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Sample records for optical reflector solar

  1. Magnetron sputtering in rigid optical solar reflectors production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asainov, O. Kh; Bainov, D. D.; Krivobokov, V. P.; Sidelev, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetron sputtering was applied to meet the growing need for glass optical solar reflectors. This plasma method provided more uniform deposition of the silver based coating on glass substrates resulted in decrease of defective reflectors fraction down to 5%. For instance, such parameter of resistive evaporation was of 30%. Silver film adhesion to glass substrate was enhanced with indium tin oxide sublayer. Sunlight absorption coefficient of these rigid reflectors was 0.081-0.083.

  2. Solar reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, D. C.

    1981-02-17

    A solar reflector having a flexible triangular reflective sheet or membrane for receiving and reflecting solar energy therefrom. The reflector is characterized by the triangular reflective sheet which is placed under tension thereby defining a smooth planar surface eliminating surface deflection which heretofore has reduced the efficiency of reflectors or heliostats used in combination for receiving and transmitting solar energy to an absorber tower.

  3. High efficiency epitaxial optical reflector solar cells. Final subcontract report, 1 January 1990--31 October 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Dapkus, P.D.; Hummel, S.G.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes work to test the feasibility of a new solar cell concept -- the epitaxial optical reflector (EOR) solar cell. This cell concept alters current designs for high efficiency cells by changing the optical absorption efficiency of single cells. The change is introduced by the use an epitaxial multilayer reflector as an integral part of the cell to increase the optical path length of certain wavelengths of light in the cell. These changes are expected to increase the open circuit voltage at which power is extracted from the cell. The program is designed to test the feasibility of the use of a broad band epitaxial multilayer reflector grown as an integral part of the device structure to reflect the near-band-edge light back through the device for a second absorption pass. This second pass allows the design of a solar cell with a thinner base, and the use of the epitaxial reflector as a heterojunction carrier-reflecting barrier at the rear of the device. The thinner cell design and altered carrier profile that results from the light- and carrier-reflecting barrier will decrease the carrier concentration gradient and increase the open circuit voltage. The program is structured to have three tasks: (1) Solar Cell and Reflector Modeling, (2) Materials Growth and Optimization, and (3) Solar Cell Fabrication and Characterization.

  4. Passive solar reflector satellite revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, C.; Daly, J. C.

    1980-07-01

    Passive light weight reflectors in space which direct the incident solar energy to a specified location on the Earth surface are proposed as an alternative system for the solar power satellite to overcome conversion losses and to avoid the need for photovoltaic cells. On Earth, either photovoltaic cells or a steam turbine alternator on a solar tower, or a similar conventional, relatively high efficiency cycle are used for electricity generation. The constraints which apply to the design of the optical system if a single satellite is placed in geostationary orbit are outlined. A single lens and a two lens system are discussed.

  5. Passive solar reflector satellite revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, C.; Daly, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Passive light weight reflectors in space which direct the incident solar energy to a specified location on the Earth surface are proposed as an alternative system for the solar power satellite to overcome conversion losses and to avoid the need for photovoltaic cells. On Earth, either photovoltaic cells or a steam turbine alternator on a solar tower, or a similar conventional, relatively high efficiency cycle are used for electricity generation. The constraints which apply to the design of the optical system if a single satellite is placed in geostationary orbit are outlined. A single lens and a two lens system are discussed.

  6. Testing and Qualification of a Semi-Automated Bonding Process for Optical Solar Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, M.; Ranzenberger, C.; Rejsek-Riba, V.

    2014-06-01

    Optical Solar Reflectors (OSR) are highly efficient thermal emitter tiles with a typical size of 40x40mm. Spacecraft radiator panels are covered with these tiles to reduce absorption of solar radiation and to dissipate heat of internal payloads into deep space.State of the art processes to apply such OSR tiles are labour intensive and involve application of two- component adhesives, manual placing of tiles and long duration temperature controlled adhesive curing cycles.This paper presents the test and qualification campaign of a new OSR application method using electrically conductive pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) and a semi-automated OSR pick-and-place facility. Compared to standard OSR application using filled silicone resins, the new process is resulting in radiator surfaces with up to 27% lower mass.The pick-and-place facility will be introduced, the process qualification campaign discussed. Results of tensile- and thermo-optical testing of exposed samples compared to pristine materials will be shown.

  7. Solar central receiver heliostat reflector assembly

    DOEpatents

    Horton, Richard H.; Zdeb, John J.

    1980-01-01

    A heliostat reflector assembly for a solar central receiver system comprises a light-weight, readily assemblable frame which supports a sheet of stretchable reflective material and includes mechanism for selectively applying tension to and positioning the sheet to stretch it to optical flatness. The frame is mounted on and supported by a pipe pedestal assembly that, in turn, is installed in the ground. The frame is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e. central receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The frame may include a built-in system for testing for optical flatness of the reflector. The preferable geometric configuration of the reflector is octagonal; however, it may be other shapes, such as hexagonal, pentagonal or square. Several different embodiments of means for tensioning and positioning the reflector to achieve optical flatness are disclosed. The reflector assembly is based on the stretch frame concept which provides an extremely light-weight, simple, low-cost reflector assembly that may be driven for positioning and tracking by a light-weight, inexpensive drive system.

  8. Solar central receiver heliostat reflector assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, R.H.; Zdeb, J.J.

    1980-06-24

    A heliostat reflector assembly for a solar central receiver system comprises a light-weight, readily assemblable frame which supports a sheet of stretchable reflective material and includes a mechanism for selectively applying tension to and positioning the sheet to stretch it to optical flatness. The frame is mounted on and supported by a pipe pedestal assembly that, in turn, is installed in the ground. The frame is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e. central receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The frame may include a built-in system for testing for optical flatness of the reflector. The preferable geometric configuration of the reflector is octagonal; however, it may be other shapes, such as hexagonal, pentagonal or square. Several different embodiments of means for tensioning and positioning the reflector to achieve optical flatness are disclosed. The reflector assembly is based on the stretch frame concept which provides an extremely light-weight, simple, low-cost reflector assembly that may be driven for positioning and tracking by a light-weight, inexpensive drive system. 14 figs.

  9. Solar central receiver heliostat reflector assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, R.H.; Zdeb, J.J.

    1980-06-24

    A heliostat reflector assembly for a solar central receiver system comprises a light-weight, readily assemblable frame which supports a sheet of stretchable reflective material and includes mechanism for selectively applying tension to and positioning the sheet to stretch it to optical flatness. The frame is mounted on and supported by a pipe pedestal assembly that, in turn, is installed in the ground. The frame is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e., central receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The frame may include a built-in system for testing for optical flatness of the reflector. The preferable geometric configuration of the reflector is octagonal; however, it may be other shapes, such as hexagonal, pentagonal or square. Several different embodiments of means for tensioning and positioning the reflector to achieve optical flatness are disclosed. The reflector assembly is based on the stretch frame concept which provides an extremely light-weight, simple, low-cost reflector assembly that may be driven for positioning and tracking by a light-weight, inexpensive drive system. 14 claims.

  10. Advanced reflector materials for solar concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G; Williams, T; Wendelin, T

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes the research and development program at the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in advanced reflector materials for solar concentrators. NREL's research thrust is to develop solar reflector materials that maintain high specular reflectance for extended lifetimes under outdoor service conditions and whose cost is significantly lower than existing products. Much of this work has been in collaboration with private-sector companies that have extensive expertise in vacuum-coating and polymer-film technologies. Significant progress and other promising developments will be discussed. These are expected to lead to additional improvements needed to commercialize solar thermal concentration systems and make them economically attractive to the solar manufacturing industry. To explicitly demonstrate the optical durability of candidate reflector materials in real-world service conditions, a network of instrumented outdoor exposure sites has been activated.

  11. Advanced reflector materials for solar concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Gary; Williams, Tom; Wendelin, Tim

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes the research and development at the US National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in advanced reflector materials for solar concentrators. NREL's research thrust is to develop solar reflector materials that maintain high specular reflectance for extended lifetimes under outdoor service conditions and whose cost is significantly lower than existing products. Much of this work has been in collaboration with private-sector companies that have extensive expertise in vacuum-coating and polymer-film technologies. Significant progress and other promising developments will be discussed. These are expected to lead to additional improvements needed to commercialize solar thermal concentration systems and make them economically attractive to the solar manufacturing industry. To explicitly demonstrate the optical durability of candidate reflector materials in real-world service conditions, a network of instrumented outdoor exposure sites has been activated.

  12. Testing the figure of parabolic reflectors for solar concentrators.

    PubMed

    Bodenheimer, J S; Eisenberg, N P; Gur, J

    1982-12-15

    A novel method for testing the optical quality of large parabolic solar concentrators is presented, based on autocollimation. An optical system continuously scans the reflector along a fixed reference axis. At each position along the axis, the spread function is obtained. Analysis of the location, width, and intensity changes of this function gives quantitative information about the reflector's defects. A figure of merit describing the performance of parabolic trough reflectors is proposed.

  13. Optical and thermal characterization of membrane reflector materials for solar orbit transfer vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Gregory D.; McGee, Jennie K.; Partch, Russell; Lester, Dean M.

    2002-01-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), is advancing technologies to enable greater mobility for future AF spacecraft. The Solar Orbit Transfer Vehicle (SOTV) program is developing components for a concept based on a solar thermal rocket and solar thermal power generation. The program is performing ground testing of a thin film membrane concentrator concept. To better understand system performance, a series of optical characterization tests of the membrane material were performed. The objective was to quantify the relationship between membrane optical properties and the concentrator on-orbit transmission performance and thermal profile. During testing we collected reflectivity, absorptivity, transmissivity, and emissivity data for un-coated and coated membrane material. The membrane material tested was fabricated using a flight-qualified polyimide material and proven manufacturing processes. The test results, and system thermal analysis are presented in this paper. The results of this research will be used to refine hardware performance predictions and improve sizing for flight demonstration. .

  14. Development of electro-optic systems for self cleaning concentrated solar reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Jeremy W.

    The current demand for energy usage in the world is increasing at a rapid pace; in China alone, the electricity usage has increased by 12% per year from 2006-2010, where more than 75% of electrical power is produced by coal burning facilities. Numerous studies have shown the effects of carbon dioxide emissions on global climate change, and even showing the permanence of high carbon dioxide levels after emissions cease. Current trends away from carbon emitting power facilities are pushing solar energy into a position for many new solar power plants to be constructed. Terrestrial solar energy at AM1.5 is generally given at 1kW/m2, which is a vast free source of energy that can be be harvested to meet the global demand for electricity. Aside from some areas receiving intermittent levels of solar insolation, one of the largest hindrances to large scale solar power production is obscuration of sunlight on solar collectors caused by dust deposition. In areas with the highest average solar insolation, dust deposition is a major problem for maintaining a constant maximum power output. The southern Negev desert in Israel receives on average 17g/m2 per month in dust deposition on solar installations, which in turn causes losses of a third of the total power output of the installation. In these areas, water is a scarce commodity, which can only be used to clean solar installations at a prohibitive cost. To resolve this problem, a cost effective solution would be the application of electrodynamic screens (EDS), which can be implemented by embedding a set of parallel electrodes into the sun facing surface of solar collectors, including concentrating mirrors or photovoltaic (PV) modules, and applying a low frequency pulsed voltage to these electrodes. Three major contributions made in the course of this research in advancing (EDS) for self-cleaning solar mirrors are: (1) development of non-contact specular reflectometer for solar mirrors that allows measurement of reflectance

  15. Double-tailored nonimaging reflector optics for maximum-performance solar concentration.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Alex; Gordon, Jeffrey M

    2010-09-01

    A nonimaging strategy that tailors two mirror contours for concentration near the étendue limit is explored, prompted by solar applications where a sizable gap between the optic and absorber is required. Subtle limitations of this simultaneous multiple surface method approach are derived, rooted in the manner in which phase space boundaries can be tailored according to the edge-ray principle. The fundamental categories of double-tailored reflective optics are identified, only a minority of which can pragmatically offer maximum concentration at high collection efficiency. Illustrative examples confirm that acceptance half-angles as large as 30 mrad can be realized at a flux concentration of approximately 1000.

  16. Primary reflector for solar energy collection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G. (Inventor); Stephens, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    A fixed, linear, ground-based primary reflector is disclosed which has an extended curved sawtooth-contoured surface covered with a metalized polymeric reflecting material. The device reflects solar energy to a movably supported collector that is kept at the concentrated line focus of the reflector primary. The primary reflector may be constructed by a process utilizing well-known freeway paving machinery.

  17. Lambertian back reflector in Cu(InGa)Se2 solar cell: optical modeling and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahan, Nir; Jehl, Zacharie; Guillemoles, Jean-François; Lincot, Daniel; Naghavi, Negar; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2013-03-01

    In the past years, reducing the thickness of the absorber layer in CIGS-based solar cells has become a key issue to reduce the global Indium consumption and thus increased its competitiveness. As the absorber thickness is reduced, less photons are absorbed and consequently the efficiency decreases. It is well known that scattering light in the absorbing layer increases the effective optical length, which results in enhanced absorption. In this study, we have deposited a transparent conductive oxide as a back contact to the cell with a white paint on the rear surface to diffuse the light back to the cell. A proof of concept device is realized and optically characterized. Modeling scattering by rough surfaces can be done by brute force numerical simulations but does not provide a physical insight in the absorption mechanisms. In our approach, we regard the collimated solar light and its specular reection/transmission as coherent. On an irregular surface, part of the collimated light is scattered in other directions. To model this diffuse light, we adopt the formalism of the radiative transfer equation, which is an energy transport equation. Thus, interference effects are accounted for only in the coherent part. A special attention is dedicated to preserving reciprocity and energy conservation on the interface. It is seen that most of the absorption near the energy bandgap of CIGS is due to the diffuse light and that this approach can yield very significant photocurrent gains below 500nm absorber thickness.

  18. Solar-powered illuminated reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.C.

    1987-05-26

    A highway traffic marker is described comprising: a housing adapted to be secured to a highway; a reflector in the housing for reflecting light in at least one predetermined direction toward highway traffic; at least one light source in the housing; a battery in circuit with the light source; a photovoltaic system is the housing for charging the battery. The housing includes window means for transmitting light from the light source outward from the housing in the predetermined direction; and optical lightguide element is mounted in the housing for guiding light from the one light source to the window means. The optical lightguide element has a generally conical shape and the window means being a Fresnel lens.

  19. Deployable Reflector for Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. L.

    1982-01-01

    Unfoldable-membrane-reflector concept leads to mobile photovoltaic generators. Hinged containers swing open for deployment, and counterbalance beam swings into position. Folded reflector membranes are unfolded as deployment mast is extended, until stretched out flat.

  20. Back surface reflectors for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chai, A. T.

    1980-01-01

    Sample solar cells were fabricated to study the effects of various back surface reflectors on the device performance. They are typical 50 micrometers thick, space quality, silicon solar cells except for variations of the back contact configuration. The back surfaces of the sample cells are polished to a mirror like finish, and have either conventional full contacts or grid finger contacts. Measurements and evaluation of various metallic back surface reflectors, as well as cells with total internal reflection, are presented. Results indicate that back surface reflectors formed using a grid finger back contact are more effective reflectors than cells with full back metallization and that Au, Ag, or Cu are better back surface reflector metals than Al.

  1. Conformal Membrane Reflectors for Deployable Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Patrick J.; Keys, Andrew S. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation reports the Phase I results on NASA's Gossamer Spacecraft Exploratory Research and Technology Program. Cornerstone Research Group, Inc., the University of Rochester, and International Photonics Consultants collaborated to investigate the feasibility of free-standing, liquid-crystal-polymer (LCP) reflectors for integration into space-based optical systems. The goal of the program was to achieve large-diameter, broadband. reflective membranes that are resistant to the effects of space, specifically cryogenic environments and gamma-ray irradiation. Additionally, we assessed the applicability of utilizing the technology as tight sails, since, by their very nature, these films offer high-reflectivity at specified wavelengths. Previous research programs have demonstrated all-polymer, narrow-band Specular reflectors and diffuse membrane reflectors. The feasibility of fabricating an all-polymer broadband specular reflector and a narrow-band specular membrane reflector was assessed in the Phase I Gossamer program. In addition, preliminary gamma irradiation studies were conducted to determine the stability of the polymer reflectors to radiation. Materials and process technology were developed to fabricate coupon-scale reflectors of both broad- and narrow-band specular reflectors in Phase 1. This presentation will report the results of these studies, including, the performance of a narrow-band specular membrane. Gamma irradiation exposures indicate limited impact on the optical performance although additional exposure studies are warranted. Plans to scale up the membrane fabrication process will be presented.

  2. CO2 laser cutting of ultra thin (75 μm) glass based rigid optical solar reflector (OSR) for spacecraft application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Shubham; Sridhara, N.; Mitra, Avijit; Yougandar, B.; Dash, Sarat Kumar; Agarwal, Sanjay; Dey, Arjun

    2017-03-01

    Present study reports for the first time laser cutting of multilayered coatings on both side of ultra thin (i.e., 75 μm) glass substrate based rigid optical solar reflector (OSR) for spacecraft thermal control application. The optimization of cutting parameters was carried out as a function of laser power, cutting speed and number of cutting passes and their effect on cutting edge quality. Systematic and in-detail microstructural characterizations were carried out by optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques to study the laser affected zone and cutting edge quality. Sheet resistance and water contact angle experiments were also conducted locally both prior and after laser cut to investigate the changes of electrical and surface properties, if any.

  3. Polarization-dependent angular-optical reflectance in solar-selective SnOx:F/Al2O3/Al reflector surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mwamburi, Mghendi; Wäckelgård, Ewa; Roos, Arne; Kivaisi, Rogath

    2002-05-01

    Polarization-dependent angular-optical properties of spectrally selective reflector surfaces of fluorine-doped tin oxide (SnOx:F) deposited pyrolytically on anodized aluminum are reported. The angular-reflectance measurements, for which both s- and p-polarized light are used in the solar wavelength range 0.3-2.5 microm, reveal strong spectral selectivity, and the angular behavior is highly dependent on the polarizing component of the incident beam, the total film thickness, and the individual thickness of the Al2O3 and the SnO2:F layers. The anodic A12O3 layers were produced electrochemically and varied between 100 and 205 nm in thickness. The SnOx:F films were grown pyrolytically at a temperature of 400 degrees C with film thicknesses varying in the range 180-320 nm. The reflectors were aimed at silicon solar cells, and good spectrally selective reflector characteristics were achieved with these thinly preanodized, SnOx:F/Al samples; that is, high cell reflectance was obtained for wavelengths below 1.1 microm and low thermal reflectance for wavelengths above 1.1 microm, with the best samples having values of 0.80 and 0.42, respectively, at near-normal angles of incidence. This corresponds to an anodic layer thickness of 155 nm. Both the angular calculations and the experimental measurements show that the cell reflectance is relatively insensitive to the incidence angle, and a low thermal reflectance is maintained up to an angle of approximately 60 degrees.

  4. Shape control of slack space reflectors using modulated solar pressure.

    PubMed

    Borggräfe, Andreas; Heiligers, Jeannette; Ceriotti, Matteo; McInnes, Colin R

    2015-07-08

    The static deflection profile of a large spin-stabilized space reflector because of solar radiation pressure acting on its surface is investigated. Such a spacecraft consists of a thin reflective circular film, which is deployed from a supporting hoop structure in an untensioned, slack manner. This paper investigates the use of a variable reflectivity distribution across the surface to control the solar pressure force and hence the deflected shape. In this first analysis, the film material is modelled as one-dimensional slack radial strings with no resistance to bending or transverse shear, which enables a semi-analytic derivation of the nominal deflection profile. An inverse method is then used to find the reflectivity distribution that generates a specific, for example, parabolic deflection shape of the strings. Applying these results to a parabolic reflector, short focal distances can be obtained when large slack lengths of the film are employed. The development of such optically controlled reflector films enables future key mission applications such as solar power collection, radio-frequency antennae and optical telescopes.

  5. Shape control of slack space reflectors using modulated solar pressure

    PubMed Central

    Borggräfe, Andreas; Heiligers, Jeannette; Ceriotti, Matteo; McInnes, Colin R.

    2015-01-01

    The static deflection profile of a large spin-stabilized space reflector because of solar radiation pressure acting on its surface is investigated. Such a spacecraft consists of a thin reflective circular film, which is deployed from a supporting hoop structure in an untensioned, slack manner. This paper investigates the use of a variable reflectivity distribution across the surface to control the solar pressure force and hence the deflected shape. In this first analysis, the film material is modelled as one-dimensional slack radial strings with no resistance to bending or transverse shear, which enables a semi-analytic derivation of the nominal deflection profile. An inverse method is then used to find the reflectivity distribution that generates a specific, for example, parabolic deflection shape of the strings. Applying these results to a parabolic reflector, short focal distances can be obtained when large slack lengths of the film are employed. The development of such optically controlled reflector films enables future key mission applications such as solar power collection, radio-frequency antennae and optical telescopes. PMID:26345083

  6. Free-flying solar reflector spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Results of investigations of requirements and design concepts for large solar-reflecting spacecraft are given. The emphasis is on the one kilometer diameter self contained spacecraft that can be packaged and launched in the space shuttle. The configuration consists of a compression rim stabilized by stays coming from each end of the central compression hub. The stays are stowed on reels on the ends of the hub. The hub consists of two Astromasts which are deployed after launch. The reflector membrane is a two micron thick Kapton film with a vapor deposited aluminum coating.

  7. Solar Tracking Error Analysis of Fresnel Reflector

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jiantao; Yan, Junjie; Pei, Jie; Liu, Guanjie

    2014-01-01

    Depending on the rotational structure of Fresnel reflector, the rotation angle of the mirror was deduced under the eccentric condition. By analyzing the influence of the sun tracking rotation angle error caused by main factors, the change rule and extent of the influence were revealed. It is concluded that the tracking errors caused by the difference between the rotation axis and true north meridian, at noon, were maximum under certain conditions and reduced at morning and afternoon gradually. The tracking error caused by other deviations such as rotating eccentric, latitude, and solar altitude was positive at morning, negative at afternoon, and zero at a certain moment of noon. PMID:24895664

  8. Silicon solar cell using optimized intermediate reflector layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Ahmed E.; Swillam, Mohamed A.

    2016-03-01

    Thin film silicon based photovoltaic cells have the advantages of using low cost nontoxic abundant constituents and low thermal manufacturing budget. However, better long-term efficiencies need to be achieved overcoming its inherent bad electrical properties of amorphous and/or microcrystalline Silicon. For the goal of achieving best results, multijunction cells of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon thin layers are industrially and lab utilized in addition to using one or more light management techniques such as textured layers, periodic and plasmonic back reflectors, flattened reflective substrates and intermediate reflector layer (IRL) between multijunction cells. The latter, IRL, which is the focus of this paper, serves as spectrally selective layer between different cells of the multijunction silicon thin film solar cell. IRL, reflects to the top cell short wavelength while permitting and scattering longer ones to achieve the best possible short circuit current. In this study, a new optimized periodic design of Intermediate reflector layer in micromorph (two multijunction cells of Microcrystalline and Amorphous Silicon) thin film solar cells is proposed. The optically simulated short circuit current reaches record values for same thickness designs when using all-ZnO design and even better results is anticipated if Lacquer material is used in combination with ZnO. The design methodology used in the paper can be easily applied to different types of IRL materials and also extended to triple and the relatively newly proposed quadruple thin films solar cells.

  9. State-of-the-art low-cost solar reflector materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C; Jorgensen, G

    1994-11-01

    Solar thermal technologies generate power by concentrating sunlight with large mirrors. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is working with industrial partners to develop the optical reflector materials needed for the successful deployment of this technology. The reflector materials must be low in cost and maintain high specular reflectance for extended lifetimes in severe outdoor environments. Currently, the best candidate materials for solar mirrors are silver-coated low-iron glass and silvered polymer films. Polymer reflectors are lighter in weight, offer greater flexibility in system design, and have the potential for lower cost than glass mirrors. In parallel with collaborative activities, several innovative candidate reflector-material constructions were investigated at NREL. The low-cost material requirement necessitates manufacturing compatible with mass-production techniques. Future cooperative efforts with the web-coating industry offers the promise of exciting new alternative materials and the potential for dramatic cost savings in developing advanced solar reflector materials.

  10. Velocity characteristics of reflectors in solar tower systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparisi, R. R.; Tepliakov, D. I.; Khantsis, B. G.

    An analysis is presented of the velocities of azimuthal and zenithal rotations of reflectors in solar tower systems in relation to reflector arrangement, geographic latitude, and season of the year. Two methods are used in the analysis: (1) the direct calculation of heliostat rotation velocity at successive moments of time; and (2) a generalized representation of reflector velocity fields. Research and engineering applications of the calculations are discussed.

  11. Solar thermal collectors using planar reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espy, P. N.

    1978-01-01

    Specular reflectors have been used successfully with flat-plate collectors to achieve exceptionally high operating temperatures and high delivered energy per unit collector area. Optimal orientation of collectors and reflectors can result in even higher performance with an improved relationship between energy demand and supply. This paper reports on a study providing first order optimization of collector-reflector arrays in which single- and multiple-faceted reflectors in fixed or singly adjustable configurations provide delivered energy maxima in either summer or winter.

  12. Optical Reflectance Measurements for Commonly Used Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Janecek, Petr Martin; Moses, William

    2008-06-11

    When simulating light collection in scintillators, modeling the angular distribution of optical light reflectance from surfaces is very important. Since light reflectance is poorly understood, either purely specular or purely diffuse reflectance is generally assumed. In this paper we measure the optical reflectance distribution for eleven commonly used reflectors. A 440 nm, output power stabilized, un-polarized laser is shone onto a reflector at a fixed angle of incidence. The reflected light's angular distribution is measured by an array of silicon photodiodes. The photodiodes are movable to cover 2 pi of solid angle. The light-induced current is, through a multiplexer, read out with a digital multimeter. A LabVIEW program controls the motion of the laser and the photodiode array, the multiplexer, and the data collection. The laser can be positioned at any angle with a position accuracy of 10 arc minutes. Each photodiode subtends 6.3o, and the photodiode array can be positioned at any angle with up to 10 arc minute angular resolution. The dynamic range for the current measurements is 105:1. The measured light reflectance distribution was measured to be specular for several ESR films as well as for aluminum foil, mostly diffuse for polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tape and titanium dioxide paint, and neither specular nor diffuse for Lumirror(R), Melinex(R) and Tyvek(R). Instead, a more complicated light distribution was measured for these three materials.

  13. Electrophoretic deposited TiO(2) pigment-based back reflectors for thin film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Bills, Braden; Morris, Nathan; Dubey, Mukul; Wang, Qi; Fan, Qi Hua

    2015-02-09

    Highly reflective coatings with strong light scattering effect have many applications in optical components and optoelectronic devices. This work reports titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) pigment-based reflectors that have 2.5 times higher broadband diffuse reflection than commercially produced aluminum or silver based reflectors and result in efficiency enhancements of a single-junction amorphous Si solar cell. Electrophoretic deposition is used to produce pigment-based back reflectors with high pigment density, controllable film thickness and site-specific deposition. Electrical conductivity of the pigment-based back reflectors is improved by creating electrical vias throughout the pigment-based back reflector by making holes using an electrical discharge / dielectric breakdown approach followed by a second electrophoretic deposition of conductive nanoparticles into the holes. While previous studies have demonstrated the use of pigment-based back reflectors, for example white paint, on glass superstrate configured thin film Si solar cells, this work presents a scheme for producing pigment-based reflectors on complex shape and flexible substrates. Mechanical durability and scalability are demonstrated on a continuous electrophoretic deposition roll-to-roll system which has flexible metal substrate capability of 4 inch wide and 300 feet long.

  14. Electrophoretic deposited TiO2 pigment-based back reflectors for thin film solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Bills, Braden; Morris, Nathan; Dubey, Mukul; ...

    2015-01-16

    Highly reflective coatings with strong light scattering effect have many applications in optical components and optoelectronic devices. This paper reports titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment-based reflectors that have 2.5 times higher broadband diffuse reflection than commercially produced aluminum or silver based reflectors and result in efficiency enhancements of a single-junction amorphous Si solar cell. Electrophoretic deposition is used to produce pigment-based back reflectors with high pigment density, controllable film thickness and site-specific deposition. Electrical conductivity of the pigment-based back reflectors is improved by creating electrical vias throughout the pigment-based back reflector by making holes using an electrical discharge / dielectric breakdownmore » approach followed by a second electrophoretic deposition of conductive nanoparticles into the holes. While previous studies have demonstrated the use of pigment-based back reflectors, for example white paint, on glass superstrate configured thin film Si solar cells, this work presents a scheme for producing pigment-based reflectors on complex shape and flexible substrates. Finally, mechanical durability and scalability are demonstrated on a continuous electrophoretic deposition roll-to-roll system which has flexible metal substrate capability of 4 inch wide and 300 feet long.« less

  15. Illumination from space with orbiting solar-reflector spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canady, J. E., Jr.; Allen, J. L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of using orbiting mirrors to reflect sunlight to Earth for several illumination applications is studied. A constellation of sixteen 1 km solar reflector spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit can illuminate a region 333 km in diameter to 8 lux, which is brighter than most existing expressway lighting systems. This constellation can serve one region all night long or can provide illumination during mornings and evenings to five regions across the United States. Preliminary cost estimates indicate such an endeavor is economically feasible. The studies also explain how two solar reflectors can illuminate the in-orbit nighttime operations of Space Shuttle. An unfurlable, 1 km diameter solar reflector spacecraft design concept was derived. This spacecraft can be packaged in the Space, Shuttle, transported to low Earth orbit, unfurled, and solar sailed to operational orbits up to geosynchronous. The necessary technical studies and improvements in technology are described, and potential environmental concerns are discussed.

  16. Long-Life Self-Renewing Solar Reflector Stack

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Barry Lynn

    1997-07-08

    A long-life solar reflector includes a solar collector substrate and a base layer bonded to a solar collector substrate. The first layer includes a first reflective layer and a first acrylic or transparent polymer layer covering the first reflective layer to prevent exposure of the first reflective layer. The reflector also includes at least one upper layer removably bonded to the first acrylic or transparent polymer layer of the base layer. The upper layer includes a second reflective layer and a second acrylic or transparent polymer layer covering the second reflective layer to prevent exposure of the second reflective layer. The upper layer may be removed from the base reflective layer to expose the base layer, thereby lengthening the useful life of the solar reflector. A method of manufacturing a solar reflector includes the steps of bonding a base layer to a solar collector substrate, wherein the base reflective layer includes a first reflective layer and a first transparent polymer or acrylic layer covering the first reflective layer; and removably bonding a first upper layer to the first transparent polymer or acrylic layer of the base layer. The first upper layer includes a second reflective layer and a second transparent polymer or acrylic layer covering the second reflective layer to prevent exposure of the second reflective layer.

  17. Optical biometry of biological tissues by ellipsoidal reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezuglyi, M. A.; Pavlovets, N. V.

    2013-06-01

    Possibilities of measuring systems that uses ellipsoidal reflectors for determining the optical parameters of biological tissue are studied. The modified inverse Monte Carlo method was designed for biomedical photometric system "biological tissue - ellipsoidal mirror."

  18. Distributed Bragg Reflectors With Reduced Optical Absorption

    DOEpatents

    Klem, John F.

    2005-08-16

    A new class of distributed Bragg reflectors has been developed. These distributed Bragg reflectors comprise interlayers positioned between sets of high-index and low-index quarter-wave plates. The presence of these interlayers is to reduce photon absorption resulting from spatially indirect photon-assisted electronic transitions between the high-index and low-index quarter wave plates. The distributed Bragg reflectors have applications for use in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for use at 1.55 .mu.m and at other wavelengths of interest.

  19. Ellipsoidal optical reflectors reproduced by electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hungerford, W. J.; Larmer, J. W.; Levinsohn, M.

    1964-01-01

    An accurately dimensioned convex ellipsoidal surface, which will become a master after polishing, is fabricated from 316L stainless steel. When polishing of the master is completed, it is suspended in a modified watt bath for electroforming of nickel reflectors.

  20. Modeling and optimization of white paint back reflectors for thin-film silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovšek, Benjamin; Krč, Janez; Isabella, Olindo; Zeman, Miro; Topič, Marko

    2010-11-01

    Diffusive dielectric materials such as white paint have been demonstrated as effective back reflectors in the photovoltaic technology. In this work, a one-dimensional (1D) optical modeling approach for simulation of white paint films is developed and implemented in a 1D optical simulator for thin-film solar cells. The parameters of white paint, such as the paint film thickness, the pigment volume concentration (PVC), and the pigment/binder refractive index ratio (RIR), are examined and optimized to achieve the required optical properties for back reflector application. The simulation trends indicate that white paint back reflectors with sufficient film thickness and higher PVC and RIR values exhibit improved reflectivity characteristics which results in an increased long-wavelength quantum efficiency of thin-film silicon solar cells. The simulation results based on the 1D model agree very well with the experimental data obtained from reflectance measurements of various white paint compositions and quantum efficiency measurements of amorphous silicon solar cells with white paint back reflectors.

  1. Solar reflector soiling pattern distributions and reflectance measurement requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Kidney, K. )

    1990-10-01

    Short-term specular reflectance losses from optical surfaces used in the collection or concentration of solar energy results in significant reduction of these systems' output. Losses range from 0.1% to 1.0% per day, approaching asymptotes of 25% to 60% for periods greater than one year, depending onsite and season. To appropriately assess the value of a particular location for the production of power, consideration of the rates of soiling and strategies to minimize losses resulting from soiling must be considered. Strategies for measuring the optical performance of reflector materials to a specified degree of accuracy have been developed, according to the types of soiling patterns observed. It was found most soiling occurs with the accumulation of particulates in spots of different sizes, and the spot sizes follow a lognormal distribution. For most practical situations, it was determined that 10 measurements with a 1-cm-diameter beam are enough to place the average value within 3% of the true value, with a confidence level of 95%.

  2. Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Testing for Solar Reflectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, W.; Elmore, R.; Lee, J.; Kennedy, C.

    2011-09-01

    To meet the challenge to reduce the cost of electricity generated with concentrating solar power (CSP) new low-cost reflector materials are being developed including metalized polymer reflectors and must be tested and validated against appropriate failure mechanisms. We explore the application of testing methods and statistical inference techniques for quantifying estimates and improving lifetimes of concentrating solar power (CSP) reflectors associated with failure mechanisms initiated by exposure to the ultraviolet (UV) part of the solar spectrum. In general, a suite of durability and reliability tests are available for testing a variety of failure mechanisms where the results of a set are required to understand overall lifetime of a CSP reflector. We will focus on the use of the Ultra-Accelerated Weathering System (UAWS) as a testing device for assessing various degradation patterns attributable to accelerated UV exposure. Depending on number of samples, test conditions, degradation and failure patterns, test results may be used to derive insight into failure mechanisms, associated physical parameters, lifetimes and uncertainties. In the most complicated case warranting advanced planning and statistical inference, step-stress accelerated degradation (SSADT) methods may be applied.

  3. Novel back-reflector architecture with nanoparticle based buried light-scattering microstructures for improved solar cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desta, Derese; Ram, Sanjay K.; Rizzoli, Rita; Bellettato, Michele; Summonte, Caterina; Jeppesen, Bjarke R.; Jensen, Pia B.; Tsao, Yao-Chung; Wiggers, Hartmut; Pereira, Rui N.; Balling, Peter; Larsen, Arne Nylandsted

    2016-06-01

    A new back-reflector architecture for light-management in thin-film solar cells is proposed that includes a morphologically smooth top surface with light-scattering microstructures buried within. The microstructures are pyramid shaped, fabricated on a planar reflector using TiO2 nanoparticles and subsequently covered with a layer of Si nanoparticles to obtain a flattened top surface, thus enabling growth of good quality thin-film solar cells. The optical properties of this back-reflector show high broadband haze parameter and wide angular distribution of diffuse light-scattering. The n-i-p amorphous silicon thin-film solar cells grown on such a back-reflector show enhanced light absorption resulting in improved external quantum efficiency. The benefit of the light trapping in those solar cells is evidenced by the gains in short-circuit current density and efficiency up to 15.6% and 19.3% respectively, compared to the reference flat solar cells. This improvement in the current generation in the solar cells grown on the flat-topped (buried pyramid) back-reflector is observed even when the irradiation takes place at large oblique angles of incidence. Finite-difference-time-domain simulation results of optical absorption and ideal short-circuit current density values agree well with the experimental findings. The proposed approach uses a low cost and simple fabrication technique and allows effective light manipulation by utilizing the optical properties of micro-scale structures and nanoscale constituent particles.

  4. Colloidal plasmonic back reflectors for light trapping in solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Manuel J.; Morawiec, Seweryn; Simone, Francesca; Priolo, Francesco; Crupi, Isodiana

    2014-04-01

    A novel type of plasmonic light trapping structure is presented in this paper, composed of metal nanoparticles synthesized in colloidal solution and self-assembled in uniform long-range arrays using a wet-coating method. The high monodispersion in size and spherical shape of the gold colloids used in this work allows a precise match between their measured optical properties and electromagnetic simulations performed with Mie theory, and enables the full exploitation of their collective resonant plasmonic behavior for light-scattering applications. The colloidal arrays are integrated in plasmonic back reflector (PBR) structures aimed for light trapping in thin film solar cells. The PBRs exhibit high diffuse reflectance (up to 75%) in the red and near-infrared spectrum, which can pronouncedly enhance the near-bandgap photocurrent generated by the cells. Furthermore, the colloidal PBRs are fabricated by low-temperature (<120 °C) processes that allow their implementation, as a final step of the cell construction, in typical commercial thin film devices generally fabricated in a superstrate configuration.

  5. Design of anti-ring back reflectors for thin-film solar cells based on three-dimensional optical and electrical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Hui-Hsin; Wu, Yuh-Renn; Chang, Hung-Chun

    2014-08-11

    The optical and electrical properties of a photonic-plasmonic nanostructure on the back contact of thin-film solar cells were investigated numerically through the three-dimensional (3D) finite-difference time-domain method and the 3D Poisson and drift-diffusion solver. The focusing effect and the Fabry-Perot resonances are identified as the main mechanisms for the enhancement of the optical generation rate as well as the short circuit current density. However, the surface topography of certain nanopattern structures is found to reduce the internal electrostatic field of the device, thus limiting charge collection. The optimized conditions for both optics and electronics have been analyzed in this paper.

  6. Systematic analysis of diffuse rear reflectors for enhanced light trapping in silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeffer, Florian; Eisenlohr, Johannes; Basch, Angelika; Hermle, Martin; Lee, Benjamin G.; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph

    2016-08-01

    Simple diffuse rear reflectors can enhance the light path length of weakly absorbed near infrared light in silicon solar cells and set a benchmark for more complex and expensive light trapping structures like dielectric gratings or plasmonic particles. We analyzed such simple diffuse rear reflectors systematically by optical and electrical measurements. We applied white paint, TiO2 nanoparticles, white backsheets and a silver mirror to bifacial silicon solar cells and measured the enhancement of the external quantum efficiency for three different solar cell geometries: planar front and rear side, textured front and planar rear side, and textured front and rear side. We showed that an air-gap between the solar cell and the reflector decreases the absorption enhancement significantly, thus white paint and TiO2 nanoparticles directly applied to the rear cell surface lead to the highest short circuit current density enhancements. The short circuit current density gains for a 200 um thick planar solar cell reached up to 1.8 mA/cm2, compared to a non-reflecting black rear side and up to 0.8 mA/cm2 compared to a high-quality silver mirror rear side. For solar cells with textured front side the short circuit current density gains are in the range between 0.5 and 1.0 mA/cm2 compared to a non-reflecting black rear side and do not significantly depend on the angular characteristic of the rear side reflector but mainly on its absolute reflectance.

  7. Solar module having reflector between cells

    DOEpatents

    Kardauskas, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    A photovoltaic module comprising an array of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells disposed in a planar and mutually spaced relationship between a light-transparent front cover member in sheet form and a back sheet structure is provided with a novel light-reflecting means disposed between adjacent cells for reflecting light falling in the areas between cells back toward said transparent cover member for further internal reflection onto the solar cells. The light-reflecting comprises a flexible plastic film that has been embossed so as to have a plurality of small V-shaped grooves in its front surface, and a thin light-reflecting coating on said front surface, the portions of said coating along the sides of said grooves forming light-reflecting facets, said grooves being formed so that said facets will reflect light impinging thereon back into said transparent cover sheet with an angle of incidence greater than the critical angle, whereby substantially all of the reflected light will be internally reflected from said cover sheet back to said solar modules, thereby increasing the current output of the module.

  8. Inverse problem for shape control of flexible space reflectors using distributed solar pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borggräfe, A.; Heiligers, J.; Ceriotti, M.; McInnes, C. R.

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates controlled elastic deflection of thin circular space reflectors using an inverse problem approach to non-linear thin membrane theory. When changing the surface reflectivity across the membrane, the distributed loads due to ambient solar radiation pressure can be manipulated optically, thus controlling the surface shape without using mechanical or piezo-electric systems. The surface reflectivity can in principle be modulated using uniformly distributed thin-film electro-chromic coatings. We present an analytic solution to the inverse problem of finding the necessary reflectivity distribution that creates a specific membrane deflection, for example that of a parabolic reflector. Importantly, the reflectivity distribution across the surface is found to be independent of membrane size, thickness and solar distance, enabling engineering of the reflectivity distribution directly during the manufacture of the membrane.

  9. Panchromatic porous specular back reflectors for efficient transparent dye solar cells.

    PubMed

    López-López, Carmen; Colodrero, Silvia; Míguez, Hernán

    2014-01-14

    A panchromatic specular reflector based dye solar cell is presented herein. Photovoltaic performance of this novel design is compared to that of cells in which standard diffuse scattering layers are integrated. The capability of the proposed multilayer structures to both emulate the broad band reflection of diffuse scattering layers of standard thickness (around 5 microns) and give rise to similarly high light harvesting and power conversion efficiencies, yet preserving the transparency of the device, is demonstrated. Such white light reflectors are comprised of stacks of different porous optical multilayers, each one displaying a strong reflection in a complementary spectral range, and are designed to leave transmittance unaltered in a narrow red-frequency range in which the sensitized electrode shows negligible absorption, thus allowing us to see through the cell. The reflectance bandwidth achieved is three times as broad as the largest bandwidth previously achieved using any photonic structure integrated into a dye solar cell.

  10. Optical Phased Array Using Guided Resonance with Backside Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horie, Yu (Inventor); Arbabi, Amir (Inventor); Faraon, Andrei (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods and systems for controlling the phase of electromagnetic waves are disclosed. A device can consist of a guided resonance grating layer, a spacer, and a reflector. A plurality of devices, arranged in a grid pattern, can control the phase of reflected electromagnetic phase, through refractive index control. Carrier injection, temperature control, and optical beams can be applied to control the refractive index.

  11. Optical phased array using guided resonance with backside reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Horie, Yu; Arbabi, Amir; Faraon, Andrei

    2016-11-01

    Methods and systems for controlling the phase of electromagnetic waves are disclosed. A device can consist of a guided resonance grating layer, a spacer, and a reflector. A plurality of devices, arranged in a grid pattern, can control the phase of reflected electromagnetic phase, through refractive index control. Carrier injection, temperature control, and optical beams can be applied to control the refractive index.

  12. Low absorption float glass for back surface solar reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodyear, J. K.; Lindberg, V. L.

    1980-09-01

    It is shown that low iron float glass with relatively flat surfaces can be fabricated by the float process, and that this glass can make an excellent back surface mirror for solar energy concentrators, such as the heliostats planned for the Solar Ten Megawatt Power Project at Barstow, California. At 3 mm thickness, the low iron glass has a mean solar transmittance of 89.3%, and will produce heliostat mirrors with a calculated solar reflectance of 89.6%. The flatness of Ford 3-mm float glass is approximately 0.4 mrad, which is well below the minimum average slope angle requirement (2.5 mrad) to produce good quality heliostat reflectors.

  13. Electrophoretic deposited TiO2 pigment-based back reflectors for thin film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bills, Braden; Morris, Nathan; Dubey, Mukul; Wang, Qi; Fan, Qi Hua

    2015-01-16

    Highly reflective coatings with strong light scattering effect have many applications in optical components and optoelectronic devices. This paper reports titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment-based reflectors that have 2.5 times higher broadband diffuse reflection than commercially produced aluminum or silver based reflectors and result in efficiency enhancements of a single-junction amorphous Si solar cell. Electrophoretic deposition is used to produce pigment-based back reflectors with high pigment density, controllable film thickness and site-specific deposition. Electrical conductivity of the pigment-based back reflectors is improved by creating electrical vias throughout the pigment-based back reflector by making holes using an electrical discharge / dielectric breakdown approach followed by a second electrophoretic deposition of conductive nanoparticles into the holes. While previous studies have demonstrated the use of pigment-based back reflectors, for example white paint, on glass superstrate configured thin film Si solar cells, this work presents a scheme for producing pigment-based reflectors on complex shape and flexible substrates. Finally, mechanical durability and scalability are demonstrated on a continuous electrophoretic deposition roll-to-roll system which has flexible metal substrate capability of 4 inch wide and 300 feet long.

  14. The rigorous wave optics design of diffuse medium reflectors for photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Albert; Ming Fu, Sze; Kai Zhong, Yan; Wei Tseng, Chi; Yu Chen, Po; Ping Ju, Nyan

    2014-04-01

    Recently, diffuse reflectors are being incorporated into solar cells, due to the advantage of no metallic absorption loss, higher reflectance, decent light scattering property by embedded TiO2 scatterers, and the ease of fabrication. Different methods have been employed to analyze diffuse reflectors, including Monte Carlo method, N-flux method, and a one-dimensional approximation based on semi-coherent optics, and the calculated reflectance is around 80% by these methods. In this work, rigorous wave optics solution is used, and it is shown that the reflectance for diffuse medium mirrors can actually be as high as >99% over a broad spectral range, provided the TiO2 scatterer geometry is properly optimized. The bandwidth of diffuse reflectors is un-achievable by other dielectric mirrors such as distributed Bragg reflectors or high index contrast grating mirror, using the same index contrast. Finally, it is promisingly found that even if the distribution of TiO2 is random, the wide-band reflection can still be achieved for the optimized TiO2 geometry. Initial experimental result is included in the supplementary material which shows the high feasibility of diffuse medium mirrors for solar cells.

  15. Improving the Efficiency of Quasi-Optical Bragg Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khozin, M. A.; Denisov, G. G.; Belousov, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    In the analysis of propagation of wave beams in quasi-optical transmission lines, the loss rate and transformation of modes by various elements of the transmission line are of great importance. The effects occurring when a spatially bounded, obliquely incident wave beam is reflected from a Bragg resonator being a periodic, plane-layered medium with varied dielectric permittivity are considered. Such a reflector can be used as a frequency-selective element of the transmission line. Since the reflection coefficient of a plane wave from the Bragg reflector depends on its incidence angle, there occurs a transformation of the reflected beam. Analytical expressions for the beam displacement, the angle of deflection of the beam from the mirror reflection direction, and the wavefront curvature variation have been obtained. The influence of the mentioned effects on characteristics of the reflected wave beam in the main band of the Bragg reflector is numerically analyzed. The possibility of compensation for these distortions is considered.

  16. Hollow optical waveguides with omni-directional reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shih-Shou; Hou, Chia-Hung; Chien, Hung-Ta; Hsiao, Fu-Li; Chen, Chii-Chang

    2005-03-01

    In this study, we design and fabricate a hollow optical waveguide with omni-directional reflectors in silicon-based materials. A groove is etched by inductive coupled plasma (ICP) with photolithographic process on (100) silicon wafer. The width of the groove is varied from 3.5 to 5.5 micrometer for different waveguide designs. The depth of the groove is 1.2 micrometers. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is used to deposit six pairs of Si/SiO2(0.111/0.258micrometers) on the samples. Finally, the top of the sample is covered by another silicon substrate on which the identical omni-directional reflector has been also deposited. By wafer bonding technology, the top omni-directional reflector can be combined with the groove to form a hollow optical waveguide. Light with the wavelength at 1.55 micrometers can be confined by the omni-directional reflectors at single mode operation. Polarization independent hollow optical waveguides can be achieved with this fabrication process.

  17. Applications of ``PV Optics`` for solar cell and module design

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.L.; Madjdpour, J.; Chen, W.

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes some applications of a new optics software package, PV Optics, developed for the optical design of solar cells and modules. PV Optics is suitable for the analysis and design of both thick and thin solar cells. It also includes a feature for calculation of metallic losses related to contacts and back reflectors.

  18. Semiconductor hollow optical waveguides formed by omni-directional reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shih-Shou; Wang, Mou-Sian; Chen, Chii-Chang

    2004-12-01

    In this study, a hollow optical waveguide with omni-directional reflectors in silicon-based materials was design, fabricated and characterized. By using dry etching technique, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition for Si/SiO2 thin films and covering another wafer with omni-directional reflector together, the waveguides can be formed with an air core of 1.2μm x 1.3μm. A uniform propagation loss of the waveguide to be around 1.7dB/cm for C+L band was found for the TE and TM modes. Polarization-independent hollow optical waveguides were obtained with the hollow waveguide structure.

  19. Transparent conducting oxide contacts and textured metal back reflectors for thin film silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franken, R. H.-J.

    2006-09-01

    With the growing population and the increasing environmental problems of the 'common' fossil and nuclear energy production, the need for clean and sustainable energy sources is evident. Solar energy conversion, such as in photovoltaic (PV) systems, can play a major role in the urgently needed energy transition in electricity production. At the present time PV module production is dominated by the crystalline wafer technology. Thin film silicon technology is an alternative solar energy technology that operates at lower efficiencies, however, it has several significant advantages, such as the possibility of deposition on cheap (flexible) substrates and the much smaller silicon material consumption. Because of the small thickness of the solar cells, light trapping schemes are needed in order to obtain enough light absorption and current generation. This thesis describes the research on thin film silicon solar cells with the focus on the optimization of the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) layers and textured metal Ag substrate layers for the use as enhanced light scattering back reflectors in n-i-p type of solar cells. First we analyzed ZnO:Al (TCO) layers deposited in an radio frequent (rf) magnetron deposition system equipped with a 7 inch target. We have focused on the improvement of the electrical properties without sacrificing the optical properties by increasing the mobility and decreasing the grain boundary density. Furthermore, we described some of the effects on light trapping of ZnO:Al enhanced back reflectors. The described effects are able to explain the observed experimental data. Furthermore, we present a relation between the surface morphology of the Ag back contact and the current enhancement in microcrystalline (muc-Si:H) solar cells. We show the importance of the lateral feature sizes of the Ag surface on the light scattering and introduce a method to characterize the quality of the back reflector by combining the vertical and lateral feature sizes

  20. Optical and electrical modeling of an amorphous-silicon tandem solar cell with nonhomogeneous intrinsic layers and a periodically corrugated back-reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faryad, Muhammad; Liu, Liu; Mayer, Theresa S.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2013-09-01

    A tandem solar cell comprising two p-i-n solar cells made of amorphous-silicon alloys and backed by a periodically corrugated metallic back-re ector was theoretically investigated. The intrinsic semiconductor layers in both constituent solar cells were taken to be nonhomogeneous with linearly varying bandgap. An AM1.5 solar irradiance spectrum was incorporated in the nite-di erence-time-domain calculations (LumericalTM) to obtain the generation rate of electron-hole pairs, which was then used in Synopsys SentaurusTM to compute the electrical properties of the solar cell. The short-circuit current increases when the intrinsic layers are nonhomogeneous as compared to homogeneous intrinsic layers. However, electrical simulations showed that a new approach to modeling is needed that can take into account the continuously varying bandgap instead of considering it as piecewise uniform.

  1. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance bragg reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Lear, Kevin L.

    1996-01-01

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors.

  2. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance Bragg reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Lear, K.L.

    1996-10-22

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method are disclosed. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors. 16 figs.

  3. Performance Study of a Double-Pass Thermoelectric Solar Air Collector with Flat-Plate Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lertsatitthanakorn, C.; Rungsiyopas, M.; Therdyothin, A.; Soponronnarit, S.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper the results of the influence of flat-plate reflectors made of aluminum foil on the performance of a double-pass thermoelectric (TE) solar air collector are presented. The proposed TE solar collector with reflectors was composed of transparent glass, an air gap, an absorber plate, TE modules, a rectangular fin heat sink, and two flat-plate reflectors. The flat-plate reflectors were placed on two sides of the TE solar collector (east and west directions). The TE solar collector was installed on a one-axis sun-tracking system to obtain high solar radiation. Direct and reflected incident solar radiation heats up the absorber plate so that a temperature difference is created across the TE modules to generate a direct current. Only a small part of the absorbed solar radiation is converted to electricity, while the rest increases the temperature of the absorber plate. Ambient air flows through the heat sink located in the lower channel to gain heat. The heated air then flows to the upper channel, where it receives additional heating from the absorber plate. Improvements to the thermal energy and electrical power outputs of the system can be achieved by the use of the double-pass collector system with reflectors and TE technology. It was found that the optimum position of the reflectors is 60°, which gave significantly higher thermal energy and electrical power outputs compared with the TE solar collector without reflectors.

  4. Air-core hollow optical waveguides with omnidirectional reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shih-Shou; Chen, Chii-Chang

    2006-04-01

    We have designed and fabricated a hollow optical waveguide with omnidirectional reflectors (ODRs) on a silicon substrate. The pattern is defined by photolithography on a (100) silicon wafer. The groove is etched by inductive coupled plasma. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technology is used to deposit six-pair Si/SiO2 (0.111/0.258 µm) multilayer stacks on the sample. Finally, the top of the sample is covered with an identical ODR. Hence, the light is confined in a hollow waveguide.

  5. Performance Study of Thermoelectric Solar-Assisted Heat Pump with Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lertsatitthanakorn, C.; Soponronnarit, S.; Jamradloedluk, J.; Rungsiyopas, M.; Sarachitti, R.

    2014-06-01

    The simultaneous conversion of solar radiation into thermal and electrical energy in a thermoelectric (TE) solar-assisted heat pump is, for the purposes of this study, referred to as hybrid conversion. To capture more thermal and electrical energy, flat-plate reflectors have been mounted on a TE solar collector. To obtain higher solar radiation intensity on the TE solar collector, the position of the reflectors has been changed and the optimal position of the reflectors determined by both experimental measurements and numerical calculation so as to obtain maximal concentration of solar radiation intensity. The calculated values have been found to be in good agreement with measured ones. Improvements to the thermal energy and electrical power outputs of the system can be achieved by the use of the TE solar-assisted heat pump with reflectors. For the optimum position of the reflectors, the coefficient of performance (COP) of the system formed from a TE solar collector integrated with a heat pump (TESC-HP) was 5.60. The power output and conversion efficiency of the TE modules can reach 10.09 W and 2.40%, respectively, being improved by 34.5% and 18.2%, respectively, compared with the TESC-HP without reflectors.

