lensing science.

  1. Feasibility Study of Optically Transparent Microstrip Patch Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents a feasibility study on optically transparent patch antennas with microstrip line and probe feeds. The two antennas operate at 2.3 GHz and 19.5 GHz respectively. They are constructed from a thin sheet of clear polyester with an AgHT-8 optically transparent conductive coating. The experimental results show good radiation patterns and input impedance match. The antennas have potential applications in mobile wireless communications.

  2. Optical telecommunications: performance of the qualification model SILEX beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Michel; Dobie, Paul J.; Gollier, Jacques; Heinrichs, Theo; Woszczyk, Pawel; Sobeczko, Andre

    1995-04-01

    The Beacon is a powerful non-coherent CW infra-red laser source which is developed under the Semi-conductor Inter-satellite Link Experiment (SILEX). It will provide a high divergence beam used during the first tracking acquisition sequence of the Spot 4/Artemis optical communication link. The Beacon uses high efficiency anamorphic couplers to deliver output from 19 laser diodes into a single multi-mode Mixing Fiber, the exit of which is integrated at the focal plane of a collimator. Beacon output is maintained at the required level during unit life using an Optical Monitoring System and a Beacon output Tele-Command. The Engineering Qualification Model is now complete and overall performance with respect to the SILEX requirements is presented.

  3. Modeling of structure and properties of thermo-optical converters for laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Andrey V.; Skrypnik, Alexei V.; Kurnyshev, Vadim Y.

    2016-04-01

    Volumetric fiber-optic thermal converter (VFOTC) formed on the end of the quartz fiber as a result of two-stage conversion of quartz and carbon by medical diode laser radiation with a wavelength of 980 nm is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The geometrical dimensions of the converter are defined and the internal structure of the converter is studied by optical microscopy. The dependence of VFOTC temperature on exposure time of diode laser radiation with a wavelength of 980 nm and power of 1.0+/-0.1 W is obtained experimentally. The structural, optical and thermal model of VFOTC is proposed. Good correlation between the experimental and modeling results of laser heating of the converter is demonstrated.

  4. Analysis of optical near-field energy transfer by stochastic model unifying architectural dependencies

    SciTech Connect

    Naruse, Makoto; Akahane, Kouichi; Yamamoto, Naokatsu; Holmström, Petter; Thylén, Lars; Huant, Serge; Ohtsu, Motoichi

    2014-04-21

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate energy transfer mediated by optical near-field interactions in a multi-layer InAs quantum dot (QD) structure composed of a single layer of larger dots and N layers of smaller ones. We construct a stochastic model in which optical near-field interactions that follow a Yukawa potential, QD size fluctuations, and temperature-dependent energy level broadening are unified, enabling us to examine device-architecture-dependent energy transfer efficiencies. The model results are consistent with the experiments. This study provides an insight into optical energy transfer involving inherent disorders in materials and paves the way to systematic design principles of nanophotonic devices that will allow optimized performance and the realization of designated functions.

  5. Advanced optical modelling of dynamically deposited silicon nitride layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borojevic, N.; Hameiri, Z.; Winderbaum, S.

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic deposition of silicon nitrides using in-line plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition systems results in non-uniform structure of the dielectric layer. Appropriate analysis of such layers requires the optical characterization to be performed as a function of the layer's depth. This work presents a method to characterize dynamically deposited silicon nitride layers. The method is based on the fitting of experimental spectroscopic ellipsometry data via grading of Tauc-Lorentz optical parameters through the depth of the layer. When compared with the standard Tauc-Lorentz fitting procedure, used in previous studies, the improved method is demonstrating better quality fits to the experimental data and revealing more accurate optical properties of the dielectric layers. The most significant advantage of the method is the ability to extract the depth profile of the optical properties along the direction of the layer normal. This is enabling a better understanding of layers deposited using dynamic plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition systems frequently used in the photovoltaic industry.

  6. An optical study of grain formation: Casting and solidification technology (2-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, Mary H.

    1992-01-01

    By studying the unidirectional growth of a metal-model material in microgravity, an attempt is made to characterize alloy solidification. Using holograms and supporting temperature measurements obtained during processing in the Fluids Experiment System (FES), the solute and thermal fields associated with the dendrite growth front and extraneous nucleation will be measured and compared to a theoretical (computational) model. Ground based supporting experiments include particle tracking to measure the velocity fields, and optical phase shift techniques (confocal optical signal processing, interferometry, and Schlieren) to study thermal and solutal fields.

  7. Binary Studies with the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, C. A.; Zavala, R. T.; Sanborn, J.

    We present recent results from observations of binary and multiple systems made with the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI) on ζ and σ Orionis A, ξ Tauri, HR 6493, and b Persei. We explain how the orbital modeling is performed and show that even triple systems can be constrained with the data.

  8. Optical coherence tomography for live phenotypic analysis of embryonic ocular structures in mouse models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larina, Irina V.; Syed, Saba H.; Sudheendran, Narendran; Overbeek, Paul A.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2012-08-01

    Mouse models of ocular diseases provide a powerful resource for exploration of molecular regulation of eye development and pre-clinical studies. Availability of a live high-resolution imaging method for mouse embryonic eyes would significantly enhance longitudinal analyses and high-throughput morphological screening. We demonstrate that optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used for live embryonic ocular imaging throughout gestation. At all studied stages, the whole eye is within the imaging distance of the system and there is a good optical contrast between the structures. We also performed OCT eye imaging in the embryonic retinoblastoma mouse model Pax6-SV40 T-antigen, which spontaneously forms lens and retinal lesions, and demonstrate that OCT allows us to clearly differentiate between the mutant and wild type phenotypes. These results demonstrate that OCTin utero imaging is a potentially useful tool to study embryonic ocular diseases in mouse models.

  9. A study of nonlinear optical polymers for use in ultrafast electro-optic sampling measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deibel, Jason Allen

    Recently, electro-optic sampling (EOS), which utilizes a combination of ultrafast laser technology and the Pockels effect, has been refined into a fiber-based system that benefits from an enhanced positioning ability and measurement flexibility. EOS would still be improved further with an increase in field sensitivity and a decrease in capacitive loading (invasiveness) for near-field and integrated circuit measurements of ultrahigh bandwidth devices. Electro-optic polymers, with higher electro-optic coefficients and lower dielectric permittivities would address these two issues. This dissertation focuses on a theoretical and experimental study of the potential viability of electro-optic polymers as Electro-Optic Sampling probe materials. Finite element method simulations of EOS probe materials were performed to study the effect of the material's dielectric permittivity on performance. These simulations found that the sensitivity of an EOS probe material increases while its invasiveness decreases as its dielectric permittivity is decreased. Simulations of polymer EOS probes suggest that they would be ideal. Numerical analysis of the polymer's index ellipsoid was completed in order to study a polymer probe's potential for cross-polarization suppression capability. These results showed that an electro-optic polymer could be capable of isolating tangential electric field components, but not normal field components. A variety of electro-optic polymers were poled and tested as EOS field sensors. Poly(gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate) (PBLG) was poled using the Solution Evaporation Electric-field Poling method, producing a film with an electro-optic coefficient (r33) of 1.62 pm/V. This is believed to be the highest reported value for a poled PBLG film to date greater than that for PBLG poled by thermal poling techniques by a factor of over 30. A fiber-mounted polymer EOS electric field sensor was constructed and tested using a contact electric-field poled film of copoly

  10. Optical telecommunications: performance of the protoflight model SILEX beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Michel; Dobie, Paul J.; Grodent, C.; Woszczyk, Pawel; Sobeczko, Andre

    1996-04-01

    The beacon is a powerful non-coherent cw infra-red laser source which will provide a high divergence beam used during the first tracking acquisition sequence of the Spot 4/Artemis optical communication link. The beacon uses high efficiency anamorphic couplers to deliver output from 19 laser diodes into a single multi-mode mixing fiber, the exit of which is integrated at the focal plane of a collimator. Beacon output is maintained at the required level (nominally 8 KW/Sr) during unit life using an optical monitoring system and a beacon output tele-command. Following successful environmental testing, the proto-flight model (PFM) has recently been delivered ready for integration onto the SILEX terminal. This paper describes the overall performance of the PFM beacon with respect to SILEX requirements. An improved beacon using 1.2 W laser diodes which will be capable of delivering up to 17 KW/Sr is currently under construction. An analysis of the design aspects to be considered when using high power laser diodes in this type of application is presented. Finally, a brief summary is given of SPACEBEL activities associated with high power and more compact optical communication units for future missions.

  11. Modelling the inherent optical properties and estimating the constituents' concentrations in turbid and eutrophic waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokul, Elamurugu Alias; Shanmugam, Palanisamy; Sundarabalan, Balasubramanian; Sahay, Arvind; Chauhan, Prakash

    2014-08-01

    Retrieval of the inherent optical properties and estimation of the constituents' concentrations from satellite ocean colour data in turbid and eutrophic waters are important as these products provide innovative opportunities for the study of biological and biogeochemical properties in such optically complex waters. This paper intends to develop models to retrieve absorption coefficients of phytoplankton, suspended sediments and coloured dissolved organic matter and describe vertical profiles of chlorophyll and suspended sediments from satellite ocean colour data. These models make use of the relationships between remote sensing reflectance ratios Rrs (555)/Rrs (443) and Rrs (620)/Rrs (490) versus aph (443) and aph (555), and acdom (443), and ad (443) to derive the model parameters. Validation with the in-situ data obtained from coastal waters around India and other regional waters (e.g., NASA bio-Optical Marine Algorithm Data-Set, NOMAD) shows that the new models are more accurate in terms of producing the spectral absorption coefficients (aph, ad, acdom across the entire visible wavelengths 400-700 nm) in a wide variety of waters. Further comparison with existing models shows advantage of the new models that have important implications for remote sensing of turbid coastal and eutrophic waters. The retrieved absorption coefficients of phytoplankton and suspended sediments (non-algal matter) are also found to relate better to chlorophyll and total suspended sediments. Taking advantages of this, we derive models to determine and describe the vertical profiles of chlorophyll and suspended sediment concentrations along the depth. The model parameters are derived empirically. These new parameterizations show potential in estimating the vertical profiles of chlorophyll and suspended sediments with good accuracy. These results suggest robustness and suitability of the new models for studying the ecologically important components of optically complex turbid and eutrophic

  12. Modeling optical breakdown in dielectrics during ultrafast laser processing.

    PubMed

    Fan, C H; Longtin, J P

    2001-06-20

    Laser ablation is widely used in micromachining, manufacturing, thin-film formation, and bioengineering applications. During laser ablation the removal of material and quality of the features depend strongly on the optical breakdown region induced by the laser irradiance. The recent advent of amplified ultrafast lasers with pulse durations of less than 1 ps has generated considerable interest because of the ability of the lasers to process virtually all materials with high precision and minimal thermal damage. With ultrashort pulse widths, however, traditional breakdown models no longer accurately capture the laser-material interaction that leads to breakdown. A femtosecond breakdown model for dielectric solids and liquids is presented that characterizes the pulse behavior and predicts the time- and position-dependent breakdown region. The model includes the pulse propagation and small spatial extent of ultrashort laser pulses. Model results are presented and compared with classical breakdown models for 1-ns, 1-ps, and 150-fs pulses. The results show that the revised model is able to model breakdown accurately in the focal region for pulse durations of less than 10 ps. The model can also be of use in estimating the time- and position-resolved electron density in the interaction volume, the breakdown threshold of the material, shielding effects, and temperature distributions during ultrafast processing. PMID:18357333

  13. Modeling bidirectional reflectance of forests and woodlands using Boolean models and geometric optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahler, Alan H.; Jupp, David L. B.

    1990-01-01

    Geometric-optical discrete-element mathematical models for forest canopies have been developed using the Boolean logic and models of Serra. The geometric-optical approach is considered to be particularly well suited to describing the bidirectional reflectance of forest woodland canopies, where the concentration of leaf material within crowns and the resulting between-tree gaps make plane-parallel, radiative-transfer models inappropriate. The approach leads to invertible formulations, in which the spatial and directional variance provides the means for remote estimation of tree crown size, shape, and total cover from remotedly sensed imagery.

  14. Integrated modeling of the GMT laser tomography adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatrou, Piotr

    2014-08-01

    Laser Tomography Adaptive Optics (LTAO) is one of adaptive optics systems planned for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). End-to-end simulation tools that are able to cope with the complexity and computational burden of the AO systems to be installed on the extremely large telescopes such as GMT prove to be an integral part of the GMT LTAO system development endeavors. SL95, the Fortran 95 Simulation Library, is one of the software tools successfully used for the LTAO system end-to-end simulations. The goal of SL95 project is to provide a complete set of generic, richly parameterized mathematical models for key elements of the segmented telescope wavefront control systems including both active and adaptive optics as well as the models for atmospheric turbulence, extended light sources like Laser Guide Stars (LGS), light propagation engines and closed-loop controllers. The library is implemented as a hierarchical collection of classes capable of mutual interaction, which allows one to assemble complex wavefront control system configurations with multiple interacting control channels. In this paper we demonstrate the SL95 capabilities by building an integrated end-to-end model of the GMT LTAO system with 7 control channels: LGS tomography with Adaptive Secondary and on-instrument deformable mirrors, tip-tilt and vibration control, LGS stabilization, LGS focus control, truth sensor-based dynamic noncommon path aberration rejection, pupil position control, SLODAR-like embedded turbulence profiler. The rich parameterization of the SL95 classes allows to build detailed error budgets propagating through the system multiple errors and perturbations such as turbulence-, telescope-, telescope misalignment-, segment phasing error-, non-common path-induced aberrations, sensor noises, deformable mirror-to-sensor mis-registration, vibration, temporal errors, etc. We will present a short description of the SL95 architecture, as well as the sample GMT LTAO system simulation

  15. Cellular automaton modeling of mesospheric optical emissions: Sprites

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, M.; Iudin, D. I.; Mareev, E. A.; Trakhtengerts, V. Y.

    2007-04-15

    This paper presents a new attempt to model two-dimensional mesospheric optical emissions named sprites with the use of a cellular automaton network. A large-scale model of sprites based on the phenomenological percolation-like probabilistic approach is developed to model streamer discharges in sprites. It is shown that a sprite is a self-affine structure rather than a simple fractal one, and that this self-affine structure is tightly connected with directed percolation phenomena. The system is found to evolve in the vicinity of the percolation threshold, which results in a wide variety of sprite characteristics even under similar initial conditions. The approach developed allows us to estimate a maximum size of the discharge pattern to be formed.

  16. Advanced optical position sensors for magnetically suspended wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafleur, S.

    1985-01-01

    A major concern to aerodynamicists has been the corruption of wind tunnel test data by model support structures, such as stings or struts. A technique for magnetically suspending wind tunnel models was considered by Tournier and Laurenceau (1957) in order to overcome this problem. This technique is now implemented with the aid of a Large Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (LMSBS) and advanced position sensors for measuring model attitude and position within the test section. Two different optical position sensors are discussed, taking into account a device based on the use of linear CCD arrays, and a device utilizing area CID cameras. Current techniques in image processing have been employed to develop target tracking algorithms capable of subpixel resolution for the sensors. The algorithms are discussed in detail, and some preliminary test results are reported.

  17. Advanced optical position sensors for magnetically suspended wind tunnel models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, S.

    A major concern to aerodynamicists has been the corruption of wind tunnel test data by model support structures, such as stings or struts. A technique for magnetically suspending wind tunnel models was considered by Tournier and Laurenceau (1957) in order to overcome this problem. This technique is now implemented with the aid of a Large Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (LMSBS) and advanced position sensors for measuring model attitude and position within the test section. Two different optical position sensors are discussed, taking into account a device based on the use of linear CCD arrays, and a device utilizing area CID cameras. Current techniques in image processing have been employed to develop target tracking algorithms capable of subpixel resolution for the sensors. The algorithms are discussed in detail, and some preliminary test results are reported.

  18. Optical waveguide modeling of refractive index mediated pH responses in silica nanocomposite thin film based fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohodnicki, P. R.; Wang, C.

    2016-02-01

    Recent experiments have demonstrated a pH-dependent optical transmission of silica based nanocomposite thin film enabled evanescent wave absorption spectroscopy based fiber optic sensors in aqueous solutions. Although the response was observed to linearly correlate with the pH-dependent surface charge density of the silica matrix, the responsible mechanism was not fully clarified. In this manuscript, an optical waveguide model is applied to describe observed responses through a modified effective refractive index of the silica matrix layer as a function of the solution phase pH. The refractive index dependence results from a surface charge dependent ionic adsorption, resulting in concentration of ionic species at charged surfaces. The resultant effective index modification to porous silica is estimated through effective medium theories and applied to an optical waveguide model of a multi-mode fiber optic based sensor response capable of reproducing all experimental observations reported to date.

  19. Model of Atmospheric Links on Optical Communications from High Altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subich, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Optical communication links have the potential to solve many of the problems of current radio and microwave links to satellites and high-altitude aircraft. The higher frequency involved in optical systems allows for significantly greater signal bandwidth, and thus information transfer rate, in excess of 10 Gbps, and the highly directional nature of laser-based signals eliminates the need for frequency-division multiplexing seen in radio and microwave links today. The atmosphere, however, distorts an optical signal differently than a microwave signal. While the ionosphere is one of the most significant sources of noise and distortion in a microwave or radio signal, the lower atmosphere affects an optical signal more significantly. Refractive index fluctuations, primarily caused by changes in atmospheric temperature and density, distort the incoming signal in both deterministic and nondeterministic ways. Additionally, suspended particles, such as those in haze or rain, further corrupt the transmitted signal. To model many of the atmospheric effects on the propagating beam, we use simulations based on the beam-propagation method. This method, developed both for simulation of signals in waveguides and propagation in atmospheric turbulence, separates the propagation into a diffraction and refraction problem. The diffraction step is an exact solution, within the limits of numerical precision, to the problem of propagation in free space, and the refraction step models the refractive index variances over a segment of the propagation path. By applying refraction for a segment of the propagation path, then diffracting over that same segment, this method forms a good approximation to true propagation through the atmospheric medium. Iterating over small segments of the total propagation path gives a good approximation to the problem of propagation over the entire path. Parameters in this model, such as initial beam profile and atmospheric constants, are easily modified in a

  20. Optical model analyses of heavy ion fragmentation in hydrogen targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1994-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical optical-model methods for calculating cross sections for the fragmentation of high-energy heavy ions by hydrogen targets are presented. The cross sections are calculated with a knockout-ablation collision formalism which has no arbitrary fitting parameters. Predictions of elemental production cross sections from the fragmentation of 1.2A Ge(V(La-139) nuclei and of isotope production cross sections from the fragmentation of 400A MeV(S-32) nuclei are in good agreement with recently reported experimental measurements.

  1. Numerical modelling of multimode fibre-optic communication lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidelnikov, O. S.; Sygletos, S.; Ferreira, F.; Fedoruk, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    The results of numerical modelling of nonlinear propagation of an optical signal in multimode fibres with a small differential group delay are presented. It is found that the dependence of the error vector magnitude (EVM) on the differential group delay can be reduced by increasing the number of ADC samples per symbol in the numerical implementation of the differential group delay compensation algorithm in the receiver. The possibility of using multimode fibres with a small differential group delay for data transmission in modern digital communication systems is demonstrated. It is shown that with increasing number of modes the strong coupling regime provides a lower EVM level than the weak coupling one.

  2. Performance Study of optical Modulator based on electrooptic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palodiya, V.; Raghuwanshi, S. K.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we have studied and derive performance parameter of highly integrated Lithium Niobate optical modulator. This is a chirp free modulator having low switching voltage and large bandwidth. For an external modulator in which travelling-wave electrodes length L imposed the modulating switching voltage, the product of Vπ and L is fixed for a given electro optic material Lithium Niobate. We investigate to achieve a low Vπ by both magnitude of the electro-optic coefficient for a wide variety of electro-optic materials. A Sellmeier equation for the extraordinary index of congruent lithium niobate is derived. For phase-matching, predictions are accmate for temperature between room temperature 250°C and wavelength ranging from 0.4 to 5µm. The Sellmeier equations predict more accmately refractive indices at long wavelengths. Theoretical result is confirmed by simulated results. We have analysed the various parameters such as switching voltage, device performance index, time constant, transmittance, cut-off frequency, 3-dB bandwidth, power absorption coefficient and transmission bit rate of Lithium Niobate optical Modulator based on electro -optic effect.

  3. Study of optical clearing of blood by immersion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhernovaya, Olga S.; Jonathan, Enock; Tuchin, Valery V.; Leahy, Martin J.

    2011-03-01

    Light scattering in blood caused by refractive index mismatch between erythrocyte cytoplasm and blood plasma leads to a reduction in imaging spatial resolution, imaging depth and contrast of optical imaging techniques. A possible solution to this problem is of the addition of biocompatible clearing agents, such as glucose, fructose, glycerol, dextrans etc. The basic principle of the optical clearing technique is refractive index matching between erythrocyte cytoplasm and blood plasma. Optical clearing, a technique that has been successfully demonstrated with biologic tissue, represents a promising approach to increasing the imaging depth for various techniques, for example optical coherence tomography (OCT). OCT is based on low-coherence interferometry to produce cross-sectional tomographic imaging of the internal microstructure in materials and biological tissues by measuring the echo time delay and magnitude of backscattered light. One of the main advantages of this technique is the ability to investigate turbid and highly scattering media, such as whole blood. To determine the optimal concentration of clearing agents required for blood optical clearing in order to improve light penetration depth for optical coherence tomography, clearing agents such as glucose and fructose, with various concentrations were added to blood and investigated by OCT. Changes in light attenuation and sedimentation and aggregation properties of blood depending on particular agent and its concentration were studied.

  4. Dynamic response tests of inertial and optical wind-tunnel model attitude measurement devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, R. D.; Young, C. P., Jr.; Burner, A. W.; Tripp, J. S.; Tcheng, P.; Finley, T. D.; Popernack, T. G., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study of the response of inertial and optical wind-tunnel model attitude measurement systems in a wind-off simulated dynamic environment. This study is part of an ongoing activity at the NASA Langley Research Center to develop high accuracy, advanced model attitude measurement systems that can be used in a dynamic wind-tunnel environment. This activity was prompted by the inertial model attitude sensor response observed during high levels of model vibration which results in a model attitude measurement bias error. Significant bias errors in model attitude measurement were found for the measurement using the inertial device during wind-off dynamic testing of a model system. The amount of bias present during wind-tunnel tests will depend on the amplitudes of the model dynamic response and the modal characteristics of the model system. Correction models are presented that predict the vibration-induced bias errors to a high degree of accuracy for the vibration modes characterized in the simulated dynamic environment. The optical system results were uncorrupted by model vibration in the laboratory setup.

  5. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA LIGHT CURVE INFERENCE: HIERARCHICAL MODELS IN THE OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED

    SciTech Connect

    Mandel, Kaisey S.; Narayan, Gautham; Kirshner, Robert P.

    2011-04-20

    We have constructed a comprehensive statistical model for Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves spanning optical through near-infrared (NIR) data. A hierarchical framework coherently models multiple random and uncertain effects, including intrinsic supernova (SN) light curve covariances, dust extinction and reddening, and distances. An improved BAYESN Markov Chain Monte Carlo code computes probabilistic inferences for the hierarchical model by sampling the global probability density of parameters describing individual SNe and the population. We have applied this hierarchical model to optical and NIR data of 127 SNe Ia from PAIRITEL, CfA3, Carnegie Supernova Project, and the literature. We find an apparent population correlation between the host galaxy extinction A{sub V} and the ratio of total-to-selective dust absorption R{sub V} . For SNe with low dust extinction, A{sub V} {approx}< 0.4, we find R{sub V} {approx} 2.5-2.9, while at high extinctions, A{sub V} {approx}> 1, low values of R{sub V} < 2 are favored. The NIR luminosities are excellent standard candles and are less sensitive to dust extinction. They exhibit low correlation with optical peak luminosities, and thus provide independent information on distances. The combination of NIR and optical data constrains the dust extinction and improves the predictive precision of individual SN Ia distances by about 60%. Using cross-validation, we estimate an rms distance modulus prediction error of 0.11 mag for SNe with optical and NIR data versus 0.15 mag for SNe with optical data alone. Continued study of SNe Ia in the NIR is important for improving their utility as precise and accurate cosmological distance indicators.

  6. Polarization Drift Channel Model for Coherent Fibre-Optic Systems.

    PubMed

    Czegledi, Cristian B; Karlsson, Magnus; Agrell, Erik; Johannisson, Pontus

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical framework is introduced to model the dynamical changes of the state of polarization during transmission in coherent fibre-optic systems. The model generalizes the one-dimensional phase noise random walk to higher dimensions, accounting for random polarization drifts, emulating a random walk on the Poincaré sphere, which has been successfully verified using experimental data. The model is described in the Jones, Stokes and real four-dimensional formalisms, and the mapping between them is derived. Such a model will be increasingly important in simulating and optimizing future systems, where polarization-multiplexed transmission and sophisticated digital signal processing will be natural parts. The proposed polarization drift model is the first of its kind as prior work either models polarization drift as a deterministic process or focuses on polarization-mode dispersion in systems where the state of polarization does not affect the receiver performance. We expect the model to be useful in a wide-range of photonics applications where stochastic polarization fluctuation is an issue. PMID:26905596

  7. Polarization Drift Channel Model for Coherent Fibre-Optic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Czegledi, Cristian B.; Karlsson, Magnus; Agrell, Erik; Johannisson, Pontus

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical framework is introduced to model the dynamical changes of the state of polarization during transmission in coherent fibre-optic systems. The model generalizes the one-dimensional phase noise random walk to higher dimensions, accounting for random polarization drifts, emulating a random walk on the Poincaré sphere, which has been successfully verified using experimental data. The model is described in the Jones, Stokes and real four-dimensional formalisms, and the mapping between them is derived. Such a model will be increasingly important in simulating and optimizing future systems, where polarization-multiplexed transmission and sophisticated digital signal processing will be natural parts. The proposed polarization drift model is the first of its kind as prior work either models polarization drift as a deterministic process or focuses on polarization-mode dispersion in systems where the state of polarization does not affect the receiver performance. We expect the model to be useful in a wide-range of photonics applications where stochastic polarization fluctuation is an issue. PMID:26905596

  8. Bio-Optical Measurement and Modeling of the California Current and Southern Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, B. Gregg; Mitchell, B. Greg

    2003-01-01

    The SIMBIOS project's principal goals are to validate standard or experimental ocean color products through detailed bio-optical and biogeochemical measurements, and to combine Ocean optical observations with modeling to contribute to satellite vicarious radiometric calibration and algorithm development.

  9. Computational study of lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zujev, Aleksander

    This dissertation is composed of the descriptions of a few projects undertook to complete my doctorate at the University of California, Davis. Different as they are, the common feature of them is that they all deal with simulations of lattice models, and physics which results from interparticle interactions. As an example, both the Feynman-Kikuchi model (Chapter 3) and Bose-Fermi mixture (Chapter 4) deal with the conditions under which superfluid transitions occur. The dissertation is divided into two parts. Part I (Chapters 1-2) is theoretical. It describes the systems we study - superfluidity and particularly superfluid helium, and optical lattices. The numerical methods of working with them are described. The use of Monte Carlo methods is another unifying theme of the different projects in this thesis. Part II (Chapters 3-6) deals with applications. It consists of 4 chapters describing different projects. Two of them, Feynman-Kikuchi model, and Bose-Fermi mixture are finished and published. The work done on t - J model, described in Chapter 5, is more preliminary, and the project is far from complete. A preliminary report on it was given on 2009 APS March meeting. The Isentropic project, described in the last chapter, is finished. A report on it was given on 2010 APS March meeting, and a paper is in preparation. The quantum simulation program used for Bose-Fermi mixture project was written by our collaborators Valery Rousseau and Peter Denteneer. I had written my own code for the other projects.

  10. Modeling of laser-induced damage and optic usage at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Zhi M.; Nostrand, Mike; Carr, Wren; Bude, Jeff; Suratwala, Tayyab I.

    2016-07-01

    Modeling of laser-induced optics damage has been introduced to benchmark existing optic usage at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which includes the number of optics exchanged for damage repair. NIF has pioneered an optics recycle strategy to allow it to run the laser at capacity since fully commissioned in 2009 while keeping the cost of optics usage manageable. We will show how the damage model is being used to evaluate strategies to streamline our optics loop efficiency, as we strive to increase the laser shot rate without increasing operating costs.

  11. Optical response of ferromagnetic YTiO3 studied by spectral ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, N. N.; Boris, A. V.; Yordanov, P.; Maljuk, A.; Brücher, E.; Strempfer, J.; Konuma, M.; Zegkinoglou, I.; Bernhard, C.; Stoneham, A. M.; Keimer, B.

    2007-10-01

    We have studied the temperature dependence of spectroscopic ellipsometry spectra of an electrically insulating, nearly stoichiometric YTiO3 single crystal with ferromagnetic Curie temperature TC=30K . The optical response exhibits a weak but noticeable anisotropy. Using a classical dispersion analysis, we identify three low-energy optical bands at 2.0, 2.9, and 3.7eV . Although the optical conductivity spectra are only weakly temperature dependent below 300K , we are able to distinguish high- and low-temperature regimes with a distinct crossover point around 100K . The low-temperature regime in the optical response coincides with the temperature range in which significant deviations from a Curie-Weiss mean-field behavior are observed in the magnetization. Using an analysis based on a simple superexchange model, the spectral weight rearrangement can be attributed to intersite di1dj1→di2dj0 optical transitions. In particular, Kramers-Kronig consistent changes in optical spectra around 2.9eV can be associated with the high-spin-state (T13) optical transition. This indicates that other mechanisms, such as weakly dipole-allowed p-d transitions and/or exciton-polaron excitations, can contribute significantly to the optical band at 2eV . The recorded optical spectral weight gain of the 2.9eV optical band is significantly suppressed and anisotropic, which we associate with complex spin-orbit-lattice phenomena near the ferromagnetic ordering temperature in YTiO3 .

  12. Fiber-coupled optical pyrometer for shock-wave studies

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, N.C. )

    1995-03-01

    We have developed a new optical pyrometer with unique advantages for shock-wave studies and for measurements of systems that are moving with respect to the detection system. Our pyrometer is fully fiber optic coupled. This completely eliminates any time-dependent imaging or aperture effects common to imaging pyrometers, and is simple to align and calibrate. The sensitivity is also higher than typical imaging systems used for shock experiments. The design is excellent for observations of time-varying phenomena. Detection is done with fast photomultiplier tubes with roughly 1 ns response. In addition, one may also include a streaked spectroscopic system, making this system ideal for fast spectroscopic studies.

  13. Optical properties of soot particles: measurement - model comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forestieri, S.; Lambe, A. T.; Lack, D.; Massoli, P.; Cross, E. S.; Dubey, M.; Mazzoleni, C.; Olfert, J.; Freedman, A.; Davidovits, P.; Onasch, T. B.; Cappa, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    Soot, a product of incomplete combustion, plays an important role in the earth's climate system through the absorption and scattering of solar radiation. In order to accurately model the direct radiative impact of black carbon (BC), the refractive index and shape dependent scattering and absorption characteristics must be known. At present, the assumed shape remains highly uncertain because BC particles are fractal-like, being agglomerates of smaller (20-40 nm) spherules, yet traditional optical models such as Mie theory typically assume a spherical particle morphology. To investigate the ability of various optical models to reproduce observed BC optical properties, we measured light absorption and extinction coefficients of methane and ethylene flame soot particles. Optical properties were measured by multiple instruments: absorption by a dual cavity ringdown photoacoustic spectrometer (CRD-PAS), absorption and scattering by a 3-wavelength photoacoustic/nephelometer spectrometer (PASS-3) and extinction and scattering by a cavity attenuated phase shift spectrometer (CAPS). Soot particle mass was quantified using a centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA) and mobility size was measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). Measurements were made for nascent soot particles and for collapsed soot particles following coating with dioctyl sebacate or sulfuric acid and thermal denuding to remove the coating. Wavelength-dependent refractive indices for the sampled particles were derived by fitting the observed absorption and extinction cross-sections to spherical particle Mie theory and Rayleigh-Debye-Gans theory. The Rayleigh-Debye-Gans approximation assumes that the absorption properties of soot are dictated by the individual spherules and neglects interaction between them. In general, Mie theory reproduces the observed absorption and extinction cross-sections for particles with volume equivalent diameters (VED) < ~160 nm, but systematically predicts lower

  14. Optical pump terahertz probe studies of semiconducting polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Paul D.

