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Sample records for optical reflector system

  1. Optical Receivers With Rough Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, Victor A.

    1989-01-01

    Receiver for optical communications uses rough reflector instead of diffraction-limited reflector customarily thought necessary for such systems. Rough reflector collects and focuses optical signal. Other receiver components include narrow-passband optical filter to reject out-of-band background radiation, spatial filter to limit receiver field of view, optical-detector array (typically two concentric detectors), and postdetection processor to reconstruct transmitted message.

  2. Drive system and readout characteristics of micro-reflector optical disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Kimihiro; Horigome, Toshihiro; Miyamoto, Hirotaka; Yamatsu, Hisayuki; Tanabe, Norihiro; Hayashi, Kunihiko; Fujita, Goro; Kobayashi, Seiji; Kudo, Takao; Uchiyama, Hiroshi

    2007-06-01

    This paper reviews the analyses and the experimental results of Micro-reflector optical disc system. In Micro-reflector optical disc, data are recorded on multiple virtual planes in a monolithic holographic medium. We have demonstrated the possibility of huge capacity from our analyses of readout characteristics of the Micro-reflector. In addition, we have developed the five-axis servo control system in order to achieve precise control of two counter-propagating light spots in recording media. Using this system, we succeeded in four-layer recording/readout.

  3. Analysis of a generalized dual reflector antenna system using physical optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Lagin, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    Reflector antennas are widely used in communication satellite systems because they provide high gain at low cost. Offset-fed single paraboloids and dual reflector offset Cassegrain and Gregorian antennas with multiple focal region feeds provide a simple, blockage-free means of forming multiple, shaped, and isolated beams with low sidelobes. Such antennas are applicable to communications satellite frequency reuse systems and earth stations requiring access to several satellites. While the single offset paraboloid has been the most extensively used configuration for the satellite multiple-beam antenna, the trend toward large apertures requiring minimum scanned beam degradation over the field of view 18 degrees for full earth coverage from geostationary orbit may lead to impractically long focal length and large feed arrays. Dual reflector antennas offer packaging advantages and more degrees of design freedom to improve beam scanning and cross-polarization properties. The Cassegrain and Gregorian antennas are the most commonly used dual reflector antennas. A computer program for calculating the secondary pattern and directivity of a generalized dual reflector antenna system was developed and implemented at LeRC. The theoretical foundation for this program is based on the use of physical optics methodology for describing the induced currents on the sub-reflector and main reflector. The resulting induced currents on the main reflector are integrated to obtain the antenna far-zone electric fields. The computer program is verified with other physical optics programs and with measured antenna patterns. The comparison shows good agreement in far-field sidelobe reproduction and directivity.

  4. Radio-over-fiber transport system employing free-space optical communication scheme with parabolic reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Anindya S.; Patra, Ardhendu S.

    2015-01-01

    A bidirectional radio over fiber (ROF) transport system in combination with optical free space transmission schemes based on WDM, external light injection and optical add-drop multiplexing techniques is proposed and demonstrated. A diverging lens at the fiber end and a parabolic reflector at the receiver end are designed to employ optical free space transmission scheme in the configuration which transmits data-stream of 1~10 Gbps at 12.5 GHz. Excellent BER values and impressive eye diagrams for both down/uplink have shown that our proposed system is convenient and suitable for 80 km optical and 10 m optical free space transmission.

  5. Analysis of a dual-reflector antenna system using physical optics and digital computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    The application of physical-optics diffraction theory to a deployable dual-reflector geometry is discussed. The methods employed are not restricted to the Conical-Gregorian antenna, but apply in a general way to dual and even multiple reflector systems. Complex vector wave methods are used in the Fresnel and Fraunhofer regions of the reflectors. Field amplitude, phase, polarization data, and time average Poynting vectors are obtained via an IBM 360/91 digital computer. Focal region characteristics are plotted with the aid of a CalComp plotter. Comparison between the GSFC Huygens wavelet approach, JPL measurements, and JPL computer results based on the near field spherical wave expansion method are made wherever possible.

  6. Optical design for the large balloon reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes-Medellin, German; O'Dougherty, Stefan; Walker, Christopher; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Groppi, Chris; Smith, Steve; Bernasconi, Pietro

    2016-07-01

    We present the details of the optical design, corrector system, mechanical layout, tolerances, pointing requirements, and overall performance of the sub-millimeter wavelength Large Balloon Reflector telescope (LBR).

  7. Note: A resonating reflector-based optical system for motion measurement in micro-cantilever arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Sathishkumar, P.; Punyabrahma, P.; Sri Muthu Mrinalini, R.; Jayanth, G. R.

    2015-09-15

    A robust, compact optical measurement unit for motion measurement in micro-cantilever arrays enables development of portable micro-cantilever sensors. This paper reports on an optical beam deflection-based system to measure the deflection of micro-cantilevers in an array that employs a single laser source, a single detector, and a resonating reflector to scan the measurement laser across the array. A strategy is also proposed to extract the deflection of individual cantilevers from the acquired data. The proposed system and measurement strategy are experimentally evaluated and demonstrated to measure motion of multiple cantilevers in an array.

  8. Conformal Membrane Reflectors for Deployable Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Patrick J.; Keys, Andrew S. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation reports the Phase I results on NASA's Gossamer Spacecraft Exploratory Research and Technology Program. Cornerstone Research Group, Inc., the University of Rochester, and International Photonics Consultants collaborated to investigate the feasibility of free-standing, liquid-crystal-polymer (LCP) reflectors for integration into space-based optical systems. The goal of the program was to achieve large-diameter, broadband. reflective membranes that are resistant to the effects of space, specifically cryogenic environments and gamma-ray irradiation. Additionally, we assessed the applicability of utilizing the technology as tight sails, since, by their very nature, these films offer high-reflectivity at specified wavelengths. Previous research programs have demonstrated all-polymer, narrow-band Specular reflectors and diffuse membrane reflectors. The feasibility of fabricating an all-polymer broadband specular reflector and a narrow-band specular membrane reflector was assessed in the Phase I Gossamer program. In addition, preliminary gamma irradiation studies were conducted to determine the stability of the polymer reflectors to radiation. Materials and process technology were developed to fabricate coupon-scale reflectors of both broad- and narrow-band specular reflectors in Phase 1. This presentation will report the results of these studies, including, the performance of a narrow-band specular membrane. Gamma irradiation exposures indicate limited impact on the optical performance although additional exposure studies are warranted. Plans to scale up the membrane fabrication process will be presented.

  9. Conformal Membrane Reflectors for Deployable Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Patrick J.; Keys, Andrew S. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation reports the Phase I results on NASA's Gossamer Spacecraft Exploratory Research and Technology Program. Cornerstone Research Group, Inc., the University of Rochester, and International Photonics Consultants collaborated to investigate the feasibility of free-standing, liquid-crystal-polymer (LCP) reflectors for integration into space-based optical systems. The goal of the program was to achieve large-diameter, broadband. reflective membranes that are resistant to the effects of space, specifically cryogenic environments and gamma-ray irradiation. Additionally, we assessed the applicability of utilizing the technology as tight sails, since, by their very nature, these films offer high-reflectivity at specified wavelengths. Previous research programs have demonstrated all-polymer, narrow-band Specular reflectors and diffuse membrane reflectors. The feasibility of fabricating an all-polymer broadband specular reflector and a narrow-band specular membrane reflector was assessed in the Phase I Gossamer program. In addition, preliminary gamma irradiation studies were conducted to determine the stability of the polymer reflectors to radiation. Materials and process technology were developed to fabricate coupon-scale reflectors of both broad- and narrow-band specular reflectors in Phase 1. This presentation will report the results of these studies, including, the performance of a narrow-band specular membrane. Gamma irradiation exposures indicate limited impact on the optical performance although additional exposure studies are warranted. Plans to scale up the membrane fabrication process will be presented.

  10. A distributed optical fiber sensing system for dynamic strain measurement based on artificial reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhenhong; Shan, Yuanyuan; Li, Yanting; Zhang, Yixin; Zhang, Xuping

    2016-10-01

    Phase sensitive optical time domain reflectometry (Φ-OTDR) has been widely used in many applications for its distributed sensing ability on weak disturbance all along the sensing fiber. However, traditional Φ-OTDR cannot make quantitative measurement on the external disturbance due to the randomly distributed position and reflectivity of scatters within the optical fiber. Recently, some methods have been proposed to realize quantitative measurement of dynamic strain. In these literatures, the fiber with or without FBGs in practice was easily damaged and with difficulty of maintenance. PZT is employed to generate strain event in the fiber. There is a large gap compared with the real detecting environment, which will not reveal the full performance of the sensing system. In this paper, a distributed optical fiber sensing (DOFS) system for dynamic strain measurement based on artificial reflector is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. The fiber under test (FUT) is composed by four 20-meter long single mode optical fiber patch cords (OFPCs), which are cascaded with ferrule contactor/physical contact (FC/PC) connectors via fiber flanges. The fiber facet of FC/PC connector forms an artificial reflector. When the interval between the two reflectors is changed, the phase of the interference signal will also be changed. A symmetric 3×3 coupler with table-look-up scheme is introduced to discriminate the phase change through interference intensity. In our experiment, the center 10m section of the second OFPC is attached to the bottom of an aluminum alloy plate. An ordinary loudspeaker box was located on the top of the aluminum alloy plate. The dynamic strain generated by the loudspeaker box is transmitted from the aluminum alloy plate to the OFPC. Experimental results show that the proposed method has a good frequency response characteristic up to 3.2 kHz and a linear intensity response of R2=0.9986 while the optical probe pulse width and repetition rate were 100ns

  11. Discretely swept optical coherence tomography system using super-structure grating distributed Bragg reflector lasers at 1561-1639nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, D.; Yoshimura, R.; Hiro-Oka, H.; Furukawa, H.; Goto, A.; Satoh, N.; Igarashi, A.; Nakanishi, M.; Shimizu, K.; Ohbayashi, K.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) system with an optical comb swept source system. The swept source system comprised of two super-structured grating distributed Bragg reflector lasers covering a wavelength range from 1561-1693 nm. A method to scan these lasers to obtain an interference signal without stitching noises, which are inherent in these lasers, and to connect two lasers without concatenation noise is explained. Method to reduce optical aliasing noises in this optical comb swept laser OCT is explained and demonstrated based on the characteristic of the optical aliasing noises in this particular OCT system. By reduction of those noises, a sensitivity of 124 dB was realized. The A-scan rate, resolution and depth range were 3.1 kHz, 16 μm (in air) and 12 mm, respectively. Deep imaging penetration into tissue is demonstrated for two selected samples.

  12. Research on the reflection coating at three wavelengths for primary reflector of the optical antenna in the laser communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huasong; Liu, Muxiao; Wang, Zhanshan; Ji, Yiqin; Lu, Jiangtao

    2011-02-01

    Primary reflector of the optical antenna is a key component in the space laser communication systems, and multi-wavelengths laser need to be worked in the common aperture. Reflection coating is designed for the primary reflector of a laser communication system, which can work at three wavelengths (633nm, 808nm, 1550nm), the designed target reflectance are R633nm>=50%, R808nm>=99% and R1550nm>=99% at angle of incidence from 0 to 20 deg. We selected Ta2O5 and SiO2 as the high refractive index and low refractive index coating materials, analyzed the impact on the reflection coating of the systemic errors and random errors, and determined the manufacture error of the coater system which can't greater than 1%. The Ion beam sputtering deposition technique was used to manufacture reflection coating for three-wavelengths and a LAMBDA900 spectrophotometer was used to analysis the reflectance at three wavelengths which achieved the design requirements. Finally we give the origin of manufacture error source for this high reflection coating. The reflection coating component was successfully used in the primary reflector of the optical antenna of the laser communication systems.

  13. Research on the reflection coating at three wavelengths for primary reflector of the optical antenna in the laser communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huasong; Liu, Muxiao; Wang, Zhanshan; Ji, Yiqin; Lu, Jiangtao

    2010-10-01

    Primary reflector of the optical antenna is a key component in the space laser communication systems, and multi-wavelengths laser need to be worked in the common aperture. Reflection coating is designed for the primary reflector of a laser communication system, which can work at three wavelengths (633nm, 808nm, 1550nm), the designed target reflectance are R633nm>=50%, R808nm>=99% and R1550nm>=99% at angle of incidence from 0 to 20 deg. We selected Ta2O5 and SiO2 as the high refractive index and low refractive index coating materials, analyzed the impact on the reflection coating of the systemic errors and random errors, and determined the manufacture error of the coater system which can't greater than 1%. The Ion beam sputtering deposition technique was used to manufacture reflection coating for three-wavelengths and a LAMBDA900 spectrophotometer was used to analysis the reflectance at three wavelengths which achieved the design requirements. Finally we give the origin of manufacture error source for this high reflection coating. The reflection coating component was successfully used in the primary reflector of the optical antenna of the laser communication systems.

  14. Optical biometry of biological tissues by ellipsoidal reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezuglyi, M. A.; Pavlovets, N. V.

    2013-06-01

    Possibilities of measuring systems that uses ellipsoidal reflectors for determining the optical parameters of biological tissue are studied. The modified inverse Monte Carlo method was designed for biomedical photometric system "biological tissue - ellipsoidal mirror."

  15. Monolithic resonant optical reflector laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, T.; Suehiro, M.; Maeda, M.; Hihara, M.; Hosomatsu, H.

    1991-10-01

    The first monolithic resonant optical reflector laser diode that has a waveguide directional coupler and two DBR reflectors integrated by compositional disordering of quantum-well heterostructures is described. A linewidth of 440 kHz was obtained, and this value is expected to be greatly decreased by reducing the propagation loss in the integrated waveguide.

  16. Optical heterodyne accelerometry: passively stabilized, fully balanced velocity interferometer system for any reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Buttler, William T.; Lamoreaux, Steven K.

    2010-08-10

    We formalize the physics of an optical heterodyne accelerometer that allows measurement of low and high velocities from material surfaces under high strain. The proposed apparatus incorporates currently common optical velocimetry techniques used in shock physics, with interferometric techniques developed to self-stabilize and passively balance interferometers in quantum cryptography. The result is a robust telecom-fiber-based velocimetry system insensitive to modal and frequency dispersion that should work well in the presence of decoherent scattering processes, such as from ejecta clouds and shocked surfaces.

  17. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael J.; Page, Erik; Gould, Carl T.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope.

  18. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, M.J.; Page, E.; Gould, C.T.

    1998-09-08

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope. 5 figs.

  19. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael J.; Page, Erik; Gould, Carl T.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope.

  20. Optical Phased Array Using Guided Resonance with Backside Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horie, Yu (Inventor); Arbabi, Amir (Inventor); Faraon, Andrei (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods and systems for controlling the phase of electromagnetic waves are disclosed. A device can consist of a guided resonance grating layer, a spacer, and a reflector. A plurality of devices, arranged in a grid pattern, can control the phase of reflected electromagnetic phase, through refractive index control. Carrier injection, temperature control, and optical beams can be applied to control the refractive index.

  1. Optical phased array using guided resonance with backside reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Horie, Yu; Arbabi, Amir; Faraon, Andrei

    2016-11-01

    Methods and systems for controlling the phase of electromagnetic waves are disclosed. A device can consist of a guided resonance grating layer, a spacer, and a reflector. A plurality of devices, arranged in a grid pattern, can control the phase of reflected electromagnetic phase, through refractive index control. Carrier injection, temperature control, and optical beams can be applied to control the refractive index.

  2. Moving Reflector Type Micro Optical Switch for High-Power Transfer in a MEMS-Based Safety and Arming System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-14

    electrostatically actuated, spring supported slider. Fabrication is performed using Bosch process deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) [3, 4]. Several optical...consisted of a Bosch process DRIE followed by deposition of a 500 Å thick Cr adhesion layer and a 6500 Å thick Au layer for bond pads and reflector... cusped surface not accounted for in the model. The rather rough surface may also somewhat shadow the evaporated metal layers further contributing to

  3. Development of the Theory and Algorithms for Synthesis of Reflector Antenna Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-28

    reflector antennas with distributed sources, IEE Proceedings, v. 136, Pt. H. No.5, 1989, pp.361-366 31 [191 B.S. Westcott , Shaped Reflector Antenna ... reflector antenna systems in geometric optics approximation. During the reporting period the direct and inverse problems of design of reflector antennas ...in design of single and dual reflector antennas ’ by Vladimir Oliker, Elsa Newman 2 , and Laird Prussner Introduction

  4. Development of electro-optic systems for self cleaning concentrated solar reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Jeremy W.

    loss as a function of dust deposition, (2) development of a dust deposition analyzer capable of measuring size distribution of deposited dust and provides mass concentration of dust on the surface of the mirror, and (3) optimization of electrode geometry of EDS film for minimizing optical reflection losses caused by the lamination of the film on the mirror surface while maintaining high reflection efficiency with high dust removal efficiency. The non-contact specular reflectometer and the dust deposition analyzer allowed experimental investigation of reflection losses as functions of surface mass concentration of dust on mirrors for validation of the optical model presented in this study.

  5. Optical Reflectance Measurements for Commonly Used Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janecek, Martin; Moses, William W.

    2008-08-01

    When simulating light collection in scintillators, modeling the angular distribution of optical light reflectance from surfaces is very important. Since light reflectance is poorly understood, either purely specular or purely diffuse reflectance is generally assumed. In this paper we measure the optical reflectance distribution for eleven commonly used reflectors. A 440 nm, output power stabilized, un-polarized laser is shone onto a reflector at a fixed angle of incidence. The reflected light's angular distribution is measured by an array of silicon photodiodes. The photodiodes are movable to cover 2pi of solid angle. The light-induced current is, through a multiplexer, read out with a digital multimeter. A LabVIEW program controls the motion of the laser and the photodiode array, the multiplexer, and the data collection. The laser can be positioned at any angle with a position accuracy of 10 arc minutes. Each photodiode subtends 6.3deg, and the photodiode array can be positioned at any angle with up to 10 arc minute angular resolution. The dynamic range for the current measurements is 10 5:1. The measured light reflectance distribution was measured to be specular for several ESR films as well as for aluminum foil, mostly diffuse for polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tape and titanium dioxide paint, and neither specular nor diffuse for Lumirrorreg, Melinexreg and Tyvekreg. Instead, a more complicated light distribution was measured for these three materials.

  6. Optical Reflectance Measurements for Commonly Used Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Janecek, Petr Martin; Moses, William

    2008-06-11

    When simulating light collection in scintillators, modeling the angular distribution of optical light reflectance from surfaces is very important. Since light reflectance is poorly understood, either purely specular or purely diffuse reflectance is generally assumed. In this paper we measure the optical reflectance distribution for eleven commonly used reflectors. A 440 nm, output power stabilized, un-polarized laser is shone onto a reflector at a fixed angle of incidence. The reflected light's angular distribution is measured by an array of silicon photodiodes. The photodiodes are movable to cover 2 pi of solid angle. The light-induced current is, through a multiplexer, read out with a digital multimeter. A LabVIEW program controls the motion of the laser and the photodiode array, the multiplexer, and the data collection. The laser can be positioned at any angle with a position accuracy of 10 arc minutes. Each photodiode subtends 6.3o, and the photodiode array can be positioned at any angle with up to 10 arc minute angular resolution. The dynamic range for the current measurements is 105:1. The measured light reflectance distribution was measured to be specular for several ESR films as well as for aluminum foil, mostly diffuse for polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tape and titanium dioxide paint, and neither specular nor diffuse for Lumirror(R), Melinex(R) and Tyvek(R). Instead, a more complicated light distribution was measured for these three materials.

  7. Precision segmented reflector figure control system architecture.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mettler, E.; Eldred, D.; Briggs, C.; Kiceniuk, T.; Agronin, M.

    1989-09-01

    This paper describes an advanced technology figure control system for a generic class of large space based segmented reflector telescopes. Major technology and design motivations for selection of sensing, actuation, and mechanism approaches result from the high precision and very low mass and power goals for the reflector system.

  8. Magnetron sputtering in rigid optical solar reflectors production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asainov, O. Kh; Bainov, D. D.; Krivobokov, V. P.; Sidelev, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetron sputtering was applied to meet the growing need for glass optical solar reflectors. This plasma method provided more uniform deposition of the silver based coating on glass substrates resulted in decrease of defective reflectors fraction down to 5%. For instance, such parameter of resistive evaporation was of 30%. Silver film adhesion to glass substrate was enhanced with indium tin oxide sublayer. Sunlight absorption coefficient of these rigid reflectors was 0.081-0.083.

  9. Main-Reflector Manufacturing Technology for the Deep Space Optical Communications Ground Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britcliffe, M. J.; Hoppe, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) has plans to develop a 10-m-diameter optical communications receiving station. The system uses the direct detection technique, which has much different requirements from a typical astronomical telescope. The receiver must operate in daylight and nighttime conditions. This imposes special requirements on the optical system to reject stray light from the Sun and other sources. One of the biggest challenges is designing a main-reflector surface that meets these requirements and can be produced at a reasonable cost. The requirements for the performance of the reflector are presented. To date, an aspherical primary reflector has been assumed. A reflector with a spherical reflector has a major cost advantage over an aspherical design, with no sacrifice in performance. A survey of current manufacturing techniques for optical mirrors of this type was performed. Techniques including solid glass, lightweight glass, diamond-turned aluminum, and composite mirrors were investigated.

  10. Main-Reflector Manufacturing Technology for the Deep Space Optical Communications Ground Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcliffe, M. J.; Hoppe, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) has plans to develop a 10-m-diameter optical communications receiving station. The system uses the direct detection technique, which has much different requirements from a typical astronomical telescope. The receiver must operate in daylight and nighttime conditions. This imposes special requirements on the optical system to reject stray light from the Sun and other sources. One of the biggest challenges is designing a main-reflector surface that meets these requirements and can be produced at a reasonable cost. The requirements for the performance of the reflector are presented. To date, an aspherical primary reflector has been assumed. A reflector with a spherical reflector has a major cost advantage over an aspherical design, with no sacrifice in performance. A survey of current manufacturing techniques for optical mirrors of this type was performed. Techniques including solid glass, lightweight glass, diamond-turned aluminum, and composite mirrors were investigated.

  11. New CPV Systems With Static Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripanagnostopoulos, Y.; Chemisana, D.; Rosell, J. I.; Souliotis, M.

    2010-10-01

    New designs of low concentrating photovoltaics have been studied, where static reflectors and moving absorbers that track the concentrated solar rays, aim to cost effective solar devices. These systems are based on the concept that strip absorbers can use the beam radiation and convert it to electricity, while the diffuse radiation is absorbed by flat absorbers and converted into heat. The work on these designs follow the research on the linear Fresnel lenses, which are combined with PV or PV/T absorbers and can be used not only for the conversion of solar radiation into electricity and heat but also to control the illumination and the temperature of interior building spaces. Design aspects and optical results give a figure of the optical performance of these new CPV collectors, which are based on the converged solar radiation distribution profiles for East-West orientation of parabolic trough reflectors. The concentration ratio depends on the geometry of the parabola axis and the higher values correspond to the axis towards the summer solstice. The results show that the new CPV designs can be effectively applied in buildings adapting energy demand in electricity and heat.

  12. Structural Characterization of a Mo/Ru/Si Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Reflector by Optical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, In-Yong; Kim, Tae Geun; Lee, Seung Yoon; Ahn, Jinho; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2004-06-01

    The performance of a multilayer extreme ultraviolet (EUV) reflector has a direct bearing on process throughput and the cost of new technology. Using measured data from an experimentally manufactured reflector, we intend, in this work, to show that the reflectivity of the Bragg reflector can be characterized by using structural parameters such as the d-spacing, density, thicknesses of the interdiffusion layers and oxidation layer. This quantitative analysis of the reflectivity derived from the structural parameters can be utilized to optimize the optical properties of the existing Mo/Ru/Si system and to provide fundamental insights into the science involved in a Bragg EUV reflector.

  13. Theoretical modeling of the dynamics of a semiconductor laser subject to double-reflector optical feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Bakry, A.; Abdulrhmann, S.; Ahmed, M.

    2016-06-15

    We theoretically model the dynamics of semiconductor lasers subject to the double-reflector feedback. The proposed model is a new modification of the time-delay rate equations of semiconductor lasers under the optical feedback to account for this type of the double-reflector feedback. We examine the influence of adding the second reflector to dynamical states induced by the single-reflector feedback: periodic oscillations, period doubling, and chaos. Regimes of both short and long external cavities are considered. The present analyses are done using the bifurcation diagram, temporal trajectory, phase portrait, and fast Fourier transform of the laser intensity. We show that adding the second reflector attracts the periodic and perioddoubling oscillations, and chaos induced by the first reflector to a route-to-continuous-wave operation. During this operation, the periodic-oscillation frequency increases with strengthening the optical feedback. We show that the chaos induced by the double-reflector feedback is more irregular than that induced by the single-reflector feedback. The power spectrum of this chaos state does not reflect information on the geometry of the optical system, which then has potential for use in chaotic (secure) optical data encryption.

  14. Theoretical modeling of the dynamics of a semiconductor laser subject to double-reflector optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakry, A.; Abdulrhmann, S.; Ahmed, M.

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically model the dynamics of semiconductor lasers subject to the double-reflector feedback. The proposed model is a new modification of the time-delay rate equations of semiconductor lasers under the optical feedback to account for this type of the double-reflector feedback. We examine the influence of adding the second reflector to dynamical states induced by the single-reflector feedback: periodic oscillations, period doubling, and chaos. Regimes of both short and long external cavities are considered. The present analyses are done using the bifurcation diagram, temporal trajectory, phase portrait, and fast Fourier transform of the laser intensity. We show that adding the second reflector attracts the periodic and perioddoubling oscillations, and chaos induced by the first reflector to a route-to-continuous-wave operation. During this operation, the periodic-oscillation frequency increases with strengthening the optical feedback. We show that the chaos induced by the double-reflector feedback is more irregular than that induced by the single-reflector feedback. The power spectrum of this chaos state does not reflect information on the geometry of the optical system, which then has potential for use in chaotic (secure) optical data encryption.

  15. Optical characterisation of metallic meshes for space antennas transformable reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, RA; Reznik, SV; Rukavishnikov, RV; Shishulina, VA; Zavaruev, VA

    2016-10-01

    The paper deals with metallic meshes for space antenna transformable reflectors. Optical characteristics of four metallic meshes (15 micron tungsten, 15 micron gold-plated tungsten, 20 micron molybdenum, and 50 micron Ni-coated steel) were investigated with the Nikolet IS50 spectrophotometer. The spectral optical characteristics of these metallic meshes in the range from 0.4 to 2.5 microns are required for thermal design of space antenna reflectors.

  16. Distributed Bragg Reflectors With Reduced Optical Absorption

    DOEpatents

    Klem, John F.

    2005-08-16

    A new class of distributed Bragg reflectors has been developed. These distributed Bragg reflectors comprise interlayers positioned between sets of high-index and low-index quarter-wave plates. The presence of these interlayers is to reduce photon absorption resulting from spatially indirect photon-assisted electronic transitions between the high-index and low-index quarter wave plates. The distributed Bragg reflectors have applications for use in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for use at 1.55 .mu.m and at other wavelengths of interest.

  17. Bichromatic tuning of reflection bands in integrated CLC reflectors for optical switches, gates, and logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shing-Trong; Fuh, Andy Ying-Guey; Ho, Shau-Jung; Li, Ming-Shian

    2015-03-01

    This study investigates the bichromatic tuning of cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) reflection bands from reflectors containing chiral azo dopants. Because the chiral azo molecules change their helical twist power in reversible photoisomerization, the reflection bands of the CLCs are modulated using purple and green laser beams. The CLC reflectors are integrated into an optical gate that can be used to modulate output spectra. We also apply the integrated system in optical switching and logic.

  18. Ellipsoidal optical reflectors reproduced by electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hungerford, W. J.; Larmer, J. W.; Levinsohn, M.

    1964-01-01

    An accurately dimensioned convex ellipsoidal surface, which will become a master after polishing, is fabricated from 316L stainless steel. When polishing of the master is completed, it is suspended in a modified watt bath for electroforming of nickel reflectors.

  19. Improving the Efficiency of Quasi-Optical Bragg Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khozin, M. A.; Denisov, G. G.; Belousov, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    In the analysis of propagation of wave beams in quasi-optical transmission lines, the loss rate and transformation of modes by various elements of the transmission line are of great importance. The effects occurring when a spatially bounded, obliquely incident wave beam is reflected from a Bragg resonator being a periodic, plane-layered medium with varied dielectric permittivity are considered. Such a reflector can be used as a frequency-selective element of the transmission line. Since the reflection coefficient of a plane wave from the Bragg reflector depends on its incidence angle, there occurs a transformation of the reflected beam. Analytical expressions for the beam displacement, the angle of deflection of the beam from the mirror reflection direction, and the wavefront curvature variation have been obtained. The influence of the mentioned effects on characteristics of the reflected wave beam in the main band of the Bragg reflector is numerically analyzed. The possibility of compensation for these distortions is considered.

  20. Hollow optical waveguides with omni-directional reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shih-Shou; Hou, Chia-Hung; Chien, Hung-Ta; Hsiao, Fu-Li; Chen, Chii-Chang

    2005-03-01

    In this study, we design and fabricate a hollow optical waveguide with omni-directional reflectors in silicon-based materials. A groove is etched by inductive coupled plasma (ICP) with photolithographic process on (100) silicon wafer. The width of the groove is varied from 3.5 to 5.5 micrometer for different waveguide designs. The depth of the groove is 1.2 micrometers. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is used to deposit six pairs of Si/SiO2(0.111/0.258micrometers) on the samples. Finally, the top of the sample is covered by another silicon substrate on which the identical omni-directional reflector has been also deposited. By wafer bonding technology, the top omni-directional reflector can be combined with the groove to form a hollow optical waveguide. Light with the wavelength at 1.55 micrometers can be confined by the omni-directional reflectors at single mode operation. Polarization independent hollow optical waveguides can be achieved with this fabrication process.

  1. Dual annular rotating "windowed" nuclear reflector reactor control system

    DOEpatents

    Jacox, Michael G.; Drexler, Robert L.; Hunt, Robert N. M.; Lake, James A.

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core.

  2. Feasibility study of a synthesis procedure for array feeds to improve radiation performance of large distorted reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Takamizawa, K.; Werntz, P.; Lapean, J.; Barts, R.

    1991-01-01

    The following subject areas are covered: General Reflector Antenna Systems Program version 7(GRASP7); Multiple Reflector Analysis Program for Cylindrical Antennas (MRAPCA); Tri-Reflector 2D Synthesis Code (TRTDS); a geometrical optics and a physical optics synthesis techniques; beam scanning reflector, the type 2 and 6 reflectors, spherical reflector, and multiple reflector imaging systems; and radiometric array design.

  3. Articulated Deployment System for Antenna Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, M.; Borst, G.; Grimminck, M.; Robroek, M.; Geuskens, F.

    2015-09-01

    An articulated deployment system is developed for the deployment and pointing of antenna reflectors with a larger diameter and extended focal length. The articulated boom can be folded in several configurations to stow on the spacecraft sidewall. The boom, made of carbon fibre that is configured for a low CTE of better than ±0.3μm/m-K, deploys by means of spring-driven hinges interconnected via synchronisation cables and is controlled by an actuator. When fully deployed the hinges are latched, providing a stiff structure essential for disturbance-free pointing of the antenna. For pointing, the existing ADTM Mk2 gimbal by Airbus Defence and Space UK is used. The arm is mounted (repeatably) to the spacecraft with an adjustable range of ±7mm in all axes for coarse adjustment and mounted (repeatably) to the reflector with fine adjustment range of ±2mm and ±1.5°.The reflector boom has a modular design, which allows a wide range of mission configurations by tuning only a few design parameters such as limb length, deployment angles, and the number of articulations required to stow the boom.

  4. Studies of Beam Expansion and Distributed Bragg Reflector Lasers for Fiber Optics and Optical Signal Processing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-03

    block number) Separate studies were performed on beam expansion and on Distributed Bragg Reflector ( DBR ) lasers preliminary to monolithic integration on...Reflector ( DBR ) laser is a light source compatible with monolithic integrated optics. In the DBR laser one or both cleaved endfaces of a typical double...cleave as a laser cavity mirror. The DBR laser can be used as an integrated optics light source for integrated optical circuits. In this report we

  5. Semiconductor hollow optical waveguides formed by omni-directional reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shih-Shou; Wang, Mou-Sian; Chen, Chii-Chang

    2004-12-01

    In this study, a hollow optical waveguide with omni-directional reflectors in silicon-based materials was design, fabricated and characterized. By using dry etching technique, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition for Si/SiO2 thin films and covering another wafer with omni-directional reflector together, the waveguides can be formed with an air core of 1.2μm x 1.3μm. A uniform propagation loss of the waveguide to be around 1.7dB/cm for C+L band was found for the TE and TM modes. Polarization-independent hollow optical waveguides were obtained with the hollow waveguide structure.

  6. Primary reflector for solar energy collection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G. (Inventor); Stephens, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    A fixed, linear, ground-based primary reflector is disclosed which has an extended curved sawtooth-contoured surface covered with a metalized polymeric reflecting material. The device reflects solar energy to a movably supported collector that is kept at the concentrated line focus of the reflector primary. The primary reflector may be constructed by a process utilizing well-known freeway paving machinery.

  7. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance bragg reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Lear, Kevin L.

    1996-01-01

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors.

  8. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance Bragg reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Lear, K.L.

    1996-10-22

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method are disclosed. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors. 16 figs.

  9. A biological sub-micron thickness optical broadband reflector characterized using both light and microwaves

    PubMed Central

    Vukusic, P.; Kelly, R.; Hooper, I.

    2008-01-01

    Broadband optical reflectors generally function through coherent scattering from systems comprising one of three designs: overlapped; chirped; or chaotic multilayer reflectors. For each, the requirement to scatter a broad band of wavelengths is met through the presence of a variation in nanostructural periodicity running perpendicular to the systems' outer surfaces. Consequently, the requisite total thickness of the multilayer can often be in excess of 50 μm. Here, we report the discovery and the microwave-assisted characterization of a natural system that achieves excellent optical broadband reflectivity but that is less than 1 μm thick. This system, found on the wing scales of the butterfly Argyrophorus argenteus, comprises a distinctive variation in periodicity that runs parallel to the reflecting surface, rather than perpendicular to it. In this way, the requirement for an extensively thick system is removed. PMID:19042180

  10. A biological sub-micron thickness optical broadband reflector characterized using both light and microwaves.

    PubMed

    Vukusic, P; Kelly, R; Hooper, I

    2009-04-06

    Broadband optical reflectors generally function through coherent scattering from systems comprising one of three designs: overlapped; chirped; or chaotic multilayer reflectors. For each, the requirement to scatter a broad band of wavelengths is met through the presence of a variation in nanostructural periodicity running perpendicular to the systems' outer surfaces. Consequently, the requisite total thickness of the multilayer can often be in excess of 50 mum. Here, we report the discovery and the microwave-assisted characterization of a natural system that achieves excellent optical broadband reflectivity but that is less than 1 mum thick. This system, found on the wing scales of the butterfly Argyrophorus argenteus, comprises a distinctive variation in periodicity that runs parallel to the reflecting surface, rather than perpendicular to it. In this way, the requirement for an extensively thick system is removed.

  11. Velocity characteristics of reflectors in solar tower systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparisi, R. R.; Tepliakov, D. I.; Khantsis, B. G.

    An analysis is presented of the velocities of azimuthal and zenithal rotations of reflectors in solar tower systems in relation to reflector arrangement, geographic latitude, and season of the year. Two methods are used in the analysis: (1) the direct calculation of heliostat rotation velocity at successive moments of time; and (2) a generalized representation of reflector velocity fields. Research and engineering applications of the calculations are discussed.

  12. Air-core hollow optical waveguides with omnidirectional reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shih-Shou; Chen, Chii-Chang

    2006-04-01

    We have designed and fabricated a hollow optical waveguide with omnidirectional reflectors (ODRs) on a silicon substrate. The pattern is defined by photolithography on a (100) silicon wafer. The groove is etched by inductive coupled plasma. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technology is used to deposit six-pair Si/SiO2 (0.111/0.258 µm) multilayer stacks on the sample. Finally, the top of the sample is covered with an identical ODR. Hence, the light is confined in a hollow waveguide.

  13. Development of optical ground verification method for μm to sub-mm reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockman, Y.; Thizy, C.; Lemaire, P.; Georges, M.; Mazy, E.; Mazzoli, A.; Houbrechts, Y.; Rochus, P.; Roose, S.; Doyle, D.; Ulbrich, G.

    2004-06-01

    Large reflectors and antennas for the IR to mm wavelength range are being planned for many Earth observation and astronomical space missions and for commercial communication satellites as well. Scientific observatories require large telescopes with precisely shaped reflectors for collecting the electro-magnetic radiation from faint sources. The challenging tasks of on-ground testing are to achieve the required accuracy in the measurement of the reflector shapes and antenna structures and to verify their performance under simulated space conditions (vacuum, low temperatures). Due to the specific surface characteristics of reflectors operating in these spectral regions, standard optical metrology methods employed in the visible spectrum do not provide useful measurement results. The current state-of-the-art commercial metrology systems are not able to measure these types of reflectors because they have to face the measurement of shape and waviness over relatively large areas with a large deformation dynamic range and encompassing a wide range of spatial frequencies. 3-D metrology (tactile coordinate measurement) machines are generally used during the manufacturing process. Unfortunately, these instruments cannot be used in the operational environmental conditions of the reflector. The application of standard visible wavelength interferometric methods is very limited or impossible due to the large relative surface roughnesses involved. A small number of infrared interferometers have been commercially developed over the last 10 years but their applications have also been limited due to poor dynamic range and the restricted spatial resolution of their detectors. These restrictions affect also the surface error slopes that can be captured and makes their application to surfaces manufactured using CRFP honeycomb technologies rather difficult or impossible. It has therefore been considered essential, from the viewpoint of supporting future ESA exploration missions, to

  14. Shaped reflector beam waveguide and high gain antenna systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo-Israel, V.; Mittra, R.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper the problem of synthesizing dual reflector antennas for both amplitude and phase control of the final aperture distribution is discussed. An approximate procedure for the offset synthesis problem is presented and applications of the procedure to the shaping of beam waveguides and reflectors for high-gain antenna systems are illustrated.

  15. Studies of beam expansion and distributed Bragg reflector lasers for fiber optics and optical signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmire, E. M.

    1981-03-01

    Separate studies were performed on beam expansion and on distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) lasers preliminary to monolithic integration on GaAs substrates. These components are proposed for use in optical signal processing, for fiber optic sources and for high brightness lasers.

  16. Structural analysis of FAST reflector supporting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y. F.; Deng, C. G.; Li, G. Q.; He, Y. M.

    According to the deformation and movement requirements of the FAST reflector, a multi-purpose analysis, including the load-bearing behavior, deformation, construction costs of the reflector supporting structure and its model, is presented in this paper. The advantages and disadvantages of steel and aluminum alloy structures are also discussed and compared through detailed design calculations under load-bearing capacity and normal working conditions.

  17. Cryogenic systems for the large deployable reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Peter V.

    1988-01-01

    There are five technologies which may have application for Large Deployable Reflector (LDR), one passive and four active. In order of maturity, they are passive stored cryogen systems, and mechanical, sorption, magnetic, and pulse-tube refrigerators. In addition, deep space radiators will be required to reject the heat of the active systems, and may be useful as auxiliary coolers for the stored cryogen systems. Hybrid combinations of these technologies may well be more efficient than any one alone, and extensive system studies will be required to determine the best trade-offs. Stored cryogen systems were flown on a number of missions. The systems are capable of meeting the temperature requirements of LDR. The size and weight of stored cryogen systems are proportional to heat load and, as a result, are applicable only if the low-temperature heat load can be kept small. Systems using chemisorption and physical adsorption for compressors and pumps have received considerable attention in the past few years. Systems based on adiabatic demagnetization of paramagnetic salts were used for refrigeration for many years. Pulse-tube refrigerators were recently proposed which show relatively high efficiency for temperatures in the 60 to 80 K range. The instrument heat loads and operating temperatures are critical to the selection and design of the cryogenic system. Every effort should be made to minimize heat loads, raise operating temperatures, and to define these precisely. No one technology is now ready for application to LDR. Substantial development efforts are underway in all of the technologies and should be monitored and advocated. Magnetic and pulse-tube refrigerators have high potential.

  18. Adaptive feed array compensation system for reflector antenna surface distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Zaman, A.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of a closed loop adaptive feed array system for compensating reflector surface deformations has been investigated. The performance characteristics (gain, sidelobe level, pointing, etc.) of large communication antenna systems degrade as the reflector surface distorts mainly due to thermal effects from a varying solar flux. The compensating systems described in this report can be used to maintain the design performance characteristics independent of thermal effects on the reflector surface. The proposed compensating system employs the concept of conjugate field matching to adjust the feed array complex excitation coefficients.

  19. A Cassegrain reflector system for compact range applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rader, Mark D.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1986-01-01

    An integral part of a compact range is the means of providing a uniform plane wave. A Cassegrain reflector system is one alternative for achieving this goal. Theoretically, this system offers better performance than a simple reflector system. The longer pathlengths in the Cassegrain system lead to a more uniform field in the plane of interest. The addition of the subreflector creates several problems, though. System complexity is increased both in terms of construction and performance analysis. The subreflector also leads to aperture blockage and the orientation of the feed now results in spillover illuminating the target areas as well as the rest of the range. Finally, the addition of the subreflector leads to interaction between the two reflectors resulting in undesired field variations in the plane of interest. These difficulties are addressed and through the concept of blending the surfaces, a Cassegrain reflector system is developed that will provide a uniform plane wave that offers superior performance over large target areas for a given size reflector system. Design and analysis is implemented by considering the main reflector and subreflector separately. Then the system may be put together and the final design and system analysis completed.

  20. Laser reflector arrangement on H2A-lRE satellite for monitoring spin rate and optical degradation.

    PubMed

    Otsubo, Toshimichi; Kunimori, Hiroo; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Hashimoto, Hidekazu

    2002-09-20

    We devised a unique array of cube-corner reflectors on a spherical satellite so that laser ranging could be used to detect the spin rate and the optical degradation. On the H2A-LRE satellite, there are reflectors made of synthetic silica and ones made of BK7 glass. We report that the degradation of the BK7 reflectors, as well as the spin rate of the satellite, can be monitored through a spectral analysis of laser-ranging data. The center-of-mass correction of the Laser Ranging Equipment satellite was calculated at 210 +/- 10 mm for all possible systems and throughout the degradation process of the BK7 reflectors.

  1. Design method for four-reflector type beam waveguide systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betsudan, S.; Katagi, T.; Urasaki, S.

    1986-01-01

    Discussed is a method for the design of four reflector type beam waveguide feed systems, comprised of a conical horn and 4 focused reflectors, which are used widely as the primary reflector systems for communications satellite Earth station antennas. The design parameters for these systems are clarified, the relations between each parameter are brought out based on the beam mode development, and the independent design parameters are specified. The characteristics of these systems, namely spillover loss, crosspolarization components, and frequency characteristics, and their relation to the design parameters, are also shown. It is also indicated that design parameters which decide the dimensions of the conical horn or the shape of the focused reflectors can be unerringly established once the design standard for the system has been selected as either: (1) minimizing the crosspolarization component by keeping the spillover loss to within acceptable limits, or (2) minimizing the spillover loss by maintaining the crossover components below an acceptable level and the independent design parameters, such as the respective sizes of the focused reflectors and the distances between the focussed reflectors, etc., have been established according to mechanical restrictions. A sample design is also shown. In addition to being able to clarify the effects of each of the design parameters on the system and improving insight into these systems, the efficiency of these systems will also be increased with this design method.

  2. Pressure surge reflector for pipe type cable system

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, H.; El Badaly, H.A.; Ghafurian, R. ); Aabo, T.; Ringlee, R.R.; Williams, J.A. ); Melcher, J. )

    1990-04-01

    This paper describes work performed on the development and testing of a pressure surge reflector, designed to reduce the pressure seen at potheads during an electrical failure in a pipe type cable system. The reflector is designed to protect the potheads from failing due to the pressure surge that may be large enough to fracture the porcelain, particularly when the electrical failure is physically close to the pothead. Test results show that the prototype reflector will lower the pressure significantly, bringing the pressure surge below the factory pressure test level for standard potheads.

  3. Simplified Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) system

    SciTech Connect

    Sweatt, W.C.; Stanton, P.L.; Crump, O.B. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A simplified, rugged VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) system has been developed using a non-removable delay element and an essentially non-adjustable interferometer cavity. In this system, the critical interference adjustments are performed during fabrication of the cavity, freeing the user from this task. Prototype systems are easy to use and give extremely high quality results. 6 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) system concept and technology definition study. Volume 1: Executive summary, analyses and trades, and system concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnew, Donald L.; Jones, Peter A.

    1989-04-01

    A study was conducted to define reasonable and representative large deployable reflector (LDR) system concepts for the purpose of defining a technology development program aimed at providing the requisite technological capability necessary to start LDR development by the end of 1991. This volume includes the executive summary for the total study, a report of thirteen system analysis and trades tasks (optical configuration, aperture size, reflector material, segmented mirror, optical subsystem, thermal, pointing and control, transportation to orbit, structures, contamination control, orbital parameters, orbital environment, and spacecraft functions), and descriptions of three selected LDR system concepts. Supporting information is contained in appendices.

  5. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) system concept and technology definition study. Volume 1: Executive summary, analyses and trades, and system concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, Donald L.; Jones, Peter A.

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to define reasonable and representative large deployable reflector (LDR) system concepts for the purpose of defining a technology development program aimed at providing the requisite technological capability necessary to start LDR development by the end of 1991. This volume includes the executive summary for the total study, a report of thirteen system analysis and trades tasks (optical configuration, aperture size, reflector material, segmented mirror, optical subsystem, thermal, pointing and control, transportation to orbit, structures, contamination control, orbital parameters, orbital environment, and spacecraft functions), and descriptions of three selected LDR system concepts. Supporting information is contained in appendices.

  6. Improved Dichroics For Microwave Reflector Antenna Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao

    1995-01-01

    Panel contains array of grid and square conductive loops as array elements designed to reflect most of incident electromagnetic radiation in K(subu) band (13.5 to 15.5 GHz) and to pass that in X band (7 to 9 GHz). Designed to exhibit this dichroic property at angles of incidence up to 40 degrees in transverse electric, transverse magnetic, or circular polarization. Concept of gridded-square-loop dichroic array related to double-loop dichroic arrays described in "Frequency-Selective Microwave Reflectors" (NPO-18701). Improved version exhibits smaller shift of resonant frequency with angle of incidence.

  7. Angle amplifying optics using plane and ellipsoidal reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Alexander J.

    1977-01-01

    An optical system for providing a wide angle input beam into ellipsoidal laser fusion target illumination systems. The optical system comprises one or more pairs of centrally apertured plane and ellipsoidal mirrors disposed to accept the light input from a conventional lens of modest focal length and thickness, to increase the angular divergence thereof to a value equivalent to that of fast lenses, and to direct the light into the ellipsoidal target illumination system.

  8. Optical and Durability Evaluation for Silvered Polymeric Mirrors and Reflectors: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number, CRD-08-316

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M.

    2014-08-01

    3M is currently developing silvered polymeric mirror reflectors as low-cost replacements for glass mirrors in concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. This effort is focused on development of reflectors comprising both metallized polymeric mirror films based on improved versions of ECP-305+ or other durable mirror film concepts and appropriate mechanically robust substrates. The objectives for this project are to reduce the system capital and operating costs and to lower the levelized cost of energy for CSP installations. The development of mirror reflectors involves work on both full reflectors and mirror films with and without coatings. Mirror reflectors must meet rigid optical specifications in terms of radius of curvature, slope errors and specularity. Mirror films must demonstrate long-term durability and maintain high reflectivity. 3M would like to augment internal capabilities to validate product performance with methods and tools developed at NREL to address these areas.

