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Sample records for optical reflector system

  1. Analysis of a generalized dual reflector antenna system using physical optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Lagin, Alan R.

    1992-02-01

    Reflector antennas are widely used in communication satellite systems because they provide high gain at low cost. Offset-fed single paraboloids and dual reflector offset Cassegrain and Gregorian antennas with multiple focal region feeds provide a simple, blockage-free means of forming multiple, shaped, and isolated beams with low sidelobes. Such antennas are applicable to communications satellite frequency reuse systems and earth stations requiring access to several satellites. While the single offset paraboloid has been the most extensively used configuration for the satellite multiple-beam antenna, the trend toward large apertures requiring minimum scanned beam degradation over the field of view 18 degrees for full earth coverage from geostationary orbit may lead to impractically long focal length and large feed arrays. Dual reflector antennas offer packaging advantages and more degrees of design freedom to improve beam scanning and cross-polarization properties. The Cassegrain and Gregorian antennas are the most commonly used dual reflector antennas. A computer program for calculating the secondary pattern and directivity of a generalized dual reflector antenna system was developed and implemented at LeRC. The theoretical foundation for this program is based on the use of physical optics methodology for describing the induced currents on the sub-reflector and main reflector. The resulting induced currents on the main reflector are integrated to obtain the antenna far-zone electric fields. The computer program is verified with other physical optics programs and with measured antenna patterns. The comparison shows good agreement in far-field sidelobe reproduction and directivity.

  2. Analysis of a generalized dual reflector antenna system using physical optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Lagin, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    Reflector antennas are widely used in communication satellite systems because they provide high gain at low cost. Offset-fed single paraboloids and dual reflector offset Cassegrain and Gregorian antennas with multiple focal region feeds provide a simple, blockage-free means of forming multiple, shaped, and isolated beams with low sidelobes. Such antennas are applicable to communications satellite frequency reuse systems and earth stations requiring access to several satellites. While the single offset paraboloid has been the most extensively used configuration for the satellite multiple-beam antenna, the trend toward large apertures requiring minimum scanned beam degradation over the field of view 18 degrees for full earth coverage from geostationary orbit may lead to impractically long focal length and large feed arrays. Dual reflector antennas offer packaging advantages and more degrees of design freedom to improve beam scanning and cross-polarization properties. The Cassegrain and Gregorian antennas are the most commonly used dual reflector antennas. A computer program for calculating the secondary pattern and directivity of a generalized dual reflector antenna system was developed and implemented at LeRC. The theoretical foundation for this program is based on the use of physical optics methodology for describing the induced currents on the sub-reflector and main reflector. The resulting induced currents on the main reflector are integrated to obtain the antenna far-zone electric fields. The computer program is verified with other physical optics programs and with measured antenna patterns. The comparison shows good agreement in far-field sidelobe reproduction and directivity.

  3. Analysis of a dual-reflector antenna system using physical optics and digital computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    The application of physical-optics diffraction theory to a deployable dual-reflector geometry is discussed. The methods employed are not restricted to the Conical-Gregorian antenna, but apply in a general way to dual and even multiple reflector systems. Complex vector wave methods are used in the Fresnel and Fraunhofer regions of the reflectors. Field amplitude, phase, polarization data, and time average Poynting vectors are obtained via an IBM 360/91 digital computer. Focal region characteristics are plotted with the aid of a CalComp plotter. Comparison between the GSFC Huygens wavelet approach, JPL measurements, and JPL computer results based on the near field spherical wave expansion method are made wherever possible.

  4. Note: A resonating reflector-based optical system for motion measurement in micro-cantilever arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Sathishkumar, P.; Punyabrahma, P.; Sri Muthu Mrinalini, R.; Jayanth, G. R.

    2015-09-15

    A robust, compact optical measurement unit for motion measurement in micro-cantilever arrays enables development of portable micro-cantilever sensors. This paper reports on an optical beam deflection-based system to measure the deflection of micro-cantilevers in an array that employs a single laser source, a single detector, and a resonating reflector to scan the measurement laser across the array. A strategy is also proposed to extract the deflection of individual cantilevers from the acquired data. The proposed system and measurement strategy are experimentally evaluated and demonstrated to measure motion of multiple cantilevers in an array.

  5. Conformal Membrane Reflectors for Deployable Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Patrick J.; Keys, Andrew S. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation reports the Phase I results on NASA's Gossamer Spacecraft Exploratory Research and Technology Program. Cornerstone Research Group, Inc., the University of Rochester, and International Photonics Consultants collaborated to investigate the feasibility of free-standing, liquid-crystal-polymer (LCP) reflectors for integration into space-based optical systems. The goal of the program was to achieve large-diameter, broadband. reflective membranes that are resistant to the effects of space, specifically cryogenic environments and gamma-ray irradiation. Additionally, we assessed the applicability of utilizing the technology as tight sails, since, by their very nature, these films offer high-reflectivity at specified wavelengths. Previous research programs have demonstrated all-polymer, narrow-band Specular reflectors and diffuse membrane reflectors. The feasibility of fabricating an all-polymer broadband specular reflector and a narrow-band specular membrane reflector was assessed in the Phase I Gossamer program. In addition, preliminary gamma irradiation studies were conducted to determine the stability of the polymer reflectors to radiation. Materials and process technology were developed to fabricate coupon-scale reflectors of both broad- and narrow-band specular reflectors in Phase 1. This presentation will report the results of these studies, including, the performance of a narrow-band specular membrane. Gamma irradiation exposures indicate limited impact on the optical performance although additional exposure studies are warranted. Plans to scale up the membrane fabrication process will be presented.

  6. Optical heterodyne accelerometry: passively stabilized, fully balanced velocity interferometer system for any reflector.

    PubMed

    Buttler, William T; Lamoreaux, Steven K

    2010-08-10

    We formalize the physics of an optical heterodyne accelerometer that allows measurement of low and high velocities from material surfaces under high strain. The proposed apparatus incorporates currently common optical velocimetry techniques used in shock physics, with interferometric techniques developed to self-stabilize and passively balance interferometers in quantum cryptography. The result is a robust telecom-fiber-based velocimetry system insensitive to modal and frequency dispersion that should work well in the presence of decoherent scattering processes, such as from ejecta clouds and shocked surfaces. PMID:20697446

  7. Optical heterodyne accelerometry: passively stabilized, fully balanced velocity interferometer system for any reflector.

    PubMed

    Buttler, William T; Lamoreaux, Steven K

    2010-08-10

    We formalize the physics of an optical heterodyne accelerometer that allows measurement of low and high velocities from material surfaces under high strain. The proposed apparatus incorporates currently common optical velocimetry techniques used in shock physics, with interferometric techniques developed to self-stabilize and passively balance interferometers in quantum cryptography. The result is a robust telecom-fiber-based velocimetry system insensitive to modal and frequency dispersion that should work well in the presence of decoherent scattering processes, such as from ejecta clouds and shocked surfaces.

  8. Optical heterodyne accelerometry: passively stabilized, fully balanced velocity interferometer system for any reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Buttler, William T.; Lamoreaux, Steven K.

    2010-08-10

    We formalize the physics of an optical heterodyne accelerometer that allows measurement of low and high velocities from material surfaces under high strain. The proposed apparatus incorporates currently common optical velocimetry techniques used in shock physics, with interferometric techniques developed to self-stabilize and passively balance interferometers in quantum cryptography. The result is a robust telecom-fiber-based velocimetry system insensitive to modal and frequency dispersion that should work well in the presence of decoherent scattering processes, such as from ejecta clouds and shocked surfaces.

  9. System concept for a moderate cost Large Deployable Reflector (LDR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, P. N.; Breckinridge, J. B.; Diner, A.; Freeland, R. E.; Irace, W. R.; Mcelroy, P. M.; Meinel, A. B.; Tolivar, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    A study was carried out at JPL during the first quarter of 1985 to develop a system concept for NASA's LDR. Major features of the concept are a four-mirror, two-stage optical system; a lightweight structural composite segmented primary reflector; and a deployable truss backup structure with integral thermal shield. The two-stage optics uses active figure control at the quaternary reflector located at the primary reflector exit pupil, allowing the large primary to be passive. The lightweight composite reflector panels limit the short-wavelength operation to approximately 30 microns but reduce the total primary reflector weight by a factor of 3 to 4 over competing technologies. On-orbit thermal analysis indicates a primary reflector equilibrium temperature of less than 200 K with a maximum gradient of about 5 C across the 20-m aperture. Weight and volume estimates are consistent with a single Shuttle launch, and are based on Space Station assembly and checkout.

  10. System dynamic simulation of precision segmented reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Choon-Foo; Lou, Michael C.

    1991-01-01

    A joint effort was undertaken on a Precision Segmented Reflector (PSR) Project. The missions in which the PSR is to be used will use large (up to 20 m in diameter) telescopes. The essential requirement for the telescopes is that the reflector surface of the primary mirror must be made extremely precise to allow no more than a few microns of errors and, additionally, this high surface precision must be maintained when the telescope is subjected to on-orbital mechanical and thermal disturbances. Based on the mass, size, and stability considerations, reflector surface formed by segmented, probably actively or passively controlled, composite panels are regarded as most suitable for future space based astronomical telescope applications. In addition to the design and fabrication of composite panels with a surface error of less than 3 microns RMS, PSR also develops related reflector structures, materials, control, and sensing technologies. As part of the planning effort for PSR Technology Demonstration, a system model which couples the reflector, consisting of panels, support truss and actuators, and the optical bench was assembled for dynamic simulations. Random vibration analyses using seismic data obtained from actual measurements at the test site designated for PSR Technology Demonstration are described.

  11. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael J.; Page, Erik; Gould, Carl T.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope.

  12. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael J.; Page, Erik; Gould, Carl T.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope.

  13. Reflector system for a lighting fixture

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, M.J.; Page, E.; Gould, C.T.

    1998-09-08

    Disclosed herein is a reflector system for a lighting fixture having a illumination source surrounded by an envelope. The reflector system includes a first reflector surrounding the illumination source. The reflector system also includes a second reflector which is non-contiguous with the first reflector and which surrounds the illumination source. The illumination source creates light rays which are reflected by the first and second reflectors. The first reflector directs light rays toward the center line of the fixture. However, the reflected rays despite being so reflected do not substantially intersect the envelope. The reflected light rays from the second reflector being directed so that they diverge from the center line of the fixture avoiding intersection with the semi-transparent envelope. 5 figs.

  14. Development of electro-optic systems for self cleaning concentrated solar reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Jeremy W.

    loss as a function of dust deposition, (2) development of a dust deposition analyzer capable of measuring size distribution of deposited dust and provides mass concentration of dust on the surface of the mirror, and (3) optimization of electrode geometry of EDS film for minimizing optical reflection losses caused by the lamination of the film on the mirror surface while maintaining high reflection efficiency with high dust removal efficiency. The non-contact specular reflectometer and the dust deposition analyzer allowed experimental investigation of reflection losses as functions of surface mass concentration of dust on mirrors for validation of the optical model presented in this study.

  15. Configurations of the reflector for optical-electronic autocollimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konyakhin, Igor A.; Moiseeva, Anastasia A.; Moiseev, Evgenii A.

    2016-04-01

    The problem of increasing working distance opto-electronic autocollimator in determining the angular position of the object was considered. It is proposed to use a reflector in the form of a quadrangular pyramid. We determined the measurement algorithm using the proposed reflector. Several types of retroreflectors with different reflective qualities were considered. The comparative analysis of these mirror systems and basic quadrangular pyramidal reflector are presented. The autocollimation system with pyramidal reflector is simulated and analyzed. Radiation passing through the autocollimation system with a pyramidal reflector is simulated.

  16. Precision segmented reflector figure control system architecture.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mettler, E.; Eldred, D.; Briggs, C.; Kiceniuk, T.; Agronin, M.

    1989-09-01

    This paper describes an advanced technology figure control system for a generic class of large space based segmented reflector telescopes. Major technology and design motivations for selection of sensing, actuation, and mechanism approaches result from the high precision and very low mass and power goals for the reflector system.

  17. Optical communication with micromachined corner cube reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Patrick Breckow

    Micromachined corner cube reflectors (CCRs) were demonstrated to transmit digital data optically across 150 meters indoors. These micro CCRs, made of gold-coated hinged polysilicon plates with dimensions of about 300/mu m, had two fixed mirrors and one electrostatically actuated mirrors so that the CCRs could modulate incident light. Actuation voltages ranged from 15V to 37V, with bandwidth ranging from 500Hz to 3kHz and angular motions of up to 3 degrees. Largest (best) mirror radius of curvature was about 20mrad. Excellent mirror alignments was achieved using novel designs including tie-downs, tenon, and mortise. Divergence of reflected beams from typical CCRs was about 20mrad. These micro CCRs were fabricated by a commercial foundry using a polysilicon surface micromachining process. All the working devices were manually assembled. Self- assembled CCRs using scratch-drive actuators were also investigated and demonstrated to be viable option for batch assembly of CCRs. By reflecting incident light from a 4.2mW interrogating laser, CCRs devices successfully demonstrated data transmission across 150 meters at 4bps, consuming 16nW for mirror actuation. Low data rate was limited by our commercial off-the-shelf hardware. The experimental results not only support our CCR communication analysis but also strongly suggest that low-power long-range communication (greater than 1km) is achievable with suitable improvement of the CCRs' performance and the receiver system. Communication with multiple CCRs was also demonstrated, which suggests that CCRs can be used in applications requiring multiple communication channels. Small hand-held CCR-based communication units were also demonstrated. Fabrication of micro CCRs using a commercial standard CMOS process was also investigated. A novel etching process using xenon difluoride (XeF2) was developed to create hinged mirrors made of oxide, aluminum, and polysilicon by selectively etching away the supporting bulk silicon. Static

  18. Main-Reflector Manufacturing Technology for the Deep Space Optical Communications Ground Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcliffe, M. J.; Hoppe, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) has plans to develop a 10-m-diameter optical communications receiving station. The system uses the direct detection technique, which has much different requirements from a typical astronomical telescope. The receiver must operate in daylight and nighttime conditions. This imposes special requirements on the optical system to reject stray light from the Sun and other sources. One of the biggest challenges is designing a main-reflector surface that meets these requirements and can be produced at a reasonable cost. The requirements for the performance of the reflector are presented. To date, an aspherical primary reflector has been assumed. A reflector with a spherical reflector has a major cost advantage over an aspherical design, with no sacrifice in performance. A survey of current manufacturing techniques for optical mirrors of this type was performed. Techniques including solid glass, lightweight glass, diamond-turned aluminum, and composite mirrors were investigated.

  19. Magnetron sputtering in rigid optical solar reflectors production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asainov, O. Kh; Bainov, D. D.; Krivobokov, V. P.; Sidelev, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetron sputtering was applied to meet the growing need for glass optical solar reflectors. This plasma method provided more uniform deposition of the silver based coating on glass substrates resulted in decrease of defective reflectors fraction down to 5%. For instance, such parameter of resistive evaporation was of 30%. Silver film adhesion to glass substrate was enhanced with indium tin oxide sublayer. Sunlight absorption coefficient of these rigid reflectors was 0.081-0.083.

  20. Wide-angle scannable reflector design using conformal transformation optics.

    PubMed

    Liang, Liang; Hum, Sean V

    2013-01-28

    A flat reflector capable of scanning over wide angles is designed using a transformation optics approach. This reflector is derived from its virtual parabolic counterpart using a conformal coordinate transformation that determines the permittivity profile of the flat reflector. By changing the permittivity profile, the flat reflector is then capable of scanning up to 47° away from broadside while maintaining good beam characteristics across a wide frequency range. Moreover, its directivity is comparable to that of the virtual parabolic reflector, even at high scan angles. We use the Schwarz-Christoffel transformation as a versatile tool to produce perfect conformal mapping of coordinates between the virtual and flat reflectors, thereby avoiding the need to monitor the anisotropy of the material that results when employing quasi-conformal methods. PMID:23389194

  1. Theoretical modeling of the dynamics of a semiconductor laser subject to double-reflector optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakry, A.; Abdulrhmann, S.; Ahmed, M.

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically model the dynamics of semiconductor lasers subject to the double-reflector feedback. The proposed model is a new modification of the time-delay rate equations of semiconductor lasers under the optical feedback to account for this type of the double-reflector feedback. We examine the influence of adding the second reflector to dynamical states induced by the single-reflector feedback: periodic oscillations, period doubling, and chaos. Regimes of both short and long external cavities are considered. The present analyses are done using the bifurcation diagram, temporal trajectory, phase portrait, and fast Fourier transform of the laser intensity. We show that adding the second reflector attracts the periodic and perioddoubling oscillations, and chaos induced by the first reflector to a route-to-continuous-wave operation. During this operation, the periodic-oscillation frequency increases with strengthening the optical feedback. We show that the chaos induced by the double-reflector feedback is more irregular than that induced by the single-reflector feedback. The power spectrum of this chaos state does not reflect information on the geometry of the optical system, which then has potential for use in chaotic (secure) optical data encryption.

  2. Distributed Bragg Reflectors With Reduced Optical Absorption

    DOEpatents

    Klem, John F.

    2005-08-16

    A new class of distributed Bragg reflectors has been developed. These distributed Bragg reflectors comprise interlayers positioned between sets of high-index and low-index quarter-wave plates. The presence of these interlayers is to reduce photon absorption resulting from spatially indirect photon-assisted electronic transitions between the high-index and low-index quarter wave plates. The distributed Bragg reflectors have applications for use in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for use at 1.55 .mu.m and at other wavelengths of interest.

  3. Dual annular rotating "windowed" nuclear reflector reactor control system

    DOEpatents

    Jacox, Michael G.; Drexler, Robert L.; Hunt, Robert N. M.; Lake, James A.

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core.

  4. Physical optics analysis of a four-reflector antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cha, A. G.

    1986-01-01

    Concern has been raised for the 64-m to 70-m antenna upgrade project that the 70-m system may experience greater S-band beam-pointing perturbations than the 64-m system. The S-band perturbations are due to minor (higher order) mode generation, causing subtle cross-polarization fields affecting beam pointing direction, as described herein. For the antennas in their present configuration (64 m), a slight S-band gain degradation of about 0.05 dB can be attributed to these effects. Therefore, a full physical optics analysis was performed for the present-day 64-m system, as described herein. The results were compared with past analyses and experimental observations in order to verify the algebra and computer code with the intent of deriving a valid analysis method for accurately analyzing the 70-m shaped dual reflector Cassegrainian antenna. The results of the new analysis appear to be in excellent agreement with previous analyses and experimental data.

  5. Physical optics analysis of a four-reflector antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, A. G.

    1986-08-01

    Concern has been raised for the 64-m to 70-m antenna upgrade project that the 70-m system may experience greater S-band beam-pointing perturbations than the 64-m system. The S-band perturbations are due to minor (higher order) mode generation, causing subtle cross-polarization fields affecting beam pointing direction, as described herein. For the antennas in their present configuration (64 m), a slight S-band gain degradation of about 0.05 dB can be attributed to these effects. Therefore, a full physical optics analysis was performed for the present-day 64-m system, as described herein. The results were compared with past analyses and experimental observations in order to verify the algebra and computer code with the intent of deriving a valid analysis method for accurately analyzing the 70-m shaped dual reflector Cassegrainian antenna. The results of the new analysis appear to be in excellent agreement with previous analyses and experimental data.

  6. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance Bragg reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Lear, K.L.

    1996-10-22

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method are disclosed. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors. 16 figs.

  7. Optical device with low electrical and thermal resistance bragg reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Lear, Kevin L.

    1996-01-01

    A compound-semiconductor optical device and method. The optical device is provided with one or more asymmetrically-graded heterojunctions between compound semiconductor layers for forming a distributed Bragg reflector mirror having an improved electrical and thermal resistance. Efficient light-emitting devices such as light-emitting diodes, resonant-cavity light-emitting diodes, and vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers may be formed according to the present invention, which may be applied to the formation of resonant-cavity photodetectors.

  8. A biological sub-micron thickness optical broadband reflector characterized using both light and microwaves

    PubMed Central

    Vukusic, P.; Kelly, R.; Hooper, I.

    2008-01-01

    Broadband optical reflectors generally function through coherent scattering from systems comprising one of three designs: overlapped; chirped; or chaotic multilayer reflectors. For each, the requirement to scatter a broad band of wavelengths is met through the presence of a variation in nanostructural periodicity running perpendicular to the systems' outer surfaces. Consequently, the requisite total thickness of the multilayer can often be in excess of 50 μm. Here, we report the discovery and the microwave-assisted characterization of a natural system that achieves excellent optical broadband reflectivity but that is less than 1 μm thick. This system, found on the wing scales of the butterfly Argyrophorus argenteus, comprises a distinctive variation in periodicity that runs parallel to the reflecting surface, rather than perpendicular to it. In this way, the requirement for an extensively thick system is removed. PMID:19042180

  9. Development of optical ground verification method for μm to sub-mm reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockman, Y.; Thizy, C.; Lemaire, P.; Georges, M.; Mazy, E.; Mazzoli, A.; Houbrechts, Y.; Rochus, P.; Roose, S.; Doyle, D.; Ulbrich, G.

    2004-06-01

    Large reflectors and antennas for the IR to mm wavelength range are being planned for many Earth observation and astronomical space missions and for commercial communication satellites as well. Scientific observatories require large telescopes with precisely shaped reflectors for collecting the electro-magnetic radiation from faint sources. The challenging tasks of on-ground testing are to achieve the required accuracy in the measurement of the reflector shapes and antenna structures and to verify their performance under simulated space conditions (vacuum, low temperatures). Due to the specific surface characteristics of reflectors operating in these spectral regions, standard optical metrology methods employed in the visible spectrum do not provide useful measurement results. The current state-of-the-art commercial metrology systems are not able to measure these types of reflectors because they have to face the measurement of shape and waviness over relatively large areas with a large deformation dynamic range and encompassing a wide range of spatial frequencies. 3-D metrology (tactile coordinate measurement) machines are generally used during the manufacturing process. Unfortunately, these instruments cannot be used in the operational environmental conditions of the reflector. The application of standard visible wavelength interferometric methods is very limited or impossible due to the large relative surface roughnesses involved. A small number of infrared interferometers have been commercially developed over the last 10 years but their applications have also been limited due to poor dynamic range and the restricted spatial resolution of their detectors. These restrictions affect also the surface error slopes that can be captured and makes their application to surfaces manufactured using CRFP honeycomb technologies rather difficult or impossible. It has therefore been considered essential, from the viewpoint of supporting future ESA exploration missions, to

  10. Effect of the incidence angle to free space optical communication based on cat-eye modulating retro-reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lai-xian; Sun, Hua-yan; Zhao, Yan-zhong; Zheng, Yong-hui; Shan, Cong-miao

    2013-08-01

    Based on the cat-eye effect of optical system, free space optical communication based on cat-eye modulating retro-reflector can build communication link rapidly. Compared to classical free space optical communication system, system based on cat-eye modulating retro-reflector has great advantages such as building communication link more rapidly, a passive terminal is smaller, lighter and lower power consuming. The incident angle is an important factor of cat-eye effect, so it will affect the retro-reflecting communication link. In this paper, the principle and work flow of free space optical communication based on cat-eye modulating retro-reflector were introduced. Then, using the theory of geometric optics, the equivalent model of modulating retro-reflector with incidence angle was presented. The analytical solution of active area and retro-reflected light intensity of cat-eye modulating retro-reflector were given. Noise of PIN photodetector was analyzed, based on which, bit error rate of free space optical communication based on cat-eye modulating retro-reflector was presented. Finally, simulations were done to study the effect of incidence angle to the communication. The simulation results show that the incidence angle has little effect on active area and retro-reflected light intensity when the incidence beam is in the active field angle of cat-eye modulating retro-reflector. With certain system and condition, the communication link can rapidly be built when the incidence light beam is in the field angle, and the bit error rate increases greatly with link range. When link range is smaller than 35Km, the bit error rate is less than 10-16.

  11. Shaped reflector beam waveguide and high gain antenna systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo-Israel, V.; Mittra, R.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper the problem of synthesizing dual reflector antennas for both amplitude and phase control of the final aperture distribution is discussed. An approximate procedure for the offset synthesis problem is presented and applications of the procedure to the shaping of beam waveguides and reflectors for high-gain antenna systems are illustrated.

  12. Cryogenic systems for the large deployable reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Peter V.

    1988-01-01

    There are five technologies which may have application for Large Deployable Reflector (LDR), one passive and four active. In order of maturity, they are passive stored cryogen systems, and mechanical, sorption, magnetic, and pulse-tube refrigerators. In addition, deep space radiators will be required to reject the heat of the active systems, and may be useful as auxiliary coolers for the stored cryogen systems. Hybrid combinations of these technologies may well be more efficient than any one alone, and extensive system studies will be required to determine the best trade-offs. Stored cryogen systems were flown on a number of missions. The systems are capable of meeting the temperature requirements of LDR. The size and weight of stored cryogen systems are proportional to heat load and, as a result, are applicable only if the low-temperature heat load can be kept small. Systems using chemisorption and physical adsorption for compressors and pumps have received considerable attention in the past few years. Systems based on adiabatic demagnetization of paramagnetic salts were used for refrigeration for many years. Pulse-tube refrigerators were recently proposed which show relatively high efficiency for temperatures in the 60 to 80 K range. The instrument heat loads and operating temperatures are critical to the selection and design of the cryogenic system. Every effort should be made to minimize heat loads, raise operating temperatures, and to define these precisely. No one technology is now ready for application to LDR. Substantial development efforts are underway in all of the technologies and should be monitored and advocated. Magnetic and pulse-tube refrigerators have high potential.

  13. A Cassegrain reflector system for compact range applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rader, Mark D.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1986-01-01

    An integral part of a compact range is the means of providing a uniform plane wave. A Cassegrain reflector system is one alternative for achieving this goal. Theoretically, this system offers better performance than a simple reflector system. The longer pathlengths in the Cassegrain system lead to a more uniform field in the plane of interest. The addition of the subreflector creates several problems, though. System complexity is increased both in terms of construction and performance analysis. The subreflector also leads to aperture blockage and the orientation of the feed now results in spillover illuminating the target areas as well as the rest of the range. Finally, the addition of the subreflector leads to interaction between the two reflectors resulting in undesired field variations in the plane of interest. These difficulties are addressed and through the concept of blending the surfaces, a Cassegrain reflector system is developed that will provide a uniform plane wave that offers superior performance over large target areas for a given size reflector system. Design and analysis is implemented by considering the main reflector and subreflector separately. Then the system may be put together and the final design and system analysis completed.

  14. Design method for four-reflector type beam waveguide systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betsudan, S.; Katagi, T.; Urasaki, S.

    1986-01-01

    Discussed is a method for the design of four reflector type beam waveguide feed systems, comprised of a conical horn and 4 focused reflectors, which are used widely as the primary reflector systems for communications satellite Earth station antennas. The design parameters for these systems are clarified, the relations between each parameter are brought out based on the beam mode development, and the independent design parameters are specified. The characteristics of these systems, namely spillover loss, crosspolarization components, and frequency characteristics, and their relation to the design parameters, are also shown. It is also indicated that design parameters which decide the dimensions of the conical horn or the shape of the focused reflectors can be unerringly established once the design standard for the system has been selected as either: (1) minimizing the crosspolarization component by keeping the spillover loss to within acceptable limits, or (2) minimizing the spillover loss by maintaining the crossover components below an acceptable level and the independent design parameters, such as the respective sizes of the focused reflectors and the distances between the focussed reflectors, etc., have been established according to mechanical restrictions. A sample design is also shown. In addition to being able to clarify the effects of each of the design parameters on the system and improving insight into these systems, the efficiency of these systems will also be increased with this design method.

  15. Geometric-optic synthesis of single-reflector antennas with distributed sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westcott, B. S.; Brickell, F.

    1984-02-01

    Previous systematic treatments of reflector synthesis have usually assumed that the feed is a point source producing a spherical wave, or a line source producing a cylindrical wave. To cater for a more general source, such as a feed array or a feed/subreflector system, within the existing methodology of geometric-optic synthesis, it is convenient to define a source aperture over which the field can be arbitrarily specified. The basic equations necessary to synthesize a single reflector to meet a prespecified output aperture field distribution are derived under general conditions, and the relationship with existing work is indicated. The Monge-Ampere partial differential equation occupies a central role in the discussion.

  16. Simplified Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) system

    SciTech Connect

    Sweatt, W.C.; Stanton, P.L.; Crump, O.B. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A simplified, rugged VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) system has been developed using a non-removable delay element and an essentially non-adjustable interferometer cavity. In this system, the critical interference adjustments are performed during fabrication of the cavity, freeing the user from this task. Prototype systems are easy to use and give extremely high quality results. 6 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Pressure surge reflector for pipe type cable system

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, H.; El Badaly, H.A.; Ghafurian, R. ); Aabo, T.; Ringlee, R.R.; Williams, J.A. ); Melcher, J. )

    1990-04-01

    This paper describes work performed on the development and testing of a pressure surge reflector, designed to reduce the pressure seen at potheads during an electrical failure in a pipe type cable system. The reflector is designed to protect the potheads from failing due to the pressure surge that may be large enough to fracture the porcelain, particularly when the electrical failure is physically close to the pothead. Test results show that the prototype reflector will lower the pressure significantly, bringing the pressure surge below the factory pressure test level for standard potheads.

  18. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) system concept and technology definition study. Volume 1: Executive summary, analyses and trades, and system concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, Donald L.; Jones, Peter A.

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to define reasonable and representative large deployable reflector (LDR) system concepts for the purpose of defining a technology development program aimed at providing the requisite technological capability necessary to start LDR development by the end of 1991. This volume includes the executive summary for the total study, a report of thirteen system analysis and trades tasks (optical configuration, aperture size, reflector material, segmented mirror, optical subsystem, thermal, pointing and control, transportation to orbit, structures, contamination control, orbital parameters, orbital environment, and spacecraft functions), and descriptions of three selected LDR system concepts. Supporting information is contained in appendices.

  19. Angle amplifying optics using plane and ellipsoidal reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Alexander J.

    1977-01-01

    An optical system for providing a wide angle input beam into ellipsoidal laser fusion target illumination systems. The optical system comprises one or more pairs of centrally apertured plane and ellipsoidal mirrors disposed to accept the light input from a conventional lens of modest focal length and thickness, to increase the angular divergence thereof to a value equivalent to that of fast lenses, and to direct the light into the ellipsoidal target illumination system.

  20. Optical and Durability Evaluation for Silvered Polymeric Mirrors and Reflectors: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number, CRD-08-316

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, M.

    2014-08-01

    3M is currently developing silvered polymeric mirror reflectors as low-cost replacements for glass mirrors in concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. This effort is focused on development of reflectors comprising both metallized polymeric mirror films based on improved versions of ECP-305+ or other durable mirror film concepts and appropriate mechanically robust substrates. The objectives for this project are to reduce the system capital and operating costs and to lower the levelized cost of energy for CSP installations. The development of mirror reflectors involves work on both full reflectors and mirror films with and without coatings. Mirror reflectors must meet rigid optical specifications in terms of radius of curvature, slope errors and specularity. Mirror films must demonstrate long-term durability and maintain high reflectivity. 3M would like to augment internal capabilities to validate product performance with methods and tools developed at NREL to address these areas.

  1. Application of the theory of coupled waves for analysis of inclined reflectors in optical waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Kolosovskii, E A; Tsarev, A V

    2008-09-30

    A new method for analysing the transmission and scattering of the guided TE mode in an inclined reflector located in an optical waveguide is proposed and studied. The reflection of an inhomogeneous optical beam from the inclined reflector is described semi-analytically for the first time by using the theory of coupled waves and taking into account the interrelation and transformation of energy between all the waves of the discrete and continuous spectra of the optical 2D-waveguide (even and odd guided, radiation, and evanescent waves). The results of calculations of the propagation of light through the inclined reflector in the form of a thin (10-500 nm) homogeneous strip obtained by our method and by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method are in excellent quantitative agreement. The calculation rate of our method considerably (by one-two orders of magnitude) exceeds that of the FDTD method and our method has a better accuracy. (optical waveguides)

  2. The measurement of optical reflector with complex surface using nano-CMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhichao; Guo, Tong; Chen, Jinping; Fu, Xing; Hu, Xiaotang

    2012-11-01

    Among variety of methods to measure complex surfaces, coordinate measurement is widely used in reverse engineering and measuring complex topography. In this paper, a coordinate measuring system based on 3D tactile probe is introduced. This system can measure complex surface with resolution of 1nm, measuring range of 25mm×25mm×5mm. The component of the measuring system, the principle and advantages of the probe are also introduced as the major part. We used the nano-CMM to test an optical reflector with sine curve surface. The fluctuation of the topography is about 5 micrometers. The result is compared with the data of AFM and the source of deviation is analyzed in the conclusions.

  3. Optical Coating Performance for Heat Reflectors of the JWST-ISIM Electronic Component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashford, Robert A.; Perrygo, Charles M.; Garrison, Matthew B.; White, Bryant K.; Threat, Felix T.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Jeans, James W.; Huber, Frank K.; Bousquet, Robert R.; Shaw, Dave

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a thermal radiator design consisting of lightweight composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings for use on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) structure. The structure will have a Thermal Subsystem unit to provide passive cooling to the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) control electronics. The ISIM, in the JWST observatory, is the platform that provides the mounting surfaces for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the control electronic generated-heat away from JWST is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft s own heat does not interfere with the infrared-light gathering of distant cosmic sources. The need to have lateral control in the emission direction of the IEC (ISIM Electronics Compartment) radiators led to the development of a directional baffle design that uses multiple curved mirrorlike surfaces. This concept started out from the so-called Winston non-imaging optical concentrators that use opposing parabolic reflector surfaces, where each parabola has its focus at the opposite edge of the exit aperture. For this reason they are often known as compound parabolic concentrators or CPCs. This radiator system with the circular section was chosen for the IEC reflectors because it offers two advantages over other designs. The first is that the area of the reflector strips for a given radiator area is less, which results in a lower mass baffle assembly. Secondly, the fraction of energy emitted by the radiator strips and subsequently reflected by the baffle is less. These fewer reflections reduced the amount of energy that is absorbed and eventually re-emitted, typically in a direction outside the design emission range angle. A baffle frame holds the mirrors in position above a radiator panel on the IEC. Together, these will direct the majority of the heat from the IEC above the sunshield away towards empty space.

  4. Large Deployable Reflector Science and Technology Workshop. Volume 3: Systems and Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leidich, C. A. (Editor); Pittman, R. B. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The results of five technology panels which convened to discuss the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) are presented. The proposed LDR is a large, ambient-temperature, far infrared/submillimeter telescope designed for space. Panel topics included optics, materials and structures, sensing and control, science instruments, and systems and missions. The telescope requirements, the estimated technology levels, and the areas in which the generic technology work has to be augmented are enumerated.

  5. Cassegrain dual reflector antenna design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-02-01

    A folded optics reflector system could mitigate problems associated with the pointability and controllability of the large UHF antenna for MSAT. Such a system is comprised of a parabolic main reflector and a hyperboloidal subreflector (Cassegrain arrangement) or an ellipsoidal subreflector (Gregorian arrangement), either of which brings the feed closer to the main reflector. By shaping the subreflector and the main reflector, an improved scan capability might be achieved and the size of the required feed aperture-per-beam could be reduced. In such a shaped dual reflector system, the need for overlapping cluster feed arrangement and its concomitant beam forming network could be removed. In this system, a relatively low gain feed element together with the shaped subreflector would be sufficient to produce the required high illumination taper that at the main reflector.

  6. Modular design of a high-efficiency LED headlamp system based on freeform reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Heng; Zhang, Xianmin; Ge, Peng

    2015-09-01

    A modular of the LED headlamp system based on freeform reflectors is proposed. Glare suppression and optical design are taken into account during the module design. The proposed module consists of six LEDs and each of them has a freeform reflector correspondingly, which is constructed based on the light energy maps and Snell's Law. Through lighting up different LEDs, the high-beam light and the low-beam light can be switched conveniently. With the proposed method, a module is designed and LUW HWQP LED source whose chip size is 1.0 mm×1.0 mm is adopted for the simulation. Results demonstrate that the lighting distribution can well fulfill the requirements of ECE R112 regulation without any other lenses, shields or baffles. Furthermore, the total optical efficiency can reach up to 80.29% and 81.16% for the low-beam light and high-beam light respectively.

  7. Gregorian all-reflective optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, W. L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An optical heterodyne receiver comprises a system of reflectors forming a folded Gregorian configuration for collecting a signal beam, and an optical detector located at the focus of the system. A paraboloidal primary reflector and an elipsoidal secondary reflector face each other on an optical axis with the focus of the secondary reflector coinciding with the focus of the primary reflector. An auxiliary laser generates a local oscillator beam that is combined with the signal beam after the signal beam emerges from the exit pupil (which is also the aperture stop) of the system, and the resultant is impinged on the detector. A pair of image motion compensators is located as close to the exit pupil as possible for aligning off-axis inputs to the detector.

  8. Dual annular rotating [open quotes]windowed[close quotes] nuclear reflector reactor control system

    DOEpatents

    Jacox, M.G.; Drexler, R.L.; Hunt, R.N.M.; Lake, J.A.

    1994-03-29

    A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core. 4 figures.

  9. Reflector adjustment for a large radio telescope based on active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tongying; Zhang, Zhenchao; Li, Aihua; Wang, You

    2012-09-01

    The reflector deformation caused by gravity, temperature, humidity, wind loading and so on can reduce the global performance of a large radio telescope. In this paper, considering the characteristics of the primary reflector of a 13.7 m millimeter-wave telescope a novel reflector adjustment method based on active optics has therefore been proposed to control the active surface of the reflector through the communication between the active surface computer and embedded intelligent controller with a large quantity of displacement actuators, in which the active surface computer estimates and controls the real time active surface figure at any elevation angle, reduces or eliminates the adverse effects of the reflector deformation to increase the resolution and sensitivity of the radio telescope due to the more radio signals collected. A Controller Area Network /Ethernet protocol converter is designed for the communication between the active surface control computer as a host computer in Ethernet and the displacement actuator controller in Controller Area Network. The displacement actuator is driven by a stepper motor and controlled by an intelligent controller with the data from the active surface computer. The closed-loop control of the stepper motor improves the control accuracy greatly through the feedback link based on the optical encoder.

  10. Discourse on the Characterization of Waveguide Distributed Bragg Reflectors for Application to Nonlinear Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grieco, Andrew Lewis

    Precise characterization of waveguide parameters is necessary for the successful design of nonlinear photonic devices. This dissertation contains a description of methods for the experimental characterization of distributed Bragg reflectors for use in nonlinear optics and other applications. The general coupled-mode theory of Bragg reflection arising from a periodic dielectric perturbation is developed from Maxwell's equations. This theory is then applied to develop a method of characterizing the fundamental parameters that describe Bragg reflection by comparing the spectral response of Bragg reflector resonators. This method is also extended to characterize linear loss in waveguides. A model of nonlinear effects in Bragg reflector resonators manifesting in bistability is also developed, as this phenomenon can be detrimental to the characterization method. Specific recommendations are made regarding waveguide fabrication and experimental design to reduce sources of experimental error.

  11. Control of a small robot using a hybrid optical modulating retro-reflector/RF link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, James L.; Ferraro, Mike S.; Rabinovich, William S.; Goetz, Peter G.; Suite, Michele R.; Uecke, Stanley H.

    2014-06-01

    Tele-operated robots used for Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) are ordinarily controlled using a radio frequency (RF) link. Use of RF links on the battlefield presents several challenges including spectrum allocation and jamming effects (both by the enemy and friendly forces). Several solutions have been attempted including electrical or fiber optic umbilicals and spread spectrum radios with varying degrees of success. Modulating Retro-reflector Free Space Optical (MRR-FSO) communications links avoid these effects entirely but are limited to line of sight operation. We have developed a system consisting of an MRR-FSO link with a tracking optical terminal, a conventional RF link and a deployable pod to provide a relay node bridging the FSO link to the operator and the RF link to the robot. The MRRFSO link provides the capability to operate the robot in the presence of jamming while the RF link allows short range non line of sight operation. The operator uses the MRR-FSO link to drive the robot to a position downrange outside the influence of the jammer or other interference. Once the robot is positioned downrange near the area of operation the pod is deployed. This allows the robot to maneuver freely including venturing beyond line of sight using the short range RF link to maintain communications between the vehicle and pod while the FSO link maintains connectivity between the pod and the operator.

  12. Anti-glare LED projection lamp based on an optical design with a confocal double-reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ching-Cherng; Lo, Yi-Chien; Tsai, Chih-Chi; Lee, Xuan-Hao; Chien, Wei-Ting

    2012-10-01

    A new optical design of a confocal double-reflector, for white LED lighting, performing uniform illumination with a specific projection angle has been presented and demonstrated. In addition, the anti-glare design with double-reflector prevents direct view of the LED, and the measured veiling luminance is much lower than that in general LED-based projection lamps.

  13. Extrinsic chirality: Tunable optically active reflectors and perfect absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plum, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Conventional three-dimensional (3D) chiral media can exhibit optical activity for transmitted waves, but optical activity for reflected waves is negligible. This work shows that mirror asymmetry of the experimental arrangement—extrinsic 3D chirality—leads to giant optical activity for reflected waves with fundamentally different characteristics. It is demonstrated experimentally that extrinsically 3D-chiral illumination of a lossy metasurface backed by a mirror enables tunable circular dichroism and circular birefringence as well as perfect absorption of circularly polarized waves. In contrast, such polarization phenomena vanish for conventional optically active media backed by a mirror.

  14. Physical optics analysis of a four-reflector antenna, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cha, A. G.

    1986-01-01

    Concern has been raised for the 64-m to 70-m antenna upgrade project that the 70-m system may experience greater S-band beam-pointing perturbations than the 64-m system. The S-band perturbations are due to minor (higher order) mode generation, causing subtle cross-polarization fields affecting beam pointing direction, as described herein. For the antennas in their present configuration (64 m), a slight S-band gain degradation of about 0.05 dB can be attributed to these effects. Therefore, a full physical optics analysis was performed for the present-day 64-m system, as described herein. The results were compared with past analyses and experimental observations in order to verify the algebra and computer code with the intent of deriving a valid analysis method for accurately analyzing the 70-m shaped dual reflector Cassegrainian antenna. The results of the new analysis appear to be in excellent agreement with previous analyses and experimental data.

  15. Physical optics analysis of a four-reflector antenna, part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, A. G.

    1986-02-01

    Concern has been raised for the 64-m to 70-m antenna upgrade project that the 70-m system may experience greater S-band beam-pointing perturbations than the 64-m system. The S-band perturbations are due to minor (higher order) mode generation, causing subtle cross-polarization fields affecting beam pointing direction, as described herein. For the antennas in their present configuration (64 m), a slight S-band gain degradation of about 0.05 dB can be attributed to these effects. Therefore, a full physical optics analysis was performed for the present-day 64-m system, as described herein. The results were compared with past analyses and experimental observations in order to verify the algebra and computer code with the intent of deriving a valid analysis method for accurately analyzing the 70-m shaped dual reflector Cassegrainian antenna. The results of the new analysis appear to be in excellent agreement with previous analyses and experimental data.

  16. An innovative modulating retro-reflector for free-space optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenkrantz, Etai; Arnon, Shlomi

    2013-09-01

    Modulating retro-reflectors (MRR) are beneficial for asymmetric free-space optics communication links. An MRR includes an optical retro-reflector and an electro-optic shutter. The main advantage of an MRR configuration is that it shifts most of the power, weight, and pointing requirements onto one end of the link. In this study an innovative device comprising of nanoparticle-embedded ferroelectric thin film is used as an MRR. The new modulator is mounted in front of a passive retro-reflector. In our study we calculated the link budget for lunar exploration scenario. The scenario includes a base station that communicates with several robots or astronauts. In our simulations, the base station illuminates a robot with a continuous-wave beam, i.e. an interrogating beam. The un-modulated beam strikes the MRR, which is located on the robot, and is passively reflected back to the base station carrying the data that has been modulated onto it by the MRR. In this scenario a robot and a base-station are 4km apart, with a clear line of sight. In addition, the innovative MRR is capable of achieving 12dB contrast ratio. Under these assumptions and using the nanoparticle-embedded ferroelectric MRR we calculated the required transmission power for a given bit-rate and BER.

  17. Session: CSP Advanced Systems: Optical Materials (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.

    2008-04-01

    The Optical Materials project description is to characterize advanced reflector, perform accelerated and outdoor testing of commercial and experimental reflector materials, and provide industry support.

  18. System overview on electromagnetic compensation for reflector antenna surface distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.; Zaman, A. J.; Terry, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    The system requirements and hardware implementation for electromagnetic compensation of antenna performance degradations due to thermal effects was investigated. Future commercial space communication antenna systems will utilize the 20/30 GHz frequency spectrum and support very narrow multiple beams (0.3 deg) over wide angle field of view (15-20 beamwidth). On the ground, portable and inexpensive very small aperture terminals (VSAT) for transmitting and receiving video, facsimile and data will be employed. These types of communication system puts a very stringent requirement on spacecraft antenna beam pointing stability (less than .01 deg), high gain (greater than 50 dB) and very lowside lobes (less than -25 dB). Thermal analysis performed on the advanced communication technology satellite (ACTS) has shown that the reflector surfaces, the mechanical supporting structures and metallic surfaces on the spacecraft body will distort due thermal effects from a varying solar flux. The antenna performance characteristics (e.g., pointing stability, gain, side lobe, etc.) will degrade due to thermal distortion in the reflector surface and supporting structures. Specifically, antenna RF radiation analysis has shown that pointing error is the most sensitive antenna performance parameter to thermal distortions. Other antenna parameters like peak gain, cross polarization level (beam isolation), and side lobe level will also degrade with thermal distortions. In order to restore pointing stability and in general antenna performance several compensation methods were proposed. In general these compensation methods can be classified as being either of mechanical or electromagnetic type. This paper will address only the later one. In this approach an adaptive phased array antenna feed is used to compensate for the antenna performance degradation. Extensive work has been devoted to demonstrate the feasibility of adaptive feed compensation on space communication antenna systems. This

  19. An offset-fed reflector antenna with an axially symmetric main reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, D.-C.; Rusch, W. V. T.

    1984-11-01

    A design method for an offset-fed, dual reflector antenna (Cassegrain type or Gregorian type) system with an axisymmetric main reflector is presented. Geometrical optics (GO) and the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD) are used to find the surface-current density on the main reflector. A modified Jacobi-Bessel series (JBS) method is used to find the far-field pattern for the physical optics (PO) integral. In the defocused mode of operation, a new technique is developed to find the reflection point on the subreflector corresponding to the defocused feed and a general field point on the main reflector. Two sample systems are designed.

  20. Optical parameters of the tunable Bragg reflectors in squid

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Amitabh; DeMartini, Daniel G.; Eck, Elizabeth; Morse, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    system can be used as a model system to quantify the effects of various methods of tissue fixation. The microspectrophotometry technique described can be expected to provide deeper insights into the molecular and physical mechanisms governing other biophotonically active cells and structures. PMID:23740489

  1. Uniform diffracted fields from a perfectly conducting cylindrical reflector with modified theory of physical optics.

    PubMed

    Yalçın, Uğur; Sarnık, Mücahit

    2013-01-01

    The uniform diffracted fields are calculated on PEC cylindrical reflector by Modified Theory of Physical Optics (MTPO). It is aimed to convert the noncontinuous solution to a continuous solution by finding a uniform equation which does not contain any expression converging to 0 in the denominator part. Three axioms of MTPO theory are used to construct the integral equations for the perfectly electrically conducting surface application. The "edge-point" technique is used to find the diffracted field, and uniform solution is to be found via "detour parameter(s)." Finally, the obtained results are to be compared with the nonuniform ones, numerically. PMID:23766679

  2. A two dimensional optical input to one dimensional serial pulse transformation using confocal reflectors.

    PubMed

    Hulse, George

    2014-01-01

    An optical approach using confocal parabolic reflectors is used to transform 2D input data based on spatial position to a 1D sequenced serial string. The optical input data are set up as a 2D array. Individual channels are established between the input array and the final output detector, which reads the data as a time based serial data. The transformation is achieved by changing the optical path length associated with each pixel and its channel to the output detector. The 2D data can be images or individual sources but the light must be parallel. This paper defines how to establish the channels and the calculations required to achieve the desired transformation.

  3. Distributed Bragg reflector laser for frequency modulated communication systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chraplyvy, A.R.; Koch, T.L.; Tkach, R.W.

    1990-02-27

    This patent describes a lightwave transmitter. It includes a distributed Bragg reflector laser and means for frequency modulating said laser. The laser comprises first and second semiconductor heterostructure regions.

  4. Feasibility study of a synthesis procedure for array feeds to improve radiation performance of large distorted reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Takamizawa, K.; Werntz, P.; Lapean, J.; Barts, R.; Shen, B.; Dunn, D.

    1992-04-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) performance analysis of the Gregorian tri-reflector; (2) design and performance of the type 6 reflector antenna; (3) a new spherical main reflector system design; (4) optimization of reflector configurations using physical optics; (5) radiometric array design; and (7) beam efficiency studies.

  5. Feasibility study of a synthesis procedure for array feeds to improve radiation performance of large distorted reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Takamizawa, K.; Werntz, P.; Lapean, J.; Barts, R.; Shen, B.; Dunn, D.

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: (1) performance analysis of the Gregorian tri-reflector; (2) design and performance of the type 6 reflector antenna; (3) a new spherical main reflector system design; (4) optimization of reflector configurations using physical optics; (5) radiometric array design; and (7) beam efficiency studies.

  6. High efficiency epitaxial optical reflector solar cells. Final subcontract report, 1 January 1990--31 October 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Dapkus, P.D.; Hummel, S.G.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes work to test the feasibility of a new solar cell concept -- the epitaxial optical reflector (EOR) solar cell. This cell concept alters current designs for high efficiency cells by changing the optical absorption efficiency of single cells. The change is introduced by the use an epitaxial multilayer reflector as an integral part of the cell to increase the optical path length of certain wavelengths of light in the cell. These changes are expected to increase the open circuit voltage at which power is extracted from the cell. The program is designed to test the feasibility of the use of a broad band epitaxial multilayer reflector grown as an integral part of the device structure to reflect the near-band-edge light back through the device for a second absorption pass. This second pass allows the design of a solar cell with a thinner base, and the use of the epitaxial reflector as a heterojunction carrier-reflecting barrier at the rear of the device. The thinner cell design and altered carrier profile that results from the light- and carrier-reflecting barrier will decrease the carrier concentration gradient and increase the open circuit voltage. The program is structured to have three tasks: (1) Solar Cell and Reflector Modeling, (2) Materials Growth and Optimization, and (3) Solar Cell Fabrication and Characterization.

  7. Testing the figure of parabolic reflectors for solar concentrators.

    PubMed

    Bodenheimer, J S; Eisenberg, N P; Gur, J

    1982-12-15

    A novel method for testing the optical quality of large parabolic solar concentrators is presented, based on autocollimation. An optical system continuously scans the reflector along a fixed reference axis. At each position along the axis, the spread function is obtained. Analysis of the location, width, and intensity changes of this function gives quantitative information about the reflector's defects. A figure of merit describing the performance of parabolic trough reflectors is proposed.

  8. Solar absorptance degradation of optical solar reflector radiators on the Spacenet satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naegeli, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    Telemetry data are presented for two communications hybrid satellites, Spacenet I and Spacenet II, collected to determine the long-term temperature trend and associated solar absorptance degradation of the optical solar reflectors (OSRs). A thermal model was used to calculate the thermal sensitivity of various OSR components to changes in the solar absorptance and to determine absolute values of solar absorptance. The separation of the data into sunlit and nonsunlit periods made it possible to confirm the hypothesis that degradation occurs under the catalytic activity of direct sunlight on the spacecraft contaminants. The differences found between the degradation rates for Spacenet-I and Spacenet-II satellites and between the present results and published reports on other satellites are considered to be related to variations in the volume of spacecraft contaminants.