    Optical-pump terahertz-probe spectroscopy (OPTP) has been applied to study charge generation, transport and the evolution of the photo-induced excited states in thin film organic semiconductors, with emphasis on their relevance to photovoltaic technology. In these experiments the response of the photoexcited material to the AC electric field of a terahertz (THz) pulse was measured. From this response, the evolution of the complex conductivity in the far-infrared was monitored. OPTP presents advantages over other techniques by being an all-optical probe of the complex conductivity over nanometer scale distances with sub-picosecond resolution and exhibits particular sensitivity to carrier scattering rates, which typically lay in the THz range. Conductivity models were applied to the extracted conductivity curves in order to determine technologically relevant quantities like the charge carrier mobility and external quantum yield of charge carrier generation. We observed charge carriers generated on a subpicosecond time scale in thin films of polyhexylthiophene (P3HT). Through application of the Drude-Smith model (DSM) over the 0-2 THz band, we determined a room temperature intrinsic mobility of about 30 cm2/Vs. The temperature dependence of the conductivity dynamics showed signs of thermally activated polaron hopping influenced by torsional disorder. Both above and below gap excitation resulted in similar dynamics, showing that the majority of carriers recombine within 1 ps. We were able to observe charge transfer occurring on a sub-ps timescale to the soluble fullerene, PCBM, for both excited states, demonstrating that narrow gap polymers can be blended with PCBM for photovoltaic applications. We observed charge carrier generated on a sub-ps time scale in thin amorphous films of metalated polymers. The time evolution of the conductivity showed that charge carriers recombine and only excitons persist after 100 ps. This characteristic appears to be common to amorphous

  15. Mathematical modeling of multiresonance problems in nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Julie A.

    2000-10-01

    We have explored asymptotic and exact solution methods for equations modeling multi-resonant interactions of light with optical media. For two-level media that are inhomogeneously broadened, we find small amplitude asymptotic solutions using the method of multiple scales. For Λ-type three level media, in which the ground state of the two level atom has two degenerated ground sublevels, we employ the inverse scattering transform to find exact solutions and then use parametrizations to plot the solutions on simple manifolds such as spheres and ellipses. We have used the method of multiple scales on completely integrable two-level Maxwell-Bloch system in order to find the leading order behavior of ``small'' solutions. The solution technique we have employed involves computing the small-amplitude expansion on the equations and also directly on the Lax Pair at every step of the calculation to ensure that integrability is retained. Thus, the ``secularity condition,'' which eliminates the growing terms and produces the successive approximate equations in the method of multiple scales, must also satisfy the compatibility condition of the Lax pair at each level of approximation. In the limit of low intensity, the electric field becomes a sum of plane waves with small and slowly-modulated amplitudes. These amplitudes are described by the nonlinear Schrodinger equations. We have calculated solutions of the three-level Maxwell- Bloch equations in the ``Lambda'' configuration that represent the switching of light polarization in a nonlinear resonant optically active medium. These are special solutions of soliton type, and correspond to the physical setup in which initially only one of the two less energetic atomic quantum levels in the optical medium is populated by electrons. In order to display the physical properties of the polarization switching solutions, we used the Stokes' sphere representation from optics to display the polarization of light. We also used the Euler

  16. Dedicated spectrometers based on diffractive optics: design, modelling and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Løvhaugen, O.; Johansen, I.-R.; Bakke, K. A. H.; Fismen, B. G.; Nicolas, S.

    The described design of diffractive optical elements for low cost IR-spectrometers gives a built-in wavelength reference and allows 'spectral arithmetic' to be implemented in the optical performance of the DOE. The diffractive element combines the function of the lenses and the grating and eliminates the need for alignment of those components in the standard scanned grating spectrometer design. The element gives out a set of foci, each with one spectral component, which are scanned across a detector, thus relaxing the demands for scan angle control. It can thus be regarded as an alternative solution to a beam splitter and band pass filter instrument. Software tools have been designed to ease the adaptation of the design to different applications. To model the performance of the spectrometers we have implemented a scalar Rayleigh-Sommerfeldt diffraction model. The gold-coated elements are produced by injection moulding using a compact disc (CD) moulding technique and mould inlays mastered by e-beam lithography. The optimized selection of wavelength bands and the classification of the measured signal use a combination of principal component analysis and robust statistical methods. Typical applications will be material characterization of recycled plastics and gas monitoring. Spectrometers for two different applications have been built and tested. Comparisons between the design goals and the measured performance have been made and show good agreements.

  17. Modelling thermal transfer in optically stimulated luminescence of quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagonis, V.; Chen, R.; Wintle, A. G.

    2007-02-01

    A previously published kinetic model for the production of luminescence signals in quartz is used to investigate the production of thermally transferred optically stimulated luminescence (TT-OSL) signals. This paper provides a mathematical description of the thermal transfer mechanism for two different phenomena that have been observed in previously published experiments (Aitken and Smith 1988 Quat. Sci. Rev. 7 387-93). The starting point is the model proposed by Bailey (2001 Radiat. Meas. 33 17-45). The numerical values of some of the parameters are varied so that they match the experimental data. The effect caused by varying these values is investigated. The first of these phenomena takes place after storing optically bleached samples at room temperature; this involves the traps responsible for the 110 °C thermoluminescence (TL) peak of quartz acting as a refuge trap. The second phenomenon concerns OSL signals that are induced by heating the samples after the bleaching of the OSL signal and involves a putative TL peak at ~230 °C associated with the refuge trap; specifically, the paper presents a simulation of the temperature dependence of the OSL signal measured by successively heating the quartz samples to higher temperatures up to ~400 °C.

  18. Multiscale modeling and computation of optically manipulated nano devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Gang; Liu, Di; Luo, Songting

    2016-07-01

    We present a multiscale modeling and computational scheme for optical-mechanical responses of nanostructures. The multi-physical nature of the problem is a result of the interaction between the electromagnetic (EM) field, the molecular motion, and the electronic excitation. To balance accuracy and complexity, we adopt the semi-classical approach that the EM field is described classically by the Maxwell equations, and the charged particles follow the Schrödinger equations quantum mechanically. To overcome the numerical challenge of solving the high dimensional multi-component many-body Schrödinger equations, we further simplify the model with the Ehrenfest molecular dynamics to determine the motion of the nuclei, and use the Time-Dependent Current Density Functional Theory (TD-CDFT) to calculate the excitation of the electrons. This leads to a system of coupled equations that computes the electromagnetic field, the nuclear positions, and the electronic current and charge densities simultaneously. In the regime of linear responses, the resonant frequencies initiating the out-of-equilibrium optical-mechanical responses can be formulated as an eigenvalue problem. A self-consistent multiscale method is designed to deal with the well separated space scales. The isomerization of azobenzene is presented as a numerical example.

  19. Validation of document image defect models for optical character recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Lopresti, D.; Tomkins, A.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper we consider the problem of evaluating models for physical defects affecting the optical character recognition (OCR) process. While a number of such models have been proposed, the contention that they produce the desired result is typically argued in an ad hoc and informal way. We introduce a rigorous and more pragmatic definition of when a model is accurate: we say a defect model is validated if the OCR errors induced by the model are effectively indistinguishable from the errors encountered when using real scanned documents. We present two measures to quantify this similarity: the Vector Space method and the Coin Bias method. The former adapts an approach used in information retrieval, the latter simulates an observer attempting to do better than a {open_quotes}random{close_quotes} guesser. We compare and contrast the two techniques based on experimental data; both seem to work well, suggesting this is an appropriate formalism for the development and evaluation of document image defect models.

  20. Optical Property Trends in Metal/Polymer (Ag/PVDF) Nanocomposites: A Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, Christopher Kenneth

    Metal-polymer nanocomposite materials were found to have highly tunable optical properties. Density functional theory-based calculations were employed to study trends in Ag/polyvinylidene fluoride nanocomposite optical properties. The frequency-dependent imaginary part of the dielectric constant was calculated from dipolar inter-band transitions. The metallic inclusion introduced both occupied and unoccupied states into the large polymer band gap. Thus, higher inclusion volume fractions generally led to stronger composite optical response. Spectra from monodisperse systems correlated well with nanoparticle quantum confinement models. A polydisperse system exhibited optical properties that correlated best with interparticle distances along the field direction. Nanodisk and nanorod-shaped inclusions had tunable response from field polarization, aspect ratio, crystallographic projections, and nanorod end-cap morphology.

  1. Third order optical nonlinearity and optical limiting studies of propane hydrazides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseema, K.; Manjunatha, K. B.; Sujith, K. V.; Umesh, G.; Kalluraya, Balakrishna; Rao, Vijayalakshmi

    2012-09-01

    Four hydrazones, 2-(4-isobutylphenyl)-N'-[phenylmethylene] propanehydrazide (P1), 2-(4-isobutylphenyl)-N'-[(4- tolyl)methylene] propane hydrazide (P2), 2-(4-isobutylphenyl)-N'-[1-(4- chlorophenyl)ethylidene] propanehydrazide (P3) and 2-(4-isobutylphenyl)-N'-[1-(4-Nitrrophenyl)ethylidene] propane hydrazide (P4) were synthesized and their third order nonlinear optical properties have been investigated using a single beam Z-scan technique with nanosecond laser pulses at 532 nm. The measurement on the compound-P1 is not reported as there is no detectable nonlinear response. Open aperture data of the other three compounds indicate two photon absorption at this wavelength. The nonlinear refractive index n2, nonlinear absorption coefficient β, magnitude of effective third order susceptibility χ(3), the second order hyperpolarizability γh and the coupling factor ρ have been estimated. The values obtained are comparable with the values obtained for 4-methoxy chalcone derivatives and dibenzylideneacetone derivatives. The experimentally determined values of β, n2, Re χ(3) and Im χ(3), γh and ρ of the compound-P4 are 1.42 cm/GW, -0.619 × 10-11 esu, -0.663 × 10-13 esu, 0.22 × 10-13 esu, 0.34 × 10-32 esu and 0.33 respectively. Further the compound-P4 exhibited the best optical power limiting behavior at 532 nm among the compounds studied. Our studies suggest that compounds P2, P3 and P4 are potential candidates for the optical device applications such as optical limiters and optical switches.

  2. New Methods of Optical Modeling for Astronomical Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutin, B.

    1996-05-01

    A new raytracing program written by the author is being used to model the Keck II telescope and two new instruments currently being built at UCO/Lick Observatory, DEIMOS and ESI. Optical systems are written as programs in a block-structured programming language which includes arbitrary mathematical expressions. Full three-dimensional models of the telescope and instruments are raytraced, and a complete description of the final system can be written as an AutoCAD file for mechanical engineering purposes. Detailed spectral format, distortion, image diameters, and beam "footprints" at any surface are easily displayed. Light losses from surface reflections and internal absorption in refractive elements and vignetting are calculated. Examples of each of these uses are given for either the DEIMOS or ESI instruments.

  3. Threshold studies of pulsed confocal unstable optical parametric oscillators.

    PubMed

    Gong, Mali; Zou, Shanshan; Chen, Gang; Yan, Ping; Liu, Qiang; Huang, Lei

    2004-06-28

    A theoretical threshold model based on the spherical wave assumption for a pulsed double-pass pumped singly resonant confocal positive-branch unstable optical parametric oscillator (OPO) has been proposed. It is demonstrated that this model is also applicable to the plane-parallel resonator in the special case. The OPO threshold as a function of important parameters such as the cavity magnification factor, cavity physical length, crystal length, pump pulsewidth, output coupler reflectance and crystal position inside the resonator has been presented. Experimental data show the good agreement with the results obtained from the theoretical model. PMID:19483810

  4. Study of Optical Mode Scrambling of Fiber Optics for High Precision Radial Velocity Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassette, Anthony; Ge, Jian; Jeram, Sarik; Klanot, Khaya; Ma, Bo; Varosi, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Optical Fibers have been used throughout Astronomy for spectroscopy with spectrographs located some distance away from the telescope. This fiber-fed design has greatly increased precision for radial velocity (RV) measurements. However, due to the incomplete fiber illumination mode scrambling in the radial direction, high resolution spectrographs with regular circular fibers have suffered RV uncertainties on the order of a few to tens of m/s with stellar observations, which largely limited their sensitivity in detecting and characterizing low mass planets around stars. At the University of Florida, we studied mode scrambling gain of a few different optical devices, such as three-lens optical double scramblers, octagonal fibers and low numerical aperture fibers with a goal to find an optimal mode scrambling solution for the TOU optical very high resolution spectrograph (R=100,000, 0.38-0.9 microns) and FIRST near infrared high resolution spectrograph (R=60,000, 0.9-1.8 microns) for the on-going Dharma Planet Survey. This presentation will report our lab measurement results and also stellar RV measurements at the observatories.

  5. Integrating the Advanced Human Eye Model (AHEM) and optical instrument models to model complete visual optical systems inclusive of the typical or atypical eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, William J., III

    2012-06-01

    PURPOSE: To present a commercially available optical modeling software tool to assist the development of optical instrumentation and systems that utilize and/or integrate with the human eye. METHODS: A commercially available flexible eye modeling system is presented, the Advanced Human Eye Model (AHEM). AHEM is a module that the engineer can use to perform rapid development and test scenarios on systems that integrate with the eye. Methods include merging modeled systems initially developed outside of AHEM and performing a series of wizard-type operations that relieve the user from requiring an optometric or ophthalmic background to produce a complete eye inclusive system. Scenarios consist of retinal imaging of targets and sources through integrated systems. Uses include, but are not limited to, optimization, telescopes, microscopes, spectacles, contact and intraocular lenses, ocular aberrations, cataract simulation and scattering, and twin eye model (binocular) systems. RESULTS: Metrics, graphical data, and exportable CAD geometry are generated from the various modeling scenarios.

  6. Modeling of Distributed Sensing of Elastic Waves by Fiber-Optic Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Agbodjan Prince, Just; Kohl, Franz; Sauter, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the transduction of strain accompanying elastic waves in solids by firmly attached optical fibers. Stretching sections of optical fibers changes the time required by guided light to pass such sections. Exploiting interferometric techniques, highly sensitive fiber-optic strain transducers are feasible based on this fiber-intrinsic effect. The impact on the actual strain conversion of the fiber segment's shape and size, as well as its inclination to the elastic wavefront is studied. FEM analyses show that severe distortions of the interferometric response occur when the attached fiber length spans a noticeable fraction of the elastic wavelength. Analytical models of strain transduction are presented for typical transducer shapes. They are used to compute input-output relationships for the transduction of narrow-band strain pulses as a function of the mechanical wavelength. The described approach applies to many transducers depending on the distributed interaction with the investigated object. PMID:27608021

  7. Modeling of Distributed Sensing of Elastic Waves by Fiber-Optic Interferometry.

    PubMed

    Agbodjan Prince, Just; Kohl, Franz; Sauter, Thilo

    2016-09-06

    This paper deals with the transduction of strain accompanying elastic waves in solids by firmly attached optical fibers. Stretching sections of optical fibers changes the time required by guided light to pass such sections. Exploiting interferometric techniques, highly sensitive fiber-optic strain transducers are feasible based on this fiber-intrinsic effect. The impact on the actual strain conversion of the fiber segment's shape and size, as well as its inclination to the elastic wavefront is studied. FEM analyses show that severe distortions of the interferometric response occur when the attached fiber length spans a noticeable fraction of the elastic wavelength. Analytical models of strain transduction are presented for typical transducer shapes. They are used to compute input-output relationships for the transduction of narrow-band strain pulses as a function of the mechanical wavelength. The described approach applies to many transducers depending on the distributed interaction with the investigated object.

  8. Modeling of Distributed Sensing of Elastic Waves by Fiber-Optic Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Agbodjan Prince, Just; Kohl, Franz; Sauter, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the transduction of strain accompanying elastic waves in solids by firmly attached optical fibers. Stretching sections of optical fibers changes the time required by guided light to pass such sections. Exploiting interferometric techniques, highly sensitive fiber-optic strain transducers are feasible based on this fiber-intrinsic effect. The impact on the actual strain conversion of the fiber segment’s shape and size, as well as its inclination to the elastic wavefront is studied. FEM analyses show that severe distortions of the interferometric response occur when the attached fiber length spans a noticeable fraction of the elastic wavelength. Analytical models of strain transduction are presented for typical transducer shapes. They are used to compute input-output relationships for the transduction of narrow-band strain pulses as a function of the mechanical wavelength. The described approach applies to many transducers depending on the distributed interaction with the investigated object. PMID:27608021

  9. Enhancements to FDTD modeling for optical metrology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salski, Bartlomiej; Celuch, Malgorzata; Gwarek, Wojciech

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method based on discretised Maxwell curl equations and widely used in microwave circuit design - as a promising tool for new optical metrology purposes. We focus on periodic FDTD formulations for scattering problems. The interest in efficient full-wave modelling of periodic structures has arisen due to their increasing applications as slow wave transmission lines, photonic crystals, and metamaterials. Recently, new efforts have been made to incorporate the FDTD algorithms into the scatterometry overlay technology (SCOL) toolkit. In SCOL, multilayered grating targets on silicon wafers are illuminated with polarised light at a particular angle of incidence; reflected signal of the 0 th diffraction order is processed to extract the information about misalignment between grating layers. Since the illumination spot size typically covers tens or even hundreds of grating periods, direct 3D FDTD modelling of such an electrically large problem needs long computing times. The periodic FDTD algorithm discussed herein, built upon Floquet theorem, allows reduction of the modelling problem to one or just a few periods. As a consequence, it substantially speeds up the simulation. The incident wave is modelled as a plane wave. The reflected wave is extracted via near-to-far (NTF) transformation as in antenna analysis. We cross-calibrate the FDTD algorithm against other numerical techniques better established in optical metrology, like Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA). For a benchmark of multilayered rectangular grating composition illuminated with light within the 500 to 700 nm spectrum, we show that the FDTD and RCWA results for the 0 th diffraction order reflection coefficient are in excellent agreement. The FDTD approach is more flexible as it further allows quantitative characterisation of non-rectangular periodic structures, higher-order diffraction rays, and periodicity violation. This work was done in the

  10. [Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy animal model and its treatment applications].

    PubMed

    Chuman, Hideki

    2014-04-01

    Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is one of the most common acute unilaterally onset optic nerve diseases. One management problem in terms of NAION is the difficulty of differential diagnosis between NAION and anterior optic neuritis (ON). A second problem is that there is no established treatment for the acute stage of NAION. A third problem is that there is no preventive treatment for a subsequent attack on the fellow eye, estimated to occur in 15 to 25% of patients with NAION. For differentiation of acute NAION from anterior optic neuritis, we investigated the usefulness of laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG). In the normal control group, the tissue blood flow did not significantly differ between the right and left eyes. In the NAION group, all 6 patients had 29.5% decreased mean blur rate (MBR), which correlates to optic disc blood flow, of the NAION eye compared with the unaffected eye. In the anterior ON group, all 6 cases had 15.9% increased MBR of the anterior ON eye compared with the unaffected eye. Thus, LSFG showed a difference of the underlying pathophysiology between NAION and anterior ON despite showing disc swelling in both groups and could be useful for differentiating both groups. For the treatment of acute stage of NAION, we tried to reproduce the rodent model of NAION (rNAION) developed by Bernstein and colleagues. To induce rNAION, after the administration of rose bengal(RB) (2.5 mM) into the tail vein of SD rats, the small vessels of the left optic nerve were photoactivated using a 514 nm argon green laser (RB-laser-induction). In the RB-laser-induction eyes, the capillaries within the optic disc were reduced markedly, the optic disc became swollen, and fluorescein angiography showed filling defect in the choroid and the optic disc at an early stage, followed by hyperfluorescence at a late stage. Electrophysiological evaluation revealed that visual evoked potential (VEP) amplitude was significantly decreased but an electroretinogram

  11. Studies of interfaces and vapors with Optical Second Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, C. S.

    1993-12-01

    Optical Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) has been applied to the study of soap-like molecules adsorbed to the water-air interface. By calibrating the signal from a soluble monolayer with that of an insoluble homolog, absolute measurements of the surface density could be obtained and related to the bulk concentration and surface tension. We could then demonstrate that the soluble surfactant forms a single monolayer at the interface. Furthermore, it deviates significantly from the ideal case in that its activity coefficients are far from 1, yet those coefficients remain constant over a broad range of surface pressures. We present evidence of a first-order phase transition taking place during the adsorption of this soluble monolayer. We consider the effects of the non-ideal behavior and the phase transition on the microscopic model of adsorption, and formulate an alternative to the Langmuir picture of adsorption which is just as simple, yet it can more easily allow for non-ideal behavior. The second half of this thesis considers the problem of SHG in bulk metal vapors. The symmetry of the vapor forbids SHG, yet it has been observed. We consider several models whereby the symmetry of the vapor is broken by the presence of the laser and compare their predictions to new observations we have made using a few-picosecond laser pulse. The two-lobed output beam profile shows that it is the vapor-plus-beam combination whose symmetry is important. The dependence on vapor pressure demonstrates the coherent nature of the radiation, while the dependence on buffer gas pressure hints at a change of the symmetry in time. The time-dependence is measured directly with a preliminary pump-probe measurement. The magnitude and intensity dependence of the signal are also measured. All but one of the models are eliminated by this comparison.

  12. Optical modeling of plasma-deposited ZnO films: Electron scattering at different length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Knoops, Harm C. M. Loo, Bas W. H. van de; Smit, Sjoerd; Ponomarev, Mikhail V.; Weber, Jan-Willem; Sharma, Kashish; Kessels, Wilhelmus M. M.; Creatore, Mariadriana

    2015-03-15

    In this work, an optical modeling study on electron scattering mechanisms in plasma-deposited ZnO layers is presented. Because various applications of ZnO films pose a limit on the electron carrier density due to its effect on the film transmittance, higher electron mobility values are generally preferred instead. Hence, insights into the electron scattering contributions affecting the carrier mobility are required. In optical models, the Drude oscillator is adopted to represent the free-electron contribution and the obtained optical mobility can be then correlated with the macroscopic material properties. However, the influence of scattering phenomena on the optical mobility depends on the considered range of photon energy. For example, the grain-boundary scattering is generally not probed by means of optical measurements and the ionized-impurity scattering contribution decreases toward higher photon energies. To understand this frequency dependence and quantify contributions from different scattering phenomena to the mobility, several case studies were analyzed in this work by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry and Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The obtained electrical parameters were compared to the results inferred by Hall measurements. For intrinsic ZnO (i-ZnO), the in-grain mobility was obtained by fitting reflection data with a normal Drude model in the IR range. For Al-doped ZnO (Al:ZnO), besides a normal Drude fit in the IR range, an Extended Drude fit in the UV-vis range could be used to obtain the in-grain mobility. Scattering mechanisms for a thickness series of Al:ZnO films were discerned using the more intuitive parameter “scattering frequency” instead of the parameter “mobility”. The interaction distance concept was introduced to give a physical interpretation to the frequency dependence of the scattering frequency. This physical interpretation furthermore allows the prediction of which Drude models can be used in a specific

  13. Damage modeling and statistical analysis of optics damage performance in MJ-class laser systems.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhi M; Raymond, B; Gaylord, J; Fallejo, R; Bude, J; Wegner, P

    2014-11-17

    Modeling the lifetime of a fused silica optic is described for a multiple beam, MJ-class laser system. This entails combining optic processing data along with laser shot data to account for complete history of optic processing and shot exposure. Integrating with online inspection data allows for the construction of a performance metric to describe how an optic performs with respect to the model. This methodology helps to validate the damage model as well as allows strategic planning and identifying potential hidden parameters that are affecting the optic's performance.

  14. Optical coherence tomography and hyperspectral imaging of vascular recovery in a model of peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Kristin M.; Sit, Wesley W.; Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M.; Duvall, Craig L.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) leads to an increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke, increased mortality, and reduced quality of life. The mouse hind limb ischemia (HLI) model is the most commonly used system for studying the mechanisms of collateral vessel formation and for testing new PAD therapies, but there is a lack of techniques for acquiring physiologically-relevant, quantitative data intravitally in this model. In this work, non-invasive, quantitative optical imaging techniques were applied to the mouse HLI model over a time course. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaged changes in blood flow (Doppler OCT) and microvessel morphology (speckle variance OCT) through the skin of haired mice with high resolution. Hyperspectral imaging was also used to quantify blood oxygenation. In ischemic limbs, blood oxygenation in the footpad was substantially reduced after induction of ischemia followed by complete recovery by three weeks, consistent with standard measures. Three dimensional images of the vasculature distal to vessel occlusion acquired with speckle variance OCT revealed changes in OCT flow signal and vessel morphology. Taken together, OCT and hyperspectral imaging enable intravital acquisition of both functional and morphological data which fill critical gaps in understanding structure-function relationships that contribute to recovery in the mouse HLI model. Therefore, these optical imaging methods hold promise as tools for studying the mechanisms of vascular recovery and evaluating novel therapeutic treatments in preclinical studies.

  15. Modeling the influence of LASIK surgery on optical properties of the human eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szul-Pietrzak, Elżbieta; Hachoł, Andrzej; Cieślak, Krzysztof; Drożdż, Ryszard; Podbielska, Halina

    2011-11-01

    The aim was to model the influence of LASIK surgery on the optical parameters of the human eye and to ascertain which factors besides the central corneal radius of curvature and central thickness play the major role in postsurgical refractive change. Ten patients were included in the study. Pre- and postsurgical measurements included standard refraction, anterior corneal curvature and pachymetry. The optical model used in the analysis was based on the Le Grand and El Hage schematic eye, modified by the measured individual parameters of corneal geometry. A substantial difference between eye refractive error measured after LASIK and estimated from the eye model was observed. In three patients, full correction of the refractive error was achieved. However, analysis of the visual quality in terms of spot diagrams and optical transfer functions of the eye optical system revealed some differences in these measurements. This suggests that other factors besides corneal geometry may play a major role in postsurgical refraction. In this paper we investigated whether the biomechanical properties of the eyeball and changes in intraocular pressure could account for the observed discrepancies.

  16. Nuclear mean field and double-folding model of the nucleus-nucleus optical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoa, Dao T.; Phuc, Nguyen Hoang; Loan, Doan Thi; Loc, Bui Minh

    2016-09-01

    Realistic density dependent CDM3Yn versions of the M3Y interaction have been used in an extended Hartree-Fock (HF) calculation of nuclear matter (NM), with the nucleon single-particle potential determined from the total NM energy based on the Hugenholtz-van Hove theorem that gives rise naturally to a rearrangement term (RT). Using the RT of the single-nucleon potential obtained exactly at different NM densities, the density and energy dependence of the CDM3Yn interactions was modified to account properly for both the RT and observed energy dependence of the nucleon optical potential. Based on a local density approximation, the double-folding model of the nucleus-nucleus optical potential has been extended to take into account consistently the rearrangement effect and energy dependence of the nuclear mean-field potential, using the modified CDM3Yn interactions. The extended double-folding model was applied to study the elastic 12C+12C and 16O+12C scattering at the refractive energies, where the Airy structure of the nuclear rainbow has been well established. The RT was found to affect significantly the real nucleus-nucleus optical potential at small internuclear distances, giving a potential strength close to that implied by the realistic optical model description of the Airy oscillation.

  17. Modeling Saharan dust emissions, transport, deposition, and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colarco, Peter Richard

    We simulate Saharan dust emissions, transport, and removal with a three-dimensional aerosol transport model driven by assimilated meteorology. We explore dust distributions and optical properties for model runs over the tropical North Atlantic for time periods covering the ACE-2 (summer 1997, Canary Islands) and PRIDE (summer 2000, Puerto Rico) field experiments. Modeled dust fields are compared to ground-based, in situ, and satellite observations. Dust imaginary refractive index and single scatter albedo at UV wavelengths are inferred near source regions by computing the TOMS Aerosol Index from modeled dust fields. Our results indicate a dust aerosol that is considerably less absorbing than previous estimates. The timing of downwind dust events is generally uncorrelated with the details of the dust source process, indicating the dust exists in a persistent reservoir over source regions and the timing of its transport to remote regions is most strongly controlled by the transporting dynamics. Our model simulates the complicated vertical distributions of dust observed over Puerto Rico. The dust vertical distribution is controlled by sedimentation of dust particles and a general descending air motion over the tropical North Atlantic. Low-level dust can be transported directly from source regions, but the majority of it is efficiently eroded away in transit by wet removal processes. Our computed estimates of iron deposition fluxes into the North Atlantic are in reasonable agreement with estimates based on station data.

  18. Research Studies on Advanced Optical Module/Head Designs for Optical Disk Recording Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, James J.; Seery, Bernard D.

    1993-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Optical Data Storage Center of the University of Arizona is presented. Summary reports on continuing projects are presented. Research areas include: magneto-optic media, optical heads, and signal processing.

  19. Experimental study of optical storage characteristics of photochromic material: pyrrylfulgide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ming; Yao, Baoli; Chen, Yi; Han, Yong; Wang, Congmin; Wang, Yingli; Menke, Neimule; Chen, Guofu; Fan, Meigong

    2003-04-01

    Optical data storage is a frontier in the information science. Currently, there are mainly two kinds of storage materials, i.e., thermal-optic and photonic materials. The storage methods are divided into serial and parallel modes. In the market, the mature technique is CD-RW, which uses the thermal-optic material and serial method. The storage density of the CD-RW is restricted by the size of material particles, the conduction of heat, etc. Besides, the recording speed is seriously limited by the process of heating. Photonic materials and parallel method will be the trend in the optical data storage. Because it is based on the photon reaction on the molecule scale, the storage density and speed will be greatly increased. In this paper, a new kind of organic photochromic material -- pyrrylfulgide was studied. A parallel optical data storage system was established. Using the pyrrylfulgide/PMMA film as a recording medium, micro-images and binary digital information could be recorded, readout and erased in this parallel system. The recorded information on the film can be kept for at least 8 months in dark at room temperature. So far, the storage density is 3 x 107 bit/cm2.

  20. Comprehensive study on the concept of temporal optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Junhe; Zheng, Guozeng; Wu, Jianjie

    2016-06-01

    Time and space are dual variables which bring a lot of analogies during theoretical study. In this paper, we extend the concept of a spatial optical waveguide to the temporal domain. Here we show that it is possible to confine the optical pulse within a time interval by introducing the temporal index boundaries. The confined pulse will propagate at a speed of the index change in the waveguide, and it will be behind the original optical pulse which propagates without the temporal index variations. In this way, we may offer an approach to broaden the bandwidth of the slow light and to tune the light speed based on the existing slow light devices. The temporal waveguide has modes, which are the temporal waveforms maintaining their shapes during the propagation. In a single-mode temporal waveguide, the pulse retains its shape as the only mode of the waveguide just like an optical soliton. In a multimode temporal waveguide, multimode interference effect exists, which can duplicate a single pulse into multiple copies and be potentially implemented for all-optical signal processing.

  1. Statistical Studies of Ground-Based Optical Lightning Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, C. R.; Nemzek, R. J.; Suszcynsky, D. M.