  9. Computer program aids dual reflector antenna system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firnett, P.; Gerritsen, R.; Jarvie, P.; Ludwig, A.

    1968-01-01

    Computer program aids in the design of maximum efficiency dual reflector antenna systems. It designs a shaped cassegrainian antenna which has nearly 100 percent efficiency, and accepts input parameters specifying an existing conventional antenna and produces as output the modifications necessary to conform to a shaped design.

  10. Control of active reflector system for radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guo-hua; Li, Guo-ping; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Zhen-chao

    2016-10-01

    According to the control requirements of the active reflector surface in the 110 m radio telescope at QiTai(QTT) Xinjiang, a new displacement actuator and a new displacement control system were designed and manufactured and then their characteristics were tested by a dual-frequency laser interferometer in the micro-displacement laboratory. The displacement actuator was designed by a scheme of high precision worm and roller screw structures, and the displacement control system was based on a ARM micro-processor. Finally, the S curve acceleration control methods were used to design the hardware platform and software algorithm for the active reflection surface of the control system. The test experiments were performed based on the laser metrology system on an active reflector close-loop antenna prototype for large radio telescope. Experimental results indicate that it achieves a 30 mm working stroke and 5 μm RMS motion resolution. The accuracy (standard deviation) is 3.67 mm, and the error between the determined and theoretical values is 0.04% when the rated load is 300 kg, the step is 2 mm and the stroke is 30mm. Furthermore, the active reflector integrated system was tested by the laser sensors with the accuracy of 0.25 μm RMS on 4-panel radio telescope prototype, the measurement results show that the integrated precision of the active reflector closed-loop control system is less than 5 μm RMS, and well satisfies the technical requirements of active reflector control system of the QTT radio telescope in 3 mm wavelength.

  11. Application of the theory of coupled waves for analysis of inclined reflectors in optical waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Kolosovskii, E A; Tsarev, A V

    2008-09-30

    A new method for analysing the transmission and scattering of the guided TE mode in an inclined reflector located in an optical waveguide is proposed and studied. The reflection of an inhomogeneous optical beam from the inclined reflector is described semi-analytically for the first time by using the theory of coupled waves and taking into account the interrelation and transformation of energy between all the waves of the discrete and continuous spectra of the optical 2D-waveguide (even and odd guided, radiation, and evanescent waves). The results of calculations of the propagation of light through the inclined reflector in the form of a thin (10-500 nm) homogeneous strip obtained by our method and by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method are in excellent quantitative agreement. The calculation rate of our method considerably (by one-two orders of magnitude) exceeds that of the FDTD method and our method has a better accuracy. (optical waveguides)

  12. Optically-free-standing InGaN microdisks with metallic reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuhui; To, Chap Hang; Choi, Hoi Wai

    2017-01-01

    The optical properties of free-standing thin-film microdisks with NiAg metallic reflectors are compared with those with an indium tin oxide (ITO) interfacial layer. The microdisks have been fabricated by a combination of microsphere lithography and laser lift-off processes. Optical-pumped lasing from the microdisk with NiAg reflector has been observed, with reduced threshold and higher quality factor compared those with ITO layers, attributed to improved optical confinement due to the reflectivity of the Ag coating. The results are supported by three-dimensional (3D) finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) simulations.

  13. An integrated model of scintillator-reflector properties for advanced simulations of optical transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roncali, Emilie; Stockhoff, Mariele; Cherry, Simon R.

    2017-06-01

    Accurately modeling the light transport in scintillation detectors is essential to design new detectors for nuclear medicine or high energy physics. Optical models implemented in software such as Geant4 and GATE suffer from important limitations that we addressed by implementing a new approach in which the crystal reflectance was computed from 3D surface measurements. The reflectance was saved in a look-up-table (LUT) then used in Monte Carlo simulation to determine the fate of optical photons. Our previous work using this approach demonstrated excellent agreement with experimental characterization of crystal light output in a limited configuration, i.e. when using no reflector. As scintillators are generally encapsulated in a reflector, it is essential to include the crystal-reflector interface in the LUT. Here we develop a new LUT computation and apply it to several reflector types. A second LUT that contains transmittance data is also saved to enable modeling of optical crosstalk. LUTs have been computed for rough and polished crystals coupled to a Lambertian (e.g. Teflon tape) or a specular reflector (e.g. ESR) using air or optical grease, and the light output was computed using a custom Monte Carlo code. 3  ×  3  ×  20 mm3 lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals were prepared using these combinations, and the light output was measured experimentally at different irradiation depths. For all reflector and surface finish combinations, the measured and simulated light output showed very good agreement. The behavior of optical photons at the interface crystal-reflector was studied using these simulations, and results highlighted the large difference in optical properties between rough and polished crystals, and Lambertian and specular reflectors. These simulations also showed how the travel path of individual scintillation photons was affected by the reflector and surface finish. The ultimate goal of this work is to implement this model in Geant4 and

  14. Autocollimation system for measuring angular deformations with reflector designed by quaternionic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Phong V.; Konyakhin, Igor A.

    2017-06-01

    Autocollimators are widely used for angular measurements in instrument-making and the manufacture of elements of optical systems (wedges, prisms, plane-parallel plates) to check their shape parameters (rectilinearity, parallelism and planarity) and retrieve their optical parameters (curvature radii, measure and test their flange focusing). Autocollimator efficiency is due to the high sensitivity of the autocollimation method to minor rotations of the reflecting control element or the controlled surface itself. We consider using quaternions to optimize reflector parameters during autocollimation measurements as compared to the matrix technique. Mathematical model studies have demonstrated that the orthogonal positioning of the two basic unchanged directions of the tetrahedral reflector of the autocollimator is optimal by the criterion of reducing measurement errors where the axis of actual rotation is in a bisecting position towards them. Computer results are presented of running quaternion models that yielded conditions for diminishing measurement errors provided apriori information is available on the position of rotation axis. A practical technique is considered for synthesizing the parameters of the tetrahedral reflector that employs the newly-retrieved relationships. Following the relationships found between the angles of the tetrahedral reflector and the angles of the parameters of its initial orientation, an applied technique was developed to synthesize the control element for autocollimation measurements in case apriori information is available on the axis of actual rotation during monitoring measurements of shaft or pipeline deformation.

  15. Monolithic integration of elliptic-symmetry diffractive optical element on silicon-based 45 degrees micro-reflector.

    PubMed

    Lan, Hsiao-Chin; Hsiao, Hsu-Liang; Chang, Chia-Chi; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Wang, Chih-Ming; Wu, Mount-Learn

    2009-11-09

    A monolithically integrated micro-optical element consisting of a diffractive optical element (DOE) and a silicon-based 45 degrees micro-reflector is experimentally demonstrated to facilitate the optical alignment of non-coplanar fiber-to-fiber coupling. The slanted 45 degrees reflector with a depth of 216 microm is fabricated on a (100) silicon wafer by anisotropic wet etching. The DOE with a diameter of 174.2 microm and a focal length of 150 microm is formed by means of dry etching. Such a compact device is suitable for the optical micro-system to deflect the incident light by 90 degrees and to focus it on the image plane simultaneously. The measured light pattern with a spot size of 15 microm has a good agreement with the simulated result of the elliptic-symmetry DOE with an off-axis design for eliminating the strongly astigmatic aberration. The coupling efficiency is enhanced over 10-folds of the case without a DOE on the 45 degrees micro-reflector. This device would facilitate the optical alignment of non-coplanar light coupling and further miniaturize the volume of microsystem.

  16. Optical Coating Performance for Heat Reflectors of the JWST-ISIM Electronic Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashford, Robert A.; Perrygo, Charles M.; Garrison, Matthew B.; White, Bryant K.; Threat, Felix T.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Jeans, James W.; Huber, Frank K.; Bousquet, Robert R.; Shaw, Dave

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a thermal radiator design consisting of lightweight composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings for use on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) structure. The structure will have a Thermal Subsystem unit to provide passive cooling to the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) control electronics. The ISIM, in the JWST observatory, is the platform that provides the mounting surfaces for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the control electronic generated-heat away from JWST is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft s own heat does not interfere with the infrared-light gathering of distant cosmic sources. The need to have lateral control in the emission direction of the IEC (ISIM Electronics Compartment) radiators led to the development of a directional baffle design that uses multiple curved mirrorlike surfaces. This concept started out from the so-called Winston non-imaging optical concentrators that use opposing parabolic reflector surfaces, where each parabola has its focus at the opposite edge of the exit aperture. For this reason they are often known as compound parabolic concentrators or CPCs. This radiator system with the circular section was chosen for the IEC reflectors because it offers two advantages over other designs. The first is that the area of the reflector strips for a given radiator area is less, which results in a lower mass baffle assembly. Secondly, the fraction of energy emitted by the radiator strips and subsequently reflected by the baffle is less. These fewer reflections reduced the amount of energy that is absorbed and eventually re-emitted, typically in a direction outside the design emission range angle. A baffle frame holds the mirrors in position above a radiator panel on the IEC. Together, these will direct the majority of the heat from the IEC above the sunshield away towards empty space.

  17. Large Deployable Reflector Science and Technology Workshop. Volume 3: Systems and Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidich, C. A. (Editor); Pittman, R. B. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The results of five technology panels which convened to discuss the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) are presented. The proposed LDR is a large, ambient-temperature, far infrared/submillimeter telescope designed for space. Panel topics included optics, materials and structures, sensing and control, science instruments, and systems and missions. The telescope requirements, the estimated technology levels, and the areas in which the generic technology work has to be augmented are enumerated.

  18. Sharply bent hollow optical waveguides formed by an omni-directional reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hua-Kung; Hsu, Chih-Ming; Lo, Shih-Shou; Chen, Chii-Chang; Lee, Chien-Chieh

    2009-10-01

    In this work, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally the air core bent optical waveguide composed of omni-directional reflectors on a silicon substrate. Amorphous silicon and silicon oxide are used for high index-contrast Bragg reflectors. The transmission efficiency of power for the bent optical waveguide with various bending angles of 1°-90° is calculated by the two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method and the three-dimensional beam propagation method. The sample is measured using the end-butt method. The device exhibits a lower polarization dependent loss at the operation wavelength of 1550 nm.

  19. Modular design of a high-efficiency LED headlamp system based on freeform reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Heng; Zhang, Xianmin; Ge, Peng

    2015-09-01

    A modular of the LED headlamp system based on freeform reflectors is proposed. Glare suppression and optical design are taken into account during the module design. The proposed module consists of six LEDs and each of them has a freeform reflector correspondingly, which is constructed based on the light energy maps and Snell's Law. Through lighting up different LEDs, the high-beam light and the low-beam light can be switched conveniently. With the proposed method, a module is designed and LUW HWQP LED source whose chip size is 1.0 mm×1.0 mm is adopted for the simulation. Results demonstrate that the lighting distribution can well fulfill the requirements of ECE R112 regulation without any other lenses, shields or baffles. Furthermore, the total optical efficiency can reach up to 80.29% and 81.16% for the low-beam light and high-beam light respectively.

  20. Studies of beam expansion and distributed Bragg reflector lasers for fiber optics and optical signal processing. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Garmire, E.M.

    1981-03-03

    Separate studies were performed on beam expansion and on Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) lasers preliminary to monolithic integration on GaAs substrates. These components are proposed for use in optical signal processing, for fiber optic sources and for high-brightness lasers.

  1. Bifocal dual reflector antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. L. J.

    1973-01-01

    A bifocal dual reflector antenna is similar to and has better scan capability than classical cassegrain reflector antenna. The method used in determining the reflector surfaces is a modification of a design method for the dielectric bifocal lens. The three dimensional dual reflector is obtained by first designing an exact (in geometrical optics sense) two-point corrected two dimensional reflector and then rotating it around its axis of symmetry. A point by point technique is used in computing the reflector surfaces. Computed radiation characteristics of the dual reflector are compared with those of a cassegrain reflector. The results confirm that the bifocal antenna has superior performance.

  2. The control system of the active main reflector for FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yuhai; Zhu, Lichun

    The main reflector of FAST consists of about 1800 elementary units. Each unit has three adjustable supports to fix its position, and its position is adjusted by mean of mechanical actuators. According to the radio source position at any given time, all the actuators are continuously adjusted to form a proper paraboloid in real time during the course of the observation. The basic requirements of such a control system are discussed. A fieldbus control system based on LonWorks technology is suggested to control all 1800 actuators. The main advantages of this distributed control system are its reliability, flexibility, efficiency and economics.

  3. Stabilization and Frequency Control of a DFB Laser With a Tunable Optical Reflector Integrated in a Silicon Photonics PIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck, Johannes; Schrammen, Matthias; Romero-Garcia, Sebastian; Muller, Juliana; Shen, Bin; Richter, Jens; Merget, Florian; Witzens, Jeremy

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the effect of tunable optical feedback on a commercial DFB laser edge coupled to a Silicon Photonics planar integrated circuit in which a tunable reflector has been implemented by means of a ring resonator based add-drop multiplexer. Controlled optical feedback allows for fine-tuning of the laser oscillation frequency. Under certain conditions it also allows suppression of bifurcation modes triggered by reflections occurring elsewhere on the chip. A semi-analytical model describing laser dynamics under combined optical feedback from the input facet of the edge coupler and from the tunable on-chip reflector fits the measurements. Compensation of detrimental effects from reflections induced elsewhere on a transceiver chip may allow moving isolators downstream in future communications systems, facilitating direct hybrid laser integration in Silicon Photonics chips, provided a suitable feedback signal for a control system can be identified. Moreover, the optical frequency tuning at lower feedback levels can be used to form a rapidly tunable optical oscillator as part of an optical phase locked loop, circumventing the problem of the thermal to free carrier effect crossover in the FM response of injection current controlled semiconductor laser diodes.

  4. Control of a small robot using a hybrid optical modulating retro-reflector/RF link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, James L.; Ferraro, Mike S.; Rabinovich, William S.; Goetz, Peter G.; Suite, Michele R.; Uecke, Stanley H.

    2014-06-01

    Tele-operated robots used for Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) are ordinarily controlled using a radio frequency (RF) link. Use of RF links on the battlefield presents several challenges including spectrum allocation and jamming effects (both by the enemy and friendly forces). Several solutions have been attempted including electrical or fiber optic umbilicals and spread spectrum radios with varying degrees of success. Modulating Retro-reflector Free Space Optical (MRR-FSO) communications links avoid these effects entirely but are limited to line of sight operation. We have developed a system consisting of an MRR-FSO link with a tracking optical terminal, a conventional RF link and a deployable pod to provide a relay node bridging the FSO link to the operator and the RF link to the robot. The MRRFSO link provides the capability to operate the robot in the presence of jamming while the RF link allows short range non line of sight operation. The operator uses the MRR-FSO link to drive the robot to a position downrange outside the influence of the jammer or other interference. Once the robot is positioned downrange near the area of operation the pod is deployed. This allows the robot to maneuver freely including venturing beyond line of sight using the short range RF link to maintain communications between the vehicle and pod while the FSO link maintains connectivity between the pod and the operator.

  5. The rigorous wave optics design of diffuse medium reflectors for photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Albert; Ming Fu, Sze; Kai Zhong, Yan; Wei Tseng, Chi; Yu Chen, Po; Ping Ju, Nyan

    2014-04-01

    Recently, diffuse reflectors are being incorporated into solar cells, due to the advantage of no metallic absorption loss, higher reflectance, decent light scattering property by embedded TiO2 scatterers, and the ease of fabrication. Different methods have been employed to analyze diffuse reflectors, including Monte Carlo method, N-flux method, and a one-dimensional approximation based on semi-coherent optics, and the calculated reflectance is around 80% by these methods. In this work, rigorous wave optics solution is used, and it is shown that the reflectance for diffuse medium mirrors can actually be as high as >99% over a broad spectral range, provided the TiO2 scatterer geometry is properly optimized. The bandwidth of diffuse reflectors is un-achievable by other dielectric mirrors such as distributed Bragg reflectors or high index contrast grating mirror, using the same index contrast. Finally, it is promisingly found that even if the distribution of TiO2 is random, the wide-band reflection can still be achieved for the optimized TiO2 geometry. Initial experimental result is included in the supplementary material which shows the high feasibility of diffuse medium mirrors for solar cells.

  6. Lead foil wrapping of the plastic scintillators for the gamma ray detection: optical reflector or spectrum intensifier?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, A.; Askari, M.; Taghan Sasanpour, M.

    2017-08-01

    This paper studies the effect of lead wrapping on the response of the plastic scintillators as gamma detectors. Experimental tests and Geant4 simulations showed that lead wrapping cannot increase the gamma absorption efficiency of the detector but, as a reflector, it can improve the optical properties of the detector. The reflectivity of the lead foil as an optical reflector was determined equal to 66% using an experimental-simulation combined method. Based on the obtained results, the optical collection efficiency of the detector was also increased about 4% after employing the lead reflector.

  7. Electromagnetic Simulations for an Axisymmetric Gregorian Reflector System for a Space Deployed Inflatable Antenna

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-22

    Electromagnetic Simulations for an Axisymmetric Gregorian Reflector System for a Space-Deployed Inflatable Antenna Alan J. Fenn Lincoln... system for potential space deployment is explored. The antenna utilizes a planar array located near the vertex of the primary reflector. Numerical...fixed on-axis peak directivity performance. Simulations of the radiation pattern performance of a dual reflector system with a 2.4m diameter primary

  8. Optical reflector coatings for astronomical applications from EUV to IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schürmann, Mark; Jobst, Paul Johannes; Yulin, Sergiy; Feigl, Torsten; Heiße, Hanno; Wilbrandt, Steffen; Stenzel, Olaf; Gebhardt, Andreas; Risse, Stefan; Kaiser, Norbert

    2012-09-01

    Optical coatings are an integral part of superior optical components. Astronomical applications (ground- and space-based) place especially high demands on these coatings, not only with regard to their optical performance but also to their mechanical and environmental stability, their thermal properties, and their radiation resistance. This article presents a short overview of several coating solutions developed in recent years at Fraunhofer IOF in order to meet the challenging demands of astronomical applications. The focus is placed on high reflective coatings for different wavelength regions including coatings for the VUV range below 100nm, coatings for the DUV wavelength range above 100nm and VIS/NIR/IR coatings. Further, amorphous silicon layers will be introduced which can be polished to very low roughness values and therefore can act as polishing layer for the manufacture of ultraprecise optical components from metal substrates.

  9. Compositionally-Graded Shape Memory Film for Self-Deployment of Membrane Reflectors and Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Lisa; Carman, Greg; Brantley, Lott W., Sr. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The next generation of space systems will require large apertures in order to image faint targets or cover large areas of Earth. These large apertures must be able to fit inside a launch vehicle fairing, be light enough for launch into orbit, and deploy on orbit with repeatability and reliability. The current state-of-the-art in flight optics is represented by the 4 meter LAMP telescope, with an areal density of 10 km sq m. Development of a Beryllium mirror demonstration article for NGST (Next Generation Space Telescope) at the University of Arizona indicate areal densities of 0.5 kg sq m with flight hardware in the 12 meter range. With progressive improvements in existing deployment, packaging, and structural technologies, the size of optics and reflectors will continue to increase, while mass is reduced. However, without a breakthrough in materials, packaging and/or deployment technologies, the goal for Gossamer structures of 0.1 kg sq m is unachievable for the near and mid-term NASA missions. Membrane technology provides the best hope of achieving such low areal densities. In combination with advances in membrane materials and structures, development of revolutionary techniques for deployment systems can provide significant improvements in large aperture technology. In this paper, the results of a six-month Phase I research effort to demonstrate the application of thin film NiTi to aerospace-qualified membrane and mesh materials are presented. Deposition of shape memory thin film was achieved Astromesh (trademark) metal mesh and CP-1, and optical-quality polymer membrane. Not only was full-coating deposition demonstrated, but also small segment deposition which holds potential for local surface control. Deployment of these materials was also demonstrated, setting the stage for the development of a larger test article.

  10. Compositionally-Graded Shape Memory Film for Self-Deployment of Membrane Reflectors and Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Lisa; Carman, Greg; Brantley, Lott W., Sr. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The next generation of space systems will require large apertures in order to image faint targets or cover large areas of Earth. These large apertures must be able to fit inside a launch vehicle fairing, be light enough for launch into orbit, and deploy on orbit with repeatability and reliability. The current state-of-the-art in flight optics is represented by the 4 meter LAMP telescope, with an areal density of 10 km sq m. Development of a Beryllium mirror demonstration article for NGST (Next Generation Space Telescope) at the University of Arizona indicate areal densities of 0.5 kg sq m with flight hardware in the 12 meter range. With progressive improvements in existing deployment, packaging, and structural technologies, the size of optics and reflectors will continue to increase, while mass is reduced. However, without a breakthrough in materials, packaging and/or deployment technologies, the goal for Gossamer structures of 0.1 kg sq m is unachievable for the near and mid-term NASA missions. Membrane technology provides the best hope of achieving such low areal densities. In combination with advances in membrane materials and structures, development of revolutionary techniques for deployment systems can provide significant improvements in large aperture technology. In this paper, the results of a six-month Phase I research effort to demonstrate the application of thin film NiTi to aerospace-qualified membrane and mesh materials are presented. Deposition of shape memory thin film was achieved Astromesh (trademark) metal mesh and CP-1, and optical-quality polymer membrane. Not only was full-coating deposition demonstrated, but also small segment deposition which holds potential for local surface control. Deployment of these materials was also demonstrated, setting the stage for the development of a larger test article.

  11. System overview on electromagnetic compensation for reflector antenna surface distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.; Zaman, A. J.; Terry, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    The system requirements and hardware implementation for electromagnetic compensation of antenna performance degradations due to thermal effects was investigated. Future commercial space communication antenna systems will utilize the 20/30 GHz frequency spectrum and support very narrow multiple beams (0.3 deg) over wide angle field of view (15-20 beamwidth). On the ground, portable and inexpensive very small aperture terminals (VSAT) for transmitting and receiving video, facsimile and data will be employed. These types of communication system puts a very stringent requirement on spacecraft antenna beam pointing stability (less than .01 deg), high gain (greater than 50 dB) and very lowside lobes (less than -25 dB). Thermal analysis performed on the advanced communication technology satellite (ACTS) has shown that the reflector surfaces, the mechanical supporting structures and metallic surfaces on the spacecraft body will distort due thermal effects from a varying solar flux. The antenna performance characteristics (e.g., pointing stability, gain, side lobe, etc.) will degrade due to thermal distortion in the reflector surface and supporting structures. Specifically, antenna RF radiation analysis has shown that pointing error is the most sensitive antenna performance parameter to thermal distortions. Other antenna parameters like peak gain, cross polarization level (beam isolation), and side lobe level will also degrade with thermal distortions. In order to restore pointing stability and in general antenna performance several compensation methods were proposed. In general these compensation methods can be classified as being either of mechanical or electromagnetic type. This paper will address only the later one. In this approach an adaptive phased array antenna feed is used to compensate for the antenna performance degradation. Extensive work has been devoted to demonstrate the feasibility of adaptive feed compensation on space communication antenna systems. This

  12. Reflectivity quenching of ESR multilayer polymer film reflector in optically bonded scintillator arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loignon-Houle, Francis; Pepin, Catherine M.; Charlebois, Serge A.; Lecomte, Roger

    2017-04-01

    The 3M-ESR multilayer polymer film is a widely used reflector in scintillation detector arrays. As specified in the datasheet and confirmed experimentally by measurements in air, it is highly reflective (> 98 %) over the entire visible spectrum (400-1000 nm) for all angles of incidence. Despite these outstanding characteristics, it was previously found that light crosstalk between pixels in a bonded LYSO scintillator array with ESR reflector can be as high as ∼30-35%. This unexplained light crosstalk motivated further investigation of ESR optical performance. Analytical simulation of a multilayer structure emulating the ESR reflector showed that the film becomes highly transparent to incident light at large angles when surrounded on both sides by materials of refractive index higher than air. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that a considerable fraction (∼25-35%) of scintillation photons are incident at these leaking angles in high aspect ratio LYSO scintillation crystals. The film transparency was investigated experimentally by measuring the scintillation light transmission through the ESR film sandwiched between a scintillation crystal and a photodetector with or without layers of silicone grease. Strong light leakage, up to nearly 30%, was measured through the reflector when coated on both sides with silicone, thus elucidating the major cause of light crosstalk in bonded arrays. The reflector transparency was confirmed experimentally for angles of incidence larger than 60 ° using a custom designed setup allowing illumination of the bonded ESR film at selected grazing angles. The unsuspected ESR film transparency can be beneficial for detector arrays exploiting light sharing schemes, but it is highly detrimental for scintillator arrays designed for individual pixel readout.

  13. A physical optics/equivalent currents model for the RCS of trihedral corner reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Polycarpou, Anastasis C.

    1993-01-01

    The scattering in the interior regions of both square and triangular trihedral corner reflectors is examined. The theoretical model presented combines geometrical and physical optics (GO and PO), used to account for reflection terms, with equivalent edge currents (EEC), used to account for first-order diffractions from the edges. First-order, second-order, and third-order reflection terms are included. Calculating the first-order reflection terms involves integrating over the entire surface of the illuminated plate. Calculating the second- and third-order reflection terms, however, is much more difficult because the illuminated area is an arbitrary polygon whose shape is dependent upon the incident angles. The method for determining the area of integration is detailed. Extensive comparisons between the high-frequency model, Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) and experimental data are used for validation of the radar cross section (RCS) of both square and triangular trihedral reflectors.

  14. A physical optics/equivalent currents model for the RCS of trihedral corner reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Polycarpou, Anastasis C.

    1993-07-01

    The scattering in the interior regions of both square and triangular trihedral corner reflectors is examined. The theoretical model presented combines geometrical and physical optics (GO and PO), used to account for reflection terms, with equivalent edge currents (EEC), used to account for first-order diffractions from the edges. First-order, second-order, and third-order reflection terms are included. Calculating the first-order reflection terms involves integrating over the entire surface of the illuminated plate. Calculating the second- and third-order reflection terms, however, is much more difficult because the illuminated area is an arbitrary polygon whose shape is dependent upon the incident angles. The method for determining the area of integration is detailed. Extensive comparisons between the high-frequency model, Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) and experimental data are used for validation of the radar cross section (RCS) of both square and triangular trihedral reflectors.

  15. Session: CSP Advanced Systems: Optical Materials (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.

    2008-04-01

    The Optical Materials project description is to characterize advanced reflector, perform accelerated and outdoor testing of commercial and experimental reflector materials, and provide industry support.

  16. The design of scanning fiber optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yangbo; Xiang, Wanghua; Zu, Peng; Li, Xu; Ren, Fang; Shi, Xiaozhou; Xu, Xiaoyan

    2009-11-01

    A novel scanning fiber optical system for multi-channel optical switch has been demonstrated. This scanning fiber system consists of motor, photoelectric encoder, EPOS position controller, Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), fiber laser, transmitting energy fiber bundle, reflector, five-dimensional optical adjustable mounts, etc. In this device, the control system is composed of EPOS position controller and FPGA. Furthermore, the photoelectric encoder is directly connected to the central shaft of the motor to read its position information. The reflector is slantways fixed on the other end of the motor central shaft. Also, the fiber bundle is fixed by optical adjustable mounts to achieve slight position adjustment, which is used as launching system of this configuration. In the operation process, the motor in uniform rotation state drives the photoelectric encoder and the reflector at the same angle velocity. The photoelectric encoder reads the incremental signal and absolute position signal of motor, and then sends them to EPOS position controller and FPGA respectively. FPGA sends square wave signal to the fiber laser under the control of EPOS position controller and FPGA. Triggered by the square wave signal, the fiber laser emits a laser pulse to the center point of the reflector. At the same time, the reflector makes the laser pulse transmitting into a certain transmitting energy fiber according to the angle of the reflector at that moment. Therefore, with the motor rotates at uniform speed, the laser pulse is sent to different fibers, by which multi-channel optical switch is completed.

  17. Bragg reflectors for large optical aperture MEMS Fabry-Perot interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissanen, Anna; Mannila, Rami; Antila, Jarkko

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the fabrication of large-aperture low-pressure chemical-vapour deposited (LPCVD) Bragg reflectors utilizing low-stress polysilicon (PolySi) and silicon-rich silicon nitride (SiN) λ/4-thin film stacks. These structures can function as the upper mirror in a MEMS FPI device. High aspect-ratio mirror membranes were successfully released for 5 - 10 mm diameter range by sacrificial SiO2 etching in HF vapour. Optical simulations are presented for the Bragg reflector test structures designed for FPIs operating in the NIR range and the properties such as release yield and mechanical stability of the released LPCVD deposited polySi-SiN mirror membranes are compared with similar released atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3-TiO2 λ/4-thin film mirror stacks. The realization of these Bragg reflector structures is the first step in the process integration of large-aperture MEMS FPI for miniature NIR imaging spectrometers, which can be applied to a variety of applications ranging from medical imaging and diagnostics to spaceand environmental monitoring instrumentation.

  18. Optical parameters of the tunable Bragg reflectors in squid

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Amitabh; DeMartini, Daniel G.; Eck, Elizabeth; Morse, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    system can be used as a model system to quantify the effects of various methods of tissue fixation. The microspectrophotometry technique described can be expected to provide deeper insights into the molecular and physical mechanisms governing other biophotonically active cells and structures. PMID:23740489

  19. Optical parameters of the tunable Bragg reflectors in squid.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Amitabh; Demartini, Daniel G; Eck, Elizabeth; Morse, Daniel E

    2013-08-06

    system can be used as a model system to quantify the effects of various methods of tissue fixation. The microspectrophotometry technique described can be expected to provide deeper insights into the molecular and physical mechanisms governing other biophotonically active cells and structures.

  20. Optical transmitter module using polymer waveguide with fully integrated reflector mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, In-Kui; Ahn, Seoung-Ho; Lee, Woo-Jin; Han, Sang-Pil; Bae, Byeong-Soo; Yoon, Keun Byoung; Jeong, Myung-Yung; Park, Hyo Hoon

    2006-09-01

    The cost-effective and repeatable technology for integration of polymer multimode waveguide and out-of-plane 45° reflector mirrors is developed. This method is cost-effective, repeatable, robust, and fully compatible with the standard manufacturing processes for a 90° optical bending structure. The basic concept of the technology for integration of waveguide and out-of-plane 45° reflector mirrors is as follows; 1) The positively patterned master in order to mold waveguides is manufactured by using photolithography and Deep RIE (Reactive Ion Etching). And the master is polished to obtain 45°-inclined plane. 2) Both sides of the positively patterned master are divided into three parts by using a sawing machine. One is a center master (main-master) with a positively patterned waveguide and the others are side masters (sub-master) without a pattered waveguide. The main master and sub-master turned over get back together again. 3) The negatively patterned PDMS master to be able to mold simultaneously both waveguide and out-of-plane 45° reflector mirrors is manufactured through pouring PDMS gel into master and thermally curing the PDMS master. 4) The multimode tapered waveguides with out-of-plane 45° reflector mirrors are simultaneously embossed by using PDMS master. The UV (Ultraviolet) curable material is organic-inorganic hybrid material (HYBRIMER, core index: 1.51, clad index: 1.48). The transmitter module is constructed on a MOB. The MOB was employed for several purposes; to align optical module passively, to use as heat sinker and also to support the boards. On this MOB, 1×4 arrays of vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) and Tapered Waveguide with 45° reflector mirrors are integrated. The height and width of waveguide's core are 100 μm, 60 μm respectively and the pitch is 250 μm. The transmission access lines in transmitter are designed considering differential impedance matching for high-speed operation. We measured the insertion loss of this

  1. Uniform diffracted fields from a perfectly conducting cylindrical reflector with modified theory of physical optics.

    PubMed

    Yalçın, Uğur; Sarnık, Mücahit

    2013-01-01

    The uniform diffracted fields are calculated on PEC cylindrical reflector by Modified Theory of Physical Optics (MTPO). It is aimed to convert the noncontinuous solution to a continuous solution by finding a uniform equation which does not contain any expression converging to 0 in the denominator part. Three axioms of MTPO theory are used to construct the integral equations for the perfectly electrically conducting surface application. The "edge-point" technique is used to find the diffracted field, and uniform solution is to be found via "detour parameter(s)." Finally, the obtained results are to be compared with the nonuniform ones, numerically.

  2. Uniform Diffracted Fields from a Perfectly Conducting Cylindrical Reflector with Modified Theory of Physical Optics

    PubMed Central

    Yalçın, Uğur; Sarnık, Mücahit

    2013-01-01

    The uniform diffracted fields are calculated on PEC cylindrical reflector by Modified Theory of Physical Optics (MTPO). It is aimed to convert the noncontinuous solution to a continuous solution by finding a uniform equation which does not contain any expression converging to 0 in the denominator part. Three axioms of MTPO theory are used to construct the integral equations for the perfectly electrically conducting surface application. The “edge-point” technique is used to find the diffracted field, and uniform solution is to be found via “detour parameter(s).” Finally, the obtained results are to be compared with the nonuniform ones, numerically. PMID:23766679

  3. A dielectric omnidirectional reflector

    PubMed

    Fink; Winn; Fan; Chen; Michel; Joannopoulos; Thomas

    1998-11-27

    A design criterion that permits truly omnidirectional reflectivity for all polarizations of incident light over a wide selectable range of frequencies was used in fabricating an all-dielectric omnidirectional reflector consisting of multilayer films. The reflector was simply constructed as a stack of nine alternating micrometer-thick layers of polystyrene and tellurium and demonstrates omnidirectional reflection over the wavelength range from 10 to 15 micrometers. Because the omnidirectionality criterion is general, it can be used to design omnidirectional reflectors in many frequency ranges of interest. Potential uses depend on the geometry of the system. For example, coating of an enclosure will result in an optical cavity. A hollow tube will produce a low-loss, broadband waveguide, whereas a planar film could be used as an efficient radiative heat barrier or collector in thermoelectric devices.

  4. Feasibility study of a synthesis procedure for array feeds to improve radiation performance of large distorted reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Takamizawa, K.; Werntz, P.; Lapean, J.; Barts, R.; Shen, B.; Dunn, D.

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) performance analysis of the Gregorian tri-reflector; (2) design and performance of the type 6 reflector antenna; (3) a new spherical main reflector system design; (4) optimization of reflector configurations using physical optics; (5) radiometric array design; and (7) beam efficiency studies.

  5. Backscatter analysis of dihedral corner reflectors using physical optics and the physical theory of diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griesser, Timothy; Balanis, Constantine A.

    1987-01-01

    The backscatter cross-sections of dihedral corner reflectors in the azimuthal plane are presently determined by both physical optics (PO) and the physical theory of diffraction (PTD), yielding results for the vertical and horizontal polarizations. In the first analysis method used, geometrical optics is used in place of PO at initial reflections in order to maintain the planar character of the reflected wave and reduce the complexity of the analysis. In the second method, PO is used at almost every reflection in order to maximize the accuracy of the PTD solution at the expense of a rapid increase in complexity. Induced surface current densities and resulting cross section patterns are illustrated for the two methods.

  6. Backscatter analysis of dihedral corner reflectors using physical optics and the physical theory of diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesser, Timothy; Balanis, Constantine A.

    1987-10-01

    The backscatter cross-sections of dihedral corner reflectors in the azimuthal plane are presently determined by both physical optics (PO) and the physical theory of diffraction (PTD), yielding results for the vertical and horizontal polarizations. In the first analysis method used, geometrical optics is used in place of PO at initial reflections in order to maintain the planar character of the reflected wave and reduce the complexity of the analysis. In the second method, PO is used at almost every reflection in order to maximize the accuracy of the PTD solution at the expense of a rapid increase in complexity. Induced surface current densities and resulting cross section patterns are illustrated for the two methods.

  7. Optical absorptions in ZnO/a-Si distributed Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aqing; Chen, Zhian; Zhu, Kaigui; Ji, Zhenguo

    2017-01-01

    The distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) consisting of alternating layers of ZnO and heavy doped amorphous silicon (a-Si) have been fabricated by magnetron sputtering. It is novel to find that the optical absorptions exist in the stopband of the DBRs, and that many discrete strong optical absorption peaks exist in the wavelength range of visible to near-infrared. The calculated results by FDTD show that the absorptions in the stopband mainly exist in the first a-Si layer, and that the light absorbed by other a-Si layers inside contributes to the two absorption peaks in near-infrared range. The strong absorptions ranged from visible to infrared open new possibilities to the enhancement of the performance of amorphous silicon solar cells.

  8. High efficiency epitaxial optical reflector solar cells. Final subcontract report, 1 January 1990--31 October 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Dapkus, P.D.; Hummel, S.G.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes work to test the feasibility of a new solar cell concept -- the epitaxial optical reflector (EOR) solar cell. This cell concept alters current designs for high efficiency cells by changing the optical absorption efficiency of single cells. The change is introduced by the use an epitaxial multilayer reflector as an integral part of the cell to increase the optical path length of certain wavelengths of light in the cell. These changes are expected to increase the open circuit voltage at which power is extracted from the cell. The program is designed to test the feasibility of the use of a broad band epitaxial multilayer reflector grown as an integral part of the device structure to reflect the near-band-edge light back through the device for a second absorption pass. This second pass allows the design of a solar cell with a thinner base, and the use of the epitaxial reflector as a heterojunction carrier-reflecting barrier at the rear of the device. The thinner cell design and altered carrier profile that results from the light- and carrier-reflecting barrier will decrease the carrier concentration gradient and increase the open circuit voltage. The program is structured to have three tasks: (1) Solar Cell and Reflector Modeling, (2) Materials Growth and Optimization, and (3) Solar Cell Fabrication and Characterization.

  9. Testing the figure of parabolic reflectors for solar concentrators.

    PubMed

    Bodenheimer, J S; Eisenberg, N P; Gur, J

    1982-12-15

    A novel method for testing the optical quality of large parabolic solar concentrators is presented, based on autocollimation. An optical system continuously scans the reflector along a fixed reference axis. At each position along the axis, the spread function is obtained. Analysis of the location, width, and intensity changes of this function gives quantitative information about the reflector's defects. A figure of merit describing the performance of parabolic trough reflectors is proposed.

  10. A low-cost antenna reflector shape and distortion measuring system with high accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xudong; Jiang, Hongzhi; Zhou, Jie; Li, Dong; Zhao, Huijie

    2008-09-01

    The antenna which is used in space for satellite control command communication and data transmission is a key unit for a satellite to work properly and accomplish the task successfully. Accurately measuring the antenna reflector shape and the reflector distortion shortly after the antenna manufacturing or assembling on the satellite is very important to ensure that the antenna functions well. Considering the constraints during the measurement, an antenna reflector shape and distortion measuring system, which is based on the close-range photogrammetry, is proposed. The system configuration, measuring principles, calibration and measuring procedures, data processing, experiment configuration and results as well as error analysis are discussed in the paper. The system was constructed and tested in the laboratory environment. The experiment results show that the system has the ability of accurately measuring the shape of the reflector. The distortion of the reflector surface can then be gained from the shape data. The average accuracy of measurement about 240 points on a 600mm antenna reflector is less than 0.015 mm (1σ).

  11. Reflector Surface Error Compensation in Dual-Reflector Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Imbriale, William

    2010-01-01

    By probing the field on a small subreflector at a minimal number of points, the main reflector surface errors can be obtained and subsequently used to design a phase-correction subreflector that can compensate for main reflector errors. The compensating phase-error profile across the subreflector can be achieved either by a surface deformation or by the use of an array of elements such as patch antennas that can cause a phase shift between the incoming and outgoing fields. The second option is of primary interest here, but the methodology can be applied to either case. The patch array is most easily implemented on a planar surface. Therefore, the example of a flat subreflector and a parabolic main reflector (a Newtonian dual reflector system) is considered in this work. The subreflector is assumed to be a reflector array covered with patch elements. The phase variation on a subreflector can be detected by a small number of receiving patch elements (probes). By probing the phase change at these few selected positions on the subreflector, the phase error over the entire surface can be recovered and used to change the phase of all the patch elements covering the subreflector plane to compensate for main reflector errors. This is accomplished by using a version of sampling theorem on the circular aperture. The sampling is performed on the phase-error function on the circular aperture of the main reflector by a method developed using Zernike polynomials. This method is based upon and extended from a theory previously proposed and applied to reflector aperture integration. This sampling method provides for an exact retrieval of the coefficients of up to certain orders in the expansion of the phase function, from values on a specifically calculated set of points in radial and azimuthal directions in the polar coordinate system, on the circular reflector aperture. The corresponding points on the subreflector are then obtained and, by probing the fields at these points, a

  12. A new approach for shaping of dual-reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Teh-Hong; Burnside, W. D.; Rudduck, Roger C.

    1987-01-01

    The shaping of 2-D dual-reflector antenna systems to generate a prescribed distribution with uniform phase at the aperture of the second reflector is examined. This method is based on the geometrical nature of Cassegrain and Gregorian dual-reflector antennas. The method of syntheses satisfies the principles of geometrical optics which are the foundations of dual-reflector designs. Instead of setting up differential equations or heuristically designing the subreflector, a set of algebraic equations is formulated and solved numerically to obtain the desired surfaces. The caustics of the reflected rays from the subreflector can be obtained and examined. Several examples of 2-D dual-reflector shaping are shown to validate the study. Geometrical optics and physical optics are used to calculate the scattered fields from the reflectors.

  13. Electro-nanomechanically wavelength-tunable integrated-optical Bragg reflectors Part II: Stable device operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabathuler, W.; Lukosz, W.

    1998-01-01

    We demonstrate stable operation of electro-nanomechanically wavelength-tunable integrated-optical (IO) Bragg reflectors. We eliminated the wavelength drift of these IO devices reported in a previous paper I [Optics Comm. 135 (1997) 385] by surface treatment (hydrophobization) of the waveguides and of the micromachined membranes. The membranes are spanned as `effective-refractive-index-shifting elements' E over surface relief gratings on the planar or rib waveguides. Electrostatic forces cause elastic deflections of an element E and, consequently, changes in the width of a sub-wavelength-wide air gap between the element E and the waveguide. Thus, the effective-refractive-index changes required for device operation are induced. As the cause of the drift effect, we identified the small but finite ionic electric conductivity of the nanometer thick adsorbed water film on the surfaces of the element E and of the waveguide enclosing the air gap. The IO nanomechanical devices with response times of μs to ms are fabricated using silicon technology. Their achieved stability is a precondition for potential applications, for example, as wavelength-tunable filters in optical networks.

  14. Analysis of Fabry-Perot optical micro-cavities based on coating-free all-silicon cylindrical Bragg reflectors.

    PubMed

    Malak, Maurine; Gaber, Noha; Marty, Frédéric; Pavy, Nicolas; Richalot, Elodie; Bourouina, Tarik

    2013-01-28

    We study the behavior of Fabry-Perot micro-optical resonators based on cylindrical reflectors, optionally combined with cylindrical lenses. The core of the resonator architecture incorporates coating-free, all-silicon, Bragg reflectors of cylindrical shape. The combined effect of high reflectance and light confinement produced by the reflectors curvature allows substantial reduction of the energy loss. The proposed resonator uses curved Bragg reflectors consisting of a stack of silicon-air wall pairs constructed by micromachining. Quality factor Q ~1000 was achieved on rather large cavity length L = 210 microns, which is mainly intended to lab-on-chip analytical experiments, where enough space is required to introduce the analyte inside the resonator. We report on the behavioral analysis of such resonators through analytical modeling along with numerical simulations supported by experimental results. We demonstrate selective excitation of pure longitudinal modes, taking advantage of a proper control of mode matching involved in the process of coupling light from an optical fiber to the resonator. For the sake of comparison, insight on the behavior of Fabry-Perot cavity incorporating a Fiber-Rod-Lens is confirmed by similar numerical simulations.

  15. Testing and Qualification of a Semi-Automated Bonding Process for Optical Solar Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, M.; Ranzenberger, C.; Rejsek-Riba, V.

    2014-06-01

    Optical Solar Reflectors (OSR) are highly efficient thermal emitter tiles with a typical size of 40x40mm. Spacecraft radiator panels are covered with these tiles to reduce absorption of solar radiation and to dissipate heat of internal payloads into deep space.State of the art processes to apply such OSR tiles are labour intensive and involve application of two- component adhesives, manual placing of tiles and long duration temperature controlled adhesive curing cycles.This paper presents the test and qualification campaign of a new OSR application method using electrically conductive pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) and a semi-automated OSR pick-and-place facility. Compared to standard OSR application using filled silicone resins, the new process is resulting in radiator surfaces with up to 27% lower mass.The pick-and-place facility will be introduced, the process qualification campaign discussed. Results of tensile- and thermo-optical testing of exposed samples compared to pristine materials will be shown.

  16. Solar central receiver heliostat reflector assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, R.H.; Zdeb, J.J.

    1980-06-24

    A heliostat reflector assembly for a solar central receiver system comprises a light-weight, readily assemblable frame which supports a sheet of stretchable reflective material and includes a mechanism for selectively applying tension to and positioning the sheet to stretch it to optical flatness. The frame is mounted on and supported by a pipe pedestal assembly that, in turn, is installed in the ground. The frame is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e. central receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The frame may include a built-in system for testing for optical flatness of the reflector. The preferable geometric configuration of the reflector is octagonal; however, it may be other shapes, such as hexagonal, pentagonal or square. Several different embodiments of means for tensioning and positioning the reflector to achieve optical flatness are disclosed. The reflector assembly is based on the stretch frame concept which provides an extremely light-weight, simple, low-cost reflector assembly that may be driven for positioning and tracking by a light-weight, inexpensive drive system. 14 figs.

  17. Solar central receiver heliostat reflector assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, R.H.; Zdeb, J.J.

    1980-06-24

    A heliostat reflector assembly for a solar central receiver system comprises a light-weight, readily assemblable frame which supports a sheet of stretchable reflective material and includes mechanism for selectively applying tension to and positioning the sheet to stretch it to optical flatness. The frame is mounted on and supported by a pipe pedestal assembly that, in turn, is installed in the ground. The frame is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e., central receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The frame may include a built-in system for testing for optical flatness of the reflector. The preferable geometric configuration of the reflector is octagonal; however, it may be other shapes, such as hexagonal, pentagonal or square. Several different embodiments of means for tensioning and positioning the reflector to achieve optical flatness are disclosed. The reflector assembly is based on the stretch frame concept which provides an extremely light-weight, simple, low-cost reflector assembly that may be driven for positioning and tracking by a light-weight, inexpensive drive system. 14 claims.

  18. Solar central receiver heliostat reflector assembly

    DOEpatents

    Horton, Richard H.; Zdeb, John J.

    1980-01-01

    A heliostat reflector assembly for a solar central receiver system comprises a light-weight, readily assemblable frame which supports a sheet of stretchable reflective material and includes mechanism for selectively applying tension to and positioning the sheet to stretch it to optical flatness. The frame is mounted on and supported by a pipe pedestal assembly that, in turn, is installed in the ground. The frame is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e. central receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The frame may include a built-in system for testing for optical flatness of the reflector. The preferable geometric configuration of the reflector is octagonal; however, it may be other shapes, such as hexagonal, pentagonal or square. Several different embodiments of means for tensioning and positioning the reflector to achieve optical flatness are disclosed. The reflector assembly is based on the stretch frame concept which provides an extremely light-weight, simple, low-cost reflector assembly that may be driven for positioning and tracking by a light-weight, inexpensive drive system.

  19. All-reflective optical target illumination system with high numerical aperture

    DOEpatents

    Sigler, Robert D.

    1978-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for providing illumination of a target focal region at high numerical aperture from a pair of co-axially, confluent collimated light beams. A target cavity is defined by a pair of opposed inner ellipsoidal reflectors having respective first focal points within a target region and second focal points at a vertex opening in the opposing reflector. Outwardly of each inner reflector is the opposed combination of a spherical reflector, and an outer generally ellipsoidal reflector having an aberrated first focal point coincident with the focus of the opposing spherical reflector and a second focal point coincident with the second focal point of the opposing inner ellipsoidal reflector through a vertex opening in the spherical reflector. The confluent collimated beams are incident through vertex openings in the outer ellipsoidal reflectors onto respective opposing spherical reflectors. Each beam is reflected by the associated spherical reflector onto the opposing outer ellipsoidal reflector and focused thereby onto the opposing inner ellipsoidal reflector, and then onto the target region.