  9. Reflector Surface Error Compensation in Dual-Reflector Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Imbriale, William

    2010-01-01

    By probing the field on a small subreflector at a minimal number of points, the main reflector surface errors can be obtained and subsequently used to design a phase-correction subreflector that can compensate for main reflector errors. The compensating phase-error profile across the subreflector can be achieved either by a surface deformation or by the use of an array of elements such as patch antennas that can cause a phase shift between the incoming and outgoing fields. The second option is of primary interest here, but the methodology can be applied to either case. The patch array is most easily implemented on a planar surface. Therefore, the example of a flat subreflector and a parabolic main reflector (a Newtonian dual reflector system) is considered in this work. The subreflector is assumed to be a reflector array covered with patch elements. The phase variation on a subreflector can be detected by a small number of receiving patch elements (probes). By probing the phase change at these few selected positions on the subreflector, the phase error over the entire surface can be recovered and used to change the phase of all the patch elements covering the subreflector plane to compensate for main reflector errors. This is accomplished by using a version of sampling theorem on the circular aperture. The sampling is performed on the phase-error function on the circular aperture of the main reflector by a method developed using Zernike polynomials. This method is based upon and extended from a theory previously proposed and applied to reflector aperture integration. This sampling method provides for an exact retrieval of the coefficients of up to certain orders in the expansion of the phase function, from values on a specifically calculated set of points in radial and azimuthal directions in the polar coordinate system, on the circular reflector aperture. The corresponding points on the subreflector are then obtained and, by probing the fields at these points, a

  10. A new approach for shaping of dual-reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Teh-Hong; Burnside, W. D.; Rudduck, Roger C.

    1987-12-01

    The shaping of 2-D dual-reflector antenna systems to generate a prescribed distribution with uniform phase at the aperture of the second reflector is examined. This method is based on the geometrical nature of Cassegrain and Gregorian dual-reflector antennas. The method of syntheses satisfies the principles of geometrical optics which are the foundations of dual-reflector designs. Instead of setting up differential equations or heuristically designing the subreflector, a set of algebraic equations is formulated and solved numerically to obtain the desired surfaces. The caustics of the reflected rays from the subreflector can be obtained and examined. Several examples of 2-D dual-reflector shaping are shown to validate the study. Geometrical optics and physical optics are used to calculate the scattered fields from the reflectors.

  11. A new approach for shaping of dual-reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Teh-Hong; Burnside, W. D.; Rudduck, Roger C.

    1987-01-01

    The shaping of 2-D dual-reflector antenna systems to generate a prescribed distribution with uniform phase at the aperture of the second reflector is examined. This method is based on the geometrical nature of Cassegrain and Gregorian dual-reflector antennas. The method of syntheses satisfies the principles of geometrical optics which are the foundations of dual-reflector designs. Instead of setting up differential equations or heuristically designing the subreflector, a set of algebraic equations is formulated and solved numerically to obtain the desired surfaces. The caustics of the reflected rays from the subreflector can be obtained and examined. Several examples of 2-D dual-reflector shaping are shown to validate the study. Geometrical optics and physical optics are used to calculate the scattered fields from the reflectors.

  12. Thin film deployable reflector model for ET gamma ray imaging telescope system (ET-GRITS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huegele, Vinson B.

    1989-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center is developing a thin film reflector for a Gamma Ray Imaging Telescope System (GRITS) using the Shuttle External Tank (ET). The concept is to install an inflatable reflector in the ET that could be transferred from the orbiter in orbit. This is a study of a scale model reflector for the ET GRITS application. The approach is to form 1/2 mil film into a spherical mirror mounted on a seven-foot diameter metal ring. The ring mount is sealed and slightly evacuated to pressurize the film into shape. Several different fabrication techniques were investigated using seamed gore designs to form the reflector. Also studied was casting a film into a seamless circular sheet. The goal for this model was to achieve a one milliradian (rms) surface curvature error over 90 percent of the reflector area. This curvature was measured by a laser scanning instrument. The results show how different reflector designs and fabrication techniques contribute to surface curvature and focusing errors.

  13. All-reflective optical target illumination system with high numerical aperture

    DOEpatents

    Sigler, Robert D.

    1978-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for providing illumination of a target focal region at high numerical aperture from a pair of co-axially, confluent collimated light beams. A target cavity is defined by a pair of opposed inner ellipsoidal reflectors having respective first focal points within a target region and second focal points at a vertex opening in the opposing reflector. Outwardly of each inner reflector is the opposed combination of a spherical reflector, and an outer generally ellipsoidal reflector having an aberrated first focal point coincident with the focus of the opposing spherical reflector and a second focal point coincident with the second focal point of the opposing inner ellipsoidal reflector through a vertex opening in the spherical reflector. The confluent collimated beams are incident through vertex openings in the outer ellipsoidal reflectors onto respective opposing spherical reflectors. Each beam is reflected by the associated spherical reflector onto the opposing outer ellipsoidal reflector and focused thereby onto the opposing inner ellipsoidal reflector, and then onto the target region.

  14. Enhancement of strain measurement accuracy using optical extensometer by application of dual-reflector imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Feipeng; Bai, Pengxiang; Shi, Hongjian; Jiang, Zhencheng; Lei, Dong; He, Xiaoyuan

    2016-06-01

    At present, the accuracy of strain measurement using a common optical extensometer with 2D digital image correlation is not sufficient for experimental applications due to the effect of out-of-plane motion. Therefore, this paper proposes a dual-reflector imaging method to improve the accuracy of strain measurement when using a common optical extensometer, with which the front and rear surfaces of a specimen can be simultaneously recorded in the sensor plane of a digital camera. By averaging the strain in two optical extensometers formed on the front and rear surfaces of a specimen, the effect of any slight out-of-plane motion can be eliminated and therefore the strain measurement accuracy can also be improved. Uniaxial tensile tests with an Al-alloy specimen, including static loading and continuous loading, were conducted to validate the feasibility and reliability of the proposed method. The strain measurement results obtained with the proposed method and those obtained with an electrical-resistance strain gauge were found to be in good agreement. The average errors of the proposed method for the two continuous loading tests were found to be 8  ±  10 με and  ‑6  ±  8 με. Given that no correction sheet or compensation specimen is required, the proposed method is easy to implement and thus especially suitable for determining the mechanical properties of brittle materials due to the high level of accuracy with which strain can be measured.

  15. Enhancement of strain measurement accuracy using optical extensometer by application of dual-reflector imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Feipeng; Bai, Pengxiang; Shi, Hongjian; Jiang, Zhencheng; Lei, Dong; He, Xiaoyuan

    2016-06-01

    At present, the accuracy of strain measurement using a common optical extensometer with 2D digital image correlation is not sufficient for experimental applications due to the effect of out-of-plane motion. Therefore, this paper proposes a dual-reflector imaging method to improve the accuracy of strain measurement when using a common optical extensometer, with which the front and rear surfaces of a specimen can be simultaneously recorded in the sensor plane of a digital camera. By averaging the strain in two optical extensometers formed on the front and rear surfaces of a specimen, the effect of any slight out-of-plane motion can be eliminated and therefore the strain measurement accuracy can also be improved. Uniaxial tensile tests with an Al-alloy specimen, including static loading and continuous loading, were conducted to validate the feasibility and reliability of the proposed method. The strain measurement results obtained with the proposed method and those obtained with an electrical-resistance strain gauge were found to be in good agreement. The average errors of the proposed method for the two continuous loading tests were found to be 8  ±  10 μɛ and  -6  ±  8 μɛ. Given that no correction sheet or compensation specimen is required, the proposed method is easy to implement and thus especially suitable for determining the mechanical properties of brittle materials due to the high level of accuracy with which strain can be measured.

  16. Solar central receiver heliostat reflector assembly

    DOEpatents

    Horton, Richard H.; Zdeb, John J.

    1980-01-01

    A heliostat reflector assembly for a solar central receiver system comprises a light-weight, readily assemblable frame which supports a sheet of stretchable reflective material and includes mechanism for selectively applying tension to and positioning the sheet to stretch it to optical flatness. The frame is mounted on and supported by a pipe pedestal assembly that, in turn, is installed in the ground. The frame is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e. central receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The frame may include a built-in system for testing for optical flatness of the reflector. The preferable geometric configuration of the reflector is octagonal; however, it may be other shapes, such as hexagonal, pentagonal or square. Several different embodiments of means for tensioning and positioning the reflector to achieve optical flatness are disclosed. The reflector assembly is based on the stretch frame concept which provides an extremely light-weight, simple, low-cost reflector assembly that may be driven for positioning and tracking by a light-weight, inexpensive drive system.

  17. Single-mode, narrow-linewidth external cavity quantum cascade laser through optical feedback from a partial-reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Cendejas, Richard A.; Phillips, Mark C.; Myers, Tanya L.; Taubman, Matthew S.

    2010-11-30

    An external-cavity (EC) quantum cascade (QC) laser using optical feedback from a partial-reflector is reported. With this configuration, the otherwise multi-mode emission of a Fabry-Perot QC laser was made single-mode with optical output powers exceeding 40 mW. A mode-hop free tuning range of 2.46 cm-1 was achieved by synchronously tuning the EC length and QC laser current. The linewidth of the partial-reflector EC-QC laser was measured for integration times from 100 μs to 4 s, and compared to a distributed feedback QC laser. Linewidths as small as 480 kHz were recorded for the EC-QC laser

  18. Single-mode, narrow-linewidth external cavity quantum cascade laser through optical feedback from a partial-reflector.

    PubMed

    Cendejas, Richard A; Phillips, Mark C; Myers, Tanya L; Taubman, Matthew S

    2010-12-01

    An external-cavity (EC) quantum cascade (QC) laser using optical feedback from a partial-reflector is reported. With this configuration, the otherwise multi-mode emission of a Fabry-Perot QC laser was made single-mode with optical output powers exceeding 40 mW. A mode-hop free tuning range of 2.46 cm(-1) was achieved by synchronously tuning the EC length and QC laser current. The linewidth of the partial-reflector EC-QC laser was measured for integration times from 100 μs to 4 seconds, and compared to a distributed feedback QC laser. Linewidths as small as 480 kHz were recorded for the EC-QC laser.

  19. Optically pumped vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser at 374.9 nm with an electrically conducting n-type distributed Bragg reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuh-Shiuan; Saniul Haq, Abul Fazal Muhammad; Mehta, Karan; Kao, Tsung-Ting; Wang, Shuo; Xie, Hongen; Shen, Shyh-Chiang; Yoder, P. Douglas; Ponce, Fernando A.; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Dupuis, Russell D.

    2016-11-01

    An optically pumped vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with an electrically conducting n-type distributed Bragg reflector was achieved at 374.9 nm. An epitaxially grown 40-pair n-type AlGaN/GaN distributed Bragg reflector was used as the bottom mirror, while the top mirror was formed by a dielectric distributed Bragg reflector composed of seven pairs of HfO2/SiO2. A numerical simulation for the optical mode clearly demonstrated that a high confinement factor was achieved and the threshold pumping power density at room temperature was measured as 1.64 MW/cm2. The achieved optically pumped laser demonstrates the potential of utilizing an n-type distributed Bragg reflector for surface-emitting optical devices.

  20. Cassegrain dual reflector antenna design. [MSAT UHF antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A folded optics reflector system could mitigate problems associated with the pointability and controllability of the large UHF antenna for MSAT. Such a system is comprised of a parabolic main reflector and a hyperboloidal subreflector (Cassegrain arrangement) or an ellipsoidal subreflector (Gregorian arrangement), either of which brings the feed closer to the main reflector. By shaping the subreflector and the main reflector, an improved scan capability might be achieved and the size of the required feed aperture-per-beam could be reduced. In such a shaped dual reflector system, the need for overlapping cluster feed arrangement and its concomitant beam forming network could be removed. In this system, a relatively low gain feed element together with the shaped subreflector would be sufficient to produce the required high illumination taper that at the main reflector.

  1. Optical coating performance for heat reflectors of JWST-ISIM electronic component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Bousquet, Robert; Garrison, Matt; Perrygo, Chuck; Threat, Felix; Rashford, Robert

    2008-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) consists of an infrared-optimized Optical Telescope Element (OTE) that is cooled down to 40 degrees Kelvin. A second adjacent component to the OTE is the Integrated Science Instrument Module, or ISIM. This module includes the electronic compartment, which provides the mounting surfaces and ambient thermally controlled environment for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the 200 watts generated from the ISIM structure away from the OTE is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft's own heat does not interfere with the infrared light detected from distant cosmic sources. This technical challenge is overcome by a thermal subsystem unit that provides passive cooling to the ISIM control electronics. The proposed design of this thermal radiator consists of a lightweight structure made out of composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings. In this paper, we will present characterizations of the coating emittance, bidirectional reflectance, and mechanical structure design that will affect the performance of this passive cooling reflector.

  2. Tailored reflectors for illumination.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, D; Winston, R

    1996-04-01

    We report on tailored reflector design methods that allow the placement of general illumination patterns onto a target plane. The use of a new integral design method based on the edge-ray principle of nonimaging optics gives much more compact reflector shapes by eliminating the need for a gap between the source and the reflector profile. In addition, the reflectivity of the reflector is incorporated as a design parameter. We show the performance of design for constant irradiance on a distant plane, and we show how a leading-edge-ray method may be used to achieve general illumination patterns on nearby targets. PMID:21085288

  3. Large Deployable Reflector Science and Technology Workshop. Volume 3: Systems and Technology Assessment. Conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The physical parameters of the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) required to achieve the anticipated astronomical objectives are reviewed briefly. System parameters and performance requirements for the LDR are enumerated. The LDR was compared with the Cosmic Background Experiment (COBE), the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), and the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Angular resolution and high resolution spectroscopy requirements for LDR were considered.

  4. Large Deployable Reflector Science and Technology Workshop. Volume 3: Systems and Technology Assessment. Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Large Deployable Reflector (LDR), a proposed 20 m diameter telescope designed for infrared and submillimeter astronomical measurements from space, is discussed in terms of scientific purposes, capabilities, current status, and history of development. The LDR systems goals and functional/telescope requirements are enumerated.

  5. 0. 04 Hz relative optical-frequency stability in a 1. 5. mu. m distributed-Bragg-reflector (DBR) laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, O.; Toba, H. ); Tohmori, Y. )

    1989-12-01

    The optical frequency of a 1.5 {mu}m distributed-Bragg-reflector (DBR) laser is stabilized against that of a master laser by heterodyne-type frequency locking with a phase-locked loop (PLL). Despite its wide linewidth of 16 MHz, stable PLL operation with an optical hold-in range of 26 GHz is realized, and residual frequency fluctuations are reduced to 0.04 Hz at an averaging time of 500 s. The combination of DBR laser and PLL is, therefore, suitable for future frequency-controlled light sources. The offset error from the settled frequency caused by the band-limited beat spectrum is also discussed.

  6. VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector): Line-imaging interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hemsing, W.F.; Mathews, A.R.; Warnes, R.H.; Whittemore, G.R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) technique that extends velocity measurements from single points to a line. Single-frequency argon laser light was focused through a cylindrical lens to illuminate a line on a surface. The initially stationary, flat surface was accelerated unevenly during the experiment. Motion produced a Doppler-shift of light reflected from the surface that was proportional to the velocity at each point. The Doppler-shifted image of the illuminated line was focused from the surface through a push-pull VISAR interferometer where the light was split into four quadrature-coded images. When the surface accelerated, the Doppler-shift caused the interference for each point on each line image to oscillate sinusoidally. Coherent fiber optic bundles transmitted images from the interferometer to an electronic streak camera for sweeping in time and recording on film. Data reduction combined the images to yield a continuous velocity and displacement history for all points on the surface that reflected sufficient light. The technique was demonstrated in an experiment where most of the surface was rapidly driven to a saddle shape by an exploding foil. Computer graphics were used to display the measured velocity history and to aid visualization of the surface motion. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Solar receiver heliostat reflector having a linear drive and position information system

    DOEpatents

    Horton, Richard H.

    1980-01-01

    A heliostat for a solar receiver system comprises an improved drive and control system for the heliostat reflector assembly. The heliostat reflector assembly is controllably driven in a predetermined way by a light-weight drive system so as to be angularly adjustable in both elevation and azimuth to track the sun and efficiently continuously reflect the sun's rays to a focal zone, i.e., heat receiver, which forms part of a solar energy utilization system, such as a solar energy fueled electrical power generation system. The improved drive system includes linear stepping motors which comprise low weight, low cost, electronic pulse driven components. One embodiment comprises linear stepping motors controlled by a programmed, electronic microprocessor. Another embodiment comprises a tape driven system controlled by a position control magnetic tape.

  8. Development of a straightness measurement and compensation system with multiple right-angle reflectors and a lead zirconate titanate-based compensation stage

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chien-Hung; Chen, Jui-Hung; Teng, Yun-Feng

    2009-11-15

    This paper presents a real-time straightness measurement and compensation system with an optical straightness measurement system and a single-axis flexure-hinge type lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-based compensation stage. The optical straightness measurement system consists of a He-Ne laser, a quadrant photodiode detector, and five right-angle reflectors. Multiple laser beam reflections between the right-angle reflectors increase the sensitivity of the straightness measurement by a factor of 6. The right-angle reflectors can be moved by the flexure-hinge type PZT-based compensation stage that is actuated by a PZT actuator to ensure that the laser beam is always projected onto the center of the quadrant detector. These two systems are integrated and fixed on a scanning stage. The resolution of the straightness measurement system is 0.1 {mu}m. Using the real-time straightness compensation system, the straightness error of the scanning stage is fed back to the control system. The compensated straightness error of the scanning stage system was reduced from 6.5 {mu}m to less than 1 {mu}m.

  9. Fabrication and optical properties of non-polar III-nitride air-gap distributed Bragg reflector microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Renchun Kako, Satoshi; Arita, Munetaka; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2013-11-11

    Using the thermal decomposition technique, non-polar III-nitride air-gap distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) microcavities (MCs) with a single quantum well have been fabricated. Atomic force microscopy reveals a locally smooth DBR surface, and room-temperature micro-photoluminescence measurements show cavity modes. There are two modes per cavity due to optical birefringence in the non-polar MCs, and a systematic cavity mode shift with cavity thickness was also observed. Although the structures consist of only 3 periods (top) and 4 periods (bottom), a quality factor of 1600 (very close to the theoretical value of 2100) reveals the high quality of the air-gap DBR MCs.

  10. Fiber-optic ultrasonic hydrophone using short Fabry-Perot cavity with multilayer reflectors deposited on small stub.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Su; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2014-04-01

    A fiber-optic probe with dielectric multilayer films deposited on a small stub is studied for mega-hertz ultrasonic-wave detection in water. The small stub with a short Fabry-Perot cavity and distributed reflectors is attached on the fiber end. The structure is mechanically strong and withstands intense ultrasonic pressure. Ultrasonic waves at 1.56MHz are successfully detected in water with a good signal-to-noise ratio. The working principle and the characteristics are studied by comparing the ultrasonic sensitivity with that of a conventional piezoelectric hydrophone. The distance response and directional response are also investigated.

  11. DAZZLE project: UAV to ground communication system using a laser and a modulated retro-reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thueux, Yoann; Avlonitis, Nicholas; Erry, Gavin

    2014-10-01

    The advent of the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) has generated the need for reduced size, weight and power (SWaP) requirements for communications systems with a high data rate, enhanced security and quality of service. This paper presents the current results of the DAZZLE project run by Airbus Group Innovations. The specifications, integration steps and initial performance of a UAV to ground communication system using a laser and a modulated retro-reflector are detailed. The laser operates at the wavelength of 1550nm and at power levels that keep it eye safe. It is directed using a FLIR pan and tilt unit driven by an image processing-based system that tracks the UAV in flight at a range of a few kilometers. The modulated retro-reflector is capable of a data rate of 20Mbps over short distances, using 200mW of electrical power. The communication system was tested at the Pershore Laser Range in July 2014. Video data from a flying Octocopter was successfully transmitted over 1200m. During the next phase of the DAZZLE project, the team will attempt to produce a modulated retro-reflector capable of 1Gbps in partnership with the research institute Acreo1 based in Sweden. A high speed laser beam steering capability based on a Spatial Light Modulator will also be added to the system to improve beam pointing accuracy.

  12. Six-dimensional optical storage utilizing wavelength selective, polarization sensitive, and reflectivity graded Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shangqing

    2014-09-01

    An optical storage system which stores data in three spacial and three physical dimensions is designed and investigated. Its feasibility has been demonstrated by theoretical derivation and numerical calculation. This system has comprehensive advantages including very large capacity, ultrafast throughputs, relatively simple structure and compatibility with CD and DVD. It's an actually practicable technology. With two-photon absorption writing/erasing and optical coherence tomography reading, its storage capacity is over 32 Tbytes per DVD sized disk, and its reading speed is over 25 Gbits/s with high signal-to-noise ratio of over 76 dB. The larger capacity of over 1 Pbyte per disk is potential.

  13. Secondary pattern computation of an offset reflector antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Reflector antennas are widely used in communications satellite systems because they provide high gain at low cost. In analyzing reflector antennas the computation of the secondary pattern is the main concern. A computer program for calculating the secondary pattern of an offset reflector has been developed and implemented at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The theoretical foundation for this program is based on the use of geometrical optics to describe the fields from the feed to the reflector surface and to the aperture plane. The resulting aperture field distribution is then transformed to the far-field zone by the fast Fourier transform algorithm. Comparing this technique with other well-known techniques (the geometrical theory of diffraction, physical optics (Jacobi-Bessel), etc.) shows good agreement for large (diameter of 100 lambda or greater) reflector antennas.

  14. Ring retroreflector system consisting of cube-corner reflectors with special coating

    SciTech Connect

    Burmistrov, V B; Sadovnikov, M A; Sokolov, A L; Shargorodskiy, V D

    2013-09-30

    The ring retroreflector system (RS) consisting of cubecorner reflectors (CCRs) with a special coating of reflecting surfaces, intended for uniaxially Earth-oriented navigation satellites, is considered. The error of distance measurement caused by both the laser pulse delay in the CCR and its spatial position (CCR configuration) is studied. It is shown that the ring RS, formed by the CCR with a double-spot radiation pattern, allows the distance measurement error to be essentially reduced. (nanogradient dielectric coatings and metamaterials)

  15. Physics of elliptical reflectors at large reflection and divergence angles II: Analysis of optical beam distortions in integrated ultra-large-angle elliptical curved reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Z.; Li, X.; Huang, Y.; Ho, S. T.; Member, IEEE

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we study the behavior of elliptical reflectors in nanophotonic integrated circuits in the context of two-dimensional multimode Gaussian beam. We show that the transformation of the beam profile at the input/output waveguide mouths, and the transformation of the beam profile at the reflector can be described in terms of 2D Hermite-Gaussian (HG) beam modes under first order approximation (FOA), referred to as HG-FOA. Due to the wavelength-scale waveguides in nanophotonic integrated circuits, the beams incident on the elliptical reflector have large diffraction angle which will result in asymmetric amplitude distortion upon non-normal reflection even for ideal elliptical reflecting surfaces. The amplitude distortion can be illustrated in the oscillation of the peaks of the reflected beam profiles around the propagation axis of the reflected beam. The amplitude distortion can also be shown by the deterioration in the coupling efficiency from the input waveguide to the output waveguide due to the excitation of higher order HG modes during the reflection. These two observations can both be explained by the HG-FOA method and are verified with Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method. Moreover, we show that the coupling loss from the input waveguide to the output waveguide due to the higher order modes excited can be eliminated via insertion of a second reflector. Two specific arrangement of the second reflector are discussed and verified by the FDTD simulation.

  16. Intervening in Earth's climate system through space-based solar reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, F. J. T.; McInnes, C. R.; Winter, O. C.

    2016-07-01

    Several space-based climate engineering methods, including shading the Earth with a particle ring for active cooling, or the use of orbital reflectors to increase the total insolation of Mars for climate warming have been considered to modify planetary climates in a controller manner. In this study, solar reflectors on polar orbits are proposed to intervene in the Earth's climate system, involving near circular polar orbits normal to the ecliptic plane of the Earth. Similarly, a family of displaced polar orbits (non-Keplerian orbits) are also characterized to mitigate future natural climate variability, producing a modest global temperature increase, again to compensate for possible future cooling. These include deposition of aerosols in the stratosphere from large volcanic events. The two-body problem is considered, taking into account the effects of solar radiation pressure and the Earth's J2 oblateness perturbation.

  17. A figure control sensor for the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartman, R.; Dubovitsky, S.

    1988-01-01

    A sensing and control system is required to maintain high optical figure quality in a segmented reflector. Upon detecting a deviation of the segmented surface from its ideal form, the system drives segment mounted actuators to realign the individual segments and thereby return the surface to its intended figure. When the reflector is in use, a set of figure sensors will determine positions of a number of points on the back surface of each of the reflector's segments, each sensor being assigned to a single point. By measuring the positional deviations of these points from previously established nominal values, the figure sensors provide the control system with the information required to maintain the reflector's optical figure. The optical lever, multiple wavelength interferometer, and electronic capacitive sensor, the most promising technologies for the development of the figure sensor, are illustrated. It is concluded that to select a particular implementation of the figure sensors, performance requirement will be refined and relevant technologies investigated further.

  18. Fabrication and Thermo-Optical Properties of the MLS Composite Primary Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Paul B.; Dyer, Jack; Dummer, Sam

    2000-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) is a limb-sounding radiometer sensing emissions in the millimeter and sub-millimeter range. MLS will contribute to an understanding of atmospheric chemistry by assessing stratospheric and tropospheric ozone depletion, climate forcings and volcanic effects. The heart of the antenna is the primary reflector, constructed from graphite/cyanate composites in a facesheet/core construction. The reflector has an aperture of one square meter, a mass of 8.7 kilos and final figure accuracy of 4.37 microns rms. The surface is also modified to ensure RF reflectivity, prevent solar concentration and provide thermal balance to the spacecraft The surface is prepared by precision beadblasting, then coated with vapor deposited aluminum (VDA) and finally a layer of silicon suboxide (SiO(x)) to control the infrared emissivity. The resulting surface has a solar absorptance of 0.43 and an absorptance/emittance ratio of 1.3. BRDF analysis shows that 93% of the incident thermal energy is reflected outside a 10 degree angle of cone. For its mass and aperture, we believe this reflector to have the highest figure accuracy yet achieved in a composite antenna construction.

  19. Satellite-Tracking Millimeter-Wave Reflector Antenna System For Mobile Satellite-Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Densmore, Arthur C. (Inventor); Jamnejad, Vahraz (Inventor); Woo, Kenneth E. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A miniature dual-band two-way mobile satellite-tracking antenna system mounted on a movable vehicle includes a miniature parabolic reflector dish having an elliptical aperture with major and minor elliptical axes aligned horizontally and vertically, respectively, to maximize azimuthal directionality and minimize elevational directionality to an extent corresponding to expected pitch excursions of the movable ground vehicle. A feed-horn has a back end and an open front end facing the reflector dish and has vertical side walls opening out from the back end to the front end at a lesser horn angle and horizontal top and bottom walls opening out from the back end to the front end at a greater horn angle. An RF circuit couples two different signal bands between the feed-horn and the user. An antenna attitude controller maintains an antenna azimuth direction relative to the satellite by rotating it in azimuth in response to sensed yaw motions of the movable ground vehicle so as to compensate for the yaw motions to within a pointing error angle. The controller sinusoidally dithers the antenna through a small azimuth dither angle greater than the pointing error angle while sensing a signal from the satellite received at the reflector dish, and deduces the pointing angle error from dither-induced fluctuations in the received signal.

  20. A satellite-tracking millimeter-wave reflector antenna system for mobile satellite-tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Densmore, Arthur C. (Inventor); Jamnejad, Vahraz (Inventor); Woo, Kenneth E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A miniature dual-band two-way mobile satellite tracking antenna system mounted on a movable ground vehicle includes a miniature parabolic reflector dish having an elliptical aperture with major and minor elliptical axes aligned horizontally and vertically, respectively, to maximize azimuthal directionality and minimize elevational directionality to an extent corresponding to expected pitch excursions of the movable ground vehicle. A feed-horn has a back end and an open front end facing the reflector dish and has vertical side walls opening out from the back end to the front end at a lesser horn angle and horizontal top and bottom walls opening out from the back end to the front end at a greater horn angle. An RF circuit couples two different signal bands between the feed-horn and the user. An antenna attitude controller maintains an antenna azimuth direction relative to the satellite by rotating it in azimuth in response to sensed yaw motions of the movable ground vehicle so as to compensate for the yaw motions to within a pointing error angle. The controller sinusoidally dithers the antenna through a small azimuth dither angle greater than the pointing error angle while sensing a signal from the satellite received at the reflector dish, and deduces the pointing angle error from dither-induced fluctuations in the received signal.

  1. Optic-electronic system for measuring the three-dimensional angular deformation of pipe sections at large constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konyakhin, Igor; Hoang, Van Phong; Artemenko, Yury; Li, Renpu; Smekhov, Andrey

    2015-05-01

    The improved autocollimation system for measuring three-dimension angular deformations of pipe sections at large constructions as support tube of radio telescope mirror is analyzed. New type of the reflector for autocollimators is researched. The reflector is the trihedral mirror composition of three reflecting sides. It advantage is the measurement pitch, yaw and torsion as three angular rotation of controlled object. The second advantage of reflector is the measurements on the large work distances. Causes are the small value of the conversion coefficient and two orthogonal reference axes of trihedral reflector. The technical characteristics of the experimental setups of new reflector are presented. The features of trihedral reflector as the reflectors for optic-electronic autocollimators are discussed.

  2. The gaze control system: reflector of cognitive activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirevaag, Erik J.; Stern, John A.

    2005-05-01

    A hybrid sustained attention task was developed in order to examine the relationships between manual response times and the timing and morphology of horizontal saccades involved in shifting gaze to a source of task relevant visual information. Twelve subjects performed this task for 60 min with no breaks. Performance and gaze control measures were aggregated across 20 min intervals comprising early, middle and late segments of the task. Response time variability was significantly increased during later task segments (p<0.05). These segments were also associated with increased variability in the amplitude of saccades (p<0.05). Saccade durations during the late task segments were also longer and more variable (p<0.05). Correlations between response times and measure of saccadic activity were also computed across consecutive 5 min intervals for each individual subject. The obtained correlations between saccade latency and response times exceeded 0.70 for six of the twelve subjects. Additional analyses examined the relationship between trials characterized by extreme values on either the performance or the gaze control measures. Trials characterized by extremely long response times were also associated with increased saccade amplitudes, durations and latencies (p<0.01). Conversely, response times were abnormally long on trials categorized as extreme on the basis of the saccade morphology and timing measures (p<0.01). These results confirm the utility of the sustained attention task as a laboratory platform for the development of real-time systems for alertness monitoring. The data also support the contention that measures of gaze control behavior can reflect aspects of cognitive activity and, therefore, should be seriously considered for inclusion in any physiologically-based alertness assessment battery.

  3. Reflector Technology Development and System Design for Concentrating Solar Power Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Schaut Philip Smith

    2011-12-30

    Alcoa began this program in March of 2008 with the goal of developing and validating an advanced CSP trough design to lower the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) as compared to existing glass based, space-frame trough technology. In addition to showing a pathway to a significant LCOE reduction, Alcoa also desired to create US jobs to support the emerging CSP industry. Alcoa's objective during Phase I: Concept Feasibility was to provide the DOE with a design approach that demonstrates significant overall system cost savings without sacrificing performance. Phase I consisted of two major tasks; reflector surface development and system concept development. Two specific reflective surface technologies were investigated, silver metallized lamination, and thin film deposition both applied on an aluminum substrate. Alcoa prepared samples; performed test validation internally; and provided samples to the NREL for full-spectrum reflectivity measurements. The final objective was to report reflectivity at t = 0 and the latest durability results as of the completion of Phase 1. The target criteria for reflectance and durability were as follows: (1) initial (t = 0), hemispherical reflectance >93%, (2) initial spectral reflectance >90% for 25-mrad reading and >87% for 7-mrad reading, and (3) predicted 20 year durability of less than 5% optical performance drop. While the results of the reflective development activities were promising, Alcoa was unable to down-select on a reflective technology that met the target criteria. Given the progress and potential of both silver film and thin film technologies, Alcoa continued reflector surface development activities in Phase II. The Phase I concept development activities began with acquiring baseline CSP system information from both CSP Services and the DOE. This information was used as the basis to develop conceptual designs through ideation sessions. The concepts were evaluated based on estimated cost and high-level structural

  4. New dual-reflector feed system for the Nancay radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granet, Christophe; James, Graeme L.; Pezzani, Jacques

    1997-09-01

    A new compact dual-reflector Gregorian feed system has been designed to improve the overall performance of the Nancay radio telescope. To operate continuously within the 1.0-3.5-GHz band, two wideband compact corrugated horns are used. The new feed system improves the sensitivity of the telescope by a factor between 2 and 3. To verify the theoretical design, a 1/20th-scale model was constructed and tested. The measured results were in excellent agreement with the predicted values.

  5. Lamp system with conditioned water coolant and diffuse reflector of polytetrafluorethylene(PTFE)

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, Luis E.; Hackel, Lloyd

    1999-01-01

    A lamp system with a very soft high-intensity output is provided over a large area by water cooling a long-arc lamp inside a diffuse reflector of polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) and titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) white pigment. The water is kept clean and pure by a one micron particulate filter and an activated charcoal/ultraviolet irradiation system that circulates and de-ionizes and biologically sterilizes the coolant water at all times, even when the long-arc lamp is off.

  6. Adaptation algorithms for satellite communication systems equipped with hybrid reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartsan, I. N.; Zelenkov, P. V.; Tyapkin, V. N.; Dmitriev, D. D.; Goncharov, A. E.

    2015-10-01

    This paper reviews adaptation algorithms influenced by active interferences in satellite communication systems. A multi-beam antenna is suggested as an adaptive system; it is built on the basis of a hybrid reflector antenna with a 19-element array feed element, which incorporates a modified algorithm for radiation pattern synthesis used for suppressing targeted interferences. As a criterion for this synthesis, antenna gains are used at fixed points. As a result, the size of the objective function and time required for the synthesis can be significantly limited.

  7. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alff, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility and costs were determined for a 1 m to 30 m diameter ambient temperature, infrared to submillimeter orbiting astronomical telescope which is to be shuttle-deployed, free-flying, and have a 10 year orbital life. Baseline concepts, constraints on delivery and deployment, and the sunshield required are examined. Reflector concepts, the optical configuration, alignment and pointing, and materials are also discussed. Technology studies show that a 10 m to 30 m diameter system which is background and diffraction limited at 30 micron m is feasible within the stated time frame. A 10 m system is feasible with current mirror technology, while a 30 m system requires technology still in development.

  8. Wavelength selection and spectral narrowing of Distributed Bragg Reflector quantum cascade lasers up to peak optical power.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Arash; Liu, Peter Q; Wang, Xiaojun; Fan, Jenyu; Troccoli, Mariano; Gmachl, Claire F

    2013-12-16

    We investigate the impact of Distributed Bragg Reflectors (DBR), ion-milled directly on top of Fabry-Perot type Quantum Cascade (QC) laser ridges, following fabrication and processing of the devices and observe a more than 10-fold reduction in spectral full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) and a maximum of 20dB side-mode suppression ratio (SMSR), maintained to peak optical power. As predicted by our model, and experimentally verified, there is a "sweet-spot" in terms of grating length, ~200 µm on a 3 mm long laser ridge, and a trade-off between spectral narrowing and output power, set by the grating depth, varied from 1.8 to 2.5 µm.

  9. Measuring preheat in laser-drive aluminum using velocity interferometer system for any reflector: Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Hua; Fu, Sizu; Huang, Xiuguang; Wu, Jiang; Xie, Zhiyong; Zhang, Fan; Ye, Junjian; Jia, Guo; Zhou, Huazhen

    2014-08-15

    In this paper, we systematically study preheating in laser-direct-drive shocks by using a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR). Using the VISAR, we measured free surface velocity histories of Al samples over time, 10–70 μm thick, driven directly by a laser at different frequencies (2ω, 3ω). Analyzing our experimental results, we concluded that the dominant preheating source was X-ray radiation. We also discussed how preheating affected the material initial density and the measurement of Hugoniot data for high-Z materials (such as Au) using impedance matching. To reduce preheating, we proposed and tested three kinds of targets.

  10. Experimental Results of Plasma Induced EMI Effects in a Reflector Antenna System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandinelli, M.; Pandolfo, L.; Sarri, A.; Fittipaldi, D. A.; Pawlak, H.; Marliani, F.

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents measurement results of the electromagnetic interference (EMI) caused by the plasma plume of ion thrusters firing through the RF beam of reflector antennas. The EMI effect consists mainly in the introduction of discrete spurious modulation products on the RF carrier thus degrading spectral purity. The measurements were carried out on a mockup which is geometrically representative of the actual SGEO spacecraft design. The mockup and the acquisition system were specifically designed to allow RF measurements inside a metallic vacuum chamber. Three ion thrusters were characterised during the test campaign: SPT-100, HEMP-T, PPS-1350.

  11. Study of retro reflector array for the polarimeter-interferometer system on EAST Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, T.; Wang, S. X.; Liu, H. Q.; Liu, J.; Jie, Y. X.; Zou, Z. Y.; Li, W. M.; Gao, X.; Qin, H.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we experimentally verify the feasibility of replacing individual retro reflectors (RRs) with retro reflector array (RRA) in EAST POlarimeter/INTerferometer (POINT) system, by considering mode transformation and power wastage. Being exposed to plasma environment directly, RRs have risks of deformation, erosion and deposition. RRA is preferable because it can be installed within a smaller space and provide a gap of several centimeters for the shutter design. This protective structure can reduce the cost of device maintenance and bring down system errors. According to Helmholtz-Kirchhoff integral theorem, the optimized incident diameter for the RRA, constituted by seven hexagonal RR cells, is 40 mm in POINT system. The corresponding bench tests are carried out by measuring the propagation properties of reflected beams by plane RRA for perpendicular incidence and reflected beams by terrace RRA for oblique incidence. The experimental results illustrate that RRA can be satisfactorily applied in POINT system at the optimized incident diameter. In view of the energy wastage caused by plasma film coating, it is found that RRA has more advantages for diagnostics using shorter wavelengths, such as the case in ITER.

  12. MHD compressor---expander conversion system integrated with GCR inside a deployable reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Tuninetti, G. . Research Div.); Botta, E.; Criscuolo, C.; Riscossa, P. . Nuclear Div.); Giammanco, F. . Dipt. di Fisica); Rosa-Clot, M. . Dipt. di Fisica)

    1989-04-20

    This work originates from the proposal MHD Compressor-Expander Conversion System Integrated with a GCR Inside a Deployable Reflector''. The proposal concerned an innovative concept of nuclear, closed-cycle MHD converter for power generation on space-based systems in the multi-megawatt range. The basic element of this converter is the Power Conversion Unit (PCU) consisting of a gas core reactor directly coupled to an MHD expansion channel. Integrated with the PCU, a deployable reflector provides reactivity control. The working fluid could be either uranium hexafluoride or a mixture of uranium hexafluoride and helium, added to enhance the heat transfer properties. The original Statement of Work, which concerned the whole conversion system, was subsequently redirected and focused on the basic mechanisms of neutronics, reactivity control, ionization and electrical conductivity in the PCU. Furthermore, the study was required to be inherently generic such that the study was required to be inherently generic such that the analysis an results can be applied to various nuclear reactor and/or MHD channel designs''.

  13. Fiber optic sensor employing successively destroyed coupled points or reflectors for detecting shock wave speed and damage location

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    1995-01-01

    A shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival "points" constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the "points" of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor.

  14. Fiber optic sensor employing successively destroyed coupled points or reflectors for detecting shock wave speed and damage location

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, J.D.

    1995-08-29

    A shock velocity and damage location sensor providing a means of measuring shock speed and damage location is disclosed. The sensor consists of a long series of time-of-arrival ``points`` constructed with fiber optics. The fiber optic sensor apparatus measures shock velocity as the fiber sensor is progressively crushed as a shock wave proceeds in a direction along the fiber. The light received by a receiving means changes as time-of-arrival points are destroyed as the sensor is disturbed by the shock. The sensor may comprise a transmitting fiber bent into a series of loops and fused to a receiving fiber at various places, time-of-arrival points, along the receiving fibers length. At the ``points`` of contact, where a portion of the light leaves the transmitting fiber and enters the receiving fiber, the loops would be required to allow the light to travel backwards through the receiving fiber toward a receiving means. The sensor may also comprise a single optical fiber wherein the time-of-arrival points are comprised of reflection planes distributed along the fibers length. In this configuration, as the shock front proceeds along the fiber it destroys one reflector after another. The output received by a receiving means from this sensor may be a series of downward steps produced as the shock wave destroys one time-of-arrival point after another, or a nonsequential pattern of steps in the event time-of-arrival points are destroyed at any point along the sensor. 6 figs.

  15. Special test equipment and fixturing for MSAT reflector assembly alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Jeffrey A.; Zinn, Michael R.; Mccarten, David R.

    1994-01-01

    The MSAT Reflector Assembly is a state of the art subsystem for Mobile Satellite (MSAT), a geosynchronous-based commercial mobile telecommunication satellite program serving North America. The Reflector Assembly consisted of a deployable, three-hinge, folding-segment Boom, deployable 5.7 x 5.3-meter 16-rib Wrap-Rib Reflector, and a Reflector Pointing Mechanism (RPM). The MSAT spacecraft was based on a Hughes HS601 spacecraft bus carrying two Reflector Assemblies independently dedicated for L-band transmit and receive operations. Lockheed Missiles and Space Company (LMSC) designed and built the Reflector Assembly for MSAT under contract to SPAR Aerospace Ltd. Two MSAT satellites were built jointly by SPAR Aerospace Ltd. and Hughes Space and Communications Co. for this program, the first scheduled for launch in 1994. When scaled for wavelength, the assembly and alignment requirements for the Reflector Assembly were in many instances equivalent to or exceeded that of a diffraction-limited visible light optical system. Combined with logistical constraints inherent to large, compliant, lightweight structures; 'bolt-on' alignment; and remote, indirect spacecraft access; the technical challenges were formidable. This document describes the alignment methods, the special test equipment, and fixturing for Reflector Assembly assembly and alignment.

  16. Characterisation Of Corner Reflectors For The Australian Geophysical Observing System To Support SAR Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thankappan, Medhavy; Garthwaite, Matthew C.; Williams, Mark L.; Hislop, Andrew; Nancarrow, Shane; Dawson, John

    2013-12-01

    The Australian Government has invested $23 million in building the Australian Geophysical Observing System (AGOS). AGOS will enable highly accurate spatial and temporal estimation of large-scale ground deformation. The key geospatial components of AGOS include Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) instrumentation, high precision GPS monuments, corner reflectors and a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data repository. The corner reflector (CR) array that forms a key piece of AGOS infrastructure will enable the precise measurement of crustal deformation using Interferometric SAR(InSAR) techniques. The CR array will also provide a reliable means to perform independent and ongoing radiometric, geometric and impulse response measurements for the calibration of a number of satellite-borne SAR instruments. A combination of plate sizes and materials have been used in the design and construction of 18 different CR prototypes. Radar Cross Section (RCS) measurements for all CR prototypes was undertaken at the Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) outdoor radar ground range facility to compare theoretical versus actual values for a range of azimuth and elevation combinations and characterise the design performance. The prototypes will be deployed at a field site for testing over a 3-month period. Data captures over the test site will be planned, with satellite-borne X and C-band SAR instruments to assess the response performance of the CR prototypes for calibration activities. The design, construction, RCS measurements, deployment and field performance of the CR is covered in this paper.

  17. Corner reflector SAR interferometry as an element of a landslide early warning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, J.; Riedmann, M.; Lang, O.; Anderssohn, J.; Thuro, K.; Wunderlich, Th.; Heunecke, O.; Minet, Ch.

    2012-04-01

    The development of efficient and cost-effective landslide monitoring techniques is the central aim of the alpEWAS research project (www.alpewas.de). Within the scope of the project a terrestrial geosensor network on a landslide site in the Bavarian Alps has been set up, consisting of low cost GNSS with subcentimeter precision, time domain reflectometry (TDR) and video tacheometry (VTPS). To increase the spatial sampling, 16 low-cost Radar Corner Reflectors (CRs) were installed on the site in 2011. The CRs are to reflect radar signals back to the TerraSAR-X radar satellite, allowing for precise displacement measurements. The subject of this study is the application of the CR SAR Interferometry (CRInSAR) technique, and the integration of the derived motion field into an early warning system for landslide monitoring based on terrestrial measurements. An accurate validation data set is realized independently of the monitoring network using millimeter precision GNSS and tacheometer measurements. The 12 CRs from Astrium Geo-Information Services employed over the test site were specifically designed for TerraSAR-X satellite passes. They are made of concrete with integrated metal plates weighing about 80 to 100 kg. They are of triangular trihedral shape with minimal dimensions to obtain a Radar Cross Section 100 times stronger than that of the surrounding area. The concrete guarantees stability against harsh weather conditions, and robustness with respect to vandalism or theft. In addition, the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) installed another four CRs made entirely out of aluminum, with the TUM reflectors being of similar minimum size than the Astrium reflectors. Three CRs were placed on assumed stable ground outside the slope area and shall act as reference reflectors. Since the installation date of most CRs (25/08/2011), TerraSAR-X HighResolution SpotLight data have been repeatedly acquired from ascending orbit over the test

  18. Welding torch with arc light reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A welding torch arc light reflector is disclosed for welding torches having optical viewing systems. A schematic of a welding torch having an internal coaxial viewing system consisting of a lens which focuses the field of view of the weld scene of the workpiece onto the end of the fiberoptic bundle is provided. The transmitted image of the fiberoptic bundle is provided to a camera lens which focuses it onto a TV sensor array for transmission. To improve the parity of the image of the monitoring system, an arc light reflector is shown fitted to the end of the torch housing or gas cup. The arc light reflector has an internal conical section portion which is polished to serve as a mirror which reflects the bright arc light back onto the darker areas of the weld area and thereby provides a more detailed image for the monitoring system. The novelty of the invention lies in the use of an arc light reflector on welding torches having optical viewing systems.

  19. Estimates of the error caused by atmospheric turbulence in optical determination of the orientation angle of a series of reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valley, M. T.; Dudorov, V. V.; Kolosov, V. V.; Filimonov, G. A.

    2006-11-01

    The error caused by atmospheric turbulence, in determining the orientation angle of an object (a series of reflectors) has been studied. The orientation angle was determined by studying the image of the object. Numerical modeling was performed involving construction of the image of a series of reflectors as if they were observed through a turbulent medium, calculation of the coordinates of reflector mass centers, finding of the line closest to the reflector mass centers, and determination of its slope angle. Variance of the slope angle fluctuations is calculated.

  20. Photonic crystal slab reflectors for compact passive and active optical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutami, S.; Benbakir, B.; Leclercq, J. L.; Letartre, X.; Regreny, P.; Garrigues, M.; Viktorovitch, P.; Le Gratiet, L.; Beaudoin, G.; Sagnes, I.

    2007-02-01

    Compact photonic crystal mirrors (PCM) formed in suspended InP membranes are theoretically and experimentally studied under normal incidence. They are based on the coupling of free space waves with slow Bloch modes of the crystal. These mirrors provide high-efficiency and broadband reflectivity (stop-band superior to 400nm), when involving two slow Bloch modes of the crystal. They allow also for an accurate control of the polarization. These PCMs can be used in new photonic devices, where they replace DBR mirrors. The authors report on the demonstration of a compact and highly selective (Q>1000) tunable filter at 1.55μm, using a Fabry-Perot resonator combining a bottom micromachined 3-pair-InP/air-gap Bragg reflector with a top InP/air PCM. Micromechanical tuning of the device via electrostatic actuation is also demonstrated over a 20nm range for a maximum 4V tuning voltage. The active version of this device is also considered: a PCM-VCSEL is studied, combining a solid 40 quarter wavelength InP/InGaAlAs DBR with a top PCM. First experimental results show a high Q-factor (around 2000) compatible with a laser regime. We finally demonstrate in this paper a vertical-cavity Fabry-Perot filter with ultimate compactness, associating two PCMs.

  1. Advanced reflector materials for solar concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G; Williams, T; Wendelin, T

    1994-10-01

    This paper describes the research and development program at the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in advanced reflector materials for solar concentrators. NREL's research thrust is to develop solar reflector materials that maintain high specular reflectance for extended lifetimes under outdoor service conditions and whose cost is significantly lower than existing products. Much of this work has been in collaboration with private-sector companies that have extensive expertise in vacuum-coating and polymer-film technologies. Significant progress and other promising developments will be discussed. These are expected to lead to additional improvements needed to commercialize solar thermal concentration systems and make them economically attractive to the solar manufacturing industry. To explicitly demonstrate the optical durability of candidate reflector materials in real-world service conditions, a network of instrumented outdoor exposure sites has been activated.

  2. Optically pumped distributed feedback dye lasing with slide-coated TiO₂ inverse-opal slab as Bragg reflector.

    PubMed

    Han, Sung Gu; Lim, Jongchul; Shin, Jinsub; Lee, Sung-Min; Park, Taiho; Yoon, Jongseung; Woo, Kyoungja; Lee, Hyunjung; Lee, Wonmok

    2014-08-15

    We demonstrate an optical amplification of organic dye within a TiO2 inverse-opal (IO) distributed feedback (DFB) reflector prepared by a slide-coating method. Highly reflective TiO2 IO film was fabricated by slide coating the binary aqueous dispersions of polystyrene microspheres and charge-stabilized TiO2 nanoparticles on a glass slide and subsequently removing the polymer-opal template. TiO2 IO film was infiltrated, in turn, with the solutions of DCM, a fluorescent dye in various solvents with different indices of refraction. Optical pumping by frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser resulted in amplified spontaneous emission in each dye solution. In accordance with the semi-empirical simulation by the FDTD method, DCM in ethanol showed the best emission/stopband matching for the TiO2 IO film used in this study. Therefore, photo excitation of a DCM/ethanol cavity showed a single-mode DFB lasing at 640 nm wavelength at moderate pump energy. PMID:25121863

  3. Optically pumped distributed feedback dye lasing with slide-coated TiO₂ inverse-opal slab as Bragg reflector.

    PubMed

    Han, Sung Gu; Lim, Jongchul; Shin, Jinsub; Lee, Sung-Min; Park, Taiho; Yoon, Jongseung; Woo, Kyoungja; Lee, Hyunjung; Lee, Wonmok

    2014-08-15

    We demonstrate an optical amplification of organic dye within a TiO2 inverse-opal (IO) distributed feedback (DFB) reflector prepared by a slide-coating method. Highly reflective TiO2 IO film was fabricated by slide coating the binary aqueous dispersions of polystyrene microspheres and charge-stabilized TiO2 nanoparticles on a glass slide and subsequently removing the polymer-opal template. TiO2 IO film was infiltrated, in turn, with the solutions of DCM, a fluorescent dye in various solvents with different indices of refraction. Optical pumping by frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser resulted in amplified spontaneous emission in each dye solution. In accordance with the semi-empirical simulation by the FDTD method, DCM in ethanol showed the best emission/stopband matching for the TiO2 IO film used in this study. Therefore, photo excitation of a DCM/ethanol cavity showed a single-mode DFB lasing at 640 nm wavelength at moderate pump energy.