    2005-12-01

    Most extensive optical studies of lightning have been conducted from orbit, and the statistics of events collected from earth are relatively poorly documented. The time signatures of optical power measured in the presence of clouds are inevitably affected by scattering,which can distort the signatures by extending and delaying the amplitude profile in time. We have deployed two all-sky photodiode detectors, one in New Mexico and one in Oklahoma, which are gathering data alongside electric field change monitors as part of the LANL EDOTX Great Plains Array. Preliminary results show that the photodiode is sensitive to approximately 50% or more of RF events detected at ranges of up to 30 km, and still has some sensitivity at ranges in excess of 60 km (distances determined by the EDOTX field-change array). The shapes of events within this range were assessed, with focus on rise time, width, peak power, and their correlation to corresponding electric field signatures, and these are being compared with published on-orbit and ground-based data. Initial findings suggest a mean characteristic width (ratio of total detected optical energy to peak power) of 291 +/- 12 microseconds and a mean delay between the RF signal peak and optical peak of 121 +/- 17 microseconds. These values fall between prior ground-based measurements of direct return stroke emissions, and scattering-dominated on-orbit measurements. This work will promote better understanding of the correspondence between radio and optical measurements of lightning.

  2. A closure study of aerosol optical properties at a regional background mountainous site in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liang; Yin, Yan; Xiao, Hui; Yu, Xingna; Hao, Jian; Chen, Kui; Liu, Chao

    2016-04-15

    There is a large uncertainty in evaluating the radiative forcing from aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interactions due to the limited knowledge on aerosol properties. In-situ measurements of aerosol physical and chemical properties were carried out in 2012 at Mt. Huang (the Yellow Mountain), a continental background mountainous site in eastern China. An aerosol optical closure study was performed to verify the model outputs by using the measured aerosol optical properties, in which a spherical Mie model with assumptions of external and core-shell mixtures on the basis of a two-component optical aerosol model and high size-segregated element carbon (EC) ratio was applied. Although the spherical Mie model would underestimate the real scattering with increasing particle diameters, excellent agreement between the calculated and measured values was achieved with correlation coefficients above 0.98. Sensitivity experiments showed that the EC ratio had a negligible effect on the calculated scattering coefficient, but largely influenced the calculated absorption coefficient. The high size-segregated EC ratio averaged over the study period in the closure was enough to reconstruct the aerosol absorption coefficient in the Mie model, indicating EC size resolution was more important than time resolution in retrieving the absorption coefficient in the model. The uncertainties of calculated scattering and absorption coefficients due to the uncertainties of measurements and model assumptions yielded by a Monte Carlo simulation were ±6% and ±14% for external mixture and ±9% and ±31% for core-shell mixture, respectively. This study provided an insight into the inherent relationship between aerosol optical properties and physicochemical characteristics in eastern China, which could supplement the database of aerosol optical properties for background sites in eastern China and provide a method for regions with similar climate.

  3. Magneto-optical and photoemission studies of ultrathin wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Bader, S.D.; Li, Dongqi

    1995-12-01

    Magnetic phase transitions of Fe wedges grown epitaxially on Cu(100) are detected via the surface magneto-optical Kerr effect and used to construct a phase diagram for face centered Fe. Also, the confinement of Cu sp- and d-quantum-well states is studied for Cu/Co(wedge)/Cu(100) utilizing undulator-based photoemission experiments.

  4. The Zoom Lens: A Case Study in Geometrical Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheville, Alan; Scepanovic, Misa

    2002-01-01

    Introduces a case study on a motion picture company considering the purchase of a newly developed zoom lens in which students act as the engineers designing the zoom lens based on the criteria of company's specifications. Focuses on geometrical optics. Includes teaching notes and classroom management strategies. (YDS)

  5. Finite Element Studies Of Tangent Mounted Conical Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoneking, J.; Casstevens, J.; Stillman, D.

    1982-12-01

    This paper presents experimental and analytical results from a study investigating the effect of centrifugal force and gravity on two candidate mirror fixture designs to be used on a diamond-turning ma-chine. The authors illustrate and discuss the use of the finite element method as an aid in the design and fabrication of high precision metallic optical components.

  6. Optical studies of high-temperature superconducting cuprates.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Setsuko

    2016-09-01

    The optical studies of high-temperature superconducting cuprates (HTSC) are reviewed. From the doping dependence of room temperature spectra, a dramatic change of the electronic state from a Mott (charge transfer) insulator to a Fermi liquid has been revealed. Additionally, the unusual 2D nature of the electronic state has been found. The temperature dependence of the optical spectra provided a rich source of information on the pseudogap, superconducting gap, Josephson plasmon, transverse Josephson plasma mode and precursory superconductivity. Among these issues, Josephson plasmons and transverse Josephson plasma mode were experimentally discovered by optical measurements, and thus are unique to HTSC. The effect of the spin/charge stripe order is also unique to HTSC, reflecting the conducting nature of the stripe order in this system. The pair-breaking due to the stripe order seems stronger in the out-of-plane direction than in the in-plane one. PMID:27472654

  7. Combining Radar and Optical Data for Forest Disturbance Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranson, K. Jon; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Disturbance is an important factor in determining the carbon balance and succession of forests. Until the early 1990's researchers have focused on using optical or thermal sensors to detect and map forest disturbances from wild fires, logging or insect outbreaks. As part of a NASA Siberian mapping project, a study evaluated the capability of three different radar sensors (ERS, JERS and Radarsat) and an optical sensor (Landsat 7) to detect fire scars, logging and insect damage in the boreal forest. This paper describes the data sets and techniques used to evaluate the use of remote sensing to detect disturbance in central Siberian forests. Using images from each sensor individually and combined an assessment of the utility of using these sensors was developed. Transformed Divergence analysis and maximum likelihood classification revealed that Landsat data was the single best data type for this purpose. However, the combined use of the three radar and optical sensors did improve the results of discriminating these disturbances.

  8. Optical tweezers force measurements to study parasites chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Thomaz, A. A.; Pozzo, L. Y.; Fontes, A.; Almeida, D. B.; Stahl, C. V.; Santos-Mallet, J. R.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Feder, D.; Ayres, D. C.; Giorgio, S.; Cesar, C. L.

    2009-07-01

    In this work, we propose a methodology to study microorganisms chemotaxis in real time using an Optical Tweezers system. Optical Tweezers allowed real time measurements of the force vectors, strength and direction, of living parasites under chemical or other kinds of gradients. This seems to be the ideal tool to perform observations of taxis response of cells and microorganisms with high sensitivity to capture instantaneous responses to a given stimulus. Forces involved in the movement of unicellular parasites are very small, in the femto-pico-Newton range, about the same order of magnitude of the forces generated in an Optical Tweezers. We applied this methodology to investigate the Leishmania amazonensis (L. amazonensis) and Trypanossoma cruzi (T. cruzi) under distinct situations.

  9. Simultaneous photoacoustic and optically mediated ultrasound microscopy: phantom study.

    PubMed

    Subochev, Pavel; Katichev, Alexey; Morozov, Andrey; Orlova, Anna; Kamensky, Vladislav; Turchin, Ilya

    2012-11-15

    An experimental setup for combined photoacoustic (PA) and optically mediated ultrasound (US) microscopy is presented. A spherically focused 35 MHz polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) ultrasonic detector with a numerical aperture of 0.28, a focal distance of 9 mm, and a bandwidth (-6 dB level) of 24 MHz was used to obtain PA and US data with a 3 mm imaging depth. A fiber-optic system was employed to deliver laser excitation pulses from a tunable laser to the studied medium. A single optical pulse was used to form both PA and US A-scans. The probing US pulses were generated thermoelastically due to absorption of backscattered laser radiation by the metalized surface of a PVDF film. PMID:23164853

  10. Optical studies of high-temperature superconducting cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, Setsuko

    2016-09-01

    The optical studies of high-temperature superconducting cuprates (HTSC) are reviewed. From the doping dependence of room temperature spectra, a dramatic change of the electronic state from a Mott (charge transfer) insulator to a Fermi liquid has been revealed. Additionally, the unusual 2D nature of the electronic state has been found. The temperature dependence of the optical spectra provided a rich source of information on the pseudogap, superconducting gap, Josephson plasmon, transverse Josephson plasma mode and precursory superconductivity. Among these issues, Josephson plasmons and transverse Josephson plasma mode were experimentally discovered by optical measurements, and thus are unique to HTSC. The effect of the spin/charge stripe order is also unique to HTSC, reflecting the conducting nature of the stripe order in this system. The pair-breaking due to the stripe order seems stronger in the out-of-plane direction than in the in-plane one.

  11. Modeling silica aerogel optical performance by determining its radiative properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lin; Yang, Sungwoo; Bhatia, Bikram; Strobach, Elise; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2016-02-01

    Silica aerogel has been known as a promising candidate for high performance transparent insulation material (TIM). Optical transparency is a crucial metric for silica aerogels in many solar related applications. Both scattering and absorption can reduce the amount of light transmitted through an aerogel slab. Due to multiple scattering, the transmittance deviates from the Beer-Lambert law (exponential attenuation). To better understand its optical performance, we decoupled and quantified the extinction contributions of absorption and scattering separately by identifying two sets of radiative properties. The radiative properties are deduced from the measured total transmittance and reflectance spectra (from 250 nm to 2500 nm) of synthesized aerogel samples by solving the inverse problem of the 1-D Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE). The obtained radiative properties are found to be independent of the sample geometry and can be considered intrinsic material properties, which originate from the aerogel's microstructure. This finding allows for these properties to be directly compared between different samples. We also demonstrate that by using the obtained radiative properties, we can model the photon transport in aerogels of arbitrary shapes, where an analytical solution is difficult to obtain.

  12. Study of laser reflection of infrared cameras with germanium optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Patrio; Shih, Ishiang; Shi, S.; Laou, Philips

    2003-09-01

    Infrared cameras are widely used in today's battlefield for surveillance purpose. Because of retroreflection, an incident laser beam entering the camera optics results in a beam reflecting back to the direction of the laser source. An IR detector positioned close to the laser source can then detect the reflected beam. This effect can reveal the location of the cameras and thus increases the risk of covert operations. In the present work, the characteristics of the retroreflection is studied. It is found that the reflection intensity is high when the incident beam enters through the middle part of the lenses while it is low and the beam is diverged when entering through the outer part of the lenses. The reflection is symmetric when the incident beam is normal to the lenses while asymmetric when it is incident with an angle to the lenses. In order to study the potential effects on retroreflection of modified camera optics, IR low index slides (ZnSe and KCl with refractive indices of 2.49 and 1.54, respectively) with different thicknesses (2mm, 4mm and 6mm) are placed in the optical system. The result shows that the focal point of the lenses is changed by the addition of the slide but the optical paths of the reflection remain unchanged. The relationship between the different slides and beam intensity is also studied.

  13. Optical characterization of murine model's in-vivo skin using Mueller matrix polarimetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora-Núñez, Azael; Martinez-Ponce, Geminiano; Garcia-Torales, Guillermo

    2015-12-01

    Mueller matrix polarimetric imaging (MMPI) provides a complete characterization of an anisotropic optical medium. Subsequent single value decomposition allows image interpretation in terms of basic optical anisotropies, such as depolarization, diattenuation, and retardance. In this work, healthy in-vivo skin at different anatomical locations of a biological model (Rattus norvegicus) was imaged by the MMPI technique using 532nm coherent illumination. The body parts under study were back, abdomen, tail, and calvaria. Because skin components are randomly distributed and skin thickness depends on its location, polarization measures arise from the average over a single detection element (pixel) and on the number of free optical paths, respectively. Optical anisotropies over the imaged skin indicates, mainly, the presence of components related to the physiology of the explored region. In addition, a MMPI-based comparison between a tumor on the back of one test subject and proximal healthy skin was made. The results show that the single values of optical anisotropies can be helpful in distinguishing different areas of in-vivo skin and also lesions.

  14. Long range effects on the optical model of 6He around the Coulomb barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-García, J. P.; Rodríguez-Gallardo, M.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Moro, A. M.

    2010-09-01

    We present an optical model (OM) analysis of the elastic scattering data of the reactions 6He + 27Al and 6He + 208Pb at incident energies around the Coulomb barrier. The bare part of the optical potential is constructed microscopically by means of a double folding procedure, using the São Paulo prescription without any renormalization. This bare interaction is supplemented with a Coulomb dipole polarization (CDP) potential, which takes into account the effect of the dipole Coulomb interaction. For this CDP potential, we use an analytical formula derived from the semiclassical theory of Coulomb excitation. The rest of the optical potential is parametrized in terms of Woods-Saxon shapes. In the 6He + 208Pb case, the analysis confirms the presence of long range components, in agreement with previous works. Four-body Continuum-Discretized Coupled-Channels calculations have been performed in order to better understand the features of the optical potentials found in the OM analysis. This study searches to elucidate some aspects of the optical potential of weakly bound systems, such as the dispersion relation and the long range (attractive and absorptive) mechanisms.

  15. Virtual optical network provisioning with unified service logic processing model for software-defined multidomain optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongli; Li, Shikun; Song, Yinan; Sun, Ji; Zhang, Jie

    2015-12-01

    Hierarchical control architecture is designed for software-defined multidomain optical networks (SD-MDONs), and a unified service logic processing model (USLPM) is first proposed for various applications. USLPM-based virtual optical network (VON) provisioning process is designed, and two VON mapping algorithms are proposed: random node selection and per controller computation (RNS&PCC) and balanced node selection and hierarchical controller computation (BNS&HCC). Then an SD-MDON testbed is built with OpenFlow extension in order to support optical transport equipment. Finally, VON provisioning service is experimentally demonstrated on the testbed along with performance verification.

  16. Psychophysical testing in rodent models of glaucomatous optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Stephanie L; Koulen, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Processing of visual information begins in the retina, with photoreceptors converting light stimuli into neural signals. Ultimately, signals are transmitted to the brain through signaling networks formed by interneurons, namely bipolar, horizontal and amacrine cells providing input to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which form the optic nerve with their axons. As part of the chronic nature of glaucomatous optic neuropathy, the increasing and irreversible damage and ultimately loss of neurons, RGCs in particular, occurs following progressive damage to the optic nerve head (ONH), eventually resulting in visual impairment and visual field loss. There are two behavioral assays that are typically used to assess visual deficits in glaucoma rodent models, the visual water task and the optokinetic drum. The visual water task can assess an animal's ability to distinguish grating patterns that are associated with an escape from water. The optokinetic drum relies on the optomotor response, a reflex turning of the head and neck in the direction of the visual stimuli, which usually consists of rotating black and white gratings. This reflex is a physiological response critical for keeping the image stable on the retina. Driven initially by the neuronal input from direction-selective RGCs, this reflex is comprised of a number of critical sensory and motor elements. In the presence of repeatable and defined stimuli, this reflex is extremely well suited to analyze subtle changes in the circuitry and performance of retinal neurons. Increasing the cycles of these alternating gratings per degree, or gradually reducing the contrast of the visual stimuli, threshold levels can be determined at which the animal is no longer tracking the stimuli, and thereby visual function of the animal can be determined non-invasively. Integrating these assays into an array of outcome measures that determine multiple aspects of visual function is a central goal in vision research and can be realized, for

  17. Integrated Modeling Activities for the James Webb Space Telescope: Optical Jitter Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, T. Tupper; Ha, Kong Q.; Johnston, John D.; Howard, Joseph M.; Mosier, Gary E.

    2004-01-01

    This is a continuation of a series of papers on the integrated modeling activities for the James Webb Space Telescope(JWST). Starting with the linear optical model discussed in part one, and using the optical sensitivities developed in part two, we now assess the optical image motion and wavefront errors from the structural dynamics. This is often referred to as "jitter: analysis. The optical model is combined with the structural model and the control models to create a linear structural/optical/control model. The largest jitter is due to spacecraft reaction wheel assembly disturbances which are harmonic in nature and will excite spacecraft and telescope structural. The structural/optic response causes image quality degradation due to image motion (centroid error) as well as dynamic wavefront error. Jitter analysis results are used to predict imaging performance, improve the structural design, and evaluate the operational impact of the disturbance sources.

  18. Histologic models for optical tomography and spectroscopy of tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhargava, Rohit; Davis, Brynmor J.

    2009-02-01

    Histologic information is often the ground truth against which imaging technology performance is measured. Typically, this information is limited, however, due to the need to excise tissue, stain it and have the tissue section manually reviewed. As a consequence, histologic models of actual tissues are difficult to acquire and are generally prohibitively expensive. Models and phantoms for imaging development, hence, have to be simple and reproducible for concordance between different groups developing the same imaging methods but may not reflect tissue structure. Here, we propose a route to histologic information that does not involve the use of human review nor does it require specialized dyes or stains. We combine mid-infrared Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy with imaging to record data from tissue sections. Attendant numerical algorithms are used to convert the data to histologic information. Additionally, the biochemical nature of the recorded information can be used to generate contrast for other modalities. We propose that this histologic model and spectroscopic generation of contrast can serve as standard for testing and design aid for tomography and spectroscopy of tissues. We discuss here the biochemical and statistical issues involved in creating histologic models and demonstrate the use of the approach in generating optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of prostate tissue samples.

  19. Optical closure study on light-absorbing aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petzold, Andreas; Bundke, Ulrich; Freedman, Andrew; Onasch, Timothy B.; Massoli, Paola; Andrews, Elizabeth; Hallar, Anna G.

    2014-05-01

    The in situ measurement of atmospheric aerosol optical properties is an important component of quantifying climate change. In particular, the in-situ measurement of the aerosol single-scattering albedo (SSA), which is the ratio of aerosol scattering to aerosol extinction, is identified as a key challenge in atmospheric sciences and climate change research. Ideally, the complete set of aerosol optical properties is measured through optical closure studies which simultaneous measure aerosol extinction, scattering and absorption coefficients. The recent development of new optical instruments have made real-time in situ optical closure studies attainable, however, many of these instruments are state-of-the-art but not practical for routine monitoring. In our studies we deployed a suit of well-established and recently developed instruments including the cavity attenuated phase shift (CAPS) method for aerosol light extinction, multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP) and particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) for aerosol light absorption, and an integrating nephelometer (NEPH) for aerosol light scattering measurements. From these directly measured optical properties we calculated light absorption from extinction minus scattering (difference method), light extinction from scattering plus absorption, and aerosol single-scattering albedo from combinations CAPS + MAAP, NEPH + PSAP, NEPH + MAAP, CAPS + NEPH. Closure studies were conducted for laboratory-generated aerosols composed of various mixtures of black carbon (Regal 400R pigment black, Cabot Corp.) and ammonium sulphate, urban aerosol (Billerica, MA), and background aerosol (Storm Peak Lab.). Key questions addressed in our closure studies are: (1) how well can we measure aerosol light absorption by various methods, and (2) how well can we measure the aerosol single-scattering albedo by various instrument combinations? In particular we investigated (3) whether the combination of a CAPS and NEPH provides a reasonable

  20. Study of optical properties and proteoglycan content of tendons by polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Rupani, Asha; Bagnaninchi, Pierre; Wimpenny, Ian; Weightman, Alan

    2012-08-01

    The highly orientated collagen fibers in tendons play a critical role for transferring tensile stress, and they demonstrate birefringent optical properties. However, the influence that proteoglycans (PGs) have on the optical properties of tendons is yet to be fully elucidated. PGs are the essential components of the tendon extracellular matrix; the changes in their quantities and compositions have been associated with tendinopathies. In this study, polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) has been used to reveal the relationship between PG content/location and birefringence properties of tendons. Fresh chicken tendons were imaged at regular intervals by PS-OCT and polarization light microscopy during the extraction of PGs, using guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl). Complementary time-lapsed images taken from the two modalities mutually demonstrated that the extraction of PGs disturbed the local organization of collagen bundles. This corresponded with a decrease in birefringence and associated banding pattern observed by PS-OCT. Furthermore, this study revealed there was a higher concentration of PGs in the outer sheath region than in the fascicles, and therefore the change in birefringence was reduced when extraction was performed on unsheathed tendons. The results provide new insights of tendon structure and the role of PGs on the structural stability of tendons, which also demonstrates the great potential for using PS-OCT as a diagnostic tool to examine tendon pathology.

  1. Study of optical properties and proteoglycan content of tendons by polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Rupani, Asha; Bagnaninchi, Pierre; Wimpenny, Ian; Weightman, Alan

    2012-08-01

    The highly orientated collagen fibers in tendons play a critical role for transferring tensile stress, and they demonstrate birefringent optical properties. However, the influence that proteoglycans (PGs) have on the optical properties of tendons is yet to be fully elucidated. PGs are the essential components of the tendon extracellular matrix; the changes in their quantities and compositions have been associated with tendinopathies. In this study, polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) has been used to reveal the relationship between PG content/location and birefringence properties of tendons. Fresh chicken tendons were imaged at regular intervals by PS-OCT and polarization light microscopy during the extraction of PGs, using guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl). Complementary time-lapsed images taken from the two modalities mutually demonstrated that the extraction of PGs disturbed the local organization of collagen bundles. This corresponded with a decrease in birefringence and associated banding pattern observed by PS-OCT. Furthermore, this study revealed there was a higher concentration of PGs in the outer sheath region than in the fascicles, and therefore the change in birefringence was reduced when extraction was performed on unsheathed tendons. The results provide new insights of tendon structure and the role of PGs on the structural stability of tendons, which also demonstrates the great potential for using PS-OCT as a diagnostic tool to examine tendon pathology.

  2. Model of a thin film optical fiber fluorosensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio O.; Rogowski, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    The efficiency of core-light injection from sources in the cladding of an optical fiber is modeled analytically by means of the exact field solution of a step-profile fiber. The analysis is based on the techniques by Marcuse (1988) in which the sources are treated as infinitesimal electric currents with random phase and orientation that excite radiation fields and bound modes. Expressions are developed based on an infinite cladding approximation which yield the power efficiency for a fiber coated with fluorescent sources in the core/cladding interface. Marcuse's results are confirmed for the case of a weakly guiding cylindrical fiber with fluorescent sources uniformly distributed in the cladding, and the power efficiency is shown to be practically constant for variable wavelengths and core radii. The most efficient fibers have the thin film located at the core/cladding boundary, and fibers with larger differences in the indices of refraction are shown to be the most efficient.

  3. Model of a thin film optical fiber fluorosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egalon, Claudio O.; Rogowski, Robert S.

    1991-03-01

    The efficiency of core-light injection from sources in the cladding of an optical fiber is modeled analytically by means of the exact field solution of a step-profile fiber. The analysis is based on the techniques by Marcuse (1988) in which the sources are treated as infinitesimal electric currents with random phase and orientation that excite radiation fields and bound modes. Expressions are developed based on an infinite cladding approximation which yield the power efficiency for a fiber coated with fluorescent sources in the core/cladding interface. Marcuse's results are confirmed for the case of a weakly guiding cylindrical fiber with fluorescent sources uniformly distributed in the cladding, and the power efficiency is shown to be practically constant for variable wavelengths and core radii. The most efficient fibers have the thin film located at the core/cladding boundary, and fibers with larger differences in the indices of refraction are shown to be the most efficient.

  4. Neutron scattering analysis with microscopic optical model potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, L.F.

    1991-09-03

    A review of microscopic optical model potentials used in the analysis of neutron scattering and analyzing power data below 100 MeV (5 {le}E{sub n}{le}100 MeV) is presented. The quality of the fits to the data over a wide massd ({sup 6}Li-{sup 239}Pu) and energy range is discussed. It is shown that reasonably good agreement with the data is obtained with only three parameters, {lambda}{sub V}, {lambda}{sub W}, and {lambda}{sub SO}, which show a smooth mass and energy dependence. These parameters are normalizing constants to the real (V), and imaginary (W) central potentials and the real spin-orbit (V{sub SO}) potential. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Modelling MEMS deformable mirrors for astronomical adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Celia

    As of July 2012, 777 exoplanets have been discovered utilizing mainly indirect detection techniques. The direct imaging of exoplanets is the next goal for astronomers, because it will reveal the diversity of planets and planetary systems, and will give access to the exoplanet's chemical composition via spectroscopy. With this spectroscopic knowledge, astronomers will be able to know, if a planet is terrestrial and, possibly, even find evidence of life. With so much potential, this branch of astronomy has also captivated the general public attention. The direct imaging of exoplanets remains a challenging task, due to (i) the extremely high contrast between the parent star and the orbiting exoplanet and (ii) their small angular separation. For ground-based observatories, this task is made even more difficult, due to the presence of atmospheric turbulence. High Contrast Imaging (HCI) instruments have been designed to meet this challenge. HCI instruments are usually composed of a coronagraph coupled with the full onaxis corrective capability of an Extreme Adaptive Optics (ExAO) system. An efficient coronagraph separates the faint planet's light from the much brighter starlight, but the dynamic boiling speckles, created by the stellar image, make exoplanet detection impossible without the help of a wavefront correction device. The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) system is a high performance HCI instrument developed at Subaru Telescope. The wavefront control system of SCExAO consists of three wavefront sensors (WFS) coupled with a 1024- actuator Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM). MEMS DMs offer a large actuator density, allowing high count DMs to be deployed in small size beams. Therefore, MEMS DMs are an attractive technology for Adaptive Optics (AO) systems and are particularly well suited for HCI instruments employing ExAO technologies. SCExAO uses coherent light modulation in the focal plane introduced by the DM, for

  6. Optical trapping studies of acto-myosin motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrow, Rachel E.; Rosenthal, Peter B.; Mashanov, Gregory I.; Holder, Anthony A.; Molloy, Justin E.

    2007-09-01

    Optical tweezers have been used extensively to measure the mechanical properties of individual biological molecules. Over the past 10-15 years optical trapping studies have revealed important information about the way in which motor proteins convert chemical energy to mechanical work. This paper focuses on studies of the acto-myosin motor system that is responsible for muscle contraction and a host of other cellular motilities. Myosin works by binding to filamentous actin, pulling and then releasing. Each cycle of interaction produces a few nanometres movement and a few piconewtons force. Individual interactions can be observed directly by holding an individual actin filament between two optically trapped microspheres and positioning it in the immediate vicinity of a single myosin motor. When the chemical fuel (adenosine triphosphate or ATP) is present the myosin undergoes repeated cycles of interaction with the actin filament producing square-wave like displacements and forces. Analysis of optical trapping data sets enables the size and timing of the molecular motions to be deduced.

  7. NIR electro-optical measurement for pseudo-models of biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Min-Cheng; Huang, Wei-Hua; Chen, Chien-Hung; Pan, Min-Chun

    2006-02-01

    In the research, the pseudo-model technique is proposed and implemented to simulate biological tissues under the framework of investigating near infrared (NIR) light propagating in diffusive media. The same optical characteristics inhere in the corresponding pseudo-models as in real tissues, where pseudo-models are constructed by using various volume densities of Intralipid. The pseudo-model technique proposed in the study has following advantages: 1.For the NIR tomography imaging system, the output signal from the real tissue may be too weak to be detected beyond the ability of current technologies. Thus, the pseudo-model is a viable alternative to cope with the limitation of the system in the measurement of real tissues. 2.Once the pseudo-model of a real tissue is decided, its optical properties can be investigated thoroughly. In addition, the initial estimates for the reconstruction of NIR optical property images can be selected adequately, and the image reconstruction algorithm can be modified accordingly with the information acquired from the pseudo-model. In the experiment, a pseudo-model of the background with an inclusion is performed for real tissues of pork inserted by a bone. It is observed that 1 % v.d. and 3 % v.d. of Intralipids can replace the pork and the bone, respectively, and the characteristics of the pseudo-model proposed here are consistent with those of the real tissues. As part of conclusion, the use of the pseudo-model technique is a promising approach to mimicking real tissues, especially for some parts of human body unable to be detected effectively.

  8. Study of Optical Properties on Fractal Aggregation Using the GMM Method by Different Cluster Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kuo-En; Lin, Tang-Huang; Lien, Wei-Hung

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic pollutants or smoke from biomass burning contribute significantly to global particle aggregation emissions, yet their aggregate formation and resulting ensemble optical properties are poorly understood and parameterized in climate models. Particle aggregation refers to formation of clusters in a colloidal suspension. In clustering algorithms, many parameters, such as fractal dimension, number of monomers, radius of monomer, and refractive index real part and image part, will alter the geometries and characteristics of the fractal aggregation and change ensemble optical properties further. The cluster-cluster aggregation algorithm (CCA) is used to specify the geometries of soot and haze particles. In addition, the Generalized Multi-particle Mie (GMM) method is utilized to compute the Mie solution from a single particle to the multi particle case. This computer code for the calculation of the scattering by an aggregate of spheres in a fixed orientation and the experimental data have been made publicly available. This study for the model inputs of optical determination of the monomer radius, the number of monomers per cluster, and the fractal dimension is presented. The main aim in this study is to analyze and contrast several parameters of cluster aggregation aforementioned which demonstrate significant differences of optical properties using the GMM method finally. Keywords: optical properties, fractal aggregation, GMM, CCA

  9. Electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption spectral studies on chalcocite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, S. Lakshmi; Fayazuddin, Md.; Frost, Ray L.; Endo, Tamio

    2007-11-01

    A chalcocite mineral sample of Shaha, Congo is used in the present study. An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on powdered sample confirms the presence of Mn(II), Fe(III) and Cu(II). Optical absorption spectrum indicates that Fe(III) impurity is present in octahedral structure whereas Cu(II) is present in rhombically distorted octahedral environment. Mid-infrared results are due to water and sulphate fundamentals.

  10. Electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption spectral studies on chalcocite.

    PubMed

    Reddy, S Lakshmi; Fayazuddin, Md; Frost, Ray L; Endo, Tamio

    2007-11-01

    A chalcocite mineral sample of Shaha, Congo is used in the present study. An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on powdered sample confirms the presence of Mn(II), Fe(III) and Cu(II). Optical absorption spectrum indicates that Fe(III) impurity is present in octahedral structure whereas Cu(II) is present in rhombically distorted octahedral environment. Mid-infrared results are due to water and sulphate fundamentals. PMID:17324611

  11. Virtual Mie particle model of laser damage to optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Kazuya; Haraguchi, Koshi

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, devices being developed for application systems have used laser beams that have high average power, high peak power, short pulse width, and short wavelength. Therefore, optical elements using such application systems require a high laser damage threshold. The laser damage threshold is provided by International Organization for Standardization 11254 (ISO11254). One of the measurement methods of the laser damage threshold provided by ISO11254 is an online method to measure the intensity of light scattering due to a laser damage trace. In this paper, we propose a measurement method for the laser damage threshold that realizes high sensitivity and high accuracy by using polarized light and lock-in detection. Since the scattering light with laser damage is modeled on the asperity of the optical element-surface as Mie particles (virtual Mie particles), we consider the intensity change of scattering light as a change in the radius of a virtual Mie particle. To evaluate this model, the laser damage trace on the optical element-surface was observed by an atomic force microscopy (AFM). Based on the observed AFM image, we analyzed the frequency domain by the Fourier transform, and estimated the dominant virtual Mie particle radius in the AFM measurement area. In addition, we measured the laser damage threshold. The light source was the fifth generation of a Nd:YAG laser (λ =213nm). The specifications of the laser were: repetition frequency 10Hz, pulse width 4ns, linear type polarization, laser pulse energy 4mJ, and laser transverse mode TEM00. The laser specifications were a repetition frequency, pulse width, pulse energy and beam diameter of 10Hz, 4ns, 4mJ and 13mm, respectively. The laser damage thresholds of an aluminum coated mirror and a dielectric multi-layer mirror designed at a wavelength of 213nm as measured by this method were 0.684 J/cm2 and 0.998J/cm2, respectively. These laser damage thresholds were 1/4 the laser damage thresholds measured based

  12. Non-linear optical studies of adsorbates: Spectroscopy and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xiangdong.

    1989-08-01

    In the first part of this thesis, we have established a systematic procedure to apply the surface optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) technique to study surface dynamics of adsorbates. In particular, we have developed a novel technique for studies of molecular surface diffusions. In this technique, the laser-induced desorption with two interfering laser beams is used to produce a monolayer grating of adsorbates. The monolayer grating is detected with diffractions of optical SHG. By monitoring the first-order second-harmonic diffraction, we can follow the time evolution of the grating modulation from which we are able to deduce the diffusion constant of the adsorbates on the surface. We have successfully applied this technique to investigate the surface diffusion of CO on Ni(111). The unique advantages of this novel technique will enable us to readily study anisotropy of a surface diffusion with variable grating orientation, and to investigate diffusion processes of a large dynamic range with variable grating spacings. In the second part of this work, we demonstrate that optical infrared-visible sum-frequency generation (SFG) from surfaces can be used as a viable surface vibrational spectroscopic technique. We have successfully recorded the first vibrational spectrum of a monolayer of adsorbates using optical infrared-visible SFG. The qualitative and quantitative correlation of optical SFG with infrared absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopies are examined and experimentally demonstrated. We have further investigated the possibility to use transient infrared-visible SFG to probe vibrational transients and ultrafast relaxations on surfaces. 146 refs.