  20. Reflectivity Spectra for Commonly Used Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janecek, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulations play an important role in developing and evaluating the performance of radiation detection systems. To accurately model a reflector in an optical Monte Carlo simulation, the reflector's spectral response has to be known. We have measured the reflection coefficient for many commonly used reflectors for wavelengths from 250 nm to 800 nm. The reflectors were also screened for fluorescence and angular distribution changes with wavelength. The reflectors examined in this work include several polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) reflectors, Spectralon, GORE diffuse reflector, titanium dioxide paint, magnesium oxide, nitrocellulose filter paper, Tyvek paper, Lumirror, Melinex, ESR films, and aluminum foil. All PTFE films exhibited decreasing reflectivity with longer wavelengths due to transmission. To achieve >;0.95 reflectivity in the 380 to 500 nm range, the PTFE films have to be at least 0.5 mm thick-nitrocellulose is a good alternative if a thin diffuse reflector is needed. Several of the reflectors have sharp declines in reflectivity below a cut-off wavelength, including TiO2 (420 nm), ESR film (395 nm), nitrocellulose (330 nm), Lumirror (325 nm), and Melinex (325 nm). PTFE-like reflectors were the only examined reflectors that had reflectivity above 0.90 for wavelengths below 300 nm. Lumirror, Melinex, and ESR film exhibited fluorescence. Lumirror and Melinex are excited by wavelengths between 320 and 420 nm and have their emission peaks located at 440 nm, while ESR film is excited by wavelengths below 400 nm and the emission peak is located at 430 nm. Lumirror and Melinex also exhibited changing angular distributions with wavelength.

  1. Single-mode, narrow-linewidth external cavity quantum cascade laser through optical feedback from a partial-reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Cendejas, Richard A.; Phillips, Mark C.; Myers, Tanya L.; Taubman, Matthew S.

    2010-11-30

    An external-cavity (EC) quantum cascade (QC) laser using optical feedback from a partial-reflector is reported. With this configuration, the otherwise multi-mode emission of a Fabry-Perot QC laser was made single-mode with optical output powers exceeding 40 mW. A mode-hop free tuning range of 2.46 cm-1 was achieved by synchronously tuning the EC length and QC laser current. The linewidth of the partial-reflector EC-QC laser was measured for integration times from 100 μs to 4 s, and compared to a distributed feedback QC laser. Linewidths as small as 480 kHz were recorded for the EC-QC laser

  2. Single-mode, narrow-linewidth external cavity quantum cascade laser through optical feedback from a partial-reflector.

    PubMed

    Cendejas, Richard A; Phillips, Mark C; Myers, Tanya L; Taubman, Matthew S

    2010-12-06

    An external-cavity (EC) quantum cascade (QC) laser using optical feedback from a partial-reflector is reported. With this configuration, the otherwise multi-mode emission of a Fabry-Perot QC laser was made single-mode with optical output powers exceeding 40 mW. A mode-hop free tuning range of 2.46 cm(-1) was achieved by synchronously tuning the EC length and QC laser current. The linewidth of the partial-reflector EC-QC laser was measured for integration times from 100 μs to 4 seconds, and compared to a distributed feedback QC laser. Linewidths as small as 480 kHz were recorded for the EC-QC laser.

  3. Optical coating performance for heat reflectors of JWST-ISIM electronic component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Bousquet, Robert; Garrison, Matt; Perrygo, Chuck; Threat, Felix; Rashford, Robert

    2008-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) consists of an infrared-optimized Optical Telescope Element (OTE) that is cooled down to 40 degrees Kelvin. A second adjacent component to the OTE is the Integrated Science Instrument Module, or ISIM. This module includes the electronic compartment, which provides the mounting surfaces and ambient thermally controlled environment for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the 200 watts generated from the ISIM structure away from the OTE is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft's own heat does not interfere with the infrared light detected from distant cosmic sources. This technical challenge is overcome by a thermal subsystem unit that provides passive cooling to the ISIM control electronics. The proposed design of this thermal radiator consists of a lightweight structure made out of composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings. In this paper, we will present characterizations of the coating emittance, bidirectional reflectance, and mechanical structure design that will affect the performance of this passive cooling reflector.

  4. Simulation modeling of functional adaptive interference nulling for multibeam hybrid reflector antenna systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartsan, I. N.; Tyapkin, V. N.; Dmitriev, D. D.; Goncharov, A. E.; Zelenkov, P. V.; Kovalev, I. V.

    2016-11-01

    This paper considers the simulation of adaptive nulling mechanism patterns in hybrid reflector antenna systems with a 19-element feed element, in which the radiation pattern is formed as a cluster. Incidents of broadband and narrowband interference are studied in the article.

  5. Large Deployable Reflector Science and Technology Workshop. Volume 3: Systems and Technology Assessment. Conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The physical parameters of the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) required to achieve the anticipated astronomical objectives are reviewed briefly. System parameters and performance requirements for the LDR are enumerated. The LDR was compared with the Cosmic Background Experiment (COBE), the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), and the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Angular resolution and high resolution spectroscopy requirements for LDR were considered.

  6. Multiple Reflector Scanning Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Bing

    Narrow beamwidth antenna systems are important to remote sensing applications and point-to-point communication systems. In many applications the main beam of the antenna radiation pattern must be scannable over a region of space. Scanning by mechanically skewing the entire antenna assembly is difficult and in many situations is unacceptable. Performance during scan is, of course, also very important. Traditional reflector systems employing the well-focused paraboloidal -shaped main reflector accomplish scan by motion of a few feeds, or by phase steering a focal plane feed array. Such scanning systems can experience significant gain loss. Traditional reflecting systems with a spherical main reflector have low aperture efficiency and poor side lobe and cross polarization performance. This dissertation introduces a new approach to the design of scanning spherical reflector systems, in which the performance weaknesses of high cross polarization and high side lobe levels are avoided. Moreover, the low aperture utilization common in spherical reflectors is overcome. As an improvement to this new spherical main reflector configuration, a flat mirror reflector is introduced to minimize the mechanical difficulties to scan the main beam. In addition to the reflector system design, reflector antenna performance evaluation is also important. The temperature resolution issue important for earth observation radiometer antennas is studied, and a new method to evaluate and optimize such temperature resolution is introduced.

  7. Solar receiver heliostat reflector having a linear drive and position information system

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, R.H.

    1980-03-11

    A heliostat for a solar receiver system comprises an improved drive and control system for the heliostat reflector assembly. The heliostat reflector assembly is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e., heat receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The improved drive system includes linear stepping motors which comprise low weight, low cost, electronic pulse driven components. One embodiment comprises linear stepping motors controlled by a programmed, electronic microprocessor. Another embodiment comprises a tape driven system controlled by a position control magnetic tape. 11 figs.

  8. Solar receiver heliostat reflector having a linear drive and position information system

    DOEpatents

    Horton, Richard H.

    1980-01-01

    A heliostat for a solar receiver system comprises an improved drive and control system for the heliostat reflector assembly. The heliostat reflector assembly is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e., heat receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The improved drive system includes linear stepping motors which comprise low weight, low cost, electronic pulse driven components. One embodiment comprises linear stepping motors controlled by a programmed, electronic microprocessor. Another embodiment comprises a tape driven system controlled by a position control magnetic tape.

  9. Solar reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, D. C.

    1981-02-17

    A solar reflector having a flexible triangular reflective sheet or membrane for receiving and reflecting solar energy therefrom. The reflector is characterized by the triangular reflective sheet which is placed under tension thereby defining a smooth planar surface eliminating surface deflection which heretofore has reduced the efficiency of reflectors or heliostats used in combination for receiving and transmitting solar energy to an absorber tower.

  10. [Improved depth exposure for monocular anterior rhinoscopy with the fiber optic headlight reflector].

    PubMed

    aWengen, D F

    1996-11-01

    The usual position of the light reflector of the fiberoptic headlight over the nose of the physicians allows exposure of only the anterior half of the depth of the nose. This limitation is due to the distance between the visual axis and the axis of light. A simple rotation of the reflector towards the dominant eye of the physician decreases the distance between these axes. This allows exposure of structures within the entire nose and into the nasopharynx. This technique not only facilitates diagnostic assessment but also improves postoperative care after endonasal surgery.

  11. DAZZLE project: UAV to ground communication system using a laser and a modulated retro-reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thueux, Yoann; Avlonitis, Nicholas; Erry, Gavin

    2014-10-01

    The advent of the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) has generated the need for reduced size, weight and power (SWaP) requirements for communications systems with a high data rate, enhanced security and quality of service. This paper presents the current results of the DAZZLE project run by Airbus Group Innovations. The specifications, integration steps and initial performance of a UAV to ground communication system using a laser and a modulated retro-reflector are detailed. The laser operates at the wavelength of 1550nm and at power levels that keep it eye safe. It is directed using a FLIR pan and tilt unit driven by an image processing-based system that tracks the UAV in flight at a range of a few kilometers. The modulated retro-reflector is capable of a data rate of 20Mbps over short distances, using 200mW of electrical power. The communication system was tested at the Pershore Laser Range in July 2014. Video data from a flying Octocopter was successfully transmitted over 1200m. During the next phase of the DAZZLE project, the team will attempt to produce a modulated retro-reflector capable of 1Gbps in partnership with the research institute Acreo1 based in Sweden. A high speed laser beam steering capability based on a Spatial Light Modulator will also be added to the system to improve beam pointing accuracy.

  12. Ring retroreflector system consisting of cube-corner reflectors with special coating

    SciTech Connect

    Burmistrov, V B; Sadovnikov, M A; Sokolov, A L; Shargorodskiy, V D

    2013-09-30

    The ring retroreflector system (RS) consisting of cubecorner reflectors (CCRs) with a special coating of reflecting surfaces, intended for uniaxially Earth-oriented navigation satellites, is considered. The error of distance measurement caused by both the laser pulse delay in the CCR and its spatial position (CCR configuration) is studied. It is shown that the ring RS, formed by the CCR with a double-spot radiation pattern, allows the distance measurement error to be essentially reduced. (nanogradient dielectric coatings and metamaterials)

  13. Secondary pattern computation of an offset reflector antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Reflector antennas are widely used in communications satellite systems because they provide high gain at low cost. In analyzing reflector antennas the computation of the secondary pattern is the main concern. A computer program for calculating the secondary pattern of an offset reflector has been developed and implemented at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The theoretical foundation for this program is based on the use of geometrical optics to describe the fields from the feed to the reflector surface and to the aperture plane. The resulting aperture field distribution is then transformed to the far-field zone by the fast Fourier transform algorithm. Comparing this technique with other well-known techniques (the geometrical theory of diffraction, physical optics (Jacobi-Bessel), etc.) shows good agreement for large (diameter of 100 lambda or greater) reflector antennas.

  14. Efficient Reflector Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathker, D. A.; Cha, A. G.; Galindo, V.; Reilly, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    Efficient antenna applicable to systems where main reflector diameter is at least 500 wavelengths. Design provides 2-to-3-dB improvement in gain divided by noise temperature (G/T) over centerline symmetric designs. Performance improvement largely due to clear-aperture, off-axis dual-reflector design.

  15. Six-dimensional optical storage utilizing wavelength selective, polarization sensitive, and reflectivity graded Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shangqing

    2014-09-01

    An optical storage system which stores data in three spacial and three physical dimensions is designed and investigated. Its feasibility has been demonstrated by theoretical derivation and numerical calculation. This system has comprehensive advantages including very large capacity, ultrafast throughputs, relatively simple structure and compatibility with CD and DVD. It's an actually practicable technology. With two-photon absorption writing/erasing and optical coherence tomography reading, its storage capacity is over 32 Tbytes per DVD sized disk, and its reading speed is over 25 Gbits/s with high signal-to-noise ratio of over 76 dB. The larger capacity of over 1 Pbyte per disk is potential.

  16. Cat’s Eye Quantum Well Modulating Retro-Reflectors for Free-Space Optical Communications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    optical communication with a laser and pointing/acquisition/tracking system required on only one end of the link. In operation a conventional free space optical communications terminal, the interrogator, is used on one end of the link to illuminate the MRR on the other end of the link with a cw beam. The MRR imposes a modulation on the interrogating beam and passively retro-reflects it back to the interrogator. These types of systems are attractive for asymmetric communication links for which one end of the link cannot afford the weight, power or expense of a conventional

  17. Global search and rescue - A new concept. [orbital digital radar system with passive reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivertson, W. E., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A new terrestrial search and rescue concept is defined embodying the use of simple passive radiofreqeuncy reflectors in conjunction with a low earth-orbiting, all-weather, synthetic aperture radar to detect, identify, and position locate earth-bound users in distress. Users include ships, aircraft, small boats, explorers, hikers, etc. Airborne radar tests were conducted to evaluate the basic concept. Both X-band and L-band, dual polarization radars were operated simultaneously. Simple, relatively small, corner-reflector targets were successfully imaged and digital data processing approaches were investigated. Study of the basic concept and evaluation of results obtained from aircraft flight tests indicate an all-weather, day or night, global search and rescue system is feasible.

  18. Global search and rescue - A new concept. [orbital digital radar system with passive reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivertson, W. E., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A new terrestrial search and rescue concept is defined embodying the use of simple passive radiofreqeuncy reflectors in conjunction with a low earth-orbiting, all-weather, synthetic aperture radar to detect, identify, and position locate earth-bound users in distress. Users include ships, aircraft, small boats, explorers, hikers, etc. Airborne radar tests were conducted to evaluate the basic concept. Both X-band and L-band, dual polarization radars were operated simultaneously. Simple, relatively small, corner-reflector targets were successfully imaged and digital data processing approaches were investigated. Study of the basic concept and evaluation of results obtained from aircraft flight tests indicate an all-weather, day or night, global search and rescue system is feasible.

  19. Intervening in Earth's climate system through space-based solar reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, F. J. T.; McInnes, C. R.; Winter, O. C.

    2016-07-01

    Several space-based climate engineering methods, including shading the Earth with a particle ring for active cooling, or the use of orbital reflectors to increase the total insolation of Mars for climate warming have been considered to modify planetary climates in a controller manner. In this study, solar reflectors on polar orbits are proposed to intervene in the Earth's climate system, involving near circular polar orbits normal to the ecliptic plane of the Earth. Similarly, a family of displaced polar orbits (non-Keplerian orbits) are also characterized to mitigate future natural climate variability, producing a modest global temperature increase, again to compensate for possible future cooling. These include deposition of aerosols in the stratosphere from large volcanic events. The two-body problem is considered, taking into account the effects of solar radiation pressure and the Earth's J2 oblateness perturbation.

  20. A satellite-tracking millimeter-wave reflector antenna system for mobile satellite-tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Densmore, Arthur C. (Inventor); Jamnejad, Vahraz (Inventor); Woo, Kenneth E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A miniature dual-band two-way mobile satellite tracking antenna system mounted on a movable ground vehicle includes a miniature parabolic reflector dish having an elliptical aperture with major and minor elliptical axes aligned horizontally and vertically, respectively, to maximize azimuthal directionality and minimize elevational directionality to an extent corresponding to expected pitch excursions of the movable ground vehicle. A feed-horn has a back end and an open front end facing the reflector dish and has vertical side walls opening out from the back end to the front end at a lesser horn angle and horizontal top and bottom walls opening out from the back end to the front end at a greater horn angle. An RF circuit couples two different signal bands between the feed-horn and the user. An antenna attitude controller maintains an antenna azimuth direction relative to the satellite by rotating it in azimuth in response to sensed yaw motions of the movable ground vehicle so as to compensate for the yaw motions to within a pointing error angle. The controller sinusoidally dithers the antenna through a small azimuth dither angle greater than the pointing error angle while sensing a signal from the satellite received at the reflector dish, and deduces the pointing angle error from dither-induced fluctuations in the received signal.

  1. Satellite-Tracking Millimeter-Wave Reflector Antenna System For Mobile Satellite-Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Densmore, Arthur C. (Inventor); Jamnejad, Vahraz (Inventor); Woo, Kenneth E. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A miniature dual-band two-way mobile satellite-tracking antenna system mounted on a movable vehicle includes a miniature parabolic reflector dish having an elliptical aperture with major and minor elliptical axes aligned horizontally and vertically, respectively, to maximize azimuthal directionality and minimize elevational directionality to an extent corresponding to expected pitch excursions of the movable ground vehicle. A feed-horn has a back end and an open front end facing the reflector dish and has vertical side walls opening out from the back end to the front end at a lesser horn angle and horizontal top and bottom walls opening out from the back end to the front end at a greater horn angle. An RF circuit couples two different signal bands between the feed-horn and the user. An antenna attitude controller maintains an antenna azimuth direction relative to the satellite by rotating it in azimuth in response to sensed yaw motions of the movable ground vehicle so as to compensate for the yaw motions to within a pointing error angle. The controller sinusoidally dithers the antenna through a small azimuth dither angle greater than the pointing error angle while sensing a signal from the satellite received at the reflector dish, and deduces the pointing angle error from dither-induced fluctuations in the received signal.

  2. Fabrication and Thermo-Optical Properties of the MLS Composite Primary Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Paul B.; Dyer, Jack; Dummer, Sam

    2000-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) is a limb-sounding radiometer sensing emissions in the millimeter and sub-millimeter range. MLS will contribute to an understanding of atmospheric chemistry by assessing stratospheric and tropospheric ozone depletion, climate forcings and volcanic effects. The heart of the antenna is the primary reflector, constructed from graphite/cyanate composites in a facesheet/core construction. The reflector has an aperture of one square meter, a mass of 8.7 kilos and final figure accuracy of 4.37 microns rms. The surface is also modified to ensure RF reflectivity, prevent solar concentration and provide thermal balance to the spacecraft The surface is prepared by precision beadblasting, then coated with vapor deposited aluminum (VDA) and finally a layer of silicon suboxide (SiO(x)) to control the infrared emissivity. The resulting surface has a solar absorptance of 0.43 and an absorptance/emittance ratio of 1.3. BRDF analysis shows that 93% of the incident thermal energy is reflected outside a 10 degree angle of cone. For its mass and aperture, we believe this reflector to have the highest figure accuracy yet achieved in a composite antenna construction.

  3. Reflector Technology Development and System Design for Concentrating Solar Power Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Schaut Philip Smith

    2011-12-30

    Alcoa began this program in March of 2008 with the goal of developing and validating an advanced CSP trough design to lower the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) as compared to existing glass based, space-frame trough technology. In addition to showing a pathway to a significant LCOE reduction, Alcoa also desired to create US jobs to support the emerging CSP industry. Alcoa's objective during Phase I: Concept Feasibility was to provide the DOE with a design approach that demonstrates significant overall system cost savings without sacrificing performance. Phase I consisted of two major tasks; reflector surface development and system concept development. Two specific reflective surface technologies were investigated, silver metallized lamination, and thin film deposition both applied on an aluminum substrate. Alcoa prepared samples; performed test validation internally; and provided samples to the NREL for full-spectrum reflectivity measurements. The final objective was to report reflectivity at t = 0 and the latest durability results as of the completion of Phase 1. The target criteria for reflectance and durability were as follows: (1) initial (t = 0), hemispherical reflectance >93%, (2) initial spectral reflectance >90% for 25-mrad reading and >87% for 7-mrad reading, and (3) predicted 20 year durability of less than 5% optical performance drop. While the results of the reflective development activities were promising, Alcoa was unable to down-select on a reflective technology that met the target criteria. Given the progress and potential of both silver film and thin film technologies, Alcoa continued reflector surface development activities in Phase II. The Phase I concept development activities began with acquiring baseline CSP system information from both CSP Services and the DOE. This information was used as the basis to develop conceptual designs through ideation sessions. The concepts were evaluated based on estimated cost and high-level structural

  4. Optical and thermal characterization of membrane reflector materials for solar orbit transfer vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Gregory D.; McGee, Jennie K.; Partch, Russell; Lester, Dean M.

    2002-01-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), is advancing technologies to enable greater mobility for future AF spacecraft. The Solar Orbit Transfer Vehicle (SOTV) program is developing components for a concept based on a solar thermal rocket and solar thermal power generation. The program is performing ground testing of a thin film membrane concentrator concept. To better understand system performance, a series of optical characterization tests of the membrane material were performed. The objective was to quantify the relationship between membrane optical properties and the concentrator on-orbit transmission performance and thermal profile. During testing we collected reflectivity, absorptivity, transmissivity, and emissivity data for un-coated and coated membrane material. The membrane material tested was fabricated using a flight-qualified polyimide material and proven manufacturing processes. The test results, and system thermal analysis are presented in this paper. The results of this research will be used to refine hardware performance predictions and improve sizing for flight demonstration. .

  5. Lamp system with conditioned water coolant and diffuse reflector of polytetrafluorethylene(PTFE)

    DOEpatents

    Zapata, Luis E.; Hackel, Lloyd

    1999-01-01

    A lamp system with a very soft high-intensity output is provided over a large area by water cooling a long-arc lamp inside a diffuse reflector of polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) and titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) white pigment. The water is kept clean and pure by a one micron particulate filter and an activated charcoal/ultraviolet irradiation system that circulates and de-ionizes and biologically sterilizes the coolant water at all times, even when the long-arc lamp is off.

  6. Lamp system with conditioned water coolant and diffuse reflector of polytetrafluorethylene(PTFE)

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, L.E.; Hackel, L.

    1999-10-26

    A lamp system with a very soft high-intensity output is provided over a large area by water cooling a long-arc lamp inside a diffuse reflector of polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) and titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) white pigment. The water is kept clean and pure by a one micron particulate filter and an activated charcoal/ultraviolet irradiation system that circulates and de-ionizes and biologically sterilizes the coolant water at all times, even when the long-arc lamp is off.

  7. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alff, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility and costs were determined for a 1 m to 30 m diameter ambient temperature, infrared to submillimeter orbiting astronomical telescope which is to be shuttle-deployed, free-flying, and have a 10 year orbital life. Baseline concepts, constraints on delivery and deployment, and the sunshield required are examined. Reflector concepts, the optical configuration, alignment and pointing, and materials are also discussed. Technology studies show that a 10 m to 30 m diameter system which is background and diffraction limited at 30 micron m is feasible within the stated time frame. A 10 m system is feasible with current mirror technology, while a 30 m system requires technology still in development.

  8. Measuring preheat in laser-drive aluminum using velocity interferometer system for any reflector: Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Hua; Fu, Sizu; Huang, Xiuguang; Wu, Jiang; Xie, Zhiyong; Zhang, Fan; Ye, Junjian; Jia, Guo; Zhou, Huazhen

    2014-08-15

    In this paper, we systematically study preheating in laser-direct-drive shocks by using a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR). Using the VISAR, we measured free surface velocity histories of Al samples over time, 10–70 μm thick, driven directly by a laser at different frequencies (2ω, 3ω). Analyzing our experimental results, we concluded that the dominant preheating source was X-ray radiation. We also discussed how preheating affected the material initial density and the measurement of Hugoniot data for high-Z materials (such as Au) using impedance matching. To reduce preheating, we proposed and tested three kinds of targets.

  9. Experimental Results of Plasma Induced EMI Effects in a Reflector Antenna System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandinelli, M.; Pandolfo, L.; Sarri, A.; Fittipaldi, D. A.; Pawlak, H.; Marliani, F.

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents measurement results of the electromagnetic interference (EMI) caused by the plasma plume of ion thrusters firing through the RF beam of reflector antennas. The EMI effect consists mainly in the introduction of discrete spurious modulation products on the RF carrier thus degrading spectral purity. The measurements were carried out on a mockup which is geometrically representative of the actual SGEO spacecraft design. The mockup and the acquisition system were specifically designed to allow RF measurements inside a metallic vacuum chamber. Three ion thrusters were characterised during the test campaign: SPT-100, HEMP-T, PPS-1350.

  10. Study of retro reflector array for the polarimeter-interferometer system on EAST Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, T.; Wang, S. X.; Liu, H. Q.; Liu, J.; Jie, Y. X.; Zou, Z. Y.; Li, W. M.; Gao, X.; Qin, H.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we experimentally verify the feasibility of replacing individual retro reflectors (RRs) with retro reflector array (RRA) in EAST POlarimeter/INTerferometer (POINT) system, by considering mode transformation and power wastage. Being exposed to plasma environment directly, RRs have risks of deformation, erosion and deposition. RRA is preferable because it can be installed within a smaller space and provide a gap of several centimeters for the shutter design. This protective structure can reduce the cost of device maintenance and bring down system errors. According to Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral theorem, the optimized incident diameter for the RRA, constituted by seven hexagonal RR cells, is 40 mm in POINT system. The corresponding bench tests are carried out by measuring the propagation properties of reflected beams by plane RRA for perpendicular incidence and reflected beams by terrace RRA for oblique incidence. The experimental results illustrate that RRA can be satisfactorily applied in POINT system at the optimized incident diameter. In view of the energy wastage caused by plasma film coating, it is found that RRA has more advantages for diagnostics using shorter wavelengths, such as the case in ITER.

  11. Optic-electronic system for measuring the three-dimensional angular deformation of pipe sections at large constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konyakhin, Igor; Hoang, Van Phong; Artemenko, Yury; Li, Renpu; Smekhov, Andrey

    2015-05-01

    The improved autocollimation system for measuring three-dimension angular deformations of pipe sections at large constructions as support tube of radio telescope mirror is analyzed. New type of the reflector for autocollimators is researched. The reflector is the trihedral mirror composition of three reflecting sides. It advantage is the measurement pitch, yaw and torsion as three angular rotation of controlled object. The second advantage of reflector is the measurements on the large work distances. Causes are the small value of the conversion coefficient and two orthogonal reference axes of trihedral reflector. The technical characteristics of the experimental setups of new reflector are presented. The features of trihedral reflector as the reflectors for optic-electronic autocollimators are discussed.

  12. MHD compressor---expander conversion system integrated with GCR inside a deployable reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Tuninetti, G. . Research Div.); Botta, E.; Criscuolo, C.; Riscossa, P. . Nuclear Div.); Giammanco, F. . Dipt. di Fisica); Rosa-Clot, M. . Dipt. di Fisica)

    1989-04-20

    This work originates from the proposal MHD Compressor-Expander Conversion System Integrated with a GCR Inside a Deployable Reflector''. The proposal concerned an innovative concept of nuclear, closed-cycle MHD converter for power generation on space-based systems in the multi-megawatt range. The basic element of this converter is the Power Conversion Unit (PCU) consisting of a gas core reactor directly coupled to an MHD expansion channel. Integrated with the PCU, a deployable reflector provides reactivity control. The working fluid could be either uranium hexafluoride or a mixture of uranium hexafluoride and helium, added to enhance the heat transfer properties. The original Statement of Work, which concerned the whole conversion system, was subsequently redirected and focused on the basic mechanisms of neutronics, reactivity control, ionization and electrical conductivity in the PCU. Furthermore, the study was required to be inherently generic such that the study was required to be inherently generic such that the analysis an results can be applied to various nuclear reactor and/or MHD channel designs''.

  13. Fiber-optic ultrasonic hydrophone using short Fabry-Perot cavity with multilayer reflectors deposited on small stub.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Su; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2014-04-01

    A fiber-optic probe with dielectric multilayer films deposited on a small stub is studied for mega-hertz ultrasonic-wave detection in water. The small stub with a short Fabry-Perot cavity and distributed reflectors is attached on the fiber end. The structure is mechanically strong and withstands intense ultrasonic pressure. Ultrasonic waves at 1.56MHz are successfully detected in water with a good signal-to-noise ratio. The working principle and the characteristics are studied by comparing the ultrasonic sensitivity with that of a conventional piezoelectric hydrophone. The distance response and directional response are also investigated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Synthesis and study of the optical properties of dielectric Bragg reflectors infiltrated with 6G-Rhodamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Barojas, E.; Aca-López, V.; Sánchez-Mora, E.; Silva-González, R.; Luna-López, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    We report the study of the optical properties of 6G-Rhodamine (Rhd) infiltrated porous silicon dielectric Bragg reflectors (DBRs) with 31 constituent periods. The DBRs were obtained by an electrochemical anodizing process of Si in a two electrodes Teflon cell. The porosity was determined by gravimetric measurements on single Porous silicon (PSi) layers. Based on the characterization results of single layers the DBRs were synthesized. After anodizing, the DBRs were silanized with a 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane solution and functionalized with Rhd solutions at different concentrations. Cross section scanning electron micrographs show that the DBRs synthesis was successful. After each preparation step, Reflectance and Fluorescence (FL) spectra were recorded. These spectra show that as the Rhd concentration in solution is increased the stop band intensity as well as the FL intensity are enhanced due to constructive interference effects.

  15. Passive solar reflector satellite revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, C.; Daly, J. C.

    1980-07-01

    Passive light weight reflectors in space which direct the incident solar energy to a specified location on the Earth surface are proposed as an alternative system for the solar power satellite to overcome conversion losses and to avoid the need for photovoltaic cells. On Earth, either photovoltaic cells or a steam turbine alternator on a solar tower, or a similar conventional, relatively high efficiency cycle are used for electricity generation. The constraints which apply to the design of the optical system if a single satellite is placed in geostationary orbit are outlined. A single lens and a two lens system are discussed.

  16. Passive solar reflector satellite revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, C.; Daly, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Passive light weight reflectors in space which direct the incident solar energy to a specified location on the Earth surface are proposed as an alternative system for the solar power satellite to overcome conversion losses and to avoid the need for photovoltaic cells. On Earth, either photovoltaic cells or a steam turbine alternator on a solar tower, or a similar conventional, relatively high efficiency cycle are used for electricity generation. The constraints which apply to the design of the optical system if a single satellite is placed in geostationary orbit are outlined. A single lens and a two lens system are discussed.

  17. Special test equipment and fixturing for MSAT reflector assembly alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Jeffrey A.; Zinn, Michael R.; Mccarten, David R.

    1994-01-01

    The MSAT Reflector Assembly is a state of the art subsystem for Mobile Satellite (MSAT), a geosynchronous-based commercial mobile telecommunication satellite program serving North America. The Reflector Assembly consisted of a deployable, three-hinge, folding-segment Boom, deployable 5.7 x 5.3-meter 16-rib Wrap-Rib Reflector, and a Reflector Pointing Mechanism (RPM). The MSAT spacecraft was based on a Hughes HS601 spacecraft bus carrying two Reflector Assemblies independently dedicated for L-band transmit and receive operations. Lockheed Missiles and Space Company (LMSC) designed and built the Reflector Assembly for MSAT under contract to SPAR Aerospace Ltd. Two MSAT satellites were built jointly by SPAR Aerospace Ltd. and Hughes Space and Communications Co. for this program, the first scheduled for launch in 1994. When scaled for wavelength, the assembly and alignment requirements for the Reflector Assembly were in many instances equivalent to or exceeded that of a diffraction-limited visible light optical system. Combined with logistical constraints inherent to large, compliant, lightweight structures; 'bolt-on' alignment; and remote, indirect spacecraft access; the technical challenges were formidable. This document describes the alignment methods, the special test equipment, and fixturing for Reflector Assembly assembly and alignment.

  18. Design tradeoff study for reflector antenna systems for the shuttle imaging microwave system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    A general tradeoff is made of the symmetric Cassegrain antenna with regard to the possibility of meeting a 90% beam efficiency. The effects of aperture taper and blockage are calculated using an adjustable sidelobe circular distribution. Numerical integration is used. For the feed spillover calculation, a low sidelobe symmetric feed pattern is used with the equivalent parabola and numerical integration. Reflector cross polarization is calculated using double numerical integration. Reflector back lobes are estimated from radiation pattern envelopes of commercial common carrier dish antennas. The curves allow a range of f/D to be determined for a specified edge taper and blockage diameter ratio, and with a table of Cassegrain parameters, a range of possible designs that meet the 90% beam efficiency is obtained. It is shown that the feed and reflector design and implementation must be carefully done.

  19. Corner reflector SAR interferometry as an element of a landslide early warning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, J.; Riedmann, M.; Lang, O.; Anderssohn, J.; Thuro, K.; Wunderlich, Th.; Heunecke, O.; Minet, Ch.

    2012-04-01

    The development of efficient and cost-effective landslide monitoring techniques is the central aim of the alpEWAS research project (www.alpewas.de). Within the scope of the project a terrestrial geosensor network on a landslide site in the Bavarian Alps has been set up, consisting of low cost GNSS with subcentimeter precision, time domain reflectometry (TDR) and video tacheometry (VTPS). To increase the spatial sampling, 16 low-cost Radar Corner Reflectors (CRs) were installed on the site in 2011. The CRs are to reflect radar signals back to the TerraSAR-X radar satellite, allowing for precise displacement measurements. The subject of this study is the application of the CR SAR Interferometry (CRInSAR) technique, and the integration of the derived motion field into an early warning system for landslide monitoring based on terrestrial measurements. An accurate validation data set is realized independently of the monitoring network using millimeter precision GNSS and tacheometer measurements. The 12 CRs from Astrium Geo-Information Services employed over the test site were specifically designed for TerraSAR-X satellite passes. They are made of concrete with integrated metal plates weighing about 80 to 100 kg. They are of triangular trihedral shape with minimal dimensions to obtain a Radar Cross Section 100 times stronger than that of the surrounding area. The concrete guarantees stability against harsh weather conditions, and robustness with respect to vandalism or theft. In addition, the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) installed another four CRs made entirely out of aluminum, with the TUM reflectors being of similar minimum size than the Astrium reflectors. Three CRs were placed on assumed stable ground outside the slope area and shall act as reference reflectors. Since the installation date of most CRs (25/08/2011), TerraSAR-X HighResolution SpotLight data have been repeatedly acquired from ascending orbit over the test

  20. Fiber optic sensor employing successively destroyed coupled points or reflectors for detecting shock wave speed and damage location

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, J.D.

    1995-08-29

    A shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location is disclosed. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival ``points`` constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the ``points`` of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor. 6 figs.

  1. Fiber optic sensor employing successively destroyed coupled points or reflectors for detecting shock wave speed and damage location

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    1995-01-01

    A shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival "points" constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the "points" of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor.

  2. Millimeter Wave Imaging System Using Monopole Antenna with Cylindrical Reflector and Silicon Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Maya; Fukunaga, Kaori; Suzuki, Masaki; Saito, Shingo; Fujii, Katsumi; Hosako, Iwao; Yamanaka, Yukio

    2011-04-01

    We built a reflection imaging system that uses a monopole antenna with a cylindrical reflector and silicon semi-spherical lens for millimeter waves to identify detachments of alabaster from support material such as wood and stone, which can be subject to painting deterioration. Based on the electric field property near the monopole antenna in the system and the lens effect, the system was able to clearly image a test sample made of 2-mm width aluminium tape, which was placed within a range of approximately 10 mm from the lens. In practical imaging testing using a detachment model, which consists of alabaster and wood plating, the result also showed the possibility of observing slight detachment of the alabaster from the wood more easily than an imaging with large numerical aperture.

  3. Welding torch with arc light reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A welding torch arc light reflector is disclosed for welding torches having optical viewing systems. A schematic of a welding torch having an internal coaxial viewing system consisting of a lens which focuses the field of view of the weld scene of the workpiece onto the end of the fiberoptic bundle is provided. The transmitted image of the fiberoptic bundle is provided to a camera lens which focuses it onto a TV sensor array for transmission. To improve the parity of the image of the monitoring system, an arc light reflector is shown fitted to the end of the torch housing or gas cup. The arc light reflector has an internal conical section portion which is polished to serve as a mirror which reflects the bright arc light back onto the darker areas of the weld area and thereby provides a more detailed image for the monitoring system. The novelty of the invention lies in the use of an arc light reflector on welding torches having optical viewing systems.

  4. Welding torch with arc light reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Stephen S.

    1986-12-01

    A welding torch arc light reflector is disclosed for welding torches having optical viewing systems. A schematic of a welding torch having an internal coaxial viewing system consisting of a lens which focuses the field of view of the weld scene of the workpiece onto the end of the fiberoptic bundle is provided. The transmitted image of the fiberoptic bundle is provided to a camera lens which focuses it onto a TV sensor array for transmission. To improve the parity of the image of the monitoring system, an arc light reflector is shown fitted to the end of the torch housing or gas cup. The arc light reflector has an internal conical section portion which is polished to serve as a mirror which reflects the bright arc light back onto the darker areas of the weld area and thereby provides a more detailed image for the monitoring system. The novelty of the invention lies in the use of an arc light reflector on welding torches having optical viewing systems.

  5. Advanced reflector materials for solar concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G; Williams, T; Wendelin, T

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes the research and development program at the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in advanced reflector materials for solar concentrators. NREL's research thrust is to develop solar reflector materials that maintain high specular reflectance for extended lifetimes under outdoor service conditions and whose cost is significantly lower than existing products. Much of this work has been in collaboration with private-sector companies that have extensive expertise in vacuum-coating and polymer-film technologies. Significant progress and other promising developments will be discussed. These are expected to lead to additional improvements needed to commercialize solar thermal concentration systems and make them economically attractive to the solar manufacturing industry. To explicitly demonstrate the optical durability of candidate reflector materials in real-world service conditions, a network of instrumented outdoor exposure sites has been activated.

  6. Advanced reflector materials for solar concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Gary; Williams, Tom; Wendelin, Tim

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes the research and development at the US National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in advanced reflector materials for solar concentrators. NREL's research thrust is to develop solar reflector materials that maintain high specular reflectance for extended lifetimes under outdoor service conditions and whose cost is significantly lower than existing products. Much of this work has been in collaboration with private-sector companies that have extensive expertise in vacuum-coating and polymer-film technologies. Significant progress and other promising developments will be discussed. These are expected to lead to additional improvements needed to commercialize solar thermal concentration systems and make them economically attractive to the solar manufacturing industry. To explicitly demonstrate the optical durability of candidate reflector materials in real-world service conditions, a network of instrumented outdoor exposure sites has been activated.

  7. A self pulsed laser ranging system under development at 'JPL'. [for onboard measurement of large space deployable reflector surface distortions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, M.

    1979-01-01

    The performance of large space deployable antenna reflectors to be used for broad-based communications systems is largely dependent on the accuracy with which the surface figure can be constructed and maintained. The paper examines various surface distortion tolerance and measurement requirements for various classes of communication antennas. Several surface measuring methods are described including a self-pulsed laser ranging system.

  8. Performance of Cat’s Eye Modulating Retro-Reflectors for Free-Space Optical Communications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    attenuation is higher and in addition they fall off as 1/R 4 instead of 1/R 2 . The MRR parameters that affect the link are the MRR’s optical antenna gain...its modulation efficiency, and it modulation bandwidth. To overcome, its large propagation losses the MRR must exhibit a high optical antenna gain...light as its retro-reflects it. Thus its optical antenna gain is the product of the classical formulas for receiver gain and transmitter gain. The

  9. An analysis of thermionic space nuclear reactor power system: I. Effect of disassembling radial reflector, following a reactivity initiated accident

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Paramonov, D. )

    1993-01-10

    An analysis is performed to determine the effect of disassembling the radial reflector of the TOPAZ-II reactor, following a hypothetical severe Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA). Such an RIA is assumed to occur during the system start-up in orbit due to a malfunction of the drive mechanism of the control drums, causing the drums to rotate the full 180[degree] outward at their maximum speed of 1.4[degree]/s. Results indicate that disassembling only three of twelve radial reflector panels would successfully shutdown the reactor, with little overheating of the fuel and the moderator.

  10. Optical Coating Performance and Thermal Structure Design for Heat Reflectors of JWST Electronic Control Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Threat, Felix; Garrison, Matt; Perrygo, Chuck; Bousquet, Robert; Rashford, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) consists of an infrared-optimized Optical Telescope Element (OTE) that is cooled down to 40 degrees Kelvin. A second adjacent component to the OTE is the Integrated Science Instrument Module, or ISIM. This module includes the electronic compartment, which provides the mounting surfaces and ambient thermally controlled environment for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the 200 watts generated from the ISIM structure away from the OTE is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft's own heat does not interfere with the infrared light detected from distant cosmic sources. This technical challenge is overcome by a thermal subsystem unit that provides passive cooling to the ISIM control electronics. The proposed design of this thermal radiator consists of a lightweight structure made out of composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings. In this paper, we will present characterizations of the coating emittance, bidirectional reflectance, and mechanical structure design that will affect the performance of this passive cooling system.

  11. Optical Coating Performance and Thermal Structure Design for Heat Reflectors of JWST Electronic Control Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Threat, Felix; Garrison, Matt; Perrygo, Chuck; Bousquet, Robert; Rashford, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) consists of an infrared-optimized Optical Telescope Element (OTE) that is cooled down to 40 degrees Kelvin. A second adjacent component to the OTE is the Integrated Science Instrument Module, or ISIM. This module includes the electronic compartment, which provides the mounting surfaces and ambient thermally controlled environment for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the 200 watts generated from the ISIM structure away from the OTE is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft's own heat does not interfere with the infrared light detected from distant cosmic sources. This technical challenge is overcome by a thermal subsystem unit that provides passive cooling to the ISIM control electronics. The proposed design of this thermal radiator consists of a lightweight structure made out of composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings. In this paper, we will present characterizations of the coating emittance, bidirectional reflectance, and mechanical structure design that will affect the performance of this passive cooling system.

  12. Disordered animal multilayer reflectors and the localization of light.

    PubMed

    Jordan, T M; Partridge, J C; Roberts, N W

    2014-12-06

    Multilayer optical reflectors constructed from 'stacks' of alternating layers of high and low refractive index dielectric materials are present in many animals. For example, stacks of guanine crystals with cytoplasm gaps occur within the skin and scales of fish, and stacks of protein platelets with cytoplasm gaps occur within the iridophores of cephalopods. Common to all these animal multilayer reflectors are different degrees of random variation in the thicknesses of the individual layers in the stack, ranging from highly periodic structures to strongly disordered systems. However, previous discussions of the optical effects of such thickness disorder have been made without quantitative reference to the propagation of light within the reflector. Here, we demonstrate that Anderson localization provides a general theoretical framework to explain the common coherent interference and optical properties of these biological reflectors. Firstly, we illustrate how the localization length enables the spectral properties of the reflections from more weakly disordered 'coloured' and more strongly disordered 'silvery' reflectors to be explained by the same physical process. Secondly, we show how the polarization properties of reflection can be controlled within guanine-cytoplasm reflectors, with an interplay of birefringence and thickness disorder explaining the origin of broadband polarization-insensitive reflectivity.

  13. Disordered animal multilayer reflectors and the localization of light

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, T. M.; Partridge, J. C.; Roberts, N. W.

    2014-01-01

    Multilayer optical reflectors constructed from ‘stacks’ of alternating layers of high and low refractive index dielectric materials are present in many animals. For example, stacks of guanine crystals with cytoplasm gaps occur within the skin and scales of fish, and stacks of protein platelets with cytoplasm gaps occur within the iridophores of cephalopods. Common to all these animal multilayer reflectors are different degrees of random variation in the thicknesses of the individual layers in the stack, ranging from highly periodic structures to strongly disordered systems. However, previous discussions of the optical effects of such thickness disorder have been made without quantitative reference to the propagation of light within the reflector. Here, we demonstrate that Anderson localization provides a general theoretical framework to explain the common coherent interference and optical properties of these biological reflectors. Firstly, we illustrate how the localization length enables the spectral properties of the reflections from more weakly disordered ‘coloured’ and more strongly disordered ‘silvery’ reflectors to be explained by the same physical process. Secondly, we show how the polarization properties of reflection can be controlled within guanine–cytoplasm reflectors, with an interplay of birefringence and thickness disorder explaining the origin of broadband polarization-insensitive reflectivity. PMID:25339688

  14. Optical figure testing of prototype mirrors for JPL's Precision Segmented Reflector (PSR) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochberg, Eric B.

    1991-01-01

    JPL's PSR program is developing enabling technologies for large space telescopes employing segmented optics, and in particular, lightweight, thermally stable mirrors for telescopes operating at sub-mm wavelengths. JPL's vacuum cryointerferometric optical test facility includes a computer-controlled phase shifting interferometer operating at 10.59 microns and laser metrology for measurement of piston and absolute radius of curvature. The optical metrology has been integrated with a large vacuum chamber including a liquid nitrogen shroud capable of radiatively cooling 1.5 meter aperture mirrors down to 150 K. The facility is now being used to characterize prototype mirrors in both their room-temperature 'as-replicated' condition, and under orbital temperature conditions. The performance and limitations of the optical metrology hardware and software components are noted. Representative test results on prototype one meter-class composite mirrors being developed for PSR and related ground-based programs are also presented.

  15. Large space-borne reflector antenna characterization: Evaluation and distortion compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoferer, Robert Alois

    For space-borne reflector antenna applications, both size and weight of the antenna is restricted to the payload capacity of the launch vehicle. Advantages in the material and manufacturing capabilities of large reflector antennas over the recent years have made it possible to propose antenna systems with ever increasing size and operating frequency. Before deployment, however, it is crucial to accurately evaluate the radiation characteristics of these antennas. Also, if compensatory measures are applied to compensate for structural distortions, it is necessary to assess its effectiveness for a particular the examined antenna configuration. In this dissertation, an effective dual reflector analysis technique has been developed, using a combination of Physical Optics, Geometrical Optics and Fourier-Jacobi surface expansion. This analysis technique has been applied to two classes of reflector antenna applications. First, two challenging single reflector antenna configurations have been designed and analyzed. Second, the analysis technique is used for subreflector shaping in the process of main reflector distortion compensation for an electrically large dual reflector antenna configuration. Note that the inflatable reflector antenna configurations investigated in this thesis belong to the class reflector antennas larger than 20 m, which are now being considered for future space missions.

  16. Double-tailored nonimaging reflector optics for maximum-performance solar concentration.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Alex; Gordon, Jeffrey M

    2010-09-01

    A nonimaging strategy that tailors two mirror contours for concentration near the étendue limit is explored, prompted by solar applications where a sizable gap between the optic and absorber is required. Subtle limitations of this simultaneous multiple surface method approach are derived, rooted in the manner in which phase space boundaries can be tailored according to the edge-ray principle. The fundamental categories of double-tailored reflective optics are identified, only a minority of which can pragmatically offer maximum concentration at high collection efficiency. Illustrative examples confirm that acceptance half-angles as large as 30 mrad can be realized at a flux concentration of approximately 1000.

  17. Electromagnetic backscattering by corner reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, C. A.; Griesser, T.

    1986-01-01

    The Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD), which supplements Geometric Optics (GO), and the Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD), which supplements Physical Optics (PO), are used to predict the backscatter cross sections of dihedral corner reflectors which have right, obtuse, or acute included angles. These theories allow individual backscattering mechanisms of the dihedral corner reflectors to be identified and provide good agreement with experimental results in the azimuthal plane. The advantages and disadvantages of the geometrical and physical theories are discussed in terms of their accuracy, usefulness, and complexity. Numerous comparisons of analytical results with experimental data are presented. While physical optics alone is more accurate and more useful than geometrical optics alone, the combination of geometrical optics and geometrical diffraction seems to out perform physical optics and physical diffraction when compared with experimental data, especially for acute angle dihedral corner reflectors.

  18. Electromagnetic backscattering by corner reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanis, C. A.; Griesser, T.

    1986-05-01

    The Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD), which supplements Geometric Optics (GO), and the Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD), which supplements Physical Optics (PO), are used to predict the backscatter cross sections of dihedral corner reflectors which have right, obtuse, or acute included angles. These theories allow individual backscattering mechanisms of the dihedral corner reflectors to be identified and provide good agreement with experimental results in the azimuthal plane. The advantages and disadvantages of the geometrical and physical theories are discussed in terms of their accuracy, usefulness, and complexity. Numerous comparisons of analytical results with experimental data are presented. While physical optics alone is more accurate and more useful than geometrical optics alone, the combination of geometrical optics and geometrical diffraction seems to out perform physical optics and physical diffraction when compared with experimental data, especially for acute angle dihedral corner reflectors.