  4. Optical Coating Performance and Thermal Structure Design for Heat Reflectors of JWST Electronic Control Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Threat, Felix; Garrison, Matt; Perrygo, Chuck; Bousquet, Robert; Rashford, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) consists of an infrared-optimized Optical Telescope Element (OTE) that is cooled down to 40 degrees Kelvin. A second adjacent component to the OTE is the Integrated Science Instrument Module, or ISIM. This module includes the electronic compartment, which provides the mounting surfaces and ambient thermally controlled environment for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the 200 watts generated from the ISIM structure away from the OTE is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft's own heat does not interfere with the infrared light detected from distant cosmic sources. This technical challenge is overcome by a thermal subsystem unit that provides passive cooling to the ISIM control electronics. The proposed design of this thermal radiator consists of a lightweight structure made out of composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings. In this paper, we will present characterizations of the coating emittance, bidirectional reflectance, and mechanical structure design that will affect the performance of this passive cooling system.

  5. An analysis of thermionic space nuclear reactor power system: I. Effect of disassembling radial reflector, following a reactivity initiated accident

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.S.; Paramonov, D. )

    1993-01-10

    An analysis is performed to determine the effect of disassembling the radial reflector of the TOPAZ-II reactor, following a hypothetical severe Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA). Such an RIA is assumed to occur during the system start-up in orbit due to a malfunction of the drive mechanism of the control drums, causing the drums to rotate the full 180[degree] outward at their maximum speed of 1.4[degree]/s. Results indicate that disassembling only three of twelve radial reflector panels would successfully shutdown the reactor, with little overheating of the fuel and the moderator.

  6. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  7. Disordered animal multilayer reflectors and the localization of light

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, T. M.; Partridge, J. C.; Roberts, N. W.

    2014-01-01

    Multilayer optical reflectors constructed from ‘stacks’ of alternating layers of high and low refractive index dielectric materials are present in many animals. For example, stacks of guanine crystals with cytoplasm gaps occur within the skin and scales of fish, and stacks of protein platelets with cytoplasm gaps occur within the iridophores of cephalopods. Common to all these animal multilayer reflectors are different degrees of random variation in the thicknesses of the individual layers in the stack, ranging from highly periodic structures to strongly disordered systems. However, previous discussions of the optical effects of such thickness disorder have been made without quantitative reference to the propagation of light within the reflector. Here, we demonstrate that Anderson localization provides a general theoretical framework to explain the common coherent interference and optical properties of these biological reflectors. Firstly, we illustrate how the localization length enables the spectral properties of the reflections from more weakly disordered ‘coloured’ and more strongly disordered ‘silvery’ reflectors to be explained by the same physical process. Secondly, we show how the polarization properties of reflection can be controlled within guanine–cytoplasm reflectors, with an interplay of birefringence and thickness disorder explaining the origin of broadband polarization-insensitive reflectivity. PMID:25339688

  8. Active optical zoom system

    DOEpatents

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  9. Double-tailored nonimaging reflector optics for maximum-performance solar concentration.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Alex; Gordon, Jeffrey M

    2010-09-01

    A nonimaging strategy that tailors two mirror contours for concentration near the étendue limit is explored, prompted by solar applications where a sizable gap between the optic and absorber is required. Subtle limitations of this simultaneous multiple surface method approach are derived, rooted in the manner in which phase space boundaries can be tailored according to the edge-ray principle. The fundamental categories of double-tailored reflective optics are identified, only a minority of which can pragmatically offer maximum concentration at high collection efficiency. Illustrative examples confirm that acceptance half-angles as large as 30 mrad can be realized at a flux concentration of approximately 1000. PMID:20808405

  10. 16 CFR 1512.16 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... vehicle headlamps. The use of reflector combinations off the center plane of the bicycle (defined in...) Front reflector. The reflector or mount shall not contact the ground plane when the bicycle is resting on that plane in any orientation. The optical axis of the reflector shall be directed forward...

  11. Design of an optical element forming an axial line segment for efficient LED lighting systems.

    PubMed

    Aslanov, Emil R; Doskolovich, Leonid L; Moiseev, Mikhail A; Bezus, Evgeni A; Kazanskiy, Nikolay L

    2013-11-18

    An LED optical element is proposed as an alternative to cold-cathode fluorescent lamps. The optical element generates two symmetric uniformly illuminated line segments on the diffuse reflector. The illuminated segments then act as secondary linear light sources. The calculation of the optical element is reduced to the integration of the system of two explicit ordinary differential equations. The results of the simulation of an illumination system module consisting of a set of optical elements generating a set of line segments on the surface of the diffuse reflector are presented. The elements are located directly on the surface of the reflector. The simulation results demonstrate the uniform illumination of a rectangular area at a distance of 30-40 mm from the light source plane. The lighting efficiency of the designed system exceeds 83%. PMID:24514376

  12. Electromagnetic backscattering by corner reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, C. A.; Griesser, T.

    1986-01-01

    The Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD), which supplements Geometric Optics (GO), and the Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD), which supplements Physical Optics (PO), are used to predict the backscatter cross sections of dihedral corner reflectors which have right, obtuse, or acute included angles. These theories allow individual backscattering mechanisms of the dihedral corner reflectors to be identified and provide good agreement with experimental results in the azimuthal plane. The advantages and disadvantages of the geometrical and physical theories are discussed in terms of their accuracy, usefulness, and complexity. Numerous comparisons of analytical results with experimental data are presented. While physical optics alone is more accurate and more useful than geometrical optics alone, the combination of geometrical optics and geometrical diffraction seems to out perform physical optics and physical diffraction when compared with experimental data, especially for acute angle dihedral corner reflectors.

  13. Research on reverse association mechanism of the thermal control performance of conducting optical solar reflector and its antistatic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tianhai; Wu, Shuling; Xing, Zheng; Wei, Xiaoqun

    2014-12-01

    As we know, optical solar reflector (OSR) is used as the thermal control element for communications satellites and other spacecraft. The solar absorption, infrared emissivity and their ratio of OSR, are considered as the main standard of its thermal control performance. OSR is divided into conducting OSR and non-conducting OSR. When using the indium tin oxide (ITO) film coated on the surface of conducting OSR's glass substrate, ITO film will improve OSR's solar absorption rate and reduce the infrared emissivity. That means the thermal control performance will be declined. The paper is aimed to revealing the reverse association mechanism between the thermal control performance of conducting OSR used for spacecraft and the antistatic properties of ITO film. First, we combined the Drude theory with the Thermal radiation theorem to analyze how the antistatic parameters of ITO film impact the solar absorption and the infrared emissivity of OSR. Then,based on the theoretic analysis of main antistatic parameters of ITO, including the surface square resistance, secondary electron emission characteristic, solar absorption rate, infrared emissivity and other optical and electrical parameters. It illustrated that those factors have a strong reverse connection with the thermal control parameters of OSR, and influenced the solar absorption, infrared emissivity and their ratio of OSR. Comparison of the predicted and experimental results demonstrate that when reducing the surface square resistance of the ITO film, the antistatic properties was declined, and increased the value of the OSR solar absorption. On the contrary, reducing the infrared emissivity, It would result in the degradation of OSR's thermal control performance. The study has performed that the reverse association mechanism of conducting OSR can't be ignored. And apparently it shows that if we want to keep its application in the spacecraft thermal control environment and antistatic properties long-term stable, the

  14. 16 CFR 1512.16 - Requirements for reflectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... on that plane in any orientation. The optical axis of the reflector shall be directed forward within..., preferred assembly method that shall insure that the reflector meets the optical requirements of this... seat post. The optical axis of the reflector shall be directed rearward within 5° of the...

  15. Development of a dual-reflector feed for the Arecibo radio telescope - An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kildal, P.-S.; Baker, L.; Hagfors, T.

    1991-10-01

    The 305-m spherical-reflector antenna of the Arecibo Observatory will be equipped with a dual-reflector feed. This reflector system is often referred to as the Gregorian. An overview of the work that led to this design is given, and the basic ideas behind the design are described. The methods and algorithms that have been developed to synthesize the shapes of the two reflectors and to analyze them are reviewed. Results are given of analysis by forward ray tracing, using geometrical optics with edge-diffraction corrections included. At low frequencies, analysis is performed by physical optics (PO) integration. A 'mini-Gregorian' that has been constructed, built, and tested to verify the dual-reflector feed concept is described.

  16. Development of the Maypole (Hoop/Column) deployable reflector concept for large space systems applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D. C.; Sikes, L. D.

    1980-01-01

    The conceptual design, performance projections, and materials development for the maypole (hoop/column) reflector concept are summarized. Factors influencing configuration choices are discussed along with quad aperture/feed characteristics and antenna requirements based on missions.

  17. Solar passive ceiling system. Final report. [Passive solar heating system with venetian blind reflectors and latent heat storage in ceiling

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    The construction of a 1200 square foot building, with full basement, built to be used as a branch library in a rural area is described. The primary heating source is a passive solar system consisting of a south facing window system. The system consists of: a set of windows located in the south facing wall only, composed of double glazed units; a set of reflectors mounted in each window which reflects sunlight up to the ceiling (the reflectors are similar to venetian blinds); a storage area in the ceiling which absorbs the heat from the reflected sunlight and stores it in foil salt pouches laid in the ceiling; and an automated curtain which automatically covers and uncovers the south facing window system. The system is totally passive and uses no blowers, pumps or other active types of heat distribution equipment. The building contains a basement which is normally not heated, and the north facing wall is bermed four feet high around the north side.

  18. Optical Solar Reflector - A stable, low alpha(s)/epsilon(IR), electrically conducting thermal control surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanisamy, R.; Bhojaraj, H.; Nagendra, C. L.; Thutupalli, G. K. M.

    1991-08-01

    Experimental studies related to the development of a stable, low alpha(s)/epsilon(IR) thermal control surface have been carried out for space applications. Systematic studies have been performed to overcome inherent problem of poor adhesion and environmental degradation of silver. The influence of the deposition parameters and post annealing temperatures on the electrical and optical properties of Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) film (used as transparent conductive coating) has been investigated. The test results indicate excellent stability of the coatings with adhesion and abrasion tests in accordance with military standards and also against prolonged exposure to humidity, thermal cycling, and thermo vacuum hot and cold soak tests. In addition, a summary of laboratory simulated exposure to ultraviolet, electron and proton irradiation are presented.

  19. Conical-reflector antennas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, A. C.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical advantages of a singly curved conical reflector are demonstrated by the experimental test of a furlable 1.83 m conical-Gregorian antenna at 16.33 GHz. The measured gain of 47.5 dB corresponds to a net efficiency of over 57%. A ray-optics analysis of conical-reflector antennas is presented, and data useful in the design of conical antennas are given. The conical-Gregorian antenna, in which a subreflector is used in conjunction with a conventional horn feed, is considered in detail. A physical-optics analysis of the conical-Gregorian antenna is used to investigate diffraction and other effects, and to analytically confirm the high performance of the antenna.

  20. Arc Reflector For Welding Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.

    1990-01-01

    Arc-light reflector for through-the-torch welding vision system designed expressly for use in welding ducts of small diameter. Cylindrical reflector positioned to reflect light diffusely from welding arc onto nearby surface of workpiece for most advantageous viewing along axis of welding torch.

  1. Single-crystal silicon beams formed by merged epitaxial lateral overgrowth (MELO) for optical reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neudeck, Gerold W.; Kabir, Abul E.

    1995-05-01

    Single crystalline silicon has very well known and predictable mechanical, optical, and electrical properties and is easily manufactured with consistent results. It is also integrated circuit compatible and leads to incorporation of circuits and high quality piezoresistors which are available to monitor motion for self-testing. We present for the first time a novel surface micro-machining process using merged epitaxial lateral overgrowth (MELO) silicon to demonstrate the fabrication of single crystal silicon, free standing cantilever beams 1 mm long and 5 micrometers X 10 micrometers in cross section. These beams had no evidence of stress related bending and were free from the substrate, returning to its original position after numerous electrostatic deflections. MELO has also shown great potential for advanced BJT and MOSFET device applications, hence active devices can be incorporated into the deflecting beam arrays. Diodes fabricated in the beams show excellent characteristics with average ideality factors of 1.01. Note that the technology permits adding of single crystal silicon to selected areas, hence it is an additive process as compared to traditional subtractive methods that deposit films over the entire wafer.

  2. Influence of simulated space environment on the performance of optical solar reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bingsen; Qiu, Jiawen; Wang, Bin; Chang, Tianhai

    1990-08-01

    The inf1ere of simulated space environment on the prcpert ies of the satel 1 i te temperature-control coat ing --- Optical Sol ar Ref1etor (OSR) is discussed. I kinds of CSR sample are tested in the simu1at1 space environment . The simulat ion i tens include vacuum US? irradi at on, electron and proton i rradiat ion . The surface charge/discharge test is carried out tcx . After the ecron, proton and UV accelerat ive irradiat ion of total dosage equivalent to 7 years at the south or north pale of geosyixthrcrx,us satellite, the solar aI:sorptaire increases from 0 .068 to 0 . 078 for cczxkt ive C , and from 0 . 066 to 0 . 085 for ncn-oonduct ive OSR; the normal ni ttance decreases from 0 .83 to 0.72 for conditive OSR, and from 0.82 to 0.76 for non-conductive OSR. Also, it is shown from the charge/discharge test that the surface charge potential is only I5--40 V for conduct ive CSR, and about 1 --1 0 Ky for non-conduct ive CSR.

  3. K- and Ka-band mobile-vehicular satellite-tracking reflector antenna system for the NASA ACTS mobile terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Densmore, Art; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Wu, T. K.; Woo, Ken

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the K- and Ka-band mobile-vehicular satellite-tracking reflector antenna system for NASA's ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) project. ACTS is NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellites. The AMT project will make the first experimental use of ACTS soon after the satellite is operational, to demonstrate mobile communications via the satellite from a van on the road. The AMT antenna system consists of a mechanically steered small reflector antenna, using a shared aperture for both frequency bands and fitting under a radome of 23 cm diameter and 10 cm height, and a microprocessor controlled antenna controller that tracks the satellite as the vehicle moves about. The RF and mechanical characteristics of the antenna and the antenna tracking control system are discussed. Measurements of the antenna performance are presented.

  4. Surface Accuracy Measurement Sensor for Deployable Reflector Antennas (SAMS DRA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neiswander, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Specifications, system configurations, and concept tests for surface measurement sensors for deployable reflector antennas are presented. Two approaches toward the optical measurement of remote target displacements are discussed: optical ranging, in which the basic measurement is target-to-sensor range; and in particular, optical angular sensing, in which the principle measurements are of target angular displacements lateral to the line of sight. Four representative space antennas are examined.

  5. Compact triple coupled quantum well system for electrical/optical control of optical bi/multistability.

    PubMed

    Sattari, Hamed; Sahrai, Mostafa; Ebadollahi-Bakhtevar, Solmaz

    2015-03-20

    Optical bistability (OB) and optical multistability (OM) are investigated in a triple coupled quantum wells system inside a semiconductor cavity sandwiched by distributed Bragg reflector mirrors. By proper manipulation of the optical and electrical parameters, the behaviors of OB and OM can be efficiently controlled. We show that, by tuning the tunneling rates between the quantum wells, the threshold and hysteresis cycle of OB and OM can be engineered. The effect of the incoherent pump field as well as the cooperation parameter on creation of OB is also discussed. PMID:25968535

  6. Performance improvements of symmetry-breaking reflector structures in nonimaging devices

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    2004-01-13

    A structure and method for providing a broken symmetry reflector structure for a solar concentrator device. The component of the optical direction vector along the symmetry axis is conserved for all rays propagated through a translationally symmetric optical device. This quantity, referred to as the translational skew invariant, is conserved in rotationally symmetric optical systems. Performance limits for translationally symmetric nonimaging optical devices are derived from the distributions of the translational skew invariant for the optical source and for the target to which flux is to be transferred. A numerically optimized non-tracking solar concentrator utilizing symmetry-breaking reflector structures can overcome the performance limits associated with translational symmetry.

  7. Design of an offset fed scanning antenna for the shuttle imaging microwave system. [performance prediction parabolic reflectors and microwave antennas for space shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustincic, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    A design study is described for a mechanically scanned offset fed parabolic torus reflector antenna having a 4m x 2m aperture for simultaneous use at eleven frequency channels from UHF to millimeter wavelengths. A design for the antenna is presented utilizing dipole and horn feeds at the low frequencies and a Gregorian aberration correcting subreflector system for feeding the torus at the high frequencies. The results and details of a theroetical study based on geometrical optics performed to evaluate the high frequency design and the results of an experimental study involving a one-tenth scale model for evaluation of the low-frequency behavior are given. Beam efficiencies, antenna patterns, beamwidths and cross polarization levels are presented and these results demonstrate that the antenna concept is viable for the Shuttle Imaging Microwave System requirement.

  8. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  9. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  10. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  11. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  12. 46 CFR 169.726 - Radar reflector.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Radar reflector. 169.726 Section 169.726 Shipping COAST... Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment § 169.726 Radar reflector. Each nonmetallic vessel less than 90 feet in length must exhibit a radar reflector of suitable size and design while underway. Markings...

  13. Hohlraum glint and laser pre-pulse detector for NIF experiments using velocity interferometer system for any reflector.

    PubMed

    Moody, J D; Clancy, T J; Frieders, G; Celliers, P M; Ralph, J; Turnbull, D P

    2014-11-01

    Laser pre-pulse and early-time laser reflection from the hohlraum wall onto the capsule (termed "glint") can cause capsule imprint and unwanted early-time shocks on indirect drive implosion experiments. In a minor modification to the existing velocity interferometer system for any reflector diagnostic on NIF a fast-response vacuum photodiode was added to detect this light. The measurements show evidence of laser pre-pulse and possible light reflection off the hohlraum wall and onto the capsule.

  14. Research of the application of low-precision large aperture nonimaging optics in free-space optical communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jia; Yu, Xin

    2008-03-01

    A novel receiving antenna using low precision large aperture nonimaging optical apparatus in free-space optical (FSO) communication system has been proposed. The receiving optical antenna of FSO communication system is usually a conventional imaging optical system such as Newton system, Green system or Cassegrain system. It is ineffective to use a large aperture receiving antenna in FSO communication system because the precision imaging optical apparatus will be very expensive with aperture increase, so that, in order to reduce the difficulty of pointing and tracking between transmitter and receiver, the beam divergence has to be increased with the cost of lost part of the transmitted power. Since in the field of FSO communication system, the receiving optical antenna is used not to image but to concentrate optical signal as much as possible, the novel concept of using low precision large aperture nonimaging optical apparatus as receiving optical antenna to replace the conventional imaging optical system was proposed. Several nonimaging apparatus including spherical reflector, elliptical reflector, compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) and conical barrel concentrator are analyzed by ray tracing. Their gain and the transmission rate limitation due to wave-front aberrations are discussed, and their merit used in FSO communication system has been proved.

  15. Design of optical system for collimating the light of an LED uniformly.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Zhang, Xiaohui

    2014-05-01

    A type of optical system consisting of one total internal reflection (TIR) lens and two reflectors is designed for collimating the light of an LED to a uniform pattern. Application of this kind of optical system includes underwater light communication and an underwater image system. The TIR lens collimates all the light of the LED to a nonuniform plane wavefront. The double-reflector system redistributes the plane wavefront uniformly and collimates again. Three optical systems that produce a different radius of the output light patterns are designed. The simulation result shows that the uniformity of the designed optical system is greater than 0.76, and the total output efficiency (TOE) is greater than 89%. At the same time, we conclude that the radius of the output reflector should not be smaller than that of the input reflector in order to keep high uniformity and TOE. One of the designed optical systems is fabricated by computer numeric control, and the experiment results satisfy that goal. PMID:24979645

  16. State-of-the-art low-cost solar reflector materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C; Jorgensen, G

    1994-11-01

    Solar thermal technologies generate power by concentrating sunlight with large mirrors. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is working with industrial partners to develop the optical reflector materials needed for the successful deployment of this technology. The reflector materials must be low in cost and maintain high specular reflectance for extended lifetimes in severe outdoor environments. Currently, the best candidate materials for solar mirrors are silver-coated low-iron glass and silvered polymer films. Polymer reflectors are lighter in weight, offer greater flexibility in system design, and have the potential for lower cost than glass mirrors. In parallel with collaborative activities, several innovative candidate reflector-material constructions were investigated at NREL. The low-cost material requirement necessitates manufacturing compatible with mass-production techniques. Future cooperative efforts with the web-coating industry offers the promise of exciting new alternative materials and the potential for dramatic cost savings in developing advanced solar reflector materials.

  17. Highly Accurate Photogrammetric Measurements of the Planck Reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri Parian, J.; Gruen, Armin; Cozzani, Alessandro

    2006-06-01

    The Planck mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) is designed to image the anisotropies of the Cosmic Background Radiation Field over the whole sky. To achieve this aim, sophisticated reflectors are used as part of the Planck telescope receiving system. The system consists of secondary and primary reflectors which are sections of two different ellipsoids of revolution with mean diameters of 1 and 1.6 meters. Deformations of the reflectors which influence the optical parameters and the gain of receiving signals are investigated in vacuum and at very low temperatures. For this investigation, among the various high accuracy measurement techniques, photogrammetry was selected. With respect to the photogrammetric measurements, special considerations had to be taken into account in design steps, measurement arrangement and data processing to achieve very high accuracies. The determinability of additional parameters of the camera under the given network configuration, datum definition, reliability and precision issues as well as workspace limits and propagating errors from different sources are considered. We have designed an optimal photogrammetric network by heuristic simulation for the flight model of the primary and the secondary reflectors with relative precisions better than 1:1000000 and 1:400000 to achieve the requested accuracies. A least squares best fit ellipsoid method was developed to determine the optical parameters of the reflectors. In this paper we will report about the procedures, the network design and the results of real measurements.

  18. Analysis of bonding stress with high strength adhesive between the reflector and the mounts in space camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Hu, Yongming; Li, Yingcai; Qu, Youshan; Ding, Jiaoteng

    2010-05-01

    The bond stress is analyzed when the optics were attached to their mounts with high strength adhesive in space camera. The model was founded that a circular planar reflector supported by one, three, six or twelve adhesive points, which evenly distributed on different circles. The surface deformation of reflector is mainly caused by the shrinkage after solidity. The functional relation was deduced between the bonding force of the reflector and the characteristic dimension of the adhesive spot using piecewise function, and then analyzing the RMS error of no gravity assuming that the adhesive spot is fixed connect to the reflector using Nastran. The analytical RMS error was the aberration which added by solidification of adhesive. The calculation result is in good agreement with the experiment results. This analyzing method will be useful for the microstress clamping of high performance reflector system for application in space optical systems.

  19. Increasing the operating distance of a phase-shift laser range-finding system by using an active reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Pengcheng; Yu, Liang; Mei, Jianting; Tan, Jiubin

    2015-12-01

    A new phase-shift laser ranging method is developed by combining the conventional phase-shift ranging and the concept of transponder, in which the passive mirror in a phase-shift laser range-finding system is replaced with an active reflector whose light source power is the same as that at the measurement terminal. As a result, the power of the returned light is inversely proportional to the 2nd instead of the 4th power of the distance being measured. Section 3 indicate that by using the active reflector, the operating distance is dramatically increased without increasing the laser power or lens aperture. With a transmitted power of 20 mW and an aperture of 100 mm, the operating distance increased from 1.5 km to 9.4 km, and a 15-fold range gain can be forecasted for a transmitted power of 1 W. This strongly confirms the suitability of the developed phase-shift method with an active reflector for measuring longer distances.

  20. Modular reflector concept study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of space erecting a 100 meter paraboloidal radio frequency reflector by joining a number of individually deployed structural modules. Three module design concepts were considered: (1) the deployable cell module (DCM); (2) the modular paraboloidal erectable truss antenna (Mod-PETA); and (3) the modular erectable truss antenna (META). With the space shuttle (STS) as the launch system, the methodology of packaging and stowing in the orbiter, and of dispensing, deploying and joining, in orbit, were studied and the necessary support equipment identified. The structural performance of the completed reflectors was evaluated and their overall operational capability and feasibility were evaluated and compared. The potential of the three concepts to maintain stable shape in the space environment was determined. Their ability to operate at radio frequencies of 1 GHz and higher was assessed assuming the reflector surface to consist of a number of flat, hexagonal facets. A parametric study was performed to determine figure degradation as a function of reflector size, flat facet size, and f/D ratio.

  1. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, Roland L.; Cannon, Theodore W.

    1988-01-01

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

  2. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOEpatents

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

  3. Wavefront Correction for Large, Flexible Antenna Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, William A.; Jammejad, Vahraz; Rajagopalan, Harish; Xu, Shenheng

    2010-01-01

    A wavefront-correction system has been proposed as part of an outer-space radio communication system that would include a large, somewhat flexible main reflector antenna, a smaller subreflector antenna, and a small array feed at the focal plane of these two reflector antennas. Part of the wavefront-correction system would reside in the subreflector, which would be a planar patch-element reflectarray antenna in which the phase shifts of the patch antenna elements would be controlled via microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) radio -frequency (RF) switches. The system would include the following sensing-and-computing subsystems: a) An optical photogrammetric subsystem built around two cameras would estimate geometric distortions of the main reflector; b) A second subsystem would estimate wavefront distortions from amplitudes and phases of signals received by the array feed elements; and c) A third subsystem, built around small probes on the subreflector plane, would estimate wavefront distortions from differences among phases of signals received by the probes. The distortion estimates from the three subsystems would be processed to generate control signals to be fed to the MEMS RF switches to correct for the distortions, thereby enabling collimation and aiming of the received or transmitted radio beam to the required precision.

  4. Grating-assisted glass waveguide devices and fiber-optic parametric amplifiers for optical communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaeyoun

    The theory, design, and implementation of several photonics devices for the generation, amplification, and processing of optical signals in optical communication systems are described. A cascaded fiber-optic parametric amplifier based on a quasi-phase matching technique is implemented. This cascaded implementation is the first explicit application of quasi-phase matching techniques to a fiber-optic parametric amplifier and results in a 12 dB gain enhancement using a 3-stage structure. For the generation and the wavelength-sensitive processing of optical signals, distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) waveguide devices are fabricated in un-doped and Er/Yb co-doped glass substrates using Ag+ and K+ ion-exchange, respectively. Wavelength-selective operation is realized by implementing the DBRs using a high refractive index overlay technique. This technique allows DBR fabrication on substrates with hard-to-etch surfaces and can produce very short, high efficiency reflectors by utilizing the enhanced interactions between the waveguide and the high index overlay DBR. The development of methods for overlay/waveguide design, thin-film characterization, and optimum thickness deposition are reported. Using this technique, an Er/Yb co-doped glass waveguide DBR laser with a 30 mW lasing threshold and a 8.5% slope efficiency is demonstrated. An optical add-drop multiplexer with a 24 dB transmission dip and a 0.5 nm wide 3 dB bandwidth is also designed and fabricated based on the same technique.

  5. Direct broadcast satellite receiver system with optical distribution network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemery, S. M.; Daryoush, A. S.; Herczfeld, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    With recent developments in fiber optic communications and optical distribution networks, short haul optical communications becomes an economical alternative to conventional cable TV systems. This paper presents a system design for a direct broadcast satellite receiver system with a fiber optic distribution network based on the reception of Ku-band signals from ANIK C2, a Canadian direct broadcast satellite. Such a system is proposed for the first time and can address small communities in remote areas. Theoretical power budget calculations predict that 37 subscribers can access 128 television channels using a 3 ft reflector dish antenna. To implement such a design, a number of components that are not commercially available are custom designed.

  6. Stereoscopic optical viewing system

    DOEpatents

    Tallman, Clifford S.

    1987-01-01

    An improved optical system which provides the operator a stereoscopic viewing field and depth of vision, particularly suitable for use in various machines such as electron or laser beam welding and drilling machines. The system features two separate but independently controlled optical viewing assemblies from the eyepiece to a spot directly above the working surface. Each optical assembly comprises a combination of eye pieces, turning prisms, telephoto lenses for providing magnification, achromatic imaging relay lenses and final stage pentagonal turning prisms. Adjustment for variations in distance from the turning prisms to the workpiece, necessitated by varying part sizes and configurations and by the operator's visual accuity, is provided separately for each optical assembly by means of separate manual controls at the operator console or within easy reach of the operator.

  7. Stereoscopic optical viewing system

    DOEpatents

    Tallman, C.S.

    1986-05-02

    An improved optical system which provides the operator with a stereoscopic viewing field and depth of vision, particularly suitable for use in various machines such as electron or laser beam welding and drilling machines. The system features two separate but independently controlled optical viewing assemblies from the eyepiece to a spot directly above the working surface. Each optical assembly comprises a combination of eye pieces, turning prisms, telephoto lenses for providing magnification, achromatic imaging relay lenses and final stage pentagonal turning prisms. Adjustment for variations in distance from the turning prisms to the workpiece, necessitated by varying part sizes and configurations and by the operator's visual accuity, is provided separately for each optical assembly by means of separate manual controls at the operator console or within easy reach of the operator.

  8. Pyramidal-Reflector Solar Heater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Motor-driven reflector compensates for seasonal changes in Sun's altitude. System has flat-plate absorbers mounted on north side of attic interior. Skylight window on south-facing roof admits Sunlight into attic, lined with mirrors that reflect light to absorbers. Reflectors are inner surfaces of a pyramid lying on its side with window at its base and absorber plates in a cross-sectional plane near its apex.

  9. Reflectors for SAR performance testing.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) performance testing and estimation is facilitated by observing the system response to known target scene elements. Trihedral corner reflectors and other canonical targets play an important role because their Radar Cross Section (RCS) can be calculated analytically. However, reflector orientation and the proximity of the ground and mounting structures can significantly impact the accuracy and precision with which measurements can be made. These issues are examined in this report.

  10. Modular optical detector system

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Brent A.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2006-02-14

    A modular optical detector system. The detector system is designed to detect the presence of molecules or molecular species by inducing fluorescence with exciting radiation and detecting the emitted fluorescence. Because the system is capable of accurately detecting and measuring picomolar concentrations it is ideally suited for use with microchemical analysis systems generally and capillary chromatographic systems in particular. By employing a modular design, the detector system provides both the ability to replace various elements of the detector system without requiring extensive realignment or recalibration of the components as well as minimal user interaction with the system. In addition, the modular concept provides for the use and addition of a wide variety of components, including optical elements (lenses and filters), light sources, and detection means, to fit particular needs.

  11. Fiber optic multiplex optical transmission system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, C. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A multiplex optical transmission system which minimizes external interference while simultaneously receiving and transmitting video, digital data, and audio signals is described. Signals are received into subgroup mixers for blocking into respective frequency ranges. The outputs of these mixers are in turn fed to a master mixer which produces a composite electrical signal. An optical transmitter connected to the master mixer converts the composite signal into an optical signal and transmits it over a fiber optic cable to an optical receiver which receives the signal and converts it back to a composite electrical signal. A de-multiplexer is coupled to the output of the receiver for separating the composite signal back into composite video, digital data, and audio signals. A programmable optic patch board is interposed in the fiber optic cables for selectively connecting the optical signals to various receivers and transmitters.

  12. Thermal state of the safety system, reactor, side reflector and shielding of the {open_quote}{open_quote}TOPAZ-2{close_quote}{close_quote} system under conditions of fire caused by a launcher accident at the launch pad

    SciTech Connect

    Grinberg, E.I.; Doschatov, V.V.; Nikolaev, V.S.; Sokolov, N.S.; Usov, V.A.

    1996-03-01

    The paper presents some results of calculational analyses performed to determine thermal state of the TOPAZ II safety system structure, radiation shielding, reactor without the side reflector, rods and inserts of the side reflector under conditions of fire at the launch pad when an accident occurs to a launch vehicle. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Optical Complex Systems 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Guillaume

    The Optical Complex Systems are more and more in the heart of various systems that industrial applications bring to everyday life. From environment up to spatial applications, OCS is also relevant in monitoring, transportation, robotics, life sciences, sub-marine, and even for agricultural purposes.

  14. Optical parallel selectionist systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, H. John

    1993-01-01

    There are at least two major classes of computers in nature and technology: connectionist and selectionist. A subset of connectionist systems (Turing Machines) dominates modern computing, although another subset (Neural Networks) is growing rapidly. Selectionist machines have unique capabilities which should allow them to do truly creative operations. It is possible to make a parallel optical selectionist system using methods describes in this paper.

  15. Optic-electronic systems for measurement the three-dimension angular deformation of axles at the millimeter wave range radiotelescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konyakhin, Igor A.; Kopylova, Tatyana V.; Konyakhin, Alexsey I.; Smekhov, Andrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Researches in the millimetre wave range require the high accuracy for position of the mirror components of the radiotelescope. A mirror weight is the cause of the three-dimension angular deformation of the elevation axle and azimuth axle relatively bearings. At result the elevation angle and azimuth angle of a parabolic mirror axis orientation is not equal to the set values. For the measuring roll, pitch and yaw angular deformations the autocollimation system with new type of the reflector are used. Reflector for autocollimation measurements as compositions of the anamorphic prism and special tetrahedral reflector is described. New methods for roll, pitch, yaw angles measuring are discussed. Optical scheme for the measurement system, structure the anamorphic prism and tetrahedral reflector are proposed. Equations for the static characteristic of the measuring system are shown.

  16. An experimental study on reflector wave-front error correction using PZT actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Lan; Jiang, Shuidong; Zhou, Yang; Fang, Houfei; Wu, Zhigang; Du, Jianming

    2016-04-01

    An adaptive control system for correcting wave-front error of a CFRC reflector has been studied. Errors investigated in this paper were mainly introduced by fabrication and gravity. 72 Piezoelectric Ceramic Transducer (PZT) actuators were integrated to the CFRC reflector to conduct wave-front error control. The adaptive CFRC reflector was fixed on an optical platform without any external loads. The temperature and humidity were well controlled during the experimental study. The wave-front error correction algorithm is based on influence matrix approach coupled with least squares optimization method. The linear relationship between the PZT actuator's input voltage and the output displacement of the adaptive CFRC reflector surface is validated. A laser displacement sensor was used for measuring the displacements. The influence matrix was obtained experimentally by measuring the displacements of the associated points while each actuator was activated separately. The wave-front error and influence matrix were measured using a V-Stars photogrammetry system. Experimental investigation validated that this adaptive control system is capable to significantly reduce the reflector surface geometry error. Experimental results are correlated very well with simulation results which were obtained by using a multidisciplinary analytical approach. Conclusions of this study suggest that the adaptive CFRC reflector technology can provide a low cost method to significantly increase the precision of a CFRC reflector.

  17. Optics Supply Planning System

    SciTech Connect

    Gaylord, J

    2009-04-30

    The purpose of this study is to specify the design for an initial optics supply planning system for NIF, and to present quality assurance and test plans for the construction of the system as specified. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large laser facility that is just starting operations. Thousands of specialized optics are required to operate the laser, and must be exchanged over time based on the laser shot plan and predictions of damage. Careful planning and tracking of optic exchanges is necessary because of the tight inventory of spare optics, and the long lead times for optics procurements and production changes. Automated inventory forecasting and production planning tools are required to replace existing manual processes. The optics groups members who are expected to use the supply planning system are the stakeholders for this project, and are divided into three groups. Each of these groups participated in a requirements specification that was used to develop this design. (1) Optics Management--These are the top level stakeholdersk, and the final decision makers. This group is the interface to shot operations, is ultimately responsible for optics supply, and decides which exchanges will be made. (2) Work Center Managers--This group manages the on site optics processing work centers. They schedule the daily work center operations, and are responsible for developing long term processing, equipment, and staffing plans. (3) Component Engineers--This group manages the vendor contracts for the manufacture of new optics and the off site rework of existing optics. They are responsible for sourcing vendors, negotiating contracts, and managing vendor processes. The scope of this analysis is to describe the structure and design details of a system that will meet all requirements that were described by stakeholders and documented in the analysis model for this project. The design specifies the architecture, components, interfaces, and data stores of the system

  18. Dual-shaped offset reflector antenna designs from solutions of the geometrical optics first-order partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-Israel, V.; Imbriale, W.; Shogen, K.; Mittra, R.

    1990-02-01

    In obtaining solutions to the first-order nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) for synthesizing offset dual-shaped reflectors, it is found that previously observed computational problems can be avoided if the integration of the PDEs is started from an inner projected perimeter and integrated outward rather than starting from an outer projected perimeter and integrating inward. This procedure, however, introduces a new parameter, the main reflector inner perimeter radius p(o), when given a subreflector inner angle 0(o). Furthermore, a desired outer projected perimeter (e.g., a circle) is no longer guaranteed. Stability of the integration is maintained if some of the initial parameters are determined first from an approximate solution to the PDEs. A one-, two-, or three-parameter optimization algorithm can then be used to obtain a best set of parameters yielding a close fit to the desired projected outer rim. Good low cross-polarization mapping functions are also obtained. These methods are illustrated by synthesis of a high-gain offset-shaped Cassegrainian antenna and a low-noise offset-shaped Gregorian antenna.

  19. Dual-shaped offset reflector antenna designs from solutions of the geometrical optics first-order partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo-Israel, V.; Imbriale, W.; Shogen, K.; Mittra, R.

    1990-01-01

    In obtaining solutions to the first-order nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) for synthesizing offset dual-shaped reflectors, it is found that previously observed computational problems can be avoided if the integration of the PDEs is started from an inner projected perimeter and integrated outward rather than starting from an outer projected perimeter and integrating inward. This procedure, however, introduces a new parameter, the main reflector inner perimeter radius p(o), when given a subreflector inner angle 0(o). Furthermore, a desired outer projected perimeter (e.g., a circle) is no longer guaranteed. Stability of the integration is maintained if some of the initial parameters are determined first from an approximate solution to the PDEs. A one-, two-, or three-parameter optimization algorithm can then be used to obtain a best set of parameters yielding a close fit to the desired projected outer rim. Good low cross-polarization mapping functions are also obtained. These methods are illustrated by synthesis of a high-gain offset-shaped Cassegrainian antenna and a low-noise offset-shaped Gregorian antenna.

  20. Optical key system

    DOEpatents

    Hagans, Karla G.; Clough, Robert E.

    2000-01-01

    An optical key system comprises a battery-operated optical key and an isolated lock that derives both its operating power and unlock signals from the correct optical key. A light emitting diode or laser diode is included within the optical key and is connected to transmit a bit-serial password. The key user physically enters either the code-to-transmit directly, or an index to a pseudorandom number code, in the key. Such person identification numbers can be retained permanently, or ephemeral. When a send button is pressed, the key transmits a beam of light modulated with the password information. The modulated beam of light is received by a corresponding optical lock with a photovoltaic cell that produces enough power from the beam of light to operate a password-screen digital logic. In one application, an acceptable password allows a two watt power laser diode to pump ignition and timing information over a fiberoptic cable into a sealed engine compartment. The receipt of a good password allows the fuel pump, spark, and starter systems to each operate. Therefore, bypassing the lock mechanism as is now routine with automobile thieves is pointless because the engine is so thoroughly disabled.

  1. Realization of LOS (Line of Sight) stabilization based on reflector using carrier attitude compensation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yao; Tian, Jing; Ma, Jia-guang

    2015-02-01

    The techonology of LOS stabilization is widely applicated in moving carrier photoelectric systems such as shipborne, airborne and so on. In application situations with compact structure, such as LOS stabilization system of unmanned aerial vehicle, LOS stabilization based on reflector is adopted, and the detector is installed on the carrier to reduce the volume of stabilized platform and loading weight. However, the LOS deflection angle through reflector and the rotation angle of the reflector has a ratio relation of 2:1, simple reflector of stable inertial space can not make the optical axis stable. To eliminate the limitation of mirror stabilizing method, this article puts forward the carrier attitude compensation method, which uses the inertial sensor installed on the carrier to measure the attitude change of the carrier, and the stabilized platform rotating half of the carrier turbulence angle to realize the LOS stabilization.

  2. The Planck Telescope reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stute, Thomas

    2004-09-01

    The mechanical division of EADS-Astrium GmbH, Friedrichshafen is currently engaged with the development, manufacturing and testing of the advanced dimensionally stable composite reflectors for the ESA satellite borne telescope Planck. The objective of the ESA mission Planck is to analyse the first light that filled the universe, the cosmic microwave background radiation. Under contract of the Danish Space Research Institute and ESA EADS-Astrium GmbH is developing the all CFRP primary and secondary reflectors for the 1.5-metre telescope which is the main instrument of the Planck satellite. The operational frequency ranges from to 25 GHz to 1000 GHz. The demanding high contour accuracy and surface roughness requirements are met. The design provides the extreme dimensional stability required by the cryogenic operational environment at around 40 K. The elliptical off-axis reflectors display a classical lightweight sandwich design with CFRP core and facesheets. Isostatic mounts provide the interfaces to the telescope structure. Protected VDA provides the reflecting surface. The manufacturing is performed at the Friedrichshafen premises of EADS-Space Transportation GmbH, the former Dornier composite workshops. Advanced manufacturing technologies like true angle lay-up by CNC fibre placement and filament winding are utilized. The protected coating is applied at the CAHA facilities at the Calar Alto Observatory, Spain. The exhaustive environmental testing is performed at the facilities of IABG, Munich (mechanical testing) and for the cryo-optical tests at CSL Liege. The project is in advanced state with both Qualification Models being under environmental testing. The flight models will be delivered in 2004. The paper gives an overview over the requirements and the main structural features how these requirements are met. Special production aspects and available test results are reported.

  3. Binary optics at Hughes Danbury Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logue, James; Power, Michael

    1993-01-01

    An overview of binary optics development at Hughes Danbury Optical Systems is presented. Design software used for mask design is presented. A brief discussion of fabrication follows. Two examples of actual projects are used to highlight the discussion: (1) a large aspheric lens; and (2) a set of grating and lenslet arrays.

  4. Computer prediction of dual reflector antenna radiation properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christodoulou, C.

    1981-01-01

    A program for calculating radiation patterns for reflector antennas with either smooth analytic surfaces or with surfaces composed of a number of panels. Techniques based on the geometrical optics (GO) approach were used in tracing rays over the following regions: from a feed antenna to the first reflector surface (subreflector); from this reflector to a larger reflector surface (main reflector); and from the main reflector to a mathematical plane (aperture plane) in front of the main reflector. The equations of GO were also used to calculate the reflected field components for each ray making use of the feed radiation pattern and the parameters defining the surfaces of the two reflectors. These resulting fields form an aperture distribution which is integrated numerically to compute the radiation pattern for a specified set of angles.

  5. All-reflective optical target illumination system with high numerical aperture

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Carlton E.; Sigler, Robert D.; Hoeger, John G.

    1979-01-01

    An all-reflective optical system for providing illumination of a target focal region at high numerical aperture from a pair of confluent collimated light beams. The collimated beams are each incident upon an associated concave eccentric pupil paraboloidal reflective surface, and thereby each focused through an opening in an associated outer ellipsoidal reflective surface onto a plane reflector. Each beam is reflected by its associated plane reflector onto the opposing concave surface of the outer ellipsoids to be focused through an opening in the plane surface onto an opposing inner concave ellipsoidal reflective surface, and thence onto the target region.

  6. Pattern nulling by reflector shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havens, D. A.

    1983-12-01

    The applicability of adaptive array concepts to continuous aperture antennas was studied and appropriate aperture field distributions for pattern nulling were found from them. The adaptive array weights were found to be useful as discrete points in a continuous distribution. This distribution could then be used in an aperture integration scheme to produce a nulled pattern. Also studied was the use of geometrical optics to calculate the aperture field distribution of an arbitrarily shaped reflector. Under some restrictions, geometrical optics can provide a useful approximation. Constructing the aperture field of a reflector defined by a discrete grid of points using a numerical ray tracing scheme was also investigated. Certain numerical problems were identified. Finally, an attempt was made to implement the nulled pattern by a well known beam shaping method based on geometrical optics principles. This technique was found to be inadequate. More promising techniques for implementing the aperture distributions were suggested but not pursued in this work.

  7. OPTICAL SYSTEMS: Calculation of the illuminance distribution in the focal spot of a focusing system taking into account aberrations in this system and divergence of a focused laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitin, Andrey V.

    2007-03-01

    The dependence of the focal-spot size of a 'deep' parabolic mirror reflector on the laser-beam divergence is analysed by the method of elementary reflections. The dependence of the focal-beam diameter of an ideal focusing optical system on the laser-beam parameters is described. The expression is obtained for calculating the illumination distribution in the focal spot of a 'deep' mirror reflector which takes into account both aberrations and light-gathering power of the reflector and the divergence of a focused laser beam.

  8. Electrophoretic deposited TiO2 pigment-based back reflectors for thin film solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Bills, Braden; Morris, Nathan; Dubey, Mukul; Wang, Qi; Fan, Qi Hua

    2015-01-16

    Highly reflective coatings with strong light scattering effect have many applications in optical components and optoelectronic devices. This paper reports titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment-based reflectors that have 2.5 times higher broadband diffuse reflection than commercially produced aluminum or silver based reflectors and result in efficiency enhancements of a single-junction amorphous Si solar cell. Electrophoretic deposition is used to produce pigment-based back reflectors with high pigment density, controllable film thickness and site-specific deposition. Electrical conductivity of the pigment-based back reflectors is improved by creating electrical vias throughout the pigment-based back reflector by making holes using an electrical discharge / dielectric breakdownmore » approach followed by a second electrophoretic deposition of conductive nanoparticles into the holes. While previous studies have demonstrated the use of pigment-based back reflectors, for example white paint, on glass superstrate configured thin film Si solar cells, this work presents a scheme for producing pigment-based reflectors on complex shape and flexible substrates. Finally, mechanical durability and scalability are demonstrated on a continuous electrophoretic deposition roll-to-roll system which has flexible metal substrate capability of 4 inch wide and 300 feet long.« less

  9. Actuator Grouping Optimization on Flexible Space Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Jeffrey R.; Wang, K. W.; Fang, Houfei; Quijano, Ubaldo

    2011-01-01

    With the rapid advances in deployable membrane and mesh antenna technologies, the feasibility of developing large, lightweight reflectors has greatly improved. In order to achieve the required surface accuracy, precision surface control is needed on these lightweight reflectors. For this study, an analytical model is shown which combines a flexible Kapton reflector with Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) actuators for surface control. Surface errors are introduced that are similar to real world scenarios, and a least squares control algorithm is developed for surface control. Experimental results on a 2.4 meter reflector show that while the analytical reflector model is generally correct, due to idiosyncrasies in the reflector it cannot be used for online control. A new method called the En Mass Elimination algorithm is used to determine the optimal grouping of actuators when the number of actuators in the system exceeds the number of power supplies available.

  10. Advanced Manufacture of Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Angel, Roger

    2014-12-17

    The main project objective has been to develop an advanced gravity sag method for molding large glass solar reflectors with either line or point focus, and with long or short focal length. The method involves taking standard sized squares of glass, 1.65 m x 1.65 m, and shaping them by gravity sag into precision steel molds. The method is designed for high volume manufacture when incorporated into a production line with separate pre-heating and cooling. The performance objectives for the self-supporting glass mirrors made by this project include mirror optical accuracy of 2 mrad root mean square (RMS), requiring surface slope errors less than 1 mrad rms, a target not met by current production of solar reflectors. Our objective also included development of new methods for rapidly shaping glass mirrors and coating them for higher reflectivity and soil resistance. Reflectivity of 95% for a glass mirror with anti-soil coating was targeted, compared to the present ~94% with no anti-soil coating. Our mirror cost objective is ~$20/m2 in 2020, a significant reduction compared to the present ~$35/m2 for solar trough mirrors produced for trough solar plants.

  11. Feasibility of Concurrent Treatment with the Scanning Ultrasound Reflector Linear Array System (SURLAS) and the Helical Tomotherapy System

    PubMed Central

    Peñagarícano, José A.; Moros, Eduardo; Novák, Petr; Yan, Yulong; Corry, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of concurrent treatment with the Scanning Ultrasound Reflector Linear Array System (SURLAS) and helical tomotherapy (HT) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods The SURLAS was placed on a RANDO phantom simulating a patient with superficial or deep recurrent breast cancer. A Megavoltage CT (MVCT) of the phantom with and without the SURLAS was obtained in the HT system. MVCT images with the SURLAS were obtained for two configurations: i) with the SURLAS' long axis parallel and ii) perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the phantom. The MVCT simulation data set was then transferred to a radiation therapy planning station. Organs at risk (OAR) were contoured including the lungs, heart, abdomen and spinal cord. The metallic parts of the SURLAS were contoured as well and constraints were assigned to completely or directionally block radiation through them. The MVCT-simulation data set and regions of interest (ROI) files were subsequently transferred to the HT planning station. Several HT plans were obtained with optimization parameters that are usually used in the clinic. For comparison purposes, planning was also performed without the SURLAS on the phantom. Results All plans with the SURLAS on the phantom showed adequate dose covering 95% of the planning target volume (PTV D95%), average dose and coefficient of variation of the planning target volume (PTV) dose distribution regardless of the SURLAS' orientation with respect to the RANDO phantom. Likewise, all OAR showed clinically acceptable dose values. Spatial dose distributions and dose-volume histogram (DVH) evaluation showed negligible plan degradation due to the presence of the SURLAS. Beam-on time varied depending on the selected optimization parameters. Conclusion From the perspective of the radiation dosage, concurrent treatment with the SURLAS and HT IMRT is feasible as demonstrated by the obtained clinically acceptable treatment plans. In addition, proper

  12. Application of parabolic reflector on Raman analysis of gas samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Anlan; Zuo, Duluo; Gao, Jun; Li, Bin; Wang, Xingbing

    2016-05-01

    Studies on the application of a parabolic reflector in spontaneous Raman scattering for low background Raman analysis of gas samples are reported. As an effective signal enhancing sample cell, photonic bandgap fiber (HC-PBF) or metallined capillary normally result in a strong continuous background in spectra caused by the strong Raman/fluorescence signal from the silica wall and the polymer protective film. In order to obtain enhanced signal with low background, a specially designed sample cell with double-pass and large collecting solid angle constructed by a parabolic reflector and a planar reflector was applied, of which the optical surfaces had been processed by diamond turning and coated by silver film and protective film of high-purity alumina. The influences of optical structure, polarization characteristic, collecting solid-angle and collecting efficiency of the sample cell on light propagation and signal enhancement were studied. A Raman spectrum of ambient air with signal to background ratio of 94 was acquired with an exposure time of 1 sec by an imaging spectrograph. Besides, the 3σ limits of detection (LOD) of 7 ppm for H2, 8 ppm for CO2 and 12 ppm for CO were also obtained. The sample cell mainly based on parabolic reflector will be helpful for compact and high-sensitive Raman system.

  13. Optical systems in ergophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, Valentina; Besedovskaya, Valentina; Paloob, Tamara

    1994-02-01

    The important part of ergophthalmology is the problem of diagnosing and treatment of refraction errors, accommodation and visual disorders by means of the special optical systems. The using of our diagnostical approach helps to choose the right treatment strategy. Our therapeutical approach permits to normalize the muscle tonus and working capacity of eye accommodation apparatus and gives the possibility to obtain the stable positive results in treatment of the refraction amblyopia as well.

  14. Dish-based high concentration PV system with Köhler optics.

    PubMed

    Coughenour, Blake M; Stalcup, Thomas; Wheelwright, Brian; Geary, Andrew; Hammer, Kimberly; Angel, Roger

    2014-03-10

    We present work at the Steward Observatory Solar Lab on a high concentration photovoltaic system in which sunlight focused by a single large paraboloidal mirror powers many small triple-junction cells. The optical system is of the XRX-Köhler type, comprising the primary reflector (X) and a ball lens (R) at the focus that reimages the primary reflector onto an array of small reflectors (X) that apportion the light to the cells. We present a design methodology that provides generous tolerance to mis-pointing, uniform illumination across individual cells, minimal optical loss and even distribution between cells, for efficient series connection. An operational prototype has been constructed with a 3.3m x 3.3m square primary reflector of 2m focal length powering 36 actively cooled triple-junction cells at 1200x concentration (geometric). The measured end-to-end system conversion efficiency is 28%, including the parasitic loss of the active cooling system. Efficiency ~32% is projected for the next system.