  13. Structural and optical studies on selected web spinning spider silks.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyani, R; Divya, A; Mathavan, T; Asath, R Mohamed; Benial, A Milton Franklin; Muthuchelian, K

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the structural and optical properties in the cribellate silk of the sheet web spider Stegodyphus sarasinorum Karsch (Eresidae) and the combined dragline, viscid silk of the orb-web spiders Argiope pulchella Thorell (Araneidae) and Nephila pilipes Fabricius (Nephilidae). X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR), Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques were used to study these three spider silk species. X-ray diffraction data are consistent with the amorphous polymer network which is arising from the interaction of larger side chain amino acid contributions due to the poly-glycine rich sequences known to be present in the proteins of cribellate silk. The same amorphous polymer networks have been determined from the combined dragline and viscid silk of orb-web spiders. From FTIR spectra the results demonstrate that, cribellate silk of Stegodyphus sarasinorum, combined dragline viscid silk of Argiope pulchella and Nephila pilipes spider silks are showing protein peaks in the amide I, II and III regions. Further they proved that the functional groups present in the protein moieties are attributed to α-helical and side chain amino acid contributions. The optical properties of the obtained spider silks such as extinction coefficients, refractive index, real and imaginary dielectric constants and optical conductance were studied extensively from UV-Vis analysis. The important fluorescent amino acid tyrosine is present in the protein folding was investigated by using fluorescence spectroscopy. This research would explore the protein moieties present in the spider silks which were found to be associated with α-helix and side chain amino acid contributions than with β-sheet secondary structure and also the optical relationship between the three different spider silks are investigated. Successful spectroscopic knowledge of the internal protein structure and optical properties of the spider silks could

  14. Structural and optical studies on selected web spinning spider silks.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyani, R; Divya, A; Mathavan, T; Asath, R Mohamed; Benial, A Milton Franklin; Muthuchelian, K

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the structural and optical properties in the cribellate silk of the sheet web spider Stegodyphus sarasinorum Karsch (Eresidae) and the combined dragline, viscid silk of the orb-web spiders Argiope pulchella Thorell (Araneidae) and Nephila pilipes Fabricius (Nephilidae). X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR), Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques were used to study these three spider silk species. X-ray diffraction data are consistent with the amorphous polymer network which is arising from the interaction of larger side chain amino acid contributions due to the poly-glycine rich sequences known to be present in the proteins of cribellate silk. The same amorphous polymer networks have been determined from the combined dragline and viscid silk of orb-web spiders. From FTIR spectra the results demonstrate that, cribellate silk of Stegodyphus sarasinorum, combined dragline viscid silk of Argiope pulchella and Nephila pilipes spider silks are showing protein peaks in the amide I, II and III regions. Further they proved that the functional groups present in the protein moieties are attributed to α-helical and side chain amino acid contributions. The optical properties of the obtained spider silks such as extinction coefficients, refractive index, real and imaginary dielectric constants and optical conductance were studied extensively from UV-Vis analysis. The important fluorescent amino acid tyrosine is present in the protein folding was investigated by using fluorescence spectroscopy. This research would explore the protein moieties present in the spider silks which were found to be associated with α-helix and side chain amino acid contributions than with β-sheet secondary structure and also the optical relationship between the three different spider silks are investigated. Successful spectroscopic knowledge of the internal protein structure and optical properties of the spider silks could

  15. Optical Measurements and Modeling to Estimate Concentrations and Fluxes of Organic Matter in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stramski, Dariusz; Mitchell, B. Greg; Marra, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This project was a collaboration between two Principal Investigators, Dr. Dariusz Stramski and Dr. Greg Mitchell of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego. Our overall goal was to conduct optical measurements and modeling to estimate concentrations of organic matter in the Southern Ocean in support of the U.S. JGOFS Process Study in this region. Key variables and processes of high relevance to accomplish the JGOFS goals include time and space resolution of phytoplankton pigments, particulate organic carbon, and the formation and export of organic carbon. Our project focused on establishing the fundamental relationships for parameterization of these variables and processes in terms of the optical properties of seawater, and developing understanding of why the Southern Ocean differs from other low-latitude systems, or has differentiation within. Our approach builds upon historical observations that optical properties provide a useful proxy for key reservoirs of organic matter such as chlorophyll alpha (Chl) and particulate organic carbon (POC) concentrations, which are of relevance to the JGOFS objectives. We carried out detailed studies of in situ and water sample optical properties including spectral reflectance, absorption, beam attenuation, scattering, and backscattering coefficients. We evaluated the ability to estimate Chl from the spectral reflectance (ocean color) in the Southern Ocean. We examined relationships between the ocean optical properties and particulate organic carbon. We developed, for the first time, an algorithm for estimating particulate organic carbon concentration in the surface ocean from satellite imagery of ocean color. With this algorithm, we obtained maps of POC distribution in the Southern Ocean showing the seasonal progression of POC in the austral spring-summer season. We also developed a semianalytical reflectance model for the investigated polar waters based on our field measurements of absorption

  16. Modeling Optical Properties of Polluted Dust and its Morphological Effects by T-Matrix Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Yang, P.; Brooks, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    Dust storms largely contribute to regional or global aerosol loads, influence radiative energy budget, and air quality, and cause atmospheric environmental, public health problems. As dusts are transported long distances, aerosols such as black carbon can pollute the air mass along the transport path. Two mixing processes, externally and semi-externally (sticking) mixing may substantially affect the single-scattering and radiative properties of polluted dust particles compared to the unpolluted counterparts. This study focuses on quantifying the changes in the optical properties of dust aerosols due to black carbon contamination. The dust model we use is an irregular polyhedron, which is in good agreement with the laboratory measurement. The black carbon model is spherules aggregate defined with a cluster-cluster aggregation algorithm. Specifically, we define the degree of pollution in terms of two variables, the adhesion degree of pollutants and their mixing ratios, since both can alter the optical properties of polluted dust in different ways. By applying the Invariant Imbedding T-matrix Method (II-TM), we obtain the scattering phase matrix and other optical properties of dust aerosols with different degrees of contamination. Furthermore, the morphological effects on the optical properties of polluted dust are quantified by considering different fractal dimensions of black carbon as particles age. The overall changes due to different degrees of pollution by black carbon are investigated at various wavelengths.

  17. Correlation-based smoothing model for optical polishing.

    PubMed

    Shu, Yong; Kim, Dae Wook; Martin, Hubert M; Burge, James H

    2013-11-18

    A generalized model is developed to quantitatively describe the smoothing effects from different polishing tools used for optical surfaces. The smoothing effect naturally corrects mid-to-high spatial frequency errors that have features small compared to the size of the polishing lap. The original parametric smoothing model provided a convenient way to compare smoothing efficiency of different polishing tools for the case of sinusoidal surface irregularity, providing the ratio of surface improvement via smoothing to the bulk material removal. A new correlation-based smoothing model expands the capability to quantify smoothing using general surface data with complex irregularity. For this case, we define smoothing as a band-limited correlated component of the change in the surface and original surface. Various concepts and methods, such as correlation screening, have been developed and verified to manipulate the data for the calculation of smoothing factor. Data from two actual polishing runs from the Giant Magellan Telescope off-axis segment and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope monolithic primary-tertiary mirror were processed, and a quantitative evaluation for the smoothing efficiency of a large pitch lap and a conformal lap with polishing pads is provided.

  18. Nonlinear optical studies of aqueous interfaces, polymers, and nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onorato, Robert Michael

    -transfer-to-solvent band and a Langmuir adsorption model are used to determine the affinity of bromide for both the air/water and dodecanol/water interfaces in the molar concentration regime. The Gibbs free energy of adsorption for the former is determined to be -1.4 kJ/mol with a lower 90% confidence limit of -4.1 kJ/mol. For the dodecanol/water interface the data are best fit with a Gibbs free energy of +8 kJ/mol with an estimated a lower limit of -4 kJ/mol. Adsorption of ions to the air/water interface in the millimolar regime is a particularly interesting phenomenon. In Chapter 4, the affinity of sodium chloride and sodium bromide to the air/water interface is probed by UV-SHG. Both salts exhibit a strong adsorption, with free energies greater than -20 kJ/mol. Interestingly, sodium chloride exhibits a stronger affinity for the interface than does sodium iodide, which was previously studied by Poul Peterson. This is counter to both experimental and theoretical results for higher concentrations. It has been predicted that ion adsorption is dictated by strong and opposing electrostatic and entropic forces. The change in order of ion interfacial affinity can be explained by relatively small changes in these forces at different concentrations and ionic strengths. In Chapters 5 and 6, other work using nonlinear optical techniques is described. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy is a promising tool for chemically selective imaging based on molecular vibrations. While CARS is currently used as a biological imaging tool, many variations are still being developed, perhaps the most important being multiplex CARS microscopy. Multiplex CARS has the advantage of comparing images based on different molecular vibrations without changing the excitation wavelengths. In Chapter 5, I demonstrate both high spectral and spatial resolution multiplex CARS imaging of polymer films using a simple scheme for chirped CARS with a spectral bandwidth of 300 cm-1. In Chapter 6, the nonlinear optical

  19. Optical digital microscopy for cyto- and hematological studies in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganilova, Yu. A.; Dolmashkin, A. A.; Doubrovski, V. A.; Yanina, I. Yu.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2013-08-01

    The dependence of the spatial resolution and field of view of an optical microscope equipped with a CCD camera on the objective magnification has been experimentally investigated. Measurement of these characteristics has shown that a spatial resolution of 20-25 px/μm at a field of view of about 110 μm is quite realistic; this resolution is acceptable for a detailed study of the processes occurring in cell. It is proposed to expand the dynamic range of digital camera by measuring and approximating its light characteristics with subsequent plotting of the corresponding calibration curve. The biological objects of study were human adipose tissue cells, as well as erythrocytes and their immune complexes in human blood; both objects have been investigated in vitro. Application of optical digital microscopy for solving specific problems of cytology and hematology can be useful in both biomedical studies in experiments with objects of nonbiological origin.

  20. X-ray and optical studies of dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellwi, Samir Shakir

    X-ray and optical investigations of dense plasmas and x- ray sources for laser-plasma studies are presented in this thesis. Short pulse laser interaction with solids is reviewed. The transport of laser energy into the bulk of the target by electron thermal conduction, radiation and shock waves is described. X-ray characterisation of different types of plasma are presented. The first experiment deals with the generation of a plasma cathode x-ray source. The experimental results are compared with a simulation made using a simple self consistent model. The x-ray source size depends upon the cone angle of the tip of the anode. A wide range of experimental data for different parameters (anode-cathode separation, anode positive voltages, anode material, cathode material and different laser energies) is collected and analysed. In chapter 5 the equation of state of gold is studied using the shock wave reflection method. Experimental measurements are done for the direct and indirect drives. The experimental data are compared to the SESAME tabular data. Indirect drive is found to give a more accurate measurement compared to direct drive using the Phase Zone Plate (PZP) method technique. Preheating effects in laser driven shock waves is presented in chapter 6. We used two different diagnostics: the colour temperature measurements deduced by recording the target rear side emissivity in two spectral bands and the target rear side reflectivity measurements. We use the MULTI hydrodynamic code to measure the temperature of the preheat and in coupling with the Fresnel reflectivity model in order to compare the theoretical calculations to the experimental observations. Qualitative results of energy transport by hot fast electrons in solid cold and compressed plastic are presented in chapter 7. K-alpha emission from chlorine fluor buried layers is used to measure the fast electron transport. These data are collected from time integrated spectrometers using k-alpha spectroscopy of the

  1. Clinical study of bladder diseases using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagainova, Elena; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Strelzova, O.; Sumin, A.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Iksanov, Rashid R.

    2000-11-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), a new optical bioimaging technique was used to evaluate the state of mucosa in the urinary bladder. The state of mucosa of the bladder was evaluated in patients with prostatic adenoma (11 male patients) during the course of prostatectomy operation via a resection cytoscope. An OCT probe was inserted into the biopsy channel of a cystoscope. The sites to be imaged by OCT were determined visually and, after OCT study, underwent excisional biopsy and subsequent histological examination. Children (9 girls) were examined during diagnostic cystoscopy. Our analysis of diagnostic capabilities of OCT in urology relies on the comparison of OCT information on normal and morphologically altered tissues. OCT is able to provide objective data concerning the structure of mucosa of the bladder due to the difference in optical properties of different layers in tissue. The epithelium and the layers of connective tissue, both in norm and pathology, are clearly visualized in the tomograms. Our OCT study of healthy mucosa of the urinary bladder has demonstrated that the epithelium appears in the tomograms as an upper highly backscattering layer. An underlying optically less transparent layer, much greater in size than the previous one, corresponds to the connective tissue of the mucosa. Inside this layer, elongated poorly backscattering formations with clear contours are seen; they do not alter the longitudinal structure of the submucosal layer. These formations are blood vessels. Optical patterns characteristic of chronic inflammation are obtained. They correspond, as confirmed histologically, to liquid accumulation, cellular infiltration of mucosal layers, hypervascularization, and fibrosis. OCT information on proliferative processes, such as papillomatosis of the urinary bladder and squamous cell carcinoma, is analyzed. It is shown that OCT can reliably reveal edema of the mucous membrane of the bladder and identify the character of appearing

  2. Assimilation of remotely-sensed optical properties to improve marine biogeochemistry modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciavatta, Stefano; Torres, Ricardo; Martinez-Vicente, Victor; Smyth, Timothy; Dall'Olmo, Giorgio; Polimene, Luca; Allen, J. Icarus

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we evaluate whether the assimilation of remotely-sensed optical data into a marine ecosystem model improves the simulation of biogeochemistry in a shelf sea. A localized Ensemble Kalman filter was used to assimilate weekly diffuse light attenuation coefficient data, Kd(443) from SeaWiFs, into an ecosystem model of the western English Channel. The spatial distributions of (unassimilated) surface chlorophyll from satellite, and a multivariate time series of eighteen biogeochemical and optical variables measured in situ at one long-term monitoring site were used to evaluate the system performance for the year 2006. Assimilation reduced the root mean square error and improved the correlation with the assimilated Kd(443) observations, for both the analysis and, to a lesser extent, the forecast estimates, when compared to the reference model simulation. Improvements in the simulation of (unassimilated) ocean colour chlorophyll were less evident, and in some parts of the Channel the simulation of this data deteriorated. The estimation errors for the (unassimilated) in situ data were reduced for most variables with some exceptions, e.g. dissolved nitrogen. Importantly, the assimilation adjusted the balance of ecosystem processes by shifting the simulated food web towards the microbial loop, thus improving the estimation of some properties, e.g. total particulate carbon. Assimilation of Kd(443) outperformed a comparative chlorophyll assimilation experiment, in both the estimation of ocean colour data and in the simulation of independent in situ data. These results are related to relatively low error in Kd(443) data, and because it is a bulk optical property of marine ecosystems. Assimilation of remotely-sensed optical properties is a promising approach to improve the simulation of biogeochemical and optical variables that are relevant for ecosystem functioning and climate change studies.

  3. COMPUTER MODEL OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN OPTICALLY PUMPED LASER RODS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrukh, U. O.

    1994-01-01

    Managing the thermal energy that accumulates within a solid-state laser material under active pumping is of critical importance in the design of laser systems. Earlier models that calculated the temperature distribution in laser rods were single dimensional and assumed laser rods of infinite length. This program presents a new model which solves the temperature distribution problem for finite dimensional laser rods and calculates both the radial and axial components of temperature distribution in these rods. The modeled rod is either side-pumped or end-pumped by a continuous or a single pulse pump beam. (At the present time, the model cannot handle a multiple pulsed pump source.) The optical axis is assumed to be along the axis of the rod. The program also assumes that it is possible to cool different surfaces of the rod at different rates. The user defines the laser rod material characteristics, determines the types of cooling and pumping to be modeled, and selects the time frame desired via the input file. The program contains several self checking schemes to prevent overwriting memory blocks and to provide simple tracing of information in case of trouble. Output for the program consists of 1) an echo of the input file, 2) diffusion properties, radius and length, and time for each data block, 3) the radial increments from the center of the laser rod to the outer edge of the laser rod, and 4) the axial increments from the front of the laser rod to the other end of the rod. This program was written in Microsoft FORTRAN77 and implemented on a Tandon AT with a 287 math coprocessor. The program can also run on a VAX 750 mini-computer. It has a memory requirement of about 147 KB and was developed in 1989.

  4. Optical activity in planar chiral metamaterials: Theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Benfeng; Svirko, Yuri; Turunen, Jari; Vallius, Tuomas

    2007-08-15

    A thorough theoretical study of the optical activity in planar chiral metamaterial (PCM) structures, made of both dielectric and metallic media, is conducted by the analysis of gammadion-shaped nanoparticle arrays. The general polarization properties are first analyzed from an effective-medium perspective, by analogy with natural optical activity, and then verified by rigorous numerical simulation, some of which are corroborated by previous experimental results. The numerical analysis suggests that giant polarization rotation (tens of degrees) may be achieved in the PCM structures with a thickness of only hundreds of nanometers. The artificial optical activity arises from circular birefringence induced by the structural chirality and is enhanced by the guided-mode or surface-plasmon resonances taking place in the structures. There are two polarization conversion types in the dielectric PCMs, whereas only one type in the metallic ones. Many intriguing features of the polarization property of PCMs are also revealed and explained: the polarization effect is reciprocal and vanishes in the symmetrically layered structures; the effect occurs only in the transmitted field, but not in the reflected field; and the polarization spectra of two enantiomeric PCM structures are mirror symmetric to each other. These remarkable properties pave the way for the PCMs to be used as polarization elements in new-generation integrated optical systems.

  5. Modelling single shot damage thresholds of multilayer optics for high-intensity short-wavelength radiation sources.

    PubMed

    Loch, R A; Sobierajski, R; Louis, E; Bosgra, J; Bijkerk, F

    2012-12-17

    The single shot damage thresholds of multilayer optics for high-intensity short-wavelength radiation sources are theoretically investigated, using a model developed on the basis of experimental data obtained at the FLASH and LCLS free electron lasers. We compare the radiation hardness of commonly used multilayer optics and propose new material combinations selected for a high damage threshold. Our study demonstrates that the damage thresholds of multilayer optics can vary over a large range of incidence fluences and can be as high as several hundreds of mJ/cm(2). This strongly suggests that multilayer mirrors are serious candidates for damage resistant optics. Especially, multilayer optics based on Li(2)O spacers are very promising for use in current and future short-wavelength radiation sources.

  6. Optical performance simulation of free-form optics for an eye implant based on a measurement data enhanced model.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Ingo; Li, Likai; Gengenbach, Ulrich; Beckert, Erik; Steinkopf, Ralf; Yi, Allen Y

    2016-08-20

    This paper describes the application of a modeling approach for precise optical performance prediction of free-form optics-based subsystems on a demonstration model of an eye implant. The simulation model is enhanced by surface data measured on the free-form lens parts. The manufacturing of the free-form lens parts is realized by two different manufacturing processes: ultraprecision diamond machining and microinjection molding. Evaluation of both processes is conducted by a simulation of the optical performance on the basis of their surface measurement comparisons with the nominal geometry. The simulation results indicate that improvements from the process optimization of microinjection molding were obtained for the best manufacturing accuracy. PMID:27556988

  7. Modeling of mineral dust in the atmosphere: Sources, transport, and optical thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegen, Ina; Fung, Inez

    1994-01-01

    A global three-dimensional model of the atmospheric mineral dust cycle is developed for the study of its impact on the radiative balance of the atmosphere. The model includes four size classes of minearl dust, whose source distributions are based on the distributions of vegetation, soil texture and soil moisture. Uplift and deposition are parameterized using analyzed winds and rainfall statistics that resolve high-frequency events. Dust transport in the atmosphere is simulated with the tracer transport model of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies. The simulated seasonal variations of dust concentrations show general reasonable agreement with the observed distributions, as do the size distributions at several observing sites. The discrepancies between the simulated and the observed dust concentrations point to regions of significant land surface modification. Monthly distribution of aerosol optical depths are calculated from the distribution of dust particle sizes. The maximum optical depth due to dust is 0.4-0.5 in the seasonal mean. The main uncertainties, about a factor of 3-5, in calculating optical thicknesses arise from the crude resolution of soil particle sizes, from insufficient constraint by the total dust loading in the atmosphere, and from our ignorance about adhesion, agglomeration, uplift, and size distributions of fine dust particles (less than 1 micrometer).

  8. Optical latches using optical amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenbo; Hu, Hongyu; Dutta, Niloy K.

    2013-05-01

    Optical latches are important for a wide range of applications including communication systems, optical logic systems, optical random access memory (RAM) and encryption. All optical logic operations using quantum dot (QD) based semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) have been studied. The building block of an optical latch such as NAND gate has been fabricated and their operation experimentally demonstrated at ~ 80 GHz. A rate equation model has been developed for the QD-SOA-MZI and it has been used to analyze the Boolean logic operation. The model has been used to analyze the Set-Reset (S-R) latch and the D-Flip-Flop (DFF) devices. The DFF is the basic device for building larger logic circuits. The results show that the latches would work to speeds of ~ 250 Gb/s.

  9. Optical absorptance and thermomodulation studies of several A-15 compounds

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, R.C.

    1983-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the optical properties of several high T/sub c/ compounds in the form of sputtered films. The measurements are used toward this end: optical absorptance (using a calorimetric technique near 4.2K), which yields (after Kramers-Kronig analysis) the complex dielectric function, and thermoreflectance (which measures the change in reflectance in the optical range when a 1 to 10/sup 0/K temperature wave is applied), performed at two ambient temperatures (80 and 300/sup 0/K), yielding the differential dielectric function. The sputtered films included Nb/sub 3/Ge, Nb/sub 3/Al, V/sub 3/Ga and Nb/sub 3/Ir. It is noted that Nb/sub 3/Ir is not a high T/sub c/ superconductor. The thermoreflectance on the bulk samples V/sub 3/Si, V/sub 3/Ge and single crystal Cr/sub 3/Si were not performed because the samples were not in the form of thin films. The thermomodulation studies are correlated with the absorptance measurements in comparison to band structure calculations. When thermomodulation studies are performed on semiconductors, these studies yield information about critical points, but studies on metals indicate that Fermi-level transitions become important. It is thought that A-15 structured compounds, which have a high density of electron states around the Fermi level, will produce spectra due to this high density of states. Procedures and results are detailed.

  10. An optical study of four regional lakes in upstate New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenak, David S.

    2011-12-01

    The biotic and abiotic factors that determine the optical properties of inland waters include phytoplankton, detrital, and minerogenic suspended particles, and chromophoric dissolved organic matter. Bio-optical models utilize the spectral response (absorption and scattering) of these constituents to identify and estimate mass concentration. This combined with optical remote sensing can significantly enhance real-time monitoring capability. Modern instrumentation has advanced this effort by allowing the measurement of optical properties in situ. However, in situ methods are limited by uncertainties in measurement practices, and analytical models have not been extensively tested in freshwater systems. My research first assesses closure between laboratory and field measurements of the particle absorption coefficient. Difficulty arises in measuring dilute particle suspensions in vivo and concentration methods are necessary. The recommended procedure of filtering particles onto glass-fiber filters subjects the particle substrate to a diffuse light field, creating pathlength amplification that must be corrected for. Using four lakes as test cases, correction estimates were found to be different than previously reported values. Unlike earlier investigations, estimates were shown to be related to particle composition and possibly source (i.e. lake) dependent. Next, I examine semi-analytical algorithms to estimate bulk optical properties through the subsurface remote sensing reflectance ratio. Verified against in situ data, uncertainty in the bidirectional f parameter made closure difficult. Solutions are shown to be very sensitive to the spectral shape of the backscattering coefficient (bbp ). Established algorithms produced erratic outcomes across all four systems, even when bbp was customized to each lake. Transpectral artifacts are also addressed. This study suggests better parameterizations of f and bbp are needed before semi-analytical algorithms can be readily

  11. Towards an Optical Internet: New Vision in Optical Network Design and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finsmith, David

    2002-10-01

    Today's bandwidth explosion and increasing traffic demand point toward an all-optical network, which will have the speed and bandwidth to send more information to more people faster. Convening in Vienna, researchers at ONDM 2001 exchanged ideas on their recent progress in optical communication techniques and new technologies.

  12. Visualization of microhemorrhages with optical histology in mouse model of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Patrick; Crouzet, Christian; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Choi, Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a neurovascular disease that is strongly associated with an increase in the number and size of spontaneous microhemorrhages. Conventional methods, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), can detect microhemorrhages while positron emission tomography (PET) with Pittsburgh Compound B can detect amyloid deposits. MRI and PET can separately demonstrate the presence of microhemorrhages and CAA in affected brains in vivo; however, there is still a lack of strong evidence for the direct involvement of CAA in the presence of microhemorrhage formation. In this study, we use optical histology, a method which combines histochemical staining, chemical optical clearing, and optical imaging, in a Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease to enable simultaneous, co-registered three-dimensional visualization of cerebral microvasculature, microhemorrhages, and amyloid deposits. Our data strongly suggest that microhemorrhages are localized within the brain regions affected by amyloid deposits. All but two observed microhemorrhages (n=18) were closely localized with vessels affected by CAA whereas no microhemorrhages or amyloid deposits were observed in wild type mouse brain sections. Our data also suggest that the predominant type of CAA-related microhemorrhage is associated with leaky or ruptured hemorrhagic microvasculature within the hippocampus and cerebral cortex rather than occluded ischemic microvasculature. The proposed optical histology method will allow future studies about the relationship between CAA and microhemorrhages during disease development and in response to treatment strategies.

  13. GROUT HOPPER MODELING STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2011-08-30

    The Saltstone facility has a grout hopper tank to provide agitator stirring of the Saltstone feed materials. The tank has about 300 gallon capacity to provide a larger working volume for the grout slurry to be held in case of a process upset, and it is equipped with a mechanical agitator, which is intended to keep the grout in motion and agitated so that it won't start to set up. The dry feeds and the salt solution are already mixed in the mixer prior to being transferred to the hopper tank. The hopper modeling study through this work will focus on fluid stirring and agitation, instead of traditional mixing in the literature, in order to keep the tank contents in motion during their residence time so that they will not be upset or solidified prior to transferring the grout to the Saltstone disposal facility. The primary objective of the work is to evaluate the flow performance for mechanical agitators to prevent vortex pull-through for an adequate stirring of the feed materials and to estimate an agitator speed which provides acceptable flow performance with a 45{sup o} pitched four-blade agitator. In addition, the power consumption required for the agitator operation was estimated. The modeling calculations were performed by taking two steps of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling approach. As a first step, a simple single-stage agitator model with 45{sup o} pitched propeller blades was developed for the initial scoping analysis of the flow pattern behaviors for a range of different operating conditions. Based on the initial phase-1 results, the phase-2 model with a two-stage agitator was developed for the final performance evaluations. A series of sensitivity calculations for different designs of agitators and operating conditions have been performed to investigate the impact of key parameters on the grout hydraulic performance in a 300-gallon hopper tank. For the analysis, viscous shear was modeled by using the Bingham plastic approximation. Steady

  14. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties from In-situ Surface Measurements and Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeisser, L.; Andrews, E.; Schulz, M.; Fiebig, M.; Zhang, K.; Randles, C. A.; Myhre, G.; Chin, M.; Stier, P.; Takemura, T.; Krol, M. C.; Bian, H.; Skeie, R. B.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Kokkola, H.; Laakso, A.; Ghan, S.; Easter, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data have the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is a big asset in accomplishing the overarching goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosol processes and predicative capability of global climate models. The INSITU project looks at how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies on a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis, using GOCART and other models participating in this AeroCom project, show substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location and optical property. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography (see Figure 1). Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol co-dependencies, for example, the tendency of in-situ surface single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. This study elucidates specific problems with current aerosol models and suggests additional model runs and perturbations that could further evaluate the discrepancies between measured and modeled

  15. Comparison of three optical methods to study erythrocyte aggregation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Wang, X; Stoltz, J F

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate three optical methods designed to determine erythrocyte aggregation: Erythroaggregometer (EA; Regulest, France), Laser-assisted Optical Rotational Cell Analyzer (LORCA; Mechatronics, Netherlands) and Fully Automatic Erythrocyte Aggregometer (FAEA; Myrenne, GmbH, Germany). Blood samples were taken from fifty donors (26 males and 24 females). The aggregation of normal red blood cell (RBC) and RBCs suspended in three normo- and hyperaggregating suspending media was studied. The results revealed some significant correlations between parameters measured by these instruments, in particular, between the indexes of aggregation of EA and LORCA. Further, RBC aggregation of multiple myeloma patients was also studied and a hyper erythrocyte aggregation state was found by EA and LORCA.

  16. Comparative analysis of absorbance calculations for integrated optical waveguide configurations by use of the ray optics model and the electromagnetic wave theory.

    PubMed

    Mendes, S B; Saavedra, S S

    2000-02-01

    Focusing on the use of planar waveguides as platforms for highly sensitive attenuated total reflection spectroscopy of organic thin films, we extend the ray optics model to provide absorbance expressions for the case of dichroic layers immobilized on the waveguide surface. Straightforward expressions are derived for the limiting case of weakly absorbing, anisotropically oriented molecules in the waveguide-cladding region. The second major focus is on the accuracy of the ray optics model. This model assumes that the introduction of absorbing species, either in the bulk cladding or as an adlayer on the waveguide surface, only causes a small perturbation to the original waveguide-mode profile. We investigate the accuracy of this assumption and the conditions under which it is valid. A comparison to an exact calculation by use of the electromagnetic wave theory is implemented, and the discrepancy of the ray optics model is determined for various waveguide configurations. We find that in typical situations in which waveguide-absorbance measurements are used to study organic thin films (k(l)/n(l) optics and the exact calculations is only a few percent (2-3%).

  17. Modeling of optical losses in graphene contacted CIGS solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houshmand, Mohammad; Zandi, M. Hossein

    2016-09-01

    For the first time, an optical model is applied to superstrate configuration of CdS/CIGS thin film solar cells with graphene front/back contact (FC/BC) to simulate the loss in current density and efficiency. Graphene shows to be a great candidate to replace with the metallic BC transparent conductive oxides as the front electrode. Our model is based on the refractive index and extinction coefficient and takes into account the reflection and absorption in interfaces and layer’s thickness, respectively. CIGS cells with graphene as front electrode have a lower current density and efficiency than the one with graphene BC. However, the bifacial configuration shows a higher current density and efficiency, mostly because of a higher transmission rate. The interference effect was observed in simulation of transmission rate of hybrid cells representing that graphene can cause multiple reflection. We simulated the device parameters versus the ZnO layer’s thickness, which is essential for high quality interfaces. However, the simulation results are also consistent when CdS thickness is replaced with inorganic ZnO.

  18. Electro-optical parameters of bond polarizability model for aluminosilicates.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Konstantin S; Bougeard, Daniel; Tandon, Poonam

    2006-04-01

    Electro-optical parameters (EOPs) of bond polarizability model (BPM) for aluminosilicate structures were derived from quantum-chemical DFT calculations of molecular models. The tensor of molecular polarizability and the derivatives of the tensor with respect to the bond length are well reproduced with the BPM, and the EOPs obtained are in a fair agreement with available experimental data. The parameters derived were found to be transferable to larger molecules. This finding suggests that the procedure used can be applied to systems with partially ionic chemical bonds. The transferability of the parameters to periodic systems was tested in molecular dynamics simulation of the polarized Raman spectra of alpha-quartz. It appeared that the molecular Si-O bond EOPs failed to reproduce the intensity of peaks in the spectra. This limitation is due to large values of the longitudinal components of the bond polarizability and its derivative found in the molecular calculations as compared to those obtained from periodic DFT calculations of crystalline silica polymorphs by Umari et al. (Phys. Rev. B 2001, 63, 094305). It is supposed that the electric field of the solid is responsible for the difference of the parameters. Nevertheless, the EOPs obtained can be used as an initial set of parameters for calculations of polarizability related characteristics of relevant systems in the framework of BPM.