  19. Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography using an Vernier-tuned distributed Bragg reflector swept laser in the mouse middle ear.

    PubMed

    Park, Jesung; Carbajal, Esteban F; Chen, Xi; Oghalai, John S; Applegate, Brian E

    2014-11-01

    Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhOCT) offers exquisite sensitivity to mechanical vibration in biological tissues. There is growing interest in using PhOCT for imaging the nanometer scale vibrations of the ear in animal models of hearing disorders. Swept-source-based systems offer fast acquisition speeds, suppression of common mode noise via balanced detection, and good signal roll-off. However, achieving high phase stability is difficult due to nonlinear laser sweeps and trigger jitter in a typical swept laser source. Here, we report on the initial application of a Vernier-tuned distributed Bragg reflector (VT-DBR) swept laser as the source for a fiber-based PhOCT system. The VT-DBR swept laser is electronically tuned and precisely controls sweeps without mechanical movement, resulting in highly linear sweeps with high wavelength stability and repeatability. We experimentally measured a phase sensitivity of 0.4 pm standard deviation, within a factor of less than 2 of the computed shot-noise limit. We further demonstrated the system by making ex vivo measurements of the vibrations of the mouse middle ear structures.

  20. Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography using an Vernier-tuned distributed Bragg reflector swept laser in the mouse middle ear

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jesung; Carbajal, Esteban F.; Chen, Xi; Oghalai, John S.; Applegate, Brian E.

    2017-01-01

    Phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PhOCT) offers exquisite sensitivity to mechanical vibration in biological tissues. There is growing interest in using PhOCT for imaging the nanometer scale vibrations of the ear in animal models of hearing disorders. Swept-source-based systems offer fast acquisition speeds, suppression of common mode noise via balanced detection, and good signal roll-off. However, achieving high phase stability is difficult due to nonlinear laser sweeps and trigger jitter in a typical swept laser source. Here, we report on the initial application of a Vernier-tuned distributed Bragg reflector (VT-DBR) swept laser as the source for a fiber-based PhOCT system. The VT-DBR swept laser is electronically tuned and precisely controls sweeps without mechanical movement, resulting in highly linear sweeps with high wavelength stability and repeatability. We experimentally measured a phase sensitivity of 0.4 pm standard deviation, within a factor of less than 2 of the computed shot-noise limit. We further demonstrated the system by making ex vivo measurements of the vibrations of the mouse middle ear structures. PMID:25361322

  1. The hybrid control of an orbiting flexible tethered antenna/reflector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Zhaozhi; Bainum, Peter M.

    In considering the dynamics of tethered spacecraft systems, the longitudinal vibration of the tether has been ignored by most researchers. For the tethered antenna/reflector system considered here, however, the longitudinal vibration of the tether has a significant effect on the tether tension and is coupled to the rest of the motions of the system. This can result in the performance of the system, under the control logic drawn from the mathematical model without consideration of the tether longitudinal vibration, to degrade, or even to become unstable in some cases. The frequencies of the longitudinal modes are quite high; direct measurement of the vibration is not easily implemented. Therefore, a passive damper is designed for possible use. The damper is mounted in the subsatellite at the end of the tether. The system without the damper is neutrally stable in the gravitational field. But the in-plane subsystem will be asymptotically stable with the proper damper design parameters. It is found that only the tether longitudinal vibration and the axisymmetric modes of the shell are effectively damped by the passive damper. Therefore, attitude and shape control is assumed to result from the combination of active actuators, the tether tension, and the passive damper. The linear quadratic regulator (LQR) technique is employed to synthesize the control laws.

  2. Use of acoustic reflector to make a compact photoacoustic tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalva, Sandeep Kumar; Pramanik, Manojit

    2017-02-01

    A typical photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system uses a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser for irradiating the sample and a single-element ultrasound transducer (UST) for acquiring the photoacoustic data. Conventionally, in PAT systems, the UST is held in a horizontal position and moved in a circular motion around the sample in full 2π radians. Horizontal positioning of the UST requires a large water tank to house, and load on the motor is also high. To overcome this limitation, we used the UST in the vertical plane instead of the horizontal plane. The photoacoustic (PA) waves generated from the sample are directed to the detector surface using an acoustic reflector placed at 45 deg to the transducer body. Hence, we can reduce the scanning radius, which, in turn, will reduce the size of the water tank and load on the motor, and the overall conventional PAT system size can be minimized. In this work, we demonstrate that with this system configuration, we acquire nearly similar images for phantom and in vivo data as that of the conventional PAT system using both flat and focused USTs.

  3. Development of the Maypole (Hoop/Column) deployable reflector concept for large space systems applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D. C.; Sikes, L. D.

    1980-01-01

    The conceptual design, performance projections, and materials development for the maypole (hoop/column) reflector concept are summarized. Factors influencing configuration choices are discussed along with quad aperture/feed characteristics and antenna requirements based on missions.

  4. Solar passive ceiling system. Final report. [Passive solar heating system with venetian blind reflectors and latent heat storage in ceiling

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    The construction of a 1200 square foot building, with full basement, built to be used as a branch library in a rural area is described. The primary heating source is a passive solar system consisting of a south facing window system. The system consists of: a set of windows located in the south facing wall only, composed of double glazed units; a set of reflectors mounted in each window which reflects sunlight up to the ceiling (the reflectors are similar to venetian blinds); a storage area in the ceiling which absorbs the heat from the reflected sunlight and stores it in foil salt pouches laid in the ceiling; and an automated curtain which automatically covers and uncovers the south facing window system. The system is totally passive and uses no blowers, pumps or other active types of heat distribution equipment. The building contains a basement which is normally not heated, and the north facing wall is bermed four feet high around the north side.

  5. High resolution on-chip optical filter array based on double subwavelength grating reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Horie, Yu; Arbabi, Amir; Han, Seunghoon; Faraon, Andrei

    2015-11-05

    An optical filter array consisting of vertical narrow-band Fabry-Pèrot (FP) resonators formed by two highly reflective high contrast subwavelength grating mirrors is reported. The filters are designed to cover a wide range of operation wavelengths ( Δλ/λ=5%) just by changing the in-plane grating parameters while the device thickness is maintained constant. In conclusion, operation in the telecom band with transmission efficiencies greater than 40% and quality factors greater than 1,000 are measured experimentally for filters fabricated on the same substrate.

  6. Lambertian back reflector in Cu(InGa)Se2 solar cell: optical modeling and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahan, Nir; Jehl, Zacharie; Guillemoles, Jean-François; Lincot, Daniel; Naghavi, Negar; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2013-03-01

    In the past years, reducing the thickness of the absorber layer in CIGS-based solar cells has become a key issue to reduce the global Indium consumption and thus increased its competitiveness. As the absorber thickness is reduced, less photons are absorbed and consequently the efficiency decreases. It is well known that scattering light in the absorbing layer increases the effective optical length, which results in enhanced absorption. In this study, we have deposited a transparent conductive oxide as a back contact to the cell with a white paint on the rear surface to diffuse the light back to the cell. A proof of concept device is realized and optically characterized. Modeling scattering by rough surfaces can be done by brute force numerical simulations but does not provide a physical insight in the absorption mechanisms. In our approach, we regard the collimated solar light and its specular reection/transmission as coherent. On an irregular surface, part of the collimated light is scattered in other directions. To model this diffuse light, we adopt the formalism of the radiative transfer equation, which is an energy transport equation. Thus, interference effects are accounted for only in the coherent part. A special attention is dedicated to preserving reciprocity and energy conservation on the interface. It is seen that most of the absorption near the energy bandgap of CIGS is due to the diffuse light and that this approach can yield very significant photocurrent gains below 500nm absorber thickness.

  7. K- and Ka-band mobile-vehicular satellite-tracking reflector antenna system for the NASA ACTS mobile terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Densmore, Art; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Wu, T. K.; Woo, Ken

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the K- and Ka-band mobile-vehicular satellite-tracking reflector antenna system for NASA's ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) project. ACTS is NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellites. The AMT project will make the first experimental use of ACTS soon after the satellite is operational, to demonstrate mobile communications via the satellite from a van on the road. The AMT antenna system consists of a mechanically steered small reflector antenna, using a shared aperture for both frequency bands and fitting under a radome of 23 cm diameter and 10 cm height, and a microprocessor controlled antenna controller that tracks the satellite as the vehicle moves about. The RF and mechanical characteristics of the antenna and the antenna tracking control system are discussed. Measurements of the antenna performance are presented.

  8. On the development of control laws for an orbiting tethered antenna/reflector system test scale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong; Bainum, Peter M.

    The paper presents a general mathematical model for the dynamics of an orbiting shallow spherical shell (antenna/reflector) system connected by a massive flexible tether to a subsatellite. By proper selection of the state and control penalty matrices, this hybrid control system can be used effectively during stationkeeping and for deployment. The control law gains for stationkeeping and deployment of the system are obtained on the basis of the structural data for a future proposed real space antenna/reflector. In order to prove the feasibility of this concept, a test scale model for an in-orbit experiment is also studied. Numerical results are presented both for the real antenna as well as for the proposed in-orbit (test) scale model. It is shown that the dynamic behavior of the real model and scale model are similar when both are placed in the same altitude orbit.

  9. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  10. Surface Accuracy Measurement Sensor for Deployable Reflector Antennas (SAMS DRA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neiswander, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Specifications, system configurations, and concept tests for surface measurement sensors for deployable reflector antennas are presented. Two approaches toward the optical measurement of remote target displacements are discussed: optical ranging, in which the basic measurement is target-to-sensor range; and in particular, optical angular sensing, in which the principle measurements are of target angular displacements lateral to the line of sight. Four representative space antennas are examined.

  11. Active optical zoom system

    DOEpatents

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  12. Solar-powered illuminated reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, J.C.

    1987-05-26

    A highway traffic marker is described comprising: a housing adapted to be secured to a highway; a reflector in the housing for reflecting light in at least one predetermined direction toward highway traffic; at least one light source in the housing; a battery in circuit with the light source; a photovoltaic system is the housing for charging the battery. The housing includes window means for transmitting light from the light source outward from the housing in the predetermined direction; and optical lightguide element is mounted in the housing for guiding light from the one light source to the window means. The optical lightguide element has a generally conical shape and the window means being a Fresnel lens.

  13. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings ...

  14. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings ...

  15. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings ...

  16. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings ...

  17. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings ...

  18. Hohlraum glint and laser pre-pulse detector for NIF experiments using velocity interferometer system for any reflector.

    PubMed

    Moody, J D; Clancy, T J; Frieders, G; Celliers, P M; Ralph, J; Turnbull, D P

    2014-11-01

    Laser pre-pulse and early-time laser reflection from the hohlraum wall onto the capsule (termed "glint") can cause capsule imprint and unwanted early-time shocks on indirect drive implosion experiments. In a minor modification to the existing velocity interferometer system for any reflector diagnostic on NIF a fast-response vacuum photodiode was added to detect this light. The measurements show evidence of laser pre-pulse and possible light reflection off the hohlraum wall and onto the capsule.

  19. Optical monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nev, J. T.; Wrench, E. H.; Fox, M. G.; Lave, H.

    1973-01-01

    Instrument can measure optical transmission, reflectance, and scattering. This information can be used to identify changes in optical properties or deviations from required optical standards. Device consists of monochromatic source, photo detector, transfer mirror, and hemiellipsoid. System might be used to measure optical properties of thin film.

  20. A method for producing a shaped contour radiation pattern using a single shaped reflector and a single feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherrette, Alan R.; Lee, Shung-Wu; Acosta, Roberto J.

    1989-01-01

    Eliminating the corporate feed network in shaped contour beam antennas will reduce the expense, weight, and RF loss of the antenna system. One way of producing a shaped contour beam without using a feed network is to use a single shaped reflector with a single feed element. For a prescribed contour beam and feed, an optimization method for designing the reflector shape is given. As a design example, a shaped reflector is designed to produce a continental U.S. coverage (CONUS) beam. The RF performance of the shaped reflector is then verified by physical optics.

  1. A Method for Producing a Shaped Contour Radiation Pattern Using a Single Shaped Reflector and a Single Feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherrette, A. R.; Lee, S. W.; Acosta, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    Eliminating the corporate feed network in shaped contour beam antennas will reduce the expense, weight, and RF loss of the antenna system. One way of producing a shaped contour beam without using a feed network is to use a single shaped reflector with a single feed element. For a prescribed contour beam and feed, an optimization method for designing the reflector shape is given. As a design example, a shaped reflector is designed to produce a continental U.S. coverage (CONUS) beam. The RF performance of the shaped reflector is then verified by physical optics.

  2. A method for producing a shaped contour radiation pattern using a single shaped reflector and a single feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherrette, Alan R.; Lee, Shung-Wu; Acosta, Roberto J.

    1989-01-01

    Eliminating the corporate feed network in shaped contour beam antennas will reduce the expense, weight, and RF loss of the antenna system. One way of producing a shaped contour beam without using a feed network is to use a single shaped reflector with a single feed element. For a prescribed contour beam and feed, an optimization method for designing the reflector shape is given. As a design example, a shaped reflector is designed to produce a continental U.S. coverage (CONUS) beam. The RF performance of the shaped reflector is then verified by physical optics.

  3. Design of an offset fed scanning antenna for the shuttle imaging microwave system. [performance prediction parabolic reflectors and microwave antennas for space shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustincic, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    A design study is described for a mechanically scanned offset fed parabolic torus reflector antenna having a 4m x 2m aperture for simultaneous use at eleven frequency channels from UHF to millimeter wavelengths. A design for the antenna is presented utilizing dipole and horn feeds at the low frequencies and a Gregorian aberration correcting subreflector system for feeding the torus at the high frequencies. The results and details of a theroetical study based on geometrical optics performed to evaluate the high frequency design and the results of an experimental study involving a one-tenth scale model for evaluation of the low-frequency behavior are given. Beam efficiencies, antenna patterns, beamwidths and cross polarization levels are presented and these results demonstrate that the antenna concept is viable for the Shuttle Imaging Microwave System requirement.

  4. Precision segmented reflectors for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehman, David H.; Pawlik, Eugene V.; Meinel, Aden B.; Fichter, W. B.

    1990-01-01

    A project to develop precision segmented reflectors (PSRs) which operate at submillimeter wavelengths is described. The development of a light efficient means for the construction of large-aperture segmented reflecting space-based telescopes is the primary aim of the project. The 20-m Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) telescope is being developed for a survey mission, and it will make use of the reflector panels and materials, structures, and figure control being elaborated for the PSR. The surface accuracy of a 0.9-m PSR panel is shown to be 1.74-micron RMS, the goal of 100-micron RMS positioning accuracy has been achieved for a 4-m erectable structure. A voice-coil actuator for the figure control system architecture demonstrated 1-micron panel control accuracy in a 3-axis evaluation. The PSR technology is demonstrated to be of value for several NASA projects involving optical communications and interferometers as well as missions which make use of large-diameter segmented reflectors.

  5. Wirelessly Controllable Inflated Electroactive Polymer (EAP) Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chang, Zensheu; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea

    2005-01-01

    Inflatable membrane reflectors are attractive for deployable, large aperture, lightweight optical and microwave systems in micro-gravity space environment. However, any fabrication flaw or temperature variation may results in significant aberration of the surface. Even for a perfectly fabricated inflatable membrane mirror with uniform thickness, theory shows it will form a Hencky curve surface but a desired parabolic or spherical surface. Precision control of the surfaceshape of extremely flexible membrane structures is a critical challenge for the success of this technology. Wirelessly controllable inflated reflectors made of electroactive polymers (EAP) are proposed in this paper. A finite element model was configured to predict the behavior of the inflatable EAP membranes under pre-strains, pressures and distributed electric charges on the surface. To explore the controllability of the inflatable EAP reflectors, an iteration algorism was developed to find the required electric actuation for correcting the aberration of the Hencky curve to the desired parabolic curve. The correction capability of the reflectors with available EAP materials was explored numerically and is presented in this paper.

  6. RF Design and Predicted Performance for a Future 34-meter Shaped Dual-reflector Antenna System Using the Common Aperture X-S Feedhorn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, W. F.

    1983-01-01

    The Networks Consolidation Program (NCP) will utilize 34-meter shaped dual-reflector Cassegrain antennas. The shaping calculations, the X/S-band feedhorn to be used, and the predicted RF performance of this antenna system are discussed.

  7. RF Design and Predicted Performance for a Future 34-meter Shaped Dual-reflector Antenna System Using the Common Aperture X-S Feedhorn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, W. F.

    1983-01-01

    The Networks Consolidation Program (NCP) will utilize 34-meter shaped dual-reflector Cassegrain antennas. The shaping calculations, the X/S-band feedhorn to be used, and the predicted RF performance of this antenna system are discussed.

  8. Micromachined, Electrostatically Deformable Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartman, Randall K.; Wang, Paul K. C.; Miller, Linda M.; Kenny, Thomas W.; Kaiser, William J.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Agronin, Michael L.

    1995-01-01

    Micromachined, closed-loop, electrostatically actuated reflectors (microCLEARs) provide relatively simple and inexpensive alternatives to large, complex, expensive adaptive optics used to control wavefronts of beams of light in astronomy and in experimental laser weapons. Micromachining used to make deformable mirror, supporting structure, and actuation circuitry. Development of microCLEARs may not only overcome some of disadvantages and limitations of older adaptive optics but may also satisfy demands of potential market for small, inexpensive deformable mirrors in electronically controlled film cameras, video cameras, and other commercial optoelectronic instruments.

  9. Performance improvements of symmetry-breaking reflector structures in nonimaging devices

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    2004-01-13

    A structure and method for providing a broken symmetry reflector structure for a solar concentrator device. The component of the optical direction vector along the symmetry axis is conserved for all rays propagated through a translationally symmetric optical device. This quantity, referred to as the translational skew invariant, is conserved in rotationally symmetric optical systems. Performance limits for translationally symmetric nonimaging optical devices are derived from the distributions of the translational skew invariant for the optical source and for the target to which flux is to be transferred. A numerically optimized non-tracking solar concentrator utilizing symmetry-breaking reflector structures can overcome the performance limits associated with translational symmetry.

  10. The design of the central-axis reflector (ZAS).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hügenell, H.

    1988-10-01

    The central-axis reflector (ZAS), the design principle which is presented in the paper is a segmented-mirror telescope. The inventions relate mainly to the optical system and to the tracking apparatus. A large number of small individual mirror bodies, ground off-axis (hexagonal/polygonal) produce one primary mirror with closed circular aperture when joined together.

  11. RF verification tasks underway at the Harris Corporation for multiple aperture reflector system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutwein, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    Mesh effects on gain and patterns and adjacent aperture coupling effects for "pie" and circular apertures are discussed. Wire effects for Harris model with Langley scale model results included for assessing D/lamda effects, and wire effects with adjacent aperture coupling were determined. Reflector surface distortion effects (pillows and manufacturing roughness) were studied.

  12. RF verification tasks underway at the Harris Corporation for multiple aperture reflector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutwein, T. A.

    1982-03-01

    Mesh effects on gain and patterns and adjacent aperture coupling effects for "pie" and circular apertures are discussed. Wire effects for Harris model with Langley scale model results included for assessing D/lamda effects, and wire effects with adjacent aperture coupling were determined. Reflector surface distortion effects (pillows and manufacturing roughness) were studied.

  13. RF verification tasks underway at the Harris Corporation for multiple aperture reflector system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutwein, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    Mesh effects on gain and patterns and adjacent aperture coupling effects for "pie" and circular apertures are discussed. Wire effects for Harris model with Langley scale model results included for assessing D/lamda effects, and wire effects with adjacent aperture coupling were determined. Reflector surface distortion effects (pillows and manufacturing roughness) were studied.

  14. SEISMIC-REFLECTOR DATABASE SOFTWARE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Evelyn L.; Hosom, John-Paul; ,

    1986-01-01

    The seismic data analysis (SDA) software system facilitates generation of marine seismic reflector databases composed of reflector depths, travel times, root-mean-square and interval velocities, geographic coordinates, and identifying information. System processes include digitizing of seismic profiles and velocity semblance curves, merging of velocity and navigation data with profile travel-time data, calculation of reflector depths in meters, profile and map graphic displays, data editing and smoothing, and entry of finalized data into a comprehensive database. An overview of concepts, file structures, and programs is presented.

  15. Reflective optical imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Shafer, David R.

    2000-01-01

    An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The four optical elements are characterized in order from object to image as convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for step and scan lithography methods. The invention increases the slit dimensions associated with ringfield scanning optics, improves wafer throughput and allows higher semiconductor device density.

  16. Modular reflector concept study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of space erecting a 100 meter paraboloidal radio frequency reflector by joining a number of individually deployed structural modules. Three module design concepts were considered: (1) the deployable cell module (DCM); (2) the modular paraboloidal erectable truss antenna (Mod-PETA); and (3) the modular erectable truss antenna (META). With the space shuttle (STS) as the launch system, the methodology of packaging and stowing in the orbiter, and of dispensing, deploying and joining, in orbit, were studied and the necessary support equipment identified. The structural performance of the completed reflectors was evaluated and their overall operational capability and feasibility were evaluated and compared. The potential of the three concepts to maintain stable shape in the space environment was determined. Their ability to operate at radio frequencies of 1 GHz and higher was assessed assuming the reflector surface to consist of a number of flat, hexagonal facets. A parametric study was performed to determine figure degradation as a function of reflector size, flat facet size, and f/D ratio.

  17. State-of-the-art low-cost solar reflector materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C; Jorgensen, G

    1994-11-01

    Solar thermal technologies generate power by concentrating sunlight with large mirrors. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is working with industrial partners to develop the optical reflector materials needed for the successful deployment of this technology. The reflector materials must be low in cost and maintain high specular reflectance for extended lifetimes in severe outdoor environments. Currently, the best candidate materials for solar mirrors are silver-coated low-iron glass and silvered polymer films. Polymer reflectors are lighter in weight, offer greater flexibility in system design, and have the potential for lower cost than glass mirrors. In parallel with collaborative activities, several innovative candidate reflector-material constructions were investigated at NREL. The low-cost material requirement necessitates manufacturing compatible with mass-production techniques. Future cooperative efforts with the web-coating industry offers the promise of exciting new alternative materials and the potential for dramatic cost savings in developing advanced solar reflector materials.

  18. Optical measurements pertaining to Space Station solar dynamic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holly, S.; Springer, T.; Jefferies, K. S.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Station solar dynamic power system is a hybrid of solar photovoltaic and solar dynamic systems, the latter of which uses a parabolic reflector to collect solar energy. This paper describes analytical results of an off-axis solar illumination on the intensity distribution in arbitrary target planes perpendicular to the axis of a parabolic reflector. Such computational capability would make it possible to predict optical intensity distributions resulting from off-axis angles of incident radiation on such target planes. To validate the computer code, experimental optical measurements were performed on the multifaceted paraboloidal collecor at the Solar Dynamic Test Facility at Rockedyne's Santa Susana Field Laboratory. The experimental data compared reasonably well with the calculated values.

  19. Wavefront Correction for Large, Flexible Antenna Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, William A.; Jammejad, Vahraz; Rajagopalan, Harish; Xu, Shenheng

    2010-01-01

    A wavefront-correction system has been proposed as part of an outer-space radio communication system that would include a large, somewhat flexible main reflector antenna, a smaller subreflector antenna, and a small array feed at the focal plane of these two reflector antennas. Part of the wavefront-correction system would reside in the subreflector, which would be a planar patch-element reflectarray antenna in which the phase shifts of the patch antenna elements would be controlled via microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) radio -frequency (RF) switches. The system would include the following sensing-and-computing subsystems: a) An optical photogrammetric subsystem built around two cameras would estimate geometric distortions of the main reflector; b) A second subsystem would estimate wavefront distortions from amplitudes and phases of signals received by the array feed elements; and c) A third subsystem, built around small probes on the subreflector plane, would estimate wavefront distortions from differences among phases of signals received by the probes. The distortion estimates from the three subsystems would be processed to generate control signals to be fed to the MEMS RF switches to correct for the distortions, thereby enabling collimation and aiming of the received or transmitted radio beam to the required precision.

  20. The panels for primary and secondary mirror reflectors and the Active Surface System for the new Sardinia Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacchiroli, G.; Fiocchi, F.; Maccaferri, G.; Morsiani, M.; Orfei, A.; Pernechele, C.; Pisanu, T.; Roda, J.; Vargiu, G.

    In this paper we will describe the panels for the primary and secondary mirror reflectors and the active surface system that will be provided on the Sardinia Radio Telescope. The panels for the primary and secondary mirror have been designed to allow an operating frequency up to 100 GHz. The active surface system will be used to overcome the effect of gravity deformation on the antenna gain and to re-shape the primary mirror in a parabolic form, in order to avoid large phase error contribution on the gain for the highest frequencies placed in the primary focus.

  1. Modular Optical PDV System

    SciTech Connect

    Araceli Rutkowski, David Esquibel

    2008-12-11

    A modular optical photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV) detector system has been developed by using readily available optical components with a 20-GHz Miteq optical detector into eight channels of single-wide modules integrated into a 3U rack unit (1U = 1.75 inches) with a common power supply. Optical fibers were precisely trimmed, welded, and timed within each unit. This system has been used to collect dynamic velocity data on various physics experiments. An optical power meter displays the laser input power to the module and optical power at the detector. An adjustable micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) optical attenuator is used to adjust the amount of unshifted light entering the detector. Front panel LEDs show the presence of power to the module. A fully loaded chassis with eight channels consumes 45 watts of power. Each chassis requires 1U spacing above and below for heat management. Modules can be easily replaced.

  2. Thermal Distortion Measurements of a Dual Gridded Antenna Reflector with Laser Radar System Integrated to a Thermal Vacuum Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, Peter Jens; Doring, Daniel; Ihle, Alexander; Reichmann, Olaf; Maeyaert, Michiel

    2014-06-01

    A dual gridded reflector for Ku-Band applications (KuDGR) with two actually gridded shells made of single and individually shaped CFRP-rods (single carbon fibre reinforced plastic) has been developed by HPS. Due to the fact that these shells are made of CFRP-rods conventional methods for coordinate and thermal-distortion (TD) measuring could not be used. Therefore, the Laser Radar system (LR) was identified as best suitable measurement method for this application.The LR was chosen during the KaDGR study performed by HPS due to its capability to measure points contactless without targets and with high precision and a great number of measurement points in a short time. Furthermore, due to the gridded structure measurement systems using interferometric patterns (ESPI, Shearography) or structured light projection could not be applied.The performance of the Laser Radar system was tested during preliminary measurements on the KuDGR bread- board model. For the first environmental tests on the engineering model, the test methods at IABG were specifically adapted and qualified in order to verify that the Laser Radar system can handle the constrains set by a thermal-vacuum (TV) test facility. During the verification test run the objectives were to verify the compatibility of the LR with the positioning with respect to the chamber, the visibility, the test facilities viewport and setup inside the chamber as well as the achievable measurement accuracy. The general compatibility could be shown and optimisations regarding test setup and better accuracy were identified. Since the active surfaces of the reflector contains a multitude of single rods all with different shapes and lengths the vibration influences of the individual facility systems onto the reflector were investigated.The LR system is widely used in industrial applications but references regarding measuring thermo-elastic distortions in a TV test facility using this method are still rare. IABG has developed and

  3. Caustic Singularities Of High-Gain, Dual-Shaped Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo, Victor; Veruttipong, Thavath W.; Imbriale, William A.; Rengarajan, Sambiam

    1991-01-01

    Report presents study of some sources of error in analysis, by geometric theory of diffraction (GTD), of performance of high-gain, dual-shaped antenna reflector. Study probes into underlying analytic causes of singularity, with view toward devising and testing practical methods to avoid problems caused by singularity. Hybrid physical optics (PO) approach used to study near-field spillover or noise-temperature characteristics of high-gain relector antenna efficiently and accurately. Report illustrates this approach and underlying principles by presenting numerical results, for both offset and symmetrical reflector systems, computed by GTD, PO, and PO/GO methods.

  4. Caustic Singularities Of High-Gain, Dual-Shaped Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo, Victor; Veruttipong, Thavath W.; Imbriale, William A.; Rengarajan, Sambiam

    1991-01-01

    Report presents study of some sources of error in analysis, by geometric theory of diffraction (GTD), of performance of high-gain, dual-shaped antenna reflector. Study probes into underlying analytic causes of singularity, with view toward devising and testing practical methods to avoid problems caused by singularity. Hybrid physical optics (PO) approach used to study near-field spillover or noise-temperature characteristics of high-gain relector antenna efficiently and accurately. Report illustrates this approach and underlying principles by presenting numerical results, for both offset and symmetrical reflector systems, computed by GTD, PO, and PO/GO methods.

  5. Reflectors for SAR performance testing.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) performance testing and estimation is facilitated by observing the system response to known target scene elements. Trihedral corner reflectors and other canonical targets play an important role because their Radar Cross Section (RCS) can be calculated analytically. However, reflector orientation and the proximity of the ground and mounting structures can significantly impact the accuracy and precision with which measurements can be made. These issues are examined in this report.

  6. CO2 laser cutting of ultra thin (75 μm) glass based rigid optical solar reflector (OSR) for spacecraft application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Shubham; Sridhara, N.; Mitra, Avijit; Yougandar, B.; Dash, Sarat Kumar; Agarwal, Sanjay; Dey, Arjun

    2017-03-01

    Present study reports for the first time laser cutting of multilayered coatings on both side of ultra thin (i.e., 75 μm) glass substrate based rigid optical solar reflector (OSR) for spacecraft thermal control application. The optimization of cutting parameters was carried out as a function of laser power, cutting speed and number of cutting passes and their effect on cutting edge quality. Systematic and in-detail microstructural characterizations were carried out by optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques to study the laser affected zone and cutting edge quality. Sheet resistance and water contact angle experiments were also conducted locally both prior and after laser cut to investigate the changes of electrical and surface properties, if any.

  7. Deformable MEMS mirrors in secure optical communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziph-Schatzberg, Leah; Bifano, Thomas; Cornelissen, Steven; Stewart, Jason; Bleier, Zvi

    2009-05-01

    An optical communication system suitable for voice communication, data retrieval from remote sensors and identification had been designed, built and tested. The system design allows operation at ranges of several hundred meters. The heart of the system is a modulated MEMS mirror that is electrostatically actuated and changes between a flat reflective state and a corrugated diffractive state. A process for mass producing these mirrors at low cost was developed and implemented. The mirror was incorporated as a facet in a hollow retro-reflector, allowing temporal modulation of an interrogating beam and the return of the modulated beam to the interrogator. This modulator unit thus consists of a low power, small and light communication node with large (about 60°) angular extent. The system's range and pointing are determined by the interrogator /detector / demodulator unit (the transceiver), whereas the communicating node remains small, low power and low cost. This transceiver is comprised of a magnified optical channel to establish line of sight communication, an interrogating laser at 1550nm, an avalanche photo diode to detect the return signal and electronics to drive the laser and demodulate the returned signal and convert it to an audio signal. Voice communication in free space was demonstrated at ranges larger than 200 meters. A new retro-reflector design, incorporating more modulated mirrors had been constructed. This configuration was built and tested. Its performance and advantages as compared to the single mirror retro-reflector are discussed. An alternative system design that allows higher bandwidth data transmission is described

  8. Polarization-dependent angular-optical reflectance in solar-selective SnOx:F/Al2O3/Al reflector surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mwamburi, Mghendi; Wäckelgård, Ewa; Roos, Arne; Kivaisi, Rogath

    2002-05-01

    Polarization-dependent angular-optical properties of spectrally selective reflector surfaces of fluorine-doped tin oxide (SnOx:F) deposited pyrolytically on anodized aluminum are reported. The angular-reflectance measurements, for which both s- and p-polarized light are used in the solar wavelength range 0.3-2.5 microm, reveal strong spectral selectivity, and the angular behavior is highly dependent on the polarizing component of the incident beam, the total film thickness, and the individual thickness of the Al2O3 and the SnO2:F layers. The anodic A12O3 layers were produced electrochemically and varied between 100 and 205 nm in thickness. The SnOx:F films were grown pyrolytically at a temperature of 400 degrees C with film thicknesses varying in the range 180-320 nm. The reflectors were aimed at silicon solar cells, and good spectrally selective reflector characteristics were achieved with these thinly preanodized, SnOx:F/Al samples; that is, high cell reflectance was obtained for wavelengths below 1.1 microm and low thermal reflectance for wavelengths above 1.1 microm, with the best samples having values of 0.80 and 0.42, respectively, at near-normal angles of incidence. This corresponds to an anodic layer thickness of 155 nm. Both the angular calculations and the experimental measurements show that the cell reflectance is relatively insensitive to the incidence angle, and a low thermal reflectance is maintained up to an angle of approximately 60 degrees.

  9. Optical measurement systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesco, Daniel J.

    1987-01-01

    Some of the areas of research conducted at Lewis on optical measurement techniques are described. Two laser anemometer systems developed at Lewis are used to illustrate the special instrumentation needs encountered in aeropropulsion research. Velocity measurements to be made through small viewing ports, close to surfaces within the propulsion system components, and in turbulent or highly-accelerating flows are some of the significant challenges. The application to research facilities of two advanced optical systems, the rainbow schlieren and the combustor viewing system, is presented. The calibration and verification of commercial optical measuring systems, such as droplet sizing systems, are also discussed. Calibration techniques capable of simulating moving droplets for flight-type sizing systems are being developed at Lewis. The presentation concludes with a brief look at the forces driving future research on optical instrumentation.

  10. Thermal state of the safety system, reactor, side reflector and shielding of the {open_quote}{open_quote}TOPAZ-2{close_quote}{close_quote} system under conditions of fire caused by a launcher accident at the launch pad

    SciTech Connect

    Grinberg, E.I.; Doschatov, V.V.; Nikolaev, V.S.; Sokolov, N.S.; Usov, V.A.

    1996-03-01

    The paper presents some results of calculational analyses performed to determine thermal state of the TOPAZ II safety system structure, radiation shielding, reactor without the side reflector, rods and inserts of the side reflector under conditions of fire at the launch pad when an accident occurs to a launch vehicle. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Optical modulators for integrated photonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapleton, Andrew D.

    Optical components and systems manufactured with semiconductor wafer processing technologies have the potential to dramatically reduce the cost of photonics. This dissertation will present research results into two such chip-scale optics technologies that have the potential to revolutionize the way in which data is transmitted and manipulated. The semiconductor microresonator modulators and photonic crystal modulators discussed in this work are over an order of magnitude smaller than currently available modulators and can be made in semiconductor materials with standard processing techniques developed for the microelectronics industry. In addition to presenting these two modulator technologies, this dissertation will report on the optical phase characteristics of microdisk resonators with different ratios between the coupling loss to the waveguide and the internal loss in the microdisks. By controlling the ratio of these loss mechanisms to each other, the optical phase of a signal transmitted through the waveguide coupled microdisk system can be controlled. Photonic bandgap technology is an attractive research direction because it enables the confinement of light inside an optical material to a dimension that is roughly equal to the optical wavelength in that material. One and two dimensionally periodic photonic crystal structures are discussed including distributed Bragg reflectors (1D) and photonic crystal waveguides (2D). Both rely on a periodically varying index of refraction to form optical frequency bandgaps in which light is not allowed to propagate through the material. The optical phase from reflection off of a DBR mirror is experimentally demonstrated with a DBR mirror in a free space Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Two dimensionally periodic photonic crystals are used to construct waveguides and couplers in this work. The propagation loss in these demonstrated structures has been reduced to the point where this technology is attractive for chip

  12. An experimental study on reflector wave-front error correction using PZT actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Lan; Jiang, Shuidong; Zhou, Yang; Fang, Houfei; Wu, Zhigang; Du, Jianming

    2016-04-01

    An adaptive control system for correcting wave-front error of a CFRC reflector has been studied. Errors investigated in this paper were mainly introduced by fabrication and gravity. 72 Piezoelectric Ceramic Transducer (PZT) actuators were integrated to the CFRC reflector to conduct wave-front error control. The adaptive CFRC reflector was fixed on an optical platform without any external loads. The temperature and humidity were well controlled during the experimental study. The wave-front error correction algorithm is based on influence matrix approach coupled with least squares optimization method. The linear relationship between the PZT actuator's input voltage and the output displacement of the adaptive CFRC reflector surface is validated. A laser displacement sensor was used for measuring the displacements. The influence matrix was obtained experimentally by measuring the displacements of the associated points while each actuator was activated separately. The wave-front error and influence matrix were measured using a V-Stars photogrammetry system. Experimental investigation validated that this adaptive control system is capable to significantly reduce the reflector surface geometry error. Experimental results are correlated very well with simulation results which were obtained by using a multidisciplinary analytical approach. Conclusions of this study suggest that the adaptive CFRC reflector technology can provide a low cost method to significantly increase the precision of a CFRC reflector.

  13. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

  14. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, Roland L.; Cannon, Theodore W.

    1988-01-01

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

  15. Dual-shaped offset reflector antenna designs from solutions of the geometrical optics first-order partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo-Israel, V.; Imbriale, W.; Shogen, K.; Mittra, R.

    1990-01-01

    In obtaining solutions to the first-order nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) for synthesizing offset dual-shaped reflectors, it is found that previously observed computational problems can be avoided if the integration of the PDEs is started from an inner projected perimeter and integrated outward rather than starting from an outer projected perimeter and integrating inward. This procedure, however, introduces a new parameter, the main reflector inner perimeter radius p(o), when given a subreflector inner angle 0(o). Furthermore, a desired outer projected perimeter (e.g., a circle) is no longer guaranteed. Stability of the integration is maintained if some of the initial parameters are determined first from an approximate solution to the PDEs. A one-, two-, or three-parameter optimization algorithm can then be used to obtain a best set of parameters yielding a close fit to the desired projected outer rim. Good low cross-polarization mapping functions are also obtained. These methods are illustrated by synthesis of a high-gain offset-shaped Cassegrainian antenna and a low-noise offset-shaped Gregorian antenna.

  16. The Planck Telescope reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stute, Thomas

    2004-09-01

    The mechanical division of EADS-Astrium GmbH, Friedrichshafen is currently engaged with the development, manufacturing and testing of the advanced dimensionally stable composite reflectors for the ESA satellite borne telescope Planck. The objective of the ESA mission Planck is to analyse the first light that filled the universe, the cosmic microwave background radiation. Under contract of the Danish Space Research Institute and ESA EADS-Astrium GmbH is developing the all CFRP primary and secondary reflectors for the 1.5-metre telescope which is the main instrument of the Planck satellite. The operational frequency ranges from to 25 GHz to 1000 GHz. The demanding high contour accuracy and surface roughness requirements are met. The design provides the extreme dimensional stability required by the cryogenic operational environment at around 40 K. The elliptical off-axis reflectors display a classical lightweight sandwich design with CFRP core and facesheets. Isostatic mounts provide the interfaces to the telescope structure. Protected VDA provides the reflecting surface. The manufacturing is performed at the Friedrichshafen premises of EADS-Space Transportation GmbH, the former Dornier composite workshops. Advanced manufacturing technologies like true angle lay-up by CNC fibre placement and filament winding are utilized. The protected coating is applied at the CAHA facilities at the Calar Alto Observatory, Spain. The exhaustive environmental testing is performed at the facilities of IABG, Munich (mechanical testing) and for the cryo-optical tests at CSL Liege. The project is in advanced state with both Qualification Models being under environmental testing. The flight models will be delivered in 2004. The paper gives an overview over the requirements and the main structural features how these requirements are met. Special production aspects and available test results are reported.

  17. Nonlinear analysis and vibration suppression control for a rigid-flexible coupling satellite antenna system composed of laminated shell reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Bin Di; Wen, Jian Min; Zhao, Yang

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, a nonlinear dynamic modeling method for a rigid-flexible coupling satellite antenna system composed of laminated shell reflector is proposed undergoing a large overall motion. For the study of the characteristics of the reflector using laminated shell structure, the displacement field description of a point in a 3-noded shell element is acquired in conjunction with the length stretch, lateral bending and torsional deformation. Hence, a nonlinear dynamic model of the satellite antenna system is deduced based on Lagrange's equations. The complete expressions of nonlinear terms of elastic deformation and coupling terms between rigid motion and large deflection are considered in the dynamic equations, and the dynamic behavior of the rigid-flexible coupling system is analyzed using linear model and nonlinear model, respectively. In order to eliminate the system vibration, the PD with vibration force feedback control strategy is used to achieve its desired angles and velocity in a much shorter duration, and can further accomplish reduction of residual vibration. Then, the asymptotic stability of the system is proved based on the Lyapunov method. Through numerical computation, the results show that the linear model cannot capture the motion-induced coupling terms and geometric nonlinearity variations. However, the nonlinear model is suitable for dealing with large deformation rigid-flexible problem undergoing large overall motions. Hence, the satellite antenna pointing accuracy would be predicted based on the nonlinear model. Furthermore, the results also show that the proposed control strategy can suppress system vibration quickly. The above conclusions would have important academic significance and engineering value.

  18. Curvature of blended rolled edge reflectors at the shadow boundary contour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellingson, S. W.

    1988-01-01

    A technique is advanced for computing the radius of curvature of blended rolled edge reflector surfaces at the shadow boundary, in the plane perpendicular to the shadow boundary contour. This curvature must be known in order to compute the spurious endpoint contributions in the physical optics (PO) solution for the scattering from reflectors with rolled edges. The technique is applicable to reflectors with radially-defined rim-shapes and rolled edge terminations. The radius of curvature for several basic reflector systems is computed, and it is shown that this curvature can vary greatly along the shadow boundary contour. Finally, the total PO field in the target zone of a sample compact range system is computed and corrected using the shadow boundary radius of curvature, obtained using the technique. It is shown that the fields obtained are a better approximation to the true scattered fields.

  19. Realization of LOS (Line of Sight) stabilization based on reflector using carrier attitude compensation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yao; Tian, Jing; Ma, Jia-guang

    2015-02-01

    The techonology of LOS stabilization is widely applicated in moving carrier photoelectric systems such as shipborne, airborne and so on. In application situations with compact structure, such as LOS stabilization system of unmanned aerial vehicle, LOS stabilization based on reflector is adopted, and the detector is installed on the carrier to reduce the volume of stabilized platform and loading weight. However, the LOS deflection angle through reflector and the rotation angle of the reflector has a ratio relation of 2:1, simple reflector of stable inertial space can not make the optical axis stable. To eliminate the limitation of mirror stabilizing method, this article puts forward the carrier attitude compensation method, which uses the inertial sensor installed on the carrier to measure the attitude change of the carrier, and the stabilized platform rotating half of the carrier turbulence angle to realize the LOS stabilization.

  20. Optic-electronic systems for measurement the three-dimension angular deformation of axles at the millimeter wave range radiotelescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konyakhin, Igor A.; Kopylova, Tatyana V.; Konyakhin, Alexsey I.; Smekhov, Andrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Researches in the millimetre wave range require the high accuracy for position of the mirror components of the radiotelescope. A mirror weight is the cause of the three-dimension angular deformation of the elevation axle and azimuth axle relatively bearings. At result the elevation angle and azimuth angle of a parabolic mirror axis orientation is not equal to the set values. For the measuring roll, pitch and yaw angular deformations the autocollimation system with new type of the reflector are used. Reflector for autocollimation measurements as compositions of the anamorphic prism and special tetrahedral reflector is described. New methods for roll, pitch, yaw angles measuring are discussed. Optical scheme for the measurement system, structure the anamorphic prism and tetrahedral reflector are proposed. Equations for the static characteristic of the measuring system are shown.

  1. Optical measurement systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesco, Daniel J.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the areas of research conducted at the LeRC on optical measurement techniques for propulsion systems research are described. Most of the optical techniques used to measure gas parameters depend on very inefficient light scattering principles and, therefore, require the high light intensities provided by lasers. Significant advances in laser technology, together with the availability of sensitive photodetection systems, provide much of the impetus for research in optical diagnostics techniques. The goal of the research is to enhance the capabilities of nonintrusive research instrumentation to meet the special needs of aeropropulsion research. Optical techniques are being used to validate analytical codes and to verify the performance of aeropropulsion components and systems.

  2. Computer prediction of dual reflector antenna radiation properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulou, C.

    1981-01-01

    A program for calculating radiation patterns for reflector antennas with either smooth analytic surfaces or with surfaces composed of a number of panels. Techniques based on the geometrical optics (GO) approach were used in tracing rays over the following regions: from a feed antenna to the first reflector surface (subreflector); from this reflector to a larger reflector surface (main reflector); and from the main reflector to a mathematical plane (aperture plane) in front of the main reflector. The equations of GO were also used to calculate the reflected field components for each ray making use of the feed radiation pattern and the parameters defining the surfaces of the two reflectors. These resulting fields form an aperture distribution which is integrated numerically to compute the radiation pattern for a specified set of angles.

  3. Actuator Grouping Optimization on Flexible Space Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Jeffrey R.; Wang, K. W.; Fang, Houfei; Quijano, Ubaldo

    2011-01-01

    With the rapid advances in deployable membrane and mesh antenna technologies, the feasibility of developing large, lightweight reflectors has greatly improved. In order to achieve the required surface accuracy, precision surface control is needed on these lightweight reflectors. For this study, an analytical model is shown which combines a flexible Kapton reflector with Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) actuators for surface control. Surface errors are introduced that are similar to real world scenarios, and a least squares control algorithm is developed for surface control. Experimental results on a 2.4 meter reflector show that while the analytical reflector model is generally correct, due to idiosyncrasies in the reflector it cannot be used for online control. A new method called the En Mass Elimination algorithm is used to determine the optimal grouping of actuators when the number of actuators in the system exceeds the number of power supplies available.

  4. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Roger

    2014-12-17

    The main project objective has been to develop an advanced gravity sag method for molding large glass solar reflectors with either line or point focus, and with long or short focal length. The method involves taking standard sized squares of glass, 1.65 m x 1.65 m, and shaping them by gravity sag into precision steel molds. The method is designed for high volume manufacture when incorporated into a production line with separate pre-heating and cooling. The performance objectives for the self-supporting glass mirrors made by this project include mirror optical accuracy of 2 mrad root mean square (RMS), requiring surface slope errors less than 1 mrad rms, a target not met by current production of solar reflectors. Our objective also included development of new methods for rapidly shaping glass mirrors and coating them for higher reflectivity and soil resistance. Reflectivity of 95% for a glass mirror with anti-soil coating was targeted, compared to the present ~94% with no anti-soil coating. Our mirror cost objective is ~$20/m2 in 2020, a significant reduction compared to the present ~$35/m2 for solar trough mirrors produced for trough solar plants.

  5. Electrophoretic deposited TiO2 pigment-based back reflectors for thin film solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Bills, Braden; Morris, Nathan; Dubey, Mukul; ...

    2015-01-16

    Highly reflective coatings with strong light scattering effect have many applications in optical components and optoelectronic devices. This paper reports titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment-based reflectors that have 2.5 times higher broadband diffuse reflection than commercially produced aluminum or silver based reflectors and result in efficiency enhancements of a single-junction amorphous Si solar cell. Electrophoretic deposition is used to produce pigment-based back reflectors with high pigment density, controllable film thickness and site-specific deposition. Electrical conductivity of the pigment-based back reflectors is improved by creating electrical vias throughout the pigment-based back reflector by making holes using an electrical discharge / dielectric breakdownmore » approach followed by a second electrophoretic deposition of conductive nanoparticles into the holes. While previous studies have demonstrated the use of pigment-based back reflectors, for example white paint, on glass superstrate configured thin film Si solar cells, this work presents a scheme for producing pigment-based reflectors on complex shape and flexible substrates. Finally, mechanical durability and scalability are demonstrated on a continuous electrophoretic deposition roll-to-roll system which has flexible metal substrate capability of 4 inch wide and 300 feet long.« less

  6. Electrophoretic deposited TiO(2) pigment-based back reflectors for thin film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Bills, Braden; Morris, Nathan; Dubey, Mukul; Wang, Qi; Fan, Qi Hua

    2015-02-09

    Highly reflective coatings with strong light scattering effect have many applications in optical components and optoelectronic devices. This work reports titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) pigment-based reflectors that have 2.5 times higher broadband diffuse reflection than commercially produced aluminum or silver based reflectors and result in efficiency enhancements of a single-junction amorphous Si solar cell. Electrophoretic deposition is used to produce pigment-based back reflectors with high pigment density, controllable film thickness and site-specific deposition. Electrical conductivity of the pigment-based back reflectors is improved by creating electrical vias throughout the pigment-based back reflector by making holes using an electrical discharge / dielectric breakdown approach followed by a second electrophoretic deposition of conductive nanoparticles into the holes. While previous studies have demonstrated the use of pigment-based back reflectors, for example white paint, on glass superstrate configured thin film Si solar cells, this work presents a scheme for producing pigment-based reflectors on complex shape and flexible substrates. Mechanical durability and scalability are demonstrated on a continuous electrophoretic deposition roll-to-roll system which has flexible metal substrate capability of 4 inch wide and 300 feet long.