  15. Dish-based high concentration PV system with Köhler optics.

    PubMed

    Coughenour, Blake M; Stalcup, Thomas; Wheelwright, Brian; Geary, Andrew; Hammer, Kimberly; Angel, Roger

    2014-03-10

    We present work at the Steward Observatory Solar Lab on a high concentration photovoltaic system in which sunlight focused by a single large paraboloidal mirror powers many small triple-junction cells. The optical system is of the XRX-Köhler type, comprising the primary reflector (X) and a ball lens (R) at the focus that reimages the primary reflector onto an array of small reflectors (X) that apportion the light to the cells. We present a design methodology that provides generous tolerance to mis-pointing, uniform illumination across individual cells, minimal optical loss and even distribution between cells, for efficient series connection. An operational prototype has been constructed with a 3.3m x 3.3m square primary reflector of 2m focal length powering 36 actively cooled triple-junction cells at 1200x concentration (geometric). The measured end-to-end system conversion efficiency is 28%, including the parasitic loss of the active cooling system. Efficiency ~32% is projected for the next system. PMID:24922230

  16. Dish-based high concentration PV system with Köhler optics.

    PubMed

    Coughenour, Blake M; Stalcup, Thomas; Wheelwright, Brian; Geary, Andrew; Hammer, Kimberly; Angel, Roger

    2014-03-10

    We present work at the Steward Observatory Solar Lab on a high concentration photovoltaic system in which sunlight focused by a single large paraboloidal mirror powers many small triple-junction cells. The optical system is of the XRX-Köhler type, comprising the primary reflector (X) and a ball lens (R) at the focus that reimages the primary reflector onto an array of small reflectors (X) that apportion the light to the cells. We present a design methodology that provides generous tolerance to mis-pointing, uniform illumination across individual cells, minimal optical loss and even distribution between cells, for efficient series connection. An operational prototype has been constructed with a 3.3m x 3.3m square primary reflector of 2m focal length powering 36 actively cooled triple-junction cells at 1200x concentration (geometric). The measured end-to-end system conversion efficiency is 28%, including the parasitic loss of the active cooling system. Efficiency ~32% is projected for the next system. PMID:24800277

  17. Dual-Shaped Offset Reflector Antenna Designs From Solutions of the Geometrical Optics First-Order Partial Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-Israel, V.; Imbriale, W.; Shogen, K.; Mittra, R.

    1989-11-01

    In obtaining solutions to the first-order nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) for synthesizing dual-shaped refletors, it is found that previously observed computational problems can be avoided if the integration of the PDEs is started from an inner projected perimeter and integrated outward rather than starting from an outer projected perimeter and integrating inward. This procedure, however, introduces a new parameter, the main reflector inner perimeter radius rho, when given a subreflector inner angle theta. Furthermore, a desired outer projected perimeter (e.g. a circle) is no longer guaranteed. "Stability of the integration is maintained if some of the initial parameters are determined first from an approximate solution to the ODEs. A one-, two-, or three-parameter optimization algorithm can then be used to obtain a "best" set of parameters yielding a close fit to the desired projected outer rim. Good low cross-polarization mapping functions are also obtained. These methods are illustrated by synthesis of a high-gain offset-shaped Cassegrainian antenna and a low-noise offset-shaped Gregorian antenna.

  18. Optical gyroscope system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goss, W. C.; Goldstein, R. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Light beams pass in opposite directions through a single mode fiber optic wave guide that extends in a circle or coil in an optical gyroscope system which measures the rotation rate of the coil by measuring the relative phase shifts of the beams by interferometric techniques. Beam splitting and phase shifting of the light are facilitated by utilizing brief pulses of light and by using light-controlling devices which are operated for a brief time only when the light pulse passes in one direction through the device but not at a different time when the pulse is passing in the opposite direction through the device. High accuracy in rotation measurement is achieved at both very slow and very fast rotation rates, by alternately operating the system so that at zero rotation the interfering waves are alternately 90 out of phase and in phase. Linear polarization of the light beams is maintained by coiling the full length of the optic fiber in a single plane.

  19. Optical fiber inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Moore, F.W.

    1985-04-05

    A remote optical inspection system including an inspection head. The inspection head has a passageway through which pellets or other objects are passed. A window is provided along the passageway through which light is beamed against the objects being inspected. A plurality of lens assemblies are arranged about the window so that reflected light can be gathered and transferred to a plurality of coherent optical fiber light guides. The light guides transfer the light images to a television or other image transducer which converts the optical images into a representative electronic signal. The electronic signal can then be displayed on a signal viewer such as a television monitor for inspection by a person. A staging means can be used to support the objects for viewing through the window. Routing means can be used to direct inspected objects into appropriate exit passages for accepted or rejected objects. The inspected objects are advantageously fed in a singular manner to the staging means and routing means. The inspection system is advantageously used in an enclosure when toxic or hazardous materials are being inspected. 10 figs.

  20. Optical fiber inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Francis W.

    1987-01-01

    A remote optical inspection system including an inspection head. The inspection head has a passageway through which pellets or other objects are passed. A window is provided along the passageway through which light is beamed against the objects being inspected. A plurality of lens assemblies are arranged about the window so that reflected light can be gathered and transferred to a plurality of coherent optical fiber light guides. The light guides transfer the light images to a television or other image transducer which converts the optical images into a representative electronic signal. The electronic signal can then be displayed on a signal viewer such as a television monitor for inspection by a person. A staging means can be used to support the objects for viewing through the window. Routing means can be used to direct inspected objects into appropriate exit passages for accepted or rejected objects. The inspected objects are advantageously fed in a singular manner to the staging means and routing means. The inspection system is advantageously used in an enclosure when toxic or hazardous materials are being inspected.

  1. Optically controlled welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An optically controlled welding system wherein a welding torch having through-the-torch viewing capabilities is provided with an optical beam splitter to create a transmitted view and a reflective view of a welding operation. These views are converted to digital signals which are then processed and utilized by a computerized robotic welder to make the welding torch responsive thereto. Other features include an actively cooled electrode holder which minimizes a blocked portion of the view by virtue of being constructed of a single spoke or arm, and a weld pool contour detector comprising a laser beam directed onto the weld pool with the position of specular radiation reflected therefrom, being characteristic of a penetrated or unpenetrated condition of the weld pool.

  2. Optically controlled welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An optically controlled welding system (10) wherein a welding torch (12) having through-the-torch viewing capabilities is provided with an optical beam splitter (56) to create a transmitted view and a reflective view of a welding operation. These views are converted to digital signals which are then processed and utilized by a computerized robotic welder (15) to make the welding torch responsive thereto. Other features includes an actively cooled electrode holder (26) which minimizes a blocked portion of the view by virtue of being constructed of a single spoke or arm (28) and a weld pool contour detector (14) comprising a laser beam directed onto the weld pool with the position of specular radiation reflected therefrom being characteristic of a penetrated or unpenetrated condition of the weld pool.

  3. Multispectral scanner optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, R. C.; Koch, N. G. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An optical system for use in a multispectral scanner of the type used in video imaging devices is disclosed. Electromagnetic radiation reflected by a rotating scan mirror is focused by a concave primary telescope mirror and collimated by a second concave mirror. The collimated beam is split by a dichroic filter which transmits radiant energy in the infrared spectrum and reflects visible and near infrared energy. The long wavelength beam is filtered and focused on an infrared detector positioned in a cryogenic environment. The short wavelength beam is dispersed by a pair of prisms, then projected on an array of detectors also mounted in a cryogenic environment and oriented at an angle relative to the optical path of the dispersed short wavelength beam.

  4. Optical cavity furnace for semiconductor wafer processing

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    2014-08-05

    An optical cavity furnace 10 having multiple optical energy sources 12 associated with an optical cavity 18 of the furnace. The multiple optical energy sources 12 may be lamps or other devices suitable for producing an appropriate level of optical energy. The optical cavity furnace 10 may also include one or more reflectors 14 and one or more walls 16 associated with the optical energy sources 12 such that the reflectors 14 and walls 16 define the optical cavity 18. The walls 16 may have any desired configuration or shape to enhance operation of the furnace as an optical cavity 18. The optical energy sources 12 may be positioned at any location with respect to the reflectors 14 and walls defining the optical cavity. The optical cavity furnace 10 may further include a semiconductor wafer transport system 22 for transporting one or more semiconductor wafers 20 through the optical cavity.

  5. A fixed tilt solar collector employing reversible vee-through reflectors and evaluated tube receivers for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selcuk, M. K.

    1978-01-01

    The Vee-Trough/Evacuated Tube Collector (VTETC) was analyzed rigorously and various mathematical models were developed to calculate the optical performance of the vee-trough concentrators, and the quasi-steady state thermal performance of the evacuated tube receivers. Tests were run to verify the mathematical analyses. Back-silvered glass mirror, Alzak, Aluminized Teflon, and Kinglux (electropolished aluminum reflectors) were tested. Additional tests were run at temperatures ranging from 80 to 190 C (176-374 F). For the glass mirror reflectors, peak efficiencies, based on aperture area and operating temperatures of 125 C (257 F), were over 40%. Efficiencies of about 40% were observed at temperatures of 150 C (302 F) and 30% at 175 C (347 F). Test data for several days, predicted daily useful heats, and efficiency values are presented for a full year. These theoretical values were then compared with actual data points for the same temperature range.

  6. Scanning properties of large dual-shaped offset and symmetric reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo-Israel, Victor; Veruttipong, Watt; Norrod, Roger D.; Imbriale, William A.

    1992-01-01

    Several characteristics of dual offset (DOSR) and symmetric shaped reflectors are examined. Among these is the amelioration of the added cost of manufacturing a shaped reflector antenna, particularly a doubly curved surface for the DOSR, if adjustable panels, which may be necessary for correction of gravity and wind distortions, are also used for improving gain by shaping. The scanning properties of shaped reflectors, both offset and circularly symmetric, are examined and compared to conic section scanning characteristics. Scanning of the pencil beam is obtained by lateral and axial translation of a single point-source feed. The feed is kept pointed toward the center of the subreflector. The effects of power spillover and aperture phase error as a function of beam scanning is examined for several different types of large reflector designs including DOSR, circularly symmetric large f/D and smaller f/D dual reflector antenna systems. It is graphically illustrated that the Abbe-sine condition for improving scanning of an optical system cannot, inherently, be satisfied in a dual-shaped reflector system shaped for high gain and low feed spillover.

  7. Beam scanning offset Cassegrain reflector antennas by subreflector movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapean, James W., Jr.; Stutzman, Warren L.

    1994-01-01

    In 1987 a NASA panel recommended the creation of the Mission to Planet Earth. This mission was intended to apply to remote sensing experience of the space community to earth remote sensing to enhance the understanding of the climatological processes of our planet and to determine if, and to what extent, the hydrological cycle of Earth is being affected by human activity. One of the systems required for the mission was a wide scanning, high gain reflector antenna system for use in radiometric remote sensing from geostationary orbit. This work describes research conducted at Virginia Tech into techniques for beam scanning offset Cassegrain reflector antennas by subreflector translation and rotation. Background material relevant to beam scanning antenna systems and offset Cassegrain reflector antenna system is presented. A test case is developed based on the background material. The test case is beam scanned using two geometrical optics methods of determining the optimum subreflector position for the desired scanned beam direction. Physical optics far-field results are given for the beam scanned systems. The test case system is found to be capable of beam scanning over a range of 35 half-power beamwidths while maintaining a 90 percent beam efficiency or 50 half-power beamwidths while maintaining less than l dB of gain loss during scanning.

  8. Optical systems for synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, M.R.

    1985-12-01

    Various fundamental topics which underlie the design and use of optical systems for synchrotron radiation are considered from the viewpoint of linear system theory. These topics include the damped harmonic oscillator, free space propagation of an optical field, electromagnetic theory of optical properties of materials, theory of dispersion, and the Kramers-Kronig relations. 32 refs., 5 figs. (LEW)

  9. Low profile optical system for an aircraft beacon.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, A H

    1971-02-01

    An optical system producing an annular cone of radiation from a point source using a low profile front lens is shown to have application as a beacon for high speed vehicles. The system comprises a high pressure short are light source with axial electrodes and integral collector, a conical reflector, and a divergent meniscus lens that has low protrusion over the surface of the vehicle. The system has minimal drag, and the radiation is distributed in directions close to the plane perpendicular to the optical axis. The influences of various parameters such as lens camber, lens aperture, source size, collector shape, collection efficiency, and beam divergence are discussed. A prototype was built at Eimae Division of Varian using a xenon short arc lamp with metal ceramic structure and integral collector.

  10. Fiber optic control system integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppel, G. L.; Glasheen, W. M.; Russell, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    A total fiber optic, integrated propulsion/flight control system concept for advanced fighter aircraft is presented. Fiber optic technology pertaining to this system is identified and evaluated for application readiness. A fiber optic sensor vendor survey was completed, and the results are reported. The advantages of centralized/direct architecture are reviewed, and the concept of the protocol branch is explained. Preliminary protocol branch selections are made based on the F-18/F404 application. Concepts for new optical tools are described. Development plans for the optical technology and the described system are included.

  11. Segmented Trough Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szmyd, W. R.

    1985-01-01

    Segmented troughlike reflector for solar cells approach concentration effectiveness of true parabolic reflector yet simpler and less expensive. Walls of segmented reflector composed of reflective aluminized membrane. Lengthwise guide wire applies tension to each wall, thereby dividing each into two separate planes. Planes tend to focus Sunlight on solar cells at center of trough between walls. Segmented walls provide higher Sunlight concentration ratios than do simple walls.

  12. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, Ronald J.; Land, John T.; Misvel, Michael C.

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled.

  13. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, R.J.; Land, J.T.; Misvel, M.C.

    1994-06-07

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled. 12 figs.

  14. Terrace retro-reflector array for poloidal polarimeter on ITER.

    PubMed

    Imazawa, R; Kawano, Y; Ono, T; Kusama, Y

    2011-02-01

    A new concept of a terrace retro-reflector array (TERRA) as part of the poloidal polarimeter for ITER is proposed in this paper. TERRA reflects a laser light even from a high incident angle in the direction of the incident-light path, while a conventional retro-reflector array cannot. Besides, TERRA can be installed in a smaller space than a corner-cube retro-reflector. In an optical sense, TERRA is equivalent to a Littrow grating, the blaze angle of which varies, depending on the incident angle. The reflected light generates a bright and dark fringe, and the bright fringe is required to travel along the incident-light path to achieve the objects of laser-aided diagnostics. In order to investigate the propagation properties of laser light reflected by TERRA, we have developed a new diffraction formula. Conditions for the propagation of the bright fringe in the direction of the incident light have been obtained using the Littrow grating model and have been confirmed in a simulation applying the new diffraction formula. Finally, we have designed laser transmission optics using TERRA for the ITER poloidal polarimeter and have calculated the light propagation of the system. The optical design obtains a high transmission efficiency, with 88.6% of the incident power returned. These results demonstrate the feasibility of applying TERRA to the ITER poloidal polarimeter.

  15. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES: Frequency and wavelength tunable optical microwave source based on a distributed Bragg reflector self-pulsation laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liu; Yu, Sun; Duanhua, Kong; Baojun, Wang; Jing, Bian; Xin, An; Lingjuan, Zhao; Wei, Wang

    2010-06-01

    A frequency and wavelength tunable self-pulsation laser based on DBR laser devices is reported for the first time. This laser generates continuous tunable optical microwave in the range of 1.87-21.81 GHz with 3-dB linewidth about 10 MHz by tuning the injection currents on the front and back gain sections, and exhibits wavelength tuning range from 1536.28 to 1538.73 nm by tuning the injection currents on the grating section.

  16. Focal region fields of distorted reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buris, N. E.; Kauffman, J. F.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of the focal region fields scattered by an arbitrary surface reflector under uniform plane wave illumination is solved. The physical optics (PO) approximation is used to calculate the current induced on the reflector. The surface of the reflector is described by a number of triangular domain-wise 5th degree bivariate polynomials. A 2-dimensional Gaussian quadrature is employed to numerically evaluate the integral expressions of the scattered fields. No Freshnel or Fraunhofer zone approximations are made. The relation of the focal fields problem to surface compensation techniques and other applications are mentioned. Several examples of distorted parabolic reflectors are presented. The computer code developed is included, together with instructions on its usage.

  17. Intelligent Optical Systems Using Adaptive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, the phrase adaptive optics generally conjured images of large deformable mirrors being integrated into telescopes to compensate for atmospheric turbulence. However, the development of smaller, cheaper devices has sparked interest for other aerospace and commercial applications. Variable focal length lenses, liquid crystal spatial light modulators, tunable filters, phase compensators, polarization compensation, and deformable mirrors are becoming increasingly useful for other imaging applications including guidance navigation and control (GNC), coronagraphs, foveated imaging, situational awareness, autonomous rendezvous and docking, non-mechanical zoom, phase diversity, and enhanced multi-spectral imaging. The active components presented here allow flexibility in the optical design, increasing performance. In addition, the intelligent optical systems presented offer advantages in size and weight and radiation tolerance.

  18. Diffraction analysis of mesh deployable reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Y.

    1985-04-01

    A formulation and many representative numerical results for mesh reflector antennas are presented. The reflection coefficient matrix for the prescribed mesh configuration was determined and the local coordinate system of the mesh cells at each point on the curved reflector surface was accentuated. A novel strip aperture model was used to formulate the transmission coefficient matrix for a variety of mesh cell configurations. Numerical data are tailored to the dimensions of a conceptually designed land mobile satellite system (LMSS) which employs a large mesh deployable offset parabolic antenna. Results are shown for an offset parabolic reflector with mesh surfaces similar to the mesh surface of tracking and data relay satellite system (TDRSS).

  19. Diffraction Analysis of Mesh Deployable Reflector Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A formulation and many representative numerical results for mesh reflector antennas are presented. The reflection coefficient matrix for the prescribed mesh configuration was determined and the local coordinate system of the mesh cells at each point on the curved reflector surface was accentuated. A novel strip aperture model was used to formulate the transmission coefficient matrix for a variety of mesh cell configurations. Numerical data are tailored to the dimensions of a conceptually designed land mobile satellite system (LMSS) which employs a large mesh deployable offset parabolic antenna. Results are shown for an offset parabolic reflector with mesh surfaces similar to the mesh surface of tracking and data relay satellite system (TDRSS).

  20. High-frequency techniques for RCS prediction of plate geometries and a physical optics/equivalent currents model for the RCS of trihedral corner reflectors, parts 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Polka, Lesley A.; Polycarpou, Anastasis C.

    1994-01-01

    Formulations for scattering from the coated plate and the coated dihedral corner reflector are included. A coated plate model based upon the Uniform Theory of Diffraction (UTD) for impedance wedges was presented in the last report. In order to resolve inaccuracies and discontinuities in the predicted patterns using the UTD-based model, an improved model that uses more accurate diffraction coefficients is presented. A Physical Optics (PO) model for the coated dihedral corner reflector is presented as an intermediary step in developing a high-frequency model for this structure. The PO model is based upon the reflection coefficients for a metal-backed lossy material. Preliminary PO results for the dihedral corner reflector suggest that, in addition to being much faster computationally, this model may be more accurate than existing moment method (MM) models. An improved Physical Optics (PO)/Equivalent Currents model for modeling the Radar Cross Section (RCS) of both square and triangular, perfectly conducting, trihedral corner reflectors is presented. The new model uses the PO approximation at each reflection for the first- and second-order reflection terms. For the third-order reflection terms, a Geometrical Optics (GO) approximation is used for the first reflection; and PO approximations are used for the remaining reflections. The previously reported model used GO for all reflections except the terminating reflection. Using PO for most of the reflections results in a computationally slower model because many integrations must be performed numerically, but the advantage is that the predicted RCS using the new model is much more accurate. Comparisons between the two PO models, Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) and experimental data are presented for validation of the new model.

  1. One-Wave Optical Phase Conjugation Mirror by Actively Coupling Arbitrary Light Fields into a Single-Mode Reflector.

    PubMed

    Lee, KyeoReh; Lee, Junsung; Park, Jung-Hoon; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, YongKeun

    2015-10-01

    Rewinding the arrow of time via phase conjugation is an intriguing phenomenon made possible by the wave property of light. Here, we demonstrate the realization of a one-wave optical phase conjugation mirror using a spatial light modulator. An adaptable single-mode filter is created, and a phase-conjugate beam is then prepared by reverse propagation through this filter. Our method is simple, alignment free, and fast while allowing high power throughput in the time-reversed wave, which has not been simultaneously demonstrated before. Using our method, we demonstrate high throughput full-field light delivery through highly scattering biological tissue and multimode fibers, even for quantum dot fluorescence.

  2. POMESH - DIFFRACTION ANALYSIS OF REFLECTOR ANTENNAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    POMESH is a computer program capable of predicting the performance of reflector antennas. Both far field pattern and gain calculations are performed using the Physical Optics (PO) approximation of the equivalent surface currents. POMESH is primarily intended for relatively small reflectors. It is useful in situations where the surface is described by irregular data that must be interpolated and for cases where the surface derivatives are not known. This method is flexible and robust and also supports near field calculations. Because of the near field computation ability, this computational engine is quite useful for subreflector computations. The program is constructed in a highly modular form so that it may be readily adapted to perform tasks other than the one that is explicitly described here. Since the computationally intensive portions of the algorithm are simple loops, the program can be easily adapted to take advantage of vector processor and parallel architectures. In POMESH the reflector is represented as a piecewise planar surface comprised of triangular regions known as facets. A uniform physical optics (PO) current is assumed to exist on each triangular facet. Then, the PO integral on a facet is approximated by the product of the PO current value at the center and the area of the triangle. In this way, the PO integral over the reflector surface is reduced to a summation of the contribution from each triangular facet. The source horn, or feed, that illuminates the subreflector is approximated by a linear combination of plane patterns. POMESH contains three polarization pattern definitions for the feed; a linear x-polarized element, linear y-polarized element, and a circular polarized element. If a more general feed pattern is required, it is a simple matter to replace the subroutine that implements the pattern definitions. POMESH obtains information necessary to specify the coordinate systems, location of other data files, and parameters of the desired

  3. Electrophoretic deposited TiO2 pigment-based back reflectors for thin film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bills, Braden; Morris, Nathan; Dubey, Mukul; Wang, Qi; Fan, Qi Hua

    2015-01-16

    Highly reflective coatings with strong light scattering effect have many applications in optical components and optoelectronic devices. This paper reports titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigment-based reflectors that have 2.5 times higher broadband diffuse reflection than commercially produced aluminum or silver based reflectors and result in efficiency enhancements of a single-junction amorphous Si solar cell. Electrophoretic deposition is used to produce pigment-based back reflectors with high pigment density, controllable film thickness and site-specific deposition. Electrical conductivity of the pigment-based back reflectors is improved by creating electrical vias throughout the pigment-based back reflector by making holes using an electrical discharge / dielectric breakdown approach followed by a second electrophoretic deposition of conductive nanoparticles into the holes. While previous studies have demonstrated the use of pigment-based back reflectors, for example white paint, on glass superstrate configured thin film Si solar cells, this work presents a scheme for producing pigment-based reflectors on complex shape and flexible substrates. Finally, mechanical durability and scalability are demonstrated on a continuous electrophoretic deposition roll-to-roll system which has flexible metal substrate capability of 4 inch wide and 300 feet long.

  4. Membrane Shell Reflector Segment Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Im, Eastwood; Lin, John; Moore, James

    2012-01-01

    The mesh reflector is the only type of large, in-space deployable antenna that has successfully flown in space. However, state-of-the-art large deployable mesh antenna systems are RF-frequency-limited by both global shape accuracy and local surface quality. The limitations of mesh reflectors stem from two factors. First, at higher frequencies, the porosity and surface roughness of the mesh results in loss and scattering of the signal. Second, the mesh material does not have any bending stiffness and thus cannot be formed into true parabolic (or other desired) shapes. To advance the deployable reflector technology at high RF frequencies from the current state-of-the-art, significant improvements need to be made in three major aspects: a high-stability and highprecision deployable truss; a continuously curved RF reflecting surface (the function of the surface as well as its first derivative are both continuous); and the RF reflecting surface should be made of a continuous material. To meet these three requirements, the Membrane Shell Reflector Segment (MSRS) antenna was developed.

  5. One-Wave Optical Phase Conjugation Mirror by Actively Coupling Arbitrary Light Fields into a Single-Mode Reflector.

    PubMed

    Lee, KyeoReh; Lee, Junsung; Park, Jung-Hoon; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, YongKeun

    2015-10-01

    Rewinding the arrow of time via phase conjugation is an intriguing phenomenon made possible by the wave property of light. Here, we demonstrate the realization of a one-wave optical phase conjugation mirror using a spatial light modulator. An adaptable single-mode filter is created, and a phase-conjugate beam is then prepared by reverse propagation through this filter. Our method is simple, alignment free, and fast while allowing high power throughput in the time-reversed wave, which has not been simultaneously demonstrated before. Using our method, we demonstrate high throughput full-field light delivery through highly scattering biological tissue and multimode fibers, even for quantum dot fluorescence. PMID:26550723

  6. An advanced optical system for laser ablation propulsion in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstue, Grant; Fork, Richard; Reardon, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel space-based ablation driven propulsion engine concept utilizing transmitted energy in the form of a series of ultra-short optical pulses. Key differences are generating the pulses at the transmitting spacecraft and the safe delivery of that energy to the receiving spacecraft for propulsion. By expanding the beam diameter during transmission in space, the energy can propagate at relatively low intensity and then be refocused and redistributed to create an array of ablation sites at the receiver. The ablation array strategy allows greater control over flight dynamics and eases thermal management. Research efforts for this transmission and reception of ultra-short optical pulses include: (1) optical system design; (2) electrical system requirements; (3) thermal management; (4) structured energy transmission safety. Research has also been focused on developing an optical switch concept for the multiplexing of the ultra-short pulses. This optical switch strategy implements multiple reflectors polished into a rotating momentum wheel device to combine the pulses from different laser sources. The optical system design must minimize the thermal load on any one optical element. Initial specifications and modeling for the optical system are being produced using geometrical ray-tracing software to give a better understanding of the optical requirements. In regards to safety, we have advanced the retro-reflective beam locking strategy to include look-ahead capabilities for long propagation distances. Additional applications and missions utilizing multiplexed pulse transmission are also presented. Because the research is in early development, it provides an opportunity for new and valuable advances in the area of transmitted energy for propulsion as well as encourages joint international efforts. Researchers from different countries can cooperate in order to find constructive and safe uses of ordered pulse transmission for propulsion in future space

  7. Optical modulator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, J.

    1972-01-01

    The fabrication, test, and delivery of an optical modulator system which will operate with a mode-locked Nd:YAG laser indicating at either 1.06 or 0.53 micrometers is discussed. The delivered hardware operates at data rates up to 400 Mbps and includes a 0.53 micrometer electrooptic modulator, a 1.06 micrometer electrooptic modulator with power supply and signal processing electronics with power supply. The modulators contain solid state drivers which accept digital signals with MECL logic levels, temperature controllers to maintain a stable thermal environment for the modulator crystals, and automatic electronic compensation to maximize the extinction ratio. The modulators use two lithium tantalate crystals cascaded in a double pass configuration. The signal processing electronics include encoding electronics which are capable of digitizing analog signals between the limit of + or - 0.75 volts at a maximum rate of 80 megasamples per second with 5 bit resolution. The digital samples are serialized and made available as a 400 Mbps serial NRZ data source for the modulators. A pseudorandom (PN) generator is also included in the signal processing electronics. This data source generates PN sequences with lengths between 31 bits and 32,767 bits in a serial NRZ format at rates up to 400 Mbps.

  8. Tailoring free-form glass reflectors towards a homogeneous luminance distribution in roadway applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heßling, Thomas; Geyer, Ulf; Hellwig, Ansgar; Paßlick, Christian; Hübner, Marc C.

    2014-09-01

    Free-form reflectors are encountered in numerous illumination systems, especially in highly sophisticated applications. The construction of these kind of optics however remains a challenging task where only a few methods are available to derive the free-form shape. One such method is the multi-ellipse approach where a superposition of conic sections is utilized to create the desired illuminance or luminous intensity distribution. While it is useful in many areas one is not always interested in an illuminance or intensity distribution. Especially street lighting reflectors are often tailored towards a homogeneous luminance, taking into account the road's reflective properties, luminaire arrangement etc. While we used our implementation of the multi-ellipse method to design street lighting reflectors with a uniform illuminance before, we now extended this method to support the calculation of a roadway reflector with a homogeneous luminance. For a given roadway scenario we can quickly get an optimized reflector with a good performance compliant to roadway standards such as EN-13201 or IESNA-RP-8-00. Furthermore the optic can be quickly adapted to changing requirements.

  9. Optical power distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    Lalmond, R.G.

    1987-09-08

    This patent describes an apparatus for supplying electrical power to electrical components mounted on a circuit board. It consists of: a printed circuit board; electrical components mounted on the printed circuit board; electrically powered sources of optical energy; photovoltaic cell arrays; each photovoltaic cell array being mounted on a corresponding one of the electrical components to provide electrical power to the electrical component on which it is mounted; and means for coupling the optical energy from the electrically powered sources of optical energy to the photovoltaic cell arrays.

  10. Building automation system of payment platform weight component for large spacecraft reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, I. V.; Badanina, J. O.

    2016-04-01

    Considered Design and the logic of opening large convertible antenna. The necessity of compensation weight component in the assembly and testing of the design. Given the logic of the movement elements of power spokes, concluded that the use of the tracking system to compensate for the weight component. The analysis of the existing equipment and control systems. Produced selection of the manufacturer of automated equipment that meets the stated objectives of management and control. It is concluded that the design component of the weight compensation system based on servo controllers and sensors combined platform automation, controlled by special software. The structure of the platform automation, consistent workflow testing. It defines the principles of interaction between subsystems of the weight compensation component for receiving, processing and monitoring of process parameters testing. It is concluded that the proposed system can be integrated into the automation system and the perspective of process control testing of disclosure of large spacecraft.

  11. X-ray resonator with pear-shaped reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Churikov, V A

    2003-11-30

    An X-ray resonator design is proposed in which peculiar pear-shaped reflectors, which are grazing-incidence X-ray mirrors, serve as optical elements. Special features of this resonator are relatively high reflector efficiencies and the axial symmetry of the output radiation. (resonators)

  12. Plans for a large deployable reflector for submillimeter and infrared astronomy from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, P. N.; Breckinridge, J. B.; Gulkis, S.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Kiya, M.

    1982-10-01

    Continuing plans for a large deployable reflector (LDR), conceived as a 10- to 30-m-diameter clear-aperture telescope, operating at wavelengths from 1000 microns to a diffraction-limited 30 microns, and to be placed in orbit for a life of 10 years by the Space Shuttle, are discussed. The primary reflector will be composed of a number of closely packed hexagonal segments of glass or lightweight composite material and attached to a truss integrating structure through position actuators providing three degrees of freedom for each segment. Technical aspects of optical design, surface measurement systems, deployment, and detectors are discussed, as are practical and fiscal limitations.

  13. Surface accuracy measurement of a deployable mesh reflector by planar near-field scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chujo, Wataru; Ito, Takeo; Hori, Yoshiaki; Teshirogi, Tasuku

    1988-06-01

    Using a near-field antenna measurement facility, it is possible to simultaneously evaluate the surface accuracy of a reflector antenna as well as the far-field pattern of the antenna for a short time. The surface errors of a 2-m deployable mesh reflector for satellite use were measured by a planar near-field system. As a result, the influence of periodic structures, due to the antenna ribs, has been clearly observed. Also, the surface accuracy obtained with the near-field scanning technique has coincided well with that obtained by an optical measurement technique.

  14. Plans for a large deployable reflector for submillimeter and infrared astronomy from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, P. N.; Breckinridge, J. B.; Gulkis, S.; Kuiper, T. B. H.; Kiya, M.

    1982-01-01

    Continuing plans for a large deployable reflector (LDR), conceived as a 10- to 30-m-diameter clear-aperture telescope, operating at wavelengths from 1000 microns to a diffraction-limited 30 microns, and to be placed in orbit for a life of 10 years by the Space Shuttle, are discussed. The primary reflector will be composed of a number of closely packed hexagonal segments of glass or lightweight composite material and attached to a truss integrating structure through position actuators providing three degrees of freedom for each segment. Technical aspects of optical design, surface measurement systems, deployment, and detectors are discussed, as are practical and fiscal limitations.

  15. Synthesis of dual-offset shaped reflectors for arbitrary aperture shapes using continuous domain deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westcott, B. S.; Wolton, I. C.; Graham, R. K.

    1986-02-01

    The systematic synthesis of an optically shaped dual-offset reflector antenna with uniformly phased aperture and with source and aperture power distributions independently prescribed is reviewed. A recent paper showed that a method for dealing with circular apertures could be extended to noncircular apertures by the use of conformal mapping. The present paper describes an alternative method in which the aperture boundary is continuously deformed to the required shape. Examples show that systems with elliptical apertures of high axial ratios (e.g. 4:1) can be successfully designed. The problem of interpolating points on the reflector surfaces has been addressed using bicubic splines.

  16. High-index dielectric meta-materials for near-perfect broadband reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengqi; Liu, Xiaoshan; Wang, Yan; Pan, Pingping

    2016-05-01

    All-dielectric meta-materials offer a potential alternative to plasmonic meta-materials at optical frequencies. Herein, we take advantage of loss-less as well as simple unit cell geometry to demonstrate near-perfect broadband reflectors made from all-dielectric materials. These near-perfect reflectors, consisting of high-index cross-shaped resonators (n  =  3.5, Si), operating in the telecommunications bands, exhibit novel optical properties including polarization-independent, wide-angle near-unity reflection. The average reflectance is exceeding 98% at the wavelength range from 1.261 μm to 1.533 μm. At 1.310 μm, the average reflectance (R) reaches 99.7%, surpassing the reflectance of metallic mirrors. A near-perfect super-broadband reflection spectrum with bandwidth of 0.330 μm (R  >  98%) is achieved for a system with a higher index dielectric resonator array (n  =  4.0, Ge). Moreover, the optical properties of the reflector provide high scalability across the wavelength range via tuning of dielectric resonators. The whole structure, with common triple-layer features, can be mass-produced using standard lithography methods and deposition techniques. These optical and structural features make the proposed near-perfect broadband reflectors feasible avenues for manipulating light in important applications in spectroscopy, photovoltaics and light emission.

  17. Dynamic of large reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, P.; Dauviau, C.; Lefebvre, J. D.; Garnier, C.; Truchi, C.

    1991-10-01

    Work in the field of the unfurlable mesh reflectors as part of the dynamic of large reflectors project is presented. These studies use the unfurlable reflector design developed since 1983: gilded molybdenum reflective mesh supported by a deployable truss. From this strong background two specific critical points are studied: the deployment phase, where, for a deployment test, the test measurements are correlated with dynamic software predictions and the deployment bench chosen uses a 0 g compensation device by helium balloons; the antenna deployed configuration, where the interaction between a large structure and the attitude and orbit control subsystem is analyzed.

  18. Optical materials technology for energy efficiency and solar energy conversion XI: Selective materials, concentrators and reflectors, transparent insulation and superwindows; Proceedings of the Meeting, Toulouse, France, May 18, 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugot-Le Goff, Anne; Granqvist, Claes-Goran; Lampert, Carl M.

    1992-11-01

    The present conference discusses selective solar absorbers (SAs), selectively transmitting materials, solar concentrators and reflectors, and transparent insulators and superwindows. Attention is given to SAs produced through substituted magnetite-based coatings, the properties of spectrally selective Nb films, a Co-Cd solar-selective black coating, regular and random surface microstructures as antireflection coatings for solar absorbers, and the optical and electrical properties of doped RF-sputtered SnO(x) films. Also treated are the role of suspected films in insulated glass units, the optical properties of angle-dependent light-control film, LED nonimaging optics, combined optics for light concentration and trapping in photovoltaics, bulk and surface light-scattering from transparent silica aerogel, evacuated glazing, and a phase-diffractive coating for daylight control. (No individual items are abstracted in this volume)

  19. Biological polarized light reflectors in stomatopod crustaceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Tsyr-Huei; Cronin, Thomas W.; Caldwell, Roy L.; Marshall, Justin

    2005-08-01

    Body parts that can reflect highly polarized light have been found in several species of stomatopod crustaceans (mantis shrimps). These polarized light reflectors can be grossly divided into two major types. The first type, usually red or pink in color to the human visual system, is located within an animal's cuticle. Reflectors of the second type, showing iridescent blue, are located beneath the exoskeleton and thus are unaffected by the molt cycle. We used reflection spectropolarimetry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to study the reflective properties and the structures that reflect highly polarized light in stomatopods. For the first type of reflector, the degree of polarization usually changes dramatically, from less than 20% to over 70%, with a change in viewing angle. TEM examination indicates that the polarization reflection is generated by multilayer thin-film interference. The second type of reflector, the blue colored ones, reflects highly polarized light to all viewing angles. However, these reflectors show a slight chromatic change with different viewing angles. TEM sections have revealed that streams of oval-shaped vesicles might be responsible for the production of the polarized light reflection. In all the reflectors we have examined so far, the reflected light is always maximally polarized at around 500 nm, which is close to the wavelength best transmitted by sea water. This suggests that the polarized light reflectors found in stomatopods are well adapted to the underwater environment. We also found that most reflectors produce polarized light with a horizontal e-vector. How these polarized light reflectors are used in stomatopod signaling remains unknown.

  20. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOEpatents

    Winston, R.; Ries, H.

    1998-10-06

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source a light reflecting surface, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line with the reflecting surface defined in terms of the reference lines a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line to the reflection surface along the desired edge ray through the point. 35 figs.

  1. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOEpatents

    Winston, R.; Ries, H.

    1996-12-17

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source, a light reflecting surface, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line with the reflecting surface defined in terms of the reference line as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line to the reflection surface along the desired edge ray through the point. 35 figs.

  2. All optical OFDM transmission systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, June-Koo K.; Lim, Seong-Jin; Kserawi, Malaz

    2011-12-01

    All-optical OFDM data transmission opens up a new realm of advanced optical transmission at extreme data rates, as subcarriers are multiplexed and demultiplexed by all optical discrete Fourier transforms (DFT). This paper reviews the principles of all optical OFDM transmission and its system application techniques, providing the generic ideas and the practical implementation issues to achieve 100Gbps or higher data rates with a spectral efficiency of 1 bps/Hz or better. This paper also include discussions on all-optical OFDM implementation variants such as an AWG-based OFDM multiplexer and demultiplexer, a receiver design without optical sampling, a transmitter design with frequency-locked cw lasers, an OFDM cyclic prefix designs, and a chromatic dispersion mitigation technique.

  3. A transform-pair relationship between incident and scattered fields from an arbitrary reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, A. C.; Brunstein, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that a transform-pair relationship exists between incident and scattered fields from an infinite, perfectly conducting reflector of arbitrary shape, when the physical optics approximation is applied. As an example of potential applications, this relationship is used to synthesize a reflector feed pattern required to produce a desired far-field pattern from a given paraboloidal reflector.

  4. Correcting Thermal Deformations in an Active Composite Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Samuel C.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Wilkie, William K.

    2011-01-01

    Large, high-precision composite reflectors for future space missions are costly to manufacture, and heavy. An active composite reflector capable of adjusting shape in situ to maintain required tolerances can be lighter and cheaper to manufacture. An active composite reflector testbed was developed that uses an array of piezoelectric composite actuators embedded in the back face sheet of a 0.8-m reflector panel. Each individually addressable actuator can be commanded from 500 to +1,500 V, and the flatness of the panel can be controlled to tolerances of 100 nm. Measuring the surface flatness at this resolution required the use of a speckle holography interferometer system in the Precision Environmental Test Enclosure (PETE) at JPL. The existing testbed combines the PETE for test environment stability, the speckle holography system for measuring out-of-plane deformations, the active panel including an array of individually addressable actuators, a FLIR thermal camera to measure thermal profiles across the reflector, and a heat source. Use of an array of flat piezoelectric actuators to correct thermal deformations is a promising new application for these actuators, as is the use of this actuator technology for surface flatness and wavefront control. An isogrid of these actuators is moving one step closer to a fully active face sheet, with the significant advantage of ease in manufacturing. No extensive rib structure or other actuation backing structure is required, as these actuators can be applied directly to an easy-to-manufacture flat surface. Any mission with a surface flatness requirement for a panel or reflector structure could adopt this actuator array concept to create lighter structures and enable improved performance on orbit. The thermal environment on orbit tends to include variations in temperature during shadowing or changes in angle. Because of this, a purely passive system is not an effective way to maintain flatness at the scale of microns over several

  5. Optically Recording Velocity Interferometer System: Applications and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Marcia

    2015-06-01

    The Optically Recording Velocity Interferometer System (ORVIS) is a useful variant of the single point Velocity Interferometer System Any Reflector (VISAR) for the measurement of spatially dependent surface motion. Despite being similar in name, the two systems fundamentally differ in terms of the light recombination afforded by the interferometer geometry and subsequent recording method of the fringe phase variations. While both techniques have long been established as useful measurement technologies in shock physics studies of homogeneous and heterogeneous materials, the number of researchers employing spatially resolved ORVIS remains small. The first part of this presentation will discuss the baseline system including data examples only possible with the diagnostic's ability for continuous spatial recording. Recent adaptations of the baseline system have extended capabilities to incorporate multiple interferometers and laser illumination sources for observations in multiple spatial dimensions and non-planar geometries. The second part of this presentation will discuss efforts to overcome noted practical challenges when fielding the diagnostic and post-processing of image data. Application to non-planar geometries and highly heterogeneous materials motivates an appreciation of the coupling between the target surface reflectance properties and the light collection optics which can be quantitatively assessed through the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of the reflector. Challenges of practically locating fringe jumps in post-processing are discussed in the context of appreciating the underlying quadrature relationships of the fringe records. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Optical analysis of a photovoltaic V-trough system installed in western India.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Subarna; Sarmah, Nabin; Bapat, Pratap; Mallick, Tapas K

    2012-12-20

    The low concentrating photovoltaic (PV) system such as a 2× V-trough system can be a promising choice for enhancing the power output from conventional PV panels with the inclusion of thermal management. This system is more attractive when the reflectors are retrofitted to the stationary PV panels installed in a high aspect ratio in the north-south direction and are tracked 12 times a year manually according to preset angles, thus eliminating the need of diurnal expensive tracking. In the present analysis, a V-trough system facing exactly the south direction is considered, where the tilt angle of the PV panels' row is kept constant at 18.34°. The system is installed on the terrace of CSIR-Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute in Bhavnagar, Gujarat, India (21.47 N, 71.15 E). The dimension of the entire PV system is 9.64 m×0.55 m. The V-troughs made of anodized aluminum reflectors (70% specular reflectivity) had the same dimensions. An in-house developed; experimentally validated Monte Carlo ray-trace model was used to study the effect of the angular variation of the reflectors throughout a year for the present assembly. Results of the ray trace for the optimized angles showed the maximum simulated optical efficiency to be 85.9%. The spatial distribution of solar intensity over the 0.55 m dimension of the PV panel due to the V-trough reflectors was also studied for the optimized days in periods that included solstices and equinoxes. The measured solar intensity profiles with and without the V-trough system were used to calculate the actual optical efficiencies for several sunny days in the year, and results were validated with the simulated efficiencies within an average error limit of 10%.

  7. Optical analysis of a photovoltaic V-trough system installed in western India.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Subarna; Sarmah, Nabin; Bapat, Pratap; Mallick, Tapas K

    2012-12-20

    The low concentrating photovoltaic (PV) system such as a 2× V-trough system can be a promising choice for enhancing the power output from conventional PV panels with the inclusion of thermal management. This system is more attractive when the reflectors are retrofitted to the stationary PV panels installed in a high aspect ratio in the north-south direction and are tracked 12 times a year manually according to preset angles, thus eliminating the need of diurnal expensive tracking. In the present analysis, a V-trough system facing exactly the south direction is considered, where the tilt angle of the PV panels' row is kept constant at 18.34°. The system is installed on the terrace of CSIR-Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute in Bhavnagar, Gujarat, India (21.47 N, 71.15 E). The dimension of the entire PV system is 9.64 m×0.55 m. The V-troughs made of anodized aluminum reflectors (70% specular reflectivity) had the same dimensions. An in-house developed; experimentally validated Monte Carlo ray-trace model was used to study the effect of the angular variation of the reflectors throughout a year for the present assembly. Results of the ray trace for the optimized angles showed the maximum simulated optical efficiency to be 85.9%. The spatial distribution of solar intensity over the 0.55 m dimension of the PV panel due to the V-trough reflectors was also studied for the optimized days in periods that included solstices and equinoxes. The measured solar intensity profiles with and without the V-trough system were used to calculate the actual optical efficiencies for several sunny days in the year, and results were validated with the simulated efficiencies within an average error limit of 10%. PMID:23262601

  8. Color uniformity in spotlights optimized with reflectors and TIR lenses.

    PubMed

    Teupner, Anne; Bergenek, Krister; Wirth, Ralph; Benítez, Pablo; Miñano, Juan Carlos

    2015-02-01

    We analyze the color uniformity in the far field of spotlight systems to estimate visual perception with a merit function derived from human factor experiments. A multi-colored light-emitting diode (LED) light engine with different light mixing levels is combined with several reflectors and total internal reflection (TIR) lenses. The optimized systems are analyzed at several color uniformity levels with regard to the efficiency, peak luminous intensity and dimensions. It is shown that these properties cannot all be optimized at the same time. Furthermore, excellent color uniformity can be reached by a light mixing layer in the light engine or by adding mixing elements to the secondary optics. PMID:25836237

  9. Color uniformity in spotlights optimized with reflectors and TIR lenses.

    PubMed

    Teupner, Anne; Bergenek, Krister; Wirth, Ralph; Benítez, Pablo; Miñano, Juan Carlos

    2015-02-01

    We analyze the color uniformity in the far field of spotlight systems to estimate visual perception with a merit function derived from human factor experiments. A multi-colored light-emitting diode (LED) light engine with different light mixing levels is combined with several reflectors and total internal reflection (TIR) lenses. The optimized systems are analyzed at several color uniformity levels with regard to the efficiency, peak luminous intensity and dimensions. It is shown that these properties cannot all be optimized at the same time. Furthermore, excellent color uniformity can be reached by a light mixing layer in the light engine or by adding mixing elements to the secondary optics.

  10. Perception for a large deployable reflector telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. M.; Swanson, P. N.; Meinel, A. B.; Meinel, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    Optical science and technology concepts for a large deployable reflector for far-infrared and submillimeter astronomy from above the earth's atmosphere are discussed. Requirements given at the Asilomar Conference are reviewed. The technical challenges of this large-aperture (about 20-meter) telescope, which will be diffraction limited in the infrared, are highlighted in a brief discussion of one particular configuration.

  11. Lasing dynamics of photonic crystal reflector laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakoz, Andrei P.; Liles, A. A.; Viktorov, E. A.; O'Faolain, L.; Habruseva, T.; Huyet, G.; Hegarty, S. P.

    2016-04-01

    We describe the lasing characteristics of a compact tunable laser source formed by the butt-coupling of a reflective indium phosphide optical amplifier to an SU8 waveguide coupled to few-mode photonic crystal reflector. The short cavity length ensured that only a single longitudinal mode of the device could overlap with each photonic crystal reflection peak.

  12. Polarization analysis of optical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, Russell A.

    1989-01-01

    For most optical systems it is typically assumed that the transmitted wavefront has uniform (or Gaussian) amplitude and constant polarization state. This is the default assumption of geometrical optics. This paper considers methods suitable for analyzing systems for which this assumption is not valid. Such methods of polarization analysis include polarization ray tracing and polarization aberration theory. Definitions of the basic classes of polarization phenomena and a review of the Jones calculus are included to form a basis for the discussion.

  13. Telescope optical systems program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschbein, Murray S.; Key, Richard W.

    1991-01-01

    Telescope Optical Systems is a new focused program of technology development that will shape and enable the new 'telescope' missions being studied and planned by NASA. The program structure contains six major elements: systems, optics, materials, structures, controls, and integration and test. Activities in each element will address key technology issues that support a wide range of user needs. Program goals, technology needs, and technology performance objectives are summarized in outline form.

  14. Uniform sunlight concentration reflectors for photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Rabady, Rabi Ibrahim

    2014-03-20

    Sunlight concentration is essential to reach high temperatures of a working fluid in solar-thermal applications and to reduce the cost of photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation systems. Commonly, sunlight concentration is realized by parabolic or cylindrical reflectors, which do not provide uniform concentration on the receiver finite surface. Uniform concentration of sunlight is favored especially for the PV conversion applications since it not only enhances the conversion efficiency of sunlight but also reduces the thermal variations along the receiving PV cell, which can be a performance and life-span limiting factor. In this paper a reflector profile that uniformly infiltrates the concentrated sunlight into the receiving unit is attempted. The new design accounts for all factors that contribute to the nonuniform concentration, like the reflector curvature, which spatially reflects the sunlight nonuniformly, and the angular dependency of both the reflector reflectivity and the sunlight transmission through the PV cell.

  15. Nonimaging Optical Illumination System

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland

    1994-02-22

    A nonimaging illumination or concentration optical device. An optical device is provided having a light source, a light reflecting surface with an opening and positioned partially around the light source which is opposite the opening of the light reflecting surface. The light reflecting surface is disposed to produce a substantially uniform intensity output with the reflecting surface defined in terms of a radius vector R.sub.i in conjunction with an angle .phi..sub.i between R.sub.i, a direction from the source and an angle .theta..sub.i between direct forward illumination and the light ray reflected once from the reflecting surface. R.sub.i varies as the exponential of tan (.phi..sub.i -.theta..sub.i)/2 integrated over .phi..sub.i.

  16. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland; Ries, Harald

    2000-01-01

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

  17. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland; Ries, Harald

    1998-01-01

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

  18. Nonimaging optical illumination system

    DOEpatents

    Winston, Roland; Ries, Harald

    1996-01-01

    A nonimaging illumination optical device for producing a selected far field illuminance over an angular range. The optical device includes a light source 102, a light reflecting surface 108, and a family of light edge rays defined along a reference line 104 with the reflecting surface 108 defined in terms of the reference line 104 as a parametric function R(t) where t is a scalar parameter position and R(t)=k(t)+Du(t) where k(t) is a parameterization of the reference line 104, and D is a distance from a point on the reference line 104 to the reflection surface 108 along the desired edge ray through the point.

  19. VUV-Vis optical characterization of Tetraphenyl-butadiene films on glass and specular reflector substrates from room to liquid Argon temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francini, R.; Montereali, R. M.; Nichelatti, E.; Vincenti, M. A.; Canci, N.; Segreto, E.; Cavanna, F.; Di Pompeo, F.; Carbonara, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Perfetto, F.

    2013-09-01

    The use of efficient wavelength-shifters from the vacuum-ultraviolet to the photo-sensor's range of sensitivity is a key feature in detectors for Dark Matter search and neutrino physics based on liquid argon scintillation detection. Thin film of Tetraphenyl-butadiene (TPB) deposited onto the surface delimiting the active volume of the detector and/or onto the photosensor optical window is the most common solution in current and planned experiments. Detector design and response can be evaluated and correctly simulated only when the properties of the optical system in use (TPB film + substrate) are fully understood. Characterization of the optical system requires specific, sometimes sophisticated optical methodologies. In this paper the main features of TPB coatings on different, commonly used substrates is reported, as a result of two independent campaigns of measurements at the specialized optical metrology labs of ENEA and University of Tor Vergata. Measured features include TPB emission spectra with lineshape and relative intensity variation recorded as a function of the film thickness and for the first time down to LAr temperature, as well as optical reflectance and transmittance spectra of the TPB coated substrates in the wavelength range of the TPB emission.