  6. Inflatable Reflector For Solar Power And Radio Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sercel, Joel; Gilchriest, Carl; Ewell, Rich; Herman, Martin; Rascoe, Daniel L.; Nesmith, Bill J.

    1995-01-01

    Report proposes installation of lightweight inflatable reflector structure aboard spacecraft required to both derive power from sunlight and communicate with Earth by radio when apparent position of Earth is at manageably small angle from line of sight to Sun. Structure contains large-aperture paraboloidal reflector aimed toward Sun and concentrates sunlight onto photovoltaic power converter and acts as main reflector of spacecraft radio-communication system.

  7. The feasibility of solar reflector production from lunar materials for solar power in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) investigated the feasibility of producing solar reflectors from indigenous lunar materials for solar power production on the moon. First, lunar construction materials and production processes were reviewed, and candidate materials for reflector production were identified. At the same time, lunar environmental conditions were reviewed for their effect on production of concentrators. Next, conceptual designs and fabrication methods were proposed and studied for production of dish concentrators and heliostats. Finally, fabrication testing was performed on small-scale models using earth analogs of lunar materials. Findings from this initial investigation indicate that production of concentrators from lunar materials may be an attractive approach for solar energy production on the moon. Further design and testing are required to determine the best techniques and approaches to optimize this concept. Four materials were identified as having high potential for solar reflector manufacture. These baseline materials were foamed glass, concrete with glass-fiber reinforcement, a glass-fiber/glass-melt composite, and an iron-glass sintered material.

  8. The feasibility of solar reflector production from lunar materials for solar power in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) investigated the feasibility of producing solar reflectors from indigenous lunar materials for solar power production on the moon. First, lunar construction materials and production processes were reviewed, and candidate materials for reflector production were identified. At the same time, lunar environmental conditions were reviewed for their effect on production of concentrators. Next, conceptual designs and fabrication methods were proposed and studied for production of dish concentrators and heliostats. Finally, fabrication testing was performed on small-scale models using earth analogs of lunar materials. Findings from this initial investigation indicate that production of concentrators from lunar materials may be an attractive approach for solar energy production on the moon. Further design and testing are required to determine the best techniques and approaches to optimize this concept. Four materials were identified as having high potential for solar reflector manufacture. These baseline materials were foamed glass, concrete with glass-fiber reinforcement, a glass-fiber/glass-melt composite, and an iron-glass sintered material.

  9. Optical and Durability Evaluation for Silvered Polymeric Mirrors and Reflectors: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number, CRD-08-316

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M.

    2014-08-01

    3M is currently developing silvered polymeric mirror reflectors as low-cost replacements for glass mirrors in concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. This effort is focused on development of reflectors comprising both metallized polymeric mirror films based on improved versions of ECP-305+ or other durable mirror film concepts and appropriate mechanically robust substrates. The objectives for this project are to reduce the system capital and operating costs and to lower the levelized cost of energy for CSP installations. The development of mirror reflectors involves work on both full reflectors and mirror films with and without coatings. Mirror reflectors must meet rigid optical specifications in terms of radius of curvature, slope errors and specularity. Mirror films must demonstrate long-term durability and maintain high reflectivity. 3M would like to augment internal capabilities to validate product performance with methods and tools developed at NREL to address these areas.

  10. Optical absorptions in ZnO/a-Si distributed Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aqing; Chen, Zhian; Zhu, Kaigui; Ji, Zhenguo

    2017-01-01

    The distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) consisting of alternating layers of ZnO and heavy doped amorphous silicon (a-Si) have been fabricated by magnetron sputtering. It is novel to find that the optical absorptions exist in the stopband of the DBRs, and that many discrete strong optical absorption peaks exist in the wavelength range of visible to near-infrared. The calculated results by FDTD show that the absorptions in the stopband mainly exist in the first a-Si layer, and that the light absorbed by other a-Si layers inside contributes to the two absorption peaks in near-infrared range. The strong absorptions ranged from visible to infrared open new possibilities to the enhancement of the performance of amorphous silicon solar cells.

  11. Main-Reflector Manufacturing Technology for the Deep Space Optical Communications Ground Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britcliffe, M. J.; Hoppe, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) has plans to develop a 10-m-diameter optical communications receiving station. The system uses the direct detection technique, which has much different requirements from a typical astronomical telescope. The receiver must operate in daylight and nighttime conditions. This imposes special requirements on the optical system to reject stray light from the Sun and other sources. One of the biggest challenges is designing a main-reflector surface that meets these requirements and can be produced at a reasonable cost. The requirements for the performance of the reflector are presented. To date, an aspherical primary reflector has been assumed. A reflector with a spherical reflector has a major cost advantage over an aspherical design, with no sacrifice in performance. A survey of current manufacturing techniques for optical mirrors of this type was performed. Techniques including solid glass, lightweight glass, diamond-turned aluminum, and composite mirrors were investigated.

  12. Structural Characterization of a Mo/Ru/Si Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Reflector by Optical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, In-Yong; Kim, Tae Geun; Lee, Seung Yoon; Ahn, Jinho; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2004-06-01

    The performance of a multilayer extreme ultraviolet (EUV) reflector has a direct bearing on process throughput and the cost of new technology. Using measured data from an experimentally manufactured reflector, we intend, in this work, to show that the reflectivity of the Bragg reflector can be characterized by using structural parameters such as the d-spacing, density, thicknesses of the interdiffusion layers and oxidation layer. This quantitative analysis of the reflectivity derived from the structural parameters can be utilized to optimize the optical properties of the existing Mo/Ru/Si system and to provide fundamental insights into the science involved in a Bragg EUV reflector.

  13. Theoretical modeling of the dynamics of a semiconductor laser subject to double-reflector optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakry, A.; Abdulrhmann, S.; Ahmed, M.

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically model the dynamics of semiconductor lasers subject to the double-reflector feedback. The proposed model is a new modification of the time-delay rate equations of semiconductor lasers under the optical feedback to account for this type of the double-reflector feedback. We examine the influence of adding the second reflector to dynamical states induced by the single-reflector feedback: periodic oscillations, period doubling, and chaos. Regimes of both short and long external cavities are considered. The present analyses are done using the bifurcation diagram, temporal trajectory, phase portrait, and fast Fourier transform of the laser intensity. We show that adding the second reflector attracts the periodic and perioddoubling oscillations, and chaos induced by the first reflector to a route-to-continuous-wave operation. During this operation, the periodic-oscillation frequency increases with strengthening the optical feedback. We show that the chaos induced by the double-reflector feedback is more irregular than that induced by the single-reflector feedback. The power spectrum of this chaos state does not reflect information on the geometry of the optical system, which then has potential for use in chaotic (secure) optical data encryption.

  14. Broadband photocurrent enhancement in a-Si:H solar cells with plasmonic back reflectors.

    PubMed

    Morawiec, Seweryn; Mendes, Manuel J; Filonovich, Sergej A; Mateus, Tiago; Mirabella, Salvatore; Aguas, Hugo; Ferreira, Isabel; Simone, Francesca; Fortunato, Elvira; Martins, Rodrigo; Priolo, Francesco; Crupi, Isodiana

    2014-06-30

    Plasmonic light trapping in thin film silicon solar cells is a promising route to achieve high efficiency with reduced volumes of semiconductor material. In this paper, we study the enhancement in the opto-electronic performance of thin a-Si:H solar cells due to the light scattering effects of plasmonic back reflectors (PBRs), composed of self-assembled silver nanoparticles (NPs), incorporated on the cells' rear contact. The optical properties of the PBRs are investigated according to the morphology of the NPs, which can be tuned by the fabrication parameters. By analyzing sets of solar cells built on distinct PBRs we show that the photocurrent enhancement achieved in the a-Si:H light trapping window (600 - 800 nm) stays in linear relation with the PBRs diffuse reflection. The best-performing PBRs allow a pronounced broadband photocurrent enhancement in the cells which is attributed not only to the plasmon-assisted light scattering from the NPs but also to the front surface texture originated from the conformal growth of the cell material over the particles. As a result, remarkably high values of J(sc) and V(oc) are achieved in comparison to those previously reported in the literature for the same type of devices.

  15. High efficient radiation stable AlGaAs/GaAs solar cells with internal Bragg reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreev, V. M.; Kalinovsky, V. S.; Komin, V. V.; Kochnev, I. V.; Lantratov, V. M.; Shvarts, M. Z.

    1995-01-01

    An investigation of solar cells based on AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures with an internal Bragg reflector as the back-surface reflector is presented. The Bragg reflector is grown by low pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on n-GaAs substrates in a horizontal resistively heated reactor. The Bragg reflector with its maximum reflectance centered at a wavelength of 860 nm consists of 12 pairs of AlAs/GaAs layers. The resulting Bragg reflector has a thickness of 0.072 micrometers for AlAs and 0.059 micrometers for GaAs. The multi-layered quasi-dielectric stack selectively reflects weakly absorbed photons with energies near to the GaAs band gap for a second pass through the photoactive region, thus increasing the photocurrent. The use of the Bragg reflector allows the external quantum efficiency to be increased in the long wavelength of the spectrum. The use of the Bragg reflector and an antireflective coating and prismatic cover allowed an efficiency of 23.4 percent to be obtained.

  16. Drive system and readout characteristics of micro-reflector optical disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Kimihiro; Horigome, Toshihiro; Miyamoto, Hirotaka; Yamatsu, Hisayuki; Tanabe, Norihiro; Hayashi, Kunihiko; Fujita, Goro; Kobayashi, Seiji; Kudo, Takao; Uchiyama, Hiroshi

    2007-06-01

    This paper reviews the analyses and the experimental results of Micro-reflector optical disc system. In Micro-reflector optical disc, data are recorded on multiple virtual planes in a monolithic holographic medium. We have demonstrated the possibility of huge capacity from our analyses of readout characteristics of the Micro-reflector. In addition, we have developed the five-axis servo control system in order to achieve precise control of two counter-propagating light spots in recording media. Using this system, we succeeded in four-layer recording/readout.

  17. Bichromatic tuning of reflection bands in integrated CLC reflectors for optical switches, gates, and logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shing-Trong; Fuh, Andy Ying-Guey; Ho, Shau-Jung; Li, Ming-Shian

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates the bichromatic tuning of cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) reflection bands from reflectors containing chiral azo dopants. Because the chiral azo molecules change their helical twist power in reversible photoisomerization, the reflection bands of the CLCs are modulated using purple and green laser beams. The CLC reflectors are integrated into an optical gate that can be used to modulate output spectra. We also apply the integrated system in optical switching and logic.

  18. Solar Adaptive Optics.

    PubMed

    Rimmele, Thomas R; Marino, Jose

    Adaptive optics (AO) has become an indispensable tool at ground-based solar telescopes. AO enables the ground-based observer to overcome the adverse effects of atmospheric seeing and obtain diffraction limited observations. Over the last decade adaptive optics systems have been deployed at major ground-based solar telescopes and revitalized ground-based solar astronomy. The relatively small aperture of solar telescopes and the bright source make solar AO possible for visible wavelengths where the majority of solar observations are still performed. Solar AO systems enable diffraction limited observations of the Sun for a significant fraction of the available observing time at ground-based solar telescopes, which often have a larger aperture than equivalent space based observatories, such as HINODE. New ground breaking scientific results have been achieved with solar adaptive optics and this trend continues. New large aperture telescopes are currently being deployed or are under construction. With the aid of solar AO these telescopes will obtain observations of the highly structured and dynamic solar atmosphere with unprecedented resolution. This paper reviews solar adaptive optics techniques and summarizes the recent progress in the field of solar adaptive optics. An outlook to future solar AO developments, including a discussion of Multi-Conjugate AO (MCAO) and Ground-Layer AO (GLAO) will be given.

  19. The Abacus/Reflector and Integrated Symmetrical Concentrator: Concepts for Space Solar Power Collection and Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrington, Connie; Fikes, John; Gerry, Mark; Perkinson, Don

    2000-01-01

    New energy sources are vital for the development of emerging nations, and the growth of industry in developed economies. Also vital is the need for these energy sources to be clean and renewable. For the past several years, NASA has been taking a new look at collecting solar energy in space and transmitting it to Earth, to planetary surfaces, and to orbiting spacecraft. Several innovative concepts are being studied for the space segment component of solar power beaming. One is the Abacus/Reflector, a large sun-oriented array structure fixed to the transmitter, and a rotating RF reflector that tracks a receiving rectenna on Earth. This concept eliminates the need for power-conducting slip rings in rotating joints between the solar collectors and the transmitter. Another concept is the Integrated Symmetrical Concentrator (ISC), composed of two very large segmented reflectors which rotate to collect and reflect the incident sunlight onto two centrally-located photovoltaic arrays. Adjacent to the PV arrays is the RF transmitter, which as a unit track the receiving rectenna, again eliminating power-conducting joints, and in addition reducing the cable lengths between the arrays and transmitter. The metering structure to maintain the position of the reflectors is a long mast, oriented perpendicular to the equatorial orbit plane. This paper presents a status of ongoing systems studies and configurations for the Abacus/Reflector and the ISC concepts, and a top-level study of packaging for launch and assembly.

  20. Flexible a-Si:H Solar Cells with Spontaneously Formed Parabolic Nanostructures on a Hexagonal-Pyramid Reflector.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wan Jae; Yoo, Chul Jong; Cho, Hyoung Won; Kim, Kyoung-Bo; Kim, Moojin; Lee, Jong-Lam

    2015-04-24

    Flexible amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells with high photoconversion efficiency (PCE) are demonstrated by embedding hexagonal pyramid nanostructures below a Ag/indium tin oxide (ITO) reflector. The nanostructures constructed by nanoimprint lithography using soft materials allow the top ITO electrode to spontaneously form parabolic nanostructures. Nanoimprint lithography using soft materials is simple, and is conducted at low temperature. The resulting structure has excellent durability under repeated bending, and thus, flexible nanostructures are successfully constructed on flexible a-Si:H solar cells on plastic film. The nanoimprinted pyramid back reflector provides a high angular light scattering with haze reflectance >98% throughout the visible spectrum. The spontaneously formed parabolic nanostructure on the top surface of the a-Si:H solar cells both reduces reflection and scatters incident light into the absorber layer, thereby elongating the optical path length. As a result, the nanopatterned a-Si:H solar cells, fabricated on polyethersulfone (PES) film, exhibit excellent mechanical flexibility and PCE increased by 48% compared with devices on a flat substrate.

  1. See-through dye-sensitized solar cells: photonic reflectors for tandem and building integrated photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Heiniger, Leo-Philipp; O'Brien, Paul G; Soheilnia, Navid; Yang, Yang; Kherani, Nazir P; Grätzel, Michael; Ozin, Geoffrey A; Tétreault, Nicolas

    2013-10-25

    See-through dye-sensitized solar cells with 1D photonic crystal Bragg reflector photoanodes show an increase in peak external quantum efficiency of 47% while still maintaining high fill factors, resulting in an almost 40% increase in power conversion efficiency. These photoanodes are ideally suited for tandem and building integrated photovoltaics.

  2. Diffuse reflectors for improving light management in solar cells: a review and outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barugkin, Chog; Beck, Fiona J.; Catchpole, Kylie R.

    2017-01-01

    Pigment based diffuse reflectors (DRs) have several advantages over metal reflectors such as good stability, high reflectivity, and low parasitic absorption. As such, DRs have the potential to be applied on high efficiency silicon solar cells and further increase the power conversion efficiency. In this paper, we perform a thorough review on the notable achievements to date of DRs’ application for photovoltaics. We outline unique attributes of these technologies and discuss the theoretical and laboratory development working towards overcoming the challenges of transferring to high efficiency silicon solar cells. In order to understand the potential of DRs for high efficiency silicon solar cells, we provide a qualitative analysis of the impact of front reflection, rear absorption and the angular distribution on the useful light absorption in silicon wafers. By including this discussion, we provide an outlook for the application of DR in reaching maximum photo-current for high efficiency silicon solar cells.

  3. Optical measurements pertaining to Space Station solar dynamic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holly, S.; Springer, T.; Jefferies, K. S.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Station solar dynamic power system is a hybrid of solar photovoltaic and solar dynamic systems, the latter of which uses a parabolic reflector to collect solar energy. This paper describes analytical results of an off-axis solar illumination on the intensity distribution in arbitrary target planes perpendicular to the axis of a parabolic reflector. Such computational capability would make it possible to predict optical intensity distributions resulting from off-axis angles of incident radiation on such target planes. To validate the computer code, experimental optical measurements were performed on the multifaceted paraboloidal collecor at the Solar Dynamic Test Facility at Rockedyne's Santa Susana Field Laboratory. The experimental data compared reasonably well with the calculated values.

  4. Application of the theory of coupled waves for analysis of inclined reflectors in optical waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Kolosovskii, E A; Tsarev, A V

    2008-09-30

    A new method for analysing the transmission and scattering of the guided TE mode in an inclined reflector located in an optical waveguide is proposed and studied. The reflection of an inhomogeneous optical beam from the inclined reflector is described semi-analytically for the first time by using the theory of coupled waves and taking into account the interrelation and transformation of energy between all the waves of the discrete and continuous spectra of the optical 2D-waveguide (even and odd guided, radiation, and evanescent waves). The results of calculations of the propagation of light through the inclined reflector in the form of a thin (10-500 nm) homogeneous strip obtained by our method and by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method are in excellent quantitative agreement. The calculation rate of our method considerably (by one-two orders of magnitude) exceeds that of the FDTD method and our method has a better accuracy. (optical waveguides)

  5. Optically-free-standing InGaN microdisks with metallic reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuhui; To, Chap Hang; Choi, Hoi Wai

    2017-01-01

    The optical properties of free-standing thin-film microdisks with NiAg metallic reflectors are compared with those with an indium tin oxide (ITO) interfacial layer. The microdisks have been fabricated by a combination of microsphere lithography and laser lift-off processes. Optical-pumped lasing from the microdisk with NiAg reflector has been observed, with reduced threshold and higher quality factor compared those with ITO layers, attributed to improved optical confinement due to the reflectivity of the Ag coating. The results are supported by three-dimensional (3D) finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) simulations.

  6. Solar receiver heliostat reflector having a linear drive and position information system

    DOEpatents

    Horton, Richard H.

    1980-01-01

    A heliostat for a solar receiver system comprises an improved drive and control system for the heliostat reflector assembly. The heliostat reflector assembly is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e., heat receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The improved drive system includes linear stepping motors which comprise low weight, low cost, electronic pulse driven components. One embodiment comprises linear stepping motors controlled by a programmed, electronic microprocessor. Another embodiment comprises a tape driven system controlled by a position control magnetic tape.

  7. Solar receiver heliostat reflector having a linear drive and position information system

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, R.H.

    1980-03-11

    A heliostat for a solar receiver system comprises an improved drive and control system for the heliostat reflector assembly. The heliostat reflector assembly is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e., heat receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The improved drive system includes linear stepping motors which comprise low weight, low cost, electronic pulse driven components. One embodiment comprises linear stepping motors controlled by a programmed, electronic microprocessor. Another embodiment comprises a tape driven system controlled by a position control magnetic tape. 11 figs.

  8. The solar optical telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Objectives of the Solar Optical Telescope are to study the physics of the Sun on the scale at which many of the important physical processes occur and to attain a resolution of 73km on the Sun or 0.1 arc seconds of angular resolution. Topics discussed in this overview of the Solar Optical Telescope include: why is the Solar Optical Telescope needed; current picture of the Sun's atmosphere and convection zone; scientific problems for the Solar Optical Telescope; a description of the telescope; the facility - science management, contamination control, and accessibility to the instruments; the scientific instruments - a coordinated instrument package for unlocking the Sun's secrets; parameters of the coordinated instrument package; science operations from the Space Shuttle; and the dynamic solar atmosphere.

  9. Analysis of a generalized dual reflector antenna system using physical optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Lagin, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    Reflector antennas are widely used in communication satellite systems because they provide high gain at low cost. Offset-fed single paraboloids and dual reflector offset Cassegrain and Gregorian antennas with multiple focal region feeds provide a simple, blockage-free means of forming multiple, shaped, and isolated beams with low sidelobes. Such antennas are applicable to communications satellite frequency reuse systems and earth stations requiring access to several satellites. While the single offset paraboloid has been the most extensively used configuration for the satellite multiple-beam antenna, the trend toward large apertures requiring minimum scanned beam degradation over the field of view 18 degrees for full earth coverage from geostationary orbit may lead to impractically long focal length and large feed arrays. Dual reflector antennas offer packaging advantages and more degrees of design freedom to improve beam scanning and cross-polarization properties. The Cassegrain and Gregorian antennas are the most commonly used dual reflector antennas. A computer program for calculating the secondary pattern and directivity of a generalized dual reflector antenna system was developed and implemented at LeRC. The theoretical foundation for this program is based on the use of physical optics methodology for describing the induced currents on the sub-reflector and main reflector. The resulting induced currents on the main reflector are integrated to obtain the antenna far-zone electric fields. The computer program is verified with other physical optics programs and with measured antenna patterns. The comparison shows good agreement in far-field sidelobe reproduction and directivity.

  10. Quantum efficiency enhancement in selectively transparent silicon thin film solar cells by distributed Bragg reflectors.

    PubMed

    Kuo, M Y; Hsing, J Y; Chiu, T T; Li, C N; Kuo, W T; Lay, T S; Shih, M H

    2012-11-05

    This work demonstrated a-Si:H thin-film solar cells with backside TiO(2)/ SiO(2) distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) for applications involving building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPVs). Selectively transparent solar cells are formed by adjusting the positions of the DBR stop bands to allow the transmission of certain parts of light through the solar cells. Measurement and simulation results indicate that the transmission of blue light (430 ~500 nm) with the combination of three DBR mirrors has the highest increase in conversion efficiency.

  11. Quantum efficiency enhancement in selectively transparent silicon thin film solar cells by distributed Bragg reflectors.

    PubMed

    Kuo, M Y; Hsing, J Y; Chiu, T T; Li, C N; Kuo, W T; Lay, T S; Shih, M H

    2012-11-05

    This work demonstrated a-Si:H thin-film solar cells with backside TiO(2) / SiO(2) distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) for applications involving building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPVs). Selectively transparent solar cells are formed by adjusting the positions of the DBR stop bands to allow the transmission of certain parts of light through the solar cells. Measurement and simulation results indicate that the transmission of blue light (430 ~500 nm) with the combination of three DBR mirrors has the highest increase in conversion efficiency.

  12. Low Earth orbit atomic oxygen simulation for durability evaluation of solar reflector surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the performance and durability of solar reflector surfaces in the atomic oxygen environment typical of low Earth orbit (LEO), one must expose the reflector surface either directly to LEO or to ground-laboratory atomic oxygen environments. Although actual LEO exposures are most desired, such opportunities are typically scarce, expensive, and of limited duration. As a result, ground-laboratory exposures must be relied upon as the most practical long-term durability evaluation technique. Plasma ashers are widely used as LEO simulation facilities by producing atomic oxygen environments for durability evaluation of potential spacecraft materials. Atomic oxygen arrival differs between ground and space exposure in that plasma asher exposure produces isotropic arrival and space solar tracking produces sweeping arrival. Differences in initial impact reaction probability occur, dependent upon the energy and species existing in these environments. Due to the variations in ground-laboratory and space atomic oxygen, quantification of in-space performance based on plasma asher testing is not straightforward. The various atomic oxygen interactions that can occur with reflector surfaces, such as undercutting in organic substrates at protective coating defect sites, ground-laboratory techniques recommended for evaluating the atomic oxygen durability of reflectors based on asher exposures, and computational techniques which make use of ground-laboratory atomic oxygen exposure to predict in-space LEO durability are addressed.

  13. Integration of plasmonic Ag nanoparticles as a back reflector in ultra-thin Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Guanchao; Steigert, Alexander; Andrae, Patrick; Goebelt, Manuela; Latzel, Michael; Manley, Phillip; Lauermann, Iver; Christiansen, Silke; Schmid, Martina

    2015-11-01

    Integration of plasmonic Ag nanoparticles as a back reflector in ultra-thin Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) solar cells is investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results show that Ag nanoparticles underneath a Sn:In2O3 back contact could not be thermally passivated even at a low substrate temperature of 440 °C during CIGSe deposition. It is shown that a 50 nm thick Al2O3 film prepared by atomic layer deposition is able to block the diffusion of Ag, clearing the thermal obstacle in utilizing Ag nanoparticles as a back reflector in ultra-thin CIGSe solar cells. Via 3-D finite element optical simulation, it is proved that the Ag nanoparticles show the potential to contribute the effective absorption in CIGSe solar cells.

  14. Sharply bent hollow optical waveguides formed by an omni-directional reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hua-Kung; Hsu, Chih-Ming; Lo, Shih-Shou; Chen, Chii-Chang; Lee, Chien-Chieh

    2009-10-01

    In this work, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally the air core bent optical waveguide composed of omni-directional reflectors on a silicon substrate. Amorphous silicon and silicon oxide are used for high index-contrast Bragg reflectors. The transmission efficiency of power for the bent optical waveguide with various bending angles of 1°-90° is calculated by the two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method and the three-dimensional beam propagation method. The sample is measured using the end-butt method. The device exhibits a lower polarization dependent loss at the operation wavelength of 1550 nm.

  15. Design and optimization of ultrathin crystalline silicon solar cells using an efficient back reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, S.; Dubey, R. S.; Kalainathan, S.; More, M. A.; Gautam, D. K.

    2015-05-01

    Thin film solar cells are cheaper but having low absorption in longer wavelength and hence, an effective light trapping mechanism is essential. In this work, we proposed an ultrathin crystalline silicon solar cell which showed extraordinary performance due to enhanced light absorption in visible and infrared part of solar spectrum. Various designing parameters such as number of distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) pairs, anti-reflection layer thickness, grating thickness, active layer thickness, grating duty cycle and period were optimized for the optimal performance of solar cell. An ultrathin silicon solar cell with 40 nm active layer could produce an enhancement in cell efficiency ˜15 % and current density ˜23 mA/cm2. This design approach would be useful for the realization of new generation of solar cells with reduced active layer thickness.

  16. Mechanical behaviour of tape springs used in the deployment of reflectors around a solar panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewalque, Florence; Collette, Jean-Paul; Brüls, Olivier

    2016-06-01

    In order to increase the production of power on small satellites, solar panels are commonly deployed and, in some cases, reflectors are added to improve the concentration factor on solar cells. In this work, reflectors are deployed by the means of compliant mechanisms known as tape springs. Their attractive characteristics are, among others, their passive behaviour, their self-locking capacity, their elastic deformations and their robustness. However, their mechanical behaviour is highly nonlinear and requires thorough analyses in order to develop predictive numerical models. It is shown here through parametric studies that the nonlinear behaviour of a tape spring is mainly governed by its geometry. Thus, for each specific application, its dimensions can be determined in order to minimise two critical features: the maximum stress affecting the structure and the maximum motion amplitude during deployment. In this paper, an optimisation procedure is proposed to meet these requirements.

  17. Intervening in Earth's climate system through space-based solar reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, F. J. T.; McInnes, C. R.; Winter, O. C.

    2016-07-01

    Several space-based climate engineering methods, including shading the Earth with a particle ring for active cooling, or the use of orbital reflectors to increase the total insolation of Mars for climate warming have been considered to modify planetary climates in a controller manner. In this study, solar reflectors on polar orbits are proposed to intervene in the Earth's climate system, involving near circular polar orbits normal to the ecliptic plane of the Earth. Similarly, a family of displaced polar orbits (non-Keplerian orbits) are also characterized to mitigate future natural climate variability, producing a modest global temperature increase, again to compensate for possible future cooling. These include deposition of aerosols in the stratosphere from large volcanic events. The two-body problem is considered, taking into account the effects of solar radiation pressure and the Earth's J2 oblateness perturbation.

  18. Advanced ultraviolet-resistant silver mirrors for use in solar reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, Gary J.; Gee, Randy

    2009-11-03

    A silver mirror construction that maintains a high percentage of hemispherical reflectance throughout the UV and visible spectrum when used in solar reflectors, comprising:a) a pressure sensitive adhesive layer positioned beneath a silver overlay;b) a polymer film disposed on the silver overlay;c) an adhesive layer positioned on the polymer film; andd) a UV screening acrylic film disposed on the adhesive layer.

  19. Method of manufacturing large dish reflectors for a solar concentrator apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Angel, Roger P [Tucson, AZ; Olbert, Blain H [Tucson, AZ

    2011-12-27

    A method of manufacturing monolithic glass reflectors for concentrating sunlight in a solar energy system is disclosed. The method of manufacturing allows large monolithic glass reflectors to be made from float glass in order to realize significant cost savings on the total system cost for a solar energy system. The method of manufacture includes steps of heating a sheet of float glass positioned over a concave mold until the sheet of glass sags and stretches to conform to the shape of the mold. The edges of the dish-shaped glass are rolled for structural stiffening around the periphery. The dish-shaped glass is then silvered to create a dish-shaped mirror that reflects solar radiation to a focus. The surface of the mold that contacts the float glass preferably has a grooved surface profile comprising a plurality of cusps and concave valleys. This grooved profile minimizes the contact area and marring of the specular glass surface, reduces parasitic heat transfer into the mold and increases mold lifetime. The disclosed method of manufacture is capable of high production rates sufficiently fast to accommodate the output of a conventional float glass production line so that monolithic glass reflectors can be produced as quickly as a float glass production can make sheets of float glass to be used in the process.

  20. Design of Semiconductor-Based Back Reflectors for High Voc Monolithic Multijunction Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, I.; Geisz, J.; Steiner, M.; Olson, J.; Friedman, D.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-06-01

    State-of-the-art multijunction cell designs have the potential for significant improvement before going to higher number of junctions. For example, the Voc can be substantially increased if the photon recycling taking place in the junctions is enhanced. This has already been demonstrated (by Alta Devices) for a GaAs single-junction cell. For this, the loss of re-emitted photons by absorption in the underlying layers or substrate must be minimized. Selective back surface reflectors are needed for this purpose. In this work, different architectures of semiconductor distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR) are assessed as the appropriate choice for application in monolithic multijunction solar cells. Since the photon re-emission in the photon recycling process is spatially isotropic, the effect of the incident angle on the reflectance spectrum is of central importance. In addition, the DBR structure must be designed taking into account its integration into the monolithic multijunction solar cells, concerning series resistance, growth economics, and other issues. We analyze the tradeoffs in DBR design complexity with all these requirements to determine if such a reflector is suitable to improve multijunction solar cells.

  1. Bifocal dual reflector antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. L. J.

    1973-01-01

    A bifocal dual reflector antenna is similar to and has better scan capability than classical cassegrain reflector antenna. The method used in determining the reflector surfaces is a modification of a design method for the dielectric bifocal lens. The three dimensional dual reflector is obtained by first designing an exact (in geometrical optics sense) two-point corrected two dimensional reflector and then rotating it around its axis of symmetry. A point by point technique is used in computing the reflector surfaces. Computed radiation characteristics of the dual reflector are compared with those of a cassegrain reflector. The results confirm that the bifocal antenna has superior performance.

  2. Solar tomography adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Ren, Deqing; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhang, Xi; Dou, Jiangpei; Zhao, Gang

    2014-03-10

    Conventional solar adaptive optics uses one deformable mirror (DM) and one guide star for wave-front sensing, which seriously limits high-resolution imaging over a large field of view (FOV). Recent progress toward multiconjugate adaptive optics indicates that atmosphere turbulence induced wave-front distortion at different altitudes can be reconstructed by using multiple guide stars. To maximize the performance over a large FOV, we propose a solar tomography adaptive optics (TAO) system that uses tomographic wave-front information and uses one DM. We show that by fully taking advantage of the knowledge of three-dimensional wave-front distribution, a classical solar adaptive optics with one DM can provide an extra performance gain for high-resolution imaging over a large FOV in the near infrared. The TAO will allow existing one-deformable-mirror solar adaptive optics to deliver better performance over a large FOV for high-resolution magnetic field investigation, where solar activities occur in a two-dimensional field up to 60'', and where the near infrared is superior to the visible in terms of magnetic field sensitivity.

  3. High Temperature Solar Reflector, Its Preparation and Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A coating-substrate combination having high specular reflectivity at high temperatures reaching 8000 C in a vacuum is described. The substrate comprises pure nickel metal or a nickel-containing metal alloy such as stainless steel having a highly polished reflective surface. The coating is a layer of silver deposited on the substrate to a thickness of 300 A to 3000 A. A 300 A to 5000 A protective coating of silica, alumina or magnesium fluoride is used to cover the silver and to protect it from oxidation. The combination is useful as a parabolic shaped secondary concentrator for collecting solar radiation for generating power or thermal energy for satellite uses. The reflective layer and protective coating preferably are applied to the reflective surface of the substrate by electron beam evaporation or by ion sputtering.

  4. Analysis of a dual-reflector antenna system using physical optics and digital computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    The application of physical-optics diffraction theory to a deployable dual-reflector geometry is discussed. The methods employed are not restricted to the Conical-Gregorian antenna, but apply in a general way to dual and even multiple reflector systems. Complex vector wave methods are used in the Fresnel and Fraunhofer regions of the reflectors. Field amplitude, phase, polarization data, and time average Poynting vectors are obtained via an IBM 360/91 digital computer. Focal region characteristics are plotted with the aid of a CalComp plotter. Comparison between the GSFC Huygens wavelet approach, JPL measurements, and JPL computer results based on the near field spherical wave expansion method are made wherever possible.

  5. Innovative Solar Optical Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampert, Carl M.

    1984-02-01

    A variety of optical coatings are discussed in the context of solar energy utilization. Well-known coatings such as transparent conductors (heat mirrors), selective absorbers, and reflective films are surveyed briefly. Emphasis is placed on the materials' limitations and on use of lesser-known optical coatings and materials. Physical and optical properties are detailed for protective antireflection films, cold mirrors, fluorescent concentrator materials, radiative cooling surfaces, and optical switching films including electrochromic, thermochromic, photochromic, and liquid crystal types. For many of these materials, research has only recently been considered, so various design and durability issues need to be addressed.

  6. Photovoltaic generator with a spherical imaging lens for use with a paraboloidal solar reflector

    DOEpatents

    Angel, Roger P

    2013-01-08

    The invention is a generator for photovoltaic conversion of concentrated sunlight into electricity. A generator according to the invention incorporates a plurality of photovoltaic cells and is intended for operation near the focus of a large paraboloidal reflector pointed at the sun. Within the generator, the entering concentrated light is relayed by secondary optics to the cells arranged in a compact, concave array. The light is delivered to the cells at high concentration, consistent with high photovoltaic conversion efficiency and low cell cost per unit power output. Light enters the generator, preferably first through a sealing window, and passes through a field lens, preferably in the form of a full sphere or ball lens centered on the paraboloid focus. This lens forms a concentric, concave and wide-angle image of the primary reflector, where the intensity of the concentrated light is stabilized against changes in the position of concentrated light entering the generator. Receiving the stabilized light are flat photovoltaic cells made in different shapes and sizes and configured in a concave array corresponding to the concave image of a given primary reflector. Photovoltaic cells in a generator are also sized and interconnected so as to provide a single electrical output that remains high and stable, despite aberrations in the light delivered to the generator caused by, for example, mispointing or bending of the primary reflector. In some embodiments, the cells are set back from the image formed by the ball lens, and part of the light is reflected onto each cell small secondary reflectors in the form of mirrors set around its perimeter.

  7. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data. Polisolar Model POL solar collector with glass reflector surface

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-05-01

    Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Polisolar Model POL solar collector, with glass reflector surfaces, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  8. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data. Toltec two-axis tracking solar collector with 3M acrylic polyester film reflector surface

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-06-01

    Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Toltec solar collector, with acrylic film reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  9. Development of optical ground verification method for μm to sub-mm reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockman, Y.; Thizy, C.; Lemaire, P.; Georges, M.; Mazy, E.; Mazzoli, A.; Houbrechts, Y.; Rochus, P.; Roose, S.; Doyle, D.; Ulbrich, G.

    2004-06-01

    Large reflectors and antennas for the IR to mm wavelength range are being planned for many Earth observation and astronomical space missions and for commercial communication satellites as well. Scientific observatories require large telescopes with precisely shaped reflectors for collecting the electro-magnetic radiation from faint sources. The challenging tasks of on-ground testing are to achieve the required accuracy in the measurement of the reflector shapes and antenna structures and to verify their performance under simulated space conditions (vacuum, low temperatures). Due to the specific surface characteristics of reflectors operating in these spectral regions, standard optical metrology methods employed in the visible spectrum do not provide useful measurement results. The current state-of-the-art commercial metrology systems are not able to measure these types of reflectors because they have to face the measurement of shape and waviness over relatively large areas with a large deformation dynamic range and encompassing a wide range of spatial frequencies. 3-D metrology (tactile coordinate measurement) machines are generally used during the manufacturing process. Unfortunately, these instruments cannot be used in the operational environmental conditions of the reflector. The application of standard visible wavelength interferometric methods is very limited or impossible due to the large relative surface roughnesses involved. A small number of infrared interferometers have been commercially developed over the last 10 years but their applications have also been limited due to poor dynamic range and the restricted spatial resolution of their detectors. These restrictions affect also the surface error slopes that can be captured and makes their application to surfaces manufactured using CRFP honeycomb technologies rather difficult or impossible. It has therefore been considered essential, from the viewpoint of supporting future ESA exploration missions, to

  10. Solar Energy Economics Revisited: The Promise and Challenge of Orbiting Reflectors for World Energy Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, Kenneth W.; Gilbreath, William P.; Bowen, Stuart W.

    1978-01-01

    A system of orbiting, large-area, low mass density reflector satellites which provide nearly continuous solar energy to a world-distributed set of conversion sites is examined under the criteria for any potential new energy system: technical feasibility, significant and renewable energy impact, economic feasibility and social/political acceptability. Although many technical issues need further study, reasonable advances in space technology appear sufficient to implement the system. The enhanced insolation is shown to greatly improve the economic competitiveness of solar-electric generation to circa 1995 fossil/nuclear alternatives. The system is shown to have the potential for supplying a significant fraction of future domestic and world energy needs. Finally, the environmental and social issues, including a means for financing such a large shift to a world solar energy dependence, is addressed.

  11. Improving the efficiency of thin film tandem solar cells by plasmonic intermediate reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahr, Stephan; Rockstuhl, Carsten; Lederer, Falk

    2010-09-01

    Thin film tandem solar cells made of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon provide renewable energy at the benefit of low material consumption. As a drawback, these materials do not posses the high carrier mobilities of their crystalline counterpart which limits the feasible material thickness. For maintaining the light absorption as high as possible, photon management is required. Here we show that metallic nanodiscs that sustain localized plasmon polaritons can increase the efficiency of such solar cells if they are incorporated into the dielectric intermediate reflector separating the top and the bottom cell. We provide quantitative estimates for the possible absorption enhancement of optimized bi-periodic nanodiscs that are feasible for fabrication. Emphasis is also put on discussing the impact of obliquely incident sun light on the solar cell performance.

  12. Asymmetrical cone-type secondary concentrators for Fresnel-type reflectors in solar towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spirkl, Wolfgang; Timinger, Andreas; Ries, Harald; Kribus, Abraham; Muschaweck, Julius A.

    1997-10-01

    In solar tower plants, where a rotationally symmetric field of heliostats surrounds the tower, an axisymmetric secondary concentrator such as a Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC) or a tailored concentrator or a cone is the obvious choice. For locations at higher latitudes, however, the reflecting area of the heliostats may be used more efficiently if the field of heliostats is located opposite to the sun as seen from the tower. Then the field is asymmetric with regard to the tower. In the case of an asymmetric field, an axisymmetric concentrator necessarily has a concentration significantly lower than the upper limit. Furthermore, the area on the ground from which a tilted axisymmetric concentrator accepts radiation is an ellipse, including also heliostats very distant to the tower producing a large image of the sun. Therefore we investigate asymmetric secondaries. From the shape of the edge ray reflectors constructed for rays in the central south-north plane we conclude that a skew cone reflector might be appropriate for the field and optimized its free parameters by means of raytracing. Asymmetric concentrators may increase the concentration by up to 25% at the same efficiency compared to optimized axisymmetric CPC or cone reflectors.

  13. Optical reflector coatings for astronomical applications from EUV to IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schürmann, Mark; Jobst, Paul Johannes; Yulin, Sergiy; Feigl, Torsten; Heiße, Hanno; Wilbrandt, Steffen; Stenzel, Olaf; Gebhardt, Andreas; Risse, Stefan; Kaiser, Norbert

    2012-09-01

    Optical coatings are an integral part of superior optical components. Astronomical applications (ground- and space-based) place especially high demands on these coatings, not only with regard to their optical performance but also to their mechanical and environmental stability, their thermal properties, and their radiation resistance. This article presents a short overview of several coating solutions developed in recent years at Fraunhofer IOF in order to meet the challenging demands of astronomical applications. The focus is placed on high reflective coatings for different wavelength regions including coatings for the VUV range below 100nm, coatings for the DUV wavelength range above 100nm and VIS/NIR/IR coatings. Further, amorphous silicon layers will be introduced which can be polished to very low roughness values and therefore can act as polishing layer for the manufacture of ultraprecise optical components from metal substrates.

  14. Angle amplifying optics using plane and ellipsoidal reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Alexander J.

    1977-01-01

    An optical system for providing a wide angle input beam into ellipsoidal laser fusion target illumination systems. The optical system comprises one or more pairs of centrally apertured plane and ellipsoidal mirrors disposed to accept the light input from a conventional lens of modest focal length and thickness, to increase the angular divergence thereof to a value equivalent to that of fast lenses, and to direct the light into the ellipsoidal target illumination system.

  15. A biological sub-micron thickness optical broadband reflector characterized using both light and microwaves.

    PubMed

    Vukusic, P; Kelly, R; Hooper, I

    2009-04-06

    Broadband optical reflectors generally function through coherent scattering from systems comprising one of three designs: overlapped; chirped; or chaotic multilayer reflectors. For each, the requirement to scatter a broad band of wavelengths is met through the presence of a variation in nanostructural periodicity running perpendicular to the systems' outer surfaces. Consequently, the requisite total thickness of the multilayer can often be in excess of 50 mum. Here, we report the discovery and the microwave-assisted characterization of a natural system that achieves excellent optical broadband reflectivity but that is less than 1 mum thick. This system, found on the wing scales of the butterfly Argyrophorus argenteus, comprises a distinctive variation in periodicity that runs parallel to the reflecting surface, rather than perpendicular to it. In this way, the requirement for an extensively thick system is removed.

  16. Fabrication and Thermo-Optical Properties of the MLS Composite Primary Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Paul B.; Dyer, Jack; Dummer, Sam

    2000-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) is a limb-sounding radiometer sensing emissions in the millimeter and sub-millimeter range. MLS will contribute to an understanding of atmospheric chemistry by assessing stratospheric and tropospheric ozone depletion, climate forcings and volcanic effects. The heart of the antenna is the primary reflector, constructed from graphite/cyanate composites in a facesheet/core construction. The reflector has an aperture of one square meter, a mass of 8.7 kilos and final figure accuracy of 4.37 microns rms. The surface is also modified to ensure RF reflectivity, prevent solar concentration and provide thermal balance to the spacecraft The surface is prepared by precision beadblasting, then coated with vapor deposited aluminum (VDA) and finally a layer of silicon suboxide (SiO(x)) to control the infrared emissivity. The resulting surface has a solar absorptance of 0.43 and an absorptance/emittance ratio of 1.3. BRDF analysis shows that 93% of the incident thermal energy is reflected outside a 10 degree angle of cone. For its mass and aperture, we believe this reflector to have the highest figure accuracy yet achieved in a composite antenna construction.

  17. Nonimaging optics maximizing exergy for hybrid solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winston, Roland; Jiang, Lun; Abdelhamid, Mahmoud; Widyolar, Bennett K.; Ferry, Jonathan; Cygan, David; Abbasi, Hamid; Kozlov, Alexandr; Kirk, Alexander; Elarde, Victor; Osowski, Mark

    2016-09-01

    The project team of University of California at Merced (UC-Merced), Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and MicroLink Devices Inc. (MicroLink) are developing a hybrid solar system using a nonimaging compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) that maximizes the exergy by delivering direct electricity and on-demand heat. The hybrid solar system technology uses secondary optics in a solar receiver to achieve high efficiency at high temperature, collects heat in particles and uses reflective liftoff cooled double junction (2J) InGaP/GaAs solar cells with backside infrared (IR) reflectors on the secondary optical element to raise exergy efficiency. The nonimaging optics provides additional concentration towards the high temperature thermal stream and enables it to operate efficiently at 650 °C while the solar cell is maintained at 40 °C to operate as efficiently as possible.

  18. Aperiodic and randomized dielectric mirrors: alternatives to metallic back reflectors for solar cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Albert; Zhong, Yan-Kai; Fu, Sze-Ming; Tseng, Chi Wei; Yan, Sheng Lun

    2014-05-05

    Dielectric mirrors have recently emerged for solar cells due to the advantages of lower cost, lower temperature processing, higher throughput, and zero plasmonic absorption as compared to conventional metallic counterparts. Nonetheless, in the past, efforts for incorporating dielectric mirrors into photovoltaics were not successful due to limited bandwidth and insufficient light scattering that prevented their wide usage. In this work, it is shown that the key for ultra-broadband dielectric mirrors is aperiodicity, or randomization. In addition, it has been proven that dielectric mirrors can be widely applicable to thin-film and thick wafer-based solar cells to provide for light trapping comparable to conventional metallic back reflectors at their respective optimal geometries. Finally, the near-field angular emission plot of Poynting vectors is conducted, and it further confirms the superior light-scattering property of dielectric mirrors, especially for diffuse medium reflectors, despite the absence of surface plasmon excitation. The preliminary experimental results also confirm the high feasibility of dielectric mirrors for photovoltaics.

  19. Reflector Technology Development and System Design for Concentrating Solar Power Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Schaut Philip Smith

    2011-12-30

    Alcoa began this program in March of 2008 with the goal of developing and validating an advanced CSP trough design to lower the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) as compared to existing glass based, space-frame trough technology. In addition to showing a pathway to a significant LCOE reduction, Alcoa also desired to create US jobs to support the emerging CSP industry. Alcoa's objective during Phase I: Concept Feasibility was to provide the DOE with a design approach that demonstrates significant overall system cost savings without sacrificing performance. Phase I consisted of two major tasks; reflector surface development and system concept development. Two specific reflective surface technologies were investigated, silver metallized lamination, and thin film deposition both applied on an aluminum substrate. Alcoa prepared samples; performed test validation internally; and provided samples to the NREL for full-spectrum reflectivity measurements. The final objective was to report reflectivity at t = 0 and the latest durability results as of the completion of Phase 1. The target criteria for reflectance and durability were as follows: (1) initial (t = 0), hemispherical reflectance >93%, (2) initial spectral reflectance >90% for 25-mrad reading and >87% for 7-mrad reading, and (3) predicted 20 year durability of less than 5% optical performance drop. While the results of the reflective development activities were promising, Alcoa was unable to down-select on a reflective technology that met the target criteria. Given the progress and potential of both silver film and thin film technologies, Alcoa continued reflector surface development activities in Phase II. The Phase I concept development activities began with acquiring baseline CSP system information from both CSP Services and the DOE. This information was used as the basis to develop conceptual designs through ideation sessions. The concepts were evaluated based on estimated cost and high-level structural

  20. Reflectivity quenching of ESR multilayer polymer film reflector in optically bonded scintillator arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loignon-Houle, Francis; Pepin, Catherine M.; Charlebois, Serge A.; Lecomte, Roger

    2017-04-01

    The 3M-ESR multilayer polymer film is a widely used reflector in scintillation detector arrays. As specified in the datasheet and confirmed experimentally by measurements in air, it is highly reflective (> 98 %) over the entire visible spectrum (400-1000 nm) for all angles of incidence. Despite these outstanding characteristics, it was previously found that light crosstalk between pixels in a bonded LYSO scintillator array with ESR reflector can be as high as ∼30-35%. This unexplained light crosstalk motivated further investigation of ESR optical performance. Analytical simulation of a multilayer structure emulating the ESR reflector showed that the film becomes highly transparent to incident light at large angles when surrounded on both sides by materials of refractive index higher than air. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that a considerable fraction (∼25-35%) of scintillation photons are incident at these leaking angles in high aspect ratio LYSO scintillation crystals. The film transparency was investigated experimentally by measuring the scintillation light transmission through the ESR film sandwiched between a scintillation crystal and a photodetector with or without layers of silicone grease. Strong light leakage, up to nearly 30%, was measured through the reflector when coated on both sides with silicone, thus elucidating the major cause of light crosstalk in bonded arrays. The reflector transparency was confirmed experimentally for angles of incidence larger than 60 ° using a custom designed setup allowing illumination of the bonded ESR film at selected grazing angles. The unsuspected ESR film transparency can be beneficial for detector arrays exploiting light sharing schemes, but it is highly detrimental for scintillator arrays designed for individual pixel readout.

  1. Note: A resonating reflector-based optical system for motion measurement in micro-cantilever arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Sathishkumar, P.; Punyabrahma, P.; Sri Muthu Mrinalini, R.; Jayanth, G. R.

    2015-09-15

    A robust, compact optical measurement unit for motion measurement in micro-cantilever arrays enables development of portable micro-cantilever sensors. This paper reports on an optical beam deflection-based system to measure the deflection of micro-cantilevers in an array that employs a single laser source, a single detector, and a resonating reflector to scan the measurement laser across the array. A strategy is also proposed to extract the deflection of individual cantilevers from the acquired data. The proposed system and measurement strategy are experimentally evaluated and demonstrated to measure motion of multiple cantilevers in an array.

  2. A physical optics/equivalent currents model for the RCS of trihedral corner reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Polycarpou, Anastasis C.

    1993-01-01

    The scattering in the interior regions of both square and triangular trihedral corner reflectors is examined. The theoretical model presented combines geometrical and physical optics (GO and PO), used to account for reflection terms, with equivalent edge currents (EEC), used to account for first-order diffractions from the edges. First-order, second-order, and third-order reflection terms are included. Calculating the first-order reflection terms involves integrating over the entire surface of the illuminated plate. Calculating the second- and third-order reflection terms, however, is much more difficult because the illuminated area is an arbitrary polygon whose shape is dependent upon the incident angles. The method for determining the area of integration is detailed. Extensive comparisons between the high-frequency model, Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) and experimental data are used for validation of the radar cross section (RCS) of both square and triangular trihedral reflectors.

  3. Enhancement of photocurrent in GaInNAs solar cells using Ag/Cu double-layer back reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aho, Timo; Aho, Arto; Tukiainen, Antti; Polojärvi, Ville; Salminen, Turkka; Raappana, Marianna; Guina, Mircea

    2016-12-01

    The effect of a Ag/Cu-based double-layer back reflector on current generation in GaInNAs single-junction solar cell is reported. Compared to Ti/Au reflector, the use of Ag/Cu led to a 28% enhancement of short-circuit current density, attaining a value of ˜14 mA/cm2 at AM1.5D (1000 W/m2) under a GaAs filter. The enhanced current generation is in line with requirements for current-matching in GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAs triple-junction solar cells. The Ag/Cu reflectors also had a low contact resistivity of the order of 10-6 Ω.cm2 and none of the samples exhibited notable peeling of metals in the adhesion tests. Moreover, no discernible diffusion of the metals into the semiconductor was observed after thermal annealing at 200 °C.

  4. See-through amorphous silicon solar cells with selectively transparent and conducting photonic crystal back reflectors for building integrated photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yang; O’Brien, Paul G.; Ozin, Geoffrey A. E-mail: kherani@ecf.utoronto.ca; Kherani, Nazir P. E-mail: kherani@ecf.utoronto.ca

    2013-11-25

    Thin semi-transparent hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells with selectively transparent and conducting photonic crystal (STCPC) back-reflectors are demonstrated. Short circuit current density of a 135 nm thick a-Si:H cell with a given STCPC back-reflector is enhanced by as much as 23% in comparison to a reference cell with an ITO film functioning as its rear contact. Concurrently, solar irradiance of 295 W/m{sup 2} and illuminance of 3480 lux are transmitted through the cell with a given STCPC back reflector under AM1.5 Global tilt illumination, indicating its utility as a source of space heating and lighting, respectively, in building integrated photovoltaic applications.

  5. Experimental evaluation of a stationary spherical reflector tracking absorber solar energy collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steward, W. G.; Kreider, J. F.; Caruso, P. S., Jr.; Kreith, F.

    1976-01-01

    This article presents experimental data for the thermal performance of a stationary, spherical-reflector, tracking-absorber solar energy collector (SRTA). The principle of operation and details of thermal performance of such an SRTA have previously been described. These experimental results were compared with the predictions of a thermal analysis previously published. Experimental results were compared with the prediction of Kreider's computer model. Within the range of the temperature of the experiments, the predicted performance of the unit agreed well with experimental data collected under clear sky conditions. In addition, the extrapolation of the efficiency to higher temperature is shown so that the potential of an SRTA solar collector as a means of providing high temperature steam to operate an electric power facility or for process heat can be evaluated. As a result of the tests conducted by NASA, and an economic analysis not yet publicly available, it appears that the SRTA solar collector concept will be economically viable in competition with any other existing solar system in providing electrical energy.

  6. A distributed optical fiber sensing system for dynamic strain measurement based on artificial reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhenhong; Shan, Yuanyuan; Li, Yanting; Zhang, Yixin; Zhang, Xuping

    2016-10-01

    Phase sensitive optical time domain reflectometry (Φ-OTDR) has been widely used in many applications for its distributed sensing ability on weak disturbance all along the sensing fiber. However, traditional Φ-OTDR cannot make quantitative measurement on the external disturbance due to the randomly distributed position and reflectivity of scatters within the optical fiber. Recently, some methods have been proposed to realize quantitative measurement of dynamic strain. In these literatures, the fiber with or without FBGs in practice was easily damaged and with difficulty of maintenance. PZT is employed to generate strain event in the fiber. There is a large gap compared with the real detecting environment, which will not reveal the full performance of the sensing system. In this paper, a distributed optical fiber sensing (DOFS) system for dynamic strain measurement based on artificial reflector is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. The fiber under test (FUT) is composed by four 20-meter long single mode optical fiber patch cords (OFPCs), which are cascaded with ferrule contactor/physical contact (FC/PC) connectors via fiber flanges. The fiber facet of FC/PC connector forms an artificial reflector. When the interval between the two reflectors is changed, the phase of the interference signal will also be changed. A symmetric 3×3 coupler with table-look-up scheme is introduced to discriminate the phase change through interference intensity. In our experiment, the center 10m section of the second OFPC is attached to the bottom of an aluminum alloy plate. An ordinary loudspeaker box was located on the top of the aluminum alloy plate. The dynamic strain generated by the loudspeaker box is transmitted from the aluminum alloy plate to the OFPC. Experimental results show that the proposed method has a good frequency response characteristic up to 3.2 kHz and a linear intensity response of R2=0.9986 while the optical probe pulse width and repetition rate were 100ns

  7. An assessment of potential weather effects due to operation of the Space Orbiting Light Augmentation Reflector Energy System (SOLARES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, N. C.