  7. Stereoscopic optical viewing system

    DOEpatents

    Tallman, C.S.

    1986-05-02

    An improved optical system which provides the operator with a stereoscopic viewing field and depth of vision, particularly suitable for use in various machines such as electron or laser beam welding and drilling machines. The system features two separate but independently controlled optical viewing assemblies from the eyepiece to a spot directly above the working surface. Each optical assembly comprises a combination of eye pieces, turning prisms, telephoto lenses for providing magnification, achromatic imaging relay lenses and final stage pentagonal turning prisms. Adjustment for variations in distance from the turning prisms to the workpiece, necessitated by varying part sizes and configurations and by the operator's visual accuity, is provided separately for each optical assembly by means of separate manual controls at the operator console or within easy reach of the operator.

  8. Stereoscopic optical viewing system

    DOEpatents

    Tallman, Clifford S.

    1987-01-01

    An improved optical system which provides the operator a stereoscopic viewing field and depth of vision, particularly suitable for use in various machines such as electron or laser beam welding and drilling machines. The system features two separate but independently controlled optical viewing assemblies from the eyepiece to a spot directly above the working surface. Each optical assembly comprises a combination of eye pieces, turning prisms, telephoto lenses for providing magnification, achromatic imaging relay lenses and final stage pentagonal turning prisms. Adjustment for variations in distance from the turning prisms to the workpiece, necessitated by varying part sizes and configurations and by the operator's visual accuity, is provided separately for each optical assembly by means of separate manual controls at the operator console or within easy reach of the operator.

  9. Optical controlled keyboard system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budzyński, Łukasz; Długosz, Dariusz; Niewiarowski, Bartosz; Zajkowski, Maciej

    2011-06-01

    Control systems of our computers are common devices, based on the manipulation of keys or a moving ball. Completely healthy people have no problems with the operation of such devices. Human disability makes everyday activities become a challenge and create trouble. When a man can not move his hands, the work becomes difficult or often impossible. Controlled optical keyboard is a modern device that allows to bypass the limitations of disability limbs. The use of wireless optical transmission allows to control computer using a laser beam, which cooperates with the photodetectors. The article presents the construction and operation of non-contact optical keyboard for people with disabilities.

  10. Digital Optical Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, David H.; Tipton, Charles A.; Christmann, Charles E.; Hochhausler, Nils P.

    1988-09-01

    We describe the digital optical control system (DOGS), a state-of-the-art controller for electrical feedback in an optical system. The need for a versatile optical controller arose from a number of unique experiments being performed by the Air Force Weapons Laboratory. These experiments use similar detectors and actuator-controlled mirrors, but the control requirements vary greatly. The experiments have in common a requirement for parallel control systems. The DOGS satisfies these needs by allowing several control systems to occupy a single chassis with one master controller. The architecture was designed to allow upward compatibility with future configurations. Combinations of off-the-shelf and custom boards are configured to meet the requirements of each experiment. The configuration described here was used to control piston error to X/80 at a wavelength of 0.51 Am. A peak sample rate of 8 kHz, yielding a closed loop bandwidth of 800 Hz, was achieved.

  11. Modular optical detector system

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Brent A.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2006-02-14

    A modular optical detector system. The detector system is designed to detect the presence of molecules or molecular species by inducing fluorescence with exciting radiation and detecting the emitted fluorescence. Because the system is capable of accurately detecting and measuring picomolar concentrations it is ideally suited for use with microchemical analysis systems generally and capillary chromatographic systems in particular. By employing a modular design, the detector system provides both the ability to replace various elements of the detector system without requiring extensive realignment or recalibration of the components as well as minimal user interaction with the system. In addition, the modular concept provides for the use and addition of a wide variety of components, including optical elements (lenses and filters), light sources, and detection means, to fit particular needs.

  12. Fiber optic multiplex optical transmission system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, C. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A multiplex optical transmission system which minimizes external interference while simultaneously receiving and transmitting video, digital data, and audio signals is described. Signals are received into subgroup mixers for blocking into respective frequency ranges. The outputs of these mixers are in turn fed to a master mixer which produces a composite electrical signal. An optical transmitter connected to the master mixer converts the composite signal into an optical signal and transmits it over a fiber optic cable to an optical receiver which receives the signal and converts it back to a composite electrical signal. A de-multiplexer is coupled to the output of the receiver for separating the composite signal back into composite video, digital data, and audio signals. A programmable optic patch board is interposed in the fiber optic cables for selectively connecting the optical signals to various receivers and transmitters.

  13. The design of the Central-Axis Reflector (ZAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huegenell, Hermann

    1989-10-01

    This paper discusses the design principles of the Central-Axis Reflector (ZAS), a segmented-mirror telescope designed to produce large light-gathering areas, with particular attention given to the optical system and the tracking apparatus of the ZAS. The paper also describes the manufacturing method for the primary mirror of the ZAS, the structure of the mirror bodies, the grinding and polishing method, and the structures and procedures used for mounting and adjustment of the individual mirror bodies. Consideration is also given to sensors and control systems, the optical path of the incident light, and a protecting dome. A variant of the ZAS, the Central-Axis Inclined Reflector, is also described.

  14. Design of blended rolled edges for compact range main reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericksen, K. P.; Gupta, I. J.; Burnside, W. D.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure to design blended rolled edge terminations for arbitrary rim shape compact range main reflectors is presented. The reflector may be center-fed or offset-fed. The design procedure leads to a reflector which has a continuous and smooth surface. This procedure also ensures small diffracted fields from the junction between the paraboloid and the blended rolled edge while satisfying certain constraints regarding the maximum height of the reflector and minimum operating frequency of the system. The prescribed procedure is used to design several reflectors and the performance of these reflectors is presented.

  15. Development of silicon optics for an integrated micro-optical system-on-a-chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, David C.; Kandasamy, Sasikaran; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2013-12-01

    Development of silicon-based passive optical components such as reflectors, waveguides, and beam splitters coupled with active elements such as light emitters and detectors enable miniaturisation of a low-cost system-on-a-chip sensing device. In this work, we investigate methods to fabricate passive silicon elements on a chip. We use a combination of wet and dry etching techniques to realise angled and vertical sidewalls normal to the surface of a silicon wafer, respectively. For wet etching, we used Triton-X, a surfactant, added to an alkaline solution TMAH as the etchant. This allows perfect 45° inclined sidewalls to be fabricated. Dry etching using DRIE is to be performed on the reverse-side of the same wafer to realize through-hole vias with straight vertical sidewalls. A final Au metal layer can then be coated onto the sidewalls to realize reflective surfaces. Photolithography masks used in the wet and dry etch processes were designed and fabricated. By careful alignment of these masks using a mask aligner, we can fabricate a combination of inclined and vertical sidewalls to build optical reflectors and beam splitters with complex geometries. When integrated with active Si-optical devices, a fully integrated micro-optical system-on-a-chip can be realised.

  16. OPTICAL SYSTEMS: Calculation of the illuminance distribution in the focal spot of a focusing system taking into account aberrations in this system and divergence of a focused laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitin, Andrey V.

    2007-03-01

    The dependence of the focal-spot size of a 'deep' parabolic mirror reflector on the laser-beam divergence is analysed by the method of elementary reflections. The dependence of the focal-beam diameter of an ideal focusing optical system on the laser-beam parameters is described. The expression is obtained for calculating the illumination distribution in the focal spot of a 'deep' mirror reflector which takes into account both aberrations and light-gathering power of the reflector and the divergence of a focused laser beam.

  17. Shaped cassegrain reflector antenna. [design equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Design equations are developed to compute the reflector surfaces required to produce uniform illumination on the main reflector of a cassegrain system when the feed pattern is specified. The final equations are somewhat simple and straightforward to solve (using a computer) compared to the ones which exist already in the literature. Step by step procedure for solving the design equations is discussed in detail.

  18. All-reflective optical target illumination system with high numerical aperture

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Carlton E.; Sigler, Robert D.; Hoeger, John G.

    1979-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for providing illumination of a target focal region at high numerical aperture from a pair of confluent collimated light beams. The collimated beams are each incident upon an associated concave eccentric pupil paraboloidal reflective surface, and thereby each focused through an opening in an associated outer ellipsoidal reflective surface onto a plane reflector. Each beam is reflected by its associated plane reflector onto the opposing concave surface of the outer ellipsoids to be focused through an opening in the plane surface onto an opposing inner concave ellipsoidal reflective surface, and thence onto the target region.

  19. Optical key system

    DOEpatents

    Hagans, Karla G.; Clough, Robert E.

    2000-01-01

    An optical key system comprises a battery-operated optical key and an isolated lock that derives both its operating power and unlock signals from the correct optical key. A light emitting diode or laser diode is included within the optical key and is connected to transmit a bit-serial password. The key user physically enters either the code-to-transmit directly, or an index to a pseudorandom number code, in the key. Such person identification numbers can be retained permanently, or ephemeral. When a send button is pressed, the key transmits a beam of light modulated with the password information. The modulated beam of light is received by a corresponding optical lock with a photovoltaic cell that produces enough power from the beam of light to operate a password-screen digital logic. In one application, an acceptable password allows a two watt power laser diode to pump ignition and timing information over a fiberoptic cable into a sealed engine compartment. The receipt of a good password allows the fuel pump, spark, and starter systems to each operate. Therefore, bypassing the lock mechanism as is now routine with automobile thieves is pointless because the engine is so thoroughly disabled.

  20. Optical key system

    SciTech Connect

    Hagans, K.G.; Clough, R.E.

    2000-04-25

    An optical key system comprises a battery-operated optical key and an isolated lock that derives both its operating power and unlock signals from the correct optical key. A light emitting diode or laser diode is included within the optical key and is connected to transmit a bit-serial password. The key user physically enters either the code-to-transmit directly, or an index to a pseudorandom number code, in the key. Such person identification numbers can be retained permanently, or ephemeral. When a send button is pressed, the key transmits a beam of light modulated with the password information. The modulated beam of light is received by a corresponding optical lock with a photovoltaic cell that produces enough power from the beam of light to operate a password-screen digital logic. In one application, an acceptable password allows a two watt power laser diode to pump ignition and timing information over a fiberoptic cable into a sealed engine compartment. The receipt of a good password allows the fuel pump, spark, and starter systems to each operate. Therefore, bypassing the lock mechanism as is now routine with automobile thieves is pointless because the engine is so thoroughly disabled.

  1. Scanning properties of large dual-shaped offset and symmetric reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo-Israel, Victor; Veruttipong, Watt; Norrod, Roger D.; Imbriale, William A.

    1992-01-01

    Several characteristics of dual offset (DOSR) and symmetric shaped reflectors are examined. Among these is the amelioration of the added cost of manufacturing a shaped reflector antenna, particularly a doubly curved surface for the DOSR, if adjustable panels, which may be necessary for correction of gravity and wind distortions, are also used for improving gain by shaping. The scanning properties of shaped reflectors, both offset and circularly symmetric, are examined and compared to conic section scanning characteristics. Scanning of the pencil beam is obtained by lateral and axial translation of a single point-source feed. The feed is kept pointed toward the center of the subreflector. The effects of power spillover and aperture phase error as a function of beam scanning is examined for several different types of large reflector designs including DOSR, circularly symmetric large f/D and smaller f/D dual reflector antenna systems. It is graphically illustrated that the Abbe-sine condition for improving scanning of an optical system cannot, inherently, be satisfied in a dual-shaped reflector system shaped for high gain and low feed spillover.

  2. Scanning properties of large dual-shaped offset and symmetric reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo-Israel, Victor; Veruttipong, Watt; Norrod, Roger D.; Imbriale, William A.

    1992-01-01

    Several characteristics of dual offset (DOSR) and symmetric shaped reflectors are examined. Among these is the amelioration of the added cost of manufacturing a shaped reflector antenna, particularly a doubly curved surface for the DOSR, if adjustable panels, which may be necessary for correction of gravity and wind distortions, are also used for improving gain by shaping. The scanning properties of shaped reflectors, both offset and circularly symmetric, are examined and compared to conic section scanning characteristics. Scanning of the pencil beam is obtained by lateral and axial translation of a single point-source feed. The feed is kept pointed toward the center of the subreflector. The effects of power spillover and aperture phase error as a function of beam scanning is examined for several different types of large reflector designs including DOSR, circularly symmetric large f/D and smaller f/D dual reflector antenna systems. It is graphically illustrated that the Abbe-sine condition for improving scanning of an optical system cannot, inherently, be satisfied in a dual-shaped reflector system shaped for high gain and low feed spillover.

  3. Beam scanning offset Cassegrain reflector antennas by subreflector movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapean, James W., Jr.; Stutzman, Warren L.

    1994-01-01

    In 1987 a NASA panel recommended the creation of the Mission to Planet Earth. This mission was intended to apply to remote sensing experience of the space community to earth remote sensing to enhance the understanding of the climatological processes of our planet and to determine if, and to what extent, the hydrological cycle of Earth is being affected by human activity. One of the systems required for the mission was a wide scanning, high gain reflector antenna system for use in radiometric remote sensing from geostationary orbit. This work describes research conducted at Virginia Tech into techniques for beam scanning offset Cassegrain reflector antennas by subreflector translation and rotation. Background material relevant to beam scanning antenna systems and offset Cassegrain reflector antenna system is presented. A test case is developed based on the background material. The test case is beam scanned using two geometrical optics methods of determining the optimum subreflector position for the desired scanned beam direction. Physical optics far-field results are given for the beam scanned systems. The test case system is found to be capable of beam scanning over a range of 35 half-power beamwidths while maintaining a 90 percent beam efficiency or 50 half-power beamwidths while maintaining less than l dB of gain loss during scanning.

  4. Active optical zoom system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Wang, Qiong-Hua; Shen, Chuan; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Chun-Mei

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we propose an active optical zoom system. The zoom module of the system is formed by a liquid lens and a spatial light modulator (SLM). By controlling the focal lengths of the liquid lens and the encoded digital lens on the SLM panel, we can change the magnification of an image without mechanical moving parts and keep the output plane stationary. The magnification can change from 1/3 to 3/2 as the focal length of the encoded lens on the SLM changes from infinity to 24 cm. The proposed active zoom system is simple and flexible, and has widespread application in optical communications, imaging systems, and displays.

  5. Deployable reflector structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulas, Martin, Jr. (Inventor); Hoberman, Charles (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A deployable reflector structure is presented. The structure has a number of movable reflector panels pivotably supported on rigid arms. Several such arms are pivotably connected to a central structure. The arm can move in starburst fashion from a packaged stage, where all arms are vertical, to a deployed stage, where all arms are horizontal. All of the movable reflector panels are maintained at a predetermined angle to an axis of the reflector structure when the arms are pivoted. The reflector panels are stacked tightly on top of each other in the packaged state of the reflector structure. Simple mechanisms are used for avoiding interference between panels on different arms in the packaged stage and for fitting the movable panels together like tiles in the deployed stage.

  6. Experimental Investigation and Computer Modeling of Optical Switching in Distributed Bragg Reflector and Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser Structures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-01

    Panish. Heterostructure Lasers, Part A: Fundamental Principles. Quantum Electronics : Principles and Applications, Orlando: Academic Press, Inc., 1978...John Wiley & Sons, 1978. 15. Gibbs, H.M. Optical Bistability: Controlling Light with Light. Quantum Electronics - Principles and Applications, Orlando

  7. Silicon reflectors for external cavity lasers based on ring resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Li, Xia; Jin, Hao; Yu, Hui; Yang, Jianyi; Jiang, Xiaoqing

    2017-01-01

    We propose and experimentally investigate types of silicon ring reflectors on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) platform. These reflectors are used for realizing the silicon hybrid external cavity lasers. A suspended edge coupler is used to connect the reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) chip and the reflectors. The properties of the reflectors and the hybrid external cavity lasers with these reflectors are illustrated. The experimental results show that all of those reflectors have a high reflectivity and the highest reflectivity can up to be 95%. The lowest insertion loss can be as low as 0.4 dB. The output power of the hybrid external cavity lasers with these reflectors can reach mW magnitude and the highest output power is 6.1 mW. Over 30 dB side mode suppression ratio is obtained.

  8. Binary optics at Hughes Danbury Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logue, James; Power, Michael

    1993-01-01

    An overview of binary optics development at Hughes Danbury Optical Systems is presented. Design software used for mask design is presented. A brief discussion of fabrication follows. Two examples of actual projects are used to highlight the discussion: (1) a large aspheric lens; and (2) a set of grating and lenslet arrays.

  9. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, R.J.; Land, J.T.; Misvel, M.C.

    1994-06-07

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled. 12 figs.

  10. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, Ronald J.; Land, John T.; Misvel, Michael C.

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled.

  11. Nonimaging optics maximizing exergy for hybrid solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winston, Roland; Jiang, Lun; Abdelhamid, Mahmoud; Widyolar, Bennett K.; Ferry, Jonathan; Cygan, David; Abbasi, Hamid; Kozlov, Alexandr; Kirk, Alexander; Elarde, Victor; Osowski, Mark

    2016-09-01

    The project team of University of California at Merced (UC-Merced), Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and MicroLink Devices Inc. (MicroLink) are developing a hybrid solar system using a nonimaging compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) that maximizes the exergy by delivering direct electricity and on-demand heat. The hybrid solar system technology uses secondary optics in a solar receiver to achieve high efficiency at high temperature, collects heat in particles and uses reflective liftoff cooled double junction (2J) InGaP/GaAs solar cells with backside infrared (IR) reflectors on the secondary optical element to raise exergy efficiency. The nonimaging optics provides additional concentration towards the high temperature thermal stream and enables it to operate efficiently at 650 °C while the solar cell is maintained at 40 °C to operate as efficiently as possible.

  12. Optical systems in ergophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, Valentina; Besedovskaya, Valentina; Paloob, Tamara

    1994-02-01

    The important part of ergophthalmology is the problem of diagnosing and treatment of refraction errors, accommodation and visual disorders by means of the special optical systems. The using of our diagnostical approach helps to choose the right treatment strategy. Our therapeutical approach permits to normalize the muscle tonus and working capacity of eye accommodation apparatus and gives the possibility to obtain the stable positive results in treatment of the refraction amblyopia as well.

  13. Focal region fields of distorted reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buris, N. E.; Kauffman, J. F.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of the focal region fields scattered by an arbitrary surface reflector under uniform plane wave illumination is solved. The physical optics (PO) approximation is used to calculate the current induced on the reflector. The surface of the reflector is described by a number of triangular domain-wise 5th degree bivariate polynomials. A 2-dimensional Gaussian quadrature is employed to numerically evaluate the integral expressions of the scattered fields. No Freshnel or Fraunhofer zone approximations are made. The relation of the focal fields problem to surface compensation techniques and other applications are mentioned. Several examples of distorted parabolic reflectors are presented. The computer code developed is included, together with instructions on its usage.

  14. Terrace retro-reflector array for poloidal polarimeter on ITER.

    PubMed

    Imazawa, R; Kawano, Y; Ono, T; Kusama, Y

    2011-02-01

    A new concept of a terrace retro-reflector array (TERRA) as part of the poloidal polarimeter for ITER is proposed in this paper. TERRA reflects a laser light even from a high incident angle in the direction of the incident-light path, while a conventional retro-reflector array cannot. Besides, TERRA can be installed in a smaller space than a corner-cube retro-reflector. In an optical sense, TERRA is equivalent to a Littrow grating, the blaze angle of which varies, depending on the incident angle. The reflected light generates a bright and dark fringe, and the bright fringe is required to travel along the incident-light path to achieve the objects of laser-aided diagnostics. In order to investigate the propagation properties of laser light reflected by TERRA, we have developed a new diffraction formula. Conditions for the propagation of the bright fringe in the direction of the incident light have been obtained using the Littrow grating model and have been confirmed in a simulation applying the new diffraction formula. Finally, we have designed laser transmission optics using TERRA for the ITER poloidal polarimeter and have calculated the light propagation of the system. The optical design obtains a high transmission efficiency, with 88.6% of the incident power returned. These results demonstrate the feasibility of applying TERRA to the ITER poloidal polarimeter.

  15. Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2014-08-05

    An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

  16. High-frequency techniques for RCS prediction of plate geometries and a physical optics/equivalent currents model for the RCS of trihedral corner reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Polka, Lesley A.; Polycarpou, Anastasis C.

    1993-01-01

    Part 1 of this report continues the investigation, initiated in previous reports, of scattering from rectangular plates coated with lossy dielectrics. The hard polarization coefficients given in the last report are incorporated into a model, which includes second- and third-order diffractions, for the coated plate. Computed results from this model are examined and compared to measured data. A breakdown of the contribution of each of the higher-order terms to the total radar cross section (RCS) is given. The effectiveness of the uniform theory of diffraction (UTD) model in accounting for the coating effect is investigated by examining a Physical Optics (PO) model which incorporates the equivalent surface impedance approximation used in the UTD model. The PO, UTD, and experimental results are compared. Part 2 of this report presents a RCS model, based on PO and the Method of Equivalent Currents (MEC), for a trihedral corner reflector. PO is used to account for the reflected fields, while MEC is used for the diffracted fields. Single, double, and triple reflections and first-order diffractions are included in the model. A detailed derivation of the E(sub theta)-polarization, monostatic RCS is included. Computed results are compared with finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) results for validation. The PO/MEC model of this report compares very well with the FDTD model, and it is a much faster model in terms of computational speed.

  17. Optical subscriber interconnect system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirn, Richard; Wolfgang, Hans; Strasser, Helmut

    1993-02-01

    To match the inherent needs of data traffic, office communications demand medium-speed connectionless packet transport in addition to circuit-switched voice and data transmission. Optical solutions to this requirement should be low in cost rather than extremely high in performance to be cost competitive with copper systems. A subscriber-premises system will be proposed which combines a digital private automatic branch exchange (PABX) with local area network (LAN) functionality. It is based on a double-star passive optical network, extending to optical wall outlets. The subsets with telephone functionality provide the opto/electrical conversion and give access to the packet channel via Terminal Adaptors (TA). Different types of customer LANs may coexist on the same network, since their data frames are embedded in an intermediate MAC-layer. The feasibility of transmission over multimode fibers at not aggregate bit rate of approx. 140 Mb/s at 1300 nm downstream and 780 nm upstream allowing the use of low-cost components (e.g. 780 nm compact-disc laser diodes) has been experimentally investigated. Calculations predict cost-of-ownership parity with conventional copper-based PABXs without LAN functionality and a cost-advantage over the usual separate LAN+PABX installations. The network topology, protocol and the implications of multimode transmission on the system will be discussed.

  18. Optical systems engineering - A tutorial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyman, C. L.

    1979-01-01

    The paper examines the use of the systems engineering approach in the design of optical systems, noting that the use of such an approach which involves an integrated interdisciplinary approach to the development of systems is most appropriate for optics. It is shown that the high precision character of optics leads to complex and subtle effects on optical system performance, resulting from structural, thermal dynamical, control system, and manufacturing and assembly considerations. Attention is given to communication problems that often occur among users and optical engineers due to the unique factors of optical systems. It is concluded that it is essential that the optics community provide leadership to resolve communication problems and fully formalize the field of optical systems engineering.

  19. REFLECTOR FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.

    1963-08-01

    A reflector for nuclear reactors that comprises an assembly of closely packed graphite rods disposed with their major axes substantially perpendicular to the interface between the reactor core and the reflector is described. Each graphite rod is round in transverse cross section at (at least) its interface end and is provided, at that end, with a coaxial, inwardly tapering hole. (AEC)

  20. Precision antenna reflector structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The assembly of the Large Precise Reflector Infrared Telescope is detailed. Also given are the specifications for the Aft Cargo Carrier and the Large Precision Reflector structure. Packaging concepts and options, stowage depth and support truss geometry are also considered. An example of a construction scenario is given.

  1. Spacecraft reflectors thermomechanical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, Viktor S.; Gerasimov, Alexander V.; Ponomarev, Sergey V.; Shendalev, Denis O.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, thermo-mechanical analysis results of the composite reflectors for the use on the geostationary Earth orbit possibility studies are described. The behavior of two different space reflector structures manufactured on composite materials is investigated. The estimates of reflecting surfaces RMS deviations for the two extreme cases orbital inclinations are presented.

  2. Optical gyroscope system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goss, W. C.; Goldstein, R. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Light beams pass in opposite directions through a single mode fiber optic wave guide that extends in a circle or coil in an optical gyroscope system which measures the rotation rate of the coil by measuring the relative phase shifts of the beams by interferometric techniques. Beam splitting and phase shifting of the light are facilitated by utilizing brief pulses of light and by using light-controlling devices which are operated for a brief time only when the light pulse passes in one direction through the device but not at a different time when the pulse is passing in the opposite direction through the device. High accuracy in rotation measurement is achieved at both very slow and very fast rotation rates, by alternately operating the system so that at zero rotation the interfering waves are alternately 90 out of phase and in phase. Linear polarization of the light beams is maintained by coiling the full length of the optic fiber in a single plane.

  3. Optical fiber inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Francis W.

    1987-01-01

    A remote optical inspection system including an inspection head. The inspection head has a passageway through which pellets or other objects are passed. A window is provided along the passageway through which light is beamed against the objects being inspected. A plurality of lens assemblies are arranged about the window so that reflected light can be gathered and transferred to a plurality of coherent optical fiber light guides. The light guides transfer the light images to a television or other image transducer which converts the optical images into a representative electronic signal. The electronic signal can then be displayed on a signal viewer such as a television monitor for inspection by a person. A staging means can be used to support the objects for viewing through the window. Routing means can be used to direct inspected objects into appropriate exit passages for accepted or rejected objects. The inspected objects are advantageously fed in a singular manner to the staging means and routing means. The inspection system is advantageously used in an enclosure when toxic or hazardous materials are being inspected.

  4. Optical fiber inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Moore, F.W.

    1985-04-05

    A remote optical inspection system including an inspection head. The inspection head has a passageway through which pellets or other objects are passed. A window is provided along the passageway through which light is beamed against the objects being inspected. A plurality of lens assemblies are arranged about the window so that reflected light can be gathered and transferred to a plurality of coherent optical fiber light guides. The light guides transfer the light images to a television or other image transducer which converts the optical images into a representative electronic signal. The electronic signal can then be displayed on a signal viewer such as a television monitor for inspection by a person. A staging means can be used to support the objects for viewing through the window. Routing means can be used to direct inspected objects into appropriate exit passages for accepted or rejected objects. The inspected objects are advantageously fed in a singular manner to the staging means and routing means. The inspection system is advantageously used in an enclosure when toxic or hazardous materials are being inspected. 10 figs.

  5. Modular reflector concept study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, D. H.

    1981-02-01

    The feasibility was studied of constructing large space structures, specifically a 100 meter paraboloidal R.F. reflector, by individually deploying a number of relatively small structural modules, and then joining them to form a single large structure in orbit. The advantage of this approach is that feasibility of a large antenna may be demonstrated by ground and flight tests of several smaller and less costly subelements. Thus, initial development costs are substantially reduced and a high degree of reliability can be obtained without commitment to construction of a very large system. The three candidate structural concepts investigated are: (1) the deployable cell module; (2) the paraboloidal extendable truss antenna adapted to modular assembly; and (3) the modular extendable truss antenna (META).

  6. Modular reflector concept study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility was studied of constructing large space structures, specifically a 100 meter paraboloidal R.F. reflector, by individually deploying a number of relatively small structural modules, and then joining them to form a single large structure in orbit. The advantage of this approach is that feasibility of a large antenna may be demonstrated by ground and flight tests of several smaller and less costly subelements. Thus, initial development costs are substantially reduced and a high degree of reliability can be obtained without commitment to construction of a very large system. The three candidate structural concepts investigated are: (1) the deployable cell module; (2) the paraboloidal extendable truss antenna adapted to modular assembly; and (3) the modular extendable truss antenna (META).

  7. New keratoscope optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, A. V.; Puryayev, D. T.

    1995-06-01

    For successfully carrying out microsurgical operations and contact lens fitting it is necessary to measure the corneal shape with a precision of 50 μm within a time of 0.05 s without patient discomfort. Special devices, keratoscopes, are used for this purpose. A new keratoscope has been designed which provides a series of unique advantages: the ability to investigate a cornea of any complicated shape, and an insensitivity to positional errors of the patient's eye relative to the device. In addition, special mathematical algorithms and software for image processing have been developed. A working model of the new device is now being used successfully for patient treatment in the Fyodorov clinic (Moscow). The original device optical system enables one to apply it in the instrument-making industry for testing the complicated aspherical surfaces of optical elements used in laser equipment.

  8. Multispectral scanner optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, R. C.; Koch, N. G. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An optical system for use in a multispectral scanner of the type used in video imaging devices is disclosed. Electromagnetic radiation reflected by a rotating scan mirror is focused by a concave primary telescope mirror and collimated by a second concave mirror. The collimated beam is split by a dichroic filter which transmits radiant energy in the infrared spectrum and reflects visible and near infrared energy. The long wavelength beam is filtered and focused on an infrared detector positioned in a cryogenic environment. The short wavelength beam is dispersed by a pair of prisms, then projected on an array of detectors also mounted in a cryogenic environment and oriented at an angle relative to the optical path of the dispersed short wavelength beam.

  9. Optically controlled welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An optically controlled welding system wherein a welding torch having through-the-torch viewing capabilities is provided with an optical beam splitter to create a transmitted view and a reflective view of a welding operation. These views are converted to digital signals which are then processed and utilized by a computerized robotic welder to make the welding torch responsive thereto. Other features include an actively cooled electrode holder which minimizes a blocked portion of the view by virtue of being constructed of a single spoke or arm, and a weld pool contour detector comprising a laser beam directed onto the weld pool with the position of specular radiation reflected therefrom, being characteristic of a penetrated or unpenetrated condition of the weld pool.

  10. Optically controlled welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An optically controlled welding system (10) wherein a welding torch (12) having through-the-torch viewing capabilities is provided with an optical beam splitter (56) to create a transmitted view and a reflective view of a welding operation. These views are converted to digital signals which are then processed and utilized by a computerized robotic welder (15) to make the welding torch responsive thereto. Other features includes an actively cooled electrode holder (26) which minimizes a blocked portion of the view by virtue of being constructed of a single spoke or arm (28) and a weld pool contour detector (14) comprising a laser beam directed onto the weld pool with the position of specular radiation reflected therefrom being characteristic of a penetrated or unpenetrated condition of the weld pool.

  11. Flat plate reflectors for PV collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Spielberg, J.I. )

    1989-01-01

    This article delineates experimentation establishing that fixed reflectors may be used with solar photovoltaic panels to obtain 70% of the efficiency of a dual-axis tracking system. Also described is how the power output of a stationary, non-tracking panel can be easily doubled via the addition of over-sized, overhanging wind reflectors in place of the traditional reflectors of a dual axis system. Discussion covers theory, experimental details, comparison of theory to results, and conclusions drawn. 15 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Membrane Shell Reflector Segment Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Im, Eastwood; Lin, John; Moore, James

    2012-01-01

    The mesh reflector is the only type of large, in-space deployable antenna that has successfully flown in space. However, state-of-the-art large deployable mesh antenna systems are RF-frequency-limited by both global shape accuracy and local surface quality. The limitations of mesh reflectors stem from two factors. First, at higher frequencies, the porosity and surface roughness of the mesh results in loss and scattering of the signal. Second, the mesh material does not have any bending stiffness and thus cannot be formed into true parabolic (or other desired) shapes. To advance the deployable reflector technology at high RF frequencies from the current state-of-the-art, significant improvements need to be made in three major aspects: a high-stability and highprecision deployable truss; a continuously curved RF reflecting surface (the function of the surface as well as its first derivative are both continuous); and the RF reflecting surface should be made of a continuous material. To meet these three requirements, the Membrane Shell Reflector Segment (MSRS) antenna was developed.

  13. POMESH - DIFFRACTION ANALYSIS OF REFLECTOR ANTENNAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    POMESH is a computer program capable of predicting the performance of reflector antennas. Both far field pattern and gain calculations are performed using the Physical Optics (PO) approximation of the equivalent surface currents. POMESH is primarily intended for relatively small reflectors. It is useful in situations where the surface is described by irregular data that must be interpolated and for cases where the surface derivatives are not known. This method is flexible and robust and also supports near field calculations. Because of the near field computation ability, this computational engine is quite useful for subreflector computations. The program is constructed in a highly modular form so that it may be readily adapted to perform tasks other than the one that is explicitly described here. Since the computationally intensive portions of the algorithm are simple loops, the program can be easily adapted to take advantage of vector processor and parallel architectures. In POMESH the reflector is represented as a piecewise planar surface comprised of triangular regions known as facets. A uniform physical optics (PO) current is assumed to exist on each triangular facet. Then, the PO integral on a facet is approximated by the product of the PO current value at the center and the area of the triangle. In this way, the PO integral over the reflector surface is reduced to a summation of the contribution from each triangular facet. The source horn, or feed, that illuminates the subreflector is approximated by a linear combination of plane patterns. POMESH contains three polarization pattern definitions for the feed; a linear x-polarized element, linear y-polarized element, and a circular polarized element. If a more general feed pattern is required, it is a simple matter to replace the subroutine that implements the pattern definitions. POMESH obtains information necessary to specify the coordinate systems, location of other data files, and parameters of the desired

  14. POMESH - DIFFRACTION ANALYSIS OF REFLECTOR ANTENNAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    POMESH is a computer program capable of predicting the performance of reflector antennas. Both far field pattern and gain calculations are performed using the Physical Optics (PO) approximation of the equivalent surface currents. POMESH is primarily intended for relatively small reflectors. It is useful in situations where the surface is described by irregular data that must be interpolated and for cases where the surface derivatives are not known. This method is flexible and robust and also supports near field calculations. Because of the near field computation ability, this computational engine is quite useful for subreflector computations. The program is constructed in a highly modular form so that it may be readily adapted to perform tasks other than the one that is explicitly described here. Since the computationally intensive portions of the algorithm are simple loops, the program can be easily adapted to take advantage of vector processor and parallel architectures. In POMESH the reflector is represented as a piecewise planar surface comprised of triangular regions known as facets. A uniform physical optics (PO) current is assumed to exist on each triangular facet. Then, the PO integral on a facet is approximated by the product of the PO current value at the center and the area of the triangle. In this way, the PO integral over the reflector surface is reduced to a summation of the contribution from each triangular facet. The source horn, or feed, that illuminates the subreflector is approximated by a linear combination of plane patterns. POMESH contains three polarization pattern definitions for the feed; a linear x-polarized element, linear y-polarized element, and a circular polarized element. If a more general feed pattern is required, it is a simple matter to replace the subroutine that implements the pattern definitions. POMESH obtains information necessary to specify the coordinate systems, location of other data files, and parameters of the desired

  15. Active optics simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, C. H.

    1973-01-01

    The active optics simulation system (AOSS) is a set of computer programs and associated software to be used in the development, design, and evaluation of a primary mirror control system for a large space telescope, (e.g., the tentatively proposed 3-meter telescope). The mathematical models of component subsystems and the solution of the physical processes that occur within the mirror surface control system were obtained, and based on these models AOSS simulates the behavior of the entire mirror surface control system as well as the behavior of the component subsystems. The program has a modular structure so that any subsystem module can be replaced or modified with minimum disruption of the rest of the simulation program.

  16. High-frequency techniques for RCS prediction of plate geometries and a physical optics/equivalent currents model for the RCS of trihedral corner reflectors, parts 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Polka, Lesley A.; Polycarpou, Anastasis C.

    1994-01-01

    Formulations for scattering from the coated plate and the coated dihedral corner reflector are included. A coated plate model based upon the Uniform Theory of Diffraction (UTD) for impedance wedges was presented in the last report. In order to resolve inaccuracies and discontinuities in the predicted patterns using the UTD-based model, an improved model that uses more accurate diffraction coefficients is presented. A Physical Optics (PO) model for the coated dihedral corner reflector is presented as an intermediary step in developing a high-frequency model for this structure. The PO model is based upon the reflection coefficients for a metal-backed lossy material. Preliminary PO results for the dihedral corner reflector suggest that, in addition to being much faster computationally, this model may be more accurate than existing moment method (MM) models. An improved Physical Optics (PO)/Equivalent Currents model for modeling the Radar Cross Section (RCS) of both square and triangular, perfectly conducting, trihedral corner reflectors is presented. The new model uses the PO approximation at each reflection for the first- and second-order reflection terms. For the third-order reflection terms, a Geometrical Optics (GO) approximation is used for the first reflection; and PO approximations are used for the remaining reflections. The previously reported model used GO for all reflections except the terminating reflection. Using PO for most of the reflections results in a computationally slower model because many integrations must be performed numerically, but the advantage is that the predicted RCS using the new model is much more accurate. Comparisons between the two PO models, Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) and experimental data are presented for validation of the new model.

  17. High-frequency techniques for RCS prediction of plate geometries and a physical optics/equivalent currents model for the RCS of trihedral corner reflectors, parts 1 and 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Polka, Lesley A.; Polycarpou, Anastasis C.

    Formulations for scattering from the coated plate and the coated dihedral corner reflector are included. A coated plate model based upon the Uniform Theory of Diffraction (UTD) for impedance wedges was presented in the last report. In order to resolve inaccuracies and discontinuities in the predicted patterns using the UTD-based model, an improved model that uses more accurate diffraction coefficients is presented. A Physical Optics (PO) model for the coated dihedral corner reflector is presented as an intermediary step in developing a high-frequency model for this structure. The PO model is based upon the reflection coefficients for a metal-backed lossy material. Preliminary PO results for the dihedral corner reflector suggest that, in addition to being much faster computationally, this model may be more accurate than existing moment method (MM) models. An improved Physical Optics (PO)/Equivalent Currents model for modeling the Radar Cross Section (RCS) of both square and triangular, perfectly conducting, trihedral corner reflectors is presented. The new model uses the PO approximation at each reflection for the first- and second-order reflection terms. For the third-order reflection terms, a Geometrical Optics (GO) approximation is used for the first reflection; and PO approximations are used for the remaining reflections. The previously reported model used GO for all reflections except the terminating reflection. Using PO for most of the reflections results in a computationally slower model because many integrations must be performed numerically, but the advantage is that the predicted RCS using the new model is much more accurate. Comparisons between the two PO models, Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) and experimental data are presented for validation of the new model.

  18. One-Wave Optical Phase Conjugation Mirror by Actively Coupling Arbitrary Light Fields into a Single-Mode Reflector.

    PubMed

    Lee, KyeoReh; Lee, Junsung; Park, Jung-Hoon; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, YongKeun

    2015-10-09

    Rewinding the arrow of time via phase conjugation is an intriguing phenomenon made possible by the wave property of light. Here, we demonstrate the realization of a one-wave optical phase conjugation mirror using a spatial light modulator. An adaptable single-mode filter is created, and a phase-conjugate beam is then prepared by reverse propagation through this filter. Our method is simple, alignment free, and fast while allowing high power throughput in the time-reversed wave, which has not been simultaneously demonstrated before. Using our method, we demonstrate high throughput full-field light delivery through highly scattering biological tissue and multimode fibers, even for quantum dot fluorescence.

  19. Electrophoretic deposited TiO2 pigment-based back reflectors for thin film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bills, Braden; Morris, Nathan; Dubey, Mukul; Wang, Qi; Fan, Qi Hua

    2015-01-16

    Highly reflective coatings with strong light scattering effect have many applications in optical components and optoelectronic devices. This paper reports titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment-based reflectors that have 2.5 times higher broadband diffuse reflection than commercially produced aluminum or silver based reflectors and result in efficiency enhancements of a single-junction amorphous Si solar cell. Electrophoretic deposition is used to produce pigment-based back reflectors with high pigment density, controllable film thickness and site-specific deposition. Electrical conductivity of the pigment-based back reflectors is improved by creating electrical vias throughout the pigment-based back reflector by making holes using an electrical discharge / dielectric breakdown approach followed by a second electrophoretic deposition of conductive nanoparticles into the holes. While previous studies have demonstrated the use of pigment-based back reflectors, for example white paint, on glass superstrate configured thin film Si solar cells, this work presents a scheme for producing pigment-based reflectors on complex shape and flexible substrates. Finally, mechanical durability and scalability are demonstrated on a continuous electrophoretic deposition roll-to-roll system which has flexible metal substrate capability of 4 inch wide and 300 feet long.

  20. PROSPECT: Optical Calibration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, Ken; Prospect Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Precision Reactor Oscillation and SPECTrum Experiment (PROSPECT), is a short baseline, reactor neutrino experiment which focuses on measurements of the flux and energy spectrum of antineutrinos emitted from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Using these measurements, PROSPECT will probe for eV-scale sterile neutrinos while making a high precision measurement of the U-235 antineutrino spectrum. PROSPECT contains two phases; the first phase consists of a mobile detector near the reactor core while the second phase adds a larger fixed detector further from the core. The PROSPECT Phase 1 detector consists of a 2ton optically segmented liquid scintillator with each segment read-out by two photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The PMTs are calibrated with a photon source generated by a nanosecond pulsed laser. In this project, we developed a plan to determine the effectiveness of a 450nm fiber-pigtailed diode laser as it coupled with several modules including an optical fiber splitter, an optical diffuser, and an attenuator. The project tested for the system ability to deliver light uniformly to each of the cells in the detector. We will present the design and result of this project as well as discuss how it will be implemented in PROSPECT.

  1. Optical detector calibrator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strobel, James P. (Inventor); Moerk, John S. (Inventor); Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An optical detector calibrator system simulates a source of optical radiation to which a detector to be calibrated is responsive. A light source selected to emit radiation in a range of wavelengths corresponding to the spectral signature of the source is disposed within a housing containing a microprocessor for controlling the light source and other system elements. An adjustable iris and a multiple aperture filter wheel are provided for controlling the intensity of radiation emitted from the housing by the light source to adjust the simulated distance between the light source and the detector to be calibrated. The geared iris has an aperture whose size is adjustable by means of a first stepper motor controlled by the microprocessor. The multiple aperture filter wheel contains neutral density filters of different attenuation levels which are selectively positioned in the path of the emitted radiation by a second stepper motor that is also controlled by the microprocessor. An operator can select a number of detector tests including range, maximum and minimum sensitivity, and basic functionality. During the range test, the geared iris and filter wheel are repeatedly adjusted by the microprocessor as necessary to simulate an incrementally increasing simulated source distance. A light source calibration subsystem is incorporated in the system which insures that the intensity of the light source is maintained at a constant level over time.

  2. Building automation system of payment platform weight component for large spacecraft reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, I. V.; Badanina, J. O.

    2016-04-01

    Considered Design and the logic of opening large convertible antenna. The necessity of compensation weight component in the assembly and testing of the design. Given the logic of the movement elements of power spokes, concluded that the use of the tracking system to compensate for the weight component. The analysis of the existing equipment and control systems. Produced selection of the manufacturer of automated equipment that meets the stated objectives of management and control. It is concluded that the design component of the weight compensation system based on servo controllers and sensors combined platform automation, controlled by special software. The structure of the platform automation, consistent workflow testing. It defines the principles of interaction between subsystems of the weight compensation component for receiving, processing and monitoring of process parameters testing. It is concluded that the proposed system can be integrated into the automation system and the perspective of process control testing of disclosure of large spacecraft.

  3. Stacking illumination of a confocal reflector light emitting diode automobile headlamp with an asymmetric triangular prism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsi-Chao; Zhou, Jia-Hao; Zhou, Yang

    2017-02-01

    A confocal reflector lamp with an asymmetric triangular prism was designed for a stacking illumination of a light emitting diode (LED) automobile headlamp fitting ECE R112 asymmetrical regulation. The optical system includes three 1st elliptic reflectors, three 2nd parabolic reflectors, and one asymmetric triangular prism. Three elliptic and parabolic reflectors were assembled with three confocal reflector modules; two modules projected the cut-off line of a 0° angle, and the other module projected the cut-off line of a 15° angle using of an asymmetric triangular prism. The ray tracing, optical simulation, and mockup experiment results exhibited that the illumination distribution met the regulation of ECE R112 class B, and the ideal efficiency could reach 96.8% in theory. The tolerance analysis showed the efficiency remained above 98% under the error values of ±0.2  mm of the position of the LED light source, and the y direction of the up-down movement was more sensitive than the x and z directions. The measurement results of the mockup sample safety factor were all larger than 1.15 and supported the regulation of the ECE R112 Class B.

  4. Cavity optomechanics with 2D photonic crystal membrane reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingaraju, Navin B.; Shuai, Yichen; Lawall, John

    2016-03-01

    Membranes made from silicon nitride have significantly higher mechanical Q-factors under tensile stress than those made of other dielectric materials. This makes them ideal candidates for membrane reflectors that provide high finesse in Fabry-Perot cavities or membrane-in-the-middle optomechanical systems. Building on our previous work with one-dimensional gratings on suspended membranes, we patterned two-dimensional photonic crystal gratings on monolithic, suspended membranes made from silicon nitride. These high-Q membranes exhibited high reflectivity, upwards of 99%, over several nanometers in the telecom band. To probe their optical response in a cavity environment, we used these membrane reflectors as the moving mirror in a Fabry-Perot cavity. We were able to realize cavities with a finesse of over 4,500.

  5. Synthesis of offset dual reflector antennas transforming a given feed illumination pattern into a specified aperture distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.; Galindo-Israel, V.; Hyjazie, F.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of transforming a given primary feed pattern into a desired aperture field distribution through two reflections by an offset dual reflector system is investigated using the concepts of geometrical optics. A numerically rigorous solution for the reflector surfaces is developed which realizes an exact aperture phase distribution and an aperture amplitude distribution that is accurate to within an arbitrarily small numerical tolerance. However, this procedure does not always yield a smooth solution, i.e., the reflector surfaces thus realized may not be continuous or their slopes may vary too rapidly. In the event of nonexistence of a numerically rigorous smooth solution, an approximate solution that enforces the smoothness of the reflector surfaces can be obtained. In the approximate solution, only the requirement for the aperture amplitude distribution is relaxed, and the condition on the aperture phase distribution is continued to be satisfied exactly.

  6. X-ray resonator with pear-shaped reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Churikov, V A

    2003-11-30

    An X-ray resonator design is proposed in which peculiar pear-shaped reflectors, which are grazing-incidence X-ray mirrors, serve as optical elements. Special features of this resonator are relatively high reflector efficiencies and the axial symmetry of the output radiation. (resonators)

  7. Resonant-state expansion applied to planar open optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doost, M. B.; Langbein, W.; Muljarov, E. A.

    2012-02-01

    The resonant-state expansion (RSE), a rigorous perturbation theory of the Brillouin-Wigner type recently developed in electrodynamics[E. A. Muljarov, W. Langbein, and R. Zimmermann, Europhys. Lett.EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/0295-5075/92/50010 92, 50010 (2010)], is applied to planar, effectively one-dimensional optical systems, such as layered dielectric slabs and Bragg reflector microcavities. It is demonstrated that the RSE converges with a power law in the basis size. Algorithms for error estimation and their reduction by extrapolation are presented and evaluated. Complex eigenfrequencies, electromagnetic fields, and the Green's function of a selection of optical systems are calculated, as well as the observable transmission spectra. In particular, we find that for a Bragg-mirror microcavity, which has sharp resonances in the spectrum, the transmission calculated using the RSE reproduces the result of the transfer- or scattering-matrix method.