  20. Monitoring of the reflectors of ESA's Planck telescope by close-range photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parian, Jafar Amiri; Gruen, Armin; Cozzani, Alessandro

    2007-11-01

    The Planck mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) is designed to image the anisotropies of the Cosmic Background Radiation Field over the whole sky. Planck's objective is to analyze, with the highest accuracy ever achieved, the remnants of the radiation that filled the universe immediately after the Big Bang, which we observe today as the cosmic microwave background. To achieve this aim well-manufactured reflectors are used as parts of the Planck telescope receiving system. The system consists of the Secondary and Primary Reflectors which are sections of two different ellipsoids of revolution with diameters of 1.1 and 1.9 meters. Deformations of the reflectors which influence the optical parameters and the gain of receiving signals are investigated in vacuum and at temperatures down to 95K, using close-range photogrammetric techniques. We have designed an optimal close-range photogrammetric network by heuristic simulation for the Primary and Secondary Reflectors with a mean relative precision better than 1:1,000,000 and 1:400,000, respectively, to achieve the requested accuracies. Special considerations have been taken into account in different steps of design, such as the determinability of additional parameters under the given network configuration, datum definition, reliability and precision issues as well as workspace limits and propagating errors from different sources of errors. A least squares best-fit ellipsoid was developed to determine the optical parameters of the reflector. We present our procedure and the results of processing the photogrammetric measurements of the Flight Models of the Primary and Secondary Reflectors which were executed by Thales Alenia Space France under ESA-ESTEC contract in vacuum and at very low temperatures.

  1. An assessment of potential weather effects due to operation of the Space Orbiting Light Augmentation Reflector Energy System (SOLARES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, N. C.

    1978-01-01

    Implementation of SOLARES will input large quantities of heat continuously into a stationary location on the Earth's surface. The quantity of heat released by each of the SOlARES ground receivers, having a reflector orbit height of 6378 km, exceeds by 30 times that released by large power parks which were studied in detail. Using atmospheric models, estimates are presented for the local weather effects, the synoptic scale effects, and the global scale effects from such intense thermal radiation.

  2. Fiber optic sensing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic interferometer utilizes a low coherence light emitting diode (LED) laser as a light source which is filtered and driven at two RF frequencies, high and low, that are specific to the initial length of the resonator chamber. A displacement of a reflecting mirror changes the length traveled by the nonreferencing signal. The low frequency light undergoes destructive interference which reduces the average intensity of the wave while the high frequency light undergoes constructive interference which increases the average intensity of the wave. The ratio of these two intensity measurements is proportional to the displacement incurred.

  3. A study of three techniques used in the diffraction analysis of shaped dual-reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, Tom A.; Kildal, Per-Simon

    1989-01-01

    An examination is presented of three techniques used for the efficient computation of fields diffracted by a subreflector that has been shaped by geometrical optics synthesis. It is found that these techniques, which are based on the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD), produce errors in the computed fields that are specific to shaped reflectors. These errors are examined for a reflector system shaped to produce maximum gain from a tapered feed illumination. The discrepancies are directly related to the caustic being located near an observation point of the GTD calculations. The errors found are localized, and they increase in magnitude as the caustic approaches the main reflector. In a general offset geometry, the location of the caustic may be located arbitrarily close to the main reflector given a prescribed output aperture distribution. For the specific case considered here-the common situation of shaping to produce maximum gain-the caustic is located near the edge of the main reflector and on the reflection shadow boundary. A local correction is derived which creates a uniform solution through the caustic and across the reflection shadow boundary. Away from this point the calculation receeds to the standard GTD solution.

  4. Enhanced light collection in fluorescence microscopy using self-assembled micro-reflectors

    PubMed Central

    Göröcs, Zoltán; McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-01-01

    In fluorescence microscopy, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the optical system is directly linked to the numerical aperture (NA) of the microscope objective, which creates detection challenges for low-NA, wide-field and high-throughput imaging systems. Here we demonstrate a method to increase the light collection efficiency from micron-scale fluorescent objects using self-assembled vapor-condensed polyethylene glycol droplets, which act as micro-reflectors for fluorescent light. Around each fluorescent particle, a liquid meniscus is formed that increases the excitation efficiency and redirects part of the laterally-emitted fluorescent light towards the detector due to internal reflections at the liquid-air interface of the meniscus. The three-dimensional shape of this micro-reflector can be tuned as a function of time, vapor temperature, and substrate contact angle, providing us optimized SNR performance for fluorescent detection. Based on these self-assembled micro-reflectors, we experimentally demonstrate ~2.5-3 fold enhancement of the fluorescent signal from 2-10 μm sized particles. A theoretical explanation of the formation rate and shapes of these micro-reflectors is presented, along with a ray tracing model of their optical performance. This method can be used as a sample preparation technique for consumer electronics-based microscopy and sensing tools, thus increasing the sensitivity of low-NA systems that image fluorescent micro-objects. PMID:26083081

  5. Enhanced light collection in fluorescence microscopy using self-assembled micro-reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göröcs, Zoltán; McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-06-01

    In fluorescence microscopy, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the optical system is directly linked to the numerical aperture (NA) of the microscope objective, which creates detection challenges for low-NA, wide-field and high-throughput imaging systems. Here we demonstrate a method to increase the light collection efficiency from micron-scale fluorescent objects using self-assembled vapor-condensed polyethylene glycol droplets, which act as micro-reflectors for fluorescent light. Around each fluorescent particle, a liquid meniscus is formed that increases the excitation efficiency and redirects part of the laterally-emitted fluorescent light towards the detector due to internal reflections at the liquid-air interface of the meniscus. The three-dimensional shape of this micro-reflector can be tuned as a function of time, vapor temperature, and substrate contact angle, providing us optimized SNR performance for fluorescent detection. Based on these self-assembled micro-reflectors, we experimentally demonstrate ~2.5-3 fold enhancement of the fluorescent signal from 2-10 μm sized particles. A theoretical explanation of the formation rate and shapes of these micro-reflectors is presented, along with a ray tracing model of their optical performance. This method can be used as a sample preparation technique for consumer electronics-based microscopy and sensing tools, thus increasing the sensitivity of low-NA systems that image fluorescent micro-objects.

  6. Optimization of optical systems for LED spot lights concerning the color uniformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teupner, Anne; Bergenek, Krister; Wirth, Ralph; Miñano, Juan C.; Benítez, Pablo

    2014-09-01

    Spotlighting is one illumination field where the application of light emitting diodes (LED) creates many advantages. Commonly, the system for spot lights consists of a LED light engine and collimating secondary optics. Through angular or spatial separated emitted light from the source and imaging optical elements, a non uniform far field appears with colored rings, dots or patterns. Many feasible combinations result in very different spatial color distributions. Several combinations of three multi-chip light sources and secondary optical elements like reflectors and TIR lenses with additional facets or scattering elements were analyzed mainly regarding the color uniformity. They are assessed by the merit function Usl which was derived from human factor experiments and describes the color uniformity based on the visual perception of humans. Furthermore, the optical systems are compared concerning efficiency, peak candela and aspect ratio. Both types of optics differ in the relation between the color uniformity level and other properties. A plain reflector with a slightly color mixing light source performs adequate. The results for the TIR lenses indicate that they need additional elements for good color mixing or blended light source. The most convenient system depends on the requirements of the application.

  7. Optical technology for flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayanagi, M.

    1986-01-01

    Optical applications to the flight control system including optical data bus, sensors, and transducers are analyzed. Examples of optical data bus include airborne light optical fiber technology (ALOFT), F-5E, YA-7D, MIL-STD-1553 fiber optic data bus and NAL-optic data bus. This NAL-optic data bus is applied to STOL, and its characteristics are stressed. Principles and advantages of optical pulse-digital transducers are discussed.

  8. Optical discriminator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robelen, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    System includes lightweight, inexpensive movie camera to record simultaneously views from three different angles on same filmstrip. This is noncritical system as it is adaptable to many applications requiring similar, but diverse, viewing areas.

  9. The Large Deployable Reflector - A technology development challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pittman, R. B.; Gualdoni, R.

    1984-01-01

    The proposed Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) telescope is an astrophysical orbiting platform whose aperture is of the order of 20 m, and is dedicated to observations in the IR and sub-mm wavelengths. NASA is currently planning a 5-year technology development program that will allow the requisite hardware and software to reach the state required for economical and reliable implementation. A computer model simulation is envisioned toward this end that will encompass and integrate structural, thermal, control, optics, and systems program elements. Possession of the enabling technology is foreseen for the early 1990s.

  10. Inflatable Reflector For Solar Power And Radio Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sercel, Joel; Gilchriest, Carl; Ewell, Rich; Herman, Martin; Rascoe, Daniel L.; Nesmith, Bill J.

    1995-01-01

    Report proposes installation of lightweight inflatable reflector structure aboard spacecraft required to both derive power from sunlight and communicate with Earth by radio when apparent position of Earth is at manageably small angle from line of sight to Sun. Structure contains large-aperture paraboloidal reflector aimed toward Sun and concentrates sunlight onto photovoltaic power converter and acts as main reflector of spacecraft radio-communication system.

  11. Roadmap on quantum optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumke, Rainer; Lu, Zehuang; Close, John; Robins, Nick; Weis, Antoine; Mukherjee, Manas; Birkl, Gerhard; Hufnagel, Christoph; Amico, Luigi; Boshier, Malcolm G.; Dieckmann, Kai; Li, Wenhui; Killian, Thomas C.

    2016-09-01

    This roadmap bundles fast developing topics in experimental optical quantum sciences, addressing current challenges as well as potential advances in future research. We have focused on three main areas: quantum assisted high precision measurements, quantum information/simulation, and quantum gases. Quantum assisted high precision measurements are discussed in the first three sections, which review optical clocks, atom interferometry, and optical magnetometry. These fields are already successfully utilized in various applied areas. We will discuss approaches to extend this impact even further. In the quantum information/simulation section, we start with the traditionally successful employed systems based on neutral atoms and ions. In addition the marvelous demonstrations of systems suitable for quantum information is not progressing, unsolved challenges remain and will be discussed. We will also review, as an alternative approach, the utilization of hybrid quantum systems based on superconducting quantum devices and ultracold atoms. Novel developments in atomtronics promise unique access in exploring solid-state systems with ultracold gases and are investigated in depth. The sections discussing the continuously fast-developing quantum gases include a review on dipolar heteronuclear diatomic gases, Rydberg gases, and ultracold plasma. Overall, we have accomplished a roadmap of selected areas undergoing rapid progress in quantum optics, highlighting current advances and future challenges. These exciting developments and vast advances will shape the field of quantum optics in the future.

  12. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) system concept and technology definition study. Analysis of space station requirements for LDR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, Donald L.; Vinkey, Victor F.; Runge, Fritz C.

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine how the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) might benefit from the use of the space station for assembly, checkout, deployment, servicing, refurbishment, and technology development. Requirements that must be met by the space station to supply benefits for a selected scenario are summarized. Quantitative and qualitative data are supplied. Space station requirements for LDR which may be utilized by other missions are identified. A technology development mission for LDR is outlined and requirements summarized. A preliminary experiment plan is included. Space Station Data Base SAA 0020 and TDM 2411 are updated.

  13. Deployable Reflector for Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. L.

    1982-01-01

    Unfoldable-membrane-reflector concept leads to mobile photovoltaic generators. Hinged containers swing open for deployment, and counterbalance beam swings into position. Folded reflector membranes are unfolded as deployment mast is extended, until stretched out flat.

  14. Laser beam modeling in optical storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treptau, J. P.; Milster, T. D.; Flagello, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    A computer model has been developed that simulates light propagating through an optical data storage system. A model of a laser beam that originates at a laser diode, propagates through an optical system, interacts with a optical disk, reflects back from the optical disk into the system, and propagates to data and servo detectors is discussed.

  15. Corrosion protection for silver reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Arendt, Paul N.; Scott, Marion L.

    1991-12-31

    A method of protecting silver reflectors from damage caused by contact with gaseous substances which are often present in the atmosphere and a silver reflector which is so protected. The inventive method comprises at least partially coating a reflector with a metal oxide such as aluminum oxide to a thickness of 15 .ANG. or less.

  16. The Corner Reflector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Whitney S., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the corner reflector array left on the moon by the July 1969 Apollo astronauts is described. The array was used to reflect earth-originating laser beams back to earth, and yielded a more accurate determination (to within six inches) of distance from the earth to the moon. (MP)

  17. System for testing optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Davies, Terence J.; Franks, Larry A.; Nelson, Melvin A.

    1981-01-01

    A system for nondestructively determining the attenuation coefficient, .alpha.(.lambda.), of low-loss optical fiber wave guides. Cerenkov light pulses are generated at a plurality of locations in the fiber by a beam of charged particles. The transit times of selected spectral components and their intensities are utilized to unfold the .alpha.(.lambda.) values over the measured spectrum.

  18. 47-km 1.25-Gbps transmission using a self-seeded transmitter with a modulation averaging reflector.

    PubMed

    Komljenovic, Tin; Babić, Dubravko; Sipus, Zvonimir

    2012-07-30

    We demonstrate an extended-cavity (1-km round trip) transmitter employing a reflective-semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) self-seeded by spectrally-sliced passive modulation-averaging reflector. We show that using modulation averaging reflectors in self-seeded transmitters improves link margin, allows a wider range of bias conditions for the RSOA by removing the modulation in the seeding light and consequently allows operation with higher extinction ratios. We furthermore demonstrate 47 km transmission at 1.25 Gbps with a 16-channel fully passive remote node. This type of transmitter is suitable for application in colorless WDM-PON systems. PMID:23038291

  19. Streaked Optical Pyrometer System for Laser-Driven Shock-Wave Experiments on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.; Boehly, T.R.; Melchior, Meyerhofer, D.D.; Celliers, P.M.; Eggert, J.H.; Hicks, D.G.; Sorce, C.M.; Oertel, J.A.; Emmel, P.M.

    2007-03-23

    The temperature of laser-driven shock waves is of interest to inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density physics. We report on a streaked optical pyrometer that measures the self-emission of laser-driven shocks simultaneously with a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR). Together these diagnostics are used to obtain the temporally and spatially resolved temperatures of ~Mbar shocks driven by the OMEGA laser. We provide a brief description of the diagnostic and how it is used with VISAR. Key spectral calibration results are discussed and important characteristics of the recording system are presented.

  20. Streaked optical pyrometer system for laser-driven shock-wave experiments on OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Miller, J E; Boehly, T R; Melchior, A; Meyerhofer, D D; Celliers, P M; Eggert, J H; Hicks, D G; Sorce, C M; Oertel, J A; Emmel, P M

    2007-03-01

    The temperature of laser-driven shock waves is of interest to inertial confinement fusion and high-energy-density physics. We report on a streaked optical pyrometer that measures the self-emission of laser-driven shocks simultaneously with a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR). Together these diagnostics are used to obtain the temporally and spatially resolved temperatures of approximately megabar shocks driven by the OMEGA laser. We provide a brief description of the diagnostic and how it is used with VISAR. Key spectral calibration results are discussed and important characteristics of the recording system are presented. PMID:17411209

  1. Three-axis optic-electronic autocollimation system for the inspection of large-scale objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konyakhin, Igor A.; Timofeev, Alexandr N.; Konyakhin, Aleksey

    2013-04-01

    Ways of refining autocollimation systems for the inspection of angular deformation of industrial objects are analyzed. Control elements based on tetrahedral reflectors with plane and cylinder reflecting sides are researched. Results of an analysis the action matrix of tetrahedral reflectors are considered. The features of tetrahedral reflector as the control elements for three-axis angular systems are discussed. Equations for static characteristics of the measuring system are shown.

  2. Study of Membrane Reflector Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, K.; Hedgepeth, J.

    1979-01-01

    Very large reflective surfaces are required by future spacecraft for such purposes as solar energy collection, antenna surfaces, thermal control, attitude and orbit control with solar pressure, and solar sailing. The performance benefits in large membrane reflector systems, which may be derived from an advancement of this film and related structures technology, are identified and qualified. The results of the study are reported and summarized. Detailed technical discussions of various aspects of the study are included in several separate technical notes which are referenced.

  3. Self-adaptive, narrowband tuning of a pulsed optical parametric oscillator and a continuous-wave diode laser via phase-conjugate photorefractive cavity reflectors: verification by high-resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y.; Orr, B. J.

    2009-08-01

    A dynamic self-adaptive Bragg grating formed in a photorefractive crystal is shown to be a convenient way to attain single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) operation and narrowband tuning both in a pulsed, injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and in a continuous-wave (cw) extended-cavity diode laser. The pulsed OPO cavity comprises a Rh:BaTiO3 photorefractive (PR) crystal, a periodically poled KTiOPO4 nonlinear-optical crystal, and a dielectrically-coated end mirror. A continuous-wave seed beam at 820-850 nm from a tunable SLM diode laser traverses firstly the Rh:BaTiO3 crystal and then is retro-reflected by the end mirror; this creates a wavelength-selective Bragg grating reflector in the PR crystal, thereby completing the OPO cavity. The cavity stays automatically resonant with the seed radiation, with no need to actively control its length or to make any other mechanical adjustment. One form of injection seeder comprises a novel extended-cavity diode laser (ECDL) design incorporating a self-pumped photorefractive phase-conjugate reflector and a compact, high-finesse tunable intracavity ring filter. This combination facilitates robust tunable single-frequency operation with narrow optical bandwidth. The performance characteristics of the OPO and the ECDL are evaluated by recording high-resolution atomic and molecular spectra. Notably, fluorescence-detected sub-Doppler two-photon excitation at 822 nm, of the 8 S ←6 S transition in atomic Cs, provides a crucial linewidth test.

  4. Diffraction profile synthesis applied to offset dual reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, R. I.

    1985-05-01

    During the last 15 years, in work carried out at a research center, the physical optics method has been applied directly to the synthesis process itself. It is pointed out that the results of this method, known as Diffraction Profile Synthesis (DPS), are Cassegrain antennas with efficiencies superior to those of any ray optics design. Thus, the reflectors generated by this process realize the theoretical maximum efficiency for any given size of antenna. Attention is given to the diffraction profile synthesis, the extension of DPS, spherical wave expansions, the application to offset reflectors, the main reflector focussed field, the near-field feed pattern, reflector perturbations, profile smoothing, high efficiency offset Gregorian, the offset Gregorian with Hansen distribution, and the low sidelobe elliptical antenna.

  5. Planar omnidirectional reflectors in chalcogenide glass and polymer.

    PubMed

    Decorby, R; Nguyen, H; Dwivedi, P; Clement, T

    2005-08-01

    We have fabricated and tested planar reflectors exhibiting an omnidirectional stop band centered near 1750 nm wavelength. The reflectors are comprised of multiple layers of Ge33As12Se55 chalcogenide glass and polyamide-imide polymer. Glass layers were deposited by thermal evaporation and polymer layers were deposited by spin-casting. Thin film stacks of up to 13 layers showed good planarity and adhesion, which we attribute to the well-matched thermo-mechanical properties of the materials. The optical properties of the reflectors were tested in both transmission and reflection, and the results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Relatively low-temperature processing steps were employed, making these reflectors of interest for integrated optics.

  6. Models for the prediction of polar coordinates of lunar reflectors in the dynamic Earth-Moon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichert, B. D.

    Two models for the prediction of polar coordinates of reflectors installed on the Moon were investigated with respect to their usefulness for Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR). The first model is purely mechanical-analytical, and is based on the Brown Moon theory and on the Moon rotation and libration theory. The second method applies recursive filter algorithms using Kalman filtering. Data from laser ranging measurements were compared with data obtained with both models. Both models fulfil the required accuracy, and are more or less equivalent, with respect to the accuracy of the predictions of azimuth and elevation. However, for range, the Kalman filtering method is preferable. The FORTRAN computer programs for the Kalman filtering are enclosed.

  7. Gregorian optical system with non-linear optical technology for protection against intense optical transients

    DOEpatents

    Ackermann, Mark R.; Diels, Jean-Claude M.

    2007-06-26

    An optical system comprising a concave primary mirror reflects light through an intermediate focus to a secondary mirror. The secondary mirror re-focuses the image to a final image plane. Optical limiter material is placed near the intermediate focus to optically limit the intensity of light so that downstream components of the optical system are protected from intense optical transients. Additional lenses before and/or after the intermediate focus correct optical aberrations.

  8. Floating volumetric image formation using a dihedral corner reflector array device.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Daisuke; Hirano, Noboru; Maeda, Yuki; Yamamoto, Siori; Mukai, Takaaki; Maekawa, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    A volumetric display system using an optical imaging device consisting of numerous dihedral corner reflectors placed perpendicular to the surface of a metal plate is proposed. Image formation by the dihedral corner reflector array (DCRA) is free from distortion and focal length. In the proposed volumetric display system, a two-dimensional real image is moved by a mirror scanner to scan a three-dimensional (3D) space. Cross-sectional images of a 3D object are displayed in accordance with the position of the image plane. A volumetric image is observed as a stack of the cross-sectional images. The use of the DCRA brings compact system configuration and volumetric real image generation with very low distortion. An experimental volumetric display system including a DCRA, a galvanometer mirror, and a digital micro-mirror device was constructed to verify the proposed method. A volumetric image consisting of 1024×768×400 voxels was formed by the experimental system.

  9. System performance and cost sensitivity comparisons of stretched membrane heliostat reflectors with current generation glass/metal concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, L.M.; Anderson, J.V.; Short, W.; Wendelin, T.

    1985-12-01

    Heliostat costs have long been recognized as a major factor in the cost of solar central receiver plants. Research on stretched membrane heliostats has been emphasized because of their potential as a cost-effective alternative to current glass/metal designs. However, the cost and performance potential of stretched membrane heliostats from a system perspective has not been studied until this time. The optical performance of individual heliostats is predicted here using results established in previous structural studies. These performance predictions are used to compare both focused and unfocused stretched membrane heliostats with state-of-the-art glass/metal heliostats from a systems perspective. We investigated the sensitivity of the relative cost and performance of fields of heliostats to a large number of parameter variations, including system size, delivery temperature, heliostat module size, surface specularity, hemispherical reflectance, and macroscopic surface quality. The results indicate that focused stretched membrane systems should have comparable performance levels to those of current glass/metal heliostat systems. Further, because of their relatively lower cost, stretched membrane heliostats should provide an economically attractive alternative to current glass/metal heliostats over essentially the entire range of design parameters studied. Unfocused stretched membrane heliostats may also be attractive for a somewhat more limited range of applications, including the larger plant sizes and lower delivery temperatures.

  10. Compact optical imaging system for arrays of optical thyristors.

    PubMed

    Kirk, A; Goulet, A; Thienpont, H; McArdle, N; Brenner, K H; Kuijk, M; Heremans, P; Veretennicoff, I

    1997-05-10

    A compact and modular optical system that employs gradient-refractive-index rod lenses to image arrays of Lambertian sources is characterized both experimentally and by ray-tracing simulations. A hybrid optical system that incorporates additional microlens arrays to reduce transmittance losses and aberrations is also modeled, and the two systems are compared.

  11. Thermal/Optical analysis of optical system of star tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Si-yu; Huang, Yi-fan

    2011-08-01

    Spacecraft would be expected to encounter diverse extreme environmental (EE) conditions throughout their mission phases. These EE conditions are often coupled. Star tracker is a high accurate 3-axis attitude measuring instrument used in various spacecrafts. In this paper, an effective scheme to the thermal/optical analysis in optical system of star sensor was described and the concept of thermal optical analysis of star tracker optical system was introduced in detail. Using finite element analysis (FEA) and ray tracing, we can study the relationship of optical properties of optical systems and optical system's temperature distribution . A lens system configuration having six uncemented elements was discussed. The lens system was a 56mm EFL, which was different from common lens used in imaging system that this lens system was required to have a high resolving power in design thoughts. It was designed to determine the attitude of space platform by detecting and mapping the geometric pattern of stars. Based on this system, the FEA models of the optical system were established for temperature distribution calculation and for thermal-elastic structural deformation analysis respectively. Using the models, the steady-state temperature distributions of the tracker were simulated. The rigid body displacements of the optical components under homogeneous temperature changes and certain temperature distributions were derived out. It is convenient to use Zernike polynomials as the data transmission between optical and structural analysis programs. Here, Zernike polynomials and their fitting method are used as an example to determine the thermal induced optical degradations of the optical system.

  12. Heat dissipation in water-cooled reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozai, Toyoki

    1994-01-01

    The energy balance of a lamp varies with the thermal and optical characteristics of the reflector. The photosynthetic radiation efficiency of lamps, defined as input power divided by photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm) emitted from the lamp ranges between 0.17 and 0.26. The rest of the energy input is wasted as longwave (3000 nm and over) and non-PAR shortwave radiation (from 700 nm to 3000 nm), convective, and conductive heat from the lamp, reflector, and ballast, and simply for increasing the cooling load. Furthermore, some portion of the PAR is uselessly absorbed by the inner walls, shelves, vessels, etc. and some portion of the PAR received by the plantlets is converted into sensible and latent heat. More than 98% of the energy input is probably converted into heat, with only less than 2% of the energy input being converted into chemical energy as carbohydrates by photosynthesis. Therefore, it is essential to reduce the generation of heat in the culture room in order to reduce the cooling load. Through use of a water-cooled reflector, the generation of convective and conductive heat and longwave radiation from the reflector can be reduced, without reduction of PAR.

  13. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) system concept and technology definition study. Volume 2: Technology assessment and technology development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, Donald L.; Jones, Peter A.

    1989-01-01

    A study was conducted to define reasonable and representative LDR system concepts for the purpose of defining a technology development program aimed at providing the requisite technological capability necessary to start LDR development by the end of 1991. This volume presents thirteen technology assessments and technology development plans, as well as an overview and summary of the LDR concepts. Twenty-two proposed augmentation projects are described (selected from more than 30 candidates). The five LDR technology areas most in need of supplementary support are: cryogenic cooling; astronaut assembly of the optically precise LDR in space; active segmented primary mirror; dynamic structural control; and primary mirror contamination control. Three broad, time-phased, five-year programs were synthesized from the 22 projects, scheduled, and funding requirements estimated.

  14. Actuator grouping optimization on flexible space reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Jeffrey R.; Wang, K. W.; Fang, Houfei; Quijano, Ubaldo

    2011-03-01

    With the rapid advances in deployable membrane and mesh antenna technologies, the feasibility of developing large, lightweight reflectors has greatly improved. In order to achieve the required accuracy, precision surface control is needed on these lightweight reflectors. While studies have shown that domain control of space reflectors via Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) actuators is promising, the challenge is to realistically control a large number of distributed actuators with limited number of power supplies. In this research, a new En Mass Elimination method is synthesized to determine the optimal grouping of actuators when the actuator number exceeds the number of power supplies available. An analytical model is developed and the methodology is demonstrated numerically through system simulation on the derived model.

  15. Advanced deployable reflectors for communications satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Elvin; Josephs, Michael; Hedgepeth, John

    1993-02-01

    This paper discusses a concept for a deployable mesh reflector for large spacecraft antennas and the processes used in design, fabrication and testing. A set of overall reflector requirements such as stowed volume, deployed diameter and RF loss derived from system specifications are presented. The development of design and analysis tools to allow parametric studies such as facet size, number of ribs and number of rib segments is discussed. CATIA (a commercially available three-dimensional design and analysis tool) is used to perform kinematic analyses as well as to establish the database to be used by the several groups participating in the development is examined. Results of trade studies performed to reduce cost with minimum risk to product delivery are included. A thirty foot reflector has been built and tested.

  16. Optical fiber data transfer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    This Phase 2 effort applies the results of Phase 1 to design and fabricate an optical slip ring system for a helicopter rotor blade/wind tunnel application. In this application, there are two assemblies: one on the rotating portion of the mechanical system, one on the stationary portion. The assembly on the rotating portion digitizes and encodes 128 transducer signals from various parts of the blade, and optically transfers data across the noncontacting coupling. Two complete identical independent channels are provided. On the stationary side, the signals are decoded and one channel is transmitted in digital form to a computer for recording and analysis. The second channel reconstructs the analog transducer signals for real time observation. In the opposite direction, eight signal channels enable control signals to be passed from the stationary to the rotating part of the system. Power to the rotor mounted electronics is supplied via power slip rings. The advantages of the optical over the traditional electro-mechanical slip ring method of data transfer across a rotating joint are long life, low-maintenance, immunity to crosstalk, and wider bandwidth. Successful completion of this effort demonstrated that this method is practical and reliable, and can be implemented under difficult conditions of available space, power, environment, and stringent performance and equipment life requirements.

  17. Optical fiber data transfer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, S. H.

    1988-09-01

    This Phase 2 effort applies the results of Phase 1 to design and fabricate an optical slip ring system for a helicopter rotor blade/wind tunnel application. In this application, there are two assemblies: one on the rotating portion of the mechanical system, one on the stationary portion. The assembly on the rotating portion digitizes and encodes 128 transducer signals from various parts of the blade, and optically transfers data across the noncontacting coupling. Two complete identical independent channels are provided. On the stationary side, the signals are decoded and one channel is transmitted in digital form to a computer for recording and analysis. The second channel reconstructs the analog transducer signals for real time observation. In the opposite direction, eight signal channels enable control signals to be passed from the stationary to the rotating part of the system. Power to the rotor mounted electronics is supplied via power slip rings. The advantages of the optical over the traditional electro-mechanical slip ring method of data transfer across a rotating joint are long life, low-maintenance, immunity to crosstalk, and wider bandwidth. Successful completion of this effort demonstrated that this method is practical and reliable, and can be implemented under difficult conditions of available space, power, environment, and stringent performance and equipment life requirements.

  18. Optical Energy Transfer and Conversion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, William C. (Inventor); Hogan, Bartholomew P. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An optical power transfer system comprising a fiber spooler, a fiber optic rotary joint mechanically connected to the fiber spooler, and an electrical power extraction subsystem connected to the fiber optic rotary joint with an optical waveguide. Optical energy is generated at and transferred from a base station through fiber wrapped around the spooler, through the rotary joint, and ultimately to the power extraction system at a remote mobility platform for conversion to another form of energy.

  19. Portable, solid state, fiber optic coupled Doppler interferometer system for detonation and shock diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, K. J.; Crump, O. B.

    1994-01-01

    VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) is a specialized Doppler interferometer system that is gaining world-wide acceptance as the standard for shock phenomena analysis. The VISAR's large power and cooling requirements, and the sensitive and complex nature of the interferometer cavity have restricted the traditional system to the laboratory. This paper describes the new portable VISAR, its peripheral sensors, and the role it played in optically measuring ground shock of and underground nuclear detonation. The Solid State VISAR uses a prototype diode pumped Nd:YAG laser and solid state detectors that provide a suitcase-size system with low power requirements. A special window and sensors were developed for fiber optic coupling (1 kilometer long) to the VISAR. The system has proven itself as a reliable, easy to use instrument that is capable of field test use and rapid data reduction using only a notebook personal computer (PC).

  20. Portable, solid state, fiber optic coupled doppler interferometer system for detonation and shock diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, K.J.; Crump, O.B.

    1993-01-01

    VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) is a specialized Doppler interferometer system that is gaining world-wide acceptance as the standard for shock phenomena analysis. The VISAR's large power and cooling requirements, and the sensitive and complex nature of the interferometer cavity has restricted the traditional system to the laboratory. This paper describes the new portable VISAR, its peripheral sensors, and the role it played in optically measuring ground shock of an underground nuclear detonation (UGT). The Solid State VISAR uses a prototype diode pumped ND:YAG laser and solid state detectors that provide a suitcase-size system with low power requirements. A special window and sensor was developed for fiber optic coupling (1 kilometer long) to the VISAR. The system has proven itself as a reliable, easy-to-use instrument that is capable of field test use and rapid data reduction employing only a personal computer (PC).

  1. Portable, solid state, fiber optic coupled Doppler interferometer system for detonation and shock diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, K.J.

    1994-08-01

    VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) is a specialized Doppler interferometer system that is gaining world-wide acceptance as the standard for shock phenomena analysis. The VISAR`s large power and cooling requirements, and the sensitive and complex nature of the interferometer cavity has restricted the traditional system to the laboratory. This paper describes the new portable VISAR, its peripheral sensors, and the role it played in optically measuring ground shock of an underground nuclear detonation (UGT). The Solid State VISAR uses a prototype diode pumped Nd:YAG laser and solid state detectors that provide a suitcase-size system with low power requirements. A special window and sensors was developed for fiber optic coupling (1 kilometer long) to the VISCAR. The system has proven itself as reliable, easy to use instrument that is capable of field test use and rapid data reduction using only a notebook personal computer (PC).

  2. Portable, solid state, fiber optic coupled Doppler interferometer system for detonation and shock diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, K.J.; Crump, O.B.

    1994-03-01

    VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) is a specialized Doppler interferometer system that is gaining world-wide acceptance as the standard for shock phenomena analysis. The VISAR`s large power and cooling requirements, and the sensitive and complex nature of the interferometer cavity have restricted the traditional system to the laboratory. This paper describes the new portable VISAR, its peripheral sensors, and the role it played in optically measuring ground shock of an underground nuclear detonation. The solid State VISAR uses a prototype diode pumped ND:YAG laser and solid state detectors that provide a suitcase-size system with low power requirements. A special window and sensors were developed for fiber optic coupling (1 kilometer long) to the VISAR. The system has proven itself as a reliable, easy to use instrument that is capable of field test use and rapid data reduction using only a notebook personal computer (PC).

  3. Reflective optical imaging system with balanced distortion

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Hudyma, Russell M.; Shafer, David R.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    1999-01-01

    An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The four optical elements comprise, in order from object to image, convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for step and scan lithography methods. The invention enables the use of larger slit dimensions associated with ring field scanning optics, improves wafer throughput and allows higher semiconductor device density. The inventive optical system is characterized by reduced dynamic distortion because the static distortion is balanced across the slit width.

  4. Pioneer imaging photopolarimeter optical system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellicori, S. F.; Russell, E. E.; Watts, L. A.

    1973-01-01

    The imaging photopolarimeter aboard the Pioneer 10 spacecraft en route to the vicinity of Jupiter is described. This instrument is capable of moderate resolution spin-scan imaging and high precision polarimetric and photometric mapping of Jupiter in red and blue light. The field of view can be selectively changed from 0.50 mrad square to 40 mrad square to accommodate resolution and radiance combinations ranging from the zodiacal background to that of Jupiter. Optical materials were chosen to survive, with minimum degradation, the rigors of a nearly 2-year journey to Jupiter including transit through the Jovian trapped radiation belts. The optics are described in detail, and the operational system is outlined. The procedures for preflight and in-flight calibration are described, and some performance characteristics and preliminary flight results are presented.

  5. Pioneer imaging photopolarimeter optical system.

    PubMed

    Pellicori, S F; Russell, E E; Watts, L A

    1973-06-01

    The imaging photopolarimeter aboard the Pioneer 10 spacecraft en route to the vicinity of Jupiter is described. This instrument is capable of moderate resolution spin-scan imaging and high precision polarimetric and photometric mapping of Jupiter in red and blue light. The field of view can be selectively changed from 0.50 mrad square to 40 mrad square to accommodate resolution and radiance combinations ranging from the zodiacal background to that of Jupiter. The dynamic range (radiance) of the instrument is greater than 10(8). Optical materials were chosen to survive, with minimum degradation, the rigors of a nearly 2-year journey to Jupiter including transit through the Jovian trapped radiation belts. The optics are described in detail, and the operational system is outlined. The procedures for preflight and in-flight calibration are described, and some performance characteristics and preliminary flight results are presented. PMID:20125507

  6. Anomalous Results from PO Applied to Reflector Antennas: The importance of Near Field Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Yahya; Imbriale, William A.

    1998-01-01

    There is no doubt among the designers of reflector antennas that the physical optics (PO) analysis technique is the most popular numerical technique. Powerful computer codes are available for the analysis of single or multi reflector antenna systems. Additionally, ever increasingly demand on the antenna performance necessitates the computation of antenna far field patterns under various situations. For example, in using multi reflector antennas such as, Gregorian or Cassegrain, it may become necessary to determine the total fields including the feed radiation pattern, subreflector scattered pattern and the main reflector scattered pattern. In these situations, the common practice is to sum up various scattered fields and the incident field contributions to obtain the desired total field, it is the purpose of this paper to demonstrate that the typical approach based on the far field pattern of the feed would result into erroneous result and special care must be exercised to obtain the correct result. This will be demonstrated through a detailed investigation of a representative test case.

  7. Don't Forget the Reflector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, N.

    1991-01-01

    Various modes of reflection are classified and practical examples of devices, such as cat's eyes, are discussed. Typical light rays are traced through several systems, providing exercises with varying degrees of difficulty. Corner-cube retroreflectors, glass spheres, reflecting luminaries, light concentrators, parabolic reflectors, and off-set and…

  8. Free-form surface design method for nonaxial-symmetrical reflectors producing arbitrary image patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chung-Yu

    2016-07-01

    A free-form (FF) surface design method is proposed for a nonaxial-symmetrical projector system comprising an FF reflector and a light source. The profile of the reflector is designed using a nonaxial-symmetrical FF (NFF) surface construction method such that each incident ray is directed in such a way as to form a user-specified image pattern on the target region of the image plane. The light ray paths within the projection system are analyzed using an exact analytical model and a skew-ray tracing approach. The validity of the proposed NFF design method is demonstrated by means of ZEMAX simulations. It is shown that the image pattern formed on the target region of the image plane is in good agreement with that specified by the user. The NFF method is mathematically straightforward and easily implemented in computer code. As such, it provides a useful tool for the design and analysis stages of optical systems design.

  9. Design of free-form reflector for vehicle LED low-beam headlamp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chung-Yu

    2016-08-01

    A method is proposed for the design of a vehicle low-beam headlamp system comprising a reflector and an LED light source. In the proposed approach, the profile of the reflector is designed using a free-form (FF) surface construction method such that each incident ray is directed in such a way as to form a user-specified light pattern on the measuring plane. The light ray paths within the headlamp system are analyzed using an exact analytical model and a skew-ray tracing approach. The validity of the proposed FF design method is demonstrated by means of ZEMAX simulations. It is shown that the light pattern formed on the measuring plane is in good agreement with the target pattern specified by ECE R112. The FF design method is mathematically straightforward and easily implemented in computer code. As such, it provides a useful tool for the design and analysis tasks in optical systems design.

  10. Benchmarking of Optical Dimerizer Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Optical dimerizers are a powerful new class of optogenetic tools that allow light-inducible control of protein–protein interactions. Such tools have been useful for regulating cellular pathways and processes with high spatiotemporal resolution in live cells, and a growing number of dimerizer systems are available. As these systems have been characterized by different groups using different methods, it has been difficult for users to compare their properties. Here, we set about to systematically benchmark the properties of four optical dimerizer systems, CRY2/CIB1, TULIPs, phyB/PIF3, and phyB/PIF6. Using a yeast transcriptional assay, we find significant differences in light sensitivity and fold-activation levels between the red light regulated systems but similar responses between the CRY2/CIB and TULIP systems. Further comparison of the ability of the CRY2/CIB1 and TULIP systems to regulate a yeast MAPK signaling pathway also showed similar responses, with slightly less background activity in the dark observed with CRY2/CIB. In the process of developing this work, we also generated an improved blue-light-regulated transcriptional system using CRY2/CIB in yeast. In addition, we demonstrate successful application of the CRY2/CIB dimerizers using a membrane-tethered CRY2, which may allow for better local control of protein interactions. Taken together, this work allows for a better understanding of the capacities of these different dimerization systems and demonstrates new uses of these dimerizers to control signaling and transcription in yeast. PMID:25350266

  11. Benchmarking of optical dimerizer systems.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Gopal P; Strickland, Devin; Vrana, Justin D; Tucker, Chandra L

    2014-11-21

    Optical dimerizers are a powerful new class of optogenetic tools that allow light-inducible control of protein-protein interactions. Such tools have been useful for regulating cellular pathways and processes with high spatiotemporal resolution in live cells, and a growing number of dimerizer systems are available. As these systems have been characterized by different groups using different methods, it has been difficult for users to compare their properties. Here, we set about to systematically benchmark the properties of four optical dimerizer systems, CRY2/CIB1, TULIPs, phyB/PIF3, and phyB/PIF6. Using a yeast transcriptional assay, we find significant differences in light sensitivity and fold-activation levels between the red light regulated systems but similar responses between the CRY2/CIB and TULIP systems. Further comparison of the ability of the CRY2/CIB1 and TULIP systems to regulate a yeast MAPK signaling pathway also showed similar responses, with slightly less background activity in the dark observed with CRY2/CIB. In the process of developing this work, we also generated an improved blue-light-regulated transcriptional system using CRY2/CIB in yeast. In addition, we demonstrate successful application of the CRY2/CIB dimerizers using a membrane-tethered CRY2, which may allow for better local control of protein interactions. Taken together, this work allows for a better understanding of the capacities of these different dimerization systems and demonstrates new uses of these dimerizers to control signaling and transcription in yeast. PMID:25350266

  12. Deployment simulation of a deployable reflector for earth science application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaokai; Fang, Houfei; Cai, Bei; Ma, Xiaofei

    2015-10-01

    A novel mission concept namely NEXRAD-In-Space (NIS) has been developed for monitoring hurricanes, cyclones and other severe storms from a geostationary orbit. It requires a space deployable 35-meter diameter Ka-band (35 GHz) reflector. NIS can measure hurricane precipitation intensity, dynamics and its life cycle. These information is necessary for predicting the track, intensity, rain rate and hurricane-induced floods. To meet the requirements of the radar system, a Membrane Shell Reflector Segment (MSRS) reflector technology has been developed and several technologies have been evaluated. However, the deployment analysis of this large size and high-precision reflector has not been investigated. For a pre-studies, a scaled tetrahedral truss reflector with spring driving deployment system has been made and tested, deployment dynamics analysis of this scaled reflector has been performed using ADAMS to understand its deployment dynamic behaviors. Eliminating the redundant constraints in the reflector system with a large number of moving parts is a challenging issue. A primitive joint and flexible struts were introduced to the analytical model and they can effectively eliminate over constraints of the model. By using a high-speed camera and a force transducer, a deployment experiment of a single-bay tetrahedral module has been conducted. With the tested results, an optimization process has been performed by using the parameter optimization module of ADAMS to obtain the parameters of the analytical model. These parameters were incorporated to the analytical model of the whole reflector. It is observed from the analysis results that the deployment process of the reflector with a fixed boundary experiences three stages. These stages are rapid deployment stage, slow deployment stage and impact stage. The insight of the force peak distributions of the reflector can help the optimization design of the structure.

  13. Self-clamping arc light reflector for welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    This invention is directed to a coaxial extending metal mirror reflector attached to the electrode housing or gas cup on a welding torch. An electric welding torch with an internal viewing system for robotic welding is provded with an annular arc light reflector to reflect light from the arc back onto the workpiece. The reflector has a vertical split or gap in its surrounding wall to permit the adjacent wall ends forming the split to be sprung open slightly to permit the reflector to be removed or slipped onto the torch housing or gas cup. The upper opening of the reflector is slightly smaller than the torch housing or gas cup and therefore, when placed on the torch housing or gas cup has that springiness to cause it to clamp tightly on the housing or gas cup. The split or gap also serves to permit the feed of weld wire through to the weld area,

  14. Effects of Optical Loss Factors on Heliostat Field Layout for Beam-Down Solar Concentrating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utamura, Motoaki; Takamatsu, Tadahiko; Yuasa, Minoru; Kajita, Rina; Yamamoto, Takashi

    A methodology to give an optimal layout of a group of heliostats has been developed for beam-down concentrating solar tower systems. Given the maximum solar power together with optical parameters, the method determines an optimal configuration of a heliostat field around a tower. Various optical losses such as cosine factor, shadowing and blocking at heliostats are considered in the calculation. Furthermore, spillage at the receiver is taken into account due to the spread of light caused by the effects of a finite solar disk, flat facet and various stochastic errors in optical hardware and control. It is found the effect of spillage becomes significant at heliostats from the tower at the distance farther than four times of upper focus height of the reflector when receiver diameter is one fifteenth of the height and dominates the configuration of the optimal heliostat layout.

  15. A fixed tilt solar collector employing reversible vee-trough reflectors and vacuum tube receivers for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selcuk, M. K.

    1977-01-01

    The usefulness of vee-trough concentrators in improving the efficiency and reducing the cost of collectors assembled from evacuated tube receivers was studied in the vee-trough/vacuum tube collector (VTVTC) project. The VTVTC was analyzed rigorously and various mathematical models were developed to calculate the optical performance of the vee-trough concentrator and the thermal performance of the evacuated tube receiver. A test bed was constructed to verify the mathematical analyses and compare reflectors made out of glass, Alzak and aluminized FEP Teflon. Tests were run at temperatures ranging from 95 to 180 C. Vee-trough collector efficiencies of 35 to 40% were observed at an operating temperature of about 175 C. Test results compared well with the calculated values. Predicted daily useful heat collection and efficiency values are presented for a year's duration of operation temperatures ranging from 65 to 230 C. Estimated collector costs and resulting thermal energy costs are presented. Analytical and experimental results are discussed along with a complete economic evaluation.

  16. Optical fibre gas detections systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culshaw, Brian

    2016-05-01

    This tutorial review covers the principles of and prospects for fibre optic sensor technology in gas detection. Many of the potential benefits common to fibre sensor technology also apply in the context of gas sensing - notably long distance - many km - access to multiple remote measurement points; invariably intrinsic safety; access to numerous important gas species and often uniquely high levels of selectivity and/or sensitivity. Furthermore, the range of fibre sensor network architectures - single point, multiple point and distributed - enable unprecedented flexibility in system implementation. Additionally, competitive technologies and regulatory issues contribute to final application potential.

  17. Battlefield Optical Surveillance System (BOSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Robert J.

    1997-02-01

    The battlefield optical surveillance system (BOSS) was developed for DARPA by the U.S. Air Force's Phillips Laboratory. BOSS is a HMMWV mounted laser surveillance and deterrence system. It is intended to be used to detect and to deter potentially hostile individuals, snipers and groups of agitators. The BOSS integrates the following: (1) a thermal camera (8-12 micrometer FLIR), that detects and cues to possible targets, (2) a 45 watt, 808 nm (near IR), air- cooled laser which provides covert illumination and designation for a day/night camera to acquire said target and attain a high-resolution image using night vision equipment, and (3) a 1 watt, 532 nm (green) laser that overtly illuminates and designates the target. It also has significant deterring effects both physiological and psychological on individuals and crowds. BOSS offers the potential capability to detect snipers before the first shot is fired. Detection of optical augmentations and the thermal characteristics of a sniper allows for this early detection. The integration of BOSS with acoustic sniper detection systems are being explored.

  18. The ANTARES optical beacon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageron, M.; Aguilar, J. A.; Albert, A.; Ameli, F.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardellier-Desages, F.; Aslanides, E.; Aubert, J.-J.; Auer, R.; Barbarito, E.; Basa, S.; Battaglieri, M.; Becherini, Y.; Beltramelli, J.; Bertin, V.; Bigi, A.; Billault, M.; Blaes, R.; de Botton, N.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Bradbury, S. M.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Burgio, G. F.; Busto, J.; Cafagna, F.; Caillat, L.; Calzas, A.; Capone, A.; Caponetto, L.; Carmona, E.; Carr, J.; Cartwright, S. L.; Castel, D.; Castorina, E.; Cavasinni, V.; Cecchini, S.; Ceres, A.; Charvis, P.; Chauchot, P.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Colnard, C.; Compère, C.; Coniglione, R.; Cottini, N.; Coyle, P.; Cuneo, S.; Cussatlegras, A.-S.; Damy, G.; van Dantzig, R.; de Bonis, G.; de Marzo, C.; de Vita, R.; Dekeyser, I.; Delagnes, E.; Denans, D.; Deschamps, A.; Destelle, J.-J.; Dinkespieler, B.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Drogou, J.-F.; Druillole, F.; Durand, D.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Falchini, E.; Favard, S.; Fehr, F.; Feinstein, F.; Ferry, S.; Fiorello, C.; Flaminio, V.; Fratini, K.; Fuda, J.-L.; Galeotti, S.; Gallone, J.-M.; Giacomelli, G.; Girard, N.; Gojak, C.; Goret, Ph.; Graf, K.; Hallewell, G.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hartmann, B.; Heijboer, A.; Heine, E.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hößl, J.; Hoffman, C.; Hogenbirk, J.; Hubbard, J. R.; Jaquet, M.; Jaspers, M.; de Jong, M.; Jouvenot, F.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Katz, U.; Keller, P.; Kok, E.; Kok, H.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kouchner, A.; Kretschmer, W.; Kruijer, A.; Kuch, S.; Kudryavstev, V. A.; Lagier, P.; Lahmann, R.; Lamanna, G.; Lamare, P.; Lambard, G.; Languillat, J.-C.; Laschinsky, H.; Lavalle, J.; Le Guen, Y.; Le Provost, H.; Le van Suu, A.; Lefèvre, D.; Legou, T.; Lelaizant, G.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Louis, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Lyashuk, V.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Masullo, R.; Mazéas, F.; Mazure, A.; McMillan, J. E.; Megna, R.; Melissas, M.; Migneco, E.; Milovanovic, A.; Mongelli, M.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Musumeci, M.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Naumann, C.; Niess, V.; Noble, T.; Olivetto, C.; Ostasch, R.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Payre, P.; Peek, H.; Perez, A.; Petta, C.; Piattelli, P.; Pillet, R.; Pineau, J.-P.; Poinsignon, J.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Randazzo, N.; van Randwijk, J.; Real, D.; van Rens, B.; Réthoré, F.; Rewiersma, P.; Riccobene, G.; Rigaud, V.; Ripani, M.; Roca, V.; Roda, C.; Rolin, J. F.; Rose, H. J.; Rostovtsev, A.; Roux, J.; Ruppi, M.; Russo, G. V.; Rusydi, G.; Salesa, F.; Salomon, K.; Sapienza, P.; Schmitt, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Shanidze, R.; Sokalski, I.; Spona, T.; Spurio, M.; van der Steenhoven, G.; Stolarczyk, T.; Streeb, K.; Sulak, L.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Tao, C.; Terreni, G.; Thompson, L. F.; Urbano, F.; Valdy, P.; Valente, V.; Vallage, B.; Vaudaine, G.; Venekamp, G.; Verlaat, B.; Vernin, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; van Wijk, R.; Wijnker, G.; de Witt Huberts, P.; Wobbe, G.; de Wolf, E.; Yao, A.-F.; Zaborov, D.; Zaccone, H.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2007-08-01

    ANTARES is a neutrino telescope being deployed in the Mediterranean Sea. It consists of a three-dimensional array of photomultiplier tubes that can detect the Cherenkov light induced by charged particles produced in the interactions of neutrinos with the surrounding medium. High angular resolution can be achieved, in particular, when a muon is produced, provided that the Cherenkov photons are detected with sufficient timing precision. Considerations of the intrinsic time uncertainties stemming from the transit time spread in the photomultiplier tubes and the mechanism of transmission of light in sea water lead to the conclusion that a relative time accuracy of the order of 0.5 ns is desirable. Accordingly, different time calibration systems have been developed for the ANTARES telescope. In this article, a system based on Optical Beacons, a set of external and well-controlled pulsed light sources located throughout the detector, is described. This calibration system takes into account the optical properties of sea water, which is used as the detection volume of the ANTARES telescope. The design, tests, construction and first results of the two types of beacons, LED and laser-based, are presented.

  19. Technology reviews: Daylighting optical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-09-01

    We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize the state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology. Determine the performance range of available technologies. Identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances. Examine market forces and market trends.Develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fall into that class.