  19. Automated optic disk boundary detection by modified active contour model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Chutatape, Opas; Chew, Paul

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a novel deformable-model-based algorithm for fully automated detection of optic disk boundary in fundus images. The proposed method improves and extends the original snake (deforming-only technique) in two aspects: clustering and smoothing update. The contour points are first self-separated into edge-point group or uncertain-point group by clustering after each deformation, and these contour points are then updated by different criteria based on different groups. The updating process combines both the local and global information of the contour to achieve the balance of contour stability and accuracy. The modifications make the proposed algorithm more accurate and robust to blood vessel occlusions, noises, ill-defined edges and fuzzy contour shapes. The comparative results show that the proposed method can estimate the disk boundaries of 100 test images closer to the groundtruth, as measured by mean distance to closest point (MDCP) <3 pixels, with the better success rate when compared to those obtained by gradient vector flow snake (GVF-snake) and modified active shape models (ASM).

  20. Bio-Optical Measurement and Modeling of the California Current and Polar Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, B. Greg; Fargion, Giulietta S. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The principal goals of our research are to validate standard or experimental products through detailed bio-optical and biogeochemical measurements, and to combine ocean optical observations with advanced radiative transfer modeling to contribute to satellite vicarious radiometric calibration and advanced algorithm development. To achieve our goals requires continued efforts to execute complex field programs globally, as well as development of advanced ocean optical measurement protocols. We completed a comprehensive set of ocean optical observations in the California Current, Southern Ocean, Indian Ocean requiring a large commitment to instrument calibration, measurement protocols, data processing and data merger. We augmented separately funded projects of our own, as well as others, to acquire ill situ data sets we have collected on various global cruises supported by separate grants or contracts. In collaboration with major oceanographic ship-based observation programs funded by various agencies (CalCOFI, US JGOFS, NOAA AMLR, INDOEX and Japan/East Sea) our SIMBIOS effort has resulted in data from diverse bio-optical provinces. For these global deployments we generate a high-quality, methodologically consistent, data set encompassing a wide-range of oceanic conditions. Global data collected in recent years have been integrated with our on-going CalCOFI database and have been used to evaluate SeaWiFS algorithms and to carry out validation studies. The combined database we have assembled now comprises more than 700 stations and includes observations for the clearest oligotrophic waters, highly eutrophic blooms, red-tides and coastal case 2 conditions. The data has been used to validate water-leaving radiance estimated with SeaWiFS as well as bio-optical algorithms for chlorophyll pigments. The comprehensive data is utilized for development of experimental algorithms (e.g. high-low latitude pigment transition, phytoplankton absorption, and cDOM). During this period

  1. All-optical magnetization reversal by circularly polarized laser pulses: Experiment and multiscale modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahaplar, K.; Kalashnikova, A. M.; Kimel, A. V.; Gerlach, S.; Hinzke, D.; Nowak, U.; Chantrell, R.; Tsukamoto, A.; Itoh, A.; Kirilyuk, A.; Rasing, Th.

    2012-03-01

    We present results of detailed experimental and theoretical studies of all-optical magnetization reversal by single circularly-polarized laser pulses in ferrimagnetic rare earth—transition metal (RE-TM) alloys GdxFe90-xCo10 (20%optical microscopy and multiscale simulations, we identified and described the unconventional path followed by the magnetization during the reversal process. This reversal does not involve precessional motion of magnetization but is governed by the longitudinal relaxation and thus has a linear character. We demonstrate that this all-optically driven linear reversal can be modeled as a result of a two-fold impact of the laser pulse on the medium. First, due to absorption of the light and ultrafast laser-induced heating, the medium is brought to a highly nonequilibrium state. Simultaneously, due to the ultrafast inverse Faraday effect the circularly polarized laser pulse acts as an effective magnetic field of the amplitude up to ˜20 T. We show that the polarization-dependent reversal triggered by the circularly polarized light is feasible only in a narrow range (below 10%) of laser fluences. The duration of the laser pulse required for the reversal can be varied from ˜40 fs up to at least ˜1700 fs. We also investigate experimentally the role of the ferrimagnetic properties of GdFeCo in the all-optical reversal. In particular, the optimal conditions for the all-optical reversal are achieved just below the ferrimagnetic compensation temperature, where the magnetic information can be all-optically written by a laser pulse of minimal fluence and read out within just 30 ps. We argue that this is the fastest write-read event demonstrated for magnetic recording so far.

  2. [STUDY EFFECT OF ASSOSIATED PATHOLOGY ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF OPTIC NERVE ATROPHY].

    PubMed

    Vasyuta, V A

    2015-01-01

    Studied effect of assosiated pathology on the development of optic nerve atrophy (ONA). The basis of population study was comparison some factors in the groups with ONA and without ONA (analysis case-control) and evaluation of relative risk. Analysis showed that the risk of development of ONA increased in coronary heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, atherosclerosis. A functional-organizational model of care for patients with ONA was proposed.

  3. Design-oriented analytic model of phase and frequency modulated optical links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsurrò, Pietro; Saitto, Antonio; Tommasino, Pasquale; Trifiletti, Alessandro; Vannucci, Antonello; Cimmino, Rosario F.

    2016-07-01

    An analytic design-oriented model of phase and frequency modulated microwave optical links has been developed. The models are suitable for design of broadband high dynamic range optical links for antenna remoting and optical beamforming, where noise and linearity of the subsystems are a concern Digital filter design techniques have been applied to the design of optical filters working as frequency discriminator, that are the bottleneck in terms of linearity for these systems. The models of frequency modulated, phase modulated, and coherent I/Q link have been used to compare performance of the different architectures in terms of linearity and SFDR.

  4. Biologically inspired optics: analog semiconductor model of the beetle exoskeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhl, Kaia; Roth, Zachary; Srinivasan, Pradeep; Rumpf, Raymond; Johnson, Eric

    2008-08-01

    Evolution in nature has produced through adaptation a wide variety of distinctive optical structures in many life forms. For example, pigment differs greatly from the observed color of most beetles because their exoskeletons contain multilayer coatings. The green beetle is disguised in a surrounding leaf by having a comparable reflection spectrum as the leaves. The Manuka and June beetle have a concave structure where light incident at any angle on the concave structures produce matching reflection spectra. In this work, semiconductor processing methods were used to duplicate the structure of the beetle exoskeleton. This was achieved by combining analog lithography with a multilayer deposition process. The artificial exoskeleton, 3D concave multilayer structure, demonstrates a wide field of view with a unique spectral response. Studying and replicating these biologically inspired nanostructures may lead to new knowledge for fabrication and design of new and novel nano-photonic devices, as well as provide valuable insight to how such phenomenon is exploited.

  5. Modeling of consecutive local events in fiber-optic lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salikhov, Aydar I.; Vinogradova, Irina L.; Sultanov, Albert K.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this work is to study the impact of a series of local defects on the transmitted signal. In this paper we propose a new method for correlation analysis of measurement results allowing to increase the accuracy of the search of the local events. This will allow to predict the destruction of the optical fiber to the stage of a complete loss of communication. Also, this method will identify the most difficult sections of the cable laying and to take measures to create the best conditions for their operation. These results are essential for the analysis of the link and provide the best conditions for the transfer of signals with mode division multiplexing (MDM).

  6. Analytical model and optical design of distributed aperture optical system for millimeter-wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Caihua; Schuetz, Christopher A.; Martin, Richard D.; Samluk, Jesse; Stein, E. Lee, Jr.; MacKrides, Daniel G.; Mirotznik, Mark; Prather, Dennis W.

    2008-10-01

    Millimeter-wave imaging is very interesting due to its unique transmission properties through a broad range of atmospheric obscurants such as cloud, dust, fog, sandstorms, and smoke, which thereby enables all-weather passive imaging. Unfortunately, the usefulness of millimeter-wave imagers is often limited by the large aperture sizes required to obtain images of sufficient resolution, as governed by the diffraction limit. To this end, we previously proposed a distributed aperture system for direct non-scan millimeter-wave imaging using an optical upconversion technique. In this proposed approach, an antenna array is employed to sample image signals in the millimeter-wave domain. The sampled millimeter-wave signals are then upconverted to the optical domain using electro-optic modulation techniques. These optical signals are mapped into a similar array on the entrance pupil of the following optical system for direct imaging. Although distributed aperture imaging is not new in both radio astronomy and conventional optical inteferometric imaging, the proposed approach is different in that it physically samples image in the millimeter-wave domain and directly forms the image in the optical domain. Therefore, specific analysis and evaluation techniques are required for the design and optimization of the proposed system. In this paper, we will address these issues, develop techniques to evaluate and enhance the system imaging performance and present methods to optimize the geometric configuration.

  7. Accurate mask model implementation in optical proximity correction model for 14-nm nodes and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zine El Abidine, Nacer; Sundermann, Frank; Yesilada, Emek; Farys, Vincent; Huguennet, Frederic; Armeanu, Ana-Maria; Bork, Ingo; Chomat, Michael; Buck, Peter; Schanen, Isabelle

    2016-04-01

    In a previous work, we demonstrated that the current optical proximity correction model assuming the mask pattern to be analogous to the designed data is no longer valid. An extreme case of line-end shortening shows a gap up to 10 nm difference (at mask level). For that reason, an accurate mask model has been calibrated for a 14-nm logic gate level. A model with a total RMS of 1.38 nm at mask level was obtained. Two-dimensional structures, such as line-end shortening and corner rounding, were well predicted using scanning electron microscopy pictures overlaid with simulated contours. The first part of this paper is dedicated to the implementation of our improved model in current flow. The improved model consists of a mask model capturing mask process and writing effects, and a standard optical and resist model addressing the litho exposure and development effects at wafer level. The second part will focus on results from the comparison of the two models, the new and the regular.

  8. Ultra-Wideband Optical Modulation Spectrometer (OMS) Development: Study of the Optical Setup of a Wide-Band Optical Modulation Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolls, Volker; Stringfellow, Guy (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to advance the design of the optical setup for a wide-band Optical Modulation Spectrometer (OMS) for use with astronomical heterodyne receiver systems. This report describes the progress of this investigation achieved from March until December 2001.

  9. Improving Estimated Optical Constants With MSTM and DDSCAT Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitman, K. M.; Wolff, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    We present numerical experiments to determine quantitatively the effects of mineral particle clustering on Mars spacecraft spectral signatures and to improve upon the values of refractive indices (optical constants n, k) derived from Mars dust laboratory analog spectra such as those from RELAB and MRO CRISM libraries. Whereas spectral properties for Mars analog minerals and actual Mars soil are dominated by aggregates of particles smaller than the size of martian atmospheric dust, the analytic radiative transfer (RT) solutions used to interpret planetary surfaces assume that individual, well-separated particles dominate the spectral signature. Both in RT models and in the refractive index derivation methods that include analytic RT approximations, spheres are also over-used to represent nonspherical particles. Part of the motivation is that the integrated effect over randomly oriented particles on quantities such as single scattering albedo and phase function are relatively less than for single particles. However, we have seen in previous numerical experiments that when varying the shape and size of individual grains within a cluster, the phase function changes in both magnitude and slope, thus the "relatively less" effect is more significant than one might think. Here we examine the wavelength dependence of the forward scattering parameter with multisphere T-matrix (MSTM) and discrete dipole approximation (DDSCAT) codes that compute light scattering by layers of particles on planetary surfaces to see how albedo is affected and integrate our model results into refractive index calculations to remove uncertainties in approximations and parameters that can lower the accuracy of optical constants. By correcting the single scattering albedo and phase function terms in the refractive index determinations, our data will help to improve the understanding of Mars in identifying, mapping the distributions, and quantifying abundances for these minerals and will address long

  10. Electrical Equivalent Model for an Optical VCO in a PLL Synchronization Scheme for Ultrashort Optical Pulse Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoni, Antonella; Potì, Luca; Ponzini, Filippo; Ghelfi, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    The electrical modeling of complex electrooptical devices is a useful task for the correct design of its schemes and for the estimation of its performance. In this paper, we consider an electrooptical phase-locked loop (PLL) used to synchronize an RF system clock to the repetition rate of an optical pulsed source, realized by an active fiber mode-locking (ML) technique in the regenerative configuration. The synchronization scheme is suggested by a description of the pulsed source, for the first time, as an optical voltage-control oscillator (VCO). In particular, we present a simple new all-electrical model for the proposed optical VCO, and we verify its accuracy by the implementation of the whole PLL scheme at 2.5 and 10 GHz.

  11. Single-step stereolithography of complex anatomical models for optical flow measurements.

    PubMed

    de Zélicourt, Diane; Pekkan, Kerem; Kitajima, Hiroumi; Frakes, David; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2005-02-01

    Transparent stereolithographic rapid prototyping (RP) technology has already demonstrated in literature to be a practical model construction tool for optical flow measurements such as digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV), laser doppler velocimetry (LDV), and flow visualization. Here, we employ recently available transparent RP resins and eliminate time-consuming casting and chemical curing steps from the traditional approach. This note details our methodology with relevant material properties and highlights its advantages. Stereolithographic model printing with our procedure is now a direct single-step process, enabling faster geometric replication of complex computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models for exact experimental validation studies. This methodology is specifically applied to the in vitro flow modeling of patient-specific total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) morphologies. The effect of RP machining grooves, surface quality, and hydrodynamic performance measurements as compared with the smooth glass models are also quantified.

  12. Satellite and correlative measurements of the stratospheric aerosol. I An optical model for data conversions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Livingston, J. M.; Swissler, T. J.; Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.; Pepin, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    A description is presented of an empirically based model of stratospheric aerosol optical properties (size distributions and refractive indices) and their variations. The need for such a model arose in the data validation and archival programs for two satellite sensors, SAM II and SAGE. These programs require the ability to convert measurements of a given aerosol macroproperty (e.g., volume extinction coefficient, volume backscatter coefficient, particle number or mass per unit volume) to best estimates of other aerosol macroproperties, and to assess quantitatively the uncertainties in the conversion process. The described model provides the information on size distributions, refractive indices and their variations necessary for these tasks, and also defines a procedure for combining the model information with empirical data in a way that facilitates automatic data processing. Although the model was developed for use in the satellite validation and archival programs, it also has proven useful in other studies of stratospheric aerosol.

  13. Study of strong turbulence effects for optical wireless links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuksel, Heba; Meric, Hasim; Kunter, Fulya

    2012-10-01

    Strong turbulence measurements that are taken using real time optical wireless experimental setups are valuable when studying the effects of turbulence regimes on a propagating optical beam. In any kind of FSO system, for us to know the strength of the turbulence thus the refractive index structure constant, is beneficial for having an optimum bandwidth of communication. Even if the FSO Link is placed very well-high-above the ground just to have weak enough turbulence effects, there can be severe atmospheric conditions that can change the turbulence regime. Having a successful theory that will cover all regimes will give us the chance of directly processing the image in existing or using an additional hardware thus deciding on the optimum bandwidth of the communication line at firsthand. For this purpose, Strong Turbulence data has been collected using an outdoor optical wireless setup placed about 85 centimeters above the ground with an acceptable declination and a path length of about 250 meters inducing strong turbulence to the propagating beam. Variations of turbulence strength estimation methods as well as frame image analysis techniques are then been applied to the experimental data in order to study the effects of different parameters on the result. Such strong turbulence data is compared with existing weak and intermediate turbulence data. Aperture Averaging Factor for different turbulence regimes is also investigated.

  14. Structural and optical studies of CuO nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Chand, Prakash Gaur, Anurag Kumar, Ashavani

    2014-04-24

    In the present study, copper oxide (CuO) nanostructures have been synthesized at 140 °C for different aging periods, 1, 24, 48 and 96 hrs by hydrothermal method to investigate their effects on structural and optical properties. The X-ray diffractometer (XRD) pattern indicates the pure phase formation of CuO and the particle size, calculated from XRD data, has been found to be increasing from 21 to 36 nm for the samples synthesized at different aging periods. Field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) analysis also shows that the average diameter and length of these rectangular nano flakes increases with increasing the aging periods. Moreover Raman spectrums also confirm the phase formation of CuO. The optical band gaps calculated through UV-visible spectroscopy are found to be decreasing from 2.92 to 2.69 eV with increase in aging periods, 1 to 96 hrs, respectively.

  15. An X-ray and optical study of the cluster of galaxies Abell 754

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabricant, D.; Beers, T. C.; Geller, M. J.; Gorenstein, P.; Huchra, J. P.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray and optical data for A754 are used to study the relative distribution of the luminous and dark matter in this dense, rich cluster of galaxies with X-ray luminosity comparable to that of the Coma Cluster. A quantitative statistical comparison is made of the galaxy positions with the total mass responsible for maintaining the X-ray emitting gas in hydrostatic equilibrium. A simple bimodal model which fits both the X-ray and optical data suggests that the galaxies are distributed consistently with the projected matter distribution within the region covered by the X-ray map (0.5-1 Mpc). The X-ray and optical estimates of the mass in the central region of the cluster are 2.9 x 10 to the 14th and 3.6 + or - 0.5 x 10 to the 14th solar masses, respectively.

  16. Ultrafast optical nonlinearity, electronic absorption, vibrational spectra and solvent effect studies of ninhydrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajan, D.; Devi, T. Uma; Safakath, K.; Philip, Reji; Němec, Ivan; Karabacak, M.

    2013-05-01

    FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-Vis spectra of the nonlinear optical molecule ninhydrin have been recorded and analyzed. The equilibrium geometry, bonding features, and harmonic vibrational wavenumbers have been investigated with the help of B3LYP density functional theory method. A detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra is carried out with the aid of normal coordinate analysis following the scaled quantum mechanical force field methodology. Solvent effects have been calculated using time-dependent density functional theory in combination with the polarized continuum model. Natural bond orbital analysis confirms the occurrence of strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the molecule. Employing the open-aperture z-scan technique, nonlinear optical absorption of the sample has been studied in the ultrafast and short-pulse excitation regimes, using 100 fs and 5 ns laser pulses respectively. It is found that ninhydrin exhibits optical limiting for both excitations, indicating potential photonic applications.

  17. Bioinformatic and statistical analysis of the optic nerve head in a primate model of ocular hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kompass, Kenneth S; Agapova, Olga A; Li, Wenjun; Kaufman, Paul L; Rasmussen, Carol A; Hernandez, M Rosario

    2008-01-01

    Background The nonhuman primate model of glaucomatous optic neuropathy most faithfully reproduces the human disease. We used high-density oligonucleotide arrays to investigate whole genome transcriptional changes occurring at the optic nerve head during primate experimental glaucoma. Results Laser scarification of the trabecular meshwork of cynomolgus macaques produced elevated intraocular pressure that was monitored over time and led to varying degrees of damage in different samples. The macaques were examined clinically before enucleation and the myelinated optic nerves were processed post-mortem to determine the degree of neuronal loss. Global gene expression was examined in dissected optic nerve heads with Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays. We validated a subset of differentially expressed genes using qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and immuno-enriched astrocytes from healthy and glaucomatous human donors. These genes have previously defined roles in axonal outgrowth, immune response, cell motility, neuroprotection, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Conclusion Our findings show that glaucoma is associated with increased expression of genes that mediate axonal outgrowth, immune response, cell motility, neuroprotection, and ECM remodeling. These studies also reveal that, as glaucoma progresses, retinal ganglion cell axons may make a regenerative attempt to restore lost nerve cell contact. PMID:18822132

  18. Direct numerical modeling of Saturn's dense rings at high optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Derek C.; Ballouz, Ronald-Louis; Morishima, Ryuji

    2015-11-01

    Saturn's B ring exhibits complex optical depth structure of uncertain origin. We are investigating the extent to which viscous overstability and/or gravitational wakes can give rise to this structure, via discrete particle numerical simulations. We use the parallelized N-body tree code pkdgrav with a soft-sphere collision model for detailed treatment of particle collisional physics, including multi-point persistent contact with static, sliding, rolling, and twisting friction forces. This enables us to perform local simulations with millions of particles, realistic sizes, and configurable material properties in high-optical-depth ring patches with near-linear scaling across multiple processors. Recent code improvements to the collision search algorithm provide a further roughly factor of 2 speedup. We present results from the first year of this study in which a library of simulations with different optical depths was constructed. Parameters explored include normal (dynamical) optical depths between 0.5 (approximately 100,000 particles) and 4.0 (approximately 8.3 million particles) in ring patches of dimension 6 by 6 critical Toomre wavelengths, using material parameters ranging from highly elastic smooth spheres to rough "gravel"-like particles. We also vary the particle internal densities to enhance (low density)/suppress (high density) viscous overstability in order to compare against gravitational instability in these different regimes. These libraries will be used to carry out simulated observations for comparison with Cassini CIRS temperature measurements and UVIS occulation data of Saturn's dense rings.

  19. Blocking performance of the hose model and the pipe model for VPN service provisioning over WDM optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haibo; Swee Poo, Gee

    2004-08-01

    We study the provisioning of virtual private network (VPN) service over WDM optical networks. For this purpose, we investigate the blocking performance of the hose model versus the pipe model for the provisioning. Two techniques are presented: an analytical queuing model and a discrete event simulation. The queuing model is developed from the multirate reduced-load approximation technique. The simulation is done with the OPNET simulator. Several experimental situations were used. The blocking probabilities calculated from the two approaches show a close match, indicating that the multirate reduced-load approximation technique is capable of predicting the blocking performance for the pipe model and the hose model in WDM networks. A comparison of the blocking behavior of the two models shows that the hose model has superior blocking performance as compared with pipe model. By and large, the blocking probability of the hose model is better than that of the pipe model by a few orders of magnitude, particularly at low load regions. The flexibility of the hose model allowing for the sharing of resources on a link among all connections accounts for its superior performance.

  20. Implications for GCM Modeling of MARCI/TES ACB Optical Depth Differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, David R.; Kahre, Melinda A.; Wolff, Michael J.; Haberle, Robert; Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.

    2016-10-01

    The Aphelion Cloud Belt (ACB) is a well-studied phenomenon of Mars. HST violet images and microwave observations [e.g. 1–3] helped characterize its seasonal morphology and measure typical optical depths. Follow up, long-term studies by orbiting instruments [e.g. 4–6] characterized the growth and decline of the ACB as well as a baseline set of zonally averaged optical depths as a function of latitude and season. All this work provided ground-truth for the assessment and modification of Mars GCMs and current models provide good agreement with observations [e.g. 7–8].We will present recent analyses of MARCI and TES ACB optical depths that show a wavelength dependance on the timing of the peak zonal-average optical depth that implies a possible evolution in average effective radius of ACB cloud particles as the ACB ages. As we will show, this difference in timing of the optical depth peak between short and long wavelength bands is not seen in the Ames MGCM. In order to begin understanding these differences, we will present retrieved ACB cloud particle sizes from the Ames MGCM to compare to the optical depth observations and calculations and discuss possible model adjustments that may lead to better fits. Aligning model and observation results should lead to a better understanding of what is physically driving the particle size evolution.[1] James, P. B., et al. 1996, JGR, 101, 18883[2] Clancy, R. T., et al. 1996, Icarus, 122, 36[3] Wolff, M. J., et al. 1999, in The Fifth International Conference on Mars, July 19-24, 1999, Pasadena, California, 6173[4] Pearl, J. C., et al. 2001, JGR, 106, 12325[5] Smith, M. D., et al. 2003, JGR-Planets, 108, 1[6] Smith, M. D. 2004, Icarus, 167, 148[7] Montmessin, F., et al. 2004, JGR-Planets, 109, E10004[8] Haberle, R. M., et al. 2010, in BAAS, 42, 1031

  1. An analytical study of thermal invariance of polymeric nanolayer gradient index optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fein, Howard; Ponting, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Specially formulated Gradient-Index polymeric optical materials offer capabilities not possible in conventional GRIN or homogenous optics. A novel technology that enables large scale processing of nanolayered polymer films into real, performance-enhancing lenses and other optical components for Defense-related optical systems is currently being employed. Polymeric nanoLayer GRIN materials (LGRIN) offer the ability to design and fabricate optics with custom gradient refractive index profiles in optical components up to 90 mm in diameter and approaching 5 cm thick. High performance achromatic singlet lenses were designed using specially developed ZEMAX design tools and exceptionally high quality lenses were fabricated from the LGRIN materials. Optical performance of LGRIN optics is shown to be significantly better than with conventional monolithic optics while also significantly reducing optical system mass, volume, and optical element count. Understanding the thermal behavior of such optical components is essential to their operational capability. An experimental study of the effects of elevated operational environments to validate the feasibility of deploying LGRIN optics into real-world operational environments was carried out. Interferometric and physical measurements of structure and optical performance of LGRIN lenses was completed over a 30° - 50°C temperature range. It is shown that nanolayered LGRIN optics and components exhibit no significant variation in optical performance with temperature as compared with commercial, homogenous acrylic optics in the designed operational thermal range.

  2. Optical Detection of Early Damage in Retinal Ganglion Cells in a Mouse Model of Partial Optic Nerve Crush Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ji; Puyang, Zhen; Feng, Liang; Duan, Lian; Liang, Peiji; Backman, Vadim; Liu, Xiaorong; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Elastic light backscattering spectroscopy (ELBS) has exquisite sensitivity to the ultrastructural properties of tissue and thus has been applied to detect various diseases associated with ultrastructural alterations in their early stages. This study aims to test whether ELBS can detect early damage in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Methods We used a mouse model of partial optic nerve crush (pONC) to induce rapid RGC death. We confirmed RGC loss by axon counting and characterized the changes in retinal morphology by optical coherence tomography (OCT) and in retinal function by full-field electroretinogram (ERG), respectively. To quantify the ultrastructural properties, elastic backscattering spectroscopic analysis was implemented in the wavelength-dependent images recorded by reflectance confocal microscopy. Results At 3 days post-pONC injury, no significant change was found in the thickness of the RGC layer or in the mean amplitude of the oscillatory potentials measured by OCT and ERG, respectively; however, we did observe a significantly decreased number of axons compared with the controls. At 3 days post-pONC, we used ELBS to calculate the ultrastructural marker (D), the shape factor quantifying the shape of the local mass density correlation functions. It was significantly reduced in the crushed eyes compared with the controls, indicating the ultrastructural fragmentation in the crushed eyes. Conclusions Elastic light backscattering spectroscopy detected ultrastructural neuronal damage in RGCs following the pONC injury when OCT and ERG tests appeared normal. Our study suggests a potential clinical method for detecting early neuronal damage prior to anatomical alterations in the nerve fiber and ganglion cell layers. PMID:27784071

  3. Optical truss and retroreflector modeling for picometer laser metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, Braden E.

    1993-09-01

    Space-based astrometric interferometer concepts typically have a requirement for the measurement of the internal dimensions of the instrument to accuracies in the picometer range. While this level of resolution has already been achieved for certain special types of laser gauges, techniques for picometer-level accuracy need to be developed to enable all the various kinds of laser gauges needed for space-based interferometers. Systematic errors due to retroreflector imperfections become important as soon as the retroreflector is allowed to either translate in position or articulate in angle away from its nominal zero-point. Also, when combining several laser interferometers to form a three-dimensional laser gauge (a laser optical truss), systematic errors due to imperfect knowledge of the truss geometry are important as the retroreflector translates away from its nominal zero-point. In order to assess the astrometric performance of a proposed instrument, it is necessary to determine how the effects of an imperfect laser metrology system impact the astrometric accuracy. This paper show the development of an error propagation model from errors in the 1-D metrology measurements through the impact on the overall astrometric accuracy for OSI. Simulations are then presented based on this development which were used to define a multiplier which determines the 1-D metrology accuracy required to produce a given amount of fringe position error.

  4. Bio-Optical Measurement and Modeling of the California Current and Polar Oceans. Chapter 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, B. Greg

    2001-01-01

    This Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) project contract supports in situ ocean optical observations in the California Current, Southern Ocean, Indian Ocean as well as merger of other in situ data sets we have collected on various global cruises supported by separate grants or contracts. The principal goals of our research are to validate standard or experimental products through detailed bio-optical and biogeochemical measurements, and to combine ocean optical observations with advanced radiative transfer modeling to contribute to satellite vicarious radiometric calibration and advanced algorithm development. In collaboration with major oceanographic ship-based observation programs funded by various agencies (CalCOFI, US JGOFS, NOAA AMLR, INDOEX and Japan/East Sea) our SIMBIOS effort has resulted in data from diverse bio-optical provinces. For these global deployments we generate a high-quality, methodologically consistent, data set encompassing a wide-range of oceanic conditions. Global data collected in recent years have been integrated with our on-going CalCOFI database and have been used to evaluate Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) algorithms and to carry out validation studies. The combined database we have assembled now comprises more than 700 stations and includes observations for the clearest oligotrophic waters, highly eutrophic blooms, red-tides and coastal case two conditions. The data has been used to validate water-leaving radiance estimated with SeaWiFS as well as bio optical algorithms for chlorophyll pigments. The comprehensive data is utilized for development of experimental algorithms (e.g., high-low latitude pigment transition, phytoplankton absorption, and cDOM).

  5. Modeling, simulation, and analysis of optical remote sensing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerekes, John Paul; Landgrebe, David A.

    1989-01-01

    Remote Sensing of the Earth's resources from space-based sensors has evolved in the past 20 years from a scientific experiment to a commonly used technological tool. The scientific applications and engineering aspects of remote sensing systems have been studied extensively. However, most of these studies have been aimed at understanding individual aspects of the remote sensing process while relatively few have studied their interrelations. A motivation for studying these interrelationships has arisen with the advent of highly sophisticated configurable sensors as part of the Earth Observing System (EOS) proposed by NASA for the 1990's. Two approaches to investigating remote sensing systems are developed. In one approach, detailed models of the scene, the sensor, and the processing aspects of the system are implemented in a discrete simulation. This approach is useful in creating simulated images with desired characteristics for use in sensor or processing algorithm development. A less complete, but computationally simpler method based on a parametric model of the system is also developed. In this analytical model the various informational classes are parameterized by their spectral mean vector and covariance matrix. These class statistics are modified by models for the atmosphere, the sensor, and processing algorithms and an estimate made of the resulting classification accuracy among the informational classes. Application of these models is made to the study of the proposed High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (HRIS). The interrelationships among observational conditions, sensor effects, and processing choices are investigated with several interesting results.