    1978-01-01

    Implementation of SOLARES will input large quantities of heat continuously into a stationary location on the Earth's surface. The quantity of heat released by each of the SOlARES ground receivers, having a reflector orbit height of 6378 km, exceeds by 30 times that released by large power parks which were studied in detail. Using atmospheric models, estimates are presented for the local weather effects, the synoptic scale effects, and the global scale effects from such intense thermal radiation.

  8. Solar optical energy collector

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, K.

    1983-10-18

    A solar optical energy collector is disclosed having a lens system for concentrating sun beams and a sun beams receiving system for introducing said sun beams being concentrated into a optical-conductor cable. In order to obtain the most effective arrangement of the lens system, said lens system comprises a plurality (N) of Fresnel lenses each formed in the shape of a hexagon, i.e. N=3n(+1) Fresnel lenses are disposed around one Fresnel lens so that each side of the one Fresnel lens positioned in the center of the lens system adjoins to one side of each respective surrounding Fresnel lenses in a concentric-circular relationship, wherein (n) stands for a natural number.

  9. Optical transmitter module using polymer waveguide with fully integrated reflector mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, In-Kui; Ahn, Seoung-Ho; Lee, Woo-Jin; Han, Sang-Pil; Bae, Byeong-Soo; Yoon, Keun Byoung; Jeong, Myung-Yung; Park, Hyo Hoon

    2006-09-01

    The cost-effective and repeatable technology for integration of polymer multimode waveguide and out-of-plane 45° reflector mirrors is developed. This method is cost-effective, repeatable, robust, and fully compatible with the standard manufacturing processes for a 90° optical bending structure. The basic concept of the technology for integration of waveguide and out-of-plane 45° reflector mirrors is as follows; 1) The positively patterned master in order to mold waveguides is manufactured by using photolithography and Deep RIE (Reactive Ion Etching). And the master is polished to obtain 45°-inclined plane. 2) Both sides of the positively patterned master are divided into three parts by using a sawing machine. One is a center master (main-master) with a positively patterned waveguide and the others are side masters (sub-master) without a pattered waveguide. The main master and sub-master turned over get back together again. 3) The negatively patterned PDMS master to be able to mold simultaneously both waveguide and out-of-plane 45° reflector mirrors is manufactured through pouring PDMS gel into master and thermally curing the PDMS master. 4) The multimode tapered waveguides with out-of-plane 45° reflector mirrors are simultaneously embossed by using PDMS master. The UV (Ultraviolet) curable material is organic-inorganic hybrid material (HYBRIMER, core index: 1.51, clad index: 1.48). The transmitter module is constructed on a MOB. The MOB was employed for several purposes; to align optical module passively, to use as heat sinker and also to support the boards. On this MOB, 1×4 arrays of vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) and Tapered Waveguide with 45° reflector mirrors are integrated. The height and width of waveguide's core are 100 μm, 60 μm respectively and the pitch is 250 μm. The transmission access lines in transmitter are designed considering differential impedance matching for high-speed operation. We measured the insertion loss of this

  10. Self-assembly method for controlling spatial frequency response of plasmonic back reflectors in organic thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Takayuki; Shinotsuka, Kei; Kawamukai, Etsuko; Ishibashi, Koji

    2017-01-01

    We propose a novel colloidal lithography technique that uses a mixture of colloidal particles with a few different diameters. This technique can be used for fabricating quasi-random nanostructures whose k-space spectra can be easily controlled by using an appropriate combination of particles. We introduced such nanostructures into the back reflectors of organic thin-film solar cells, where they serve as plasmonic back reflectors for recycling the nonabsorbed transmitted light into surface plasmons. The obtained photon-to-current efficiency was enhanced by 14-20% compared with that of a flat cell.

  11. Optical performance of exposed solar cell covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Thomas H.; Hichwa, Bryant P.; Selee, Steven R.; Dodds, Jerry; Long, Greg S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the characterization results of samples flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). These samples included both coated and uncoated fused silica and ceria glass substrates used in the manufacture of solar cell covers. The coatings comprised a single-layer magnesium fluoride antireflection coating and an all-dielectric high-reflector multilayer coating centered at 350 nm. Samples were mounted on both the leading and trailing surfaces of the LDEF for exposure to the environment of space. The optical properties of the coatings will be compared to control samples which were stored on the ground during the LDEF Mission. Results of Auger Electron Spectroscopy and Rutherford Backscatter Spectroscopy measurements made on several of the coatings will be presented to explain the effects of space on the chemical composition of the coatings.

  12. Optical performance of exposed solar cell covers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hichwa, Bryant P.; Selee, Steven R.; Dodds, Jerry; Long, Greg S.

    1991-01-01

    The characterization results of samples flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) are discussed. These samples included both coated and uncoated fused silica and ceria glass substrates used in the manufacture of solar cell covers. The coatings comprised a single-layer magnesium fluoride antireflection coating and an all-dielectric high-reflector multilayer coating centered at 350 nm. Samples were mounted on both the leading and trailing surfaces of the LDEF for exposure to the environment of space. The optical properties of the coatings will be compared to control samples which were stored on the ground during the LDEF Mission. Results of Auger Electron Spectroscopy and Rutherford Backscatter Spectroscopy measurements made on several of the coatings are presented to explain the effects of space on the chemical composition of the coatings.

  13. Uniform diffracted fields from a perfectly conducting cylindrical reflector with modified theory of physical optics.

    PubMed

    Yalçın, Uğur; Sarnık, Mücahit

    2013-01-01

    The uniform diffracted fields are calculated on PEC cylindrical reflector by Modified Theory of Physical Optics (MTPO). It is aimed to convert the noncontinuous solution to a continuous solution by finding a uniform equation which does not contain any expression converging to 0 in the denominator part. Three axioms of MTPO theory are used to construct the integral equations for the perfectly electrically conducting surface application. The "edge-point" technique is used to find the diffracted field, and uniform solution is to be found via "detour parameter(s)." Finally, the obtained results are to be compared with the nonuniform ones, numerically.

  14. Application of ITO/Al reflectors for increasing the efficiency of single-crystal silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kopach, V. R.; Kirichenko, M. V. Khrypunov, G. S.; Zaitsev, R. V.

    2010-06-15

    It is shown that an increase in the efficiency and manufacturability of single-junction single-crystal silicon photoelectric converters of solar energy requires the use of a back-surface reflector based on conductive transparent indium-tin oxide (ITO) 0.25-2 {mu}m thick. To increase the efficiency and reduce the sensitivity to the angle of light incidence on the photoreceiving surface of multijunction photoelectric converters with vertical diode cells based on single-crystal silicon, ITO/Al reflectors with an ITO layer >1 {mu}m thick along vertical boundaries of diode cells should be fabricated. The experimental study of multijunction photoelectric converters with ITO/Al reflectors at diode cell boundaries shows the necessity of modernizing the used technology of ITO layers to achieve their theoretically calculated thickness.

  15. Comparative study of solar optics for paraboloidal concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, L.; Poon, P.; Carley, W.; Huang, L.

    1979-01-01

    Different analytical methods for computing the flux distribution on the focal plane of a paraboloidal solar concentrator are reviewed. An analytical solution in algebraic form is also derived for an idealized model. The effects resulting from using different assumptions in the definition of optical parameters used in these methodologies are compared and discussed in detail. These parameters include solar irradiance distribution (limb darkening and circumsolar), reflector surface specular spreading, surface slope error, and concentrator pointing inaccuracy. The type of computational method selected for use depends on the maturity of the design and the data available at the time the analysis is made.

  16. Solar passive ceiling system. Final report. [Passive solar heating system with venetian blind reflectors and latent heat storage in ceiling

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    The construction of a 1200 square foot building, with full basement, built to be used as a branch library in a rural area is described. The primary heating source is a passive solar system consisting of a south facing window system. The system consists of: a set of windows located in the south facing wall only, composed of double glazed units; a set of reflectors mounted in each window which reflects sunlight up to the ceiling (the reflectors are similar to venetian blinds); a storage area in the ceiling which absorbs the heat from the reflected sunlight and stores it in foil salt pouches laid in the ceiling; and an automated curtain which automatically covers and uncovers the south facing window system. The system is totally passive and uses no blowers, pumps or other active types of heat distribution equipment. The building contains a basement which is normally not heated, and the north facing wall is bermed four feet high around the north side.

  17. Solar disk sextant optical configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, H.-Y.; Maier, E.; Schatten, K. H.; Sofia, S.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper the performance of a plausible configuration for the solar disk sextant, an instrument to be used to monitor the solar diameter, is evaluated. Overall system requirements are evaluated, and tolerable uncertainties are obtained. It is concluded that by using a beam splitting wedge, a folded optics design can be used to measure the solar diameter to an accuracy of 10 to the -6th, despite the greater aberrations present in such optical systems.

  18. Effectiveness of solar disinfection using batch reactors with non-imaging aluminium reflectors under real conditions: Natural well-water and solar light.

    PubMed

    Navntoft, C; Ubomba-Jaswa, E; McGuigan, K G; Fernández-Ibáñez, P

    2008-12-11

    Inactivation kinetics are reported for suspensions of Escherichia coli in well-water using compound parabolic collector (CPC) mirrors to enhance the efficiency of solar disinfection (SODIS) for batch reactors under real, solar radiation (cloudy and cloudless) conditions. On clear days, the system with CPC reflectors achieved complete inactivation (more than 5-log unit reduction in bacterial population to below the detection limit of 4CFU/mL) one hour sooner than the system fitted with no CPC. On cloudy days, only systems fitted with CPCs achieved complete inactivation. Degradation of the mirrors under field conditions was also evaluated. The reflectivity of CPC systems that had been in use outdoors for at least 3 years deteriorated in a non-homogeneous fashion. Reflectivity values for these older systems were found to vary between 27% and 72% compared to uniform values of 87% for new CPC systems. The use of CPC has been proven to be a good technological enhancement to inactivate bacteria under real conditions in clear and cloudy days. A comparison between enhancing optics and thermal effect is also discussed.

  19. High-performance AlGaN-based solar-blind avalanche photodiodes with dual-periodic III–nitride distributed Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Chujun; Ye, Xuanchao; Sun, Rui; Yang, Guofeng; Wang, Jin; Lu, Yanan; Yan, Pengfei; Cao, Jintao; Gao, Shumei

    2017-03-01

    Separate absorption and multiplication AlGaN solar-blind avalanche photodiodes with dual-periodic III–nitride distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) are numerically demonstrated. The designed devices exhibit an improved solar-blind characteristic with a maximum spectral responsivity of 0.184 A/W at λ = 284 nm owing to the optimized optical properties of the dual-periodic III–nitride DBRs. Compared with their conventional counterparts, an increased multiplication gain and a reduced breakdown voltage are achieved by using p-type Al0.15Ga0.85N layers with a lower Al content and multiplication layers. These improvements are attributed to the high p-doping efficiency and large hole ionization coefficient.

  20. Optical Coating Performance for Heat Reflectors of the JWST-ISIM Electronic Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashford, Robert A.; Perrygo, Charles M.; Garrison, Matthew B.; White, Bryant K.; Threat, Felix T.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Jeans, James W.; Huber, Frank K.; Bousquet, Robert R.; Shaw, Dave

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a thermal radiator design consisting of lightweight composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings for use on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) structure. The structure will have a Thermal Subsystem unit to provide passive cooling to the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) control electronics. The ISIM, in the JWST observatory, is the platform that provides the mounting surfaces for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the control electronic generated-heat away from JWST is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft s own heat does not interfere with the infrared-light gathering of distant cosmic sources. The need to have lateral control in the emission direction of the IEC (ISIM Electronics Compartment) radiators led to the development of a directional baffle design that uses multiple curved mirrorlike surfaces. This concept started out from the so-called Winston non-imaging optical concentrators that use opposing parabolic reflector surfaces, where each parabola has its focus at the opposite edge of the exit aperture. For this reason they are often known as compound parabolic concentrators or CPCs. This radiator system with the circular section was chosen for the IEC reflectors because it offers two advantages over other designs. The first is that the area of the reflector strips for a given radiator area is less, which results in a lower mass baffle assembly. Secondly, the fraction of energy emitted by the radiator strips and subsequently reflected by the baffle is less. These fewer reflections reduced the amount of energy that is absorbed and eventually re-emitted, typically in a direction outside the design emission range angle. A baffle frame holds the mirrors in position above a radiator panel on the IEC. Together, these will direct the majority of the heat from the IEC above the sunshield away towards empty space.

  1. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Roger

    2014-12-17

    The main project objective has been to develop an advanced gravity sag method for molding large glass solar reflectors with either line or point focus, and with long or short focal length. The method involves taking standard sized squares of glass, 1.65 m x 1.65 m, and shaping them by gravity sag into precision steel molds. The method is designed for high volume manufacture when incorporated into a production line with separate pre-heating and cooling. The performance objectives for the self-supporting glass mirrors made by this project include mirror optical accuracy of 2 mrad root mean square (RMS), requiring surface slope errors less than 1 mrad rms, a target not met by current production of solar reflectors. Our objective also included development of new methods for rapidly shaping glass mirrors and coating them for higher reflectivity and soil resistance. Reflectivity of 95% for a glass mirror with anti-soil coating was targeted, compared to the present ~94% with no anti-soil coating. Our mirror cost objective is ~$20/m2 in 2020, a significant reduction compared to the present ~$35/m2 for solar trough mirrors produced for trough solar plants.

  2. Handbook of solar energy data for south-facing surfaces in the United States. Volume 1: An insolation, array shadowing, and reflector augmentation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    A quick reference for obtaining estimates of available solar insolation for numerous locations and array angles is presented. A model and a computer program are provided which considered the effects of array shadowing reflector augmentation as design variables.

  3. Control of a small robot using a hybrid optical modulating retro-reflector/RF link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, James L.; Ferraro, Mike S.; Rabinovich, William S.; Goetz, Peter G.; Suite, Michele R.; Uecke, Stanley H.

    2014-06-01

    Tele-operated robots used for Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) are ordinarily controlled using a radio frequency (RF) link. Use of RF links on the battlefield presents several challenges including spectrum allocation and jamming effects (both by the enemy and friendly forces). Several solutions have been attempted including electrical or fiber optic umbilicals and spread spectrum radios with varying degrees of success. Modulating Retro-reflector Free Space Optical (MRR-FSO) communications links avoid these effects entirely but are limited to line of sight operation. We have developed a system consisting of an MRR-FSO link with a tracking optical terminal, a conventional RF link and a deployable pod to provide a relay node bridging the FSO link to the operator and the RF link to the robot. The MRRFSO link provides the capability to operate the robot in the presence of jamming while the RF link allows short range non line of sight operation. The operator uses the MRR-FSO link to drive the robot to a position downrange outside the influence of the jammer or other interference. Once the robot is positioned downrange near the area of operation the pod is deployed. This allows the robot to maneuver freely including venturing beyond line of sight using the short range RF link to maintain communications between the vehicle and pod while the FSO link maintains connectivity between the pod and the operator.

  4. Application of Sol-Gel Method as a Protective Layer on a Specular Reflective Surface for Secondary Reflector in a Solar Receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Afrin, Samia; Dagdelen, John; Ma, Zhiwen; Kumar, Vinod

    2017-01-01

    Highly-specular reflective surfaces that can withstand elevated-temperatures are desirable for many applications including reflective heat shielding in solar receivers and secondary reflectors, which can be used between primary concentrators and heat collectors. A high-efficiency, high-temperature solar receiver design based on arrays of cavities needs a highly-specular reflective surface on its front section to help sunlight penetrate into the absorber tubes for effective flux spreading. Since this application is for high-temperature solar receivers, this surface needs to be durable and to maintain its optical properties through the usable life. Degradation mechanisms associated with elevated temperatures and thermal cycling, which include cracking, delamination, corrosion/oxidation, and environmental effects, could cause the optical properties of surfaces to degrade rapidly in these conditions. Protected mirror surfaces for these applications have been tested by depositing a thin layer of SiO2 on top of electrodeposited silver by means of the sol-gel method. To obtain an effective thin film structure, this sol-gel procedure has been investigated extensively by varying process parameters that affect film porosity and thickness. Endurance tests have been performed in a furnace at 150 degrees C for thousands of hours. This paper presents the sol-gel process for intermediate-temperature specular reflective coatings and provides the long-term reliability test results of sol-gel protected silver-coated surfaces.

  5. Analysis of Fabry-Perot optical micro-cavities based on coating-free all-silicon cylindrical Bragg reflectors.

    PubMed

    Malak, Maurine; Gaber, Noha; Marty, Frédéric; Pavy, Nicolas; Richalot, Elodie; Bourouina, Tarik

    2013-01-28

    We study the behavior of Fabry-Perot micro-optical resonators based on cylindrical reflectors, optionally combined with cylindrical lenses. The core of the resonator architecture incorporates coating-free, all-silicon, Bragg reflectors of cylindrical shape. The combined effect of high reflectance and light confinement produced by the reflectors curvature allows substantial reduction of the energy loss. The proposed resonator uses curved Bragg reflectors consisting of a stack of silicon-air wall pairs constructed by micromachining. Quality factor Q ~1000 was achieved on rather large cavity length L = 210 microns, which is mainly intended to lab-on-chip analytical experiments, where enough space is required to introduce the analyte inside the resonator. We report on the behavioral analysis of such resonators through analytical modeling along with numerical simulations supported by experimental results. We demonstrate selective excitation of pure longitudinal modes, taking advantage of a proper control of mode matching involved in the process of coupling light from an optical fiber to the resonator. For the sake of comparison, insight on the behavior of Fabry-Perot cavity incorporating a Fiber-Rod-Lens is confirmed by similar numerical simulations.

  6. SOLAR SAIL PROPULSION SENSITIVITY TO MEMBRANE SHAPE AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES USING THE SOLAR VECTORING EVALUATION TOOL (SVET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    Solar sail propulsive performance is dependent on sail membrane optical properties and on sail membrane shape. Assumptions of an ideal sail (flat, perfect reflector) can result in errors which can affect spacecraft control, trajectory analyses, and overall evaluation of solar sail performance. A MATLAB(R) program has been developed to generate sail shape point cloud files for two square-architecture solar sail designs. Simple parabolic profiles are assumed for sail shape under solar pressure loading. These files are then input into the Solar Vectoring Evaluation Tool (SVET) software to determine the propulsive force vector, center of pressure, and moments about the sail body axes as a function of sail shape and optical properties. Also, the impact of the center-line angle, due to non-perfect optical properties, is addressed since this constrains sail force vector cone angle and is often overlooked when assuming ideal-reflector membranes. Preliminary sensitivity analysis using these tools aids in determining the key geometric and optical parameters that drive solar sail propulsive performance.

  7. Improved light trapping in microcrystalline silicon solar cells by plasmonic back reflector with broad angular scattering and low parasitic absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Hairen; Sivec, Laura; Yan, Baojie; Santbergen, Rudi; Zeman, Miro; Smets, Arno H. M.

    2013-04-01

    We show experimentally that the photocurrent of thin-film hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) solar cells can be enhanced by 4.5 mA/cm2 with a plasmonic back reflector (BR). The light trapping performance is improved using plasmonic BR with broader angular scattering and lower parasitic absorption loss through tuning the size of silver nanoparticles. The μc-Si:H solar cells deposited on the improved plasmonic BR demonstrate a high photocurrent of 26.3 mA/cm2 which is comparable to the state-of-the-art textured Ag/ZnO BR. The commonly observed deterioration of fill factor is avoided by using μc-SiOx:H as the n-layer for solar cells deposited on plasmonic BR.

  8. Back reflectors based on buried Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} for enhancement of photon recycling in monolithic, on-substrate III-V solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    García, I.; Ward, J. S.; Steiner, M. A.; Geisz, J. F.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2014-09-29

    Photon management has been shown to be a fruitful way to boost the open circuit voltage and efficiency of high quality solar cells. Metal or low-index dielectric-based back reflectors can be used to confine the reemitted photons and enhance photon recycling. Gaining access to the back of the solar cell for placing these reflectors implies having to remove the substrate, with the associated added complexity to the solar cell manufacturing. In this work, we analyze the effectiveness of a single-layer reflector placed at the back of on-substrate solar cells, and assess the photon recycling improvement as a function of the refractive index of this layer. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based reflectors, created by lateral oxidation of an AlAs layer, are identified as a feasible choice for on-substrate solar cells, which can produce a V{sub oc} increase of around 65% of the maximum increase attainable with an ideal reflector. The experimental results obtained using prototype GaAs cell structures show a greater than two-fold increase in the external radiative efficiency and a V{sub oc} increase of ∼2% (∼18 mV), consistent with theoretical calculations. For GaAs cells with higher internal luminescence, this V{sub oc} boost is calculated to be up to 4% relative (36 mV), which directly translates into at least 4% higher relative efficiency.

  9. Compositionally-Graded Shape Memory Film for Self-Deployment of Membrane Reflectors and Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Lisa; Carman, Greg; Brantley, Lott W., Sr. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The next generation of space systems will require large apertures in order to image faint targets or cover large areas of Earth. These large apertures must be able to fit inside a launch vehicle fairing, be light enough for launch into orbit, and deploy on orbit with repeatability and reliability. The current state-of-the-art in flight optics is represented by the 4 meter LAMP telescope, with an areal density of 10 km sq m. Development of a Beryllium mirror demonstration article for NGST (Next Generation Space Telescope) at the University of Arizona indicate areal densities of 0.5 kg sq m with flight hardware in the 12 meter range. With progressive improvements in existing deployment, packaging, and structural technologies, the size of optics and reflectors will continue to increase, while mass is reduced. However, without a breakthrough in materials, packaging and/or deployment technologies, the goal for Gossamer structures of 0.1 kg sq m is unachievable for the near and mid-term NASA missions. Membrane technology provides the best hope of achieving such low areal densities. In combination with advances in membrane materials and structures, development of revolutionary techniques for deployment systems can provide significant improvements in large aperture technology. In this paper, the results of a six-month Phase I research effort to demonstrate the application of thin film NiTi to aerospace-qualified membrane and mesh materials are presented. Deposition of shape memory thin film was achieved Astromesh (trademark) metal mesh and CP-1, and optical-quality polymer membrane. Not only was full-coating deposition demonstrated, but also small segment deposition which holds potential for local surface control. Deployment of these materials was also demonstrated, setting the stage for the development of a larger test article.

  10. Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data. Alpha Solarco Model 104 solar collector with 0. 125-inch Schott low-iron glass reflector surface

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-04-01

    Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Alpha Solarco Model 104 solar collector, with 0.125-inch Schott low-iron glass reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  11. Single-mode, narrow-linewidth external cavity quantum cascade laser through optical feedback from a partial-reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Cendejas, Richard A.; Phillips, Mark C.; Myers, Tanya L.; Taubman, Matthew S.

    2010-11-30

    An external-cavity (EC) quantum cascade (QC) laser using optical feedback from a partial-reflector is reported. With this configuration, the otherwise multi-mode emission of a Fabry-Perot QC laser was made single-mode with optical output powers exceeding 40 mW. A mode-hop free tuning range of 2.46 cm-1 was achieved by synchronously tuning the EC length and QC laser current. The linewidth of the partial-reflector EC-QC laser was measured for integration times from 100 μs to 4 s, and compared to a distributed feedback QC laser. Linewidths as small as 480 kHz were recorded for the EC-QC laser

  12. Optical coating performance for heat reflectors of JWST-ISIM electronic component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Bousquet, Robert; Garrison, Matt; Perrygo, Chuck; Threat, Felix; Rashford, Robert

    2008-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) consists of an infrared-optimized Optical Telescope Element (OTE) that is cooled down to 40 degrees Kelvin. A second adjacent component to the OTE is the Integrated Science Instrument Module, or ISIM. This module includes the electronic compartment, which provides the mounting surfaces and ambient thermally controlled environment for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the 200 watts generated from the ISIM structure away from the OTE is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft's own heat does not interfere with the infrared light detected from distant cosmic sources. This technical challenge is overcome by a thermal subsystem unit that provides passive cooling to the ISIM control electronics. The proposed design of this thermal radiator consists of a lightweight structure made out of composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings. In this paper, we will present characterizations of the coating emittance, bidirectional reflectance, and mechanical structure design that will affect the performance of this passive cooling reflector.

  13. Stabilization and Frequency Control of a DFB Laser With a Tunable Optical Reflector Integrated in a Silicon Photonics PIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck, Johannes; Schrammen, Matthias; Romero-Garcia, Sebastian; Muller, Juliana; Shen, Bin; Richter, Jens; Merget, Florian; Witzens, Jeremy

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the effect of tunable optical feedback on a commercial DFB laser edge coupled to a Silicon Photonics planar integrated circuit in which a tunable reflector has been implemented by means of a ring resonator based add-drop multiplexer. Controlled optical feedback allows for fine-tuning of the laser oscillation frequency. Under certain conditions it also allows suppression of bifurcation modes triggered by reflections occurring elsewhere on the chip. A semi-analytical model describing laser dynamics under combined optical feedback from the input facet of the edge coupler and from the tunable on-chip reflector fits the measurements. Compensation of detrimental effects from reflections induced elsewhere on a transceiver chip may allow moving isolators downstream in future communications systems, facilitating direct hybrid laser integration in Silicon Photonics chips, provided a suitable feedback signal for a control system can be identified. Moreover, the optical frequency tuning at lower feedback levels can be used to form a rapidly tunable optical oscillator as part of an optical phase locked loop, circumventing the problem of the thermal to free carrier effect crossover in the FM response of injection current controlled semiconductor laser diodes.

  14. Research on the reflection coating at three wavelengths for primary reflector of the optical antenna in the laser communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huasong; Liu, Muxiao; Wang, Zhanshan; Ji, Yiqin; Lu, Jiangtao

    2011-02-01

    Primary reflector of the optical antenna is a key component in the space laser communication systems, and multi-wavelengths laser need to be worked in the common aperture. Reflection coating is designed for the primary reflector of a laser communication system, which can work at three wavelengths (633nm, 808nm, 1550nm), the designed target reflectance are R633nm>=50%, R808nm>=99% and R1550nm>=99% at angle of incidence from 0 to 20 deg. We selected Ta2O5 and SiO2 as the high refractive index and low refractive index coating materials, analyzed the impact on the reflection coating of the systemic errors and random errors, and determined the manufacture error of the coater system which can't greater than 1%. The Ion beam sputtering deposition technique was used to manufacture reflection coating for three-wavelengths and a LAMBDA900 spectrophotometer was used to analysis the reflectance at three wavelengths which achieved the design requirements. Finally we give the origin of manufacture error source for this high reflection coating. The reflection coating component was successfully used in the primary reflector of the optical antenna of the laser communication systems.

  15. Research on the reflection coating at three wavelengths for primary reflector of the optical antenna in the laser communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huasong; Liu, Muxiao; Wang, Zhanshan; Ji, Yiqin; Lu, Jiangtao

    2010-10-01

    Primary reflector of the optical antenna is a key component in the space laser communication systems, and multi-wavelengths laser need to be worked in the common aperture. Reflection coating is designed for the primary reflector of a laser communication system, which can work at three wavelengths (633nm, 808nm, 1550nm), the designed target reflectance are R633nm>=50%, R808nm>=99% and R1550nm>=99% at angle of incidence from 0 to 20 deg. We selected Ta2O5 and SiO2 as the high refractive index and low refractive index coating materials, analyzed the impact on the reflection coating of the systemic errors and random errors, and determined the manufacture error of the coater system which can't greater than 1%. The Ion beam sputtering deposition technique was used to manufacture reflection coating for three-wavelengths and a LAMBDA900 spectrophotometer was used to analysis the reflectance at three wavelengths which achieved the design requirements. Finally we give the origin of manufacture error source for this high reflection coating. The reflection coating component was successfully used in the primary reflector of the optical antenna of the laser communication systems.

  16. Discretely swept optical coherence tomography system using super-structure grating distributed Bragg reflector lasers at 1561-1639nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, D.; Yoshimura, R.; Hiro-Oka, H.; Furukawa, H.; Goto, A.; Satoh, N.; Igarashi, A.; Nakanishi, M.; Shimizu, K.; Ohbayashi, K.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with an optical comb swept source system. The swept source system comprised of two super-structured grating distributed Bragg reflector lasers covering a wavelength range from 1561-1693 nm. A method to scan these lasers to obtain an interference signal without stitching noises, which are inherent in these lasers, and to connect two lasers without concatenation noise is explained. Method to reduce optical aliasing noises in this optical comb swept laser OCT is explained and demonstrated based on the characteristic of the optical aliasing noises in this particular OCT system. By reduction of those noises, a sensitivity of 124 dB was realized. The A-scan rate, resolution and depth range were 3.1 kHz, 16 μm (in air) and 12 mm, respectively. Deep imaging penetration into tissue is demonstrated for two selected samples.

  17. Performance improvements of symmetry-breaking reflector structures in nonimaging devices

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    2004-01-13

    A structure and method for providing a broken symmetry reflector structure for a solar concentrator device. The component of the optical direction vector along the symmetry axis is conserved for all rays propagated through a translationally symmetric optical device. This quantity, referred to as the translational skew invariant, is conserved in rotationally symmetric optical systems. Performance limits for translationally symmetric nonimaging optical devices are derived from the distributions of the translational skew invariant for the optical source and for the target to which flux is to be transferred. A numerically optimized non-tracking solar concentrator utilizing symmetry-breaking reflector structures can overcome the performance limits associated with translational symmetry.

  18. Optimal design of one-dimensional photonic crystal back reflectors for thin-film silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Peizhuan; Hou, Guofu Zhang, Jianjun Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhao, Ying

    2014-08-14

    For thin-film silicon solar cells (TFSC), a one-dimensional photonic crystal (1D PC) is a good back reflector (BR) because it increases the total internal reflection at the back surface. We used the plane-wave expansion method and the finite difference time domain (FDTD) algorithm to simulate and analyze the photonic bandgap (PBG), the reflection and the absorption properties of a 1D PC and to further explore the optimal 1D PC design for use in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells. With identified refractive index contrast and period thickness, we found that the PBG and the reflection of a 1D PC are strongly influenced by the contrast in bilayer thickness. Additionally, light coupled to the top three periods of the 1D PC and was absorbed if one of the bilayers was absorptive. By decreasing the thickness contrast of the absorptive layer relative to the non-absorptive layer, an average reflectivity of 96.7% was achieved for a 1D PC alternatively stacked with a-Si:H and SiO{sub 2} in five periods. This reflectivity was superior to a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) structure with 93.5% and an Ag film with 93.4%. n-i-p a-Si:H solar cells with an optimal 1D PC-based BR offer a higher short-circuit current density than those with a DBR-based BR or an AZO/Ag-based BR. These results provide new design rules for photonic structures in TFSC.

  19. Hybrid solar collector using nonimaging optics and photovoltaic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winston, Roland; Yablonovitch, Eli; Jiang, Lun; Widyolar, Bennett K.; Abdelhamid, Mahmoud; Scranton, Gregg; Cygan, David; Kozlov, Alexandr

    2015-08-01

    The project team of University of California at Merced (UC-M), Gas Technology Institute, and Dr. Eli Yablonovitch of University of California at Berkeley developed a novel hybrid concentrated solar photovoltaic thermal (PV/T) collector using nonimaging optics and world record single-junction Gallium arsenide (GaAs) PV components integrated with particle laden gas as thermal transfer and storage media, to simultaneously generate electricity and high temperature dispatchable heat. The collector transforms a parabolic trough, commonly used in CSP plants, into an integrated spectrum-splitting device. This places a spectrum-sensitive topping element on a secondary reflector that is registered to the thermal collection loop. The secondary reflector transmits higher energy photons for PV topping while diverting the remaining lower energy photons to the thermal media, achieving temperatures of around 400°C even under partial utilization of the solar spectrum. The collector uses the spectral selectivity property of Gallium arsenide (GaAs) cells to maximize the exergy output of the system, resulting in an estimated exergy efficiency of 48%. The thermal media is composed of fine particles of high melting point material in an inert gas that increases heat transfer and effectively stores excess heat in hot particles for later on-demand use.

  20. Study on the fabrication of back surface reflectors in nano-crystalline silicon thin-film solar cells by using random texturing aluminum anodization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Kang Sik; Jang, Eunseok; Cho, Jun-Sik; Yoo, Jinsu; Park, Joo Hyung; Byungsung, O.

    2015-09-01

    In recent decades, researchers have improved the efficiency of amorphous silicon solar cells in many ways. One of the easiest and most practical methods to improve solar-cell efficiency is adopting a back surface reflector (BSR) as the bottom layer or as the substrate. The BSR reflects the incident light back to the absorber layer in a solar cell, thus elongating the light path and causing the so-called "light trapping effect". The elongation of the light path in certain wavelength ranges can be enhanced with the proper scale of BSR surface structure or morphology. An aluminum substrate with a surface modified by aluminum anodizing is used to improve the optical properties for applications in amorphous silicon solar cells as a BSR in this research due to the high reflectivity and the low material cost. The solar cells with a BSR were formed and analyzed by using the following procedures: First, the surface of the aluminum substrate was degreased by using acetone, ethanol and distilled water, and it was chemically polished in a dilute alkali solution. After the cleaning process, the aluminum surface's morphology was modified by using a controlled anodization in a dilute acid solution to form oxide on the surface. The oxidized film was etched off by using an alkali solution to leave an aluminum surface with randomly-ordered dimple-patterns of approximately one micrometer in size. The anodizing conditions and the anodized aluminum surfaces after the oxide layer had been removed were systematically investigated according to the applied voltage. Finally, amorphous silicon solar cells were deposited on a modified aluminum plate by using dc magnetron sputtering. The surfaces of the anodized aluminum were observed by using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The total and the diffuse reflectances of the surface-modified aluminum sheets were measured by using UV spectroscopy. We observed that the diffuse reflectances increased with increasing anodizing voltage. The

  1. Light trapping efficiency of periodic and quasiperiodic back-reflectors for thin film solar cells: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micco, A.; Ricciardi, A.; Pisco, M.; La Ferrara, V.; Mercaldo, L. V.; Delli Veneri, P.; Cutolo, A.; Cusano, A.

    2013-08-01

    Recently, great efforts have been carried out to design optimized metallic nano-grating back-reflectors to improve the light absorption in thin film solar cells. In this work, we compare the performances of deterministic aperiodic backreflectors in the form of 1-D nanogratings based on the generalized Fibonacci deterministic aperiodic sequence with a standard periodic one. The case of study here analyzed relies on a realistic solar cell model, where light absorption is evaluated only in the intrinsic region of an amorphous silicon P-I-N junction. We found that the results of comparison are strongly influenced by the amorphous silicon extinction coefficient within the near-infrared wavelength range, where most photonic-plasmonic modes (responsible for the light absorption enhancement typically observed when structured metal nanogratings are employed) are excited. In particular, with device-grade hydrogenated amorphous silicon, we demonstrate that Fibonacci-like backreflectors are able to provide an absorption enhancement of about 4% and 20% with respect to periodic and flat metallic backreflectors, respectively. We also found that aperiodic gratings guarantee better results in terms of robustness to the incident angle of the incoming radiation. Overall, our results confirm that aperiodic geometries are effectively able to offer some intriguing perspectives to enhance light trapping capability in thin film solar cells especially thanks to the large set of patterns employable to enable a proper design of resonant modes number and their spectral locations.

  2. Linear Fresnel Reflector based Solar Radiation Concentrator for Combined Heating and Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Aveek; Bernal, Eva; Seshadri, Satya; Mayer, Oliver; Greaves, Mikal

    2011-12-01

    We have designed and realized a test rig to characterize concentrated solar-based CHP (combined heat and power) generator. Cost benefit analysis has been used to compare alternate technologies, which can cogenerate electrical and thermal power. We have summarized the experimental setup and methods to characterize a concentrated solar thermal (CST) unit. In this paper, we demonstrate the performance data of a concentrated solar thermal system.

  3. Performance enhancement of thin film silicon solar cells based on distributed Bragg reflector and diffraction grating

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, R. S.; Saravanan, S.; Kalainathan, S.

    2014-12-15

    The influence of various designing parameters were investigated and explored for high performance solar cells. Single layer grating based solar cell of 50 μm thickness gives maximum efficiency up to 24 % whereas same efficiency is achieved with the use of three bilayers grating based solar cell of 30 μm thickness. Remarkably, bilayer grating based solar cell design not only gives broadband absorption but also enhancement in efficiency with reduced cell thickness requirement. This absorption enhancement is attributed to the high reflection and diffraction from DBR and grating respectively. The obtained short-circuit current were 29.6, 32.9, 34.6 and 36.05 mA/cm{sup 2} of 5, 10, 20 and 30 μm cell thicknesses respectively. These presented designing efforts would be helpful to design and realize new generation of solar cells.

  4. Optically enhanced photon recycling in mechanically stacked multijunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Myles A.; Geisz, John F.; Ward, J. Scott; Garcia, Ivan; Friedman, Daniel J.; King, Richard R.; Chiu, Philip T.; France, Ryan M.; Duda, Anna; Olavarria, Waldo J.; Young, Michelle; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2015-11-09

    Multijunction solar cells can be fabricated by mechanically bonding together component cells that are grown separately. Here, we present four-junction four-terminal mechanical stacks composed of GaInP/GaAs tandems grown on GaAs substrates and GaInAsP/GaInAs tandems grown on InP substrates. The component cells were bonded together with a low-index transparent epoxy that acts as an angularly selective reflector to the GaAs bandedge luminescence, while simultaneously transmitting nearly all of the subbandgap light. As determined by electroluminescence measurements and optical modeling, the GaAs subcell demonstrates a higher internal radiative limit and, thus, higher subcell voltage, compared with GaAs subcells without the epoxy reflector. The best cells demonstrate 38.8 ± 1.0% efficiency under the global spectrum at 1000 W/m2 and ~ 42% under the direct spectrum at ~100 suns. As a result, eliminating the series resistance is the key challenge for further improving the concentrator cells.

  5. Optically enhanced photon recycling in mechanically stacked multijunction solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Steiner, Myles A.; Geisz, John F.; Ward, J. Scott; ...

    2015-11-09

    Multijunction solar cells can be fabricated by mechanically bonding together component cells that are grown separately. Here, we present four-junction four-terminal mechanical stacks composed of GaInP/GaAs tandems grown on GaAs substrates and GaInAsP/GaInAs tandems grown on InP substrates. The component cells were bonded together with a low-index transparent epoxy that acts as an angularly selective reflector to the GaAs bandedge luminescence, while simultaneously transmitting nearly all of the subbandgap light. As determined by electroluminescence measurements and optical modeling, the GaAs subcell demonstrates a higher internal radiative limit and, thus, higher subcell voltage, compared with GaAs subcells without the epoxy reflector.more » The best cells demonstrate 38.8 ± 1.0% efficiency under the global spectrum at 1000 W/m2 and ~ 42% under the direct spectrum at ~100 suns. As a result, eliminating the series resistance is the key challenge for further improving the concentrator cells.« less

  6. ZnO/a-Si distributed Bragg reflectors for light trapping in thin film solar cells from visible to infrared range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aqing; Yuan, Qianmin; Zhu, Kaigui

    2016-01-01

    Distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) consisting of ZnO and amorphous silicon (a-Si) were prepared by magnetron sputtering method for selective light trapping. The quarter-wavelength ZnO/a-Si DBRs with only 6 periods exhibit a peak reflectance of above 99% and have a full width at half maximum that is greater than 347 nm in the range of visible to infrared. The 6-pair reversed quarter-wavelength ZnO/a-Si DBRs also have a peak reflectance of 98%. Combination of the two ZnO/a-Si DBRs leads to a broader stopband from 686 nm to 1354 nm. Using the ZnO/a-Si DBRs as the rear reflector of a-Si thin film solar cells significantly increases the photocurrent in the spectrum range of 400⿿1000 nm, in comparison with that of the cells with Al reflector. The obtained results suggest that ZnO/a-Si DBRs are promising reflectors of a-Si thin-film solar cells for light trapping.

  7. Effects of Optical Loss Factors on Heliostat Field Layout for Beam-Down Solar Concentrating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utamura, Motoaki; Takamatsu, Tadahiko; Yuasa, Minoru; Kajita, Rina; Yamamoto, Takashi

    A methodology to give an optimal layout of a group of heliostats has been developed for beam-down concentrating solar tower systems. Given the maximum solar power together with optical parameters, the method determines an optimal configuration of a heliostat field around a tower. Various optical losses such as cosine factor, shadowing and blocking at heliostats are considered in the calculation. Furthermore, spillage at the receiver is taken into account due to the spread of light caused by the effects of a finite solar disk, flat facet and various stochastic errors in optical hardware and control. It is found the effect of spillage becomes significant at heliostats from the tower at the distance farther than four times of upper focus height of the reflector when receiver diameter is one fifteenth of the height and dominates the configuration of the optimal heliostat layout.

  8. Adaptive Optics at the Big Bear Solar Observatory: Instrument Description and First Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, Carsten; Tritschler, Alexandra; Rimmele, Thomas R.; Richards, Kit; Hegwer, Steve L.; Wöger, Friedrich

    2007-02-01

    In 2004 January, the Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) was equipped with a high-order adaptive optics (AO) system built in collaboration with the National Solar Observatory (NSO) at Sacramento Peak. The hardware is almost identical to the AO system operated at the NSO Dunn Solar Tower (DST), incorporating a 97 actuator deformable mirror, a Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor with 76 subapertures, and an off-the-shelf digital signal processor system. However, the BBSO optical design is quite different. It had to be adapted to the 65 cm vacuum reflector and the downstream postfocus instrumentation. In this paper, we describe the optical design, demonstrate the AO performance, and use image restoration techniques to illustrate the image quality that can be achieved with the new AO system.

  9. Development of Cd1-xMgxTe thin films for application as an electron reflector in CdS/CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobyakov, Pavel S.

    Efficiencies of CdS/CdTe photovoltaic cells significantly lag behind their theoretical limit, primarily because open-circuit voltage ( VOC) of record efficiency cells (872 mV) is well below what is expected for the CdTe band gap (1.5 eV). A substantial V OC improvement can be achieved through addition of an electron reflector (ER) layer to CdTe devices. The ER layer forms a conduction-band barrier that reflects minority-charge carriers (i.e. electrons in p-type CdTe) away from the back surface. Similar to back-surface fields in c-Si, III-V, and CIGS solar cells, the ER strategy is expected to reduce back-surface recombination and is estimated to increase CdTe VOC by about 200 mV based on numerical simulation. The presented research investigates the addition of a thin layer of wider band gap Cd1-xMgxTe (CMT) to achieve a CdTe ER structure. First, a novel co-sublimation process was developed for deposition of Cd 1-xMgxTe thin films that demonstrates excellent experimental capabilities, commercial viability, and improved alloy control over other techniques. Next, the effects of processing on material properties of CMT deposition onto CdS/CdTe structures were investigated. It was discovered that substrate temperature during CMT deposition is a critical parameter for achieving uniform CMT film coverage on polycrystalline CdTe. Furthermore, CMT film growth was found to be epitaxial on CdTe where the CMT films retain the same microstructural features as the underlying CdTe grains. Despite film uniformity, significant Mg loss from the CMT film, oxide formation, and a reduction of the optical band gap was found after CdCl2-based passivation treatments. Preliminary process optimization found that band gap degradation can be minimized by utilizing MgCl2 in addition to CdCl2 as a treatment source material. Finally, development of CdS/CdTe/Cd1-xMgxTe electron reflector devices demonstrated a barrier behavior at high voltage bias and improved voltage when CdTe thickness is held

  10. Synthesis and study of the optical properties of dielectric Bragg reflectors infiltrated with 6G-Rhodamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Barojas, E.; Aca-López, V.; Sánchez-Mora, E.; Silva-González, R.; Luna-López, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    We report the study of the optical properties of 6G-Rhodamine (Rhd) infiltrated porous silicon dielectric Bragg reflectors (DBRs) with 31 constituent periods. The DBRs were obtained by an electrochemical anodizing process of Si in a two electrodes Teflon cell. The porosity was determined by gravimetric measurements on single Porous silicon (PSi) layers. Based on the characterization results of single layers the DBRs were synthesized. After anodizing, the DBRs were silanized with a 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane solution and functionalized with Rhd solutions at different concentrations. Cross section scanning electron micrographs show that the DBRs synthesis was successful. After each preparation step, Reflectance and Fluorescence (FL) spectra were recorded. These spectra show that as the Rhd concentration in solution is increased the stop band intensity as well as the FL intensity are enhanced due to constructive interference effects.

  11. Handbook of solar energy data for south-facing surfaces in the United States. Volume I. An insolation, array shadowing, and reflector augmentation model

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.H.

    1980-01-15

    This handbook provides estimates of average available solar insolation to fixed, flat-plate, south-facing collector surfaces at various array tilt angles at numerous sites in the US. This first volume contains average daily, total insolation estimates, by month, and annual totals for 235 locations. A model that estimates the direct, diffuse, and reflected components of total insolation on an hourly, daily, and monthly basis is presented. A shadow loss model and a reflector augmentation model providing estimates of the losses and gains associated with various fixed array geometries are also described. These models can be used with the insolation model provided or with other recorded data. A FORTRAN computer program with user's guide is presented. The program can be used to generate additional handbook values or to examine the effects of array shadowing and fixed reflector augmentation effects on a daily, monthly, or annual basis. Array shadowing depends on location, array size, array tilt, array separation, and time. The program can be used to examine trade-offs between array spacing and insolation losses due to shadowing. The reflector augmentation program can be used to examine trade-offs among array size and tilt, separation, and reflector tilt to determine the combination of design values that optimize the economic objectives or technical criteria of the system.

  12. Coatings for large-area low-cost solar concentrators and reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter M.; Affinito, John D.; Gross, Mark E.; Bennett, Wendy D.

    1994-09-01

    Large-optics coating facilities and processes at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) that were used to develop large-area high-performance laser mirrors for SDIO are now being used to fabricate a variety of optical components for commercial clients, and for novel applications for other DoD clients. Emphasis of this work is on technology transfer of low-cost coating processes and equipment to private clients. Much of the technology transfer is being accomplished through the CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) process funded by the Department of Energy (DOE).

  13. Demonstration of portable solar adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Deqing; Dong, Bing

    2012-10-01

    Solar-adaptive optics (AO) are more challenging than night-time AO, in some aspects. A portable solar adaptive optics (PSAO) system featuring compact physical size, low cost, and good performance has been proposed and developed. PSAO can serve as a visiting instrument for any existing ground-based solar telescope to improve solar image quality by replacing just a few optical components. High-level programming language, LabVIEW, is used to develop the wavefront sensing and control software, and general purpose computers are used to drive the whole system. During October 2011, the feasibility and good performance of PSAO was demonstrated with the 61-cm solar telescope at San Fernando Observatory. The image contrast and resolution are noticeably improved after AO correction.

  14. Conceptual design studies for large free-flying solar-reflector spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.; Miller, R. K.; Knapp, K. P. W.

    1981-01-01

    The 1 km diameter reflecting film surface is supported by a lightweight structure which may be automatically deployed after launch in the Space Shuttle. A twin rotor, control moment gyroscope, with deployable rotors, is included as a primary control actuator. The vehicle has a total specific mass of less than 12 g/sq m including allowances for all required subsystems. The structural elements were sized to accommodate the loads of a typical SOLARES type mission where a swam of these free flying satellites is employed to concentrate sunlight on a number of energy conversion stations on the ground.

  15. Combined plasmonic and dielectric rear reflectors for enhanced photocurrent in solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basch, A.; Beck, F. J.; Söderström, T.; Varlamov, S.; Catchpole, K. R.

    2012-06-01

    A doubling of the photocurrent due to light trapping is demonstrated by the combination of silver nanoparticles with a highly reflective back scatterer fabricated by Snow Globe Coating on the rear of a 2 μm polycrystalline silicon thin film solar cell. The binder free high refractive index titania particles can overcome light losses due to transmission. Modelling indicates that adding plasmonic nanoparticles to the back scatterer widens the angular distribution of scattered light such that over 80% of long wavelength light is scattered outside the Si/air loss cone and trapped in the cell, compared to 30% for the titania alone.

  16. Fiber optic sensor employing successively destroyed coupled points or reflectors for detecting shock wave speed and damage location

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    1995-01-01

    A shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival "points" constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the "points" of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor.

  17. Fiber optic sensor employing successively destroyed coupled points or reflectors for detecting shock wave speed and damage location

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, J.D.

    1995-08-29

    A shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location is disclosed. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival ``points`` constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the ``points`` of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor. 6 figs.

  18. New CPV Systems With Static Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripanagnostopoulos, Y.; Chemisana, D.; Rosell, J. I.; Souliotis, M.

    2010-10-01

    New designs of low concentrating photovoltaics have been studied, where static reflectors and moving absorbers that track the concentrated solar rays, aim to cost effective solar devices. These systems are based on the concept that strip absorbers can use the beam radiation and convert it to electricity, while the diffuse radiation is absorbed by flat absorbers and converted into heat. The work on these designs follow the research on the linear Fresnel lenses, which are combined with PV or PV/T absorbers and can be used not only for the conversion of solar radiation into electricity and heat but also to control the illumination and the temperature of interior building spaces. Design aspects and optical results give a figure of the optical performance of these new CPV collectors, which are based on the converged solar radiation distribution profiles for East-West orientation of parabolic trough reflectors. The concentration ratio depends on the geometry of the parabola axis and the higher values correspond to the axis towards the summer solstice. The results show that the new CPV designs can be effectively applied in buildings adapting energy demand in electricity and heat.

  19. Freeform lens design to achieve 1000X solar concentration with a parabolic trough reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheelwright, Brian M.; Angel, Roger; Coughenour, Blake

    2014-12-01

    Line-focus parabolic trough mirrors for solar thermal generation cannot produce the high concentration required for concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) systems. We describe a freeform lens array with toroidal symmetry which intercepts the low-concentration line focus to produce a series of elongated, high-concentration foci. The design employs 2D Kӧhler illumination to improve the acceptance angle in one direction. The two-stage concentrator has 1000X average geometric concentration with an acceptance angle of +/-1.49° in the azimuthal direction and +/-0.29° in the elevation direction. Preliminary results of a prototype roll-forming process are shown in thermoplastics and B270 glass.

  20. Performance of Cat’s Eye Modulating Retro-Reflectors for Free-Space Optical Communications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    attenuation is higher and in addition they fall off as 1/R 4 instead of 1/R 2 . The MRR parameters that affect the link are the MRR’s optical antenna gain...its modulation efficiency, and it modulation bandwidth. To overcome, its large propagation losses the MRR must exhibit a high optical antenna gain...light as its retro-reflects it. Thus its optical antenna gain is the product of the classical formulas for receiver gain and transmitter gain. The

  1. A dielectric omnidirectional reflector

    PubMed

    Fink; Winn; Fan; Chen; Michel; Joannopoulos; Thomas

    1998-11-27

    A design criterion that permits truly omnidirectional reflectivity for all polarizations of incident light over a wide selectable range of frequencies was used in fabricating an all-dielectric omnidirectional reflector consisting of multilayer films. The reflector was simply constructed as a stack of nine alternating micrometer-thick layers of polystyrene and tellurium and demonstrates omnidirectional reflection over the wavelength range from 10 to 15 micrometers. Because the omnidirectionality criterion is general, it can be used to design omnidirectional reflectors in many frequency ranges of interest. Potential uses depend on the geometry of the system. For example, coating of an enclosure will result in an optical cavity. A hollow tube will produce a low-loss, broadband waveguide, whereas a planar film could be used as an efficient radiative heat barrier or collector in thermoelectric devices.

  2. Optical materials technology for energy efficiency and solar energy conversion VI; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, Aug. 18, 19, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Lampert, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    Recent advances in optical materials for energy conversion are discussed in reviews and reports. Sections are devoted to transparent IR reflectors and large-area deposition technology; optical switching materials; holographic films and reflector technology; and absorbers, photovoltaics, and solar materials. Topics addressed include bendable Ag-based low-emissivity coating on glass, plasma oxidation of Ag and Zn in low-emissivity stacks, smart window coatings, improved colored-state reflectivity in lithiated WO3 films, photochromic and thermochromic pigments for solar absorbing-reflecting coatings, the design and optimization of holographic solar concentrators, the properties of black cobalt coatings, and interface states and Fermi-level pinning in CdSe thin-film solar cells.

  3. Nanostructured metallic rear reflectors for thin solar cells: balancing parasitic absorption in metal and large-angle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disney, Claire E. R.; Pillai, Supriya; Green, Martin A.

    2015-12-01

    Rear reflectors for solar cells comprised of metal films with periodic arrays of nanoscale features on their surface can provide significantly enhanced light trapping in the absorber layer. However these structures can also result in significantly increased parasitic absorption into the metal layer at various wavelengths of light. Conversely these highly absorbing resonances can also coincide with the wavelengths which display the largest enhancement to the cell's photocurrent. As such it is important to understand the underlying causes for such photocurrent enhancements and losses in the metal in order to design the optimum structure for use. 3D Finite-difference-time-domain simulations have been used to model a variety of structures and analyze the spatial distribution of absorption within different materials which make up the structure, the angles at which light will be scattered from the rear surface, as well as the idealized short circuit current from each structure integrated across the AM1.5 spectrum. These reveal the properties of these modes at resonant wavelengths at which absorption into both materials is enhanced. Despite the enhanced coupling of light into the metal at these wavelengths, the amount of light scattered back into the absorber at large angles is also significantly boosted. For a large variety of geometries, the impact of this large angle scattering dominates leading to significant increases to a cell's photocurrent. Our simulations allow us to understand the contributions of multiple plasmonic effects occurring in such structures, allowing selection of the most suitable geometries to achieve large-angle scattering in a desired wavelength range.

  4. Performance measurements of new silicon carbide coated reflectors for concentrated solar power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belasri, Djawed; Nakamura, Kazuki; Armstrong, Peter; Calvet, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    The new silicon carbide coated mirrors (SiC-mirrors) developed by Ibiden Co., Ltd. and tested at the Masdar Institute of Science and Technology offer several advantages in concentrated solar power (CSP) structure and operation. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of the reflectance and durability of the SiC-mirrors compared to high quality CSP glass mirrors in conjunction with two different applied cleaning methods. SiC-mirrors are 40 % lighter than high quality CSP glass mirrors, which leads to reduce costs of heliostat, parabolic trough or linear Fresnel structures, including assembly and installation time, lower drive power requirements, and stress during tracking operation. Lab and field tests show the SiC mirrors' reflectance is as high as the high quality CSP glass mirrors. Indeed, after 32 weeks of exposure, the high quality CSP glass mirrors' reflectance has decreased by 19 %, while the SiC mirrors' reflectance has decreased by 20 % when the brushing with water cleaning was applied. Using the brushing without water cleaning, the reflectance has decreased by 13 % and 2 % for the high quality CSP glass mirrors and the SiC-mirrors, respectively.