  20. Comparison-based optical study on a point-line-coupling-focus system with linear Fresnel heliostats.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yanjun; Li, Xian; Zhou, Lingyu; Ma, Xuan; Wang, Ruzhu

    2016-05-16

    Concentrating the concept of a beam-down solar tower with linear Fresnel heliostat (PLCF) is one of the feasible choices and has great potential in reducing spot size and improving optical efficiency. Optical characteristics of a PLCF system with the hyperboloid reflector are introduced and investigated theoretically. Taking into account solar position and optical surface errors, a Monte Carlo ray-tracing (MCRT) analysis model for a PLCF system is developed and applied in a comparison-based study on the optical performance between the PLCF system and the conventional beam-down solar tower system with flat and spherical heliostats. The optimal square facet of linear Fresnel heliostat is also proposed for matching with the 3D-CPC receiver.

  1. Comparison-based optical study on a point-line-coupling-focus system with linear Fresnel heliostats.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yanjun; Li, Xian; Zhou, Lingyu; Ma, Xuan; Wang, Ruzhu

    2016-05-16

    Concentrating the concept of a beam-down solar tower with linear Fresnel heliostat (PLCF) is one of the feasible choices and has great potential in reducing spot size and improving optical efficiency. Optical characteristics of a PLCF system with the hyperboloid reflector are introduced and investigated theoretically. Taking into account solar position and optical surface errors, a Monte Carlo ray-tracing (MCRT) analysis model for a PLCF system is developed and applied in a comparison-based study on the optical performance between the PLCF system and the conventional beam-down solar tower system with flat and spherical heliostats. The optimal square facet of linear Fresnel heliostat is also proposed for matching with the 3D-CPC receiver. PMID:27409969

  2. Contact cleaning of polymer film solar reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sansom, Christopher; Fernández-García, Aránzazu; Sutter, Florian; Almond, Heather; King, Peter

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the accelerated ageing of polymer film reflecting surfaces under the conditions to be found during contact cleaning of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) collectors in the presence of dust and sand particles. In these situations, contact cleaning using brushes and water is required to clean the reflecting surfaces. Whilst suitable for glass reflectors, this paper discusses the effects of existing cleaning processes on the optical and visual properties of polymer film surfaces, and then describes the development of a more benign but effective contact cleaning process for cleaning polymer reflectors. The effects of a range of cleaning brushes are discussed, with and without the presence of water, in the presence of sand and dust particles from selected representative locations. Reflectance measurements and visual inspection shows that a soft cleaning brush with a small amount of water can clean polymer film reflecting surfaces without inflicting surface damage or reducing specular reflectance.

  3. Computer program for optical systems ray tracing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, T. J.; Konn, H.

    1967-01-01

    Program traces rays of light through optical systems consisting of up to 65 different optical surfaces and computes the aberrations. For design purposes, paraxial tracings with astigmation and third order tracings are provided.

  4. Advanced optical manufacturing digital integrated system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yizheng; Li, Xinglan; Li, Wei; Tang, Dingyong

    2012-10-01

    It is necessarily to adapt development of advanced optical manufacturing technology with modern science technology development. To solved these problems which low of ration, ratio of finished product, repetition, consistent in big size and high precision in advanced optical component manufacturing. Applied business driven and method of Rational Unified Process, this paper has researched advanced optical manufacturing process flow, requirement of Advanced Optical Manufacturing integrated System, and put forward architecture and key technology of it. Designed Optical component core and Manufacturing process driven of Advanced Optical Manufacturing Digital Integrated System. the result displayed effective well, realized dynamic planning Manufacturing process, information integration improved ratio of production manufactory.

  5. High pressure fiber optic sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Guida, Renato; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon K; Dekate, Sachin N

    2013-11-26

    The present application provides a fiber optic sensor system. The fiber optic sensor system may include a small diameter bellows, a large diameter bellows, and a fiber optic pressure sensor attached to the small diameter bellows. Contraction of the large diameter bellows under an applied pressure may cause the small diameter bellows to expand such that the fiber optic pressure sensor may measure the applied pressure.

  6. Wide field strip-imaging optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Arthur H. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A strip imaging wide angle optical system is provided. The optical system is provided with a 'virtual' material stop to avoid aberrational effects inherent in wide angle optical systems. The optical system includes a spherical mirror section for receiving light from a 180-degree strip or arc of a target image. Light received by the spherical mirror section is reflected to a frusto-conical mirror section for subsequent rereflection to a row of optical fibers. Each optical fiber transmits a portion of the received light to a detector. The optical system exploits the narrow cone of acceptance associated with optical fibers to substantially eliminate vignetting effects inherent in wide-angle systems. Further, the optical system exploits the narrow cone of acceptance of the optical fibers to substantially limit spherical aberration. The optical system is ideally suited for any application wherein a 180-degree strip image need be detected, and is particularly well adapted for use in hostile environments such as in planetary exploration.

  7. Acoustic Levitation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammell, P. M.; Wang, T. G.; Croonquist, A.; Lee, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    Dense materials, such as steel balls, continuously levitated with energy provided by efficient high-powered siren in combination with shaped reflector. Reflector system, consisting of curved top reflector and flat lower reflector, eliminates instability in spatial positioning of sample.

  8. Environmental Degradation of Solar Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    Report presents results of study of atmospheric degradation of large solar reflectors for power generators. Three general types of reflective surfaces investigated. Report also describes computer buildup and removal (by rain and dew) of contamination from reflectors. Data used to determine effects of soil buildup and best method and frequency of washing at various geographic locations.

  9. Freeform reflectors for architectural lighting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ruidong; Hong, Qi; Zhang, Hongxia; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2015-12-14

    We propose an improved method to design freeform reflectors for architectural lighting: one for accent lighting and another for large area wall washing. The designed freeform reflectors effectively distribute light fluxes over the target surfaces, and generate appropriate illumination patterns for comfortable visual environments, which provides greater flexibility for lighting designs, allows many challenging designs, and improves energy-efficiency simultaneously.

  10. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data. Toltec two-axis tracking solar collector with 3M acrylic polyester film reflector surface

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-06-01

    Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Toltec solar collector, with acrylic film reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  11. Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data. Polisolar Model POL solar collector with glass reflector surface

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-05-01

    Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Polisolar Model POL solar collector, with glass reflector surfaces, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

  12. The ERIS adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Enrico; Fedrigo, Enrico; Le Louarn, Miska; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Soenke, Christian; Brast, Roland; Conzelmann, Ralf; Delabre, Bernard; Duchateau, Michel; Frank, Christoph; Klein, Barbara; Amico, Paola; Hubin, Norbert; Esposito, Simone; Antichi, Jacopo; Carbonaro, Luca; Puglisi, Alfio; Quirós-Pacheco, Fernando; Riccardi, Armando; Xompero, Marco

    2014-07-01

    The Enhanced Resolution Imager and Spectrograph (ERIS) is the new Adaptive Optics based instrument for ESO's VLT aiming at replacing NACO and SINFONI to form a single compact facility with AO fed imaging and integral field unit spectroscopic scientific channels. ERIS completes the instrument suite at the VLT adaptive telescope. In particular it is equipped with a versatile AO system that delivers up to 95% Strehl correction in K band for science observations up to 5 micron It comprises high order NGS and LGS correction enabling the observation from exoplanets to distant galaxies with a large sky coverage thanks to the coupling of the LGS WFS with the high sensitivity of its visible WFS and the capability to observe in dust embedded environment thanks to its IR low order WFS. ERIS will be installed at the Cassegrain focus of the VLT unit hosting the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF). The wavefront correction is provided by the AOF deformable secondary mirror while the Laser Guide Star is provided by one of the four launch units of the 4 Laser Guide Star Facility for the AOF. The overall layout of the ERIS AO system is extremely compact and highly optimized: the SPIFFI spectrograph is fed directly by the Cassegrain focus and both the NIX's (IR imager) and SPIFFI's entrance windows work as visible/infrared dichroics. In this paper we describe the concept of the ERIS AO system in detail, starting from the requirements and going through the estimated performance, the opto-mechanical design and the Real-Time Computer design.

  13. Making Curved Frequency-Selective Microwave Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Wu, Te-Kao

    1995-01-01

    Prototype curved lightweight dichroic microwave reflectors designed to be highly reflective in X and K(suba) frequency bands and highly transmissive in K(subu) and S bands. Conductive grid elements formed photolithographically on curved reflector surfaces. Intended for use as subreflectors of main paraboloidal antenna reflector to enable simultaneous operation in both prime-focus configuration in K(subu) and S bands and Cassegrain configuration in X and K(suba) bands. Basic concepts of reflectors described in "Frequency-Selective Microwave Reflectors" (NPO-18701). "Double Square-Loop Dichroic Microwave Reflector" (NPO-18676), "Triband Circular-Loop Dichroic Microwave Reflector" (NPO-18714), and "Improved Dichroic Microwave Reflector" (NPO-18664).

  14. GridOPTICS Software System

    2014-02-24

    GridOPTICS Software System (GOSS) is a middleware that facilitates creation of new, modular and flexible operational and planning platforms that can meet the challenges of the next generation power grid. GOSS enables Department of Energy, power system utilities, and vendors to build better tools faster. GOSS makes it possible to integrate Future Power Grid Initiative software products/prototypes into existing power grid software systems, including the PNNL PowerNet and EIOC environments. GOSS is designed to allowmore » power grid applications developed for different underlying software platforms installed in different utilities to communicate with ease. This can be done in compliance with existing security and data sharing policies between the utilities. GOSS not only supports one-to-one data transfer between applications, but also publisher/subscriber scheme. To support interoperability requirements of future EMS, GOSS is designed for CIM compliance. In addition to this, it supports authentication and authorization capabilities to protect the system from cyber threats. In summary, the contributions of the GOSS middleware are as follows: • A platform to support future EMS development. • A middleware that promotes interoperability between power grid applications. • A distributed architecture that separates data sources from power grid applications. • Support for data exchange with either one-to-one or publisher/subscriber interfaces. • An authentication and authorization scheme for limiting the access to data between utilities.« less

  15. GridOPTICS Software System

    SciTech Connect

    Akyol, Bora A; Ciraci, PNNL Selim; Gibson, PNNL Tara; Rice, PNNL Mark; Sharma, PNNL Poorva; Yin, PNNL Jian; Allwardt, PNNL Craig; PNNL,

    2014-02-24

    GridOPTICS Software System (GOSS) is a middleware that facilitates creation of new, modular and flexible operational and planning platforms that can meet the challenges of the next generation power grid. GOSS enables Department of Energy, power system utilities, and vendors to build better tools faster. GOSS makes it possible to integrate Future Power Grid Initiative software products/prototypes into existing power grid software systems, including the PNNL PowerNet and EIOC environments. GOSS is designed to allow power grid applications developed for different underlying software platforms installed in different utilities to communicate with ease. This can be done in compliance with existing security and data sharing policies between the utilities. GOSS not only supports one-to-one data transfer between applications, but also publisher/subscriber scheme. To support interoperability requirements of future EMS, GOSS is designed for CIM compliance. In addition to this, it supports authentication and authorization capabilities to protect the system from cyber threats. In summary, the contributions of the GOSS middleware are as follows: • A platform to support future EMS development. • A middleware that promotes interoperability between power grid applications. • A distributed architecture that separates data sources from power grid applications. • Support for data exchange with either one-to-one or publisher/subscriber interfaces. • An authentication and authorization scheme for limiting the access to data between utilities.

  16. A portable free space optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Yong; Lu, Xingguang; Yang, Jinglin; Chen, Jing; Hao, Zhonggang

    2005-08-01

    A portable protocol independent free space optical communication terminal was developed, which enables customer to quickly deploy optical bandwidth services for applications such as fiber extension, wild field point to point communication and wireless backhaul while avoiding costly and time-consuming fiber installation. By using specially designed optical components and optical-mechanical structure, the system is very compact and effective, can establish optical link within a few minutes, with total weight 4kg, size 160 x 360 x 155 mm, effective transmitting/receiving aperture 40mm, data rate 100Mbps, maximum communication distance 1500m. The system and experiments are presented in the paper.

  17. Teaching Optics and Systems Engineering With Adaptive Optics Workbenches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, D. M.; Ammons, M.; Hunter, L.; Max, C.; Hoffmann, M.; Pitts, M.; Armstrong, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Adaptive optics workbenches are fully functional optical systems that can be used to illustrate and teach a variety of concepts and cognitive processes. Four systems have been funded, designed and constructed by various institutions and people as part of education programs associated with the Center for Adaptive Optics, the Professional Development Program and the Institute for Scientist & Engineer Educators. Activities can range from first-year undergraduate explorations to professional level training. These workbenches have been used in many venues including the Center for Adaptive Optics AO Summer School, the Maui Community College-hosted Akamai Maui Short Course, classrooms, training of new staff in laboratories and other venues. The activity content has focused on various elements of systems thinking, characterization, feedback and system control, basic optics and optical alignment as well as advanced topics such as phase conjugation, wave-front sensing and correction concepts, and system design. The workbenches have slightly different designs and performance capabilities. We describe here outlines for several activities utilizing these different designs and some examples of common student learner outcomes and experiences.

  18. Beam squint in axially symmetric reflector antennas with laterally displaced feeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiebig, Dirk; Wohlleben, Rudolph; Prata, Aluizio; Rusch, Willard V. T.

    1991-06-01

    The beam squint effect appearing in axially symmetric reflector antennas with laterally displaced feeds was investigated. Numerical calculations have been carried out and the beam squint for circular polarized excitation has been measured using a 100-m telescope. The telescope was operated in the Gregorian mode, where the equivalent focal length equals 387.5 m. The feed horn was laterally displaced by 1.364 m from the optical axis at the system focus. Good agreement was obtained between the numerical calculations and the experimental results. The authors found a shift of the two radiation patterns of phi of about 2 arcsec. The orientation of the beam squint in the configuration with a laterally displaced feed is different from the orientation in offset reflector antennas.

  19. Small scale adaptive optics experiment systems engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boykin, William H.

    1993-01-01

    Assessment of the current technology relating to the laser power beaming system which in full scale is called the Beam Transmission Optical System (BTOS). Evaluation of system integration efforts are being conducted by the various government agencies and industry. Concepts are being developed for prototypes of adaptive optics for a BTOS.

  20. A simplified approach to axisymmetric dual-reflector antenna design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, Raymond L.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure is described for designing dual reflector antennas. The analysis is developed by taking each reflector to be the envelope of its tangent planes. Rather than specifying the phase distribution in the emitted beam, the slopes of the emitted rays were specified. Thus, both the output wave shape and angular distribution of intensity can be specified. Computed examples include variations from both Cassegrain and Gregorian systems, permitting deviation from uniform source distributions and from parallel beam property of conventional systems.

  1. On the theory of the synthesis of offset dual-shaped reflectors - Case examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-Israel, Victor; Imbriale, William A.; Mittra, Raj; Shogen, Kazuyoshi

    1991-05-01

    In an earlier paper by Galindo-Israel et al. (1987), the geometrical optics (GO) principles, constraints, and requirements of the dual- and single-offset-shaped reflector synthesis problem were collected and developed into a set of nonlinear first-order PDEs. An extension of the methods by which solutions to the PDEs can be obtained is presented, together with several case examples. These examples are independently analyzed by GO and physical optics diffraction methods. The starting point for the integration over each reflector can be taken on the outer rim, at the center, or at an intermediate point-the intermediate starting point being the more general case. The utility of the speed of this synthesis method is demonstrated. For example, the program utilized completes a synthesis in less than 45 s on a 386/20 personal computer and within a fraction of a second on a mainframe Cray. This makes practical the incorporation of the synthesis into a search algorithm that can optimize one or more parameters of the reflector system. As an example, the optimization of the mapping equations for low cross polarization is discussed.

  2. On the theory of the synthesis of offset dual-shaped reflectors - Case examples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo-Israel, Victor; Imbriale, William A.; Mittra, Raj; Shogen, Kazuyoshi

    1991-01-01

    In an earlier paper by Galindo-Israel et al. (1987), the geometrical optics (GO) principles, constraints, and requirements of the dual- and single-offset-shaped reflector synthesis problem were collected and developed into a set of nonlinear first-order PDEs. An extension of the methods by which solutions to the PDEs can be obtained is presented, together with several case examples. These examples are independently analyzed by GO and physical optics diffraction methods. The starting point for the integration over each reflector can be taken on the outer rim, at the center, or at an intermediate point-the intermediate starting point being the more general case. The utility of the speed of this synthesis method is demonstrated. For example, the program utilized completes a synthesis in less than 45 s on a 386/20 personal computer and within a fraction of a second on a mainframe Cray. This makes practical the incorporation of the synthesis into a search algorithm that can optimize one or more parameters of the reflector system. As an example, the optimization of the mapping equations for low cross polarization is discussed.

  3. Optical axis jitter rejection for double overlapped adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qi; Luo, Xi; Li, Xinyang

    2016-04-01

    Optical axis jitters, or vibrations, which arise from wind shaking and structural oscillations of optical platforms, etc., cause a deleterious impact on the performance of adaptive optics systems. When conventional integrators are utilized to reject such high frequency and narrow-band disturbance, the benefits are quite small despite their acceptable capabilities to reject atmospheric turbulence. In our case, two suits of complete adaptive optics systems called double overlapped adaptive optics systems (DOAOS) are used to counteract both optical jitters and atmospheric turbulence. A novel algorithm aiming to remove vibrations is proposed by resorting to combine the Smith predictor and notch filer. With the help of loop shaping method, the algorithm will lead to an effective and stable controller, which makes the characteristics of error transfer function close to notch filters. On the basis of the spectral analysis of observed data, the peak frequency and bandwidth of vibrations can be identified in advance. Afterwards, the number of notch filters and their parameters will be determined using coordination descending method. The relationship between controller parameters and filtering features is discussed, and the robustness of the controller against varying parameters of the control object is investigated. Preliminary experiments are carried out to validate the proposed algorithms. The overall control performance of DOAOS is simulated. Results show that time delays are a limit of the performance, but the algorithm can be successfully implemented on our systems, which indicate that it has a great potential to reject jitters.

  4. Convergence studies of deterministic methods for LWR explicit reflector methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Canepa, S.; Hursin, M.; Ferroukhi, H.; Pautz, A.

    2013-07-01

    The standard approach in modem 3-D core simulators, employed either for steady-state or transient simulations, is to use Albedo coefficients or explicit reflectors at the core axial and radial boundaries. In the latter approach, few-group homogenized nuclear data are a priori produced with lattice transport codes using 2-D reflector models. Recently, the explicit reflector methodology of the deterministic CASMO-4/SIMULATE-3 code system was identified to potentially constitute one of the main sources of errors for core analyses of the Swiss operating LWRs, which are all belonging to GII design. Considering that some of the new GIII designs will rely on very different reflector concepts, a review and assessment of the reflector methodology for various LWR designs appeared as relevant. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to first recall the concepts of the explicit reflector modelling approach as employed by CASMO/SIMULATE. Then, for selected reflector configurations representative of both GII and GUI designs, a benchmarking of the few-group nuclear data produced with the deterministic lattice code CASMO-4 and its successor CASMO-5, is conducted. On this basis, a convergence study with regards to geometrical requirements when using deterministic methods with 2-D homogenous models is conducted and the effect on the downstream 3-D core analysis accuracy is evaluated for a typical GII deflector design in order to assess the results against available plant measurements. (authors)

  5. Accuracy of optical navigation systems for automatic head surgery: optical tracking versus optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Díaz, Jesús; Riva, Mauro H.; Majdani, Omid; Ortmaier, Tobias

    2014-03-01

    The choice of a navigation system highly depends on the medical intervention and its accuracy demands. The most commonly used systems for image guided surgery (IGS) are based on optical and magnetic tracking systems. This paper compares two optical systems in terms of accuracy: state of the art triangulation-based optical tracking (OT) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). We use an experimental setup with a combined OCT and cutting laser, and an external OT. We simulate a robotic assisted surgical intervention, including planning, navigation, and processing, and compare the accuracies reached at a specific target with each navigation system.

  6. Capillary Electrophoresis - Optical Detection Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sepaniak, M. J.

    2001-08-06

    Molecular recognition systems are developed via molecular modeling and synthesis to enhance separation performance in capillary electrophoresis and optical detection methods for capillary electrophoresis. The underpinning theme of our work is the rational design and development of molecular recognition systems in chemical separations and analysis. There have been, however, some subtle and exciting shifts in our research paradigm during this period. Specifically, we have moved from mostly separations research to a good balance between separations and spectroscopic detection for separations. This shift is based on our perception that the pressing research challenges and needs in capillary electrophoresis and electrokinetic chromatography relate to the persistent detection and flow rate reproducibility limitations of these techniques (see page 1 of the accompanying Renewal Application for further discussion). In most of our work molecular recognition reagents are employed to provide selectivity and enhance performance. Also, an emerging trend is the use of these reagents with specially-prepared nano-scale materials. Although not part of our DOE BES-supported work, the modeling and synthesis of new receptors has indirectly supported the development of novel microcantilevers-based MEMS for the sensing of vapor and liquid phase analytes. This fortuitous overlap is briefly covered in this report. Several of the more significant publications that have resulted from our work are appended. To facilitate brevity we refer to these publications liberally in this progress report. Reference is also made to very recent work in the Background and Preliminary Studies Section of the Renewal Application.

  7. Optical Potential Field Mapping System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Max B. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates to an optical system for creating a potential field map of a bounded two dimensional region containing a goal location and an arbitrary number of obstacles. The potential field mapping system has an imaging device and a processor. Two image writing modes are used by the imaging device, electron deposition and electron depletion. Patterns written in electron deposition mode appear black and expand. Patterns written in electron depletion mode are sharp and appear white. The generated image represents a robot's workspace. The imaging device under processor control then writes a goal location in the work-space using the electron deposition mode. The black image of the goal expands in the workspace. The processor stores the generated images, and uses them to generate a feedback pattern. The feedback pattern is written in the workspace by the imaging device in the electron deposition mode to enhance the expansion of the original goal pattern. After the feedback pattern is written, an obstacle pattern is written by the imaging device in the electron depletion mode to represent the obstacles in the robot's workspace. The processor compares a stored image to a previously stored image to determine a change therebetween. When no change occurs, the processor averages the stored images to produce the potential field map.

  8. Optical Multiplex Systems For Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Wesley A.

    1980-09-01

    Optical multiplex technology, presently in vogue in many segments of industry, is now under scrutiny at General Motors. We are evaluating this technology as a means of simplifying the vehicle harness, reducing weight, eliminating electromagnetic interference, and providing drastically new interior styling options. Door, seat, steering column, forward and rear harness vehicle assemblies, are replaced with a single fiber optic cable in each area. A four bit microprocessor at the top of the steering column, and in each door, multiplexes control console button commands over fiber optic cables. A microprocessor at the other end of the cables decodes the optical signals and operates seats, windows, windshield wipers, etc.

  9. Stability of periodic paraxial optical systems.

    PubMed

    Longhi, S

    2002-02-01

    Based on ray propagation of paraxial geometric optics, we show that any stable periodic paraxial system or optical resonator becomes unstable in presence of stochastic perturbations of the the periodic sequence along which the rays are propagated. The exponential divergence with distance of ray displacements from the optical axis bears a close connection to the phenomenon of Anderson localization in disordered systems. The stability of the periodic focusing system is restored when finite aperture effects are accounted for and complex paraxial optics is used to describe wave propagation. PMID:11863701

  10. Micro-optical-mechanical system photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Kotovsky, Jack; Benett, William J.; Tooker, Angela C.; Alameda, Jennifer B.

    2013-01-01

    All-optical photoacoustic spectrometer sensing systems (PASS system) and methods include all the hardware needed to analyze the presence of a large variety of materials (solid, liquid and gas). Some of the all-optical PASS systems require only two optical-fibers to communicate with the opto-electronic power and readout systems that exist outside of the material environment. Methods for improving the signal-to-noise are provided and enable mirco-scale systems and methods for operating such systems.

  11. Design and experimental results for a compact laser printer optical system with MEMS scanning mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Takatoshi; Seki, Daisuke; Fujii, Shuichi; Mukai, Yukihiro

    2010-02-01

    There are many features expected by printer users, which include high resolution, low price, compact size, color, high speed printing and so on. Laser printers generally utilize a polygon mirror as a reflector in their optical configurations, but the usual size of the polygon mirror prevents laser scanning unit from being made much smaller. We have been conducting research on techniques which can contribute to reducing the optical unit size. Although oscillating mirror made with MEMS technology enables the system to be compact, it requires a sophisticated optical design having an increased number of constraints due to the change in angular velocity which varies depending on the orientation of the mirror, while the polygon mirror allows the scanning with constant speed. Using a small MEMS mirror is one of the critical issues concerning the reduction of cost. We have successfully resolved all the challenges listed above by using high-precision free-form optical surfaces and an optical layout making efficient use of 3D space. Our techniques can make the unit size much smaller and reduce the price. The optical path is designed to have a ray passing through a lens twice. We report both theoretical and experimental results for this system.

  12. Prototype Optical Correlator For Robotic Vision System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholl, Marija S.

    1993-01-01

    Known and unknown images fed in electronically at high speed. Optical correlator and associated electronic circuitry developed for vision system of robotic vehicle. System recognizes features of landscape by optical correlation between input image of scene viewed by video camera on robot and stored reference image. Optical configuration is Vander Lugt correlator, in which Fourier transform of scene formed in coherent light and spatially modulated by hologram of reference image to obtain correlation.

  13. Optics Toolbox: An Intelligent Relational Database System For Optical Designers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Scott W.; Hopkins, Robert E.

    1986-12-01

    Optical designers were among the first to use the computer as an engineering tool. Powerful programs have been written to do ray-trace analysis, third-order layout, and optimization. However, newer computing techniques such as database management and expert systems have not been adopted by the optical design community. For the purpose of this discussion we will define a relational database system as a database which allows the user to specify his requirements using logical relations. For example, to search for all lenses in a lens database with a F/number less than two, and a half field of view near 28 degrees, you might enter the following: FNO < 2.0 and FOV of 28 degrees ± 5% Again for the purpose of this discussion, we will define an expert system as a program which contains expert knowledge, can ask intelligent questions, and can form conclusions based on the answers given and the knowledge which it contains. Most expert systems store this knowledge in the form of rules-of-thumb, which are written in an English-like language, and which are easily modified by the user. An example rule is: IF require microscope objective in air and require NA > 0.9 THEN suggest the use of an oil immersion objective The heart of the expert system is the rule interpreter, sometimes called an inference engine, which reads the rules and forms conclusions based on them. The use of a relational database system containing lens prototypes seems to be a viable prospect. However, it is not clear that expert systems have a place in optical design. In domains such as medical diagnosis and petrology, expert systems are flourishing. These domains are quite different from optical design, however, because optical design is a creative process, and the rules are difficult to write down. We do think that an expert system is feasible in the area of first order layout, which is sufficiently diagnostic in nature to permit useful rules to be written. This first-order expert would emulate an expert

  14. Optimum Reflector Configurations for Minimizing Fission Power Peaking in a Lithium-Cooled, Liquid-Metal Reactor with Sliding Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, Michael L.; Poston, David I.

    2005-02-06

    Many design constraints limit the development of a space fission power system optimized for fuel performance, system reliability, and mission cost. These design constraints include fuel mass provisions to meet cycle-length requirements, fuel centerline and clad temperatures, and clad creep from fission gas generation. Decreasing the fission power peaking of the reactor system enhances all of the mentioned parameters. This design study identifies the cause, determines the reflector configurations for reactor criticality, and generates worth curves for minimized fission-power-peaking configuration in a lithium-cooled liquid-metal reactor that uses sliding reflectors. Because of the characteristics of the core axial power distribution and axial power distortions inherent to the sliding reflector design, minimizing the power peaking of the reactor involves placing the reflectors in a position that least distorts the axial power distribution. The views expressed in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect agreement by the Government.

  15. Small diameter, deep bore optical inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Lord, D.E.; Petrini, R.R.; Carter, G.W.

    An improved rod optic system for inspecting small diameter, deep bores is described. The system consists of a rod optic system utilizing a curved mirror at the end of the rod lens such that the optical path through the system is bent 90/sup 0/ to minimize optical distortion in examing the sides of a curved bore. The system is particularly useful in the examination of small bores for corrosion, and is capable if examing 1/16 inch diameter and up to 4-inch deep drill holes, for example. The positioning of the curved mirror allows simultaneous viewing from shallow and righ angle points of observation of the same artifact (such as corrosion) in the bore hole. The improved rod optic system may be used for direct eye sighting, or in combination with a still camera or a low-light television monitor; particularly low-light color television.

  16. Small diameter, deep bore optical inspection system

    DOEpatents

    Lord, David E.; Petrini, Richard R.; Carter, Gary W.

    1981-01-01

    An improved rod optic system for inspecting small diameter, deep bores. The system consists of a rod optic system utilizing a curved mirror at the end of the rod lens such that the optical path through the system is bent 90.degree. to minimize optical distortion in examining the sides of a curved bore. The system is particularly useful in the examination of small bores for corrosion, and is capable of examining 1/16 inch diameter and up to 4 inch deep drill holes, for example. The positioning of the curved mirror allows simultaneous viewing from shallow and right angle points of observation of the same artifact (such as corrosion) in the bore hole. The improved rod optic system may be used for direct eye sighting, or in combination with a still camera or a low-light television monitor; particularly low-light color television.

  17. Design of anti-ring back reflectors for thin-film solar cells based on three-dimensional optical and electrical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Hui-Hsin; Wu, Yuh-Renn; Chang, Hung-Chun

    2014-08-11

    The optical and electrical properties of a photonic-plasmonic nanostructure on the back contact of thin-film solar cells were investigated numerically through the three-dimensional (3D) finite-difference time-domain method and the 3D Poisson and drift-diffusion solver. The focusing effect and the Fabry-Perot resonances are identified as the main mechanisms for the enhancement of the optical generation rate as well as the short circuit current density. However, the surface topography of certain nanopattern structures is found to reduce the internal electrostatic field of the device, thus limiting charge collection. The optimized conditions for both optics and electronics have been analyzed in this paper.

  18. Power system applications of fiber optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, H.; Johnston, A.; Lutes, G.; Daud, T.; Hyland, S.

    1984-01-01

    Power system applications of optical systems, primarily using fiber optics, are reviewed. The first section reviews fibers as components of communication systems. The second section deals with fiber sensors for power systems, reviewing the many ways light sources and fibers can be combined to make measurements. Methods of measuring electric field gradient are discussed. Optical data processing is the subject of the third section, which begins by reviewing some widely different examples and concludes by outlining some potential applications in power systems: fault location in transformers, optical switching for light fired thyristors and fault detection based on the inherent symmetry of most power apparatus. The fourth and final section is concerned with using optical fibers to transmit power to electric equipment in a high voltage situation, potentially replacing expensive high voltage low power transformers. JPL has designed small photodiodes specifically for this purpose, and fabricated and tested several samples. This work is described.

  19. Reflectors for SAR performance testing-second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-02-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) performance testing and estimation is facilitated by observing the system response to known target scene elements. Trihedral corner reflectors and other canonical targets play an important role because their Radar Cross Section (RCS) can be calculated analytically. However, reflector orientation and the proximity of the ground and mounting structures can significantly impact the accuracy and precision with which measurements can be made. These issues are examined in this report.

  20. Isogrid Membranes for Precise, Singly Curved Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Lou, Michael

    2005-01-01

    A new type of composite material has been proposed for membranes that would constitute the reflective surfaces of planned lightweight, single-curvature (e.g., parabolic cylindrical) reflectors for some radar and radio-communication systems. The proposed composite materials would consist of polyimide membranes containing embedded grids of highstrength (e.g., carbon) fibers. The purpose of the fiber reinforcements, as explained in more detail below, is to prevent wrinkling or rippling of the membrane.

  1. New principles of optical system synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezdidko, Sergey N.

    1995-10-01

    The global synthesis and global optimization methods developed recently are based on numerical methods of search of the global extremum of the merit function. Such methods are developed without paying due regard to image formation law and with no account of the role of the separate optical subsystem for appearance of aberrations. These circumstances don't make possible effective formalization of the problem of obtaining the starting system. It should be mentioned that 'before the computer epoch' the optical system design was characterized by wide use of analytic methods based upon classical aberration theory. These methods were used both for optical system designing and the detailed study of their potential possibilities. The efficiency of said methods is proved by the possibility for an optical designer to get almost 'by hand' a real optical system. The labor-consuming and tedious procedure of the real system aberration correction took place only at final stages of operational development of the optical systems. The paper describes the author's methodology of starting system synthesis. This methodology makes possible numeric- and analytical-construction of optical systems on the basis of wide use of the classical theory of aberrations and it substantially develops 'before the computer epoch' approaches. Let us consider a set of principal peculiarities of the offered methods of starting system synthesis and the results of particular use of such methods.

  2. Portable fiber optic coupled doppler interferometer system for detonation and shock wave diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, K.J.

    1993-03-01

    Testing and analysis of shock wave characteristics such as produced by detonators and ground shock propagation frequently require a method of measuring velocity and displacement of the surface of interest. One method of measurement is doppler interferometry. The VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) uses doppler interferometry and has pined wide acceptance as the preferred tool for shock measurement. An important asset of VISAR is that it measures velocity and displacement non intrusively. The conventional VISAR is not well suited for portability because of its sensitive components, large power and cooling requirements, and hazardous laser beam. A new VISAR using the latest technology in solid state lasers and detectors has been developed and tested. To further enhance this system`s versatility, the unit is fiber optic coupled which allows remote testing, permitting the VISAR to be placed over a kilometer away from the target being measured. Because the laser light is contained in the fiber optic, operation of the system around personnel is far less hazardous. A software package for data reduction has also been developed for use with a personal computer. These new advances have produced a very versatile system with full portability which can be totally powered by batteries or a small generator. This paper describes the solid state VISAR and its peripheral components, fiber optic coupling methods and the fiber optic coupled sensors used for sending and receiving laser radiation.

  3. Geometrical optics design of a compact range Gregorian subreflector system by the principle of the central ray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clerici, Giancarlo; Burnside, Walter D.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, the compact range has become very popular for measuring Radar Cross Section (RCS) and antenna patterns. The compact range, in fact, offers several advantages due to reduced size, a controlled environment, and privacy. On the other hand, it has some problems of its own, which must be solved properly in order to achieve high quality measurement results. For example, diffraction from the edges of the main reflector corrupts the plane wave in the target zone and creates spurious scattering centers in RCS measurements. While diffraction can be minimized by using rolled edges, the field of an offset single reflector compact range is corrupted by three other errors: the taper of the reflected field, the cross polarization introduced by the tilt of the feed and the aperture blockage introduced by the feed itself. These three errors can be eliminated by the use of a subreflector system. A properly designed subreflector system offers very little aperture blockage, no cross-polarization introduced and a minimization of the taper of the reflected field. A Gregorian configuration has been adopted in order to enclose the feed and the ellipsoidal subreflector in a lower chamber, which is isolated by absorbers from the upper chamber, where the main parabolic reflector and the target zone are enclosed. The coupling between the two rooms is performed through a coupling aperture. The first cut design for such a subreflector system is performed through Geometrical Optics ray tracing techniques (GO), and is greatly simplified by the use of the concept of the central ray introduced by Dragone. The purpose of the GO design is to establish the basic dimensions of the main reflector and subreflector, the size of the primary and secondary illuminating surfaces, the tilt angles of the subreflector and feed, and estimate the feed beamwidth. At the same time, the shape of the coupling aperture is initially determined.

  4. Passive intermodulation generation in wire mesh deployable reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Gregory M.

    1993-01-01

    Deployable reflector antennas represent a proven technology with obvious benefits for mobile satellite applications. Harris Corporation has provided deployable reflector antennas for NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). These antennas utilize a rigid, radial rib unfurlable reflector with a wire mesh surface. This type of mesh has been identified as a potential design risk for multichannel communications applications based on the potential for generation of Passive Intermodulation (PIM). These concerns are based on the existence of numerous, nonpermanent metal to metal contacts that are inherent to the mesh design. To address this issue, Harris has an ongoing IR&D program to characterize mesh PIM performance. This paper presents the results of the investigation into mesh PIM performance to date and provides background information on the design and performance of the Harris radial rib deployable reflector.

  5. Passive intermodulation generation in wire mesh deployable reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Gregory M.

    Deployable reflector antennas represent a proven technology with obvious benefits for mobile satellite applications. Harris Corporation has provided deployable reflector antennas for NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). These antennas utilize a rigid, radial rib unfurlable reflector with a wire mesh surface. This type of mesh has been identified as a potential design risk for multichannel communications applications based on the potential for generation of Passive Intermodulation (PIM). These concerns are based on the existence of numerous, nonpermanent metal to metal contacts that are inherent to the mesh design. To address this issue, Harris has an ongoing IR&D program to characterize mesh PIM performance. This paper presents the results of the investigation into mesh PIM performance to date and provides background information on the design and performance of the Harris radial rib deployable reflector.

  6. Optically pumped isotopic ammonia laser system

    DOEpatents

    Buchwald, Melvin I.; Jones, Claude R.; Nelson, Leonard Y.

    1982-01-01

    An optically pumped isotopic ammonia laser system which is capable of producing a plurality of frequencies in the middle infrared spectral region. Two optical pumping mechanisms are disclosed, i.e., pumping on R(J) and lasing on P(J) in response to enhancement of rotational cascade lasing including stimulated Raman effects, and, pumping on R(J) and lasing on P(J+2). The disclosed apparatus for optical pumping include a hole coupled cavity and a grating coupled cavity.

  7. Deployable reflector configurations. [for space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meinel, A. B.; Meinel, M. P.; Woolf, N. J.

    1983-01-01

    Both the theoretical reasons for considering a non-circular format for the Large Deployable Reflector, and a potentially realizable concept for such a device, are discussed. The optimum systems for diffraction limited telescopes with incoherent detection have either a single filled aperture, or two such apertures as an interferometer to synthesize a larger aperture. For a single aperture of limited area, a reflector in the form of a slot can be used to give increased angular resolution. It is shown how a 20 x 8 meter telescope can be configured to fit the Space Shuttle bay, and deployed with relatively simple operations. The relationship between the sunshield design and the inclination of the orbit is discussed. The possible use of the LDR as a basic module to permit the construction of supergiant space telescopes and interferometers both for IR/submm studies and for the entire ultraviolet through mm wave spectral region is discussed.

  8. ADL ORVIS: an air-delay-leg, line-imaging optically recording velocity interferometer system.

    PubMed

    Trott, Wayne M; Castañeda, Jaime N; Cooper, Marcia A

    2014-04-01

    An interferometry system that enables acquisition of spatially resolved velocity-time profiles with very high velocity sensitivity has been designed and applied to two diverse, instructive experimental problems: (1) measurement of low-amplitude reverberations in laser-driven flyer plates and (2) measurement of ramp-wave profiles in symmetric impact studies of fused silica. The delay leg in this version of a line-imaging optically recording velocity interferometer system (ORVIS) consists of a long air path that includes relay optics to transmit the optical signal through the interferometer cavity. Target image quality from the delay path at the image recombination plane is preserved by means of a compact and flexible optical design utilizing two parabolic reflectors (serving as the relay optics) in a folded path. With an instrument tuned to a velocity per fringe constant of 22.4 m s(-1) fringe(-1), differences of 1-2 m s(-1) across the probe line segment can be readily distinguished. Measurements that capture small spatial variations in flyer velocity are presented and briefly discussed. In the fused silica impact experiments, the ramp-wave profile observed by this air-delay instrument compares favorably to the profile recorded simultaneously by a conventional line-imaging ORVIS.

  9. ADL ORVIS: An air-delay-leg, line-imaging optically recording velocity interferometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trott, Wayne M.; Castañeda, Jaime N.; Cooper, Marcia A.

    2014-04-01

    An interferometry system that enables acquisition of spatially resolved velocity-time profiles with very high velocity sensitivity has been designed and applied to two diverse, instructive experimental problems: (1) measurement of low-amplitude reverberations in laser-driven flyer plates and (2) measurement of ramp-wave profiles in symmetric impact studies of fused silica. The delay leg in this version of a line-imaging optically recording velocity interferometer system (ORVIS) consists of a long air path that includes relay optics to transmit the optical signal through the interferometer cavity. Target image quality from the delay path at the image recombination plane is preserved by means of a compact and flexible optical design utilizing two parabolic reflectors (serving as the relay optics) in a folded path. With an instrument tuned to a velocity per fringe constant of 22.4 m s-1 fringe-1, differences of 1-2 m s-1 across the probe line segment can be readily distinguished. Measurements that capture small spatial variations in flyer velocity are presented and briefly discussed. In the fused silica impact experiments, the ramp-wave profile observed by this air-delay instrument compares favorably to the profile recorded simultaneously by a conventional line-imaging ORVIS.

  10. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOEpatents

    DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

    2007-03-06

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  11. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

    2007-11-20

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  12. A two-axis in-plane motion measurement system based on optical beam deflection

    SciTech Connect

    Sriramshankar, R.; Mrinalini, R. Sri Muthu; Jayanth, G. R.

    2013-10-15

    Measurement of in-plane motion with high resolution and large bandwidth enables model-identification and real-time control of motion-stages. This paper presents an optical beam deflection based system for measurement of in-plane motion of both macro- and micro-scale motion stages. A curved reflector is integrated with the motion stage to achieve sensitivity to in-plane translational motion along two axes. Under optimal settings, the measurement system is shown to theoretically achieve sub-angstrom measurement resolution over a bandwidth in excess of 1 kHz and negligible cross-sensitivity to linear motion. Subsequently, the proposed technique is experimentally demonstrated by measuring the in-plane motion of a piezo flexure stage and a scanning probe microcantilever. For the former case, reflective spherical balls of different radii are employed to measure the in-plane motion and the measured sensitivities are shown to agree with theoretical values, on average, to within 8.3%. For the latter case, a prototype polydimethylsiloxane micro-reflector is integrated with the microcantilever. The measured in-plane motion of the microcantilever probe is used to identify nonlinearities and the transient dynamics of the piezo-stage upon which the probe is mounted. These are subsequently compensated by means of feedback control.

  13. Optical components damage parameters database system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yizheng; Li, Xinglan; Jin, Yuquan; Xie, Dongmei; Tang, Dingyong

    2012-10-01

    Optical component is the key to large-scale laser device developed by one of its load capacity is directly related to the device output capacity indicators, load capacity depends on many factors. Through the optical components will damage parameters database load capacity factors of various digital, information technology, for the load capacity of optical components to provide a scientific basis for data support; use of business processes and model-driven approach, the establishment of component damage parameter information model and database systems, system application results that meet the injury test optical components business processes and data management requirements of damage parameters, component parameters of flexible, configurable system is simple, easy to use, improve the efficiency of the optical component damage test.

  14. Micro electro mechanical system optical switching

    DOEpatents

    Thorson, Kevin J; Stevens, Rick C; Kryzak, Charles J; Leininger, Brian S; Kornrumpf, William P; Forman, Glenn A; Iannotti, Joseph A; Spahn, Olga B; Cowan, William D; Dagel, Daryl J

    2013-12-17

    The present disclosure includes apparatus, system, and method embodiments that provide micro electo mechanical system optical switching and methods of manufacturing switches. For example, one optical switch embodiment includes at least one micro electro mechanical system type pivot mirror structure disposed along a path of an optical signal, the structure having a mirror and an actuator, and the mirror having a pivot axis along a first edge and having a second edge rotatable with respect to the pivot axis, the mirror being capable of and arranged to be actuated to pivot betweeen a position parallel to a plane of an optical signal and a position substantially normal to the plane of the optical signal.

  15. Controllable decay in an optical waveguide system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G. L.; Zhao, T.; Xiao, H. F.; Liu, Z. L.; Yang, J. H.; Tian, Y. H.

    2016-09-01

    The optical waveguide arrays can be employed to simulate the unstable quantum systems when the light propagates in them, which can present the optical Zeno and anti-Zeno effects. In this paper, we propose the scheme of periodic modulation of the coupling coefficient based on the coupling between the straight and cosine bend optical waveguides, which can realize the controllable optical Zeno and anti-Zeno effects. Based on the special decay law, the decay of light intensity in the straight waveguide can be freely controlled by selecting the appropriate observation positions.

  16. Bioactive "self-sensing" optical systems.

    PubMed

    Domachuk, Peter; Perry, Hannah; Amsden, Jason J; Kaplan, David L; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G

    2009-12-21

    Free-standing silk films are useful materials to manufacture nanopatterned optical elements and to immobilize bio-dopants such as enzymes while maintaining their biological activity. These traits were combined by incorporating hemoglobin into free-standing silk diffraction gratings to fabricate chemically responsive optofluidic devices responsive to ambient gas conditions, constituting a simple oxygen sensor. This type of self-analyzing optical system is enabled by the unique ability to reproduce high-fidelity optical structures in silk while maintaining the activity of entrapped proteins such as hemoglobin. These bioactive optical devices offer a direct readout capability, adding utility into the bioresponsive material arena. PMID:20087427

  17. Bioactive “self-sensing” optical systems

    PubMed Central

    Domachuk, Peter; Perry, Hannah; Amsden, Jason J.; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2009-01-01

    Free-standing silk films are useful materials to manufacture nanopatterned optical elements and to immobilize bio-dopants such as enzymes while maintaining their biological activity. These traits were combined by incorporating hemoglobin into free-standing silk diffraction gratings to fabricate chemically responsive optofluidic devices responsive to ambient gas conditions, constituting a simple oxygen sensor. This type of self-analyzing optical system is enabled by the unique ability to reproduce high-fidelity optical structures in silk while maintaining the activity of entrapped proteins such as hemoglobin. These bioactive optical devices offer a direct readout capability, adding utility into the bioresponsive material arena. PMID:20087427

  18. Integrated optical biosensor system (IOBS)

    SciTech Connect

    Grace, Karen M.; Sweet, Martin R.; Goeller, Roy M.; Morrison, Leland Jean; Grace, Wynne Kevin; Kolar, Jerome D.

    2007-10-30

    An optical biosensor has a first enclosure with a pathogen recognition surface, including a planar optical waveguide and grating located in the first enclosure. An aperture is in the first enclosure for insertion of sample to be investigated to a position in close proximity to the pathogen recognition surface. A laser in the first enclosure includes means for aligning and means for modulating the laser, the laser having its light output directed toward said grating. Detection means are located in the first enclosure and in optical communication with the pathogen recognition surface for detecting pathogens after interrogation by the laser light and outputting the detection. Electronic means is located in the first enclosure and receives the detection for processing the detection and outputting information on the detection, and an electrical power supply is located in the first enclosure for supplying power to the laser, the detection means and the electronic means.

  19. Optical design and lighting application of an LED-based sports lighting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxler, Larry

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes both the optical development of an LED-based sports lighting system and the results of the application of the system to an actual sport field. A traditional sport lighting fixture is generally composed of a single 1500 watt High Intensity Discharge (HID) light source with reflectors used to control the light distribution. The efficacy of the HID light source is equivalent or nearly equivalent to most LED light sources, putting LEDs at a large cost disadvantage in a high light output application such as sports lighting due to the number of LEDs and supporting components required to run an LED system. To assess the feasibility and applicability of LEDs in a sports lighting application, an LED-based sport light has been developed and installed on a small soccer field specified to have an average maintained illuminance level of 30 footcandles. An existing HID sport lighting system was also installed on the same size soccer field adjacent to the LED field with the same average footcandle level for comparison. Results indicate that LEDs can provide equivalent average illumination; however the LED source and system component cost is substantially higher. Despite the high cost, it was found that improved optical control afforded by the optical design used in the system provides a significant improvement in offsite wasted spill light, glare control, and on field uniformity. This could provide an advantage for LED systems.

  20. Optical simulations for Ambilight TV systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruyneel, Filip; Lanoye, Lieve

    2012-06-01

    Ambilight is a unique Philips feature, where RGB LEDs are used to create a dynamic light halo around the television. This extends the screen and hence increases the viewing experience, as it draws the viewer more into the action on the screen. The feature receives very positive consumer feedback. However, implementing Ambilight in the increasingly stringent design boundary conditions of a slim and thin TV set is a challenging task. Optical simulations play a vital role in each step of the Ambilight development. Ranging from prototype to final product, we use simulations, next to prototyping, to aid the choice of LEDs, optical materials and optical systems during different phases of the design process. Each step the impact of the optical system on the mechanical design and TV set dimensions needs to be taken into account. Moreover, optical simulations are essential to guarantee the required optical performance given a big spread in LED performance, mechanical tolerances and material properties. Next to performance, optical efficiency is also an important parameter to evaluate an optical design, as it establishes the required number of LEDs and the total LED power. As such optical efficiency defines the thermal power which needs to be dissipated by the LED system. The innovation roadmap does not stop here. For future systems we see a miniaturization trend, where smaller LED packages and smaller dies are used. This evolution makes the impact of mechanical tolerances on the optical design more severe. Consequentially, this approach poses a whole new challenge to the way we use optical simulations in our design process.

  1. Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data: Custom Engineering trough with glass reflector surface and Sandia-designed receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, T.D.

    1981-05-01

    Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Custom Engineering trough and Sandia-designed receivers, with glass reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States. Two experimental receivers were tested, one with an antireflective coating on the glass envelope around the receiver tube and one without the antireflective coating.

  2. Wavelength-controlled external-cavity laser with a silicon photonic crystal resonant reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, A. A.; Liles, Alexandros A.; Persheyev, Saydulla; Debnath, Kapil; O'Faolain, Liam

    2016-03-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of an alternative design of external-cavity hybrid lasers consisting of a III-V Semiconductor Optical Amplifier with fiber reflector and a Photonic Crystal (PhC) based resonant reflector on SOI. The Silicon reflector comprises a polymer (SU8) bus waveguide vertically coupled to a PhC cavity and provides a wavelength-selective optical feedback to the laser cavity. This device exhibits milliwatt-level output power and sidemode suppression ratio of more than 25 dB.

  3. Large-Scale All-Dielectric Metamaterial Perfect Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Moitra, Parikshit; Slovick, Brian A.; li, Wei; Kravchencko, Ivan I.; Briggs, Dayrl P.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Valentine, Jason

    2015-05-08

    All-dielectric metamaterials offer a potential low-loss alternative to plasmonic metamaterials at optical frequencies. In this paper, we take advantage of the low absorption loss as well as the simple unit cell geometry to demonstrate large-scale (centimeter-sized) all-dielectric metamaterial perfect reflectors made from silicon cylinder resonators. These perfect reflectors, operating in the telecommunications band, were fabricated using self-assembly based nanosphere lithography. In spite of the disorder originating from the self-assembly process, the average reflectance of the metamaterial perfect reflectors is 99.7% at 1530 nm, surpassing the reflectance of metallic mirrors. Moreover, the spectral separation of the electric and magnetic resonances can be chosen to achieve the required reflection bandwidth while maintaining a high tolerance to disorder. Finally, the scalability of this design could lead to new avenues of manipulating light for low-loss and large-area photonic applications.

  4. Large-Scale All-Dielectric Metamaterial Perfect Reflectors

    DOE PAGES

    Moitra, Parikshit; Slovick, Brian A.; li, Wei; Kravchencko, Ivan I.; Briggs, Dayrl P.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Valentine, Jason

    2015-05-08

    All-dielectric metamaterials offer a potential low-loss alternative to plasmonic metamaterials at optical frequencies. In this paper, we take advantage of the low absorption loss as well as the simple unit cell geometry to demonstrate large-scale (centimeter-sized) all-dielectric metamaterial perfect reflectors made from silicon cylinder resonators. These perfect reflectors, operating in the telecommunications band, were fabricated using self-assembly based nanosphere lithography. In spite of the disorder originating from the self-assembly process, the average reflectance of the metamaterial perfect reflectors is 99.7% at 1530 nm, surpassing the reflectance of metallic mirrors. Moreover, the spectral separation of the electric and magnetic resonances canmore » be chosen to achieve the required reflection bandwidth while maintaining a high tolerance to disorder. Finally, the scalability of this design could lead to new avenues of manipulating light for low-loss and large-area photonic applications.« less

  5. Advanced optical blade tip clearance measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, M. J.; Honeycutt, R. E.; Nordlund, R. E.; Robinson, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    An advanced electro-optical system was developed to measure single blade tip clearances and average blade tip clearances between a rotor and its gas path seal in an operating gas turbine engine. This system is applicable to fan, compressor, and turbine blade tip clearance measurement requirements, and the system probe is particularly suitable for operation in the extreme turbine environment. A study of optical properties of blade tips was conducted to establish measurement system application limitations. A series of laboratory tests was conducted to determine the measurement system's operational performance characteristics and to demonstrate system capability under simulated operating gas turbine environmental conditions. Operational and environmental performance test data are presented.