  8. A Space-Based Optical Communication System Utilizing Fiber Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-09

    free-space optical communication systems are not widely recognized. The current generation of spaceborne optical communication systems relies on the...Preliminary experimental results of our breadboard fiber-based coherent optical communication system are also presented.

  9. Compact MEMS-driven pyramidal polygon reflector for circumferential scanned endoscopic imaging probe.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xiaojing; Zhou, Guangya; Yu, Hongbin; Du, Yu; Feng, Hanhua; Tsai, Julius Ming Lin; Chau, Fook Siong

    2012-03-12

    A novel prototype of an electrothermal chevron-beam actuator based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) platform has been successfully developed for circumferential scan. Microassembly technology is utilized to construct this platform, which consists of a MEMS chevron-beam type microactuator and a micro-reflector. The proposed electrothermal microactuators with a two-stage electrothermal cascaded chevron-beam driving mechanism provide displacement amplification, thus enabling a highly reflective micro-pyramidal polygon reflector to rotate a large angle for light beam scanning. This MEMS platform is ultra-compact, supports circumferential imaging capability and is suitable for endoscopic optical coherence tomography (EOCT) applications, for example, for intravascular cancer detection.

  10. Plans for a large deployable reflector for submillimeter and infrared astronomy from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, P. N.; Breckinridge, J. B.; Gulkis, S.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Kiya, M.

    1982-01-01

    Continuing plans for a large deployable reflector (LDR), conceived as a 10- to 30-m-diameter clear-aperture telescope, operating at wavelengths from 1000 microns to a diffraction-limited 30 microns, and to be placed in orbit for a life of 10 years by the Space Shuttle, are discussed. The primary reflector will be composed of a number of closely packed hexagonal segments of glass or lightweight composite material and attached to a truss integrating structure through position actuators providing three degrees of freedom for each segment. Technical aspects of optical design, surface measurement systems, deployment, and detectors are discussed, as are practical and fiscal limitations.

  11. Fiber optic control system integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppel, G. L.; Glasheen, W. M.; Russell, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    A total fiber optic, integrated propulsion/flight control system concept for advanced fighter aircraft is presented. Fiber optic technology pertaining to this system is identified and evaluated for application readiness. A fiber optic sensor vendor survey was completed, and the results are reported. The advantages of centralized/direct architecture are reviewed, and the concept of the protocol branch is explained. Preliminary protocol branch selections are made based on the F-18/F404 application. Concepts for new optical tools are described. Development plans for the optical technology and the described system are included.

  12. Radio frequency verification tasks related to a multiple aperture reflector system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    The establishment of analytical methods for predicting the electromagnetic performance of multiple offset fed apertures for multiple beam large space antenna systems is highlighted. The development of experimental modeling techniques for verifying the analytical methods used in predicting the effects of surface roughness (pillows), scattering, and aperture coupling on RF performance is discussed.

  13. Biological polarized light reflectors in stomatopod crustaceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Tsyr-Huei; Cronin, Thomas W.; Caldwell, Roy L.; Marshall, Justin

    2005-08-01

    Body parts that can reflect highly polarized light have been found in several species of stomatopod crustaceans (mantis shrimps). These polarized light reflectors can be grossly divided into two major types. The first type, usually red or pink in color to the human visual system, is located within an animal's cuticle. Reflectors of the second type, showing iridescent blue, are located beneath the exoskeleton and thus are unaffected by the molt cycle. We used reflection spectropolarimetry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to study the reflective properties and the structures that reflect highly polarized light in stomatopods. For the first type of reflector, the degree of polarization usually changes dramatically, from less than 20% to over 70%, with a change in viewing angle. TEM examination indicates that the polarization reflection is generated by multilayer thin-film interference. The second type of reflector, the blue colored ones, reflects highly polarized light to all viewing angles. However, these reflectors show a slight chromatic change with different viewing angles. TEM sections have revealed that streams of oval-shaped vesicles might be responsible for the production of the polarized light reflection. In all the reflectors we have examined so far, the reflected light is always maximally polarized at around 500 nm, which is close to the wavelength best transmitted by sea water. This suggests that the polarized light reflectors found in stomatopods are well adapted to the underwater environment. We also found that most reflectors produce polarized light with a horizontal e-vector. How these polarized light reflectors are used in stomatopod signaling remains unknown.

  14. Homology Parameters for Large Axisymmetric Shaped Dual-Reflector Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, You; Duan, Baoyan; Wang, Congsi; Wang, Wei; Feng, Shufei; Xiang, Binbin

    2017-05-01

    We extend the concept of best-fitting paraboloids for large single and dual reflectors with conic-section surfaces to best-fit shaped surface for large dual reflectors shaped for uniform amplitude distribution. The point focus of the paraboloidal main reflector is replaced by focal lines for the main reflector and the primary subreflector focus, whereas the secondary subreflector point focus at the feed is kept. The reflector surfaces are shaped, and all rays from the main-reflector aperture to the feed meet an equal-path-length condition. This condition may be represented by a set of "homology parameters" determined by a least-squares method. Finally, we calculate the homology parameters and the root mean square of surface errors for an 8-m dual-reflector system including gravity effects for the antenna pointed toward zenith and the horizon.

  15. High-index dielectric meta-materials for near-perfect broadband reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengqi; Liu, Xiaoshan; Wang, Yan; Pan, Pingping

    2016-05-01

    All-dielectric meta-materials offer a potential alternative to plasmonic meta-materials at optical frequencies. Herein, we take advantage of loss-less as well as simple unit cell geometry to demonstrate near-perfect broadband reflectors made from all-dielectric materials. These near-perfect reflectors, consisting of high-index cross-shaped resonators (n  =  3.5, Si), operating in the telecommunications bands, exhibit novel optical properties including polarization-independent, wide-angle near-unity reflection. The average reflectance is exceeding 98% at the wavelength range from 1.261 μm to 1.533 μm. At 1.310 μm, the average reflectance (R) reaches 99.7%, surpassing the reflectance of metallic mirrors. A near-perfect super-broadband reflection spectrum with bandwidth of 0.330 μm (R  >  98%) is achieved for a system with a higher index dielectric resonator array (n  =  4.0, Ge). Moreover, the optical properties of the reflector provide high scalability across the wavelength range via tuning of dielectric resonators. The whole structure, with common triple-layer features, can be mass-produced using standard lithography methods and deposition techniques. These optical and structural features make the proposed near-perfect broadband reflectors feasible avenues for manipulating light in important applications in spectroscopy, photovoltaics and light emission.

  16. Astigmatism in reflector antennas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogdell, J. R.; Davis, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    Astigmatic phase error in large parabolic reflector antennas is discussed. A procedure for focusing an antenna and diagnosing the presence and degree of astigmatism is described. Theoretical analysis is conducted to determine the nature of this error in such antennas.

  17. Laser optical displacement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starritt, Larry W.; Matthews, Larryl K.

    1995-04-01

    The current quality of our nations bridges is on a decline. There are roughly half a million highway bridges in the United States and out of the half a million more than 200,000 are deficient. With catastrophic failure of bridges causing the loss of life and property, the need for bridge inspection and maintenance is evident. When the Silver Bridge that crossed the Ohio River collapsed in December 1967, 46 people were killed. The failure to prevent the disaster was attributed to the poor inspection techniques used by the bridge inspectors. Current inspection techniques depend on humans being able to recognize structural imperfections without the aid of instrumentation. The Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1968 mandated both national bridge inspection standards and training for bridge inspectors. This act has encouraged the development of instruments that would allow inspectors to perform more complete inspections of bridges. To improve the quality of inspection and data, there is a great need for proven methods and instruments used to acquire data. The Laser Optical Displacement System (L.O.D.S.) developed at New Mexico State University by the Optical and Materials Science Lab is such a device. The L.O.D.S. has been tested and proven in both laboratory situations and in the field. This paper describes some of the methods that are now being used to measure deflections in bridges. Then, a description of the development and application of the L.O.D.S. unit is given.

  18. Precision segmented reflector, figure verification sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manhart, Paul K.; Macenka, Steve A.

    1989-01-01

    The Precision Segmented Reflector (PSR) program currently under way at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is a test bed and technology demonstration program designed to develop and study the structural and material technologies required for lightweight, precision segmented reflectors. A Figure Verification Sensor (FVS) which is designed to monitor the active control system of the segments is described, a best fit surface is defined, and an image or wavefront quality of the assembled array of reflecting panels is assessed

  19. Intelligent Optical Systems Using Adaptive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, the phrase adaptive optics generally conjured images of large deformable mirrors being integrated into telescopes to compensate for atmospheric turbulence. However, the development of smaller, cheaper devices has sparked interest for other aerospace and commercial applications. Variable focal length lenses, liquid crystal spatial light modulators, tunable filters, phase compensators, polarization compensation, and deformable mirrors are becoming increasingly useful for other imaging applications including guidance navigation and control (GNC), coronagraphs, foveated imaging, situational awareness, autonomous rendezvous and docking, non-mechanical zoom, phase diversity, and enhanced multi-spectral imaging. The active components presented here allow flexibility in the optical design, increasing performance. In addition, the intelligent optical systems presented offer advantages in size and weight and radiation tolerance.

  20. Correcting Thermal Deformations in an Active Composite Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Samuel C.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Wilkie, William K.

    2011-01-01

    Large, high-precision composite reflectors for future space missions are costly to manufacture, and heavy. An active composite reflector capable of adjusting shape in situ to maintain required tolerances can be lighter and cheaper to manufacture. An active composite reflector testbed was developed that uses an array of piezoelectric composite actuators embedded in the back face sheet of a 0.8-m reflector panel. Each individually addressable actuator can be commanded from 500 to +1,500 V, and the flatness of the panel can be controlled to tolerances of 100 nm. Measuring the surface flatness at this resolution required the use of a speckle holography interferometer system in the Precision Environmental Test Enclosure (PETE) at JPL. The existing testbed combines the PETE for test environment stability, the speckle holography system for measuring out-of-plane deformations, the active panel including an array of individually addressable actuators, a FLIR thermal camera to measure thermal profiles across the reflector, and a heat source. Use of an array of flat piezoelectric actuators to correct thermal deformations is a promising new application for these actuators, as is the use of this actuator technology for surface flatness and wavefront control. An isogrid of these actuators is moving one step closer to a fully active face sheet, with the significant advantage of ease in manufacturing. No extensive rib structure or other actuation backing structure is required, as these actuators can be applied directly to an easy-to-manufacture flat surface. Any mission with a surface flatness requirement for a panel or reflector structure could adopt this actuator array concept to create lighter structures and enable improved performance on orbit. The thermal environment on orbit tends to include variations in temperature during shadowing or changes in angle. Because of this, a purely passive system is not an effective way to maintain flatness at the scale of microns over several

  1. Enhanced imaging of reflector antenna surface distortion using microwave holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmore, Sean W.; Rudduck, Roger C.

    1989-01-01

    Two signal processing techniques are discussed that improve the accuracy of a microwave holographic measurement by removing unwanted signals from the aperture distribution: pattern simulation and subtraction, and time domain filtering. Pattern simulation and subtraction involves modeling unwanted scattering mechanisms and then removing them from the measured far-field data. Measurements taken on a focal point geometry and a Cassegrain geometry at 11 GHz were processed by the holographic analysis system. Pattern simulation and subtraction was applied to both geometries. Surface deformation profiles generated for the Cassegrain antenna by this system were compared to an optical measurement of the main reflector surface.

  2. Optical power source control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husbands, C. R.

    1984-05-01

    An optical power source control system having a four port optical coupler, an optical receiver and associated comparator circuits operably connected to the optical transmission line connecting the source to an output connector. When the output connector is mated with another connector, the receiver senses the optical energy reflected from the glass/air and air/glass interfaces of the connectors and provides an appropriate signal. This signal is sufficiently high when compared to a threshold voltage level to permit the power source to operate. When the output connector is in the unmated condition the reflected optical power from the air/glass interface is no longer present and therefore the signal from the receiver falls below the threshold voltage level. With this reduced signal level, power flow to the optical source is removed or reduced thereby controlling the operation of the optical power source.

  3. Multiaperture optical system research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Richard T.

    1987-11-01

    A basic and applied research program concerned with multiaperture optics is described. The intent is to explore to what extent the principles of the insect eye can be incorporated into the design of optical instruments. The advantages and disadvantages of multiaperture optics are investigated in the basic part of the program. The applied part of the program was devoted to the design and construction of prototype instruments based on the design information generated during the basic part of the program.

  4. An advanced optical system for laser ablation propulsion in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstue, Grant; Fork, Richard; Reardon, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel space-based ablation driven propulsion engine concept utilizing transmitted energy in the form of a series of ultra-short optical pulses. Key differences are generating the pulses at the transmitting spacecraft and the safe delivery of that energy to the receiving spacecraft for propulsion. By expanding the beam diameter during transmission in space, the energy can propagate at relatively low intensity and then be refocused and redistributed to create an array of ablation sites at the receiver. The ablation array strategy allows greater control over flight dynamics and eases thermal management. Research efforts for this transmission and reception of ultra-short optical pulses include: (1) optical system design; (2) electrical system requirements; (3) thermal management; (4) structured energy transmission safety. Research has also been focused on developing an optical switch concept for the multiplexing of the ultra-short pulses. This optical switch strategy implements multiple reflectors polished into a rotating momentum wheel device to combine the pulses from different laser sources. The optical system design must minimize the thermal load on any one optical element. Initial specifications and modeling for the optical system are being produced using geometrical ray-tracing software to give a better understanding of the optical requirements. In regards to safety, we have advanced the retro-reflective beam locking strategy to include look-ahead capabilities for long propagation distances. Additional applications and missions utilizing multiplexed pulse transmission are also presented. Because the research is in early development, it provides an opportunity for new and valuable advances in the area of transmitted energy for propulsion as well as encourages joint international efforts. Researchers from different countries can cooperate in order to find constructive and safe uses of ordered pulse transmission for propulsion in future space

  5. An assessment of potential weather effects due to operation of the Space Orbiting Light Augmentation Reflector Energy System (SOLARES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, N. C.

    1978-01-01

    Implementation of SOLARES will input large quantities of heat continuously into a stationary location on the Earth's surface. The quantity of heat released by each of the SOlARES ground receivers, having a reflector orbit height of 6378 km, exceeds by 30 times that released by large power parks which were studied in detail. Using atmospheric models, estimates are presented for the local weather effects, the synoptic scale effects, and the global scale effects from such intense thermal radiation.

  6. Monitoring of the reflectors of ESA's Planck telescope by close-range photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parian, Jafar Amiri; Gruen, Armin; Cozzani, Alessandro

    2007-11-01

    The Planck mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) is designed to image the anisotropies of the Cosmic Background Radiation Field over the whole sky. Planck's objective is to analyze, with the highest accuracy ever achieved, the remnants of the radiation that filled the universe immediately after the Big Bang, which we observe today as the cosmic microwave background. To achieve this aim well-manufactured reflectors are used as parts of the Planck telescope receiving system. The system consists of the Secondary and Primary Reflectors which are sections of two different ellipsoids of revolution with diameters of 1.1 and 1.9 meters. Deformations of the reflectors which influence the optical parameters and the gain of receiving signals are investigated in vacuum and at temperatures down to 95K, using close-range photogrammetric techniques. We have designed an optimal close-range photogrammetric network by heuristic simulation for the Primary and Secondary Reflectors with a mean relative precision better than 1:1,000,000 and 1:400,000, respectively, to achieve the requested accuracies. Special considerations have been taken into account in different steps of design, such as the determinability of additional parameters under the given network configuration, datum definition, reliability and precision issues as well as workspace limits and propagating errors from different sources of errors. A least squares best-fit ellipsoid was developed to determine the optical parameters of the reflector. We present our procedure and the results of processing the photogrammetric measurements of the Flight Models of the Primary and Secondary Reflectors which were executed by Thales Alenia Space France under ESA-ESTEC contract in vacuum and at very low temperatures.

  7. Composite materials for precision space reflector panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.; Funk, Joan G.; Bowles, David E.; Towell, Timothy W.; Connell, John W.

    1992-01-01

    One of the critical technology needs of large precision reflectors for future astrophysical and optical communications satellites lies in the area of structural materials. Results from a materials research and development program at NASA Langley Research Center to provide materials for these reflector applications are discussed. Advanced materials that meet the reflector panel requirements are identified, and thermal, mechanical and durability properties of candidate materials after exposure to simulated space environments are compared. A parabolic, graphite-phenolic honeycomb composite panel having a surface accuracy of 70.8 microinches rms and an areal weight of 1.17 lbm/sq ft was fabricated with T50/ERL1962 facesheets, a PAEI thermoplastic surface film, and Al and SiO(x) coatings.

  8. Optical modulator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, J.

    1972-01-01

    The fabrication, test, and delivery of an optical modulator system which will operate with a mode-locked Nd:YAG laser indicating at either 1.06 or 0.53 micrometers is discussed. The delivered hardware operates at data rates up to 400 Mbps and includes a 0.53 micrometer electrooptic modulator, a 1.06 micrometer electrooptic modulator with power supply and signal processing electronics with power supply. The modulators contain solid state drivers which accept digital signals with MECL logic levels, temperature controllers to maintain a stable thermal environment for the modulator crystals, and automatic electronic compensation to maximize the extinction ratio. The modulators use two lithium tantalate crystals cascaded in a double pass configuration. The signal processing electronics include encoding electronics which are capable of digitizing analog signals between the limit of + or - 0.75 volts at a maximum rate of 80 megasamples per second with 5 bit resolution. The digital samples are serialized and made available as a 400 Mbps serial NRZ data source for the modulators. A pseudorandom (PN) generator is also included in the signal processing electronics. This data source generates PN sequences with lengths between 31 bits and 32,767 bits in a serial NRZ format at rates up to 400 Mbps.

  9. High reflector absorptance measurements by the surface thermal lensing technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R.; Taylor, J.R.; Wu, Z.L.; Krupka, R.; Yang, T.

    1996-11-01

    Surface thermal lensing is an alternate configuration of a photothermal deflection system that was used to measure low levels of optical absorption. The thermal lensing configuration facilitated the alignment of the pump and probe laser beams by using a larger diameter probe beam. This technique was applied to high performance optical coatings, specifically high reflectors at 511 nm, zero degrees angle of incidence. The absorptance of these coatings was previously measured using a high power copper vapor laser system. A high power copper laser beam is focused onto a -2 mm diameter spot. A thermal camera senses the temperature rise with respect to the rest of the coating. The temperature change, power density and beam diameter were used with an empirical formula that yields optical absorption. The surface thermal lensing technique was able to resolve absorption levels lower than that achieved with the copper laser method.

  10. The Design Of The Central-Axis Reflector (ZAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenell, Hermann

    1990-07-01

    The central-axis reflector (LAS) , the design principle which is pre-sented below is a segmented-mirror telescope.The inventions relate main-ly to the optical system and to the tracking apparatus. A large number of small individual mirror bodies , ground off-axis (hexagonal/polygonal) produce one primary mirror with closed circular aperture when joined together. The overall design of the tracking apparatus results directly-and thus without unnecessary adornment- from the two planes of motion which have been reduced to a minimum but which are required for tracking of the telescope.

  11. The design of the central-axis reflector (ZAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huegenell, Hermann

    1989-04-01

    The design principle of the central-axis reflector, a segmented-mirror telescope, is presented. The inventions relate mainly to the optical system and to the tracking apparatus. A large number of small individual mirror bodies, ground off-axis (hexagonal/polygonal), produce one primary mirror with closed circular aperture when joined together. The overall design of the tracking apparatus results directly (and thus without unnecessary adornment) from the two planes of motion which have been reduced to a minimum but which are required for tracking of the telescope.

  12. Research on no-guide distance measurement using internal servo interferometer optics system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang Songlin; Li Mengchao; He Liqing; Zhou Zijian; Yuan Yifang

    1996-12-31

    A synthetic type of distance ranging system is described in this paper. In this system, one frequency-modulated laser beam and two multi-mode laser beams that come from different lasers, having different wave length, are inputed to a Michelson interferometer together with the same path. When the system start to run, computer may send out signals driving the reference reflector to find or keep the zero optical path difference, according to the principle of frequency-modulated ranging and quasi-white light positioning with interferometer. In the meantime, the shifted value of the reference reflector would be measured by another interferometer. Lastly, the distance can be accurately detected by that value and the environment parameters through calculating with computer. Some fundamental experiments have been done, proving the feasibility of this synthetic method.

  13. Optical analysis of a photovoltaic V-trough system installed in western India.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Subarna; Sarmah, Nabin; Bapat, Pratap; Mallick, Tapas K

    2012-12-20

    The low concentrating photovoltaic (PV) system such as a 2× V-trough system can be a promising choice for enhancing the power output from conventional PV panels with the inclusion of thermal management. This system is more attractive when the reflectors are retrofitted to the stationary PV panels installed in a high aspect ratio in the north-south direction and are tracked 12 times a year manually according to preset angles, thus eliminating the need of diurnal expensive tracking. In the present analysis, a V-trough system facing exactly the south direction is considered, where the tilt angle of the PV panels' row is kept constant at 18.34°. The system is installed on the terrace of CSIR-Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute in Bhavnagar, Gujarat, India (21.47 N, 71.15 E). The dimension of the entire PV system is 9.64 m×0.55 m. The V-troughs made of anodized aluminum reflectors (70% specular reflectivity) had the same dimensions. An in-house developed; experimentally validated Monte Carlo ray-trace model was used to study the effect of the angular variation of the reflectors throughout a year for the present assembly. Results of the ray trace for the optimized angles showed the maximum simulated optical efficiency to be 85.9%. The spatial distribution of solar intensity over the 0.55 m dimension of the PV panel due to the V-trough reflectors was also studied for the optimized days in periods that included solstices and equinoxes. The measured solar intensity profiles with and without the V-trough system were used to calculate the actual optical efficiencies for several sunny days in the year, and results were validated with the simulated efficiencies within an average error limit of 10%.

  14. Secure optical communication system utilizing deformable MEMS mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziph-Schatzberg, Leah; Bifano, Thomas; Cornelissen, Steven; Stewart, Jason; Bleier, Zvi

    2009-02-01

    An optical communication system suitable for voice, data retrieval from remote sensors and identification is described. The system design allows operation at ranges of several hundred meters. The heart of the system is a modulated MEMS mirror that is electrostatically actuated and changes between a flat reflective state and a corrugated diffractive state. A process for mass producing these mirrors at low cost was developed and is described. The mirror was incorporated as a facet in a hollow retro-reflector, allowing temporal modulation of an interrogating beam and the return of the modulated beam to the interrogator. This system thus consists of a low power, small and light communication node with large (about 60°) angular extent. The system's range and pointing are determined by the interrogator /detector/demodulator (Transceiver) unit. The transceiver is comprised of an optical channel to establish line of sight communication, an interrogating laser at 1550nm, an avalanche photo diode to detect the return signal and electronics to drive the laser and demodulate the detected signal and convert it to an audio signal. A functional prototype system was built using a modified compact optical sight as the transceiver. Voice communication in free space was demonstrated. The design and test of major components and the complete system are discussed.

  15. System for testing optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Golob, John E. [Olathe, KS; Looney, Larry D. [Los Alamos, NM; Lyons, Peter B. [Los Alamos, NM; Nelson, Melvin A. [Santa Barbara, CA; Davies, Terence J. [Santa Barbara, CA

    1980-07-15

    A system for measuring a combination of optical transmission properties of fiber optic waveguides. A polarized light pulse probe is injected into one end of the optical fiber. Reflections from discontinuities within the fiber are unpolarized whereas reflections of the probe pulse incident to its injection remain polarized. The polarized reflections are prevented from reaching a light detector whereas reflections from the discontinuities reaches the detector.

  16. System for testing optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Golob, J.E.; Looney, L.D.; Lyons, P.B.; Nelson, M.A.; Davies, T.J.

    1980-07-15

    A system for measuring a combination of optical transmission properties of fiber optic waveguides. A polarized light pulse probe is injected into one end of the optical fiber. Reflections from discontinuities within the fiber are unpolarized whereas reflections of the probe pulse incident to its injection remain polarized. The polarized reflections are prevented from reaching a light detector whereas reflections from the discontinuities reaches the detector. 2 figs.

  17. Optical prefiltering in subcarrier systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhalgh, Philip A.; Abel, Robin D.; Davies, Phillip A.

    1993-02-01

    Subcarrier multiplexing (SCM) is a convenient method of implementing multi-access in a lightwave system. Conventionally SCM receivers detect all channels using high speed optoelectronic components, each channel then being selected using heterodyne techniques in the electrical domain. Optical prefiltering is a novel technique where channel selection is accomplished optically. This method has the primary advantage that only a low bandwidth optical detector and receiver is needed to recover the baseband information.

  18. Inflatable Reflector For Solar Power And Radio Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sercel, Joel; Gilchriest, Carl; Ewell, Rich; Herman, Martin; Rascoe, Daniel L.; Nesmith, Bill J.

    1995-01-01

    Report proposes installation of lightweight inflatable reflector structure aboard spacecraft required to both derive power from sunlight and communicate with Earth by radio when apparent position of Earth is at manageably small angle from line of sight to Sun. Structure contains large-aperture paraboloidal reflector aimed toward Sun and concentrates sunlight onto photovoltaic power converter and acts as main reflector of spacecraft radio-communication system.

  19. The DART Cylindrical, Infrared, 1 Meter Membrane Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Rhonda M.; Agnes, Greg S.; Barber, Dan; Dooley, Jennifer; Dragovan, Mark; Hatheway, Al E.; Marcin, Marty

    2004-01-01

    The Dual Anamorphic Reflector Telescopes (DART) is an architecture for large aperture space telescopes that enables the use of membranes. A membrane can be readily shaped in one direction of curvature using a combination of boundary control and tensioning, yielding a cylindrical reflector. Two cylindrical reflectors (orthogonal and confocal) comprise the 'primary mirror' of the telescope system. The aperture is completely unobstructed and ideal for infrared and high contrast observations.

  20. The DART Cylindrical, Infrared, 1 Meter Membrane Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Rhonda M.; Agnes, Greg S.; Barber, Dan; Dooley, Jennifer; Dragovan, Mark; Hatheway, Al E.; Marcin, Marty

    2004-01-01

    The Dual Anamorphic Reflector Telescopes (DART) is an architecture for large aperture space telescopes that enables the use of membranes. A membrane can be readily shaped in one direction of curvature using a combination of boundary control and tensioning, yielding a cylindrical reflector. Two cylindrical reflectors (orthogonal and confocal) comprise the 'primary mirror' of the telescope system. The aperture is completely unobstructed and ideal for infrared and high contrast observations.

  1. Large space reflector technology on the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankins, J. C.; Dickinson, R. M.; Freeland, R. E.; Marzwell, N. I.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of the Space Station in the evolutionary development of large space reflector technology and the accommodation of mission systems which will apply large space reflectors during the late 1990s and the early part of the next century. Reflectors which range from 10 to 100 meters in size and which span the electromagnetic spectrum for applications that include earth communications, earth observations, astrophysics and solar physics, and deep space communications are discussed. The role of the Space Station in large space reflector technology development and system performance demonstration is found to be critical; that role involves the accommodation of a wide variety of technology demonstrations and operational activities on the Station, including reflector deployment and/or assembly, mechanical performance verification and configuration refinement, systematic diagnostics of reflector surfaces, structural dynamics and controls research, overall system performance characterization and modification (including both radio frequency field pattern measurements and required end-to-end system demonstrations), and reflector-to-spacecraft integration and staging. A unique facility for Space Station-based, large space reflector research and development is proposed. A preliminary concept for such a Space Station-based Large Space Reflector Facility (LSRF) is described.

  2. Optically Recording Velocity Interferometer System: Applications and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Marcia

    2015-06-01

    The Optically Recording Velocity Interferometer System (ORVIS) is a useful variant of the single point Velocity Interferometer System Any Reflector (VISAR) for the measurement of spatially dependent surface motion. Despite being similar in name, the two systems fundamentally differ in terms of the light recombination afforded by the interferometer geometry and subsequent recording method of the fringe phase variations. While both techniques have long been established as useful measurement technologies in shock physics studies of homogeneous and heterogeneous materials, the number of researchers employing spatially resolved ORVIS remains small. The first part of this presentation will discuss the baseline system including data examples only possible with the diagnostic's ability for continuous spatial recording. Recent adaptations of the baseline system have extended capabilities to incorporate multiple interferometers and laser illumination sources for observations in multiple spatial dimensions and non-planar geometries. The second part of this presentation will discuss efforts to overcome noted practical challenges when fielding the diagnostic and post-processing of image data. Application to non-planar geometries and highly heterogeneous materials motivates an appreciation of the coupling between the target surface reflectance properties and the light collection optics which can be quantitatively assessed through the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of the reflector. Challenges of practically locating fringe jumps in post-processing are discussed in the context of appreciating the underlying quadrature relationships of the fringe records. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Design of the Central-Axis Reflector (ZAS) and results leading to the Off-Axis Reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huegenell, Hermann

    1990-07-01

    The Central-Axis Reflector (ZAS), the design of which is presented, is a segmented mirror telescope. The inventions relate mainly to the optical system and to the tracking apparatus. A number of individual mirror bodies, ground off-axis (hexagonal/polygonal) produce one primary mirror with closed circular aperture when joined together. The overall design of the tracking apparatus results directly (and thus without unnecessary adornment) from the two planes of motion which have been reduced to an obligatory minimum but which are required for tracking of the telescope.

  4. Deployable Reflector for Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. L.

    1982-01-01

    Unfoldable-membrane-reflector concept leads to mobile photovoltaic generators. Hinged containers swing open for deployment, and counterbalance beam swings into position. Folded reflector membranes are unfolded as deployment mast is extended, until stretched out flat.

  5. Optical aberration compensation in a multiplexed optical trapping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čižmár, T.; Dalgarno, H. I. C.; Ashok, P. C.; Gunn-Moore, F. J.; Dholakia, K.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper we discuss optical aberrations within a multiplexed optical trapping system. We analyze two of the most powerful methods for optical trap multiplexing: time-shared beam steering and holographic beam shaping in a tandem system with an acousto-optic deflector and spatial light modulator. We show how to isolate and correct for the aberrations introduced by these individual optical components using the spatial light modulator and demonstrate the enhancement this provides to optical trapping.

  6. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) system concept and technology definition study. Analysis of space station requirements for LDR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, Donald L.; Vinkey, Victor F.; Runge, Fritz C.

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine how the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) might benefit from the use of the space station for assembly, checkout, deployment, servicing, refurbishment, and technology development. Requirements that must be met by the space station to supply benefits for a selected scenario are summarized. Quantitative and qualitative data are supplied. Space station requirements for LDR which may be utilized by other missions are identified. A technology development mission for LDR is outlined and requirements summarized. A preliminary experiment plan is included. Space Station Data Base SAA 0020 and TDM 2411 are updated.

  7. Tolerancing the LITE optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Mark E.

    This paper describes the optical system used in the Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE) and presents the results of a study designed to generate a tolerance budget for the LITE, using the combination of manual and Monte Carlo tolerancing techniques utilizing the SYNOPSYS optical analysis program. The tolerance budget derived for LITE, including the contributions of both the fabrication and the alignment of the optical-path elements, are presented. It is shown that the nature of the design allows for typical optical shop tolerances of about 5 mils of despace and decenter, 0.1 deg of tilt, and about 5 fringes of surface figure error.

  8. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOEpatents

    Winston, R.; Ries, H.

    1996-12-17

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source, a light reflecting surface, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line with the reflecting surface defined in terms of the reference line as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line to the reflection surface along the desired edge ray through the point. 35 figs.

  9. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOEpatents

    Winston, R.; Ries, H.

    1998-10-06

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source a light reflecting surface, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line with the reflecting surface defined in terms of the reference lines a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line to the reflection surface along the desired edge ray through the point. 35 figs.

  10. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, R.; Ries, H.

    2000-02-01

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source, a light reflecting surface, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line with the reflecting surface defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t) = k(t) + Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

  11. Electrically thin flat lenses and reflectors.

    PubMed

    Ruphuy, Miguel; Siddiqui, Omar; Ramahi, Omar M

    2015-09-01

    We introduce electrically thin dielectric lenses and reflectors that focus a plane wave based on the principles of phase compensation and constructive wave interference. Phase compensation is achieved by arranging thin rectangular slabs having different dielectric permittivity according to a permittivity profile obtained through analytic design equations. All incident rays parallel to the optical axis converge to a focal point with equalized optical paths resulting in constructive interference. Plane wave simulations indicate strong focusing, even in the presence of impedance mismatch between free space and the dielectric layers composing the lens. We demonstrate focusing at 9.45 GHz using a lens fabricated with commercially available dielectric materials. In addition to focusing, the flat lens proposed here demonstrates relatively high power gain at the focal point. We also present a flat reflector based on the same concept. We believe that the proposed dielectric lens and reflector are strong candidates to replace heavy metallic dishes and reflectors used in a variety of applications, especially satellites.

  12. The Corner Reflector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Whitney S., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the corner reflector array left on the moon by the July 1969 Apollo astronauts is described. The array was used to reflect earth-originating laser beams back to earth, and yielded a more accurate determination (to within six inches) of distance from the earth to the moon. (MP)

  13. The Corner Reflector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Whitney S., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the corner reflector array left on the moon by the July 1969 Apollo astronauts is described. The array was used to reflect earth-originating laser beams back to earth, and yielded a more accurate determination (to within six inches) of distance from the earth to the moon. (MP)

  14. Corrosion protection for silver reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Arendt, Paul N.; Scott, Marion L.

    1991-12-31

    A method of protecting silver reflectors from damage caused by contact with gaseous substances which are often present in the atmosphere and a silver reflector which is so protected. The inventive method comprises at least partially coating a reflector with a metal oxide such as aluminum oxide to a thickness of 15 .ANG. or less.

  15. Tunable Optical Polymer Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Background and MURI Program Objectives Chromogenic phenomena (for example: electrochromism, photochromism , thermochromism, piezochromism, and...achieving real time tunability of optical properties of materials. Photochromism and electrochromism in polymeric and organic materials have been...chromogenic phenomena, especially electrochromism, photochromism , photoelectrochromism, thermochromism, tunable luminescence, and tunable reflection, in

  16. Improved optical lens system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, L. F.

    1970-01-01

    Objective lens produces a backwardly curving image of a star field that matches the similarly curved surface of the photocathode of an image dissector tube. Lens eliminates the need for a fiber-optics translation between the flat plane image and curved photocathode.

  17. Ellipsoidal reflector design of the LED vehicle projector type headlamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Shang-Ping; Lyu, Jhen-Cyun

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the design of the projector type headlamp using LEDs with different structure parameters is proposed. The ellipsoidal reflector with different major and minor axis would contribute different aperture and focal lengths of the ellipsoidal reflector, and then collimate the light to the converging lens. With specific converging lens and metal-based baffle plate in the projector type headlamp system, we systematical analysis of the ellipsoidal reflector in the projector type headlamp. The systematical analysis of the ellipsoidal reflector can be a reference to design a projector type headlamp with compact size and high photometry performance.

  18. Multiple pass reimaging optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunter, W. D., Jr.; Brown, R. M. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An optical imaging system for enabling nonabsorbed light imaged onto a photodetective surface to be collected and reimaged one or more times onto that surface in register with the original image. The system includes an objective lens, one or more imaging lenses, one or more retroreflectors and perhaps a prism for providing optical matching of the imaging lens focal planes to the photo detective surface.

  19. Optimization of optical systems for LED spot lights concerning the color uniformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teupner, Anne; Bergenek, Krister; Wirth, Ralph; Miñano, Juan C.; Benítez, Pablo

    2014-09-01

    Spotlighting is one illumination field where the application of light emitting diodes (LED) creates many advantages. Commonly, the system for spot lights consists of a LED light engine and collimating secondary optics. Through angular or spatial separated emitted light from the source and imaging optical elements, a non uniform far field appears with colored rings, dots or patterns. Many feasible combinations result in very different spatial color distributions. Several combinations of three multi-chip light sources and secondary optical elements like reflectors and TIR lenses with additional facets or scattering elements were analyzed mainly regarding the color uniformity. They are assessed by the merit function Usl which was derived from human factor experiments and describes the color uniformity based on the visual perception of humans. Furthermore, the optical systems are compared concerning efficiency, peak candela and aspect ratio. Both types of optics differ in the relation between the color uniformity level and other properties. A plain reflector with a slightly color mixing light source performs adequate. The results for the TIR lenses indicate that they need additional elements for good color mixing or blended light source. The most convenient system depends on the requirements of the application.

  20. A coherent optical feedback system for optical information processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jablonowski, D. P.; Lee, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    A unique optical feedback system for coherent optical data processing is described. With the introduction of feedback, the well-known transfer function for feedback systems is obtained in two dimensions. Operational details of the optical feedback system are given. Experimental results of system applications in image restoration, contrast control and analog computation are presented.

  1. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland; Ries, Harald

    1996-01-01

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

  2. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland; Ries, Harald

    1998-01-01

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

  3. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland; Ries, Harald

    2000-01-01

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

  4. Nonimaging Optical Illumination System

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    1994-02-22

    A nonimaging illumination or concentration optical device. An optical device is provided having a light source, a light reflecting surface with an opening and positioned partially around the light source which is opposite the opening of the light reflecting surface. The light reflecting surface is disposed to produce a substantially uniform intensity output with the reflecting surface defined in terms of a radius vector R.sub.i in conjunction with an angle .phi..sub.i between R.sub.i, a direction from the source and an angle .theta..sub.i between direct forward illumination and the light ray reflected once from the reflecting surface. R.sub.i varies as the exponential of tan (.phi..sub.i -.theta..sub.i)/2 integrated over .phi..sub.i.

  5. Optical Detection System Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    cases the wavelength 7 II TABLE 2 SAMPLE CONTENTS OF OPTICAL MATERIAL FILE ODSOPT.INP SRF2 3.000 0.120 13.000 9.000 0.120 0.100 0.130 0.600 0.200 0.850...N THESE ARE THE AVAILABLE FILTER TYPES: CORNING VYCOR SILICA MGF2 SRF2 VYC7905 INFRASIL SAPPHIRE MGO 1102 CDISE CBS CDTE SE ZNSE CAF2 DIAMOND

  6. Polarizing holographic reflector for electron cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) on the Tandem Mirror Experiment Upgrade (TMX-U)

    SciTech Connect

    Coffield, F.E.; Felker, B.; Gallagher, N.C. Jr.; Pedrotti, L.R.; Stallard, B.W.; Sweeney, D.W.; Wyman, E.W.; Christensen, T.E.

    1983-11-14

    A reflector for electron cyclotron resonant heating on the Tandem Mirror Experiment Upgrade has been designed to convert the high-power TE/sub 01/ output of the circular waveguide system into a linearly polarized gaussian intensity pattern in the plasma. The reflector is a computer-generated holographic optical element with a twist polarizer. Its design, fabrication, and performance are discussed. Results of the low- and high-power tests are presented. Low-power tests were used to determine the beam pattern and the degree of cross-polarization. High-power tests verified that arcing across the grooves of the twist polarizer does not occur.

  7. Nonimaging Optical Illumination System

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    1994-08-02

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing selected intensity output over an angular range. The device includes a light reflecting surface (24, 26) around a light source (22) which is disposed opposite the aperture opening of the light reflecting surface (24, 26). The light source (22) has a characteristic dimension which is small relative to one or more of the distance from the light source (22) to the light reflecting surface (24, 26) or the angle subtended by the light source (22) at the light reflecting surface (24, 26).

  8. Fiber optic sensing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic interferometer utilizes a low coherence light emitting diode (LED) laser as a light source which is filtered and driven at two RF frequencies, high and low, that are specific to the initial length of the resonator chamber. A displacement of a reflecting mirror changes the length traveled by the nonreferencing signal. The low frequency light undergoes destructive interference which reduces the average intensity of the wave while the high frequency light undergoes constructive interference which increases the average intensity of the wave. The ratio of these two intensity measurements is proportional to the displacement incurred.

  9. Novel design of hollow-core multi clad fiber for long haul optical communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palodiya, Vikram; Raghuwanshi, Sanjeev K.

    2016-09-01

    We have described a dispersion characteristics of hollow-core multi-clad index profiles, which include a hollow core. The designs satisfy the most important requirements for applications in long haul communication. This design fiber shows zero dispersion at 1550 nm can be obtained for the fundamental air core mode over a wide wavelength range by introducing the partial reflector layer around the core, optimizing expanded core size and silica cladding thickness. Also analyze dispersion compensating properties of these fibers. This unique structure of the fundamental air core mode is presented by the introduction of partial reflector cladding around the core. The potential applications of hollow-core multi clad fibers in long-haul optical communication system.

  10. Design of an LED-based compound optical system for a driving beam system.

    PubMed

    Ge, Aiming; Wang, Wei; Du, Zhengqing; Qiu, Peng; Wang, Junwei; Cai, Jinlin; Song, Xiaobo

    2013-04-20

    This paper proposes an LED-based compound optical system, which can be involved in the design of the driving beam system in automotive headlamps with high system efficiency and low power consumption. The compound system can meet the requirements announced in the UNECE regulation "Addendum 111: Regulation No. 112 Revision 2." Also, it is composed of a nonspherical reflector, a compound lens, and a two-dimensional diverging lens. Using a single device of high-brightness LED of merely 7.6 W, the specified illumination requirements for the driving beam can be achieved. As we have expected, on the test screen at a distance of 25 m, the simulation results, as well as the testing results for the prototype, can reach the illuminance distribution requirements, including all specified regions and key points. Moreover, this compound system enjoys the features of high compactness, high energy efficiency, and feasibility of manufacturing.

  11. Optical technology for flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayanagi, M.

    1986-01-01

    Optical applications to the flight control system including optical data bus, sensors, and transducers are analyzed. Examples of optical data bus include airborne light optical fiber technology (ALOFT), F-5E, YA-7D, MIL-STD-1553 fiber optic data bus and NAL-optic data bus. This NAL-optic data bus is applied to STOL, and its characteristics are stressed. Principles and advantages of optical pulse-digital transducers are discussed.

  12. System performance and cost sensitivity comparisons of stretched membrane heliostat reflectors with current generation glass/metal concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, L.M.; Anderson, J.V.; Short, W.; Wendelin, T.

    1985-12-01

    Heliostat costs have long been recognized as a major factor in the cost of solar central receiver plants. Research on stretched membrane heliostats has been emphasized because of their potential as a cost-effective alternative to current glass/metal designs. However, the cost and performance potential of stretched membrane heliostats from a system perspective has not been studied until this time. The optical performance of individual heliostats is predicted here using results established in previous structural studies. These performance predictions are used to compare both focused and unfocused stretched membrane heliostats with state-of-the-art glass/metal heliostats from a systems perspective. We investigated the sensitivity of the relative cost and performance of fields of heliostats to a large number of parameter variations, including system size, delivery temperature, heliostat module size, surface specularity, hemispherical reflectance, and macroscopic surface quality. The results indicate that focused stretched membrane systems should have comparable performance levels to those of current glass/metal heliostat systems. Further, because of their relatively lower cost, stretched membrane heliostats should provide an economically attractive alternative to current glass/metal heliostats over essentially the entire range of design parameters studied. Unfocused stretched membrane heliostats may also be attractive for a somewhat more limited range of applications, including the larger plant sizes and lower delivery temperatures.

  13. Circular-Loop-Element Microwave Frequency-Selective Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John; Wu, Te-Kao; Lee, Shung-Wu

    1995-01-01

    Double or single planar arrays of circular loops laminated with dielectric sheets. Reflectors designed for use in multiplexing signals at several frequencies in microwave antenna system. Well suited to both circularly and linearly polarized radiation. Transmission and reflection characteristics relatively insensitive to angle of incidence. Similar device described in "Triband Circular-Loop Frequency-Selective Microwave Reflector" (NPO-18714).

  14. Heat dissipation in water-cooled reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozai, Toyoki

    1994-01-01

    The energy balance of a lamp varies with the thermal and optical characteristics of the reflector. The photosynthetic radiation efficiency of lamps, defined as input power divided by photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm) emitted from the lamp ranges between 0.17 and 0.26. The rest of the energy input is wasted as longwave (3000 nm and over) and non-PAR shortwave radiation (from 700 nm to 3000 nm), convective, and conductive heat from the lamp, reflector, and ballast, and simply for increasing the cooling load. Furthermore, some portion of the PAR is uselessly absorbed by the inner walls, shelves, vessels, etc. and some portion of the PAR received by the plantlets is converted into sensible and latent heat. More than 98% of the energy input is probably converted into heat, with only less than 2% of the energy input being converted into chemical energy as carbohydrates by photosynthesis. Therefore, it is essential to reduce the generation of heat in the culture room in order to reduce the cooling load. Through use of a water-cooled reflector, the generation of convective and conductive heat and longwave radiation from the reflector can be reduced, without reduction of PAR.

  15. Measuring Shapes Of Reflectors By Microwave Holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Pair of reports discusses theoretical foundation and recent theoretical and practical developments in use of microwave holography to measure surfaces of microwave antennas. (Second report abbreviated version of first report.) Microwave holographic measurements provide acceptable accuracy and are more convenient and less time consuming than optical and mechanical measurements, especially where measurements repeated. Microwave holographyic metrology of lare reflectors, first reported in 1976, improved into accurate technique with potential industrial applications.

  16. Precision optical navigation guidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starodubov, D.; McCormick, K.; Nolan, P.; Johnson, D.; Dellosa, M.; Volfson, L.; Fallahpour, A.; Willner, A.

    2016-05-01

    We present the new precision optical navigation guidance system approach that provides continuous, high quality range and bearing data to fixed wing aircraft during landing approach to an aircraft carrier. The system uses infrared optical communications to measure range between ship and aircraft with accuracy and precision better than 1 meter at ranges more than 7.5 km. The innovative receiver design measures bearing from aircraft to ship with accuracy and precision better than 0.5 mRad. The system provides real-time range and bearing updates to multiple aircraft at rates up to several kHz, and duplex data transmission between ship and aircraft.

  17. Floating volumetric image formation using a dihedral corner reflector array device.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Daisuke; Hirano, Noboru; Maeda, Yuki; Yamamoto, Siori; Mukai, Takaaki; Maekawa, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    A volumetric display system using an optical imaging device consisting of numerous dihedral corner reflectors placed perpendicular to the surface of a metal plate is proposed. Image formation by the dihedral corner reflector array (DCRA) is free from distortion and focal length. In the proposed volumetric display system, a two-dimensional real image is moved by a mirror scanner to scan a three-dimensional (3D) space. Cross-sectional images of a 3D object are displayed in accordance with the position of the image plane. A volumetric image is observed as a stack of the cross-sectional images. The use of the DCRA brings compact system configuration and volumetric real image generation with very low distortion. An experimental volumetric display system including a DCRA, a galvanometer mirror, and a digital micro-mirror device was constructed to verify the proposed method. A volumetric image consisting of 1024×768×400 voxels was formed by the experimental system.

  18. Self-adaptive, narrowband tuning of a pulsed optical parametric oscillator and a continuous-wave diode laser via phase-conjugate photorefractive cavity reflectors: verification by high-resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y.; Orr, B. J.

    2009-08-01

    A dynamic self-adaptive Bragg grating formed in a photorefractive crystal is shown to be a convenient way to attain single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) operation and narrowband tuning both in a pulsed, injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and in a continuous-wave (cw) extended-cavity diode laser. The pulsed OPO cavity comprises a Rh:BaTiO3 photorefractive (PR) crystal, a periodically poled KTiOPO4 nonlinear-optical crystal, and a dielectrically-coated end mirror. A continuous-wave seed beam at 820-850 nm from a tunable SLM diode laser traverses firstly the Rh:BaTiO3 crystal and then is retro-reflected by the end mirror; this creates a wavelength-selective Bragg grating reflector in the PR crystal, thereby completing the OPO cavity. The cavity stays automatically resonant with the seed radiation, with no need to actively control its length or to make any other mechanical adjustment. One form of injection seeder comprises a novel extended-cavity diode laser (ECDL) design incorporating a self-pumped photorefractive phase-conjugate reflector and a compact, high-finesse tunable intracavity ring filter. This combination facilitates robust tunable single-frequency operation with narrow optical bandwidth. The performance characteristics of the OPO and the ECDL are evaluated by recording high-resolution atomic and molecular spectra. Notably, fluorescence-detected sub-Doppler two-photon excitation at 822 nm, of the 8 S ←6 S transition in atomic Cs, provides a crucial linewidth test.