  5. Optical models for silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T.; Sopori, B.

    1995-08-01

    Light trapping is an important design feature for high-efficiency silicon solar cells. Because light trapping can considerably enhance optical absorption, a thinner substrate can be used which, in turn, can lower the bulk carrier recombination and concommitantly increase open-circuit voltage, and fill factor of the cell. The basic concepts of light trapping are similar to that of excitation of an optical waveguide, where a prism or a grating structure increases the phase velocity of the incoming optical wave such that waves propagated within the waveguide are totally reflected at the interfaces. Unfortunately, these concepts break down because the entire solar cell is covered with such a structure, making it necessary to develop new analytical approaches to deal with incomplete light trapping in solar cells. This paper describes two models that analyze light trapping in thick and thin solar cells.

  6. Optical figure testing of prototype mirrors for JPL's Precision Segmented Reflector (PSR) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochberg, Eric B.

    1991-01-01

    JPL's PSR program is developing enabling technologies for large space telescopes employing segmented optics, and in particular, lightweight, thermally stable mirrors for telescopes operating at sub-mm wavelengths. JPL's vacuum cryointerferometric optical test facility includes a computer-controlled phase shifting interferometer operating at 10.59 microns and laser metrology for measurement of piston and absolute radius of curvature. The optical metrology has been integrated with a large vacuum chamber including a liquid nitrogen shroud capable of radiatively cooling 1.5 meter aperture mirrors down to 150 K. The facility is now being used to characterize prototype mirrors in both their room-temperature 'as-replicated' condition, and under orbital temperature conditions. The performance and limitations of the optical metrology hardware and software components are noted. Representative test results on prototype one meter-class composite mirrors being developed for PSR and related ground-based programs are also presented.

  7. VSHOT: a tool for characterizing large, imprecise reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.A.; Neal, D.R.; Gruetzner, J.K.; Houser, R.M.; Edgar, R.M.; Wendelin, T.J.

    1996-11-01

    A prototype Video Scanning Hartmann Optical Tester (VSHOT) has been developed to characterize the optics of dish-type solar concentrators. VSHOT is a flexible platform that may characterize any large reflector with a focal length over diameter ratio (f{number_sign}) greater than 0. 45, and RMS optical error in the 0. I - I 0 milliradian range. The VSHOT hardware, software, and operation are described. Measurement uncertainty and preliminary test results are discussed. Another potential application being explored for the VSHOT is the quality assurance of slumped-glass automobile windshields. Preliminary test results from a reference optic and a section of a windshield are presented.

  8. The Optical Design of a System using a Fresnel Lens that Gathers Light for a Solar Concentrator and that Feeds into Solar Alignment Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, Gary W.; Huegele, Vinson

    1998-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been developing a space deployable, lightweight membrane concentrator to focus solar energy into a solar furnace while remaining aligned to the sun. For an inner surface, this furnace has a cylindrical heat exchanger cavity coaligned to the optical axis; the furnace warms gas to propel the spacecraft. The membrane concentrator is a 1727 mm (68.00 in.) diameter, F/1.7 Fresnel lens. This large membrane is made from polyimide and is 0.076 mm (0.0030 in.) thick; it has the Fresnel grooves cast into it. The solar concentrator system has a super fast paraboloid reflector near the lens focus and immediately adjacent to the cylindrical exchanger cavity. The paraboloid collects the wide bandwidth and some of the solar energy scattered by the Fresnel lens. Finally, the paraboloid feeds the light into the cylinder. The Fresnel lens also possesses a narrow annular zone that focuses a reference beam toward four detectors that keep the optical system aligned to the sun; thus, occurs a refracting lens that focuses two places! The result can be summarized as a composite Fresnel lens for solar concentration and alignment.

  9. Extraterrestrial applications of solar optics for interior illumination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eijadi, David A.; Williams, Kyle D.

    1992-01-01

    Solar optics is a terrestrial technology that has potential extraterrestrial applications. Active solar optics (ASO) and passive solar optics (PSO) are two approaches to the transmission of sunlight to remote interior spaces. Active solar optics is most appropriate for task illumination, while PSO is most appropriate for general illumination. Research into solar optics, motivated by energy conservation, has produced lightweight and low-cost materials, products that have applications to NASA's Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) program and its lunar base studies. Specifically, prism light guides have great potential in these contexts. Several applications of solar optics to lunar base concepts are illustrated.

  10. Electromagnetic backscattering by corner reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, C. A.; Griesser, T.

    1986-01-01

    The Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD), which supplements Geometric Optics (GO), and the Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD), which supplements Physical Optics (PO), are used to predict the backscatter cross sections of dihedral corner reflectors which have right, obtuse, or acute included angles. These theories allow individual backscattering mechanisms of the dihedral corner reflectors to be identified and provide good agreement with experimental results in the azimuthal plane. The advantages and disadvantages of the geometrical and physical theories are discussed in terms of their accuracy, usefulness, and complexity. Numerous comparisons of analytical results with experimental data are presented. While physical optics alone is more accurate and more useful than geometrical optics alone, the combination of geometrical optics and geometrical diffraction seems to out perform physical optics and physical diffraction when compared with experimental data, especially for acute angle dihedral corner reflectors.

  11. Six-dimensional optical storage utilizing wavelength selective, polarization sensitive, and reflectivity graded Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shangqing

    2014-09-01

    An optical storage system which stores data in three spacial and three physical dimensions is designed and investigated. Its feasibility has been demonstrated by theoretical derivation and numerical calculation. This system has comprehensive advantages including very large capacity, ultrafast throughputs, relatively simple structure and compatibility with CD and DVD. It's an actually practicable technology. With two-photon absorption writing/erasing and optical coherence tomography reading, its storage capacity is over 32 Tbytes per DVD sized disk, and its reading speed is over 25 Gbits/s with high signal-to-noise ratio of over 76 dB. The larger capacity of over 1 Pbyte per disk is potential.

  12. Optical study of solar tower power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddhibi, F.; Ben Amara, M.; Balghouthi, M.; Guizani, A.

    2015-04-01

    The central receiver technology for electricity generation consists of concentrating solar radiation coming from the solar tracker field into a central receiver surface located on the top of the tower. The heliostat field is constituted of a big number of reflective mirrors; each heliostat tracks the sun individually and reflects the sunlight to a focal point. Therefore, the heliostat should be positioned with high precision in order to minimize optical losses. In the current work, a mathematical model for the analysis of the optical efficiency of solar tower field power plant is proposed. The impact of the different factors which influence the optical efficiency is analyzed. These parameters are mainly, the shading and blocking losses, the cosine effect, the atmospheric attenuation and the spillage losses. A new method for the calculation of blocking and shadowing efficiency is introduced and validated by open literature.

  13. Simulation of DKIST solar adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Jose; Carlisle, Elizabeth; Schmidt, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    Solar adaptive optics (AO) simulations are a valuable tool to guide the design and optimization process of current and future solar AO and multi-conjugate AO (MCAO) systems. Solar AO and MCAO systems rely on extended object cross-correlating Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors to measure the wavefront. Accurate solar AO simulations require computationally intensive operations, which have until recently presented a prohibitive computational cost. We present an update on the status of a solar AO and MCAO simulation tool being developed at the National Solar Observatory. The simulation tool is a multi-threaded application written in the C++ language that takes advantage of current large multi-core CPU computer systems and fast ethernet connections to provide accurate full simulation of solar AO and MCAO systems. It interfaces with KAOS, a state of the art solar AO control software developed by the Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, that provides reliable AO control. We report on the latest results produced by the solar AO simulation tool.

  14. A fixed tilt solar collector employing reversible vee-trough reflectors and vacuum tube receivers for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selcuk, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    The usefulness of vee-trough concentrators in improving the efficiency and reducing the cost of collectors assembled from evacuated tube receivers was studied in the vee-trough/vacuum tube collector (VTVTC) project. The VTVTC was analyzed rigorously and various mathematical models were developed to calculate the optical performance of the vee-trough concentrator and the thermal performance of the evacuated tube receiver. A test bed was constructed to verify the mathematical analyses and compare reflectors made out of glass, Alzak and aluminized FEP Teflon. Tests were run at temperatures ranging from 95 to 180 C. Vee-trough collector efficiencies of 35 to 40% were observed at an operating temperature of about 175 C. Test results compared well with the calculated values. Predicted daily useful heat collection and efficiency values are presented for a year's duration of operation temperatures ranging from 65 to 230 C. Estimated collector costs and resulting thermal energy costs are presented. Analytical and experimental results are discussed along with a complete economic evaluation.

  15. Optics for future solar system exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, D. D.; Vescelus, F. E.; Wellman, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    The optics technology necessary for future solar system exploration is discussed. To satisfy the various mission objectives, optical components need to be of low weight, provide adequate spatial resolution and mapping coverage, provide necessary spectral resolution, provide means to perform adaptable mapping spectrometry, operate under low light levels, provide color images of high fidelity and operate under high temperatures. Future near-infrared mapping spectrometers are examined, and the use of focal-plane detectors to improve their sensitivity is discussed.

  16. Midtemperature solar systems test faclity predictions for thermal performance based on test data: Solar Kinetics T-700 solar collector with glass reflector surface

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA), is currently conducting a program to predict the performance and measure the characteristics of commercially available solar collectors that have the potential for use in industrial process heat and enhanced oil recovery applications. The thermal performance predictions for the Solar Kinetics solar line-focusing parabolic trough collector for five cities in the US are presented. (WHK)

  17. Optical design of a system using a Fresnel lens that gathers light for a solar concentrator and that feeds into solar alignment optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkerson, Gary W.; Huegele, Vinson B.

    1998-09-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has been developing a space deployable, lightweight membrane concentrator to focus energy from the sun into a solar engine while remaining aligned to the sun. For an inner surface, this engine has a cylindrical heat exchanger cavity coaligned to the optical axis; the engine warms gas to propel the spacecraft. The membrane concentrator is a 1727 mm (68.00 in.) diameter, F/1.7 Fresnel lens. This large membrane is made from polyimide and is 0.076 mm (0.0030 in.) thick; it has the Fresnel grooves cast into it. The solar concentrator system has a super fast paraboloid reflector near the lens focus and immediately adjacent to the cylindrical exchanger cavity. The paraboloid collects the wide bandwidth and some of the solar energy scattered by the Fresnel lens. Finally, the paraboloid feeds the light into the cylinder. The Fresnel lens also possesses a narrow annular zone that focuses a reference beam toward four detectors that keep the optical system aligned to the sun; thus, occurs a refracting lens that focuses two places summarized as a composite Fresnel lens for solar concentration and alignment.

  18. An efficient light trapping scheme based on textured conductive photonic crystal back reflector for performance improvement of amorphous silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Peizhuan; Hou, Guofu Huang, Qian; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Jianjun Ni, Jian; Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhao, Ying; Fan, QiHua

    2014-08-18

    An efficient light trapping scheme named as textured conductive photonic crystal (TCPC) has been proposed and then applied as a back-reflector (BR) in n-i-p hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cell. This TCPC BR combined a flat one-dimensional photonic crystal and a randomly textured surface of chemically etched ZnO:Al. Total efficiency enhancement was obtained thanks to the sufficient conductivity, high reflectivity and strong light scattering of the TCPC BR. Unwanted intrinsic losses of surface plasmon modes are avoided. An initial efficiency of 9.66% for a-Si:H solar cell was obtained with short-circuit current density of 14.74 mA/cm{sup 2}, fill factor of 70.3%, and open-circuit voltage of 0.932 V.

  19. Solar optical telescope primary mirror controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. J.; Liu, D.

    1980-01-01

    The development of a technique to control the articulated primary mirror (APM) of the solar optical telescope (SOT) is discussed. Program results indicate that a single, all digital controller has sufficient capability to totally handle the computational requirements for control of the SOT APM.

  20. Optical Coating Performance and Thermal Structure Design for Heat Reflectors of JWST Electronic Control Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Threat, Felix; Garrison, Matt; Perrygo, Chuck; Bousquet, Robert; Rashford, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) consists of an infrared-optimized Optical Telescope Element (OTE) that is cooled down to 40 degrees Kelvin. A second adjacent component to the OTE is the Integrated Science Instrument Module, or ISIM. This module includes the electronic compartment, which provides the mounting surfaces and ambient thermally controlled environment for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the 200 watts generated from the ISIM structure away from the OTE is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft's own heat does not interfere with the infrared light detected from distant cosmic sources. This technical challenge is overcome by a thermal subsystem unit that provides passive cooling to the ISIM control electronics. The proposed design of this thermal radiator consists of a lightweight structure made out of composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings. In this paper, we will present characterizations of the coating emittance, bidirectional reflectance, and mechanical structure design that will affect the performance of this passive cooling system.

  1. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data: solar kinetics T-600 solar collector with FEK 244 reflector surface

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA), is currently conducting a program to predict the performance and measure the characteristics of commercially available solar collectors that have the potential for use in industrial process heat and enhanced oil recovery applications. The thermal performance predictions for the Solar Kinetics T-600 solar line-focusing parabolic trough collector are presented for three output temperatures at five cities in the US. (WHK)

  2. Offset truss hex solar concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, John E. (Inventor); Sturgis, James D. (Inventor); Erikson, Raymond J. (Inventor); Waligroski, Gregg A. (Inventor); Scott, Michael A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A solar energy concentrator system comprises an offset reflector structure made up of a plurality of solar energy reflector panel sections interconnected with one another to form a piecewise approximation of a portion of a (parabolic) surface of revolution rotated about a prescribed focal axis. Each panel section is comprised of a plurality of reflector facets whose reflective surfaces effectively focus reflected light to preselected surface portions of the interior sidewall of a cylindrically shaped solar energy receiver. The longitudinal axis of the receiver is tilted at an acute angle with respect to the optical axis such that the distribution of focussed solar energy over the interior surface of the solar engine is optimized for dynamic solar energy conversion. Each reflector panel section comprises a flat, hexagonally shaped truss support framework and a plurality of beam members interconnecting diametrically opposed corners of the hexagonal framework recessed within which a plurality of (spherically) contoured reflector facets is disposed. The depth of the framework and the beam members is greater than the thickness of a reflector facet such that a reflector facet may be tilted (for controlling the effective focus of its reflected light through the receiver aperture) without protruding from the panel section.

  3. An Optical Characterization Technique for Parabolic Trough Solar Collectors Using Images of the Absorber Reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owkes, Jeanmarie Kathleen

    As the concentrating solar power industry competes to develop a less-expensive parabolic trough collector, assurance is needed that new parabolic trough collectors maintain accurate optical alignment. Previous optical characterization techniques are either too slow, ill-suited for field testing, or do not allow the collector to be tested in realistic orientations. The Observer method presented here enables the rapid optical characterization of parabolic trough collectors in any orientation in the field. The Observer method directly measures the combined optical angular errors in the reflector surface shape and the absorber position, which can be separated into its two components: reflector surface slope and absorber misalignment. The data acquisition requires the placement of photogrammetry targets on and around the collector. Multiple photographs of the absorber and its reflection are taken with a digital camera from different angles with respect to the collector. The images are processed to determine the camera location of each image using photogrammetry bundle analysis. The absorber and its reflection are found in the photographs using image-processing techniques. A Monte Carlo uncertainty model was developed to determine the uncertainty in the Observer measurements. The uncertainty was estimated for a wide array of measurement test scenarios to demonstrate the user's control over the measurement uncertainty. To validate the Observer method, the absorber alignment technique was compared to traditional photogrammetry; the absorber position measured with the two methods compared with a root-mean-square difference of 1.5 mm in the transverse direction and 0.86 mm along the optical axis. The reflector surface slope error measurement was compared to both VSHOT and SOFAST, two well-established optical characterization tools, by measuring a single reflector panel in the laboratory. The VSHOT and SOFAST measurements agreed with the Observer with a root

  4. Micromachined, Electrostatically Deformable Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartman, Randall K.; Wang, Paul K. C.; Miller, Linda M.; Kenny, Thomas W.; Kaiser, William J.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Agronin, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    Micromachined, closed-loop, electrostatically actuated reflectors (microCLEARs) provide relatively simple and inexpensive alternatives to large, complex, expensive adaptive optics used to control wavefronts of beams of light in astronomy and in experimental laser weapons. Micromachining used to make deformable mirror, supporting structure, and actuation circuitry. Development of microCLEARs may not only overcome some of disadvantages and limitations of older adaptive optics but may also satisfy demands of potential market for small, inexpensive deformable mirrors in electronically controlled film cameras, video cameras, and other commercial optoelectronic instruments.

  5. Optical designs for improved solar cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosten, Emily Dell

    The solar resource is the most abundant renewable resource on earth, yet it is currently exploited with relatively low efficiencies. To make solar energy more affordable, we can either reduce the cost of the cell or increase the efficiency with a similar cost cell. In this thesis, we consider several different optical approaches to achieve these goals. First, we consider a ray optical model for light trapping in silicon microwires. With this approach, much less material can be used, allowing for a cost savings. We next focus on reducing the escape of radiatively emitted and scattered light from the solar cell. With this angle restriction approach, light can only enter and escape the cell near normal incidence, allowing for thinner cells and higher efficiencies. In Auger-limited GaAs, we find that efficiencies greater than 38% may be achievable, a significant improvement over the current world record. To experimentally validate these results, we use a Bragg stack to restrict the angles of emitted light. Our measurements show an increase in voltage and a decrease in dark current, as less radiatively emitted light escapes. While the results in GaAs are interesting as a proof of concept, GaAs solar cells are not currently made on the production scale for terrestrial photovoltaic applications. We therefore explore the application of angle restriction to silicon solar cells. While our calculations show that Auger-limited cells give efficiency increases of up to 3% absolute, we also find that current amorphous silicion-crystalline silicon heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) cells give significant efficiency gains with angle restriction of up to 1% absolute. Thus, angle restriction has the potential for unprecedented one sun efficiencies in GaAs, but also may be applicable to current silicon solar cell technology. Finally, we consider spectrum splitting, where optics direct light in different wavelength bands to solar cells with band gaps tuned to those

  6. Reflector Surface Error Compensation in Dual-Reflector Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Imbriale, William

    2010-01-01

    set of phase values is determined that is then transferred back to the main reflector aperture for recovering the phase function. Once this function is recovered, the corresponding phase function on the subreflector is calculated and used to compensate for main reflector surface errors. In going back and forth between sub and main reflectors, geometrical (ray) optics is employed, which even though it ignores edge diffraction and other effects, is shown to be accurate for phase recovery.

  7. Science with the solar optical telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, S. D.; Hogan, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) is designed to provide the solar physics community with the data necessary for solving several fundamental problems in the energetics and dynamics of the solar atmosphere. Among these problems are questions on the origin and evolution of the sun's magnetic field, heating of the outer solar atmosphere, and sources of the solar wind in the lower lying regions of the outer atmosphere. The SOT will be built under the management of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, with science instruments provided by teams led by Principal Investigators. The telescope will be built by the Perkin-Elmer Corporation, and the science instruments selected for the first flight will be provided by the Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory (LPARL) and the California Institute of Technology, with actual construction of a combined science instrument taking place at the LPARL. The SOT has a 1.3-meter-diameter primary mirror that will be capable of achieving diffraction-limited viewing in the visible of 0.1 arc-second. This dimension is less than a hydrodynamic scale-height or a mean-free-path of a continuum photon in the solar atmosphere. Image stability will be achieved by a control system in the telescope, which moves both the primary and tertiary mirrors in tandem, and will be further enhanced by a correlation tracker in the combined science instrument. The SOT Facility is currently scheduled for its first flight on Spacelab at the beginning of the 1990's.

  8. Optical materials technology for energy efficiency and solar energy conversion VII; Proceedings of the Meeting, Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany, Sept. 19-21, 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granqvist, Claes G.; Lampert, Carl M.

    Various papers on optical materials technology for energy efficiency and solar energy conversion are presented. Individual topics addressed include: nonlinear optical effects in organic molecules and polymers, optical and electrical properties of amorphous Li(x)WO3 films, electrochromism in sputtered vanadium pentoxide, characterization of nickel oxide electrochromic films, radiative cooling with pigmented polyethylene foils, plasma-film interactions in RF sputtered a-Si:H and a-Ge:H, metal oxyfluoride coatings for energy-efficient windows, fatigue-resistant photochromic plastics, evaporated VO(x) thin films, electrochromism in nickel oxide films, system design for high-rate deposition of indium oxide solar coatings, performance and bandwidth analysis of holographic solar reflectors, laser and spectroscopic characterization of thin films, high-efficiency collectors for solar energy applications, influence of surface roughness on the optical properties of cermet coatings, and sputtered aluminum composite selective absorbing surfaces.

  9. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddier, Francois; Owen, Toby

    1997-01-01

    Most solar system objects have never been observed at wavelengths longer than the R band with an angular resolution better than 1 sec. The Hubble Space Telescope itself has only recently been equipped to observe in the infrared. However, because of its small diameter, the angular resolution is lower than that one can now achieved from the ground with adaptive optics, and time allocated to planetary science is limited. We have been using adaptive optics (AO) on a 4-m class telescope to obtain 0.1 sec resolution images solar system objects at far red and near infrared wavelengths (0.7-2.5 micron) which best discriminate their spectral signatures. Our efforts has been put into areas of research for which high angular resolution is essential, such as the mapping of Titan and of large asteroids, the dynamics and composition of Neptune stratospheric clouds, the infrared photometry of Pluto, Charon, and close satellites previously undetected from the ground.

  10. Cassegrainian concentrator solar array exploratory development module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, R. E.; Crabtree, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    A miniaturized Cassegrainian concentrator solar array concept is under development to reduce the cost of multi-kW spacecraft solar arrays. A primary parabolic reflector directs incoming solar energy to a secondary, centrally mounted inverted hyperbolic reflector and down onto a solar cell mounted on an Mo heat spreader on a 0.25 mm thick Al heat fin. Each unit is 12.7 mm thick, which makes the concentrator assembly roughly as thick as a conventional panel. The output is 100 W/sq and 20 W/kg, considering 20% efficient Si cells at 100 suns. A tertiary light catcher is mounted around the cell to ameliorate optic errors. The primary reflector is electroformed Ni with protective and reflective coatings. The cells have back surface reflectors and a SiO antireflective coating. An optical efficiency of 80% is projected, and GaAs cells are being considered in an attempt to raise cell efficiencies to over 30%.

  11. High-Quality Crystal Growth and Characteristics of AlGaN-Based Solar-Blind Distributed Bragg Reflectors with a Tri-layer Period Structure.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jianjun; Chen, Dunjun; Yang, Lianhong; Liu, Yanli; Dong, Kexiu; Lu, Hai; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Youdou

    2016-07-06

    To realize AlGaN-based solar-blind ultraviolet distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs), a novel tri-layer AlGaN/AlInN/AlInGaN periodical structure that differs from the traditional periodically alternating layers of high- and low-refractive-index materials was proposed and grown on an Al0.5Ga0.5N template via metal-organic chemical vapour deposition. Because of the intentional design of the AlInGaN strain transition layer, a state-of-the-art DBR structure with atomic-level-flatness interfaces was achieved using an AlGaN template. The fabricated DBR exhibits a peak reflectivity of 86% at the centre wavelength of 274 nm and a stopband with a full-width at half-maximum of 16 nm.

  12. High-Quality Crystal Growth and Characteristics of AlGaN-Based Solar-Blind Distributed Bragg Reflectors with a Tri-layer Period Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jianjun; Chen, Dunjun; Yang, Lianhong; Liu, Yanli; Dong, Kexiu; Lu, Hai; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Youdou

    2016-07-01

    To realize AlGaN-based solar-blind ultraviolet distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs), a novel tri-layer AlGaN/AlInN/AlInGaN periodical structure that differs from the traditional periodically alternating layers of high- and low-refractive-index materials was proposed and grown on an Al0.5Ga0.5N template via metal-organic chemical vapour deposition. Because of the intentional design of the AlInGaN strain transition layer, a state-of-the-art DBR structure with atomic-level-flatness interfaces was achieved using an AlGaN template. The fabricated DBR exhibits a peak reflectivity of 86% at the centre wavelength of 274 nm and a stopband with a full-width at half-maximum of 16 nm.

  13. High-Quality Crystal Growth and Characteristics of AlGaN-Based Solar-Blind Distributed Bragg Reflectors with a Tri-layer Period Structure

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jianjun; Chen, Dunjun; Yang, Lianhong; Liu, Yanli; Dong, Kexiu; Lu, Hai; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Youdou

    2016-01-01

    To realize AlGaN-based solar-blind ultraviolet distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs), a novel tri-layer AlGaN/AlInN/AlInGaN periodical structure that differs from the traditional periodically alternating layers of high- and low-refractive-index materials was proposed and grown on an Al0.5Ga0.5N template via metal-organic chemical vapour deposition. Because of the intentional design of the AlInGaN strain transition layer, a state-of-the-art DBR structure with atomic-level-flatness interfaces was achieved using an AlGaN template. The fabricated DBR exhibits a peak reflectivity of 86% at the centre wavelength of 274 nm and a stopband with a full-width at half-maximum of 16 nm. PMID:27381651

  14. Optical Amplifier Based Space Solar Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fork, Richard L.

    2001-01-01

    The objective was to design a safe optical power beaming system for use in space. Research was focused on identification of strategies and structures that would enable achievement near diffraction limited optical beam quality, highly efficient electrical to optical conversion, and high average power in combination in a single system. Efforts centered on producing high efficiency, low mass of the overall system, low operating temperature, precision pointing and tracking capability, compatibility with useful satellite orbits, component and system reliability, and long component and system life in space. A system based on increasing the power handled by each individual module to an optimum and the number of modules in the complete structure was planned. We were concerned with identifying the most economical and rapid path to commercially viable safe space solar power.

  15. Planar Micro-Optic Solar Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, Jason Harris

    Solar radiation can be converted directly into electricity with materials exhibiting a photovoltaic response. Most photovoltaic arrays use crystalline silicon cells assembled in large modules which convert <20% of incident light into electricity. More recently, multijunction solar cells, comprised of multiple semiconducting layers, have exceeded 41% conversion. The drawback to these devices is the high cost associated with materials and fabrication, making them impractical as rigid panels. The field of concentrator photovoltaics pairs these costly devices with inexpensive collection optics which reduce the amount of active cell area. Most commercial systems rely upon simple lenses or mirrors focusing through secondary optics, yet these approaches lead to hundreds of individual components which must be assembled, aligned and interconnected. In this dissertation, I present an alternative concentration approach which replaces discrete optics with a segmented lens array and common slab waveguide. Sunlight collected by each small lens aperture focuses onto mirrors placed on the waveguide surface which reflect rays at angles that guide by total internal reflection. This configuration directs light from thousands of arrayed lenses into the same waveguide which connects to a single photovoltaic cell. We refer to this approach as planar micro-optic concentration because the waveguide remains uniform in cross-section and is compatible with large-scale microfabrication techniques such as roll-to-roll processing. In the following chapters, I discuss the concept and tradeoffs associated with waveguide coupling and propagation. I present optimized systems which demonstrated >80% optical efficiency at 300x geometric concentration. In addition, I develop a self-aligned fabrication process to assemble several small-scale prototypes using commercially-available components. These systems were experimentally measured at 52.3% optical efficiency. Lastly, I show how the waveguide

  16. Optical Films For Solar Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampert, Carl M.

    1983-11-01

    Stratified optical materials and coatings play an important role in improving the efficiency of solar conversion processes. At present the best-known stratified media are multilayer and graded-index films. Stratified media are used as heat mirrors, selective absorbers, antireflective films, and transparent insulation. Graded-index films can be homogenous materials, spatially oriented structures, or etched materials. Such films and materials improve efficiency and allow for innovation in energy-efficient windows, passive and active energy conversion, and photovoltaics. The horizons of invention can be expanded by considering new materials, techniques, and concepts that can increase the efficiency of energy utilization in buildings and transform solar energy into heat, light and electrical power. The stability requirements for materials to effectively collect and transmit solar energy are extremely demanding. This, coMbined with the need for inexpensive production methods, creates a broad area for innovative scientific research. We describe several approaches and materials systems for two broad application categories: 1) low-conductance, high-transmittance systems and 2) solar absorbers.

  17. Electro-optics of perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qianqian; Armin, Ardalan; Nagiri, Ravi Chandra Raju; Burn, Paul L.; Meredith, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Organohalide-perovskite solar cells have emerged as a leading next-generation photovoltaic technology. However, despite surging efficiencies, many questions remain unanswered regarding the mechanisms of operation. Here we report a detailed study of the electro-optics of efficient CH3NH3PbI3-perovskite-only planar devices. We report the dielectric constants over a large frequency range. Importantly, we found the real part of the static dielectric constant to be ∼70, from which we estimate the exciton-binding energy to be of order 2 meV, which strongly indicates a non-excitonic mechanism. Also, Jonscher's Law behaviour was consistent with the perovskite having ionic character. Accurate knowledge of the cell's optical constants allowed improved modelling and design, and using this information we fabricated an optimized device with an efficiency of 16.5%. The optimized devices have ∼100% spectrally flat internal quantum efficiencies and minimal bimolecular recombination. These findings establish systematic design rules to achieve silicon-like efficiencies in simple perovskite solar cells.

  18. Semiconductor nanowire optical antenna solar absorbers.

    PubMed

    Cao, Linyou; Fan, Pengyu; Vasudev, Alok P; White, Justin S; Yu, Zongfu; Cai, Wenshan; Schuller, Jon A; Fan, Shanhui; Brongersma, Mark L

    2010-02-10

    Photovoltaic (PV) cells can serve as a virtually unlimited clean source of energy by converting sunlight into electrical power. Their importance is reflected in the tireless efforts that have been devoted to improving the electrical and structural properties of PV materials. More recently, photon management (PM) has emerged as a powerful additional means to boost energy conversion efficiencies. Here, we demonstrate an entirely new PM strategy that capitalizes on strong broad band optical antenna effects in one-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures to dramatically enhance absorption of sunlight. We show that the absorption of sunlight in Si nanowires (Si NWs) can be significantly enhanced over the bulk. The NW's optical properties also naturally give rise to an improved angular response. We propose that by patterning the silicon layer in a thin film PV cell into an array of NWs, one can boost the absorption for solar radiation by 25% while utilizing less than half of the semiconductor material (250% increase in the light absorption per unit volume of material). These results significantly advance our understanding of the way sunlight is absorbed by one-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures and provide a clear, intuitive guidance for the design of efficient NW solar cells. The presented approach is universal to any semiconductor and a wide range of nanostructures; as such, it provides a new PV platform technology.

  19. The Planck Telescope reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stute, Thomas

    2004-09-01

    The mechanical division of EADS-Astrium GmbH, Friedrichshafen is currently engaged with the development, manufacturing and testing of the advanced dimensionally stable composite reflectors for the ESA satellite borne telescope Planck. The objective of the ESA mission Planck is to analyse the first light that filled the universe, the cosmic microwave background radiation. Under contract of the Danish Space Research Institute and ESA EADS-Astrium GmbH is developing the all CFRP primary and secondary reflectors for the 1.5-metre telescope which is the main instrument of the Planck satellite. The operational frequency ranges from to 25 GHz to 1000 GHz. The demanding high contour accuracy and surface roughness requirements are met. The design provides the extreme dimensional stability required by the cryogenic operational environment at around 40 K. The elliptical off-axis reflectors display a classical lightweight sandwich design with CFRP core and facesheets. Isostatic mounts provide the interfaces to the telescope structure. Protected VDA provides the reflecting surface. The manufacturing is performed at the Friedrichshafen premises of EADS-Space Transportation GmbH, the former Dornier composite workshops. Advanced manufacturing technologies like true angle lay-up by CNC fibre placement and filament winding are utilized. The protected coating is applied at the CAHA facilities at the Calar Alto Observatory, Spain. The exhaustive environmental testing is performed at the facilities of IABG, Munich (mechanical testing) and for the cryo-optical tests at CSL Liege. The project is in advanced state with both Qualification Models being under environmental testing. The flight models will be delivered in 2004. The paper gives an overview over the requirements and the main structural features how these requirements are met. Special production aspects and available test results are reported.

  20. Dual-shaped offset reflector antenna designs from solutions of the geometrical optics first-order partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo-Israel, V.; Imbriale, W.; Shogen, K.; Mittra, R.

    1990-01-01

    In obtaining solutions to the first-order nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) for synthesizing offset dual-shaped reflectors, it is found that previously observed computational problems can be avoided if the integration of the PDEs is started from an inner projected perimeter and integrated outward rather than starting from an outer projected perimeter and integrating inward. This procedure, however, introduces a new parameter, the main reflector inner perimeter radius p(o), when given a subreflector inner angle 0(o). Furthermore, a desired outer projected perimeter (e.g., a circle) is no longer guaranteed. Stability of the integration is maintained if some of the initial parameters are determined first from an approximate solution to the PDEs. A one-, two-, or three-parameter optimization algorithm can then be used to obtain a best set of parameters yielding a close fit to the desired projected outer rim. Good low cross-polarization mapping functions are also obtained. These methods are illustrated by synthesis of a high-gain offset-shaped Cassegrainian antenna and a low-noise offset-shaped Gregorian antenna.

  1. Optically (solar) pumped oxygen-iodine lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, O. B.; Zhevlakov, A. P.; Yur'ev, M. S.

    2014-07-01

    We present the results of theoretical and experimental studies demonstrating the possibility of developing an oxygen-iodine laser (OIL) with direct optical pumping of molecular oxygen involving inter-molecular interaction with charge transfer from donor molecule (buffer gas) to acceptor molecule (oxygen). This interaction lifts degeneracy of the lower energy states of molecular oxygen and increases its absorption cross section in the visible spectral region and the UV Herzberg band, where high quantum yield of singlet oxygen is achieved (QY ˜ 1 and QY ˜ 2, respectively) at the same time. A pulse-periodic optical pump sources with pulse energy of ˜50 kJ, pulse duration of ˜25 μs, and repetition rate of ˜10 Hz, which are synchronized with the mechanism of singlet oxygen generation, are developed. This allows implementation of a pulse-periodic oxygen-iodine laser with an efficiency of ˜25%, optical efficiency of ˜40%, and parameter L/ T ˜ 1/1.5, where T is the thermal energy released in the laser active medium upon generation of energy L. It is demonstrated that, under direct solar pumping of molecular oxygen, the efficiency parameter of the OIL can reach L/ T ˜ 1/0.8 in a wide range of scaling factors.

  2. Results from Coupled Optical and Electrical Sentaurus TCAD Models of a Gallium Phosphide on Silicon Electron Carrier Selective Contact Solar Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Limpert, Steven; Ghosh, Kunal; Wagner, Hannes; Bowden, Stuart; Honsberg, Christiana; Goodnick, Stephen; Bremner, Stephen; Green, Martin

    2014-06-09

    We report results from coupled optical and electrical Sentaurus TCAD models of a gallium phosphide (GaP) on silicon electron carrier selective contact (CSC) solar cell. Detailed analyses of current and voltage performance are presented for devices having substrate thicknesses of 10 μm, 50 μm, 100 μm and 150 μm, and with GaP/Si interfacial quality ranging from very poor to excellent. Ultimate potential performance was investigated using optical absorption profiles consistent with light trapping schemes of random pyramids with attached and detached rear reflector, and planar with an attached rear reflector. Results indicate Auger-limited open-circuit voltages up to 787 mV and efficiencies up to 26.7% may be possible for front-contacted devices.

  3. Flat plate reflectors for PV collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Spielberg, J.I. )

    1989-01-01

    This article delineates experimentation establishing that fixed reflectors may be used with solar photovoltaic panels to obtain 70% of the efficiency of a dual-axis tracking system. Also described is how the power output of a stationary, non-tracking panel can be easily doubled via the addition of over-sized, overhanging wind reflectors in place of the traditional reflectors of a dual axis system. Discussion covers theory, experimental details, comparison of theory to results, and conclusions drawn. 15 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Optical Waveguide Solar Energy System for Lunar Materials Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, T.; Case, J. A.; Senior, C. L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses results of our work on development of the Optical Waveguide (OW) Solar Energy System for Lunar Materials Processing. In the OW system as shown, solar radiation is collected by the concentrator which transfers the concentrated solar radiation to the OW transmission line consisting of low-loss optical fibers. The OW line transmits the solar radiation to the thermal reactor of the lunar materials processing plant. The feature of the OW system are: (1) Highly concentrated solar radiation (up to 104 suns) can be transmitted via flexible OW lines directly into the thermal reactor for materials processing: (2) Solar radiation intensity or spectra can be tailored to specific materials processing steps; (3) Provide solar energy to locations or inside of enclosures that would not otherwise have an access to solar energy; and (4) The system can be modularized and can be easily transported to and deployed at the lunar base.

  5. Computer prediction of dual reflector antenna radiation properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulou, C.

    1981-01-01

    A program for calculating radiation patterns for reflector antennas with either smooth analytic surfaces or with surfaces composed of a number of panels. Techniques based on the geometrical optics (GO) approach were used in tracing rays over the following regions: from a feed antenna to the first reflector surface (subreflector); from this reflector to a larger reflector surface (main reflector); and from the main reflector to a mathematical plane (aperture plane) in front of the main reflector. The equations of GO were also used to calculate the reflected field components for each ray making use of the feed radiation pattern and the parameters defining the surfaces of the two reflectors. These resulting fields form an aperture distribution which is integrated numerically to compute the radiation pattern for a specified set of angles.

  6. Fundamentals and techniques of nonimaging optics for solar energy concentration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, R.

    1980-05-20

    Nonimaging optics is a new discipline with techniques, formalism and objectives quite distinct from the traditional methods of focusing optics. These new systems achieve or closely approach the maximum concentration permitted by the Second Law of Thermodynamics for a given angular acceptance and are often called ideal. Application of these new principles to solar energy over the past seven years has led to the invention of a new class of solar concentrators, the most well known version of which is the Compound Parabolic Concentrator or CPC. A new formalism for analyzing nonimaging systems in terms of a quantity called the geometrical vector flux has been developed. This has led not only to a better understanding of the properties of ideal concentrators but to the discovery of several new concentrator designs. One of these new designs referred to as the trumpet concentrator has several advantageous features when used as a secondary concentrator for a point focusing dish concentrator. A new concentrator solution for absorbers which must be separated from the reflector by a gap has been invented. The properties of a variety of new and previously known nonimaging optical configurations have been investigated: for example, Compound Elliptical Concentrators (CEC's) as secondary concentrators and asymmetric ideal concentrators. A thermodynamic model which explains quantitatively the enhancement of effective absorptance of gray body receivers through cavity effects has been developed. The classic method of Liu and Jordan, which allows one to predict the diffuse sunlight levels through correlation with the total and direct fraction was revised and updated and applied to predict the performance of nonimaging solar collectors. The conceptual design for an optimized solar collector which integrates the techniques of nonimaging concentration with evacuated tube collector technology was carried out.

  7. Applications of nonimaging optics for very high solar concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    O`Gallagher, J.; Winston, R.

    1997-12-31

    Using the principles and techniques of nonimaging optics, solar concentrations that approach the theoretical maximum can be achieved. This has applications in solar energy collection wherever concentration is desired. In this paper, we survey recent progress in attaining and using high and ultrahigh solar fluxes. We review a number of potential applications for highly concentrated solar energy and the current status of the associated technology. By making possible new and unique applications for intense solar flux, these techniques have opened a whole new frontier for research and development of potentially economic uses of solar energy.

  8. Solar adaptive optics: specificities, lessons learned, and open alternatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montilla, I.; Marino, J.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Collados, M.; Montoya, L.; Tallon, M.

    2016-07-01

    First on sky adaptive optics experiments were performed on the Dunn Solar Telescope on 1979, with a shearing interferometer and limited success. Those early solar adaptive optics efforts forced to custom-develop many components, such as Deformable Mirrors and WaveFront Sensors, which were not available at that time. Later on, the development of the correlation Shack-Hartmann marked a breakthrough in solar adaptive optics. Since then, successful Single Conjugate Adaptive Optics instruments have been developed for many solar telescopes, i.e. the National Solar Observatory, the Vacuum Tower Telescope and the Swedish Solar Telescope. Success with the Multi Conjugate Adaptive Optics systems for GREGOR and the New Solar Telescope has proved to be more difficult to attain. Such systems have a complexity not only related to the number of degrees of freedom, but also related to the specificities of the Sun, used as reference, and the sensing method. The wavefront sensing is performed using correlations on images with a field of view of 10", averaging wavefront information from different sky directions, affecting the sensing and sampling of high altitude turbulence. Also due to the low elevation at which solar observations are performed we have to include generalized fitting error and anisoplanatism, as described by Ragazzoni and Rigaut, as non-negligible error sources in the Multi Conjugate Adaptive Optics error budget. For the development of the next generation Multi Conjugate Adaptive Optics systems for the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope and the European Solar Telescope we still need to study and understand these issues, to predict realistically the quality of the achievable reconstruction. To improve their designs other open issues have to be assessed, i.e. possible alternative sensing methods to avoid the intrinsic anisoplanatism of the wide field correlation Shack-Hartmann, new parameters to estimate the performance of an adaptive optics solar system, alternatives to

  9. Optical performance of conical windows for concentrated solar radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kribus, A. . Dept. of Environmental Science and Energy Research)

    1994-02-01

    Radiative energy transfer through a truncated cone window with a back-plane reflector is considered. This geometry is proposed for a high-pressure direct-radiation (volumetric) central solar receiver for use in combined-cycle electricity generation. The transmission and loss characteristics, computed by ray-tracing, are parameterized by the angle of incident radiation relative to the cone axis. The overall performance of the window is an integral of the angle-dependent transmission data, weighted by the actual distribution of input radiation, over all incidence angles. This parameterization provides insight and assists in tailoring of the window geometry to different solar collection methods. Results are presented for several window geometries. Overall window performance is presented for a dish-type distribution of input radiation.

  10. Solar internal lighting using optical collectors and fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francini, F.; Fontani, D.; Jafrancesco, D.; Mercatelli, L.; Sansoni, P.

    2006-08-01

    A system exploiting solar energy, by means of optical collectors and fibres, has been applied for indoor illumination. The project has been called "The Sunflowers" for the property of solar collectors to track solar position during the day. Every "sunflower" contains several solar collectors, each of which is coupled to an optical fibre. The "Sunflower" is provided of mechanical systems and electric accessories for solar tracking. The light focused by the solar collector can be used in two possible ways: for internal illumination with direct solar light; otherwise it can be accumulated for lighting when the sun is not present. The first function is obtained coupling the optical collector to an optical fibre, which transports the solar light in selected points within the showcases. The second one consists in focusing solar light on a photovoltaic cell of the last generation type with high efficiency. In this configuration the photovoltaic cell converts the focused light into electric energy to be used for illumination in case of sun absence. A demonstrative installation has been realised applying this solar illumination system to museum lighting: a prototype has been tested in a prestigious museum in Florence.

  11. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alff, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility and costs were determined for a 1 m to 30 m diameter ambient temperature, infrared to submillimeter orbiting astronomical telescope which is to be shuttle-deployed, free-flying, and have a 10 year orbital life. Baseline concepts, constraints on delivery and deployment, and the sunshield required are examined. Reflector concepts, the optical configuration, alignment and pointing, and materials are also discussed. Technology studies show that a 10 m to 30 m diameter system which is background and diffraction limited at 30 micron m is feasible within the stated time frame. A 10 m system is feasible with current mirror technology, while a 30 m system requires technology still in development.

  12. Using radiative transfer equation to model absorption by thin Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells with Lambertian back reflector.

    PubMed

    Dahan, N; Jehl, Z; Guillemoles, J F; Lincot, D; Naghavi, N; Greffet, J-J

    2013-02-11

    We investigate the optical absorption in a thin Cu(In,Ga)Se(2) solar cell with a Lambertian white paint beneath a transparent back contact. Although this configuration has been proposed more than 30 years ago, it turns out that rigorous simulation of Maxwell's equations demand powerful numerical calculations. This type of approach is time consuming and does not provide a physical insight in the absorption mechanisms. Here, we use the radiative transfer equation to deal with multiple scattering of the diffuse part of the light. The collimated part is treated accounting for wave effects. Our model is in good agreement with optical measurements.

  13. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data: AAI solar collector with pressure-formed glass reflector surface

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNLA), is currently conducting a program to predict the performance and measure the characteristics of commercially available solar collectors that have the potential for use in industrial process heat and enhance oil recovery applications. The thermal performance predictions for the AAI solar line-focusing slat-type collector for five cities in the US are presented. (WHK)

  14. The Focusing Optics Solar X-ray Imager (FOXSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, S.; Glesener, L.; Krucker, S.; Ramsey, B.; Ishikawa, S.; Takahashi, T.

    2009-12-01

    The Focusing Optics x-ray Solar Imager is a sounding rocket payload funded under the NASA Low Cost Access to Space program to test hard x-ray focusing optics and position-sensitive solid state detectors for solar observations. Today's leading solar hard x-ray instrument, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager provides excellent spatial (2 arcseconds) and spectral (1~keV) resolution. Yet, due to its use of indirect imaging, the derived images have a low dynamic range (<30) and sensitivity. These limitations make it difficult to study faint x-ray sources in the solar corona which are crucial for understanding the solar flare acceleration process. Grazing-incidence x-ray focusing optics combined with position-sensitive solid state detectors can overcome both of these limitations enabling the next breakthrough in understanding particle acceleration in solar flares. The foxsi project is led by the Space Science Laboratory at the University of California. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, with experience from the HERO balloon project, is responsible for the grazing-incidence optics, while the Astro H team (JAXA/ISAS) will provide double-sided silicon strip detectors. FOXSI will be a pathfinder for the next generation of solar hard x-ray spectroscopic imagers. Such observatories will be able to image the non-thermal electrons within the solar flare acceleration region, trace their paths through the corona, and provide essential quantitative measurements such as energy spectra, density, and energy content in accelerated electrons.

  15. Research on solar-blind UV optical imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baohua; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhong, Xiaoming; Ruan, Ningjuan

    2015-02-01

    Solar blind UV detecting system has many advantages such as strong environmental adaptability, low error rate, small volume and without refrigeration. To in-depth develop UV solar blind detection system research work has important significance for further improving solar blind UV detection technology. The working principle of solar blind UV detection system and the basic components were introduced firstly, and then the key technology of solar blind UV detection system was deeply analyzed. Finally, large coverage solar blind UV optical imaging system was designed according to the actual demand for greater coverage of the solar blind UV detection system. The result shows that the system has good imaging quality, simple and compact structure. This system can be used in various types of solar blind UV detection system, and is of high application value.

  16. Solar collector performance evaluation with the NASA-Lewis solar simulator-results for an all-glass-evacuated-tubular selectively-coated collector with a diffuse reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, F.

    1975-01-01

    A solar collector was tested in a solar simulator for inlet temperatures of temperatures of 70 to 200 F, flux levels of 230 and rate of 7 lb/(hr)(sq. ft), and incident angles of 0 deg, 33 deg, and 52 deg. Test results plotted in a form suggested by analysis indicate a very low heat loss coefficient. The collector shows excellent performance on an all-day performance basis, and also for conditions corresponding to temperatures required in solar Rankine systems and/or for low flux level radiation.

  17. A new approach for shaping of dual-reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Teh-Hong; Burnside, W. D.; Rudduck, Roger C.

    1987-01-01

    The shaping of 2-D dual-reflector antenna systems to generate a prescribed distribution with uniform phase at the aperture of the second reflector is examined. This method is based on the geometrical nature of Cassegrain and Gregorian dual-reflector antennas. The method of syntheses satisfies the principles of geometrical optics which are the foundations of dual-reflector designs. Instead of setting up differential equations or heuristically designing the subreflector, a set of algebraic equations is formulated and solved numerically to obtain the desired surfaces. The caustics of the reflected rays from the subreflector can be obtained and examined. Several examples of 2-D dual-reflector shaping are shown to validate the study. Geometrical optics and physical optics are used to calculate the scattered fields from the reflectors.

  18. Residential solar-heating system uses pyramidal optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Report describes reflective panels which optimize annual solar energy collection in attic installation. Subunits include collection, storage, distribution, and 4-mode control systems. Pyramid optical system heats single-family and multi-family dwellings.

  19. Solar Cell light trapping beyond the ray optic limit.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Dennis M; Munday, Jeremy N; Atwater, Harry A

    2012-01-11

    In 1982, Yablonovitch proposed a thermodynamic limit on light trapping within homogeneous semiconductor slabs, which implied a minimum thickness needed to fully absorb the solar spectrum. However, this limit is valid for geometrical optics but not for a new generation of subwavelength solar absorbers such as ultrathin or inhomogeneously structured cells, wire-based cells, photonic crystal-based cells, and plasmonic cells. Here we show that the key to exceeding the conventional ray optic or so-called ergodic light trapping limit is in designing an elevated local density of optical states (LDOS) for the absorber. Moreover, for any semiconductor we show that it is always possible to exceed the ray optic light trapping limit and use these principles to design a number of new solar absorbers with the key feature of having an elevated LDOS within the absorbing region of the device, opening new avenues for solar cell design and cost reduction.

  20. Numerical analysis on using compound parabolic couplers for direct transmission of concentrated solar radiation via optical fibre (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahou, Maryam; Andrews, John; Rosengarten, Gary

    2016-09-01

    A challenge in high-temperature solar thermal applications is transfer of concentrated solar radiation to the load with minimum energy loss. The use of a solar concentrator in conjunction with optical fibres has potential advantages in terms of transmission efficiency, technical feasibility and cost-effectiveness compared to a conventional heat transfer system employing heat exchangers and a heat transfer fluid. For transferring higher levels of concentrated flux it is necessary to employ multiple optical fibres or fibre bundles. However, the losses at the incident plane of a bundle due to absorption by the epoxy and cladding between the individual fibres in a bundle are substantial, typically over 60% of the overall transmission loss. The optical transmission of the system can thus be enhanced by employing a coupler between the concentrated solar radiation and the entrance to the bundle that reflects all incident light into the cores of individual fibres rather than allowing it to strike the interstitial spaces between the cores. This paper describes the design for such couplers based on multiple compound parabolic (CP) reflectors each with its exit aperture coinciding with the core of an individual fibre within the bundle. The proposed design employs external reflection from a machined metallic aluminium surface. This CP arrangement has the additional benefit of increasing the concentration ratio of the primary solar concentrator used. Simulation modeling using LightTools is conducted into a parabolic Cassegrain solar concentrator employing these CP couplers prior to a fibre bundle. The dependence of overall transmission and total optical efficiency of the system over lengths of the bundle up to 100 m are investigated quantitatively. In addition, the influence on transmission of the angular distribution of radiation intensity at the aperture of the couplers is studied.

  1. Solar adaptive optics at the Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltau, Dirk; Berkefeld, Thomas; Schmidt, Dirk; von der Lühe, Oskar

    2013-10-01

    Observing the Sun with high angular resolution is difficult because the turbulence in the atmosphere is strongest during day time. In this paper we describe the principles of solar adaptive optics exemplified by the two German solar telescopes VTT and GREGOR at the Observatorio del Teide. With theses systems we obtain near diffraction limited images of the Sun. Ways to overcome the limits of conventional AO by applying multiconjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) are shown.

  2. Design data brochure for a pyramidal optics solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    This Design Data Brochure provides information on a Pyramidal Optics Solar System for solar heating and domestic hot water. The system is made up of the collecting, storage, and distribution subsystems. Contained in the brochure are such items as system description, available accessories, installation arrangements, physical data, piping and wiring diagrams, and guide specifications.

  3. Silicon reflectors for external cavity lasers based on ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Li, Xia; Jin, Hao; Yu, Hui; Yang, Jianyi; Jiang, Xiaoqing

    2017-01-01

    We propose and experimentally investigate types of silicon ring reflectors on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) platform. These reflectors are used for realizing the silicon hybrid external cavity lasers. A suspended edge coupler is used to connect the reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) chip and the reflectors. The properties of the reflectors and the hybrid external cavity lasers with these reflectors are illustrated. The experimental results show that all of those reflectors have a high reflectivity and the highest reflectivity can up to be 95%. The lowest insertion loss can be as low as 0.4 dB. The output power of the hybrid external cavity lasers with these reflectors can reach mW magnitude and the highest output power is 6.1 mW. Over 30 dB side mode suppression ratio is obtained.

  4. Experimental Investigation and Computer Modeling of Optical Switching in Distributed Bragg Reflector and Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-01

    Panish. Heterostructure Lasers, Part A: Fundamental Principles. Quantum Electronics : Principles and Applications, Orlando: Academic Press, Inc., 1978...John Wiley & Sons, 1978. 15. Gibbs, H.M. Optical Bistability: Controlling Light with Light. Quantum Electronics - Principles and Applications, Orlando

  5. Multiple Reflector Scanning Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Bing

    Narrow beamwidth antenna systems are important to remote sensing applications and point-to-point communication systems. In many applications the main beam of the antenna radiation pattern must be scannable over a region of space. Scanning by mechanically skewing the entire antenna assembly is difficult and in many situations is unacceptable. Performance during scan is, of course, also very important. Traditional reflector systems employing the well-focused paraboloidal -shaped main reflector accomplish scan by motion of a few feeds, or by phase steering a focal plane feed array. Such scanning systems can experience significant gain loss. Traditional reflecting systems with a spherical main reflector have low aperture efficiency and poor side lobe and cross polarization performance. This dissertation introduces a new approach to the design of scanning spherical reflector systems, in which the performance weaknesses of high cross polarization and high side lobe levels are avoided. Moreover, the low aperture utilization common in spherical reflectors is overcome. As an improvement to this new spherical main reflector configuration, a flat mirror reflector is introduced to minimize the mechanical difficulties to scan the main beam. In addition to the reflector system design, reflector antenna performance evaluation is also important. The temperature resolution issue important for earth observation radiometer antennas is studied, and a new method to evaluate and optimize such temperature resolution is introduced.

  6. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, Ronald J.; Land, John T.; Misvel, Michael C.

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled.

  7. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, R.J.; Land, J.T.; Misvel, M.C.

    1994-06-07

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled. 12 figs.