  6. Optical scanning system for laser velocimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    An optical system was developed to provide fast incremental scanning of a backscattered laser velocimeter focus point over a 36-cm distance. The system is used to measure flow velocities at 16 positions along its optical axis and to scan these 16 positions up to 30 times a second. Dwell time at each location is approximately 2 milliseconds. Sample volumes typically are 0.2 mm in diameter by 1.4 cm in length. The optical scanning system consists of a wheel containing plane parallel quartz windows of various thicknesses. The laser velocimeter beams are imaged to a primary focus within the dead airspace of an optical cell. The beams emerging from the cell pass through the windows of the scanning wheel. The refraction of the beams passing through the windows causes an apparent shift of the focus within the optical cell and hence in the test zone. Light scattered from the secondary focus within the test zone is concurrently collected and reimaged through the same optical path which originally projected the primary focus. The reimaged backscattered light containing the velocity information is then collected and focused onto a photomultiplier detector system to complete the scanned laser velocimeter optical system.

  7. Fiber optics for propulsion control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    In aircraft systems with digital controls, fiberoptics has advantages over wire systems because of its inherent immunity to electromagnetic noise (EMI) and electromagnetic pulses (EMP). It also offers a weight benefit when metallic conductors are replaced by optical fibers. To take full advantage of the benefits of optical waveguides, passive optical sensors are also being developed to eliminate the need for electrical power to the sensor. Fiberoptics may also be used for controlling actuators on engine and airframe. In this application, the optical fibers, connectors, etc. will be subjected to high temperature and vibrations. This paper discussed the use of fiberoptics in aircraft propulsion systems together with the optical sensors and optically controlled actuators being developed to take full advantage of the benefits which fiberoptics offers. The requirements for sensors and actuators in advanced propulsion systems are identified. The benefits of using fiberoptics in place of conventional wire systems are discussed as well as the environmental conditions under which the optical components must operate.

  8. Predicting the optical gap of conjugated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botelho, Andre Leitao

    The adapted Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model is developed in this work as a tool for in silico prediction of the optical gap of pi-conjugated systems for photovoltaic applications. Full transferability of the model ensures reliable predictive power - excellent agreement with 180 independent experimental data points covering virtually all existing conjugated system types with an accuracy exceeding the time-dependent density functional theory, one of the most accurate first-principles methods. Insights on the structure-property relation of conjugated systems obtained from the model lead to guiding rules for optical gap design: 1) fusing aromatic rings parallel to the conjugated path does not significantly lower the optical gap, 2) fusing rings perpendicularly lowers the optical gap of the monomer, but has a reduced benefit from polymerization, and 3) copolymers take advantage of the lower optical gap of perpendicular fused rings and benefit from further optical gap reduction through added parallel fused rings as electronic communicators. A copolymer of parallel and perpendicular benzodithiophenes, differing only in sulfur atom locations, is proposed as a candidate to achieve the optimal 1.2 eV donor optical gap for organic photovoltaics. For small-molecule organic photovoltaics, substituting the end pairs of carbon atoms on pentacene with sulfur atoms is predicted to lower the optical gap from 1.8 eV to 1.1 eV. Furthermore, the model offers an improvement of orders of magnitude in the computational efficiency over commonly used first-principles tools.

  9. Computer prediction of large reflector antenna radiation properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botula, A.

    1980-01-01

    A FORTRAN program for calculating reflector antenna radiation patterns was rewritten and extended to include reflectors composed of a number of panels. These individual panels must be analytic surfaces. The theoretical foundation for the program is as follows: Geometrical optics techniques are used to trace rays from a feed antenna to the reflector surface and back to a mathematical plane just in front of the reflector. The resulting tangential electric field distribution, assumed to be the only source of forward radiation, is integrated numerically to calculate the radiation pattern for a desired set of angles. When the reflector is composed of more than one panel, each panel is treated as a separated antenna, the ray-tracing procedure and integration being repeated for each panel. The results of the individual aperture plane integrations are stored and summed to yield the relative electric field strength over the angles of interest. An example and several test cases are included to demonstrate the use of the program and verify the new method of computation.

  10. Thermal Stability of a 4 Meter Primary Reflector for the Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofield, Richard E.; Kasl, Eldon P.

    2011-01-01

    The Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder (SMLS) is a space-borne heterodyne radiometer which will measure pressure, temperature and atmospheric constituents from thermal emission in [180,680] GHz. SMLS, planned for the NRC Decadal Survey's Global Atmospheric Composition Mission, uses a novel toric Cassegrain antenna to perform both elevation and azimuth scanning. This provides better horizontal and temporal resolution and coverage than were possible with elevation-only scanning in the two previous MLS satellite instruments. SMLS is diffraction-limited in the vertical plane but highly astigmatic in the horizontal (beam aspect ratio approx. 1:20). Nadir symmetry ensures that beam shape is nearly invariant over plus or minus 65 deg azimuth. A low-noise receiver FOV is swept over the reflector system by a small azimuth-scanning mirror. We describe the fabrication and thermal-stability test of a composite demonstration primary reflector, having full 4m height and 1/3 the width planned for flight. Using finite-element models of reflectors and structure, we evaluate thermal deformations and optical performance for 4 orbital environments and isothermal soak. We compare deformations with photogrammetric measurements made during soak tests in a chamber. The test temperature range exceeds predicted orbital ranges by large factors, implying in-orbit thermal stability of 0.21 micron rms (root mean square)/C, which meets SMLS requirements.

  11. The Position and Attitude of Sub-reflector Modeling for TM65 m Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z. X.; Chen, L.; Wang, J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    In the course of astronomical observations, with changes in angle of pitch, the large radio telescope will have different degrees of deformation in the sub-reflector support, back frame, main reflector etc, which will lead to the dramatic decline of antenna efficiency in both high and low elevation. A sub-reflector system of the Tian Ma 65 m radio telescope has been installed in order to compensate for the gravitational deformations of the sub-reflector support and the main reflector. The position and attitude of the sub-reflector are variable in order to improve the pointing performance and the efficiency at different elevations. In this paper, it is studied that the changes of position and attitude of the sub-reflector have influence on the efficiency of antenna in the X band and Ku band. A model has been constructed to determine the position and attitude of the sub-reflector with elevation, as well as the point compensation model, by observing the radio source. In addition, antenna efficiency was tested with sub-reflector position adjusted and fixed. The results show that the model of sub-reflector can effectively improve the efficiency of the 65 m radio telescope. In X band, the aperture efficiency of the radio telescope reaches more than 60% over the entire elevation range.

  12. Optical spring effect in nanoelectromechanical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Feng; Zhou, Guangya Du, Yu; Chau, Fook Siong; Deng, Jie

    2014-08-11

    In this Letter, we report a hybrid system consisting of nano-optical and nano-mechanical springs, in which the optical spring effect works to adjust the mechanical frequency of a nanoelectromechanical systems resonator. Nano-scale folded beams are fabricated as the mechanical springs and double-coupled one-dimensional photonic crystal cavities are used to pump the “optical spring.” The dynamic characteristics of this hybrid system are measured and analyzed at both low and high input optical powers. This study leads the physical phenomenon of optomechanics in complex nano-opto-electro-mechanical systems (NOEMS) and could benefit the future applications of NOEMS in chip-level communication and sensing.

  13. Broadband reconfigurable optical beam-forming systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toughlian, Edward N.; Zmuda, Henry; Carter, Charity A.

    1994-06-01

    It is shown that by applying spatial frequency dependent optical phase compensation in an optical heterodyne process, variable RF delay can be achieved over a prescribed frequency band. Experimental results that demonstrate the performance of the delay line with regard to both maximum delay and resolution over a broad bandwidth are presented. Additionally, a spatially integrated optical system is proposed for control of phased array antennas, providing mechanical stability, essentially eliminating the drift problems associated with free-space optical systems, and providing high packing density. This approach uses a class of SLM known as a deformable mirror device and leads to a steerable arbitrary antenna radiation pattern of the true time-delay type. Also considered is the ability to utilize the delay line as a general photonic signal processing element in an adaptive (reconfigurable) transversal frequency filter configuration. Such systems are widely applicable in jammer/noise canceling systems, broadband ISDN, spread spectrum secure communications and the like.

  14. Nonlinear Mixing in Optical Multicarrier Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, Mahmood Abdul

    Although optical fiber has a vast spectral bandwidth, efficient use of this bandwidth is still important in order to meet the ever increased capacity demand of optical networks. In addition to wavelength division multiplexing, it is possible to partition multiple low-rate subcarriers into each high speed wavelength channel. Multicarrier systems not only ensure efficient use of optical and electrical components, but also tolerate transmission impairments. The purpose of this research is to understand the impact of mixing among subcarriers in Radio-Over-Fiber (RoF) and high speed optical transmission systems, and experimentally demonstrate techniques to minimize this impact. We also analyze impact of clipping and quantization on multicarrier signals and compare bandwidth efficiency of two popular multiplexing techniques, namely, orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) and Nyquist modulation. For an OFDM-RoF system, we present a novel technique that minimizes the RF domain signal-signal beat interference (SSBI), relaxes the phase noise limit on the RF carrier, realizes the full potential of optical heterodyne-based RF carrier generation, and increases the performance-to-cost ratio of RoF systems. We demonstrate a RoF network that shares the same RF carrier for both downlink and uplink, avoiding the need of an additional RF oscillator in the customer unit. For multi-carrier optical transmission, we first experimentally compare performance degradations of coherent optical OFDM and single-carrier Nyquist pulse modulated systems in a nonlinear environment. We then experimentally evaluate SSBI compensation techniques in the presence of semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) induced nonlinearities for a multicarrier optical system with direct detection. We show that SSBI contamination can be significantly reduced from the data signal when the carrier-to-signal power ratio is sufficiently low.

  15. High-output LED-based light engine for profile lighting fixtures with high color uniformity using freeform reflectors.

    PubMed

    Gadegaard, Jesper; Jensen, Thøger Kari; Jørgensen, Dennis Thykjær; Kristensen, Peter Kjær; Søndergaard, Thomas; Pedersen, Thomas Garm; Pedersen, Kjeld

    2016-02-20

    In the stage lighting and entertainment market, light engines (LEs) for lighting fixtures are often based on high-intensity discharge (HID) bulbs. Switching to LED-based light engines gives possibilities for fast switching, additive color mixing, a longer lifetime, and potentially, more energy-efficient systems. The lumen output of a single LED is still not sufficient to replace an HID source in high-output profile fixtures, but combining multiple LEDs can create an LE with a similar output, but with added complexity. This paper presents the results of modeling and testing such a light engine. Custom ray-tracing software was used to design a high-output red, green and blue LED-based light engine with twelve CBT-90 LEDs using a dual-reflector principle. The simulated optical system efficiency was 0.626 with a perfect (R=1) reflector coating for light delivered on a target surface through the entire optical system. A profile lighting fixture prototype was created, and provided an output of 6744 lumen and an efficiency of 0.412. The lower efficiency was mainly due to a non-optimal reflector coating, and the optimized design is expected to reach a significantly higher efficiency.

  16. High-output LED-based light engine for profile lighting fixtures with high color uniformity using freeform reflectors.

    PubMed

    Gadegaard, Jesper; Jensen, Thøger Kari; Jørgensen, Dennis Thykjær; Kristensen, Peter Kjær; Søndergaard, Thomas; Pedersen, Thomas Garm; Pedersen, Kjeld

    2016-02-20

    In the stage lighting and entertainment market, light engines (LEs) for lighting fixtures are often based on high-intensity discharge (HID) bulbs. Switching to LED-based light engines gives possibilities for fast switching, additive color mixing, a longer lifetime, and potentially, more energy-efficient systems. The lumen output of a single LED is still not sufficient to replace an HID source in high-output profile fixtures, but combining multiple LEDs can create an LE with a similar output, but with added complexity. This paper presents the results of modeling and testing such a light engine. Custom ray-tracing software was used to design a high-output red, green and blue LED-based light engine with twelve CBT-90 LEDs using a dual-reflector principle. The simulated optical system efficiency was 0.626 with a perfect (R=1) reflector coating for light delivered on a target surface through the entire optical system. A profile lighting fixture prototype was created, and provided an output of 6744 lumen and an efficiency of 0.412. The lower efficiency was mainly due to a non-optimal reflector coating, and the optimized design is expected to reach a significantly higher efficiency. PMID:26906589

  17. Design of optical systems using derivatives of rays: derivatives of variable vector of spherical boundary surfaces with respect to system variable vector.

    PubMed

    Lin, Psang Dain

    2013-10-20

    A computational scheme based on differential geometry was proposed in a previous study [Appl. Opt.52, 4151 (2013)] for determining the first- and second-order derivative matrices of a skew ray reflected/refracted at a flat boundary surface. The present study extends this methodology to the case of a skew ray reflected/refracted at a spherical boundary surface. The validity of the proposed approach is demonstrated using two retro-reflectors for illustration purposes. The results show that the proposed method provides an effective means of determining the search direction required to minimize the merit function during the optimization stage of the optical system design process.

  18. Design of optical systems using derivatives of rays: derivatives of variable vector of spherical boundary surfaces with respect to system variable vector.

    PubMed

    Lin, Psang Dain

    2013-10-20

    A computational scheme based on differential geometry was proposed in a previous study [Appl. Opt.52, 4151 (2013)] for determining the first- and second-order derivative matrices of a skew ray reflected/refracted at a flat boundary surface. The present study extends this methodology to the case of a skew ray reflected/refracted at a spherical boundary surface. The validity of the proposed approach is demonstrated using two retro-reflectors for illustration purposes. The results show that the proposed method provides an effective means of determining the search direction required to minimize the merit function during the optimization stage of the optical system design process. PMID:24216581

  19. Optics and multilayer coatings for EUVL systems

    SciTech Connect

    Soufli, R; Bajt, S; Hudyma, R M; Taylor, J S

    2008-03-21

    EUV lithography (EUVL) employs illumination wavelengths around 13.5 nm, and in many aspects it is considered an extension of optical lithography, which is used for the high-volume manufacturing (HVM) of today's microprocessors. The EUV wavelength of illumination dictates the use of reflective optical elements (mirrors) as opposed to the refractive lenses used in conventional lithographic systems. Thus, EUVL tools are based on all-reflective concepts: they use multilayer (ML) coated optics for their illumination and projection systems, and they have a ML-coated reflective mask.

  20. Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) feasibility study update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alff, W. H.; Banderman, L. W.

    1983-01-01

    In 1982 a workshop was held to refine the science rationale for large deployable reflectors (LDR) and develop technology requirements that support the science rationale. At the end of the workshop, a set of LDR consensus systems requirements was established. The subject study was undertaken to update the initial LDR study using the new systems requirements. The study included mirror materials selection and configuration, thermal analysis, structural concept definition and analysis, dynamic control analysis and recommendations for further study. The primary emphasis was on the dynamic controls requirements and the sophistication of the controls system needed to meet LDR performance goals.

  1. Optical Design for Extremely Large Telescope Adaptive Optics Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B J

    2003-11-26

    Designing an adaptive optics (AO) system for extremely large telescopes (ELT's) will present new optical engineering challenges. Several of these challenges are addressed in this work, including first-order design of multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems, pyramid wavefront sensors (PWFS's), and laser guide star (LGS) spot elongation. MCAO systems need to be designed in consideration of various constraints, including deformable mirror size and correction height. The y,{bar y} method of first-order optical design is a graphical technique that uses a plot with marginal and chief ray heights as coordinates; the optical system is represented as a segmented line. This method is shown to be a powerful tool in designing MCAO systems. From these analyses, important conclusions about configurations are derived. PWFS's, which offer an alternative to Shack-Hartmann (SH) wavefront sensors (WFS's), are envisioned as the workhorse of layer-oriented adaptive optics. Current approaches use a 4-faceted glass pyramid to create a WFS analogous to a quad-cell SH WFS. PWFS's and SH WFS's are compared and some newly-considered similarities and PWFS advantages are presented. Techniques to extend PWFS's are offered: First, PWFS's can be extended to more pixels in the image by tiling pyramids contiguously. Second, pyramids, which are difficult to manufacture, can be replaced by less expensive lenslet arrays. An approach is outlined to convert existing SH WFS's to PWFS's for easy evaluation of PWFS's. Also, a demonstration of PWFS's in sensing varying amounts of an aberration is presented. For ELT's, the finite altitude and finite thickness of LGS's means that the LGS will appear elongated from the viewpoint of subapertures not directly under the telescope. Two techniques for dealing with LGS spot elongation in SH WFS's are presented. One method assumes that the laser will be pulsed and uses a segmented micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) to track the LGS light subaperture by

  2. Optical system storage design with diffractive optical elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostuk, Raymond K.; Haggans, Charles W.

    1993-01-01

    Optical data storage systems are gaining widespread acceptance due to their high areal density and the ability to remove the high capacity hard disk from the system. In magneto-optical read-write systems, a small rotation of the polarization state in the return signal from the MO media is the signal which must be sensed. A typical arrangement used for detecting these signals and correcting for errors in tracking and focusing on the disk is illustrated. The components required to achieve these functions are listed. The assembly and alignment of this complex system has a direct impact on cost, and also affects the size, weight, and corresponding data access rates. As a result, integrating these optical components and improving packaging techniques is an active area of research and development. Most designs of binary optic elements have been concerned with optimizing grating efficiency. However, rigorous coupled wave models for vector field diffraction from grating surfaces can be extended to determine the phase and polarization state of the diffracted field, and the design of polarization components. A typical grating geometry and the phase and polarization angles associated with the incident and diffracted fields are shown. In our current stage of work, we are examining system configurations which cascade several polarization functions on a single substrate. In this design, the beam returning from the MO disk illuminates a cascaded grating element which first couples light into the substrate, then introduces a quarter wave retardation, then a polarization rotation, and finally separates s- and p-polarized fields through a polarization beam splitter. The input coupler and polarization beam splitter are formed in volume gratings, and the two intermediate elements are zero-order elements.

  3. Method of increasing the working distance of optical-electronic autocollimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konyakhin, Igor A.; Moiseeva, Anastasia A.

    2015-05-01

    It's considered the problem of the increase to tens of meters working distance of the optical-electronic autocollimators is studied when determining the angular position of objects. To solve this problem it is proposed to use a quadrangular pyramid-shaped reflector. By means computer models comparative analysis of the effectiveness of the proposed reflector and traditional flat mirror was carried out. Type of algorithm that allows to realize the required accuracy at longer distances was defined. Also radiation properties of systems of mirrors in the form of mirror-symmetric angles are investigated. Comparison of such mirror systems and proposed quadrangular pyramidal reflector was carried out.

  4. Radar Cross-Section Measurements of V22 Blade Tip with and without LLNL Tipcap Reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Poland, D; Simpson, R

    2000-07-01

    It is desired to quantify the effect, in terms of radar cross-section (RCS), of the addition of a small aluminum reflector to the end of the V22 blades. This reflector was designed and manufactured in order to facilitate blade lag measurements by the 95 GHz Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Radar Blade Tracker (RBT) system. The reflector used in these measurements was designed and fabricated at LLNL and is pictured in Figure 1.

  5. Lamp bulb with integral reflector

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Izrail; Shanks, Bruce; Sumner, Thomas L.

    2001-01-01

    An improved electrodeless discharge lamp bulb includes an integral ceramic reflector as a portion of the bulb envelope. The bulb envelope further includes two pieces, a reflector portion or segment is cast quartz ceramic and a light transmissive portion is a clear fused silica. In one embodiment, the cast quartz ceramic segment includes heat sink fins or stubs providing an increased outside surface area to dissipate internal heat. In another embodiment, the quartz ceramic segment includes an outside surface fused to eliminate gas permeation by polishing.

  6. A new optical antennas based on fiber coupling system and aspherical optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ye; Tian, Shaohua

    2013-08-01

    Space Laser communication is a new technology in recent years of optical communications, optical antenna is a communications front receiving system, compose of the optical antenna receiver, optical fiber coupling lenses. Optical antenna to receive as much as possible the signal light from the target of free space, In this paper, 10.6μm wavelength of infrared light for communication wave, we use spherical mirror and aspheric lens combination of the system, Design of large diameter concave mirror to collect more laser energy, After another spherical convex mirror reflection again to aspherical lens, then coupled into the fiber. The aspheric lens can be a good feature to correct aberration, so this design has less transmission loss and high coupling efficiency. Using Zemax software, we setting reasonable energy analysis and image quality evaluation, design spherical mirrors and aspherical refractive lenses optical system, has good optical performance and economy, can be apply on the atmospheric Laser communication the receiving device.

  7. Optical seismic sensor systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Beal, A. Craig; Cummings, Malcolm E.; Zavriyev, Anton; Christensen, Caleb A.; Lee, Keun

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed is an optical seismic sensor system for measuring seismic events in a geological formation, including a surface unit for generating and processing an optical signal, and a sensor device optically connected to the surface unit for receiving the optical signal over an optical conduit. The sensor device includes at least one sensor head for sensing a seismic disturbance from at least one direction during a deployment of the sensor device within a borehole of the geological formation. The sensor head includes a frame and a reference mass attached to the frame via at least one flexure, such that movement of the reference mass relative to the frame is constrained to a single predetermined path.

  8. Optical switching system and method

    DOEpatents

    Ranganathan, Radha; Gal, Michael; Taylor, P. Craig

    1992-01-01

    An optically bistable device is disclosed. The device includes a uniformly thick layer of amorphous silicon to constitute a Fabry-Perot chamber positioned to provide a target area for a probe beam. The probe beam has a maximum energy less than the energy band gap of the amorphous semiconductor. In a preferred embodiment, a multilayer dielectric mirror is positioned on the Fabry-Perot chamber to increase the finesse of switching of the device. The index of refraction of the amorphous material is thermally altered to alter the transmission of the probe beam.

  9. Axle Shaft Optical Inspection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freese, Fritz; Geise, Philip; George, Eugene; Singh, Tom

    1980-11-01

    An electro-optical instrument to gauge automotive rear axle shafts is described. A high contrast image of the axle lug flange is projected via a high quality photographic lens on two self-scanning linear photodiode arrays. In one three-second rotation, a dedicated digital processor measures bolt circle location, hole diameter and separation. The unit automatically: compares each measurement with preset tolerances, computes the average bolt circle diameter, computes the bolt circle runout, makes a pass/fail decision, provides a digital readout, marks the axle shaft with colored ink and provides the operator a pass/fail light.

  10. Adjusting the Contour of Reflector Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, W. B.; Giebler, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    Postfabrication adjustment of contour of panels for reflector, such as parabolic reflector for radio antennas, possible with simple mechanism consisting of threaded stud, two nuts, and flexure. Contours adjusted manually.

  11. Design and implementation of omni-directional light source and receiving system used in underwater wireless optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Jionghui; Yao, Wenming; Chen, Nannan

    2013-08-01

    Underwater wireless optical communication is a communication mode which uses light as an information carrier and water as transmission medium. As a result of the inherent characteristics of the light waves, underwater wireless optical communication has the advantages of high transmission rate, good security, and strong anti-interference ability. It is suitable for high-speed, short-range communication between underwater mobile vehicles. Underwater optical wireless communication system designed in this paper is composed of the omni-directional communication light source and the receiving system. In the omni-directional communication light source, the laser beams with small divergence angle of 532nm wavelength produced by modulated laser are expanded through a combination refraction-reflection solid and then obtain more than 2π space divergence angle. The paper use TRACEPRO simulation tool to help design a combination solid composed of the lens, conical reflector and parabolic reflector, and test in the air and underwater, the result shows that the effect is fine. Unlike in the air, light attenuation is heavy in the water and a large range of variations in light intensity at different distances appear during underwater optical communication. In order to overcome this problem, the paper use a small photomultiplier as the detection device, design the receiving system using the automatic gain control technique. Underwater wireless optical communication system designed in this paper has the characteristics of small size, low power dissipation and the omni-directional communication function, it is suitable for application in the UUV, AUV, Swimmer Delivery Vehicle (SDV) and other underwater mobile platform, it realizes point-to-point communications and point-to-multipoint communications.

  12. Economics Of Optical Fibre Transmission Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, W. J.

    1983-08-01

    Optical fibre as a telecommunication transmission medium has become one of the most significant developments so far of the digital era. A major contributory factor to the availability of optical fibre transmission systems has been the outstanding progress in the technology of manufacturing high quality glass fibre having relatively low attenuation and broad bandwidths. This and other achievements has enabled manufacturers in the United Kingdom to develop a range of optical fibre cables and transmission equipment for operation over short and long distances at the CCITT recommended digital hierarchical rates of 2, 8, 34 and 140Mbit/s which have been adopted by British Telecom (BT) for modernisation to an all digital transmission network. These optical fibre systems are now becoming increasingly price and performance competitive with conventional technology in many parts of telecommunications networks. In the British Telecom (BT) network the 140Mbit/s optical fibre systems are now economically competitive with equivalent systems on coaxial cable and microwave radio. The economics of 8 and 34Mbit/s systems are not yet sufficiently attractive, compared with 2Mbit/s digital line systems on pair type copper cables, for large scale use in rural and local distribution networks and are presently only justified on cost in and around large cities. As system costs decrease large applications are predicted particularly in support of future high speed data, cable television and visual information services.

  13. Optical disk uses in criminal identification systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sypherd, Allen D.

    1990-08-01

    A significant advancement in law enforcement tools has been made possible by the rapid and innovative development of electronic imaging for criminal identification systems. In particular, development of optical disks capable of high-capacity and random-access storage has provided a unique marriage of application and technology. Fast random access to any record, non-destructive reading of stored images, electronic sorting and transmission of images and an accepted legal basis for evidence are a few of the advantages derived from optical disk technology. This paper discusses the application of optical disk technology to both Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems (AFIS) and Automated Mugshot Retrieval Systems (AMRS). The following topics are addressed in light of AFIS and AMRS user requirements and system capabilities: Write once vs. rewritable, gray level and storage requirements, multi-volume library systems, data organization and capacity trends.

  14. Development and Testing of a Power Trough System Using a Structurally-Efficient, High-Performance, Large-Aperture Concentrator with Thin Glass Reflector and Focal Point Rotation

    SciTech Connect

    May, E. K.; Forristall, R.

    2005-11-01

    Industrial Solar Technology has assembled a team of experts to develop a large-aperture parabolic trough for the electric power market that moves beyond cost and operating limitations of 1980's designs based on sagged glass reflectors. IST's structurally efficient space frame design will require nearly 50% less material per square meter than a Solel LS-2 concentrator and the new trough will rotate around the focal point. This feature eliminates flexhoses that increase pump power, installation and maintenance costs. IST aims to deliver a concentrator module costing less than $100 per square meter that can produce temperatures up to 400 C. The IST concentrator is ideally suited for application of front surface film reflectors and ensures that US corporations will manufacture major components, except for the high temperature receivers.

  15. Large-area, high-intensity PV arrays for systems using dish concentrating optics

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, J.S.; Duda, A.; Zweibel, K.; Coutts, T.J.

    1998-09-01

    In this paper, the authors report on efforts to fabricate monolithic interconnected modules (MIMs) using III-V semiconductors with bandgaps appropriate for the terrestrial solar spectrum. The small size of the component cells comprising the MIM allows for operation at extremely high flux densities and relaxes the requirement for a small spot size to be generated by the optics. This makes possible a PV option for the large dish concentrator systems that have been developed by the solar thermal community for use with Stirling engines. Additionally, the highly effective back-surface reflector integrated into the MIM design is an effective tool for thermal management of the array. Development of this technology would radically alter the projections for PV manufacturing capacity because of the potential for extremely high power generation per unit area of semiconductor material.

  16. The effect of thin turbulent shear layers on the optical quality of imaging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinmetz, W. J.

    1975-01-01

    A modified C141 transport was outfitted with a 91.5-cm reflector telescope designed to view objects radiating outside the visible window in the infrared range from 1 micron to 1000 microns. The telescope is situated in a cavity which is operated open port. Spoilers were designed which reduce turbulence-induced excitation of the cavity. The aircraft was designed to operate at altitudes up to 15 km to significantly reduce the effect of the H2O and CO2. Furthermore, the optically degrading influence of the large-scale atmospheric turbulence on land-based telescopes is replaced by the effect of the turbulent shear layer resulting from the spoiler upstream of the cavity. A mathematical model was established to describe the effect of turbulent shear layers on imaging systems and to examine the parameters of interest relevant to potential wind-tunnel experimentation.

  17. Upgrades to the VISAR-streaked optical pyrometer (SOP) system on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, A. M.; Millot, M.; Seppala, L. G.; Frieders, G.; Zeid, Z.; Christensen, K.; Celliers, P. M.

    2015-08-01

    The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) is a critical diagnostic in Inertial Confinement Fusion and High Energy Density research as it has the ability to track shock fronts or interfaces moving 0.1-100 km/s with great accuracy. At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the VISAR has recently been used successfully for implosion tuning and equation of state measurements. However, the initial design of the companion Streaked Optical Pyrometer (SOP) to measure spectral radiance - hence shock temperature - suffers from large background levels and poor spatial resolution. We report on an upgrade to improve the spatial resolution in the 560-640nm band by using custom lenses and replacing the Dove prism with a K-mirror and implementing a gating-circuit for the streak camera to reduce background signal. We envision that upgraded SOP will provide high quality data collection matching NIF VISAR's standards.

  18. Characterization of Fiber Optic CMM Probe System

    SciTech Connect

    K.W.Swallow

    2007-05-15

    This report documents a study completed on the fiber optic probe system that is a part of the Werth optical CMM. This study was necessary due to a lack of documentation from the vendor for the proper use and calibration of the fiber probe, and was performed in support of the Lithographie Galvanoformung Abformung (LIGA) development program at the FM&T. As a result of this study, a better understanding of the fiber optic probe has been developed, including guidelines for its proper use and calibration.

  19. Full-duplex optical communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, Thomas M. (Inventor); Hazzard, David A. (Inventor); Horan, Stephen (Inventor); Payne, Jason A. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method of full-duplex electromagnetic communication wherein a pair of data modulation formats are selected for the forward and return data links respectively such that the forward data electro-magnetic beam serves as a carrier for the return data. A method of encoding optical information is used wherein right-hand and left-hand circular polarizations are assigned to optical information to represent binary states. An application for an earth to low earth orbit optical communications system is presented which implements the full-duplex communication and circular polarization keying modulation format.

  20. Multi-band reflector antenna with double-ring element frequency selective subreflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Lee, S. W.

    1993-01-01

    Frequency selective subreflectors (FSS) are often employed in the reflector antenna system of a communication satellite or a deep space exploration vehicle for multi-frequency operations. In the past, FSS's have been designed for diplexing two frequency bands. For example, the Voyager FSS was designed to diplex S and X bands and the TDRSS FSS was designed to diplex S and Ku bands. Recently, NASA's CASSINI project requires an FSS to multiplex four frequency (S/X/Ku/Ka) bands. Theoretical analysis and experimental verifications are presented for a multi-band flat pannel FSS with double-ring elements. Both the exact formulation and the thin-ring approximation are described for analyzing and designing this multi-ring patch element FSS. It is found that the thin-ring approximation fails to predict the electrically wide ring element FSS's performance. A single screen double-ring element FSS is demonstrated for the tri-band system that reflects the X-band signal while transmitting through the S- and Ku-band signals. In addition, a double screen FSS with non-similar double-ring elements is presented for the Cassini's four-band system which reflects the X- and Ka-band signals while passing the S- and Ku-band signals. To accurately predict the FSS effects on a dual reflector antenna's radiation pattern, the FSS subreflector's transmitted/reflected field variation as functions of the polarization and incident angles with respect to the local coordinates was taken into account. An FSS transmission/reflection coefficient table is computed for TE and TM polarizations at various incident angles based on the planar FSS model. Next, the hybrid Geometric Optics (GO) and Physical Optics (PO) technique is implemented with linearly interpolating the FSS table to efficiently determine the FSS effects in a dual reflector antenna.

  1. Electrical performance of wire mesh for spacecraft deployable reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Greg

    1993-01-01

    Mobile satellite communications systems require large, high gain antennas at the spacecraft to minimize the antenna gain and power requirements for mobile user elements. The use of a deployable reflector antenna for these applications provides a lightweight system that can be compactly stowed prior to deployment on orbit. The mesh surface material is a critical component in the deployable reflector antenna design. The mesh is required to provide the desired electrical performance as well as the mechanical properties that are necessary to deploy and maintain the reflector surface on orbit. Of particular interest in multi-channel communications applications is the generation of Passive InterModulation (PIM) products at the reflector surface that can result in interference in the receive band. Wire mesh was specifically identified by some as having a high potential for PIM generation based solely on the existence of nonpermanent metal to metal contacts at the junctions that are inherent in the mesh design. There are a number of other factors, however, that reduce the likelihood of PIM occurring at the mesh reflector surface. Experimental data presented demonstrate that mesh PIM generation is not significant for typical applications. PIM and reflectivity performance of wire mesh composed of gold plated molybdenum wire in a tricot knit are described. This type of mesh was successfully used for the deployable Single Access Antennas of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System.

  2. Electrical performance of wire mesh for spacecraft deployable reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Greg

    Mobile satellite communications systems require large, high gain antennas at the spacecraft to minimize the antenna gain and power requirements for mobile user elements. The use of a deployable reflector antenna for these applications provides a lightweight system that can be compactly stowed prior to deployment on orbit. The mesh surface material is a critical component in the deployable reflector antenna design. The mesh is required to provide the desired electrical performance as well as the mechanical properties that are necessary to deploy and maintain the reflector surface on orbit. Of particular interest in multi-channel communications applications is the generation of Passive InterModulation (PIM) products at the reflector surface that can result in interference in the receive band. Wire mesh was specifically identified by some as having a high potential for PIM generation based solely on the existence of nonpermanent metal to metal contacts at the junctions that are inherent in the mesh design. There are a number of other factors, however, that reduce the likelihood of PIM occurring at the mesh reflector surface. Experimental data presented demonstrate that mesh PIM generation is not significant for typical applications. PIM and reflectivity performance of wire mesh composed of gold plated molybdenum wire in a tricot knit are described. This type of mesh was successfully used for the deployable Single Access Antennas of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System.

  3. Solar Thermal Vacuum Test of Deployable Astromesh Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegman, Matthew D.

    2009-01-01

    On September 10, 2008, a 36-hour Solar Thermal Vacuum Test of a 5m deployable mesh reflector was completed in JPL's 25' Space Simulator by the Advanced Deployable Structures Group at JPL. The testing was performed under NASA's Innovative Partnership Program (IPP) as a risk reduction effort for two JPL Decadal Survey Missions: DESDynI and SMAP. The 5.0 m aperture Astromesh reflector was provided by Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) Astro Aerospace, our IPP industry partner. The testing utilized a state-of-the-art photogrammetry system to measure deformation of the reflector under LN2 cold soak, 0.25 Earth sun, 0.5 sun and 1.0 sun. An intricate network of thermocouples (approximately 200 in total) was used to determine the localized temperature across the mesh as well as on the perimeter truss of the reflector. Half of the reflector was in a fixed shadow to maximize thermal gradients. A mobility system was built for remotely actuating the cryo-vacuum capable photogrammetry camera around the circumference of the Solar Simulator. Photogrammetric resolution of 0.025 mm RMS (0.001") was achieved over the entire 5 meter aperture for each test case. The data will be used for thermo-elastic model correlation and validation, which will benefit the planned Earth Science Missions.

  4. Research on techniques for laser ranging to optical corner reflectors on the moon. Research on laser techniques and single photo-electron detection and timing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alley, C. O.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental studies using a pulsed LED, Cerenkov source, and a 100 ps laser were made of various photomultipliers and discriminator combinations. In addition, a new type of neodymium-YAG frequency doubled laser was used as the basis for the development of a stable, short pulse, high repetition rate laser system. This laser was then used in conjunction with atomic clocks to study the effect of gravitational potential on elapsed time. Avenues to promote the development of international cooperation in the area of lunar laser ranging were also explored.

  5. Efficient optical pulse stacker system

    DOEpatents

    Seppala, Lynn G.; Haas, Roger A.

    1982-01-01

    Method and apparatus for spreading and angle-encoding each pulse of a multiplicity of small area, short pulses into several temporally staggered pulses by use of appropriate beam splitters, with the optical elements being arranged so that each staggered pulse is contiguous with one or two other such pulses, and the entire sequence of stacked pulses comprising a single, continuous long pulse. The single long pulse is expanded in area, and then doubly passed through a nonstorage laser amplifier such as KrF. After amplification, the physically separated, angle-encoded and temporally staggered pulses are recombined into a single pulse of short duration. This high intensity output beam is well collimated and may be propagated over long distance, or used for irradiating inertial confinement fusion targets.

  6. Fiber optic gyroscopes for vehicle navigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Tatsuya; Soekawa, Hirokazu; Yuhara, Toshiya; Kajioka, Hiroshi; Oho, Shigeru; Sonobe, Hisao

    1994-03-01

    Fiber optic gyroscopes (FOGs) have been developed for vehicle navigation systems and are used in Toyota Motor Corporation models Mark II, Chaser and Cresta in Japan. Use of FOGs in these systems requires high reliability under a wide range of conditions, especially in a temperature range between -40 and 85 degree(s)C. In addition, a high cost-performance ratio is needed. We have developed optical and electrical systems that are inexpensive and can perform well. They are ready to be mass-produced. FOGs have already been installed in luxury automobiles, and will soon be included in more basic vehicles. We have developed more inexpensive FOGs for this purpose.

  7. Evaluation of Hardware and Procedures for Astronaut Assembly and Repair of Large Precision Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Watson, Judith J.; Collins, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    A detailed procedure is presented that enables astronauts in extravehicular activity (EVA) to efficiently assemble and repair large (i.e., greater than 10m-diameter) segmented reflectors, supported by a truss, for space-based optical or radio-frequency science instruments. The procedure, estimated timelines, and reflector hardware performance are verified in simulated 0-g (neutral buoyancy) assembly tests of a 14m-diameter, offset-focus, reflector test article. The test article includes a near-flight-quality, 315-member, doubly curved support truss and 7 mockup reflector panels (roughly 2m in diameter) representing a portion of the 37 total panels needed to fully populate the reflector. Data from the tests indicate that a flight version of the design (including all reflector panels) could be assembled in less than 5 hours - less than the 6 hours normally permitted for a single EVA. This assembly rate essentially matches pre-test predictions that were based on a vast amount of historical data on EVA assembly of structures produced by NASA Langley Research Center. Furthermore, procedures and a tool for the removal and replacement of a damaged reflector panel were evaluated, and it was shown that EVA repair of this type of reflector is feasible with the use of appropriate EVA crew aids.

  8. Lightweight reflector assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argoud, M. J.; Jolley, J.; Walker, W. L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An inexpensive, lightweight reflective assembly member having good optical quality and particularly adaptable to accommodating temperature variations without providing destructive thermal stresses and reflective slope errors is described. The reflective assembly consists of a thin sheet of glass with appropriate reflective coating and a cellular glass block substrate bonded together. The method of fabrication includes abrading the cellular substrate with an abrasive master die to form an appropriate concave surface. An adhesive is applied to the abraded surface and a lamina reflective surface is placed under a uniform pressure to conform the reflective surface onto the desired abraded surface of the substrate.

  9. External insulation systems for cryogenic storage systems. Volume 1: Optical properties of Kapton and report of process variable study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, A. M.

    1974-01-01

    Investigations are conducted into the optical properties of the glass and Kapton substrate materials, and three variables were chosen: deposition rate, sputter gas pressure, and film contamination time. Substrate tests have shown that fabrication of an dielectric broadband reflector would require an extremely complex and expensive filter design.

  10. Thermal Stability of a 4 Meter Primary Reflector for the Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofield, Richard; Kasl, Eldon P.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the fabrication and thermal-stability analysis and test of a composite demonstration model of the Scanning Microwave Limb Sounder (SMLS) primary reflector, having full 4m height and 1/3 the width planned for flight. SMLS is a space-borne heterodyne radiometer which will measure pressure, temperature and atmospheric constituents from thermal emission between 180 and 660 GHz. Current MLS instruments in low Earth orbit scan pencil-beam antennas (sized to resolve about one scale height) vertically over the atmospheric limb. SMLS, planned for the Global Atmospheric Composition Mission of the NRC Decadal Survey, adds azimuthal scanning for better horizontal and temporal resolution and coverage than typical orbit spacing provides. SMLS combines the wide scan range of the parabolic torus with unblocked offset Cassegrain optics. The resulting system is diffraction-limited in the vertical plane but highly astigmatic in the horizontal, having a beam aspect ratio [tilde operator]1:20. Symmetry about the nadir axis ensures that beam shape is nearly invariant over +/-65(white bullet) azimuth. The a feeds a low-noise SIS receiver whose FOV is swept over the reflector system by a small scanning mirror. Using finiteelement models of antenna reflectors and structure, we evaluate thermal deformations and the resulting optical performance for 4 orbital environments and isothermal soak. We compare deformations with photogrammetric measurements made during wide-range (ambient+[-97,+75](white bullet) C) thermal soak tests of the primary in a chamber. This range exceeds predicted orbital soak ranges by large factors, implying in-orbit thermal stability of 0.21(mu)m rms/(white bullet)C, which meets SMLS requirements.

  11. Diffractive surfaces for cat-eye array retro-reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, I.

    2008-09-01

    Cat-eye-array retro-reflectors, combining a lenslet array with a reflective surface at the common focal plane of the lenslets, are widely used due to their simple structure and low cost. While for many applications the performance (brightness, acceptance angle range and directionality) is acceptable, others could benefit from better performance. Improving these retroreflectors is difficult because their simplicity results in too few degrees of freedom. Here, we show how the use of one or two diffractive surfaces can significantly increase the brightness of the reflected beam and/or the acceptance angle while still allowing inexpensive manufacturing by molding or replication. Specifically, we focus here on one potential application of cat-eye-array retro-reflectors: semipassive optical communication units. Semi-passive communication units combine a retroreflector with a light modulator. The directional auto-aligned retro-reflected signal enhances security and power efficiency. Furthermore, many modulators use very low power: far lower than light emitter. Modulated retro-reflectors have already been demonstrated for space and military communication. Here we focus on a different application: optical smart cards. These devices described elsewhere, can be used, for example, for access control identification or as non-contact secure teller machine ID. Such devices must have an optical modulator in the optical path, so the effect of the modulator must also be accounted for in the design. As a consumer product, low cost manufacturability is another requirement. Design examples are presented.

  12. The Discovery Channel Telescope optical coating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Heather K.; Ash, Gary S.; Parsley, William F.

    2010-07-01

    The Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) is a project of Lowell Observatory, undertaken with support from Discovery Communications, Inc., to design and construct a 4-meter class telescope and support facility on a site approximately 40 miles southeast of Flagstaff, AZ. Lowell Observatory contracted with Dynavac of Hingham, MA to design and build an optical coating system for the DCT optics. The DCT Optical Coating System includes a mechanical roughing pump, two high-vacuum cryogenic pumps, a Meissner trap, evaporative filament aluminum deposition system, LabView software and PLC-based control system, and all ancillary support equipment. The system was installed at the site and acceptance testing was completed in October 2009. The Optical Coating System achieved near perfect reflectivity performance, thickness uniformity of 1000 angstroms +/-10%, and adhesion conforming to MIL-F-48616, Section 4.6.8.1. This paper discusses the design and analysis of the coating system, the process of transportation and assembly as well as testing results.

  13. Solar reflector soiling pattern distributions and reflectance measurement requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Kidney, K. )

    1990-10-01

    Short-term specular reflectance losses from optical surfaces used in the collection or concentration of solar energy results in significant reduction of these systems' output. Losses range from 0.1% to 1.0% per day, approaching asymptotes of 25% to 60% for periods greater than one year, depending onsite and season. To appropriately assess the value of a particular location for the production of power, consideration of the rates of soiling and strategies to minimize losses resulting from soiling must be considered. Strategies for measuring the optical performance of reflector materials to a specified degree of accuracy have been developed, according to the types of soiling patterns observed. It was found most soiling occurs with the accumulation of particulates in spots of different sizes, and the spot sizes follow a lognormal distribution. For most practical situations, it was determined that 10 measurements with a 1-cm-diameter beam are enough to place the average value within 3% of the true value, with a confidence level of 95%.

  14. Ultrasonic temperature measurements with fiber optic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Siwen; Wu, Nan; Zhou, Jingcheng; Ma, Tong; Liu, Yuqian; Cao, Chengyu; Wang, Xingwei

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic temperature measurements have been developed and widely applied in non-contact temperature tests in many industries. However, using optical fibers to build ultrasound generators are novel. This paper reports this new fiber optic ultrasonic system based on the generator of gold nanoparticles/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composites. The optical acoustic system was designed to test the change of temperature on the aluminum plate and the temperature of the torch in the air. This paper explores the relationship between the ultrasonic transmission and the change of temperature. From the experimental results, the trend of ultrasonic speed was different in the aluminum plate and air with the change of temperature. Since the system can measure the average temperature of the transmission path, it will have significant influence on simulating the temperature distribution.

  15. Fiber optical parametric amplifiers in optical communication systems

    PubMed Central

    Marhic (†), Michel E; Andrekson, Peter A; Petropoulos, Periklis; Radic, Stojan; Peucheret, Christophe; Jazayerifar, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    The prospects for using fiber optical parametric amplifiers (OPAs) in optical communication systems are reviewed. Phase-insensitive amplifiers (PIAs) and phase-sensitive amplifiers (PSAs) are considered. Low-penalty amplification at/or near 1 Tb/s has been achieved, for both wavelength- and time-division multiplexed formats. High-quality mid-span spectral inversion has been demonstrated at 0.64 Tb/s, avoiding electronic dispersion compensation. All-optical amplitude regeneration of amplitude-modulated signals has been performed, while PSAs have been used to demonstrate phase regeneration of phase-modulated signals. A PSA with 1.1-dB noise figure has been demonstrated, and preliminary wavelength-division multiplexing experiments have been performed with PSAs. 512 Gb/s have been transmitted over 6,000 km by periodic phase conjugation. Simulations indicate that PIAs could reach data rate x reach products in excess of 14,000 Tb/s × km in realistic wavelength-division multiplexed long-haul networks. Technical challenges remaining to be addressed in order for fiber OPAs to become useful for long-haul communication networks are discussed. PMID:25866588

  16. Off-axis reflective optical apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Lawrence L. (Inventor); Leary, David F. (Inventor); Mammini, Paul V. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed to a simple apparatus and a convenient and accurate method of mounting the components to form an off-axis reflective optical apparatus such as a collimator. In one embodiment, an off-axis reflective optical apparatus comprises a mounting block having a ferrule holder support surface and an off-axis reflector support surface which is generally perpendicular to the ferrule holder support surface. An optical reflector is mounted on the off-axis reflector support surface and has a reflected beam centerline. The optical reflector has a conic reflective surface and a conic center. A ferrule holder is mounted on the ferrule holder support surface. The ferrule holder provides a ferrule for coupling to an optical fiber and orienting a fiber tip of the optical fiber along a fiber axis toward the optical reflector. The fiber axis is nonparallel to the reflected beam centerline. Prior to mounting the optical reflector to the off-axis reflector support surface and prior to mounting the ferrule holder to the ferrule holder support surface, the optical reflector is movable on the off-axis reflector surface and the ferrule holder is movable on the ferrule holder support surface to align the conic center of the optical reflector with respect to the fiber tip of the optical fiber, and the apparatus has at least one of the following features: (1) the optical reflector is movable on the off-axis reflector support surface to adjust a focus of the fiber tip with respect to the optical reflector, and (2) the ferrule holder is movable on the ferrule holder support surface to adjust the focus of the fiber tip with respect to the optical reflector.

  17. Enhanced light absorption in GaAs solar cells with internal Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, S. P.; Vernon, S. M.; Sanfacon, M. M.; Mastrovito, A.

    The use of epitaxial multilayer dielectric mirrors (Bragg reflectors) as back-surface reflectors in thin-film GaAs solar cells on GaAs and silicon substrates is investigated. Al0.3Ga0.9As/Al0.85Ga0.15As Bragg reflectors were grown by low-pressure MOCVD on GaAs substrates and shown to exhibit near-ideal optical reflectance and structural perfection. Thin GaAs solar cells grown on Bragg reflectors showed increases in short-circuit current (0.5 to 1.0 mA/sq cm) and efficiency (0.7 percentage points) relative to cells without back reflectors. Efficiencies of 24.7 percent at one sun AM1.5 were measured for GaAs cells only 2 microns thick on Bragg reflectors. In addition to the optical enhancements, Bragg reflectors also appear to improve the defect structure of GaAs-on-Si solar cells. This approach should lead to improved efficiency for GaAs-on-Si solar cells and improved radiation resistance on GaAs cells.

  18. High-contrast grating reflectors for 980 nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebski, M.; Kuzior, O.; Wasiak, M.; Szerling, A.; Wójcik-Jedlińska, A.; Pałka, N.; Dems, M.; Xie, Y. Y.; Xu, Z. J.; Wang, Q. J.; Zhang, D. H.; Czyszanowski, T.

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents results of computer simulation of 1D monolithic high refractive index contrast grating (MHCG) reflector also called surface grating reflector (SGR). We analyzed optical properties of the GaAs reflector designed for 980 nm wavelength with respect to the grating parameters variation. We also determined the electric field patterns after reflection from the structure in several cases of parameters variation. We show that thanks to the scalability and design simplicity, proposed design is a promising candidate for simple, next generation vertical cavity surface emitting lasers emitting from ultra-violet to infrared.

  19. The large deployable reflector: A NASA submillimeter-infrared orbiting observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Paul N.

    1986-01-01

    The Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) concept is outlined. The LDR telescope is based on a 20-m diameter reflector. The primary mirror is a filled aperture made up of 84 hexagonal panels, each 2 m edge-to-edge. The panels are based on lightweight structural composite materials. The optical configuration is a four mirror two stage system. The primary mirror is passive. The active optical elements for figure control are at the quaternary mirror. The primary mirror panels are supported by a deployable PAC truss backup structure at the vertices of each hexagon. The four focal plane instruments covering the range of 30 to 1000 microns are located near the vertex of the primary mirror. Some instruments will be cooled with stored cryogens to liquid helium temperatures, others to liquid nitrogen temperatures. The spacecraft functions will be located in a resource module behind the primary mirror. The LDR will be transferred to orbit by the space transportation system and assembled and tested at the space station. It will then be boosted to an orbit of greater than or = 700 km as a free flyer.

  20. Optical studies of meteors at Mount Hopkins Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weekes, T. C.; Williams, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    The 10-m optical reflector and an array of phototubes are used to extend the optical measurements beyond the present limit achieved by the Vidicon system. The first detection of optical meteors with M sub v = + 12 is reported. It is hoped that this system can be used to determine intermediate points in the meteor frequency mass curve for sporadic meteors and to study in detail the faint components of meteor showers. Preliminary observations made on three nights in September 1974 are presented.

  1. Definition of optical systems payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downey, J. A., III

    1981-01-01

    The various phases in the formulation of a major NASA project include the inception of the project, planning of the concept, and the project definition. A baseline configuration is established during the planning stage, which serves as a basis for engineering trade studies. Basic technological problems should be recognized early, and a technological verification plan prepared before development of a project begins. A progressive series of iterations is required during the definition phase, illustrating the complex interdependence of existing subsystems. A systems error budget should be established to assess the overall systems performance, identify key performance drivers, and guide performance trades and iterations around these drivers, thus decreasing final systems requirements. Unnecessary interfaces should be avoided, and reasonable design and cost margins maintained. Certain aspects of the definition of the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility are used as an example.