  6. Optical aberrations, retinal image quality and eye growth: Experimentation and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yibin

    2007-12-01

    Retinal image quality is important for normal eye growth. Optical aberrations are of interest for two reasons: first, they degrade retinal images; second, they might provide some cues to defocus. Higher than normal ocular aberrations have been previously associated with human myopia. However, these studies were cross-sectional in design, and only reported aberrations in terms of root mean square (RMS) errors of Zernike coefficients, a poor metric of optical quality. This dissertation presents results from investigations of ocular optical aberrations, retinal image quality and eye growth in chicks and humans. A number of techniques were utilized, including Shack-Hartmann aberrometry, high-frequency A-scan ultrasonography, ciliary nerve section (CNX), photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) as well as computer simulations and modeling. A technique to extract light scatter information from Shack-Hartmann images was also developed. The main findings of the dissertation are summarized below. In young chicks, most ocular aberrations decreased with growth in both normal and CNX eyes, and there were diurnal fluctuations in some aberrations. Modeling suggested active reduction in higher order aberrations (HOAs) during early development. Although CNX eyes manifested greater than normal HOAs, they showed near normal growth. Retinal image degradation varied greatly among individual eyes post-PRK in young chicks. Including light scatter information into analyses of retinal image quality better estimated the latter. Albino eyes showed more severe retinal image degradation than normal eyes, due to increased optical aberrations and light scatter, but their growth was similar to those of normal eyes, implying that they are relatively insensitive to retina image quality. Although the above results questioned the influence of optical aberrations on early ocular growth, some optical quality metrics, derived from optical aberrations data, could predict how much the eyes of young chicks

  7. Optic Nerve Dysfunction in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: An Electrophysiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Claudio; Palmieri, Maria Giuseppina; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Cesareo, Massimo; Romigi, Andrea; Izzi, Francesca; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Oliva, Corrado; Mercuri, Nicola Biagio; Placidi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the integrity of the visual system in patients affected by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by means of electroretinogram (ERG) and visual evoked potential (VEP). Methods: We performed electrophysiological study of the visual system in a population of severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea events/time in bed ≥ 30/h) patients without medical comorbidities compared to a group of healthy controls similar for age, sex, and body mass index. Patients and controls did not have visual impairment or systemic disorders with known influence on the visual system. ERG and VEP were elicited by a reversal pattern generated on a television monitor at low (55') and high (15') spatial frequencies stimulation. Daytime sleepiness was assessed using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) in both patients and controls. Results: In comparison with healthy controls (n = 27), patients with OSA (n = 27) showed a significant latency delay coupled with a significant amplitude reduction of P100 wave of VEP at all spatial frequencies in both eyes. No significant differences between groups were detected as concerning ERG components. No correlations were found between polygraphic parameters, ESS scores, or VEP and ERG components in OSA patients. Conclusions: This study documented that patients with OSA, without medical comorbidities, present VEP alteration as documented by lower amplitude and longer latency of the P100 component than healthy controls. These altered electrophysiological findings may be the expression of optic nerve dysfunction provoked by hypoxia, acidosis, hypercarbia and airway obstruction, frequently observed in patients with OSA. Hence, we hypothesize that OSA per se may impair optic nerve function. Citation: Liguori C, Palmieri MG, Pierantozzi M, Cesareo M, Romigi A, Izzi F, Marciani MG, Oliva C, Mercuri NB, Placidi F. Optic nerve dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea: an electrophysiological study. SLEEP 2016;39(1):19–23. PMID

  8. Nonlinear optical studies of curcumin metal derivatives with cw laser

    SciTech Connect

    Henari, F. Z. Cassidy, S.

    2015-03-30

    We report on measurements of the nonlinear refractive index and nonlinear absorption coefficients for curcumin and curcumin metal complexes of boron, copper, and iron at different wavelengths using the Z-scan technique. These materials are found to be novel nonlinear media. It was found that the addition of metals slightly influences its nonlinearity. These materials show a large negative nonlinear refractive index of the order of 10{sup −7} cm{sup 2}/W and negative nonlinear absorption of the order of 10{sup −6} cm/W. The origin of the nonlinearity was investigated by comparison of the formalism that is known as the Gaussian decomposition model with the thermal lens model. The optical limiting behavior based on the nonlinear refractive index was also investigated.

  9. Nonlinear optical studies of curcumin metal derivatives with cw laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henari, F. Z.; Cassidy, S.

    2015-03-01

    We report on measurements of the nonlinear refractive index and nonlinear absorption coefficients for curcumin and curcumin metal complexes of boron, copper, and iron at different wavelengths using the Z-scan technique. These materials are found to be novel nonlinear media. It was found that the addition of metals slightly influences its nonlinearity. These materials show a large negative nonlinear refractive index of the order of 10-7 cm2/W and negative nonlinear absorption of the order of 10-6 cm/W. The origin of the nonlinearity was investigated by comparison of the formalism that is known as the Gaussian decomposition model with the thermal lens model. The optical limiting behavior based on the nonlinear refractive index was also investigated.

  10. Argand-plane vorticity singularities in complex scalar optical fields: an experimental study using optical speckle.

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Freda; Bishop, Alexis I; Kitchen, Marcus J; Paganin, David M

    2014-03-24

    The Cornu spiral is, in essence, the image resulting from an Argand-plane map associated with monochromatic complex scalar plane waves diffracting from an infinite edge. Argand-plane maps can be useful in the analysis of more general optical fields. We experimentally study particular features of Argand-plane mappings known as "vorticity singularities" that are associated with mapping continuous single-valued complex scalar speckle fields to the Argand plane. Vorticity singularities possess a hierarchy of Argand-plane catastrophes including the fold, cusp and elliptic umbilic. We also confirm their connection to vortices in two-dimensional complex scalar waves. The study of vorticity singularities may also have implications for higher-dimensional fields such as coherence functions and multi-component fields such as vector and spinor fields. PMID:24663998

  11. Geometric-optics forest canopy modelling for high spatial resolution imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, R.A., Edwards, G.; Gauthier, R.P.

    1996-11-01

    This research studies processes influencing the radiometric appearance of a forest at fine spatial resolution. A canopy radiance model, Treatment of Radiance Emerging from Light Interactions in a Treed Environment (TRELITE), was formulated using a geometric-optical approach. This model explored the relationship between image radiometric textures and canopy physical parameters. TRELITE`s geometric parameters of influence were tree shape, pixel dimension, source and viewing directions, and forest configuration. TRELITE`s optical parameters and interaction processes were collimated and sky irradiance, surface reflectivity, object transmissivity, and projected and mutual shading. Simulated airborne images were generated from a physical representation of these parameters. Four conifer plantation test sites were chosen to evaluate the influence of the modelled parameters on the scene radiance. The Multispectral Electro-Optical Imaging Scanner (MEIS-II), with 45 cm spatial resolution for eight channels spanning visible to near-infrared, measured scene radiance. MEIS image radiance patterns were analyzed for single trees, in four monospecific stands. The influence on the simulated radiance of the modelled canopy factors in TRELITE were examined, on a single tree basis, to determine relative importance in high spatial resolution imagery. Several modelling options were tested. Among them, the most appropriate tree outline shape was the truncated ellipse. Details of simulated images, particularly those in shaded areas, compared more favorably with airborne images when both collimated and diffuse illumination were modelled. Three processes emerged which were imperative to successful simulation: mutual shading (on-object and between object), bidirectional reflectance, and light transmissivity through crowns. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. A CORRELATED STUDY OF OPTICAL AND X-RAY AFTERGLOWS OF GRBs

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Liang; Ryde, Felix; Wu, Xue-Feng; Huang, Yong-Feng; Tang, Qing-Wen; Geng, Jin-Jun; Wang, Xiang-Gao; Liang, En-Wei; Liang, Yun-Feng; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Wang, Yu; Wei, Jian-Yan; Zhang, Bing E-mail: liang.li@fysik.su.se

    2015-05-20

    We study an extensive sample of 87 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) for which there are well-sampled and simultaneous optical and X-ray light curves. We extract the cleanest possible signal of the afterglow component and compare the temporal behaviors of the X-ray light curve, observed by Swift XRT, and optical data, observed by UVOT and ground-based telescopes for each individual burst. Overall we find that 62% of the GRBs are consistent with the standard afterglow model. When more advanced modeling is invoked, up to 91% of the bursts in our sample may be consistent with the external-shock model. A large fraction of these bursts are consistent with occurring in a constant interstellar density medium (61%) while only 39% of them occur in a wind-like medium. Only nine cases have afterglow light curves that exactly match the standard fireball model prediction, having a single power-law decay in both energy bands that are observed during their entire duration. In particular, for the bursts with chromatic behavior, additional model assumptions must be made over limited segments of the light curves in order for these bursts to fully agree with the external-shock model. Interestingly, for 54% of the X-ray and 40% of the optical band observations, the end of the shallow decay (t{sup ∼−0.5}) period coincides with the jet-break (t{sup ∼−p}) time, causing an abrupt change in decay slope. The fraction of the burst that is consistent with the external-shock model is independent of the observational epochs in the rest frame of GRBs. Moreover, no cases can be explained by the cooling frequency crossing the X-ray or optical band.

  13. Application study of the optical biopsy system for small experimental animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Morita, Shin-ichi; Maruyama, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Toru; Matsuura, Yuji; Kanai, Gen'ichi; Ura, Nobuo; Masutani, Koji; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2008-02-01

    An optical biopsy system for small experimental animals has been developed. The system includes endoscope probe, portable probe and two kinds of miniaturized Raman probes. The micro Raman probe (MRP) is made of optical fibers and the ball lens hollow optical fiber Raman probe (BHRP) is made of hollow fiber. The former has large focal depth and suitable to measure average spectra of subsurface tissue. The latter has rather small focal depth and it is possible to control focal length by selecting ball lens attached at the probe head. It is suitable to survey materials at the fixed depth in the tissue. The system is applied to study various small animal cancer models, such as esophagus and stomach rat models and subcutaneous mouse models of pancreatic cancers. In the studies of subcutaneous tumor model mouse, it is suggested that protein conformational changes occur in the tumor tissue within few minutes after euthanasia of the mouse. No more change is observed for the following ten minutes. Any alterations in the molecular level are not observed in normal skin, muscle tissues. Since the change completes in such a short time, it is suggested that this phenomenon caused by termination of blood circulation.

  14. Study of optical techniques for the Ames unitary wind tunnel. Part 5: Infrared imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, George

    1992-01-01

    A survey of infrared thermography for aerodynamics was made. Particular attention was paid to boundary layer transition detection. IR thermography flow visualization of 2-D and 3-D separation was surveyed. Heat transfer measurements and surface temperature measurements were also covered. Comparisons of several commercial IR cameras were made. The use of a recently purchased IR camera in the Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels was studied. Optical access for these facilities and the methods to scan typical models was investigated.

  15. Multilayer Markov Random Field models for change detection in optical remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedek, Csaba; Shadaydeh, Maha; Kato, Zoltan; Szirányi, Tamás; Zerubia, Josiane

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we give a comparative study on three Multilayer Markov Random Field (MRF) based solutions proposed for change detection in optical remote sensing images, called Multicue MRF, Conditional Mixed Markov model, and Fusion MRF. Our purposes are twofold. On one hand, we highlight the significance of the focused model family and we set them against various state-of-the-art approaches through a thematic analysis and quantitative tests. We discuss the advantages and drawbacks of class comparison vs. direct approaches, usage of training data, various targeted application fields and different ways of Ground Truth generation, meantime informing the Reader in which roles the Multilayer MRFs can be efficiently applied. On the other hand we also emphasize the differences between the three focused models at various levels, considering the model structures, feature extraction, layer interpretation, change concept definition, parameter tuning and performance. We provide qualitative and quantitative comparison results using principally a publicly available change detection database which contains aerial image pairs and Ground Truth change masks. We conclude that the discussed models are competitive against alternative state-of-the-art solutions, if one uses them as pre-processing filters in multitemporal optical image analysis. In addition, they cover together a large range of applications, considering the different usage options of the three approaches.

  16. Proposals for quantum simulating simple lattice gauge theory models using optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Unmuth-Yockey, Judah; Bazavov, Alexei; Meurice, Yannick; Tsai, Shan-Wen

    We derive an effective spin Hamiltonian for the (1 +1)-dimensional Abelian Higgs model in the strongly coupled region by integrating out the link variables. With finite spin truncations, the Hamiltonian can be matched with a 1-dimensional two-species Bose Hubbard model in the strong-coupling limit that can be implemented with cold atoms on an optical lattice. We study the phase diagram of the original Abelian Higgs model with Monte Carlo simulation and Tensor Renormalization Group methods. The results show a crossover line which terminates near the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition point. The effective quantum Hamiltonian is also studied with the DMRG method, and we find that they have a similar behavior. We discuss practical experimental implementations for our quantum simulator. Species-dependent optical lattices and ladder systems with double-well potentials are considered. We show how to obtain each of the interaction parameters required in the Bose-Hubbard model that we obtained, and confirm the possibility of tuning these interactions to the region in which our mapping is valid. We emphasize that this proposal for quantum simulating a gauge theory uses a manifestly gauge-invariant formulation and Gauss's Law is therefore automatically satisfied. Supported by DoD ARO under Grant No. W911NF-13-1-0119 and by the NSF under Grants No. DMR-1411345.

  17. Optical nonlinearity of liquid nanosuspensions: Kerr versus exponential model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, E. M.; Lee, W. M.; Dholakia, K.; El-Ganainy, R.; Christodoulides, D. N.

    2009-08-01

    We report our experimental and theoretical progress towards elucidating the nonlinear optical response of nanosuspensions. To date, we have devised a fiber-optic variant of the Z-scan method to accurately measure the nonlinearity of liquid nanosuspensions. Furthermore, we shall show that the optical nonlinearity may be properly accounted theoretically by including both the virial coefficients for the soft-condensed matter system in addition to the exponential term, which does not account for particleparticle interactions, yielding an effective or renormalized Kerr effect in many cases.

  18. A statistical model for road surface friction forecasting applying optical road weather measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hippi, M.; Juga, I.; Nurmi, P.

    2009-09-01

    Road surface friction is defined as the grip between car tyre and underlying surface. Poor friction often plays a crucial role in wintertime car accidents. Friction can decrease dramatically during snowfall or when wet road surface temperature falls below zero. Even a thin layer of ice or snow can decrease friction substantially increasing the risk of accidents. Many studies have shown that road surface temperature, road conditions and friction can fluctuate dramatically within short distances under specific weather situations. Friction or grip can be improved with road maintenance activities like salting and gritting. Salting will melt the ice or snow layer, whereas gritting will improve the grip. Salting is effective only above -5C temperatures. Light snowfall together with low temperatures can result in very slippery driving conditions. Finnish Road Administration's observing network covers c. 500 road weather stations in Finland. Almost 100 of them are equipped with optical sensors (in winter 2008-2009). The number of optical sensors has increased remarkably during past few years. The optical measuring devices are Vaisala DSC111 sensors which measure the depth of water, snow and ice on the road surface and also produce an estimate of the state of road and prevailing friction. Observation data from road weather stations with optical sensors were collected from winter 2007/08, and a couple of representative (from a weather perspective) stations were selected for detailed statistical analysis. The purpose of the study was to find a statistical relationship between the observed values and, especially, the correlation between friction and other road weather parameters. Consequently, a model based on linear regression was developed. With the model friction being the dependent variable, the independent variables having highest correlations were the composite of ice and snow (water content) on the road, and the road surface temperature. In the case of a wet road

  19. Electronic structures and nonlinear optical properties of macrocycles in model compounds and in photosynthetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.X.

    1996-05-01

    Ultrafast energy and electron transfer processes are carried out in natural photosynthetic systems via chlorophyll molecules attached to proteins. The chlorophyll molecules are held by the protein matrices with different relative distances and orientations. The environment around each chlorophyll determines its energetics and function in initial photochemical reactions. One of the most important factors that modify the energetics of the chlorophylls is the electronic interactions between the chlorophylls. This has been demonstrated by the structural details of the two chlorophyll arrays, B800 and B850 in photosynthetic bacterial antenna LHII, as well as the special pair chlorophylls in the bacterial photosynthetic reaction center. The former conducts the energy transfer to LFI, then to the reaction center, the latter, the electron transfer. The electronic interactions between chlorophylls in model systems and natural photosynthetic systems have been studied extensively with various techniques, e.g., linear optical absorption, but the nonlinear optical properties, such as high order nonlinear optical susceptibilities, are not well characterized. In this study, we intend to characterize the nonlinear optical susceptibility {Chi} in various molecular systems consisting of chlorophyll, porphyrin and phthalocyanine with different configurations and aggregation states. The goal of this research is twofold, (1) to establish the correlation between the electronic couplings in macrocycles and {Chi} with experimental measurements (e.g., degenerated four wave mixing, DFWM) and theoretical modeling, and (2) to explore the potential applications of biophotonics device based on the {Chi} measurements of various chlorophyll arrays which perform ultrafast energy and electron transfer similar to those desirable functions in photonic devices.

  20. Continuous monitoring of arthritis in animal models using optical imaging modalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Taeyoon; Yoon, Hyung-Ju; Lee, Saseong; Jang, Won Seuk; Jung, Byungjo; Kim, Wan-Uk

    2014-10-01

    Given the several difficulties associated with histology, including difficulty in continuous monitoring, this study aimed to investigate the feasibility of optical imaging modalities-cross-polarization color (CPC) imaging, erythema index (EI) imaging, and laser speckle contrast (LSC) imaging-for continuous evaluation and monitoring of arthritis in animal models. C57BL/6 mice, used for the evaluation of arthritis, were divided into three groups: arthritic mice group (AMG), positive control mice group (PCMG), and negative control mice group (NCMG). Complete Freund's adjuvant, mineral oil, and saline were injected into the footpad for AMG, PCMG, and NCMG, respectively. LSC and CPC images were acquired from 0 through 144 h after injection for all groups. EI images were calculated from CPC images. Variations in feet area, EI, and speckle index for each mice group over time were calculated for quantitative evaluation of arthritis. Histological examinations were performed, and the results were found to be consistent with those from optical imaging analysis. Thus, optical imaging modalities may be successfully applied for continuous evaluation and monitoring of arthritis in animal models.

  1. Optical scattering simulation of ice particles with surface roughness modeled using the Edwards-Wilkinson equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianing; Bi, Lei; Liu, Jianping; Panetta, R. Lee; Yang, Ping; Kattawar, George W.

    2016-07-01

    Constructing an appropriate particle morphology model is essential for realistic simulation of optical properties of atmospheric particles. This paper presents a model for generating surface roughness based on a combination of methods from discrete differential geometry combined with a stochastic partial differential equation for surface evolution introduced by Edwards and Wilkinson. Scattering of light by roughened particles is simulated using the Invariant Imbedding T-Matrix (II-TM) method. The effects of surface roughness on the single-scattering properties, namely, the phase matrix, asymmetry factor, and extinction efficiency, are investigated for a single wavelength in the visible range and for a range of size parameters up to x=50. Three different smooth shapes are considered: spherical, spheroidal, and hexagonal, the latter two in just the "compact particle" case of unit aspect ratio. It is shown that roughness has negligible effects on the optical scattering properties for size parameters less than 20. For size parameters ranging from 20 to 50, the phase matrix elements are more sensitive to the surface roughness than are two important integral optical properties, the extinction efficiency and asymmetry factor. As has been seen in studies using other forms of roughening, the phase function is progressively smoothed as roughness increases. The effect on extinction efficiency is to increase it, and on asymmetry factor is to decrease it. Each of these effects is relatively modest in the size range considered, but the trend of results suggests that greater effects will be seen for size parameters larger than ones considered here.

  2. Numerical analysis using 2D modeling of optical fiber poled by induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, D.; De Lucia, F.; Corbari, C.; Healy, N.; Sazio, P. J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Thermal poling, a technique to introduce effective second-order nonlinearities in silica optical fibers, has found widespread applications in frequency conversion, electro-optic modulation, switching and polarization-entangled photon pair generation. Since its first demonstration around 25 years ago, studies into thermal poling were primarily based on anode-cathode electrode configurations. However, more recently, superior electrode configurations have been investigated that allow for robust and reliable thermally poled fibers with excellent second order nonlinear properties [1, 2]. Very recently, we experimentally demonstrated an electrostatic induction poling technique that creates a stable second-order nonlinearity in a twin-hole fiber without any direct physical contact to internal fiber electrodes whatsoever [3]. This innovative technique lifts a number of restrictions on the use of complex microstructured optical fibers (MOF) for poling, as it is no longer necessary to individually contact internal electrodes and presents a general methodology for selective liquid electrode filling of complex MOF geometries. In order to systematically implement these more advanced device embodiments, it is first necessary to develop comprehensive numerical models of the induction poling mechanism itself. To this end, we have developed two-dimensional (2D) simulations of space-charge region formation using COMSOL finite element analysis, by building on current numerical models [4].

  3. Assessment of an Underwater Light Attenuation Model Using Bio-optical Data Collected in Monterey Bay, CA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penta, B.; Goode, W.; Blum, M.; Lamb, E.; Shulman, I.; Jolliff, J.; Anderson, S.; Derada, S.

    2008-12-01

    A new model for the underwater propagation of photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) based on inherent optical properties (IOP) has been developed for use in marine ecosystem models. This "pseudo- spectral," IOP-based model has improved accuracy compared to standard Lambert-Beer law schemes while being appreciably more computationally efficient than multi-spectral optical models. IOP input to the model can originate from an ecosystem model, remote sensing observations, in-situ data, or any combination thereof. To assess the utility of this new light model, we employ a bio-optical data set collected in Monterey Bay, California during May and June 2008 as part of the Naval Research Laboratory's Bio-Optical Studies of Predictability and Assimilation for the Coastal Environment (BIOSPACE) program. A diverse set of sampling platforms included satellites, gliders, autonomous underwater vehicles, profiling moorings (SEPTR), a ship- towed platform (ScanFish MK II), and ship-based profiling and water sampling. Predictions derived from an ecosystem model using different parameterizations of the IOP-based light scheme are compared.

  4. High pressure studies on nanometer sized clusters: Structural, optical, and cooperative properties

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, S.H.

    1995-05-01

    High-pressure Se EXAFS is used to study pressure-induced structural transformations in CdSe nanocrystals. The transformation is wurtzite to rock salt, at a pressure much higher than in bulk. High-pressure XRD is used to confirm the EXAFS results. Diffraction peak widths indicate that nanocrystals do not fragment upon transformation. Optical absorption correlates with structural transformations and is used to measure transition pressures; transformation pressure increases smoothly as nanocrystal size decreases. Thermodynamics of transformation is modeled using an elevated surface energy in the high-pressure phase. High-pressure study of Si nanocrystals show large increases in transformation pressure in crystallites to 500{angstrom} diameter, and an overall change in crystallite shape upon transformation is seen from XRD line widths. C{sub 60} single crystals were studied using Raman scattering; results provide information about the clusters` rotational state. Optical properties of high-pressure phase CdSe clusters were studied.

  5. Cryogenic Optical Performance of a Lightweighted Mirror Assembly for Future Space Astronomical Telescopes: Correlating Optical Test Results and Thermal Optical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Ron; Arnold, William R.; Baker, Marcus A.; Bevan, Ryan M.; Burdick, Gregory; Effinger, Michael R.; Gaddy, Darrell E.; Goode, Brian K.; Hanson, Craig; Hogue, William D.; Kegley, Jeffrey R.; Kirk, Charlie; Maffett, Steven P.; Matthews, Gary W.; Siler, Richard D.; Smith, W. Scott; Stahl, H. Philip; Tucker, John M.; Wright, Ernest R.

    2013-01-01

    A 43cm diameter stacked core mirror demonstrator was interferometrically tested at room temperature down to 250 degrees Kelvin for thermal deformation. The 2.5m radius of curvature spherical mirror assembly was constructed by low temperature fusing three abrasive waterjet core sections between two CNC pocket milled face sheets. The 93% lightweighted Corning ULE® mirror assembly represents the current state of the art for future UV, optical, near IR space telescopes. During the multiple thermal test cycles, test results of interferometric test, thermal IR images of the front face were recorded in order to validate thermal optical model.

  6. Cryogenic Optical Performance of a Light-weight Mirror Assembly for Future Space Astronomical Telescopes: Optical Test Results and Thermal Optical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Ron; Arnold, William; Baker, Markus A.; Bevan, Ryan M.; Carpenter, James R.; Effinger, Michael R.; Gaddy, Darrell E.; Goode, Brian K.; Kegley, Jeffrey R.; Hogue, William D.; Siler, Richard D.; Smith, W. Scott; Stahl. H. Philip; Tucker, John M.; Wright, Ernest R.; Kirk, Charles S.; Hanson, Craig; Burdick, Gregory; Maffett, Steven

    2013-01-01

    A 40 cm diameter mirror assembly was interferometrically tested at room temperature down to 250 degrees Kelvin for thermal deformation. The 2.5 m radius of curvature spherical mirror assembly was constructed by low temperature fusing three abrasive waterjet core sections between two face sheets. The 93% lightweighted Corning ULE mirror assembly represents the current state of the art for future UV, optical, near IR space telescopes. During the multiple thermal test cycles, test results of interferometric test, thermal IR images of the front face were recorded in order to validate thermal optical model.

  7. Analytical model of optical field distribution of thin disk laser with thermal-optical aberration gain medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangzhi; Qiu, Yuli; Wang, Zexiong; Zhu, Xiao; Zhu, Changhong

    2016-08-01

    An analytical model is developed to analyze the optical field distribution of thin disk laser with a thermal-optical aberration gain medium. The fundamental mode field distribution is calculated by using the eigenvector method of the resonator transit matrix for different pumping parameters. The analytical results show that the uniformity of the pumping spot is an important factor that impacts the beam quality of thin disk laser. The uniform pumping spot is beneficial to decrease thermal aberration and Optical Path Difference (OPD) of thin disk crystal, and to improve the beam quality. However, the beam quality still decreases slightly with the increasing of pumping intensity under the uniform pumping condition. The main reason for degradation of beam quality is the aspherical part of OPD which leads to diffraction losses of the resonator and wavefront deformation.

  8. Thermal vegetation canopy model studies

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.A.; Ranson, K.J.; Nguyen, D.; Balick, L.; Link, L.E.; Fritschen, L.; Hutchison, B.

    1981-01-01

    An iterative-type thermal model applicable to forest canopies was tested with data from two diverse forest types. The model framework consists of a system of steady-state energy budget equations describing the interactions of short- and long-wave radiation within three horizontally infinite canopy layers. A state-space formulation of the energy dynamics within the canopy is used which permits a factorization of canopy geometrical parameters from canopy optical and thermal coefficients as well as environmental driving variables. Two sets of data characterizing a coniferous (Douglas-fir) and deciduous (oak-hickory) canopy were collected to evaluate the thermal model. The results show that the model approximates measured mean canopy temperatures to within 2/sup 0/C for relatively clear weather conditions and deviates by a maximum of 3/sup 0/C for very hazy or foggy conditions.

  9. Preliminary study of digital image correlation based optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cuiru; Vuong, Barry; Wen, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Victor

    2013-06-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) provides deformation or material properties mapping of soft tissue, which is important for morphological and pathological studies of the tissue. An OCE technique is developed based on digital image correlation. System calibration and measurement error evaluation are performed. The displacement measurement of 0.6 μm to over 100 μm was obtained through a phantom experiment. The capability of this OCE technique for differentiation of stiffness was evaluated by imaging a two-components phantom. OCE imaging of an aneurysm sample shows promising results for characterization of composites of aneurismal wall in the future.

  10. Optical Traps to Study Properties of Molecular Motors

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, James A.; Rice, Sarah E.; Rock, Ronald S.; Purcell, Thomas J.; Warrick, Hans M.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro motility assays enabled the analysis of coupling between ATP hydrolysis and movement of myosin along actin filaments or kinesin along microtubules. Single-molecule assays using laser trapping have been used to obtain more detailed information about kinesins, myosins, and processive DNA enzymes. The combination of in vitro motility assays with laser-trap measurements has revealed detailed dynamic structural changes associated with the ATPase cycle. This article describes the use of optical traps to study processive and nonprocessive molecular motor proteins, focusing on the design of the instrument and the assays to characterize motility. PMID:22046048

  11. Optical traps to study properties of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Spudich, James A; Rice, Sarah E; Rock, Ronald S; Purcell, Thomas J; Warrick, Hans M

    2011-11-01

    In vitro motility assays enabled the analysis of coupling between ATP hydrolysis and movement of myosin along actin filaments or kinesin along microtubules. Single-molecule assays using laser trapping have been used to obtain more detailed information about kinesins, myosins, and processive DNA enzymes. The combination of in vitro motility assays with laser-trap measurements has revealed detailed dynamic structural changes associated with the ATPase cycle. This article describes the use of optical traps to study processive and nonprocessive molecular motor proteins, focusing on the design of the instrument and the assays to characterize motility.

  12. Optical characterization of SiO2 thin films using universal dispersion model over wide spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franta, Daniel; Nečas, David; Ohlídal, Ivan; Giglia, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    Vacuum evaporated SiO2 thin films are very important in a design and manufacturing of optical devices produced in optics industry. In this contribution a reliable and precise optical characterization of such SiO2 thin films is performed using the combined method of spectrophotometry at normal incidence and variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry applied over spectral range from far IR to extreme UV (0.01-45 eV). This method uses the Universal Dispersion Model based on parametrization of the joint density of states and structural model comprising film defects such as nanometric boundary roughness, inhomogeneity and area non-uniformity. The optical characterization over the wide spectral range provides not only the spectral dependencies of the optical constants of the films within the wide range but, more significantly, it enables their correct and precise determination within the spectral range of interest, i.e. the range of their transparency. Furthermore, measurements in the ranges of film absorption, i. e. phonon excitations in IR and electron excitations in UV, reveal information about the material structure. The results of the optical characterization of the SiO2 thin films prepared on silicon single crystal substrates under various technological conditions are presented in detail for two selected samples. Beside film thicknesses and values of dispersion parameters and spectral dependencies of the optical constants of the SiO2 films, the characterization also enables quantification of film defects and their parameters are presented as well. The results concerning the optical constants of SiO2 films are compared with silica optical constants determined in our earlier studies.

  13. F-14 modeling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, W. H.; Baron, S.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results in the application of a closed loop pilot/simulator model to the analysis of some simulator fidelity issues are discussed in the context of an air to air target tracking task. The closed loop model is described briefly. Then, problem simplifications that are employed to reduce computational costs are discussed. Finally, model results showing sensitivity of performance to various assumptions concerning the simulator and/or the pilot are presented.

  14. Climate and atmospheric modeling studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The climate and atmosphere modeling research programs have concentrated on the development of appropriate atmospheric and upper ocean models, and preliminary applications of these models. Principal models are a one-dimensional radiative-convective model, a three-dimensional global model, and an upper ocean model. Principal applications were the study of the impact of CO2, aerosols, and the solar 'constant' on climate.

  15. Studies on integrated optics at the State Institute of Applied Optics Scientific Manufacturing Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirumyants, S. O.; Pryakhin, Yu. A.

    1994-02-01

    This paper gives a brief history of how reseach and development in integrated optics has evolved and progressed at the State Institute of Applied Optics Scientific Manufacturing Organization. Systems developed for basic integrated-optics modules in the 0.5-5 micrometer spectral range are presented, and it is shown that they can be used, in particular, to detect laser radiation and to create miniature high-frequency sensors of wavefront normals, of linear displacements, and of rotation angle and rate.

  16. The study of optical fiber communication technology for space optical remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Yu, Sheng-quan; Zhang, Xiao-hong; Zhang, Rong-hui; Ma, Jian-hua

    2012-11-01

    The latest trends of Space Optical Remote Sensing are high-resolution, multispectral, and wide swath detecting. High-speed digital image data transmission will be more important for remote sensing. At present, the data output interface of Space Optical Remote Sensing, after performing the image data compression and formatting, transfers the image data to data storage unit of the Spacecraft through LVDS circuit cables. But this method is not recommended for high-speed digital image data transmission. This type of image data transmission, called source synchronization, has the low performance for high-speed digital signal. Besides, it is difficult for cable installing and system testing in limited space of vehicle. To resolve these issues as above, this paper describes a high-speed interconnection device for Space Optical Remote Sensing with Spacecraft. To meet its objectives, this device is comprised of Virtex-5 FPGA with embedded high-speed series and power-efficient transceiver, fiber-optic transceiver module, the unit of fiber-optic connection and single mode optical fiber. The special communication protocol is performed for image data transferring system. The unit of fiber-optic connection with high reliability and flexibility is provided for transferring high-speed serial data with optical fiber. It is evident that this method provides many advantages for Space Optical Remote Sensing: 1. Improving the speed of image data transferring of Space Optical Remote Sensing; 2. Enhancing the reliability and safety of image data transferring; 3. Space Optical Remote Sensing will be reduced significantly in size and in weight; 4. System installing and system testing for Space Optical Remote Sensing will become easier.