  8. Electro--optical simulation of diffraction in solar cells.

    PubMed

    Peters, Marius; Rüdiger, Marc; Bläsi, Benedikt; Platzer, Werner

    2010-11-08

    A simulation method is presented and evaluated for simulating two- and three dimensional wave optical effects in crystalline silicon solar cells. Due to a thickness in the 100 µm range, optical properties of these solar cells typically are simulated, primarily through the use of ray-tracing. Recently, diffractive elements such as gratings or photonic crystals have been investigated for their application in crystalline silicon solar cells, making it necessary to consider two- and three dimensional wave optical effects. The presented approach couples a rigorous wave optical simulation to a semiconductor device simulation. In a first step, characteristic parameters, simulated for a reference setup using the electro-optical method and the standard procedure are compared. Occurring differences provide a measure to quantify the errors of the electro-optical method. These errors are below 0.4% relative. In a second step the electro-optical method is used to simulate a crystalline silicon solar cell with a back side diffractive grating. It is found that the grating enhances to short circuit current density jSC of the solar cell by more than 1 mA/cm².

  9. Material and Optical Design Rules for High Performance Luminescent Solar Concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronstein, Noah Dylan

    This dissertation will highlight a path to achieve high photovoltaic conversion efficiency in luminescent solar concentrators, devices which absorb sunlight with a luminescent dye and then re-emit it into a waveguide where it is ultimately collected by a photovoltaic cell. Luminescent concentrators have been studied for more than three decades as potential low-cost but not high efficiency photovoltaics. Astute application of the blackbody radiation law indicates that photonic design is necessary to achieve high efficiency: a reflective filter must be used to trap luminescence at all angles while allowing higher energy photons to pass through. In addition, recent advances in the synthesis of colloidal nanomaterials have created the possibility for lumophores with broad absorption spectra, narrow-bandwidth emission, high luminescence quantum yield, tunable Stokes shifts and tunable Stokes ratios. Together, these factors allow luminescent solar concentrators to achieve the optical characteristics necessary for high efficiency. We have fabricated and tested the first generation of these devices. Our experiments demonstrate that the application of carefully matched photonic mirrors and luminescent quantum dots can allow luminescent concentration factors to reach record values while maintaining high photon collection efficiency. Finally, the photonic mirror dramatically mitigates the negative impact of scattering in the waveguide, allowing efficient photon collection over distances much longer than the scattering length of the waveguide. After demonstrating the possibility for high performance, we theoretically explore the efficacy of luminescent concentrators with dielectric reflectors as the high-bandgap top-junctions in two-junction devices. Simple thermodynamic calculations indicate that this approach can be nearly as good as a traditional vertically stacked tandem. The major barriers to such a device are the optical design of narrow-bandwidth, angle

  10. Contamination of optical surfaces. [Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Graham S.; Hall, David F.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of molecular contamination on Space Station optical surfaces is examined. In particular, contamination of solar voltaic power sources and optical solar reflectors for thermal control or solar dynamic power generation is addressed. The published Space Station requirements for molecular contamination accretion and for the monitoring of such accretion is discussed in the context of the historical performance of space systems. Specific reference is made to the results from the Spacecraft Charging at High Altitudes (SCATHA) ML12 experiment.

  11. Solar concentrator advanced development project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Robert D.; Ehresman, Derik T.

    1987-01-01

    A solar dynamic concentrator design developed for use with a solar-thermodynamic power generation module intended for the Space Station is considered. The truss hexagonal panel reflector uses a modular design approach and is flexible in attainable flux profiles and assembly techniques. Preliminary structural, thermal, and optical analysis results are discussed. Accuracy of the surface reflectors should be within 5 mrad rms slope error, resulting in the need for close fabrication tolerances. Significant fabrication issues to be addressed include the facet reflective and protective coating processes and the surface specularity requirements.

  12. Focal region fields of distorted reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buris, N. E.; Kauffman, J. F.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of the focal region fields scattered by an arbitrary surface reflector under uniform plane wave illumination is solved. The physical optics (PO) approximation is used to calculate the current induced on the reflector. The surface of the reflector is described by a number of triangular domain-wise 5th degree bivariate polynomials. A 2-dimensional Gaussian quadrature is employed to numerically evaluate the integral expressions of the scattered fields. No Freshnel or Fraunhofer zone approximations are made. The relation of the focal fields problem to surface compensation techniques and other applications are mentioned. Several examples of distorted parabolic reflectors are presented. The computer code developed is included, together with instructions on its usage.

  13. Reflective coatings for solar applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.

    1993-05-01

    Many applications of solar energy require large mirrors to provide high levels of concentrated sunlight. The success of such conversion systems hinges on the optical durability and economic viability of the reflector materials. A major effort at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been to improve the existing reflector materials technology and to identify candidates that retain optical performance and durability criteria and offer potential for reduced cost. To attain the goals, it is desirable to maintain and increase the involvement of industrial organizations in reflective materials R D related to the conversion of solar resources to useful energy. Toward this end, NREL has recently initiated several collaborative efforts with industry to develop advanced reflector materials.

  14. Reflective coatings for solar applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.

    1993-05-01

    Many applications of solar energy require large mirrors to provide high levels of concentrated sunlight. The success of such conversion systems hinges on the optical durability and economic viability of the reflector materials. A major effort at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been to improve the existing reflector materials technology and to identify candidates that retain optical performance and durability criteria and offer potential for reduced cost. To attain the goals, it is desirable to maintain and increase the involvement of industrial organizations in reflective materials R&D related to the conversion of solar resources to useful energy. Toward this end, NREL has recently initiated several collaborative efforts with industry to develop advanced reflector materials.

  15. High-frequency techniques for RCS prediction of plate geometries and a physical optics/equivalent currents model for the RCS of trihedral corner reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Polka, Lesley A.; Polycarpou, Anastasis C.

    1993-01-01

    Part 1 of this report continues the investigation, initiated in previous reports, of scattering from rectangular plates coated with lossy dielectrics. The hard polarization coefficients given in the last report are incorporated into a model, which includes second- and third-order diffractions, for the coated plate. Computed results from this model are examined and compared to measured data. A breakdown of the contribution of each of the higher-order terms to the total radar cross section (RCS) is given. The effectiveness of the uniform theory of diffraction (UTD) model in accounting for the coating effect is investigated by examining a Physical Optics (PO) model which incorporates the equivalent surface impedance approximation used in the UTD model. The PO, UTD, and experimental results are compared. Part 2 of this report presents a RCS model, based on PO and the Method of Equivalent Currents (MEC), for a trihedral corner reflector. PO is used to account for the reflected fields, while MEC is used for the diffracted fields. Single, double, and triple reflections and first-order diffractions are included in the model. A detailed derivation of the E(sub theta)-polarization, monostatic RCS is included. Computed results are compared with finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) results for validation. The PO/MEC model of this report compares very well with the FDTD model, and it is a much faster model in terms of computational speed.

  16. Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography using an Vernier-tuned distributed Bragg reflector swept laser in the mouse middle ear.

    PubMed

    Park, Jesung; Carbajal, Esteban F; Chen, Xi; Oghalai, John S; Applegate, Brian E

    2014-11-01

    Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhOCT) offers exquisite sensitivity to mechanical vibration in biological tissues. There is growing interest in using PhOCT for imaging the nanometer scale vibrations of the ear in animal models of hearing disorders. Swept-source-based systems offer fast acquisition speeds, suppression of common mode noise via balanced detection, and good signal roll-off. However, achieving high phase stability is difficult due to nonlinear laser sweeps and trigger jitter in a typical swept laser source. Here, we report on the initial application of a Vernier-tuned distributed Bragg reflector (VT-DBR) swept laser as the source for a fiber-based PhOCT system. The VT-DBR swept laser is electronically tuned and precisely controls sweeps without mechanical movement, resulting in highly linear sweeps with high wavelength stability and repeatability. We experimentally measured a phase sensitivity of 0.4 pm standard deviation, within a factor of less than 2 of the computed shot-noise limit. We further demonstrated the system by making ex vivo measurements of the vibrations of the mouse middle ear structures.

  17. Precision antenna reflector structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The assembly of the Large Precise Reflector Infrared Telescope is detailed. Also given are the specifications for the Aft Cargo Carrier and the Large Precision Reflector structure. Packaging concepts and options, stowage depth and support truss geometry are also considered. An example of a construction scenario is given.

  18. Spacecraft reflectors thermomechanical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, Viktor S.; Gerasimov, Alexander V.; Ponomarev, Sergey V.; Shendalev, Denis O.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, thermo-mechanical analysis results of the composite reflectors for the use on the geostationary Earth orbit possibility studies are described. The behavior of two different space reflector structures manufactured on composite materials is investigated. The estimates of reflecting surfaces RMS deviations for the two extreme cases orbital inclinations are presented.

  19. REFLECTOR FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.

    1963-08-01

    A reflector for nuclear reactors that comprises an assembly of closely packed graphite rods disposed with their major axes substantially perpendicular to the interface between the reactor core and the reflector is described. Each graphite rod is round in transverse cross section at (at least) its interface end and is provided, at that end, with a coaxial, inwardly tapering hole. (AEC)

  20. Solar Thermal Propulsion Optical Figure Measuring and Rocket Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, Joseph

    1997-01-01

    Solar thermal propulsion has been an important area of study for four years at the Propulsion Research Center. Significant resources have been devoted to the development of the UAH Solar Thermal Laboratory that provides unique, high temperature, test capabilities. The facility is fully operational and has successfully conducted a series of solar thruster shell experiments. Although presently dedicated to solar thermal propulsion, the facility has application to a variety of material processing, power generation, environmental clean-up, and other fundamental research studies. Additionally, the UAH Physics Department has joined the Center in support of an in-depth experimental investigation on Solar Thermal Upper Stage (STUS) concentrators. Laboratory space has been dedicated to the concentrator evaluation in the UAH Optics Building which includes a vertical light tunnel. Two, on-going, research efforts are being sponsored through NASA MSFC (Shooting Star Flight Experiment) and the McDonnell Douglas Corporation (Solar Thermal Upper Stage Technology Ground Demonstrator).

  1. Qualifying Solar Array Components for High Intensity, High Temperature Environments- The Test Approach for the BepiColombo Solar Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Thomas; Zimmermann, Claus; Lohberg, Andreas; de Jong, Sybren; Schuhmacher, Udo; Schneider, Jurgen; Kostler, Wolfgang; Parketta, Peter; Zah, Erwen; Holzbauer, Roland; Fink, Markus; Hall, James; Lisbona, Emilio Fernandez; Lundmark, Karin; Baur, Carsten; Taylor, Stephen; Panin, Fabio; Caon, Antonio

    2014-08-01

    We report on design and qualification of solar array components such as solar cells, cell protection diodes, optical reflectors and wires for high temperature space missions. The ECSS standard ECSS-E-ST-20-08C and ESCC specification 3901 are appropriat baselines which have been tailored, in particular for long duration tests.

  2. The Focusing Optics Solar X-ray Imager (FOXSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, Steven; Glesener, L.; Krucker, S.; Ramsey, B.; Ishikawa, S.; Takahashi, T.; Tajima, H.

    2010-05-01

    The Focusing Optics x-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) is a sounding rocket payload funded under the NASA Low Cost Access to Space program to test hard x-ray focusing optics and position-sensitive solid state detectors for solar observations. Today's leading solar hard x-ray instrument, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) provides excellent spatial (2 arcseconds) and spectral (1 keV) resolution. Yet, due to its use of indirect imaging, the derived images have a low dynamic range (<30) and sensitivity. These limitations make it difficult to study faint x-ray sources in the solar corona which are crucial for understanding the solar flare acceleration process. Grazing-incidence x-ray focusing optics combined with position-sensitive solid state detectors can overcome both of these limitations enabling the next breakthrough in understanding particle acceleration in solar flares. The FOXSI project is led by the Space Science Laboratory at the University of California. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, with experience from the HERO balloon project, is responsible for the grazing-incidence optics, while the Astro H team (JAXA/ISAS) will provide double-sided silicon strip detectors. FOXSI will be a pathfinder for the next generation of solar hard x-ray spectroscopic imagers. Such observatories will be able to image the non-thermal electrons within the solar flare acceleration region, trace their paths through the corona, and provide essential quantitative measurements such as energy spectra, density, and energy content in accelerated electrons.

  3. The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krucker, Sam; Christe, Steven; Glesener, Lindsay; McBride, Steve; Turin, Paul; Glaser, David; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Delory, Gregory; Lin, R. P.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Ramsey, Brian; Terada, Yukikatsu; Ishikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Kokubun, Motohide; Saito, Shinya; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Watanabe, Shin; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Masuda, Satoshi; Minoshima, Takashi; Shomojo, Masumi

    2009-08-01

    The Focusing Optics x-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) is a sounding rocket payload funded under the NASA Low Cost Access to Space program to test hard x-ray focusing optics and position-sensitive solid state detectors for solar observations. Today's leading solar hard x-ray instrument, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) provides excellent spatial (2 arcseconds) and spectral (1 keV) resolution. Yet, due to its use of indirect imaging, the derived images have a low dynamic range (<30) and sensitivity. These limitations make it difficult to study faint x-ray sources in the solar corona which are crucial for understanding the solar flare acceleration process. Grazing-incidence x-ray focusing optics combined with position-sensitive solid state detectors can overcome both of these limitations enabling the next breakthrough in understanding particle acceleration in solar flares. The FOXSI project is led by the Space Science Laboratory at the University of California. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, with experience from the HERO balloon project, is responsible for the grazing-incidence optics, while the Astro H team (JAXA/ISAS) will provide double-sided silicon strip detectors. FOXSI will be a pathfinder for the next generation of solar hard x-ray spectroscopic imagers. Such observatories will be able to image the non-thermal electrons within the solar flare acceleration region, trace their paths through the corona, and provide essential quantitative measurements such as energy spectra, density, and energy content in accelerated electrons.

  4. Feasibility study of a synthesis procedure for array feeds to improve radiation performance of large distorted reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Takamizawa, K.; Werntz, P.; Lapean, J.; Barts, R.; Shen, B.; Dunn, D.

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) performance analysis of the Gregorian tri-reflector; (2) design and performance of the type 6 reflector antenna; (3) a new spherical main reflector system design; (4) optimization of reflector configurations using physical optics; (5) radiometric array design; and (7) beam efficiency studies.

  5. High-frequency techniques for RCS prediction of plate geometries and a physical optics/equivalent currents model for the RCS of trihedral corner reflectors, parts 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Polka, Lesley A.; Polycarpou, Anastasis C.

    1994-01-01

    Formulations for scattering from the coated plate and the coated dihedral corner reflector are included. A coated plate model based upon the Uniform Theory of Diffraction (UTD) for impedance wedges was presented in the last report. In order to resolve inaccuracies and discontinuities in the predicted patterns using the UTD-based model, an improved model that uses more accurate diffraction coefficients is presented. A Physical Optics (PO) model for the coated dihedral corner reflector is presented as an intermediary step in developing a high-frequency model for this structure. The PO model is based upon the reflection coefficients for a metal-backed lossy material. Preliminary PO results for the dihedral corner reflector suggest that, in addition to being much faster computationally, this model may be more accurate than existing moment method (MM) models. An improved Physical Optics (PO)/Equivalent Currents model for modeling the Radar Cross Section (RCS) of both square and triangular, perfectly conducting, trihedral corner reflectors is presented. The new model uses the PO approximation at each reflection for the first- and second-order reflection terms. For the third-order reflection terms, a Geometrical Optics (GO) approximation is used for the first reflection; and PO approximations are used for the remaining reflections. The previously reported model used GO for all reflections except the terminating reflection. Using PO for most of the reflections results in a computationally slower model because many integrations must be performed numerically, but the advantage is that the predicted RCS using the new model is much more accurate. Comparisons between the two PO models, Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) and experimental data are presented for validation of the new model.

  6. Innovative design of parabolic reflector light guiding structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whang, Allen J.; Tso, Chun-Hsien; Chen, Yi-Yung

    2008-02-01

    Due to the idea of everlasting green architecture, it is of increasing importance to guild natural light into indoors. The advantages are multifold - to have better color rendering index, excellent energy savings from environments viewpoints and make humans more healthy, etc. Our search is to design an innovative structure, to convert outdoor sun light impinges on larger surfaces, into near linear light beam sources, later convert this light beam into near point sources which enters the indoor spaces then can be used as lighting sources indoors. We are not involved with the opto-electrical transformation, to the guild light into to the building, to perform the illumination, as well as the imaging function. Because non-imaging optics, well known for apply to the solar concentrators, that can use non-imaging structures to fulfill our needs, which can also be used as energy collectors in solar energy devices. Here, we have designed a pair of large and small parabolic reflector, which can be used to collect daylight and change area from large to small. Then we make a light-guide system that is been designed by us use of this parabolic reflector to guide the collection light, can pick up the performance for large surface source change to near linear source and a larger collection area.

  7. Electro-optical characterization of GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Larry C.; Dunham, Glen; Addis, F. W.; Huber, Dan; Daling, Dave

    1987-01-01

    The electro-optical characterization of gallium arsenide p/n solar cells is discussed. The objective is to identify and understand basic mechanisms which limit the performance of high efficiency gallium arsenide solar cells. The approach involves conducting photoresponse and temperature dependent current-voltage measurements, and interpretation of the data in terms of theory to determine key device parameters. Depth concentration profiles are also utilized in formulating a model to explain device performance.

  8. Durable innovative solar optical materials: The international challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampert, C. M.

    1982-07-01

    A variety of optical coatings is discussed in the context of solar energy utilization. Well known coatings such as heat mirrors, selective absorbers, and reflective films are covered briefly. Emphasis is placed on the materials limitations and design choices for various lesser known optical coatings and materials. Physical and optical properties are detailed for protective antireflection films, fluorescent concentrator materials, holographic films, cold mirrors, radiative cooling surfaces, and optical switching films including electrochromic, thermochromic, photochromic, and liquid crystal types. For many of these materials research is only now being considered, and various design and durability issues must be addressed.

  9. Durable innovative solar optical materials - the international challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampert, Carl M.

    1982-04-01

    A variety of optical coatings are discussed in the context of solar energy utilization. Well known coatings such as heat mirrors, selective absorbers, and reflective films are covered briefly. Emphasis is placed on the materials limitations and design choices for various lesser known optical coatings and materials. Physical and optical properties are detailed for protective antireflection films, fluorescent concentrator materials, holographic films, cold mirrors, radiative cooling surfaces, and optical switching films including electrochromic, thermochromic, photochromic, and liquid crystal types. For many of these materials research is only now being considered, and various design and durability issues must be addressed.

  10. Durable innovative solar optical materials: the international challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Lampert, C.M.

    1982-01-01

    A variety of optical coatings are discussed in the context of solar energy utilization. Well known coatings such as heat mirrors, selective absorbers, and reflective films are covered briefly. Emphasis is placed on the materials limitations and design choices for various lesser known optical coatings and materials. Physical and optical properties are detailed for protective antireflection films, fluorescent concentrator materials, holographic films, cold mirrors, radiative cooling surfaces, and optical switching films including electrochromic, thermochromic, photochromic, and liquid crystal types. For many of these materials research is only now being considered, and various design and durability issues must be addressed.

  11. High concentration two-stage optics for parabolic trough solar collectors with tubular absorber and large rim angle

    SciTech Connect

    Collares-Pereira, M. ); Gordon, J.M. ); Rabl, A. ); Winston, R. )

    1991-01-01

    A new two-stage optical design is proposed for parabolic trough solar collectors with tubular absorbers. It can boost the concentration ratio by a factor of 2.5 relative to the conventional design, while maintaining the large rim angles (i.e., low nominal f-numbers) that are desirable for practical and economical reasons. The second state involves asymmetric nonimaging concentrators of the CPC type, facing segments of the parabolic first stage. The second stage can be accommodated inside an evacuated receiver, allowing the use of first-surface silvered reflectors. The low heat loss of this design opens the possibility of producing steam at temperatures and pressures of conventional power plants, using only one-axis tracking. The improvement in conversion efficiency would be substantial.

  12. Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data: Custom Engineering trough with glass reflector surface and Sandia-designed receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-05-01

    Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Custom Engineering trough and Sandia-designed receivers, with glass reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States. Two experimental receivers were tested, one with an antireflective coating on the glass envelope around the receiver tube and one without the antireflective coating.

  13. X-ray resonator with pear-shaped reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Churikov, V A

    2003-11-30

    An X-ray resonator design is proposed in which peculiar pear-shaped reflectors, which are grazing-incidence X-ray mirrors, serve as optical elements. Special features of this resonator are relatively high reflector efficiencies and the axial symmetry of the output radiation. (resonators)

  14. Modeling the Effects of Solar Cell Attitude Distribution on Optical Cross Section for Solar Panel Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feirstine, K.; Bush, K.; Crosher, C.; Klein, M.; Bowers, D.; Wellems, D.; Duggin, M.; Vaughn, L.

    2012-09-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Time-domain Analysis Simulation for Advanced Tracking (TASAT) was used to explore the variation of Optical Cross Section (OCS) with glint angle for a solar panel with different solar cell attitude distribution statistics. Simulations were conducted using a 3D model of a solar panel with various solar cell tip and tilt distribution statistics. Modeling a solar panel as a single sheet of "solar cell" material is not appropriate for OCS glint studies. However, modeling each individual solar cell on the panel, the tips and tilts of which come from a distribution of specified statistics (distribution type, mean, and standard deviation), accurately captures the solar panel OCS with glint angle. The objective of the simulations was to vary the glint measurement angle about the maximum glint position of the solar panel and observe the variations in OCS with angle for a bi-static illumination condition. OCS was calculated relative to the simulated scattering of a Spectralon material in the glint orientation. Results show the importance of solar cell attitude distribution statistics in modeling the OCS observed for a solar panel.

  15. Optical and electronic loss analysis of mesoporous solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalsky, Anton; Burda, Clemens

    2016-07-01

    We review the art of complete optical and electronic characterization of the popular mesoporous solar cell motif. An overview is given of how the mesoporous paradigm is applied to solar cell technology, followed by a discussion on the variety of techniques available for thoroughly probing efficiency leaching mechanisms at every stage of the energy transfer pathway. Some attention is dedicated to the rising importance of computational results to augment loss analysis due to the complexity of solar cell devices, which have emergent properties that are important to account for, but difficult to measure, such as parasitic absorption.

  16. Micro-optical designs for angular confinement in solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Jeffrey M.; Feuermann, Daniel; Mashaal, Heylal

    2015-01-01

    We identify and evaluate a variety of efficient and feasible micro-optics for confining the radiative emission of solar cells. The key criteria used for assessing viable designs are (1) high optical efficiency for both the transmission of impinging solar beam radiation and the external recycling of isotropic cell luminescent emission; (2) liberal optical tolerance; (3) compactness and (4) being amenable to fabrication from existing materials and manufacturing processes. Both imaging and nonimaging candidate designs are presented, and their superiority to previous proposals is quantified. The strategy of angular confinement for boosting cell open-circuit voltage-thereby enhancing conversion efficiency-is limited to cells where radiative recombination is the dominant carrier recombination pathway. Optical systems that restrict the angular range for emission of cell luminescence must, by reciprocity, commensurately restrict the angular range for the collection of solar radiation. This, in turn, mandates the introduction of concentrators, but not for the objective of delivering concentrated flux onto the cell. Rather, the optical system must project an acceptably uniform spatial distribution of solar flux onto the cell surface at a nominal averaged irradiance of 1 sun.

  17. The Focusing Optics X-Ray Solar Imager: FOXSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krucker, Saem; Christe, Steven; Glesener, Lindsay; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; McBride, Stephen; Glaser, David; Turin, Paul; Lin, R. P.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Ramsey, Brian; Saito, Shinya; Tanaka, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Watanabe, Shin; Tajima, Takaaki; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Masuda, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    The Focusing Optics x-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) is a sounding rocket payload funded under the NASA Low Cost Access to Space program to test hard x-ray (HXR) focusing optics and position-sensitive solid state detectors for solar observations. Today's leading solar HXR instrument, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) provides excellent spatial (2 arcseconds) and spectral (1 keV) resolution. Yet, due to its use of an indirect imaging system, the derived images have a low dynamic range (typically <10) and sensitivity. These limitations make it difficult to study faint x-ray sources in the solar corona which are crucial for understanding the particle acceleration processes which occur there. Grazing-incidence x-ray focusing optics combined with position-sensitive solid state detectors can overcome both of these limitations enabling the next breakthrough in understanding impulsive energy release on the Sun. The FOXSI project is led by the Space Sciences Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is responsible for the grazing-incidence optics, while the Astro-H team at JAXA/ISAS has provided double-sided silicon strip detectors. FOXSI is a pathfinder for the next generation of solar hard x-ray spectroscopic imagers. Such observatories will be able to image the non-thermal electrons within the solar flare acceleration region, trace their paths through the corona, and provide essential quantitative measurements such as energy spectra, density, and energy content in accelerated electrons.

  18. Large space reflector technology on the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankins, J. C.; Dickinson, R. M.; Freeland, R. E.; Marzwell, N. I.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of the Space Station in the evolutionary development of large space reflector technology and the accommodation of mission systems which will apply large space reflectors during the late 1990s and the early part of the next century. Reflectors which range from 10 to 100 meters in size and which span the electromagnetic spectrum for applications that include earth communications, earth observations, astrophysics and solar physics, and deep space communications are discussed. The role of the Space Station in large space reflector technology development and system performance demonstration is found to be critical; that role involves the accommodation of a wide variety of technology demonstrations and operational activities on the Station, including reflector deployment and/or assembly, mechanical performance verification and configuration refinement, systematic diagnostics of reflector surfaces, structural dynamics and controls research, overall system performance characterization and modification (including both radio frequency field pattern measurements and required end-to-end system demonstrations), and reflector-to-spacecraft integration and staging. A unique facility for Space Station-based, large space reflector research and development is proposed. A preliminary concept for such a Space Station-based Large Space Reflector Facility (LSRF) is described.

  19. Degradation of MODIS Optics and its Reflective Solar Bands Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, X.; Sun, J.; Esposito, J.; Pan, C.; Xiong, S.; Guenther, B.; Barnes, W. L.; Degnan, John (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has 36 spectral bands with wavelength ranging from 0.41 micron to 14.5 micron and spatial resolution between 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 km at Nadir. Its ProtoFlight Model (PFM) on the NASA EOS Terra spacecraft has been providing global coverage of the Land, Ocean, and Atmosphere for the science community since the instrument opened its Nadir door on 24 February 2000. The MODIS optical system consists of a 2-sided paddle wheel scan mirror, a fold mirror, a primary mirror, and other aft optics. The sensor's 20 reflective solar bands from 0.41 to 2.1 micron are calibrated on-orbit by a solar diffuser (SD) and a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM). In addition to SD, degradation of the MODIS optics in the reflective solar bands has been observed, including variations in degradation between the two sides of the MODIS scan mirror. During MODIS first year of on-orbit operation, the overall degradations at the shortest wavelength (0.41 micron) are about 3% for SD, and in excess of 10% for the MODIS system. In this paper, we will present our degradation analysis results and discuss their impact on the reflective solar bands' on-orbit calibration.

  20. Novel solid-state solar thermal simulator supplying 30,000 suns by a fibre optical probe.

    PubMed

    Alwahabi, Zeyad T; Kueh, Kimberley C Y; Nathan, Gus J; Cannon, Scott

    2016-10-31

    An efficient 3.168 kW solid-state solar thermal simulator (SSSTS), capable of supplying ~30,000 suns at a focal plane via a fibre optical delivery, has been developed. The source consists of 41 diode lasers, each operated at a wavelength and power of ~915 nm and ~80 watt, respectively. The SSSTS provides a semi-top hat radiation profile and can be focused to a diameter of ~10.5 mm. The electro-optical power efficiency of the SSSTS was evaluated to be 55%, where the maximum value of the uniform radiation flux exceeds 36.6MW/m2. As such, the present technology is relevant to solar thermal applications that are not wavelength-sensitive or where narrow line-width is desirable. Additionally, the fibre optical delivery feature enables ease of direction onto a suitable target, without the need of large ellipsoidal reflectors usually employed for the conventional arc solar simulators. To demonstrate the new SSSTS, ZnO:Zn particles were introduced into the path of the radiation to investigate the change in their own temperature by using the laser induced phosphorescence technique (LIP). The temperature of the averaged particles was measured at a different radiation flux over a ~87 mm2 cross sectional area. A change in the average particle temperature of up to 225°C was detected within the measurement volume when the SSSTS was operated at a flux of ~30,000 suns. The unique characteristics of the SSSTS, namely, the uniformity, high power flux, efficiency, ease of delivery, and precise control of the radiation flux responds to the current demands of solar thermal research.

  1. Secondary pattern computation of an offset reflector antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Reflector antennas are widely used in communications satellite systems because they provide high gain at low cost. In analyzing reflector antennas the computation of the secondary pattern is the main concern. A computer program for calculating the secondary pattern of an offset reflector has been developed and implemented at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The theoretical foundation for this program is based on the use of geometrical optics to describe the fields from the feed to the reflector surface and to the aperture plane. The resulting aperture field distribution is then transformed to the far-field zone by the fast Fourier transform algorithm. Comparing this technique with other well-known techniques (the geometrical theory of diffraction, physical optics (Jacobi-Bessel), etc.) shows good agreement for large (diameter of 100 lambda or greater) reflector antennas.

  2. Investigation of X-ray and optical solar flare activities during solar cycles 22 and 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, L. A.; Belkina, I. L.; Bushueva, T. P.

    2003-02-01

    Daily X-ray flare indices (XFI) for the interval from January 1986 till June 2002 were calculated. The XFI behaviour during solar cycles 22 and 23 was studied. We compare the daily XFI with the daily optical flare indices (OFI) and with the International Relative Sunspot Numbers. The energy emitted by X-ray flares during 77 months of solar cycle 22 is shown to be about five times larger than the analogous value for the present solar cycle. We revealed statistically significant maxima in power spectra of the XFI and OFI. They correspond to periods of 25.5, 36.5, 73, 116, and 150d which presumably are appropriate to characteristic frequencies of the solar flare activity. A hypothesis on an possible effect of Mercury's variable electric charge on the origin of solar flares is proposed and corresponding estimates were made.

  3. Solar optical codes evaluation for modeling and analyzing complex solar receiver geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellowhair, Julius; Ortega, Jesus D.; Christian, Joshua M.; Ho, Clifford K.

    2014-09-01

    Solar optical modeling tools are valuable for modeling and predicting the performance of solar technology systems. Four optical modeling tools were evaluated using the National Solar Thermal Test Facility heliostat field combined with flat plate receiver geometry as a benchmark. The four optical modeling tools evaluated were DELSOL, HELIOS, SolTrace, and Tonatiuh. All are available for free from their respective developers. DELSOL and HELIOS both use a convolution of the sunshape and optical errors for rapid calculation of the incident irradiance profiles on the receiver surfaces. SolTrace and Tonatiuh use ray-tracing methods to intersect the reflected solar rays with the receiver surfaces and construct irradiance profiles. We found the ray-tracing tools, although slower in computation speed, to be more flexible for modeling complex receiver geometries, whereas DELSOL and HELIOS were limited to standard receiver geometries such as flat plate, cylinder, and cavity receivers. We also list the strengths and deficiencies of the tools to show tool preference depending on the modeling and design needs. We provide an example of using SolTrace for modeling nonconventional receiver geometries. The goal is to transfer the irradiance profiles on the receiver surfaces calculated in an optical code to a computational fluid dynamics code such as ANSYS Fluent. This approach eliminates the need for using discrete ordinance or discrete radiation transfer models, which are computationally intensive, within the CFD code. The irradiance profiles on the receiver surfaces then allows for thermal and fluid analysis on the receiver.

  4. Composite materials for precision space reflector panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.; Funk, Joan G.; Bowles, David E.; Towell, Timothy W.; Connell, John W.

    1992-01-01

    One of the critical technology needs of large precision reflectors for future astrophysical and optical communications satellites lies in the area of structural materials. Results from a materials research and development program at NASA Langley Research Center to provide materials for these reflector applications are discussed. Advanced materials that meet the reflector panel requirements are identified, and thermal, mechanical and durability properties of candidate materials after exposure to simulated space environments are compared. A parabolic, graphite-phenolic honeycomb composite panel having a surface accuracy of 70.8 microinches rms and an areal weight of 1.17 lbm/sq ft was fabricated with T50/ERL1962 facesheets, a PAEI thermoplastic surface film, and Al and SiO(x) coatings.

  5. Optical Diagnostic System for Solar Sails: Phase 1 Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Blandino, Joseph R.; Caldwell, Douglas W.; Carroll, Joseph A.; Jenkins, Christopher H. M.; Pollock, Thomas C.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's In-Space Propulsion program recently selected AEC-ABLE Engineering and L'Garde, Inc. to develop scale-model solar sail hardware and demonstrate its functionality on the ground. Both are square sail designs with lightweight diagonal booms (<100 g/m) and ultra-thin membranes (<10 g/sq m). To support this technology, the authors are developing an integrated diagnostics instrumentation package for monitoring solar sail structures such as these in a near-term flight experiment. We refer to this activity as the "Optical Diagnostic System (ODS) for Solar Sails" project. The approach uses lightweight optics and photogrammetric techniques to measure solar sail membrane and boom shape and dynamics, thermography to map temperature, and non-optical sensors including MEMS accelerometers and load cells. The diagnostics package must measure key structural characteristics including deployment dynamics, sail support tension, boom and sail deflection, boom and sail natural frequencies, sail temperature, and sail integrity. This report summarizes work in the initial 6-month Phase I period (conceptual design phase) and complements the final presentation given in Huntsville, AL on January 14, 2004.

  6. Hybrid Solar Lighting - Fiber Optics Brings Sunlight Inside

    SciTech Connect

    Maxey, L Curt

    2008-01-01

    Hybrid solar lighting systems focus highly concentrated sunlight into a fiber optic bundle to provide sunlight in rooms without windows or conventional skylights. The flexible sunlight bundles are easily routed through small openings and around obstacles to carry the light to where it is needed. The optical fibers terminate in hybrid luminaires where the sunlight is combined with electric light that is automatically adjusted to keep the overall light level constant within the lighted area. The hybrid solar lighting concept was originally proposed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee in the mid-1990s, but funding hurdles prevented the idea from seeing daylight for more than five years. Hybrid solar lighting was touted as a means for using solar energy directly without any conversion losses and for increasing the visual quality of interior lighting. As such, it promised to be both energy-efficient and aesthetically appealing, but its technical complexity made potential sponsors wary. They had to be convinced that the lighting concept could be accepted into the marketplace and that the systems could be manufactured at an acceptable cost. An earlier fiber-coupled daylighting system marketed in the early 1990s used expensive quartz optical fibers to distribute the light and served only a niche market that was willing to pay a premium for the novelty. By contrast, the hybrid solar lighting system proposed using inexpensive plastic optical fibers to distribute the light to hybrid (sunlight/electric) luminaires that would be visually and functionally identical to conventional luminaires. In this way, the lighting could be integrated seamlessly into existing design concepts and thus easily embraced by architects and lighting designers as a means for offering daylight as a lighting option.

  7. Solar Mesosphere Explorer optical-mechanical systems engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gause, K. A.; Stuart, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Mission overview of the Solar Mesosphere Explorer is presented along with design analysis and summaries of results. The Solar Mesosphere Explorer is a spin stabilized satellite carrying a complement of four Ebert-Fastie spectrometers and a four-channel Mersenne radiometer. Description of the spectrometer is given including a telescope and its aberrations. The radiometer is also described with consideration given to isothermal and thermal design, a Winston paraboloid, and optical tolerances. These five instruments are for measuring the earth's ozone density and distribution and providing quantitative data about those processes which govern the formation and destruction of ozone.

  8. Optical absorption of several nanostructures arrays for silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhaopeng; Qiao, Huiling; Huangfu, Huichao; Li, Xiaowei; Guo, Jingwei; Wang, Haiyan

    2015-12-01

    To improve the efficiency and reduce the cost of solar cells, it's important to enhance the light absorption. Within the visible solar spectrum based on optimization simulations by COMSOL Multiphysics, the optical absorption of silicon cylindrical nanowires, nanocones and inverted nanocones was calculated respectively. The results reveal that the average absorption for the nanocones between 400 and 800 nm is 70.2%, which is better than cylindrical nanowires (55.3%), inverted nanocones (42.3%) and bulk silicon (42.2%). In addition, more than 95% of light from 630 to 800 nm is reflected for inverted nanocones, which can be used to enhance infrared reflection in photovoltaic devices.

  9. Development of Surfaces Optically Suitable for Flat Solar Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmet, D.; Jason, A.

    1978-01-01

    Three areas of research in the development of flat solar panels are described. (1) A reflectometer which can separately evaluate the spectral and diffuse reflectivities of surfaces was developed. The reflectometer has a phase locked detection system. (2) A coating composed of strongly bound copper oxide that is formed by an etching process performed on an aluminum alloy with high copper content was also developed. Because of this one step fabrication process, fabrication costs are expected to be small. (3) A literature search was conducted and conclusions on the required optical properties of flat plate solar collectors are presented.

  10. Optical analysis of solar energy tubular absorbers.

    PubMed

    Saltiel, C; Sokolov, M

    1982-11-15

    The energy absorbed by a solar energy tubular receiver element for a single incident ray is derived. Two types of receiver elements were analyzed: (1) an inner tube with an absorbing coating surrounded by a semitransparent cover tube, and (2) a semitransparent inner tube filled with an absorbing fluid surrounded by a semitransparent cover tube. The formation of ray cascades in the semitransparent tubes is considered. A numerical simulation to investigate the influence of the angle of incidence, sizing, thickness, and coefficient of extinction of the tubes was performed. A comparison was made between receiver elements with and without cover tubes. Ray tracing analyses in which rays were followed within the tubular receiver element as well as throughout the rest of the collector were performed for parabolic and circular trough concentrating collectors.

  11. Adaptive feed array compensation system for reflector antenna surface distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Zaman, A.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of a closed loop adaptive feed array system for compensating reflector surface deformations has been investigated. The performance characteristics (gain, sidelobe level, pointing, etc.) of large communication antenna systems degrade as the reflector surface distorts mainly due to thermal effects from a varying solar flux. The compensating systems described in this report can be used to maintain the design performance characteristics independent of thermal effects on the reflector surface. The proposed compensating system employs the concept of conjugate field matching to adjust the feed array complex excitation coefficients.

  12. Optimization of spherical facets for parabolic solar concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, J. E.; Erikson, R. J.; Sturgis, J. D.; Elfe, T. B.

    1986-01-01

    Solar concentrator designs which employ deployable hexagonal panels are being developed for space power systems. An offset optical configuration has been developed which offers significant system level advantages over previously proposed collector designs for space applications. Optical analyses have been performed which show offset reflector intercept factors to be only slightly lower than those for symmetric reflectors with the same slope error. Fluxes on the receiver walls are asymmetric but manageable by varying the tilt angle of the receiver. Greater producibility is achieved by subdividing the hexagonal panels into triangular mirror facets of spherical contour. Optical analysis has been performed upon these to yield near-optimum sizes and radii.

  13. The Corner Reflector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Whitney S., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the corner reflector array left on the moon by the July 1969 Apollo astronauts is described. The array was used to reflect earth-originating laser beams back to earth, and yielded a more accurate determination (to within six inches) of distance from the earth to the moon. (MP)

  14. Modular reflector concept study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of space erecting a 100 meter paraboloidal radio frequency reflector by joining a number of individually deployed structural modules. Three module design concepts were considered: (1) the deployable cell module (DCM); (2) the modular paraboloidal erectable truss antenna (Mod-PETA); and (3) the modular erectable truss antenna (META). With the space shuttle (STS) as the launch system, the methodology of packaging and stowing in the orbiter, and of dispensing, deploying and joining, in orbit, were studied and the necessary support equipment identified. The structural performance of the completed reflectors was evaluated and their overall operational capability and feasibility were evaluated and compared. The potential of the three concepts to maintain stable shape in the space environment was determined. Their ability to operate at radio frequencies of 1 GHz and higher was assessed assuming the reflector surface to consist of a number of flat, hexagonal facets. A parametric study was performed to determine figure degradation as a function of reflector size, flat facet size, and f/D ratio.

  15. Corrosion protection for silver reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Arendt, Paul N.; Scott, Marion L.

    1991-12-31

    A method of protecting silver reflectors from damage caused by contact with gaseous substances which are often present in the atmosphere and a silver reflector which is so protected. The inventive method comprises at least partially coating a reflector with a metal oxide such as aluminum oxide to a thickness of 15 .ANG. or less.

  16. Electrically thin flat lenses and reflectors.

    PubMed

    Ruphuy, Miguel; Siddiqui, Omar; Ramahi, Omar M

    2015-09-01

    We introduce electrically thin dielectric lenses and reflectors that focus a plane wave based on the principles of phase compensation and constructive wave interference. Phase compensation is achieved by arranging thin rectangular slabs having different dielectric permittivity according to a permittivity profile obtained through analytic design equations. All incident rays parallel to the optical axis converge to a focal point with equalized optical paths resulting in constructive interference. Plane wave simulations indicate strong focusing, even in the presence of impedance mismatch between free space and the dielectric layers composing the lens. We demonstrate focusing at 9.45 GHz using a lens fabricated with commercially available dielectric materials. In addition to focusing, the flat lens proposed here demonstrates relatively high power gain at the focal point. We also present a flat reflector based on the same concept. We believe that the proposed dielectric lens and reflector are strong candidates to replace heavy metallic dishes and reflectors used in a variety of applications, especially satellites.

  17. Welding torch with arc light reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A welding torch arc light reflector is disclosed for welding torches having optical viewing systems. A schematic of a welding torch having an internal coaxial viewing system consisting of a lens which focuses the field of view of the weld scene of the workpiece onto the end of the fiberoptic bundle is provided. The transmitted image of the fiberoptic bundle is provided to a camera lens which focuses it onto a TV sensor array for transmission. To improve the parity of the image of the monitoring system, an arc light reflector is shown fitted to the end of the torch housing or gas cup. The arc light reflector has an internal conical section portion which is polished to serve as a mirror which reflects the bright arc light back onto the darker areas of the weld area and thereby provides a more detailed image for the monitoring system. The novelty of the invention lies in the use of an arc light reflector on welding torches having optical viewing systems.

  18. Welding torch with arc light reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Stephen S.

    1986-12-01

    A welding torch arc light reflector is disclosed for welding torches having optical viewing systems. A schematic of a welding torch having an internal coaxial viewing system consisting of a lens which focuses the field of view of the weld scene of the workpiece onto the end of the fiberoptic bundle is provided. The transmitted image of the fiberoptic bundle is provided to a camera lens which focuses it onto a TV sensor array for transmission. To improve the parity of the image of the monitoring system, an arc light reflector is shown fitted to the end of the torch housing or gas cup. The arc light reflector has an internal conical section portion which is polished to serve as a mirror which reflects the bright arc light back onto the darker areas of the weld area and thereby provides a more detailed image for the monitoring system. The novelty of the invention lies in the use of an arc light reflector on welding torches having optical viewing systems.

  19. The civil/mineral engineering building solar optic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Eijadi, D.A.; Beuning, S.J.

    1983-12-01

    The introduction of beamed sunlight into deep interior spaces represents an interesting set of design, fabrication and analysis problems, the solution to which permits broad distribution of sunlight for many lighting applications. Two prototypical systems have been developed: an Active Solar Optic (ASO) System consisting of a polar axis heliostat, redirecting mirrors and concentrating lenses; and a Passive Solar Optic (PSO) System consisting of paired fresnel mirrors assembled as mosaics on large supporting substrates. The paired mirrors are separated by a distance of approximately 12 feet and look at each other through vertical north-facing insulated glass. Previous work in the area of active solar optics has been mostly confined to paper studies and computer modeling. An experimental active system was built by M.A. Duguay in 1977. No similar work in PSO has been attempted, though the concept's characteristics may be loosely linked to work by James Lambeth. Despite technical difficulties with ASO systems and modeling difficulties with PSO systems, it is reasonable to conclude that both systems have current marketplace potential for reducing the energy demands associated with artificial light. Active systems with mirrors unsatisfactory for long-distance coupling to light guides are sufficiently satisfactory for less demanding illumination distribution methods. Passive systems, though less predictable than desired (thumbnail estimates during design were +20% of the illumination received on the walkway), are not so unpredictable as to cause serious over- or under-illumination.

  20. Layer-oriented adaptive optics for solar telescopes.

    PubMed

    Kellerer, Aglaé

    2012-08-10

    First multiconjugate adaptive-optical (MCAO) systems are currently being installed on solar telescopes. The aim of these systems is to increase the corrected field of view with respect to conventional adaptive optics. However, this first generation is based on a star-oriented approach, and it is then difficult to increase the size of the field of view beyond 60-80 arc sec in diameter. We propose to implement the layer-oriented approach in solar MCAO systems by use of wide-field Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors conjugated to the strongest turbulent layers. The wavefront distortions are averaged over a wide field: the signal from distant turbulence is attenuated and the tomographic reconstruction is thus done optically. The system consists of independent correction loops, which only need to account for local turbulence: the subapertures can be enlarged and the correction frequency reduced. Most importantly, a star-oriented MCAO system becomes more complex with increasing field size, while the layer-oriented approach benefits from larger fields and will therefore be an attractive solution for the future generation of solar MCAO systems.

  1. High efficiency solar cells combining a perovskite and a silicon heterojunction solar cells via an optical splitting system

    SciTech Connect

    Uzu, Hisashi E-mail: npark@skku.edu; Ichikawa, Mitsuru; Hino, Masashi; Nakano, Kunihiro; Meguro, Tomomi; Yamamoto, Kenji; Hernández, José Luis; Kim, Hui-Seon; Park, Nam-Gyu E-mail: npark@skku.edu

    2015-01-05

    We have applied an optical splitting system in order to achieve very high conversion efficiency for a full spectrum multi-junction solar cell. This system consists of multiple solar cells with different band gap optically coupled via an “optical splitter.” An optical splitter is a multi-layered beam splitter with very high reflection in the shorter-wave-length range and very high transmission in the longer-wave-length range. By splitting the incident solar spectrum and distributing it to each solar cell, the solar energy can be managed more efficiently. We have fabricated optical splitters and used them with a wide-gap amorphous silicon (a-Si) solar cell or a CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} perovskite solar cell as top cells, combined with mono-crystalline silicon heterojunction (HJ) solar cells as bottom cells. We have achieved with a 550 nm cutoff splitter an active area conversion efficiency of over 25% using a-Si and HJ solar cells and 28% using perovskite and HJ solar cells.

  2. Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope optical alignment plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekulic, Predrag; Liang, Chen; Gonzales, Kerry; Hubbard, Robert P.; Craig, Simon C.

    2016-07-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) is a 4-meter solar telescope under construction at Haleakala, Hawaii. The challenge of the DKIST optical alignment is the off-axis Gregorian configuration based on an Altitude-Azimuth mount, the independently-rotating Coudé platform and the large number of relay mirrors. This paper describes the optical alignment plan of the complete telescope, including the primary 4.24-m diameter off-axis secondary mirror, the secondary 620 mm diameter off-axis mirror, the transfer optics and the Coudé optics feeding the wavefront correction system and the science instruments. A number of accurate metrology instruments will be used to align the telescope and to reach the performances, including a laser tracker for initial positioning, a theodolite for accurate tilt alignment, a Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM) arm for local alignment in the Coudé laboratory, and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor to characterize the aberrations by measuring selected target stars. The wavefront will be characterized at the primary focus, the Gregorian focus, the intermediate focus and at the telescope focal plane. The laser tracker will serve also to measure the mirrors positions as function of Altitude angle due to the Telescope Mount Assembly (TMA) structure deflection. This paper describes also the method that will be used to compute the compensating mirrors shift and tilt needed to correct the residual aberrations and position of the focal plane.

  3. High efficiency flat plate solar energy collector

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, R. F.

    1985-04-30

    A concentrating flat plate collector for the high efficiency collection of solar energy. Through an arrangement of reflector elements, incoming solar radiation, either directly or after reflection from the reflector elements, impinges upon both surfaces of a collector element.

  4. Session: CSP Advanced Systems: Optical Materials (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.

    2008-04-01

    The Optical Materials project description is to characterize advanced reflector, perform accelerated and outdoor testing of commercial and experimental reflector materials, and provide industry support.

  5. Optical characterization platform for transparent insulation materials in solar energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platzer, Werner J.

    1994-09-01

    The precise optical characterization of transparent insulation materials used in windows, flat- plate collectors or for transparent insulation of buildings, is an important step to design solar collector and daylighting systems with these materials and to estimate energy benefits, peak loads, efficiencies, and different potential risks such as overheating, thermal damage or glare. Physically the aim is clear: Angle-dependent transmittance and reflectance properties for the solar and visible wavelength ranges yield the necessary information for the engineer to enable him to design a good system. However, it is far from trivial to obtain these data with sufficient precision for the rather different materials. The class of TIMs poses mainly the following problems, originating in their special character. TIMs often: (a) have a rather coarse structure, (b) show considerable scattering, (c) are relatively thick, (d) are spectrally selective, (e) and are not always rotationally symmetric. Therefore the optical measurement process has to: (a) integrate over a relatively large sample area (b) be able to detect intensity scattered in the sample (c) take into account the complex structure of the sample (d) and weight the different spectral bands correctly. We have set-up a set of radiation sources and integrating detector spheres which are able to measure directional-hemispherical and hemispherical-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance (hence also absorptance) for the visible and the solar wavelength range. This was possible by applying a PTFE-based coating to the spheres, having a unique spectrally flat response over the whole range, and using non-selective broadband detectors. Careful design tried to optimize integrating sphere geometry. Moreover, spectral measurements between 285-1100 nm are possible with an optical multichannel analyzer utilizing glass fiber optics. The whole experimental set-up will be presented and discussed together with representative results.

  6. Benefits of glass fibers in solar fiber optic lighting systems.

    PubMed

    Volotinen, Tarja T; Lingfors, David H S

    2013-09-20

    The transmission properties and coupling of solar light have been studied for glass core multimode fibers in order to verify their benefits for a solar fiber optic lighting system. The light transportation distance can be extended from 20 m with plastic fibers to over 100 m with the kind of glass fibers studied here. A high luminous flux, full visible spectrum, as well as an outstanding color rendering index (98) and correlated color temperature similar to the direct sun light outside have been obtained. Thus the outstanding quality of solar light transmitted through these fibers would improve the visibility of all kinds of objects compared to fluorescent and other artificial lighting. Annual relative lighting energy savings of 36% in Uppsala, Sweden, and 76% in Dubai were estimated in an office environment. The absolute savings can be doubled by using glass optical fibers, and are estimated to be in the order of 550 kWh/year in Sweden and 1160 kWh/year in Dubai for one system of only 0.159 m(2) total light collecting area. The savings are dependent on the fiber length, the daily usage time of the interior, the type of artificial lighting substituted, the system light output flux, and the available time of sunny weather at the geographic location.

  7. Polarization optical components of the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueoka, Stacey Ritsuyo

    2016-08-01

    The Daniel K Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST), when completed in 2019 will be the largest solar telescope built to date. DKIST will have a suite of first light polarimetric instrumentation requiring broadband polarization modulation and calibration optical elements. Compound crystalline retarders meet the design requirements for efficient modulators and achromatic calibration retarders. These retarders are the only possible large diameter optic that can survive the high flux, 5 arc minute field, and ultraviolet intense environment of a large aperture solar telescope at Gregorian focus. This dissertation presents work performed for the project. First, I measured birefringence of the candidate materials necessary to complete designs. Then, I modeled the polarization effects with three-dimensional ray-tracing codes as a function of angle of incidence and field of view. Through this analysis I learned that due to the incident converging F/13 beam on the calibration retarders, the previously assumed linear retarder model fails to account for effects above the project polarization specifications. I discuss modeling strategies such as Mueller matrix decompositions and simplifications of those strategies while still meeting fit error requirements. Finally, I present characterization techniques and how these were applied to prototype components.

  8. Image dissector photocathode solar damage test program. [solar radiation shielding using a fast optical lens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Image dissector sensors of the same type which will be used in the NASA shuttle star tracker were used in a series of tests directed towards obtaining solar radiation/time damage criteria. Data were evaluated to determine the predicted level of operability of the star tracker if tube damage became a reality. During the test series a technique for reducing the solar damage effect was conceived and verified. The damage concepts are outlined and the test methods and data obtained which were used for verification of the technique's feasibility are presented. The ability to operate an image dissector sensor with the solar image focussed on the photocathode by a fast optical lens under certain conditions is feasible and the elimination of a mechanical protection device is possible.

  9. Vacuum deposited polymer/silver reflector material

    SciTech Connect

    Affinito, J.; Martin, P.; Gross, M.; Bennett, W.

    1994-07-01

    Weatherable, low cost, front surface, solar reflectors on flexible substrates would be highly desirable for lamination to solar concentrator panels. The method to be described in this paper may permit such reflector material to be fabricated for less than 50 cents per square foot. Vacuum deposited Polymer/Silver/Polymer reflectors and Fabry-Perot interference filters were fabricated in a vacuum web coating operation on polyester substrates. Reflectivities were measured in the wavelength range from .4 {mu}m to .8 {mu}m. It is hoped that a low cost substrate can be used with the substrate laminated to the concentrator and the weatherable acrylic polymer coating facing the sun. This technique should be capable of deposition line speeds approaching 1500 linear feet/minute. Central to this technique is a new vacuum deposition process for the high rate deposition of polymer films. This polymer process involves the flash evaporation of an acrylic monomer onto a moving substrate. The monomer is subsequently cured by an electron beam or ultraviolet light. This high speed polymer film deposition process has been named the PML process - for Polymer Multi-Layer.

  10. Wirelessly Controllable Inflated Electroactive Polymer (EAP) Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chang, Zensheu; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea

    2005-01-01

    Inflatable membrane reflectors are attractive for deployable, large aperture, lightweight optical and microwave systems in micro-gravity space environment. However, any fabrication flaw or temperature variation may results in significant aberration of the surface. Even for a perfectly fabricated inflatable membrane mirror with uniform thickness, theory shows it will form a Hencky curve surface but a desired parabolic or spherical surface. Precision control of the surfaceshape of extremely flexible membrane structures is a critical challenge for the success of this technology. Wirelessly controllable inflated reflectors made of electroactive polymers (EAP) are proposed in this paper. A finite element model was configured to predict the behavior of the inflatable EAP membranes under pre-strains, pressures and distributed electric charges on the surface. To explore the controllability of the inflatable EAP reflectors, an iteration algorism was developed to find the required electric actuation for correcting the aberration of the Hencky curve to the desired parabolic curve. The correction capability of the reflectors with available EAP materials was explored numerically and is presented in this paper.