  2. Multiple channel optical data acquisition system

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, G.E.; Goff, D.R.

    1985-02-22

    A multiple channel optical data acquisition system is provided in which a plurality of remote sensors monitoring specific process variable are interrogated by means of a single optical fiber connecting the remote station/sensors to a base station. The remote station/sensors derive all power from light transmitted through the fiber from the base station. Each station/sensor is individually accessed by means of a light modulated address code sent over the fiber. The remote station/sensors use a single light emitting diode to both send and receive light signals to communicate with the base station and provide power for the remote station. The system described can power at least 100 remote station/sensors over an optical fiber one mile in length.

  3. Advanced rotorcraft helmet display sighting system optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynal, Francois; Chen, Muh-Fa

    2002-08-01

    Kaiser Electronics' Advanced Rotorcraft Helmet Display Sighting System is a Biocular Helmet Mounted Display (HMD) for Rotary Wing Aviators. Advanced Rotorcraft HMDs requires low head supported weight, low center of mass offsets, low peripheral obstructions of the visual field, large exit pupils, large eye relief, wide field of view (FOV), high resolution, low luning, sun light readability with high contrast and low prismatic deviations. Compliance with these safety, user acceptance and optical performance requirements is challenging. The optical design presented in this paper provides an excellent balance of these different and conflicting requirements. The Advanced Rotorcraft HMD optical design is a pupil forming off axis catadioptric system that incorporates a transmissive SXGA Active Matrix liquid Crystal Display (AMLCD), an LED array backlight and a diopter adjustment mechanism.

  4. The JEM-EUSO optics system

    SciTech Connect

    Takizawa, Yoshiyuki; Marchi, Alessandor Zuccaro; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    2011-09-22

    The Extreme Universe Space Observatory onboard the Japanese Experiment Module is an international mission devoted to the detection of ultra high-energy cosmic particles with energies E>7x10{sup 19} eV. They are revealed through emission in the atmosphere of Cherenkov and fluorescence light in the near-UV region, by using an optical system with 60 deg. field of view and a 2.3 m entrance pupil. One of the challenges consists in developing an unusual combination of large and lightweight refractive optics: two double-sided curved Fresnel lenses and a central curved Fresnel+diffractive lens, whose maximum dimensions are 2.65 m. This paper describes the development of such a optical system and its performances of the latest configurations.

  5. Tbit/s Optical Transmission Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunning, Fatima C. G.; Ellis, Andrew D.; Cuenot, Benjamin; Healy, Tadhg; McCarthy, Mary

    2005-10-01

    We discuss our Science Foundation Ireland-funded work to design of a highly spectral efficient Tbit/s optical transmission system for long-haul communications. Such systems are comprised of several wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) channels (or frequency channels), closely spaced (<100 GHz), and modulated at high bit rates (40 Gbit/s). The highest efficiencies have been achieved using combinations of techniques, by increasing the information per channel and minimizing interferometric cross-talk. In conventional systems, incoherent interference occurs when beat signals from adjacent channels fall within the receiver bandwidth. This generates noise if the relative phase is random, e.g., where independent lasers are used for each channel. However, if the optical phase difference between adjacent channels is controlled, the interference signal is deterministic. Therefore, if each channel is modulated with a data signal, any interference effect is distributed in the same way from one bit slot to another, and the relative optical phases may be aligned to either increase or decrease the eye opening. This interference control may be achieved by controlling the phase of each laser individually with optical phase locked loops, or by replacing the typical bank of lasers with one or more coherent comb sources. The wavelengths of adjacent channels are thus phased locked to each other, and the data are encoded with an array of modulators that preserves this relative optical phase. The proposed technique, Coherent WDM, exploits this optical phase-locking mechanism in a simple and cost-effective configuration because it is based on a comb generation (multi-wavelength source) via the use of sine-wave-driven amplitude modulators (generating side-bands), followed by data encoding at the same rate. Recent results show significant improvement in performance over conventional systems. More improvement may come when a combination of approaches is used.

  6. Freeform mirror based optical systems for FAME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agócs, Tibor; Kroes, Gabby; Venema, Lars; Hugot, Emmanuel; Schnetler, Hermine; Jaskó, Attila

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we present the design of freeform mirror based optical systems that have the potential to be used in future astronomical instrumentation in the era of extremely large ground based telescopes. Firstly we describe the optical requirements followed by a summary of the optimization methodology used to design the freeform surface. The intention is to create optical architectures, which not only have the numerous advantages of freeform based systems (increased optical performance and/or reduction of mass and volume), but also can be manufactured and tested with today's manufacturing techniques and technologies. The team plans to build a demonstrator based on one of the optical design examples presented in this paper. The demonstrator will be built and tested as part of the OPTICON FP7 Freeform Active Mirror Experiment (FAME) project. A hydroforming technique developed as part of the previous OPTICON FP7 project will be used to produce an accurate, compact and stable freeform mirror. The manufacturing issues normally experienced in the production of freeform mirrors are solved through the hydroforming of thin polished substrates, which then will be supported with an active array structure. The active array will be used to compensate for residual manufacturing errors, thermo-elastic deformation and gravity-induced errors.

  7. SPARCLE Optical System Design and Operational Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Peters, Bruce R.; Li, Ye; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Reardon, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    The SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment (SPARCLE) is the first demonstration of a coherent Doppler wind lidar in space. SPARCLE will be flown aboard a space shuttle In the middle part of 2001 as a stepping stone towards the development and deployment of a long-life-time operational instrument in the later part of next decade. SPARCLE is an ambitious project that is intended to evaluate the suitability of coherent lidar for wind measurements, demonstrate the maturity of the technology for space application, and provide a useable data set for model development and validation. This paper describes the SPARCLE's optical system design, fabrication methods, assembly and alignment techniques, and its anticipated operational characteristics. Coherent detection is highly sensitive to aberrations in the signal phase front, and to relative alignment between the signal and the local oscillator beams. Consequently, the performance of coherent lidars is usually limited by the optical quality of the transmitter/receiver optical system. For SPARCLE having a relatively large aperture (25 cm) and a very long operating range (400 km), compared to the previously developed 2-micron coherent lidars, the optical performance requirements are even more stringent. In addition with stringent performance requirements, the physical and environment constraints associated with this instrument further challenge the limit of optical fabrication technologies.

  8. Injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator and system

    DOEpatents

    Lucht, Robert P.; Kulatilaka, Waruna D.; Anderson, Thomas N.; Bougher, Thomas L.

    2007-10-09

    Optical parametric oscillators (OPO) and systems are provided. The OPO has a non-linear optical material located between two optical elements where the product of the reflection coefficients of the optical elements are higher at the output wavelength than at either the pump or idler wavelength. The OPO output may be amplified using an additional optical parametric amplifier (OPA) stage.

  9. Diffraction analysis of a proposed dual-reflector feed for the spherical reflector antenna of the Arecibo Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kildal, Per-Simon; Skyttemyr, Svein Andreas

    1989-10-01

    A proposed dual-reflector feed for the spherical reflector antenna in Arecibo is presented. This is analyzed over a large frequency range: at the lower frequencies by physical optics (PO) integration, and at the higher ones by a geometrical optic (GO) ray tracing technique described in another work. The latter calculations are extended with the transition region theory (TRT) to include edge diffraction. The results clearly demonstrate the usefulness of the time efficient TRT method. However, they also show that PO integration is important, as this has detected an under illumination of the central region of the aperture. This effect is related to a similar problem with the line feeds, but can in the present case be reduced by moving the subreflectors away from the paraxial focus.

  10. Optical Blade Position Tracking System Test

    SciTech Connect

    Fingersh, L. J.

    2006-01-01

    The Optical Blade Position Tracking System Test measures the blade deflection along the span of the blade using simple off-the-shelf infrared security cameras along with blade-mounted retro-reflective tape and video image processing hardware and software to obtain these measurements.

  11. Optical guidance system for industrial vehicles

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, Robert D.; Eschbach, Eugene A.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Lind, Michael A.; Buck, Erville C.; Buck, Roger L.

    1990-01-01

    An automatically guided vehicle system for steering a vehicle. Optical sensing detects an image of a segment of track mounted above the path of the vehicle. Electrical signals corresponding to the position of the track are generated. A control circuit then converts these signals into movements for the steering of the vehicle.

  12. COANP-fullerenes system for optical modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhomanova, S. V.; Kamanina, N. V.

    2016-08-01

    The advanced investigations of ϕ-conjugated organic molecule COANP sensitized with fullerenes have been revealed to consider this system as an affective medium for optical limiting and phase modulation. The special accent has been given to influence of the nanostructured relief at the interface on the spectral and photoconductive features.

  13. Floating volumetric image formation using a dihedral corner reflector array device.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Daisuke; Hirano, Noboru; Maeda, Yuki; Yamamoto, Siori; Mukai, Takaaki; Maekawa, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    A volumetric display system using an optical imaging device consisting of numerous dihedral corner reflectors placed perpendicular to the surface of a metal plate is proposed. Image formation by the dihedral corner reflector array (DCRA) is free from distortion and focal length. In the proposed volumetric display system, a two-dimensional real image is moved by a mirror scanner to scan a three-dimensional (3D) space. Cross-sectional images of a 3D object are displayed in accordance with the position of the image plane. A volumetric image is observed as a stack of the cross-sectional images. The use of the DCRA brings compact system configuration and volumetric real image generation with very low distortion. An experimental volumetric display system including a DCRA, a galvanometer mirror, and a digital micro-mirror device was constructed to verify the proposed method. A volumetric image consisting of 1024×768×400 voxels was formed by the experimental system. PMID:23292404

  14. Illumination from space with orbiting solar-reflector spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canady, J. E., Jr.; Allen, J. L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of using orbiting mirrors to reflect sunlight to Earth for several illumination applications is studied. A constellation of sixteen 1 km solar reflector spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit can illuminate a region 333 km in diameter to 8 lux, which is brighter than most existing expressway lighting systems. This constellation can serve one region all night long or can provide illumination during mornings and evenings to five regions across the United States. Preliminary cost estimates indicate such an endeavor is economically feasible. The studies also explain how two solar reflectors can illuminate the in-orbit nighttime operations of Space Shuttle. An unfurlable, 1 km diameter solar reflector spacecraft design concept was derived. This spacecraft can be packaged in the Space, Shuttle, transported to low Earth orbit, unfurled, and solar sailed to operational orbits up to geosynchronous. The necessary technical studies and improvements in technology are described, and potential environmental concerns are discussed.

  15. Beam-Steerable Flat-Panel Reflector Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choon Sae; Lee, Chanam; Miranda, Felix A.

    2005-01-01

    Many space applications require a high-gain antenna that can be easily deployable in space. Currently, the most common high-gain antenna for space-born applications is an umbrella-type reflector antenna that can be folded while being lifted to the Earth orbit. There have been a number of issues to be resolved for this type of antenna. The reflecting surface of a fine wire mesh has to be light in weight and flexible while opening up once in orbit. Also the mesh must be a good conductor at the operating frequency. In this paper, we propose a different type of high-gain antenna for easy space deployment. The proposed antenna is similar to reflector antennas except the curved main reflector is replaced by a flat reconfigurable surface for easy packing and deployment in space. Moreover it is possible to steer the beam without moving the entire antenna system.

  16. Birefringence insensitive optical coherence domain reflectometry system

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew J.; Davis, Joseph G.

    2002-01-01

    A birefringence insensitive fiber optic optical coherence domain reflectometry (OCDR) system is provided containing non-polarization maintaining (non-PM) fiber in the sample arm and the reference arm without suffering from signal degradation caused by birefringence. The use of non-PM fiber significantly reduces the cost of the OCDR system and provides a disposable or multiplexed section of the sample arm. The dispersion in the reference arm and sample arm of the OCDR system are matched to achieve high resolution imaging. This system is useful in medical applications or for non-medical in situ probes. The disposable section of non-PM fiber in the sample arm can be conveniently replaced when contaminated by a sample or a patient.

  17. Evolution Of Map Display Optical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boot, Alan

    1983-06-01

    It is now over 20 years since Ferranti plc introduced optically projected map displays into operational aircraft navigation systems. Then, as now, it was the function of the display to present an image of a topographical map to a pilot or navigator with his present position clearly identified. Then, as now, the map image was projected from a reduced image stored on colour micro film. Then, as now, the fundamental design problems are the same.In the exposed environment of an aircraft cockpit where brightness levels may vary from those associated with direct sunlight on the one hand, to starlight on the other, how does one design an optical system with sufficient luminance, contrast and resolution where in the daytime sunlight may fall on the display or in the pilot's eyes, and at night time the display luminance must not detract from the pilot's ability to pick up external clues? This paper traces the development of Ferranti plc optically projected map displays from the early V Bomber and the ill-fated TSR2 displays to the Harrier and Concorde displays. It then goes on to the development of combined map and electronic displays (COMED), showing how an earlier design, as fitted to Tornado, has been developed into the current COMED design which is fitted to the F-18 and Jaguar aircraft. In each of the above display systems particular features of optical design interest are identified and their impact on the design as a whole are discussed. The use of prisms both for optical rotation and translation, techniques for the maximisation of luminance, the problems associated with contrast enhancement, particularly with polarising filters in the presence of optically active materials, the use of aerial image combining systems and the impact of the pilot interface on the system parameter are all included.Perhaps the most interesting result in considering the evolution of map displays has not been so much the designer's solutions in overcoming the various design problems but

  18. Optical countermeasures against CLOS weapon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toet, Alexander; Benoist, Koen W.; van Lingen, Joost N. J.; Schleijpen, H. Ric M. A.

    2013-10-01

    There are many weapon systems in which a human operator acquires a target, tracks it and designates it. Optical countermeasures against this type of systems deny the operator the possibility to fulfill this visual task. We describe the different effects that result from stimulation of the human visual system with high intensity (visible) light, and the associated potential operational impact. Of practical use are flash blindness, where an intense flash of light produces a temporary "blind-spot" in (part of) the visual field, flicker distraction, where strong intensity and/or color changes at a discomfortable frequency are produced, and disability glare where a source of light leads to contrast reduction. Hence there are three possibilities to disrupt the visual task of an operator with optical countermeasures such as flares or lasers or a combination of these; namely, by an intense flash of light, by an annoying light flicker or by a glare source. A variety of flares for this purpose is now available or under development: high intensity flash flares, continuous burning flares or strobe flares which have an oscillating intensity. The use of flare arrays seems particularly promising as an optical countermeasure. Lasers are particularly suited to interfere with human vision, because they can easily be varied in intensity, color and size, but they have to be directed at the (human) target, and issues like pointing and eye-safety have to be taken into account. Here we discuss the design issues and the operational impact of optical countermeasures against human operators.

  19. A unique, accurate LWIR optics measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantone, Stephen D.; Orband, Daniel G.

    2011-05-01

    A compact low-cost LWIR test station has been developed that provides real time MTF testing of IR optical systems and EO imaging systems. The test station is intended to be operated by a technician and can be used to measure the focal length, blur spot size, distortion, and other metrics of system performance. The challenges and tradeoffs incorporated into this instrumentation will be presented. The test station performs the measurement of an IR lens or optical system's first order quantities (focal length, back focal length) including on and off-axis imaging performance (e.g., MTF, resolution, spot size) under actual test conditions to enable the simulation of their actual use. Also described is the method of attaining the needed accuracies so that derived calculations like focal length (EFL = image shift/tan(theta)) can be performed to the requisite accuracy. The station incorporates a patented video capture technology and measures MTF and blur characteristics using newly available lowcost LWIR cameras. This allows real time determination of the optical system performance enabling faster measurements, higher throughput and lower cost results than scanning systems. Multiple spectral filters are also accommodated within the test stations which facilitate performance evaluation under various spectral conditions.

  20. Active feed array compensation for reflector antenna surface distortions. Ph.D. Thesis - Akron Univ., Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility of electromagnetic compensation for reflector antenna surface distortions is investigated. The performance characteristics of large satellite communication reflector antenna systems degrade as the reflector surface distorts, mainly due to thermal effects from solar radiation. The technique developed can be used to maintain the antenna boresight directivity and sidelobe level independent of thermal effects on the reflector surface. With the advent of monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC), a greater flexibility in array fed reflector antenna systems can be achieved. MMIC arrays provide independent control of amplitude and phase for each of the many radiating elements in the feed array. By assuming a known surface distortion profile, a simulation study is carried out to examine the antenna performance as a function of feed array size and number of elements. Results indicate that the compensation technique can effectively control boresight directivity and sidelobe level under peak surface distortion in the order of tenth of a wavelength.

  1. Stokes analysis of an optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Georgi; Slavkovsky, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    As a transfer from research to teaching we are using stokes analysis to represent changes in the vectors for polarization of light as acted upon by the matrices of optical elements in undergraduate physics lab. The goal is to integrate students' knowledge for matrix analysis with an experimental determination of the changes in the polarization of light. This method allows students to learn how to design an optical system by using mathematical analysis, a skill necessary for future scientists or engineers in the fields of optics. We have tested and implemented the lab. The results are that it is well accepted by the students, but is very involved computationally, and needs to be shortened. The Stokes analysis needs to be introduces earlier in the curriculum in order to make the students comfortable with the formalism.

  2. Power system applications of fiber optic sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. R.; Jackson, S. P.; Kirkham, H.; Yeh, C.

    1986-01-01

    This document is a progress report of work done in 1985 on the Communications and Control for Electric Power Systems Project at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. These topics are covered: Electric Field Measurement, Fiber Optic Temperature Sensing, and Optical Power transfer. Work was done on the measurement of ac and dc electric fields. A prototype sensor for measuring alternating fields was made using a very simple electroscope approach. An electronic field mill sensor for dc fields was made using a fiber optic readout, so that the entire probe could be operated isolated from ground. There are several instances in which more precise knowledge of the temperature of electrical power apparatus would be useful. This report describes a number of methods whereby the distributed temperature profile can be obtained using a fiber optic sensor. The ability to energize electronics by means of an optical fiber has the advantage that electrical isolation is maintained at low cost. In order to accomplish this, it is necessary to convert the light energy into electrical form by means of photovoltaic cells. JPL has developed an array of PV cells in gallium arsenide specifically for this purpose. This work is described.

  3. Balloon borne optical disk mass storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanek, M. D.; Jennings, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    An on-board data recording system for balloon-borne interferometer using a vacuum operable, ruggedized WORM optical drive is presented. This system, as presently under development, provides 320 Mbytes of data storage (or approximately 11 hrs at the 64 kbits/sec telemetry rate of the experiment). It has the capability of recording the unmodified telemetry bit system as transmitted or doing some preprocessing of the data onboard. The system is compact and requires less than 28 watts of battery power to operate.

  4. Manufacturing of high performance, low cost dual mirror lamp reflector modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Li

    The Lamp Reflector Module (LRM) is a key component in every micro display projection system, which has played a dominant role in the large-screen display market today. The goal of this research is to (1) improve the Dual Mirror prototype's light output performance, (2) investigate the underlying principles of its slow output deterioration so as to help develop effective and efficient LRM thermal management for maximized lifetime performance, and (3) improve/enable low cost mass LRM manufacturing for the projection display market. The first part of this research addresses the prototype's low output problem. More sophisticated 3D Optical Ray Tracing (ORT) models were generated to provide the output prediction depending on the arc gap, system collection etendue, etc. It was concluded that upgrading the manufacturing processes, particularly the reflector shape, surface and cold mirror coating, could effectively improve the output performance. Additionally, these theoretical models are shown to be used to design a LRM with 16% output gain for the consumer Rear Projection display market. The second part of this research focuses on the issue of lifetime performance. The electrode, arc attachment and envelope evolution were monitored by camera systems. The upgraded ORT models confirmed the arc length insensitivity property of the Dual Mirror LRM being one of the major reasons for its longer native lifetime. The third part of this research focuses on issues related to the entire LRM manufacturing. A series of quality control tools were developed to help implement manufacturing process optimization. LRMs made with the upgraded manufacturing processes showed about 25% output gain over the previous prototypes. Based on the imaging property of the Dual Mirror LRM, a lower cost lamp reflector alignment method, called cold alignment, was developed. In this method, the etendue efficiency is maintained and a slower degrading and more stable lifetime output performance are achieved

  5. Ultra Small Integrated Optical Fiber Sensing System

    PubMed Central

    Van Hoe, Bram; Lee, Graham; Bosman, Erwin; Missinne, Jeroen; Kalathimekkad, Sandeep; Maskery, Oliver; Webb, David J.; Sugden, Kate; Van Daele, Peter; Van Steenberge, Geert

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a revolutionary way to interrogate optical fiber sensors based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) and to integrate the necessary driving optoelectronic components with the sensor elements. Low-cost optoelectronic chips are used to interrogate the optical fibers, creating a portable dynamic sensing system as an alternative for the traditionally bulky and expensive fiber sensor interrogation units. The possibility to embed these laser and detector chips is demonstrated resulting in an ultra thin flexible optoelectronic package of only 40 μm, provided with an integrated planar fiber pigtail. The result is a fully embedded flexible sensing system with a thickness of only 1 mm, based on a single Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VCSEL), fiber sensor and photodetector chip. Temperature, strain and electrodynamic shaking tests have been performed on our system, not limited to static read-out measurements but dynamically reconstructing full spectral information datasets.

  6. Fiber coupled optical spark delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Yalin, Azer; Willson, Bryan; Defoort, Morgan

    2008-08-12

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, the spark delivery system including a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. In addition, the laser delivery assembly includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. In accordance with embodiments of the present invention, the assembly may be used to create a spark in a combustion engine. In accordance with other embodiments of the present invention, a method of using the spark delivery system is provided. In addition, a method of choosing an appropriate fiber for creating a spark using a laser beam is also presented.

  7. Boosted X Waves in Nonlinear Optical Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo, Edward

    2010-01-15

    X waves are spatiotemporal optical waves with intriguing superluminal and subluminal characteristics. Here we theoretically show that for a given initial carrier frequency of the system localized waves with genuine superluminal or subluminal group velocity can emerge from initial X waves in nonlinear optical systems with normal group velocity dispersion. Moreover, we show that this temporal behavior depends on the wave detuning from the carrier frequency of the system and not on the particular X-wave biconical form. A spatial counterpart of this behavior is also found when initial X waves are boosted in the plane transverse to the direction of propagation, so a fully spatiotemporal motion of localized waves can be observed.

  8. Automated acousto-optic infrared analyzer system

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbruegge, K.B.; Gottlieb, M.S.

    1984-12-25

    An automated acousto-optic tunable filter infrared analyzer system useable in a variety of industrial and commercial control applications. The system relies upon a narrow band pass tunable acousto-optic filter which is selectively tuned by predetermined rf frequency signals to selectively transmit the narrow band pass of interest which corresponds to a specific molecular species for identification and analysis. The system includes a microcomputer and associated memory function to measure and compare detected signals from an infrared detector which converts the filtered infrared signal to an electrical signal. The memory provides control signals for the computer and for controlling the sequence and frequency of rf energy applied to tune the filter. In this way, the near to mid range infrared can be analyzed for absorption bands corresponding to predetermined molecular species such as combustion product gases, and a feedback signal generated to control the combustion process.

  9. The future of large optical system verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Gary

    2005-08-01

    As optical systems grow in size, there becomes a point in which traditional system verification prior to launch will become impossible. This implies that observatory ground testing will not be completed. Our history does not support this premise and therefore results in an unacceptable programmatic risk. But, if the dream of building 20-30 meter systems is ever to become true, these realities must be accepted. To make this possible, new and better analytical tools and processes must be developed and certified on programs that can be tested on the ground. This change in paradigm does not eliminate critical testing; it just does it at different assembly levels and most likely adds alignment flexibility to correct optical errors after launch. This paper provides ideas on how the hardware, analysis tools, and testing may evolve to support these ambitious future programs.

  10. Fiber laser coupled optical spark delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Yalin, Azer; Willson, Bryan; Defoort, Morgan; Joshi, Sachin; Reynolds, Adam

    2008-03-04

    A spark delivery system for generating a spark using a laser beam is provided, and includes a laser light source and a laser delivery assembly. The laser delivery assembly includes a hollow fiber and a launch assembly comprising launch focusing optics to input the laser beam in the hollow fiber. The laser delivery assembly further includes exit focusing optics that demagnify an exit beam of laser light from the hollow fiber, thereby increasing the intensity of the laser beam and creating a spark. Other embodiments use a fiber laser to generate a spark. Embodiments of the present invention may be used to create a spark in an engine. Yet other embodiments include collecting light from the spark or a flame resulting from the spark and conveying the light for diagnostics. Methods of using the spark delivery systems and diagnostic systems are provided.

  11. Boosted X waves in nonlinear optical systems.

    PubMed

    Arévalo, Edward

    2010-01-15

    X waves are spatiotemporal optical waves with intriguing superluminal and subluminal characteristics. Here we theoretically show that for a given initial carrier frequency of the system localized waves with genuine superluminal or subluminal group velocity can emerge from initial X waves in nonlinear optical systems with normal group velocity dispersion. Moreover, we show that this temporal behavior depends on the wave detuning from the carrier frequency of the system and not on the particular X-wave biconical form. A spatial counterpart of this behavior is also found when initial X waves are boosted in the plane transverse to the direction of propagation, so a fully spatiotemporal motion of localized waves can be observed.

  12. Zoom optical system using tunable polymer lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Dan; Wang, Xuan Yin

    2016-07-01

    This paper demonstrated a zoom optical system with variable magnification based on the tunable polymer lens. The designed system mainly consists of two polymer lenses, voice coil motors, a doublet lens and CMOS chip. The zoom magnification can be adjusted by altering the focal length of the two elastic polymer lenses synergistically through controlling the output displacement of the voice coil motor. A static doublet lens in combination with the polymer lenses stabilize the image plane at the CMOS chip. The optical structure of the zoom system is presented, as well as a detailed description including the lens materials and fabrication process. Images with each zoom magnification are captured, and the Spot diagram and MTF are simulated using Zemax software. A change in magnification from 0.13×to 8.44×is demonstrated within the tiny 0.4 mm variation of the displacement load, and produce a 16.1×full range of magnification experimentally. Simulation analyses show that all the radii of the spot diagram under different magnifications are less than 11.3 um, and the modulation transfer function reaches 107 line pairs per mm. The designed optical system shows the potential for developing stable, integrated, and low-cost zoom systems with large magnification range.

  13. SAFARI optical system architecture and design concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, Carmen; Jellema, Willem; Zuluaga-Ramírez, Pablo; Arrazola, David; Fernández-Rodriguez, M.; Belenguer, Tomás.; González Fernández, Luis M.; Audley, Michael D.; Evers, Jaap; Eggens, Martin; Torres Redondo, Josefina; Najarro, Francisco; Roelfsema, Peter

    2016-07-01

    SpicA FAR infrared Instrument, SAFARI, is one of the instruments planned for the SPICA mission. The SPICA mission is the next great leap forward in space-based far-infrared astronomy and will study the evolution of galaxies, stars and planetary systems. SPICA will utilize a deeply cooled 2.5m-class telescope, provided by European industry, to realize zodiacal background limited performance, and high spatial resolution. The instrument SAFARI is a cryogenic grating-based point source spectrometer working in the wavelength domain 34 to 230 μm, providing spectral resolving power from 300 to at least 2000. The instrument shall provide low and high resolution spectroscopy in four spectral bands. Low Resolution mode is the native instrument mode, while the high Resolution mode is achieved by means of a Martin-Pupplet interferometer. The optical system is all-reflective and consists of three main modules; an input optics module, followed by the Band and Mode Distributing Optics and the grating Modules. The instrument utilizes Nyquist sampled filled linear arrays of very sensitive TES detectors. The work presented in this paper describes the optical design architecture and design concept compatible with the current instrument performance and volume design drivers.

  14. The experimental optical burst switching system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinwan; Chen, Jian-Ping; Wu, Guiling; Wang, Hui; Lu, Jialin; Ye, Ailun

    2005-02-01

    The first optical burst switching (OBS) system has been demonstrated in China, which includes three edge routers and one core-node. A kind of fast wavelength selective optical switching was used in the system. The core OBS node consists of a kind of wavelength selective optical switch we developed. It consists of two SOA switches and one wavelength selective thin film filter with centre wavelength at one wavelength. There are one input optical fiber and two output fibers, each fiber carries two wavelengths. The Dell PE2650 servers act as the edge OBS routers. The wavelength of each data channel is located in C-band and the bit rate is at 1.25Gbps. The control channel uses bit rate of 100Mbps at wavelength of 1310 nm. A novel effective scheme for Just-In-Time (JIT) protocol was proposed and implemented. OBS services, such as Video on Demand (VOD) and file transfer protocol (FTP), have been demonstrated. Assembling and scheduling methods that are capable to guarantee the QoS (quality of service) of the transported service are studied.

  15. Optical system for proximity operations in aerospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-Liang; Liu, Xiao-Chun; Lu, Huan-Zhang

    2008-12-01

    Satellite serving offers a potential for extending the life of satellites and reducing launching and operating costs. Proximity operations are necessary for purpose of satellite serving. As the primary measurement system, optical system can provide the information of relative navigation in near field. The paper has two main contributions. Firstly, we summarize use of optical systems for guidance and navigation in the missions of proximity operations in aerospace. Their characteristics vary from the manned missions, which are performed by astronauts on-orbit, through semi-autonomous missions, wherein human operators on the ground segment issue high level directives and sensor-guided systems on the space segment guide the execution, to the full-autonomous missions, which are executed using unmanned space robotic systems. It comes to light that future space operations will be more autonomous. Secondly, we present a concept and framework of a vision system for satellite proximity operations, which is semi-autonomous and can treat with uncooperative satellites. The vision system uses visible and infrared sensors synchronously to acquire images, which solves the problem of data integrity introduced by ambient illumination and direct sunlight for visible sensor. The vision system uses natural features on the satellite surfaces instead of artificial markers for its operation, computes relative motion and structure of the target, and tracks features in image sequences. Selected algorithms of the system have been characterized in ground environment; they are undergoing systematic sets of adaptation for space.

  16. Development and Testing of Solar Reflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.; Terwilliger, K.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-01-01

    To make concentrating solar power technologies more cost competitive, it is necessary to develop advanced reflector materials that are low in cost and maintain high reflectance for extended lifetimes under severe outdoor environments. The Advanced Materials Team performs durability testing of candidate solar reflectors at outdoor test sites and in accelerated weathering chambers. Several materials being developed by industry have been submitted for evaluation. These include silvered glass mirrors, aluminized reflectors, and front-surface mirrors. In addition to industry-supplied materials, NREL is funding the development of new, innovative reflectors, including a new commercial laminate reflector and an advanced solar reflective mirror (ASRM). To help commercialize the ASRM, a cost analysis was performed; it shows the total production cost could meet the goal. The development, performance, and durability of these candidate solar reflectors and cost analysis results will be described.

  17. Fiber optic systems for mobile platforms II

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, N.E.; Moore, E.L.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at the symposium of International Society for Optical Engineering. Topics covered/include: Fiber optic pressure sensor for internal combustion engine; Automotive fiber optic technology: application issues; and Fiber optic guided missile.

  18. Extrinsic fiber optic displacement sensors and displacement sensing systems

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Kent A.; Gunther, Michael F.; Vengsarkar, Ashish M.; Claus, Richard O.

    1994-01-01

    An extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor comprises a single-mode fiber, used as an input/output fiber, and a multimode fiber, used purely as a reflector, to form an air gap within a silica tube that acts as a Fizeau cavity. The Fresnel reflection from the glass/air interface at the front of the air gap (reference reflection) and the reflection from the air/glass interface at the far end of the air gap (sensing reflection) interfere in the input/output fiber. The two fibers are allowed to move in the silica tube, and changes in the air gap length cause changes in the phase difference between the reference reflection and the sensing reflection. This phase difference is observed as changes in intensity of the light monitored at the output arm of a fused biconical tapered coupler. The extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor behaves identically whether it is surface mounted or embedded, which is unique to the extrinsic sensor in contrast to intrinsic Fabry-Perot sensors. The sensor may be modified to provide a quadrature phase shift extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor for the detection of both the amplitude and the relative polarity of dynamically varying strain. The quadrature light signals may be generated by either mechanical or optical means. A plurality of the extrinsic sensors may connected in cascade and multiplexed to allow monitoring by a single analyzer.

  19. Extrinsic fiber optic displacement sensors and displacement sensing systems

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, K.A.; Gunther, M.F.; Vengsarkar, A.M.; Claus, R.O.

    1994-04-05

    An extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor comprises a single-mode fiber, used as an input/output fiber, and a multimode fiber, used purely as a reflector, to form an air gap within a silica tube that acts as a Fizeau cavity. The Fresnel reflection from the glass/air interface at the front of the air gap (reference reflection) and the reflection from the air/glass interface at the far end of the air gap (sensing reflection) interfere in the input/output fiber. The two fibers are allowed to move in the silica tube, and changes in the air gap length cause changes in the phase difference between the reference reflection and the sensing reflection. This phase difference is observed as changes in intensity of the light monitored at the output arm of a fused biconical tapered coupler. The extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor behaves identically whether it is surface mounted or embedded, which is unique to the extrinsic sensor in contrast to intrinsic Fabry-Perot sensors. The sensor may be modified to provide a quadrature phase shift extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor for the detection of both the amplitude and the relative polarity of dynamically varying strain. The quadrature light signals may be generated by either mechanical or optical means. A plurality of the extrinsic sensors may connected in cascade and multiplexed to allow monitoring by a single analyzer. 14 figures.

  20. A Broadband AM Fiber Optic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cudworth, Stewart K.

    1990-01-01

    Broadband systems, using well developed coaxial cable and amplifier technology are noted for versatility and flexibility. Networks of infinite variety may be assembled using couplers, taps and filters. Every signal is available simultaneously throughout the network. Intricate timing and switching schemes of high rate digital networks are avoided. Broadband long distance fiber optic systems became practical about 1983 when single mode fiber optimized for operating at 1300 nm became the fiber of choice for long haul digital telephone service. Removing the bandwidth limits imposed by multimode fibers, which had confined link limits to 6 miles and transmission rates to 45 Mbps, opened the way for development of systems transmitting at rates above 500 Mbps. At the same time development of laser diodes,emitting at 1300 nm,with excellent optic power, allowed extension of link distances to 25 miles and greater. Single mode fibers have been refined to have attenuation of less than 0.5 dB/km at 1300 nm. CATV operators had long sought ways of reducing the noise and distortion caused by repeated amplification in extending systems to new subscribers. Efforts at using fiber optic systems in the multimode era were relatively futile. 4 or 5 channels and 3-4 mile links using FM video modulation were all that could be achieved. With single mode fiber development these limitations were partially removed. In 1984, installation began of the present generation of FM modulated CATV fiber optic trunk lines. FM produces superior transmission at the greatest distance, but is quite expensive because of the cost of FM modulation and demodulation. Costs are typically in excess of $4,000/channel, with a practical limit of 16 channels per fiber. For distances shorter than 12 miles,FM is often considered too expensive.

  1. Design concepts for large reflector antenna structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.; Adams, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    Practical approaches for establishing large, precise antenna reflectors in space are described. Reflector surfaces consisting of either solid panels or knitted mesh are considered. The approach using a deep articulated truss structure to support a mesh reflector is selected for detailed investigations. A new sequential deployment concept for the tetrahedral truss is explained. Good joint design is discussed, and examples are described both analytically and by means of demonstration models. The influence of curvature on the design and its vibration characteristics are investigated.

  2. Optical passive athermalization for infrared zoom system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shenghui; Yang, Changcheng; Zheng, Jia; Lan, Ning; Xiong, Tao; Li, Yong

    2007-12-01

    In an infrared zoom system, it is difficult to obtain the best thermal compensation for all effective focal length (EFL) simultaneously by moving a single lens group. According to the principle of optical passive athermalization, the equations of focal length, achromatization and athermalization of both long and short EFL are established respectively. By analyzing the thermal aberration value relations between long EFL and short EFL, the thermal aberration values of the switching groups for short EFL athermalization are calculated. Firstly, the athermalization of long EFL is designed. Then through reasonable optical materials matching of the switching groups, the short EFL achieves athermalization as well. In this paper, a re-imaging switching zoom system is designed. It has a relative aperture of f/4.0, 100% cold shield efficiency, the EFL of 180mm/30mm at 3.7-4.8μm. The long EFL includes four refractive elements and one hybrid refractive/diffractive element. The switching groups of short EFL have two types, one is composed of four refractive elements, and the other is composed of two refractive elements and one hybrid refractive/diffractive element. Both of the short EFL achieve athermalization. With the aluminum materials of system structures, the zoom system achieves optical passive athermalization. It has the diffraction limited image quality and stable image plane from -30°C to 70°C.

  3. Green photonics realized by optical complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanri, Hiroto; Sasaki, Wakao

    2013-12-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated a new smart grid model which can control DC electric power flow autonomously among individual homes, by using an optical self-organized node with optical non-linear characteristics, and these homes are assumed to be installed by distributed power supplies, and electric power storage devices, and also supposed to be supplied partly by the commercial electric power grid utilities. An electric power network is composed of nodes and devises called Power Gate Unit (PGU). The nodes have optical nonlinearity for self-organizing informations about surplus or shortage of electric power as to individual homes. The PGU is a distributing unit of actual electric power based on above informations of power surplus or shortage at each home. The PGU at each home is electrically connected to both the onsite power supplies and household load such as a solar panel, a DC motor, and a storage battery as well as the commercial electric power grid utilities. In this work, we composed our experimental self-organized DC power grid with above components and supposed the supplied maximum power from the commercial electric power grid utilities to be limited to 5V-0.5A. In this network, information about surplus or shortage of electric power will propagate through the nodes. In the experiments, surplus electric current 0.4A at a particular node was distributed toward a PGU of another node suffering from shortage of electric current. We also confirmed in the experiments and simulations that even when signal propagation path was disconnected accidentally the network could recover an optimized path. The present smart grid system we have attained may be applied by optical fiber link in the near future because our essential components controlling PGU, i.e. the nodes are electro-optical hybrid which are easily applicable to fiber optical link so as to control electric power transmission line.

  4. Characterization of submicron systems via optical methods.

    PubMed

    Haskell, R J

    1998-02-01

    As a means of addressing the issues of drug delivery, submicron colloidal systems have become increasingly used as pharmaceutical formulations. Accurately characterizing physical properties of the constituent particulates present in these systems is an indispensable activity. However, measuring descriptors such as particle size distribution and surface potential presents an experimental challenge. This paper describes the physical basis for a number of optically based techniques that are useful in this task. In addition, the caveats and benefits of these methods are discussed and reference is made to their use in the examination of various multiphase systems such as liposomes, nanoparticles, and emulsions.

  5. Novel optical system for neonatal brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Zhou, Shuoming; Nioka, Shoko; Chance, Britton; Anday, Endla; Ravishankar, Sudha; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, Maria

    1999-03-01

    A highly portable, fast, safe and affordable imaging system that provides interpretable images of brain function in full- and pre-term neonates within a few seconds has been applied to neonates with normal and pathological states. We have used a uniquely sensitive optical tomography system, termed phased array, which has revealed significant functional responses, particularly to parietal stimulation in neonate brain. This system can indicate the blood concentration and oxygenation change during the parietal brain activation in full- and pre-term neonates. The preliminary clinical results, especially a longitudinal study of a cardiac arrest neonate, suggest a variety of future applications.

  6. Contamination of optical surfaces. [Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Graham S.; Hall, David F.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of molecular contamination on Space Station optical surfaces is examined. In particular, contamination of solar voltaic power sources and optical solar reflectors for thermal control or solar dynamic power generation is addressed. The published Space Station requirements for molecular contamination accretion and for the monitoring of such accretion is discussed in the context of the historical performance of space systems. Specific reference is made to the results from the Spacecraft Charging at High Altitudes (SCATHA) ML12 experiment.

  7. The effects of stainless steel radial reflector on core reactivity for small modular reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jung Kil; Hah, Chang Joo; Cho, Sung Ju; Seong, Ki Bong

    2016-01-01

    Commercial PWR core is surrounded by a radial reflector, which consists of a baffle and water. Radial reflector is designed to reflect neutron back into the core region to improve the neutron efficiency of the reactor and to protect the reactor vessels from the embrittling effects caused by irradiation during power operation. Reflector also helps to flatten the neutron flux and power distributions in the reactor core. The conceptual nuclear design for boron-free small modular reactor (SMR) under development in Korea requires to have the cycle length of 4˜5 years, rated power of 180 MWth and enrichment less than 5 w/o. The aim of this paper is to analyze the effects of stainless steel radial reflector on the performance of the SMR using UO2 fuels. Three types of reflectors such as water, water/stainless steel 304 mixture and stainless steel 304 are selected to investigate the effect on core reactivity. Additionally, the thickness of stainless steel and double layer reflector type are also investigated. CASMO-4/SIMULATE-3 code system is used for this analysis. The results of analysis show that single layer stainless steel reflector is the most efficient reflector.

  8. Reflector for efficient coupling of a laser beam to air or other fluids

    DOEpatents

    Kare, J.T.

    1992-10-06

    A reflector array is disclosed herein that provides a controlled region or regions of plasma breakdowns from a laser beam produced at a remotely-based laser source. The plasma may be applied to produce thrust to propel a spacecraft, or to diagnose a laser beam, or to produce shock waves. The spacecraft propulsion system comprises a reflector array attached to the vehicle. The reflector array comprises a plurality of reflectors spaced apart on a reflective surface, with each reflector acting as an independent focusing mirror. The reflectors are spaced closely together to form a continuous or partially-continuous surface. The reflector array may be formed from a sheet of reflective material, such as copper or aluminum. In operation, a beam of electromagnetic energy, such as a laser beam, is directed at the reflectors which focus the reflected electromagnetic energy at a plurality of regions off the surface. The energy concentrated in the focal region causes a breakdown of the air or other fluid in the focal region, creating a plasma. Electromagnetic energy is absorbed in the plasma and it grows in volume, compressing and heating the adjacent fluid thereby providing thrust. Laser pulses may be applied repetitively. After each such thrust pulse, fresh air can be introduced next to the surface either laterally, or through a perforated surface. If air or some other gas or vapor is supplied, for example from a tank carried on board a vehicle, this invention may also be used to provide thrust in a vacuum environment. 10 figs.

  9. Reflector for efficient coupling of a laser beam to air or other fluids

    DOEpatents

    Kare, Jordin T.

    1992-01-01

    A reflector array is disclosed herein that provides a controlled region or regions of plasma breakdowns from a laser beam produced at a remotely-based laser source. The plasma may be applied to produce thrust to propel a spacecraft, or to diagnose a laser beam, or to produce shockwaves. The spacecraft propulsion system comprises a reflector array attached to the vehicle. The reflector array comprises a plurality of reflectors spaced apart on a reflective surface, with each reflector acting as an independent focusing mirror. The reflectors are spaced closely together to form a continuous or partially-continuous surface. The reflector array may be formed from a sheet of reflective material, such as copper or aluminum. In operation, a beam of electromagnetic energy, such as a laser beam, is directed at the reflectors which focus the reflected electromagnetic energy at a plurality of regions off the surface. The energy concentrated in the focal region causes a breakdown of the air or other fluid in the focal region, creating a plasma. Electromagnetic energy is absorbed in the plasma and it grows in volume, compressing and heating the adjacent fluid thereby providing thrust. Laser pulses may be applied repetitively. After each such thrust pulse, fresh air can be introduced next to the surface either laterally, or through a perforated surface. If air or some other gas or vapor is supplied, for example from a tank carried on board a vehicle, this invention may also be used to provide thrust in a vacuum environment.

  10. Computer-aided design of reflector antennas - The Green Bank Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Marco A. B.; Stutzman, Warren L.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the electrical performance of the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) reflector antenna, operating as single- and dual-offset configurations, as well as a general overview of the GBT system. The GBT dual-offset Gregorian configuration is designed for low cross polarization (XPOL) using the dual-offset reflector antenna (DORA) synthesis package code. The procedure implemented in DORA to upgrade an existing main reflector to a low cross-polarized dual-offset Gregorian reflector antenna is also described. All computed patterns were obtained with the parabolic reflector analysis code (PRAC) program, and with the commercial code GRASP7. The GBT radiation patterns and performance values indicate that low XPOL performance can be achieved with a dual-offset configuration, provided that a low XPOL feed is used. The GBT configuration is employed as a case example for the aforementioned procedure.

  11. Design and Fabrication of Integrated Fabry-Perot Type Color Reflector for Reflective Displays.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seong M; Cheon, Sang Hoon; Kim, Tae-Youb; Ah, Chil Seong; Song, Juhee; Ryu, Hojun; Chu, Hye Yong

    2016-05-01

    A Fabry-Perot type integrated color reflector, with red/blue/green colors as subpixels, was designed and fabricated with Si substrate. Ag films were used as reflective mirror layers, SiO2 films were used as Fabry-Perot cavity layers and W films were used as partially reflective layers for the cavity. To minimize the effects of the thickness variation of the oxide cavity layers, the structure of the color reflector was optimized, and the differential deposition scheme was devised and applied in the fabrication process. The integrated color reflector was successfully fabricated with the proposed fabrication scheme. The measured white reflectance was > 45% in the visible spectrum range and -49% at 550 nm wavelength. The fabricated reflector had moderate color gamut of 17% of the National Television System Committee (NTSC) standard and it showed very high white reflectivity. The fabricated color reflector is expected to be applicable to reflective displays. PMID:27483867

  12. Fan beam generated by a linear-array fed parabolic reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    1990-01-01

    The theoretical background and the results of computer simulations and experimental studies for a parabolic reflector fed by a linear array are detailed. The concept of using a parabolic reflector antenna fed by a small linear array to generate fan-beam patterns is validated. Large angle scan along the broad-beam direction of the fan beam can be achieved by offsetting the linear array laterally. It is both empirically and numerically demonstrated that the array feed must be displaced in the reflector's axial direction to an optimum location from the focal plane in order to achieve the best antenna gain performance. As a result, the linear-array-fed parabolic reflector can be used in place of a long planar array in a multifunctional reflector antenna system.

  13. Demonstration of radar reflector detection and ground clutter suppression using airborne weather and mapping radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. J.; Bull, J. S.; Chisholm, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    A navigation system which utilizes minimum ground-based equipment is especially advantageous to helicopters, which can make off-airport landings. Research has been conducted in the use of weather and mapping radar to detect large radar reflectors overland for navigation purposes. As initial studies have not been successful, investigations were conducted regarding a new concept for the detection of ground-based radar reflectors and eliminating ground clutter, using a device called an echo processor (EP). A description is presented of the problems associated with detecting radar reflectors overland, taking into account the EP concept and the results of ground- and flight-test investigations. The echo processor concept was successfully demonstrated in detecting radar reflectors overland in a high-clutter environment. A radar reflector target size of 55 dBsm was found to be adequate for detection in an urban environment.

  14. Design and Fabrication of Integrated Fabry-Perot Type Color Reflector for Reflective Displays.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seong M; Cheon, Sang Hoon; Kim, Tae-Youb; Ah, Chil Seong; Song, Juhee; Ryu, Hojun; Chu, Hye Yong

    2016-05-01

    A Fabry-Perot type integrated color reflector, with red/blue/green colors as subpixels, was designed and fabricated with Si substrate. Ag films were used as reflective mirror layers, SiO2 films were used as Fabry-Perot cavity layers and W films were used as partially reflective layers for the cavity. To minimize the effects of the thickness variation of the oxide cavity layers, the structure of the color reflector was optimized, and the differential deposition scheme was devised and applied in the fabrication process. The integrated color reflector was successfully fabricated with the proposed fabrication scheme. The measured white reflectance was > 45% in the visible spectrum range and -49% at 550 nm wavelength. The fabricated reflector had moderate color gamut of 17% of the National Television System Committee (NTSC) standard and it showed very high white reflectivity. The fabricated color reflector is expected to be applicable to reflective displays.

  15. Advanced Reflector and Absorber Materials (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities in the area of advanced reflector and absorber materials: evaluating performance, determining degradation rates and lifetime, and developing new coatings.

  16. Quantum optical properties in plasmonic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond

    2015-04-24

    Plasmonic metallic particle (MP) can affect the optical properties of a quantum system (QS) in a remarkable way. We develop a general quantum nonlinear formalism with exact vectorial description for the scattered photons by the QS. The formalism enables us to study the variations of the dielectric function and photon spectrum of the QS with the particle distance between QS and MP, exciting laser direction, polarization and phase in the presence of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in the MP. The quantum formalism also serves as a powerful tool for studying the effects of these parameters on the nonclassical properties of the scattered photons. The plasmonic effect of nanoparticles has promising possibilities as it provides a new way for manipulating quantum optical properties of light in nanophotonic systems.

  17. Synthetic approach to designing optical alignment systems.

    PubMed

    Whang, A J; Gallagher, N C

    1988-08-15

    The objective of this study is twofold: to design reticle patterns with desirable alignment properties; to build an automatic alignment system using these patterns. We design such reticle patterns via a synthetic approach; the resultant patterns, so-called pseudonoise arrays, are binary and their autocorrelation functions are bilevel. Both properties are desirable in optical alignment. Besides, these arrays have attractive signal-to-noise ratio performance when employed in alignment. We implement the pseudonoise array as a 2-D cross-grating structure of which the grating period is much less than the wavelength of impinging light used for alignment. The short grating period feature, together with the use of polarized light, enables us to perform essentially 2-D optical alignment in one dimension. This alignment separability allows us to build a system that performs alignment automatically according to a simple 1-D algorithm. PMID:20539412

  18. Optical memory system having track following

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, D.; LaBudde, E.V.

    1984-02-14

    A high density optical storage system is disclosed which employs a laser beam for reading data in a track on a rotating optical disk containing a large number of concentric tracks. Track following is provided using a galvanometer-controlled mirror in the path of the beam which is angularly deflected during track following in response to detected track deviations, whereby the beam is controlled to accurately follow the track. Provision is also made for detecting the angular position of the mirror. A linear motor responsive to the detected angular position moves the mirror in a direction which reduces the deflection required to be provided by the mirror in order to maintain the beam accurately following the track. The mirror is also controlled in response to the rate of change of the linear motor velocity for providing greater system stability.

  19. Distributed fiber optic moisture intrusion sensing system

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2003-06-24

    Method and system for monitoring and identifying moisture intrusion in soil such as is contained in landfills housing radioactive and/or hazardous waste. The invention utilizes the principle that moist or wet soil has a higher thermal conductance than dry soil. The invention employs optical time delay reflectometry in connection with a distributed temperature sensing system together with heating means in order to identify discrete areas within a volume of soil wherein temperature is lower. According to the invention an optical element and, optionally, a heating element may be included in a cable or other similar structure and arranged in a serpentine fashion within a volume of soil to achieve efficient temperature detection across a large area or three dimensional volume of soil. Remediation, moisture countermeasures, or other responsive action may then be coordinated based on the assumption that cooler regions within a soil volume may signal moisture intrusion where those regions are located.

  20. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddier, Francois; Owen, Toby

    1997-01-01

    Most solar system objects have never been observed at wavelengths longer than the R band with an angular resolution better than 1 sec. The Hubble Space Telescope itself has only recently been equipped to observe in the infrared. However, because of its small diameter, the angular resolution is lower than that one can now achieved from the ground with adaptive optics, and time allocated to planetary science is limited. We have been using adaptive optics (AO) on a 4-m class telescope to obtain 0.1 sec resolution images solar system objects at far red and near infrared wavelengths (0.7-2.5 micron) which best discriminate their spectral signatures. Our efforts has been put into areas of research for which high angular resolution is essential, such as the mapping of Titan and of large asteroids, the dynamics and composition of Neptune stratospheric clouds, the infrared photometry of Pluto, Charon, and close satellites previously undetected from the ground.