  17. Optical Studies on Antimonide Superlattice Infrared Detector Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoglund, Linda; Soibel, Alexander; Hill, Cory J.; Ting, David Z.; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Liao, Anna; Keo, Sam; Lee, Michael C.; Nguyen, Jean; Mumolo, Jason M.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2010-01-01

    In this study the material quality and optical properties of type II InAs/GaSb superlattices are investigated using transmission and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The influence of the material quality on the intensity of the luminescence and on the electrical properties of the detectors is studied and a good correlation between the photodetector current-voltage (IV) characteristics and the PL intensity is observed. Studies of the temperature dependence of the PL reveal that Shockley-Read-Hall processes are limiting the minority carrier lifetime in both the mid-IR wavelength and the long-IR wavelength detector material studied. These results demonstrate that PL spectroscopy is a valuable tool for optimization of infrared detectors.

  18. Optical systems modeling and experimental realization of pump and probe technique: investigation of nonlinear absorption in colloidal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A.; Golinskaya, A.; Ezhova, K.; Kozlova, M.; Dneprovskii, V.

    2016-04-01

    Two optical systems modeling of laser and broadband radiation focusing, that is necessary for realization of the pump and probe method, was carried out in this work. Modeling was utilized to construct experimental setup for transmission spectra measuring of studied sample by probe nanosecond broadband radiation (coumarin photoluminescence) depending on the intensity of the nanosecond laser pump pulses. The saturation effect of absorption and the induced charge Stark-effect coexistence and predominate issue of these effects are determined by power of optical excitation. In dependence of tuning of excitation radiation frequency from basic exciton transition frequency nonlinear effects in colloidal CdSe/ZnS quantum dots has been investigated.

  19. Physical modeling of optical characteristics of blood-containing tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernova, Svetlana P.; Pravdin, Alexander B.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Vari, Sandor G.

    1998-01-01

    In the course of search for systems and media that could simulate optical characteristics of bio-objects we developed a method of preparation of tissue phantoms on a gel base. Examination of fluorescence spectra of agar and gelatin gel revealed that agar gel may be used in phantom preparation as a matrix free of reabsorption effect and with low intrinsic fluorescence. But in subsequent experiments we used 10% gelatin gel in order to reproduce native fluorescence of biotissue. Phantom samples were prepared as 2.2 or 3.2 mm thick 25 mm diameter gel 'tablets' with controlled content of blood and scatterer (polystyrene latex). In phantoms without scatterer we studied the dependence of the shape of fluorescence spectrum on blood content (excitation wavelength 350 - 380 nm, observation of emission spectra within 400 - 650 nm range). We obtained an agreement of fluorescence intensity and spectrum shape transformation, as the blood concentration in phantom increases, with the changes of in vivo tissue autofluorescence spectra (literature data) when going from normal tissue to the abnormal region. Using measurements of collimated transmittance we evaluated scattering coefficient for polystyrene latex embedded in 10% gelatin gel. When blood was added, the linear dependence of extinction in phantom on latex concentration was distorted within absorption band.

  20. Imaging studies for diagnosing Graves' orbitopathy and dysthyroid optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Allan C. Pieroni; Gebrim, Eloísa M. M. S.; Monteiro, Mário L. R.

    2012-01-01

    Although the diagnosis of Graves' orbitopathy is primarily made clinically based on laboratory tests indicative of thyroid dysfunction and autoimmunity, imaging studies, such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and color Doppler imaging, play an important role both in the diagnosis and follow-up after clinical or surgical treatment of the disease. Imaging studies can be used to evaluate morphological abnormalities of the orbital structures during the diagnostic workup when a differential diagnosis versus other orbital diseases is needed. Imaging may also be useful to distinguish the inflammatory early stage from the inactive stage of the disease. Finally, imaging studies can be of great help in identifying patients prone to develop dysthyroid optic neuropathy and therefore enabling the timely diagnosis and treatment of the condition, avoiding permanent visual loss. In this paper, we review the imaging modalities that aid in the diagnosis and management of Graves' orbitopathy, with special emphasis on the diagnosis of optic nerve dysfunction in this condition. PMID:23184212

  1. Design studies of quasi-optical gyro amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, W.; Kreischer, K.E.; Temkin, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    The Quasi-Optical Gyro Amplifier is a novel device for generating high-frequency, high-power coherent microwave radiation. The authors report a study on a quasi-optical gyro amplifier designed with a periodic mirror structure. A specific design is presented for an amplifier at 95 GHz with an output power level of 100 kW and an efficiency of 30%. The system consists of two sets of parallel mirrors facing each other. A free space Gaussian beam can propagate through the structure in a zigzagged path. An on axis gyrotron beam interacts with the radiation each time it crosses the Gaussian waist. With a beam of 70 kV, 5A and velocity ratio of 1.5, this nonlinear simulation shows that this device can be 16% efficient. With a tapered magnetic field, the efficiency can be increased to 40%. However, studies also show that electron velocity spread significantly reduces the gain. More seriously, bunched electrons considerably change the direction of radiation propagation. These issues need to be addressed in further studies.

  2. Night Myopia Studied with an Adaptive Optics Visual Analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Artal, Pablo; Schwarz, Christina; Cánovas, Carmen; Mira-Agudelo, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Eyes with distant objects in focus in daylight are thought to become myopic in dim light. This phenomenon, often called “night myopia” has been studied extensively for several decades. However, despite its general acceptance, its magnitude and causes are still controversial. A series of experiments were performed to understand night myopia in greater detail. Methods We used an adaptive optics instrument operating in invisible infrared light to elucidate the actual magnitude of night myopia and its main causes. The experimental setup allowed the manipulation of the eye's aberrations (and particularly spherical aberration) as well as the use of monochromatic and polychromatic stimuli. Eight subjects with normal vision monocularly determined their best focus position subjectively for a Maltese cross stimulus at different levels of luminance, from the baseline condition of 20 cd/m2 to the lowest luminance of 22×10−6 cd/m2. While subjects performed the focusing tasks, their eye's defocus and aberrations were continuously measured with the 1050-nm Hartmann-Shack sensor incorporated in the adaptive optics instrument. The experiment was repeated for a variety of controlled conditions incorporating specific aberrations of the eye and chromatic content of the stimuli. Results We found large inter-subject variability and an average of −0.8 D myopic shift for low light conditions. The main cause responsible for night myopia was the accommodation shift occurring at low light levels. Other factors, traditionally suggested to explain night myopia, such as chromatic and spherical aberrations, have a much smaller effect in this mechanism. Conclusions An adaptive optics visual analyzer was applied to study the phenomenon of night myopia. We found that the defocus shift occurring in dim light is mainly due to accommodation errors. PMID:22768343

  3. Coupled escape probability for an asymmetric spherical case: Modeling optically thick comets

    SciTech Connect

    Gersch, Alan M.; A'Hearn, Michael F.

    2014-05-20

    We have adapted Coupled Escape Probability, a new exact method of solving radiative transfer problems, for use in asymmetrical spherical situations. Our model is intended specifically for use in modeling optically thick cometary comae, although not limited to such use. This method enables the accurate modeling of comets' spectra even in the potentially optically thick regions nearest the nucleus, such as those seen in Deep Impact observations of 9P/Tempel 1 and EPOXI observations of 103P/Hartley 2.

  4. Optical Near Field Studies of Plasmonic and Optical Antennas For Sensitive and Selective Biosensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfand, Ryan M.

    For biosensing applications a useful device needs at least two properties: high sensitivity and high selectivity. Optical spectroscopy offers unique advantages over other sensing techniques however one big challenge to overcome is the mismatch between wavelength and the size of biologically relevant molecules. In order to have high enough sensitivity to approach the single-molecule limit, the interaction between the light and the molecule should be strong. However, the diffraction limit of light is approximately half the incidence wavelength, on the order of 100 nm for the smallest nondestructive wavelengths. This presents a significant mismatch between the size of the molecule and the smallest focus spot of the light. The photo-excitation should be compressed more than 100 fold to interact strongly. We must use metallic antennas that convert the incidence radiation into plasmonic modes which can then be compressed well below the wavelength diffraction limit. Studying the near field characteristics of these metallic nanostructures will help us gain insight into this emerging field and allow us to better use them in developing next generation devices. We have developed different geometries of these antennas and simulated their performance using Finite Difference Time Domain software. We have concentrated our efforts in the mid-infrared because that is the natural molecular vibration frequency region and also the near infrared because at these frequencies there exists a mature industry for compact sources, detectors, and fiber optic components. Our simulations show a 6,000 fold mode compression for a bowtie antenna and a million fold compression for a plasmonic photonic crystal (ppc) antenna. The bull's-eye antenna does not have as a high a mode compression but it has a natural geometry for molecular sensing due to the central metallic disc. Experimentally, we have measured the near field of these antennas with a custom back reflection apertureless NSOM setup in both

  5. A novel integrated fiber-optic interferometer model and its application in micro-displacement measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chi; Xu, Long-long; Zhu, Jun; Yuan, Zhi-wen; Yu, Ying-jie; Asundi, Anand K.

    2016-11-01

    We conducted an investigation in a novel integrated fiber-optic interferometer model based on ultra-small self-focusing optical fiber probe and the method of its application in micro-displacement measurement. Firstly, we proposed the structure model of integrated fiber-optic interferometer and established its input-output mathematical model applied in micro-displacement measurement. Secondly, we established the hardware system of the integrated fiber-optic interferometer. Finally, we analyzed the fitting result of experimental data of micro-displacement measurement and some error factors and defined the linear working range. The experimental results indicate that, under the given experimental conditions, the linear measurement range, linearity and sensitivity of the integrated fiber-optic interferometer were 10 μm, 1.36% and 8.8 mv/μm respectively.

  6. Study of fiber optics standardization, reliability, and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The use of fiber optics in space applications is investigated. Manufacturers and users detailed the problems they were having with the use or manufacture of fiber optic components. The general consensus of all the companies/agencies interviewed is that fiber optics is a maturing technology and will definitely have a place in future NASA system designs. The use of fiber optics was found to have two main advantages - weight savings and increased bandwidth.

  7. Distributed parameter model for characterizing magnetic crosstalk in a fiber optic current sensor.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Song; Guo, Zhi-Zhong; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Yu, Wen-Bin; Shen, Yan

    2015-12-01

    The effects of magnetic crosstalk on a fiber optic current sensor are studied using the distributed parameter model. A new method to enhance the immunity to magnetic crosstalk is proposed. The experimental results show that magnetic crosstalk changes periodically with the azimuth angle and decreases as the distance between the conductors increases. When the sensing coil is placed at the optimal azimuth angle, the ratio error from magnetic crosstalk decreases from -0.32% to -0.02%, demonstrating the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:26836653

  8. Optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy of angiogenesis in a transgenic mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Song; Oladipupo, Sunday; Yao, Junjie; Santeford, Andrea C.; Maslov, Konstantin; Kovalski, Joanna; Arbeit, Jeffrey M.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-02-01

    A major obstacle in studying angiogenesis is the inability to noninvasively image neovascular development in an individual animal. We applied optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM) to determine the kinetics of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)-mediated angiogenesis in a transgenic mouse model. During continuous 30-day activation of HIF-1α, we used OR-PAM to monitor alterations in microvasculature in transgenic mice compared to nontransgenic mice. OR-PAM has demonstrated the potential to precisely monitor antiangiogenic therapy of human cancers, allowing for rapid determinations of therapeutic efficacy or resistance.

  9. Synthesis, structural, optical and thermal studies of an organic nonlinear optical 4-aminopyridinium maleate single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandi, P.; Peramaiyan, G.; Kumar, M. Krishna; Kumar, R. Mohan; Jayavel, R.

    2012-03-01

    Synthesis and growth of a novel organic nonlinear optical (NLO) crystal of 4-aminopyridinium maleate (4APM) in larger size by the slow evaporation solution growth technique are reported. Single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that 4APM crystallizes in monoclinic system with space group P21 with cell parameters a = 8.140(4) Å, b = 5.457(5) Å, c = 10.926(10) Å and volume = 481.4(7) Å3. The grown crystal has been characterized by Fourier transform infrared and UV-visible spectral analyses. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) have been carried out to study its thermal properties. Dielectric measurements have been carried out to study the distribution of charges within the crystal. The mechanical strength of the crystal has been studied by using Vickers' microhardness test. The etching studies have been carried out on the grown crystal. The Kurtz and Perry powder SHG technique confirms the NLO property of the grown crystal and the SHG efficiency of 4APM was found to be 4.8 times greater than that of KDP crystal.

  10. Dislocations, microhardness and optical studies on glycine potassium nitrate crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Ch. Sateesh; Nagaraju, D.; Shekar, P. V. Raja; Rao, T. Tirumal; Krishna, N. Gopi

    2015-06-01

    Single crystals of glycine potassium nitrate (GPN), a semiorganic nonlinear optical crystal, of dimensions 15×12×4 mm3 were grown in a period of 10 days. The defect content present in the crystals was estimated by chemical etching technique. The results indicate that the average dislocation density is about 4.1×103/cm2. The UV-Vis. studies indicate that the crystal has a wide transmission range. The Kurtz powder test indicates that the second harmonic generation efficiency of GPN is 2.5 times that of KDP. The load-hardness curves for GPN were studied over the load range 10-100 g. The anisotropy in hardness was studied using Knoop indentation technique.

  11. Optical and dielectric studies on tin(iv) tungstate nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    B, Beena; S, Manoj

    2015-02-01

    Tin(IV) tungstate nanoparticles in the form of disc were synthesized by a novel chemical coprecipitation method. Surface morphology and particle size of the synthesized materials were analysed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). SEM image shows disc like appearance of the nanoparticles. The particle size obtained was found to be ~20nm. Optical absorption for this material arises due to O2p → W5d charge transfer in the tungstate structure. The energy band gap determined using optical absorption spectrum shows that it is a direct band gap semiconductor. The extent of disorder determined using Urbach plot was found to be 0.00176 meV. The material showed intrinsic Photoluminescence around 468nm when excited by UV light of 275nm. The variation of dielectric permittivity in the frequency range 316 Hz to 3.16 MHz was studied. The temperature dependence of dielectric permittivity was also studied in the frequency range 10Hz and 32 MHz. The compound exhibit a high dielectric constant at room temperature (ε1>103) for frequencies 10Hz and (ε1 > 105) for frequencies 3.2×107 Hz. It posses lower dielectric loss ie, ~0.1 at 10 Hz to ~3 at 3.2×107 Hz. The material is very attractive for potential application provides its losses can be minimized.

  12. Visible Light Photo-oxidation of Model Pollutants Using CaCu3Ti4O12: An Experimental and Theoretical Study of Optical Properties, Electronic Structure, and Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Charge transfer between metal ions occupying distinct crystallographic sublattices in an ordered material is a strategy to confer visible light absorption on complex oxides to generate potentially catalytically active electron and hole charge carriers. CaCu3Ti4O12 has distinct octahedral Ti4+ and square planar Cu2+ sites and is thus a candidate material for this approach. The sol−gel synthesis of high surface area CaCu3Ti4O12 and investigation of its optical absorption and photocatalytic reactivity with model pollutants are reported. Two gaps of 2.21 and 1.39 eV are observed in the visible region. These absorptions are explained by LSDA+U electronic structure calculations, including electron correlation on the Cu sites, as arising from transitions from a Cu-hybridized O 2p-derived valence band to localized empty states on Cu (attributed to the isolation of CuO4 units within the structure of CaCu3Ti4O12) and to a Ti-based conduction band. The resulting charge carriers produce selective visible light photodegradation of 4-chlorophenol (monitored by mass spectrometry) by Pt-loaded CaCu3Ti4O12 which is attributed to the chemical nature of the photogenerated charge carriers and has a quantum yield comparable with commercial visible light photocatalysts. PMID:21158451

  13. A Wearable Goggle Navigation System for Dual-Mode Optical and Ultrasound Localization of Suspicious Lesions: Validation Studies Using Tissue-Simulating Phantoms and an Ex Vivo Human Breast Tissue Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Gan, Qi; Ye, Jian; Yue, Jian; Wang, Benzhong; Povoski, Stephen P.; Martin, Edward W.; Hitchcock, Charles L.; Yilmaz, Alper; Tweedle, Michael F.; Shao, Pengfei; Xu, Ronald X.

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection remains the primary curative treatment for many early-stage cancers, including breast cancer. The development of intraoperative guidance systems for identifying all sites of disease and improving the likelihood of complete surgical resection is an area of active ongoing research, as this can lead to a decrease in the need of subsequent additional surgical procedures. We develop a wearable goggle navigation system for dual-mode optical and ultrasound imaging of suspicious lesions. The system consists of a light source module, a monochromatic CCD camera, an ultrasound system, a Google Glass, and a host computer. It is tested in tissue-simulating phantoms and an ex vivo human breast tissue model. Our experiments demonstrate that the surgical navigation system provides useful guidance for localization and core needle biopsy of simulated tumor within the tissue-simulating phantom, as well as a core needle biopsy and subsequent excision of Indocyanine Green (ICG)—fluorescing sentinel lymph nodes. Our experiments support the contention that this wearable goggle navigation system can be potentially very useful and fully integrated by the surgeon for optimizing many aspects of oncologic surgery. Further engineering optimization and additional in vivo clinical validation work is necessary before such a surgical navigation system can be fully realized in the everyday clinical setting. PMID:27367051

  14. Optical-thermal mathematical model for endovenous laser ablation of varicose veins.

    PubMed

    van Ruijven, Peter W M; Poluektova, Anna A; van Gemert, Martin J C; Neumann, H A Martino; Nijsten, Tamar; van der Geld, Cees W M

    2014-03-01

    Endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) is successfully used to treat varicose veins. However, the exact working mechanism is still not fully identified and the clinical procedure is not yet standardized. Mathematical modeling of EVLA could strongly improve our understanding of the influence of the various EVLA processes. The aim of this study is to combine Mordon's optical-thermal model with the presence of a strongly absorbing carbonized blood layer on the fiber tip. The model anatomy includes a cylindrically symmetric blood vessel surrounded by an infinite homogenous perivenous tissue. The optical fiber is located in the center of the vessel and is withdrawn with a pullback velocity. The fiber tip includes a small layer of strongly absorbing material, representing the layer of carbonized blood, which absorbs 45% of the emitted laser power. Heat transfer due to boiling bubbles is taken into account by increasing the heat conduction coefficient by a factor of 200 for temperatures above 95 °C. The temperature distribution in the blood, vessel wall, and surrounding medium is calculated from a numerical solution of the bioheat equation. The simulations were performed in MATLAB™ and validated with the aid of an analytical solution. The simulations showed, first, that laser wavelength did virtually not influence the simulated temperature profiles in blood and vessel wall, and, second, that temperatures of the carbonized blood layer varied slightly, from 952 to 1,104 °C. Our improved mathematical optical-thermal EVLA model confirmed previous predictions and experimental outcomes that laser wavelength is not an important EVLA parameter and that the fiber tip reaches exceedingly high temperatures.

  15. Synthesis, characterization, optical and antimicrobial studies of polyvinyl alcohol-silver nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, K. H.

    2015-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were synthesized by chemical reduction of silver salt (AgNO3) through sodium borohydride. The characteristic surface plasmon resonance band located at around 400 nm in the UV-Visible absorption spectrum confirmed the formation of Ag nanoparticles. Polyvinyl alcohol-silver (PVA-Ag) nanocomposite films were prepared by the casting technique. The morphology and interaction of PVA with Ag NPs were examined by transmission electron microscopy and FTIR spectroscopy. Optical studies show that PVA exhibited indirect allowed optical transition with optical energy gap of 4.8 eV, which reduced to 4.45 eV under addition of Ag NPs. Optical parameters such as refractive index, complex dielectric constant and their dispersions have been analyzed using Wemple and DiDomenco model. Color properties of the nanocomposites are discussed in the framework of CIE L∗u∗v∗ color space. The antimicrobial activity of the nanocomposite samples was tested against Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus NCTC 7447 &Bacillus subtillis NCIB 3610), Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, NTC10416 &Pseudomonas aeruginosa NCIB 9016) and fungi (Aspergillus niger Ferm - BAM C-21) using the agar diffusion technique. The antimicrobial study showed that PVA has moderate antibacterial activity against B. subtillis and the 0.04 wt% Ag NPs composite sample effect was strong against S. aureus.

  16. Nonlinear Optical Properties of Organic and Polymeric Thin Film Materials of Potential for Microgravity Processing Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdeldayem, Hossin; Frazier, Donald O.; Paley, Mark S.; Penn, Benjamin; Witherow, William K.; Bank, Curtis; Shields, Angela; Hicks, Rosline; Ashley, Paul R.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we will take a closer look at the state of the art of polydiacetylene, and metal-free phthalocyanine films, in view of the microgravity impact on their optical properties, their nonlinear optical properties and their potential advantages for integrated optics. These materials have many attractive features with regard to their use in integrated optical circuits and optical switching. Thin films of these materials processed in microgravity environment show enhanced optical quality and better molecular alignment than those processed in unit gravity. Our studies of these materials indicate that microgravity can play a major role in integrated optics technology. Polydiacetylene films are produced by UV irradiation of monomer solution through an optical window. This novel technique of forming polydiacetylene thin films has been modified for constructing sophisticated micro-structure integrated optical patterns using a pre-programmed UV-Laser beam. Wave guiding through these thin films by the prism coupler technique has been demonstrated. The third order nonlinear parameters of these films have been evaluated. Metal-free phthalocyanine films of good optical quality are processed in our laboratories by vapor deposition technique. Initial studies on these films indicate that they have excellent chemical, laser, and environmental stability. They have large nonlinear optical parameters and show intrinsic optical bistability. This bistability is essential for optical logic gates and optical switching applications. Waveguiding and device making investigations of these materials are underway.

  17. Vibratory response modeling and verification of a high precision optical positioning system.

    SciTech Connect

    Barraza, J.; Kuzay, T.; Royston, T. J.; Shu, D.

    1999-06-18

    A generic vibratory-response modeling program has been developed as a tool for designing high-precision optical positioning systems. Based on multibody dynamics theory, the system is modeled as rigid-body structures connected by linear elastic elements, such as complex actuators and bearings. The full dynamic properties of each element are determined experimentally or theoretically, then integrated into the program as inertial and stiffness matrices. Utilizing this program, the theoretical and experimental verification of the vibratory behavior of a double-multilayer monochromator support and positioning system is presented. Results of parametric design studies that investigate the influence of support floor dynamics and highlight important design issues are also presented. Overall, good matches between theory and experiment demonstrate the effectiveness of the program as a dynamic modeling tool.

  18. Computed anatomical modelling of the optic pathway and oculomotor system using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Juanes, J A; Ruisoto, P; Prats-Galino, A; Framiñán, A; Riesco, J M

    2014-07-01

    This study presents a computer-based tool for three-dimensional (3D) visualization of the optic pathway and oculomotor system using 3D high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets from a healthy subject. The 3D models were built as wireframe grids co-registered with MRI sections. First, 3D anatomical models were generated of the visual pathway from the eyeball to the primary visual cortex and of the cranial oculomotor nerves from the brain stem to the extrinsic eye muscles. Second, a graphical user interface allowed individual and group visualization, translation, rotation and zooming of the 3D models in different spatial positions simultaneously with MRI orthogonal cut planes. Educational and clinical applications are also discussed.

  19. Optical properties of As33S67-xSex bulk glasses studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orava, J.; Šik, J.; Wágner, T.; Frumar, M.

    2008-04-01

    Variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE) was employed to study the optical properties of As33S67-xSex (x =0, 17, 33.5, 50, and 67at.%) bulk glasses in the UV-vis-NIR (near infrared) spectral region for photon energies from 0.54to4.13eV (photon wavelengths from 2300to300nm). For data analysis, we employed Tauc-Lorentz (TL) dispersion model in the entire measured near bandgap spectral region and standard Cauchy dispersion model in the spectral region below the bandgap. With increasing Se content (x) in the bulk glass, we observed a linear decrease in optical bandgap energy Egopt from 2.52±0.02eV for As33S67 to 1.75±0.01eV for As33Se67 and linear increase in refractive index nTL in the NIR spectral region, e.g., at 0.80eV from 2.327 for As33S67 to 2.758 for As33Se67. The amplitude A decreased with increasing Se content. The peak transition energy E0 and broadening C had a maximum value for x =33.5at.% and systematically decreased for higher S or Se content in glasses. Our study showed that TL model is suitable to describe dielectric functions of studied chalcogenide bulk glasses in the broad spectral region. The bulk glasses had a higher refractive index compared to thin films of corresponding composition. The bulk glasses with high S content had higher value of optical bandgap energy than was previously reported for thin films. The optical bandgap energy of glasses with higher Se content was very similar to the thin films.

  20. Modeling for deformable mirrors and the adaptive optics optimization program

    SciTech Connect

    Henesian, M.A.; Haney, S.W.; Trenholme, J.B.; Thomas, M.

    1997-03-18

    We discuss aspects of adaptive optics optimization for large fusion laser systems such as the 192-arm National Ignition Facility (NIF) at LLNL. By way of example, we considered the discrete actuator deformable mirror and Hartmann sensor system used on the Beamlet laser. Beamlet is a single-aperture prototype of the 11-0-5 slab amplifier design for NIF, and so we expect similar optical distortion levels and deformable mirror correction requirements. We are now in the process of developing a numerically efficient object oriented C++ language implementation of our adaptive optics and wavefront sensor code, but this code is not yet operational. Results are based instead on the prototype algorithms, coded-up in an interpreted array processing computer language.

  1. Optically tunable nanoparticle contrast agents for early cancer detection: model-based analysis of gold nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Alex W H; Lewinski, Nastassja A; West, Jennifer L; Halas, Naomi J; Drezek, Rebekah A

    2005-01-01

    Many optical diagnostic approaches rely on changes in scattering and absorption properties to generate optical contrast between normal and diseased tissue. Recently, there has been increasing interest in using exogenous agents to enhance this intrinsic contrast with particular emphasis on the development for targeting specific molecular features of disease. Gold nanoshells are a class of core-shell nanoparticles with an extremely tunable peak optical resonance ranging from the near-UV to the mid-IR wavelengths. Using current chemistries, nanoshells of a wide variety of core and shell sizes can easily be fabricated to scatter and/or absorb light with optical cross sections often several times larger than the geometric cross section. Using gold nanoshells of different size and optical parameters, we employ Monte Carlo models to predict the effect of varying concentrations of nanoshells on tissue reflectance. The models demonstrate the importance of absorption from the nanoshells on remitted signals even when the optical extinction is dominated by scattering. Furthermore, because of the strong optical response of nanoshells, a considerable change in reflectance is observed with only a very small concentration of nanoshells. Characterizing the optical behavior of gold nanoshells in tissue will aid in developing nanoshells as contrast agents for optical diagnostics. PMID:16409100

  2. Analytical study of acousto/optical holography-interfacing methods for acoustical and optical holography NDT research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Sum, H. M. A.

    1976-01-01

    The international status of the art of acousto optical imaging techniques adaptable to nondestructive testing and, interfacing methods for acoustical and optical holography in nondestructive testing research are studied. Evaluation of 20 different techniques encompassed investigation of varieties of detectors and detection schemes, all of which are described and summarized. Related investigation is reported in an Appendix. Important remarks on image quality, factors to be considered in designing a particular system, and conclusions and recommendations are presented. Three bibliographies are included.

  3. Strategies to Improve the Accuracy of Mars-GRAM Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The poster provides an overview of techniques to improve the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) sensitivity. It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) when used for sensitivity studies for TES MapYear = 0 and large optical depth values such as tau = 3 is less than realistic. A preliminary fix has been made to Mars-GRAM by adding a density factor value that was determined for tau = 0.3, 1 and 3.

  4. Measurement and modelization of silica opal optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avoine, Amaury; Hong, Phan Ngoc; Frederich, Hugo; Aregahegn, Kifle; Bénalloul, Paul; Coolen, Laurent; Schwob, Catherine; Thu Nga, Pham; Gallas, Bruno; Maître, Agnès

    2014-03-01

    We present the synthesis process and optical characterization of artificial silica opals. The specular reflection spectra are analyzed and compared to band structure calculations and finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. The silica optical index is a key parameter to correctly describe an opal and is usually not known and treated as a free parameter. Here we propose a method to infer the silica index, as well as the silica spheres diameter, from the reflection spectra and we validate it by comparison with two independent infrared methods for the index and, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements for the spheres diameter.

  5. Modeling Optical Properties of Mineral Dust over "The Great Indian Desert"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S.; Tripathi, S. N.

    2007-12-01

    The Thar desert, sometimes also described as 'The Great Indian Desert', lying in the Northwest part of India with an area of 0.32*106 km2, is known to be the source of natural mineral dust . The mineral dust particles are mostly non-spherical having sharp edges, which show different scattering signature compared to that of equivalent spheres while interacting with the radiation. Furthermore accurate mineralogical information, that governs their refractive indices, is essential for scattering calculations. The radiative impacts of dust particles therefore depend on their morphology and mineralogy. Most of the present satellites consider the particle to be spherical while retrieving their optical properties. Some newly launched spacecraft instruments such as MISR accounts for non spherical nature by including spheroid particles in its retrieval algorithm . Clearly there exits a need for improvement in dust model used in retrieval algorithm to account for their sharp edges together with their index of refraction based on the latest chemical composition at the sensing wavelengths. To the best of our knowledge no such attempt has been made to calculate the optical properties of dust particles over the Thar desert. In this study, the optical properties of mineral dust of the Thar desert has been modeled using T-matrix method with realistic dust shapes based on Scanning Electron Microscope images of the dust over the desert with particle size ranging from 0.1-1.0 ìm at wavelengths spanning from ultraviolet to near infrared (0.38-1.2ìm). Representative dust particles shapes considered are sphere, cylinder, spheroids and chebyshev together with realistic mineral dust composition. Mineralogical analysis of airborne dust over Northwest India has revealed the presence of only basic non-metallic minerals such as Quartz, Feldspar, Mica and Calcite, which posses negligible imaginary part of refractive index at considered wavelength domain, however, the subsequent dust sampling

  6. Development of electro-optical instrumentation for reactor safety studies

    SciTech Connect

    Turko, B.T.; Kolbe, W.F.; Leskovar, B.; Sun, R.K.

    1980-11-01

    The development of new electro-optical instrumentation for reactor safety studies is described. The system measures the thickness of the water film and droplet size and velocity distributions which would be encountered in the annular two-phase flow in a reactor cooling system. The water film thickness is measured by a specially designed capacitance system with a short time constant. Water droplet size and velocity are measured by a subsystem consisting of a continuously pulsed laser light source, a vidicon camera, a video recorder, and an automatic image analyzer. An endoscope system attached to the video camera is used to image the droplets. Each frame is strobed with two accurately spaced uv light pulses, from two sequentially fired nitrogen lasers. The images are stored in the video disk recorder. The modified automatic image analyzer is programmed to digitize the droplet size and velocity distributions. Many special optical, mechanical and electronic system components were designed and fabricated. They are described in detail, together with calibration charts and experimental results.

  7. Synthesis of photochromic oligophenylenimines: optical and computational studies.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Armando I Martínez; Alonso, Oscar Coreño; Borbolla, Julián Cruz; Vásquez-Pérez, José M; Alonso, Juan Coreño; Ayala, Karina Alemán; Luna-Bárcenas, Gabriel; Pandiyan, Thangarasu; García, Rosa A Vázquez

    2015-03-27

    Phenyleneimine oligomers 4,4'-(((1E,1'E)-(((1E,1'E)-(1,4-phenylenebis-(azanylylidene))bis(methanylylidene))bis(2,5-bis(octyloxy)-4,1-phenylene))bis(methanylyl-idene))-bis(azanylylidene))dianiline (OIC1MS) and 7,7'-(((1E,1'E)-(((1E,1'E)-((9H-fluorene-2,7-diyl)bis(azanylylidene))bis(methanylylidene))bis(2,5-bis(octyloxy)-4,1phenylene))bis- (methanylylidene))bis(azanylylidene))bis(9H-fluoren-2-amine) (OIC2MS) were prepared by means of conventional and mechanochemical synthesis and characterized by FT-IR, 1H- and 13C-NMR techniques. The optical properties of the compounds were studied in solution by using UV-visible spectroscopy, and the optical effects were analyzed as a function of solvent. The results show that OIC2MS exhibits interesting photochromic properties. Furthermore, the structural and electronic properties of the compounds were analyzed by TD-DFT. It was found that the mechanosynthesis is an efficient method for the synthesis of both tetraimines.