  11. Nanofluid optical property characterization: towards efficient direct absorption solar collectors.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Robert A; Phelan, Patrick E; Otanicar, Todd P; Adrian, Ronald; Prasher, Ravi

    2011-03-15

    Suspensions of nanoparticles (i.e., particles with diameters < 100 nm) in liquids, termed nanofluids, show remarkable thermal and optical property changes from the base liquid at low particle loadings. Recent studies also indicate that selected nanofluids may improve the efficiency of direct absorption solar thermal collectors. To determine the effectiveness of nanofluids in solar applications, their ability to convert light energy to thermal energy must be known. That is, their absorption of the solar spectrum must be established. Accordingly, this study compares model predictions to spectroscopic measurements of extinction coefficients over wavelengths that are important for solar energy (0.25 to 2.5 μm). A simple addition of the base fluid and nanoparticle extinction coefficients is applied as an approximation of the effective nanofluid extinction coefficient. Comparisons with measured extinction coefficients reveal that the approximation works well with water-based nanofluids containing graphite nanoparticles but less well with metallic nanoparticles and/or oil-based fluids. For the materials used in this study, over 95% of incoming sunlight can be absorbed (in a nanofluid thickness ≥10 cm) with extremely low nanoparticle volume fractions - less than 1 × 10-5, or 10 parts per million. Thus, nanofluids could be used to absorb sunlight with a negligible amount of viscosity and/or density (read: pumping power) increase.

  12. Nanofluid optical property characterization: towards efficient direct absorption solar collectors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Suspensions of nanoparticles (i.e., particles with diameters < 100 nm) in liquids, termed nanofluids, show remarkable thermal and optical property changes from the base liquid at low particle loadings. Recent studies also indicate that selected nanofluids may improve the efficiency of direct absorption solar thermal collectors. To determine the effectiveness of nanofluids in solar applications, their ability to convert light energy to thermal energy must be known. That is, their absorption of the solar spectrum must be established. Accordingly, this study compares model predictions to spectroscopic measurements of extinction coefficients over wavelengths that are important for solar energy (0.25 to 2.5 μm). A simple addition of the base fluid and nanoparticle extinction coefficients is applied as an approximation of the effective nanofluid extinction coefficient. Comparisons with measured extinction coefficients reveal that the approximation works well with water-based nanofluids containing graphite nanoparticles but less well with metallic nanoparticles and/or oil-based fluids. For the materials used in this study, over 95% of incoming sunlight can be absorbed (in a nanofluid thickness ≥10 cm) with extremely low nanoparticle volume fractions - less than 1 × 10-5, or 10 parts per million. Thus, nanofluids could be used to absorb sunlight with a negligible amount of viscosity and/or density (read: pumping power) increase. PMID:21711750

  13. Solar-blind ultraviolet optical system design for missile warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Huo, Furong; Zheng, Liqin

    2015-03-01

    Solar-blind region of Ultraviolet (UV) spectrum has very important application in military field. The spectrum range is from 240nm to 280nm, which can be applied to detect the tail flame from approaching missile. A solar-blind UV optical system is designed to detect the UV radiation, which is an energy system. iKon-L 936 from ANDOR company is selected as the UV detector, which has pixel size 13.5μm x 13.5 μm and active image area 27.6mm x 27.6 mm. CaF2 and F_silica are the chosen materials. The original structure is composed of 6 elements. To reduce the system structure and improve image quality, two aspheric surfaces and one diffractive optical element are adopted in this paper. After optimization and normalization, the designed system is composed of five elements with the maximum spot size 11.988μ m, which is less than the pixel size of the selected CCD detector. Application of aspheric surface and diffractive optical element makes each FOV have similar spot size, which shows the system almost meets the requirements of isoplanatic condition. If the focal length can be decreased, the FOV of the system can be enlarged further.

  14. Fraunhofer filters to reduce solar background for optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, E. L.

    1986-01-01

    A wavelength that lies within a spectral interval of reduced solar emission (a Fraunhofer line) can carry optical communications with reduced interference from direct or reflected background sunlight. Suitable Fraunhofer lines are located within the tuning range of good candidate lasers. The laser should be tunable dynamically to track Doppler shifts in the sunlight incident on any solar system body that may appear in the background as viewed by the receiver. A Fraunhofer filter used with a direct-detection receiver should be tuned to match the Doppler shifts of the source and background. The required tuning calculated here for various situations is also required if, instead, one uses a heterodyne receiver with limited post-detection bandwidth.

  15. Speckle image reconstruction of the adaptive optics solar images.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Libo; Tian, Yu; Rao, Changhui

    2014-11-17

    Speckle image reconstruction, in which the speckle transfer function (STF) is modeled as annular distribution according to the angular dependence of adaptive optics (AO) compensation and the individual STF in each annulus is obtained by the corresponding Fried parameter calculated from the traditional spectral ratio method, is used to restore the solar images corrected by AO system in this paper. The reconstructions of the solar images acquired by a 37-element AO system validate this method and the image quality is improved evidently. Moreover, we found the photometric accuracy of the reconstruction is field dependent due to the influence of AO correction. With the increase of angular separation of the object from the AO lockpoint, the relative improvement becomes approximately more and more effective and tends to identical in the regions far away the central field of view. The simulation results show this phenomenon is mainly due to the disparity of the calculated STF from the real AO STF with the angular dependence.

  16. Disordered animal multilayer reflectors and the localization of light

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, T. M.; Partridge, J. C.; Roberts, N. W.

    2014-01-01

    Multilayer optical reflectors constructed from ‘stacks’ of alternating layers of high and low refractive index dielectric materials are present in many animals. For example, stacks of guanine crystals with cytoplasm gaps occur within the skin and scales of fish, and stacks of protein platelets with cytoplasm gaps occur within the iridophores of cephalopods. Common to all these animal multilayer reflectors are different degrees of random variation in the thicknesses of the individual layers in the stack, ranging from highly periodic structures to strongly disordered systems. However, previous discussions of the optical effects of such thickness disorder have been made without quantitative reference to the propagation of light within the reflector. Here, we demonstrate that Anderson localization provides a general theoretical framework to explain the common coherent interference and optical properties of these biological reflectors. Firstly, we illustrate how the localization length enables the spectral properties of the reflections from more weakly disordered ‘coloured’ and more strongly disordered ‘silvery’ reflectors to be explained by the same physical process. Secondly, we show how the polarization properties of reflection can be controlled within guanine–cytoplasm reflectors, with an interplay of birefringence and thickness disorder explaining the origin of broadband polarization-insensitive reflectivity. PMID:25339688

  17. Disordered animal multilayer reflectors and the localization of light.

    PubMed

    Jordan, T M; Partridge, J C; Roberts, N W

    2014-12-06

    Multilayer optical reflectors constructed from 'stacks' of alternating layers of high and low refractive index dielectric materials are present in many animals. For example, stacks of guanine crystals with cytoplasm gaps occur within the skin and scales of fish, and stacks of protein platelets with cytoplasm gaps occur within the iridophores of cephalopods. Common to all these animal multilayer reflectors are different degrees of random variation in the thicknesses of the individual layers in the stack, ranging from highly periodic structures to strongly disordered systems. However, previous discussions of the optical effects of such thickness disorder have been made without quantitative reference to the propagation of light within the reflector. Here, we demonstrate that Anderson localization provides a general theoretical framework to explain the common coherent interference and optical properties of these biological reflectors. Firstly, we illustrate how the localization length enables the spectral properties of the reflections from more weakly disordered 'coloured' and more strongly disordered 'silvery' reflectors to be explained by the same physical process. Secondly, we show how the polarization properties of reflection can be controlled within guanine-cytoplasm reflectors, with an interplay of birefringence and thickness disorder explaining the origin of broadband polarization-insensitive reflectivity.

  18. Optical and THz reflectance investigations of organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sporea, Dan; Mihai, Laura; Sporea, Adelina; Galagan, Yulia

    2016-04-01

    Two Organic Photovoltaic devices having a photoactive layer containing Poly[N-9'-heptadecanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5- (4',7'-di-2-thienyl-2',1',3'-benzothiadiazole)] (PCDTBT) and [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM, 99%), and the layer sequences - glass/ITO/ZnO/PAL/PEDOT:PSS/Ag/encapsulation were non-destructively investigated by diffuse optical spectral reflectance, THz spectroscopy and THz imaging. The proposed methods proved to be powerful tools to support quality assurance in organic solar cells development, facilitating both the localization of manufacturing defects and the device degradation, as they are combined with "classical" evaluation means.

  19. First generation solar adaptive optics system for 1-m New Vacuum Solar Telescope at Fuxian Solar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Chang-Hui; Zhu, Lei; Rao, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Lan-Qiang; Bao, Hua; Ma, Xue-An; Gu, Nai-Ting; Guan, Chun-Lin; Chen, Dong-Hong; Wang, Cheng; Lin, Jun; Jin, Zen-Yu; Liu, Zhong

    2016-02-01

    The first generation solar adaptive optics (AO) system, which consists of a fine tracking loop with a tip-tilt mirror (TTM) and a correlation tracker, and a high-order correction loop with a 37-element deformable mirror (DM), a correlating Shack-Hartmann (SH) wavefront sensor (WFS) based on the absolute difference algorithm and a real time controller (RTC), has been developed and installed at the 1-m New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) that is part of Fuxian Solar Observatory (FSO). Compared with the 37-element solar AO system developed for the 26-cm Solar Fine Structure Telescope, administered by Yunnan Astronomical Observatories, this AO system has two updates: one is the subaperture arrangement of the WFS changed from square to hexagon; the other is the high speed camera of the WFS and the corresponding real time controller. The WFS can be operated at a frame rate of 2100 Hz and the error correction bandwidth can exceed 100 Hz. After AO correction, the averaged residual image motion and the averaged RMS wavefront error are reduced to 0.06″ and 45 nm, respectively. The results of on-sky testing observations demonstrate better contrast and finer structures of the images taken with AO than those without AO.

  20. Solar Power Satellite (SPS) fiber optic link assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A feasibility demonstration of a 980 MHz fiber optic link for the Solar Power Satellite (SPS) phase reference distribution system was accomplished. A dual fiber-optic link suitable for a phase distribution frequency of 980 MHz was built and tested. The major link components include single mode injection laser diodes, avalanche photodiodes, and multimode high bandwidth fibers. Signal throughput was demonstrated to be stable and of high quality in all cases. For a typical SPS link length of 200 meters, the transmitted phase at 980 MHz varies approximately 2.5 degrees for every deg C of fiber temperature change. This rate is acceptable because of the link length compensation feature of the phase control design.

  1. Optical design of organic solar cell with hybrid plasmonic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Wei E. I.; Choy, Wallace C. H.; Chen, Yongpin P.; Chew, Weng Cho

    2011-08-01

    We propose a novel optical design of organic solar cell with a hybrid plasmonic system, which comprises a plasmonic cavity coupled with a dielectric core-metal shell nanosphere. From a rigorous solution of Maxwell's equations, called volume integral equation method, optical absorption of the active polymer material has a four-fold increase. The significant enhancement mainly attributes to the coupling of symmetric surface wave modes supported by the cavity resonator. The dispersion relation of the plasmonic cavity is characterized by solving an 1D eigenvalue problem of the air/metal/polymer/metal/air structure with finite thicknesses of metal layers. We demonstrate that the optical enhancement strongly depends on the decay length of surface plasmon waves penetrated into the active material. Furthermore, the coherent interplay between the cavity and the dielectric core-metal shell nanosphere is undoubtedly confirmed by our theoretical model. The work offers detailed physical explanations to the hybrid plasmonic cavity device structure for enhancing the optical absorption of organic photovoltaics.

  2. Optical design of organic solar cell with hybrid plasmonic system.

    PubMed

    Sha, Wei E I; Choy, Wallace C H; Chen, Yongpin P; Chew, Weng Cho

    2011-08-15

    We propose a novel optical design of organic solar cell with a hybrid plasmonic system, which comprises a plasmonic cavity coupled with a dielectric core-metal shell nanosphere. From a rigorous solution of Maxwell's equations, called volume integral equation method, optical absorption of the active polymer material has a four-fold increase. The significant enhancement mainly attributes to the coupling of symmetric surface wave modes supported by the cavity resonator. The dispersion relation of the plasmonic cavity is characterized by solving an 1D eigenvalue problem of the air/metal/polymer/metal/air structure with finite thicknesses of metal layers. We demonstrate that the optical enhancement strongly depends on the decay length of surface plasmon waves penetrated into the active material. Furthermore, the coherent interplay between the cavity and the dielectric core-metal shell nanosphere is undoubtedly confirmed by our theoretical model. The work offers detailed physical explanations to the hybrid plasmonic cavity device structure for enhancing the optical absorption of organic photovoltaics.

  3. Modeling of optical losses in perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghavi, M. Javad; Houshmand, Mohammad; Zandi, M. Hossein; Gorji, Nima E.

    2016-09-01

    The optical losses within the structure of hybrid perovskite solar cells are investigated using only the optical properties of each layer e.g. refractive index and extinction coefficient. This model allows calculating the transmission/reflection rates at the interfaces and absorption loss within any layer. Then, the short circuit current density and loss percentage are calculated versus the perovskite and TiO2 thicknesses from 50 nm to 150 nm. To make our calculations closer to reality, we extracted the optical properties of each device component from the literature reports on glass/TCO/TiO2/perovskite/metal. The simulations were fitted with the experimental results of some relevant references. Our simulations show that ITO transmits the light better than SnO2 as the TCO front electrode, and the light reflection at both sides of the perovskite layer, e.g. at TiO2/perovskite and perovskite/Spiro-OMeTAD, is lower than 25%. The light interference and multiple reflections have been accounted in our calculations and finally we showed that a thicker TiO2 and perovskite cause more optical loss in current density due to stronger absorption.

  4. Practical implementation of a planar micro-optic solar concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Katherine; Karp, Jason; Hallas, Justin; Ford, Joseph

    2012-10-01

    CPV optics typically have multiple discrete apertures which each focus sunlight directly onto an associated PV cell. Waveguide based CPV systems instead couple light from multiple small apertures through a shared slab waveguide, avoiding individual optical alignment and electrical connection of multiple PV cells. We previously demonstrated the design and fabrication of a planar micro-optic waveguide concentrator, where incoming sunlight is focused through millimeter pitch lenslets onto mirrored micro-prisms which couple light into a slab waveguide toward common PV cells. This enables an efficient high concentrator system with a compact geometry. However, this design has the typical CPV limitation of low angular acceptance, requiring precise two-axis large-scale mechanical tracking. Here, we present the results of a design study to adapt the planar micro-optic design for use in combination with a one-dimensional mechanical tracker, tilted at latitude, to provide azimuthal alignment and altitude bias. Lateral mechanical micro-tracking can accommodate the residual altitude misalignment. The design shows that this relatively simple system can still provide over 72% annual optical efficiency for a 50x concentrator. Replacing the micro-tracking with passive optical altitude alignment further reduces system complexity, but also reduces efficiency. These waveguide based concentrators have primarily been designed for use with photovoltaic cells, which are index matched onto the waveguide either directly, or through output couplers. For concentrating solar power systems, sunlight is focused onto thermally isolated devices which can not be in direct contact. We will also present alternative output coupler designs, which allow extraction of light from the waveguide to an air or vacuum isolated coupler. The loss associated with these couplers is substantially identical to the reflection losses of one additional mirror.

  5. Simulation of Locking Space Truss Deployments for a Large Deployable Sparse Aperture Reflector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    solar cells , there exists the potential to increase the signal gain by using a larger antenna reflector aperture. However, the use of large reflectors, or...and Focus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.3 Assumptions and Limitations ...69 Initial Displacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 First Cell Lockout Event

  6. Solar optics-based active panel for solar energy storage and disinfection of greywater.

    PubMed

    Lee, W; Song, J; Son, J H; Gutierrez, M P; Kang, T; Kim, D; Lee, L P

    2016-09-01

    Smart city and innovative building strategies are becoming increasingly more necessary because advancing a sustainable building system is regarded as a promising solution to overcome the depleting water and energy. However, current sustainable building systems mainly focus on energy saving and miss a holistic integration of water regeneration and energy generation. Here, we present a theoretical study of a solar optics-based active panel (SOAP) that enables both solar energy storage and photothermal disinfection of greywater simultaneously. Solar collector efficiency of energy storage and disinfection rate of greywater have been investigated. Due to the light focusing by microlens, the solar collector efficiency is enhanced from 25% to 65%, compared to that without the microlens. The simulation of greywater sterilization shows that 100% disinfection can be accomplished by our SOAP for different types of bacteria including Escherichia coli. Numerical simulation reveals that our SOAP as a lab-on-a-wall system can resolve the water and energy problem in future sustainable building systems.

  7. Lightweight diaphragm mirror module system for solar collectors

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Barry L.

    1985-01-01

    A mirror module system is provided for accurately focusing solar radiation on a point or a line as defined by an array of solar collectors. Each mirror module includes a flexible membrane stretched over a frame in a manner similar to that of a drum or a trampoline and further includes a silvered glass or plastic mirror for forming an optical reflecting surface. The configuration of the optical reflecting surface is variably adjustable to provide for the accurate focusing of the solar energy on a given collector array, e.g., a point or a linear array arrangement. The flexible mirror-membrane combination is lightweight to facilitate installation and reduce system cost yet structurally strong enough to provide for the precise focusing of the incident solar radiation in a semi-rigid reflector system in which unwanted reflector displacement is minimized.

  8. Lightweight diaphragm mirror module system for solar collectors

    DOEpatents

    Butler, B.L.

    1984-01-01

    A mirror module system is provided for accurately focusing solar radiation on a point or a line as defined by an array of solar collectors. Each mirror module includes a flexible membrane stretched over a frame in a manner similar to that of a drum or a trampoline and further includes a silvered glass or plastic mirror for forming an optical reflecting surface. The configuration of the optical reflecting surface is variably adjustable to provide for the accurate focusing of the solar energy on a given collector array, e.g., a point or a linear array arrangement. The flexible mirror-membrane combination is lightweight to facilitate installation and reduce system cost yet structurally strong enough to provide for the precise focusing of the incident solar radiation in a semi-rigid reflector system in which unwanted reflector displacement is minimized.

  9. Secondary pattern computation of an arbitrarily shaped main reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, P. T. C.; Lee, S. W.; Acosta, R.

    1984-01-01

    The secondary pattern of a perfectly conducting offset main reflector being illuminated by a point feed at an arbitrary location was studied. The method of analysis is based upon the application of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to the aperture fields obtained using geometrical optics (GO) and geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD). Key features of the reflector surface is completely arbitrary, the incident field from the feed is most general with arbitrary polarization and location, and the edge diffraction is calculated by either UAT or by UTD. Comparison of this technique for an offset parabolic reflector with the Jacobi-Bessel and Fourier-Bessel techniques shows good agreement. Near field, far field, and scan data of a large reflector are presented.

  10. Overview of optical rectennas for solar energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zixu; Joshi, Saumil; Pelz, Bradley; Moddel, Garret

    2013-09-01

    Although the concept of using optical rectenna for harvesting solar energy was first introduced four decades ago, only recently has it invited a surge of interest, with dozens of laboratories around the world working on various aspects of the technology. An optical rectenna couples an ultra-high-speed diode to a submicron antenna so that the incoming radiation received by the antenna is rectified by the diode to produce a DC power output. The result is a technology that can be efficient and inexpensive, requiring only low-cost materials. Conventional classical rectification theory does not apply at optical frequencies, necessitating the application of quantum photon-assisted tunneling theory to describe the device operation. At first glance it would appear that the ultimate conversion efficiency is limited only by the Landsberg limit of 93%, but a more sober analysis that includes limitation due to the coherence of solar radiation leads to a result that coincides with the Trivich-Flinn limit of 44%. Innovative antenna designs are required to achieve high efficiency at frequencies where resistive losses in metal are substantial. The diode most often considered for rectennas make use of electron tunneling through ultra-thin insulators in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) diodes. The most severe constraint is that the impedances of the antenna and diodes must match for efficient power transfer. The consequence is an RC time constant that cannot be achieved with parallel-plate MIM diodes, leading to the need for real innovations in diode structures. Technologies under consideration include sharp-tip and traveling-wave MIM diodes, and graphene geometric diodes. We survey the technologies under consideration.

  11. The Focal Plane Package of the Solar Optical telescope on Solar B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarbell, Theodore D.

    2006-06-01

    The Solar-B satellite will be launched into a full-sun low-earth orbit in the fall of 2006 from Japan's Uchinoura Space center. It includes the 50-cm diameter Solar Optical Telescope with its Focal Plane Package (FPP), for near-UV and visible observations of the photosphere and chromosphere at very high (diffraction limited) angular resolution. The FPP has a Spectro-Polarimeter (SP) for precision measurements of photospheric vector magnetic fields over a 160 x 320 arcsecond field of view; a Narrowband Filter Imager (NFI) with a tunable birefringent filter for magnetic, Doppler, and intensity maps over the same field of view; and a Broadband Filter Imager (BFI) for highest resolution images in six wavelengths (G band, Ca II H, continua, etc.) over two-thirds of that field of view. A polarization modulator in the telescope allows measurement of Stokes parameters at all wavelengths in the SP and NFI. The NFI wavelengths include both photospheric and chromospheric lines (Fe I, Mg b, Na D, H-alpha). All images are stabilized by a tip-tilt mirror and correlation tracker. This presentation will include pictures and description of the instrument, results from calibration and sun testing, portions of the draft science plan, and some preliminary JOP's. Solar-B is an international cooperative mission between JAXA/ISAS of Japan, NASA of the United States, and PPARC of the United Kingdom. The Solar Optical Telescope has been developed by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitsubishi Electric Company, and JAXA/ISAS. The FPP has been developed by the Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, High Altitude Observatory, and NASA.

  12. Development of optical tool for the characterization of selective solar absorber tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braillon, Julien; Stollo, Alessio; Delord, Christine; Raccurt, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    In the Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) technologies, selective solar absorbers, which have a cylindrical geometry, are submitted to strong environmental constraints. The degradation of their optical properties (total solar absorbance and total emittance) has a direct impact on the performances. In order to know optical properties of absorber tubes, we present in this article a new optical tool developed by our laboratory which fit onto commercial spectrometers. Total solar absorbance and total emittance are calculated from total reflectance spectra measured by UV-Vis and IR spectrophotometry. To verify and validate the measurement method, we performed a comparative study between flat and cylindrical samples with same surface properties.

  13. Exact analytic flux distributions for two-dimensional solar concentrators.

    PubMed

    Fraidenraich, Naum; Henrique de Oliveira Pedrosa Filho, Manoel; Vilela, Olga C; Gordon, Jeffrey M

    2013-07-01

    A new approach for representing and evaluating the flux density distribution on the absorbers of two-dimensional imaging solar concentrators is presented. The formalism accommodates any realistic solar radiance and concentrator optical error distribution. The solutions obviate the need for raytracing, and are physically transparent. Examples illustrating the method's versatility are presented for parabolic trough mirrors with both planar and tubular absorbers, Fresnel reflectors with tubular absorbers, and V-trough mirrors with planar absorbers.

  14. Making Curved Frequency-Selective Microwave Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Wu, Te-Kao

    1995-01-01

    Prototype curved lightweight dichroic microwave reflectors designed to be highly reflective in X and K(suba) frequency bands and highly transmissive in K(subu) and S bands. Conductive grid elements formed photolithographically on curved reflector surfaces. Intended for use as subreflectors of main paraboloidal antenna reflector to enable simultaneous operation in both prime-focus configuration in K(subu) and S bands and Cassegrain configuration in X and K(suba) bands. Basic concepts of reflectors described in "Frequency-Selective Microwave Reflectors" (NPO-18701). "Double Square-Loop Dichroic Microwave Reflector" (NPO-18676), "Triband Circular-Loop Dichroic Microwave Reflector" (NPO-18714), and "Improved Dichroic Microwave Reflector" (NPO-18664).

  15. A Proposal to Develop and Test a Fibre-Optic Coupled Solar Thermal Propulsion System for Microsatellites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    high numerical aperture fibre optics. Applying fibre optics to STP allows the solar concentrator mirror to be mechanically decoupled from the solar...Applying fibre optics to STP allows the solar concentrator mirror to be mechanically decoupled from the solar heat exchanger as well as granting...concentration is achieved via an optical concentrating system, such as a series of lenses or mirrors . This concentrated sunlight impinges on a blackbody

  16. Optical modeling of graphene contacted CdTe solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldosari, Marouf; Sohrabpoor, Hamed; Gorji, Nima E.

    2016-04-01

    For the first time, an optical model is applied on CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells with graphene front or back contact. Graphene is highly conductive and is as thin as a single atom which reduces the light reflection and absorption, and thus enhances the light transmission to CdTe layer for a wide range of wavelengths including IR. Graphene as front electrode of CdTe devices led to loss in short circuit current density of 10% ΔJsc ≤ 15% compared to the conventional electrodes of TCO and ITO at CdS thickness of dCdS = 100 nm. In addition, all the multilayer graphene electrodes with 2, 4, and 7 graphene layers led to Jsc ≤ 20 mA/cm2. Therefore, we conclude that a single monolayer graphene with hexagonal carbon network reduces optical losses and enhances the carrier collection measured as Jsc. In another structure design, we applied the optical model to graphene back contacted CdS/CdTe device. This scheme allows double side irradiation of the cell which is expected to enhance the Jsc. We obtained 1 ∼ 6 , 23, and 38 mA/cm2 for back, front and bifacial illumination of graphene contacted CdTe cell with CdS = 100 nm. The bifacial irradiated cell, to be efficient, requires an ultrathin CdTe film with dCdTe ≤ 1 μm. In this case, the junction electric field extends to the back region and collects out the generated carriers efficiently. This was modelled by absorptivity rather than transmission rate and optical losses. Since the literature suggest that ZnO can increase the graphene conductivity and enhance the Jsc, we performed our simulations for a graphene/ZnO electrode (ZnO = 100 nm) instead of a single graphene layer.

  17. Solar irradiance measurements by means of optical fibers and silicon detectors.

    PubMed

    Corrons, A; Pons, A

    1979-08-15

    An experimental system has been constructed for the continuous measurement of solar irradiance using silicon diode detectors not directly exposed to solar radiation. The received incident solar radiation is conducted from the roof of the building to the detectors by an optical fiber. An electronic computer receives the signal and processes it, introducing the necessary corrections to calculate the total solar irradiance in W m(-2). The system measures with a proved accuracy to better than 3%.

  18. Solar magnetic fields measurements with a magneto-optical filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cacciani, A.; Ricci, D.; Rosati, P.; Rhodes, E. J.; Smith, E.

    1990-01-01

    The presence of a magnetic field at different levels inside the sun has crucial implications for helioseismology. The solar oscillation observing program carried out since 1983 at Mt. Wilson with Cacciani magneto-optical filter has recently been modified to acquire full-disk magnetograms with 2 arcsec spatial resolution. A method for the correct determination of magnetic maps which are free of contamination by velocity signal is presented. It is shown that no cross-talk exists between the Doppler and Zeeman shifts of the Na D lines, provided that instrumental polarization effects are taken into account. The observed line-of-sight photospheric field was used to map the vector field in the inner corona, above active regions, in the current free approximation.

  19. Recent Progress Towards Quantum Dot Solar Cells with Enhanced Optical Absorption.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zerui; Ji, Haining; Yu, Peng; Wang, Zhiming

    2016-12-01

    Quantum dot solar cells, as a promising candidate for the next generation solar cell technology, have received tremendous attention in the last 10 years. Some recent developments in epitaxy growth and device structures have opened up new avenues for practical quantum dot solar cells. Unfortunately, the performance of quantum dot solar cells is often plagued by marginal photon absorption. In this review, we focus on the recent progress made in enhancing optical absorption in quantum dot solar cells, including optimization of quantum dot growth, improving the solar cells structure, and engineering light trapping techniques.

  20. Recent Progress Towards Quantum Dot Solar Cells with Enhanced Optical Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zerui; Ji, Haining; Yu, Peng; Wang, Zhiming

    2016-05-01

    Quantum dot solar cells, as a promising candidate for the next generation solar cell technology, have received tremendous attention in the last 10 years. Some recent developments in epitaxy growth and device structures have opened up new avenues for practical quantum dot solar cells. Unfortunately, the performance of quantum dot solar cells is often plagued by marginal photon absorption. In this review, we focus on the recent progress made in enhancing optical absorption in quantum dot solar cells, including optimization of quantum dot growth, improving the solar cells structure, and engineering light trapping techniques.

  1. Solar energy collection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A fixed, linear, ground-based primary reflector having an extended curved sawtooth-contoured surface covered with a metalized polymeric reflecting material, reflects solar energy to a movably supported collector that is kept at the concentrated line focus reflector primary. The primary reflector may be constructed by a process utilizing well known freeway paving machinery. The solar energy absorber is preferably a fluid transporting pipe. Efficient utilization leading to high temperatures from the reflected solar energy is obtained by cylindrical shaped secondary reflectors that direct off-angle energy to the absorber pipe. A seriatim arrangement of cylindrical secondary reflector stages and spot-forming reflector stages produces a high temperature solar energy collection system of greater efficiency.

  2. New Method to Characterize Degradation of First Surface Aluminum Reflectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, F.; Heller, P.; Meyen, S.; Pitz-Paal, R.; Kennedy, C.; Fernandez-Garcia, A.; Schmucker, M.

    2010-10-01

    This paper reports the development of a new optical instrument capable of characterizing the aging process of enhanced first surface aluminum reflectors for concentrating solar power (CSP) application. Samples were exposed outdoors at different sites and in accelerated exposure tests. All samples exposed outdoors showed localized corrosion spots. Degradation originated from points of damage in the protective coating, but propagated underneath the protective coating. The degraded samples were analyzed with a microscope and with a newly designed space-resolved specular reflectometer (SR)2 that is capable of optically detecting and characterizing the corrosion spots. The device measures the specular reflectance at three acceptance angles and the wavelengths with spatial resolution using a digital camera's CMOS sensor. It can be used to measure the corrosion growth rate during outdoor and accelerated exposure tests. These results will allow a correlation between the degraded mirror surface and its specular reflectance.

  3. Test results, Industrial Solar Technology parabolic trough solar collector

    SciTech Connect

    Dudley, V.E.; Evans, L.R.; Matthews, C.W.

    1995-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Industrial Solar Technology are cost-sharing development of advanced parabolic trough technology. As part of this effort, several configurations of an IST solar collector were tested to determine the collector efficiency and thermal losses with black chrome and black nickel receiver selective coatings, combined with aluminized film and silver film reflectors, using standard Pyrex{reg_sign} and anti-reflective coated Pyrex{reg_sign} glass receiver envelopes. The development effort has been successful, producing an advanced collector with 77% optical efficiency, using silver-film reflectors, a black nickel receiver coating, and a solgel anti-reflective glass receiver envelope. For each receiver configuration, performance equations were empirically derived relating collector efficiency and thermal losses to the operating temperature. Finally, equations were derived showing collector performance as a function of input insolation value, incident angle, and operating temperature.

  4. Analysis of Reflector Antennas in Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeap, K. H.; Loh, M. C.; Tham, C. Y.; Yiam, C. Y.; Yeong, K. C.; Lai, K. C.

    2016-11-01

    We present an analysis on the performance of the Cassegrain and Gregorian on-axis, off-axis and offset antennas. In our study, we have adopted the design parameters for the Cassegrain configuration used in the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) project. Modifications on the original parameters are made so as to meet the design requirement for the off-axis and offset configurations. To reduce spillover loss in the offset antennas, we have adjusted the angle between the axis of the primary reflector and that of the sub-reflector, so that the feed horn is placed right next to the edge of the primary reflector. This is to allow the offset antennas to receive the highest power at the feed horn. The results obtained from the physical optics simulation show that the radiation characteristics of both Cassegrain and Gregorian antennas are similar. The offset designs exhibit the best performance, followed by the on-axis, and, finally, the off-axis designs. Our analysis also shows that the performance of both offset Cassegrain and Gregorian antennas are comparable to each other.

  5. Wavefront Correction for Large, Flexible Antenna Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, William A.; Jammejad, Vahraz; Rajagopalan, Harish; Xu, Shenheng

    2010-01-01

    A wavefront-correction system has been proposed as part of an outer-space radio communication system that would include a large, somewhat flexible main reflector antenna, a smaller subreflector antenna, and a small array feed at the focal plane of these two reflector antennas. Part of the wavefront-correction system would reside in the subreflector, which would be a planar patch-element reflectarray antenna in which the phase shifts of the patch antenna elements would be controlled via microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) radio -frequency (RF) switches. The system would include the following sensing-and-computing subsystems: a) An optical photogrammetric subsystem built around two cameras would estimate geometric distortions of the main reflector; b) A second subsystem would estimate wavefront distortions from amplitudes and phases of signals received by the array feed elements; and c) A third subsystem, built around small probes on the subreflector plane, would estimate wavefront distortions from differences among phases of signals received by the probes. The distortion estimates from the three subsystems would be processed to generate control signals to be fed to the MEMS RF switches to correct for the distortions, thereby enabling collimation and aiming of the received or transmitted radio beam to the required precision.

  6. A Simple Optical Model Well Explains Plasmonic-Nanoparticle-Enhanced Spectral Photocurrent in Optically Thin Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2016-05-01

    A simple optical model for photocurrent enhancement by plasmonic metal nanoparticles atop solar cells has been developed. Our model deals with the absorption, reflection, and scattering of incident sunlight as well as radiation efficiencies on metallic nanoparticles. Our calculation results satisfactorily reproduce a series of experimental spectral data for optically thin GaAs solar cells with Ag and Al nanoparticles of various dimensions, demonstrating the validity of our modeling approach. Our model is likely to be a powerful tool for investigations of surface plasmon-enhanced thin-film solar cells.

  7. A Simple Optical Model Well Explains Plasmonic-Nanoparticle-Enhanced Spectral Photocurrent in Optically Thin Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2016-12-01

    A simple optical model for photocurrent enhancement by plasmonic metal nanoparticles atop solar cells has been developed. Our model deals with the absorption, reflection, and scattering of incident sunlight as well as radiation efficiencies on metallic nanoparticles. Our calculation results satisfactorily reproduce a series of experimental spectral data for optically thin GaAs solar cells with Ag and Al nanoparticles of various dimensions, demonstrating the validity of our modeling approach. Our model is likely to be a powerful tool for investigations of surface plasmon-enhanced thin-film solar cells.

  8. SEISMIC-REFLECTOR DATABASE SOFTWARE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Evelyn L.; Hosom, John-Paul; ,

    1986-01-01

    The seismic data analysis (SDA) software system facilitates generation of marine seismic reflector databases composed of reflector depths, travel times, root-mean-square and interval velocities, geographic coordinates, and identifying information. System processes include digitizing of seismic profiles and velocity semblance curves, merging of velocity and navigation data with profile travel-time data, calculation of reflector depths in meters, profile and map graphic displays, data editing and smoothing, and entry of finalized data into a comprehensive database. An overview of concepts, file structures, and programs is presented.

  9. Status of the DKIST system for solar adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Luke C.; Cummings, Keith; Drobilek, Mark; Johansson, Erik; Marino, Jose; Richards, Kit; Rimmele, Thomas; Sekulic, Predrag; Wöger, Friedrich

    2016-07-01

    When the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) achieves first light in 2019, it will deliver the highest spatial resolution images of the solar atmosphere ever recorded. Additionally, the DKIST will observe the Sun with unprecedented polarimetric sensitivity and spectral resolution, spurring a leap forward in our understanding of the physical processes occurring on the Sun. The DKIST wavefront correction system will provide active alignment control and jitter compensation for all six of the DKIST science instruments. Five of the instruments will also be fed by a conventional adaptive optics (AO) system, which corrects for high frequency jitter and atmospheric wavefront disturbances. The AO system is built around an extended-source correlating Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, a Physik Instrumente fast tip-tilt mirror (FTTM) and a Xinetics 1600-actuator deformable mirror (DM), which are controlled by an FPGA-based real-time system running at 1975 Hz. It is designed to achieve on-axis Strehl of 0.3 at 500 nm in median seeing (r0 = 7 cm) and Strehl of 0.6 at 630 nm in excellent seeing (r0 = 20 cm). The DKIST wavefront correction team has completed the design phase and is well into the fabrication phase. The FTTM and DM have both been delivered to the DKIST laboratory in Boulder, CO. The real-time controller has been completed and is able to read out the camera and deliver commands to the DM with a total latency of approximately 750 μs. All optics and optomechanics, including many high-precision custom optics, mounts, and stages, are completed or nearing the end of the fabrication process and will soon undergo rigorous acceptance testing. Before installing the wavefront correction system at the telescope, it will be assembled as a testbed in the laboratory. In the lab, performance tests beginning with component-level testing and continuing to full system testing will ensure that the wavefront correction system meets all performance requirements. Further work in the

  10. Super Smooth Optics for Extra-Solar Planet Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrile, Richard J.; Ftaclas, Christ

    1989-01-01

    The goal of imaging planets around the nearby stars has important scientific significance but requires the use of advanced methods of controlling diffracted and scattered light. Over the last three years we have undertaken a study of coronagraphic methods of controlling diffracted light and of figuring hyper-contrast optics. Progress in these two general areas have led to a proposed space-based, 1.9 meter diameter coronagraphic telescope designed specifically for very high performance in the imaging of faint objects near bright sources. This instrument, called the Circumstellar Imaging Telescope (CIT), relies on a new high efficiency coronagraph design and the careful control of scattered light by extremely smooth optics. The high efficiency coronagraph uses focal plane apodization in order to concentrate diffracted light more efficiently in the pupil. This allows convenient removal of the diffracted light by masking off parts of the telescope pupil while not sacrificing the center of the field. Reductions of diffracted light by factors exceeding 1000 are not only possible but are required in order to detect extra-solar planets. Laboratory experiments with this new design have confirmed the theoretical diffraction reductions to the limits of the optics used (factors of about 300) . The extremely high efficiency of this coronagraph puts strong constraints on the narrow angle scattered light due to figure errors in the telescope mirror. Since planets orbiting nearby stars are expected at angular distances of about 1 arcsecond, it is in this small angular range in which scattering must be controlled. The figure errors responsible for scattering in this range come from mid-spatial frequencies corresponding to correlation lengths of about 10 cm on the primary mirror. A primary mirror about 15 times smoother than the Hubble Space Telescope mirror is required for the CIT. Laboratory experiments indicate that small test mirrors can be fabricated with existing technology

  11. Large space-borne reflector antenna characterization: Evaluation and distortion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoferer, Robert Alois

    For space-borne reflector antenna applications, both size and weight of the antenna is restricted to the payload capacity of the launch vehicle. Advantages in the material and manufacturing capabilities of large reflector antennas over the recent years have made it possible to propose antenna systems with ever increasing size and operating frequency. Before deployment, however, it is crucial to accurately evaluate the radiation characteristics of these antennas. Also, if compensatory measures are applied to compensate for structural distortions, it is necessary to assess its effectiveness for a particular the examined antenna configuration. In this dissertation, an effective dual reflector analysis technique has been developed, using a combination of Physical Optics, Geometrical Optics and Fourier-Jacobi surface expansion. This analysis technique has been applied to two classes of reflector antenna applications. First, two challenging single reflector antenna configurations have been designed and analyzed. Second, the analysis technique is used for subreflector shaping in the process of main reflector distortion compensation for an electrically large dual reflector antenna configuration. Note that the inflatable reflector antenna configurations investigated in this thesis belong to the class reflector antennas larger than 20 m, which are now being considered for future space missions.

  12. Bright color reflective displays with interlayer reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitson, Stephen; Geisow, Adrian; Rudin, John; Taphouse, Tim

    2011-08-01

    A good solution to the reflective display of color has been a major challenge for the display industry, with very limited color gamuts demonstrated to date. Conventional side-by-side red, green and blue color filters waste two-thirds of incident light. The alternative of stacking cyan, magenta and yellow layers is also challenging -- a 10% loss per layer compounds to nearly 50% overall. Here we demonstrate an architecture that interleaves absorbing-to-clear shutters with matched wavelength selective reflectors. This increases color gamut by reducing losses and more cleanly separating the color channels, and gives much wider choice of electro-optic colorants.

  13. Reflectors for SAR performance testing.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) performance testing and estimation is facilitated by observing the system response to known target scene elements. Trihedral corner reflectors and other canonical targets play an important role because their Radar Cross Section (RCS) can be calculated analytically. However, reflector orientation and the proximity of the ground and mounting structures can significantly impact the accuracy and precision with which measurements can be made. These issues are examined in this report.

  14. OFFSET - RAY TRACING OPTICAL ANALYSIS OF OFFSET SOLAR COLLECTOR FOR SPACE STATION SOLAR DYNAMIC POWER SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferies, K.

    1994-01-01

    OFFSET is a ray tracing computer code for optical analysis of a solar collector. The code models the flux distributions within the receiver cavity produced by reflections from the solar collector. It was developed to model the offset solar collector of the solar dynamic electric power system being developed for Space Station Freedom. OFFSET has been used to improve the understanding of the collector-receiver interface and to guide the efforts of NASA contractors also researching the optical components of the power system. The collector for Space Station Freedom consists of 19 hexagonal panels each containing 24 triangular, reflective facets. Current research is geared toward optimizing flux distribution inside the receiver via changes in collector design and receiver orientation. OFFSET offers many options for experimenting with the design of the system. The offset parabolic collector model configuration is determined by an input file of facet corner coordinates. The user may choose other configurations by changing this file, but to simulate collectors that have other than 19 groups of 24 triangular facets would require modification of the FORTRAN code. Each of the roughly 500 facets in the assembled collector may be independently aimed to smooth out, or tailor, the flux distribution on the receiver's wall. OFFSET simulates the effects of design changes such as in receiver aperture location, tilt angle, and collector facet contour. Unique features of OFFSET include: 1) equations developed to pseudo-randomly select ray originating sources on the Sun which appear evenly distributed and include solar limb darkening; 2) Cone-optics technique used to add surface specular error to the ray originating sources to determine the apparent ray sources of the reflected sun; 3) choice of facet reflective surface contour -- spherical, ideal parabolic, or toroidal; 4) Gaussian distributions of radial and tangential components of surface slope error added to the surface normals at

  15. Recent results on the optical performance of solar two heliostats

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.A.; Edgar, R.M.; Houser, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    Recent Sandia support of the Solar Two project has included the analysis of optical performance issues related to heliostat field improvements. Two types of heliostats will be used for the Solar Two project: The 1818 original 38.4 m{sup 2} Martin Marietta Co. heliostats, and 108 new 95 m{sup 2} Lugo heliostats. Carrisa Plains mirror modules will be used to construct the Lugo heliostats and refurbish original heliostats. Baseline, clean reflectivity measurements of 0.90 and 0.94 are recomended for the original heliostat and the Carrisa Plains modules, respectively. Sandia`s Beam Characterization System provided beam quality information for representative configurations of both heliostats. This showed that the replacement of two facets with Carrisa Plains modules on an original heliostat led to a slight increase in spillage, but also increased beam power. As expected, the large beam of the Lugo heliostat showed poorer beam quality and significant spillage, but proved to be an economical addition of reflective area. The Carrisa Plains modules were found to be nominally flat, although the focal length changed slightly with temperature. An analysis of the canting options for both types of heliostats was performed. It was recommended the original heliostats be canted with an on-axis, lookback method, whereas a two-step method using first on-, then off-axis approaches was recommended for the Lugo heliostats. Finally, measurements performed at the Daggett site showed that despite the 1992 Landers earthquake, heliostat pedestal tilt and the associated tracking errors are expected to be within acceptable limits.

  16. Probing other solar systems with current and future adaptive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Macintosh, B; Marois, C; Phillion, D; Poyneer, L; Graham, J; Zuckerman, B; Gavel, D; Veran, J; Wilhelmsen-Evans, J; Mellis, C

    2008-09-08

    Over the past decade, the study of extrasolar planets through indirect techniques--primarily Doppler measurements--has revolutionized our understanding of other solar systems. The next major step in this field will be the direct detection and characterization, via imaging and spectroscopy, of the planets themselves. To achieve this, we must separate the light from the faint planet from the extensive glare of its parent star. We pursued this goal using the current generation of adaptive optics (AO) systems on large ground-based telescopes, using infrared imaging to search for the thermal emission from young planets and developing image processing techniques to distinguish planets from telescope-induced artifacts. Our new Angular Differential Imaging (ADI) technique, which uses the sidereal rotation of the Earth and telescope, is now standard for ground-based high-contrast imaging. Although no young planets were found in our surveys, we placed the strongest limits yet on giant planets in wide orbits (>30 AU) around young stars and characterized planetary companion candidates. The imaging of planetary companions on solar-system-like scales (5-30 AU) will require a new generation of advanced AO systems that are an order of magnitude more powerful than the LLNL-built Keck AO system. We worked to develop and test the key technologies needed for these systems, including a spatially-filtered wavefront sensor, efficient and accurate wavefront reconstruction algorithms, and precision AO wavefront control at the sub-nm level. LLNL has now been selected by the Gemini Observatory to lead the construction of the Gemini Planet Imager, a $24M instrument that will be the most advanced AO system in the world.

  17. The design of the central-axis reflector (ZAS).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hügenell, H.

    1988-10-01

    The central-axis reflector (ZAS), the design principle which is presented in the paper is a segmented-mirror telescope. The inventions relate mainly to the optical system and to the tracking apparatus. A large number of small individual mirror bodies, ground off-axis (hexagonal/polygonal) produce one primary mirror with closed circular aperture when joined together.

  18. Mesoporous Bragg reflectors: block-copolymer self-assembly leads to building blocks with well defined continuous pores and high control over optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guldin, S.; Kolle, M.; Stefik, M.; Wiesner, U.; Steiner, U.

    2011-09-01

    Mesoporous distributed Bragg re ectors (MDBRs) exhibit porosity on the sub-optical length scale. This makes them ideally suited as sensing platforms in biology and chemistry as well as for light management in optoelectronic devices. Here we present a new fast forward route for the fabrication of MDBRs which relies on the self-assembling properties of the block copolymer poly(isoprene-block-ethylene oxide) (PI-b-PEO) in combination with sol-gel chemistry. The interplay between structure directing organic host and co-assembled inorganic guest allows the ne tuning of refractive index in the outcome material. The refractive index dierence between the high and low porosity layer can be as high as 0.4, with the optical interfaces being well dened. Following a 30 min annealing protocol after each layer deposition enables the fast and reliable stacking of MDBRs which exhibit a continuous TiO2 network with large accessible pores and high optical quality.

  19. Modeling of optical losses in graphene contacted CIGS solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houshmand, Mohammad; Zandi, M. Hossein

    2016-09-01

    For the first time, an optical model is applied to superstrate configuration of CdS/CIGS thin film solar cells with graphene front/back contact (FC/BC) to simulate the loss in current density and efficiency. Graphene shows to be a great candidate to replace with the metallic BC transparent conductive oxides as the front electrode. Our model is based on the refractive index and extinction coefficient and takes into account the reflection and absorption in interfaces and layer’s thickness, respectively. CIGS cells with graphene as front electrode have a lower current density and efficiency than the one with graphene BC. However, the bifacial configuration shows a higher current density and efficiency, mostly because of a higher transmission rate. The interference effect was observed in simulation of transmission rate of hybrid cells representing that graphene can cause multiple reflection. We simulated the device parameters versus the ZnO layer’s thickness, which is essential for high quality interfaces. However, the simulation results are also consistent when CdS thickness is replaced with inorganic ZnO.

  20. On three-dimensional reconstruction of optically thin solar emission sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kastner, S. O.; Thomas, R. J.; Wade, C.

    1977-01-01

    Calculations are given for constructing the three dimensional distribution of optically thin EUV emission sources associated with solar active regions, from two dimensional observations (projections) recorded by the spectroheliograph on the OSO 7 satellite. The relation of the method to other image reconstruction methods is briefly discussed as well as the special requirements imposed in the solar case such as a knowledge of the true solar rotation function. A useful correlation criterion for establishing the physical validity of solutions is given.

  1. Development of optical tools for the characterization of selective solar absorber at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraud, Philemon; Braillon, Julien; Delord, Christine; Raccurt, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    Durability of solar components for CSP (Concentrated Solar Power Plant) technologies is a key point to lower cost and ensure their large deployment. These technologies concentrated the solar radiation by means of mirrors on a receiver tube where it is collected as thermal energy. The absorbers are submitted to strong environmental constraints and the degradation of their optical properties (emittance and solar absorbance) have a direct impact on performance. The objective is to develop new optical equipment for characterization of this solar absorber in condition of use that is to say in air and at elevated temperature. In this paper we present two new optical test benches developed for optical characterization of solar absorbers in condition of use up to 800°C. The first equipment is an integrated sphere with heated sample holder which measures the hemispherical reflectance between 280 and 2500 nm to calculate the solar absorbance at high temperature. The second optical test bench measures the emittance of samples up to 1000°C in the range of 1.25 to 28.57 µm. Results of high temperature measurements on a series of metallic absorbers with selective coating and refractory material for high thermal receiver are presented.

  2. Caustic Singularities Of High-Gain, Dual-Shaped Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo, Victor; Veruttipong, Thavath W.; Imbriale, William A.; Rengarajan, Sambiam

    1991-01-01

    Report presents study of some sources of error in analysis, by geometric theory of diffraction (GTD), of performance of high-gain, dual-shaped antenna reflector. Study probes into underlying analytic causes of singularity, with view toward devising and testing practical methods to avoid problems caused by singularity. Hybrid physical optics (PO) approach used to study near-field spillover or noise-temperature characteristics of high-gain relector antenna efficiently and accurately. Report illustrates this approach and underlying principles by presenting numerical results, for both offset and symmetrical reflector systems, computed by GTD, PO, and PO/GO methods.

  3. Dichroic Bragg reflectors based on birefringent porous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, J.; Kunzner, N.; Kovalev, D.; Gross, E.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.; Polisski, G.; Koch, F.

    2001-06-11

    Multilayers of anisotropically nanostructured silicon (Si) have been fabricated and studied by polarization-resolved reflection measurements. Alternating layers having different refractive indices exhibit additionally a strong in-plane anisotropy of their refractive index (birefringence). Therefore, a stack of layers, acting as a distributed Bragg reflector, has two distinct reflection bands, depending on the polarization of the incident linearly polarized light. This effect is governed by a three-dimensional (in-plane and in-depth) variation of the refractive index. These structures can yield optical effects which are difficult to achieve with conventional Bragg reflectors. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, M.J.; Page, E.; Gould, C.T.

    1998-09-08

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope. 5 figs.

  5. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael J.; Page, Erik; Gould, Carl T.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope.

  6. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael J.; Page, Erik; Gould, Carl T.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope.

  7. Slope Error Measurement Tool for Solar Parabolic Trough Collectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Stynes, J. K.; Ihas, B.

    2012-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed an optical measurement tool for parabolic solar collectors that measures the combined errors due to absorber misalignment and reflector slope error. The combined absorber alignment and reflector slope errors are measured using a digital camera to photograph the reflected image of the absorber in the collector. Previous work using the image of the reflection of the absorber finds the reflector slope errors from the reflection of the absorber and an independent measurement of the absorber location. The accuracy of the reflector slope error measurement is thus dependent on the accuracy of the absorber location measurement. By measuring the combined reflector-absorber errors, the uncertainty in the absorber location measurement is eliminated. The related performance merit, the intercept factor, depends on the combined effects of the absorber alignment and reflector slope errors. Measuring the combined effect provides a simpler measurement and a more accurate input to the intercept factor estimate. The minimal equipment and setup required for this measurement technique make it ideal for field measurements.

  8. Solar multi-conjugate adaptive optics based on high order ground layer adaptive optics and low order high altitude correction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lanqiang; Guo, Youming; Rao, Changhui

    2017-02-20

    Multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) is the most promising technique currently developed to enlarge the corrected field of view of adaptive optics for astronomy. In this paper, we propose a new configuration of solar MCAO based on high order ground layer adaptive optics and low order high altitude correction, which result in a homogeneous correction effect in the whole field of view. An individual high order multiple direction Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor is employed in the configuration to detect the ground layer turbulence for low altitude correction. Furthermore, the other low order multiple direction Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor supplies the wavefront information caused by high layers' turbulence through atmospheric tomography for high altitude correction. Simulation results based on the system design at the 1-meter New Vacuum Solar Telescope show that the correction uniform of the new scheme is obviously improved compared to conventional solar MCAO configuration.

  9. Solar Concentrator Advanced Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knasel, Don; Ehresman, Derik

    1989-01-01

    The Solar Concentrator Advanced Development Project has successfully designed, fabricated, and tested a full scale prototypical solar dynamic concentrator for space station applications. A Truss Hexagonal Panel reflector was selected as a viable solar concentrator concept to be used for space station applications. This concentrator utilizes a modular design approach and is flexible in attainable flux profiles and assembly techniques. The detailed design of the concentrator, which included structural, thermal and optical analysis, identified the feasibility of the design and specific technologies that were required to fabricate it. The needed surface accuracy of the reflectors surface was found to be very tight, within 5 mrad RMS slope error, and results in very close tolerances for fabrication. To meet the design requirements, a modular structure composed of hexagonal panels was used. The panels, made up of graphite epoxy box beams provided the strength, stiffness and dimensional stability needed. All initial project requirements were met or exceeded by hardware demonstration. Initial testing of structural repeatability of a seven panel portion of the concentrator was followed by assembly and testing of the full nineteen panel structure. The testing, which consisted of theodolite and optical measurements over an assembly-disassembly-reassembly cycle, demonstrated that the concentrator maintained the as-built contour and optical characteristics. The facet development effort within the project, which included developing the vapor deposited reflective facet, produced a viable design with demonstrated optical characteristics that are within the project goals.

  10. Active feed array compensation for reflector antenna surface distortions. Ph.D. Thesis - Akron Univ., Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility of electromagnetic compensation for reflector antenna surface distortions is investigated. The performance characteristics of large satellite communication reflector antenna systems degrade as the reflector surface distorts, mainly due to thermal effects from solar radiation. The technique developed can be used to maintain the antenna boresight directivity and sidelobe level independent of thermal effects on the reflector surface. With the advent of monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC), a greater flexibility in array fed reflector antenna systems can be achieved. MMIC arrays provide independent control of amplitude and phase for each of the many radiating elements in the feed array. By assuming a known surface distortion profile, a simulation study is carried out to examine the antenna performance as a function of feed array size and number of elements. Results indicate that the compensation technique can effectively control boresight directivity and sidelobe level under peak surface distortion in the order of tenth of a wavelength.

  11. Secondary pattern computation of an arbitrarily shaped main reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. W.; Lam, P. T. C.; Acosta, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The secondary pattern of a perfectly conducting offset main reflector being illuminated by a point feed at an arbitrary location is studied. The method of analysis is based upon the application of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to the aperture fields obtained using geometrical optics (GO) and geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD). Key features of the present work are (1) the reflector surface is completely arbitrary, (2) the incident field from the feed is most general with arbitrary polarization and location, and (3) the edge diffraction is calculated by either UAT or by UTD. Comparison of this technique for an offset parabolic reflector with the Jacobi-Bessel and Fourier-Bessel techniques shows good agreement. Near field, far field, and scan data of a large refelctor are presented.