  19. Advanced deployable reflectors for communications satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Elvin; Josephs, Michael; Hedgepeth, John

    1993-02-01

    This paper discusses a concept for a deployable mesh reflector for large spacecraft antennas and the processes used in design, fabrication and testing. A set of overall reflector requirements such as stowed volume, deployed diameter and RF loss derived from system specifications are presented. The development of design and analysis tools to allow parametric studies such as facet size, number of ribs and number of rib segments is discussed. CATIA (a commercially available three-dimensional design and analysis tool) is used to perform kinematic analyses as well as to establish the database to be used by the several groups participating in the development is examined. Results of trade studies performed to reduce cost with minimum risk to product delivery are included. A thirty foot reflector has been built and tested.

  20. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) system concept and technology definition study. Volume 2: Technology assessment and technology development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, Donald L.; Jones, Peter A.

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to define reasonable and representative LDR system concepts for the purpose of defining a technology development program aimed at providing the requisite technological capability necessary to start LDR development by the end of 1991. This volume presents thirteen technology assessments and technology development plans, as well as an overview and summary of the LDR concepts. Twenty-two proposed augmentation projects are described (selected from more than 30 candidates). The five LDR technology areas most in need of supplementary support are: cryogenic cooling; astronaut assembly of the optically precise LDR in space; active segmented primary mirror; dynamic structural control; and primary mirror contamination control. Three broad, time-phased, five-year programs were synthesized from the 22 projects, scheduled, and funding requirements estimated.

  1. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) system concept and technology definition study. Volume 2: Technology assessment and technology development plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnew, Donald L.; Jones, Peter A.

    1989-04-01

    A study was conducted to define reasonable and representative LDR system concepts for the purpose of defining a technology development program aimed at providing the requisite technological capability necessary to start LDR development by the end of 1991. This volume presents thirteen technology assessments and technology development plans, as well as an overview and summary of the LDR concepts. Twenty-two proposed augmentation projects are described (selected from more than 30 candidates). The five LDR technology areas most in need of supplementary support are: cryogenic cooling; astronaut assembly of the optically precise LDR in space; active segmented primary mirror; dynamic structural control; and primary mirror contamination control. Three broad, time-phased, five-year programs were synthesized from the 22 projects, scheduled, and funding requirements estimated.

  2. The optical deposition system for fabricating semiconductor cylinder fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nivartvong, Nitipun

    2002-09-01

    In responding to the urgent need for a suitable thin film growing technique for semiconductor cylinder fiber fabrication, the optical deposition system (ODS) is introduced. It is designed to optically evaporate the semiconductor material without heating a glass tube (a substrate). A tungsten halogen bulb is used as a light source for evaporation. A cylindrical cavity reflector focuses the radiation from the light source onto an evacuated glass tube that has the semiconductor powder inside. All of these three objects are located under deionized water, which serves two purposes. One is to filter out the light wavelength in the infrared range and longer, and the other is to cool the whole system. Thus there is emissive light in the visible range left to which the glass tube is transparent. Light with frequencies in the visible range is absorbed by the semiconductor. This heats the semiconductor sufficiently to vaporize it. CdTe, Cd3P2 and GaSb are selected for demonstrations. The transmission spectrum of the deposited films is measured, then they are processed to find their energy gaps. The comparisons of the measured results with those for other thin films formed by alternate growing methods are discussed. ODS has shown substantial evidence that the target is optically energized without heating the glass tube. ODS may also be applicable to metals because they share some solid state characteristics with semiconductors.

  3. Imaging performance tests of diffractive optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jianchao; Su, Yun; Wang, Baohua; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Yue; Jin, Jiangao

    2016-10-01

    Diffractive optical imaging is a new method to realize high-resolution imaging from geostationary orbit(GEO). Technical advantages of diffractive optical imaging is analyzed in the field of space optics. For application of super large diameter space optical system, the system scheme and a new achromatic method is proposed. An imaging system is developed and tested, the result of optical system wavefront is 0.169λ(RMS), optical system MTF is 0.85, and the imaging system MTF is 0.19. Test results show the new achromatic method is feasible. The above conclusions have reference significance for the development of super large diameter diffractive optical imaging system.

  4. Roadmap on quantum optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumke, Rainer; Lu, Zehuang; Close, John; Robins, Nick; Weis, Antoine; Mukherjee, Manas; Birkl, Gerhard; Hufnagel, Christoph; Amico, Luigi; Boshier, Malcolm G.; Dieckmann, Kai; Li, Wenhui; Killian, Thomas C.

    2016-09-01

    This roadmap bundles fast developing topics in experimental optical quantum sciences, addressing current challenges as well as potential advances in future research. We have focused on three main areas: quantum assisted high precision measurements, quantum information/simulation, and quantum gases. Quantum assisted high precision measurements are discussed in the first three sections, which review optical clocks, atom interferometry, and optical magnetometry. These fields are already successfully utilized in various applied areas. We will discuss approaches to extend this impact even further. In the quantum information/simulation section, we start with the traditionally successful employed systems based on neutral atoms and ions. In addition the marvelous demonstrations of systems suitable for quantum information is not progressing, unsolved challenges remain and will be discussed. We will also review, as an alternative approach, the utilization of hybrid quantum systems based on superconducting quantum devices and ultracold atoms. Novel developments in atomtronics promise unique access in exploring solid-state systems with ultracold gases and are investigated in depth. The sections discussing the continuously fast-developing quantum gases include a review on dipolar heteronuclear diatomic gases, Rydberg gases, and ultracold plasma. Overall, we have accomplished a roadmap of selected areas undergoing rapid progress in quantum optics, highlighting current advances and future challenges. These exciting developments and vast advances will shape the field of quantum optics in the future.

  5. Compensation of reflector surface distortions using conjugate field matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of compensating for reflector surface distortions has been investigated. The performance characteristics (gain, sidelobe level, null location, beamwidth, etc.) of space communication reflector antenna systems degrade as the reflector surface distorts due to thermal effects from a varying solar flux. The technique reported here will maintain the design radiation performance independently of thermal effects on the reflector surface. With the advent of monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC), a greater flexibility in array-fed reflector system design can be achieved. MMIC arrays provides independent control of amplitude and phase for each of many radiating elements of the feed array. The conjugate field matching technique provide a basis for obtaining the required element excitations under surface distortion for maintaining the design radiation performance. It is assumed that the surface characteristics (x, y, z, first derivatives, and second derivatives) under distortion are known.

  6. Wyko Systems For Optical Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creath, Katherine

    1987-03-01

    WYKO produces interferometer systems for a number of optical metrology applications. Systems to be discussed include: WISP, an interferogram analysis package that uses input from a graphics digitizing tablet or video camera; TOPO, a microscope system for profiling surfaces such as mirrors, hard disks, magnetic tape, and paint; SIRIS, used to test optical components ranging in size from a millimeter to meters; IR3, a 10.6 μm Twyman-Green interferometer for testing up to 16-in, diameter objects; LADITE, a wavefront analysis system whose major application is the testing of diode lasers; HOLOCAM, for quantitative holographic interferometry; and MAX, a projected fringe contouring system. All products but WISP use phase-measurement interferometry principles to obtain data. This paper gives the general operational principles of these systems and describes some of their applications and results.

  7. Don't Forget the Reflector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, N.

    1991-01-01

    Various modes of reflection are classified and practical examples of devices, such as cat's eyes, are discussed. Typical light rays are traced through several systems, providing exercises with varying degrees of difficulty. Corner-cube retroreflectors, glass spheres, reflecting luminaries, light concentrators, parabolic reflectors, and off-set and…

  8. Atmospheric Optical Communication Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    Tnteral system noise due to dark current id is Oven by . 1d = 2qGrB"" (2-9) Dark current is due to detecor biasing in some instances, and in somue...8217 without extansive pro- gr-=:ing exer’ence. Although. the znodel is designed to be Lteracdve, slight mod-.- i~cadons winl ezw :&31 r~ing of the progrsm

  9. Multiaperture Optical System Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    object point. The correlation albeit being non- immaging is unambigous but also multiple, allowing verification by coincidence. The advantages of...neighboring FOVs. Such an arrangement will allow the detectors monitoring the overlapping FOVs to compare notes which can be exploited for motion detection...element is comparable with the detector size and since the detector size limits the resolving power, the overall size of the system is necessarily small

  10. Establishing Information Security Systems via Optical Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-11

    to encrypt and authenticate information for data/images storage and transmission, including optical systems for secured information. 15. SUBJECT...TERMS Optical Imaging, Optical Cryptosystems , Diffractive Imaging, Optical Encryption 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18...sector). The main objective is to develop optical imaging technologies to encrypt and authenticate information for data/images storage and

  11. Deployment simulation of a deployable reflector for earth science application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaokai; Fang, Houfei; Cai, Bei; Ma, Xiaofei

    2015-10-01

    A novel mission concept namely NEXRAD-In-Space (NIS) has been developed for monitoring hurricanes, cyclones and other severe storms from a geostationary orbit. It requires a space deployable 35-meter diameter Ka-band (35 GHz) reflector. NIS can measure hurricane precipitation intensity, dynamics and its life cycle. These information is necessary for predicting the track, intensity, rain rate and hurricane-induced floods. To meet the requirements of the radar system, a Membrane Shell Reflector Segment (MSRS) reflector technology has been developed and several technologies have been evaluated. However, the deployment analysis of this large size and high-precision reflector has not been investigated. For a pre-studies, a scaled tetrahedral truss reflector with spring driving deployment system has been made and tested, deployment dynamics analysis of this scaled reflector has been performed using ADAMS to understand its deployment dynamic behaviors. Eliminating the redundant constraints in the reflector system with a large number of moving parts is a challenging issue. A primitive joint and flexible struts were introduced to the analytical model and they can effectively eliminate over constraints of the model. By using a high-speed camera and a force transducer, a deployment experiment of a single-bay tetrahedral module has been conducted. With the tested results, an optimization process has been performed by using the parameter optimization module of ADAMS to obtain the parameters of the analytical model. These parameters were incorporated to the analytical model of the whole reflector. It is observed from the analysis results that the deployment process of the reflector with a fixed boundary experiences three stages. These stages are rapid deployment stage, slow deployment stage and impact stage. The insight of the force peak distributions of the reflector can help the optimization design of the structure.

  12. Compact double optical feedback external-cavity diode laser system and its frequency stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, Kohei; Minabe, Yuta; Sato, Takashi; Maruyama, Takeo; Ohkawa, Masashi; Tsubokawa, Tsuneya

    2007-02-01

    External cavity diode laser (ECDL) systems are presently experiencing a surge in popularity as laser light-sources, in advanced optical communications- and measurement-systems. Because such systems require that their external reflectors be precisely controlled, to eliminate low frequency fluctuations (LFF) in optical output, we conducted experiments with a two-cavity version, which easily eliminated LFFs, as expected. The technique has the added advantage of a narrower oscillation-linewidth than would be achievable, using a single optical feedback. However, the ECDL's oscillation frequency is susceptible to the influences of the drive-current, as well as changes, both in the refractive index, and the overall length of the external reflector that results from fluctuations in atmospheric temperature. We made every effort to maintain the length of the ECDL cavity, while evaluating oscillation-frequency stability. We used a Super-Invar board as the platform for our compact ECDL system to minimize the influence of thermal expansion, because of its low expansion coefficient. We then compared the effect of atmospheric temperature variations between two experimental conditions, with the Super-invar board and without it, and finally took note of the improvement in performance, using the board.

  13. Chaotic systems in optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siuzdak, J.

    2016-09-01

    Communications application of chaotic oscillations of lasers with optoelectronic feedback was discussed. The possibility of eavesdropping of the transmission was analyzed. It was proved that if the rogue party precisely knows parameters of the chaotic system it may recreate the entire signals solely by observation of the optical signal power causing security breach.

  14. System for testing optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Davies, Terence J.; Franks, Larry A.; Nelson, Melvin A.

    1981-01-01

    A system for nondestructively determining the attenuation coefficient, .alpha.(.lambda.), of low-loss optical fiber wave guides. Cerenkov light pulses are generated at a plurality of locations in the fiber by a beam of charged particles. The transit times of selected spectral components and their intensities are utilized to unfold the .alpha.(.lambda.) values over the measured spectrum.

  15. Self-clamping arc light reflector for welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    This invention is directed to a coaxial extending metal mirror reflector attached to the electrode housing or gas cup on a welding torch. An electric welding torch with an internal viewing system for robotic welding is provded with an annular arc light reflector to reflect light from the arc back onto the workpiece. The reflector has a vertical split or gap in its surrounding wall to permit the adjacent wall ends forming the split to be sprung open slightly to permit the reflector to be removed or slipped onto the torch housing or gas cup. The upper opening of the reflector is slightly smaller than the torch housing or gas cup and therefore, when placed on the torch housing or gas cup has that springiness to cause it to clamp tightly on the housing or gas cup. The split or gap also serves to permit the feed of weld wire through to the weld area,

  16. Self-clamping arc light reflector for welding torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Stephen S.

    1987-07-01

    This invention is directed to a coaxial extending metal mirror reflector attached to the electrode housing or gas cup on a welding torch. An electric welding torch with an internal viewing system for robotic welding is provded with an annular arc light reflector to reflect light from the arc back onto the workpiece. The reflector has a vertical split or gap in its surrounding wall to permit the adjacent wall ends forming the split to be sprung open slightly to permit the reflector to be removed or slipped onto the torch housing or gas cup. The upper opening of the reflector is slightly smaller than the torch housing or gas cup and therefore, when placed on the torch housing or gas cup has that springiness to cause it to clamp tightly on the housing or gas cup. The split or gap also serves to permit the feed of weld wire through to the weld area,

  17. Design of free-form reflector for vehicle LED low-beam headlamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chung-Yu

    2016-08-01

    A method is proposed for the design of a vehicle low-beam headlamp system comprising a reflector and an LED light source. In the proposed approach, the profile of the reflector is designed using a free-form (FF) surface construction method such that each incident ray is directed in such a way as to form a user-specified light pattern on the measuring plane. The light ray paths within the headlamp system are analyzed using an exact analytical model and a skew-ray tracing approach. The validity of the proposed FF design method is demonstrated by means of ZEMAX simulations. It is shown that the light pattern formed on the measuring plane is in good agreement with the target pattern specified by ECE R112. The FF design method is mathematically straightforward and easily implemented in computer code. As such, it provides a useful tool for the design and analysis tasks in optical systems design.

  18. Free-form surface design method for nonaxial-symmetrical reflectors producing arbitrary image patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chung-Yu

    2016-07-01

    A free-form (FF) surface design method is proposed for a nonaxial-symmetrical projector system comprising an FF reflector and a light source. The profile of the reflector is designed using a nonaxial-symmetrical FF (NFF) surface construction method such that each incident ray is directed in such a way as to form a user-specified image pattern on the target region of the image plane. The light ray paths within the projection system are analyzed using an exact analytical model and a skew-ray tracing approach. The validity of the proposed NFF design method is demonstrated by means of ZEMAX simulations. It is shown that the image pattern formed on the target region of the image plane is in good agreement with that specified by the user. The NFF method is mathematically straightforward and easily implemented in computer code. As such, it provides a useful tool for the design and analysis stages of optical systems design.

  19. Toward a real time stand-off submillimeter-wave imaging system with large field of view: quasi-optical system design considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandini, Erio; Llombart, Nuria

    2015-05-01

    In the frame-work of the European project CONSORTIS, a stand-off system for concealed object detections working at submillimeter-wave frequencies is being developed. The system is required to perform real-time image acquisition over a large field of view at a short range using both an active and a passive sensor operating in the frequency range from 250 to 600 GHz. In this contribution, the main trade-offs associated with the quasi-optical system design are presented. The imaging distance is from 2 m to 5 m range with a spatial resolution lower than 2 cm. Focal plane arrays will be used to achieve high imaging frame rates. Two configurations are considered in CONSORTIS: a sparse array of active transceivers and incoherent passive staring array with a large number of elements. Both cases use mechanical scanning to achieve the required field of view. This paper presents an in-depth analysis of the different trade-offs driving the quasi-optical design: from the mechanical scanner considerations to the optical beam quality required over the whole field of view. This analysis starts from the fundamental limitations of the quasi-optical mechanical systems. The limitations of the optics are discussed considering a canonical elliptical reflector as a reference. After this fundamental analysis, we compare the performances of several practical standard implementations, based on dual-reflectors and lenses, with canonical geometries. It is shown that, at short ranges, the main limitation of the optical system is the poor beam quality associated with the wide angular field of view and none of the standard implementation fulfills the requirements. In the last section, a technique to overcome this limitation is investigated. In particular, the use of optics with oversized reflectors can significantly improve the performance over a larger field of view if the coma aberrations are limited by a good angular filter.

  20. A fixed tilt solar collector employing reversible vee-trough reflectors and vacuum tube receivers for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selcuk, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    The usefulness of vee-trough concentrators in improving the efficiency and reducing the cost of collectors assembled from evacuated tube receivers was studied in the vee-trough/vacuum tube collector (VTVTC) project. The VTVTC was analyzed rigorously and various mathematical models were developed to calculate the optical performance of the vee-trough concentrator and the thermal performance of the evacuated tube receiver. A test bed was constructed to verify the mathematical analyses and compare reflectors made out of glass, Alzak and aluminized FEP Teflon. Tests were run at temperatures ranging from 95 to 180 C. Vee-trough collector efficiencies of 35 to 40% were observed at an operating temperature of about 175 C. Test results compared well with the calculated values. Predicted daily useful heat collection and efficiency values are presented for a year's duration of operation temperatures ranging from 65 to 230 C. Estimated collector costs and resulting thermal energy costs are presented. Analytical and experimental results are discussed along with a complete economic evaluation.

  1. Detection of reflector surface from near field phase measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ida, Nathan

    1991-01-01

    The deviation of a reflector antenna surface from a perfect parabolic shape causes degradation of the performance of the antenna. The problem of determining the shape of the reflector surface in a reflector antenna using near field phase measurements is not a new one. A recent issue of the IEEE tansactions on Antennas and Propagation (June 1988) contained numerous descriptions of the use of these measurements: holographic reconstruction or inverse Fourier transform. Holographic reconstruction makes use of measurement of the far field of the reflector and then applies the Fourier transform relationship between the far field and the current distribution on the reflector surface. Inverse Fourier transformation uses the phase measurements to determine the far field pattern using the method of Kerns. After the far field pattern is established, an inverse Fourier transform is used to determine the phases in a plane between the reflector surface and the plane in which the near field measurements were taken. These calculations are time consuming since they involve a relatively large number of operations. A much faster method can be used to determine the position of the reflector. This method makes use of simple geometric optics to determine the path length of the ray from the feed to the reflector and from the reflector to the measurement point. For small physical objects and low frequencies, diffraction effects have a major effect on the error, and the algorithm provides incorrect results. It is believed that the effect is less noticeable for large distortions such as antenna warping, and more noticeable for small, localized distortions such as bumps and depressions such as might be caused by impact damage.

  2. Secondary pattern computation of an arbitrarily shaped main reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, P. T. C.; Lee, S. W.; Acosta, R.

    1984-01-01

    The secondary pattern of a perfectly conducting offset main reflector being illuminated by a point feed at an arbitrary location was studied. The method of analysis is based upon the application of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to the aperture fields obtained using geometrical optics (GO) and geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD). Key features of the reflector surface is completely arbitrary, the incident field from the feed is most general with arbitrary polarization and location, and the edge diffraction is calculated by either UAT or by UTD. Comparison of this technique for an offset parabolic reflector with the Jacobi-Bessel and Fourier-Bessel techniques shows good agreement. Near field, far field, and scan data of a large reflector are presented.

  3. CP symmetry in optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dana, Brenda; Bahabad, Alon; Malomed, Boris A.

    2015-04-01

    We introduce a model of a dual-core optical waveguide with opposite signs of the group-velocity dispersion in the two cores, and a phase-velocity mismatch between them. The coupler is embedded into an active host medium, which provides for the linear coupling of a gain-loss type between the two cores. The same system can be derived, without phenomenological assumptions, by considering the three-wave propagation in a medium with the quadratic nonlinearity, provided that the depletion of the second-harmonic pump is negligible. This linear system offers an optical realization of the charge-parity symmetry, while the addition of the intracore cubic nonlinearity breaks the symmetry. By means of direct simulations and analytical approximations, it is demonstrated that the linear system generates expanding Gaussian states, while the nonlinear one gives rise to broad oscillating solitons, as well as a general family of stable stationary gap solitons.

  4. Optical isolator system for fiber-optic uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutes, George

    1988-01-01

    A low loss optical isolator suitable for fiber-optic uses has been assembled from commercial components. The isolator exhibits reverse isolation of greater than 70 dB, with a forward loss of less than 1.3dB. This system provides an effective approach for reducing instabilities encountered in the output signal of semiconductor lasers in certain applications of fiber-optic systems. The paper presents a phenomenological explanation for the superior performance of the isolator system.

  5. Optical isolator system for fiber-optic uses.

    PubMed

    Lutes, G

    1988-04-01

    A low loss optical isolator suitable for fiber-optic uses has been assembled from commercial components. The isolator exhibits reverse isolation of >70 dB, with a forward loss of <1.3 dB. This system provides an effective approach for reducing instabilities encountered in the output signal of semiconductor lasers in certain applications of fiber-optic systems. The paper presents a phenomenological explanation for the superior performance of the isolator system.

  6. Freeform reflectors for architectural lighting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ruidong; Hong, Qi; Zhang, Hongxia; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2015-12-14

    We propose an improved method to design freeform reflectors for architectural lighting: one for accent lighting and another for large area wall washing. The designed freeform reflectors effectively distribute light fluxes over the target surfaces, and generate appropriate illumination patterns for comfortable visual environments, which provides greater flexibility for lighting designs, allows many challenging designs, and improves energy-efficiency simultaneously.

  7. Support trusses for large precision segmented reflectors - Preliminary design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Timothy J.; Fichter, W. B.

    1989-01-01

    The Precision Segmented Reflector (PSR) primary structures plan is outlined. Geometries and design considerations for erectable and deployable reflector support structures are discussed. Support truss requirements and goals for the PSR are given, and the results of static and dynamic analyses of a prototype four meter diameter structure are presented. In addition, similar results are presented for two 20-meter diameter support trusses. Implications of the analyses for the PSR program are considered and the formulation and limitations of current PSR finite element models are discussed. It is shown that if the secondary optical system is supported by a simple tripod design, the first six vibration modes are likely to be dominated by the secondary system. The 20-meter diameter support trusses are found to be quite stiff for structures of such large size.

  8. Portable, solid state, fiber optic coupled Doppler interferometer system for detonation and shock diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, K. J.; Crump, O. B.

    1994-01-01

    VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) is a specialized Doppler interferometer system that is gaining world-wide acceptance as the standard for shock phenomena analysis. The VISAR's large power and cooling requirements, and the sensitive and complex nature of the interferometer cavity have restricted the traditional system to the laboratory. This paper describes the new portable VISAR, its peripheral sensors, and the role it played in optically measuring ground shock of and underground nuclear detonation. The Solid State VISAR uses a prototype diode pumped Nd:YAG laser and solid state detectors that provide a suitcase-size system with low power requirements. A special window and sensors were developed for fiber optic coupling (1 kilometer long) to the VISAR. The system has proven itself as a reliable, easy to use instrument that is capable of field test use and rapid data reduction using only a notebook personal computer (PC).

  9. Portable, solid state, fiber optic coupled Doppler interferometer system for detonation and shock diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, K.J.

    1994-08-01

    VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) is a specialized Doppler interferometer system that is gaining world-wide acceptance as the standard for shock phenomena analysis. The VISAR`s large power and cooling requirements, and the sensitive and complex nature of the interferometer cavity has restricted the traditional system to the laboratory. This paper describes the new portable VISAR, its peripheral sensors, and the role it played in optically measuring ground shock of an underground nuclear detonation (UGT). The Solid State VISAR uses a prototype diode pumped Nd:YAG laser and solid state detectors that provide a suitcase-size system with low power requirements. A special window and sensors was developed for fiber optic coupling (1 kilometer long) to the VISCAR. The system has proven itself as reliable, easy to use instrument that is capable of field test use and rapid data reduction using only a notebook personal computer (PC).

  10. Portable, solid state, fiber optic coupled Doppler interferometer system for detonation and shock diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, K.J.; Crump, O.B.

    1994-03-01

    VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) is a specialized Doppler interferometer system that is gaining world-wide acceptance as the standard for shock phenomena analysis. The VISAR`s large power and cooling requirements, and the sensitive and complex nature of the interferometer cavity have restricted the traditional system to the laboratory. This paper describes the new portable VISAR, its peripheral sensors, and the role it played in optically measuring ground shock of an underground nuclear detonation. The solid State VISAR uses a prototype diode pumped ND:YAG laser and solid state detectors that provide a suitcase-size system with low power requirements. A special window and sensors were developed for fiber optic coupling (1 kilometer long) to the VISAR. The system has proven itself as a reliable, easy to use instrument that is capable of field test use and rapid data reduction using only a notebook personal computer (PC).

  11. Portable, solid state, fiber optic coupled doppler interferometer system for detonation and shock diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, K.J.; Crump, O.B.

    1993-01-01

    VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) is a specialized Doppler interferometer system that is gaining world-wide acceptance as the standard for shock phenomena analysis. The VISAR's large power and cooling requirements, and the sensitive and complex nature of the interferometer cavity has restricted the traditional system to the laboratory. This paper describes the new portable VISAR, its peripheral sensors, and the role it played in optically measuring ground shock of an underground nuclear detonation (UGT). The Solid State VISAR uses a prototype diode pumped ND:YAG laser and solid state detectors that provide a suitcase-size system with low power requirements. A special window and sensor was developed for fiber optic coupling (1 kilometer long) to the VISAR. The system has proven itself as a reliable, easy-to-use instrument that is capable of field test use and rapid data reduction employing only a personal computer (PC).

  12. Gregorian optical system with non-linear optical technology for protection against intense optical transients

    DOEpatents

    Ackermann, Mark R.; Diels, Jean-Claude M.

    2007-06-26

    An optical system comprising a concave primary mirror reflects light through an intermediate focus to a secondary mirror. The secondary mirror re-focuses the image to a final image plane. Optical limiter material is placed near the intermediate focus to optically limit the intensity of light so that downstream components of the optical system are protected from intense optical transients. Additional lenses before and/or after the intermediate focus correct optical aberrations.

  13. Polarisation-dependent scattering properties of trihedral corner reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. C.

    1985-09-01

    Physical optics represents one of the most widely used methods for estimating the electromagnetic field scattered from a three-dimensional, closed, perfectly conducting surface S. As geometrical optics, physical optics provides a solution correct only in the high frequency limit. Its advantage over geometrical optics is related to the possibility that it can be applied to a wider variety of targets. The present paper is concerned with an investigation of the polarization-dependent effects predicted in the physical optics approximation of the case of the trihedral corner reflector. For each possible reflection process in the corner reflector, geometrical optics is used to find the surface fields which are then substituted into the physical optics integrals to yield the backscattered field. The observed polarization dependence in the experimental data is in very good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  14. Thermal/Optical analysis of optical system of star tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Si-yu; Huang, Yi-fan

    2011-08-01

    Spacecraft would be expected to encounter diverse extreme environmental (EE) conditions throughout their mission phases. These EE conditions are often coupled. Star tracker is a high accurate 3-axis attitude measuring instrument used in various spacecrafts. In this paper, an effective scheme to the thermal/optical analysis in optical system of star sensor was described and the concept of thermal optical analysis of star tracker optical system was introduced in detail. Using finite element analysis (FEA) and ray tracing, we can study the relationship of optical properties of optical systems and optical system's temperature distribution . A lens system configuration having six uncemented elements was discussed. The lens system was a 56mm EFL, which was different from common lens used in imaging system that this lens system was required to have a high resolving power in design thoughts. It was designed to determine the attitude of space platform by detecting and mapping the geometric pattern of stars. Based on this system, the FEA models of the optical system were established for temperature distribution calculation and for thermal-elastic structural deformation analysis respectively. Using the models, the steady-state temperature distributions of the tracker were simulated. The rigid body displacements of the optical components under homogeneous temperature changes and certain temperature distributions were derived out. It is convenient to use Zernike polynomials as the data transmission between optical and structural analysis programs. Here, Zernike polynomials and their fitting method are used as an example to determine the thermal induced optical degradations of the optical system.

  15. Adaptation of adaptive optics systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yu; Zhao, Dazun; Li, Chen

    1997-10-01

    In the paper, a concept of an adaptation of adaptive optical system (AAOS) is proposed. The AAOS has certain real time optimization ability against the variation of the brightness of detected objects m, atmospheric coherence length rO and atmospheric time constant τ by means of changing subaperture number and diameter, dynamic range, and system's temporal response. The necessity of AAOS using a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor and some technical approaches are discussed. Scheme and simulation of an AAOS with variable subaperture ability by use of both hardware and software are presented as an example of the system.

  16. A low-cost, flexible, high dynamic range test for free-form illumination optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lirong; Su, Peng; Parks, Robert; Angel, Roger; Sasian, Jose; Burge, James

    2010-08-01

    Software Configurable Optical Test System (SCOTS)[1], a computerized "reverse Hartmann test", can rapidly, robustly and quantitatively measure complex 3-dimensional specular surfaces, for instance large segmented solar collectors, faceted automotive headlight reflector or other free-form surfaces.

  17. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data. Polisolar Model POL solar collector with glass reflector surface

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-05-01

    Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Polisolar Model POL solar collector, with glass reflector surfaces, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  18. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data. Toltec two-axis tracking solar collector with 3M acrylic polyester film reflector surface

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-06-01

    Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Toltec solar collector, with acrylic film reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  19. Constant magnification optical tracking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazer, R. E. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A constant magnification optical tracking system for continuously tracking of a moving object is described. In the tracking system, a traveling objective lens maintains a fixed relationship with an object to be optically tracked. The objective lens was chosen to provide a collimated light beam oriented in the direction of travel of the moving object. A reflective surface is attached to the traveling objective lens for reflecting an image of the moving object. The object to be tracked is a free-falling object which is located at the focal point of the objective lens for at least a portion of its free-fall path. A motor and control means is provided for mantaining the traveling objective lens in a fixed relationship relative to the free-falling object, thereby keeping the free-falling object at the focal point and centered on the axis of the traveling objective lens throughout its entire free-fall path.

  20. Optical Energy Transfer and Conversion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, William C. (Inventor); Hogan, Bartholomew P. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An optical power transfer system comprising a fiber spooler, a fiber optic rotary joint mechanically connected to the fiber spooler, and an electrical power extraction subsystem connected to the fiber optic rotary joint with an optical waveguide. Optical energy is generated at and transferred from a base station through fiber wrapped around the spooler, through the rotary joint, and ultimately to the power extraction system at a remote mobility platform for conversion to another form of energy.

  1. Optical Strain Measurement System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lant, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    Investigations of physical phenomena affecting the durability of SSME components require measurement systems operational in hostile environments. The need for such instrumentation caused the definition and operation of an optical strain measurement system. This optical strain measurement system based on the speckle shift method is being developed. This is a noncontact, automatic method of measuring surface strain in one dimension that corrects for error due to rigid body motion. It provides a gauge length of 1 to 2 mm and allows the region of interest on the test specimen to be mapped point by point. The output is a graphics map of the points inspected on the specimen; data points is stored in quasi-real time. This is the first phase of a multiphase effort in optical strain measurement. The speckle pattern created by the test specimen is interpreted as high order interference fringes resulting from a random diffraction grating, being the natural surface roughness of the specimen. Strain induced on the specimen causes a change in spacing of the surface roughness, which in turn shifts the position of the interference pattern (speckles).

  2. Optical Strain Measurement System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lant, C. T.

    1985-01-01

    Investigations of physical phenomena affecting the durability of SSME components require measurement systems operational in hostile environments. The need for such instrumentation caused the definition and operation of an optical strain measurement system. This optical strain measurement system based on the speckle shift method is being developed. This is a noncontact, automatic method of measuring surface strain in one dimension that corrects for error due to rigid body motion. It provides a gauge length of 1 to 2 mm and allows the region of interest on the test specimen to be mapped point by point. The output is a graphics map of the points inspected on the specimen; data points is stored in quasi-real time. This is the first phase of a multiphase effort in optical strain measurement. The speckle pattern created by the test specimen is interpreted as high order interference fringes resulting from a random diffraction grating, being the natural surface roughness of the specimen. Strain induced on the specimen causes a change in spacing of the surface roughness, which in turn shifts the position of the interference pattern (speckles).

  3. Optical fiber data transfer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    This Phase 2 effort applies the results of Phase 1 to design and fabricate an optical slip ring system for a helicopter rotor blade/wind tunnel application. In this application, there are two assemblies: one on the rotating portion of the mechanical system, one on the stationary portion. The assembly on the rotating portion digitizes and encodes 128 transducer signals from various parts of the blade, and optically transfers data across the noncontacting coupling. Two complete identical independent channels are provided. On the stationary side, the signals are decoded and one channel is transmitted in digital form to a computer for recording and analysis. The second channel reconstructs the analog transducer signals for real time observation. In the opposite direction, eight signal channels enable control signals to be passed from the stationary to the rotating part of the system. Power to the rotor mounted electronics is supplied via power slip rings. The advantages of the optical over the traditional electro-mechanical slip ring method of data transfer across a rotating joint are long life, low-maintenance, immunity to crosstalk, and wider bandwidth. Successful completion of this effort demonstrated that this method is practical and reliable, and can be implemented under difficult conditions of available space, power, environment, and stringent performance and equipment life requirements.

  4. Advanced optical fiber communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazovsky, Leonid G.

    1994-03-01

    Our research is focused on three major aspects of advanced optical fiber communication systems: dynamic wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) networks, fiber nonlinearities, and high dynamic range coherent analog optical links. In the area of WDM networks, we have designed and implemented two high-speed interface boards and measured their throughput and latency. Furthermore, we designed and constructed an experimental PSK/ASK transceiver that simultaneously transmits packet-switched ASK data and circuit-switched PSK data on the same optical carrier. In the area of fiber nonlinearities, we investigated the theoretical impact of modulation frequency on cross-phase modulation (XPM) in dispersive fibers. In the area of high dynamic range coherent analog optical links, we developed theoretical expressions for the RF power transfer ratio (or RF power gain) and the noise figure (NF) of angle-modulated links. We then compared the RF power gains and noise figures of these links to that of an intensity modulated direct detection (DD) link.

  5. Reflective optical imaging system with balanced distortion

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Hudyma, Russell M.; Shafer, David R.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    1999-01-01

    An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The four optical elements comprise, in order from object to image, convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for step and scan lithography methods. The invention enables the use of larger slit dimensions associated with ring field scanning optics, improves wafer throughput and allows higher semiconductor device density. The inventive optical system is characterized by reduced dynamic distortion because the static distortion is balanced across the slit width.

  6. Innovative design of parabolic reflector light guiding structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whang, Allen J.; Tso, Chun-Hsien; Chen, Yi-Yung

    2008-02-01

    Due to the idea of everlasting green architecture, it is of increasing importance to guild natural light into indoors. The advantages are multifold - to have better color rendering index, excellent energy savings from environments viewpoints and make humans more healthy, etc. Our search is to design an innovative structure, to convert outdoor sun light impinges on larger surfaces, into near linear light beam sources, later convert this light beam into near point sources which enters the indoor spaces then can be used as lighting sources indoors. We are not involved with the opto-electrical transformation, to the guild light into to the building, to perform the illumination, as well as the imaging function. Because non-imaging optics, well known for apply to the solar concentrators, that can use non-imaging structures to fulfill our needs, which can also be used as energy collectors in solar energy devices. Here, we have designed a pair of large and small parabolic reflector, which can be used to collect daylight and change area from large to small. Then we make a light-guide system that is been designed by us use of this parabolic reflector to guide the collection light, can pick up the performance for large surface source change to near linear source and a larger collection area.

  7. Analysis of Reflector Antennas in Radio Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeap, K. H.; Loh, M. C.; Tham, C. Y.; Yiam, C. Y.; Yeong, K. C.; Lai, K. C.

    2016-11-01

    We present an analysis on the performance of the Cassegrain and Gregorian on-axis, off-axis and offset antennas. In our study, we have adopted the design parameters for the Cassegrain configuration used in the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) project. Modifications on the original parameters are made so as to meet the design requirement for the off-axis and offset configurations. To reduce spillover loss in the offset antennas, we have adjusted the angle between the axis of the primary reflector and that of the sub-reflector, so that the feed horn is placed right next to the edge of the primary reflector. This is to allow the offset antennas to receive the highest power at the feed horn. The results obtained from the physical optics simulation show that the radiation characteristics of both Cassegrain and Gregorian antennas are similar. The offset designs exhibit the best performance, followed by the on-axis, and, finally, the off-axis designs. Our analysis also shows that the performance of both offset Cassegrain and Gregorian antennas are comparable to each other.

  8. Acoustic Levitation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammell, P. M.; Wang, T. G.; Croonquist, A.; Lee, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    Dense materials, such as steel balls, continuously levitated with energy provided by efficient high-powered siren in combination with shaped reflector. Reflector system, consisting of curved top reflector and flat lower reflector, eliminates instability in spatial positioning of sample.

  9. Acoustic Levitation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammell, P. M.; Wang, T. G.; Croonquist, A.; Lee, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    Dense materials, such as steel balls, continuously levitated with energy provided by efficient high-powered siren in combination with shaped reflector. Reflector system, consisting of curved top reflector and flat lower reflector, eliminates instability in spatial positioning of sample.

  10. Design of a low distortion shared aperture reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donato, L.; Jha, V. K.

    1986-08-01

    A design concept for a low thermal distortion dual gridded shared aperture reflector for satellite antennas is proposed. Low distortion characteristics result in improved on-orbit gain performance of the antenna system. The absence of an intercostal structure between reflectors improves electrical cross polar and gain performance. A finite difference model to predict temperatures of the reflector assembly was generated. From the temperature profiles a finite element model was used to evaluate the distortions of the parabolic surfaces. From the distorted best fit surfaces, pointing errors, defocussing, and rms deviation from the best fit parabola were evaluated and compared to thermal distortions of previous designs. The results show a significant improvement.

  11. Effects of Optical Loss Factors on Heliostat Field Layout for Beam-Down Solar Concentrating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utamura, Motoaki; Takamatsu, Tadahiko; Yuasa, Minoru; Kajita, Rina; Yamamoto, Takashi

    A methodology to give an optimal layout of a group of heliostats has been developed for beam-down concentrating solar tower systems. Given the maximum solar power together with optical parameters, the method determines an optimal configuration of a heliostat field around a tower. Various optical losses such as cosine factor, shadowing and blocking at heliostats are considered in the calculation. Furthermore, spillage at the receiver is taken into account due to the spread of light caused by the effects of a finite solar disk, flat facet and various stochastic errors in optical hardware and control. It is found the effect of spillage becomes significant at heliostats from the tower at the distance farther than four times of upper focus height of the reflector when receiver diameter is one fifteenth of the height and dominates the configuration of the optimal heliostat layout.

  12. Simulation of the Optical System for the ASTRO-G Offset Cassegrain Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, K.; Toshikawa, T.; Shiroyama, N.; Kurozumi, A.; Ojima, T. K.; Abe, Y.; Yonekura, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Ujihara, H.; Murata, Y.; Tsuboi, M.; Kasuga, T.

    2009-08-01

    We are developing the satellite (ASTRO-G) for the space VLBI mission, called VSOP-2 (Hirabayashi et al. 2004). This system will have an offset cassegrain antenna, and the three multi-mode feed horns (8, 22, 43 GHz bands) will be chosen by the Cassegrain focus position. We are designing the antenna optics of the three band receivers by using the GRASP physical optics software package on simulated feed configurations. The result of these simulations shows low cross-polarization level, a good radiation pattern, and the antenna efficiencies are 63--68 percent in these bands, assuming a perfect reflector. In this paper, we present these results of simulation of ASTRO-G antenna optics.

  13. Pioneer imaging photopolarimeter optical system.

    PubMed

    Pellicori, S F; Russell, E E; Watts, L A

    1973-06-01

    The imaging photopolarimeter aboard the Pioneer 10 spacecraft en route to the vicinity of Jupiter is described. This instrument is capable of moderate resolution spin-scan imaging and high precision polarimetric and photometric mapping of Jupiter in red and blue light. The field of view can be selectively changed from 0.50 mrad square to 40 mrad square to accommodate resolution and radiance combinations ranging from the zodiacal background to that of Jupiter. The dynamic range (radiance) of the instrument is greater than 10(8). Optical materials were chosen to survive, with minimum degradation, the rigors of a nearly 2-year journey to Jupiter including transit through the Jovian trapped radiation belts. The optics are described in detail, and the operational system is outlined. The procedures for preflight and in-flight calibration are described, and some performance characteristics and preliminary flight results are presented.

  14. Optical analysis of electro-optical systems by MTF calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbarini, Elisa Signoreto; Dos Santos, Daniel, Jr.; Stefani, Mário Antonio; Yasuoka, Fátima Maria Mitsue; Castro Neto, Jarbas C.; Rodrigues, Evandro Luís Linhari

    2011-08-01

    One of the widely used methods for performance analysis of an optical system is the determination of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). The MTF represents a quantitative and direct measure of image quality, and, besides being an objective test, it can be used on concatenated optical system. This paper presents the application of software called SMTF (software modulation transfer function), built in C++ and Open CV platforms for MTF calculation on electro-optical system. Through this technique, it is possible to develop specific method to measure the real time performance of a digital fundus camera, an infrared sensor and an ophthalmological surgery microscope. Each optical instrument mentioned has a particular device to measure the MTF response, which is being developed. Then the MTF information assists the analysis of the optical system alignment, and also defines its resolution limit by the MTF graphic. The result obtained from the implemented software is compared with the theoretical MTF curve from the analyzed systems.

  15. Visible light focusing flat lenses based on hybrid dielectric-metal metasurface reflector-arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Qingbin; Huo, Pengcheng; Wang, Daopeng; Liang, Yuzhang; Yan, Feng; Xu, Ting

    2017-03-01

    Conventional metasurface reflector-arrays based on metallic resonant nanoantenna to control the wavefront of light for focusing always suffer from strong ohmic loss at optical frequencies. Here, we overcome this challenge by constructing a non-resonant, hybrid dielectric-metal configuration consisting of TiO2 nanofins associated with an Ag reflector substrate that provides a broadband response and high polarization conversion efficiency in the visible range. A reflective flat lens based on this configuration shows an excellent focusing performance with the spot size close to the diffraction limit. Furthermore, by employing the superimposed phase distribution design to manipulate the wavefront of the reflected light, various functionalities, such as multifocal and achromatic focusing, are demonstrated for the flat lenses. Such a reflective flat lens will find various applications in visible light imaging and sensing systems.

  16. Visible light focusing flat lenses based on hybrid dielectric-metal metasurface reflector-arrays

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qingbin; Huo, Pengcheng; Wang, Daopeng; Liang, Yuzhang; Yan, Feng; Xu, Ting

    2017-01-01

    Conventional metasurface reflector-arrays based on metallic resonant nanoantenna to control the wavefront of light for focusing always suffer from strong ohmic loss at optical frequencies. Here, we overcome this challenge by constructing a non-resonant, hybrid dielectric-metal configuration consisting of TiO2 nanofins associated with an Ag reflector substrate that provides a broadband response and high polarization conversion efficiency in the visible range. A reflective flat lens based on this configuration shows an excellent focusing performance with the spot size close to the diffraction limit. Furthermore, by employing the superimposed phase distribution design to manipulate the wavefront of the reflected light, various functionalities, such as multifocal and achromatic focusing, are demonstrated for the flat lenses. Such a reflective flat lens will find various applications in visible light imaging and sensing systems. PMID:28332611

  17. Analysis of near-field Cassegrain reflector - Plane wave versus element-by-element approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houshmand, Bijan; Lee, Shung-Wu; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya; Lam, Peter T.

    1990-01-01

    A near-field Cassegrain reflector (NFCR) is an effective way to magnify a small phased array into a much larger-aperture antenna for limited scan applications. Traditionally the pattern analysis of NFCR is based on a plane wave approach, which simplifies the computation tremendously, but fails to provide design information about the most critical component of the whole antenna system, the feed array. Currently available computers make it possible to calculate the pattern of an NFCR by a more exact element-by-element approach. Each element in the feed array is considered individually, and the diffraction pattern from the subreflector is calculated by the geometrical theory of diffraction (including uniform theories at the shadow boundaries). The field contributions from all elements are superimposed at the curved main reflector surface, and a physical-optics integration is performed to obtain the secondary pattern.

  18. Inverse problem for shape control of flexible space reflectors using distributed solar pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borggräfe, A.; Heiligers, J.; Ceriotti, M.; McInnes, C. R.

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates controlled elastic deflection of thin circular space reflectors using an inverse problem approach to non-linear thin membrane theory. When changing the surface reflectivity across the membrane, the distributed loads due to ambient solar radiation pressure can be manipulated optically, thus controlling the surface shape without using mechanical or piezo-electric systems. The surface reflectivity can in principle be modulated using uniformly distributed thin-film electro-chromic coatings. We present an analytic solution to the inverse problem of finding the necessary reflectivity distribution that creates a specific membrane deflection, for example that of a parabolic reflector. Importantly, the reflectivity distribution across the surface is found to be independent of membrane size, thickness and solar distance, enabling engineering of the reflectivity distribution directly during the manufacture of the membrane.

  19. Visible light focusing flat lenses based on hybrid dielectric-metal metasurface reflector-arrays.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qingbin; Huo, Pengcheng; Wang, Daopeng; Liang, Yuzhang; Yan, Feng; Xu, Ting

    2017-03-23

    Conventional metasurface reflector-arrays based on metallic resonant nanoantenna to control the wavefront of light for focusing always suffer from strong ohmic loss at optical frequencies. Here, we overcome this challenge by constructing a non-resonant, hybrid dielectric-metal configuration consisting of TiO2 nanofins associated with an Ag reflector substrate that provides a broadband response and high polarization conversion efficiency in the visible range. A reflective flat lens based on this configuration shows an excellent focusing performance with the spot size close to the diffraction limit. Furthermore, by employing the superimposed phase distribution design to manipulate the wavefront of the reflected light, various functionalities, such as multifocal and achromatic focusing, are demonstrated for the flat lenses. Such a reflective flat lens will find various applications in visible light imaging and sensing systems.

  20. Comparison-based optical study on a point-line-coupling-focus system with linear Fresnel heliostats.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yanjun; Li, Xian; Zhou, Lingyu; Ma, Xuan; Wang, Ruzhu

    2016-05-16

    Concentrating the concept of a beam-down solar tower with linear Fresnel heliostat (PLCF) is one of the feasible choices and has great potential in reducing spot size and improving optical efficiency. Optical characteristics of a PLCF system with the hyperboloid reflector are introduced and investigated theoretically. Taking into account solar position and optical surface errors, a Monte Carlo ray-tracing (MCRT) analysis model for a PLCF system is developed and applied in a comparison-based study on the optical performance between the PLCF system and the conventional beam-down solar tower system with flat and spherical heliostats. The optimal square facet of linear Fresnel heliostat is also proposed for matching with the 3D-CPC receiver.