  8. Optical Lithography on non-flat surfaces; A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Clayton; Newton, Conrad; Geerts, Wilhelmus; Palmer, Daniel; Tamir, Dan

    2008-10-01

    Only a few studies of optical lithography on non-flat substrates have been reported. Most of these systems only work on polished very well defined substrates. For example, Ball Semiconductor developed a system for projection lithography on polished spherical balls of 1 mm diameter. We propose a system that works on an arbitrary surface and enables lithography on a wide variety of substrates including the wings of insects or a single crystalline grain of a ceramic sample. The system consists of a computer controlled laser beam that is focused through an optical microscope on an XY-table. The size of the beam can be changed by varying the size of the aperture or the change of the objective. The focus of the microscope can be automatically adjusted enabling to follow the 3D profile of the sample's surface. The laser intensity is automatically adjusted to keep the dose constant as the samples profile and the speed of the xy-table very. A cross-compiler, which utilizes principles of computer graphics to figure the required exposure parameters based on the surface of the object was developed. It accepts a text file, a vector based graphic file, or a raster image and generates a file with instructions for the laser beam writer.

  9. Synthesis of photochromic oligophenylenimines: optical and computational studies.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Armando I Martínez; Alonso, Oscar Coreño; Borbolla, Julián Cruz; Vásquez-Pérez, José M; Alonso, Juan Coreño; Ayala, Karina Alemán; Luna-Bárcenas, Gabriel; Pandiyan, Thangarasu; García, Rosa A Vázquez

    2015-01-01

    Phenyleneimine oligomers 4,4'-(((1E,1'E)-(((1E,1'E)-(1,4-phenylenebis-(azanylylidene))bis(methanylylidene))bis(2,5-bis(octyloxy)-4,1-phenylene))bis(methanylyl-idene))-bis(azanylylidene))dianiline (OIC1MS) and 7,7'-(((1E,1'E)-(((1E,1'E)-((9H-fluorene-2,7-diyl)bis(azanylylidene))bis(methanylylidene))bis(2,5-bis(octyloxy)-4,1phenylene))bis- (methanylylidene))bis(azanylylidene))bis(9H-fluoren-2-amine) (OIC2MS) were prepared by means of conventional and mechanochemical synthesis and characterized by FT-IR, 1H- and 13C-NMR techniques. The optical properties of the compounds were studied in solution by using UV-visible spectroscopy, and the optical effects were analyzed as a function of solvent. The results show that OIC2MS exhibits interesting photochromic properties. Furthermore, the structural and electronic properties of the compounds were analyzed by TD-DFT. It was found that the mechanosynthesis is an efficient method for the synthesis of both tetraimines. PMID:25826785

  10. Optical water quality model of Lake Ontario. 2: Determination of chlorophyll a and suspended mineral concentrations of natural waters from submersible and low altitude optical sensors.

    PubMed

    Bukata, R P; Bruton, J E; Jerome, J H; Jain, S C; Zwick, H H

    1981-05-01

    Spectrooptical and water quality data collected from a 1979 coordinated in situ and airborne study of western Lake Ontario are used to devise a five-component model from which subsurface chlorophyll a and suspended solids concentrations may be determined from submersible optical sensors capable of measuring spectral irradiance reflectance just beneath the free-surface layer. A water-air interface model, which incorporates the effects of surface reflection, is also presented in an attempt to extend such water quality estimations to low altitude remote sensors. Special emphasis is given to the spectral wavelength bands of the Coastal Zone Color Scanner aboard Nimbus-7.

  11. Analytical model for optical bistability in nonlinear metal nano-antennae involving Kerr materials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fei; Liu, Ye; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Xia, Younan

    2010-06-21

    Optical bistability at nanoscale is a promising way to realize optical switching, a key component of integrated nanophotonic devices. In this work we present an analytical model for optical bistability in a metal nano-antenna involving Kerr nonlinear medium based on detailed analysis of the correlation between the incident and extinction light intensity under surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The model allows one to construct a clear picture on how the threshold, contrast, and other characteristics of optical bistability are influenced by the nonlinear coefficient, incident light intensity, local field enhancement factor, SPR peak width, and other physical parameters of the nano-antenna. It shows that the key towards low threshold power and high contrast optical bistability in the nanosystem is to reduce the SPR peak width. This can be achieved by reducing the absorption of metal materials or introducing gain media into nanosystems.

  12. Modeling photosynthesis of discontinuous plant canopies by linking Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer model with biochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Q.; Gong, P.; Li, W.

    2015-02-01

    Modeling vegetation photosynthesis is essential for understanding carbon exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The radiative transfer process within plant canopies is one of the key drivers that regulate canopy photosynthesis. Most vegetation cover consists of discrete plant crowns, of which the physical observation departs from the underlying assumption of a homogenous and uniform medium in classic radiative transfer theory. Here we advance the Geometric Optical Radiative Transfer (GORT) model to simulate photosynthesis activities for discontinuous plant canopies. We separate radiation absorption into two components that are absorbed by sunlit and shaded leaves, and derive analytical solutions by integrating over the canopy layer. To model leaf-level and canopy-level photosynthesis, leaf light absorption is then linked to the biochemical process of gas diffusion through leaf stomata. The canopy gap probability derived from GORT differs from classic radiative transfer theory, especially when the leaf area index is high, due to leaf clumping effects. Tree characteristics such as tree density, crown shape, and canopy length affect leaf clumping and regulate radiation interception. Modeled gross primary production (GPP) for two deciduous forest stands could explain more than 80% of the variance of flux tower measurements at both near hourly and daily time scales. We also demonstrate that the ambient CO2 concentration influences daytime vegetation photosynthesis, which needs to be considered in state-of-the-art biogeochemical models. The proposed model is complementary to classic radiative transfer theory and shows promise in modeling the radiative transfer process and photosynthetic activities over discontinuous forest canopies.

  13. Experimental study of ? RF plasma jet by optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBenedictis, S.; Dilecce, G.; Simek, M.; Vigliotti, M.

    1998-11-01

    An 0963-0252/7/4/013/img9 jet stream expanding from a radio-frequency discharge has been investigated by optical emission spectroscopy. The axial and lateral profiles of the expansion glow and the jet axial velocity have been measured by optical methods in order to infer the fluid-dynamic properties of the jet. The position of the shock wave is located at about 5 mm from the nozzle, and the stream velocity achieves a maximum of about 2 Mach in the supersonic region. Optical titration of N atoms and the analysis of emitting excited species 0963-0252/7/4/013/img10 and 0963-0252/7/4/013/img11) have been carried out to monitor the active species in the jet stream and their energy content. The titration of N atoms by NO, injected in the subsonic region, monitored by 0963-0252/7/4/013/img9 first positive 0963-0252/7/4/013/img13 band, 0963-0252/7/4/013/img14 NO 0963-0252/7/4/013/img15 and 0963-0252/7/4/013/img16 continuum emissions, has been examined. This latter emission has been found to give a reasonable estimation of the N density, which is in the range of about (0.1-0.2)% 0963-0252/7/4/013/img9 for a discharge power varying from 50 to 80 W. The 0963-0252/7/4/013/img9 first positive emission, NO 0963-0252/7/4/013/img15 and 0963-0252/7/4/013/img20 bands, instead, are largely affected by the presence of the 0963-0252/7/4/013/img21 metastable and by the high velocity of the N stream. The analysis of 0963-0252/7/4/013/img22 and 0963-0252/7/4/013/img11 vibrational distributions shows the presence of a significant density of the 0963-0252/7/4/013/img21 metastable as well as a non-negligible presence in the expansion of hot electrons. A quasi-one-dimensional fluid-dynamic model of the expansion gives a rough account of the measured location of the shock wave and of the velocity and temperature axial profiles.

  14. The APOSTEL recommendations for reporting quantitative optical coherence tomography studies

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Herranz, Andrés; Balk, Lisanne J.; Oberwahrenbrock, Timm; Saidha, Shiv; Martinez-Lapiscina, Elena H.; Lagreze, Wolf A.; Schuman, Joel S.; Villoslada, Pablo; Calabresi, Peter; Balcer, Laura; Petzold, Axel; Green, Ari J.; Paul, Friedemann; Brandt, Alexander U.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To develop consensus recommendations for reporting of quantitative optical coherence tomography (OCT) study results. Methods: A panel of experienced OCT researchers (including 11 neurologists, 2 ophthalmologists, and 2 neuroscientists) discussed requirements for performing and reporting quantitative analyses of retinal morphology and developed a list of initial recommendations based on experience and previous studies. The list of recommendations was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group. Results: We provide a 9-point checklist encompassing aspects deemed relevant when reporting quantitative OCT studies. The areas covered are study protocol, acquisition device, acquisition settings, scanning protocol, funduscopic imaging, postacquisition data selection, postacquisition data analysis, recommended nomenclature, and statistical analysis. Conclusions: The Advised Protocol for OCT Study Terminology and Elements recommendations include core items to standardize and improve quality of reporting in quantitative OCT studies. The recommendations will make reporting of quantitative OCT studies more consistent and in line with existing standards for reporting research in other biomedical areas. The recommendations originated from expert consensus and thus represent Class IV evidence. They will need to be regularly adjusted according to new insights and practices. PMID:27225223

  15. A physically based model for dielectric charging in an integrated optical MEMS wavelength selective switch.

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Barbastathis, George

    2005-07-01

    A physical parameter based model for dielectric charge accumulation is proposed and used to predict the displacement versus applied voltage and pull-in response of an electrostatic MEMS wavelength selective integrated optical switch.

  16. The optical dielectric model of Cu2O thin film and its verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Guo-Zhong; Liang, Xiong; Lv, Jing

    2016-11-01

    The transmittance and reflectance of cuprous oxide (Cu2O) thin film deposited on quartz substrate were measured by a spectrophotometer. Use the optical dielectric model combining the Forouhi-Bloomer model with modified Drude model (FBM+MDM), the optical constants, as well as the thickness of Cu2O film were attained from its measured transmittance data. Moreover, by means of the TFCalc software, the reflectance and transmittance were calculated conversely from the optical constants (n, k) and the thickness of the Cu2O film. It was found that the calculated reflectance and transmittance were in good agreement with the measured ones. So the optical dielectric model, namely FBM+MDM, is suitable for Cu2O thin film.

  17. Identification of muscle necrosis in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy using three-dimensional optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyen, Blake R.; Shavlakadze, Thea; Radley-Crabb, Hannah G.; Grounds, Miranda D.; Sampson, David D.

    2011-07-01

    Three-dimensional optical coherence tomography (3D-OCT) was used to image the structure and pathology of skeletal muscle tissue from the treadmill-exercised mdx mouse model of human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of excised muscle samples were compared with co-registered hematoxylin and eosin-stained and Evans blue dye fluorescence histology. We show, for the first time, structural 3D-OCT images of skeletal muscle dystropathology well correlated with co-located histology. OCT could identify morphological features of interest and necrotic lesions within the muscle tissue samples based on intrinsic optical contrast. These findings demonstrate the utility of 3D-OCT for the evaluation of small-animal skeletal muscle morphology and pathology, particularly for studies of mouse models of muscular dystrophy.

  18. Traceability study of optical fiber degree of polarization (DOP) measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Nan; Li, Jianwei; Li, Jian; Zhang, Zhixin

    2013-09-01

    Degree of polarization (DOP) is an important physical quantity for describing the optical polarization effect and is widely applied in optical fiber communication, optical fiber gyro and the related technologies. Currently, the optical polarization degree tester for the purpose of communication uses mainly two kinds of measurement methods: Stokes vector method and extremum method. At present, there isn't a standard to measure the accuracy and consistency of DOP parameter measurement by the devices listed above, affecting seriously the application of DOP parameter measurement in the fields of optical fiber gyro and optical fiber communication. So, it is urgent to table the accurate guarantees to trace the source of quantitative values of the DOP measuring devices and testers. In this paper, the polarization beam combination method is raised to research and manufacture the standard optical fiber light source device with the variable DOP, and an indicated error measurement has been conducted for a DOP meter. A kind of standard optical fiber light source device that uses a single light source to realize the variable DOP is put forward. It is used to provide the accurate and variable optical fiber polarization degree light with a scope of 0~100%. It is used to calibrate the DOP meters and widely applied in the field of national defense and optical communication fields. By using the standard optical power meter, DOP value by which the optical power meter calculates the optical signal can be measured, which will be used ultimately for calibration of the DOP meter. A measurement uncertainty of 0.5% is obtained using the polarization beam combination method.

  19. Assessment of the Aerosol Optics Component of the Coupled WRF-CMAQ Model usingCARES Field Campaign data and a Single Column Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES), a field campaign held in central California in June 2010, provides a unique opportunity to assess the aerosol optics modeling component of the two-way coupled Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) – Community Multisc...

  20. Model of optical nonlinearity of air in the mid-IR wavelength range

    SciTech Connect

    Geints, Yu E; Zemlyanov, A A

    2014-09-30

    A model of optical nonlinearity of air (atmospheric nitrogen and oxygen) is developed. This model can be used to calculate numerically the propagation of radiation with a wavelength close to 10 μm. It takes into account the electronic Kerr effect, higher order nonlinearities, ionisation of a gas medium by electron impact, and pulse group-velocity dispersion. The applicability limits of the Drude approximation for calculating the impact-ionisation rate are also considered. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  1. An optical model description of momentum transfer in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, F.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, J. W.; Norbury, John W.

    1989-01-01

    An optical model description of momentum transfer in relativistic heavy ion collisions, based upon composite particle multiple scattering theory, is presented. The imaginary component of the complex momentum transfer, which comes from the absorptive part of the optical potential, is identified as the longitudinal momentum downshift of the projectile. Predictions of fragment momentum distribution observables are made and compared with experimental data. Use of the model as a tool for estimating collision impact parameters is discussed.

  2. Integrated Optical Design Analysis (IODA): New Test Data and Modeling Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jim; Troy, Ed; Patrick, Brian

    2003-01-01

    A general overview of the capabilities of the IODA ("Integrated Optical Design Analysis") exchange of data and modeling results between thermal, structures, optical design, and testing engineering disciplines. This presentation focuses on new features added to the software that allow measured test data to be imported into the IODA environment for post processing or comparisons with pretest model predictions. software is presented. IODA promotes efficient

  3. Optical model description of momentum transfer in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, F.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.; Norbury, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    An optical model description of momentum transfer in relativistic heavy ion collisions, based upon composite particle multiple scattering theory, is presented. The imaginary component of the complex momentum transfer, which comes from the absorptive part of the optical potential, is identified as the longitudinal momentum downshift of the projectile. Predictions of fragment momentum distribution observables are made and compared with experimental data. Use of the model as a tool for estimating collision impact parameters is discussed.

  4. Different presentations of intraretinal fluid collections in optic disc pits: OCT study of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Brasil, Oswaldo Ferreira Moura; Brasil, Maria Vitoria Oliveira Moura; Brasil, Oswaldo Moura

    2006-01-01

    The congenital optic disc pit is a rare anomaly that can lead to major visual impairment associated with subretinal fluid accumulation. The authors describe the optical coherence tomography study of three cases of untreated congenital optic disc pits with different levels of visual impairment and its different presentations of intraretinal fluid collections.

  5. Study of influence of the fiber optic coatings parameters on optical acoustic sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrov, V. S.; Kulikov, A. V.; Plotnikov, M. U.; Efimov, M. E.; Varzhel, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents the optical fiber acoustic sensitivity dependence on the coating parameters and the thickness of coating layer. A comparison of data obtained from the theoretical research and experimental estimates of real samples sensitivity in air and water.

  6. Time resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy with geometrically accurate models for bulk parameter recovery

    PubMed Central

    Guggenheim, James A.; Bargigia, Ilaria; Farina, Andrea; Pifferi, Antonio; Dehghani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    A novel straightforward, accessible and efficient approach is presented for performing hyperspectral time-domain diffuse optical spectroscopy to determine the optical properties of samples accurately using geometry specific models. To allow bulk parameter recovery from measured spectra, a set of libraries based on a numerical model of the domain being investigated is developed as opposed to the conventional approach of using an analytical semi-infinite slab approximation, which is known and shown to introduce boundary effects. Results demonstrate that the method improves the accuracy of derived spectrally varying optical properties over the use of the semi-infinite approximation. PMID:27699137

  7. Time resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy with geometrically accurate models for bulk parameter recovery

    PubMed Central

    Guggenheim, James A.; Bargigia, Ilaria; Farina, Andrea; Pifferi, Antonio; Dehghani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    A novel straightforward, accessible and efficient approach is presented for performing hyperspectral time-domain diffuse optical spectroscopy to determine the optical properties of samples accurately using geometry specific models. To allow bulk parameter recovery from measured spectra, a set of libraries based on a numerical model of the domain being investigated is developed as opposed to the conventional approach of using an analytical semi-infinite slab approximation, which is known and shown to introduce boundary effects. Results demonstrate that the method improves the accuracy of derived spectrally varying optical properties over the use of the semi-infinite approximation.

  8. Synthesis and optical study of barium magnesium aluminate blue phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Jeet, Suninder Pandey, O. P.; Sharma, Manoj

    2015-05-15

    Europium doped barium magnesium aluminate (BaMgAl{sub 10}O{sub 17}:Eu{sup 2+}) phosphor was prepared via solution combustion method at 550°C using urea as a fuel. Morphological and optical properties of the prepared sample was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). XRD result showed the formation of pure phase BaMgAl{sub 10}O{sub 17}(JCPDS 26-0163) along with an additional phase BaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}(JCPDS 01-082-1350). TEM image indicated the formation of faceted particles with average particle size 40 nm. From PL spectra, a broad emission band obtained at about 450 nm attributes to 4f{sup 6} 5d → 4f{sup 7} transition of Eu{sup 2+} which lies in the blue region of the visible spectrum.

  9. Mechanical properties of a giant liposome studied using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitamichi, Yoko; Ichikawa, Masatoshi; Kimura, Yasuyuki

    2009-09-01

    The mechanical properties of a micrometer-sized giant liposome are studied by deforming it from the inside using dual-beam optical tweezers. As the liposome is extended, its shape changes from a sphere to a lemon shape, and finally, a tubular part is generated. The surface tension σ and the bending rigidity κ of the lipid membrane are obtained from the measured force-extension curve. In a one-phase liposome, it was found that σ increases as the charged component increases but κ remains approximately constant. In a two-phase liposome, the characteristic deformation and the force-extension curve differ from those observed for the one-phase liposome.

  10. Improved properties of phosphor-filled luminescent down-shifting layers: reduced scattering, optical model, and optimization for PV application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodovnyk, Anastasiia; Lipovšek, Benjamin; Forberich, Karen; Stern, Edda; Krč, Janez; Batentschuk, Miroslaw; Topič, Marko; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2015-12-01

    We studied the optical properties of polymer layers filled with phosphor particles in two aspects. First, we used two different polymer binders with refractive indices n = 1.46 and n = 1.61 (λ = 600 nm) to decrease Δn with the phosphor particles (n = 1.81). Second, we prepared two particle size distributions D50 = 12 μm and D50 = 19 μm. The particles were dispersed in both polymer binders in several volume concentrations and coated onto glass with thicknesses of 150 - 600 μm. We present further a newly developed optical model for simulation and optimization of such luminescent down-shifting (LDS) layers. The model is developed within the ray tracing framework of the existing optical simulator CROWM (Combined Ray Optics / Wave Optics Model), which enables simulation of standalone LDS layers as well as complete solar cells (including thick and thin layers) enhanced by the LDS layers for an improved solar spectrum harvesting. Experimental results and numerical simulations show that the layers of the higher refractive index binder with larger particles result in the highest optical transmittance in the visible light spectrum. Finally we proved that scattering of the phosphor particles in the LDS layers may increase the overall light harvesting in the solar cell. We used numerical simulations to determine optimal layer composition for application in realistic thin-film photovoltaic devices. Surprisingly LDS layers with lower measured optical transmittance are more efficient when applied onto the solar cells due to graded refractive index and efficient light scattering. Therefore, our phosphor-filled LDS layers could possibly complement other light-coupling techniques in photovoltaics.

  11. Nonlinear propagation of spark-generated N-waves in air: modeling and measurements using acoustical and optical methods.

    PubMed

    Yuldashev, Petr; Ollivier, Sébastien; Averiyanov, Mikhail; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; Khokhlova, Vera; Blanc-Benon, Philippe

    2010-12-01

    The propagation of nonlinear spherically diverging N-waves in homogeneous air is studied experimentally and theoretically. A spark source is used to generate high amplitude (1.4 kPa) short duration (40 μs) N-waves; acoustic measurements are performed using microphones (3 mm diameter, 150 kHz bandwidth). Numerical modeling with the generalized Burgers equation is used to reveal the relative effects of acoustic nonlinearity, thermoviscous absorption, and oxygen and nitrogen relaxation on the wave propagation. The results of modeling are in a good agreement with the measurements in respect to the wave amplitude and duration. However, the measured rise time of the front shock is ten times longer than the calculated one, which is attributed to the limited bandwidth of the microphone. To better resolve the shock thickness, a focused shadowgraphy technique is used. The recorded optical shadowgrams are compared with shadow patterns predicted by geometrical optics and scalar diffraction model of light propagation. It is shown that the geometrical optics approximation results in overestimation of the shock rise time, while the diffraction model allows to correctly resolve the shock width. A combination of microphone measurements and focused optical shadowgraphy is therefore a reliable way of studying evolution of spark-generated shock waves in air. PMID:21218866

  12. On the assimilation of optical reflectances and snow depth observations into a detailed snowpack model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charrois, Luc; Cosme, Emmanuel; Dumont, Marie; Lafaysse, Matthieu; Morin, Samuel; Libois, Quentin; Picard, Ghislain

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines the ability of optical reflectance data assimilation to improve snow depth and snow water equivalent simulations from a chain of models with the SAFRAN meteorological model driving the detailed multilayer snowpack model Crocus now including a two-stream radiative transfer model for snow, TARTES. The direct use of reflectance data, allowed by TARTES, instead of higher level snow products, mitigates uncertainties due to commonly used retrieval algorithms.Data assimilation is performed with an ensemble-based method, the Sequential Importance Resampling Particle filter, to represent simulation uncertainties. In snowpack modeling, uncertainties of simulations are primarily assigned to meteorological forcings. Here, a method of stochastic perturbation based on an autoregressive model is implemented to explicitly simulate the consequences of these uncertainties on the snowpack estimates.Through twin experiments, the assimilation of synthetic spectral reflectances matching the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) spectral bands is examined over five seasons at the Col du Lautaret, located in the French Alps. Overall, the assimilation of MODIS-like data reduces by 45 % the root mean square errors (RMSE) on snow depth and snow water equivalent. At this study site, the lack of MODIS data on cloudy days does not affect the assimilation performance significantly. The combined assimilation of MODIS-like reflectances and a few snow depth measurements throughout the 2010/2011 season further reduces RMSEs by roughly 70 %. This work suggests that the assimilation of optical reflectances has the potential to become an essential component of spatialized snowpack simulation and forecast systems. The assimilation of real MODIS data will be investigated in future works.

  13. Optical Pattern Formation in Spatially Bunched Atoms: A Self-Consistent Model and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmittberger, Bonnie L.; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2014-05-01

    The nonlinear optics and optomechanical physics communities use different theoretical models to describe how optical fields interact with a sample of atoms. There does not yet exist a model that is valid for finite atomic temperatures but that also produces the zero temperature results that are generally assumed in optomechanical systems. We present a self-consistent model that is valid for all atomic temperatures and accounts for the back-action of the atoms on the optical fields. Our model provides new insights into the competing effects of the bunching-induced nonlinearity and the saturable nonlinearity. We show that it is crucial to keep the fifth and seventh-order nonlinearities that arise when there exists atomic bunching, even at very low optical field intensities. We go on to apply this model to the results of our experimental system where we observe spontaneous, multimode, transverse optical pattern formation at ultra-low light levels. We show that our model accurately predicts our experimentally observed threshold for optical pattern formation, which is the lowest threshold ever reported for pattern formation. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through Grant #PHY-1206040.

  14. Estimation of partial optical path length in the brain in subject-specific head models for near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kotaro; Kurihara, Kazuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Obata, Takayuki; Ito, Hiroshi; Okada, Eiji

    2016-04-01

    Three-dimensional head models with the structures constructed from the MR head images of 40 volunteers were constructed to analyze light propagation in the subject-specific head models. The mean optical path length in the head and the partial optical path length in the brain at 13 fiducial points for each volunteer were estimated to evaluate the intersubject and spatial variability in the optical path lengths. Although the intersubject variability in the optical path lengths is very high, the spatial variability in the average of the mean optical path length and partial optical path length is similar to the previously reported data. The mean optical path length in the head increases, whereas the partial optical path length in the brain decreases with an increase in the depth of the brain surface. The partial optical path length is highly correlated with the depth of the brain surface in comparison to the mean optical path length in the head.

  15. High energy laser optics manufacturing: a preliminary study

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, E.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report presents concepts and methods, major conclusions, and major recommendations concerning the fabrication of high energy laser optics (HELO) that are to be machined by the Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine (LODTM) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Detailed discussions of concepts and methods proposed for metrological operations, polishing of reflective surfaces, mounting of optical components, construction of mirror substrates, and applications of coatings are included.

  16. Optical Study of Liquid Crystal Doped with Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharde, Rita A.; Thakare, Sangeeta Y.

    2014-11-01

    Liquid crystalline materials have been useful for display devices i.e watches, calculators, automobile dashboards, televisions, multi media projectors etc. as well as in electro tunable lasers, optical fibers and lenses. Carbon nanotube is chosen as the main experimental factor in this study as it has been observed that Carbon Nano Tube influence the existing properties of liquid crystal host and with the doping of CNT can enhance1 the properties of LC. The combination of carbon nanotube (CNT) and liquid crystal (LC) materials show considerable interest in the scientific community due to unique physical properties of CNT in liquid crystal. Dispersion of CNTs in LCs can provide us a cheap, simple, versatile and effective means of controlling nanotube orientation on macroscopic scale with no restrictions on nanotube type. LCs have the long range orientational order rendering them to be anisotropic phases. If CNTs can be well dispersed in LC matrix, they will align with their long axes along the LC director to minimize distortions of the LC director field and the free energy. In this paper, we doped liquid crystal (Cholesteryl Nonanoate) by a small amount of multiwall carbon nanotube 0.05% and 0.1% wt. We found that by adding carbon nanotube to liquid crystals the melting point of the mixture is decreased but TNI is increased. It has been also observed that with incereas in concentration of carbon nanotube into liquid crystal shows conciderable effect on LC. The prepared samples were characterized using various techniques to study structural, thermal and optical properties i.e PMS, FPSS, UV-Vis spectroscopy, FT-IR measurements, and DTA.

  17. Solvothermal synthesis and study of nonlinear optical properties of nanocrystalline thallium doped bismuth telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Molli, Muralikrishna; Parola, Sowmendran; Avinash Chunduri, L.A.; Aditha, Saikiran; Sai Muthukumar, V; Mimani Rattan, Tanu; Kamisetti, Venkataramaniah

    2012-05-15

    Nanocrystalline Bismuth telluride and thallium (4 mol %) doped Bismuth telluride were synthesized through hydrothermal method. The as-prepared products were characterized using Powder X-ray Diffraction, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, UV-Visible spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Powder XRD results revealed the crystalline nature of the obtained phases. HRTEM showed the particle-like morphology of the products. The decrease in the absorption coefficient due to thallium doping was observed in FTIR spectra. The intensity dependent nonlinear optical properties of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride and thallium doped bismuth telluride were studied using the Z-scan technique in open-aperture configuration. Bismuth telluride doped with thallium showed enhanced nonlinear optical response compared to pristine bismuth telluride and hence could be used as a potential candidate for optical power limiting applications. - Graphical Abstract: Nonlinear transmission (Z-scan) curves of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride ({Delta}) and thallium doped bismuth telluride ({open_square}). Thallium doped bismuth telluride showed enhanced nonlinear absorption compared to bismuth telluride. Inset: TEM micrograph of bismuth telluride nanocrystallites. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of Nanocrystalline Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Thallium doped Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} through solvothermal method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduced absorption coefficient due to thallium doping found from IR spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Open-aperture Z-scan technique for nonlinear optical studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two photon absorption based model for theoretical fitting of Z-scan data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhanced nonlinear absorption in Thallium doped Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} - potential candidate for optical power limiting applications.

  18. An experimental study of aero-optical aberration and dithering of supersonic mixing layer via BOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuxin; Yi, Shihe; Tian, Lifeng; He, Lin; Cheng, Zhongyu

    2010-01-01

    The optical performance of supersonic mixing layer is heavily deteriorated by the aero-optical aberration and dithering of coherent structures, but current measuring methods limit the spatiotemporal resolution in relevant studies. A high resolution whole-field aero-optical aberration and dithering measuring method based on the Background Orient Schlieren (BOS) technique was studied. The systematic structure, sensitivity and resolution of BOS are analyzed in this paper. The aero-optical aberration and dithering of streamwise structures in supersonic mixing layers were quantificationally studied with BOS. The aberration field of spanwise structures revealed the ribbon-like aberration structures, which heavily restrict the optical performance of a mixing layer. The quantifications of aero-optical aberration and dithering are very important in studying aero-optical performance of supersonic mixing layer.

  19. Feasibility studies of optical processing of image bandwidth compression schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, B. R.; Strickland, R. N.; Schowengerdt, R. A.

    1983-05-01

    This research focuses on these three areas: (1) formulation of alternative architectural concepts for image bandwidth compression, i.e., the formulation of components and schematic diagrams which differ from conventional digital bandwidth compression schemes by being implemented by various optical computation methods; (2) simulation of optical processing concepts for image bandwidth compression, so as to gain insight into typical performance parameters and elements of system performance sensitivity; and (3) maturation of optical processing for image bandwidth compression until the overall state of optical methods in image compression becomes equal to that of digital image compression.

  20. Assessment of water constituents in highly turbid productive water by optimization bio-optical retrieval model after optical classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Changchun; Li, Yunmei; Yang, Hao; Li, Junsheng; Chen, Xia; Sun, Deyong; Le, Chengfeng; Zou, Jun; Xu, Liangjiang

    2014-11-01

    Based on the bio-optical properties of highly turbid productive inland waterbody, Taihu Lake, a novel bio-optical optimization algorithm was developed to estimate chlorophyll-a concentration (Cchla) and total suspended matter concentration (CTSM) after optical classification. Between 2006 and 2013, 1080 in situ samples collected from four inland lakes in China were utilized to test this optimization algorithm. All data were classified into four classes based on a new bio-optical classification method. The retrieval results of CTSM and Cchla exhibit a good consistency with in situ measured CTSM and Cchla. CTSM retrieval accuracies (evaluated by the root mean square of percentage errors: RMSPs) of classes 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 35.77%, 16.09%, 28.42%, and 26.86% for data1 and were 32.15%, 33.14%, 47.71%, and 34.89% for data3, respectively. Cchla retrieval accuracies (RMSPs) of classes 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 32.49%, 20.05%, 42.01%, and 34.85% for data1, were 44.71%, 32.59%, 47.92%, and 38.11% for data2, and were 33.12%, 25.65%, 70.88%, and 23.57% for data3, respectively. The optimization algorithm was also tested by the simulated data of Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, and Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor satellite sensors' center wavelengths. The validation shows a good correlation with the measured CTSM and Cchla. All these examinations demonstrate that the bio-optical optimization algorithm and classification are valid and robust for both the in situ data and the simulated satellite data. The optical relationships of aph(4 4 0) to Cchla and bbp(4 4 0) to CTSM are reasonable and effective. In summary, the results present that the bio-optical optimization algorithm proposed in this study shows high potential application to various water types and satellite sensors. The retrieval accuracy of CTSM and Cchla derived by bio-optical optimization algorithm was significantly improved after classification.