  12. Large-Scale All-Dielectric Metamaterial Perfect Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Moitra, Parikshit; Slovick, Brian A.; li, Wei; Kravchencko, Ivan I.; Briggs, Dayrl P.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Valentine, Jason

    2015-05-08

    All-dielectric metamaterials offer a potential low-loss alternative to plasmonic metamaterials at optical frequencies. In this paper, we take advantage of the low absorption loss as well as the simple unit cell geometry to demonstrate large-scale (centimeter-sized) all-dielectric metamaterial perfect reflectors made from silicon cylinder resonators. These perfect reflectors, operating in the telecommunications band, were fabricated using self-assembly based nanosphere lithography. In spite of the disorder originating from the self-assembly process, the average reflectance of the metamaterial perfect reflectors is 99.7% at 1530 nm, surpassing the reflectance of metallic mirrors. Moreover, the spectral separation of the electric and magnetic resonances can be chosen to achieve the required reflection bandwidth while maintaining a high tolerance to disorder. Finally, the scalability of this design could lead to new avenues of manipulating light for low-loss and large-area photonic applications.

  13. Large-Scale All-Dielectric Metamaterial Perfect Reflectors

    DOE PAGES

    Moitra, Parikshit; Slovick, Brian A.; li, Wei; ...

    2015-05-08

    All-dielectric metamaterials offer a potential low-loss alternative to plasmonic metamaterials at optical frequencies. In this paper, we take advantage of the low absorption loss as well as the simple unit cell geometry to demonstrate large-scale (centimeter-sized) all-dielectric metamaterial perfect reflectors made from silicon cylinder resonators. These perfect reflectors, operating in the telecommunications band, were fabricated using self-assembly based nanosphere lithography. In spite of the disorder originating from the self-assembly process, the average reflectance of the metamaterial perfect reflectors is 99.7% at 1530 nm, surpassing the reflectance of metallic mirrors. Moreover, the spectral separation of the electric and magnetic resonances canmore » be chosen to achieve the required reflection bandwidth while maintaining a high tolerance to disorder. Finally, the scalability of this design could lead to new avenues of manipulating light for low-loss and large-area photonic applications.« less

  14. Utilization of solar radiation by polar animals: an optical model for pelts

    SciTech Connect

    Grojean, R.E.; Sousa, J.A.; Henry, M.C.

    1980-02-01

    A summary of existing passive solar-heat conversion panels provides the basis for a definition of an ideal passive solar-heat converter. Evidence for the existence of a biological greenhouse effect in certain homopolar homeothermic species is reviewed. The thermal and optical properties of homeothermic pelts, in particular those of the polar bear, are described, and a qualitative optical model of the polar bear pelt is proposed. The effectiveness of polar bear and seal pelts as solar-heat converters is discussed, and comparison is made with the ideal converter.

  15. Utilization of solar radiation by polar animals: an optical model for pelts.

    PubMed

    Grojean, R E; Sousa, J A; Henry, M C

    1980-02-01

    A summary of existing passive solar-heat conversion panels provides the basis for a definition of an ideal passive solar-heat converter. Evidence for the existence of a biological greenhouse effect in certain homopolar homeothermic species is reviewed. The thermal and optical properties of homeothermic pelts, in particular those of the polar bear, are described, and a qualitative optical model of the polar bear pelt is proposed. The effectiveness of polar bear and seal pelts as solar-heat converters is discussed, and comparison is made with the ideal converter.

  16. Extension to PV OPTICS to include front electrode design in solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guhabiswas, Debraj

    Proper optical designing of solar cells and modules is of paramount importance towards achieving high photovoltaic conversion efficiencies. Modeling softwares such as PV OPTICS, BIRANDY and SUNRAYS have been created to aid such optical designing of cells and modules; but none of these modeling packages take the front metal electrode architecture of a solar cell into account. A new model, has been developed to include the front metal electrode architecture to finished solar cells for optical calculations. This has been implemented in C++ in order to add a new module to PV OPTICS (NREL's photovoltaic modeling tool) to include front metallization patterns for optical design and simulation of solar cells. This new addition also calculates the contribution of light that diffuses out of the illuminated (non-metallized) regions to the solar cell current. It also determines the optical loss caused by the absorption in the front metal and separates metallic losses due to front and back contacts. This added capability also performs the following functions: • calculates the total current that can be generated in a solar cell due to optical absorption in each region, including the region beneath the front metal electrodes for the radiation spectrum of AM 1.5, • calculates various losses in the solar cell due to front electrode shading, metal absorption, and reflectance, • makes a plot of how light is absorbed in the metal as well as silicon under the shaded region in the solar cell. Although Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) is the numerical technique of choice to solve Maxwell's equations for a propagating electromagnetic wave, it is both time consuming and very demanding on the computer processors. Furthermore, for complicated geometric structures, FDTD poses various limitations. Hence, ray tracing has been chosen as the means of implementing this new model. This new software has been used to carry out a detailed investigation on the effect of various parameters of

  17. Investigation of solar active regions at high resolution by balloon flights of the solar optical universal polarimeter, definition phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarbell, Theodore D.; Topka, Kenneth P.

    1992-01-01

    The definition phase of a scientific study of active regions on the sun by balloon flight of a former Spacelab instrument, the Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP) is described. SOUP is an optical telescope with image stabilization, tunable filter and various cameras. After the flight phase of the program was cancelled due to budgetary problems, scientific and engineering studies relevant to future balloon experiments of this type were completed. High resolution observations of the sun were obtained using SOUP components at the Swedish Solar Observatory in the Canary Islands. These were analyzed and published in studies of solar magnetic fields and active regions. In addition, testing of low-voltage piezoelectric transducers was performed, which showed they were appropriate for use in image stabilization on a balloon.

  18. Computer prediction of large reflector antenna radiation properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botula, A.

    1980-01-01

    A FORTRAN program for calculating reflector antenna radiation patterns was rewritten and extended to include reflectors composed of a number of panels. These individual panels must be analytic surfaces. The theoretical foundation for the program is as follows: Geometrical optics techniques are used to trace rays from a feed antenna to the reflector surface and back to a mathematical plane just in front of the reflector. The resulting tangential electric field distribution, assumed to be the only source of forward radiation, is integrated numerically to calculate the radiation pattern for a desired set of angles. When the reflector is composed of more than one panel, each panel is treated as a separated antenna, the ray-tracing procedure and integration being repeated for each panel. The results of the individual aperture plane integrations are stored and summed to yield the relative electric field strength over the angles of interest. An example and several test cases are included to demonstrate the use of the program and verify the new method of computation.

  19. POMESH - DIFFRACTION ANALYSIS OF REFLECTOR ANTENNAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    POMESH is a computer program capable of predicting the performance of reflector antennas. Both far field pattern and gain calculations are performed using the Physical Optics (PO) approximation of the equivalent surface currents. POMESH is primarily intended for relatively small reflectors. It is useful in situations where the surface is described by irregular data that must be interpolated and for cases where the surface derivatives are not known. This method is flexible and robust and also supports near field calculations. Because of the near field computation ability, this computational engine is quite useful for subreflector computations. The program is constructed in a highly modular form so that it may be readily adapted to perform tasks other than the one that is explicitly described here. Since the computationally intensive portions of the algorithm are simple loops, the program can be easily adapted to take advantage of vector processor and parallel architectures. In POMESH the reflector is represented as a piecewise planar surface comprised of triangular regions known as facets. A uniform physical optics (PO) current is assumed to exist on each triangular facet. Then, the PO integral on a facet is approximated by the product of the PO current value at the center and the area of the triangle. In this way, the PO integral over the reflector surface is reduced to a summation of the contribution from each triangular facet. The source horn, or feed, that illuminates the subreflector is approximated by a linear combination of plane patterns. POMESH contains three polarization pattern definitions for the feed; a linear x-polarized element, linear y-polarized element, and a circular polarized element. If a more general feed pattern is required, it is a simple matter to replace the subroutine that implements the pattern definitions. POMESH obtains information necessary to specify the coordinate systems, location of other data files, and parameters of the desired

  20. A solar magnetic and velocity field measurement system for Spacelab 2: The Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarbell, Theodore D.; Title, Alan M.

    1992-01-01

    The Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP) flew on the shuttle mission Spacelab 2 (STS-51F) in August, 1985, and collected historic solar observations. SOUP is the only solar telescope on either a spacecraft or balloon which has delivered long sequences of diffraction-limited images. These movies led to several discoveries about the solar atmosphere which were published in the scientific journals. After Spacelab 2, reflights were planned on the shuttle Sunlab mission, which was cancelled after the Challenger disaster, and on a balloon flights, which were also cancelled for funding reasons. In the meantime, the instrument was used in a productive program of ground-based observing, which collected excellent scientific data and served as instrument tests. Given here is an overview of the history of the SOUP program, the scientific discoveries, and the instrument design and performance.

  1. Dielectric core-shell optical antennas for strong solar absorption enhancement.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yiling; Ferry, Vivian E; Alivisatos, A Paul; Cao, Linyou

    2012-07-11

    We demonstrate a new light trapping technique that exploits dielectric core-shell optical antennas to strongly enhance solar absorption. This approach can allow the thickness of active materials in solar cells lowered by almost 1 order of magnitude without scarifying solar absorption capability. For example, it can enable a 70 nm thick hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film to absorb 90% of incident solar radiation above the bandgap, which would otherwise require a thickness of 400 nm in typical antireflective coated thin films. This strong enhancement arises from a controlled optical antenna effect in patterned core-shell nanostructures that consist of absorbing semiconductors and nonabsorbing dielectric materials. This core-shell optical antenna benefits from a multiplication of enhancements contributed by leaky mode resonances (LMRs) in the semiconductor part and antireflection effects in the dielectric part. We investigate the fundamental mechanism for this enhancement multiplication and demonstrate that the size ratio of the semiconductor and the dielectric parts in the core-shell structure is key for optimizing the enhancement. By enabling strong solar absorption enhancement, this approach holds promise for cost reduction and efficiency improvement of solar conversion devices, including solar cells and solar-to-fuel systems. It can generally apply to a wide range of inorganic and organic active materials. This dielectric core-shell antenna can also find applications in other photonic devices such as photodetectors, sensors, and solid-state lighting diodes.

  2. Jet screech reduction with perforated flat reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Md. Tawhidul Islam; Teramoto, Kenbu; Matsuo, Shigeru; Setoguchi, Toshiaki

    2008-09-01

    In the present experimental study, investigations have been carried out to evaluate the performance of the new control technique of jet screech with different perforated flat reflectors. Mainly two types of porous flat reflectors had been used in the experiment. One reflector (reflector-V) designed for placing the reflector surface vertical to the jet axis, when, another type of reflector (reflector-H) designed for placing the reflecting surface horizontal to the jet axis. In both cases the reflectors had been placed at the nozzle (base tube with uniform cross-sectional area) exit. The diameter of the reflector-V was 15D when the diameter of the reflector-H was 10D. The porous area of the reflector-V was 6D and 4.5D for reflector-H where D indicated the diameter of the nozzle exit. The placement of the reflector at the exit of the nozzle reduces the sound pressure at the nozzle exit. Thus the muted sound can not excite the unstable disturbance at the nozzle exit and the loop of the feedback mechanism disappeared, finally, the generation of jet screech be cancelled. The suction space located at the back side of the porous surface of the reflector-V improves the efficiency of the screech control technique. However, in the case of reflector-H, the receptivity process of feedback loop had been controlled by reducing the disturbances at the effective shock fronts as well as at the nozzle exit. The performance of the proposed method was verified with a flat reflector concept and good performance in jet screech suppression has been confirmed in the case of porous reflector.

  3. No Photon Left Behind: Advanced Optics at ARPA-E for Buildings and Solar Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branz, Howard M.

    2015-04-01

    Key technology challenges in building efficiency and solar energy utilization require transformational optics, plasmonics and photonics technologies. We describe advanced optical technologies funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy. Buildings technologies include a passive daytime photonic cooler, infra-red computer vision mapping for energy audit, and dual-band electrochromic windows based on plasmonic absorption. Solar technologies include novel hybrid energy converters that combine high-efficiency photovoltaics with concentrating solar thermal collection and storage. Because the marginal cost of thermal energy storage is low, these systems enable generation of inexpensive and dispatchable solar energy that can be deployed when the sun doesn't shine. The solar technologies under development include nanoparticle plasmonic spectrum splitting, Rugate filter interference structures and photovoltaic cells that can operate efficiently at over 400° C.

  4. Multijunction Solar Cell Efficiencies: Effect of Spectral Window, Optical Environment and Radiative Coupling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-04

    a high quality GaAs solar cell in the absence of radiative coupling (B¼ 0).6,9 The current–voltage response of the cell was characterized by a solar ...efficiency multijunction cells . Experimental Alta Devices provided thin-lm, exible GaAs solar cells for the experimental portion of this study. The...Multijunction solar cell efficiencies: effect of spectral window, optical environment and radiative coupling† Carissa N. Eisler,a Ze’ev R. Abrams,b

  5. Degradation of solar cell optical performance due to plume particle pitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidl, William; Smith, Kendall; Soares, Carlos; Steagall, Courtney; Shaw, Christopher G.

    2008-08-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) solar arrays provide power that is needed for on-orbit experiments and operations. The ISS solar arrays are exposed to space environment effects that include contamination, atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation and thermal cycling. The contamination effects include exposure to thruster plume contamination and erosion. This study was performed to better understand potential solar cell optical performance degradation due to increased scatter caused by plume particle pitting. A ground test was performed using a light gas gun to shoot glass beads at a solar cell with a shotgun approach. The increase in scatter was then measured and correlated with the surface damage.

  6. Lamp bulb with integral reflector

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Izrail; Shanks, Bruce; Sumner, Thomas L.

    2001-01-01

    An improved electrodeless discharge lamp bulb includes an integral ceramic reflector as a portion of the bulb envelope. The bulb envelope further includes two pieces, a reflector portion or segment is cast quartz ceramic and a light transmissive portion is a clear fused silica. In one embodiment, the cast quartz ceramic segment includes heat sink fins or stubs providing an increased outside surface area to dissipate internal heat. In another embodiment, the quartz ceramic segment includes an outside surface fused to eliminate gas permeation by polishing.

  7. FOXSI-2: Upgrades of the Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager for its Second Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, Steven; Glesener, Lindsay; Buitrago-Casas, Camilo; Ishikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Ramsey, Brian; Gubarev, Mikhail; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Watanabe, Shin; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Turin, Paul; Shourt, Van; Foster, Natalie; Krucker, Sam

    2016-03-01

    The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket payload flew for the second time on 2014 December 11. To enable direct Hard X-Ray (HXR) imaging spectroscopy, FOXSI makes use of grazing-incidence replicated focusing optics combined with fine-pitch solid-state detectors. FOXSI’s first flight provided the first HXR focused images of the Sun. For FOXSI’s second flight several updates were made to the instrument including updating the optics and detectors as well as adding a new Solar Aspect and Alignment System (SAAS). This paper provides an overview of these updates as well as a discussion of their measured performance.

  8. Method of making reflecting film reflector

    DOEpatents

    Cottingham, James G.

    1980-01-01

    A reflector of the reflecting film type is disclosed and which may be used in a heliostatic system for concentrating solar energy and comprising a reflecting film bonded to an appropriate rigid substrate in such a way that specularity of a very high order is achieved. A method of bonding the reflecting film to the substrate is also disclosed and comprises the steps of initially adhering the film to a smooth, clean flat rigid surface with a non-bonding liquid between the rigid surface and film, and then bonding the substrate and film. The non-bonding liquid has a molecular adhesion greater than any stresses due to handling or curing of the bonding agent which is applied between the film and the opposing surface of the rigid substrate.

  9. Technology status of the 13 m aperture deployment antenna reflectors for Engineering Test Satellite VIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Akira; Tsujihata, Akio; Hamamoto, Naokazu; Homma, Masanori

    2000-07-01

    Large deployable antenna reflectors for Engineering Test Satellite VIII (ETS-VIII) are now stated in the critical design phase. The Fourteen 4.8m modules, which construct a 19.2 m × 16.7 m (13m aperture) antenna reflector, have been fabricated as Engineering Models. Ground testing for the fourteen modules will be performed until next spring. This paper describes results of critical design for the antenna reflectors and their validation plans. Each module consists of a gold-plated molybdenum mesh surface, spacially determined cable network, and a deployable truss structure as a supporting structure. Stowed size is 1 m (diameter) × 4 m (height). In stowed configuration, the lowest eigen frequencies of the antenna reflector are 47 Hz (longitudinal) and 69 Hz (lateral) respectively. The lowest eigen frequency is 0.14 Hz. Solar ray transparency of the reflector structure is designed to be more than 85% to avoid excessive solar pressure torque. Weight of each reflector is expected to be less than 100 kg. In addition, we will perform a piggyback deployment experiment in transfer orbit using the second stage of the first flight H-II A vehicle in 2000. Half scale seven modules antenna reflector will be used to validate its deployment reliability. Design, analysis and test results of LDR-P are also introduced in this paper.

  10. Extreme Precision Antenna Reflector Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, G. R.; Gilger, L. D.; Ard, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    Thermal and mechanical distortion degrade the RF performance of antennas. The complexity of future communications antennas requires accurate, dimensionally stable antenna reflectors and structures built from materials other than those currently used. The advantages and disadvantages of using carbon fibers in an epoxy matrix are reviewed as well as current reflector fabrications technology and adjustment. The manufacturing sequence and coefficient of thermal expansion of carbon fiber/borosilicate glass composites is described. The construction of a parabolic reflector from this material and the assembling of both reflector and antenna are described. A 3M-aperture-diameter carbon/glass reflector that can be used as a subassembly for large reflectors is depicted. The deployment sequence for a 10.5M-aperture-diameter antenna, final reflector adjustment, and the deployment sequence for large reflectors are also illustrated.

  11. Adjusting the Contour of Reflector Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, W. B.; Giebler, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    Postfabrication adjustment of contour of panels for reflector, such as parabolic reflector for radio antennas, possible with simple mechanism consisting of threaded stud, two nuts, and flexure. Contours adjusted manually.

  12. Analysis of light guiding property in light piped based solar concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whang, Allen J.; Chuang, Chun-Hsien, Jr.; Chen, Yi-Yung

    2008-02-01

    Recently, many researchers have tried to design a system for indoor illumination because the benefits of solar systems. A simple parabolic reflector is often used to collect sunlight but the efficiency is poor when sunlight isn't incident normally. Therefore, an accurate machine to track sun has to be used. In order to get better tolerance, a light pipe based solar concentrator (LPBSC) which comprises a parabolic reflector and a hollow reflective light pipe is proposed. We develop a math model which combines the reflection times of sunlight in light pipe and the candela data of parabolic reflector to analyze the efficiency. And then, straight light pipe is replaced by tapered light pipe to improve the tolerance. Optical simulation software, TracePro, and mathematical software, MATLAB, are used to prove the model is correct and feasible. In the results, LPBSC can improve the tolerance to get good efficiency.

  13. Solar collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Uroshevich, M.

    1981-09-22

    The disclosure illustrates a solar collector of the focusing type comprising a trough like element with an interior reflective surface that faces a main reflector of the collector. A tubular receiver providing a passage for heat transfer fluid is positioned in the trough like element generally along the focal line of the main reflector. A flat glass plate covers the trough along a perimeter seal so that subatmospheric conditions may be maintained within the trough like element to minimize convection heat losses.

  14. Ellipsoidal reflectors in biomedical diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezuglyi, M. A.; Bezuglaya, N. V.

    2013-11-01

    In this work were considered photometric tools for biomedical diagnostics, which contain a mirror ellipsoid of revolution. Proposed schemes with ellipsoidal reflectors for diagnostics in reflected and in reflected and transmitted light. A comparative analysis of measurement standards scattering surfaces was held.

  15. Membrane Shell Reflector Segment Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Im, Eastwood; Lin, John; Moore, James

    2012-01-01

    The mesh reflector is the only type of large, in-space deployable antenna that has successfully flown in space. However, state-of-the-art large deployable mesh antenna systems are RF-frequency-limited by both global shape accuracy and local surface quality. The limitations of mesh reflectors stem from two factors. First, at higher frequencies, the porosity and surface roughness of the mesh results in loss and scattering of the signal. Second, the mesh material does not have any bending stiffness and thus cannot be formed into true parabolic (or other desired) shapes. To advance the deployable reflector technology at high RF frequencies from the current state-of-the-art, significant improvements need to be made in three major aspects: a high-stability and highprecision deployable truss; a continuously curved RF reflecting surface (the function of the surface as well as its first derivative are both continuous); and the RF reflecting surface should be made of a continuous material. To meet these three requirements, the Membrane Shell Reflector Segment (MSRS) antenna was developed.

  16. Polarization losses in reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safak, M.; Yazgan, E.

    1985-08-01

    Various definitions for polarization-loss efficiency of Cassegrainian and front-fed reflectors are compared. The effects of flare angle, feed taper and the feed pattern asymmetry on the polarization-loss efficiency are investigated. The definitions based on aperture fields are shown to be inadequate and far fields must be used for calculating the polarization losses.

  17. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  18. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  19. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  20. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  1. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  2. Performance of an electro-optical solar compass in partially obscured Sun conditions.

    PubMed

    Bollanti, S; De Meis, D; Di Lazzaro, P; Flora, F; Gallerano, G P; Mezi, L; Murra, D; Vicca, D

    2016-04-20

    Solar compasses are designed to accurately find true North on sunny days. However, no data on their performance are available when sunlight is partially blocked, e.g., by a cloud. We have measured, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the performance of one of the most accurate electro-optical solar compasses (accuracy better than 0.01  deg) as a function of the solar disk obscuration during the Sun's eclipse on 20 March 2015. The measurements show that the accuracy level is mainly dependent on the asymmetry of the obscuration with respect to the main axis of the optical detection system and, to a lesser extent, on the percentage of the solar disk covered. In particular, azimuth measurement suffered a maximum deviation of 0.08 deg when 35% of the solar disk was asymmetrically obscured. The deviation was smaller when 46% of the solar disk was more symmetrically obscured. This experiment demonstrates that, even in the case of a partially obscured Sun, the electro-optical solar compass maintains an accuracy better than magnetic and electronic compasses.

  3. Solar cooker

    SciTech Connect

    Zwach, D.M.

    1987-09-29

    A solar unit is described comprising a solar oven having an open end. A generally concave parabolic main reflector is joined to the oven to move therewith and reflect solar radiation away from the oven. The main reflector has a central opening to the oven open end, a generally parabolic convex secondary reflector for reflecting the radiation from the main reflector through the central opening to the open end of the oven, means for mounting the secondary reflector on the main reflector for movement, a frame, and means for mounting the oven on the frame for adjustable movement relative to the frame. This permits adjusting the angular position relative to the earth. The last mentioned means includes means for supporting the oven including first and second pairs of pivot members that respectively have a fist pivot axis and a second pivot axis that extends perpendicular to the first pivot axis. The oven extends between each of the first pivot members and each of the second pivot members.

  4. Lightweight reflector assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argoud, M. J.; Jolley, J.; Walker, W. L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An inexpensive, lightweight reflective assembly member having good optical quality and particularly adaptable to accommodating temperature variations without providing destructive thermal stresses and reflective slope errors is described. The reflective assembly consists of a thin sheet of glass with appropriate reflective coating and a cellular glass block substrate bonded together. The method of fabrication includes abrading the cellular substrate with an abrasive master die to form an appropriate concave surface. An adhesive is applied to the abraded surface and a lamina reflective surface is placed under a uniform pressure to conform the reflective surface onto the desired abraded surface of the substrate.

  5. A new optical concentrator design and analysis for rooftop solar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Cheng; Li, Qiyuan; Rosengarten, Gary; Hawkes, Evatt; Taylor, Robert A.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a new type of linear focus, linear-tracking, catadioptric concentrator system is proposed and analysed for roof-integrated solar thermal applications. The optical concentrator designs have a focal distance of less than 10cm and are analysed using optical simulation software (Zemax). The results show that a relatively high concentration ratio (4.5 ~ 5.9 times) can be obtained and that the concentrators are capable of achieving an average optical efficiency around 66 - 69% during the middle 6 hours of a sunny day (i.e. a day with ~1000W/m2 global irradiance). Optical efficiency is analysed for perfect and non-ideal optical components to predict the collector performance under different `practical' circumstances. Overall, we intend for this paper to catalyse the development of rooftop solar thermal concentrators with compact form factors, similar to PV panels.

  6. Optical description of solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells. I. Measurement of layer optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Moule, Adam J.; Snaith, Henry J.; Kaiser, Markus; Klesper, Heike; Meerholz, Klaus; Huang, David M.; Graetzel, Michael

    2009-10-01

    The efficiency of a photovoltaic device is limited by the portion of solar energy that can be captured. We discuss how to measure the optical properties of the various layers in solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (SDSC). We use spectroscopic ellipsometry to determine the complex refractive index of each of the various layers in a SDSC. Each of the ellipsometry fits is used to calculate a transmission spectrum that is compared to a measured transmission spectrum. The complexities of pore filling on the fitting of the ellipsometric data are discussed. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy is shown to be an effective method for determining pore filling in SDSC layers. Accurate effective medium optical constants for each layer are presented and the material limits under which these optical constants can be used are discussed.

  7. Evaluation of Hardware and Procedures for Astronaut Assembly and Repair of Large Precision Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Watson, Judith J.; Collins, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    A detailed procedure is presented that enables astronauts in extravehicular activity (EVA) to efficiently assemble and repair large (i.e., greater than 10m-diameter) segmented reflectors, supported by a truss, for space-based optical or radio-frequency science instruments. The procedure, estimated timelines, and reflector hardware performance are verified in simulated 0-g (neutral buoyancy) assembly tests of a 14m-diameter, offset-focus, reflector test article. The test article includes a near-flight-quality, 315-member, doubly curved support truss and 7 mockup reflector panels (roughly 2m in diameter) representing a portion of the 37 total panels needed to fully populate the reflector. Data from the tests indicate that a flight version of the design (including all reflector panels) could be assembled in less than 5 hours - less than the 6 hours normally permitted for a single EVA. This assembly rate essentially matches pre-test predictions that were based on a vast amount of historical data on EVA assembly of structures produced by NASA Langley Research Center. Furthermore, procedures and a tool for the removal and replacement of a damaged reflector panel were evaluated, and it was shown that EVA repair of this type of reflector is feasible with the use of appropriate EVA crew aids.

  8. Characterization of optical turbulence at the GREGOR solar telescope: temporal and local behavior and its influence on the solar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprung, D.; Sucher, E.; Stein, K.; von der Lühe, O.; Berkefeld, Th.

    2016-10-01

    Local atmospheric turbulence at the telescope level is regarded as a major reason for affecting the performance of the adaptive optics systems using wavelengths in the visible and infrared for solar observations. During the day the air masses around the telescope dome are influenced by flow distortions. Additionally heating of the infrastructure close to telescope causes thermal turbulence. Thereby optical turbulence is produced and leads to quality changes in the local seeing throughout the day. Image degradation will be yielded affecting the performance of adaptive optical systems. The spatial resolution of the solar observations will be reduced. For this study measurements of the optical turbulence, represented by the structure function parameter of the refractive index Cn2 were performed on several locations at the GREGOR telescope at the Teide observatory at Tenerife at the Canary Islands / Spain. Since September 2012 measurements of Cn2 were carried out between the towers of the Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) and of GREGOR with a laser-scintillometer. The horizontal distance of the measurement path was about 75 m. Additional from May 2015 up to March 2016 the optical turbulence was determined at three additional locations close to the solar telescope GREGOR. The optical turbulence is derived from sonic anemometer measurements. Time series of the sonic temperature are analyzed and compared to the direct measurements of the laser scintillometer. Meteorological conditions are investigated, especially the influence of the wind direction. Turbulence of upper atmospheric layers is not regarded. The measured local turbulence is compared to the system performance of the GREGOR telescopes. It appears that the mountain ridge effects on turbulence are more relevant than any local causes of seeing close to the telescope. Results of these analyses and comparison of nearly one year of measurements are presented and discussed.

  9. Self-reverse-biased solar panel optical receiver for simultaneous visible light communication and energy harvesting.

    PubMed

    Shin, Won-Ho; Yang, Se-Hoon; Kwon, Do-Hoon; Han, Sang-Kook

    2016-10-31

    We propose a self-reverse-biased solar panel optical receiver for energy harvesting and visible light communication. Since the solar panel converts an optical component into an electrical component, it provides both energy harvesting and communication. The signal component can be separated from the direct current component, and these components are used for communication and energy harvesting. We employed a self-reverse-biased receiver circuit to improve the communication and energy harvesting performance. The reverse bias on the solar panel improves the responsivity and response time. The proposed system achieved 17.05 mbps discrete multitone transmission with a bit error rate of 1.1 x 10-3 and enhanced solar energy conversion efficiency.

  10. Optical simulations of P3HT/Si nanowire array hybrid solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenbo; Li, Xinhua; Wen, Long; Zhao, Yufeng; Duan, Huahua; Zhou, Bukang; Shi, Tongfei; Zeng, Xuesong; Li, Ning; Wang, Yuqi

    2014-01-01

    An optical simulation of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/Si nanowire array (NWA) hybrid solar cells was investigated to evaluate the optical design requirements of the system by using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Steady improvement of light absorption was obtained with increased P3HT coating shell thickness from 0 to 80 nm on Si NWA. Further increasing the thickness caused dramatic decrease of the light absorption. Combined with the analysis of ultimate photocurrents, an optimum geometric structure with a coating P3HT thickness of 80 nm was proposed. At this structure, the hybrid solar cells show the most efficient light absorption. The optimization of the geometric structure and further understanding of the optical characteristics may contribute to the development for the practical experiment of the promising hybrid solar cells.

  11. FIRST IMAGES FROM THE FOCUSING OPTICS X-RAY SOLAR IMAGER

    SciTech Connect

    Krucker, Säm; Glesener, Lindsay; Turin, Paul; McBride, Stephen; Glaser, David; Fermin, Jose; Lin, Robert; Christe, Steven; Ishikawa, Shin-nosuke; Ramsey, Brian; Gubarev, Mikhail; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Watanabe, Shin; Saito, Shinya; Tanaka, Takaaki; White, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) sounding rocket payload flew for the first time on 2012 November 2, producing the first focused images of the Sun above 5 keV. To enable hard X-ray (HXR) imaging spectroscopy via direct focusing, FOXSI makes use of grazing-incidence replicated optics combined with fine-pitch solid-state detectors. On its first flight, FOXSI observed several targets that included active regions, the quiet Sun, and a GOES-class B2.7 microflare. This Letter provides an introduction to the FOXSI instrument and presents its first solar image. These data demonstrate the superiority in sensitivity and dynamic range that is achievable with a direct HXR imager with respect to previous, indirect imaging methods, and illustrate the technological readiness for a spaceborne mission to observe HXRs from solar flares via direct focusing optics.

  12. Investigation of solar active regions at high resolution by balloon flights of the solar optical universal polarimeter, extended definition phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarbell, Theodore D.

    1993-01-01

    Technical studies of the feasibility of balloon flights of the former Spacelab instrument, the Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter, with a modern charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, to study the structure and evolution of solar active regions at high resolution, are reviewed. In particular, different CCD cameras were used at ground-based solar observatories with the SOUP filter, to evaluate their performance and collect high resolution images. High resolution movies of the photosphere and chromosphere were successfully obtained using four different CCD cameras. Some of this data was collected in coordinated observations with the Yohkoh satellite during May-July, 1992, and they are being analyzed scientifically along with simultaneous X-ray observations.

  13. A method for producing a shaped contour radiation pattern using a single shaped reflector and a single feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherrette, Alan R.; Lee, Shung-Wu; Acosta, Roberto J.

    1989-01-01

    Eliminating the corporate feed network in shaped contour beam antennas will reduce the expense, weight, and RF loss of the antenna system. One way of producing a shaped contour beam without using a feed network is to use a single shaped reflector with a single feed element. For a prescribed contour beam and feed, an optimization method for designing the reflector shape is given. As a design example, a shaped reflector is designed to produce a continental U.S. coverage (CONUS) beam. The RF performance of the shaped reflector is then verified by physical optics.

  14. A Method for Producing a Shaped Contour Radiation Pattern Using a Single Shaped Reflector and a Single Feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherrette, A. R.; Lee, S. W.; Acosta, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    Eliminating the corporate feed network in shaped contour beam antennas will reduce the expense, weight, and RF loss of the antenna system. One way of producing a shaped contour beam without using a feed network is to use a single shaped reflector with a single feed element. For a prescribed contour beam and feed, an optimization method for designing the reflector shape is given. As a design example, a shaped reflector is designed to produce a continental U.S. coverage (CONUS) beam. The RF performance of the shaped reflector is then verified by physical optics.

  15. Diffractive surfaces for cat-eye array retro-reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, I.

    2008-09-01

    Cat-eye-array retro-reflectors, combining a lenslet array with a reflective surface at the common focal plane of the lenslets, are widely used due to their simple structure and low cost. While for many applications the performance (brightness, acceptance angle range and directionality) is acceptable, others could benefit from better performance. Improving these retroreflectors is difficult because their simplicity results in too few degrees of freedom. Here, we show how the use of one or two diffractive surfaces can significantly increase the brightness of the reflected beam and/or the acceptance angle while still allowing inexpensive manufacturing by molding or replication. Specifically, we focus here on one potential application of cat-eye-array retro-reflectors: semipassive optical communication units. Semi-passive communication units combine a retroreflector with a light modulator. The directional auto-aligned retro-reflected signal enhances security and power efficiency. Furthermore, many modulators use very low power: far lower than light emitter. Modulated retro-reflectors have already been demonstrated for space and military communication. Here we focus on a different application: optical smart cards. These devices described elsewhere, can be used, for example, for access control identification or as non-contact secure teller machine ID. Such devices must have an optical modulator in the optical path, so the effect of the modulator must also be accounted for in the design. As a consumer product, low cost manufacturability is another requirement. Design examples are presented.

  16. Efficient 'Optical Furnace': A Cheaper Way to Make Solar Cells is Reaching the Marketplace

    SciTech Connect

    von Kuegelgen, T.

    2008-10-01

    In Bhushan Sopori's laboratory, you'll find a series of optical furnaces he has developed for fabricating solar cells. When not in use, they sit there discreetly among the lab equipment. But when a solar silicon wafer is placed inside one for processing, Sopori walks over to a computer and types in a temperature profile. Almost immediately this fires up the furnace, which glows inside and selectively heats up the silicon wafer to 800 degrees centigrade by the intense light it produces. Sopori, a principal engineer at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has been researching and developing optical furnace technology for around 20 years. He says it's a challenging technology to develop because there are many issues to consider when you process a solar cell, especially in optics. Despite the challenges, Sopori and his research team have advanced the technology to the point where it will benefit all solar cell manufacturers. They are now developing a commercial version of the furnace in partnership with a manufacturer. 'This advanced optical furnace is highly energy efficient, and it can be used to manufacture any type of solar cell,' he says. Each type of solar cell or manufacturing process typically requires a different furnace configuration and temperature profile. With NREL's new optical furnace system, a solar cell manufacturer can ask the computer for any temperature profile needed for processing a solar cell, and the same type of furnace is suitable for several solar cell fabrication process steps. 'In the future, solar cell manufacturers will only need this one optical furnace because it can be used for any process, including diffusion, metallization and oxidation,' Sopori says. 'This helps reduce manufacturing costs.' One startup company, Applied Optical Systems, has recognized the furnace's potential for manufacturing thin-film silicon cells. 'We'd like to develop thin-film silicon cells with higher efficiencies, up to 15 to 18 percent, and we believe

  17. Optical Properties of Mixed Nanofluids Containing Carbon Nanohorns and Silver Nanoparticles for Solar Energy Applications.

    PubMed

    Sani, E; Di Ninni, P; Colla, L; Barison, S; Agresti, F

    2015-05-01

    Different kinds of nanofluids show peculiar characteristics. In this work, a mixed nanofluid consisting of single-wall carbon nanohorns and silver nanoparticles aqueous suspensions is prepared and optically characterized, in the perspective to merge the favorable optical characteristics of carbon nanohorn-based nanofluids to the good thermal properties of silver-nanofluids. For the samples, both the spectral extinction and the scattering albedo at discrete wavelengths have been investigated. The silver nanoparticle plasmonic peak in the visible range further improves the overall nanofluid sunlight absorption properties, opening interesting perspectives for using such mixed nanofluids as solar absorber and heat transfer media in solar thermal collectors.

  18. High Concentrating GaAs Cell Operation Using Optical Waveguide Solar Energy System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, T.; Case, J. A.; Timmons, M. L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the result of the concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) cell experiments conducted with the Optical Waveguide (OW) Solar Energy System. The high concentration GaAs cells developed by Research Triangle Institute (RTI) were combined with the OW system in a "fiber-on-cell" configuration. The sell performance was tested up to the solar concentration of 327. Detailed V-I characteristics, power density and efficiency data were collected. It was shown that the CPV cells combined with the OW solar energy system will be an effective electric power generation device.

  19. Recent Optical and SEM Characterization of Genesis Solar Wind Concentrator Diamond on Silicon Collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, Judith H.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Burkett, P. J.; Ross, D. K.; Gonzalez, C. P.; McNamara, K. M.

    2013-01-01

    One of the 4 Genesis solar wind concentrator collectors was a silicon substrate coated with diamond-like carbon (DLC) in which to capture solar wind. This material was designed for analysis of solar nitrogen and noble gases [1, 2]. This particular collector fractured during landing, but about 80% of the surface was recovered, including a large piece which was subdivided in 2012 [3, 4, 5]. The optical and SEM imaging and analysis described below supports the subdivision and allocation of the diamond-on-silicon (DOS) concentrator collector.

  20. The rise of non-imaging optics for rooftop solar collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengarten, Gary; Stanley, Cameron; Ferrari, Dave; Blakers, Andrew; Ratcliff, Tom

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we explore the use of non-imaging optics for rooftop solar concentrators. Specifically, we focus on compound parabolic concentrators (CPCs), which form an ideal shape for cylindrical thermal absorbers, and for linear PV cells (allowing the use of more expensive but more efficient cells). Rooftops are ideal surfaces for solar collectors as they face the sky and are generally free, unused space. Concentrating solar radiation adds thermodynamic value to thermal collectors (allowing the attainment of higher temperature) and can add efficiency to PV electricity generation. CPCs allow that concentration over the day without the need for tracking. Hence they have become ubiquitous in applications requiring low concentration.

  1. Unassisted photoelectrochemical water splitting exceeding 7% solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency using photon recycling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xinjian; Jeong, Hokyeong; Oh, Seung Jae; Ma, Ming; Zhang, Kan; Kwon, Jeong; Choi, In Taek; Choi, Il Yong; Kim, Hwan Kyu; Kim, Jong Kyu; Park, Jong Hyeok

    2016-06-21

    Various tandem cell configurations have been reported for highly efficient and spontaneous hydrogen production from photoelectrochemical solar water splitting. However, there is a contradiction between two main requirements of a front photoelectrode in a tandem cell configuration, namely, high transparency and high photocurrent density. Here we demonstrate a simple yet highly effective method to overcome this contradiction by incorporating a hybrid conductive distributed Bragg reflector on the back side of the transparent conducting substrate for the front photoelectrochemical electrode, which functions as both an optical filter and a conductive counter-electrode of the rear dye-sensitized solar cell. The hybrid conductive distributed Bragg reflectors were designed to be transparent to the long-wavelength part of the incident solar spectrum (λ>500 nm) for the rear solar cell, while reflecting the short-wavelength photons (λ<500 nm) which can then be absorbed by the front photoelectrochemical electrode for enhanced photocurrent generation.

  2. Pupil-transformation multiconjugate adaptive optics for solar high-resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Deqing; Zhang, Xi; Dou, Jiangpei; Zhu, Yongtian; Broadfoot, Robert; Chapman, Julius

    2016-09-01

    We propose a multiconjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) system called pupil-transformation MCAO (PT-MCAO) for solar high-angular resolution imaging over a large field of view. The PT-MCAO, consisting of two deformable mirrors (DMs), uses a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor located on the telescope pupil to measure the wavefront slopes from several guide stars. The average slopes are used to control the first DM conjugated on the telescope aperture by a solar ground-layer adaptive optics (AO) approach while the remaining slopes are used to control the second DM conjugated on a high altitude by a conventional solar AO via a geometric PT. The PT-MCAO uses a similar hardware configuration as the conventional star-oriented MCAO. However, a distinctive feature of our PT-MCAO is that it avoids the construction of tomography wavefront, which is a time-consuming and complex process for the solar real-time atmospheric turbulence correction. For the PT-MCAO, current widely used and fully understood conventional solar AO closed-loop control algorithms can be directly used to control the two DMs, which greatly reduces the real-time calculation power requirement and makes the PT-MCAO easy to implement. In this publication, we discuss the PT-MCAO methodology, its unique features, and compare its performance with that of the conventional solar star-oriented MCAO systems, which demonstrate that the PT-MCAO can be immediately used for solar high-resolution imaging.

  3. Coastal ocean optical influences on solar transmission and radiant heating rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Grace C.; Dickey, Tommy D.

    2004-01-01

    An extensive set of physical and optical measurements is utilized to characterize the processes and quantify parameters that contribute to the variability of solar transmission, sea surface albedo, and radiant heating rate (RHR). This study is among the first to utilize multidisciplinary observations coupled with radiative transfer simulations to investigate the impact of optical properties on solar transmission, albedo, and heating in nearshore coastal waters. The data were collected from a shallow-water coastal mooring as part of the Hyperspectral Coastal Ocean Dynamics Experiment (HyCODE) in summer 2001. Over the 41-day time series, the average loss in solar radiation was 274 W m-2 for mean surface radiation of 365 W m-2 (average solar transmission of 21%). Quantitative coherence and principle component analyses suggest that cloud cover, chlorophyll concentration (Chl), and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) have the greatest impacts on solar transmission variability on timescales of ˜1 week. Radiative transfer simulations show that Chl, absorption, and attenuation have the most significant impact on solar transmission, whereas solar angle and cloud cover greatly influence albedo.

  4. Giant Bragg Wavelength Tuning of Tunable Hollow Waveguide Bragg Reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yasuki; Matsutani, Akihiro; Sakaguchi, Takahiro; Koyama, Fumio

    2005-09-01

    We demonstrate a giant Bragg wavelength tuning with a grating loaded hollow waveguide Bragg reflector. An air-core thickness change of a hollow waveguide enables us to achieve a large propagation constant change over few tens percent, which would be useful for various tunable optical devices. Our observed Bragg-wavelength tuning range is over 160 nm at an air-core thickness change from 10.7 to 1.8 μm, which corresponds to a propagation constant change of over 10%. This is the record large tuning value ever reported in conventional tuning schemes such as thermo-optic or electro-optic effects.

  5. High contrast reflective liquid crystal display using a thermochromic reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Kyong Chan; Yi, Jonghoon; Kwon, Jin Hyuk; Seog Gwag, Jin

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a reflective liquid crystal display (LCD) with a high contrast ratio (CR) combined with mono-type thermochromic materials to solve the low CR of reflective type LCDs. Here, reflective, wide-band, electrically controlled birefringence mode was used as the optical liquid crystal (LC) mode, and a thermochromic material was used as the reflector for the white state and an absorber for the dark state. The combination of LCD and thermochromic material can have a synergistic effect in achieving a better display. By controlling the reflectance of the thermochromic reflector using Joule heating, the proposed reflective LC cell exhibited a high CR of approximately 70:1. The figure was extremely high compared to the approximately 10:1 of a typical reflective LC cell with an optically wide band design. The proposed LC cell configuration is expected to find many outdoor applications which can admit slow response speed.

  6. The design of the Central-Axis Reflector (ZAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huegenell, Hermann

    1989-10-01

    This paper discusses the design principles of the Central-Axis Reflector (ZAS), a segmented-mirror telescope designed to produce large light-gathering areas, with particular attention given to the optical system and the tracking apparatus of the ZAS. The paper also describes the manufacturing method for the primary mirror of the ZAS, the structure of the mirror bodies, the grinding and polishing method, and the structures and procedures used for mounting and adjustment of the individual mirror bodies. Consideration is also given to sensors and control systems, the optical path of the incident light, and a protecting dome. A variant of the ZAS, the Central-Axis Inclined Reflector, is also described.

  7. Optical tools and techniques for aligning solar payloads with the SPARCS control system. [Solar Pointing Aerobee Rocket Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, N. L.; Chisel, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The success of a rocket-borne experiment depends not only on the pointing of the attitude control system, but on the alignment of the attitude control system to the payload. To ensure proper alignment, special optical tools and alignment techniques are required. Those that were used in the SPARCS program are described and discussed herein. These tools include theodolites, autocollimators, a 38-cm diameter solar simulator, a high-performance 1-m heliostat to provide a stable solar source during the integration of the rocket payload, a portable 75-cm sun tracker for use at the launch site, and an innovation called the Solar Alignment Prism. Using the real sun as the primary reference under field conditions, the Solar Alignment Prism facilitates the coalignment of the attitude sun sensor with the payload. The alignment techniques were developed to ensure the precise alignment of the solar payloads to the SPARCS attitude sensors during payload integration and to verify the required alignment under field conditions just prior to launch.

  8. Cloud Optical Depth Retrievals from Solar Background "signal" of Micropulse Lidars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, J. Christine; Marshak, A.; Wiscombe, W.; Valencia, S.; Welton, E. J.

    2007-01-01

    Pulsed lidars are commonly used to retrieve vertical distributions of cloud and aerosol layers. It is widely believed that lidar cloud retrievals (other than cloud base altitude) are limited to optically thin clouds. Here we demonstrate that lidars can retrieve optical depths of thick clouds using solar background light as a signal, rather than (as now) merely a noise to be subtracted. Validations against other instruments show that retrieved cloud optical depths agree within 10-15% for overcast stratus and broken clouds. In fact, for broken cloud situations one can retrieve not only the aerosol properties in clear-sky periods using lidar signals, but also the optical depth of thick clouds in cloudy periods using solar background signals. This indicates that, in general, it may be possible to retrieve both aerosol and cloud properties using a single lidar. Thus, lidar observations have great untapped potential to study interactions between clouds and aerosols.

  9. Optical Design of Segmented Hexagon Array Solar Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huegele, Vince

    2000-01-01

    A segmented array of mirrors was designed for a solar concentrator test stand at MSFC for firing solar thermal propulsion engines. The 144 mirrors each have a spherical surface to approximate a parabolic concentrator when combined into the entire 18-foot diameter array. The mirror segments are aluminum hexagons that had the surface diamond turned and quartz coated. The array focuses sunlight reflected from a heliostat to a 4 inch diameter spot containing 10 kw of power at the 15-foot focal point. The derivation of the surface figure for the respective mirror elements is shown. The alignment process of the array is discussed and test results of the system's performance is given.

  10. Optical design of SHASM: segmented hexagon array solar mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huegele, Vinson B.

    2000-10-01

    A segmented array of mirrors was designed for a solar concentrator test stand at MSFC for firing solar thermal propulsion engines. The 144 mirrors each have s spherical surface to approximate a parabolic concentrator when combined into the entire 17-foot diameter array. The mirror segments are aluminum hexagons that had the surface diamond turned and quartz coated. The array focuses sunlight reflected from a heliostat to a 4 inch diameter spot containing 8 kilowatts of power at the 15 foot focal point. The derivation of the surface figure for the respective mirror elements is shown. The alignment process of the array is discussed and test results of the system's performance are given.

  11. Efficient optical analysis of surface texture combinations for silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucher, Nico; Eisenlohr, Johannes; Kiefel, Peter; Gebrewold, Habtamu; Höhn, Oliver; Hauser, Hubert; Müller, Claas; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph; Bläsi, Benedikt

    2016-04-01

    Surface textures can significantly improve anti-reflective and light trapping properties of silicon solar cells. Combining standard pyramidal front side textures with scattering or diffractive rear side textures has the potential to further increase the light path length inside the silicon and thereby increase the solar cell efficiency. In this work we introduce the OPTOS (Optical Properties of Textured Optical Sheets) simulation formalism and apply it to the modelling of silicon solar cells with different surface textures at front and rear side. OPTOS is a matrix-based method that allows for the computationally-efficient calculation of non-coherent light propagation within textured solar cells, featuring multiple textures that may operate in different optical regimes. After calculating redistribution matrices for each individual surface texture with the most appropriate technique, optical properties like angle dependent reflectance, transmittance or absorptance can be determined via matrix multiplications. Using OPTOS, we demonstrate for example that the integration of a diffractive grating at the rear side of solar cells with random pyramids at the front results in an absorptance gain that corresponds to a photocurrent density enhancement of 0.73 mA/cm2 for a 250 μm thick cell. The re-usability of matrices enables the investigation of different solar cell thicknesses within minutes. For thicknesses down to 50 μm the simulated gain increases up to 1.22 mA/cm2. The OPTOS formalism is furthermore not restricted with respect to the number of textured interfaces. By combining two or more textured sheets to effective interfaces, it is possible to optically model a complete photovoltaic module including EVA and potentially textured glass layers with one calculation tool.

  12. Geometrical optical performance evaluation of some seasonally adjusted solar concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, R.K.; Kandpal, T.C.; Mullick, S.C.

    1986-12-01

    The concentration characteristics of mirror profiles composed of small plane mirror elements have been studied for seasonally adjusted solar concentrators with different absorbers: flat horizontal, flat vertical, triangular cross section, and tubular. The distributions of local concentration ratio over these absorbers have been investigated using a ray tracing procedure.

  13. Cadmium stannate selective optical films for solar energy applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haacke, G.

    1975-01-01

    Efforts concentrated on reducing the electrical sheet resistance of sputtered cadmium stannate films, installing and testing equipment for spray coating experiments, and sputter deposition of thin cadmium sulfide layers onto cadmium stannate electrodes. In addition, single crystal silicon wafers were coated with cadmium stannate. Work also continued on the development of the backwall CdS solar cell.

  14. Solar concentrator advanced development program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Knasel, D.; Ehresman, D.

    1989-10-01

    The Solar Concentrator Advanced Development Project has successfully designed, fabricated, and tested a full scale prototypical solar dynamic concentrator for space station applications. A Truss Hexagonal Panel reflector was selected as a viable solar concentrator concept to be used for space station applications. This concentrator utilizes a modular design approach and is flexible in attainable flux profiles and assembly techniques. The detailed design of the concentrator, which included structural, thermal and optical analysis, identified the feasibility of the design and specific technologies that were required to fabricate it. The needed surface accuracy of the reflectors surface was found to be very tight, within 5 mrad RMS slope error, and results in very close tolerances for fabrication. To meet the design requirements, a modular structure composed of hexagonal panels was used. The panels, made up of graphite epoxy box beams provided the strength, stiffness and dimensional stability needed. All initial project requirements were met or exceeded by hardware demonstration. Initial testing of structural repeatability of a seven panel portion of the concentrator was followed by assembly and testing of the full nineteen panel structure. The testing, which consisted of theodolite and optical measurements over an assembly-disassembly-reassembly cycle, demonstrated that the concentrator maintained the as-built contour and optical characteristics. The facet development effort within the project, which included developing the vapor deposited reflective facet, produced a viable design with demonstrated optical characteristics that are within the project goals.

  15. Terrace retro-reflector array for poloidal polarimeter on ITER.

    PubMed

    Imazawa, R; Kawano, Y; Ono, T; Kusama, Y

    2011-02-01

    A new concept of a terrace retro-reflector array (TERRA) as part of the poloidal polarimeter for ITER is proposed in this paper. TERRA reflects a laser light even from a high incident angle in the direction of the incident-light path, while a conventional retro-reflector array cannot. Besides, TERRA can be installed in a smaller space than a corner-cube retro-reflector. In an optical sense, TERRA is equivalent to a Littrow grating, the blaze angle of which varies, depending on the incident angle. The reflected light generates a bright and dark fringe, and the bright fringe is required to travel along the incident-light path to achieve the objects of laser-aided diagnostics. In order to investigate the propagation properties of laser light reflected by TERRA, we have developed a new diffraction formula. Conditions for the propagation of the bright fringe in the direction of the incident light have been obtained using the Littrow grating model and have been confirmed in a simulation applying the new diffraction formula. Finally, we have designed laser transmission optics using TERRA for the ITER poloidal polarimeter and have calculated the light propagation of the system. The optical design obtains a high transmission efficiency, with 88.6% of the incident power returned. These results demonstrate the feasibility of applying TERRA to the ITER poloidal polarimeter.

  16. Case study of active array feed compensation with sidelobe control for reflector surface distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.; Zaman, A. J. M.; Bobinsky, E. A.; Cherrette, A. R.; Lee, S. W.

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility of electromagnetically compensating for reflector surface distortions has been investigated. The performance characteristics (gain, sidelobe levels, etc.) of large communication antenna systems degrade as the reflector surface distorts mainly due to thermal effects from a varying solar flux. The techniques described in this report can be used to maintain the design performance characteristics independently of thermal effects on the reflector surface. With the advent of monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC), a greater flexibility in array-fed reflector system design can be achieved. MMIC arrays provide independent control of amplitude and phase for each of many radiating elements of the feed array. It is assumed that the surface characteristics (x,y,z, its first and second derivatives) under distorted conditions are known.

  17. Structural analysis, manufacturing and test evaluation of a polarization sensitive reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, W.; Pfeifer, K.; Leitner, R.

    1986-02-01

    A parabolic reflector for space applications was developed. The reflector consists of two Kevlar/Nomex sandwich shells with a diameter of 1100 mm. Their edges are connected by a Kevlar/glass ring. The rear shell is fixed to the satellite by a conical carbon fiber composite cylinder and stiffened by four Kevlar/Nomex ribs. To minimize the thermal stresses the thermal expansion coefficients were adjusted to the reflector shells. In the static analysis a finite element calculation was performed for an acceleration of 15 g and for the most critical Sun irradiation with a partly shadowed reflector. All stresses are below the strength limits. The antenna was tested by sine vibration, acoustic noise, thermal cycling, and solar simulation without failure.

  18. Refurbishment of solar simulation optical train mirror assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leverton, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    Mirror refurbishment processing is described, and the results of processing 251 mirror assemblies are reported. The mirror replica bonding, optical tests, electrical discharge machining, and vacuum coating are discussed.

  19. Solar cyclic tests of optical fiber components working in ammonia and high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidelus, Janusz D.; Stańczyk, Tomasz; Wysokiński, Karol; Lipiński, Stanisław; Tenderenda, Tadeusz; Rodriguez Garcia, José; Canadas Martinez, Inmaculada; Nasiłowski, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    The paper reports on the metal (Cu, Ni, Au)-coated fibers annealed under concentrated solar radiation in ammonia and N2/H2 atmospheres at temperatures up to 580 °C. Tensile strength of the annealed fiber components was studied from the point of view of their possible application as a fiber optic sensors in urea chemical synthesis process control.