  1. On the theory of the synthesis of offset dual-shaped reflectors - Case examples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo-Israel, Victor; Imbriale, William A.; Mittra, Raj; Shogen, Kazuyoshi

    1991-01-01

    In an earlier paper by Galindo-Israel et al. (1987), the geometrical optics (GO) principles, constraints, and requirements of the dual- and single-offset-shaped reflector synthesis problem were collected and developed into a set of nonlinear first-order PDEs. An extension of the methods by which solutions to the PDEs can be obtained is presented, together with several case examples. These examples are independently analyzed by GO and physical optics diffraction methods. The starting point for the integration over each reflector can be taken on the outer rim, at the center, or at an intermediate point-the intermediate starting point being the more general case. The utility of the speed of this synthesis method is demonstrated. For example, the program utilized completes a synthesis in less than 45 s on a 386/20 personal computer and within a fraction of a second on a mainframe Cray. This makes practical the incorporation of the synthesis into a search algorithm that can optimize one or more parameters of the reflector system. As an example, the optimization of the mapping equations for low cross polarization is discussed.

  2. On the theory of the synthesis of offset dual-shaped reflectors - Case examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-Israel, Victor; Imbriale, William A.; Mittra, Raj; Shogen, Kazuyoshi

    1991-05-01

    In an earlier paper by Galindo-Israel et al. (1987), the geometrical optics (GO) principles, constraints, and requirements of the dual- and single-offset-shaped reflector synthesis problem were collected and developed into a set of nonlinear first-order PDEs. An extension of the methods by which solutions to the PDEs can be obtained is presented, together with several case examples. These examples are independently analyzed by GO and physical optics diffraction methods. The starting point for the integration over each reflector can be taken on the outer rim, at the center, or at an intermediate point-the intermediate starting point being the more general case. The utility of the speed of this synthesis method is demonstrated. For example, the program utilized completes a synthesis in less than 45 s on a 386/20 personal computer and within a fraction of a second on a mainframe Cray. This makes practical the incorporation of the synthesis into a search algorithm that can optimize one or more parameters of the reflector system. As an example, the optimization of the mapping equations for low cross polarization is discussed.

  3. CRT electron-optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Shoji

    1995-09-01

    CRT is the most successful electron optical system, commercially. Over a hundred million systems are produced each year, and distributed to the whole world as television sets or personal computers. Therefore, the system has to be extremely cost and power effective, and ergonomics is the important issue at its design. Also, CRT has to be bright enough to be watched in the luminous living or office room. Therefore, electron beam current and anode voltage (CRT screen voltage) are as high as 0.5 to 7 mA and 20 to 33 kV, respectively. These unique restrictions cause unique electron lens design such as in-line rotationally asymmetrical lens or dynamic quadrupole lens and deflection yoke design such as self converging deflection yoke which produces barrel shaped vertical and pin-cushion shaped horizontal magnetic fields. In this paper the recent technical advancement and future trends of the CRT electron optical system will be discussed. The discussion will be restricted only to the picture tube, and other devices such as camera tube, oscilloscope tube will be excluded.

  4. Electro-Optic Surface Field Imaging System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    ELECTRO - OPTIC SURFACE FIELD IMAGING SYSTEM L. E. Kingsley and W. R. Donaldson LABORATORY FOR LASER ENERGETICS University of Rochester 250 East...surface electric fields present during switch operation. The electro - optic , or Pockel’s effect, provides an extremely useful probe of surface electric...fields. Using the electro - optic effect, surface fields can be measured with an optical probe. This paper describes an electro - optic probe which is

  5. Bright color reflective displays with interlayer reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitson, Stephen; Geisow, Adrian; Rudin, John; Taphouse, Tim

    2011-08-01

    A good solution to the reflective display of color has been a major challenge for the display industry, with very limited color gamuts demonstrated to date. Conventional side-by-side red, green and blue color filters waste two-thirds of incident light. The alternative of stacking cyan, magenta and yellow layers is also challenging -- a 10% loss per layer compounds to nearly 50% overall. Here we demonstrate an architecture that interleaves absorbing-to-clear shutters with matched wavelength selective reflectors. This increases color gamut by reducing losses and more cleanly separating the color channels, and gives much wider choice of electro-optic colorants.

  6. Battlefield Optical Surveillance System (BOSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Robert J.

    1997-02-01

    The battlefield optical surveillance system (BOSS) was developed for DARPA by the U.S. Air Force's Phillips Laboratory. BOSS is a HMMWV mounted laser surveillance and deterrence system. It is intended to be used to detect and to deter potentially hostile individuals, snipers and groups of agitators. The BOSS integrates the following: (1) a thermal camera (8-12 micrometer FLIR), that detects and cues to possible targets, (2) a 45 watt, 808 nm (near IR), air- cooled laser which provides covert illumination and designation for a day/night camera to acquire said target and attain a high-resolution image using night vision equipment, and (3) a 1 watt, 532 nm (green) laser that overtly illuminates and designates the target. It also has significant deterring effects both physiological and psychological on individuals and crowds. BOSS offers the potential capability to detect snipers before the first shot is fired. Detection of optical augmentations and the thermal characteristics of a sniper allows for this early detection. The integration of BOSS with acoustic sniper detection systems are being explored.

  7. Optical fibre gas detections systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culshaw, Brian

    2016-05-01

    This tutorial review covers the principles of and prospects for fibre optic sensor technology in gas detection. Many of the potential benefits common to fibre sensor technology also apply in the context of gas sensing - notably long distance - many km - access to multiple remote measurement points; invariably intrinsic safety; access to numerous important gas species and often uniquely high levels of selectivity and/or sensitivity. Furthermore, the range of fibre sensor network architectures - single point, multiple point and distributed - enable unprecedented flexibility in system implementation. Additionally, competitive technologies and regulatory issues contribute to final application potential.

  8. System of optical noncontact microtopography.

    PubMed

    Costa, M F; Almeida, J B

    1993-09-01

    In this paper we describe a method of noncontact optical microtopography based on discrete triangulation. We show that a light beam with an oblique incidence on a surface can be used to assess the distance of the latter to a reference plane if the bright spot produced on the surface is imaged onto an array of detectors that tracks its lateral displacement. The light beam is swept over the surface so that large areas can be scanned. The authors have used their system with success for the topographic inspection of several surfaces, e.g., thin copper and silver films, polyethylene rough films and molds, graphite, machined metallic parts, and fabrics.

  9. Synthesis of optical system from reflective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zverev, Victor A.; Pozhinskaya, Irina I.; Sobolev, Kirill; Jurova, Svetlana

    1996-10-01

    The possible element of telescope optical system with the composite aperture can be two-mirror system, consisting of two confocal paraboloids (Mersen system). This system is an aplanatic anastigmat for infinite target. Its obvious deficiency is the image field curvature. The ways of its elimination are defined by the application of optical system. The possible versions of their constructive realization are considered.

  10. Packaging considerations for planar optical interconnection systems.

    PubMed

    Acklin, B; Jahns, J

    1994-03-10

    We discuss various aspects of building an integrated optoelectronic system that is based on the concept of planar optics. A particular optical interconnection system has been fabricated and demonstrated. It provides parallel interconnections with 1024 optical channels that could be useful as an optical backplane in an optoelectronic multichip module. We consider the design and the fabrication of the optical system, schemes for the hybrid integration with optoelectronic device arrays, and the thermal management of an integrated system. The proposed hybrid integration scheme is based on mature technologies such as thermal anodic bonding and flip-chip bonding. Possibilities for efficient heat sinking are described.

  11. Advanced optical manufacturing digital integrated system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yizheng; Li, Xinglan; Li, Wei; Tang, Dingyong

    2012-10-01

    It is necessarily to adapt development of advanced optical manufacturing technology with modern science technology development. To solved these problems which low of ration, ratio of finished product, repetition, consistent in big size and high precision in advanced optical component manufacturing. Applied business driven and method of Rational Unified Process, this paper has researched advanced optical manufacturing process flow, requirement of Advanced Optical Manufacturing integrated System, and put forward architecture and key technology of it. Designed Optical component core and Manufacturing process driven of Advanced Optical Manufacturing Digital Integrated System. the result displayed effective well, realized dynamic planning Manufacturing process, information integration improved ratio of production manufactory.

  12. Isogrid Membranes for Precise, Singly Curved Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Lou, Michael

    2005-01-01

    A new type of composite material has been proposed for membranes that would constitute the reflective surfaces of planned lightweight, single-curvature (e.g., parabolic cylindrical) reflectors for some radar and radio-communication systems. The proposed composite materials would consist of polyimide membranes containing embedded grids of highstrength (e.g., carbon) fibers. The purpose of the fiber reinforcements, as explained in more detail below, is to prevent wrinkling or rippling of the membrane.

  13. High pressure fiber optic sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Guida, Renato; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon K; Dekate, Sachin N

    2013-11-26

    The present application provides a fiber optic sensor system. The fiber optic sensor system may include a small diameter bellows, a large diameter bellows, and a fiber optic pressure sensor attached to the small diameter bellows. Contraction of the large diameter bellows under an applied pressure may cause the small diameter bellows to expand such that the fiber optic pressure sensor may measure the applied pressure.

  14. Reflectors for SAR performance testing-second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-02-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) performance testing and estimation is facilitated by observing the system response to known target scene elements. Trihedral corner reflectors and other canonical targets play an important role because their Radar Cross Section (RCS) can be calculated analytically. However, reflector orientation and the proximity of the ground and mounting structures can significantly impact the accuracy and precision with which measurements can be made. These issues are examined in this report.

  15. Wide field strip-imaging optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Arthur H. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A strip imaging wide angle optical system is provided. The optical system is provided with a 'virtual' material stop to avoid aberrational effects inherent in wide angle optical systems. The optical system includes a spherical mirror section for receiving light from a 180-degree strip or arc of a target image. Light received by the spherical mirror section is reflected to a frusto-conical mirror section for subsequent rereflection to a row of optical fibers. Each optical fiber transmits a portion of the received light to a detector. The optical system exploits the narrow cone of acceptance associated with optical fibers to substantially eliminate vignetting effects inherent in wide-angle systems. Further, the optical system exploits the narrow cone of acceptance of the optical fibers to substantially limit spherical aberration. The optical system is ideally suited for any application wherein a 180-degree strip image need be detected, and is particularly well adapted for use in hostile environments such as in planetary exploration.

  16. Design of anti-ring back reflectors for thin-film solar cells based on three-dimensional optical and electrical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Hui-Hsin; Wu, Yuh-Renn; Chang, Hung-Chun

    2014-08-11

    The optical and electrical properties of a photonic-plasmonic nanostructure on the back contact of thin-film solar cells were investigated numerically through the three-dimensional (3D) finite-difference time-domain method and the 3D Poisson and drift-diffusion solver. The focusing effect and the Fabry-Perot resonances are identified as the main mechanisms for the enhancement of the optical generation rate as well as the short circuit current density. However, the surface topography of certain nanopattern structures is found to reduce the internal electrostatic field of the device, thus limiting charge collection. The optimized conditions for both optics and electronics have been analyzed in this paper.

  17. Mesoporous Bragg reflectors: block-copolymer self-assembly leads to building blocks with well defined continuous pores and high control over optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guldin, S.; Kolle, M.; Stefik, M.; Wiesner, U.; Steiner, U.

    2011-09-01

    Mesoporous distributed Bragg re ectors (MDBRs) exhibit porosity on the sub-optical length scale. This makes them ideally suited as sensing platforms in biology and chemistry as well as for light management in optoelectronic devices. Here we present a new fast forward route for the fabrication of MDBRs which relies on the self-assembling properties of the block copolymer poly(isoprene-block-ethylene oxide) (PI-b-PEO) in combination with sol-gel chemistry. The interplay between structure directing organic host and co-assembled inorganic guest allows the ne tuning of refractive index in the outcome material. The refractive index dierence between the high and low porosity layer can be as high as 0.4, with the optical interfaces being well dened. Following a 30 min annealing protocol after each layer deposition enables the fast and reliable stacking of MDBRs which exhibit a continuous TiO2 network with large accessible pores and high optical quality.

  18. Consequences of nonorthogonality on the scattering properties of dihedral reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. C.

    1987-10-01

    Small deviations from orthogonality can reduce drastically the backscattering radar cross section (RCS) of dihedral corner reflectors. The method of physical optics is used to calculate the magnitude of the reductions in RCS which result from modest departures from orthogonality. The theoretical results are then compared with experimental measurements which are found to be in very good agreement.

  19. Reflective optical imaging systems with balanced distortion

    DOEpatents

    Hudyma, Russell M.

    2001-01-01

    Optical systems compatible with extreme ultraviolet radiation comprising four reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate are described. The four optical elements comprise, in order from object to image, convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The optical systems are particularly suited for step and scan lithography methods. The invention enables the use of larger slit dimensions associated with ring field scanning optics, improves wafer throughput, and allows higher semiconductor device density. The inventive optical systems are characterized by reduced dynamic distortion because the static distortion is balanced across the slit width.

  20. The ERIS adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Enrico; Fedrigo, Enrico; Le Louarn, Miska; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Soenke, Christian; Brast, Roland; Conzelmann, Ralf; Delabre, Bernard; Duchateau, Michel; Frank, Christoph; Klein, Barbara; Amico, Paola; Hubin, Norbert; Esposito, Simone; Antichi, Jacopo; Carbonaro, Luca; Puglisi, Alfio; Quirós-Pacheco, Fernando; Riccardi, Armando; Xompero, Marco

    2014-07-01

    The Enhanced Resolution Imager and Spectrograph (ERIS) is the new Adaptive Optics based instrument for ESO's VLT aiming at replacing NACO and SINFONI to form a single compact facility with AO fed imaging and integral field unit spectroscopic scientific channels. ERIS completes the instrument suite at the VLT adaptive telescope. In particular it is equipped with a versatile AO system that delivers up to 95% Strehl correction in K band for science observations up to 5 micron It comprises high order NGS and LGS correction enabling the observation from exoplanets to distant galaxies with a large sky coverage thanks to the coupling of the LGS WFS with the high sensitivity of its visible WFS and the capability to observe in dust embedded environment thanks to its IR low order WFS. ERIS will be installed at the Cassegrain focus of the VLT unit hosting the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF). The wavefront correction is provided by the AOF deformable secondary mirror while the Laser Guide Star is provided by one of the four launch units of the 4 Laser Guide Star Facility for the AOF. The overall layout of the ERIS AO system is extremely compact and highly optimized: the SPIFFI spectrograph is fed directly by the Cassegrain focus and both the NIX's (IR imager) and SPIFFI's entrance windows work as visible/infrared dichroics. In this paper we describe the concept of the ERIS AO system in detail, starting from the requirements and going through the estimated performance, the opto-mechanical design and the Real-Time Computer design.

  1. ERIS adaptive optics system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Enrico; Le Louarn, Miska; Soenke, Christian; Fedrigo, Enrico; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Hubin, Norbert

    2012-07-01

    The Enhanced Resolution Imager and Spectrograph (ERIS) is the next-generation instrument planned for the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Adaptive Optics facility (AOF). It is an AO assisted instrument that will make use of the Deformable Secondary Mirror and the new Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF), and it is planned for the Cassegrain focus of the telescope UT4. The project is currently in its Phase A awaiting for approval to continue to the next phases. The Adaptive Optics system of ERIS will include two wavefront sensors (WFS) to maximize the coverage of the proposed sciences cases. The first is a high order 40x40 Pyramid WFS (PWFS) for on axis Natural Guide Star (NGS) observations. The second is a high order 40x40 Shack-Hartmann WFS for single Laser Guide Stars (LGS) observations. The PWFS, with appropriate sub-aperture binning, will serve also as low order NGS WFS in support to the LGS mode with a field of view patrolling capability of 2 arcmin diameter. Both WFSs will be equipped with the very low read-out noise CCD220 based camera developed for the AOF. The real-time reconstruction and control is provided by a SPARTA real-time platform adapted to support both WFS modes. In this paper we will present the ERIS AO system in all its main aspects: opto-mechanical design, real-time computer design, control and calibrations strategy. Particular emphasis will be given to the system performance obtained via dedicated numerical simulations.

  2. Optical Technology: Interacting with Traditional Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Karen

    1987-01-01

    Reviews optical technology products currently on the market, including their storage capacities, formats and uses, and outlines the benefits of integrating optical storage devices with online databases. A description of the HAYSTACK system is offered as a model of optical technology for library applications. A suggested reading list is provided.…

  3. Dichroic Bragg reflectors based on birefringent porous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, J.; Kunzner, N.; Kovalev, D.; Gross, E.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.; Polisski, G.; Koch, F.

    2001-06-11

    Multilayers of anisotropically nanostructured silicon (Si) have been fabricated and studied by polarization-resolved reflection measurements. Alternating layers having different refractive indices exhibit additionally a strong in-plane anisotropy of their refractive index (birefringence). Therefore, a stack of layers, acting as a distributed Bragg reflector, has two distinct reflection bands, depending on the polarization of the incident linearly polarized light. This effect is governed by a three-dimensional (in-plane and in-depth) variation of the refractive index. These structures can yield optical effects which are difficult to achieve with conventional Bragg reflectors. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  4. GridOPTICS Software System

    SciTech Connect

    Akyol, Bora A; Ciraci, PNNL Selim; Gibson, PNNL Tara; Rice, PNNL Mark; Sharma, PNNL Poorva; Yin, PNNL Jian; Allwardt, PNNL Craig; PNNL,

    2014-02-24

    GridOPTICS Software System (GOSS) is a middleware that facilitates creation of new, modular and flexible operational and planning platforms that can meet the challenges of the next generation power grid. GOSS enables Department of Energy, power system utilities, and vendors to build better tools faster. GOSS makes it possible to integrate Future Power Grid Initiative software products/prototypes into existing power grid software systems, including the PNNL PowerNet and EIOC environments. GOSS is designed to allow power grid applications developed for different underlying software platforms installed in different utilities to communicate with ease. This can be done in compliance with existing security and data sharing policies between the utilities. GOSS not only supports one-to-one data transfer between applications, but also publisher/subscriber scheme. To support interoperability requirements of future EMS, GOSS is designed for CIM compliance. In addition to this, it supports authentication and authorization capabilities to protect the system from cyber threats. In summary, the contributions of the GOSS middleware are as follows: • A platform to support future EMS development. • A middleware that promotes interoperability between power grid applications. • A distributed architecture that separates data sources from power grid applications. • Support for data exchange with either one-to-one or publisher/subscriber interfaces. • An authentication and authorization scheme for limiting the access to data between utilities.

  5. Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data: Custom Engineering trough with glass reflector surface and Sandia-designed receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-05-01

    Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Custom Engineering trough and Sandia-designed receivers, with glass reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States. Two experimental receivers were tested, one with an antireflective coating on the glass envelope around the receiver tube and one without the antireflective coating.

  6. Small scale adaptive optics experiment systems engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boykin, William H.

    1993-01-01

    Assessment of the current technology relating to the laser power beaming system which in full scale is called the Beam Transmission Optical System (BTOS). Evaluation of system integration efforts are being conducted by the various government agencies and industry. Concepts are being developed for prototypes of adaptive optics for a BTOS.

  7. THE SHADOW BOX OPTICAL LANDING SYSTEM,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A simple replacement for the Fresnel Lens Optical Landing System (FLOLS) was designed and built at NRL for use as a research tool in the experimental...transport, and simple to maintain. Experimental evaluation of two proposed landing systems, the Laterally Compounded Fresnel Lens Optical Landing System

  8. Effect of Facet Displacement on Radiation Field and Its Application for Panel Adjustment of Large Reflector Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Lian, Peiyuan; Zhang, Shuxin; Xiang, Binbin; Xu, Qian

    2017-05-01

    Large reflector antennas are widely used in radars, satellite communication, radio astronomy, and so on. The rapid developments in these fields have created demands for development of better performance and higher surface accuracy. However, low accuracy and low efficiency are the common disadvantages for traditional panel alignment and adjustment. In order to improve the surface accuracy of large reflector antenna, a new method is presented to determinate panel adjustment values from far field pattern. Based on the method of Physical Optics (PO), the effect of panel facet displacement on radiation field value is derived. Then the linear system is constructed between panel adjustment vector and far field pattern. Using the method of Singular Value Decomposition (SVD), the adjustment value for all panel adjustors are obtained by solving the linear equations. An experiment is conducted on a 3.7 m reflector antenna with 12 segmented panels. The results of simulation and test are similar, which shows that the presented method is feasible. Moreover, the discussion about validation shows that the method can be used for many cases of reflector shape. The proposed research provides the instruction to adjust surface panels efficiently and accurately.

  9. Long-distance fiber-optic point-sensing systems based on random fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z N; Rao, Y J; Wu, H; Li, P Y; Jiang, Y; Jia, X H; Zhang, W L

    2012-07-30

    We find that the random fiber laser (RFL) without point-reflectors is a temperature-insensitive distributed lasing system for the first time. Inspired by such thermal stability, we propose the novel concept of utilizing the RFL to achieve long-distance fiber-optic remote sensing, in which the RFL offers high-fidelity and long-distance transmission for the sensing signal. Two 100 km fiber Bragg grating (FBG) point-sensing schemes based on RFLs are experimentally demonstrated using the first-order and the second-order random lasing, respectively, to verify the concept. Each sensing scheme can achieve >20 dB optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) over 100 km distance. It is found that the second-order random lasing scheme has much better OSNR than that of the first-order random lasing scheme due to enhanced lasing efficiency, by incorporating a 1455 nm FBG into the lasing cavity.

  10. Large-Scale All-Dielectric Metamaterial Perfect Reflectors

    DOE PAGES

    Moitra, Parikshit; Slovick, Brian A.; li, Wei; ...

    2015-05-08

    All-dielectric metamaterials offer a potential low-loss alternative to plasmonic metamaterials at optical frequencies. In this paper, we take advantage of the low absorption loss as well as the simple unit cell geometry to demonstrate large-scale (centimeter-sized) all-dielectric metamaterial perfect reflectors made from silicon cylinder resonators. These perfect reflectors, operating in the telecommunications band, were fabricated using self-assembly based nanosphere lithography. In spite of the disorder originating from the self-assembly process, the average reflectance of the metamaterial perfect reflectors is 99.7% at 1530 nm, surpassing the reflectance of metallic mirrors. Moreover, the spectral separation of the electric and magnetic resonances canmore » be chosen to achieve the required reflection bandwidth while maintaining a high tolerance to disorder. Finally, the scalability of this design could lead to new avenues of manipulating light for low-loss and large-area photonic applications.« less

  11. Large-Scale All-Dielectric Metamaterial Perfect Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Moitra, Parikshit; Slovick, Brian A.; li, Wei; Kravchencko, Ivan I.; Briggs, Dayrl P.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Valentine, Jason

    2015-05-08

    All-dielectric metamaterials offer a potential low-loss alternative to plasmonic metamaterials at optical frequencies. In this paper, we take advantage of the low absorption loss as well as the simple unit cell geometry to demonstrate large-scale (centimeter-sized) all-dielectric metamaterial perfect reflectors made from silicon cylinder resonators. These perfect reflectors, operating in the telecommunications band, were fabricated using self-assembly based nanosphere lithography. In spite of the disorder originating from the self-assembly process, the average reflectance of the metamaterial perfect reflectors is 99.7% at 1530 nm, surpassing the reflectance of metallic mirrors. Moreover, the spectral separation of the electric and magnetic resonances can be chosen to achieve the required reflection bandwidth while maintaining a high tolerance to disorder. Finally, the scalability of this design could lead to new avenues of manipulating light for low-loss and large-area photonic applications.

  12. Secondary pattern computation of an arbitrarily shaped main reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. W.; Lam, P. T. C.; Acosta, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The secondary pattern of a perfectly conducting offset main reflector being illuminated by a point feed at an arbitrary location is studied. The method of analysis is based upon the application of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to the aperture fields obtained using geometrical optics (GO) and geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD). Key features of the present work are (1) the reflector surface is completely arbitrary, (2) the incident field from the feed is most general with arbitrary polarization and location, and (3) the edge diffraction is calculated by either UAT or by UTD. Comparison of this technique for an offset parabolic reflector with the Jacobi-Bessel and Fourier-Bessel techniques shows good agreement. Near field, far field, and scan data of a large refelctor are presented.

  13. Computer prediction of large reflector antenna radiation properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botula, A.

    1980-01-01

    A FORTRAN program for calculating reflector antenna radiation patterns was rewritten and extended to include reflectors composed of a number of panels. These individual panels must be analytic surfaces. The theoretical foundation for the program is as follows: Geometrical optics techniques are used to trace rays from a feed antenna to the reflector surface and back to a mathematical plane just in front of the reflector. The resulting tangential electric field distribution, assumed to be the only source of forward radiation, is integrated numerically to calculate the radiation pattern for a desired set of angles. When the reflector is composed of more than one panel, each panel is treated as a separated antenna, the ray-tracing procedure and integration being repeated for each panel. The results of the individual aperture plane integrations are stored and summed to yield the relative electric field strength over the angles of interest. An example and several test cases are included to demonstrate the use of the program and verify the new method of computation.

  14. Fiber Optic Sensor System Readiness For Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshneya, Deepak; Glomb, Walter L.

    1990-02-01

    Advantages of fiber optic technology in an aircraft control system are realized at the system level and not in sensors or components themselves. Improved system reliability and performance, and reduced electro-optic (e-o) interface size, weight and cost may be realized with the use of fiber optic technology. This paper provides a discussion on the Electro-optic Architecture conceptual designs, sensor multiplexing approaches and key design requirements for the control system of the aircraft. In addition, a comparison of Time and Wavelength division multiplexed systems (TDM and WDM) for digital position sensors configured into a network is made to identify which approach meets system design criteria more efficiently. It is concluded that present WDM sensor interrogation time must be drastically reduced to be compatible with the aircraft control system and that both approaches require a highly reliable optical source which provides adequate power and spectral bandwidth.

  15. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) feasibility study update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alff, W. H.; Banderman, L. W.

    1983-01-01

    In 1982 a workshop was held to refine the science rationale for large deployable reflectors (LDR) and develop technology requirements that support the science rationale. At the end of the workshop, a set of LDR consensus systems requirements was established. The subject study was undertaken to update the initial LDR study using the new systems requirements. The study included mirror materials selection and configuration, thermal analysis, structural concept definition and analysis, dynamic control analysis and recommendations for further study. The primary emphasis was on the dynamic controls requirements and the sophistication of the controls system needed to meet LDR performance goals.

  16. The Position and Attitude of Sub-reflector Modeling for TM65 m Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z. X.; Chen, L.; Wang, J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    In the course of astronomical observations, with changes in angle of pitch, the large radio telescope will have different degrees of deformation in the sub-reflector support, back frame, main reflector etc, which will lead to the dramatic decline of antenna efficiency in both high and low elevation. A sub-reflector system of the Tian Ma 65 m radio telescope has been installed in order to compensate for the gravitational deformations of the sub-reflector support and the main reflector. The position and attitude of the sub-reflector are variable in order to improve the pointing performance and the efficiency at different elevations. In this paper, it is studied that the changes of position and attitude of the sub-reflector have influence on the efficiency of antenna in the X band and Ku band. A model has been constructed to determine the position and attitude of the sub-reflector with elevation, as well as the point compensation model, by observing the radio source. In addition, antenna efficiency was tested with sub-reflector position adjusted and fixed. The results show that the model of sub-reflector can effectively improve the efficiency of the 65 m radio telescope. In X band, the aperture efficiency of the radio telescope reaches more than 60% over the entire elevation range.

  17. Integrated optomechanical analysis of adaptive optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Keith B.; Genberg, Victor L.; Michels, Gregory J.

    2004-01-01

    A method to predict performance of adaptive optical systems subject to mechanical perturbations is presented. Integrated modeling techniques coupling finite element analysis and optical design software are discussed that enable mechanical design trades of an adaptive mirror assembly based on correctability of the optical system wavefront error. This method is based on the linearity of wavefront error consistent with that caused by mechanical disturbances during operation. Optical surface sensitivities are computed based on rigid-body and higher-order surface deformations that relate mechanical surface errors to optical system wavefront error. The sensitivities are then used to determine the best-fit set of actuators to minimize the wavefront error in the optical system due to finite element derived mechanical disturbances. An example is demonstrated for a Cassegrain telescope with an active primary mirror.

  18. Accuracy of optical navigation systems for automatic head surgery: optical tracking versus optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Díaz, Jesús; Riva, Mauro H.; Majdani, Omid; Ortmaier, Tobias

    2014-03-01

    The choice of a navigation system highly depends on the medical intervention and its accuracy demands. The most commonly used systems for image guided surgery (IGS) are based on optical and magnetic tracking systems. This paper compares two optical systems in terms of accuracy: state of the art triangulation-based optical tracking (OT) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). We use an experimental setup with a combined OCT and cutting laser, and an external OT. We simulate a robotic assisted surgical intervention, including planning, navigation, and processing, and compare the accuracies reached at a specific target with each navigation system.

  19. Thermal Stability of a 4 Meter Primary Reflector for the Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofield, Richard E.; Kasl, Eldon P.

    2011-01-01

    The Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder (SMLS) is a space-borne heterodyne radiometer which will measure pressure, temperature and atmospheric constituents from thermal emission in [180,680] GHz. SMLS, planned for the NRC Decadal Survey's Global Atmospheric Composition Mission, uses a novel toric Cassegrain antenna to perform both elevation and azimuth scanning. This provides better horizontal and temporal resolution and coverage than were possible with elevation-only scanning in the two previous MLS satellite instruments. SMLS is diffraction-limited in the vertical plane but highly astigmatic in the horizontal (beam aspect ratio approx. 1:20). Nadir symmetry ensures that beam shape is nearly invariant over plus or minus 65 deg azimuth. A low-noise receiver FOV is swept over the reflector system by a small azimuth-scanning mirror. We describe the fabrication and thermal-stability test of a composite demonstration primary reflector, having full 4m height and 1/3 the width planned for flight. Using finite-element models of reflectors and structure, we evaluate thermal deformations and optical performance for 4 orbital environments and isothermal soak. We compare deformations with photogrammetric measurements made during soak tests in a chamber. The test temperature range exceeds predicted orbital ranges by large factors, implying in-orbit thermal stability of 0.21 micron rms (root mean square)/C, which meets SMLS requirements.

  20. Optical Potential Field Mapping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Max B. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates to an optical system for creating a potential field map of a bounded two dimensional region containing a goal location and an arbitrary number of obstacles. The potential field mapping system has an imaging device and a processor. Two image writing modes are used by the imaging device, electron deposition and electron depletion. Patterns written in electron deposition mode appear black and expand. Patterns written in electron depletion mode are sharp and appear white. The generated image represents a robot's workspace. The imaging device under processor control then writes a goal location in the work-space using the electron deposition mode. The black image of the goal expands in the workspace. The processor stores the generated images, and uses them to generate a feedback pattern. The feedback pattern is written in the workspace by the imaging device in the electron deposition mode to enhance the expansion of the original goal pattern. After the feedback pattern is written, an obstacle pattern is written by the imaging device in the electron depletion mode to represent the obstacles in the robot's workspace. The processor compares a stored image to a previously stored image to determine a change therebetween. When no change occurs, the processor averages the stored images to produce the potential field map.

  1. Capillary Electrophoresis - Optical Detection Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sepaniak, M. J.

    2001-08-06

    Molecular recognition systems are developed via molecular modeling and synthesis to enhance separation performance in capillary electrophoresis and optical detection methods for capillary electrophoresis. The underpinning theme of our work is the rational design and development of molecular recognition systems in chemical separations and analysis. There have been, however, some subtle and exciting shifts in our research paradigm during this period. Specifically, we have moved from mostly separations research to a good balance between separations and spectroscopic detection for separations. This shift is based on our perception that the pressing research challenges and needs in capillary electrophoresis and electrokinetic chromatography relate to the persistent detection and flow rate reproducibility limitations of these techniques (see page 1 of the accompanying Renewal Application for further discussion). In most of our work molecular recognition reagents are employed to provide selectivity and enhance performance. Also, an emerging trend is the use of these reagents with specially-prepared nano-scale materials. Although not part of our DOE BES-supported work, the modeling and synthesis of new receptors has indirectly supported the development of novel microcantilevers-based MEMS for the sensing of vapor and liquid phase analytes. This fortuitous overlap is briefly covered in this report. Several of the more significant publications that have resulted from our work are appended. To facilitate brevity we refer to these publications liberally in this progress report. Reference is also made to very recent work in the Background and Preliminary Studies Section of the Renewal Application.

  2. Micro-optical-mechanical system photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Kotovsky, Jack; Benett, William J.; Tooker, Angela C.; Alameda, Jennifer B.

    2013-01-01

    All-optical photoacoustic spectrometer sensing systems (PASS system) and methods include all the hardware needed to analyze the presence of a large variety of materials (solid, liquid and gas). Some of the all-optical PASS systems require only two optical-fibers to communicate with the opto-electronic power and readout systems that exist outside of the material environment. Methods for improving the signal-to-noise are provided and enable mirco-scale systems and methods for operating such systems.

  3. Patterns in a Nonlinear Optical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arecchi, F. T.; Ramazza, P. L.

    We discuss the general features of patten formation in nonlinear optics, regarding the system sizes along the coordinates longitudinal and transverse to the wavefront propagation as the crucial parameters in determining the possible dynamical behaviours. As a specific example of optical pattern forming system, we review the phenomena observed in a prototypical nonlinear interferometer formed by a Kerr-like medium with optical feedback. Particular attention is devoted to the role of nonlocal interactions in determining the pattern forming scenarios observed.

  4. Jet screech reduction with perforated flat reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Md. Tawhidul Islam; Teramoto, Kenbu; Matsuo, Shigeru; Setoguchi, Toshiaki

    2008-09-01

    In the present experimental study, investigations have been carried out to evaluate the performance of the new control technique of jet screech with different perforated flat reflectors. Mainly two types of porous flat reflectors had been used in the experiment. One reflector (reflector-V) designed for placing the reflector surface vertical to the jet axis, when, another type of reflector (reflector-H) designed for placing the reflecting surface horizontal to the jet axis. In both cases the reflectors had been placed at the nozzle (base tube with uniform cross-sectional area) exit. The diameter of the reflector-V was 15D when the diameter of the reflector-H was 10D. The porous area of the reflector-V was 6D and 4.5D for reflector-H where D indicated the diameter of the nozzle exit. The placement of the reflector at the exit of the nozzle reduces the sound pressure at the nozzle exit. Thus the muted sound can not excite the unstable disturbance at the nozzle exit and the loop of the feedback mechanism disappeared, finally, the generation of jet screech be cancelled. The suction space located at the back side of the porous surface of the reflector-V improves the efficiency of the screech control technique. However, in the case of reflector-H, the receptivity process of feedback loop had been controlled by reducing the disturbances at the effective shock fronts as well as at the nozzle exit. The performance of the proposed method was verified with a flat reflector concept and good performance in jet screech suppression has been confirmed in the case of porous reflector.

  5. Small diameter, deep bore optical inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Lord, D.E.; Petrini, R.R.; Carter, G.W.

    An improved rod optic system for inspecting small diameter, deep bores is described. The system consists of a rod optic system utilizing a curved mirror at the end of the rod lens such that the optical path through the system is bent 90/sup 0/ to minimize optical distortion in examing the sides of a curved bore. The system is particularly useful in the examination of small bores for corrosion, and is capable if examing 1/16 inch diameter and up to 4-inch deep drill holes, for example. The positioning of the curved mirror allows simultaneous viewing from shallow and righ angle points of observation of the same artifact (such as corrosion) in the bore hole. The improved rod optic system may be used for direct eye sighting, or in combination with a still camera or a low-light television monitor; particularly low-light color television.

  6. Small diameter, deep bore optical inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Lord, David E.; Petrini, Richard R.; Carter, Gary W.

    1981-01-01

    An improved rod optic system for inspecting small diameter, deep bores. The system consists of a rod optic system utilizing a curved mirror at the end of the rod lens such that the optical path through the system is bent 90.degree. to minimize optical distortion in examining the sides of a curved bore. The system is particularly useful in the examination of small bores for corrosion, and is capable of examining 1/16 inch diameter and up to 4 inch deep drill holes, for example. The positioning of the curved mirror allows simultaneous viewing from shallow and right angle points of observation of the same artifact (such as corrosion) in the bore hole. The improved rod optic system may be used for direct eye sighting, or in combination with a still camera or a low-light television monitor; particularly low-light color television.

  7. The vector reflector.

    PubMed

    Citrin, D S

    2012-06-15

    A linearly polarized Bessel beam, whose spatial frequencies correspond to the Brewster angle, impinging at normal incidence on a higher refractive-index interface is shown to lead to a reflected field that can be used to produce an azimuthally polarized optical vector beam.

  8. Geometrical optics design of a compact range Gregorian subreflector system by the principle of the central ray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clerici, Giancarlo; Burnside, Walter D.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, the compact range has become very popular for measuring Radar Cross Section (RCS) and antenna patterns. The compact range, in fact, offers several advantages due to reduced size, a controlled environment, and privacy. On the other hand, it has some problems of its own, which must be solved properly in order to achieve high quality measurement results. For example, diffraction from the edges of the main reflector corrupts the plane wave in the target zone and creates spurious scattering centers in RCS measurements. While diffraction can be minimized by using rolled edges, the field of an offset single reflector compact range is corrupted by three other errors: the taper of the reflected field, the cross polarization introduced by the tilt of the feed and the aperture blockage introduced by the feed itself. These three errors can be eliminated by the use of a subreflector system. A properly designed subreflector system offers very little aperture blockage, no cross-polarization introduced and a minimization of the taper of the reflected field. A Gregorian configuration has been adopted in order to enclose the feed and the ellipsoidal subreflector in a lower chamber, which is isolated by absorbers from the upper chamber, where the main parabolic reflector and the target zone are enclosed. The coupling between the two rooms is performed through a coupling aperture. The first cut design for such a subreflector system is performed through Geometrical Optics ray tracing techniques (GO), and is greatly simplified by the use of the concept of the central ray introduced by Dragone. The purpose of the GO design is to establish the basic dimensions of the main reflector and subreflector, the size of the primary and secondary illuminating surfaces, the tilt angles of the subreflector and feed, and estimate the feed beamwidth. At the same time, the shape of the coupling aperture is initially determined.

  9. Optics Toolbox: An Intelligent Relational Database System For Optical Designers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Scott W.; Hopkins, Robert E.

    1986-12-01

    Optical designers were among the first to use the computer as an engineering tool. Powerful programs have been written to do ray-trace analysis, third-order layout, and optimization. However, newer computing techniques such as database management and expert systems have not been adopted by the optical design community. For the purpose of this discussion we will define a relational database system as a database which allows the user to specify his requirements using logical relations. For example, to search for all lenses in a lens database with a F/number less than two, and a half field of view near 28 degrees, you might enter the following: FNO < 2.0 and FOV of 28 degrees ± 5% Again for the purpose of this discussion, we will define an expert system as a program which contains expert knowledge, can ask intelligent questions, and can form conclusions based on the answers given and the knowledge which it contains. Most expert systems store this knowledge in the form of rules-of-thumb, which are written in an English-like language, and which are easily modified by the user. An example rule is: IF require microscope objective in air and require NA > 0.9 THEN suggest the use of an oil immersion objective The heart of the expert system is the rule interpreter, sometimes called an inference engine, which reads the rules and forms conclusions based on them. The use of a relational database system containing lens prototypes seems to be a viable prospect. However, it is not clear that expert systems have a place in optical design. In domains such as medical diagnosis and petrology, expert systems are flourishing. These domains are quite different from optical design, however, because optical design is a creative process, and the rules are difficult to write down. We do think that an expert system is feasible in the area of first order layout, which is sufficiently diagnostic in nature to permit useful rules to be written. This first-order expert would emulate an expert

  10. Lamp bulb with integral reflector

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Izrail; Shanks, Bruce; Sumner, Thomas L.

    2001-01-01

    An improved electrodeless discharge lamp bulb includes an integral ceramic reflector as a portion of the bulb envelope. The bulb envelope further includes two pieces, a reflector portion or segment is cast quartz ceramic and a light transmissive portion is a clear fused silica. In one embodiment, the cast quartz ceramic segment includes heat sink fins or stubs providing an increased outside surface area to dissipate internal heat. In another embodiment, the quartz ceramic segment includes an outside surface fused to eliminate gas permeation by polishing.

  11. High-output LED-based light engine for profile lighting fixtures with high color uniformity using freeform reflectors.

    PubMed

    Gadegaard, Jesper; Jensen, Thøger Kari; Jørgensen, Dennis Thykjær; Kristensen, Peter Kjær; Søndergaard, Thomas; Pedersen, Thomas Garm; Pedersen, Kjeld

    2016-02-20

    In the stage lighting and entertainment market, light engines (LEs) for lighting fixtures are often based on high-intensity discharge (HID) bulbs. Switching to LED-based light engines gives possibilities for fast switching, additive color mixing, a longer lifetime, and potentially, more energy-efficient systems. The lumen output of a single LED is still not sufficient to replace an HID source in high-output profile fixtures, but combining multiple LEDs can create an LE with a similar output, but with added complexity. This paper presents the results of modeling and testing such a light engine. Custom ray-tracing software was used to design a high-output red, green and blue LED-based light engine with twelve CBT-90 LEDs using a dual-reflector principle. The simulated optical system efficiency was 0.626 with a perfect (R=1) reflector coating for light delivered on a target surface through the entire optical system. A profile lighting fixture prototype was created, and provided an output of 6744 lumen and an efficiency of 0.412. The lower efficiency was mainly due to a non-optimal reflector coating, and the optimized design is expected to reach a significantly higher efficiency.

  12. Radar Cross-Section Measurements of V22 Blade Tip with and without LLNL Tipcap Reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Poland, D; Simpson, R

    2000-07-01

    It is desired to quantify the effect, in terms of radar cross-section (RCS), of the addition of a small aluminum reflector to the end of the V22 blades. This reflector was designed and manufactured in order to facilitate blade lag measurements by the 95 GHz Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Radar Blade Tracker (RBT) system. The reflector used in these measurements was designed and fabricated at LLNL and is pictured in Figure 1.

  13. Self-Aligning Optical Measurement Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses how to teach a system of neural networks to respond to the alignment clues used by a human operator in performing routine, initial alignments. A paradigm is proposed for automating the alignment of the components of optical measurement systems. The paradigm which was tested on a spatial filter has proved to be successful for optical alignment.

  14. Portable fiber optic coupled doppler interferometer system for detonation and shock wave diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, K.J.

    1993-03-01

    Testing and analysis of shock wave characteristics such as produced by detonators and ground shock propagation frequently require a method of measuring velocity and displacement of the surface of interest. One method of measurement is doppler interferometry. The VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) uses doppler interferometry and has pined wide acceptance as the preferred tool for shock measurement. An important asset of VISAR is that it measures velocity and displacement non intrusively. The conventional VISAR is not well suited for portability because of its sensitive components, large power and cooling requirements, and hazardous laser beam. A new VISAR using the latest technology in solid state lasers and detectors has been developed and tested. To further enhance this system`s versatility, the unit is fiber optic coupled which allows remote testing, permitting the VISAR to be placed over a kilometer away from the target being measured. Because the laser light is contained in the fiber optic, operation of the system around personnel is far less hazardous. A software package for data reduction has also been developed for use with a personal computer. These new advances have produced a very versatile system with full portability which can be totally powered by batteries or a small generator. This paper describes the solid state VISAR and its peripheral components, fiber optic coupling methods and the fiber optic coupled sensors used for sending and receiving laser radiation.

  15. Adjusting the Contour of Reflector Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, W. B.; Giebler, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    Postfabrication adjustment of contour of panels for reflector, such as parabolic reflector for radio antennas, possible with simple mechanism consisting of threaded stud, two nuts, and flexure. Contours adjusted manually.

  16. Extreme Precision Antenna Reflector Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, G. R.; Gilger, L. D.; Ard, K. E.

    1985-01-01

    Thermal and mechanical distortion degrade the RF performance of antennas. The complexity of future communications antennas requires accurate, dimensionally stable antenna reflectors and structures built from materials other than those currently used. The advantages and disadvantages of using carbon fibers in an epoxy matrix are reviewed as well as current reflector fabrications technology and adjustment. The manufacturing sequence and coefficient of thermal expansion of carbon fiber/borosilicate glass composites is described. The construction of a parabolic reflector from this material and the assembling of both reflector and antenna are described. A 3M-aperture-diameter carbon/glass reflector that can be used as a subassembly for large reflectors is depicted. The deployment sequence for a 10.5M-aperture-diameter antenna, final reflector adjustment, and the deployment sequence for large reflectors are also illustrated.

  17. Power system applications of fiber optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, H.; Johnston, A.; Lutes, G.; Daud, T.; Hyland, S.

    1984-01-01

    Power system applications of optical systems, primarily using fiber optics, are reviewed. The first section reviews fibers as components of communication systems. The second section deals with fiber sensors for power systems, reviewing the many ways light sources and fibers can be combined to make measurements. Methods of measuring electric field gradient are discussed. Optical data processing is the subject of the third section, which begins by reviewing some widely different examples and concludes by outlining some potential applications in power systems: fault location in transformers, optical switching for light fired thyristors and fault detection based on the inherent symmetry of most power apparatus. The fourth and final section is concerned with using optical fibers to transmit power to electric equipment in a high voltage situation, potentially replacing expensive high voltage low power transformers. JPL has designed small photodiodes specifically for this purpose, and fabricated and tested several samples. This work is described.

  18. VSHOT: a tool for characterizing large, imprecise reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.A.; Neal, D.R.; Gruetzner, J.K.; Houser, R.M.; Edgar, R.M.; Wendelin, T.J.

    1996-11-01

    A prototype Video Scanning Hartmann Optical Tester (VSHOT) has been developed to characterize the optics of dish-type solar concentrators. VSHOT is a flexible platform that may characterize any large reflector with a focal length over diameter ratio (f{number_sign}) greater than 0. 45, and RMS optical error in the 0. I - I 0 milliradian range. The VSHOT hardware, software, and operation are described. Measurement uncertainty and preliminary test results are discussed. Another potential application being explored for the VSHOT is the quality assurance of slumped-glass automobile windshields. Preliminary test results from a reference optic and a section of a windshield are presented.

  19. Superresolution applied to optical data storage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Edwin Parker

    1999-09-01

    This dissertation investigates superresolution applications in optical data storage systems. The performance of standard and superresolving magneto-optic data storage system are quantified by scalar diffraction modeling and experiments. Classical resolution measures are reviewed. Background on superresolution definitions and their conceptual development in scanning optical microscopes, optical data storage, and image processing is presented. Figures of merit for quantifying the performance of the systems are reviewed, such as system transfer function, two-point response, focused spot size, and signal-to-noise ratio. The description of the scalar diffraction modeling used to simulate an optical data storage system is reviewed. Operation of the magneto-optic data storage system and tradeoffs of superresolving techniques are discussed. The signal and noise spatial distribution in the pupil of an optical data storage system are shown to be different. For a particular spatial frequency bandwidth, the signal and noise are concentrated in different regions of the pupil. This understanding allows the use of optical filters that partially equalize the system transfer function and increase the signal-to-noise ratio. The main superresolution techniques investigated are those that increase the transmission of the higher spatial frequencies, or equalize the system transfer function, without changing the system cutoff frequency. The optical methods used to achieve superresolution are amplitude and phase filters placed in strategic system locations. One location influences the properties of the focused spot such as the irradiance distribution and width of the central core. Another location does not change the focused spot at all, but does change the signal and noise properties of the system. Electronic filtering techniques are also used to increase the transmission of the high spatial frequencies. The amplitude and phase filter sensitivities to aberration are also investigated

  20. Photoelectronic detection of optical surface defects of optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shou-Cheng; Wang, Fu

    1993-04-01

    This paper introduces an auto-photoelectronic instrument for evaluating the surface defects of the optical parts inside an optical instrument. By analyzing the effects of defects on image quality, we can present the possibility of evaluating the surface defects and its damage objectively and quantitatively by measuring stray-light. Detailed discussion is given about the physical procedure for generating and measuring stray-light. On the basis of this theoretical research a new type of auto-photoelectronic instrument used to evaluate the defects on the optical surface inside the optical system is given. In this instrument the technology of photoelectronics and microcomputer is applied, so a test result is given automatically.