  20. Optics and mechanisms for the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on the Solar-B satellite.

    PubMed

    Korendyke, Clarence M; Brown, Charles M; Thomas, Roger J; Keyser, Christian; Davila, Joseph; Hagood, Robert; Hara, Hirohisa; Heidemann, Klaus; James, Adrian M; Lang, James; Mariska, John T; Moser, John; Moye, Robert; Myers, Steven; Probyn, Brian J; Seely, John F; Shea, John; Shepler, Ed; Tandy, Jason

    2006-12-01

    The Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) is the first of a new generation of normal-incidence, two-optical-element spectroscopic instruments developed for space solar extreme-ultraviolet astronomy. The instrument is currently mounted on the Solar-B satellite for a planned launch in late 2006. The instrument observes in two spectral bands, 170-210 A and 250-290 A. The spectrograph geometry and grating prescription were optimized to obtain excellent imaging while still maintaining readily achievable physical and fabrication tolerances. A refined technique using low ruling density surrogate gratings and optical metrology was developed to align the instrument with visible light. Slit rasters of the solar surface are obtained by mechanically tilting the mirror. A slit exchange mechanism allows selection among four slits at the telescope focal plane. Each slit is precisely located at the focal plane. The spectrograph imaging performance was optically characterized in the laboratory. The resolution was measured using the Mg iii and Ne iii lines in the range of 171-200 A. The He ii line at 256 A and Ne iii lines were used in the range of 251-284 A. The measurements demonstrate an equivalent resolution of ~2 arc sec? on the solar surface, in good agreement with the predicted performance. We describe the EIS optics, mechanisms, and measured performance.

  1. Effect of Solar Radiation on Fiber Optic Cables Used in Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilson, B. T.; Hatch, C. E.; Bingham, Q. G.; Tyler, S. W.

    2008-12-01

    In recent years, distributed temperature sensing (DTS) has enjoyed steady increases in the number and diversity of applications. Because fiber optic cables used for DTS are typically sheathed in dark materials resistant to UV deterioration, the question arises of how shortwave solar radiation penetrating a water column influences the accuracy of absolute DTS-derived temperatures. Initial calculations of these affects considered: shortwave radiation as a function of time of day, water depth, and water clarity; fiber optic cable dimensions; and fluid velocity. These indicate that for clear waterbodies with low velocities and shallow depths, some heating on the cable is likely during peak daily solar radiation. Given higher water velocities, substantial increases in turbidity, and/or deeper water, there should be negligible solar heating on the cable. To confirm these calculations, a field study was conducted to test the effects of solar radiation by installing two types of fiber optic cable at multiple, uniform depths in a trapezoidal canal with constant flow determined by a controlled release from Porcupine Dam near Paradise, Utah. Cables were installed in water depths from 0.05 to 0.79 m in locations of faster (center of canal) and slower (sidewall) water velocities. Thermister strings were installed at the same depths, but shielded from solar radiation and designed to record absolute water temperatures. Calculations predict that at peak solar radiation, in combination with shallow depths and slow velocities, typical fiber-optic cable is likely to experience heating greater than the ambient water column. In this study, DTS data show differences of 0.1-0.2°C in temperatures as seen by cables separated vertically by 0.31 m on the sidewall and center of the channel. Corresponding thermister data showed smaller vertical differences (~0.03-0.1°C) suggesting thermal stratification was also present in the canal. However, the magnitude of the DTS differences could not be

  2. Fabrication of optical components for the ultraviolet spectrometer and polarimeter on the Solar Maximum Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, R. S.; Bergen, G. J.; Fleetwood, C. M.; Herzig, H.; Miner, L.; Rice, S. H.; Smigocki, E.; Woodgate, B. E.; Zaniewski, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    The Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) satellite was launched in February 1980 into a 573 km high circular orbit. It contains X-ray, UV, and optical instruments for the simultaneous observation of solar flares. The ultraviolet spectrometer and polarimeter (UVSP) is one of these instruments. The objectives of the UVSP require the employment of a raster scanning telescope to study the spatial dynamics of flares, the use of a high resolution spectrometer to select and scan spectral lines for temperature and velocity diagnostics, and the utilization of a polarimeter to measure magnetic fields in the solar transition zone. The present paper has the objective to provide a description of the optical fabrication techniques developed for the instrument. Attention is given to telescope mirrors, metering rods, the Ebert mirror, grating blanks, a four-mirror polarizer, beam splitter assemblies, beam splitter fabrication, deflector mirrors, and shipping containers.

  3. Actuator Grouping Optimization on Flexible Space Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Jeffrey R.; Wang, K. W.; Fang, Houfei; Quijano, Ubaldo

    2011-01-01

    With the rapid advances in deployable membrane and mesh antenna technologies, the feasibility of developing large, lightweight reflectors has greatly improved. In order to achieve the required surface accuracy, precision surface control is needed on these lightweight reflectors. For this study, an analytical model is shown which combines a flexible Kapton reflector with Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) actuators for surface control. Surface errors are introduced that are similar to real world scenarios, and a least squares control algorithm is developed for surface control. Experimental results on a 2.4 meter reflector show that while the analytical reflector model is generally correct, due to idiosyncrasies in the reflector it cannot be used for online control. A new method called the En Mass Elimination algorithm is used to determine the optimal grouping of actuators when the number of actuators in the system exceeds the number of power supplies available.

  4. Optical Characteristics of the Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, E. A.; Porter, J. G.; Davis, J. M.; Gary, G. A.; Adams, M.; Smith, S.; Hraba, J. F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will describe the scientific objectives of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) and the optical components that have been developed to meet those objectives. In order to test the scientific feasibility of measuring magnetic fields in the UV, a sounding rocket payload is being developed. This paper will discuss: (1) the scientific measurements that will be made by the SUMI sounding rocket program, (2) how the optics have been optimized for simultaneous measurements of two magnetic lines CIV (1550 Angstroms) and MgII (2800 Angstroms), and (3) the optical, reflectance, transmission and polarization measurements that have been made on the SUMI telescope mirror and polarimeter.

  5. Analytical/experimental study of the optical performance of a transmittance-optimized linear Fresnel lens solar concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, M.J.; Waller, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    A transmittance-optimized linear Fresnel lens solar concentrator has been developed. The optical performance of the lens has been analytically predicted, using the method of cone optics, to define the radiant flux profile in the focal plane. Also, the optical performance of the lens has been experimentally determined, using a focal plane radiant flux scanner, under actual solar illumination. A brief description of the lens, its predicted performance, and its measured performance is presented.

  6. Design concepts for large reflector antenna structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.; Adams, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    Practical approaches for establishing large, precise antenna reflectors in space are described. Reflector surfaces consisting of either solid panels or knitted mesh are considered. The approach using a deep articulated truss structure to support a mesh reflector is selected for detailed investigations. A new sequential deployment concept for the tetrahedral truss is explained. Good joint design is discussed, and examples are described both analytically and by means of demonstration models. The influence of curvature on the design and its vibration characteristics are investigated.

  7. Lamp with a truncated reflector cup

    DOEpatents

    Li, Ming; Allen, Steven C.; Bazydola, Sarah; Ghiu, Camil-Daniel

    2013-10-15

    A lamp assembly, and method for making same. The lamp assembly includes first and second truncated reflector cups. The lamp assembly also includes at least one base plate disposed between the first and second truncated reflector cups, and a light engine disposed on a top surface of the at least one base plate. The light engine is configured to emit light to be reflected by one of the first and second truncated reflector cups.

  8. Structural and optical properties of copper-coated substrates for solar thermal absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratesi, Stefano; De Lucia, Maurizio; Meucci, Marco; Sani, Elisa

    2016-10-01

    Spectral selectivity, i.e. merging a high absorbance at sunlight wavelengths to a low emittance at the wavelengths of thermal spectrum, is a key characteristics for materials to be used for solar thermal receivers. It is known that spectrally selective absorbers can raise the receiver efficiency for all solar thermal technologies. Tubular sunlight receivers for parabolic trough collector (PTC) systems can be improved by the use of spectrally selective coatings. Their absorbance is increased by deposing black films, while the thermal emittance is minimized by the use of properly-prepared substrates. In this work we describe the intermediate step in the fabrication of black-chrome coated solar absorbers, namely the fabrication and characterization of copper coatings on previously nickel-plated stainless steel substrates. We investigate the copper surface features and optical properties, correlating them to the coating thickness and to the deposition process, in the perspective to assess optimal conditions for solar absorber applications.

  9. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography features of mild and severe acute solar retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Hossein, Mohammad; Jabbarpoor Bonyadi, Mohammad Hossein; Bonyadi, Jabbarpour; Soheilian, Rasam; Soheilian, Masoud; Peyman, Gholam A

    2011-09-08

    Photochemical/thermal retinal damage that results from unprotected solar eclipse viewing has vague presentations and sometimes misleading diagnosis, especially in cases with unclear history. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is a non-invasive imaging technique useful in differential diagnosis that can reveal characteristic foveal alterations in solar retinopathy to an unprecedented quasi histologic level. The authors present high-resolution SD-OCT findings correlated with clinical findings in three eyes of two cases with acute solar retinopathy. SD-OCT can precisely define the site and extent of damage in acute solar retinopathy. In mild forms, damage may be limited to the outer retina with inner segment/outer segment disruption. In severe forms, full thickness macular damage may be seen. Advances in retinal imaging have improved our ability to provide precise correlation with clinical presentation and prognosis.

  10. Performance Testing of an Off-Limb Solar Adaptive Optics System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. E.; Schmidt, D.; Marino, J.; Rimmele, T. R.; McAteer, R. T. J.

    2015-06-01

    Long-exposure spectro-polarimetry in the near-infrared is a preferred method to measure the magnetic field and other physical properties of solar prominences. In the past, it has been very difficult to observe prominences in this way with sufficient spatial resolution to fully understand their dynamical properties. Solar prominences contain highly transient structures, visible only at small spatial scales; hence they must be observed at sub-arcsecond resolution, with a high temporal cadence. An adaptive optics (AO) system capable of directly locking on to prominence structure away from the solar limb has the potential to allow for diffraction-limited spectro-polarimetry of solar prominences. We show the performance of the off-limb AO system and its expected performance at the desired science wavelength Ca ii 8542 Å.

  11. An experimental study on reflector wave-front error correction using PZT actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Lan; Jiang, Shuidong; Zhou, Yang; Fang, Houfei; Wu, Zhigang; Du, Jianming

    2016-04-01

    An adaptive control system for correcting wave-front error of a CFRC reflector has been studied. Errors investigated in this paper were mainly introduced by fabrication and gravity. 72 Piezoelectric Ceramic Transducer (PZT) actuators were integrated to the CFRC reflector to conduct wave-front error control. The adaptive CFRC reflector was fixed on an optical platform without any external loads. The temperature and humidity were well controlled during the experimental study. The wave-front error correction algorithm is based on influence matrix approach coupled with least squares optimization method. The linear relationship between the PZT actuator's input voltage and the output displacement of the adaptive CFRC reflector surface is validated. A laser displacement sensor was used for measuring the displacements. The influence matrix was obtained experimentally by measuring the displacements of the associated points while each actuator was activated separately. The wave-front error and influence matrix were measured using a V-Stars photogrammetry system. Experimental investigation validated that this adaptive control system is capable to significantly reduce the reflector surface geometry error. Experimental results are correlated very well with simulation results which were obtained by using a multidisciplinary analytical approach. Conclusions of this study suggest that the adaptive CFRC reflector technology can provide a low cost method to significantly increase the precision of a CFRC reflector.

  12. Photovoltaic concentrator optical system design: Solar energy engineering from physics to field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughenour, Blake Michael

    This dissertation describes the design, development, and field validation of a concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) solar energy system. The challenges of creating a highly efficient yet low-cost system architecture come from many sources. The solid-state physics of photovoltaic devices present fundamental limits to photoelectron conversion efficiency, while the electrical and thermal characteristics of widely available materials limit the design arena. Furthermore, the need for high solar spectral throughput, evenly concentrated sunlight, and tolerance to off-axis pointing places strict illumination requirements on the optical design. To be commercially viable, the cost associated with all components must be minimized so that when taken together, the absolute installed cost of the system in kWh is lower than any other solar energy method, and competitive with fossil fuel power generation. The work detailed herein focuses specifically on unique optical design and illumination concepts discovered when developing a viable commercial CPV system. By designing from the ground up with the fundamental physics of photovoltaic devices and the required system tolerances in mind, a select range of optical designs are determined and modeled. Component cost analysis, assembly effort, and development time frame further influence design choices to arrive at a final optical system design. When coupled with the collecting mirror, the final optical hardware unit placed at the focus generates more than 800W, yet is small and lightweight enough to hold in your hand. After fabrication and installation, the completed system's illumination, spectral, and thermal performance is validated with on-sun operational testing.

  13. Electronic Compensation For Distortion Of Antenna Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. C.; Cockrell, C.R.; Staton, L. D.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed method of obtaining approximately desired radiation or reception pattern from antenna that includes reflector based on concept of superposition of electromagnetic fields generated by multiple feedhorns or feed antenna elements arrayed at various positions near reflector and excited at electronically adjustable magnitudes and phases. In intended application, reflector nominally paraboloidal, feed elements N feedhorns in hexagonal array, and method used to compensate for deviations of real reflector surface from nominal paraboloidal shape. Method and concept also applicable to electronic beam steering and electronic antenna compensation in other situations.

  14. Low Sidelobe Scanning Beams for Parabolic Reflectors,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Parabolic antennas, *Sidelobes, *Electronic scanners, Parabolas, Far field, Antenna feeds , Reflectors, Low level, Amplitude, Distortion, Configurations, Secondary, Compensation, Feeding , Symposia, Taper

  15. Polarization modeling for the main optics of Chinese Giant Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shu; Fu, Yu; Jin, Zhenyu

    2016-07-01

    Chinese Giant Solar Telescope, which has a 8m diameter segmented primary mirror, is a plan for the next generation ground-based large solar telescope in China. A major scientific requirement for this telescope is the high accuracy polarimetry. In this paper, the instrumental polarization of the main optics is analyzed by polarization modeling, which is caused by off-axial field of view, spider asymmetry, nonuniform segment gap and segment coating. The result shows that the net polarization is sensitive to the asymmetrical spider leg widening and the uniformity of the segment optical property. For meeting the accuracy requirement, the extinction ratio and retardence error for each segment should be less than 0.3% and 0.8 degree, respectively. Generally, the ring segmented primary mirror have advantage in controlling the instrumental polarization for large main optics.

  16. SolTrace: A Ray-Tracing Code for Complex Solar Optical Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wendelin, Tim; Dobos, Aron; Lewandowski, Allan

    2013-10-01

    SolTrace is an optical simulation tool designed to model optical systems used in concentrating solar power (CSP) applications. The code was first written in early 2003, but has seen significant modifications and changes since its inception, including conversion from a Pascal-based software development platform to C++. SolTrace is unique in that it can model virtually any optical system utilizingthe sun as the source. It has been made available for free and as such is in use worldwide by industry, universities, and research laboratories. The fundamental design of the code is discussed, including enhancements and improvements over the earlier version. Comparisons are made with other optical modeling tools, both non-commercial and commercial in nature. Finally, modeled results are shownfor some typical CSP systems and, in one case, compared to measured optical data.

  17. An integral sunshade for optical reception antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, E. L.

    1988-01-01

    Optical reception antennas (telescopes) must be capable of receiving communications even when the deep-space laser source is located within a small angle of the Sun. Direst sunlight must not be allowed to shine on the primary reflector of an optical reception antenna, because too much light would be scattered into the signal detectors. A conventional sunshade that does not obstruct the antenna aperture would have to be about five times longer than its diameter in order to receive optical communications at a solar elongation of 12 degrees without interference. Such a long sunshade could not be accommodated within the dome of any existing large-aperture astronomical facility, and providing a new dome large enough would be prohibitively expensive. It is also desirable to reduce the amount of energy a space-based large-aperture optical reception facility would expend orienting a structure with such a sizable moment of inertia. Since a large aperture optical reception antenna will probably have a hexagonally segmented primary reflector, a sunshade consisting of hexagonal tubes can be mounted in alignment with the segmentation without producing any additional geometric obstruction. An analysis of the duration and recurrence of solar-conjunction communications outages (caused when a deep-space probe near an outer planet appears to be closer to the Sun than a given minimum solar elongation), and the design equations for the integral sunshade are appended.

  18. Integral sunshade for an optical reception antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, Edwin L.

    1991-01-01

    Optical reception antennas (telescopes) must be capable of receiving communications even when the deep-space laser source is located within a small angle of the sun. Direct sunlight must not be allowed to shine on the primary reflector of an optical reception antenna, because too much light would be scattered into the signal detectors. A conventional sunshade that does not obstruct the antenna aperture would have to be about five times longer than its diameter in order to receive optical communications at a solar elongation of 12 degrees without interference. Such a long sunshade could not be accommodated within the dome of any existing large-aperture astronomical facility, and providing a new dome large enough would be prohibitively expensive. It is also desirable to reduce the amount of energy a space-based large-aperture optical reception facility would expend orienting a structure with such a sizable moment of inertia. Since a large aperture optical reception antenna will probably have a hexagonally segmented primary reflector, a sunshade consisting of hexagonal tubes can be mounted in alignment with the segmentation without producing any additional geometric obstruction. An analysis of the duration and recurrence of solar-conjunction communications outages (caused when a deep-space probe near an outer planet appears to be closer to the sun than a given minimum solar elongation), and the design equations for the integral sunshade are appended.

  19. High-efficiency heterojunction crystalline Si solar cell and optical splitting structure fabricated by applying thin-film Si technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kenji; Adachi, Daisuke; Uzu, Hisashi; Ichikawa, Mitsuru; Terashita, Toru; Meguro, Tomomi; Nakanishi, Naoaki; Yoshimi, Masashi; Hernández, José Luis

    2015-08-01

    Thin-film Si technology for solar cells has been developed for over 40 years. Improvements in the conversion efficiency and industrialization of thin-film Si solar cells have been realized through continuous research and development of the thin-film Si technology. The thin-film Si technology covers a wide range of fields such as fundamental understanding of the nature of thin-film Si, cell/module production, simulation, and reliability technologies. These technologies are also significant for solar cells other than the thin-film Si solar cells. Utilizing the highly developed thin-film Si solar cell technology, we have achieved ∼24% efficiency heterojunction crystalline Si solar cells using 6-in. wafers and >26% efficiency solar cells with an optical splitting structure. These results indicate that further improvement of thin-film Si technology and its synergy with crystalline Si solar cell technology will enable further improvement of solar cells with efficiencies above 26%.

  20. Optical properties of solids for solar energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, B.

    The optical properties of transition metal carbides and nitrides were studied by reflectance measurements between 0.2 and 15 micrometers at room temperature and up to 500 C. An interpretation of the pronounced difference between the nitrides and carbides is made from a model in the electronic density of states distribution. The model is used to explain shifts in the optical constants when carbon or nitrogen-vacancies are introduced in the nitride. Calculations based on the optical constants suggest the nitrides as a new material for transparent heat-mirrors. The refractive index and band-edge of CuO, Cu sub 2O, Fe sub 2O sub 3, Cr sub 2O sub 3, i-C and a-Si have been measured and discussed within the framework of a new model for evaluating their potential use as the absorbing layer on a tandem-selective surface. A number of oxides on copper and steel were prepared by thermal and chemical methods and investigated for use as selectively absorbing surfaces. Thin films of noble and transition metals have been prepared and optically investigated for use as semi-transparent coatings on domestic windows.

  1. Tracking-integrated optics: applications in solar concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheelwright, Brian M.; Angel, Roger; Coughenour, Blake

    2014-12-01

    Conventional concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) systems track the sun with high precision dual-axis trackers. The emergent field of tracking-integrated optics has the potential to simplify the mechanics of CPV systems by loosening or eliminating the need for dual-axis tracking. In a tracking-integrated scheme, external module tracking is complemented or entirely replaced by miniature tracking within the module. This internal tracking-integration may take the form of active small-motion translation, rotation of arrayed optics, or by passive material property changes induced by the concentrated light. These methods are briefly reviewed. An insolation weighting model is presented which will aid in the design of tracking-integrated optics by quantifying the tradeoff between angular operation range and annual sunlight collection. We demonstrate that when tracking-integrated optics are used to complement external module tracking about a horizontal, North-South oriented axis, truncating the operational range may be advantageous. At Tucson AZ latitude (32.2°N), 15.6% of the angular range may be truncated while only sacrificing 3.6% of the annual insolation. We show that modules tracked about a polar-aligned axis are poorly-suited for truncation.

  2. Beam scanning offset Cassegrain reflector antennas by subreflector movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapean, James W., Jr.; Stutzman, Warren L.

    1994-01-01

    In 1987 a NASA panel recommended the creation of the Mission to Planet Earth. This mission was intended to apply to remote sensing experience of the space community to earth remote sensing to enhance the understanding of the climatological processes of our planet and to determine if, and to what extent, the hydrological cycle of Earth is being affected by human activity. One of the systems required for the mission was a wide scanning, high gain reflector antenna system for use in radiometric remote sensing from geostationary orbit. This work describes research conducted at Virginia Tech into techniques for beam scanning offset Cassegrain reflector antennas by subreflector translation and rotation. Background material relevant to beam scanning antenna systems and offset Cassegrain reflector antenna system is presented. A test case is developed based on the background material. The test case is beam scanned using two geometrical optics methods of determining the optimum subreflector position for the desired scanned beam direction. Physical optics far-field results are given for the beam scanned systems. The test case system is found to be capable of beam scanning over a range of 35 half-power beamwidths while maintaining a 90 percent beam efficiency or 50 half-power beamwidths while maintaining less than l dB of gain loss during scanning.

  3. Lithographic wavelength control of an external cavity laser with a silicon photonic crystal cavity-based resonant reflector.

    PubMed

    Liles, Alexandros A; Debnath, Kapil; O'Faolain, Liam

    2016-03-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of a new design for external cavity hybrid lasers consisting of a III-V semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) with fiber reflector and a photonic crystal (PhC)-based resonant reflector on SOI. The silicon reflector is composed of an SU8 polymer bus waveguide vertically coupled to a PhC cavity and provides a wavelength-selective optical feedback to the laser cavity. This device exhibits milliwatt-level output power and side-mode suppression ratios of more than 25 dB.

  4. Solar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, Robert; Noyes, Robert; Antiochos, Spiro K.; Canfield, Richard C.; Chupp, Edward L.; Deming, Drake; Doschek, George A.; Dulk, George A.; Foukal, Peter V.; Gilliland, Ronald L.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of modern solar physics. Topics covered include the solar interior, the solar surface, the solar atmosphere, the Large Earth-based Solar Telescope (LEST), the Orbiting Solar Laboratory, the High Energy Solar Physics mission, the Space Exploration Initiative, solar-terrestrial physics, and adaptive optics. Policy and related programmatic recommendations are given for university research and education, facilitating solar research, and integrated support for solar research.

  5. Performance of solmacs, a high PV solar concentrator with efficient optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibert, T.; Hellin, M.-L.; Loicq, J.; Mazy, E.; Jacques, L.; Verstraeten, D.; Gillis, J.-M.; Languy, F.; Emmerechts, C.; Beeckman, E.; Habraken, S.; Lecat, J.-H.

    2012-10-01

    A new solar panel with high concentration photovoltaic technology (x700) has been designed, prototyped and tested in the SOLMACS project. The quality of concentrating optics is a key factor for high module efficiency. Therefore new dedicated PMMA Fresnel lenses were studied and produced by injection molding. Lens design, material and production process were optimized to achieve a high optical yield of 86%. Thorough lens performance assessment in optical laboratory was completed with lifetime UV aging tests. Another important aspect is the thermal control of the hot spot created under the solar cell that receives the concentrated flux of 700 Suns. A dedicated heat spreader was developed to achieve passive thermal control with minimum mass and cost. This was supported by thermal models and tests at both cell and module level. 35% triple junction cells were implemented in the module. Micro-assembly technologies were used for the cell packaging and electrical connections. In support to the research, a continuous solar simulator was designed and built to assess the system performance, both at component and module level. The concentrator developments were integrated in a prototype and tested both indoor with the simulator and outdoor on the CSL solar test platform. The overall efficiency of the PV concentrator module is 28.5%.

  6. Broadband absorption enhancement achieved by optical layer mediated plasmonic solar cell.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenzhen; Zhang, Guanghui; Wu, Yukun; Ding, Huaiyi; Shen, Qinghe; Zhang, Kun; Li, Junwen; Pan, Nan; Wang, Xiaoping

    2011-12-19

    We propose a novel thin solar cell design, integrating plasmonic component with optical layer, for conspicuous performance improvement in organic (P3HT: PCBM) thin film solar cell. Despite the relatively simple structure, the designed solar cell can get strikingly high spectral performance with the short circuit current density (J(sc)) enhancement up to 67%; and a nicely large J(sc) enhancement over 50% can be easily obtained spanning rather a broad geometric parametric range. The mechanisms responsible for this significant and broadband absorption enhancement as well as the effects of intercalating a plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) array and an optical layer are theoretically and systematically investigated by finite-difference time-domain calculations (FDTD). The origin of the dramatically increased absorption is believed to be the synergistic effect between 1) the enhanced electric field and forward scattering upon excitation of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the NPs, and 2) the favorable redistributions of light field in the device due to the beneficial interference effect mediated by the optical layer. Such a design concept is quite versatile and can be easily extended to other thin film solar cell systems.

  7. Revisiting the BCS, a measurement system for characterizing the optics of solar collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, J. W.

    The Beam Characterization System is being employed at the Sandia's National Solar Thermal Test Facility to characterize the optical performance of heliostats, point-focus solar collectors, and their optical sub-elements as part of the on-going task to develop solar thermal technologies. With this measurement system, images of concentrated solar flux are acquired using digital imaging and processed to obtain such measures of the collector's optical performance as beam power, flux distribution, and beam diameter. Key system elements are a diffusely reflective target for imaging collector beams, meteorological instrumentation including a flux gauge to measure flux at one point in the beam, and a calibration technique to establish a pixel-intensity to flux-density conversion factor for the image. The system is employed in a variety of collector tests such as beam quality, tracking error, and wind effects. The paper describes the Beam Characterization System and its components and presents, for illustration, sample test results. An analysis of the Beam Characterization System's sources of measurement error is presented. Lastly, measurement techniques that employ the BCS to align heliostats and to measure or estimate collector surface slope errors are described.

  8. Effects of rapid thermal annealing on the optical properties of strain-free quantum ring solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang; Wang, Zhiming M; Dorogan, Vitaliy G; Li, Shibin; Lee, Jihoon; Mazur, Yuriy I; Kim, Eun Soo; Salamo, Gregory J

    2013-01-02

    Strain-free GaAs/Al0.33Ga0.67As quantum rings are fabricated by droplet epitaxy. Both photoresponse and photoluminescence spectra confirm optical transitions in quantum rings, suggesting that droplet epitaxial nanomaterials are applicable to intermediate band solar cells. The effects of post-growth annealing on the quantum ring solar cells are investigated, and the optical properties of the solar cells with and without thermal treatment are characterized by photoluminescence technique. Rapid thermal annealing treatment has resulted in the significant improvement of material quality, which can be served as a standard process for quantum structure solar cells grown by droplet epitaxy.

  9. Development status on the real-time controller for solar multi-conjugate adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lin; Zhu, Lei; Rao, Changhui

    2016-10-01

    Solar observations are performed over an extended field of view (FoV) and the isoplanatic patch which conventional adaptive optics (AO) provides diffraction limited resolution is a severe limitation. Multi-conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO) can be used to extend the corrected FoV of AO system. Compared to AO, MCAO which usually utilizes a wide-field Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor to control multiple deformable mirrors(DMs) is more complicated. Because the Sun is an extended object, correlation algorithms are applied to detect gradients in solar MCAO system. Moreover, due to the fast evolving daytime seeing conditions and the fact that much science has to be done at visible wavelengths, a very high closed-loop bandwidth is also required. The computation and delay development of the real-time controller (RTC) in solar MCAO system is more challenging than that in night-time MCAO system. This paper reviews the solar MCAO techniques and systems in the world, especially emphasizes the framework and implementation of the RTC. The development of MCAO in China is also introduced. An outlook of the RTC for the solar MCAO system in development is given.

  10. Low cost solar energy collection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Stephans, J. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A fixed, linear, ground-based primary reflector having an extended, curved sawtooth contoured surface covered with a metallized polymeric reflecting material, reflected solar energy to a movably supported collector that was kept at the concentrated line focus of the reflector primary. Efficient utilization leading to high temperatures from the reflected solar energy was obtained by cylindrical shaped secondary reflectors that directed off-angle energy to the absorber pipe.

  11. Cavity optomechanics with 2D photonic crystal membrane reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingaraju, Navin B.; Shuai, Yichen; Lawall, John

    2016-03-01

    Membranes made from silicon nitride have significantly higher mechanical Q-factors under tensile stress than those made of other dielectric materials. This makes them ideal candidates for membrane reflectors that provide high finesse in Fabry-Perot cavities or membrane-in-the-middle optomechanical systems. Building on our previous work with one-dimensional gratings on suspended membranes, we patterned two-dimensional photonic crystal gratings on monolithic, suspended membranes made from silicon nitride. These high-Q membranes exhibited high reflectivity, upwards of 99%, over several nanometers in the telecom band. To probe their optical response in a cavity environment, we used these membrane reflectors as the moving mirror in a Fabry-Perot cavity. We were able to realize cavities with a finesse of over 4,500.

  12. Gratings and Random Reflectors for Near-Infrared PIN Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath; Bandara, Sumith; Liu, John; Ting, David

    2007-01-01

    Crossed diffraction gratings and random reflectors have been proposed as means to increase the quantum efficiencies of InGaAs/InP positive/intrinsic/ negative (PIN) diodes designed to operate as near-infrared photodetectors. The proposal is meant especially to apply to focal-plane imaging arrays of such photodetectors to be used for near-infrared imaging. A further increase in quantum efficiency near the short-wavelength limit of the near-infrared spectrum of such a photodetector array could be effected by removing the InP substrate of the array. The use of crossed diffraction gratings and random reflectors as optical devices for increasing the quantum efficiencies of quantum-well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs) was discussed in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles. While the optical effects of crossed gratings and random reflectors as applied to PIN photodiodes would be similar to those of crossed gratings and random reflectors as applied to QWIPs, the physical mechanisms by which these optical effects would enhance efficiency differ between the PIN-photodiode and QWIP cases: In a QWIP, the multiple-quantum-well layers are typically oriented parallel to the focal plane and therefore perpendicular or nearly perpendicular to the direction of incidence of infrared light. By virtue of the applicable quantum selection rules, light polarized parallel to the focal plane (as normally incident light is) cannot excite charge carriers and, hence, cannot be detected. A pair of crossed gratings or a random reflector scatters normally or nearly normally incident light so that a significant portion of it attains a component of polarization normal to the focal plane and, hence, can excite charge carriers. A pair of crossed gratings or a random reflector on a PIN photodiode would also scatter light into directions away from the perpendicular to the focal plane. However, in this case, the reason for redirecting light away from the perpendicular is to increase the length of the

  13. Realization of LOS (Line of Sight) stabilization based on reflector using carrier attitude compensation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yao; Tian, Jing; Ma, Jia-guang

    2015-02-01

    The techonology of LOS stabilization is widely applicated in moving carrier photoelectric systems such as shipborne, airborne and so on. In application situations with compact structure, such as LOS stabilization system of unmanned aerial vehicle, LOS stabilization based on reflector is adopted, and the detector is installed on the carrier to reduce the volume of stabilized platform and loading weight. However, the LOS deflection angle through reflector and the rotation angle of the reflector has a ratio relation of 2:1, simple reflector of stable inertial space can not make the optical axis stable. To eliminate the limitation of mirror stabilizing method, this article puts forward the carrier attitude compensation method, which uses the inertial sensor installed on the carrier to measure the attitude change of the carrier, and the stabilized platform rotating half of the carrier turbulence angle to realize the LOS stabilization.

  14. Design method of a light emitting diode front fog lamp based on a freeform reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Heng; Zhang, Xianmin; Ge, Peng

    2015-09-01

    We propose a method for the design of a light emitting diode front fog lamp based on a freeform reflector. The source-target mapping is used to establish the relationship between the solid angle of the source and the target plane. The reflector is then constructed based on the non-imaging optics theory and Snell's law. A feedback function is deduced from the deviation in the simulated light pattern based on the sampling method. The reflector is then regenerated with feedback modifications and the variance is minimized after several feedbacks. A reflector for the automobile front fog lamp is designed for the OSTAR Headlamp LED source whose emitting surface is 2.8 mm×2.5 mm. Simulation results indicate that the light performance can well meet the standard of the front fog lamps in ECE R19 Revision 7.

  15. Design method of a light-emitting diode front fog lamp based on a freeform reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Heng; Zhang, Xianmin; Ge, Peng

    2015-06-01

    We propose a method for the design of a light-emitting diode front fog lamp based on a freeform reflector. The source-target mapping is used to establish the relationship between the solid angle of the source and the target plane. The reflector is then constructed based on the non-imaging optics theory and Snell's Law. A feedback function is deduced from the deviation in the simulated light pattern based on the sampling method. The reflector is then regenerated with feedback modifications and the variance is minimized after several feedbacks. A reflector for the automobile front fog lamp is designed for the OSTAR Headlamp LED source whose emitting surface is 2.8 mm×2.5 mm. Simulation results indicate that the light performance can well meet the standard of the front fog lamps in ECE R19 Revision 7.

  16. Curvature of blended rolled edge reflectors at the shadow boundary contour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellingson, S. W.

    1988-01-01

    A technique is advanced for computing the radius of curvature of blended rolled edge reflector surfaces at the shadow boundary, in the plane perpendicular to the shadow boundary contour. This curvature must be known in order to compute the spurious endpoint contributions in the physical optics (PO) solution for the scattering from reflectors with rolled edges. The technique is applicable to reflectors with radially-defined rim-shapes and rolled edge terminations. The radius of curvature for several basic reflector systems is computed, and it is shown that this curvature can vary greatly along the shadow boundary contour. Finally, the total PO field in the target zone of a sample compact range system is computed and corrected using the shadow boundary radius of curvature, obtained using the technique. It is shown that the fields obtained are a better approximation to the true scattered fields.

  17. Adaptive optics real time processing design for the advanced technology solar telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Kit

    2012-07-01

    The four meter Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) adaptive optics (AO) system will require at least twenty-four times the real time processing power as the Dunn Solar Telescope AO system. An FPGA solution for ATST AO real time processing is being pursued instead of the parallel DSP approach used for the Dunn AO76 system. An analysis shows FPGAs will have lower latency and lower hardware cost than an equivalent DSP solution. Interfacing to the proposed high speed camera and the deformable mirror will be simpler and have lower latency than with DSPs. This paper will discuss the current design and progress toward implementing the FPGA solution.

  18. Fresnel Lens Solar Concentrator Design Based on Geometric Optics and Blackbody Radiation Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Jayroe, Robert, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Fresnel lenses have been used for years as solar concentrators in a variety of applications. Several variables effect the final design of these lenses including: lens diameter, image spot distance from the lens, and bandwidth focused in the image spot. Defining the image spot as the geometrical optics circle of least confusion and applying blackbody radiation equations the spot energy distribution can be determined. These equations are used to design a fresnel lens to produce maximum flux for a given spot size, lens diameter, and image distance. This approach results in significant increases in solar efficiency over traditional single wavelength designs.

  19. Nanoimprinted diffraction gratings for crystalline silicon solar cells: implementation, characterization and simulation.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Alexander; Hauser, Hubert; Wellens, Christine; Benick, Jan; Eisenlohr, Johannes; Peters, Marius; Guttowski, Aron; Tobías, Ignacio; Martí, Antonio; Luque, Antonio; Bläsi, Benedikt

    2013-03-11

    Light trapping is becoming of increasing importance in crystalline silicon solar cells as thinner wafers are used to reduce costs. In this work, we report on light trapping by rear-side diffraction gratings produced by nano-imprint lithography using interference lithography as the mastering technology. Gratings fabricated on crystalline silicon wafers are shown to provide significant absorption enhancements. Through a combination of optical measurement and simulation, it is shown that the crossed grating provides better absorption enhancement than the linear grating, and that the parasitic reflector absorption is reduced by planarizing the rear reflector, leading to an increase in the useful absorption in the silicon. Finally, electro-optical simulations are performed of solar cells employing the fabricated grating structures to estimate efficiency enhancement potential.

  20. New vistas in solar concentration with gradient-index optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsidas, Panagiotis; Modi, Vijay; Gordon, Jeffrey M.

    2011-10-01

    Certain classes of gradient-index lenses can achieve both perfect imaging and flux concentration at the fundamental limits. Although useful in microwave technology, eponymous Luneburg lenses have been viewed as esoteric idealizations for visible and near-infrared radiation due to the paucity of suitable materials and fabrication methods. We show that the classic Luneburg problem was constrained in subtle, implicit ways that can be relaxed. With the extra degrees of freedom, we demonstrate new gradient-index profiles that can accommodate both realistic, readily available materials and existing manufacturing technologies, while compromising neither perfect imaging nor maximum concentration (confirmed by raytrace simulation) - thereby opening new vistas for solar concentration and other visible and near-infrared applications. Specifically, the broader genres of solutions identified here permit a far smaller range of refractive indices than previously believed, with minimum required refractive index values well above unity, at arbitrary lens f-number, with less sensitivity to dispersion losses than conventional lenses.

  1. Shaped cassegrain reflector antenna. [design equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Design equations are developed to compute the reflector surfaces required to produce uniform illumination on the main reflector of a cassegrain system when the feed pattern is specified. The final equations are somewhat simple and straightforward to solve (using a computer) compared to the ones which exist already in the literature. Step by step procedure for solving the design equations is discussed in detail.

  2. Solar-array-materials passive LDEF experiment (A0171)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, A. F.; Smith, C. F., Jr.; Young, L. E.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.; Forestieri, A. F.; Gaddy, E. M.; Bass, J. A.; Stella, P. M.

    1984-02-01

    The objective of this experiment is to evaluate the synergistic effects of the space environment on various solar-array materials, including solar cells, cover slips with various antireflectance coatings, adhesive, encapsulants, reflector materials, substrate strength materials, mast and harness materials, structural composites, and thermal control treatments. The experiment is passive and consists of an arrangement of material specimens mounted in a 3-in.-deep peripheral tray. The effects of the space environment on the specimens will be determined by comparison of preflight and postflight measurements of mechanical, electrical, and optical properties.

  3. The linear Fresnel lens - Solar optical analysis of tracking error effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosby, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    Real sun-tracking solar concentrators imperfectly follow the solar disk, operationally sustaining both transverse and axial misalignments. This paper describes an analysis of the solar concentration performance of a line-focusing flat-base Fresnel lens in the presence of small transverse tracking errors. Simple optics and ray-tracing techniques are used to evaluate the lens solar transmittance and focal-plane imaging characteristics. Computer-generated example data for an f/1.0 lens indicate that less than a 1% transmittance degradation occurs for transverse errors up to 2.5 deg. In this range, solar-image profiles shift laterally in the focal plane, the peak concentration ratio drops, and profile asymmetry increases with tracking error. With profile shift as the primary factor, the ninety-percent target-intercept width increases rapidly for small misalignments, e.g., almost threefold for a 1-deg error. The analytical model and computational results provide a design base for tracking and absorber systems for the linear-Fresnel-lens solar concentrator.

  4. Beam diffraction by planar and parabolic reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suedan, Gibreel A.; Jull, Edward V.

    1991-04-01

    In the complex source point (CSP) technique, an omnidirectional source diffraction solution becomes that for a directive beam when the coordinates of the source position are given appropriate complex values. This is applied to include feed directivity in reflector edge diffraction. Solutions and numerical examples for planar strip and parabolic cylinder reflectors are given, including an offset parabolic reflector. The main beams of parabolic reflectors are calculated by aperture integration and the edge diffracted fields by uniform diffraction theory. In both cases, a complex source point feed in the near or far field of the reflector may be used in the pattern calculation, with improvements in accuracy in the lateral and spillover pattern lobes.

  5. Nanolaminate Membranes as Cylindrical Telescope Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, Jennifer; Dragovan, Mark; Hickey, Gregory; Lih, Shyh-Shiu Lih

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses a proposal to use axially stretched metal nanolaminate membranes as lightweight parabolic cylindrical reflectors in the Dual Anamorphic Reflector Telescope (DART) - a planned spaceborne telescope in which the cylindrical reflectors would be arranged to obtain a point focus. The discussion brings together a combination of concepts reported separately in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, the most relevant being "Nanolaminate Mirrors With Integral Figure-Control Actuators" NPO -30221, Vol. 26, No. 5 (May 2002), page 90; and "Reflectors Made From Membranes Stretched Between Beams" NPO -30571, Vol. 33, No. 10 (October 2009), page 11a. The engineering issues receiving the greatest emphasis in the instant document are (1) the change in curvature associated with the Poisson contraction of a stretched nanolaminate reflector membrane and (2) the feasibility of using patches of poly(vinylidene fluoride) on the rear membrane surface as piezoelectric actuators to correct the surface figure for the effect of Poisson contraction and other shape errors.

  6. Controlling optical absorption in metamaterial absorbers for plasmonic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Wyatt; Vora, Ankit; Gwamuri, Jephias; Pearce, Joshua M.; Güney, Durdu Ö.

    2015-08-01

    Metals in the plasmonic metamaterial absorbers for photovoltaics constitute undesired resistive heating. However, tailoring the geometric skin depth of metals can minimize resistive losses while maximizing the optical absorbance in the active semiconductors of the photovoltaic device. Considering experimental permittivity data for InxGa1-xN, absorbance in the semiconductor layers of the photovoltaic device can reach above 90%. The results here also provides guidance to compare the performance of different semiconductor materials. This skin depth engineering approach can also be applied to other optoelectronic devices, where optimizing the device performance demands minimizing resistive losses and power consumption, such as photodetectors, laser diodes, and light emitting diodes.

  7. Modeling the Effects of Solar Cell Distribution on Optical Cross Section for Solar Panel Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report ( SAR ) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 7 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a...backscatter is not a concern in this experiment as the only geometry used is a bistatic geometry with a 90∘ Solar Phase Angle (SPA), as depicted in Figure...the space object. This way, the far-field imagery, spectrum, and any simulation data can be compared directly. Figure 3. Bistatic illumination

  8. The extreme ultraviolet imager of solar orbiter: optical design and alignment scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halain, J.-P.; Mazzoli, A.; Meining, S.; Rochus, P.; Renotte, E.; Auchère, F.; Schühle, U.; Delmotte, F.; Dumesnil, C.; Philippon, A.; Mercier, R.; Hermans, A.

    2015-09-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUI) is one of the remote sensing instruments on-board the Solar Orbiter mission. It will provide dual-band full-Sun images of the solar corona in the extreme ultraviolet (17.1 nm and 30.4 nm), and high resolution images of the solar disk in both extreme ultraviolet (17.1 nm) and vacuum ultraviolet (Lyman-alpha 121.6 nm). The EUI optical design takes heritage of previous similar instruments. The Full Sun Imager (FSI) channel is a single mirror Herschel design telescope. The two High Resolution Imager (HRI) channels are based on a two-mirror optical refractive scheme, one Ritchey-Chretien and one Gregory optical design for the EUV and the Lyman-alpha channels, respectively. The spectral performances of the EUI channels are obtained thanks to dedicated mirror multilayer coatings and specific band-pass filters. The FSI channel uses a dual-band mirror coating combined with aluminum and zirconium band-pass filters. The HRI channels use optimized band-pass selection mirror coatings combined with aluminum band-pass filters and narrow band interference filters for Lyman-alpha. The optical performances result from accurate mirror manufacturing tolerances and from a two-step alignment procedure. The primary mirrors are first co-aligned. The HRI secondary mirrors and focal planes positions are then adjusted to have an optimum interferometric cavity in each of these two channels. For that purpose a dedicated alignment test setup has been prepared, composed of a dummy focal plane assembly representing the detector position. Before the alignment on the flight optical bench, the overall alignment method has been validated on the Structural and Thermal Model, on a dummy bench using flight spare optics, then on the Qualification Model to be used for the system verification test and qualifications.

  9. Solar energy concentrator design and operation. Citations from the Engineering Index data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hundemann, A. S.

    1980-09-01

    Worldwide research on the design and operation of various types of solar energy concentrators is discussed. Topic areas cover thermal and optical performance of Fresnel lenses, compound parabolic concentrators, fixed mirror concentrators, and planar reflector enhancement of flat plate collector systems. A few abstracts deal with V-trough concentrators and methods to calculate performance of concentrators. A separate Published Search on heliostat systems is available.

  10. Isoplanatic patch considerations for solar telescope multi-conjugate adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, Jacques M.

    2014-08-01

    I compare recent site surveys for the future large 4-meter solar and 30-meter nighttime telescopes at the nearby Haleakala and Mauna Kea sites respectively. They show that the outstanding early morning image quality at the solar site corresponds indeed to that observed at the late night one at the nighttime site. That confirms the notion that daytime solar site heating only shows itself later in the morning. The nighttime survey includes observations of the refractive index structure function Cn 2(h) to high altitudes from which the radius of the isoplanatic patch (Ɵ0) can be determined. At zenith (ζ = 00) it equals 2.5 arcsec at 500 nm wavelength. For the early morning (best) seeing at the solar site, which occurs at ζsun = 750 and the cos1.6(ζ) dependence of Θ0,that means an extremely small Ɵ0 (0.26 arcsec). Such small values compromise Adaptive Optics (AO) solar correlation wavefront sensing for which areas are needed equal to about 8"× 8" I suggest options for measuring Cn2(h), and therefore Ɵ0, during the day. These make use of the solar image as well as of daytime images of bright stars and planets. Some use the MASS technique on stars; some use the SHABAR technique using very large detector baselines on the Sun and shorter baselines on planets. It is suggested that these Cn2(h) measurements are made also during regular solar observations. In that way optimal solar observations can be planned using real-time Ɵ0 observations by image selection and optimization of the MCAO configuration.

  11. Miniature lightweight x-ray optics (MiXO) for solar system exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, J.; Romaine, S.

    2014-07-01

    Over the last few decades, grazing incidence X-ray optics have been a pivotal tool for advances in X-ray astronomy. They have been successfully employed in many great observatories such as ROSAT, Chandra X-ray Observatory and XMM-Newton. In planetary science, X-ray observations of Solar system objects are a great tool to understand the nature of the target bodies and the evolutionary history of the Solar system as a whole. To date, X-ray observations in near-target planetary missions have been limited to collimator-based instruments due to tight mass and volume constraints, arising from the multi-instrument nature of planetary missions. In addition, unlike observations of astrophysical sources at virtually infinite distances, near-target observations of planetary bodies introduce a unique set of challenges. While true focusing X-ray optics can overcome these challenges, a practical implementation of focusing X-ray optics for planetary missions depends on the feasibility of compact lightweight X-ray optics. We review scientific motivations for X-ray observations of planetary bodies and illustrate the unique challenges encountered in planetary missions through a few examples. We introduce a new metal-ceramic hybrid technology for X-ray mirrors that can enable compact lightweight Wolter-I X-ray optics suitable for resource limited planetary missions.

  12. Improvement in the efficiency of organic solar cells using a low-temperature evaporable optical spacer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Jun Young; Kwon, Yongwon; Ko, Youngjun; Lee, Donggu; Syn, Ho Jung; Song, Jiyun; Kwak, Jeonghun; Lee, Changhee

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate the enhancement in performance of organic solar cells (OSCs) by employing a low-temperature evaporable optical spacer, consisting of potassium borohydride (KBH4) and bathophenanthroline (Bphen) (0.2:1, volume ratio). Since the KBH4-doped Bphen shows improved electron transporting properties and high transparency in the visible range, it can be used as an efficient optical spacer layer that can maximize the internal electrical field distribution in the active layer. As a result, the power conversion efficiency of the OSCs having the KBH4-doped Bphen with an optimized thickness was improved by 15% in comparison with the device with the non-KBH4-doped Bphen.

  13. Design of nanostructured solar cells using coupled optical and electrical modeling.

    PubMed

    Deceglie, Michael G; Ferry, Vivian E; Alivisatos, A Paul; Atwater, Harry A

    2012-06-13

    Nanostructured light trapping has emerged as a promising route toward improved efficiency in solar cells. We use coupled optical and electrical modeling to guide optimization of such nanostructures. We study thin-film n-i-p a-Si:H devices and demonstrate that nanostructures can be tailored to minimize absorption in the doped a-Si:H, improving carrier collection efficiency. This suggests a method for device optimization in which optical design not only maximizes absorption, but also ensures resulting carriers are efficiently collected.

  14. Improving optical absorptivity of natural dyes for fabrication of efficient dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmatzadeh, Reza; Mohammadi, Ahmad

    2013-11-01

    Efficient and cheap dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were fabricated using natural dyes from Pastinaca sativa and Beta vulgaris. Natural dyes are environmentally and economically superior to ruthenium-based dyes because they are nontoxic and cheap. However, the conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells based on natural dyes is low. One way to improve the DSSC performance is to enhance the absorptivity of extracted dyes. We investigated the influence of various factors in the extraction process, such as utilization of different extraction approaches, the acidity of extraction solvent, and different compounds of solvents on the optical absorption spectra. It was found that we could considerably enhance the optical absorptivity of dye and consequently the performance of DSSC by choosing a proper mixture of ethanol and water for extracting solvent and also the acidity of dye solution.

  15. Optical Design and Manufacturing of Fresnel Lenses for The First Korean High Concentration Solar PV System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Kwangsun; Shin, Goo-Hwan; Cha, Wonho; Kang, Seongwon; Kim, Youngsik; Kang, Gi-Hwan

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we designed and optimized flat Fresnel lens and the light pipe to develop 500X concentrated solar PV system. In the process, we compare the transmission efficiencies according to groove types. We performed rigorous ray tracing simulation of the flat Fresnel lenses. The computer aided simulation showed the `grooves in' case has the better efficiency than that of `grooves out' case. Based on the ray-trace results, we designed and manufactured sample Fresnel lenses. The optical performance were measured and compared with ray-trace results. Finally, the optical efficiency was measured to be above 75%. All the design and manufacturing were performed based on that InGaP/InGaAs/Ge triple junction solar cell is used to convert the photon energy to electrical power. Field test will be made and analyzed in the near future.

  16. Transparent conductor-embedding nanocones for selective emitters: optical and electrical improvements of Si solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joondong; Yun, Ju-Hyung; Kim, Hyunyub; Cho, Yunae; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Kumar, M Melvin David; Yi, Junsin; Anderson, Wayne A; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2015-03-19

    Periodical nanocone-arrays were employed in an emitter region for high efficient Si solar cells. Conventional wet-etching process was performed to form the nanocone-arrays for a large area, which spontaneously provides the graded doping features for a selective emitter. This enables to lower the electrical contact resistance and enhances the carrier collection due to the high electric field distribution through a nanocone. Optically, the convex-shaped nanocones efficiently reduce light-reflection and the incident light is effectively focused into Si via nanocone structure, resulting in an extremely improved the carrier collection performances. This nanocone-arrayed selective emitter simultaneously satisfies optical and electrical improvement. We report the record high efficiency of 16.3% for the periodically nanoscale patterned emitter Si solar cell.

  17. Transparent conductor-embedding nanocones for selective emitters: optical and electrical improvements of Si solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joondong; Yun, Ju-Hyung; Kim, Hyunyub; Cho, Yunae; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Kumar, M. Melvin David; Yi, Junsin; Anderson, Wayne A.; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Periodical nanocone-arrays were employed in an emitter region for high efficient Si solar cells. Conventional wet-etching process was performed to form the nanocone-arrays for a large area, which spontaneously provides the graded doping features for a selective emitter. This enables to lower the electrical contact resistance and enhances the carrier collection due to the high electric field distribution through a nanocone. Optically, the convex-shaped nanocones efficiently reduce light-reflection and the incident light is effectively focused into Si via nanocone structure, resulting in an extremely improved the carrier collection performances. This nanocone-arrayed selective emitter simultaneously satisfies optical and electrical improvement. We report the record high efficiency of 16.3% for the periodically nanoscale patterned emitter Si solar cell. PMID:25787933

  18. Investigation of solar noise impact on the performance of underwater wireless optical communication links.

    PubMed

    Hamza, Tasnim; Khalighi, Mohammad-Ali; Bourennane, Salah; Léon, Pierre; Opderbecke, Jan

    2016-10-31

    We investigate the effect of environmental noise, caused by solar radiations under water, on the performance of underwater wireless optical communication (UWOC) systems. Presenting an analytical and generic model for this noise, we examine its impact on the link performance in terms of the bit error rate (BER). This study is conducted for different photo-detector types in the aim of highlighting practical limitations of establishing UWOC links in the presence of subsea solar noise. We show how the solar noise can impact the performance of UWOC links for relatively low operation depths. The results we present provide valuable insight for the design of UWOC links, which are likely to be established at relatively low depths. They can be exploited not only for the purpose of practical UWOC system deployment but also for in-pool experimental set-ups, since they elucidate the effect of ambient light on the measurements.

  19. Optical properties of a grating-nanorod assembly structure for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhihao; Cheng, Qiang; Song, Jinlin; Si, Mengting; Luo, Zixue

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a grating-nanorod assembly structure that can be applied to silicon solar cells. The optical properties of the assembly structure are examined by applying the finite difference time domain method in the 300-1100 nm wavelength region, where the average spectral absorptance of the structure can reach 0.955. This high absorptance is attributed to guided mode resonance and microcavity effect. The transient and steady-state magnetic field distribution of the structure reveals the underlying mechanisms of such extraordinary phenomena. Absorptance is further investigated at different diameters and lengths of the nanorod component. The effects of incident angle on absorptance are also discussed. The solar cells of the structure can yield an optimum conversion efficiency of 25.91%. Thus, the proposed structure can be applied to silicon solar cells.

  20. Thermo-Optical and Mechanical Property Testing of Candidate Solar Sail Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollerman, WIlliam A.; Stanaland, T. L.; Womack, F.; Edwards, David; Hubbs, Whitney; Semmel, Charles

    2003-01-01

    Solar sailing is a unique form of propulsion where a spacecraft gains momentum from incident photons. Since sails are not limited by reaction mass, they provide continual acceleration, reduced only by the lifetime of the lightweight film in the space environment and the distance to the Sun. Practical solar sails can expand the number of possible missions, enabling new concepts that are difficult by conventional means. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is concentrating research into the utilization of ultra-lightweight materials for spacecraft propulsion. Solar sails are generally composed of a highly reflective metallic front layer, a thin polymeric substrate, and occasionally a highly emissive back surface. The Space Environmental Effects Team at MSFC is actively characterizing candidate sails to evaluate the thermo-optical and mechanical properties after exposure to electrons. This poster will discuss the preliminary results of this research.